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Sample records for pten dose determine

  1. Subtle variations in Pten dose determine cancer susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Alimonti, Andrea; Carracedo, Arkaitz; Clohessy, John G; Trotman, Lloyd C; Nardella, Caterina; Egia, Ainara; Salmena, Leonardo; Sampieri, Katia; Haveman, William J; Brogi, Edi; Richardson, Andrea L; Zhang, Jiangwen; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo

    2010-05-01

    Cancer susceptibility has been attributed to at least one heterozygous genetic alteration in a tumor suppressor gene (TSG). It has been hypothesized that subtle variations in TSG expression can promote cancer development. However, this hypothesis has not yet been definitively supported in vivo. Pten is a TSG frequently lost in human cancer and mutated in inherited cancer-predisposition syndromes. Here we analyze Pten hypermorphic mice (Pten(hy/+)), expressing 80% normal levels of Pten. Pten(hy/+) mice develop a spectrum of tumors, with breast tumors occurring at the highest penetrance. All breast tumors analyzed here retained two intact copies of Pten and maintained Pten levels above heterozygosity. Notably, subtle downregulation of Pten altered the steady-state biology of the mammary tissues and the expression profiles of genes involved in cancer cell proliferation. We present an alterative working model for cancer development in which subtle reductions in the dose of TSGs predispose to tumorigenesis in a tissue-specific manner.

  2. Subtle variations in Pten dose determine cancer susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Alimonti, Andrea; Carracedo, Arkaitz; Clohessy, John G; Trotman, Lloyd C; Nardella, Caterina; Egia, Ainara; Salmena, Leonardo; Sampieri, Katia; Haveman, William J; Brogi, Edi; Richardson, Andrea L; Zhang, Jiangwen; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo

    2010-01-01

    Cancer susceptibility has been attributed to at least one heterozygous genetic alteration in a tumor suppressor gene (TSG)1. It has been hypothesized that subtle variations in TSG expression can promote cancer development2,3. However, this hypothesis has not yet been definitively supported in vivo. PTEN is a TSG frequently lost in human cancer and mutated in inherited cancer-predisposition syndromes4. Here, we analyze Pten hypermorphic mice (Ptenhy/+), expressing 80% normal levels of Pten. Ptenhy/+ mice develop a spectrum of tumors, with breast tumors occurring at the highest penetrance. All breast tumors analyzed here retained two intact copies of Pten and maintained Pten levels above heterozygosis. Notably, subtle downregulation of Pten altered the steady-state biology of the mammary tissues and the expression profiles of genes involved in cancer cell proliferation. We present an alterative working model for cancer development in which subtle reductions in the dose of TSGs predispose to tumorigenesis in a tissue-specific manner. PMID:20400965

  3. PTEN

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Junco-Clemente, Pablo; Golshani, Peyman

    2014-01-01

    PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog on chromosome ten) is a dual protein/lipid phosphatase that dephosphorylates PIP3, thereby inhibiting the AKT/mTOR pathway. This inhibition ultimately decreases protein translation, cell proliferation and cell growth. In the central nervous system, inhibition of PTEN leads to increased stem cell proliferation, somatic, dendritic and axonal growth, accelerated spine maturation, diminished synaptic plasticity, and altered intrinsic excitability. In agreement with these findings, patients carrying single-copy inactivating mutations of PTEN suffer from autism, macrocephaly, mental retardation, and epilepsy.1-9 Understanding the mechanisms through which PTEN modulates the structure, function, and plasticity of cortical networks is a major focus of study. Preventing and reversing the changes induced by loss of Pten in model animals will pave the way for treatments in humans. PMID:24778766

  4. PTEN loss is a context-dependent outcome determinant in obese and non-obese endometrioid endometrial cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Westin, Shannon N.; Ju, Zhenlin; Broaddus, Russell R.; Krakstad, Camilla; Li, Jane; Pal, Navdeep; Lu, Karen H.; Coleman, Robert L.; Hennessy, Bryan T.; Klempner, Samuel J.; Werner, Henrica M. J.; Salvesen, Helga B.; Cantley, Lewis C.; Mills, Gordon B.; Myers, Andrea P.

    2015-01-01

    Endometrial cancer incidence is increasing, due in part to a strong association with obesity. Mutations in the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway, the central relay pathway of insulin signals, occur in the majority of endometrioid adenocarcinomas, the most common form of endometrial cancer. We sought to determine the impact of PI3K pathway alterations on progression free survival in a cohort of endometrioid endometrial cancers. Prognostic utility of PIK3CA, PIK3R1, and PTEN mutations, as well as PTEN protein loss by immunohistochemistry, was explored in the context of patient body mass index. Reverse-phase protein arrays were utilized to assess protein expression based on PTEN status. Among 187 endometrioid endometrial cancers, there were no statistically significant associations between PFS and PIK3CA, PIK3R1, PTEN mutation or loss. When stratified by body mass index, PTEN loss was associated with improved progression free survival (P<0.006) in obese (body mass index ≥ 30) patients. PTEN loss resulted in distinct protein changes: Canonical PI3K pathway activation was observed only in the non-obese population while decreased expression of β-CATENIN and phosphorylated FOXO3A was observed in obese patients. These data suggest the impact of PTEN loss on tumor biology and clinical outcomes must be interpreted in the context of body mass index, and provide a potential explanation for discrepant reports on the effect of PTEN status and obesity on prognosis in endometrial cancer. This reveals a clinically important interaction between metabolic state and tumor genetics that may unveil the biologic underpinning of obesity-related cancers and impact ongoing clinical trials with PI3K pathway inhibitors. PMID:26045339

  5. Nongenomic Mechanisms of PTEN Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Fata, Jimmie E.; Debnath, Shawon; Jenkins, Edmund C.; Fournier, Marcia V.

    2012-01-01

    A large amount of data supports the view that PTEN is a bona fide tumor suppressor gene. However, recent evidence suggests that derailment of cellular localization and expression levels of functional nonmutated PTEN is a determining force in inducing abnormal cellular and tissue outcomes. As the cellular mechanisms that regulate normal PTEN enzymatic activity resolve, it is evident that deregulation of these mechanisms can alter cellular processes and tissue architecture and ultimately lead to oncogenic transformation. Here we discuss PTEN ubiquitination, PTEN complex formation with components of the adherens junction, PTEN nuclear localization, and microRNA regulation of PTEN as essential regulatory mechanisms that determine PTEN function independent of gene mutations and epigenetic events. PMID:22536248

  6. PTEN methylation involved in benzene-induced hematotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Zuo, Xin; Bai, Wenlin; Niu, Piye; Tian, Lin; Gao, Ai

    2014-06-01

    It is well known that benzene is a hematotoxic carcinogen. PTEN promoter methylation is a representative example of transcriptional silencing of tumor suppressor genes. However, the effect of PTEN methylation on benzene-induced hematotoxicity has not yet been elucidated. In this study, the animal model of benzene hematotoxicity was successfully established. WBC significantly decreased in experimental groups (P < 0.01). Compared with the control group, the weight of rats increased slowly and even declined with increasing doses of benzene in the benzene-treated groups. An increase in the level of PTEN methylation was observed in the low dose group, and PTEN methylation level increased significantly in a dose-dependent manner. However, it was interesting that PTEN mRNA expression increased in the low dose group, but declined with increasing doses of benzene. The decrease of tumor suppressor function caused by PTEN methylation may be an important mechanism of benzene hematotoxicity. Furthermore, lymphoblast cell line F32 was incubated by benzene and then treated with 5-aza and TSA, alone or in combination. A dramatic decrease in the PTEN mRNA expression and a significant increase of PTEN methylation level in benzene-treated cells were also shown. PTEN mRNA expression was up regulated and PTEN methylation level was reduced by the epigenetic inhibitors, 5-aza and TSA. In conclusion, PTEN methylation is involved in benzene-induced hematotoxicity through suppressing PTEN mRNA expression.

  7. Timing of the loss of Pten protein determines disease severity in a mouse model of myeloid malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Yan; Webster, Cody; Shao, Lijian; Lensing, Shelly Y.; Ni, Hongyu; Feng, Wei; Colorado, Natalia; Pathak, Rupak; Xiang, Zhifu; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Li, Shaoguang; Zhou, Daohong; Emanuel, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML) is an aggressive pediatric mixed myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasm (MDS/MPN). JMML leukemogenesis is linked to a hyperactivated RAS pathway, with driver mutations in the KRAS, NRAS, NF1, PTPN11, or CBL genes. Previous murine models demonstrated how those genes contributed to the selective hypersensitivity of JMML cells to granulocyte macrophage–colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), a unifying characteristic in the disease. However, it is unclear what causes the early death in children with JMML, because transformation to acute leukemia is rare. Here, we demonstrate that loss of Pten (phosphatase and tensin homolog) protein at postnatal day 8 in mice harboring Nf1 haploinsufficiency results in an aggressive MPN with death at a murine prepubertal age of 20 to 35 days (equivalent to an early juvenile age in JMML patients). The death in the mice was due to organ infiltration with monocytes/macrophages. There were elevated activities of protein kinase B (Akt) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in cells at physiological concentrations of GM-CSF. These were more pronounced in mice with Nf1 haploinsufficiency than in littermates with wild-type Nf1, but this model is insufficient to cause cells to be GM-CSF hypersensitive. This new model represents a murine MPN model with features of a pediatric unclassifiable mixed MDS/MPN and mimics many clinical manifestations of JMML in terms of age of onset, aggressiveness, and organ infiltration with monocytes/macrophages. Our data suggest that the timing of the loss of PTEN protein plays a critical role in determining the disease severity in myeloid malignancies. This model may be useful for studying the pathogenesis of pediatric diseases with alterations in the Ras pathway. PMID:26764354

  8. Brain patterning perturbations following PTEN loss

    PubMed Central

    Veleva-Rotse, Biliana O.; Barnes, Anthony P.

    2014-01-01

    This review will consider the impact of compromised PTEN signaling in brain patterning. We approach understanding the contribution of PTEN to nervous system development by surveying the findings from the numerous genetic loss-of-function models that have been generated as well as other forms of PTEN inactivation. By exploring the developmental programs influenced by this central transduction molecule, we can begin to understand the molecular mechanisms that shape the developing brain. A wealth of data indicates that PTEN plays critical roles in a variety of stages during brain development. Many of them are considered here including: stem cell proliferation, fate determination, polarity, migration, process outgrowth, myelination and somatic hypertrophy. In many of these contexts, it is clear that PTEN phosphatase activity contributes to the observed effects of genetic deletion or depletion, however recent studies have also ascribed non-catalytic functions to PTEN in regulating cell function. We also explore the potential impact this alternative pool of PTEN may have on the developing brain. Together, these elements begin to form a clearer picture of how PTEN contributes to the emergence of brain structure and binds form and function in the nervous system. PMID:24860420

  9. Pten (phosphatase and tensin homologue gene) haploinsufficiency promotes insulin hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Wong, J. T.; Kim, P. T. W.; Peacock, J. W.; Yau, T. Y.; Mui, A. L.-F.; Chung, S. W.; Sossi, V.; Doudet, D.; Green, D.; Ruth, T. J.; Parsons, R.; Verchere, C. B.

    2006-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Insulin controls glucose metabolism via multiple signalling pathways, including the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway in muscle and adipose tissue. The protein/lipid phosphatase Pten (phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10) attenuates PI3K signalling by dephosphorylating the phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate generated by PI3K. The current study was aimed at investigating the effect of haploinsufficiency for Pten on insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. Materials and methods Insulin sensitivity in Pten heterozygous (Pten+/−) mice was investigated in i.p. insulin challenge and glucose tolerance tests. Glucose uptake was monitored in vitro in primary cultures of myocytes from Pten+/− mice, and in vivo by positron emission tomography. The phosphorylation status of protein kinase B (PKB/Akt), a downstream signalling protein in the PI3K pathway, and glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β), a substrate of PKB/Akt, was determined by western immunoblotting. Results Following i.p. insulin challenge, blood glucose levels in Pten+/− mice remained depressed for up to 120 min, whereas glucose levels in wild-type mice began to recover after approximately 30 min. After glucose challenge, blood glucose returned to normal about twice as rapidly in Pten+/− mice. Enhanced glucose uptake was observed both in Pten+/− myocytes and in skeletal muscle of Pten+/− mice by PET. PKB and GSK3β phosphorylation was enhanced and prolonged in Pten+/− myocytes. Conclusions/interpretation Pten is a key negative regulator of insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in vitro and in vivo. The partial reduction of Pten due to Pten haploinsufficiency is enough to elicit enhanced insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance in Pten+/− mice. PMID:17195063

  10. SLUG is a Direct Transcriptional Repressor of PTEN Tumor Suppressor

    PubMed Central

    Uygur, Berna; Abramo, Katrina; Leikina, Evgenia; Vary, Calvin; Liaw, Lucy; Wu, Wen-Shu

    2015-01-01

    BACGORUND PTEN/AKT signaling plays a key role in prostate cancer development and maintenance of prostate cancer stem cells. How other oncogenes or tumor suppressors interact with this pathway remain to be elucidated. SLUG is an zinc finger transcription factor of the Snail superfamily, and it promotes cancer metastasis and determines the mammary stem cell state. METHODS SLUG was overexpressed in cells by retroviral vector and knockdown of SLUG and PTEN was mediated by shRNAs-expressing lentiviruses. Expression level of SLUG and PTEN was examined by Western blot, RT-PCR, and qPCR analyses. PTEN promoter activity was measured by luciferase reporter assay. ChIP assay was used to measure the binding between SLUG and the PTEN promoter in vivo. RESULT We showed that overexpression of SLUG decreased expression of PTEN tumor repressor in prostate cancer cell lines 22RV1 and DU145; conversely, knockdown of SLUG expression elevated PTEN expresson at both protein and RNA level in these cells. We demonstrated that SLUG overexpression inhibits PTEN promoter activity through the proximal promoter region in prostate cancer cells. By ChIP assay, we confirmed that SLUG directly binds to the PTEN promoter region covering the E-box sites. We also showed that Slug deficiency leads to an increased expression of PTEN in mouse embryo fibroblasts and prostate tissues. Importantly, we found that overexpression of SLUG increases drug resistance of DU145 prostate cancer cell line and knockdown of SLUG by shRNA sensitizes DU145 cell line to chemotherapeutic drugs. We further demonstrated that PTEN knockdown converts drug sensitivity of DU145 cells expressing SLUG shRNA to anticancer drugs. CONCLUSION We provide compelling evidence showing that PTEN is a direct functional target of SLUG. Our findings offer new insight in the regulation of the PTEN/AKT pathway and provide a molecular basis for potential targeted therapies of prostate cancer PMID:25728608

  11. PTEN expression in PTEN-null leukaemic T cell lines leads to reduced proliferation via slowed cell cycle progression.

    PubMed

    Seminario, Maria-Cristina; Precht, Patricia; Wersto, Robert P; Gorospe, Myriam; Wange, Ronald L

    2003-11-01

    The balance of activities between the proto-oncogene phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and the tumour suppressor gene PTEN has been shown to affect cellular growth and proliferation, as well as tumorigenesis. Previously, PTEN expression in the PTEN-null Jurkat T cell leukaemia line was shown to cause reduced proliferation without cell cycle arrest. Here, we further these investigations by determining the basis for this phenomenon. By BrdU pulse-chase and cell cycle arrest and release assays, we find that PTEN expression reduced proliferation by slowing progression through all phases of the cell cycle. This was associated with reduced levels of cyclins A, B1 and B2, cdk4, and cdc25A and increased p27KIP1 expression. Apoptosis played no role in the antiproliferative effect of PTEN, since only marginal increases in the rate of apoptosis were detected upon PTEN expression, and inhibitors of effector caspases did not restore proliferative capacity. Active Akt blocked the antiproliferative effects of PTEN, indicating that PTEN mediates its effects through conventional PI3K-linked signalling pathways. Similar results were obtained from a different PTEN-null leukaemia T cell line, CEM. Together, these results show that PTEN expression in leukaemic T cells leads to reduced proliferation via an apoptosis-independent mechanism involving slower passage through the cell cycle.

  12. Focus on PTEN Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Bermúdez Brito, Miriam; Goulielmaki, Evangelia; Papakonstanti, Evangelia A.

    2015-01-01

    The role of phosphatase and tensin homolog on chromosome 10 (PTEN) as a tumor suppressor has been for a long time attributed to its lipid phosphatase activity against PI(3,4,5)P3, the phospholipid product of the class I PI3Ks. Besides its traditional role as a lipid phosphatase at the plasma membrane, a wealth of data has shown that PTEN can function independently of its phosphatase activity and that PTEN also exists and plays a role in the nucleus, in cytoplasmic organelles, and extracellularly. Accumulating evidence has shed light on diverse physiological functions of PTEN, which are accompanied by a complex regulation of its expression and activity. PTEN levels and function are regulated transcriptionally, post-transcriptionally, and post-translationally. PTEN is also sensitive to regulation by its interacting proteins and its localization. Herein, we summarize the current knowledge on mechanisms that regulate the expression and enzymatic activity of PTEN and its role in human diseases. PMID:26284192

  13. Insulin-Like Growth Factor-Type 1 Receptor Inhibitor NVP-AEW541 Enhances Radiosensitivity of PTEN Wild-Type but Not PTEN-Deficient Human Prostate Cancer Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Isebaert, Sofie F.; Swinnen, Johannes V.; McBride, William H.; Haustermans, Karin M.

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: During the past decade, many clinical trials with both monoclonal antibodies and small molecules that target the insulin-like growth factor-type 1 receptor (IGF-1R) have been launched. Despite the important role of IGF-1R signaling in radioresistance, studies of such agents in combination with radiotherapy are lagging behind. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the small molecule IGF-1R kinase inhibitor NVP-AEW541 on the intrinsic radioresistance of prostate cancer cells. Methods and Materials: The effect of NVP-AEW541 on cell proliferation, cell viability, IGF-1R signaling, radiosensitivity, cell cycle distribution, and double strand break repair was determined in three human prostate cancer cell lines (PC3, DU145, 22Rv1). Moreover, the importance of the PTEN pathway status was explored by means of transfection experiments with constitutively active Akt or inactive kinase-dead Akt. Results: NVP-AEW541 inhibited cell proliferation and decreased cell viability in a time-and dose-dependent manner in all three cell lines. Radiosensitization was observed in the PTEN wild-type cell lines DU145 and 22Rv1 but not in the PTEN-deficient PC3 cell line. NVP-AEW541-induced radiosensitization coincided with downregulation of phospho-Akt levels and high levels of residual double strand breaks. The importance of PTEN status in the radiosensitization effect was confirmed by transfection experiments with constitutively active Akt or inactive kinase-dead Akt. Conclusions: NVP-AEW541 enhances the effect of ionizing radiation in PTEN wild-type, but not in PTEN-deficient, prostate cancer cells. Proper patient selection based on the PTEN status of the tumor will be critical to the achievement of optimal results in clinical trials in which the combination of radiotherapy and this IGF-1R inhibitor is being explored.

  14. Mechanisms underlying PTEN regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Manzano, Candelaria; Fueyo, Juan; Jiang, Hong; Glass, Tricia L; Lee, Ho-Young; Hu, Min; Liu, Juinn-Lin; Jasti, Sushma L; Liu, Ta-Jen; Conrad, Charles A; Yung, W K Alfred

    2003-01-01

    Inactivation of the tumor suppressor gene PTEN and overexpression of VEGF are two of the most common events observed in high-grade malignant gliomas. The purpose of this study was to determine whether PTEN controls VEGF expression in gliomas under normoxic conditions. Transfer of PTEN to human glioma cells resulted in the transduction of a functional PTEN protein as evidenced by the upregulation of p27 and modification of the phosphorylation status of Akt. Under normoxic conditions, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Northern blot analyses showed downregulation of VEGF in PTEN-treated cells. Moreover, conditioned media from PTEN-treated glioma cells significantly diminished the ability of endothelial cells to grow and migrate. Western blot assays demonstrated that, in a normoxic environment, PTEN downregulates HIF-1 alpha. Finally, promoter activity assays showed that the VEGF promoter region containing the HIF-1alpha binding site is necessary and sufficient for PTEN-mediated downregulation of VEGF. Experiments with PI3-K inhibitors and kinase assays suggested that PI3-K is mediating the effect of PTEN on VEGF, and not the p42/p48 or p38 MAP kinases. These results indicate that restoration of PTEN function in gliomas may induce therapeutic effect by downregulating VEGF. Furthermore, this close functional relationship between PTEN and VEGF suggests that a better understanding of the transduction signal regulated by PTEN might enhance the knowledge of the cause and physiology of vascular and inflammatory diseases.

  15. PTEN Mediates the Antioxidant Effect of Resveratrol at Nutritionally Relevant Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Inglés, Marta; Gambini, Juan; Miguel, M. Graça; Bonet-Costa, Vicent; Abdelaziz, Kheira M.; El Alami, Marya; Viña, Jose; Borrás, Consuelo

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Antioxidant properties of resveratrol have been intensively studied for the last years, both in vivo and in vitro. Its bioavailability after an oral dose is very low and therefore it is very important to make sure that plasma concentrations of free resveratrol are sufficient enough to be active as antioxidant. Aims. In the present study, using nutritionally relevant concentrations of resveratrol, we aim to confirm its antioxidant capacity on reducing peroxide levels and look for the molecular pathway involved in this antioxidant effect. Methods. We used mammary gland tumor cells (MCF-7), which were pretreated with different concentrations of resveratrol for 48 h, and/or a PTEN inhibitor (bpV: bipy). Hydrogen peroxide levels were determined by fluorimetry, PTEN levels and Akt phosphorylation by Western Blotting, and mRNA expression of antioxidant genes by real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results. Resveratrol treatment for 48 h lowered peroxide levels in MCF-7, even at low nutritional concentrations (1 nM). This effect was mediated by the activation of PTEN/Akt pathway, which resulted in an upregulation of catalase and MnSOD mRNA levels. Conclusion. Resveratrol acts as an antioxidant at nutritionally relevant concentrations by inducing the expression of antioxidant enzymes, through a mechanism involving PTEN/Akt signaling pathway. PMID:24812624

  16. NEDD4-1 and PTEN expression in keloid scarring.

    PubMed

    Sang, P F; Wang, H; Wang, M; Hu, C; Zhang, J S; Li, X J; Zhu, F

    2015-01-01

    Keloid scarring remains a major problem in plastic surgery. The aim of this study was to determine the expression of the PTEN tumor suppressor and NEDD4-1 genes in keloid tissue and explore their effect on the formation of such scarring. Twenty keloid patients were enrolled in the study and underwent surgical removal of keloid tissue. No patient had received chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy prior to treatment. PTEN and NEDD4-1 mRNA expression was detected by reverse transcription PCR, while PTEN protein expression was assessed using immunohistochemistry. Our results showed that levels of PTEN were significantly diminished in keloid samples (P < 0.05), whereas those of NEDD4-1 did not significantly differ between keloid tissue and normal skin (P > 0.05). Furthermore, we found that NEDD4-1 expression is high and inversely correlated with that of PTEN in keloids. Our results suggest that the PTEN/PI3K/AKT pathway may play an important role in keloid formation and reduces PTEN expression in such tissue. Finally, although NEDD4-1 has previously been identified as a factor in keloid susceptibility, and the protein for which it encodes is known to degrade PTEN by catalyzing its polyubiquitylation, the detailed mechanism behind its involvement in keloid formation needs to be further studied. PMID:26535660

  17. Determinants of thiopental induction dose requirements.

    PubMed

    Avram, M J; Sanghvi, R; Henthorn, T K; Krejcie, T C; Shanks, C A; Fragen, R J; Howard, K A; Kaczynski, D A

    1993-01-01

    Dose requirements for thiopental anesthetic induction have significant age- and gender-related variability. We studied the association of the patient characteristics age, gender, weight, lean body mass, and cardiac output with thiopental requirements. Doses of thiopental, infused at 150 mg/min, required to reach both a clinical end-point and an electroencephalographic (EEG) end-point were determined in 30 males and 30 females, aged 18-83 yr. Univariate least squares linear regression analysis revealed outliers in the relationships of age, weight, lean body mass, and cardiac output to thiopental dose at clinical and EEG endpoints. Differential weighting of data points minimized the effect of outliers in the construction of a robust multiple linear regression model of the relationship between several selected independent variables and the dependent variables thiopental dose at clinical and EEG endpoints. The multiple linear regression model for thiopental dose at the clinical end-point selecting the regressor variables age, weight, and gender (R2 = 0.76) was similar to that for age, lean body mass, and gender (R2 = 0.75). Thiopental dose at the EEG endpoint was better described by models selecting the variables age, weight, and cardiac output (R2 = 0.88) or age, lean body mass, and cardiac output (R2 = 0.87). Although cardiac output varied with age, age always remained a selected variable. Because weight and lean body mass differed with gender, their selection as variables in the model eliminated gender as a selected variable or minimized its importance.

  18. Determinants of thiopental induction dose requirements.

    PubMed

    Avram, M J; Sanghvi, R; Henthorn, T K; Krejcie, T C; Shanks, C A; Fragen, R J; Howard, K A; Kaczynski, D A

    1993-01-01

    Dose requirements for thiopental anesthetic induction have significant age- and gender-related variability. We studied the association of the patient characteristics age, gender, weight, lean body mass, and cardiac output with thiopental requirements. Doses of thiopental, infused at 150 mg/min, required to reach both a clinical end-point and an electroencephalographic (EEG) end-point were determined in 30 males and 30 females, aged 18-83 yr. Univariate least squares linear regression analysis revealed outliers in the relationships of age, weight, lean body mass, and cardiac output to thiopental dose at clinical and EEG endpoints. Differential weighting of data points minimized the effect of outliers in the construction of a robust multiple linear regression model of the relationship between several selected independent variables and the dependent variables thiopental dose at clinical and EEG endpoints. The multiple linear regression model for thiopental dose at the clinical end-point selecting the regressor variables age, weight, and gender (R2 = 0.76) was similar to that for age, lean body mass, and gender (R2 = 0.75). Thiopental dose at the EEG endpoint was better described by models selecting the variables age, weight, and cardiac output (R2 = 0.88) or age, lean body mass, and cardiac output (R2 = 0.87). Although cardiac output varied with age, age always remained a selected variable. Because weight and lean body mass differed with gender, their selection as variables in the model eliminated gender as a selected variable or minimized its importance. PMID:8418708

  19. On determining dose rate constants spectroscopically

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, M.; Rogers, D. W. O.

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: To investigate several aspects of the Chen and Nath spectroscopic method of determining the dose rate constants of {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd seeds [Z. Chen and R. Nath, Phys. Med. Biol. 55, 6089-6104 (2010)] including the accuracy of using a line or dual-point source approximation as done in their method, and the accuracy of ignoring the effects of the scattered photons in the spectra. Additionally, the authors investigate the accuracy of the literature's many different spectra for bare, i.e., unencapsulated {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd sources. Methods: Spectra generated by 14 {sup 125}I and 6 {sup 103}Pd seeds were calculated in vacuo at 10 cm from the source in a 2.7 Multiplication-Sign 2.7 Multiplication-Sign 0.05 cm{sup 3} voxel using the EGSnrc BrachyDose Monte Carlo code. Calculated spectra used the initial photon spectra recommended by AAPM's TG-43U1 and NCRP (National Council of Radiation Protection and Measurements) Report 58 for the {sup 125}I seeds, or TG-43U1 and NNDC(2000) (National Nuclear Data Center, 2000) for {sup 103}Pd seeds. The emitted spectra were treated as coming from a line or dual-point source in a Monte Carlo simulation to calculate the dose rate constant. The TG-43U1 definition of the dose rate constant was used. These calculations were performed using the full spectrum including scattered photons or using only the main peaks in the spectrum as done experimentally. Statistical uncertainties on the air kerma/history and the dose rate/history were Less-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 0.2%. The dose rate constants were also calculated using Monte Carlo simulations of the full seed model. Results: The ratio of the intensity of the 31 keV line relative to that of the main peak in {sup 125}I spectra is, on average, 6.8% higher when calculated with the NCRP Report 58 initial spectrum vs that calculated with TG-43U1 initial spectrum. The {sup 103}Pd spectra exhibit an average 6.2% decrease in the 22.9 keV line relative to the main peak when

  20. PTEN regulates cilia through Dishevelled

    PubMed Central

    Shnitsar, Iryna; Bashkurov, Mikhail; Masson, Glenn R.; Ogunjimi, Abiodun A.; Mosessian, Sherly; Cabeza, Eduardo Aguiar; Hirsch, Calley L.; Trcka, Daniel; Gish, Gerald; Jiao, Jing; Wu, Hong; Winklbauer, Rudolf; Williams, Roger L.; Pelletier, Laurence; Wrana, Jeffrey L.; Barrios-Rodiles, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    Cilia are hair-like cellular protrusions important in many aspects of eukaryotic biology. For instance, motile cilia enable fluid movement over epithelial surfaces, while primary (sensory) cilia play roles in cellular signalling. The molecular events underlying cilia dynamics, and particularly their disassembly, are not well understood. Phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) is an extensively studied tumour suppressor, thought to primarily act by antagonizing PI3-kinase signalling. Here we demonstrate that PTEN plays an important role in multicilia formation and cilia disassembly by controlling the phosphorylation of Dishevelled (DVL), another ciliogenesis regulator. DVL is a central component of WNT signalling that plays a role during convergent extension movements, which we show here are also regulated by PTEN. Our studies identify a novel protein substrate for PTEN that couples PTEN to regulation of cilia dynamics and WNT signalling, thus advancing our understanding of potential underlying molecular etiologies of PTEN-related pathologies. PMID:26399523

  1. An inducible knockout mouse to model the cell-autonomous role of PTEN in initiating endometrial, prostate and thyroid neoplasias

    PubMed Central

    Mirantes, Cristina; Eritja, Núria; Dosil, Maria Alba; Santacana, Maria; Pallares, Judit; Gatius, Sónia; Bergadà, Laura; Maiques, Oscar; Matias-Guiu, Xavier; Dolcet, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY PTEN is one of the most frequently mutated tumor suppressor genes in human cancers. The role of PTEN in carcinogenesis has been validated by knockout mouse models. PTEN heterozygous mice develop neoplasms in multiple organs. Unfortunately, the embryonic lethality of biallelic excision of PTEN has inhibited the study of complete PTEN deletion in the development and progression of cancer. By crossing PTEN conditional knockout mice with transgenic mice expressing a tamoxifen-inducible Cre-ERT under the control of a chicken actin promoter, we have generated a tamoxifen-inducible mouse model that allows temporal control of PTEN deletion. Interestingly, administration of a single dose of tamoxifen resulted in PTEN deletion mainly in epithelial cells, but not in stromal, mesenchymal or hematopoietic cells. Using the mT/mG double-fluorescent Cre reporter mice, we demonstrate that epithelial-specific PTEN excision was caused by differential Cre activity among tissues and cells types. Tamoxifen-induced deletion of PTEN resulted in extremely rapid and consistent formation of endometrial in situ adenocarcinoma, prostate intraepithelial neoplasia and thyroid hyperplasia. We also analyzed the role of PTEN ablation in other epithelial cells, such as the tubular cells of the kidney, hepatocytes, colonic epithelial cells or bronchiolar epithelium, but those tissues did not exhibit neoplastic growth. Finally, to validate this model as a tool to assay the efficacy of anti-tumor drugs in PTEN deficiency, we administered the mTOR inhibitor everolimus to mice with induced PTEN deletion. Everolimus dramatically reduced the progression of endometrial proliferations and significantly reduced thyroid hyperplasia. This model could be a valuable tool to study the cell-autonomous mechanisms involved in PTEN-loss-induced carcinogenesis and provides a good platform to study the effect of anti-neoplastic drugs on PTEN-negative tumors. PMID:23471917

  2. 10 CFR 20.2104 - Determination of prior occupational dose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Determination of prior occupational dose. 20.2104 Section....2104 Determination of prior occupational dose. (a) For each individual who is likely to receive an annual occupational dose requiring monitoring under § 20.1502, the licensee shall determine...

  3. 10 CFR 20.2104 - Determination of prior occupational dose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Determination of prior occupational dose. 20.2104 Section....2104 Determination of prior occupational dose. (a) For each individual who is likely to receive an annual occupational dose requiring monitoring under § 20.1502, the licensee shall determine...

  4. 10 CFR 20.2104 - Determination of prior occupational dose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Determination of prior occupational dose. 20.2104 Section....2104 Determination of prior occupational dose. (a) For each individual who is likely to receive an annual occupational dose requiring monitoring under § 20.1502, the licensee shall determine...

  5. 10 CFR 20.2104 - Determination of prior occupational dose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Determination of prior occupational dose. 20.2104 Section....2104 Determination of prior occupational dose. (a) For each individual who is likely to receive an annual occupational dose requiring monitoring under § 20.1502, the licensee shall determine...

  6. 10 CFR 20.2104 - Determination of prior occupational dose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Determination of prior occupational dose. 20.2104 Section....2104 Determination of prior occupational dose. (a) For each individual who is likely to receive an annual occupational dose requiring monitoring under § 20.1502, the licensee shall determine...

  7. Pten Cell Autonomously Modulates the Hematopoietic Stem Cell Response to Inflammatory Cytokines.

    PubMed

    Porter, Shaina N; Cluster, Andrew S; Signer, Robert A J; Voigtmann, Jenna; Monlish, Darlene A; Schuettpelz, Laura G; Magee, Jeffrey A

    2016-06-14

    Pten negatively regulates the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway and is required to maintain quiescent adult hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Pten has been proposed to regulate HSCs cell autonomously and non-cell autonomously, but the relative importance of each mechanism has not been directly tested. Furthermore, the cytokines that activate the PI3K pathway upstream of Pten are not well defined. We sought to clarify whether Pten cell autonomously or non-cell autonomously regulates HSC mobilization. We also tested whether Pten deficiency affects the HSC response to granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and interferon-α (IFNα) since these cytokines induce HSC mobilization or proliferation, respectively. We show that Pten regulates HSC mobilization and expansion in the spleen primarily via cell-autonomous mechanisms. Pten-deficient HSCs do not require G-CSF to mobilize, although they are hyper-sensitized to even low doses of exogenous G-CSF. Pten-deficient HSCs are similarly sensitized to IFNα. Pten therefore modulates the HSC response to inflammatory cytokines.

  8. Pten Cell Autonomously Modulates the Hematopoietic Stem Cell Response to Inflammatory Cytokines.

    PubMed

    Porter, Shaina N; Cluster, Andrew S; Signer, Robert A J; Voigtmann, Jenna; Monlish, Darlene A; Schuettpelz, Laura G; Magee, Jeffrey A

    2016-06-14

    Pten negatively regulates the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway and is required to maintain quiescent adult hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Pten has been proposed to regulate HSCs cell autonomously and non-cell autonomously, but the relative importance of each mechanism has not been directly tested. Furthermore, the cytokines that activate the PI3K pathway upstream of Pten are not well defined. We sought to clarify whether Pten cell autonomously or non-cell autonomously regulates HSC mobilization. We also tested whether Pten deficiency affects the HSC response to granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and interferon-α (IFNα) since these cytokines induce HSC mobilization or proliferation, respectively. We show that Pten regulates HSC mobilization and expansion in the spleen primarily via cell-autonomous mechanisms. Pten-deficient HSCs do not require G-CSF to mobilize, although they are hyper-sensitized to even low doses of exogenous G-CSF. Pten-deficient HSCs are similarly sensitized to IFNα. Pten therefore modulates the HSC response to inflammatory cytokines. PMID:27185281

  9. MMAC/PTEN gene expression in endometrial cancer: RT-PCR studies.

    PubMed

    Sobczuk, Anna; Smolarz, Beata; Romanowicz-Makowska, Hanna; Pertyński, Tomasz

    2006-01-01

    Mutations in the MMAC/PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10) gene are documented in cancers of the breast, prostate, ovary, colon, melanoma, glioblastoma, lymphoma and endometrium. In the present work MMAC/PTEN gene expression in women with endometrial adenocarcinoma (n=70) in RNA samples obtained from cancer tissue were investigated. Control DNA was obtained from 68 normal endometrial tissue. The MMAC/PTEN expression was determined by RT-PCR analysis. The expression of MMAC/PTEN gene in endometrial adenocarcinoma cases was significantly reduced compared to the expression in the normal samples (P < 0.05). Furthermore the significant difference (P < 0.05) was observed between the expression of MMAC/PTEN in stage III versus lower stages of endometrial cancer. The results support the hypothesis that the MMAC/PTEN gene expression may be associated with the incidence of endometrial cancer.

  10. Determination of dose distributions and parameter sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, B.A.; Farris, W.T.; Simpson, J.C.

    1992-12-01

    A series of scoping calculations has been undertaken to evaluate the absolute and relative contribution of different radionuclides and exposure pathways to doses that may have been received by individuals living in the vicinity of the Hanford site. This scoping calculation (Calculation 005) examined the contributions of numerous parameters to the uncertainty distribution of doses calculated for environmental exposures and accumulation in foods. This study builds on the work initiated in the first scoping study of iodine in cow's milk and the third scoping study, which added additional pathways. Addressed in this calculation were the contributions to thyroid dose of infants from (1) air submersion and groundshine external dose, (2) inhalation, (3) ingestion of soil by humans, (4) ingestion of leafy vegetables, (5) ingestion of other vegetables and fruits, (6) ingestion of meat, (7) ingestion of eggs, and (8) ingestion of cows' milk from Feeding Regime 1 as described in Calculation 001.

  11. Inhibition of autophagy induced by PTEN loss promotes intrinsic breast cancer resistance to trastuzumab therapy.

    PubMed

    Ning, Liao; Guo-Chun, Zhang; Sheng-Li, An; Xue-Rui, Li; Kun, Wang; Jian, Zu; Chong-Yang, Ren; Ling-Zhu, Wen; Hai-Tong, Lv

    2016-04-01

    This study aims to explore the effects of the phosphatase and tension homolog (PTEN) expression level on autophagic status and on the resistance of breast cancer to trastuzumab treatment. PTEN and LC3I/II were knocked down with shRNA expression vectors, which were transfected into estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer cell lines. After trastuzumab treatment, the changes in the autophagy signal transduction pathways and autophagic proteins (LC3I/II, p62, LAMP, and cathepsin B) in these stably transfected cells were detected using western blot. The cells were also orthotopically implanted into nude mice to explore the influence of PTEN knockdown on tumor size, cell viability, and autophagic proteins after trastuzumab treatment. Similar determinations were performed using the LC3I/II overexpressed shPTEN breast cancer cells (LC3I/II-shPTEN). Downregulation of PTEN and autophagic proteins LC3-I and LC3-II was observed in resistant human breast cancer samples. Knockdown of PTEN and PTEN+ LC3I/II with shRNA in breast cancer cells resulted in increased resistance to trastuzumab. Consistently, trastuzumab treatment could not effectively reduce tumor size. Significant decreases in the levels of autophagic proteins LC3I/II, LAMP, p62, cathepsin B, and PI3K-Akt-mTOR and the signaling pathway protein Akt were found in PTEN knockdown cells, compared to the PTEN normal group, after trastuzumab administration, both in vitro and in vivo. However, these findings were reversed with the LC3I/II-shPTEN treatment. Therefore, the loss of PTEN may promote the development of primary resistance to trastuzumab in breast cancer via autophagy defects.

  12. Rapid estrogen signaling negatively regulates PTEN activity through phosphorylation in endometrial cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Scully, Melanie M.; Palacios-Helgeson, Leslie K.; Wah, Lah S.; Jackson, Twila A.

    2014-01-01

    Hyperestrogenicity is a risk factor for endometrial cancer. 17β-estradiol (E2) is known to stimulate both genomic and nongenomic estrogen receptor-α (ERα) actions in a number of reproductive tissues. However, the contributions of transcription-independent ERα signaling on normal and malignant endometrium are not fully understood. Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) is a tumor suppressor that decreases cellular mitosis primarily through negative regulation of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/AKT signaling axis. PTEN levels are elevated during the E2 dominated, mitotically active, proliferative phase of the menstrual cycle, indicating possible hormonal regulation of PTEN in the uterus. In order to determine if rapid E2 signaling regulates PTEN, we used ERα positive, PTEN positive, endometrial cells. We show that cytosolic E2/ERα signaling leads to increased phosphorylation of PTEN at key regulatory residues. Importantly, E2 stimulation decreased PTEN lipid phosphatase activity and caused consequent increases in phospho-AKT. We further demonstrate that cytosolic ERα forms a complex with PTEN in an E2-dependent manner, and that ERα constitutively complexes with protein kinase2-α (CK2α), a kinase previously shown to phosphorylate the C-terminal tail of PTEN. These results provide mechanistic support for an E2-dependent, ERα cytosolic signaling complex that negatively regulates PTEN activity through carboxy terminus phosphorylation. Using an animal model, we show that sustained E2 signaling results in increased phospho-PTEN (S380, T382, T383), total PTEN and phospho-AKT (S473). Taken together, we provide a novel mechanism in which transcription-independent E2/ERα signaling may promote a pro-tumorigenic environment in the endometrium. PMID:24844349

  13. Determinants of hepcidin levels in sepsis-associated acute kidney injury: Impact on pAKT/PTEN pathways?

    PubMed

    Schaalan, Mona F; Mohamed, Walid A

    2016-09-01

    The antimicrobial β-defensin-like role of hepcidin (HEPC) has been increasingly investigated for its potential role in acute kidney injury (AKI). In sepsis-induced AKI, there is a complex interplay between positive and negative regulation of HEPC, with consequently altered distributions of iron caused by changes in HEPC levels. The aim of the current research was to assess serum HEPC levels in a cohort of septic patients with AKI and investigate the regulatory impact of hypoxia-inducing factor (HIF)-1α, erythropoietin (EPO) and inflammation on HEPC levels and related signal cascades in these patients. Baseline, higher levels of SCr (2.3-fold), blood urea nitrogen (BUN) (1.8-fold), uric acid (2.3-fold) and white blood cell (2.3-fold) were noted in septic AKI patients, along with decreased levels of albumin (15.7%), creatinine (44.7%) and BUN/creatinine ratios (23.8%), compared to in normal subjects. These hosts also had increased serum levels of TNFα (4.4-times) and TGFβ1 (3.2-times) compared to controls (p < 0.05). Further, HEPC and HIF-1α levels were also increased (8.8- and 3.6-times control levels), while EPO levels were decreased (77.8%) from control levels. After 12 weeks of antibiotic therapy, all septic AKI patients showed significant improvement of the altered markers of kidney dysfunction. In line with significant reductions in serum TNFα and TGFβ1 (25.5% and 26.2%, respectively), HEPC and HIF-1α levels were significantly decreased (31.6% and 19.3%), and EPO levels increased (1.9-fold) compared to pretreatment values. There was a significant positive correlation between HEPC levels and kidney function markers (SCr and BUN), inflammatory TNFα and TGFβ1 and serum HIF-1α and pAKT in septic AKI patients before and after treatment. Based on the results here, we conclude that HEPC, EPO and HIF-1α are involved in the pathogenesis of sepsis-induced AKI and confirm the dominating effects of inflammatory determinants over hypoxia

  14. Determinants of hepcidin levels in sepsis-associated acute kidney injury: Impact on pAKT/PTEN pathways?

    PubMed

    Schaalan, Mona F; Mohamed, Walid A

    2016-09-01

    The antimicrobial β-defensin-like role of hepcidin (HEPC) has been increasingly investigated for its potential role in acute kidney injury (AKI). In sepsis-induced AKI, there is a complex interplay between positive and negative regulation of HEPC, with consequently altered distributions of iron caused by changes in HEPC levels. The aim of the current research was to assess serum HEPC levels in a cohort of septic patients with AKI and investigate the regulatory impact of hypoxia-inducing factor (HIF)-1α, erythropoietin (EPO) and inflammation on HEPC levels and related signal cascades in these patients. Baseline, higher levels of SCr (2.3-fold), blood urea nitrogen (BUN) (1.8-fold), uric acid (2.3-fold) and white blood cell (2.3-fold) were noted in septic AKI patients, along with decreased levels of albumin (15.7%), creatinine (44.7%) and BUN/creatinine ratios (23.8%), compared to in normal subjects. These hosts also had increased serum levels of TNFα (4.4-times) and TGFβ1 (3.2-times) compared to controls (p < 0.05). Further, HEPC and HIF-1α levels were also increased (8.8- and 3.6-times control levels), while EPO levels were decreased (77.8%) from control levels. After 12 weeks of antibiotic therapy, all septic AKI patients showed significant improvement of the altered markers of kidney dysfunction. In line with significant reductions in serum TNFα and TGFβ1 (25.5% and 26.2%, respectively), HEPC and HIF-1α levels were significantly decreased (31.6% and 19.3%), and EPO levels increased (1.9-fold) compared to pretreatment values. There was a significant positive correlation between HEPC levels and kidney function markers (SCr and BUN), inflammatory TNFα and TGFβ1 and serum HIF-1α and pAKT in septic AKI patients before and after treatment. Based on the results here, we conclude that HEPC, EPO and HIF-1α are involved in the pathogenesis of sepsis-induced AKI and confirm the dominating effects of inflammatory determinants over hypoxia

  15. In prostate cancer needle biopsies, detections of PTEN loss by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and by immunohistochemistry (IHC) are concordant and show consistent association with upgrading.

    PubMed

    Picanço-Albuquerque, C G; Morais, C L; Carvalho, F L F; Peskoe, S B; Hicks, J L; Ludkovski, O; Vidotto, T; Fedor, H; Humphreys, E; Han, M; Platz, E A; De Marzo, A M; Berman, D M; Lotan, T L; Squire, J A

    2016-05-01

    The prognostic value of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) loss in prostate cancer has primarily been evaluated by either fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) or immunohistochemistry (IHC). Previously, we found that PTEN loss by IHC was associated with increased risk of upgrading from biopsy (Gleason 3 + 3) to prostatectomy (Gleason 7+). Now, using an evaluable subset of 111 patients with adjacent biopsy sections, we analyzed the association between PTEN deletion in cancer and the odds of upgrading by a highly sensitive and specific four-color FISH assay. We also compared the concordance of PTEN loss by IHC and PTEN deletion by FISH. PTEN deletion was found in 27 % (12/45) of upgraded cases compared with 11 % (7/66) of controls (P = 0.03). Cancers with PTEN deletions were more likely to be upgraded than those without deletions (adjusting for age odds ratio = 3.40, 95 % confidence interval 1.14-10.11). With respect to concordance, of 93 biopsies with PTEN protein detected by IHC, 89 (96 %) had no PTEN deletion by FISH, and of 18 biopsies without PTEN protein by IHC, 15 had homozygous or hemizygous PTEN deletion by FISH. Only 4 biopsies of the 93 (4 %) with PTEN protein intact had PTEN deletion by FISH. When the regions of uncertainty in these biopsies were systematically studied by FISH, intra-tumoral variation of PTEN deletion was found, which could account for variation in immunoreactivity. Thus, FISH provides a different approach to determining PTEN loss when IHC is uncertain. Both FISH and IHC are concordant, showing consistent positive associations between PTEN loss and upgrading.

  16. Efficacy of targeted AKT inhibition in genetically engineered mouse models of PTEN-deficient prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    De Velasco, Marco A; Kura, Yurie; Yoshikawa, Kazuhiro; Nishio, Kazuto; Davies, Barry R; Uemura, Hirotsugu

    2016-03-29

    The PI3K/AKT pathway is frequently altered in advanced human prostate cancer mainly through the loss of functional PTEN, and presents as potential target for personalized therapy. Our aim was to determine the therapeutic potential of the pan-AKT inhibitor, AZD5363, in PTEN-deficient prostate cancer. Here we used a genetically engineered mouse (GEM) model of PTEN-deficient prostate cancer to evaluate the in vivo pharmacodynamic and antitumor activity of AZD5363 in castration-naïve and castration-resistant prostate cancer. An additional GEM model, based on the concomitant inactivation of PTEN and Trp53 (P53), was established as an aggressive model of advanced prostate cancer and was used to further evaluate clinically relevant endpoints after treatment with AZD5363. In vivo pharmacodynamic studies demonstrated that AZD5363 effectively inhibited downstream targets of AKT. AZD5363 monotherapy significantly reduced growth of tumors in castration-naïve and castration-resistant models of PTEN-deficient prostate cancer. More importantly, AZD5363 significantly delayed tumor growth and improved overall survival and progression-free survival in PTEN/P53 double knockout mice. Our findings demonstrate that AZD5363 is effective against GEM models of PTEN-deficient prostate cancer and provide lines of evidence to support further investigation into the development of treatment strategies targeting AKT for the treatment of PTEN-deficient prostate cancer.

  17. Apoptotic effects of signal transduction inhibitors on human tumor cells with different PTEN expression.

    PubMed

    Pfeiler, Georg; Horn, Felicitas; Lattrich, Claus; Klappenberger, Stefanie; Ortmann, Olaf; Treeck, Oliver

    2007-11-01

    An important mechanism of antitumoral targeted therapies is the induction of apoptosis in tumor cells. Tamoxifen and trastuzumab (Herceptin), respectively, are able to trigger apoptosis in human breast cancer cells. But, frequently altered apoptotic signal cascades, for instance through PTEN mutations, help tumor cells to escape antitumoral therapy. We studied to what extent the apoptotic effect of signal-transduction inhibitors is dependent on PTEN expression. PTEN expression was analysed by Western blot analysis in tumor cell lines of the breast (BT-474, MCF-7, MDA-MB-231), ovary (BG-1, SK-OV-3) and endometrium (Ishikawa, HEC-1A). Apoptotic effects of tamoxifen, trastuzumab, ZD1839 (Iressa) and different mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP) inhibitors were measured after 24 h of treatment. Cellular apoptosis was determined by the detection of cytoplasmic histone-DNA complexes. The tested tumor cell lines exhibited a different PTEN expression, ranging from a high expression (ovarian cancer cell line BG-1 and BT-474 breast cancer cells) to a total absence of PTEN expression (endometrial Ishikawa cells). The apoptotic effect of receptor-targeting drugs (tamoxifen, trastuzumab, ZD1839) was dependent both on receptor expression and PTEN expression. When cells were treated with MAPK inhibitors, no correlation between PTEN expression and the apoptosis rate was observed. Our data underline the importance of PTEN expression regarding the induction of apoptosis through various targeted therapies.

  18. Efficacy of targeted AKT inhibition in genetically engineered mouse models of PTEN-deficient prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    De Velasco, Marco A.; Kura, Yurie; Yoshikawa, Kazuhiro; Nishio, Kazuto; Davies, Barry R.; Uemura, Hirotsugu

    2016-01-01

    The PI3K/AKT pathway is frequently altered in advanced human prostate cancer mainly through the loss of functional PTEN, and presents as potential target for personalized therapy. Our aim was to determine the therapeutic potential of the pan-AKT inhibitor, AZD5363, in PTEN-deficient prostate cancer. Here we used a genetically engineered mouse (GEM) model of PTEN-deficient prostate cancer to evaluate the in vivo pharmacodynamic and antitumor activity of AZD5363 in castration-naïve and castration-resistant prostate cancer. An additional GEM model, based on the concomitant inactivation of PTEN and Trp53 (P53), was established as an aggressive model of advanced prostate cancer and was used to further evaluate clinically relevant endpoints after treatment with AZD5363. In vivo pharmacodynamic studies demonstrated that AZD5363 effectively inhibited downstream targets of AKT. AZD5363 monotherapy significantly reduced growth of tumors in castration-naïve and castration-resistant models of PTEN-deficient prostate cancer. More importantly, AZD5363 significantly delayed tumor growth and improved overall survival and progression-free survival in PTEN/P53 double knockout mice. Our findings demonstrate that AZD5363 is effective against GEM models of PTEN-deficient prostate cancer and provide lines of evidence to support further investigation into the development of treatment strategies targeting AKT for the treatment of PTEN-deficient prostate cancer. PMID:26910118

  19. Ir-192 HDR transit dose and radial dose function determination using alanine/EPR dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzmán Calcina, Carmen S.; de Almeida, Adelaide; Oliveira Rocha, José R.; Abrego, Felipe Chen; Baffa, Oswaldo

    2005-03-01

    Source positioning close to the tumour in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy is not instantaneous. An increment of dose will be delivered during the movement of the source in the trajectory to its static position. This increment is the transit dose, often not taken into account in brachytherapeutic treatment planning. The transit dose depends on the prescribed dose, number of treatment fractions, velocity and activity of the source. Combining all these factors, the transit dose can be 5% higher than the prescribed absorbed dose value (Sang-Hyun and Muller-Runkel, 1994 Phys. Med. Biol. 39 1181 8, Nath et al 1995 Med. Phys. 22 209 34). However, it cannot exceed this percentage (Nath et al 1995). In this work, we use the alanine-EPR (electron paramagnetic resonance) dosimetric system using analysis of the first derivative of the signal. The transit dose was evaluated for an HDR system and is consistent with that already presented for TLD dosimeters (Bastin et al 1993 Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys. 26 695 702). Also using the same dosimetric system, the radial dose function, used to evaluate the geometric dose degradation around the source, was determined and its behaviour agrees better with those obtained by Monte Carlo simulations (Nath et al 1995, Williamson and Nath 1991 Med. Phys. 18 434 48, Ballester et al 1997 Med. Phys. 24 1221 8, Ballester et al 2001 Phys. Med. Biol. 46 N79 90) than with TLD measurements (Nath et al 1990 Med. Phys. 17 1032 40).

  20. PTEN: Multiple Functions in Human Malignant Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Milella, Michele; Falcone, Italia; Conciatori, Fabiana; Cesta Incani, Ursula; Del Curatolo, Anais; Inzerilli, Nicola; Nuzzo, Carmen M. A.; Vaccaro, Vanja; Vari, Sabrina; Cognetti, Francesco; Ciuffreda, Ludovica

    2015-01-01

    PTEN is the most important negative regulator of the PI3K signaling pathway. In addition to its canonical, PI3K inhibition-dependent functions, PTEN can also function as a tumor suppressor in a PI3K-independent manner. Indeed, the PTEN network regulates a broad spectrum of biological functions, modulating the flow of information from membrane-bound growth factor receptors to nuclear transcription factors, occurring in concert with other tumor suppressors and oncogenic signaling pathways. PTEN acts through its lipid and protein phosphatase activity and other non-enzymatic mechanisms. Studies conducted over the past 10 years have expanded our understanding of the biological role of PTEN, showing that in addition to its ability to regulate proliferation and cell survival, it also plays an intriguing role in regulating genomic stability, cell migration, stem cell self-renewal, and tumor microenvironment. Changes in PTEN protein levels, location, and enzymatic activity through various molecular mechanisms can generate a continuum of functional PTEN levels in inherited syndromes, sporadic cancers, and other diseases. PTEN activity can indeed, be modulated by mutations, epigenetic silencing, transcriptional repression, aberrant protein localization, and post-translational modifications. This review will discuss our current understanding of the biological role of PTEN, how PTEN expression and activity are regulated, and the consequences of PTEN dysregulation in human malignant tumors. PMID:25763354

  1. KRAS and BRAF Mutations and PTEN Expression Do Not Predict Efficacy of Cetuximab-Based Chemoradiotherapy in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Erben, Philipp; Stroebel, Philipp; Horisberger, Karoline; Popa, Juliana; Bohn, Beatrice; Hanfstein, Benjamin; Kaehler, Georg; Kienle, Peter; Post, Stefan; Wenz, Frederik; Hochhaus, Andreas

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Mutations in KRAS and BRAF genes as well as the loss of expression of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) (deleted on chromosome 10) are associated with impaired activity of antibodies directed against epidermal growth factor receptor in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. The predictive and prognostic value of the KRAS and BRAF point mutations as well as PTEN expression in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) treated with cetuximab-based neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy is unknown. Methods and Materials: We have conducted phase I and II trials of the combination of weekly administration of cetuximab and irinotecan and daily doses of capecitabine in conjunction with radiotherapy (45 Gy plus 5.4 Gy) in patients with LARC (stage uT3/4 or uN+). The status of KRAS and BRAF mutations was determined with direct sequencing, and PTEN expression status was determined with immunohistochemistry testing of diagnostic tumor biopsies. Tumor regression was evaluated by using standardized regression grading, and disease-free survival (DFS) was calculated according to the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: A total of 57 patients were available for analyses. A total of 31.6% of patients carried mutations in the KRAS genes. No BRAF mutations were found, while the loss of PTEN expression was observed in 9.6% of patients. Six patients achieved complete remission, and the 3-year DFS rate was 73%. No correlation was seen between tumor regression or DFS rate and a single marker or a combination of all markers. Conclusions: In the present series, no BRAF mutation was detected. The presence of KRAS mutations and loss of PTEN expression were not associated with impaired response to cetuximab-based chemoradiotherapy and 3-year DFS.

  2. Relationship between PTEN, DNA mismatch repair, and tumor histotype in endometrial carcinoma: retained positive expression of PTEN preferentially identifies sporadic non-endometrioid carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Djordjevic, Bojana; Barkoh, Bedia A; Luthra, Rajyalakshmi; Broaddus, Russell R

    2013-10-01

    Loss of PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog) expression and microsatellite instability are two of the more common molecular alterations in endometrial carcinoma. From the published literature, it is controversial as to whether there is a relationship between these different molecular mechanisms. Therefore, a cohort of 187 pure endometrioid and non-endometrioid endometrial carcinomas, carefully characterized as to clinical and pathological features, was examined for PTEN sequence abnormalities and the immunohistochemical expression of PTEN and the DNA mismatch repair proteins MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2. MLH1 methylation analysis was performed when tumors had loss of MLH1 protein. Mismatch repair protein loss was more frequent in endometrioid carcinomas compared with non-endometrioid carcinomas, a difference primarily attributable to the presence of MLH1 methylation in a greater proportion of endometrioid tumors. Among the non-endometrioid group, mixed endometrioid/non-endometrioid carcinomas were the histotype that most commonly had loss of a mismatch repair protein. In endometrioid tumors, the frequency of PTEN loss measured by immunohistochemistry and mutation did not differ significantly between the mismatch repair protein intact or mismatch repair protein loss groups, suggesting that PTEN loss is independent of mismatch protein repair status in this group. However, in non-endometrioid carcinomas, both intact positive PTEN immunohistochemical expression and PTEN wild type were highly associated with retained positive expression of mismatch repair proteins in the tumor. Relevant to screening endometrial cancers for Lynch Syndrome, an initial PTEN immunohistochemistry determination may be able to replace the use of four mismatch repair immunohistochemical markers in 63% of patients with non-endometrioid endometrial carcinoma. Therefore, PTEN immunohistochemistry, in combination with tumor histotype, is a useful adjunct in the clinical evaluation of endometrial

  3. EGFR- and AKT-mediated reduction in PTEN expression contributes to tyrphostin resistance and is reversed by mTOR inhibition in endometrial cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Tian; Yang, Yuebo; Li, Xiaomao; Xu, Chengfang; Meng, Lirong

    2012-02-01

    Loss or mutation of the PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10) gene is associated with resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors. However, the mechanism underlying remains elusive. In this study, we aimed to explore whether sensitivity to the EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) is affected by PTEN status in endometrial cancer cells. PTEN siRNA and the PTEN gene were transfected into HEC-1A and Ishikawa endometrial cancer cells using lentiviral vectors. Cells were treated under various concentrations of RG14620 and rapamycin, which are EGFR and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors, respectively. The IC(50) of RG16420 was determined by using the MTT method. Cell apoptosis and the cell cycle were studied, and activation of EGFR, AKT, and p70S6 were detected by Western blot analysis. Loss of PTEN promoted cell proliferation and led to significant increases in the levels of EGFR, phospho-EGFR, AKT, phospho-AKT, and phospho-mTOR proteins. Ishikawa and HEC-1A(PTENkd) cells that displayed loss and inactivation of PTEN function were resistant to RG14620. HEC-1A and Ishikawa(PTEN) cells with intact PTEN were sensitive to RG14620. The combination of two inhibitors was more effective than both monotherapies, particularly in carcinoma cells with PTEN dysfunction. Decreased phospho-EGFR protein expression was observed in all cell lines that were sensitive to RG14620. Decreased phospho-AKT and phospho-p70S6 protein expression was observed in PTEN-intact cells that were sensitive to RG14620. PTEN loss results in resistance to EGFR TKI, which was reversed by PTEN reintroduction or mTOR inhibitor treatment. The combined treatment of EGFR TKI and the mTOR inhibitor provided a synergistic effect by promoting cell death in PTEN-deficient and PTEN-intact endometrial cancer cells, particularly in PTEN-deficient carcinoma cells with up-regulated EGFR activation.

  4. Synergistic tumor suppression by adenovirus-mediated ING4/PTEN double gene therapy for gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H; Zhou, X; Xu, C; Yang, J; Xiang, J; Tao, M; Xie, Y

    2016-01-01

    Both inhibitor of growth 4 (ING4) and phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) have been shown to be strong candidate tumor suppressors. However, the combined efficacy of ING4 and PTEN for human gastric cancer remains to be determined. In this report, we constructed a multiple promoter expression cassette-based recombinant adenovirus coexpressing ING4 and PTEN (AdVING4/PTEN), assessed the combined effects of AdVING4/PTEN on gastric cancer using wild-type p53 AGS and SNU-1 human gastric cancer cell lines, and elucidated its underlying mechanisms. We found that AdVING4/PTEN-induced synergistic growth inhibition and apoptosis in vitro AGS or SNU-1 tumor cells and in vivo AGS xenografted tumors subcutaneously inoculated in athymic BALB/c nude mice. Mechanistically, AdVING4/PTEN exhibited an enhanced effect on upregulation of p53, Ac-p53 (K382), P21, Bax, PUMA, Noxa, cleaved Caspase-9, cleaved Caspase-3 and cleaved PARP as well as downregulation of Bcl-2 in vitro and in vivo. In addition, AdVING4/PTEN synergistically downregulated tumor vessel CD34 expression and reduced microvessel density, and additively inhibited vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in vivo. The synergistic tumor suppression elicited by AdVING4/PTEN was closely associated with the synergistic induction of apoptosis possibly via enhancement of endogenous p53 responses through cooperatively facilitating p53's stability and acetylation, and the synergistic inhibition of tumor angiogenesis probably via overlapping reduction of VEGF through cooperatively downregulating hypoxia inducible factor-1α's level and transcription activity. Thus, our results indicate that cancer gene therapy combining ING4 and PTEN may constitute a novel and effective therapeutic modality for human gastric cancer and other cancers.

  5. Protean PTEN: Form and Function

    PubMed Central

    Waite, Kristin A.; Eng, Charis

    2002-01-01

    Germline mutations distributed across the PTEN tumor-suppressor gene have been found to result in a wide spectrum of phenotypic features. Originally shown to be a major susceptibility gene for both Cowden syndrome (CS), which is characterized by multiple hamartomas and an increased risk of breast, thyroid, and endometrial cancers, and Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba syndrome, which is characterized by lipomatosis, macrocephaly, and speckled penis, the PTEN hamartoma tumor syndrome spectrum has broadened to include Proteus syndrome and Proteus-like syndromes. Exon 5, which encodes the core motif, is a hotspot for mutations likely due to the biology of the protein. PTEN is a major lipid 3-phosphatase, which signals down the PI3 kinase/AKT pro-apoptotic pathway. Furthermore, PTEN is a protein phosphatase, with the ability to dephosphorylate both serine and threonine residues. The protein-phosphatase activity has also been shown to regulate various cell-survival pathways, such as the mitogen-activated kinase (MAPK) pathway. Although it is well established that PTEN’s lipid-phosphatase activity, via the PI3K/AKT pathway, mediates growth suppression, there is accumulating evidence that the protein-phosphatase/MAPK pathway is equally important in the mediation of growth arrest and other crucial cellular functions. PMID:11875759

  6. Activation of nuclear PTEN by inhibition of Notch signaling induces G2/M cell cycle arrest in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, S-J; Lee, H-W; Baek, J-H; Cho, Y-H; Kang, H G; Jeong, J S; Song, J; Park, H-S; Chun, K-H

    2016-01-14

    Mutation in PTEN has not yet been detected, but its function as a tumor suppressor is inactivated in many cancers. In this study we determined that, activated Notch signaling disables PTEN by phosphorylation and thereby contributes to gastric tumorigenesis. Notch inhibition by small interfering RNA or γ-secretase inhibitor (GSI) induced mitotic arrest and apoptosis in gastric cancer cells. Notch inhibition induced dephosphorylation in the C-terminal domain of PTEN, which led to PTEN nuclear localization. Overexpression of activated Notch1-induced phosphorylation of PTEN and reversed GSI-induced mitotic arrest. Dephosphorylated nuclear PTEN caused prometaphase arrest by interaction with the cyclin B1-CDK1 complex, resulting in their accumulation in the nucleus and subsequent apoptosis. We found a correlation between high expression levels of Notch1 and low survival rates and, similarly, between reduced nuclear PTEN expression and increasing the TNM classification of malignant tumours stages in malignant tissues from gastric cancer patients. The growth of Notch1-depleted gastric tumors was significantly retarded in xenografted mice, and in addition, PTEN deletion restored growth similar to control tumors. We also demonstrated that combination treatment with GSI and chemotherapeutic agents significantly reduced the orthotopically transplanted gastric tumors in mice without noticeable toxicity. Overall, our findings suggest that inhibition of Notch signaling can be employed as a PTEN activator, making it a potential target for gastric cancer therapy.

  7. Genetic alterations of PTEN in human melanoma.

    PubMed

    Aguissa-Touré, Almass-Houd; Li, Gang

    2012-05-01

    The PTEN gene is one of the most frequently inactivated tumor suppressor genes in sporadic cancers. Inactivating mutations and deletions of the PTEN gene are found in many types of cancers, including melanoma. However, the exact frequency of PTEN alteration in melanoma is unknown. In this study, we comprehensively reviewed 16 studies on PTEN genetic changes in melanoma cell lines and tumor biopsies. To date, 76 PTEN alterations have been reported in melanoma cell lines and 38 PTEN alterations in melanoma biopsies. The rate of PTEN alterations in melanoma cell lines, primary melanoma, and metastatic melanoma is 27.6, 7.3, and 15.2%, respectively. Three mutations were found in both melanoma cell lines and biopsies. These mutations are scattered throughout the gene, with the exception of exon 9. A mutational hot spot is found in exon 5, which encodes the phosphatase activity domain. Evidence is also presented to suggest that numerous homozygous deletions and missense variants exist in the PTEN transcript. Studying PTEN functions and implications of its mutations and other genes could provide insights into the precise nature of PTEN function in melanoma and additional targets for new therapeutic approaches. PMID:22076652

  8. Metformin inhibits inflammatory response via AMPK-PTEN pathway in vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sun Ae; Choi, Hyoung Chul

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PTEN was induced by metformin and inhibited by compound C and AMPK siRNA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Metformin suppressed TNF-{alpha}-induced COX-2 and iNOS mRNA expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Compound C and bpv (pic) increased iNOS and COX-2 protein expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NF-{kappa}B activation was restored by inhibiting AMPK and PTEN. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AMPK and PTEN regulated TNF-{alpha}-induced ROS production in VSMCs. -- Abstract: Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammation of the coronary arteries. Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) stimulated by cytokines and chemokines accelerate the inflammatory response and migrate to the injured endothelium during the progression of atherosclerosis. Activation of AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK), a key sensor maintaining metabolic homeostasis, suppresses the inflammatory response. However, how AMPK regulates the inflammatory response is poorly understood. To identify the mechanism of this response, we focused on phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN), which is a negative regulator of inflammation. We investigated that activation of AMPK-induced PTEN expression and suppression of the inflammatory response through the AMPK-PTEN pathway in VSMCs. We treated with the well-known AMPK activator metformin to induce PTEN expression. PTEN was induced by metformin (2 mM) and inhibited by compound C (10 {mu}M) and AMPK siRNA. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-{alpha}) was used to induce inflammation. The inflammatory response was confirmed by cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression, and activation of nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B. Metformin suppressed COX-2 and iNOS mRNA and protein expression dose dependently. Treatment with compound C and bpv (pic) in the presence of metformin, iNOS and COX-2 protein expression increased. NF-{kappa}B activation decreased in response to metformin and was restored by inhibiting AMPK

  9. Ezrin-radixin-moesin-binding phosphoprotein-50 regulates EGF-induced AKT activation through interaction with EGFR and PTEN.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Junfang; Dai, Yuanping; Yang, Zhiyu; Yang, Longyan; Peng, Zhiqiang; Meng, Ran; Xiong, Ying; He, Junqi

    2016-01-01

    Dysregulated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling, especially EGFR/AKT signaling, plays important roles in tumorigenesis and progression, the study on intracellular regulation of this signaling pathway has great clinical significance. Phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN) is an important antagonist of AKT activity. Its regulation of AKT activity can be enhanced by ezrin-radixin-moesin-binding phosphoprotein-50 (EBP50)-mediated PTEN/EBP50/platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) complex. EBP50 was reported to bind to EGFR, and that it may also mediate the formation of PTEN/EGFR complex to regulate EGFR/AKT signaling. In this study, experiments were performed to verify the hypothesis. Results showed that PTEN co-immunoprecipitated with EGFR, demonstrating PTEN/EGFR complex can form in tissue. Further studies showed that EBP50 knockdown decreased the amount of PTEN/EGFR complex by GST pull-down assay, and EBP50 overexpression increased the amount of PTEN/EGFR complex in a dose-dependent manner. While PTEN mutant (V403A), which can not bind with EBP50, only slightly mediated the formation of PTEN/EGFR complex, confirming that EBP50 specifically mediated the formation of the PTEN/EGFR complex. Both PTEN (V403A) and EGFR (L1043/1063F) mutants can not bind with EBP50. The expression of PTEN (V403A) or EGFR (L1043/1063F) mutant in cells resulted in higher AKT activation level than their respective wild-types by EGF stimulation, indicating that EBP50-mediated PTEN/EGFR complex can effectively inhibit EGF-induced AKT activation. EGF stimulation of siEBP50 cells induced higher AKT activation level compared with control cells, further confirming EBP50-mediated PTEN/EGFR complex can more effectively inhibit EGF-induced AKT activation. These results demonstrated the PTEN/EGFR complex formed under the mediation of EBP50, revealing a novel mechanism for negative regulation of EGF-induced AKT pathway, which may be an important molecular

  10. Analysis of PTEN, BRAF and PI3K status for determination of benefit from cetuximab therapy in metastatic colorectal cancer patients refractory to chemotherapy with wild-type KRAS.

    PubMed

    Tural, Deniz; Batur, Sebnem; Erdamar, Sibel; Akar, Emre; Kepil, Nuray; Mandel, Nil Molinas; Serdengeçti, Süheyla

    2014-02-01

    We investigated predictive values of BRAF, PI3K and PTEN in cetuximab responses in KRAS wild-type (+) chemotherapy refractory, metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. Primary tumour tissues of 41 KRAS wild-type mCRC patients receiving cetuximab-based chemotherapy were investigated for PI3K, PTEN, KRAS and BRAF mutations. Progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) periods were calculated with Kaplan-Meier method and the Cox proportional hazards model was used. PTEN and PI3K expressions were 63 and 42 %, respectively. BRAF mutation was observed as 9.8 % among patients. Tumours with BRAF mutation had statistically lower response rates (RR) for cetuximab-based treatment than tumours with BRAF wild type (0 vs. 58 %, p = 0.02). PTEN expressing tumours had statistically higher RR for cetuximab-based treatment than tumours with PTEN loss (42 vs. 12 %, p = 0.04). PI3K expression had worse significant effect on cetuximab RR than PI3K non-expressed tumours (15 vs. 44 %, p = 0.023). Median PFS was significantly longer in patients with PTEN expression (14 months) than in patients with PTEN loss (5 months) (HR, 0.4; p = 0.028). Median PFS was significantly longer in patients with PI3K non-expression (15.2 months) than in patients with PI3K expression (4.1 months) (HR, 0.31; p = 0.001). Significant difference in PFS and OS between patients with BRAF mutated and BRAF wild-type tumours was not detected. However, patients with PTEN expression had significantly longer OS (15.1 months) than patients with PTEN loss tumour (9.9 months) (HR, 0.34; p = 0.008). Patients without PI3K expression had significantly longer OS (18.2 months) than patients with PI3K expression (10.1 months) (HR, 0.27; p = 0.001). Multivariate analyses revealed that PTEN expression (HR, 0.48; p = 0.02) and absence of PI3K expression (HR, 0.2; p = 0.001) were independent prognostic factors for increased PFS. Similarly, PTEN overexpression (HR, 0.62; p = 0.03) and absence of PI3K expression (HR, 0

  11. PTEN deficiency mediates a reciprocal response to IGF-1 and mTOR inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Mukund; Gomez, Nicholas C.; McFadden, Andrew W.; Moats-Staats, Billie M.; Wu, Sam; Rojas, Andres; Sapp, Travis; Simon, Jeremy M.; Smith, Scott V.; Kaiser-Rogers, Kathleen; Davis, Ian J.

    2014-01-01

    Recent evidence implicates the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) pathway in development of Ewing Sarcoma, a highly malignant bone and soft tissue tumor that primarily affects children and young adults. Despite promising results from preclinical studies of therapies that target this pathway, early phase clinical trials have shown that a significant fraction of patients do not benefit, suggesting that cellular factors determine tumor sensitivity. Using FAIRE-seq, a chromosomal deletion of the PTEN locus in a Ewing sarcoma cell line was identified. In primary tumors PTEN deficiency was observed in a large subset of cases, although not mediated by large chromosomal deletions. PTEN loss resulted in hyper-activation of the AKT signaling pathway. PTEN rescue led to decreased proliferation, inhibition of colony formation, and increased apoptosis. Strikingly, PTEN loss decreased sensitivity to IGF-1R inhibitors but increased responsiveness to temsirolimus, a potent mTOR inhibitor, as marked by induction of autophagy. These results suggest that PTEN is lost in a significant fraction of primary tumors and this deficiency may have therapeutic consequences by concurrently attenuating responsiveness to IGF-1R inhibition while increasing activity of mTOR inhibitors. The identification of PTEN status in the tumors of patients with recurrent disease could help guide the selection of therapies. PMID:24994750

  12. Neutron absorbed dose determination by calculations of recoil energy.

    PubMed

    Wrobel, F; Benabdesselam, M; Iacconi, P; Lapraz, D

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this work is to calculate the absorbed dose to matter due to neutrons in the 5-150 MeV energy range. Materials involved in the calculations are Al2O3, CaSO4 and CaS, which may be used as dosemeters and have already been studied for their luminescent properties. The absorbed dose is assumed to be mainly due to the energy deposited by the recoils. Elastic reactions are treated with the ECIS code while for the non-elastic ones, a Monte Carlo code has been developed and allowed to follow the nucleus decay and to determine its characteristics (nature and energy). Finally, the calculations show that the absorbed dose is mainly due to non-elastic process and that above 20 MeV this dose decreases slightly with the neutron energy. PMID:15353750

  13. Rb1 and Pten Co-Deletion in Osteoblast Precursor Cells Causes Rapid Lipoma Formation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Filtz, Emma A.; Emery, Ann; Lu, Huarui; Forster, Colleen L.; Karasch, Chris; Hallstrom, Timothy C.

    2015-01-01

    The Rb and Pten tumor suppressor genes are important regulators of bone development and both are frequently mutated in the bone cancer osteosarcoma (OS). To determine if Rb1 and Pten synergize as tumor suppressor genes for osteosarcoma, we co-deleted them in osteoprogenitor cells. Surprisingly, we observed rapid development of adipogenic but not osteosarcoma tumors in the ΔRb1/Pten mice. ΔPten solo deleted mice also developed lipoma tumors but at a much reduced frequency and later onset than those co-deleted for Rb1. Pten deletion also led to a marked increase in adipocytes in the bone marrow. To better understand the function of Pten in bone development in vivo, we conditionally deleted Pten in OSX+ osteoprogenitor cells using OSX-Cre mice. μCT analysis revealed a significant thickening of the calvaria and an increase in trabeculae volume and number in the femur, consistent with increased bone formation in these mice. To determine if Pten and Rb1 deletion actively promotes adipogenic differentiation, we isolated calvarial cells from Ptenfl/fl and Ptenfl/fl; Rb1fl/fl mice, infected them with CRE or GFP expressing adenovirus, treated with differentiation media. We observed slightly increased adipogenic, and osteogenic differentiation in the ΔPten cells. Both phenotypes were greatly increased upon Rb1/Pten co-deletion. This was accompanied by an increase in expression of genes required for adipogenesis. These data indicate that Pten deletion in osteoblast precursors is sufficient to promote frequent adipogenic, but only rare osteogenic tumors. Rb1 hetero- or homo-zygous co-deletion greatly increases the incidence and the rapidity of onset of adipogenic tumors, again, with only rare osteosarcoma tumors. PMID:26317218

  14. PTEN functions by recruitment to cytoplasmic vesicles.

    PubMed

    Naguib, Adam; Bencze, Gyula; Cho, Hyejin; Zheng, Wu; Tocilj, Ante; Elkayam, Elad; Faehnle, Christopher R; Jaber, Nadia; Pratt, Christopher P; Chen, Muhan; Zong, Wei-Xing; Marks, Michael S; Joshua-Tor, Leemor; Pappin, Darryl J; Trotman, Lloyd C

    2015-04-16

    PTEN is proposed to function at the plasma membrane, where receptor tyrosine kinases are activated. However, the majority of PTEN is located throughout the cytoplasm. Here, we show that cytoplasmic PTEN is distributed along microtubules, tethered to vesicles via phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PI(3)P), the signature lipid of endosomes. We demonstrate that the non-catalytic C2 domain of PTEN specifically binds PI(3)P through the CBR3 loop. Mutations render this loop incapable of PI(3)P binding and abrogate PTEN-mediated inhibition of PI 3-kinase/AKT signaling. This loss of function is rescued by fusion of the loop mutant PTEN to FYVE, the canonical PI(3)P binding domain, demonstrating the functional importance of targeting PTEN to endosomal membranes. Beyond revealing an upstream activation mechanism of PTEN, our data introduce the concept of PI 3-kinase signal activation on the vast plasma membrane that is contrasted by PTEN-mediated signal termination on the small, discrete surfaces of internalized vesicles. PMID:25866245

  15. Fluence-to-dose confusion regarding external stochastic dose determination within the DOE complex.

    SciTech Connect

    Shores, E. F.; Brown, T. H.

    2002-01-01

    The Department of Energy's (DOE) occupational radiation protection dose limits are specified in 10 CFR 835 (hereafter referred to as 'regulation'). Ambiguity in the regulation regarding designation of dose and fluence-to-dose conversion factors leads to confusion and disagreement regarding the appropriate choice of conversion factors. Three primary dose quantities of relevance are absorbed dose, D, quality factor, Q, and the product of those, called dose equivalent, H. The modifier Q is intended to express the long-term fatal cancer causing potential of different radiation types and generally increases with energy for neutrons. For photons, Q is close to unity regardless of energy. In principle, H could be estimated by incorporating a phantom and relevant Q values in a radiation-transport model. In practice, this would entail too much model complexity and computer time. The evaluator of H instead relies on pre-calculated energy-dependent fluence-to-dose conversion factors. Three primary sets of fluence-to-dose conversion factors are commonly used to determine stochastic dose for neutrons and photons: (1) ANSI/ANS-6.1.1-1977 that incorporates the NCRP-38 data for neutrons and sets based on Claiborne and Wells for photons, (2) ANSI/ANS -6.1.1-1991 that are based on and nearly identical to the neutron and photon sets in ICRP -51, and (3) neutron and photon sets in ICRP-74. The first set is maximum H values in a 30-cm diameter cylinder phantom for neutrons and in a 30-cm thick slab phantom for photons. The second set is effective dose equivalent, HE, derived from an anthropomorphic phantom by summing the products of tissue dose equivalents, HT, and tissue weighting factors, w{sub T}. The third set is effective dose, E, also derived from an anthropomorphic phantom by summing the products of H{sub T} and w{sub T}. E is functionally identical to H{sub E} except H{sub T} is the product of D and the radiation weighting factor, w{sub R}, which is similar in meaning to Q.

  16. Low-Dose Radiation Cataract and Genetic Determinants of Radiosensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Kleiman, Norman Jay

    2013-11-30

    The lens of the eye is one of the most radiosensitive tissues in the body. Ocular ionizing radiation exposure results in characteristic, dose related, progressive lens changes leading to cataract formation. While initial, early stages of lens opacification may not cause visual disability, the severity of such changes progressively increases with dose until vision is impaired and cataract extraction surgery may be required. Because of the transparency of the eye, radiation induced lens changes can easily be followed non-invasively over time. Thus, the lens provides a unique model system in which to study the effects of low dose ionizing radiation exposure in a complex, highly organized tissue. Despite this observation, considerable uncertainties remain surrounding the relationship between dose and risk of developing radiation cataract. For example, a growing number of human epidemiological findings suggest significant risk among various groups of occupationally and accidentally exposed individuals and confidence intervals that include zero dose. Nevertheless, questions remain concerning the relationship between lens opacities, visual disability, clinical cataract, threshold dose and/or the role of genetics in determining radiosensitivity. Experimentally, the response of the rodent eye to radiation is quite similar to that in humans and thus animal studies are well suited to examine the relationship between radiation exposure, genetic determinants of radiosensitivity and cataractogenesis. The current work has expanded our knowledge of the low-dose effects of X-irradiation or high-LET heavy ion exposure on timing and progression of radiation cataract and has provided new information on the genetic, molecular, biochemical and cell biological features which contribute to this pathology. Furthermore, findings have indicated that single and/or multiple haploinsufficiency for various genes involved in DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoint control, such as Atm, Brca1 or Rad9

  17. PI3K isoform dependence of PTEN-deficient tumors can be altered by the genetic context.

    PubMed

    Schmit, Fabienne; Utermark, Tamara; Zhang, Sen; Wang, Qi; Von, Thanh; Roberts, Thomas M; Zhao, Jean J

    2014-04-29

    There has been increasing interest in the use of isoform-selective inhibitors of phosphatidylinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) in cancer therapy. Using conditional deletion of the p110 catalytic isoforms of PI3K to predict sensitivity of cancer types to such inhibitors, we and others have demonstrated that tumors deficient of the phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) are often dependent on the p110β isoform of PI3K. Because human cancers usually arise due to multiple genetic events, determining whether other genetic alterations might alter the p110 isoform requirements of PTEN-null tumors becomes a critical question. To investigate further the roles of p110 isoforms in PTEN-deficient tumors, we used a mouse model of ovarian endometrioid adenocarcinoma driven by concomitant activation of the rat sarcoma protein Kras, which is known to activate p110α, and loss of PTEN. In this model, ablation of p110β had no effect on tumor growth, whereas p110α ablation blocked tumor formation. Because ablation of PTEN alone is often p110β dependent, we wondered if the same held true in the ovary. Because PTEN loss alone in the ovary did not result in tumor formation, we tested PI3K isoform dependence in ovarian surface epithelium (OSE) cells deficient in both PTEN and p53. These cells were indeed p110β dependent, whereas OSEs expressing activated Kras with or without PTEN loss were p110α dependent. Furthermore, isoform-selective inhibitors showed a similar pattern of the isoform dependence in established Kras(G12D)/PTEN-deficient tumors. Taken together, our data suggest that, whereas in some tissues PTEN-null tumors appear to inherently depend on p110β, the p110 isoform reliance of PTEN-deficient tumors may be altered by concurrent mutations that activate p110α.

  18. Catalysis by the tumor-suppressor enzymes PTEN and PTEN-L.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Sean B; Raines, Ronald T

    2015-01-01

    Phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted from chromosome ten (PTEN) is a lipid phosphatase tumor suppressor that is lost or inactivated in most human tumors. The enzyme catalyzes the hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol-(3,4,5)-trisphosphate (PIP3) to form phosphatidylinositol-(4,5)-bisphosphate (PIP2) and inorganic phosphate. Here, we report on the first continuous assay for the catalytic activity of PTEN. Using this assay, we demonstrate that human PTEN is activated by the reaction product PIP2, as well as in solutions of low salt concentration. This activation is abrogated in the K13A variant, which has a disruption in a putative binding site for PIP2. We also demonstrate that PTEN-L, which derives from alternative translation of the PTEN mRNA, is activated constitutively. These findings have implications for catalysis by PTEN in physiological environments and could expedite the development of PTEN-based chemotherapeutic agents.

  19. The MATROSHKA facility--dose determination during an EVA.

    PubMed

    Reitz, Guenther; Berger, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    On 29 January 2004 the MATROSHKA facility was launched with a Russian Progress to the International Space Station. MATROSHKA is an ESA project, which has been achieved under the direction of the German Aerospace Center (DLR). The project is a cooperation of >16 research institutes from all over the world and is currently the biggest international experiment in radiation dosimetry ever performed in space. The facility simulates, as exact as possible, an astronaut during an extravehicular activity. It was successfully installed outside the Russian segment 'Zvezda' on 26 February 2004 and will remain there for a 1.5 year exposure period. The main task of the facility is to measure particle fluence and energy spectra, dose and dose rates outside and inside--including organ dose determination--in an anthropomorphic phantom mounted on the outside of the Space Station with passive and active dosemeter systems.

  20. How accurately can the peak skin dose in fluoroscopy be determined using indirect dose metrics?

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, A. Kyle; Ensor, Joe E.; Pasciak, Alexander S.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Skin dosimetry is important for fluoroscopically-guided interventions, as peak skin doses (PSD) that result in skin reactions can be reached during these procedures. There is no consensus as to whether or not indirect skin dosimetry is sufficiently accurate for fluoroscopically-guided interventions. However, measuring PSD with film is difficult and the decision to do so must be madea priori. The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy of different types of indirect dose estimates and to determine if PSD can be calculated within ±50% using indirect dose metrics for embolization procedures. Methods: PSD were measured directly using radiochromic film for 41 consecutive embolization procedures at two sites. Indirect dose metrics from the procedures were collected, including reference air kerma. Four different estimates of PSD were calculated from the indirect dose metrics and compared along with reference air kerma to the measured PSD for each case. The four indirect estimates included a standard calculation method, the use of detailed information from the radiation dose structured report, and two simplified calculation methods based on the standard method. Indirect dosimetry results were compared with direct measurements, including an analysis of uncertainty associated with film dosimetry. Factors affecting the accuracy of the different indirect estimates were examined. Results: When using the standard calculation method, calculated PSD were within ±35% for all 41 procedures studied. Calculated PSD were within ±50% for a simplified method using a single source-to-patient distance for all calculations. Reference air kerma was within ±50% for all but one procedure. Cases for which reference air kerma or calculated PSD exhibited large (±35%) differences from the measured PSD were analyzed, and two main causative factors were identified: unusually small or large source-to-patient distances and large contributions to reference air kerma from cone

  1. Committed effective dose determination in southern Brazilian cereal flours.

    PubMed

    Scheibel, V; Appoloni, C R

    2013-01-01

    The health impact of radionuclide ingestion from foodstuffs was evaluated by the committed effective doses determined in eight commercial samples of South-Brazilian cereal flours (soy, wheat, cornmeal, cassava, rye, oat, barley and rice flours). The radioactivity traces of (228)Th, (228)Ra, (226)Ra, (40)K, (7)Be and (137)Cs were measured by gamma-ray spectrometry employing an HPGe detector of 66 % relative efficiency. The efficiency curve has taken into account the differences in densities and chemical composition between the matrix and the certified sample. The highest concentration levels of (228)Th and (40)K were 3.5±0.4 and 1469±17 Bq kg(-1) for soy flour, respectively, within the 95 % confidence level. The lower limit of detection for (137)Cs ranged from 0.04 to 0.4 Bq kg(-1). The highest committed effective dose was 0.36 μSv.y(-1) for (228)Ra in cassava flour (adults). All committed effective doses determined at the present work were lower than the International Atomic Energy Agency dose limit of 1 mSv.y(-1), to the public exposure.

  2. Committed effective dose determination in southern Brazilian cereal flours.

    PubMed

    Scheibel, V; Appoloni, C R

    2013-01-01

    The health impact of radionuclide ingestion from foodstuffs was evaluated by the committed effective doses determined in eight commercial samples of South-Brazilian cereal flours (soy, wheat, cornmeal, cassava, rye, oat, barley and rice flours). The radioactivity traces of (228)Th, (228)Ra, (226)Ra, (40)K, (7)Be and (137)Cs were measured by gamma-ray spectrometry employing an HPGe detector of 66 % relative efficiency. The efficiency curve has taken into account the differences in densities and chemical composition between the matrix and the certified sample. The highest concentration levels of (228)Th and (40)K were 3.5±0.4 and 1469±17 Bq kg(-1) for soy flour, respectively, within the 95 % confidence level. The lower limit of detection for (137)Cs ranged from 0.04 to 0.4 Bq kg(-1). The highest committed effective dose was 0.36 μSv.y(-1) for (228)Ra in cassava flour (adults). All committed effective doses determined at the present work were lower than the International Atomic Energy Agency dose limit of 1 mSv.y(-1), to the public exposure. PMID:23511708

  3. Sodium butyrate induces differentiation of gastric cancer cells to intestinal cells via the PTEN/phosphoinositide 3-kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Bai, Zhigang; Zhang, Zhongtao; Ye, Yingjiang; Wang, Shan

    2010-12-01

    NaB (sodium butyrate) inhibits cell proliferation and induces differentiation in a variety of tumour cells. In this study, we aimed to determine whether NaB induced differentiation and regulated the expression of the mucosal factor MUC2 through the PTEN/PI3K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase) pathway. BGC823 cells treated with NaB for 24-72 h showed marked inhibition of cell proliferation and alteration in cellular morphology. NaB treatment markedly increased the expression of PTEN and MUC2, but it decreased the expression of PI3K. These effects were enhanced by intervention with PI3K inhibitors and were reduced by intervention with PTEN siRNA. Hence, we conclude that NaB increased PTEN expression, promoted the expression of MUC2 and induced the differentiation of gastric cancer cells through the PTEN/PI3K signalling pathway.

  4. Analytic validation of a clinical-grade PTEN immunohistochemistry assay in prostate cancer by comparison with PTEN FISH.

    PubMed

    Lotan, Tamara L; Wei, Wei; Ludkovski, Olga; Morais, Carlos L; Guedes, Liana B; Jamaspishvili, Tamara; Lopez, Karen; Hawley, Sarah T; Feng, Ziding; Fazli, Ladan; Hurtado-Coll, Antonio; McKenney, Jesse K; Simko, Jeffrey; Carroll, Peter R; Gleave, Martin; Lin, Daniel W; Nelson, Peter S; Thompson, Ian M; True, Lawrence D; Brooks, James D; Lance, Raymond; Troyer, Dean; Squire, Jeremy A

    2016-08-01

    PTEN loss is a promising prognostic and predictive biomarker in prostate cancer. Because it occurs most commonly via PTEN gene deletion, we developed a clinical-grade, automated, and inexpensive immunohistochemical assay to detect PTEN loss. We studied the sensitivity and specificity of PTEN immunohistochemistry relative to four-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for detection of PTEN gene deletion in a multi-institutional cohort of 731 primary prostate tumors. Intact PTEN immunostaining was 91% specific for the absence of PTEN gene deletion (549/602 tumors with two copies of the PTEN gene by FISH showed intact expression of PTEN by immunohistochemistry) and 97% sensitive for the presence of homozygous PTEN gene deletion (absent PTEN protein expression by immunohistochemistry in 65/67 tumors with homozygous deletion). PTEN immunohistochemistry was 65% sensitive for the presence of hemizygous PTEN gene deletion, with protein loss in 40/62 hemizygous tumors. We reviewed the 53 cases where immunohistochemistry showed PTEN protein loss and FISH showed two intact copies of the PTEN gene. On re-review, there was ambiguous immunohistochemistry loss in 6% (3/53) and failure to analyze the same tumor area by both methods in 34% (18/53). Of the remaining discordant cases, 41% (13/32) revealed hemizygous (n=8) or homozygous (n=5) PTEN gene deletion that was focal in most cases (11/13). The remaining 19 cases had two copies of the PTEN gene detected by FISH, representing truly discordant cases. Our automated PTEN immunohistochemistry assay is a sensitive method for detection of homozygous PTEN gene deletions. Immunohistochemistry screening is particularly useful to identify cases with heterogeneous PTEN gene deletion in a subset of tumor glands. Mutations, small insertions, or deletions and/or epigenetic or microRNA-mediated mechanisms may lead to PTEN protein loss in tumors with normal or hemizygous PTEN gene copy number.

  5. Bufalin Inhibits HCT116 Colon Cancer Cells and Its Orthotopic Xenograft Tumor in Mice Model through Genes Related to Apoptotic and PTEN/AKT Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jie; Chen, Chao; Wang, Shiying; Zhang, Yong; Yin, Peihao; Gao, Zhongxiang; Xu, Jie; Feng, Dianxu; Zuo, Qinsong; Zhao, Ronghua; Chen, Teng

    2015-01-01

    Aims. To investigate the anticolorectal cancer (CRC) effects of Bufalin, a bioactive polyhydroxysteroid from Venenum Bufonis, using HCT116 human CRC cell and an established orthotopic xenograft model in mice, and to explore the mechanisms of action. Material and Methods. Cultured HCT116 cells or BALB/c mice with orthotopic tumor were treated by Bufalin (positive control: 5-FU). Cell proliferation, apoptosis, and cycling were determined by MTT, Annexin V/PI staining, and flow cytometry, respectively. In mice, tumor inhibition rate and animal survival were calculated. The expressions of PTEN/phosphate-PTEN, AKT/phosphate-AKT, Bad, Bcl-xl, Bax, or Caspase-3 in cells and/or tumors were determined by Western blot or immunohistochemical staining. Results. Bufalin significantly inhibited cell proliferation and induced cell apoptosis and cycle arrest in a dose/time-dependent manner. In the animal model, Bufalin treatment resulted in significant inhibition of tumor growth and prolonged survival. In the Bufalin-treated cultured cells and/or xenograft tumors, the expressions of PTEN, Bad, Bax, and Caspase-3 were significantly increased, while p-AKT and Bcl-xL significantly decreased. Conclusions. Our results indicate that Bufalin inhibit cell proliferation and orthotopic tumor growth by inducing cell apoptosis through the intrinsic apoptotic pathway, which is of pivotal significance in the identification of an anticancer drug that may synergize with Bufalin. PMID:26770191

  6. Determinations of H(10) and its dose components onboard aircraft.

    PubMed

    Lindborg, L; Beck, P; Bottolier-Depois, J F; Latocha, M; Lillhök, J; Rollet, S; Roos, H; Roth, J; Schraube, H; Spurny, F; Stehno, G; Trompier, F; Wissmann, F

    2007-01-01

    Aircrew is in general receiving a higher average annual dose than other occupationally exposed personnel, and about half of the effective dose is deposited by high-LET neutron secondaries. A recent investigation of the cancer incidence following the atomic bombs at Hiroshima and Nagasaki has put forward the possibility that the relative biological efficiency for neutrons could be underestimated. If so, the effective dose to aircrew from this component would increase and the estimation of this component will become even more important. Different ambient dose equivalent measurement techniques and calculation methods have recently been compared on a dedicated flight. The experimental results are compared with calculations made with the codes EPCARD 3.2 and an updated version of FLUKA and different galactic proton spectra. The aircraft circulated within the target areas at two constant altitudes with a flight route variation of only about 1 degrees in longitude and latitude to reduce the influence from variations in atmospheric and geomagnetic shielding. The instrumentation consisted of tissue-equivalent proportional counters (TEPC) and a silicon diode spectrometer. Measurements were performed for 2 h to reduce the statistical uncertainties in the results. The TEPCs were evaluated either according to single-event analysis techniques or the variance-covariance method. Besides the total ambient dose equivalent, the instruments can be evaluated to reveal the low- and high-LET components. The EPCARD and FLUKA simulations can determine the contribution from each type of particle directly. The ratio between the calculated and the measured average value of the ambient dose equivalent rate was 1.00 +/- 0.08 with all instruments included for EPCARD and 0.97 +/- 0.07 when FLUKA was used. The measured high-LET component and the calculated neutron component are not quite identical, but should be similar. The agreement was always within 20%. The high-LET component contributed with

  7. Targeted deletion of tumor suppressor PTEN augments neutrophil function and enhances host defense in neutropenia-associated pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yitang; Jia, Yonghui; Pichavant, Muriel; Loison, Fabien; Sarraj, Bara; Kasorn, Anongnard; You, Jian; Robson, Bryanne E.; Umetsu, Dale T.; Mizgerd, Joseph P.; Ye, Keqiang

    2009-01-01

    Neutropenia and related infections are the most important dose-limiting toxicities in anticancer chemotherapy and radiotherapy. In this study, we explored a new strategy for augmenting host defense in neutropenia-related pneumonia. Phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate (PtdIns(3,4,5)P3) signaling in neutrophils was elevated by depleting PTEN, a phosphatidylinositol 3′-phosphatase that hydrolyzes PtdIns(3,4,5)P3. In myeloid-specific PTEN knockout mice, significantly more neutrophils were recruited to the inflamed lungs during neutropenia-associated pneumonia. Using an adoptive transfer technique, we demonstrated that this enhancement could be caused directly by PTEN depletion in neutrophils. In addition, disruption of PTEN increased the recruitment of macrophages and elevated proinflammatory cytokines/chemokine levels in the inflamed lungs, which could also be responsible for the enhanced neutrophil recruitment. Depleting PTEN also significantly delayed apoptosis and enhanced the bacteria-killing capability of the recruited neutrophils. Finally, we provide direct evidence that enhancement of neutrophil function by elevating PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 signaling can alleviate pneumonia-associated lung damage and decrease pneumonia-elicited mortality. Collectively, these results not only provide insight into the mechanism of action of PTEN and PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 signaling pathway in modulating neutrophil function during lung infection and inflammation, but they also establish PTEN and related pathways as potential therapeutic targets for treating neutropenia-associated pneumonia. PMID:19286998

  8. Determination of the prescription dose for biradionuclide permanent prostate brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Nuttens, V. E.; Lucas, S.

    2008-12-15

    A model based on the linear quadratic model that has been corrected for repopulation, sublethal cell damage repair, and RBE effect has been used to determine the prescription dose for prostate permanent brachytherapy using seeds loaded with a mixture of {sup 103}Pd and {sup 125}I or a mixture of {sup 103}Pd and {sup 131}Cs. The prescription dose was determined by comparing the tumor cell survival fractions between the considered biradionuclide seed implant and one monoradionuclide seed implant chosen from {sup 103}Pd, {sup 125}I, and {sup 131}Cs. Prostate edema is included in the model. The influence of the value of the radiobiological parameters and RBE were also investigated. Two mixtures of radionuclides were considered: {sup 103}Pd{sub 0.75}-{sup 125}I{sub 0.25} and {sup 103}Pd{sub 0.25}-{sup 131}Cs{sub 0.75}, where the subscripts indicate the fractions of total initial internal activity in the biradionuclide seed. These fractions were selected in order to obtain a dose distribution that lies between that of {sup 103}Pd and {sup 125}I/{sup 131}Cs. As expected, the computed prescription dose values are dependent on the model parameters (edema half-life and magnitude, radiobiogical parameters, and RBE). The radionuclide used as a benchmark also has a strong impact on the derived prescribed dose. The large uncertainties in the radiobiological parameters and RBE values produce big errors in the computed prescribed dose. Averaged over the range of all the parameters and depending on the radionuclide used as a benchmark (in subscript), the derived prescription dose for the first mixture (PdI) would be: D{sub Pd}{sup PdI}=142{sub -16}{sup +15} Gy and D{sub I}{sup PdI}=142{sub -8}{sup +6} Gy; and D{sub Pd}{sup PdCs}=128{sub -13}{sup +13} Gy and D{sub Cs}{sup PdCs}=115{sub -7}{sup +6} Gy for the PdCs mixture. The uncertainties could be reduced if the radiobiological parameters and RBE value were known more accurately. However, as edema characteristics are patient

  9. Novel germline mutations in the PTEN tumour suppressor gene found in women with multiple cancers

    PubMed Central

    De Vivo, I.; Gertig, D.; Nagase, S.; Hankinson, S.; O'Brien, R.; Speizer, F.; Parsons, R.; Hunter, D.

    2000-01-01

    Germline mutations in PTEN can predispose people to Cowden syndrome (CS) and Bannayan-Ruvalcaba-Riley (BRR) syndrome, rare, autosomal dominantly inherited neoplastic disorders. To determine whether germline mutations in PTEN contribute to genetic predisposition to multiple primary tumours within the general population, we conducted a nested case-control study, among 32 826 members of the prospective Nurses' Health Study cohort; cases were women with more than one primary tumour at different anatomical sites. We screened all nine exons of PTEN and flanking intronic splice sites for all 103 eligible cases using SSCP and sequencing. We observed two novel germline heterozygous missense mutations in exon 5 in five of the cases; three were V119L and two were V158L. Neither mutation was observed in 115 controls free of diagnosed cancer (p=0.02). Both mutants showed partial tumour suppressor activity when compared to wild type PTEN when transfected into a PTEN null breast cancer cell line. The phenotype was cell line specific suggesting that genetic background affects growth suppression activity of the mutants. These data provide evidence that germline mutations in PTEN may be a more frequent predisposing factor for cancers in women than previously suggested.


Keywords: population based; tumour suppressor; multiple cancers; germline mutations PMID:10807691

  10. 10 CFR 20.1203 - Determination of external dose from airborne radioactive material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Determination of external dose from airborne radioactive... RADIATION Occupational Dose Limits § 20.1203 Determination of external dose from airborne radioactive material. Licensees shall, when determining the dose from airborne radioactive material, include...

  11. 10 CFR 20.1203 - Determination of external dose from airborne radioactive material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Determination of external dose from airborne radioactive... RADIATION Occupational Dose Limits § 20.1203 Determination of external dose from airborne radioactive material. Licensees shall, when determining the dose from airborne radioactive material, include...

  12. 10 CFR 20.1203 - Determination of external dose from airborne radioactive material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Determination of external dose from airborne radioactive... RADIATION Occupational Dose Limits § 20.1203 Determination of external dose from airborne radioactive material. Licensees shall, when determining the dose from airborne radioactive material, include...

  13. 10 CFR 20.1203 - Determination of external dose from airborne radioactive material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Determination of external dose from airborne radioactive... RADIATION Occupational Dose Limits § 20.1203 Determination of external dose from airborne radioactive material. Licensees shall, when determining the dose from airborne radioactive material, include...

  14. 10 CFR 20.1203 - Determination of external dose from airborne radioactive material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Determination of external dose from airborne radioactive... RADIATION Occupational Dose Limits § 20.1203 Determination of external dose from airborne radioactive material. Licensees shall, when determining the dose from airborne radioactive material, include...

  15. A functional network of the tumor suppressors APC, hDlg, and PTEN, that relies on recognition of specific PDZ-domains.

    PubMed

    Sotelo, Natalia S; Valiente, Miguel; Gil, Anabel; Pulido, Rafael

    2012-08-01

    APC and PTEN are tumor suppressor proteins that bind through their C-termini to the PDZ domain containing-hDlg scaffolding protein. We have found that co-expression of PTEN and hDlg enhanced the negative regulation of the PI3K/Akt pathway by PTEN, indicating the physiologic importance of these interactions. APC and PTEN share other PDZ domain containing-interacting partners, including the MAGI scaffolding proteins and the MAST family of protein kinases. Mutational analysis revealed that the C-terminal PDZ-binding motifs from APC and PTEN were differentially recognized by distinct PDZ domains. APC bound to the three PDZ domains from hDlg, whereas PTEN mainly bound to PDZ-2/hDlg. This indicates the existence of overlapping, but distinct PDZ-domain recognition patterns by APC and PTEN. Furthermore, a ternary complex formed by APC, PTEN, and hDlg was detected, suggesting that hDlg may serve as a platform to bring in proximity APC and PTEN tumor suppressor activities. In line with this, tumor-related mutations targeting the PDZ-2/hDlg domain diminished its interaction with APC and PTEN. Our results expand the PDZ-domain counterparts for the tumor suppressor APC, show that APC and PTEN share PDZ-domain partners but have individual molecular determinants for specific recognition of PDZ domains, and suggest the participation of the tumor suppressors APC, PTEN, and hDlg in PDZ-domain interaction networks which may be relevant in oncogenesis.

  16. Radon Dose Determination for Cave Guides in Czech Republic

    SciTech Connect

    Thinova, Lenka; Rovenska, Katerina

    2008-08-07

    According to recommended approach there are six (from total of twelve) open-to-public caves in Czech Republic, reaching near to an effective lung-dose of 6mSv/year. A conservative approach for estimating the potential effective lung-dose in caves (or underground) is based on two season's measurements, using solid state alpha track detector (Kodak in plastic diffusion chamber). The obtained dataset is converted into an annual effective dose, in agreement with the ICRP65 recommendation, using the 'cave factor' 1.5. The value of 'cave factor' which depends on the spectrum of aerosol particles, or on the proportional representation of the unattached/attached ratio (6.5 : 93.5 for residential places, 13.6 : 86.4 for caves due to lower concentration of free aerosols) and on the equilibrium factor. Thus conversion factor is 1.5 times higher in comparison with ICRP 65. Is this correct? Because a more precisely determined dose value would have a significant impact on radon remedies, or on restricting the time workers stay underground, a series of measurement was initiated in 2003 with the aim to specify input data, computation and errors in effective dose assessment in each one of the evaluated caves separately. The enhancement of personal dosimetry for underground work places includes a study of the given questions, from the following points of view in each cave: continual radon measurement; regular measurements of radon and its daughters to estimate the equilibrium factor and the presence of free {sup 218}Po; regular indoor air flow measurements to study the location of the radon supply and its transfer among individual areas of the cave; natural radioactive element content evaluation in subsoil and in water inside/outside, a study of the radon sources in the cave; determination of the free fraction from continual unattached and attached fraction measurement (grid and filter); thoron measurement. Air flow measurements provide very interesting information about the origin

  17. Radon Dose Determination for Cave Guides in Czech Republic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thinova, Lenka; Rovenska, Katerina

    2008-08-01

    According to recommended approach there are six (from total of twelve) open-to-public caves in Czech Republic, reaching near to an effective lung-dose of 6mSv/year. A conservative approach for estimating the potential effective lung-dose in caves (or underground) is based on two season's measurements, using solid state alpha track detector (Kodak in plastic diffusion chamber). The obtained dataset is converted into an annual effective dose, in agreement with the ICRP65 recommendation, using the "cave factor" 1.5. The value of "cave factor" which depends on the spectrum of aerosol particles, or on the proportional representation of the unattached/attached ratio (6.5 : 93.5 for residential places, 13.6 : 86.4 for caves due to lower concentration of free aerosols) and on the equilibrium factor. Thus conversion factor is 1.5 times higher in comparison with ICRP 65. Is this correct? Because a more precisely determined dose value would have a significant impact on radon remedies, or on restricting the time workers stay underground, a series of measurement was initiated in 2003 with the aim to specify input data, computation and errors in effective dose assessment in each one of the evaluated caves separately. The enhancement of personal dosimetry for underground work places includes a study of the given questions, from the following points of view in each cave: continual radon measurement; regular measurements of radon and its daughters to estimate the equilibrium factor and the presence of free 218Po; regular indoor air flow measurements to study the location of the radon supply and its transfer among individual areas of the cave; natural radioactive element content evaluation in subsoil and in water inside/outside, a study of the radon sources in the cave; determination of the free fraction from continual unattached and attached fraction measurement (grid and filter); thoron measurement. Air flow measurements provide very interesting information about the origin of

  18. Tetramethylpyrazine enhances functional recovery after contusion spinal cord injury by modulation of MicroRNA-21, FasL, PDCD4 and PTEN expression.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jiang-Hu; Cao, Yong; Zeng, Lei; Wang, Guan; Cao, Min; Lu, Hong-Bin; Hu, Jian-Zhong

    2016-10-01

    Our previous study showed Tetramethylpyrazine (TMP) has protective effects against SCI. In this study, we aimed to uncover the mechanism underlying the protective effects of TMP in SCI. SCI was induced in Sprague-Dawley rats with a modified weight-drop device. One group was subjected to SCI in combination with TMP administration at a dose of 200mg/kgd, for 3 days. Concurrently, another group received SCI in combination with an equal volume of 0.9% saline. Locomotor functional recovery was assessed during the 4 weeks post-injury by performing the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB) rating procedure. Lesion size and spared tissue were measured by cresyl violet staining. MicroRNA-21 (miR-21) expression was determined by real-time PCR and in situ hybridization. FasL, PDCD4, and PTEN are direct targets of miR-21 in many diseases and cell types; their levels were analyzed by western blot. Immunohistochemistry was performed to observe the expression of PDCD4 and PTEN. Cell apoptosis was assessed by TUNEL staining and DNA laddering. TMP treatment after contusion SCI significantly improved functional recovery, decreased lesion size, and increased tissue sparing and miR-21 levels; expression of FasL, PDCD4, and PTEN was decreased. TMP treatment also reduced apoptosis after SCI. Thus, TMP administration improved functional recovery and reduced cell apoptosis. Its protective effect may partly based on increasing the expression of miR-21 and decreasing the expression of FasL, PDCD4, and PTEN. These could serve as new exploratory targets for SCI treatment. PMID:27431939

  19. Therapeutic targeting of cancers with loss of PTEN function

    PubMed Central

    Dillon, Lloye M.; Miller, Todd W.

    2015-01-01

    Phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) is one of the most frequently disrupted tumor suppressors in cancer. The lipid phosphatase activity of PTEN antagonizes the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT/mTOR pathway to repress tumor cell growth and survival. In the nucleus, PTEN promotes chromosome stability and DNA repair. Consequently, loss of PTEN function increases genomic instability. PTEN deficiency is caused by inherited germline mutations, somatic mutations, epigenetic and transcriptional silencing, post-translational modifications, and protein-protein interactions. Given the high frequency of PTEN deficiency across cancer subtypes, therapeutic approaches that exploit PTEN loss-of-function could provide effective treatment strategies. Herein, we discuss therapeutic strategies aimed at cancers with loss of PTEN function, and the challenges involved in treating patients afflicted with such cancers. We review preclinical and clinical findings, and highlight novel strategies under development to target PTEN-deficient cancers. PMID:24387334

  20. Equivalent Dose Determination Using Components of IRSL Decay Curves

    SciTech Connect

    Tanir, G.; Boeluekdemir, M. H.

    2007-04-23

    To determine the equivalent dose (ED) using conventional methods any part (or all) of the optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) decay curve can be chosen as representative luminescence signal. Recently several studies investigated the shape of OSL decay curves and showed that the luminescence emission can be decomposed into fast, medium and slow components. From this point, in this work, the ED values determined using multiple aliquots process (MAAD)for geological sample were recalculated taking into account for these components from their IRSL decay curves and the results were compared. The IRSL decay curves were decomposed using a simple fitting procedure. The ED was obtained using IRSL components and compared with those obtained by standard methods.

  1. Methods in the Study of PTEN Structure: X-Ray Crystallography and Hydrogen Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Masson, Glenn R; Burke, John E; Williams, Roger L

    2016-01-01

    Despite its small size and deceptively simple domain organization, PTEN remains a challenging structural target due to its N- and C-terminal intrinsically disordered segments, and the conformational heterogeneity caused by phosphorylation of its C terminus. Using hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS), it is possible to probe the conformational dynamics of the disordered termini, and also to determine how PTEN binds to lipid membranes. Here, we describe how to purify recombinant, homogenously dephosphorylated PTEN from a eukaryotic system for subsequent investigation with HDX-MS or crystallography. PMID:27033079

  2. PTEN regulates angiogenesis through PI3K/Akt/VEGF signaling pathway in human pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jiachi; Sawai, Hirozumi; Ochi, Nobuo; Matsuo, Yoichi; Xu, Donghui; Yasuda, Akira; Takahashi, Hiroki; Wakasugi, Takehiro; Takeyama, Hiromitsu

    2009-11-01

    Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway exerts its effects through Akt, its downstream target molecule, and thereby regulates various cell functions including cell proliferation, cell transformation, apoptosis, tumor growth, and angiogenesis. Phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) has been implicated in regulating cell survival signaling through the PI3K/Akt pathway. However, the mechanism by PI3K/PTEN signaling regulates angiogenesis and tumor growth in vivo remains to be elucidated. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) plays a pivotal role in tumor angiogenesis. The effect of PTEN on VEGF-mediated signal in pancreatic cancer is unknown. This study aimed to determine the effect of PTEN on both the expression of VEGF and angiogenesis. Toward that end, we used the siRNA knockdown method to specifically define the role of PTEN in the expression of VEGF and angiogenesis. We found that siRNA-mediated inhibition of PTEN gene expression in pancreatic cancer cells increase their VEGF secretion, up-modulated the proliferation, and migration of co-cultured vascular endothelial cell and enhanced tubule formation by HUVEC. In addition, PTEN modulated VEGF-mediated signaling and affected tumor angiogenesis through PI3K/Akt/VEGF/eNOS pathway.

  3. MMAC/PTEN tumor suppressor gene regulates vascular endothelial growth factor-mediated angiogenesis in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Koul, Dimpy; Shen, Ruijun; Garyali, Anil; Ke, L D; Liu, Ta-Jen; Yung, W K Alfred

    2002-09-01

    Prostate cancer presents with a broad spectrum of biologic behavior, ranging from being an indolent, incidental finding to an aggressively invasive and metastatic disease. An improved understanding of the events involved in prostate cancer progression is critically important to its diagnosis and staging, as well as to the development of new therapies. Tumor progression, particularly in aggressive and malignant tumors, is associated with the induction of an angiogenic, gene-driven switch. In prostate cancer, one of the most powerful stimulators of angiogenesis is the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). VEGF transcription can be induced by hypoxia through activation of the PI3 kinase pathway and hypoxia-inducible factor alpha. MMAC/PTEN (henceforth referred to as PTEN) is a recently identified tumor suppressor gene residing on chromosome 10q23, which is frequently inactivated in a wide range of human tumors, including advanced prostate cancer. The goal of this study was to determine whether PTEN inhibits angiogenesis by modulating VEGF activity. Our results showed that reintroduction of the PTEN gene into human prostate PC-3 and LNCaP cells decreased VEGF secretion, which was accompanied by various biologic activities, including inhibited endothelial cell growth and migration. PTEN expression also down-regulated VEGF mRNA levels, as detected by RT-PCR analysis. Concomitant with lessened VEGF expression was the reduction of VEGF promoter activity in PTEN-expressing cells. Our findings suggest that PTEN modulates angiogenesis by regulating VEGF expression.

  4. PTEN deficiency in a luminal ErbB-2 mouse model results in dramatic acceleration of mammary tumorigenesis and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Schade, Babette; Rao, Trisha; Dourdin, Nathalie; Lesurf, Robert; Hallett, Michael; Cardiff, Robert D; Muller, William J

    2009-07-10

    Overexpression and/or amplification of the ErbB-2 oncogene as well as inactivation of the PTEN tumor suppressor are two important genetic events in human breast carcinogenesis. To address the biological impact of conditional inactivation of PTEN on ErbB-2-induced mammary tumorigenesis, we generated a novel transgenic mouse model that utilizes the murine mammary tumor virus (MMTV) promoter to directly couple expression of activated ErbB-2 and Cre recombinase to the same mammary epithelial cell (MMTV-NIC). Disruption of PTEN in the mammary epithelium of the MMTV-NIC model system dramatically accelerated the formation of multifocal and highly metastatic mammary tumors, which exhibited homogenous pathology. PTEN-deficient/NIC-induced tumorigenesis was associated with an increase in angiogenesis. Moreover, inactivation of PTEN in the MMTV-NIC mouse model resulted in hyperactivation of the phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase/Akt signaling pathway. However, like the parental strain, tumors obtained from PTEN-deficient/NIC mice displayed histopathological and molecular features of the luminal subtype of primary human breast cancer. Taken together, our findings provide important implications in understanding the molecular determinants of mammary tumorigenesis driven by PTEN deficiency and ErbB-2 activation and could provide a valuable tool for testing the efficacy of therapeutic strategies that target these critical signaling pathways.

  5. PTEN inhibitors: an evaluation of current compounds.

    PubMed

    Spinelli, Laura; Lindsay, Yvonne E; Leslie, Nicholas R

    2015-01-01

    Small molecule inhibitors of many classes of enzymes, including phosphatases, have widespread use as experimental tools and as therapeutics. Efforts to develop inhibitors against the lipid phosphatase and tumour suppressor, PTEN, was for some time limited by concerns that their use as therapy could result in increased risk of cancer. However, the accumulation of evidence that short term PTEN inhibition may be valuable in conditions such as nerve injury has raised interest. Here we investigate the inhibition of PTEN by four available PTEN inhibitors, bpV(phen), bpV(pic), VO-OHpic and SF1670 and compared this inhibition with that of only 3 other related enzymes, the tyrosine phosphatase SHP1 and the phosphoinositide phosphatases INPP4A and INPP4B. Even with this very small number of comparators, for all compounds, inhibition of multiple enzymes was observed and with all three vanadate compounds, this was similar or more potent than the inhibition of PTEN. In particular, the bisperoxovanadate compounds were found to inhibit PTEN poorly in the presence of reducing agents including the cellular redox buffer glutathione.

  6. Pten Regulates Epithelial Cytodifferentiation during Prostate Development

    PubMed Central

    Lokody, Isabel B.; Francis, Jeffrey C.; Gardiner, Jennifer R.; Erler, Janine T.; Swain, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    Gene expression and functional studies have indicated that the molecular programmes involved in prostate development are also active in prostate cancer. PTEN has been implicated in human prostate cancer and is frequently mutated in this disease. Here, using the Nkx3.1:Cre mouse strain and a genetic deletion approach, we investigate the role of Pten specifically in the developing mouse prostate epithelia. In contrast to its role in other developing organs, this gene is dispensable for the initial developmental processes such as budding and branching. However, as cytodifferentiation progresses, abnormal luminal cells fill the ductal lumens together with augmented epithelial proliferation. This phenotype resembles the hyperplasia seen in postnatal Pten deletion models that develop neoplasia at later stages. Consistent with this, gene expression analysis showed a number of genes affected that are shared with Pten mutant prostate cancer models, including a decrease in androgen receptor regulated genes. In depth analysis of the phenotype of these mice during development revealed that loss of Pten leads to the precocious differentiation of epithelial cells towards a luminal cell fate. This study provides novel insight into the role of Pten in prostate development as part of the process of coordinating the differentiation and proliferation of cell types in time and space to form a functional organ. PMID:26076167

  7. Short term feeding of a high fat diet exerts an additive effect on hepatocellular damage and steatosis in liver-specific PTEN knockout mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hepatospecific deletion of PTEN results in constitutive activation of Akt and increased lipogenesis. In mice, the addition of a high fat diet (HFD) downregulates lipogenesis. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of a HFD on hepatocellular damage induced by deletion of PTEN. Twelve-week...

  8. DOSE TO CURIE DETERMINATION FOR CONTAINERS WITH MEASURABLE CS-137

    SciTech Connect

    RATHBUN LA; ANDERSON JD; SWAN RJ

    2010-12-03

    The Next Generation Retrieval (NGR) project will retrieve suspect transuranic (TRU) waste containers from Trenches 17 and 27 in the 218-E-12B (12B) burial ground. The trenches were in operation from May 1970 through October 1972. A portion of the retrieved containers that will require shipment to and acceptance at a treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) facility and the containers will be either remote-handled (RH) and/or contact-handled (CH). The method discussed in this document will be used for the RH and some of the CH containers to determine the radionuclide inventory. Waste disposition (shipment and TSD acceptance) requires that the radioactive content be characterized for each container. Source-term estimates using high resolution, shielded, gamma-ray scan assay techniques cannot be performed on a number of RH and other containers with high dose rates from {sup 137}Cs-{sup 137m}Ba. This document provides the method to quantify the radioactive inventory of fission product gamma emitters within the containers based on the surface dose rate measurements taken in the field with hand-held survey instruments.

  9. Identification of novel PTEN-binding partners: PTEN interaction with fatty acid binding protein FABP4.

    PubMed

    Gorbenko, O; Panayotou, G; Zhyvoloup, A; Volkova, D; Gout, I; Filonenko, V

    2010-04-01

    PTEN is a tumor suppressor with dual protein and lipid-phosphatase activity, which is frequently deleted or mutated in many human advanced cancers. Recent studies have also demonstrated that PTEN is a promising target in type II diabetes and obesity treatment. Using C-terminal PTEN sequence in pEG202-NLS as bait, yeast two-hybrid screening on Mouse Embryo, Colon Cancer, and HeLa cDNA libraries was carried out. Isolated positive clones were validated by mating assay and identified through automated DNA sequencing and BLAST database searches. Sequence analysis revealed a number of PTEN-binding proteins linking this phosphatase to a number of different signaling cascades, suggesting that PTEN may perform other functions besides tumor-suppressing activity in different cell types. In particular, the interplay between PTEN function and adipocyte-specific fatty-acid-binding protein FABP4 is of notable interest. The demonstrable tautology of PTEN to FABP4 suggested a role for this phosphatase in the regulation of lipid metabolism and adipocyte differentiation. This interaction was further studied using coimmunoprecipitation and gel-filtration assays. Finally, based on Biacore assay, we have calculated the K(D) of PTEN-FABP4 complex, which is around 2.8 microM.

  10. Role of PTEN in TNFα induced insulin resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Bulger, David A.; Conley, Jermaine; Conner, Spencer H.; Majumdar, Gipsy; Solomon, Solomon S.

    2015-06-05

    Aims/hypothesis: PTEN may play a reversible role in TNFα induced insulin resistance, which has been linked to obesity-associated insulin resistance (IR). Methods: Western blots for PTEN and p-Akt were performed on H-411E liver cells incubated with insulin, TNFα, and in selected experiments VO-OHpic vanadium complex in the presence and absence of PTEN siRNA. Total PTEN was compared to β-actin loading control and p-Akt was compared to total Akt. Results: Western blot and Real Time RT-PCR experiments showed increased PTEN after TNFα treatment (p = 0.04); slightly decreased PTEN after insulin treatment; and slightly increased PTEN after insulin + TNFα treatment. PTEN siRNA markedly inhibited the TNFα-induced increase in PTEN (p < 0.01) without significantly changing the p-Akt levels. The vanadium complex, exhibiting insulin-like effects, also significantly prevented the TNFα-induced increase in PTEN. Combining insulin and VO-OHpic was additive, providing both proof of concept and insight into mechanism. Discussion: The PTEN increase due to TNFα treatment was reversible by both PTEN siRNA knockdown and VO-OHpic treatment. Thus, PTEN is identified as a potential new therapeutic target for reducing IR in Type 2 DM. - Highlights: • TNFα treatment induced a significant increase in PTEN in H-411E liver cells. • PTEN siRNA knockdown prevented this effect. • VO-OHpic (vanadium complex) treatment, like insulin, decreased PTEN protein levels. • Thus, PTEN is identified as a potential therapeutic target in DM Type 2.

  11. Behavioral abnormalities in mice lacking mesenchyme-specific Pten.

    PubMed

    Borniger, Jeremy C; Cissé, Yasmine M; Cantemir-Stone, Carmen Z; Bolon, Brad; Nelson, Randy J; Marsh, Clay B

    2016-05-01

    Phosphatase and tensin homolog (Pten) is a negative regulator of cell proliferation and growth. Using a Cre-recombinase approach with Lox sequences flanking the fibroblast-specific protein 1 (Fsp1 aka S100A4; a mesenchymal marker), we probed sites of expression using a β-galactosidase Rosa26(LoxP) reporter allele; the transgene driving deletion of Pten (exons 4-5) was found throughout the brain parenchyma and pituitary, suggesting that deletion of Pten in Fsp1-positive cells may influence behavior. Because CNS-specific deletion of Pten influences social and anxiety-like behaviors and S100A4 is expressed in astrocytes, we predicted that loss of Pten in Fsp1-expressing cells would result in deficits in social interaction and increased anxiety. We further predicted that environmental enrichment would compensate for genetic deficits in these behaviors. We conducted a battery of behavioral assays on Fsp1-Cre;Pten(LoxP/LoxP) male and female homozygous knockouts (Pten(-/-)) and compared their behavior to Pten(LoxP/LoxP) (Pten(+/+)) conspecifics. Despite extensive physical differences (including reduced hippocampal size) and deficits in sensorimotor function, Pten(-/-) mice behaved remarkably similar to control mice on nearly all behavioral tasks. These results suggest that the social and anxiety-like phenotypes observed in CNS-specific Pten(-/-) mice may depend on neuronal Pten, as lack of Pten in Fsp1-expressing cells of the CNS had little effect on these behaviors.

  12. Role of PTEN in TNF Induced Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Bulger, David A; Conley, Jermaine; Conner, Spencer H; Majumdar, Gipsy; Solomon, Solomon S

    2015-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis PTEN may play a reversible role in TNFα induced insulin resistance, which has been linked to obesity-associated insulin resistance (IR). Methods Western blots for PTEN and p-Akt were performed on H-411E liver cells incubated with insulin, TNFα, and in selected experiments VO-OHpic vanadium complex in the presence and absence of PTEN siRNA. Total PTEN was compared to β-actin loading control and p-Akt was compared to total Akt. Results Western blot and Real Time RT-PCR experiments showed increased PTEN after TNFα treatment (p = 0.04); slightly decreased PTEN after insulin treatment; and slightly increased PTEN after insulin + TNFα treatment. PTEN siRNA markedly inhibited the TNFα-induced increase in PTEN (p < 0.01) without significantly changing the p-Akt levels. The vanadium complex, exhibiting insulin-like effects, also significantly prevented the TNFα-induced increase in PTEN. Combining insulin and VO-OHpic was additive, providing both proof of concept and insight into mechanism. Discussion The PTEN increase due to TNFα treatment was reversible by both PTEN siRNA knockdown and VO-OHpic treatment. Thus, PTEN is identified as a potential new therapeutic target for reducing IR in Type 2 DM. PMID:25918024

  13. Increased proliferation in atypical hyperplasia/endometrioid intraepithelial neoplasia of the endometrium with concurrent inactivation of ARID1A and PTEN tumour suppressors.

    PubMed

    Ayhan, Ayse; Mao, Tsui-Lien; Suryo Rahmanto, Yohan; Zeppernick, Felix; Ogawa, Hiroshi; Wu, Ren-Chin; Wang, Tian-Li; Shih, Ie-Ming

    2015-07-01

    Uterine endometrioid carcinoma is the most common neoplastic disease in the female genital tract and develops from a common precursor lesion, atypical hyperplasia/endometrioid intraepithelial neoplasia (AH/EIN). Although the genomic landscape of endometrioid carcinoma has been recently revealed, the molecular alterations that contribute to tumour progression from AH/EIN to carcinoma remain to be elucidated. In this study, we used immunohistochemistry to determine if loss of expression of two of the most commonly mutated tumour suppressors in endometrioid carcinoma, PTEN and ARID1A, was associated with increased proliferation in AH/EIN. We found that 80 (70%) of 114 cases exhibited decreased or undetectable PTEN and 17 (15%) of 114 cases had focal loss of ARID1A staining. ARID1A loss was focal, while PTEN loss was diffuse, and all specimens with ARID1A loss had concurrent PTEN loss (p = 0.0003). Mapping the distribution of PTEN and ARID1A staining in the same specimens demonstrated that all AH/EIN areas with ARID1A loss were geographically nested within the areas of PTEN loss. A significant increase in the proliferative activity was observed in areas of AH/EIN with concurrent loss of PTEN and ARID1A compared to immediately adjacent AH/EIN areas showing only PTEN loss. In a cell culture system, co-silencing of ARID1A and PTEN in human endometrial epithelial cells increased cellular proliferation to a greater degree than silencing either ARID1A or PTEN alone. These results suggest an essential gatekeeper role for ARID1A that prevents PTEN inactivation from promoting cellular proliferation in the transition of pre-cancerous lesions to uterine endometrioid carcinoma. PMID:27499903

  14. Nuclear PTEN controls DNA repair and sensitivity to genotoxic stress

    PubMed Central

    Bassi, C; Ho, J; Srikumar, T; Dowling, RJO; Gorrini, C; Miller, SJ; Mak, TW; Neel, BG; Raught, B; Stambolic, V

    2016-01-01

    Loss of function of the Phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) tumor suppressor gene is associated with many human cancers. In the cytoplasm, PTEN antagonizes the Phosphatidylinositol 3′ kinase (PI3K) signaling pathway. PTEN also accumulates in the nucleus, where its function remains poorly understood. We demonstrate that SUMOylation (SUMO) of PTEN controls its nuclear localization. In cells exposed to genotoxic stress, SUMO-PTEN was rapidly excluded from the nucleus dependent on the protein kinase Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM). Cells lacking nuclear PTEN were hypersensitive to DNA damage, while PTEN-deficient cells were susceptible to killing by a combination of genotoxic stress and a small molecule PI3K inhibitor both in vitro and in vivo. Our findings may have implications for individualized therapy for patients with PTEN-deficient tumors. PMID:23888040

  15. PTEN protein expression correlates with PTEN gene molecular changes but not with VEGF expression in astrocytomas.

    PubMed

    Idoate, M A; Soria, E; Lozano, M D; Sola, J J; Panizo, A; de Alava, E; Manrique, M; Pardo-Mindán, F J

    2003-09-01

    PTEN gene (10q23) is a relevant tumor suppressor gene whose protein is a phosphatase involved in the control of angiogenesis of some tumors including astrocytomas. There are no studies correlating molecular changes of PTEN and the immunohistochemical expression of its protein (pPTEN) with the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in astrocytomas. Fifty-six surgically resected brain gliomas, 10 grade 2, 16 grade 3, and 30 grade 4, were studied by a combined approach, consisting of (1) PCR analysis using four microsatellite markers against the PTEN gene region (10q23), (2) the FISH technique to test chromosome 10 using a pericentromeric probe, and (3) immunohistochemical evaluation of pPTEN and VEGF. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of PTEN was observed in 10% of fibrillary grade 2 astrocytomas and all gemistocytic ones. In high-grade tumors, LOH was more frequent in grade 4 than in grade 3 (> or =2 loci deleted, 83% and 56%, respectively). Monosomy for chromosome 10 was observed especially in high-grade tumors (6% of grade 3 and 50% of grade 4) and in 20% of grade 2 tumors, corresponding to gemistocytic astrocytomas. Results with both antibodies against PTEN were concordant: loss of cytoplasmic immunoreactivity was frequently observed according to homogeneous or heterogeneous patterns in 70% and 50% of grades 4 and 3, respectively, but not in grade 2. Immunonegativity of pPTEN was associated with PTEN gene deletion (> or =2 loci deleted) (P = 0.04) but not with monosomy. Cytoplasmic immunoreactivity against VEGF was observed in high-grade and in gemistocytic astrocytomas, but not in conventional grade 2 tumors. Tumor expression of pPTEN was not associated with immunoreactivity against VEGF when the same areas were considered. In conclusion, loss of PTEN expression is frequent in high-grade astrocytomas, but not in grade 2 tumors, and correlates with PTEN deletion and loss of chromosome 10. PTEN immunoreactivity does not correlate with VEGF expression

  16. Reciprocal positive regulation between TRPV6 and NUMB in PTEN-deficient prostate cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sung-Young; Hong, Chansik; Wie, Jinhong; Kim, Euiyong; Kim, Byung Joo; Ha, Kotdaji; Cho, Nam-Hyuk; Kim, In-Gyu; Jeon, Ju-Hong; So, Insuk

    2014-04-25

    Highlights: • TRPV6 interacts with tumor suppressor proteins. • Numb has a selective effect on TRPV6, depending on the prostate cancer cell line. • PTEN is a novel regulator of TRPV6–Numb complex. - Abstract: Calcium acts as a second messenger and plays a crucial role in signaling pathways involved in cell proliferation. Recently, calcium channels related to calcium influx into the cytosol of epithelial cells have attracted attention as a cancer therapy target. Of these calcium channels, TRPV6 is overexpressed in prostate cancer and is considered an important molecule in the process of metastasis. However, its exact role and mechanism is unclear. NUMB, well-known tumor suppressor gene, is a novel interacting partner of TRPV6. We show that NUMB and TRPV6 have a reciprocal positive regulatory relationship in PC-3 cells. We repeated this experiment in two other prostate cancer cell lines, DU145 and LNCaP. Interestingly, there were no significant changes in TRPV6 expression following NUMB knockdown in DU145. We revealed that the presence or absence of PTEN was the cause of NUMB–TRPV6 function. Loss of PTEN caused a positive correlation of TRPV6–NUMB expression. Collectively, we determined that PTEN is a novel interacting partner of TRPV6 and NUMB. These results demonstrated a novel relationship of NUMB–TRPV6 in prostate cancer cells, and show that PTEN is a novel regulator of this complex.

  17. Determination of radionuclides and pathways contributing to cumulative dose. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project: Dose code recovery activities, Calculation 004

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, B.A.

    1992-12-01

    A series of scoping calculations has been undertaken to evaluate the absolute and relative contributions of different radionuclides and exposure pathways to doses that may have been received by individuals living in the vicinity of the Hanford Site. This scoping calculation (Calculation 004) examined the contributions of numerous radionuclides to cumulative dose via environmental exposures and accumulation in foods. Addressed in this calculation were the contributions to organ and effective dose of infants and adults from (1) air submersion and groundshine external dose, (2) inhalation, (3) ingestion of soil by humans, (4) ingestion of leafy vegetables, (5) ingestion of other vegetables and fruits, (6) ingestion of meat, (7) ingestion of eggs, and (8) ingestion of cows` milk from Feeding Regime 1, as described in calculation 002. This calculation specifically addresses cumulative radiation doses to infants and adults resulting from releases occurring over the period 1945 through 1972.

  18. Somatic mutation of PTEN in bladder carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Aveyard, J S; Skilleter, A; Habuchi, T; Knowles, M A

    1999-01-01

    The tumour suppressor gene PTEN/MMAC1, which is mutated or homozygously deleted in glioma, breast and prostate cancer, is mapped to a region of 10q which shows loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in bladder cancer. We screened 123 bladder tumours for LOH in the region of PTEN. In 53 informative muscle invasive tumours (≥ pT2), allele loss was detected in 13 (24.5%) and allelic imbalance in four tumours (overall frequency 32%). LOH was found in four of 60 (6.6%) informative, non-invasive tumours (pTa/pT1). We screened 63 muscle invasive tumours for PTEN mutations by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis and for homozygous deletion by duplex quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Two homozygous deletions were identified but no mutations. Of 15 bladder tumour cell lines analysed, three showed homozygous deletion of all or part of the PTEN gene, but none had mutations detectable by SSCP analysis. Our results indicate that PTEN is involved in the development of some bladder tumours. The low frequency of mutation of the retained allele in tumours with 10q23 LOH suggests that there may be another predominant mechanism of inactivation of the second allele, for example small intragenic deletions, that hemizygosity may be sufficient for phenotypic effect, or that there is another target gene at 10q23. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10360673

  19. PTEN-PDZ domain interactions: binding of PTEN to PDZ domains of PTPN13.

    PubMed

    Sotelo, Natalia S; Schepens, Jan T G; Valiente, Miguel; Hendriks, Wiljan J A J; Pulido, Rafael

    2015-05-01

    Protein modular interactions mediated by PDZ domains are essential for the establishment of functional protein networks controlling diverse cellular functions. The tumor suppressor PTEN possesses a C-terminal PDZ-binding motif (PDZ-BM) that is recognized by a specific set of PDZ domains from scaffolding and regulatory proteins. Here, we review the current knowledge on PTEN-PDZ domain interactions and tumor suppressor networks, describe methodology suitable to analyze these interactions, and report the binding of PTEN and the PDZ domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase PTPN13. Yeast two-hybrid and GST pull-down analyses showed that PTEN binds to PDZ2/PTPN13 domain in a manner that depends on the specific PTPN13 PDZ domain arrangement involving the interdomain region between PDZ1 and PDZ2. Furthermore, a specific binding profile of PTEN to PDZ2/PTPN13 domain was observed by mutational analysis of the PTEN PDZ-BM. Our results disclose a PDZ-mediated physical interaction of PTEN and PTPN13 with potential relevance in tumor suppression and cell homeostasis.

  20. PTEN Overexpression Cooperates With Lithium to Reduce the Malignancy and to Increase Cell Death by Apoptosis via PI3K/Akt Suppression in Colorectal Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    de Araujo, Wallace Martins; Robbs, Bruno Kaufmann; Bastos, Lilian G; de Souza, Waldemir F; Vidal, Flávia C B; Viola, João P B; Morgado-Diaz, Jose A

    2016-02-01

    Lithium is a well-established non-competitive inhibitor of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β), a kinase that is involved in several cellular processes related to cancer progression. GSK-3β is regulated upstream by PI3K/Akt, which is negatively modulated by PTEN. The role that lithium plays in cancer is controversial because lithium can activate or inhibit survival signaling pathways depending on the cell type. In this study, we analyzed the mechanisms by which lithium can modulate events related to colorectal cancer (CRC) progression and evaluated the role that survival signaling pathways such as PI3K/Akt and PTEN play in this context. We show that the administration of lithium decreased the proliferative potential of CRC cells in a GSK-3β-independent manner but induced the accumulation of cells in G2/M phase. Furthermore, high doses of lithium increased apoptosis, which was accompanied by decreased proteins levels of Akt and PTEN. Then, cells that were induced to overexpress PTEN were treated with lithium; we observed that low doses of lithium strongly increased apoptosis. Additionally, PTEN overexpression reduced proliferation, but this effect was minor compared with that in cells treated with lithium alone. Furthermore, we demonstrated that PTEN overexpression and lithium treatment separately reduced cell migration, colony formation, and invasion, and these effects were enhanced when lithium treatment and PTEN overexpression were combined. In conclusion, our findings indicate that PTEN overexpression and lithium treatment cooperate to reduce the malignancy of CRC cells and highlight lithium and PTEN as potential candidates for studies to identify new therapeutic approaches for CRC treatment.

  1. Somatic mutation analysis of KRAS, BRAF, HER2 and PTEN in EGFR mutation-negative non-small cell lung carcinoma: determination of frequency, distribution pattern and identification of novel deletion in HER2 gene from Indian patients.

    PubMed

    Bhaumik, Sangeet; Ahmad, Firoz; Das, Bibhu Ranjan

    2016-10-01

    Somatic mutations of KRAS, BRAF, HER2, PTEN genes are the most important molecular markers after the EGFR gene mutation. The current study evaluated the frequency and distribution pattern of KRAS, BRAF, HER2, PTEN mutation in Indian non-small cell lung carcinoma patients. The frequency of KRAS, BRAF, HER2, PTEN mutations was 6.4 % (14/204), 1.5 % (3/204), 1.5 % (3/204), 0 % (0/204), respectively. KRAS, BRAF, HER2 mutations were more prevalent in males than in females. KRAS and HER2 showed a trend of a higher frequency of mutation in the age group of <60 years, whereas BRAF mutations were more frequent in the age group of ≥60 years. Sequencing analysis of KRAS gene revealed c.34G>T (G12C) (n = 8), c.35G>A (G12D) (n = 3), c.35G>T (G12 V) (n = 1) and c.34G>T (G12C)/c.41T>C (V14A) (n = 2) mutations. Three different BRAF mutations (L584P: n = 1, V600E: n = 1, K601E: n = 1) were detected. Two cases harboured c.2324_2325ins12 (ATACGTGATGGC duplication) in HER2 gene, and one case was positive for NG_007503.2 (NM_001005862.2):c.2218-4del. It is less certain, but still quite possible that this mutation will affect splicing as the deletion of one C actually brings in one additional purine into the region. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates an instance of diverse nature of KRAS, BRAF, HER2 and PTEN gene in Indian patients and confirms that the frequency of these gene mutations varies globally. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first Indian study to evaluate KRAS, BRAF, HER2 and PTEN gene mutations.

  2. Somatic mutation analysis of KRAS, BRAF, HER2 and PTEN in EGFR mutation-negative non-small cell lung carcinoma: determination of frequency, distribution pattern and identification of novel deletion in HER2 gene from Indian patients.

    PubMed

    Bhaumik, Sangeet; Ahmad, Firoz; Das, Bibhu Ranjan

    2016-10-01

    Somatic mutations of KRAS, BRAF, HER2, PTEN genes are the most important molecular markers after the EGFR gene mutation. The current study evaluated the frequency and distribution pattern of KRAS, BRAF, HER2, PTEN mutation in Indian non-small cell lung carcinoma patients. The frequency of KRAS, BRAF, HER2, PTEN mutations was 6.4 % (14/204), 1.5 % (3/204), 1.5 % (3/204), 0 % (0/204), respectively. KRAS, BRAF, HER2 mutations were more prevalent in males than in females. KRAS and HER2 showed a trend of a higher frequency of mutation in the age group of <60 years, whereas BRAF mutations were more frequent in the age group of ≥60 years. Sequencing analysis of KRAS gene revealed c.34G>T (G12C) (n = 8), c.35G>A (G12D) (n = 3), c.35G>T (G12 V) (n = 1) and c.34G>T (G12C)/c.41T>C (V14A) (n = 2) mutations. Three different BRAF mutations (L584P: n = 1, V600E: n = 1, K601E: n = 1) were detected. Two cases harboured c.2324_2325ins12 (ATACGTGATGGC duplication) in HER2 gene, and one case was positive for NG_007503.2 (NM_001005862.2):c.2218-4del. It is less certain, but still quite possible that this mutation will affect splicing as the deletion of one C actually brings in one additional purine into the region. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates an instance of diverse nature of KRAS, BRAF, HER2 and PTEN gene in Indian patients and confirms that the frequency of these gene mutations varies globally. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first Indian study to evaluate KRAS, BRAF, HER2 and PTEN gene mutations. PMID:27637917

  3. MicroRNA-21 Contributes to Liver Regeneration by Targeting PTEN

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaoyu; Song, Meiyi; Chen, Wei; Dimitrova-Shumkovska, Jasmina; Zhao, Yingying; Cao, Yan; Song, Yang; Yang, Wenzhuo; Wang, Fei; Xiang, Yang; Yang, Changqing

    2016-01-01

    Background Multiple microRNAs (miRNAs, miRs), including miR-21, have been documented to be critical regulators of liver regeneration, but the mechanism underlying their roles in hepatocyte proliferation and cell cycle progression is still far from understood. Material/Methods miR-21 levels were determined using qRT-PCRs in mouse livers at 48 h after 70% partial hepatectomy (PH-48 h). Cell proliferation was determined by use of a cell-counting kit-8 (CCK-8), EdU incorporation staining, and flow cytometry. Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) expressions were determined using qRT-PCR and Western blot analysis. PTEN siRNA was used to perform the rescue experiment. Results A marked upregulation of miR-21 was observed in mouse livers at 48 h after 70% partial hepatectomy (PH-48 h) compared to 0 h after PH (PH-0 h). Overexpression of miR-21 was associated with increased proliferation and a rapid G1-to-S phase transition of the cell cycle in BNL CL.2 normal liver cells in vitro. In addition, we showed that PTEN expression was inversely correlated with miR-21 in BNL CL.2 cells and demonstrated that PTEN expression is lower in mouse livers at PH-48 h. Moreover, the presence of PTEN siRNA significantly abolished the suppressive effect of miR-21 inhibitor on hepatocyte proliferation. Conclusions miR-21 overexpression contributes to liver regeneration and hepatocyte proliferation by targeting PTEN. Upregulation of miR-21 might be a useful therapeutic strategy to promote liver regeneration. PMID:26744142

  4. Coding-independent regulation of the tumor suppressor PTEN by competing endogenous mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Tay, Yvonne; Kats, Lev; Salmena, Leonardo; Weiss, Dror; Tan, Shen Mynn; Ala, Ugo; Karreth, Florian; Poliseno, Laura; Provero, Paolo; Di Cunto, Ferdinando; Lieberman, Judy; Rigoutsos, Isidore; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Here we demonstrate that protein-coding RNA transcripts can crosstalk by competing for common microRNAs, with microRNA response elements as the foundation of this interaction. We have termed such RNA transcripts as competing endogenous RNAs (ceRNAs). We tested this hypothesis in the context of PTEN, a key tumor suppressor whose abundance determines critical outcomes in tumorigenesis. By a combined computational and experimental approach, we identified and validated endogenous protein-coding transcripts that regulate PTEN, antagonize PI3K/AKT signaling and possess growth and tumor suppressive properties. Notably, we also show that these genes display concordant expression patterns with PTEN and copy number loss in cancers. Our study presents a road map for the prediction and validation of ceRNA activity and networks, and thus imparts a trans-regulatory function to protein-coding mRNAs. PMID:22000013

  5. Determination of dose distributions and parameter sensitivity. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project; dose code recovery activities; Calculation 005

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, B.A.; Farris, W.T.; Simpson, J.C.

    1992-12-01

    A series of scoping calculations has been undertaken to evaluate the absolute and relative contribution of different radionuclides and exposure pathways to doses that may have been received by individuals living in the vicinity of the Hanford site. This scoping calculation (Calculation 005) examined the contributions of numerous parameters to the uncertainty distribution of doses calculated for environmental exposures and accumulation in foods. This study builds on the work initiated in the first scoping study of iodine in cow`s milk and the third scoping study, which added additional pathways. Addressed in this calculation were the contributions to thyroid dose of infants from (1) air submersion and groundshine external dose, (2) inhalation, (3) ingestion of soil by humans, (4) ingestion of leafy vegetables, (5) ingestion of other vegetables and fruits, (6) ingestion of meat, (7) ingestion of eggs, and (8) ingestion of cows` milk from Feeding Regime 1 as described in Calculation 001.

  6. Determination of radionuclides and pathways contributing to cumulative dose

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, B.A.

    1992-12-01

    A series of scoping calculations has been undertaken to evaluate the absolute and relative contributions of different radionuclides and exposure pathways to doses that may have been received by individuals living in the vicinity of the Hanford Site. This scoping calculation (Calculation 004) examined the contributions of numerous radionuclides to cumulative dose via environmental exposures and accumulation in foods. Addressed in this calculation were the contributions to organ and effective dose of infants and adults from (1) air submersion and groundshine external dose, (2) inhalation, (3) ingestion of soil by humans, (4) ingestion of leafy vegetables, (5) ingestion of other vegetables and fruits, (6) ingestion of meat, (7) ingestion of eggs, and (8) ingestion of cows' milk from Feeding Regime 1, as described in calculation 002. This calculation specifically addresses cumulative radiation doses to infants and adults resulting from releases occurring over the period 1945 through 1972.

  7. PTEN status mediates 2ME2 anti-tumor efficacy in preclinical glioblastoma models: role of HIF1α suppression

    PubMed Central

    Muh, Carrie R.; Joshi, Shweta; Singh, Alok R.; Kesari, Santosh; Durden, Donald L.; Makale, Milan T.

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common brain cancer and is highly lethal in both adults and children. 2-methoxyestradiol (2ME2) is a microtubule inhibitor that potently inhibits HIF1α, GBM angiogenesis and tumor growth in preclinical models. In patients, 2ME2 exhibits low toxicity and promising but inconsistent efficacy. Given its preclinical potency and its tolerability in patients, we sought to determine whether 2ME2 therapy could be enhanced by addressing resistance via combination therapy, and with biomarkers to identify responsive glioma subgroups. We demonstrate that the PTEN-PI3K axis regulates HIF1α in glioma models. We utilized isogenic-pairs of glioma cell lines, deficient in PTEN or stably reconstituted with PTEN, to determine the role of PTEN in 2ME2 sensitivity in vitro and in vivo. Chou-Talalay synergy studies reveal significant synergy when a pan-PI3K inhibitor is combined with 2ME2. This synergistic activity was correlated with a synergistic suppression of HIF1α accumulation under hypoxic conditions in glioma models. In vivo, 2ME2 markedly inhibited tumor-induced angiogenesis and significantly reduced tumor growth only in a PTEN reconstituted GBM models in both subcutaneous and orthotopic intracranial mouse models. Collectively, these results: (1) suggest that PTEN status predicts sensitivity to 2ME2 and (2) justify exploration of 2ME2 combined with panPI3K inhibitors for the treatment of this intractable brain cancer. PMID:24162827

  8. Determination of radionuclides and pathways contributing to dose in 1945

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, B.A.

    1992-12-01

    A series of scoping calculations has been undertaken to evaluate the absolute and relative contributions of different radionuclides and exposure pathways to doses that may have been received by individuals living in the vicinity of the Hanford Site. This scoping calculation (Calculation 003) examined the contributions of numerous radionuclides to dose via environmental exposures and accumulation in foods. This study builds on the work initiated in the first scoping study of iodine in cow's milk (calculation 001). Addressed in this calculation were the contributions to organ and effective dose of infants and adults from (1) air submersion and groundshine external dose, (2) inhalation, (3) ingestion of soil by humans, (4) ingestion of leafy vegetables, (5) ingestion of other vegetables and fruits, (6) ingestion of meat, (7) ingestion of eggs, and (8) ingestion of cows' milk from Feeding Regime 1, as described in Calculation 001.

  9. PTEN regulates RPA1 and protects DNA replication forks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guangxi; Li, Yang; Wang, Pan; Liang, Hui; Cui, Ming; Zhu, Minglu; Guo, Limei; Su, Qian; Sun, Yujie; McNutt, Michael A; Yin, Yuxin

    2015-11-01

    Tumor suppressor PTEN regulates cellular activities and controls genome stability through multiple mechanisms. In this study, we report that PTEN is necessary for the protection of DNA replication forks against replication stress. We show that deletion of PTEN leads to replication fork collapse and chromosomal instability upon fork stalling following nucleotide depletion induced by hydroxyurea. PTEN is physically associated with replication protein A 1 (RPA1) via the RPA1 C-terminal domain. STORM and iPOND reveal that PTEN is localized at replication sites and promotes RPA1 accumulation on replication forks. PTEN recruits the deubiquitinase OTUB1 to mediate RPA1 deubiquitination. RPA1 deletion confers a phenotype like that observed in PTEN knockout cells with stalling of replication forks. Expression of PTEN and RPA1 shows strong correlation in colorectal cancer. Heterozygous disruption of RPA1 promotes tumorigenesis in mice. These results demonstrate that PTEN is essential for DNA replication fork protection. We propose that RPA1 is a target of PTEN function in fork protection and that PTEN maintains genome stability through regulation of DNA replication.

  10. Determination of neutron absorbed doses in lithium aluminates.

    PubMed

    Delfín Loya, A; Carrera, L M; Ureña-Núñez, F; Palacios, O; Bosch, P

    2003-04-01

    Lithium-based ceramics have been proposed as tritium breeders for fusion reactors. The lithium aluminate (gamma phase) seems to be thermally and structurally stable, the damages produced by neutron irradiation depend on the absorbed dose. A method based on the measurement of neutron activation of foils through neutron capture has been developed to obtain the neutron absorbed dose in lithium aluminates irradiated in the thermal column facility and in the fixed irradiation system of a Triga Mark III Nuclear Reactor. PMID:12672632

  11. Nuclear PTEN tumor-suppressor functions through maintaining heterochromatin structure.

    PubMed

    Gong, Lili; Govan, Jeane M; Evans, Elizabeth B; Dai, Hui; Wang, Edward; Lee, Szu-Wei; Lin, Hui-Kuan; Lazar, Alexander J; Mills, Gordon B; Lin, Shiaw-Yih

    2015-01-01

    The tumor suppressor, PTEN, is one of the most commonly mutated genes in cancer. Recently, PTEN has been shown to localize in the nucleus and is required to maintain genomic stability. Here, we show that nuclear PTEN, independent of its phosphatase activity, is essential for maintaining heterochromatin structure. Depletion of PTEN leads to loss of heterochromatic foci, decreased chromatin compaction, overexpression of heterochromatic genes, and reduced protein stability of heterochromatin protein 1 α. We found that the C-terminus of PTEN is required to maintain heterochromatin structure. Additionally, cancer-associated PTEN mutants lost their tumor-suppressor function when their heterochromatin structure was compromised. We propose that this novel role of PTEN accounts for its function in guarding genomic stability and suppressing tumor development. PMID:25946202

  12. Nuclear PTEN tumor-suppressor functions through maintaining heterochromatin structure

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Lili; Govan, Jeane M; Evans, Elizabeth B; Dai, Hui; Wang, Edward; Lee, Szu-Wei; Lin, Hui-Kuan; Lazar, Alexander J; Mills, Gordon B; Lin, Shiaw-Yih

    2015-01-01

    The tumor suppressor, PTEN, is one of the most commonly mutated genes in cancer. Recently, PTEN has been shown to localize in the nucleus and is required to maintain genomic stability. Here, we show that nuclear PTEN, independent of its phosphatase activity, is essential for maintaining heterochromatin structure. Depletion of PTEN leads to loss of heterochromatic foci, decreased chromatin compaction, overexpression of heterochromatic genes, and reduced protein stability of heterochromatin protein 1 α. We found that the C-terminus of PTEN is required to maintain heterochromatin structure. Additionally, cancer-associated PTEN mutants lost their tumor-suppressor function when their heterochromatin structure was compromised. We propose that this novel role of PTEN accounts for its function in guarding genomic stability and suppressing tumor development. PMID:25946202

  13. Dosimetrically determined doses of radioiodine for the treatment of metastatic thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Van Nostrand, Douglas; Atkins, Frank; Yeganeh, Fred; Acio, Elmo; Bursaw, Randy; Wartofsky, Leonard

    2002-02-01

    In the absence of definitive studies relating radioiodine dose to outcomes, selection of a dose of radioiodine to treat metastatic thyroid carcinoma is problematic, and several approaches have been used. These include empiric fixed doses and doses used on dosimetric approaches specific for each patient. This paper is a review of the rationale and technique for dosimetrically-determined doses of radioiodine for the treatment of metastatic thyroid carcinoma. This review (1) discusses the alternatives for selection of a dose, (2) discusses the two major approaches for determining radioiodine doses dosimetrically, (3) briefly reviews several modifications of these approaches, (4) reviews the literature regarding the results, (5) discusses the side effects of these different approaches, and (6) concludes with recommendations for patient management and future research. This review does not address use of dosimetrically-determined doses of radioiodine for the initial ablation of thyroid tissue postoperatively.

  14. Determining organ doses from computed tomography scanners using cadaveric subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griglock, Thomas M.

    The use of computed tomographic (CT) imaging has increased greatly since its inception in 1972. Technological advances have increased both the applicability of CT exams for common health problems as well as the radiation doses used to perform these exams. The increased radiation exposures have garnered much attention in the media and government agencies, and have brought about numerous attempts to quantify the amount of radiation received by patients. While the overwhelming majority of these attempts have focused on creating models of the human body (physical or computational), this research project sought to directly measure the radiation inside an actual human being. Three female cadaveric subjects of varying sizes were used to represent live patients. Optically-stimulated luminescent (OSL) dosimeters were used to measure the radiation doses. A dosimeter placement system was developed, tested, and optimized to allow accurate and reproducible placement of the dosimeters within the cadaveric subjects. A broad-beam, 320-slice, volumetric CT scanner was utilized to perform all CT exams, including five torso exams, four cardiac exams, and three organ perfusion exams. Organ doses ranged in magnitude from less than 1 to over 120 mGy, with the largest doses measured for perfusion imaging. A methodology has been developed that allows fast and accurate measurement of actual organ doses resulting from CT exams. The measurements made with this methodology represent the first time CT organ doses have been directly measured within a human body. These measurements are of great importance because they allow comparison to the doses measured using previous methods, and can be used to more accurately assess the risks from CT imaging.

  15. Physical Foundations of PTEN/Phosphoinositide Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gericke, Arne; Jiang, Zhiping; Redfern, Roberta E.; Kooijman, Edgar E.; Ross, Alonzo H.

    2009-03-01

    Phosphoinositides act as signaling molecules by recruiting critical effectors to specific subcellular membranes to regulate cell proliferation, apoptosis and cytoskeletal reorganization, which requires a tight regulation of phosphoinositide generation and turnover as well as a high degree of compartmentalization. PTEN is a phosphatase specific for the 3 position of the phosophoinositide ring that is deleted or mutated in many different disease states. PTEN association with membranes requires the interaction of its C2 domain with phosphatidylserine and the interaction of its N-terminal end with phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphophate (PI(4,5)P2). We have investigated PTEN/PI(4,5)P2 interaction and found that Lys13 is crucial for the observed binding. We also found that the presence of cholesterol enhances PTEN binding to mixed PI(4,5)P2/POPC vesicles. Fluorescence microscopy experiments utilizing GUVs yielded results consistent with enhanced phosphoinositide domain formation in the presence of cholesterol. These experiments were accompanied by zeta potential measurements and solid state MAS ^31P-NMR experiments aimed at investigating the ionization behavior of phosphoinositides.

  16. [Pten gene expression in the endometrial mucosa].

    PubMed

    Bakiewicz, Anna; Goździk, Jarosław; Sporny, Stanisław

    2006-04-01

    The opinions about the causes of the endometrial carcinoma have changed since 1995, due to molecular biology progress. The findings concerning the recently discovered suppressor PTEN gene localized on the chromosome 10 -10q23.3, the product of which is a specific phosphatase are especially valuable. The loss of the gene function is directly linked with the genesis and progression of endometrial carcinoma, as well as cancers of other tissues and organs, including thyroid, breast, ovary, prostate or skin. Immunohistochemical studies with the use of the 6H2.1 antibody directed against the protein coded by the PTEN gene indicate that the protein cannot be found in more than half of the patients with endometrial carcinoma and its precursor--EIN. Mutations of the PTEN gene have also been detected in many young women with normal microscopic structure of the endometrial mucosa. Thus, a test for the absence of the PTEN gene product in the endometrial cells may be used for precise identification of early stages of carcinogenesis.

  17. Brain-Cocaine Concentrations Determine the Dose Self-Administered by Rats on a Novel Behaviorally Dependent Dosing Schedule

    PubMed Central

    Zimmer, Benjamin A; Dobrin, Carson V; Roberts, David C S

    2011-01-01

    A novel behaviorally dependent dosing (BDD) schedule was used to examine the relationship between doses of cocaine self-administered by rats and brain drug levels within a session. The BDD schedule used a hold-down response to activate a syringe pump. The length of time the lever was held down determined the duration that the syringe pump was activated. In the first experiment, rats self-administered cocaine for daily 3 h sessions and brain levels of cocaine were modeled using well-established parameters. Although analysis revealed that rats self-administered doses within a predicted range, one extremely large dose was consistently observed at the beginning of each session when brain levels of cocaine were low. In the second experiment, we introduced a range of timeout periods (10–25 min) in order to produce variability in brain-cocaine concentrations. Animals self-administered larger doses immediately following each timeout period and the dose size was inversely correlated with the length of the timeout. These results show that the dose of cocaine that rats self-administer within a session is inversely related to the amount of drug on board. PMID:21849981

  18. Determination of canine dose conversion factors in mixed neutron and gamma radiation fields. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, B.A.; Bhatt, R.C.; Myska, J.C.; Holland, B.K.

    1996-07-01

    The primary objective of mixed-field neutron/gamma radiation dosimetry in canine irradiation experiments conducted at the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute (AFRRI) is to determine the absorbed midline tissue dose (MLT) at the region of interest in the canine. A dose conversion factor (DCF) can be applied to free-in-air (FIA) dose measurements to estimate the MLT doses to canines. This report is a summary of the measured DCFs that were used to determine the MLT doses in canines at AFRRI from 1979 to 1992.

  19. Antitumor effect of a selective COX-2 inhibitor, celecoxib, may be attributed to angiogenesis inhibition through modulating the PTEN/PI3K/Akt/HIF-1 pathway in an H₂₂ murine hepatocarcinoma model.

    PubMed

    Sui, Wenwen; Zhang, Yueying; Wang, Zhaopeng; Wang, Zhaoxia; Jia, Qing; Wu, Licun; Zhang, Weidong

    2014-05-01

    Celecoxib, a selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor, has recently been shown to affect the development of different types of cancer. The present study utilized a murine H22 hepatocarcinoma model to investigate the molecular mechanisms involved in celecoxib-induced inhibition of tumor angiogenesis. Tumor-bearing mice were randomly divided into five groups: i) control; ii) low-dose celecoxib (50 mg/kg); iii) high-dose celecoxib (200 mg/kg); iv) 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), (20 mg/kg) and v) combination of 5-FU and celecoxib (50 mg/kg). The antitumor effect of celecoxib was determined by measuring tumor volume. Tumor angiogenesis was evaluated by microvessel density (MVD). Tumor histology and immunostaining for CD34 in endothelial cells were performed to detect MVD. The expression levels of phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted from chromosome 10 (PTEN), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), phospho‑Akt (P-Akt), COX-2, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) were detected by ELISA, immunohistochemistry and western blotting, respectively. We discovered substantial growth delay in murine H22 hepatoma as a result of celecoxib treatment. The inhibition rate of tumor growth induced by high-dose and low-dose celecoxib was 49.3 and 37.0%, respectively (P<0.05). The expression of PI3K, P-Akt, COX-2, HIF-1α, VEGF-A and PTEN in tumor tissues treated with celecoxib was demonstrated by immunohistochemistry, and the MVD was decreased in a dose-dependent manner (P<0.05). Reduced PI3K and P-Akt was particularly apparent in the high-dose celecoxib group (P<0.05). ELISA and western blotting data showed that the expression of PI3K, P-Akt, COX-2, HIF-1α and VEGF-A were reduced and PTEN was increased after treatment with celecoxib. In conclusion, the impact of celecoxib-induced tumor growth delay of murine H22 hepatocarcinoma may correlate with the inhibition of angiogenesis by reducing PI3K, P-Akt, COX-2, HIF-1α and VEGF

  20. Determination of cytotoxic thermal dose during HIFU ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandlall, Sacha D.; Bazán-Peregrino, Miriam; Mo, Steven; Coussios, Constantin-C.

    2012-10-01

    Thermal dose has been proposed for various hyperthermic cancer treatment modalities as a measure of heat-induced cell and tissue damage. However, many of the models that are currently used for calculating thermal dose have not been validated or suitably adapted for the elevated temperatures and rates of heating encountered during ablation by High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU). This work quantifies the performance of the widely employed Cumulative Equivalent Minutes at 43°C (CEM43) thermal dose metric under HIFU-relevant heating. A total of 36 agar phantoms were embedded with different human cancer cell lines (PC3, 22RV1, or ZR75.1) as well as calcein AM and propidium iodide assays. The phantoms were cast in sterile molds with internal dimensions of 7 cm × 7 cm × 2 mm. Using a water bath, 12 of the phantoms were treated with mild hyperthermia (43-46°C for up to 60 minutes), while another 12 were subjected to HIFU-relevant temperature profiles (60-80°C peak temperature, 2-3°C/s peak heating rate). In each of the remaining 12 phantoms, 8 HIFU exposures were carried out in a 37°C water tank (1.067 MHz, 95% duty cycle, 3-6 MPa peak rarefaction pressure, 2-20 s exposure duration). Cavitation emissions were monitored passively with a detector transducer that was confocally and co-axially aligned with the HIFU source. Cell death was quantified by measuring the locally averaged fluorescence intensity of the assays relative to unheated and severely heat-shocked phantoms. The results show that the CEM43 dose required to achieve the same level of heat-induced cell death varies considerably across cell lines, and that inertial cavitation can cause significant mechanical damage at ablation-relevant intensities even when no significant thermal dose is delivered (CEM43 < 5 s). These findings demonstrate the need for improved models of cell death at ablation-relevant temperatures.

  1. PNUTS functions as a proto-oncogene by sequestering PTEN.

    PubMed

    Kavela, Sridhar; Shinde, Swapnil R; Ratheesh, Raman; Viswakalyan, Kotapalli; Bashyam, Murali D; Gowrishankar, Swarnalata; Vamsy, Mohana; Pattnaik, Sujit; Rao, Subramanyeshwar; Sastry, Regulagadda A; Srinivasulu, Mukta; Chen, Junjie; Maddika, Subbareddy

    2013-01-01

    PTEN is a well-defined tumor suppressor gene that antagonizes the PI3K/Akt pathway to regulate a multitude of cellular processes, such as survival, growth, motility, invasiveness, and angiogenesis. While the functions of PTEN have been studied extensively, the regulation of its activity during normal and disease conditions still remains incompletely understood. In this study, we identified the protein phosphatase-1 nuclear targeting subunit PNUTS (PPP1R10) as a PTEN-associated protein. PNUTS directly interacted with the lipid-binding domain (C2 domain) of PTEN and sequestered it in the nucleus. Depletion of PNUTS leads to increased apoptosis and reduced cellular proliferation in a PTEN-dependent manner. PNUTS expression was elevated in certain cancers compared with matched normal tissues. Collectively, our studies reveal PNUTS as a novel PTEN regulator and a likely oncogene.

  2. PNUTS functions as a proto-oncogene by sequestering PTEN

    PubMed Central

    Kavela, Sridhar; Shinde, Swapnil R; Ratheesh, Raman; Viswakalyan, Kotapalli; Bashyam, Murali D; Gowrishankar, Swarnalata; Vamsy, Mohana; Pattnaik, Sujit; Rao, Subramanyeshwar; Sastry, Regulagadda A; Srinivasulu, Mukta; Chen, Junjie; Maddika, Subbareddy

    2012-01-01

    PTEN is a well-defined tumor suppressor gene that antagonizes the PI3K/Akt pathway to regulate a multitude of cellular processes such as survival, growth, motility, invasiveness and angiogenesis. While the functions of PTEN have been studied extensively, the regulation of its activity during normal and disease conditions still remains incompletely understood. In this study, we identified the protein phosphatase-1 nuclear targeting subunit PNUTS (PPP1R10) as a PTEN associated protein. PNUTS directly interacted with the lipid-binding domain (C2 domain) of PTEN and sequestered it in the nucleus. Depletion of PNUTS leads to increased apoptosis and reduced cellular proliferation in a PTEN-dependent manner. PNUTS expression was elevated in certain cancers compared to matched normal tissues. Collectively, our studies reveal PNUTS as a novel PTEN regulator and a likely oncogene. PMID:23117887

  3. Systemic elevation of PTEN induces a tumor suppressive metabolic state

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Cao, Isabel; Song, Min Sup; Hobbs, Robin M.; Laurent, Gaelle; Giorgi, Carlotta; de Boer, Vincent C.J.; Anastasiou, Dimitrios; Ito, Keisuke; Sasaki, Atsuo T.; Rameh, Lucia; Carracedo, Arkaitz; Vander Heiden, Matthew G.; Cantley, Lewis C.; Pinton, Paolo; Haigis, Marcia C.; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Decremental loss of PTEN results in cancer susceptibility and tumor progression. In turn this raises the possibility that PTEN elevation might be an attractive option for cancer prevention and therapy. We have generated several transgenic mouse lines with variably elevated PTEN expression levels, taking advantage of BAC (Bacterial Artificial Chromosome)-mediated transgenesis. Super-PTEN mutants are viable and show reduced body size due to decreased cell number, with no effect on cell size. Unexpectedly, PTEN elevation at the organism level results in healthy metabolism characterized by increased energy expenditure and reduced body fat accumulation. Cells derived from these mice show reduced glucose and glutamine uptake, increased mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, and are resistant to oncogenic transformation. Mechanistically we find that PTEN elevation orchestrates this metabolic switch by regulating PI3K-dependent and independent pathways, and negatively impacts two of the most pronounced metabolic features of tumor cells: glutaminolysis and the Warburg effect. PMID:22401813

  4. Prompt determination of evacuee radiation dose from a nuclear event

    SciTech Connect

    Bachelor, Paula P.; Friese, Judah I.; Aalseth, Craig E.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Miley, Harry S.; Perkins, Richard W.; Warren, Glen A.

    2008-05-01

    In anticipation of a nuclear terrorist attack, techniques to quickly assess the radiation exposure of evacuees have been developed. Based on past experience relating neutron radiation exposures to activation products, quick measurement of activation products (counting time of a few seconds) in personal items exposed to significant levels of radiation should allow a neutron dose assessment. This approach allows prompt collection of important data on human exposure following a terrorist attack. Data collected will facilitate triage decisions for timely emergency medical treatment to ameliorate the radiation effects on exposed individuals. Experiments with ubiquitous items exposed to a neutron source will be outlined and presented.

  5. Oncogenic signaling in Amphiregulin and EGFR-expressing PTEN-null human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kappler, Christiana S.; Guest, Stephen T.; Irish, Jonathan C.; Garrett-Mayer, Elizabeth; Kratche, Zachary; Wilson, Robert C.; Ethier, Stephen P.

    2014-01-01

    A subset of triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is characterized by overexpression of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and loss of PTEN, and patients with these determinants have a poor prognosis. We used cell line models of EGFR-positive/PTEN null TNBC to elucidate the signaling networks that drive the malignant features of these cells and cause resistance to EGFR inhibitors. In these cells, amphiregulin (AREG)-mediated activation of EGFR results in up-regulation of fibronectin (FN1), which is known to be a mediator of invasive capacity via interaction with integrin β1. EGFR activity in this PTEN null background also results in Wnt/beta-catenin signaling and activation of NF-κB. In addition, AKT is constitutively phosphorylated in these cells and is resistant to gefitinib. Expression profiling demonstrated that AREG-activated EGFR regulates gene expression differently than EGF-activated EGFR, and functional analysis via genome-scale shRNA screening identified a set of genes, including PLK1 and BIRC5, that are essential for survival of SUM-149 cells, but are uncoupled from EGFR signaling. Thus, our results demonstrate that in cells with constitutive EGFR activation and PTEN loss, critical survival genes are uncoupled from regulation by EGFR, which likely mediates resistance to EGFR inhibitors. PMID:25454348

  6. Propylthiouracil, independent of its antithyroid effect, promotes vascular smooth muscle cells differentiation via PTEN induction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Jan; Pang, Jong-Hwei S; Lin, Kwang-Huei; Lee, Dany-Young; Hsu, Lung-An; Kuo, Chi-Tai

    2010-01-01

    Propylthiouracil (PTU), independent of its antithyroid effect, is recently found to have an antiatherosclerotic effect. The aim of this study is to determine the impact of PTU on phenotypic modulation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), as phenotypic modulation may contribute to the growth of atherosclerotic lesions and neointimal formation after arterial injury. Propylthiouracil reduced neointimal formation in balloon-injured rat carotid arteries. In vitro, PTU may convert VSMCs from a serum-induced dedifferentiation state to a differentiated state, as indicated by a spindle-shaped morphology and an increase in the expression of SMC differentiation marker contractile proteins, including calponin and smooth muscle (SM)-myosin heavy chain (SM-MHC). Transient transfection studies in VSMCs demonstrated that PTU induced the activity of SMC marker genes (calponin and SM-MHC) promoters, indicating that PTU up-regulates these genes expression predominantly at the transcriptional level. Furthermore, PTU enhanced the expression of PTEN and inhibition of PTEN by siRNA knockdown blocked PTU-induced activation of contractile proteins expression and promoter activity. In the rat carotid injury model, PTU reversed the down-regulation of contractile proteins and up-regulated PTEN in the neointima induced by balloon injury. Propylthiouracil promotes VSMC differentiation, at lest in part, via induction of the PTEN-mediated pathway. These findings suggest a possible mechanism by which PTU may contribute to its beneficial effects on atherogenesis and neointimal formation after arterial injury.

  7. Loss of PTEN promotes resistance to T cell-mediated immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Weiyi; Chen, Jie Qing; Liu, Chengwen; Malu, Shruti; Creasy, Caitlin; Tetzlaff, Michael T; Xu, Chunyu; McKenzie, Jodi A; Zhang, Chunlei; Liang, Xiaoxuan; Williams, Leila J; Deng, Wanleng; Chen, Guo; Mbofung, Rina; Lazar, Alexander J; Torres-Cabala, Carlos A; Cooper, Zachary A; Chen, Pei-Ling; Tieu, Trang N; Spranger, Stefani; Yu, Xiaoxing; Bernatchez, Chantale; Forget, Marie-Andree; Haymaker, Cara; Amaria, Rodabe; McQuade, Jennifer L; Glitza, Isabella C; Cascone, Tina; Li, Haiyan S; Kwong, Lawrence N; Heffernan, Timothy P; Hu, Jianhua; Bassett, Roland L; Bosenberg, Marcus W; Woodman, Scott E; Overwijk, Willem W; Lizée, Gregory; Roszik, Jason; Gajewski, Thomas F; Wargo, Jennifer A; Gershenwald, Jeffrey E; Radvanyi, Laszlo; Davies, Michael A; Hwu, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    T cell-mediated immunotherapies are promising cancer treatments. However, most patients still fail to respond to these therapies. The molecular determinants of immune resistance are poorly understood. We show that loss of PTEN in tumor cells in preclinical models of melanoma inhibits T cell-mediated tumor killing and decreases T cell trafficking into tumors. In patients, PTEN loss correlates with decreased T cell infiltration at tumor sites, reduced likelihood of successful T cell expansion from resected tumors, and inferior outcomes with PD-1 inhibitor therapy. PTEN loss in tumor cells increased the expression of immunosuppressive cytokines, resulting in decreased T cell infiltration in tumors, and inhibited autophagy, which decreased T cell-mediated cell death. Treatment with a selective PI3Kβ inhibitor improved the efficacy of both anti-PD-1 and anti-CTLA4 antibodies in murine models. Together these findings demonstrate that PTEN loss promotes immune resistance and support the rationale to explore combinations of immunotherapies and PI3K-AKT pathway inhibitors. PMID:26645196

  8. Roles of PTEN with DNA Repair in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ogino, Mako; Ichimura, Mayuko; Nakano, Noriko; Minami, Akari; Kitagishi, Yasuko; Matsuda, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is considered to play key roles in aging and pathogenesis of many neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s disease, which could bring DNA damage by cells. The DNA damage may lead to the cell apoptosis, which could contribute to the degeneration of neuronal tissues. Recent evidence suggests that PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog on chromosome 10) may be involved in the pathophysiology of the neurodegenerative disorders. Since PTEN expression appears to be one dominant determinant of the neuronal cell death, PTEN should be a potential molecular target of novel therapeutic strategies against Parkinson’s disease. In addition, defects in DNA damage response and DNA repair are often associated with modulation of hormone signaling pathways. Especially, many observations imply a role for estrogen in a regulation of the DNA repair action. In the present review, we have attempted to summarize the function of DNA repair molecules at a viewpoint of the PTEN signaling pathway and the hormone related functional modulation of cells, providing a broad interpretation on the molecular mechanisms for treatment of Parkinson’s disease. Particular attention will be paid to the mechanisms proposed to explain the health effects of food ingredients against Parkinson’s disease related to reduce oxidative stress for an efficient therapeutic intervention. PMID:27314344

  9. PTEN stabilizes TOP2A and regulates the DNA decatenation.

    PubMed

    Kang, Xi; Song, Chang; Du, Xiao; Zhang, Cong; Liu, Yu; Liang, Ling; He, Jinxue; Lamb, Kristy; Shen, Wen H; Yin, Yuxin

    2015-12-10

    PTEN is a powerful tumor suppressor that antagonizes the cytoplasmic PI3K-AKT pathway and suppresses cellular proliferation. PTEN also plays a role in the maintenance of genomic stability in the nucleus. Here we report that PTEN facilitates DNA decatenation and controls a decatenation checkpoint. Catenations of DNA formed during replication are decatenated by DNA topoisomerase II (TOP2), and this process is actively monitored by a decatenation checkpoint in G2 phase. We found that PTEN deficient cells form ultra-fine bridges (UFBs) during anaphase and these bridges are generated as a result of insufficient decatenation. We show that PTEN is physically associated with a decatenation enzyme TOP2A and that PTEN influences its stability through OTUD3 deubiquitinase. In the presence of PTEN, ubiquitination of TOP2A is inhibited by OTUD3. Deletion or deficiency of PTEN leads to down regulation of TOP2A, dysfunction of the decatenation checkpoint and incomplete DNA decatenation in G2 and M phases. We propose that PTEN controls DNA decatenation to maintain genomic stability and integrity.

  10. Decreased aggression and increased repetitive behavior in Pten haploinsufficient mice.

    PubMed

    Clipperton-Allen, A E; Page, D T

    2015-02-01

    Aggression is an aspect of social behavior that can be elevated in some individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and a concern for peers and caregivers. Mutations in Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN), one of several ASD risk factors encoding negative regulators of the PI3K-Akt-mTOR pathway, have been reported in individuals with ASD and comorbid macrocephaly. We previously showed that a mouse model of Pten germline haploinsufficiency (Pten(+/-) ) has selective deficits, primarily in social behavior, along with broad overgrowth of the brain. Here, we further examine the social behavior of Pten(+/-) male mice in the resident-intruder test of aggression, using a comprehensive behavioral analysis to obtain an overall picture of the agonistic, non-agonistic and non-social behavior patterns of Pten(+/-) mice during a free interaction with a novel conspecific. Pten(+/-) male mice were involved in less aggression than their wild-type littermates. Pten(+/-) mice also performed less social investigation, including anogenital investigation and approaching and/or attending to the intruder, which is consistent with our previous finding of decreased sociability in the social approach test. In contrast to these decreases in social behaviors, Pten(+/-) mice showed increased digging. In summary, we report decreased aggression and increased repetitive behavior in Pten(+/-) mice, thus extending our characterization of this model of an ASD risk factor that features brain overgrowth and social deficits.

  11. PTEN stabilizes TOP2A and regulates the DNA decatenation

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Xi; Song, Chang; Du, Xiao; Zhang, Cong; Liu, Yu; Liang, Ling; He, Jinxue; Lamb, Kristy; Shen, Wen H.; Yin, Yuxin

    2015-01-01

    PTEN is a powerful tumor suppressor that antagonizes the cytoplasmic PI3K-AKT pathway and suppresses cellular proliferation. PTEN also plays a role in the maintenance of genomic stability in the nucleus. Here we report that PTEN facilitates DNA decatenation and controls a decatenation checkpoint. Catenations of DNA formed during replication are decatenated by DNA topoisomerase II (TOP2), and this process is actively monitored by a decatenation checkpoint in G2 phase. We found that PTEN deficient cells form ultra-fine bridges (UFBs) during anaphase and these bridges are generated as a result of insufficient decatenation. We show that PTEN is physically associated with a decatenation enzyme TOP2A and that PTEN influences its stability through OTUD3 deubiquitinase. In the presence of PTEN, ubiquitination of TOP2A is inhibited by OTUD3. Deletion or deficiency of PTEN leads to down regulation of TOP2A, dysfunction of the decatenation checkpoint and incomplete DNA decatenation in G2 and M phases. We propose that PTEN controls DNA decatenation to maintain genomic stability and integrity. PMID:26657567

  12. An integrative genomic and proteomic analysis of PIK3CA, PTEN and AKT mutations in breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Stemke-Hale, Katherine; Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana Maria; Lluch, Ana; Neve, Richard M.; Kuo, Wen-Lin; Davies, Michael; Carey, Mark; Hu, Zhi; Guan, Yinghui; Sahin, Aysegul; Symmans, W. Fraser; Pusztai, Lajos; Nolden, Laura K.; Horlings, Hugo; Berns, Katrien; Hung, Mien-Chie; van de Vijver, Marc J.; Valero, Vicente; Gray, Joe W.; Bernards, Rene; Mills, Gordon B.; Hennessy, Bryan T.

    2008-05-06

    Phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT pathway aberrations are common in cancer. By applying mass spectroscopy-based sequencing and reverse phase protein arrays to 547 human breast cancers and 41 cell lines, we determined the subtype specificity and signaling effects of PIK3CA, AKT and PTEN mutations, and the effects of PIK3CA mutations on responsiveness to PI3K inhibition in-vitro and on outcome after adjuvant tamoxifen. PIK3CA mutations were more common in hormone receptor positive (33.8%) and HER2-positive (24.6%) than in basal-like tumors (8.3%). AKT1 (1.4%) and PTEN (2.3%) mutations were restricted to hormone receptor-positive cancers with PTEN protein levels also being significantly lower in hormone receptor-positive cancers. Unlike AKT1 mutations, PIK3CA (39%) and PTEN (20%) mutations were more common in cell lines than tumors, suggesting a selection for these but not AKT1 mutations during adaptation to culture. PIK3CA mutations did not have a significant impact on outcome in 166 hormone receptor-positive breast cancer patients after adjuvant tamoxifen. PIK3CA mutations, in comparison with PTEN loss and AKT1 mutations, were associated with significantly less and indeed inconsistent activation of AKT and of downstream PI3K/AKT signaling in tumors and cell lines, and PTEN loss and PIK3CA mutation were frequently concordant, suggesting different contributions to pathophysiology. PTEN loss but not PIK3CA mutations rendered cells sensitive to growth inhibition by the PI3K inhibitor LY294002. Thus, PI3K pathway aberrations likely play a distinct role in the pathogenesis of different breast cancer subtypes. The specific aberration may have implications for the selection of PI3K-targeted therapies in hormone receptor-positive breast cancer.

  13. Effects of 14-day oral low dose selenium nanoparticles and selenite in rat—as determined by metabolite pattern determination

    PubMed Central

    Loeschner, Katrin; Skov, Kasper; Ravn-Haren, Gitte; Larsen, Erik H.; Mortensen, Alicja; Lam, Henrik R.; Frandsen, Henrik L.

    2016-01-01

    Selenium (Se) is an essential element with a small difference between physiological and toxic doses. To provide more effective and safe Se dosing regimens, as compared to dosing with ionic selenium, nanoparticle formulations have been developed. However, due to the nano-formulation, unexpected toxic effects may occur. We used metabolite pattern determination in urine to investigate biological and/or toxic effects in rats administered nanoparticles and for comparison included ionic selenium at an equimolar dose in the form of sodium selenite. Low doses of 10 and 100 fold the recommended human high level were employed to study the effects at borderline toxicity. Evaluations of all significantly changed putative metabolites, showed that Se nanoparticles and sodium selenite induced similar dose dependent changes of the metabolite pattern. Putative identified metabolites included increased decenedioic acid and hydroxydecanedioic acid for both Se formulations whereas dipeptides were only increased for selenite. These effects could reflect altered fatty acid and protein metabolism, respectively. PMID:27781177

  14. Effects of mir-21 on Cardiac Microvascular Endothelial Cells After Acute Myocardial Infarction in Rats: Role of Phosphatase and Tensin Homolog (PTEN)/Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) Signal Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Feng; Liu, Wenwei; Yan, Xiaojuan; Zhou, Hanyun; Zhang, Hongshen; Liu, Jianfei; Yu, Ming; Zhu, Xiaoshan; Ma, Kezhong

    2016-01-01

    Background This study investigated how miR-21 expression is reflected in acute myocardial infarction and explored the role of miR-21 and the PTEN/VEGF signaling pathway in cardiac microvascular endothelial cells. Material/Methods We used an in vivo LAD rat model to simulate acute myocardial infarction. MiR-21 mimics and miR-21 inhibitors were injected and transfected into model rats in order to alter miR-21 expression. Cardiac functions were evaluated using echocardiographic measurement, ELISA, and Masson staining. In addition, lenti-PTEN and VEGF siRNA were transfected into CMEC cells using standard procedures for assessing the effect of PTEN and VEGE on cell proliferation, apoptosis, and angiogenesis. MiR-21, PTEN, and VEGF expressions were examined by RT-PCR and Western blot. The relationship between miR-21 and PTEN was determined by the luciferase activity assay. Results We demonstrated that miR-21 bonded with the 3′-UTR of PTEN and suppressed PTEN expressions. Established models significantly induced cardiac infarct volume and endothelial injury marker expressions as well as miR-21 and PTEN expressions (P<0.05). MiR-21 mimics exhibited significantly protective effects since they down-regulated both infarction size and injury marker expressions by increasing VEGF expression and inhibiting PTEN expression (P<0.05). In addition, results from in vitro research show that lenti-PTEN and VEGF siRNA can notably antagonize the effect of miR-21 on cell proliferation, apoptosis, and angiogenesis (P<0.05). Conclusions MiR-21 exerts protective effects on endothelial injury through the PTEN/VEGF pathway after acute myocardial infarction. PMID:27708252

  15. Austrian results from Matroshka poncho and organ dose determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajek, M.; Bergmann, R.; Fugger, M.; Vana, N.

    Cosmic rays in low-earth orbits LEO primarily consist of high-energy charged particles originating from galactic cosmic radiation GCR energetic solar particle events SPE and trapped radiation belts These radiations of high linear energy transfer LET generally inflict greater biological damage than that resulting from typical terrestrial radiation hazards Particle and energy spectra are attenuated in interaction processes within shielding structures and within the human body Reliable assessment of health risks to astronaut crews is pivotal in the design of future expeditions into interplanetary space and requires knowledge of absorbed radiation doses in critical radiosensitive organs and tissues The European Space Agency ESA Matroshka experiment---conducted under the aegis of the German Aerospace Center DLR ---is aimed at simulating an astronaut s body during extravehicular activities EVA Matroshka basically consists of a human phantom torso attached to a base structure and covered with a protective carbon-fibre container acting as a spacesuit model The phantom is divided into 33 tissue-equivalent polyurethane slices of specific density for tissue and organs Natural bones are embedded Channels and cut-outs enable accommodation of active and passive radiation monitors The torso is dressed by a skin-equivalent poncho which is also designed for dosimeter integration The phantom houses in total 7 active and more than 6000 passive radiation sensors Thereof the Atomic Institute of the Austrian Universities ATI provided more than

  16. FOXO1/3 and PTEN Depletion in Granulosa Cells Promotes Ovarian Granulosa Cell Tumor Development.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhilin; Ren, Yi A; Pangas, Stephanie A; Adams, Jaye; Zhou, Wei; Castrillon, Diego H; Wilhelm, Dagmar; Richards, JoAnne S

    2015-07-01

    The forkhead box (FOX), FOXO1 and FOXO3, transcription factors regulate multiple functions in mammalian cells. Selective inactivation of the Foxo1 and Foxo3 genes in murine ovarian granulosa cells severely impairs follicular development and apoptosis causing infertility, and as shown here, granulosa cell tumor (GCT) formation. Coordinate depletion of the tumor suppressor Pten gene in the Foxo1/3 strain enhanced the penetrance and onset of GCT formation. Immunostaining and Western blot analyses confirmed FOXO1 and phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) depletion, maintenance of globin transcription factor (GATA) 4 and nuclear localization of FOXL2 and phosphorylated small mothers against decapentaplegic (SMAD) 2/3 in the tumor cells, recapitulating results we observed in human adult GCTs. Microarray and quantitative PCR analyses of mouse GCTs further confirmed expression of specific genes (Foxl2, Gata4, and Wnt4) controlling granulosa cell fate specification and proliferation, whereas others (Emx2, Nr0b1, Rspo1, and Wt1) were suppressed. Key genes (Amh, Bmp2, and Fshr) controlling follicle growth, apoptosis, and differentiation were also suppressed. Inhbb and Grem1 were selectively elevated, whereas reduction of Inha provided additional evidence that activin signaling and small mothers against decapentaplegic (SMAD) 2/3 phosphorylation impact GCT formation. Unexpectedly, markers of Sertoli/epithelial cells (SRY [sex determining region Y]-box 9/keratin 8) and alternatively activated macrophages (chitinase 3-like 3) were elevated in discrete subpopulations within the mouse GCTs, indicating that Foxo1/3/Pten depletion not only leads to GCTs but also to altered granulosa cell fate decisions and immune responses. Thus, analyses of the Foxo1/3/Pten mouse GCTs and human adult GCTs provide strong evidence that impaired functions of the FOXO1/3/PTEN pathways lead to dramatic changes in the molecular program within granulosa cells, chronic activin signaling in the presence of

  17. The RhoA-ROCK-PTEN pathway as a molecular switch for anchorage dependent cell behavior.

    PubMed

    Yang, Seungwon; Kim, Hyun-Man

    2012-04-01

    The proliferation of anchorage-dependent cells of mesenchymal origin requires the attachment of the cells to substrates. Thus, cells that are poorly attached to substrates exhibit retarded cell cycle progression or apoptotic death. A major disadvantage of most polymers used in tissue engineering is their hydrophobicity; hydrophobic surfaces do not allow cells to attach firmly and, therefore, do not allow normal proliferation rates. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanism underlying the reduced proliferation rate of cells that are poorly attached to substrates. There was an inverse relationship between the activity of the small GTPase RhoA (RhoA) and the cell proliferation rate. RhoA activity correlated inversely with the strength of cell adhesion to the substrates. The high RhoA activity in the cells poorly attached to substrates caused an increase in the activity of Rho-associated kinase (ROCK), a well-known effector of RhoA that upregulated the activity of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN). The resulting activated PTEN downregulated Akt activity, which is essential for cell proliferation. Thus, the cells that were poorly attached to substrates showed low levels of cell proliferation because the RhoA-ROCK-PTEN pathway was hyperactive. In addition, RhoA activity seemed to be related to focal adhesion kinase (FAK) activity. Weak FAK activity in these poorly attached cells failed to downregulate the high RhoA activity that restrained cell proliferation. Interestingly, reducing the expression of any component of the RhoA-ROCK-PTEN pathway rescued the proliferation rate without physico-chemical surface modifications. Based on these results, we suggest that the RhoA-ROCK-PTEN pathway acts as a molecular switch to control cell proliferation and determine anchorage dependence. In cells that are poorly attached to substrates, its inhibition is sufficient to restore cell proliferation without the need for physico-chemical modification of the material

  18. Effects of PTEN and Nogo Codeletion on Corticospinal Axon Sprouting and Regeneration in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Geoffroy, Cédric G.; Lorenzana, Ariana O.; Kwan, Jeffrey P.; Lin, Kyle; Ghassemi, Omeed; Ma, Andrew; Xu, Nuo; Creger, Daniel; Liu, Kai; He, Zhigang

    2015-01-01

    Axons in the adult CNS have poor ability to grow after injury, impeding functional recovery in patients of spinal cord injury. This has been attributed to both a developmental decline in neuron-intrinsic growth ability and the presence of extrinsic growth inhibitors. We previously showed that genetic deletion of Nogo, an extrinsic inhibitor, promoted axonal sprouting from uninjured corticospinal tract (CST) neurons but not regeneration from injured CST neurons, whereas genetic deletion of PTEN, an intrinsic inhibitor, promoted both CST sprouting and regeneration. Here we test the hypothesis that combining an elevation of neuron-intrinsic growth ability and a reduction of extrinsic growth inhibition by genetic codeletion of PTEN and Nogo may further improve injury-induced axonal growth. In an apparent paradox, additionally deleting Nogo further enhanced CST regeneration but not sprouting in PTEN-deleted mice. Enhanced CST regeneration and sprouting in PTEN and PTEN/Nogo-deleted mice were associated with no or only temporary improvement in functional recovery. Our data illustrate that neuron-intrinsic and -extrinsic factors regulate axon regeneration and sprouting in complex ways and provide proof-of-principle evidence that targeting both can further improve regeneration. Neuron-intrinsic growth ability is an important determinant of neuronal responsiveness to changes in extrinsic growth inhibition, such that an elevated intrinsic growth state is a prerequisite for reducing extrinsic inhibition to take effect on CST regeneration. Meanwhile, additional strategies are required to unleash the full potential for functional recovery with enhanced axon regeneration and/or sprouting. PMID:25904793

  19. Determination of transit dose profile for a {sup 192}Ir HDR source

    SciTech Connect

    Fonseca, G. P.; Antunes, P. C. G.; Yoriyaz, H.

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: Several studies have reported methodologies to calculate and correct the transit dose component of the moving radiation source for high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy planning systems. However, most of these works employ the average source speed, which varies significantly with the measurement technique used, and does not represent a realistic speed profile, therefore, providing an inaccurate dose determination. In this work, the authors quantified the transit dose component of a HDR unit based on the measurement of the instantaneous source speed to produce more accurate dose values. Methods: The Nucletron microSelectron-HDR Ir-192 source was characterized considering the Task Group 43 (TG-43U1) specifications. The transit dose component was considered through the calculation of the dose distribution using a Monte Carlo particle transport code, MCNP5, for each source position and correcting it by the source speed. The instantaneous source speed measurements were performed in a previous work using two optical fibers connected to a photomultiplier and an oscilloscope. Calculated doses were validated by comparing relative dose profiles with those obtained experimentally using radiochromic films. Results: TG-43U1 source parameters were calculated to validate the Monte Carlo simulations. These agreed with the literature, with differences below 1% for the majority of the points. Calculated dose profiles without transit dose were also validated by comparison with ONCENTRA{sup Registered-Sign} Brachy v. 3.3 dose values, yielding differences within 1.5%. Dose profiles obtained with MCNP5 corrected using the instantaneous source speed profile showed differences near dwell positions of up to 800% in comparison to values corrected using the average source speed, but they are in good agreement with the experimental data, showing a maximum discrepancy of approximately 3% of the maximum dose. Near a dwell position the transit dose is about 22% of the dwell dose delivered

  20. Determination of the uncertainties in radiation doses from ingestion of strontium-90

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostoaei, Andrei Iulian

    Quantification of the uncertainties in the internal dosimetry is important because it can impact the outcome of dose reconstruction, risk assessment or epidemiological studies. This research focused on determination of the uncertainties in the dose factors from a single ingestion of 90Sr by adults, and analyzed the changes with age and the effect of gender. The uncertainties in the estimated dose factors are a factor of 6 for the bone surface, 5 for the red bone marrow, 2.5 for bladder and stomach, 2.2 for the small intestine, 2.1 for the upper large intestine and 2.7 for the lower large intestine. For the rest of the organs the uncertainty is a factor of 3. Only four parameters of the biokinetic model showed an age-dependency within the adult age group: the fractional transfers of strontium from plasma to cortical and trabecular bone, and the removal rates from the cortical and trabecular bone, respectively. When age-dependent biokinetic parameters were used, the estimated dose-factors are very close to the dose factors obtained using age-independent kinetics (within 40%). Thus, the dose factors based on age-independent parameters should suffice for most practical purposes. The dose factors and the associated uncertainties were also calculated as a function of age-at-exposure and attained age. These age dependent curves can be used for estimating doses from continuous intakes, or doses delivered over a limited portion of time. In addition to the committed dose, an expected dose is also estimated in this work. The expected dose is calculated using the dose rate weighted by the probability of surviving up to the age when the dose-rate is delivered. For exposure at young ages the expected dose and the committed dose are similar, but the committed dose decreases to zero when exposure occurs close to age 70, while the expected dose has elevated values pass age 70. No gender differences were found for bone surface, for red bone marrow, and the large intestine. The doses

  1. CTF Determination and Correction for Low Dose Tomographic Tilt Series

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Quanren; Morphew, Mary K.; Schwartz, Cindi L.; Hoenger, Andreas H.; Mastronarde, David N.

    2009-01-01

    The resolution of cryo-electron tomography can be limited by the first zero of the microscope’s contrast transfer function (CTF). To achieve higher resolution, it is critical to determine the CTF and correct its phase inversions. However, the extremely low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the defocus gradient in the projections of tilted specimens make this process challenging. Two programs, CTFPLOTTER and CTFPHASEFLIP, have been developed to address these issues. CTFPLOTTER obtains a 1D power spectrum by periodogram averaging and rotational averaging and it estimates the noise background with a novel approach, which uses images taken with no specimen. The background-subtracted 1D power spectra from image regions at different defocus values are then shifted to align their first zeros and averaged together. This averaging improves the SNR sufficiently that it becomes possible to determine the defocus for subsets of the tilt series rather than just the entire series. CTFPHASEFLIP corrects images line-by-line by inverting phases appropriately in thin strips of the image at nearly constant defocus. CTF correction by these methods is shown to improve the resolution of aligned, averaged particles extracted from tomograms. However, some restoration of Fourier amplitudes at high frequencies is important for seeing the benefits from CTF correction. PMID:19732834

  2. PTEN and NEDD4 in Human Breast Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yilun; van de Vijver, Marc J; Hibshoosh, Hanina; Parsons, Ramon; Saal, Lao H

    2016-01-01

    PTEN is an important tumor suppressor gene that antagonizes the oncogenic PI3K/AKT signaling pathway and has functions in the nucleus for maintaining genome integrity. Although PTEN inactivation by mutation is infrequent in breast cancer, transcript and protein levels are deficient in >25 % of cases. The E3 ubiquitin ligase NEDD4 (also known as NEDD4-1) has been reported to negatively regulate PTEN protein levels through poly-ubiquitination and proteolysis in carcinomas of the prostate, lung, and bladder, but its effect on PTEN in the breast has not been studied extensively. To investigate whether NEDD4 contributes to low PTEN levels in human breast cancer, we analyzed the expression of these proteins by immunohistochemistry across a large Swedish cohort of breast tumor specimens, and their transcript expression levels by microarrays. For both NEDD4 and PTEN, their transcript expression was significantly correlated to their protein expression. However, comparing NEDD4 expression to PTEN expression, either no association or a positive correlation was observed at the protein and transcript levels. This unexpected observation was further corroborated in two independent breast cancer cohorts from The Netherlands Cancer Institute and The Cancer Genome Atlas. Our results suggest that NEDD4 is not responsible for the frequent down-regulation of the PTEN protein in human breast carcinoma.

  3. Phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) reduces vascular endothelial growth factor expression in allergen-induced airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung Sun; Kim, So Ri; Park, Seoung Ju; Lee, Ho Kyung; Park, Hee Sun; Min, Kyung Hoon; Jin, Sun Mi; Lee, Yong Chul

    2006-06-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of bronchial asthma. Phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) has been implicated in regulating cell survival signaling through the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway. The key role of PI3K in VEGF-mediated signal transduction is established. However, the effects of PTEN on VEGF-mediated signaling in asthma are unknown. This study aimed to determine the effect of PI3K inhibitors and PTEN on VEGF expression in allergen-induced airway inflammation. We have used a female C57BL/6 mouse model for asthma to determine the role of PTEN in allergen-induced airway inflammation, specifically in the expression of VEGF. Allergen-induced airway inflammation leads to increased activity of PI3K in lung tissue. These mice develop the following typical pathophysiological features of asthma in the lungs: increased numbers of inflammatory cells of the airways; airway hyper-responsiveness; increased expression of interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, IL-13, intercellular adhesion molecule 1, vascular cell adhesion molecule 1, regulated on activation normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES), and eotaxin; increased vascular permeability; and increased levels of VEGF. Administration of PI3K inhibitors or adenoviruses carrying PTEN cDNA reduced the symptoms of asthma and decreased the increased levels of plasma extravasation and VEGF in allergen-induced asthmatic lungs. These results indicate that PTEN reduces VEGF expression in allergen-induced airway inflammation.

  4. TBX2 represses PTEN in rhabdomyosarcoma and skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Bo; Zhang, Meiling; Williams, Elizabeth M.; Keller, Charles; Mansoor, Atiya; Davie, Judith K.

    2015-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is the most frequent soft tissue sarcoma in children that shares many features of developing skeletal muscle. TBX2, a T-box family member, is highly up regulated in tumor cells of both major RMS subtypes where it functions as an oncogene. TBX2 is a repressor that is often over expressed in cancer cells and functions in bypassing cell growth control, including the repression of the cell cycle regulators p14 and p21. We have found that TBX2 directly represses the tumor suppressor PTEN in both RMS and normal muscle. Exogenous expression of TBX2 in normal muscle cells down regulates PTEN, and depletion or interference with TBX2 in RMS cells up regulates PTEN. Human RMS tumors show high levels of TBX2 and correspondingly low levels of PTEN. The expression of PTEN in clinical RMS samples is relatively uncharacterized and we establish that suppression of PTEN is a frequent event in both subtypes of RMS. TBX2 represses PTEN by directly binding to the promoter and recruiting the histone deacetylase, HDAC1. RMS cells have high levels of activated AKT due to the deregulation of PI3K signaling, and depletion or interference with TBX2, which up regulates PTEN, results in a reduction of phospho-AKT. We have also found that the highly related T-box family member TBX3 does not repress PTEN in the muscle lineage. This work suggests that TBX2 is a central component of the PTEN/PI3K/AKT signaling pathway deregulation in RMS cells and that targeting TBX2 in RMS tumors may offer a novel therapeutic approach for RMS. PMID:26686089

  5. TBX2 represses PTEN in rhabdomyosarcoma and skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Zhu, B; Zhang, M; Williams, E M; Keller, C; Mansoor, A; Davie, J K

    2016-08-11

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is the most frequent soft tissue sarcoma in children that shares many features of developing skeletal muscle. TBX2, a T-box family member, is highly upregulated in tumor cells of both major RMS subtypes where it functions as an oncogene. TBX2 is a repressor that is often overexpressed in cancer cells and functions in bypassing cell growth control, including the repression of the cell cycle regulators p14 and p21. We have found that TBX2 directly represses the tumor-suppressor phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) in both RMS and normal muscle. Exogenous expression of TBX2 in normal muscle cells downregulates PTEN, and depletion or interference with TBX2 in RMS cells upregulates PTEN. Human RMS tumors show high levels of TBX2 and correspondingly low levels of PTEN. The expression of PTEN in clinical RMS samples is relatively uncharacterized, and we establish that suppression of PTEN is a frequent event in both subtypes of RMS. TBX2 represses PTEN by directly binding to the promoter and recruiting the histone deacetylase, HDAC1. RMS cells have high levels of activated AKT owing to the deregulation of phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PI3K) signaling, and depletion or interference with TBX2, which upregulates PTEN, results in a reduction of phospho-AKT. We have also found that the highly related T-box family member TBX3 does not repress PTEN in the muscle lineage. This work suggests that TBX2 is a central component of the PTEN/PI3K/AKT signaling pathway deregulation in RMS cells and that targeting TBX2 in RMS tumors may offer a novel therapeutic approach for RMS.

  6. A functional dissection of PTEN N-terminus: implications in PTEN subcellular targeting and tumor suppressor activity.

    PubMed

    Gil, Anabel; Rodríguez-Escudero, Isabel; Stumpf, Miriam; Molina, María; Cid, Víctor J; Pulido, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Spatial regulation of the tumor suppressor PTEN is exerted through alternative plasma membrane, cytoplasmic, and nuclear subcellular locations. The N-terminal region of PTEN is important for the control of PTEN subcellular localization and function. It contains both an active nuclear localization signal (NLS) and an overlapping PIP2-binding motif (PBM) involved in plasma membrane targeting. We report a comprehensive mutational and functional analysis of the PTEN N-terminus, including a panel of tumor-related mutations at this region. Nuclear/cytoplasmic partitioning in mammalian cells and PIP3 phosphatase assays in reconstituted S. cerevisiae defined categories of PTEN N-terminal mutations with distinct PIP3 phosphatase and nuclear accumulation properties. Noticeably, most tumor-related mutations that lost PIP3 phosphatase activity also displayed impaired nuclear localization. Cell proliferation and soft-agar colony formation analysis in mammalian cells of mutations with distinctive nuclear accumulation and catalytic activity patterns suggested a contribution of both properties to PTEN tumor suppressor activity. Our functional dissection of the PTEN N-terminus provides the basis for a systematic analysis of tumor-related and experimentally engineered PTEN mutations.

  7. A Functional Dissection of PTEN N-Terminus: Implications in PTEN Subcellular Targeting and Tumor Suppressor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Gil, Anabel; Rodríguez-Escudero, Isabel; Stumpf, Miriam; Molina, María; Cid, Víctor J.; Pulido, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Spatial regulation of the tumor suppressor PTEN is exerted through alternative plasma membrane, cytoplasmic, and nuclear subcellular locations. The N-terminal region of PTEN is important for the control of PTEN subcellular localization and function. It contains both an active nuclear localization signal (NLS) and an overlapping PIP2-binding motif (PBM) involved in plasma membrane targeting. We report a comprehensive mutational and functional analysis of the PTEN N-terminus, including a panel of tumor-related mutations at this region. Nuclear/cytoplasmic partitioning in mammalian cells and PIP3 phosphatase assays in reconstituted S. cerevisiae defined categories of PTEN N-terminal mutations with distinct PIP3 phosphatase and nuclear accumulation properties. Noticeably, most tumor-related mutations that lost PIP3 phosphatase activity also displayed impaired nuclear localization. Cell proliferation and soft-agar colony formation analysis in mammalian cells of mutations with distinctive nuclear accumulation and catalytic activity patterns suggested a contribution of both properties to PTEN tumor suppressor activity. Our functional dissection of the PTEN N-terminus provides the basis for a systematic analysis of tumor-related and experimentally engineered PTEN mutations. PMID:25875300

  8. PTEN regulates PLK1 and controls chromosomal stability during cell division.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhong; Hou, Sheng-Qi; He, Jinxue; Gu, Tingting; Yin, Yuxin; Shen, Wen H

    2016-09-16

    PTEN functions as a guardian of the genome through multiple mechanisms. We have previously established that PTEN maintains the structural integrity of chromosomes. In this report, we demonstrate a fundamental role of PTEN in controlling chromosome inheritance to prevent gross genomic alterations. Disruption of PTEN or depletion of PTEN protein phosphatase activity causes abnormal chromosome content, manifested by enlarged or polyploid nuclei. We further identify polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) as a substrate of PTEN phosphatase. PTEN can physically associate with PLK1 and reduce PLK1 phosphorylation in a phosphatase-dependent manner. We show that PTEN deficiency leads to PLK1 phosphorylation and that a phospho-mimicking PLK1 mutant causes polyploidy, imitating functional deficiency of PTEN phosphatase. Inhibition of PLK1 activity or overexpression of a non-phosphorylatable PLK1 mutant reduces the polyploid cell population. These data reveal a new mechanism by which PTEN controls genomic stability during cell division.

  9. Impact of PTEN Protein Expression on Benefit From Adjuvant Trastuzumab in Early-Stage Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2–Positive Breast Cancer in the North Central Cancer Treatment Group N9831 Trial

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Edith A.; Dueck, Amylou C.; McCullough, Ann E.; Chen, Beiyun; Geiger, Xochiquetzal J.; Jenkins, Robert B.; Lingle, Wilma L.; Davidson, Nancy E.; Martino, Silvana; Kaufman, Peter A.; Kutteh, Leila A.; Sledge, George W.; Harris, Lyndsay N.; Gralow, Julie R.; Reinholz, Monica M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose It has been suggested that PTEN, a negative regulator of PI3K/AKT signaling, is involved in tumor sensitivity to trastuzumab. We investigated the association between tumor PTEN protein expression and disease-free survival (DFS) of patients randomly assigned to receive chemotherapy alone (arm A) or chemotherapy with sequential (arm B) or concurrent trastuzumab (arm C) in the phase III early-stage human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) –positive trial—North Central Cancer Treatment Group (NCCTG) N9831. Patients and Methods The intensity and percentage of invasive cells with cytoplasmic PTEN staining were determined in tissue microarray sections containing three cores per block (n = 1,286) or in whole tissue sections (WS; n = 516) by using standard immunohistochemistry (138G6 monoclonal antibody). Tumors were considered positive for PTEN (PTEN-positive) if any core or WS had any invasive cells with ≥ 1+ staining. Median follow-up was 6.0 years. Results Of 1,802 patients included in this analysis (of 3,505 patients registered to N9831), 1,342 (74%) had PTEN-positive tumors. PTEN positivity was associated with hormone receptor negativity (χ2 P < .001) and nodal positivity (χ2 P = .04). PTEN did not have an impact on DFS within the various arms. Comparing DFS of arm C to arm A, patients with PTEN-positive and PTEN-negative tumors had hazard ratios (HRs) of 0.65 (P = .003) and 0.47 (P = .005), respectively (interaction P = .16). For arm B versus arm A, patients with PTEN-positive and PTEN-negative tumors had HRs of 0.70 (P = .009) and 0.85 (P = .44), respectively (interaction P = .47). Conclusion In contrast to selected preclinical and limited clinical studies suggesting a decrease in trastuzumab sensitivity in patients with PTEN-negative tumors, our data show benefit of adjuvant trastuzumab for patients with HER2-positive breast cancer, independent of tumor PTEN status. PMID:23650412

  10. Experimental determination of the dose deposition profile of a 90Sr beta source.

    PubMed

    Gaza, R; Bulur, E; McKeever, S W S; Soares, C G

    2006-01-01

    Three different methods for characterising the dose deposition profile of a (90)Sr/(90)Y radioactive source are described: GAFChromic film dosimetry, Thermoluminescence (TL) and Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL). For the film measurements, GAFChromic film samples were stacked at different depths between polyethylene terephthalate (PET) foils. For TL, the thickness of a TLD-500 dosemeter was gradually reduced by polishing and the TL from chips of different thickness was used in conjunction with a mathematical model based on the exponential attenuation of dose inside the crystal to determine the decay constant for the dose-depth profile. Finally, an OSL reader with confocal stimulation / detection capabilities was used to map the two-dimensional dose distribution in TLD-500 dosemeters as a function of depth. The shapes of the dose deposition profiles obtained from all the investigated methods are in good agreement. PMID:16644945

  11. Relationship between expression and prognostic ability of PTEN, STAT3 and VEGF-C in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Jin, Canhui; Wang, Aihong; Chen, Jianmin; Liu, Xiaomin; Wang, Gongping

    2012-10-01

    Expression of phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN), signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3) and vascular endothelial growth factor-C (VEGF-C) and their relationship with clinico-pathological features and prognostic ability was determined using immunohistochemistry in 68 cases of colorectal cancer with follow-up data. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was performed and the prognostic value was determined using univariate analysis. PTEN, STAT3 and VEGF-C expression was detected in 32.4, 60.3 and 63.2% of colorectal carcinoma cases and 90.0, 0 and 0% of normal colon samples, respectively. PTEN and STAT3 were correlated with pathological grade (p=0.011, p=0.001, respectively), but not with tumor size, lymph node metastasis or clinical stage. VEGF-C was correlated with lymph node metastasis (p=0.002), but not with tumor size, pathological grade or clinical stage. Expression of STAT3 and VEGF-C was negatively correlated with PTEN (r=-0.402, r=-0.320, respectively), whereas STAT3 and VEGF-C expression was positively correlated with PTEN (r=0.254). The 3- and 5-year survival rates of PTEN protein-positive patients (68.1 and 50.0%, respectively) were significantly higher than those of PTEN protein-negative patients (32.6 and 19.6%, respectively; p=0.008). The 3- and 5-year survival rates of STAT3-positive (29.3 and 17.1%, respectively) were significantly lower than those of STAT3-negative patients (66.7 and 48.1%, respectively; p=0.005). The 3- and 5-year survival rates of VEGF-C-positive patients (29.3 and 17.1%, respectively) were significantly lower than the rates of VEGF-C-negative patients (66.7 and 48.1%, respectively; p=0.003, p=0.004, respectively). Multivariate analysis revealed that VEGF-C expression was an independent prognostic factor. In conclusion, this study indicates that PTEN, STAT3 and VEGF-C expression are beneficial prognostic factors, which may aid in the accurate assessment of prognosis and guide clinical

  12. High-grade fimbrial-ovarian carcinomas are unified by altered p53, PTEN and PAX2 expression.

    PubMed

    Roh, Michael H; Yassin, Yosuf; Miron, Alexander; Mehra, Karishma K; Mehrad, Mitra; Monte, Nicolas M; Mutter, George L; Nucci, Marisa R; Ning, Geng; Mckeon, Frank D; Hirsch, Michelle S; Wa, Xian; Crum, Christopher P

    2010-10-01

    High-grade endometrioid and serous carcinomas of the ovary and fallopian tube are responsible for the majority of cancer deaths and comprise a spectrum that includes early or localized (tubal intraepithelial carcinoma) and advanced (invasive or metastatic) disease. We subdivided a series of these tumors into three groups, (1) classic serous, (2) mixed serous and endometrioid and (3) endometrioid carcinomas and determined: (1) the frequencies of coexisting tubal intraepithelial carcinoma, (2) frequency of a dominant ovarian mass suggesting an ovarian origin and (3) immuno-localization of WT-1, p53, PTEN, PAX2 and p16(ink4). All tumors were analyzed for p53 mutations. Thirty six, 25 and 8% of groups 1-3 were associated with tubal intraepithelial carcinoma (P=0.09) and 34, 45 and 62% predominated in one ovary (P=0.028), respectively. Differences in frequencies of diffuse p53 immunostaining (85-93%), WT-1 (70-98%) and p16(ink4) positivity (69-75%) were not significant for all groups. Greater than 95% reduction in PAX2 and PTEN occurred in 67-75 and 5-12%, respectively; however, PAX2 and PTEN staining intensity, when present, was often heterogeneous, highlighting different tumor populations. PAX2 and PTEN expression were markedly reduced or absent in 12 of 12 and 4 of 12 tubal intraepithelial carcinomas. In summary, high-grade müllerian carcinomas share identical frequencies of altered or reduced expression of p53, PTEN and PAX2, all of which can be appreciated in tubal intraepithelial carcinomas. Because only a subset of these tumors appears to arise in the fallopian tube, attention to expression of these biomarkers in the ovary and other müllerian sites might facilitate the identification of other carcinogenic pathways. PAX2 and PTEN, in addition to p53 and p16(ink4), comprise a potentially important gene combination in high-grade pelvic carcinogenesis.

  13. Combined PDGFR and HDAC Inhibition Overcomes PTEN Disruption in Chordoma

    PubMed Central

    Kassam, Amin B.; Park, Myung-Jin; Gardner, Paul; Prevedello, Daniel; Henry, Stephanie; Horbinski, Craig; Beumer, Jan H.; Tawbi, Hussein; Williams, Brian J.; Shaffrey, Mark E.; Egorin, Merrill J.; Abounader, Roger; Park, Deric M.

    2015-01-01

    Background The majority of chordomas show activation of the platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR). Based on in vitro intertumoral variation in response to recombinant PDGF protein and PDGFR inhibition, and variable tumor response to imatinib, we hypothesized that chordomas resistant to PDGFR inhibition may possess downstream activation of the pathway. Methods Molecular profiling was performed on 23 consecutive chordoma primary tissue specimens. Primary cultures established from 20 of the 23 specimens, and chordoma cell lines, UCH-1 and UCH-2, were used for in vitro experiments. Results Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at the phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) locus was observed in 6 specimens (26%). PTEN disruption statistically correlated with increased Ki-67 proliferation index, an established marker of poor outcome for chordoma. Compared to wild type, PTEN deficient chordomas displayed increased proliferative rate, and responded less favorably to PDGFR inhibition. PTEN gene restoration abrogated this growth advantage. Chordomas are characterized by intratumoral hypoxia and local invasion, and histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are capable of attenuating both hypoxic signaling and cell migration. The combination of PDGFR and HDAC inhibition effectively disrupted growth and invasion of PTEN deficient chordoma cells. Conclusions Loss of heterozygosity of the PTEN gene seen in a subset of chordomas is associated with aggressive in vitro behavior and strongly correlates with increased Ki-67 proliferative index. Combined inhibition of PDGFR and HDAC attenuates proliferation and invasion in chordoma cells deficient for PTEN. PMID:26247786

  14. Analysis of PTEN ubiquitylation and SUMOylation using molecular traps.

    PubMed

    Lang, Valérie; Aillet, Fabienne; Da Silva-Ferrada, Elisa; Xolalpa, Wendy; Zabaleta, Lorea; Rivas, Carmen; Rodriguez, Manuel S

    2015-05-01

    The function of the tumour suppressor phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) is tightly controlled by post-translational modifications (PTMs) including ubiquitin or Small Ubiquitin-related MOdifiers (SUMO). It is known that SUMOylation by SUMO-1, SUMO-2/-3, mono- or polyubiquitylation have a distinct impact on PTEN activity, localisation and/or stability, however the molecular mechanisms governing these processes are still unclear. Studying PTM regulated events has always been a difficult task due to their labile nature. Here, we propose an update on the role of these PTMs on PTEN function, as well as a methodological overview on the use of molecular traps named SUMO Binding Entities (SUBEs) or Tandem Ubiquitin Binding Entities (TUBEs) to capture SUMOylated or Ubiquitylated forms of PTEN respectively. When combined with in vitro SUMOylation or Ubiquitylation assays, the use of molecular traps facilitate the detection of modified forms of PTEN. SUMO and ubiquitin-traps are also suitable to capture endogenously modified forms of PTEN after expression of E3 ligases or treatment with chemical inhibitors. This versatile approach represents an interesting alternative to explore PTEN regulation by SUMO and ubiquitin under physiological or pathological conditions.

  15. PTEN mediates Notch-dependent stalk cell arrest in angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Serra, Helena; Chivite, Iñigo; Angulo-Urarte, Ana; Soler, Adriana; Sutherland, James D; Arruabarrena-Aristorena, Amaia; Ragab, Anan; Lim, Radiance; Malumbres, Marcos; Fruttiger, Marcus; Potente, Michael; Serrano, Manuel; Fabra, Àngels; Viñals, Francesc; Casanovas, Oriol; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo; Bigas, Anna; Carracedo, Arkaitz; Gerhardt, Holger; Graupera, Mariona

    2015-07-31

    Coordinated activity of VEGF and Notch signals guides the endothelial cell (EC) specification into tip and stalk cells during angiogenesis. Notch activation in stalk cells leads to proliferation arrest via an unknown mechanism. By using gain- and loss-of-function gene-targeting approaches, here we show that PTEN is crucial for blocking stalk cell proliferation downstream of Notch, and this is critical for mouse vessel development. Endothelial deletion of PTEN results in vascular hyperplasia due to a failure to mediate Notch-induced proliferation arrest. Conversely, overexpression of PTEN reduces vascular density and abrogates the increase in EC proliferation induced by Notch blockade. PTEN is a lipid/protein phosphatase that also has nuclear phosphatase-independent functions. We show that both the catalytic and non-catalytic APC/C-Fzr1/Cdh1-mediated activities of PTEN are required for stalk cells' proliferative arrest. These findings define a Notch-PTEN signalling axis as an orchestrator of vessel density and implicate the PTEN-APC/C-Fzr1/Cdh1 hub in angiogenesis.

  16. PTEN knockdown alters dendritic spine/protrusion morphology, not density

    PubMed Central

    Haws, Michael E.; Jaramillo, Thomas C.; Espinosa-Becerra, Felipe; Widman, Allie; Stuber, Garret D.; Sparta, Dennis R.; Tye, Kay M.; Russo, Scott J.; Parada, Luis F.; Kaplitt, Michael; Bonci, Antonello; Powell, Craig M.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN) are implicated in neuropsychiatric disorders including autism. Previous studies report that PTEN knockdown in neurons in vivo leads to increased spine density and synaptic activity. To better characterize synaptic changes in neurons lacking PTEN, we examined the effects of shRNA knockdown of PTEN in basolateral amygdala neurons on synaptic spine density and morphology using fluorescent dye confocal imaging. Contrary to previous studies in dentate gyrus, we find that knockdown of PTEN in basolateral amygdala leads to a significant decrease in total spine density in distal dendrites. Curiously, this decreased spine density is associated with increased miniature excitatory post-synaptic current frequency and amplitude, suggesting an increase in number and function of mature spines. These seemingly contradictory findings were reconciled by spine morphology analysis demonstrating increased mushroom spine density and size with correspondingly decreased thin protrusion density at more distal segments. The same analysis of PTEN conditional deletion in dentate gyrus demonstrated that loss of PTEN does not significantly alter total density of dendritic protrusions in the dentate gyrus, but does decrease thin protrusion density and increases density of more mature mushroom spines. These findings suggest that, contrary to previous reports, PTEN knockdown may not induce de novo spinogenesis, but instead may increase synaptic activity by inducing morphological and functional maturation of spines. Furthermore, behavioral analysis of basolateral amygdala PTEN knockdown suggests that these changes limited only to the basolateral amygdala complex may not be sufficient to induce increased anxiety-related behaviors. PMID:24264880

  17. First Polish Cowden syndrome patient with confirmed PTEN gene mutation.

    PubMed

    Podralska, Marta; Nowakowska, Dorota; Steffen, Jan; Cichy, Wojciech; Slomski, Ryszard; Plawski, Andrzej

    2010-03-01

    Cowden syndrome is a rare hereditary disease. Incidence of the disease is conditioned by occurrence of mutations in the PTEN gene. The disease has a frequency of 1/120,000 newborn and it predisposes to the occurrence of hamartoma polyps in the gastrointestinal tract, skin tumours, as well as tumours of the breast, ovary and thyroid. Here we describe the case of a Polish patient diagnosed with Cowden syndrome with an identified mutation in the PTEN gene. The disease course of the patient is described and discussed along with other cases of carriers of substitution 68T>A in the PTEN gene.

  18. Determination of gelation doses of gamma-irradiated hydrophilic polymers by different methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yiǧit, Fatma; Tekin, Niket; Erkan, Sevin; Güven, Olgun

    1994-04-01

    Poly(acrylic acid) and poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) are hydrophilic polymers. Poly(acrylic acid) is a polyelectrolyte which ionizes in water to produce an electrically conducting medium. Therefore, the gelation dose of poly(acrylic acid) can be determined by conductometric titration, simple titration and the measurement of pH. The conventional techniques of determining gelation dose are very time and material consuming especially for poly(acrylic acid) and subject to serious errors due to its electrolytic behavior. In this study, it has been shown that the gelation dose of poly(acrylic acid) can be determined by conductimetric and titrimetric methods with NaOH and measuring pH of aqueous solution of γ-irradiated polymer. In order to develop new, simpler and rapid methods for the determination of gelation dose of PVP, its complexation with gallic acid in dilute aqueous solution has been used. The complex formation between gallic acid and irradiated PVP in aqueous solutions is followed by UV-vis spectroscopy. The reliability of the dose value found, 120 kGy for poly(acrylic acid) and 140 kGy for poly(vinyl pyrrolidone), are also verified by viscometric and solubility measurements.

  19. Clinical use of carbon-loaded thermoluminescent dosimeters for skin dose determination

    SciTech Connect

    Ostwald, P.M.; Kron, T.; Hamilton, C.S.

    1995-11-01

    Carbon-loaded thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) are designed for surface/skin dose measurements. Following 4 years in clinical use at the Mater Hospital, the accuracy and clinical usefulness of the carbon-loaded TLDs was assessed. Teflon-based carbon-loaded lithium fluoride (LiF) disks with a diameter of 13 mm were used in the present study. The TLDs were compared with ion chamber readings and TLD extrapolation to determine the effective depth of the TLD measurement. In vivo measurements were made on patients receiving open-field treatments to the chest, abdomen, and groin. Skin entry dose or entry and exit dose were assessed in comparison with doses estimated form phantom measurements. The effective depth of measurement in a 6 MV therapeutic x-ray beam was found to be about 0.10 mm using TLD extrapolation as a comparison. Entrance surface dose measurements made on a solid water phantom agreed well with ion chamber and TLD extrapolation measurements, and black TLDs have an accuracy of {plus_minus} 5% ({plus_minus}2 SD). The dose predicted from black TLD readings correlate with observed skin reactions as assessed with reflectance spectroscopy. In vivo dosimetry with carbon-loaded TLDs proved to be a useful tool in assessing the dose delivered to the basal cell layer in the skin of patients undergoing radiotherapy. 23 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Is patient size important in dose determination and optimization in cardiology?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reay, J.; Chapple, C. L.; Kotre, C. J.

    2003-12-01

    Patient dose determination and optimization have become more topical in recent years with the implementation of the Medical Exposures Directive into national legislation, the Ionising Radiation (Medical Exposure) Regulations. This legislation incorporates a requirement for new equipment to provide a means of displaying a measure of patient exposure and introduces the concept of diagnostic reference levels. It is normally assumed that patient dose is governed largely by patient size; however, in cardiology, where procedures are often very complex, the significance of patient size is less well understood. This study considers over 9000 cardiology procedures, undertaken throughout the north of England, and investigates the relationship between patient size and dose. It uses simple linear regression to calculate both correlation coefficients and significance levels for data sorted by both room and individual clinician for the four most common examinations, left ventrical and/or coronary angiography, single vessel stent insertion and single vessel angioplasty. This paper concludes that the correlation between patient size and dose is weak for the procedures considered. It also illustrates the use of an existing method for removing the effect of patient size from dose survey data. This allows typical doses and, therefore, reference levels to be defined for the purposes of dose optimization.

  1. 131 iodine gamma dose determination in the thyroid gland using two geometrical shapes: a comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betka, A.; Bentabet, A.; Azbouche, A.; Fenineche, N.; Adjiri, A.; Dib, A.

    2015-05-01

    In order to study the internal gamma dose, we used a Monte Carlo code ‘Penelope’ simulation with two geometrical models (cylindrical and spherical). The deposited energy was determined via the loss of energy calculated from the quantum theory for inelastic collisions based on the first-order (plane-wave) Born approximation for charged particles with individual atoms and molecules. Our results show that the cylindrical geometry is more suitable for carrying out such a study. Moreover, we developed an analytical expression for the 131 iodine gamma dose (the energy deposited per photon absorbed dose). This latter could be considered as an important tool for evaluating the gamma dose without going through stochastic models.

  2. PTEN recruitment controls synaptic and cognitive function in Alzheimer's models.

    PubMed

    Knafo, Shira; Sánchez-Puelles, Cristina; Palomer, Ernest; Delgado, Igotz; Draffin, Jonathan E; Mingo, Janire; Wahle, Tina; Kaleka, Kanwardeep; Mou, Liping; Pereda-Perez, Inmaculada; Klosi, Edvin; Faber, Erik B; Chapman, Heidi M; Lozano-Montes, Laura; Ortega-Molina, Ana; Ordóñez-Gutiérrez, Lara; Wandosell, Francisco; Viña, Jose; Dotti, Carlos G; Hall, Randy A; Pulido, Rafael; Gerges, Nashaat Z; Chan, Andrew M; Spaller, Mark R; Serrano, Manuel; Venero, César; Esteban, José A

    2016-03-01

    Dyshomeostasis of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) is responsible for synaptic malfunctions leading to cognitive deficits ranging from mild impairment to full-blown dementia in Alzheimer's disease. Aβ appears to skew synaptic plasticity events toward depression. We found that inhibition of PTEN, a lipid phosphatase that is essential to long-term depression, rescued normal synaptic function and cognition in cellular and animal models of Alzheimer's disease. Conversely, transgenic mice that overexpressed PTEN displayed synaptic depression that mimicked and occluded Aβ-induced depression. Mechanistically, Aβ triggers a PDZ-dependent recruitment of PTEN into the postsynaptic compartment. Using a PTEN knock-in mouse lacking the PDZ motif, and a cell-permeable interfering peptide, we found that this mechanism is crucial for Aβ-induced synaptic toxicity and cognitive dysfunction. Our results provide fundamental information on the molecular mechanisms of Aβ-induced synaptic malfunction and may offer new mechanism-based therapeutic targets to counteract downstream Aβ signaling.

  3. Determination of effective doses in image-guided radiation therapy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyone, Y. Y.; Suriyapee, S.; Sanghangthum, T.; Oonsiri, S.; Tawonwong, T.

    2016-03-01

    The organ and effective doses in image-guided radiotherapy system are determined in this study. For 2D imaging, incident air kerma (Ki) was measured by 6cc ionization chamber with Accu-Pro dosimeter. The entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) was calculated by multiplying Ki with backscatter factor. The effective dose was calculated by multiplying ESAK with conversion coefficient. For 3D imaging, computed tomography/cone-beam dose index (CTDI/CBDI) measurements were performed by using 100mm pencil ionization chamber with Accu-Pro dosimeter. The dose index in air and in CTDI phantom from planning CT and cone- beam CT were measured. Then, effective dose was calculated by ImPACT software. The effective doses from 2D conventional simulator for anteroposterior and lateral projections were 01 and 0.02mSv for head, 0.15 and 0.16mSv for thorax, 0.22 and 0.21mSv for pelvis, respectively. The effective doses from 3D, planning CT and CBCT, were 3.3 and 0.1mSv for head, 13 and 2.4mSv for thorax and 7.2 and 4.9mSv for pelvis, respectively. Based on 30 fractions of treatment course, total effective dose (3D CT, 2D setup verification and 6 times CBCT) of head, thorax and pelvis were 3.93, 27.71 and 37.03mSv, respectively. Therefore, IGRT should be administered with significant parameters to reduce the dose.

  4. Myeloid PTEN deficiency impairs tumor-immune surveillance via immune-checkpoint inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Kuttke, M.; Sahin, E.; Pisoni, J.; Percig, S.; Vogel, A.; Kraemmer, D.; Hanzl, L.; Brunner, J. S.; Paar, H.; Soukup, K.; Halfmann, A.; Dohnal, A. M.; Steiner, C. W.; Blüml, S.; Basilio, J.; Hochreiter, B.; Salzmann, M.; Hoesel, B.; Lametschwandtner, G.; Eferl, R.; Schmid, J. A.; Schabbauer, G.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tumor–host interaction is determined by constant immune surveillance, characterized by tumor infiltration of myeloid and lymphoid cells. A malfunctioning or diverted immune response promotes tumor growth and metastasis. Recent advances had been made, by treating of certain tumor types, such as melanoma, with T-cell checkpoint inhibitors. This highlights the importance of understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the crosstalk between tumors and their environment, in particular myeloid and lymphoid cells. Our aim was to study the contribution of the myeloid PI3K/PTEN-signaling pathway in the regulation of tumor-immune surveillance in murine models of cancer. We made use of conditional PTEN-deficient mice, which exhibit sustained activation of the PI3K-signaling axis in a variety of myeloid cell subsets such as macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs). In colitis-associated colon cancer (CAC), mice deficient in myeloid PTEN showed a markedly higher tumor burden and decreased survival. We attributed this observation to the increased presence of immune-modulatory conventional CD8α+ DCs in the spleen, whereas other relevant myeloid cell subsets were largely unaffected. Notably, we detected enhanced surface expression of PD-L1 and PD-L2 on these DCs. As a consequence, tumoricidal T-cell responses were hampered or redirected. Taken together, our findings indicated an unanticipated role for the PI3K/PTEN-signaling axis in the functional regulation of splenic antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Our data pointed at potential, indirect, tumoricidal effects of subclass-specific PI3K inhibitors, which are currently under clinical investigation for treatment of tumors, via myeloid cell activation. PMID:27622019

  5. Myeloid PTEN deficiency impairs tumor-immune surveillance via immune-checkpoint inhibition.

    PubMed

    Kuttke, M; Sahin, E; Pisoni, J; Percig, S; Vogel, A; Kraemmer, D; Hanzl, L; Brunner, J S; Paar, H; Soukup, K; Halfmann, A; Dohnal, A M; Steiner, C W; Blüml, S; Basilio, J; Hochreiter, B; Salzmann, M; Hoesel, B; Lametschwandtner, G; Eferl, R; Schmid, J A; Schabbauer, G

    2016-07-01

    Tumor-host interaction is determined by constant immune surveillance, characterized by tumor infiltration of myeloid and lymphoid cells. A malfunctioning or diverted immune response promotes tumor growth and metastasis. Recent advances had been made, by treating of certain tumor types, such as melanoma, with T-cell checkpoint inhibitors. This highlights the importance of understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the crosstalk between tumors and their environment, in particular myeloid and lymphoid cells. Our aim was to study the contribution of the myeloid PI3K/PTEN-signaling pathway in the regulation of tumor-immune surveillance in murine models of cancer. We made use of conditional PTEN-deficient mice, which exhibit sustained activation of the PI3K-signaling axis in a variety of myeloid cell subsets such as macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs). In colitis-associated colon cancer (CAC), mice deficient in myeloid PTEN showed a markedly higher tumor burden and decreased survival. We attributed this observation to the increased presence of immune-modulatory conventional CD8α(+) DCs in the spleen, whereas other relevant myeloid cell subsets were largely unaffected. Notably, we detected enhanced surface expression of PD-L1 and PD-L2 on these DCs. As a consequence, tumoricidal T-cell responses were hampered or redirected. Taken together, our findings indicated an unanticipated role for the PI3K/PTEN-signaling axis in the functional regulation of splenic antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Our data pointed at potential, indirect, tumoricidal effects of subclass-specific PI3K inhibitors, which are currently under clinical investigation for treatment of tumors, via myeloid cell activation. PMID:27622019

  6. Plasma Membrane Permeabilization by 60- and 600-ns Electric Pulses Is Determined by the Absorbed Dose

    PubMed Central

    Ibey, Bennett L.; Xiao, Shu; Schoenbach, Karl H.; Murphy, Michael R.; Pakhomov, Andrei G.

    2008-01-01

    We explored how the effect of plasma membrane permeabilization by nanosecond-duration electric pulses (nsEP) depends on the physical characteristics of exposure. The resting membrane resistance (Rm) and membrane potential (MP) were measured in cultured GH3 and CHO cells by conventional whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Intact cells were exposed to a single nsEP (60 or 600 ns duration, 0-22 kV/cm), followed by patch-clamp measurements after a 2-3 min delay. Consistent with earlier findings, nsEP caused long-lasting Rm decrease, accompanied by the loss of MP. The threshold for these effects was about 6 kV/cm for 60 ns pulses, and about 1 kV/cm for 600 ns pulses. Further analysis established that it was neither pulse duration nor the E-field amplitude per se, but the absorbed dose that determined the magnitude of the biological effect. In other words, exposure to nsEP at either pulse duration caused equal effects if the absorbed doses were equal. The threshold absorbed dose to produce plasma membrane effects in either GH3 or CHO cells at either pulse duration was found to be at or below 10 mJ/g. Despite being determined by the dose, the nsEP effect clearly is not thermal, as the maximum heating at the threshold dose is less than 0.01 °C. The use of the absorbed dose as a universal exposure metric may help to compare and quantify nsEP sensitivity of different cell types and of cells in different physiological conditions. The absorbed dose may also prove to be a more useful metric than the incident E-field in determining safety limits for high peak, lowaverage power EMF emissions. PMID:18839412

  7. IRS2 and PTEN are key molecules in controlling insulin sensitivity in podocytes.

    PubMed

    Santamaria, Beatriz; Marquez, Eva; Lay, Abigail; Carew, RoseaMarie M; González-Rodríguez, Águeda; Welsh, Gavin I; Ni, Lan; Hale, Lorna J; Ortiz, Alberto; Saleem, Moin A; Brazil, Derek P; Coward, Richard J; Valverde, Ángela M

    2015-12-01

    Insulin signaling to the glomerular podocyte is important for normal kidney function and is implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy (DN). This study determined the role of the insulin receptor substrate 2 (IRS2) in this system. Conditionally immortalized murine podocytes were generated from wild-type (WT) and insulin receptor substrate 2-deficient mice (Irs2(-/-)). Insulin signaling, glucose transport, cellular motility and cytoskeleton rearrangement were then analyzed. Within the glomerulus IRS2 is enriched in the podocyte and is preferentially phosphorylated by insulin in comparison to IRS1. Irs2(-/-) podocytes are significantly insulin resistant in respect to AKT signaling, insulin-stimulated GLUT4-mediated glucose uptake, filamentous actin (F-actin) cytoskeleton remodeling and cell motility. Mechanistically, we discovered that Irs2 deficiency causes insulin resistance through up-regulation of the phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN). Importantly, suppressing PTEN in Irs2(-/-) podocytes rescued insulin sensitivity. In conclusion, this study has identified for the first time IRS2 as a critical molecule for sensitizing the podocyte to insulin actions through its ability to modulate PTEN expression. This finding reveals two potential molecular targets in the podocyte for modulating insulin sensitivity and treating DN.

  8. A procedure to determine the planar integral spot dose values of proton pencil beam spots

    SciTech Connect

    Anand, Aman; Sahoo, Narayan; Zhu, X. Ronald; Sawakuchi, Gabriel O.; Poenisch, Falk; Amos, Richard A.; Ciangaru, George; Titt, Uwe; Suzuki, Kazumichi; Mohan, Radhe; Gillin, Michael T.

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: Planar integral spot dose (PISD) of proton pencil beam spots (PPBSs) is a required input parameter for beam modeling in some treatment planning systems used in proton therapy clinics. The measurement of PISD by using commercially available large area ionization chambers, like the PTW Bragg peak chamber (BPC), can have large uncertainties due to the size limitation of these chambers. This paper reports the results of our study of a novel method to determine PISD values from the measured lateral dose profiles and peak dose of the PPBS. Methods: The PISDs of 72.5, 89.6, 146.9, 181.1, and 221.8 MeV energy PPBSs were determined by area integration of their planar dose distributions at different depths in water. The lateral relative dose profiles of the PPBSs at selected depths were measured by using small volume ion chambers and were investigated for their angular anisotropies using Kodak XV films. The peak spot dose along the beam's central axis (D{sub 0}) was determined by placing a small volume ion chamber at the center of a broad field created by the superposition of spots at different locations. This method allows eliminating positioning uncertainties and the detector size effect that could occur when measuring it in single PPBS. The PISD was then calculated by integrating the measured lateral relative dose profiles for two different upper limits of integration and then multiplying it with corresponding D{sub 0}. The first limit of integration was set to radius of the BPC, namely 4.08 cm, giving PISD{sub RBPC}. The second limit was set to a value of the radial distance where the profile dose falls below 0.1% of the peak giving the PISD{sub full}. The calculated values of PISD{sub RBPC} obtained from area integration method were compared with the BPC measured values. Long tail dose correction factors (LTDCFs) were determined from the ratio of PISD{sub full}/PISD{sub RBPC} at different depths for PPBSs of different energies. Results: The spot profiles were

  9. Fatty acids increase neuronal hypertrophy of Pten knockdown neurons

    PubMed Central

    Fricano, Catherine J.; DeSpenza, Tyrone; Frazel, Paul W.; Li, Meijie; O'Malley, A. James; Westbrook, Gary L.; Luikart, Bryan W.

    2014-01-01

    Phosphatase and tensin homolog (Pten) catalyzes the reverse reaction of PI3K by dephosphorylating PIP3 to PIP2. This negatively regulates downstream Akt/mTOR/S6 signaling resulting in decreased cellular growth and proliferation. Co-injection of a lentivirus knocking Pten down with a control lentivirus allows us to compare the effects of Pten knockdown between individual neurons within the same animal. We find that knockdown of Pten results in neuronal hypertrophy by 21 days post-injection. This neuronal hypertrophy is correlated with increased p-S6 and p-mTOR in individual neurons. We used this system to test whether an environmental factor that has been implicated in cellular hypertrophy could influence the severity of the Pten knockdown-induced hypertrophy. Implantation of mini-osmotic pumps delivering fatty acids results in increased neuronal hypertrophy and p-S6/p-mTOR staining. These hypertrophic effects were reversed in response to rapamycin treatment. However, we did not observe a similar increase in hypertrophy in response to dietary manipulations of fatty acids. Thus, we conclude that by driving growth signaling with fatty acids and knocking down a critical regulator of growth, Pten, we are able to observe an additive morphological phenotype of increased soma size mediated by the mTOR pathway. PMID:24795563

  10. AIF inhibits tumor metastasis by protecting PTEN from oxidation.

    PubMed

    Shen, Shao-Ming; Guo, Meng; Xiong, Zhong; Yu, Yun; Zhao, Xu-Yun; Zhang, Fei-Fei; Chen, Guo-Qiang

    2015-11-01

    Apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) exerts dual roles on cell death and survival, but its substrates as a putative oxidoreductase and roles in tumorigenesis remain elusive. Here, we report that AIF physically interacts with and inhibits the oxidation of phosphatase and tensin homolog on chromosome ten (PTEN), a tumor suppressor susceptible for oxidation-mediated inactivation. More intriguingly, we also identify PTEN as a mitochondrial protein and the ectopic expression of mitochondrial targeting sequence-carrying PTEN almost completely inhibits Akt phosphorylation in PTEN-deficient cells. AIF knockdown causes oxidation-mediated inactivation of the lipid phosphatase activity of PTEN, with ensuing activation of Akt kinase, phosphorylation of the Akt substrate GSK-3β, and activation of β-catenin signaling in cancer cells. Through its effect on β-catenin signaling, AIF inhibits epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and metastasis of cancer cells in vitro and in orthotopically implanted xenografts. Accordingly, the expression of AIF is correlated with the survival of human patients with cancers of multiple origins. These results identify PTEN as the substrate of AIF oxidoreductase and reveal a novel function for AIF in controlling tumor metastasis.

  11. PTEN dosage is essential for neurofibroma development and malignant transformation.

    PubMed

    Gregorian, Caroline; Nakashima, Jonathan; Dry, Sarah M; Nghiemphu, P Leia; Smith, Kate Barzan; Ao, Yan; Dang, Julie; Lawson, Gregory; Mellinghoff, Ingo K; Mischel, Paul S; Phelps, Michael; Parada, Luis F; Liu, Xin; Sofroniew, Michael V; Eilber, Fritz C; Wu, Hong

    2009-11-17

    Patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) carry approximately a 10% lifetime risk of developing a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST). Although the molecular mechanisms underlying NF1 to MPNST malignant transformation remain unclear, alterations of both the RAS/RAF/MAPK and PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathways have been implicated. In a series of genetically engineered murine models, we perturbed RAS/RAF/MAPK or/and PTEN/PI3K/AKT pathway, individually or simultaneously, via conditional activation of K-ras oncogene or deletion of Nf1 or Pten tumor suppressor genes. Only K-Ras activation in combination with a single Pten allele deletion led to 100% penetrable development of NF lesions and subsequent progression to MPNST. Importantly, loss or decrease in PTEN expression was found in all murine MPNSTs and a majority of human NF1-associated MPNST lesions, suggesting that PTEN dosage and its controlled signaling pathways are critical for transformation of NFs to MPNST. Using noninvasive in vivo PET-CT imaging, we demonstrated that FDG can be used to identify the malignant transformation in both murine and human MPNSTs. Our data suggest that combined inhibition of RAS/RAF/MAPK and PTEN/PI3K/AKT pathways may be beneficial for patients with MPNST. PMID:19846776

  12. PTEN dosage is essential for neurofibroma development and malignant transformation.

    PubMed

    Gregorian, Caroline; Nakashima, Jonathan; Dry, Sarah M; Nghiemphu, P Leia; Smith, Kate Barzan; Ao, Yan; Dang, Julie; Lawson, Gregory; Mellinghoff, Ingo K; Mischel, Paul S; Phelps, Michael; Parada, Luis F; Liu, Xin; Sofroniew, Michael V; Eilber, Fritz C; Wu, Hong

    2009-11-17

    Patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) carry approximately a 10% lifetime risk of developing a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST). Although the molecular mechanisms underlying NF1 to MPNST malignant transformation remain unclear, alterations of both the RAS/RAF/MAPK and PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathways have been implicated. In a series of genetically engineered murine models, we perturbed RAS/RAF/MAPK or/and PTEN/PI3K/AKT pathway, individually or simultaneously, via conditional activation of K-ras oncogene or deletion of Nf1 or Pten tumor suppressor genes. Only K-Ras activation in combination with a single Pten allele deletion led to 100% penetrable development of NF lesions and subsequent progression to MPNST. Importantly, loss or decrease in PTEN expression was found in all murine MPNSTs and a majority of human NF1-associated MPNST lesions, suggesting that PTEN dosage and its controlled signaling pathways are critical for transformation of NFs to MPNST. Using noninvasive in vivo PET-CT imaging, we demonstrated that FDG can be used to identify the malignant transformation in both murine and human MPNSTs. Our data suggest that combined inhibition of RAS/RAF/MAPK and PTEN/PI3K/AKT pathways may be beneficial for patients with MPNST.

  13. Assays to Measure PTEN Lipid Phosphatase Activity In Vitro from Purified Enzyme or Immunoprecipitates.

    PubMed

    Spinelli, Laura; Leslie, Nicholas R

    2016-01-01

    PTEN is a one of the most frequently mutated tumor suppressors in human cancers. It is essential for regulating diverse biological processes and through its lipid phosphatase activity regulates the PI 3-Kinase signaling pathway. Sensitive phosphatase assays are employed to study the catalytic activity of PTEN against phospholipid substrates. Here we describe protocols to assay PTEN lipid phosphatase activity using either purified enzyme (purified PTEN lipid phosphatase assay) or PTEN immunopurified from tissues or cultured cells (cellular IP PTEN lipid phosphatase assay) against vesicles containing radiolabeled PIP3 substrate. PMID:27514802

  14. Pharmacological dose of alpha-tocopherol induces cardiotoxicity in Wistar rats determined by echocardiography and histology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of pharmacological dose of alpha-tocopherol on heart health was determined in Wistar rats. Animals were randomly assigned to either C (control, n = 11) or E (alpha-tocopherol, n = 11) group. Animals received corn oil (C) or alpha-tocopherol dissolved in corn oil (250 mg alpha-tocopherol/[...

  15. Determination of the median lethal dose of botulinum serotype E in channel catfish fingerlings

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The median lethal dose of botulinum serotype E in 5.3-g channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus fingerlings was determined. Five tanks (five fish/tank) were assigned to each of the following treatment groups: 70, 50, 35, 25, or 15 pg of purified botulinum serotype E. Fish were injected intracoelomically...

  16. Pantak Therapax SXT 150: performance assessment and dose determination using IAEA TRS-398 protocol.

    PubMed

    Jurado, D; Eudaldo, T; Carrasco, P; Jornet, N; Ruiz, A; Ribas, M

    2005-08-01

    The performance assessment and beam characteristics of the Therapax SXT 150 unit, which encompass both low and medium-energy beams, were evaluated. Dose determination was carried out by implementing the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) TRS-398 protocol and measuring all the dosimetric parameters in order to have a solid, consistent and reliable data set for the unit. Mechanical movements, interlocks and applicator characteristics agreed with specifications. The timer exhibited good accuracy and linearity. The output was very stable, with good repeatability, long-term reproducibility and no dependence on tube head orientation. The measured dosimetric parameters included beam first and second half-value layers (HVLs), absorbed dose rate to water under reference conditions, central axis depth dose distributions, output factors and beam profiles. Measured first HVLs agreed with comparable published data, but the homogeneity coefficients were low in comparison with typical values found in the literature. The timer error was significant for all filters and should be taken into consideration for the absorbed dose rate determination under reference conditions as well as for the calculation of treatment times. Percentage depth-dose (PDD) measurements are strongly recommended for each filter-applicator combination. The output factor definition of the IAEA TRS-398 protocol for medium-energy X-ray qualities involves the use of data that is difficult to measure. Beam profiles had small penumbras and good symmetry and flatness except for the lowest energy beam, for which a heel effect was observed. PMID:16046424

  17. Redox signaling via oxidative inactivation of PTEN modulates pressure-dependent myogenic tone in rat middle cerebral arteries.

    PubMed

    Gebremedhin, Debebe; Terashvili, Maia; Wickramasekera, Nadi; Zhang, David X; Rau, Nicole; Miura, Hiroto; Harder, David R

    2013-01-01

    The present study examined the level of generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and roles of inactivation of the phosphatase PTEN and the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway in response to an increase in intramural pressure-induced myogenic cerebral arterial constriction. Step increases in intraluminal pressure of cannulated cerebral arteries induced myogenic constriction and concomitant formation of superoxide (O2 (.-)) and its dismutation product hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as determined by fluorescent HPLC analysis, microscopic analysis of intensity of dihydroethidium fluorescence and attenuation of pressure-induced myogenic constriction by pretreatment with the ROS scavenger 4,hydroxyl-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine1-oxyl (tempol) or Mito-tempol or MitoQ in the presence or absence of PEG-catalase. An increase in intraluminal pressure induced oxidation of PTEN and activation of Akt. Pharmacological inhibition of endogenous PTEN activity potentiated pressure-dependent myogenic constriction and caused a reduction in NPo of a 238 pS arterial KCa channel current and an increase in [Ca(2+)]i level in freshly isolated cerebral arterial muscle cells (CAMCs), responses that were attenuated by Inhibition of the PI3K/Akt pathway. These findings demonstrate an increase in intraluminal pressure induced increase in ROS production triggered redox-sensitive signaling mechanism emanating from the cross-talk between oxidative inactivation of PTEN and activation of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway that involves in the regulation of pressure-dependent myogenic cerebral arterial constriction.

  18. Fine-Tuning of Pten Localization and Phosphatase Activity Is Essential for Zebrafish Angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Stumpf, Miriam; Blokzijl-Franke, Sasja; den Hertog, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    The lipid- and protein phosphatase PTEN is an essential tumor suppressor that is highly conserved among all higher eukaryotes. As an antagonist of the PI3K/Akt cell survival and proliferation pathway, it exerts its most prominent function at the cell membrane, but (PIP3-independent) functions of nuclear PTEN have been discovered as well. PTEN subcellular localization is tightly controlled by its protein conformation. In the closed conformation, PTEN localizes predominantly to the cytoplasm. Opening up of the conformation of PTEN exposes N-terminal and C-terminal regions of the protein that are required for both interaction with the cell membrane and translocation to the nucleus. Lack of Pten leads to hyperbranching of the intersegmental vessels during zebrafish embryogenesis, which is rescued by expression of exogenous Pten. Here, we observed that expression of mutant PTEN with an open conformation rescued the hyperbranching phenotype in pten double homozygous embryos and suppressed the increased p-Akt levels that are characteristic for embryos lacking Pten. In addition, in pten mutant and wild type embryos alike, open conformation PTEN induced stalled intersegmental vessels, which fail to connect with the dorsal longitudinal anastomotic vessel. Functional hyperactivity of open conformation PTEN in comparison to wild type PTEN seems to result predominantly from its enhanced recruitment to the cell membrane. Enhanced recruitment of phosphatase inactive mutants to the membrane did not induce the stalled vessel phenotype nor did it rescue the hyperbranching phenotype in pten double homozygous embryos, indicating that PTEN phosphatase activity is indispensable for its regulatory function during angiogenesis. Taken together, our data suggest that PTEN phosphatase activity needs to be carefully fine-tuned for normal embryogenesis and that the control of its subcellular localization is a key mechanism in this process. PMID:27138341

  19. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Activity Is Regulated by Pten Phosphorylation Through a Niche-Dependent Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Zhang, Jun; Tang, Minghui; Xin, Junping; Xu, Yan; Volk, Andrew; Hao, Caiqin; Hu, Chenglong; Sun, Jiewen; Wei, Wei; Cao, Quichan; Breslin, Peter; Zhang, Jiwang

    2016-08-01

    The phosphorylated form of Pten (p-Pten) is highly expressed in >70% of acute myeloid leukemia samples. However, the role of p-Pten in normal and abnormal hematopoiesis has not been studied. We found that Pten protein levels are comparable among long-term (LT) hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), short-term (ST) HSCs, and multipotent progenitors (MPPs); however, the levels of p-Pten are elevated during the HSC-to-MPP transition. To study whether p-Pten is involved in regulating self-renewal and differentiation in HSCs, we compared the effects of overexpression of p-Pten and nonphosphorylated Pten (non-p-Pten) on the hematopoietic reconstitutive capacity (HRC) of HSCs. We found that overexpression of non-p-Pten enhances the LT-HRC of HSCs, whereas overexpression of p-Pten promotes myeloid differentiation and compromises the LT-HRC of HSCs. Such phosphorylation-regulated Pten functioning is mediated by repressing the cell:cell contact-induced activation of Fak/p38 signaling independent of Pten's lipid phosphatase activity because both p-Pten and non-p-Pten have comparable activity in repressing PI3K/Akt signaling. Our studies suggest that, in addition to repressing PI3K/Akt/mTor signaling, non-p-Pten maintains HSCs in bone marrow niches via a cell-contact inhibitory mechanism by inhibiting Fak/p38 signaling-mediated proliferation and differentiation. In contrast, p-Pten promotes the proliferation and differentiation of HSCs by enhancing the cell contact-dependent activation of Src/Fak/p38 signaling. Stem Cells 2016;34:2130-2144.

  20. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Activity Is Regulated by Pten Phosphorylation Through a Niche-Dependent Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Zhang, Jun; Tang, Minghui; Xin, Junping; Xu, Yan; Volk, Andrew; Hao, Caiqin; Hu, Chenglong; Sun, Jiewen; Wei, Wei; Cao, Quichan; Breslin, Peter; Zhang, Jiwang

    2016-08-01

    The phosphorylated form of Pten (p-Pten) is highly expressed in >70% of acute myeloid leukemia samples. However, the role of p-Pten in normal and abnormal hematopoiesis has not been studied. We found that Pten protein levels are comparable among long-term (LT) hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), short-term (ST) HSCs, and multipotent progenitors (MPPs); however, the levels of p-Pten are elevated during the HSC-to-MPP transition. To study whether p-Pten is involved in regulating self-renewal and differentiation in HSCs, we compared the effects of overexpression of p-Pten and nonphosphorylated Pten (non-p-Pten) on the hematopoietic reconstitutive capacity (HRC) of HSCs. We found that overexpression of non-p-Pten enhances the LT-HRC of HSCs, whereas overexpression of p-Pten promotes myeloid differentiation and compromises the LT-HRC of HSCs. Such phosphorylation-regulated Pten functioning is mediated by repressing the cell:cell contact-induced activation of Fak/p38 signaling independent of Pten's lipid phosphatase activity because both p-Pten and non-p-Pten have comparable activity in repressing PI3K/Akt signaling. Our studies suggest that, in addition to repressing PI3K/Akt/mTor signaling, non-p-Pten maintains HSCs in bone marrow niches via a cell-contact inhibitory mechanism by inhibiting Fak/p38 signaling-mediated proliferation and differentiation. In contrast, p-Pten promotes the proliferation and differentiation of HSCs by enhancing the cell contact-dependent activation of Src/Fak/p38 signaling. Stem Cells 2016;34:2130-2144. PMID:27096933

  1. Fine-Tuning of Pten Localization and Phosphatase Activity Is Essential for Zebrafish Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Stumpf, Miriam; Blokzijl-Franke, Sasja; den Hertog, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    The lipid- and protein phosphatase PTEN is an essential tumor suppressor that is highly conserved among all higher eukaryotes. As an antagonist of the PI3K/Akt cell survival and proliferation pathway, it exerts its most prominent function at the cell membrane, but (PIP3-independent) functions of nuclear PTEN have been discovered as well. PTEN subcellular localization is tightly controlled by its protein conformation. In the closed conformation, PTEN localizes predominantly to the cytoplasm. Opening up of the conformation of PTEN exposes N-terminal and C-terminal regions of the protein that are required for both interaction with the cell membrane and translocation to the nucleus. Lack of Pten leads to hyperbranching of the intersegmental vessels during zebrafish embryogenesis, which is rescued by expression of exogenous Pten. Here, we observed that expression of mutant PTEN with an open conformation rescued the hyperbranching phenotype in pten double homozygous embryos and suppressed the increased p-Akt levels that are characteristic for embryos lacking Pten. In addition, in pten mutant and wild type embryos alike, open conformation PTEN induced stalled intersegmental vessels, which fail to connect with the dorsal longitudinal anastomotic vessel. Functional hyperactivity of open conformation PTEN in comparison to wild type PTEN seems to result predominantly from its enhanced recruitment to the cell membrane. Enhanced recruitment of phosphatase inactive mutants to the membrane did not induce the stalled vessel phenotype nor did it rescue the hyperbranching phenotype in pten double homozygous embryos, indicating that PTEN phosphatase activity is indispensable for its regulatory function during angiogenesis. Taken together, our data suggest that PTEN phosphatase activity needs to be carefully fine-tuned for normal embryogenesis and that the control of its subcellular localization is a key mechanism in this process. PMID:27138341

  2. Identification of nucleolus-localized PTEN and its function in regulating ribosome biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Pingdong; Wang, Danni; Li, Haiyang; Yu, Zhenkun; Chen, Xiaohong; Fang, Jugao

    2014-10-01

    The tumor suppressor PTEN is a lipid phosphatase that is found mutated in different types of human cancers. PTEN suppresses cell proliferation by inhibiting the PI3K-Akt signaling pathway at the cell membrane. However, PTEN is also demonstrated to localize in the cell nucleus where it exhibits tumor suppressive activity via a different, unknown mechanism. In this study we report that PTEN also localizes to the nucleolus and that nucleolar PTEN plays an important role in regulating nucleolar homeostasis and maintaining nucleolar morphology. Overexpression of nuclear PTEN in PTEN null cells inhibits Akt phosphorylation and reduces cell size. Knockdown of PTEN in PTEN positive cells leads to nucleolar morphologic changes and an increase in the proportion of cells with a greater number of nucleoli. In addition, knockdown of PTEN in PTEN positive cells increased ribosome biogenesis. These findings expand current understanding of function and relevance of nuclear localized PTEN and provide a foundation for the development of novel therapies targeting PTEN.

  3. DNMT1-mediated PTEN hypermethylation confers hepatic stellate cell activation and liver fibrogenesis in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Bian, Er-Bao; Huang, Cheng; Ma, Tao-Tao; Tao, Hui; Zhang, Hui; Cheng, Chang; Lv, Xiong-Wen; Li, Jun

    2012-10-01

    Hepatic stellate cell (HSC) activation is an essential event during liver fibrogenesis. Phosphatase and tension homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN), a tumor suppressor, is a negative regulator of this process. PTEN promoter hypermethylation is a major epigenetic silencing mechanism in tumors. The present study aimed to investigate whether PTEN promoter methylation was involved in HSC activation and liver fibrosis. Treatment of activated HSCs with the DNA methylation inhibitor 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (5-azadC) decreased aberrant hypermethylation of the PTEN gene promoter and prevented the loss of PTEN expression that occurred during HSC activation. Silencing DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) gene also decreased the PTEN gene promoter methylation and upregulated the PTEN gene expression in activated HSC-T6 cells. In addition, knockdown of DNMT1 inhibited the activation of both ERK and AKT pathways in HSC-T6 cells. These results suggest that DNMT1-mediated PTEN hypermethylation caused the loss of PTEN expression, followed by the activation of the PI3K/AKT and ERK pathways, resulting in HSC activation. Highlights: ► PTEN methylation status and loss of PTEN expression ► DNMT1 mediated PTEN hypermethylation. ► Hypermethylation of PTEN contributes to the activation of ERK and AKT pathways.

  4. Matrine derivative WM130 inhibits hepatocellular carcinoma by suppressing EGFR/ERK/MMP-2 and PTEN/AKT signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Qian, Liqiang; Liu, Yan; Xu, Yang; Ji, Weidan; Wu, Qiuye; Liu, Yongjing; Gao, Quangen; Su, Changqing

    2015-11-01

    Matrine, a sophora alkaloid, has been demonstrated to exert antitumor effects on many types of cancer. However, its bioactivity is weak and its potential druggability is low. We modified the structure of matrine and obtained a new matrine derivative, WM130 (C30N4H40SO5F), which exhibited better pharmacological activities than matrine. In this study, we investigated the antitumor activity and the underlying mechanisms of WM130 on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells in vitro and in vivo, and found that WM130 inhibited the proliferation, invasion, migration and induced apoptosis of HCC cells in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, after treatment with WM130, the expressions of p-EGFR, p-ERK, p-AKT, MMP-2 and the ratio of Bcl-2/Bax were significantly down-regulated, whereas the expression of PTEN was increased in HCC cells. Moreover, WM130 inhibited Huh-7 xenograft tumor growth in a dose-dependent manner after intravenous administration. Immunohistochemistry results demonstrated that WM130 treatment resulted in down-regulation of p-EGFR, MMP-2, and Ki67 and up-regulation of PTEN. The findings indicated that WM130 could inhibit cell proliferation, invasion, migration and induced apoptosis in HCC cells by suppressing EGFR/ERK/MMP-2 and PTEN/AKT signaling pathways and may be a novel effective candidate for HCC treatment.

  5. Matrine derivative WM130 inhibits hepatocellular carcinoma by suppressing EGFR/ERK/MMP-2 and PTEN/AKT signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Qian, Liqiang; Liu, Yan; Xu, Yang; Ji, Weidan; Wu, Qiuye; Liu, Yongjing; Gao, Quangen; Su, Changqing

    2015-11-01

    Matrine, a sophora alkaloid, has been demonstrated to exert antitumor effects on many types of cancer. However, its bioactivity is weak and its potential druggability is low. We modified the structure of matrine and obtained a new matrine derivative, WM130 (C30N4H40SO5F), which exhibited better pharmacological activities than matrine. In this study, we investigated the antitumor activity and the underlying mechanisms of WM130 on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells in vitro and in vivo, and found that WM130 inhibited the proliferation, invasion, migration and induced apoptosis of HCC cells in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, after treatment with WM130, the expressions of p-EGFR, p-ERK, p-AKT, MMP-2 and the ratio of Bcl-2/Bax were significantly down-regulated, whereas the expression of PTEN was increased in HCC cells. Moreover, WM130 inhibited Huh-7 xenograft tumor growth in a dose-dependent manner after intravenous administration. Immunohistochemistry results demonstrated that WM130 treatment resulted in down-regulation of p-EGFR, MMP-2, and Ki67 and up-regulation of PTEN. The findings indicated that WM130 could inhibit cell proliferation, invasion, migration and induced apoptosis in HCC cells by suppressing EGFR/ERK/MMP-2 and PTEN/AKT signaling pathways and may be a novel effective candidate for HCC treatment. PMID:26259512

  6. Nrf2 Enhances Cholangiocyte Expansion in Pten-Deficient Livers

    PubMed Central

    Taguchi, Keiko; Hirano, Ikuo; Itoh, Tohru; Tanaka, Minoru; Miyajima, Atsushi; Suzuki, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Keap1-Nrf2 system plays a central role in the stress response. While Keap1 ubiquitinates Nrf2 for degradation under unstressed conditions, this Keap1 activity is abrogated in response to oxidative or electrophilic stresses, leading to Nrf2 stabilization and coordinated activation of cytoprotective genes. We recently found that nuclear accumulation of Nrf2 is significantly increased by simultaneous deletion of Pten and Keap1, resulting in the stronger activation of Nrf2 target genes. To clarify the impact of the cross talk between the Keap1-Nrf2 and Pten–phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase–Akt pathways on the liver pathophysiology, in this study we have conducted closer analysis of liver-specific Pten::Keap1 double-mutant mice (Pten::Keap1-Alb mice). The Pten::Keap1-Alb mice were lethal by 1 month after birth and displayed severe hepatomegaly with abnormal expansion of ductal structures comprising cholangiocytes in a Nrf2-dependent manner. Long-term observation of Pten::Keap1-Alb::Nrf2+/− mice revealed that the Nrf2-heterozygous mice survived beyond 1 month but developed polycystic liver fibrosis by 6 months. Gsk3 directing the Keap1-independent degradation of Nrf2 was heavily phosphorylated and consequently inactivated by the double deletion of Pten and Keap1 genes. Thus, liver-specific disruption of Keap1 and Pten augments Nrf2 activity through inactivation of Keap1-dependent and -independent degradation of Nrf2 and establishes the Nrf2-dependent molecular network promoting the hepatomegaly and cholangiocyte expansion. PMID:24379438

  7. PTEN regulates EG5 to control spindle architecture and chromosome congression during mitosis.

    PubMed

    He, Jinxue; Zhang, Zhong; Ouyang, Meng; Yang, Fan; Hao, Hongbo; Lamb, Kristy L; Yang, Jingyi; Yin, Yuxin; Shen, Wen H

    2016-01-01

    Architectural integrity of the mitotic spindle is required for efficient chromosome congression and accurate chromosome segregation to ensure mitotic fidelity. Tumour suppressor PTEN has multiple functions in maintaining genome stability. Here we report an essential role of PTEN in mitosis through regulation of the mitotic kinesin motor EG5 for proper spindle architecture and chromosome congression. PTEN depletion results in chromosome misalignment in metaphase, often leading to catastrophic mitotic failure. In addition, metaphase cells lacking PTEN exhibit defects of spindle geometry, manifested prominently by shorter spindles. PTEN is associated and co-localized with EG5 during mitosis. PTEN deficiency induces aberrant EG5 phosphorylation and abrogates EG5 recruitment to the mitotic spindle apparatus, leading to spindle disorganization. These data demonstrate the functional interplay between PTEN and EG5 in controlling mitotic spindle structure and chromosome behaviour during mitosis. We propose that PTEN functions to equilibrate mitotic phosphorylation for proper spindle formation and faithful genomic transmission. PMID:27492783

  8. PTEN regulates EG5 to control spindle architecture and chromosome congression during mitosis

    PubMed Central

    He, Jinxue; Zhang, Zhong; Ouyang, Meng; Yang, Fan; Hao, Hongbo; Lamb, Kristy L.; Yang, Jingyi; Yin, Yuxin; Shen, Wen H.

    2016-01-01

    Architectural integrity of the mitotic spindle is required for efficient chromosome congression and accurate chromosome segregation to ensure mitotic fidelity. Tumour suppressor PTEN has multiple functions in maintaining genome stability. Here we report an essential role of PTEN in mitosis through regulation of the mitotic kinesin motor EG5 for proper spindle architecture and chromosome congression. PTEN depletion results in chromosome misalignment in metaphase, often leading to catastrophic mitotic failure. In addition, metaphase cells lacking PTEN exhibit defects of spindle geometry, manifested prominently by shorter spindles. PTEN is associated and co-localized with EG5 during mitosis. PTEN deficiency induces aberrant EG5 phosphorylation and abrogates EG5 recruitment to the mitotic spindle apparatus, leading to spindle disorganization. These data demonstrate the functional interplay between PTEN and EG5 in controlling mitotic spindle structure and chromosome behaviour during mitosis. We propose that PTEN functions to equilibrate mitotic phosphorylation for proper spindle formation and faithful genomic transmission. PMID:27492783

  9. PTEN regulates EG5 to control spindle architecture and chromosome congression during mitosis.

    PubMed

    He, Jinxue; Zhang, Zhong; Ouyang, Meng; Yang, Fan; Hao, Hongbo; Lamb, Kristy L; Yang, Jingyi; Yin, Yuxin; Shen, Wen H

    2016-08-05

    Architectural integrity of the mitotic spindle is required for efficient chromosome congression and accurate chromosome segregation to ensure mitotic fidelity. Tumour suppressor PTEN has multiple functions in maintaining genome stability. Here we report an essential role of PTEN in mitosis through regulation of the mitotic kinesin motor EG5 for proper spindle architecture and chromosome congression. PTEN depletion results in chromosome misalignment in metaphase, often leading to catastrophic mitotic failure. In addition, metaphase cells lacking PTEN exhibit defects of spindle geometry, manifested prominently by shorter spindles. PTEN is associated and co-localized with EG5 during mitosis. PTEN deficiency induces aberrant EG5 phosphorylation and abrogates EG5 recruitment to the mitotic spindle apparatus, leading to spindle disorganization. These data demonstrate the functional interplay between PTEN and EG5 in controlling mitotic spindle structure and chromosome behaviour during mitosis. We propose that PTEN functions to equilibrate mitotic phosphorylation for proper spindle formation and faithful genomic transmission.

  10. Determination of key radionuclides and parameters related to dose from the Columbia River pathway. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, B.A.

    1993-03-01

    A series of scoping calculations has been undertaken to evaluate the absolute and relative contributions of different radionuclides and exposure pathways to doses that may have been received by individuals living in the vicinity of the Hanford Site. These scoping calculations may include some radionuclides and pathways that were included in the Phase 1 Columbia River pathway dose evaluations, as well as other potential exposure pathways being evaluated for possible inclusion in future Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project (HEDR) modeling efforts. This scoping calculation (Calculation 009) examines the contributions of numerous radionuclides to dose via environmental exposures and accumulation in water, fish, and other aquatic biota. Addressed in these calculations are the contributions to effective dose from (1) external exposure to contaminated river water, ( 2) ingestion of contaminated drinking water, and (3) ingestion of contaminated resident Columbia River fish. Additional information on contamination of anadromous fish and waterfowl is provided.

  11. Determination of hydroxyl radical production in aqueous solutions irradiated to clinically significant doses

    SciTech Connect

    Sagone, A.L. Jr.; Democko, C.; Clark, L.; Kartha, M.

    1983-02-01

    Decarboxylation of /sup 14/C-carboxylbenzoic acid in aqueous solutions after low-dose irradiation has been used to determine the relative magnitude of oxidation reactions and estimate the hydroxyl radicals produced. The G CO/sub 2/ values determined from these measurements of 0.4 to 1.0 mM solutions of benzoic acid after x-ray doses of 1000 rads ranged from 0.72 to 0.77, in excellent agreement with values reported by authors using much higher doses of radiation. Superoxide dismutase and catalase, known scavengers of superoxide and hydrogen peroxide, respectively, did not show impairment of the oxidation of benzoic acid. On the other hand, biologically significant concentrations of phenol and mannitol appear to impair the radiation-induced oxidation of benzoic acid, indicating that the process is secondary to a reaction with OH . . We found that serum and glucose, common cell media contents, are potent OH . scavengers. These observations indicate that the oxidation of benzoic acid can be as a reliable method to estimate OH . with radiation doses of clinically significant magnitudes. In addition, these results suggest that the radiation induced by OH . in cell systems can be significantly modified by the type of buffer used.

  12. The tumor suppressor PTEN inhibits EGF-induced TSP-1 and TIMP-1 expression in FTC-133 thyroid carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Soula-Rothhut, Mahdhia; Coissard, Cyrille; Sartelet, Herve; Boudot, Cedric; Bellon, Georges; Martiny, Laurent; Rothhut, Bernard . E-mail: bernard.rothhut@univ-reims.fr

    2005-03-10

    Thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) is a multidomain extracellular macromolecule that was first identified as natural modulator of angiogenesis and tumor growth. In the present study, we found that epidermal growth factor (EGF) up-regulated TSP-1 expression in FTC-133 (primary tumor) but not in FTC-238 (lung metastasis) thyroid cancer cells. Both EGF and TSP-1 induced expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) in a mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MAPK/ERK) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-kinase)-dependent manner. In FTC-133 cells, EGF induced proliferation in a TSP-1- and TIMP-1-dependent manner. In addition, we determined that re-expression of the tumor suppressor protein PTEN induced cell death, an effect that correlated with a block of Akt kinase phosphorylation. EGF-induced TSP-1 and TIMP-1 promoter activity and protein expression were inhibited in FTC-133 cells stably expressing wtPTEN but not in cells expressing mutant PTEN. Furthermore, we found that wtPTEN inhibited EGF-but not TSP-1-stimulated FTC-133 cell migration and also inhibited invasion induced by EGF and by TSP-1. Finally, an antibody against TSP-1 reversed EGF-stimulated FTC-133 cell invasion as well as the constitutive invasive potential of FTC-238 cells. Overall, our results suggest that PTEN can function as an important modulator of extracellular matrix proteins in thyroid cancer. Therefore, analyzing differential regulation of TSP-1 by growth factors such as EGF can be helpful in understanding thyroid cancer development.

  13. Expression status and mutational analysis of the PTEN and P13K subunit genes in ovarian granulosa cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Bittinger, Sophie; Alexiadis, Maria; Fuller, Peter J

    2009-04-01

    Granulosa cell tumors (GCT) are a unique subset of ovarian tumors which have a molecular phenotype resembling that of follicle stimulating hormone (FSH)-stimulated pre-ovulatory granulosa cells. FSH acts via its receptor to stimulate signaling pathways including the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-AKT pathway. Activation of this pathway occurs in solid tumors, including ovarian epithelial tumors, through mutation of the PI3K subunit genes or inactivation of the tumor suppressor, PTEN. Activation of this pathway would be predicted to be tumorigenic in granulosa cells.Expression of the 2 PI3K subunit genes, PIK3CA, which encodes the catalytic subunit, and PIK3R1, which encodes the regulatory subunit, together with the PTEN gene was determined in a panel of GCT, 2 human GCT-derived cell lines, COV434 and KGN, and normal ovary. Direct sequence analysis was used to screen for mutations. Expression of all 3genes was observed in the GCT without evidence of overexpression for the PI3K subunit genes or loss of expression for PTEN. Sequence analysis of amplicons spanning exons 9and 20, in which greater than 75% of mutations occur in the PIK3CA gene did not identify any missense mutations. Similarly, the previously reported deletions in exons 12 and 13 of the PIK3R1 were not found in the GCT. Three amplicons spanning the entire coding sequence of the PTEN gene were sequenced; neither deletions nor mutations were identified.These findings suggest that activation of PI3K signaling through PI3K/PTEN mutation or altered expression, in contrast to many other types of solid tumor, is not associated with GCT.

  14. Systems biology reveals new strategies for personalizing cancer medicine and confirms the role of PTEN in resistance to trastuzumab.

    PubMed

    Faratian, Dana; Goltsov, Alexey; Lebedeva, Galina; Sorokin, Anatoly; Moodie, Stuart; Mullen, Peter; Kay, Charlene; Um, In Hwa; Langdon, Simon; Goryanin, Igor; Harrison, David J

    2009-08-15

    Resistance to targeted cancer therapies such as trastuzumab is a frequent clinical problem not solely because of insufficient expression of HER2 receptor but also because of the overriding activation states of cell signaling pathways. Systems biology approaches lend themselves to rapid in silico testing of factors, which may confer resistance to targeted therapies. Inthis study, we aimed to develop a new kinetic model that could be interrogated to predict resistance to receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) inhibitor therapies and directly test predictions in vitro and in clinical samples. The new mathematical model included RTK inhibitor antibody binding, HER2/HER3 dimerization and inhibition, AKT/mitogen-activated protein kinase cross-talk, and the regulatory properties of PTEN. The model was parameterized using quantitative phosphoprotein expression data from cancer cell lines using reverse-phase protein microarrays. Quantitative PTEN protein expression was found to be the key determinant of resistance to anti-HER2 therapy in silico, which was predictive of unseen experiments in vitro using the PTEN inhibitor bp(V). When measured in cancer cell lines, PTEN expression predicts sensitivity to anti-HER2 therapy; furthermore, this quantitative measurement is more predictive of response (relative risk, 3.0; 95% confidence interval, 1.6-5.5; P < 0.0001) than other pathway components taken in isolation and when tested by multivariate analysis in a cohort of 122 breast cancers treated with trastuzumab. For the first time, a systems biology approach has successfully been used to stratify patients for personalized therapy in cancer and is further compelling evidence that PTEN, appropriately measured in the clinical setting, refines clinical decision making in patients treated with anti-HER2 therapies.

  15. Determination of the implantation dose in silicon wafers by X-ray fluorescence analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Klockenkaemper, R.; Becker, M.; Bubert, H.; Burba, P. ); Palmetshofer, L. )

    1990-08-01

    The ion dose implanted in silicon wafers was determined by X-ray fluorescence analysis after the implantation process. As only near-surface layers below 1-{mu}m thickness were considered, the calibration could be carried out with external standards consisting of thin films of doped gelatine spread on pure wafers. Dose values for Cr and Co were determined between 4 {times} 10{sup 15} and 2 {times} 10{sup 17} atoms/cm{sup 2}, the detection limits being about 3 {times} 10{sup 14} atoms/cm{sup 2}. The results are precise and accurate apart from a residual scatter of less than 7%. This was confirmed by flame atomic absorption spectrometry after volatilization of the silicon matrix as SiF{sub 4}. It was found that ion-current measurements carried out during the implantation process can have considerable systematic errors.

  16. Expression of Somatostatin Receptor Type 2A and PTEN in Neuroendocrine Neoplasms Is Associated with Tumor Grade but Not with Site of Origin.

    PubMed

    Wada, Hideo; Matsuda, Katsuya; Akazawa, Yuko; Yamaguchi, Yuka; Miura, Shiro; Ueki, Nozomi; Kinoshita, Akira; Yoshiura, Koh-Ichiro; Kondo, Hisayoshi; Ito, Masahiro; Nagayasu, Takeshi; Nakashima, Masahiro

    2016-09-01

    Neuroendocrine neoplasms (NENs) are derived from endocrine cells in various organs and share common morphological features. This study aimed to clarify whether NENs of different organs are comparable at the molecular pathologic level. We retrospectively collected 99 cases of NENs from gastro-entero-pancreatic, lung, and other organs and reclassified these according to identical criteria. Grade, site, and molecular expression profile including NE markers, Ki-67, p53, somatostatin receptor type 2A (SSTR2A), and phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) were compared. PTEN immunoreactivity was also compared with genomic copy number by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (ddPCR). No significant differences were observed in the immunoreactivities of NE markers, p53, SSTR2A, or PTEN expression in NENs between the different organ sites. PTEN and p53 functional inactivation along with the loss of membranous SSTR2A expression appeared to be commonly involved in high-grade NEN. FISH results were significantly correlated with the level of PTEN immunoreactivity and with the findings of ddPCR analyses. The demonstration that these tumors are comparable at the molecular level will likely contribute to the broadening of therapeutic options such as the use of somatostatin analogues and mTOR inhibitors against NENs regardless of the affected organ, whereas molecular characterization of tumor grade will be useful for determining treatment strategy. PMID:27256098

  17. Dose-Dependent Mutation Rates Determine Optimum Erlotinib Dosing Strategies for EGFR Mutant Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lin L.; Li, Fei; Pao, William; Michor, Franziska

    2015-01-01

    Background The advent of targeted therapy for cancer treatment has brought about a paradigm shift in the clinical management of human malignancies. Agents such as erlotinib used for EGFR-mutant non-small cell lung cancer or imatinib for chronic myeloid leukemia, for instance, lead to rapid tumor responses. Unfortunately, however, resistance often emerges and renders these agents ineffective after a variable amount of time. The FDA-approved dosing schedules for these drugs were not designed to optimally prevent the emergence of resistance. To this end, we have previously utilized evolutionary mathematical modeling of treatment responses to elucidate the dosing schedules best able to prevent or delay the onset of resistance. Here we expand on our approaches by taking into account dose-dependent mutation rates at which resistant cells emerge. The relationship between the serum drug concentration and the rate at which resistance mutations arise can lead to non-intuitive results about the best dose administration strategies to prevent or delay the emergence of resistance. Methods We used mathematical modeling, available clinical trial data, and different considerations of the relationship between mutation rate and drug concentration to predict the effectiveness of different dosing strategies. Results We designed several distinct measures to interrogate the effects of different treatment dosing strategies and found that a low-dose continuous strategy coupled with high-dose pulses leads to the maximal delay until clinically observable resistance. Furthermore, the response to treatment is robust against different assumptions of the mutation rate as a function of drug concentration. Conclusions For new and existing targeted drugs, our methodology can be employed to compare the effectiveness of different dose administration schedules and investigate the influence of changing mutation rates on outcomes. PMID:26536620

  18. Neutron activation analysis for reference determination of the implantation dose of cobalt ions

    SciTech Connect

    Garten, R.P.H.; Bubert, H.; Palmetshofer, L.

    1992-05-15

    The authors prepared depth profilling reference materials by cobalt ion implantation at an ion energy of 300 keV into n-type silicon. The implanted Co dose was then determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) giving an analytical dynamic range of almost 5 decades and uncertainty of 1.5%. This form of analysis allows sources of error (beam spreading, misalignment) to be corrected. 70 refs., 3 tabs.

  19. Effects of PTEN gene alteration in patients with gallbladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Ali, Asgar; Mishra, Pramod Kumar; Sharma, Sadhana; Arora, Asit; Saluja, Sundeep Singh

    2015-12-01

    Gallbladder cancer (GBC) is an aggressive malignancy usually diagnosed in an advanced stage. We investigated the effects of alterations of the phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) gene on the occurrence and development of GBC, which has not been previously reported. A total 141 cases of GBC were analyzed for mutation, expression, and methylation across the nine exons of the PTEN gene. DNA sequencing methods were applied for mutation detection, whereas protein expression and methylation status were evaluated by immunohistochemical and methylation-specific PCR analysis, respectively. Novel PTEN mutations were observed in 6.3% of cases (9/141), and they included two silent mutations. In mutant cases, according to changes in codons, the respective amino acid sequences were also changed, which caused of proteins. A high percentage (72%) of loss of protein expression was observed more often in cases than in control samples. Interestingly, all nine cases with mutations showed loss of PTEN expression, whereas four of these nine cases showed positive promoter methylation. Hypermethylation was significantly more common in older patients than in younger ones (P<0.02). These findings suggest that PTEN mutations and inactivation may play an important role in the development and progression of gallbladder carcinoma. PMID:26586294

  20. PTEN inhibition and axon regeneration and neural repair

    PubMed Central

    Ohtake, Yosuke; Hayat, Umar; Li, Shuxin

    2015-01-01

    The intrinsic growth ability of all the neurons declines during development although some may grow better than others. Numerous intracellular signaling proteins and transcription factors have been shown to regulate the intrinsic growth capacity in mature neurons. Among them, PI3 kinase/Akt pathway is important for controlling axon elongation. As a negative regulator of this pathway, the tumor suppressor phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) appears critical to control the regenerative ability of young and adult neurons. This review will focus on recent research progress in axon regeneration and neural repair by PTEN inhibition and therapeutic potential of blocking this phosphatase for neurological disorders. Inhibition of PTEN by deletion in conditional knockout mice, knockdown by short-hairpin RNA, or blockade by pharmacological approaches, including administration of selective PTEN antagonist peptides, stimulates various degrees of axon regrowth in juvenile or adult rodents with central nervous system injuries. Importantly, post-injury PTEN suppression could enhance axonal growth and functional recovery in adult central nervous system after injury. PMID:26604880

  1. Identification of PTEN mutations in metastatic melanoma specimens

    PubMed Central

    Celebi, J. T.; Shendrik, I.; Silvers, D.; Peacocke, M.

    2000-01-01

    CONTEXT—PTEN, a tumour suppressor gene located on chromosome 10q23, develops somatic mutations in various tumours and tumour cell lines including brain, endometrium, prostate, breast, kidney, thyroid, liver, and melanoma.
OBJECTIVES—To investigate the mutational profile of this gene further, as well as its role in tumour progression in melanoma.
DESIGN, SETTINGS—We examined 21 metastatic melanoma samples for 10q23 allelic losses and PTEN sequence alterations. Additionally, we screened these samples for mutations in CDKN2A, a gene in which alterations are well documented in primary melanoma as well as in the germline of familial melanoma.
RESULTS—Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at 10q23 was observed in 33% (7/21) of the samples tested. We identified four sequence alterations in PTEN (19%) and two in CDKN2A (9.5%). Of interest, only one case showed mutations in both genes.
CONCLUSIONS—These data support the notion that PTEN alterations occur in some metastatic melanomas, and that mutation of this gene plays a role in the progression of some forms of melanoma.


Keywords: PTEN; CDKN2A; melanoma PMID:10978354

  2. Activating PTEN by COX-2 inhibitors antagonizes radiation-induced AKT activation contributing to radiosensitization

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Zhen; Gan, Ye-Hua

    2015-05-01

    Radiotherapy is still one of the most effective nonsurgical treatments for many tumors. However, radioresistance remains a major impediment to radiotherapy. Although COX-2 inhibitors can induce radiosensitization, the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. In this study, we showed that COX-2 selective inhibitor celecoxib enhanced the radiation-induced inhibition of cell proliferation and apoptosis in HeLa and SACC-83 cells. Treatment with celecoxib alone dephosphorylated phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN), promoted PTEN membrane translocation or activation, and correspondingly dephosphorylated or inactivated protein kinase B (AKT). By contrast, treatment with radiation alone increased PTEN phosphorylation, inhibited PTEN membrane translocation and correspondingly activated AKT in the two cell lines. However, treatment with celecoxib or another COX-2 selective inhibitor (valdecoxib) completely blocked radiation-induced increase of PTEN phosphorylation, rescued radiation-induced decrease in PTEN membrane translocation, and correspondingly inactivated AKT. Moreover, celecoxib could also upregulate PTEN protein expression by downregulating Sp1 expression, thereby leading to the activation of PTEN transcription. Our results suggested that COX-2 inhibitors could enhance radiosensitization at least partially by activating PTEN to antagonize radiation-induced AKT activation. - Highlights: • COX-2 inhibitor, celecoxib, could enhance radiosensitization. • Radiation induced PTEN inactivation (phosphorylation) and AKT activation. • COX-2 inhibitor induced PTEN expression and activation, and inactivated AKT. • COX-2 inhibitor enhanced radiosensitization through activating PTEN.

  3. Differential Requirement for Pten Lipid and Protein Phosphatase Activity during Zebrafish Embryonic Development

    PubMed Central

    Stumpf, Miriam; den Hertog, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    The lipid- and protein phosphatase PTEN is one of the most frequently mutated tumor suppressor genes in human cancers and many mutations found in tumor samples directly affect PTEN phosphatase activity. In order to understand the functional consequences of these mutations in vivo, the aim of our study was to dissect the role of Pten phosphatase activities during zebrafish embryonic development. As in other model organisms, zebrafish mutants lacking functional Pten are embryonically lethal. Zebrafish have two pten genes and pten double homozygous zebrafish embryos develop a severe pleiotropic phenotype around 4 days post fertilization, which can be largely rescued by re-introduction of pten mRNA at the one-cell stage. We used this assay to characterize the rescue-capacity of Pten and variants with mutations that disrupt lipid, protein or both phosphatase activities. The pleiotropic phenotype at 4dpf could only be rescued by wild type Pten, indicating that both phosphatase activities are required for normal zebrafish embryonic development. An earlier aspect of the phenotype, hyperbranching of intersegmental vessels, however, was rescued by Pten that retained lipid phosphatase activity, independent of protein phosphatase activity. Lipid phosphatase activity was also required for moderating pAkt levels at 4 dpf. We propose that the role of Pten during angiogenesis mainly consists of suppressing PI3K signaling via its lipid phosphatase activity, whereas the complex process of embryonic development requires lipid and protein phosphatase of Pten. PMID:26848951

  4. The PTEN tumor suppressor gene and its role in lymphoma pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoxiao; Huang, Huiqiang; Young, Ken H.

    2015-01-01

    The phosphatase and tensin homolog gene PTEN is one of the most frequently mutated tumor suppressor genes in human cancer. Loss of PTEN function occurs in a variety of human cancers via its mutation, deletion, transcriptional silencing, or protein instability. PTEN deficiency in cancer has been associated with advanced disease, chemotherapy resistance, and poor survival. Impaired PTEN function, which antagonizes phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling, causes the accumulation of phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-triphosphate and thereby the suppression of downstream components of the PI3K pathway, including the protein kinase B and mammalian target of rapamycin kinases. In addition to having lipid phosphorylation activity, PTEN has critical roles in the regulation of genomic instability, DNA repair, stem cell self-renewal, cellular senescence, and cell migration. Although PTEN deficiency in solid tumors has been studied extensively, rare studies have investigated PTEN alteration in lymphoid malignancies. However, genomic or epigenomic aberrations of PTEN and dysregulated signaling are likely critical in lymphoma pathogenesis and progression. This review provides updated summary on the role of PTEN deficiency in human cancers, specifically in lymphoid malignancies; the molecular mechanisms of PTEN regulation; and the distinct functions of nuclear PTEN. Therapeutic strategies for rescuing PTEN deficiency in human cancers are proposed. PMID:26655726

  5. Modulation of specific protein expression levels by PTEN: identification of AKAP121, DHFR, G3BP, Rap1, and RCC1 as potential targets of PTEN.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yanping; Wernyj, Roman P; Norton, Darrell D; Precht, Patricia; Seminario, Maria-Cristina; Wange, Ronald L

    2005-05-26

    The tumor suppressor PTEN is mutated in a high percentage of human cancers, and is implicated in pathways regulating cell growth, proliferation, survival, and migration. Despite significant advances, our understanding of its mechanisms of action remains incomplete. We have used a high-throughput proteomic immunoblotting approach to identify proteins whose expression levels are modulated by PTEN. Out of over 800 proteins screened, 22 proteins showed significant changes in expression. Five proteins that exhibited two-fold or greater changes in expression level were further characterized. AKAP121 and G3BP expression was reduced, while dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), Rap1 and RCC1 expression was elevated in response to PTEN expression in a PTEN-null T-cell leukemia line. The phosphatase activity of PTEN was required for these effects. However, direct inhibition of PI-3 Kinase could mimic PTEN in modulating expression of DHFR, G3BP, Rap1 and RCC1, but not AKAP121. Real-time PCR showed that the effects of PTEN were primarily post-transcriptional, and would not have been revealed by mRNA-based screens. We conclude from these data that PTEN can modulate the expression level of a number of different proteins. The identified proteins have the potential to serve as previously unrecognized effectors of PTEN, and suggest the existence of additional complexity in the modes by which PTEN can regulate cellular biology.

  6. Fish oil suppresses cell growth and metastatic potential by regulating PTEN and NF-κB signaling in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kansal, Shevali; Bhatnagar, Archana; Agnihotri, Navneet

    2014-01-01

    Homeostasis in eukaryotic tissues is tightly regulated by an intricate balance of the prosurvival and antisurvival signals. The tumor suppressor PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10), a dual-specificity phosphatase, plays a functional role in cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. NF-κB and its downstream regulators (such as VEGF) play a central role in prevention of apoptosis, promotion of inflammation and tumor growth. Therefore, we thought to estimate the expression of PTEN, Poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP), NF-κBp50, NF-κBp65 and VEGF to evaluate the effect of supplementation of fish oil on apoptotic and inflammatory signaling in colon carcinoma. Male wistar rats in Group I received purified diet while Group II and III received modified diet supplemented with FO∶CO(1∶1)&FO∶CO(2.5∶1) respectively. These were further subdivided into controls receiving ethylenediamine-tetra acetic-acid and treated groups received dimethylhydrazine-dihydrochloride (DMH)/week for 4 weeks. Animals sacrificed 48 hours after last injection constituted initiation phase and that sacrificed after 16 weeks constituted post-initiation phase. We have analysed expression of PTEN, NF-κBp50, NF-κBp65 by flowcytometer and nuclear localization of NF-κB by immunofluorescence. PARP and VEGF were assessed by immunohistochemistry. In the initiation phase, animals receiving DMH have shown increased % of apoptotic cells, PTEN, PARP, NF-κBp50, NF-κBp65 and VEGF however in post-initiation phase no significant alteration in apoptosis with decreased PTEN and increased PARP, NF-κBp50, NF-κBp65 and VEGF were observed as compared to control animals. On treatment with both ratios of fish oil in both the phases, augmentation in % of apoptotic cells, decreased PTEN, PARP, NF-κBp50, NF-κBp65 and VEGF were documented with respect to DMH treated animals with effect being more exerted with higher ration in post-initiation phase. Hence, fish oil activates apoptosis, diminishes

  7. Membrane Association of the PTEN Tumor Suppressor: Molecular Details of the Protein-Membrane Complex from SPR Binding Studies and Neutron Reflection

    PubMed Central

    Shenoy, Siddharth; Shekhar, Prabhanshu; Heinrich, Frank; Daou, Marie-Claire; Gericke, Arne; Ross, Alonzo H.; Lösche, Mathias

    2012-01-01

    The structure and function of the PTEN phosphatase is investigated by studying its membrane affinity and localization on in-plane fluid, thermally disordered synthetic membrane models. The membrane association of the protein depends strongly on membrane composition, where phosphatidylserine (PS) and phosphatidylinositol diphosphate (PI(4,5)P2) act pronouncedly synergistic in pulling the enzyme to the membrane surface. The equilibrium dissociation constants for the binding of wild type (wt) PTEN to PS and PI(4,5)P2 were determined to be Kd∼12 µM and 0.4 µM, respectively, and Kd∼50 nM if both lipids are present. Membrane affinities depend critically on membrane fluidity, which suggests multiple binding sites on the protein for PI(4,5)P2. The PTEN mutations C124S and H93R show binding affinities that deviate strongly from those measured for the wt protein. Both mutants bind PS more strongly than wt PTEN. While C124S PTEN has at least the same affinity to PI(4,5)P2 and an increased apparent affinity to PI(3,4,5)P3, due to its lack of catalytic activity, H93R PTEN shows a decreased affinity to PI(4,5)P2 and no synergy in its binding with PS and PI(4,5)P2. Neutron reflection measurements show that the PTEN phosphatase “scoots" along the membrane surface (penetration <5 Å) but binds the membrane tightly with its two major domains, the C2 and phosphatase domains, as suggested by the crystal structure. The regulatory C-terminal tail is most likely displaced from the membrane and organized on the far side of the protein, ∼60 Å away from the bilayer surface, in a rather compact structure. The combination of binding studies and neutron reflection allows us to distinguish between PTEN mutant proteins and ultimately may identify the structural features required for membrane binding and activation of PTEN. PMID:22505997

  8. An absolute dose determination of helical tomotherapy accelerator, TomoTherapy High-Art II

    SciTech Connect

    Bailat, Claude J.; Buchillier, Thierry; Pachoud, Marc; Moeckli, Raphaeel; Bochud, Francois O.

    2009-09-15

    Purpose: A helical tomotherapy accelerator presents a dosimetric challenge because, to this day, there is no internationally accepted protocol for the determination of the absolute dose. Because of this reality, we investigated the different alternatives for characterizing and measuring the absolute dose of such an accelerator. We tested several dosimetric techniques with various metrological traceabilities as well as using a number of phantoms in static and helical modes. Methods: Firstly, the relationship between the reading of ionization chambers and the absorbed dose is dependent on the beam quality value of the photon beam. For high energy photons, the beam quality is specified by the tissue phantom ratio (TPR{sub 20,10}) and it is therefore necessary to know the TPR{sub 20,10} to calculate the dose delivered by a given accelerator. This parameter is obtained through the ratio of the absorbed dose at 20 and 10 cm depths in water and was measured in the particular conditions of the tomotherapy accelerator. Afterward, measurements were performed using the ionization chamber (model A1SL) delivered as a reference instrument by the vendor. This chamber is traceable in absorbed dose to water in a Co-60 beam to a water calorimeter of the American metrology institute (NIST). Similarly, in Switzerland, each radiotherapy department is directly traceable to the Swiss metrology institute (METAS) in absorbed dose to water based on a water calorimeter. For our research, this traceability was obtained by using an ionization chamber traceable to METAS (model NE 2611A), which is the secondary standard of our institute. Furthermore, in order to have another fully independent measurement method, we determined the dose using alanine dosimeters provided by and traceable to the British metrology institute (NPL); they are calibrated in absorbed dose to water using a graphite calorimeter. And finally, we wanted to take into account the type of chamber routinely used in clinical

  9. Determining the Lowest Optimally Effective Methotrexate Dose for Individual RA Patients Using Their Dose Response Relation in a Tight Control Treatment Approach

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Sandhya C.; Jacobs, Johannes W. G.; Bakker, Marije F.; Jahangier, Z. Nazira; Bijlsma, Johannes W. J.; van Laar, Jacobs M.; Lafeber, Floris P. J. G.; Welsing, Paco M. J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the optimal methotrexate dose in individual patients and to explore whether this optimal dose and the level of disease activity at that dose could be predicted. Methods Data from CAMERA II trial comparing MTX and MTX with 10 mg of prednisone both in a tight control treatment strategy in early RA was used. For each patient a curve for disease activity over time was fitted and the MTX dose after which further step-up did not result in relevant improvement in disease activity anymore was determined the 'lowest optimally effective MTX dose (LOED)'. The association of demographic and clinical characteristics at baseline with this LOED and with the level of disease activity reached at LOED was studied. Results In 204 (100 MTX and 104 MTX with prednisone) out of 236 patients LOED could be defined. 10 mg/wk was the most prevalent LOED in patients treated with MTX and prednisone and 10 mg/wk, 20 mg/wk and 30 mg/wk in the MTX strategy. Although the specific LOED could not reliably be predicted, higher baseline disease activity, height and lower weight were associated with higher LOEDs (i.e at least 15 mg/wk). A score was presented to decide on a starting dose of 10 mg/wk or (at least) 15 mg/wk. The level of disease activity at LOED could not be reliably predicted. Conclusion A starting dose of 10 mg/wk might be a good choice for most patients and is frequently already the optimal dose. However, a subgroup of patient can be determined who would require higher MTX doses. PMID:26987073

  10. SU-E-T-91: Correction Method to Determine Surface Dose for OSL Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, T; Higgins, P

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: OSL detectors are commonly used in clinic due to their numerous advantages, such as linear response, negligible energy, angle and temperature dependence in clinical range, for verification of the doses beyond the dmax. Although, due to the bulky shielding envelope, this type of detectors fails to measure skin dose, which is an important assessment of patient ability to finish the treatment on time and possibility of acute side effects. This study aims to optimize the methodology of determination of skin dose for conventional accelerators and a flattening filter free Tomotherapy. Methods: Measurements were done for x-ray beams: 6 MV (Varian Clinac 2300, 10×10 cm{sup 2} open field, SSD = 100 cm) and for 5.5 MV (Tomotherapy, 15×40 cm{sup 2} field, SAD = 85 cm). The detectors were placed at the surface of the solid water phantom and at the reference depth (dref=1.7cm (Varian 2300), dref =1.0 cm (Tomotherapy)). The measurements for OSLs were related to the externally exposed OSLs measurements, and further were corrected to surface dose using an extrapolation method indexed to the baseline Attix ion chamber measurements. A consistent use of the extrapolation method involved: 1) irradiation of three OSLs stacked on top of each other on the surface of the phantom; 2) measurement of the relative dose value for each layer; and, 3) extrapolation of these values to zero thickness. Results: OSL measurements showed an overestimation of surface doses by the factor 2.31 for Varian 2300 and 2.65 for Tomotherapy. The relationships: SD{sup 2300} = 0.68 × M{sup 2300}-12.7 and SDτoμo = 0.73 × Mτoμo-13.1 were found to correct the single OSL measurements to surface doses in agreement with Attix measurements to within 0.1% for both machines. Conclusion: This work provides simple empirical relationships for surface dose measurements using single OSL detectors.

  11. Validation of OSLD and a treatment planning system for surface dose determination in IMRT treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuang, Audrey H.; Olch, Arthur J.

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of skin dose determination for composite multibeam 3D conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatments using optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters (OSLDs) and Eclipse treatment planning system. Methods: Surface doses measured by OSLDs in the buildup region for open field 6 MV beams, either perpendicular or oblique to the surface, were evaluated by comparing against dose measured by Markus Parallel Plate (PP) chamber, surface diodes, and calculated by Monte Carlo simulations. The accuracy of percent depth dose (PDD) calculation in the buildup region from the authors’ Eclipse system (Version 10), which was precisely commissioned in the buildup region and was used with 1 mm calculation grid, was also evaluated by comparing to PP chamber measurements and Monte Carlo simulations. Finally, an anthropomorphic pelvic phantom was CT scanned with OSLDs in place at three locations. A planning target volume (PTV) was defined that extended close to the surface. Both an 8 beam 3DCRT and IMRT plan were generated in Eclipse. OSLDs were placed at the CT scanned reference locations to measure the skin doses and were compared to diode measurements and Eclipse calculations. Efforts were made to ensure that the dose comparison was done at the effective measurement points of each detector and corresponding locations in CT images. Results: The depth of the effective measurement point is 0.8 mm for OSLD when used in the buildup region in a 6 MV beam and is 0.7 mm for the authors’ surface diode. OSLDs and Eclipse system both agree well with Monte Carlo and/or Markus PP ion chamber and/or diode in buildup regions in 6 MV beams with normal or oblique incidence and across different field sizes. For the multiple beam 3DCRT plan and IMRT plans, the differences between OSLDs and Eclipse calculations on the surface of the anthropomorphic phantom were within 3% and distance-to-agreement less than 0.3 mm

  12. Microdosimetric measurements for neutron-absorbed dose determination during proton therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Andújar, Angélica; DeLuca, Paul M.; Thornton, Allan F.; Fitzek, Markus; Hecksel, Draik; Farr, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    This work presents microdosimetric measurements performed at the Midwest Proton Radiotherapy Institute in Bloomington, Indiana, USA. The measurements were done simulating clinical setups with a water phantom and for a variety of stopping targets. The water phantom was irradiated by a proton spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) and by a proton pencil beam. Stopping target measurements were performed only for the pencil beam. The targets used were made of polyethylene, brass and lead. The objective of this work was to determine the neutron-absorbed dose for a passive and active proton therapy delivery, and for the interactions of the proton beam with materials typically in the beam line of a proton therapy treatment nozzle. Neutron doses were found to be higher at 45° and 90° from the beam direction for the SOBP configuration by a factor of 1.1 and 1.3, respectively, compared with the pencil beam. Meanwhile, the pencil beam configuration produced neutron-absorbed doses 2.2 times higher at 0° than the SOBP. For stopping targets, lead was found to dominate the neutron-absorbed dose for most angles due to a large production of low-energy neutrons emitted isotropically. PMID:22334761

  13. A METHODOLOGY FOR DETERMINING THE DOSE RATE FOR BOUNDING MASS LIMITS IN A 9977 PACKAGING

    SciTech Connect

    Abramczyk, G.; Bellamy, S.; Nathan, S.; Loftin, B.

    2012-05-24

    The Small Gram Quantity (SGQ) concept is based on the understanding that the hazards associated with the shipment of a radioactive material are directly proportional to its mass. This study describes a methodology that estimates the acceptable masses for several neutron and gamma emitting isotopes that can be shipped in a 9977 Package compliant with the Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71 (10CFR71) external radiation level limits. 10CFR71.33 states that a shipping application identifies the radioactive and fissile materials at their maximum quantity and provides an evaluation demonstrating compliance with the external radiation standards. Since rather small amounts of some isotopes emit sufficiently strong radiation to produce a large external dose rate, quantifying of the dose rate for a proposed content is a challenging issue for the SGQ approach. It is essential to quantify external radiation levels from several common gamma and neutron sources that can be safely placed in a specific packaging, to ensure compliance with federal regulations. A methodology was established for determining the dose rate for bounding mass limits for a set of isotopes in the Model 9977 Shipping Package. Calculations were performed to estimate external radiation levels using the MCNP radiation transport code to develop a set of response multipliers (Green's functions) for 'dose per source particle' for each neutron and photon spectral group. The source spectrum from one gram of each isotope was folded with the response multipliers to generate the dose rate per gram of each isotope in the 9977 shipping package and its associated shielded containers. The maximum amount of a single isotope that could be shipped within the regulatory limits for dose rate at the surface was determined. For a package containing a mixture of isotopes, the acceptability for shipment can be determined by a sum of fractions approach. Furthermore, the results of this analysis can be easily

  14. Radioactivity determination of sealed pure beta-sources by surface dose measurements and Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Chang Heon; Jung, Seongmoon; Choi, Kanghyuk; Son, Kwang-Jae; Lee, Jun Sig; Ye, Sung-Joon

    2016-04-01

    This study aims to determine the activity of a sealed pure beta-source by measuring the surface dose rate using an extrapolation chamber. A conversion factor (cGy s-1 Bq-1), which was defined as the ratio of surface dose rate to activity, can be calculated by Monte Carlo simulations of the extrapolation chamber measurement. To validate this hypothesis the certified activities of two standard pure beta-sources of Sr/Y-90 and Si/P-32 were compared with those determined by this method. In addition, a sealed test source of Sr/Y-90 was manufactured by the HANARO reactor group of KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute) and used to further validate this method. The measured surface dose rates of the Sr/Y-90 and Si/P-32 standard sources were 4.615×10-5 cGy s-1 and 2.259×10-5 cGy s-1, respectively. The calculated conversion factors of the two sources were 1.213×10-8 cGy s-1 Bq-1 and 1.071×10-8 cGy s-1 Bq-1, respectively. Therefore, the activity of the standard Sr/Y-90 source was determined to be 3.995 kBq, which was 2.0% less than the certified value (4.077 kBq). For Si/P-32 the determined activity was 2.102 kBq, which was 6.6% larger than the certified activity (1.971 kBq). The activity of the Sr/Y-90 test source was determined to be 4.166 kBq, while the apparent activity reported by KAERI was 5.803 kBq. This large difference might be due to evaporation and diffusion of the source liquid during preparation and uncertainty in the amount of weighed aliquot of source liquid. The overall uncertainty involved in this method was determined to be 7.3%. We demonstrated that the activity of a sealed pure beta-source could be conveniently determined by complementary combination of measuring the surface dose rate and Monte Carlo simulations.

  15. Determination of the spatial resolution required for the HEDR dose code. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project: Dose code recovery activities, Calculation 007

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, B.A.; Simpson, J.C.

    1992-12-01

    A series of scoping calculations has been undertaken to evaluate the doses that may have been received by individuals living in the vicinity of the Hanford site. This scoping calculation (Calculation 007) examined the spatial distribution of potential doses resulting from releases in the year 1945. This study builds on the work initiated in the first scoping calculation, of iodine in cow`s milk; the third scoping calculation, which added additional pathways; the fifth calculation, which addressed the uncertainty of the dose estimates at a point; and the sixth calculation, which extrapolated the doses throughout the atmospheric transport domain. A projection of dose to representative individuals throughout the proposed HEDR atmospheric transport domain was prepared on the basis of the HEDR source term. Addressed in this calculation were the contributions to iodine-131 thyroid dose of infants from (1) air submersion and groundshine external dose, (2) inhalation, (3) ingestion of soil by humans, (4) ingestion of leafy vegetables, (5) ingestion of other vegetables and fruits, (6) ingestion of meat, (7) ingestion of eggs, and (8) ingestion of cows` milk from-Feeding Regime 1 as described in scoping calculation 001.

  16. Determination of the temporal resolution required for the HEDR dose code. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project: Dose code recovery activities, Calculation 008

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, B.A.; Simpson, J.C.

    1992-12-01

    A series of scoping calculations has been undertaken to evaluate the radiation doses that may have-been received by individuals living in the vicinity of the Hanford site. This scoping calculation (Calculation 008) examined the potential for changes in the uncertainty distributions of potential doses from releases in the year 1945 as a function of temporal resolution of the intermediate data storage. This study builds on the work initiated in the fifth scoping calculation, which addressed the uncertainty of the dose estimates at a point; the sixth calculation, which extrapolated the doses throughout the atmospheric transport domain; and the seventh, which evaluated the spatial scales across the domain. A projection of dose to representative individuals throughout the proposed HEDR atmospheric transport domain was prepared on the basis of the HEDR source term. Addressed in this calculation were the contributions to iodine-131 thyroid dose of infants from (1) air submersion and groundshine external dose, (2) inhalation, (3) ingestion of soil by humans, (4) ingestion of leafy vegetables, (5) ingestion of other vegetables and fruits, (6) ingestion of meat, (7) ingestion of eggs, and ingestion of cow`s milk.

  17. PTEN overexpression improves cisplatin-resistance of human ovarian cancer cells through upregulating KRT10 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Huijuan; Wang, Ke; Liu, Wenxin; Hao, Quan

    2014-02-07

    Highlights: • Overexpression of PTEN enhanced the sensitivity of C13K cells to cisplatin. • KRT10 is a downstream molecule of PTEN involved in the resistance-reversing effect. • Overexpression of KRT10 enhanced the chemosensitivity of C13K cells to cisplatin. - Abstract: Multi-drug resistance (MDR) is a common cause of the failure of chemotherapy in ovarian cancer. PTEN, a tumor suppressor gene, has been demonstrated to be able to reverse cisplatin-resistance in ovarian cancer cell line C13K. However, the downstream molecules of PTEN involved in the resistance-reversing effect have not been completely clarified. Therefore, we screened the downstream molecules of PTEN and studied their interactions in C13K ovarian cancer cells using a 3D culture model. Firstly, we constructed an ovarian cancer cell line stably expressing PTEN, C13K/PTEN. MTT assay showed that overexpression of PTEN enhanced the sensitivity of C13K cells to cisplatin, but not to paclitaxel. Then we examined the differently expressed proteins that interacted with PTEN in C13K/PTEN cells with or without cisplatin treatment by co-immunoprecipitation. KRT10 was identified as a differently expressed protein in cisplatin-treated C13K/PTEN cells. Further study confirmed that cisplatin could induce upregulation of KRT10 mRNA and protein in C13K/PTEN cells and there was a directly interaction between KRT10 and PTEN. Forced expression of KRT10 in C13K cells also enhanced cisplatin-induced proliferation inhibition and apoptosis of C13K cells. In addition, KRT10 siRNA blocked cisplatin-induced proliferation inhibition of C13K/PTEN cells. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that KRT10 is a downstream molecule of PTEN which improves cisplatin-resistance of ovarian cancer and forced KRT10 overexpression may also act as a therapeutic method for overcoming MDR in ovarian cancer.

  18. Benefit to neoadjuvant anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-targeted therapies in HER2-positive primary breast cancer is independent of phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted from chromosome 10 (PTEN) status

    PubMed Central

    Nuciforo, P. G.; Aura, C.; Holmes, E.; Prudkin, L.; Jimenez, J.; Martinez, P.; Ameels, H.; de la Peña, L.; Ellis, C.; Eidtmann, H.; Piccart-Gebhart, M. J.; Scaltriti, M.; Baselga, J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Assessment of phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted from chromosome 10 (PTEN) might be an important tool in identifying human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive breast cancer patients unlikely to derive benefit from anti-HER2 therapies. However, studies to date have failed to demonstrate its predictive role in any treatment setting. Patients and methods Prospectively collected baseline core biopsies from 429 early-stage HER2-positive breast cancer patients treated with trastuzumab, lapatinib, or their combination in the Neo-ALTTO study were stained using two anti-PTEN monoclonal antibodies (CST and DAKO). The association of PTEN status and PI3K pathway activation (defined as either PTEN loss and/or PIK3CA mutation) with total pathological complete response (tpCR) at surgery, event-free survival (EFS), and overall survival (OS) was evaluated. Results PTEN loss was observed in 27% and 29% of patients (all arms, n = 361 and n = 363) for CST and DAKO, respectively. PTEN loss was more frequently observed in hormone receptor (HR)-negative (33% and 36% with CST and DAKO, respectively) compared with HR-positive tumours (20% and 22% with CST and DAKO, respectively). No significant differences in tpCR rates were observed according to PTEN status. PI3K pathway activation was found in 47% and 48% of patients (all arms, n = 302 and n = 301) for CST and DAKO, respectively. Similarly, tpCR rates were not significantly different for those with or without PI3K pathway activation. Neither PTEN status nor PI3K pathway activation were predictive of tpCR, EFS, or OS, independently of treatment arm or HR status. High inter-antibody and inter-observer agreements were found (>90%). Modification of scoring variables significantly affected the correlation between PTEN and HR status but not with tpCR. Conclusion These data show that PTEN status determination is not a useful biomarker to predict resistance to trastuzumab and lapatinib-based therapies. The lack of

  19. Method to determine the position-dependant metal correction factor for dose-rate equivalent laser testing of semiconductor devices

    DOEpatents

    Horn, Kevin M.

    2013-07-09

    A method reconstructs the charge collection from regions beneath opaque metallization of a semiconductor device, as determined from focused laser charge collection response images, and thereby derives a dose-rate dependent correction factor for subsequent broad-area, dose-rate equivalent, laser measurements. The position- and dose-rate dependencies of the charge-collection magnitude of the device are determined empirically and can be combined with a digital reconstruction methodology to derive an accurate metal-correction factor that permits subsequent absolute dose-rate response measurements to be derived from laser measurements alone. Broad-area laser dose-rate testing can thereby be used to accurately determine the peak transient current, dose-rate response of semiconductor devices to penetrating electron, gamma- and x-ray irradiation.

  20. Analysis of Potassium in Bricks--Determining the Dose Rate from {sup 40}K for Thermoluminescence Dating

    SciTech Connect

    Musilek, Ladislav; Polach, Tomas; Trojek, Tomas

    2008-08-07

    Thermoluminescence (TL) dating is based on accumulating the natural radiation dose in the material of a dated artefact (brick, pottery, etc.), and comparing the dose accumulated during the lifetime of the object with the dose rate within the sample collected for TL measurement. Determining the dose rate from natural radionuclides in materials is one of the most important and most difficult parts of the technique. The most important radionuclides present are usually nuclides of the uranium and thorium decay series and {sup 40}K. An analysis of the total potassium concentration enables us to determine the {sup 40}K content effectively, and from this it is possible to calculate the dose rate originating from this radiation source. X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis can be used to determine the potassium concentration in bricks rapidly and efficiently. The procedure for analysing potassium, examples of results of dose rate calculation and possible sources of error are described here.

  1. [Study of immutable variables determining rHuEPO dose requirements on hemodialysis patients].

    PubMed

    Gascón, A; Virto, R; Lou, L M; Pernaute, R; Moreno, R; Pérez, J; Aladrén, M J; Moragrega, B; Castillón, E; Gómez, R; Vives, P J; Alvarez, R; García, F J; Castilla, J; Gutiérrez Colón, J A

    2005-01-01

    Patients receiving recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) therapy show wide variability in their responsiveness to the drug. Variables that affect rHuEPO dose requirements can be broadly divided into modificable and immutable characteristics. Most of the scientific research on rHuEPO hyporesponsiveness has focused on modificable variables (iron status, dialysis adequacy), while immutable variables such as gender, etiology of chronic renal failure (CRF) and age have been insufficiently explored. A cross sectional study was performed in order to evaluate if immutable patient characteristics determine rHuEPO dose requirements among 215 patients (52% males; mean age 66 +/- 14 years) on hemodialysis (HD) for more than twelve months. Data were collected at 10 hemodialysis units in Aragon. Patients were divided into three groups according to their gender, their cause of CRF (diabetic nephropathy, vascular nephropathy, tubulointerstitial nephropathy and primary glomerulonephritis) and their age (younger than 60 years, from 60 to 75 years, older than 75 years). Despite a similar dose of rHuEPO, women had lower mean hemoglobin (11.1 +/- 1.5 versus 11.6 +/- 1.7 g/dl; p = 0.0258) than men. The greater hemoglobin in men than women may be attributed to greater serum albumin in men (3.5 +/- 0.3 versus 3.7 +/- 0.3 mg/dl; p = 0.0001). Requirements of rHuEPO were higher in the patients with etiology of primary glomerulonephritis compared with those with the other etiologies, even those with diabetic nephropathy (p = 0.0374). The rHuE-PO doses required to obtain similar hemoglobin levels were higher in patients younger than 60 years (p = 0.0249). We conclude that women, patients with primary glomerulonephritis as cause of CRF, and patients younger than 60 years showed the highest requirements of rHuEPO doses. PMID:16392304

  2. Determination of the contribution of livestock water ingestion to dose from the cow-milk pathway. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project: Dose code recovery activities, Calculation 002

    SciTech Connect

    Ikenberry, T.A.

    1992-12-01

    As part of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project, a series of calculations has been undertaken to evaluate the absolute and relative contribution of different exposure pathways to thyroid doses that may have been received by individuals living in the vicinity of the Hanford Site. These evaluations include some pathways that were included in the Phase I air-pathway dose evaluations (HEDR staff 1991, page xx), as well as other potential exposure pathways being evaluated for possible inclusion in the future HEDR modeling efforts. This calculation (002) examined the possible doses that may have been received by individuals who drank milk from cows that drank from sources of water (stock tanks and farm ponds) exposed to iodine-131 in the atmosphere during 1945.

  3. Determination of radionuclides and pathways contributing to dose in 1945. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project: Dose code recovery activities, Calculation 003

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, B.A.

    1992-12-01

    A series of scoping calculations has been undertaken to evaluate the absolute and relative contributions of different radionuclides and exposure pathways to doses that may have been received by individuals living in the vicinity of the Hanford Site. This scoping calculation (Calculation 003) examined the contributions of numerous radionuclides to dose via environmental exposures and accumulation in foods. This study builds on the work initiated in the first scoping study of iodine in cow`s milk (calculation 001). Addressed in this calculation were the contributions to organ and effective dose of infants and adults from (1) air submersion and groundshine external dose, (2) inhalation, (3) ingestion of soil by humans, (4) ingestion of leafy vegetables, (5) ingestion of other vegetables and fruits, (6) ingestion of meat, (7) ingestion of eggs, and (8) ingestion of cows` milk from Feeding Regime 1, as described in Calculation 001.

  4. PACKAGING CERTIFICATION PROGRAM METHODOLOGY FOR DETERMINING DOSE RATES FOR SMALL GRAM QUANTITIES IN SHIPPING PACKAGINGS

    SciTech Connect

    Nathan, S.; Loftin, B.; Abramczyk, G.; Bellamy, S.

    2012-05-09

    The Small Gram Quantity (SGQ) concept is based on the understanding that small amounts of hazardous materials, in this case radioactive materials (RAM), are significantly less hazardous than large amounts of the same materials. This paper describes a methodology designed to estimate an SGQ for several neutron and gamma emitting isotopes that can be shipped in a package compliant with 10 CFR Part 71 external radiation level limits regulations. These regulations require packaging for the shipment of radioactive materials, under both normal and accident conditions, to perform the essential functions of material containment, subcriticality, and maintain external radiation levels within the specified limits. By placing the contents in a helium leak-tight containment vessel, and limiting the mass to ensure subcriticality, the first two essential functions are readily met. Some isotopes emit sufficiently strong photon radiation that small amounts of material can yield a large dose rate outside the package. Quantifying the dose rate for a proposed content is a challenging issue for the SGQ approach. It is essential to quantify external radiation levels from several common gamma and neutron sources that can be safely placed in a specific packaging, to ensure compliance with federal regulations. The Packaging Certification Program (PCP) Methodology for Determining Dose Rate for Small Gram Quantities in Shipping Packagings provides bounding shielding calculations that define mass limits compliant with 10 CFR 71.47 for a set of proposed SGQ isotopes. The approach is based on energy superposition with dose response calculated for a set of spectral groups for a baseline physical packaging configuration. The methodology includes using the MCNP radiation transport code to evaluate a family of neutron and photon spectral groups using the 9977 shipping package and its associated shielded containers as the base case. This results in a set of multipliers for 'dose per particle' for

  5. Improving Dose Determination Accuracy in Nonstandard Fields of the Varian TrueBeam Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyun, Megan A.

    In recent years, the use of flattening-filter-free (FFF) linear accelerators in radiation-based cancer therapy has gained popularity, especially for hypofractionated treatments (high doses of radiation given in few sessions). However, significant challenges to accurate radiation dose determination remain. If physicists cannot accurately determine radiation dose in a clinical setting, cancer patients treated with these new machines will not receive safe, accurate and effective treatment. In this study, an extensive characterization of two commonly used clinical radiation detectors (ionization chambers and diodes) and several potential reference detectors (thermoluminescent dosimeters, plastic scintillation detectors, and alanine pellets) has been performed to investigate their use in these challenging, nonstandard fields. From this characterization, reference detectors were identified for multiple beam sizes, and correction factors were determined to improve dosimetric accuracy for ionization chambers and diodes. A validated computational (Monte Carlo) model of the TrueBeam(TM) accelerator, including FFF beam modes, was also used to calculate these correction factors, which compared favorably to measured results. Small-field corrections of up to 18 % were shown to be necessary for clinical detectors such as microionization chambers. Because the impact of these large effects on treatment delivery is not well known, a treatment planning study was completed using actual hypofractionated brain, spine, and lung treatments that were delivered at the UW Carbone Cancer Center. This study demonstrated that improperly applying these detector correction factors can have a substantial impact on patient treatments. This thesis work has taken important steps toward improving the accuracy of FFF dosimetry through rigorous experimentally and Monte-Carlo-determined correction factors, the validation of an important published protocol (TG-51) for use with FFF reference fields, and a

  6. In human retinoblastoma Y79 cells okadaic acid-parthenolide co-treatment induces synergistic apoptotic effects, with PTEN as a key player.

    PubMed

    Di Fiore, Riccardo; Drago-Ferrante, Rosa; D'Anneo, Antonella; Augello, Giuseppa; Carlisi, Daniela; De Blasio, Anna; Giuliano, Michela; Tesoriere, Giovanni; Vento, Renza

    2013-10-01

    Retinoblastoma is the most common intraocular malignancy of childhood. In developing countries, treatment is limited, long-term survival rates are low and current chemotherapy causes significant morbidity to pediatric patients and significantly limits dosing. Therefore there is an urgent need to identify new therapeutic strategies to improve the clinical outcome of patients with retinoblastoma. Here, we investigated the effects of two natural compounds okadaic acid (OKA) and parthenolide (PN) on human retinoblastoma Y79 cells. For the first time we showed that OKA/PN combination at subtoxic doses induces potent synergistic apoptotic effects accompanied by lowering in p-Akt levels, increasing in the stabilized forms of p53 and potent decrease in pS166-Mdm2. We also showed the key involvement of PTEN which, after OKA/PN treatment, potently increased before p53, thus suggesting that p53 activation was under PTEN action. Moreover, after PTEN-knockdown p-Akt/ pS166Mdm2 increased over basal levels and p53 significantly lowered, while OKA/PN treatment failed both to lower p-Akt and pS166-Mdm2 and to increase p53 below/over their basal levels respectively. OKA/PN treatment potently increased ROS levels whereas decreased those of GSH. Reducing cellular GSH by l-butathionine-[S,R]-sulfoximine treatment significantly anticipated the cytotoxic effect exerted by OKA/PN. Furthermore, the effects of OKA/PN treatment on both GSH content and cell viability were less pronounced in PTEN silenced cells than in control cells. The results provide strong suggestion for combining a treatment approach that targets the PTEN/Akt/Mdm2/p53 pathway. PMID:23938948

  7. PTEN modulates vascular endothelial growth factor-mediated signaling and angiogenic effects.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jianhua; Kontos, Christopher D

    2002-03-29

    Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase is activated by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and many of the angiogenic cellular responses of VEGF are regulated by the lipid products of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. The tumor suppressor PTEN has been shown to down-regulate phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase signaling, yet the effects of PTEN on VEGF-mediated signaling and angiogenesis are unknown. Inhibition of endogenous PTEN in cultured endothelial cells by adenovirus-mediated overexpression of a dominant negative PTEN mutant (PTEN-C/S) enhanced VEGF-mediated Akt phosphorylation, and this effect correlated with decreases in caspase-3 cleavage, caspase-3 activity, and DNA degradation after induction of apoptosis with tumor necrosis factor-alpha. Overexpression of PTEN-C/S also enhanced VEGF-mediated endothelial cell proliferation and migration. In contrast, overexpression of wild-type PTEN inhibited the anti-apoptotic, proliferative, and chemotactic effects of VEGF. Moreover, PTEN-C/S increased the length of vascular sprouts in the rat aortic ring assay and modulated VEGF-mediated tube formation in an in vitro angiogenesis assay, whereas PTEN-wild type inhibited these effects. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that PTEN potently modulates VEGF-mediated signaling and function and that PTEN is a viable target in therapeutic approaches to promote or inhibit angiogenesis.

  8. AKT activation promotes PTEN hamartoma tumor syndrome-associated cataract development.

    PubMed

    Sellitto, Caterina; Li, Leping; Gao, Junyuan; Robinson, Michael L; Lin, Richard Z; Mathias, Richard T; White, Thomas W

    2013-12-01

    Mutations in the human phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) gene cause PTEN hamartoma tumor syndrome (PHTS), which includes cataract development among its diverse clinical pathologies. Currently, it is not known whether cataract formation in PHTS patients is secondary to other systemic problems, or the result of the loss of a critical function of PTEN within the lens. We generated a mouse line with a lens-specific deletion of Pten (PTEN KO) and identified a regulatory function for PTEN in lens ion transport. Specific loss of PTEN in the lens resulted in cataract. PTEN KO lenses exhibited a progressive age-related increase in intracellular hydrostatic pressure, along with, increased intracellular sodium concentrations, and reduced Na+/K+-ATPase activity. Collectively, these defects lead to lens swelling, opacities and ultimately organ rupture. Activation of AKT was highly elevated in PTEN KO lenses compared to WT mice. Additionally, pharmacological inhibition of AKT restored normal Na+/K+-ATPase activity in primary cultured lens cells and reduced lens pressure in intact lenses from PTEN KO animals. These findings identify a direct role for PTEN in the regulation of lens ion transport through an AKT-dependent modulation of Na+/K+-ATPase activity, and provide a new animal model to investigate cataract development in PHTS patients. PMID:24270425

  9. A pseudogene long noncoding RNA network regulates PTEN transcription and translation in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Johnsson, Per; Ackley, Amanda; Vidarsdottir, Linda; Lui, Weng-Onn; Corcoran, Martin; Grandér, Dan; Morris, Kevin V.

    2013-01-01

    PTEN is a tumor suppressor gene that has been shown to be under the regulatory control of a PTEN pseudogene expressed noncoding RNA, PTENpg1. Here, we characterize a previously unidentified PTENpg1 encoded antisense RNA (asRNA), which regulates PTEN transcription and PTEN mRNA stability. We find two PTENpg1 asRNA isoforms, alpha and beta. The alpha isoform functions in trans, localizes to the PTEN promoter, and epigenetically modulates PTEN transcription by the recruitment of DNMT3a and EZH2. In contrast, the beta isoform interacts with PTENpg1 through an RNA:RNA pairing interaction, which affects PTEN protein output via changes of PTENpg1 stability and microRNA sponge activity. Disruption of this asRNA-regulated network induces cell cycle arrest and sensitizes cells to doxorubicin, suggesting a biological function for the respective PTENpg1 expressed asRNAs. PMID:23435381

  10. Imbalanced PTEN and PI3K Signaling Impairs Class Switch Recombination.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhangguo; Getahun, Andrew; Chen, Xiaomi; Dollin, Yonatan; Cambier, John C; Wang, Jing H

    2015-12-01

    Class switch recombination (CSR) generates isotype-switched Abs with distinct effector functions. B cells express phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) and multiple isoforms of class IA PI3K catalytic subunits, including p110α and p110δ, whose roles in CSR remain unknown or controversial. In this article, we demonstrate a direct effect of PTEN on CSR signaling by acute deletion of Pten specifically in mature B cells, thereby excluding the developmental impact of Pten deletion. We show that mature B cell-specific PTEN overexpression enhances CSR. More importantly, we establish a critical role for p110α in CSR. Furthermore, we identify a cooperative role for p110α and p110δ in suppressing CSR. Mechanistically, dysregulation of p110α or PTEN inversely affects activation-induced deaminase expression via modulating AKT activity. Thus, our study reveals that a signaling balance between PTEN and PI3K isoforms is essential to maintain normal CSR.

  11. Conformational Stability and Catalytic Activity of PTEN Variants Linked to Cancers and Autism Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Sean B.; Raines, Ronald T.

    2015-01-01

    Phosphoinositides are membrane components that play critical regulatory roles in mammalian cells. The enzyme PTEN, which catalyzes the dephosphorylation of the phosphoinositide PIP3, is damaged in most sporadic tumors. Mutations in the PTEN gene have also been linked to autism spectrum disorders and other forms of delayed development. Here, human PTEN is shown to be on the cusp of unfolding under physiological conditions. Variants of human PTEN linked to somatic cancers and disorders on the autism spectrum are shown to be impaired in their conformational stability, catalytic activity, or both. Those variants linked only to autism have higher activity than those linked to cancers. PTEN-L, which is a secreted trans-active isoform, has greater conformational stability than does the wild-type enzyme. These data indicate that PTEN is a fragile enzyme cast in a crucial role in cellular metabolism, and suggest that PTEN-L is a repository for a critical catalytic activity. PMID:25647146

  12. The dosing determines mutagenicity of hydrophobic compounds in the Ames II assay with metabolic transformation: passive dosing versus solvent spiking.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kilian E C; Heringa, Minne B; Uytewaal, Marijan; Mayer, Philipp

    2013-01-20

    The Ames II bacterial mutagenicity assay is a new version of the standard Ames test for screening chemicals for genotoxic activity. However, the use of plastic micro-titer plates has drawbacks in the case of testing hydrophobic mutagens, since sorptive and other losses make it difficult to control and define the exposure concentrations, and they reduce availability for bacterial uptake or to the S9 enzymes. With passive dosing, a biocompatible polymer such as silicone is loaded with the test compound and acts as a partitioning source. It compensates for any losses and results in stable freely dissolved concentrations. Passive dosing using silicone O-rings was applied in the Ames II assay to measure PAH mutagenicity in strains TA98 and TAMix - a mixture of six different bacterial strains detecting six different base-pair substitutions - after metabolic activation by S9. Initially, 10 PAHs were tested with passive dosing from saturated O-rings, aiming at levels in the test medium close to aqueous solubility. Fluoranthene, pyrene and benzo(a)pyrene were mutagenic in both TA98 and TAMix, whereas benz(a)anthracene was mutagenic in TA98 only. The concentration-dependent mutagenic activity of benzo(a)pyrene was then compared for passive dosing and solvent spiking. With spiking, nominal concentrations greatly exceeded aqueous solubility before mutagenicity was observed, due to sorptive losses and limiting dissolution kinetics. In contrast, the passive dosing concentration-response curves were more reproducible, and shifted towards lower concentrations by several orders of magnitude. This study raises fundamental questions about how to introduce hydrophobic test substances in the Ames II assay with biotransformation, since the measured mutagenicity not only depends on the compound potency but also on its supply, sorption and consumption during the assay. PMID:22989744

  13. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Pten Haplo-Insufficient Mice with Social Deficits and Repetitive Behavior: Interplay between Pten and p53

    PubMed Central

    Napoli, Eleonora; Ross-Inta, Catherine; Wong, Sarah; Hung, Connie; Fujisawa, Yasuko; Sakaguchi, Danielle; Angelastro, James; Omanska-Klusek, Alicja; Schoenfeld, Robert; Giulivi, Cecilia

    2012-01-01

    Etiology of aberrant social behavior consistently points to a strong polygenetic component involved in fundamental developmental pathways, with the potential of being enhanced by defects in bioenergetics. To this end, the occurrence of social deficits and mitochondrial outcomes were evaluated in conditional Pten (Phosphatase and tensin homolog) haplo-insufficient mice, in which only one allele was selectively knocked-out in neural tissues. Pten mutations have been linked to Alzheimer's disease and syndromic autism spectrum disorders, among others. By 4–6 weeks of age, Pten insufficiency resulted in the increase of several mitochondrial Complex activities (II–III, IV and V) not accompanied by increases in mitochondrial mass, consistent with an activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway, of which Pten is a negative modulator. At 8–13 weeks of age, Pten haplo-insufficient mice did not show significant behavioral abnormalities or changes in mitochondrial outcomes, but by 20–29 weeks, they displayed aberrant social behavior (social avoidance, failure to recognize familiar mouse, and repetitive self-grooming), macrocephaly, increased oxidative stress, decreased cytochrome c oxidase (CCO) activity (50%) and increased mtDNA deletions in cerebellum and hippocampus. Mitochondrial dysfunction was the result of a downregulation of p53-signaling pathway evaluated by lower protein expression of p21 (65% of controls) and the CCO chaperone SCO2 (47% of controls), two p53-downstream targets. This mechanism was confirmed in Pten-deficient striatal neurons and, HCT 116 cells with different p53 gene dosage. These results suggest a unique pathogenic mechanism of the Pten-p53 axis in mice with aberrant social behavior: loss of Pten (via p53) impairs mitochondrial function elicited by an early defective assembly of CCO and later enhanced by the accumulation of mtDNA deletions. Consistent with our results, (i) SCO2 deficiency and/or CCO activity defects have been reported in patients with

  14. [Frequency of stable chromosomal aberrations determined by FISH in 49 Chernobyl nuclear accident liquidators exposed to various doses of radiation].

    PubMed

    Pilinskaia, M A; Dybskiĭ, S S

    2001-01-01

    FISH technique was tested on the 49 liquidators of the Chernobyl Accident. Groups were formed according to average group exposure doses and/or individual ones determined by the method of EPR. The essential variability of spontaneous and irradiation-induced frequencies of reciprocal translocations was observed. In groups with the lowest EPR-doses (below 25 cGy) the average cytogenetic dose was considerably higher then doses determined by EPR-method. The best coincidences between average in-group EPR- and FISH-doses were in the group with 25-50 cGy doses for "acute irradiation" model and in the group with 50-100 cGy and higher for "chronic irradiation" model.

  15. Determination of the median toxic dose of type C botulism in lactating dairy cows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moeller, R.B.; Puschner, B.; Walker, R.L.; Rocke, T.; Galey, F.D.; Cullor, J.S.; Ardans, A.A.

    2003-01-01

    Because of the difficulty in identifying botulinum toxin in cattle, it is hypothesized that cattle are sensitive to levels of toxin below the detection limits of current diagnostic techniques (the mouse protection bioassay and the immunostick enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay [ELISA] for type C botulinum toxin). Using an up-down method for toxicologic testing, the median toxic dose (MTD50) for cattle was determined. Four lactating Holstein cows were dosed at 0.125 or 0.25 ng/kg with Clostridium botulinum type C toxin and failed to develop clinical signs of botulism during the 7-day observation period. Three cows given 0.50 ng/kg of toxin developed clinical signs of botulism. From these results, the MTD50 was calculated at 0.388 ng/kg (3.88 mouse lethal doses/kg) using the trim-logit method. These results suggest that cattle are 12.88 times more sensitive to type C botulinum toxin than a mouse on a per kilogram weight basis. The mouse protection bioassay and the immunostick ELISA for type C botulinum toxin failed to identify the presence of the toxin in the serum, blood, and milk samples taken from all 7 animals.

  16. A computer model to determine the primary contributors to relative radiation dose received by astronauts

    SciTech Connect

    Lazareth, O.W.; Divadeenam, M.; Ludewig, H.; Powell, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a computer model which was used to determine the relative radiation dose of protons of different energies. In the future, the model will be extended to calculate the dosage received by an astronaut during a specific mission to Mars, and within a spacecraft with specific materials and with a specific geometry. The framework for the calculations centered on the computer program HETC, a Monte Carlo transport code for computing the properties of high energy nucleon-meson cascades in matter. It is valid up to several hundred GeV. 8 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Determination of the cosmic-ray-induced neutron flux and ambient dose equivalent at flight altitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pazianotto, M. T.; Cortés-Giraldo, M. A.; Federico, C. A.; Gonçalez, O. L.; Quesada, J. M.; Carlson, B. V.

    2015-07-01

    There is interest in modeling the atmosphere in the South Atlantic Magnetic Anomaly in order to obtain information about the cosmic-ray induced neutron spectrum and angular distribution as functions of altitude. In this work we use the Monte Carlo codes MCNPX and Geant4 to determine the cosmic-ray-induced neutron flux in the atmosphere produced by the cosmic ray protons incident on the top of the atmosphere and to estimate the ambient dose equivalent rate as function of altitude. The results present a reasonable conformity to other codes (QARM and EXPACS) based on other parameterizations.

  18. A comprehensive functional analysis of PTEN mutations: implications in tumor- and autism-related syndromes.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Escudero, Isabel; Oliver, María D; Andrés-Pons, Amparo; Molina, María; Cid, Víctor J; Pulido, Rafael

    2011-11-01

    The PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog) phosphatase is unique in mammals in terms of its tumor suppressor activity, exerted by dephosphorylation of the lipid second messenger PIP(3) (phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate), which activates the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt/mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) oncogenic pathway. Loss-of-function mutations in the PTEN gene are frequent in human cancer and in the germline of patients with PTEN hamartoma tumor-related syndromes (PHTSs). In addition, PTEN is mutated in patients with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), although no functional information on these mutations is available. Here, we report a comprehensive in vivo functional analysis of human PTEN using a heterologous yeast reconstitution system. Ala-scanning mutagenesis at the catalytic loops of PTEN outlined the critical role of residues within the P-catalytic loop for PIP(3) phosphatase activity in vivo. PTEN mutations that mimic the P-catalytic loop of mammalian PTEN-like proteins (TPTE, TPIP, tensins and auxilins) affected PTEN function variably, whereas tumor- or PHTS-associated mutations targeting the PTEN P-loop produced complete loss of function. Conversely, Ala-substitutions, as well as tumor-related mutations at the WPD- and TI-catalytic loops, displayed partial activity in many cases. Interestingly, a tumor-related D92N mutation was partially active, supporting the notion that the PTEN Asp92 residue might not function as the catalytic general acid. The analysis of a panel of ASD-associated hereditary PTEN mutations revealed that most of them did not substantially abrogate PTEN activity in vivo, whereas most of PHTS-associated mutations did. Our findings reveal distinctive functional patterns among PTEN mutations found in tumors and in the germline of PHTS and ASD patients, which could be relevant for therapy.

  19. Enzymatic Analysis of PTEN Ubiquitylation by WWP2 and NEDD4-1 E3 Ligases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zan; Thomas, Stefani N; Bolduc, David M; Jiang, Xuejun; Zhang, Xiangbin; Wolberger, Cynthia; Cole, Philip A

    2016-07-01

    PTEN is a lipid phosphatase that converts phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-phosphate (PIP3) to phosphatidylinositol 4,5-phosphate (PIP2) and plays a critical role in the regulation of tumor growth. PTEN is subject to regulation by a variety of post-translational modifications, including phosphorylation on a C-terminal cluster of four Ser/Thr residues (380, 382, 383, and 385) and ubiquitylation by various E3 ligases, including NEDD4-1 and WWP2. It has previously been shown that C-terminal phosphorylation of PTEN can increase its cellular half-life. Using in vitro ubiquitin transfer assays, we show that WWP2 is more active than NEDD4-1 in ubiquitylating unphosphorylated PTEN. The mapping of ubiquitylation sites in PTEN by mass spectrometry showed that both NEDD4-1 and WWP2 can target a broad range of Lys residues in PTEN, although NEDD4-1 versus WWP2 showed a stronger preference for ubiquitylating PTEN's C2 domain. Whereas tetraphosphorylation of PTEN did not significantly affect its ubiquitylation by NEDD4-1, it inhibited PTEN ubiquitylation by WWP2. Single-turnover and pull-down experiments suggested that tetraphosphorylation of PTEN appears to weaken its interaction with WWP2. These studies reveal how the PTEN E3 ligases WWP2 and NEDD4-1 exhibit distinctive properties in Lys selectivity and sensitivity to PTEN phosphorylation. Our findings also provide a molecular mechanism for the connection between PTEN Ser/Thr phosphorylation and PTEN's cellular stability.

  20. The mechanism involved in the loss of PTEN expression in NSCLC tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Gang; Zhao, Jingfeng; Peng, Xianjing; Liang, Jian; Deng, Xin; Chen, Yuxiang

    2012-02-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Radiation stimulates PTEN reexpression in NSCLC independent of p53 activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PTEN reexpression is mediated by miR-29b overexpression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-29b regulates Dnmts expression in NSCLC tumor cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Target therapy could be established by overexpressing miR-29b expression. -- Abstract: Loss of PTEN expression is observed in most non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC). However, the mechanism by which PTEN expression is regulated in NSCLC has not been fully elucidated. In this study, we investigated the role of DNA methyltransferases (Dnmts), microRNA-29b (miR-29b), and anti-miR-29b inhibitor in PTEN promoter methylation and PTEN gene expression in H358 NSCLC cells in vitro and in vivo. PTEN mRNA was measured by RT-PCR. PTEN and Dnmts protein levels were measured by Western blot. miR-29b expression was detected by Northern blot. A xenograft H358 tumor mouse model was established by subcutaneously inoculating H358 cells into the right hind limbs of nude mice. We found that radiation induced cell apoptosis and hypomethylation in PTEN promoter, PTEN and miR-29b expression, and downregulation of Dnmt1, 3a and 3b expression in H358 tumor cells. The effect of radiation on gene expression and apoptosis was blocked by anti-miR-29b inhibitor. In the xenograft H358 tumor model, anti-miR-29b inhibitor reversed radiation-induced tumor growth delay, PTEN reexpression and downregulation of Dnmts expression. Our study suggested that miR-29b is an upstream molecule of PTEN. miR-29b regulates PTEN gene expression through downregulating Dnmts expression and subsequently induces hypomethylation in PTEN promoter. Targeting therapy could be established in NSCLC by upregulating miR-29b expression.

  1. Determination of (210)Po in calcium supplements and the possible related dose assessment to the consumers.

    PubMed

    Strumińska-Parulska, Dagmara I

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this pioneer study was to investigate the most popular calcium supplements as a potential additional source of polonium (210)Po in human diet. The analyzed calcium pharmaceutics contained organic or inorganic calcium compounds; some from natural sources as mussels' shells, fish extracts, or sedimentary rocks. The objectives of this research were to investigate the naturally occurring (210)Po activity concentrations in calcium supplements, find the correlations between (210)Po concentration in medicament and calcium chemical form, and calculate the effective radiation dose connected to analyzed calcium supplement consumption. As results showed, (210)Po concentrations in natural origin calcium supplements (especially sedimentary rocks) were higher than the other analyzed. Also the results of (210)Po analysis obtained for inorganic forms of calcium supplements were higher. The highest (210)Po activity concentrations were determined in mineral tablets made from sedimentary rocks: dolomite and chalk - 3.88 ± 0.22 and 3.36 ± 0.10 mBq g(-1) respectively; while the lowest in organic calcium compounds: calcium lactate and calcium gluconate - 0.07 ± 0.02 and 0.17 ± 0.01 mBq g(-1). The annual effective radiation doses from supplements intake were estimated as well. The highest annual radiation dose from (210)Po taken with 1 tablet of calcium supplement per day was connected to sample made from chalk - 2.5 ± 0.07 μSv year(-1), while the highest annual radiation dose from (210)Po taken with 1 g of pure calcium per day was connected to dolomite - 12.7 ± 0.70 μSv year(-1).

  2. Determination of (210)Po in calcium supplements and the possible related dose assessment to the consumers.

    PubMed

    Strumińska-Parulska, Dagmara I

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this pioneer study was to investigate the most popular calcium supplements as a potential additional source of polonium (210)Po in human diet. The analyzed calcium pharmaceutics contained organic or inorganic calcium compounds; some from natural sources as mussels' shells, fish extracts, or sedimentary rocks. The objectives of this research were to investigate the naturally occurring (210)Po activity concentrations in calcium supplements, find the correlations between (210)Po concentration in medicament and calcium chemical form, and calculate the effective radiation dose connected to analyzed calcium supplement consumption. As results showed, (210)Po concentrations in natural origin calcium supplements (especially sedimentary rocks) were higher than the other analyzed. Also the results of (210)Po analysis obtained for inorganic forms of calcium supplements were higher. The highest (210)Po activity concentrations were determined in mineral tablets made from sedimentary rocks: dolomite and chalk - 3.88 ± 0.22 and 3.36 ± 0.10 mBq g(-1) respectively; while the lowest in organic calcium compounds: calcium lactate and calcium gluconate - 0.07 ± 0.02 and 0.17 ± 0.01 mBq g(-1). The annual effective radiation doses from supplements intake were estimated as well. The highest annual radiation dose from (210)Po taken with 1 tablet of calcium supplement per day was connected to sample made from chalk - 2.5 ± 0.07 μSv year(-1), while the highest annual radiation dose from (210)Po taken with 1 g of pure calcium per day was connected to dolomite - 12.7 ± 0.70 μSv year(-1). PMID:26318774

  3. Shielding application of perturbation theory to determine changes in neutron and gamma doses due to changes in shield layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fieno, D.

    1972-01-01

    Perturbation theory formulas were derived and applied to determine changes in neutron and gamma-ray doses due to changes in various radiation shield layers for fixed sources. For a given source and detector position, the perturbation method enables dose derivatives with respect to density, or equivalently thickness, for every layer to be determined from one forward and one inhomogeneous adjoint calculation. A direct determination without the perturbation approach would require two forward calculations to evaluate the dose derivative due to a change in a single layer. Hence, the perturbation method for obtaining dose derivatives requires fewer computations for design studies of multilayer shields. For an illustrative problem, a comparison was made of the fractional change in the dose per unit change in the thickness of each shield layer in a two-layer spherical configuration as calculated by perturbation theory and by successive direct calculations; excellent agreement was obtained between the two methods.

  4. PTEN recruitment controls synaptic and cognitive function in Alzheimer's models.

    PubMed

    Knafo, Shira; Sánchez-Puelles, Cristina; Palomer, Ernest; Delgado, Igotz; Draffin, Jonathan E; Mingo, Janire; Wahle, Tina; Kaleka, Kanwardeep; Mou, Liping; Pereda-Perez, Inmaculada; Klosi, Edvin; Faber, Erik B; Chapman, Heidi M; Lozano-Montes, Laura; Ortega-Molina, Ana; Ordóñez-Gutiérrez, Lara; Wandosell, Francisco; Viña, Jose; Dotti, Carlos G; Hall, Randy A; Pulido, Rafael; Gerges, Nashaat Z; Chan, Andrew M; Spaller, Mark R; Serrano, Manuel; Venero, César; Esteban, José A

    2016-03-01

    Dyshomeostasis of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) is responsible for synaptic malfunctions leading to cognitive deficits ranging from mild impairment to full-blown dementia in Alzheimer's disease. Aβ appears to skew synaptic plasticity events toward depression. We found that inhibition of PTEN, a lipid phosphatase that is essential to long-term depression, rescued normal synaptic function and cognition in cellular and animal models of Alzheimer's disease. Conversely, transgenic mice that overexpressed PTEN displayed synaptic depression that mimicked and occluded Aβ-induced depression. Mechanistically, Aβ triggers a PDZ-dependent recruitment of PTEN into the postsynaptic compartment. Using a PTEN knock-in mouse lacking the PDZ motif, and a cell-permeable interfering peptide, we found that this mechanism is crucial for Aβ-induced synaptic toxicity and cognitive dysfunction. Our results provide fundamental information on the molecular mechanisms of Aβ-induced synaptic malfunction and may offer new mechanism-based therapeutic targets to counteract downstream Aβ signaling. PMID:26780512

  5. Inhibition of PTEN and activation of Akt by menadione.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Kyoko; Nigorikawa, Kiyomi; Tsukamoto, Mariko; Tamura, Namiko; Hazeki, Kaoru; Hazeki, Osamu

    2007-04-01

    Menadione (vitamin K(3)) has been shown to activate Erk in several cell lines. This effect has been shown to be due to the activation of EGF receptors (EGFR) as a result of inhibition of some protein tyrosine phosphatases. In the present study, we examined the effects of menadione on Akt in Chinese hamster ovary cells. The phosphorylation of Akt by menadione was not inhibited by AG1478, an inhibitor of EGFR. Menadione inhibited the lipid phosphatase activity of PTEN in a cell-free system. In an intact cell system, menadione inhibited the effect of transfected PTEN on Akt. Thus, one mechanism of its action was considered the accelerated activation of Akt through inhibition of PTEN. This was not the sole mechanism responsible for the EGFR-independent activation of Akt, because menadione attenuated the rate of Akt dephosphorylation even in PTEN-null PC3 cells. The decelerated inactivation of Akt, probably through inhibition of some tyrosine phosphatases, was considered another mechanism of its action.

  6. Use of an artificial pancreas as a tool to determine subcutaneous insulin doses in juvenile diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lambert, A E; Buysschaert, M; Lambotte, L

    1979-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to examine the feasibility of determining the most appropriate subcutaneous insulin treatment in unstable diabetes on the basis of the circadian hormonal profile delivered by an artificial pancreas. The metabolic control of 11 brittle diabetic subjects, as assessed by the M value and the MAGE index (used as indexes of blood glucose control and of glycemic fluctuations, respectively), was compared during a 5-day period before and after a 24-h connection to the artificial pancreas. The usual insulin treatment was continued to that day. Examination of the insulin pattern revealed by the artificial pancreas suggested that a valid scheme for subsequent treatment should consist of two daily injections of a mixture of short-acting and intermediate-acting insulins, which was administered to the patients beginning with the injection given after the artificial pancreas onwards. The new insulin regimen was characterized by a total daily dose that increased from 0.93 +/- 0.10 to 1.20 +/- 0.10 U/kg body weight (mean +/- SEM; P less than 0.005) as well as by a higher proportion of the dose given as regular insulin (37.1 +/- 6.9% before vs. 56.0 +/- 2.1% after; P less than 0.05). These changes led to a better control of blood glucose in 10 patients, as evidenced by a decrease of both the M value and the mean of all blood glucose levels. The mean MAGE index was not decreased, however, by the new insulin program, thereby suggesting that the lability of the disease remained unabated. These results indicate that subcutaneous treatment consisting of two daily injections of regular and intermediate-acting insulins and comprising 50 to 60% of the former could improve the metabolic control in unstable diabetes. The artifical pancreas provided a rapid and simple means to determine the appropriate doses for each type of insulin.

  7. Ambient and biological monitoring of cokeoven workers: determinants of the internal dose of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Jongeneelen, F J; van Leeuwen, F E; Oosterink, S; Anzion, R B; van der Loop, F; Bos, R P; van Veen, H G

    1990-07-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) were measured in the breathing zone air of 56 battery workers at two cokeovens during three consecutive days. The concentration of total PAH ranged up to 186 micrograms/m3. Preshift and end of shift urine samples were collected to determine 1-hydroxypyrene, a metabolite of pyrene. Control urine samples were available from 44 workers in the shipping yard of a hot rolling mill. The median values of 1-hydroxypyrene in urine of smoking and non-smoking controls were 0.51 and 0.17 mumol/mol creatinine, respectively. Concentrations of 1-hydroxypyrene up to 11.2 mumol/mol were found in the urine of the cokeoven workers. At the start of the three day working period after 32 hours off work, the 1-hydroxypyrene concentrations were four times higher and at the end of the working period 10 times higher compared with control concentrations. Excretion of 1-hydroxypyrene occurred with a half life of 6-35 hours. Both the ambient air monitoring data and the biological monitoring data showed that the topside workers were the heaviest exposed workers. The relation between air monitoring data and biological monitoring data was not strong. Multiple regression analysis was performed to identify determinants of the internal dose. The combination of exposure and smoking amplify each other and the use of a protective airstream helmet decreases the internal dose. An effect of alcohol consumption and the use of medication on the toxicokinetics of pyrene was not found.

  8. PCP METHODOLOGY FOR DETERMINING DOSE RATES FOR SMALL GRAM QUANTITIES IN SHIPPING PACKAGINGS

    SciTech Connect

    Nathan, S.

    2011-08-23

    The Small Gram Quantity (SGQ) concept is based on the understanding that small amounts of hazardous materials, in this case radioactive materials, are significantly less hazardous than large amounts of the same materials. This study describes a methodology designed to estimate an SGQ for several neutron and gamma emitting isotopes that can be shipped in a package compliant with 10 CFR Part 71 external radiation level limits regulations. These regulations require packaging for the shipment of radioactive materials perform, under both normal and accident conditions, the essential functions of material containment, subcriticality, and maintain external radiation levels within regulatory limits. 10 CFR 71.33(b)(1)(2)&(3) state radioactive and fissile materials must be identified and their maximum quantity, chemical and physical forms be included in an application. Furthermore, the U.S. Federal Regulations require application contain an evaluation demonstrating the package (i.e., the packaging and its contents) satisfies the external radiation standards for all packages (10 CFR 71.31(2), 71.35(a), & 71.47). By placing the contents in a He leak-tight containment vessel, and limiting the mass to ensure subcriticality, the first two essential functions are readily met. Some isotopes emit sufficiently strong photon radiation that small amounts of material can yield a large external dose rate. Quantifying of the dose rate for a proposed content is a challenging issue for the SGQ approach. It is essential to quantify external radiation levels from several common gamma and neutron sources that can be safely placed in a specific packaging, to ensure compliance with federal regulations. The Packaging Certification Program (PCP) Methodology for Determining Dose Rate for Small Gram Quantities in Shipping Packagings described in this report provides bounding mass limits for a set of proposed SGQ isotopes. Methodology calculations were performed to estimate external radiation levels

  9. High-resolution Structures of Protein-Membrane Complexes by Neutron Reflection and MD Simulation: Membrane Association of the PTEN Tumor Suppressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lösche, Matthias

    2012-02-01

    The lipid matrix of biomembranes is an in-plane fluid, thermally and compositionally disordered leaflet of 5 nm thickness and notoriously difficult to characterize in structural terms. Yet, biomembranes are ubiquitous in the cell, and membrane-bound proteins are implicated in a variety of signaling pathways and intra-cellular transport. We developed methodology to study proteins associated with model membranes using neutron reflection measurements and showed recently that this approach can resolve the penetration depth and orientation of membrane proteins with ångstrom resolution if their crystal or NMR structure is known. Here we apply this technology to determine the membrane bindung and unravel functional details of the PTEN phosphatase, a key player in the PI3K apoptosis pathway. PTEN is an important regulatory protein and tumor suppressor that performs its phosphatase activity as an interfacial enzyme at the plasma membrane-cytoplasm boundary. Acting as an antagonist to phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) in cell signaling, it is deleted in many human cancers. Despite its importance in regulating the levels of the phosphoinositoltriphosphate PI(3,4,5)P3, there is little understanding of how PTEN binds to membranes, is activated and then acts as a phosphatase. We investigated the structure and function of PTEN by studying its membrane affinity and localization on in-plane fluid, thermally disordered synthetic membrane models. The membrane association of the protein depends strongly on membrane composition, where phosphatidylserine (PS) and phosphatidylinositol diphosphate (PI(4,5)P2) act synergetically in attracting the enzyme to the membrane surface. Membrane affinities depend strongly on membrane fluidity, which suggests multiple binding sites on the protein for PI(4,5)P2. Neutron reflection measurements show that the PTEN phosphatase ``scoots'' along the membrane surface (penetration < 5 å) but binds the membrane tightly with its two major domains, the C2 and

  10. Determination of environmental radiation flux and organ doses using in-situ gamma spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Ghamdi, Abdulrahman S.

    Contamination of buildings represent a unique problem during Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) of nuclear facilities. It is necessary to determine the long-lived radionuclides and their respective specific activities in building materials before the right D&D decision can be made. At the same time, radiation risk of workers or potential occupants in the facility must be assessed as part of the D&D process. The goal of this project was to develop a methodology of obtaining gamma radiation flux and organ doses from in-situ gamma spectroscopy. Algorithms were developed to simulate the response functions of the HPGe detector and to convert the spectra into photon fluences. A Monte Carlo code, MCNP4C, was used to simulate HPGe detector response and to develop the conversion algorithm. The simulated spectra obtained for an HPGe detector were converted to flux using the algorithm for various different geometries. The response functions of the detector are presented in this document for the gamma energies from 60 keV to 2.2 MeV. Published fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients were used to calculate organ doses and effective dose equivalent. We then tested the theory at a 100-MeV linear electron accelerator at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI). Samples of the activated concrete walls and floor in the target room of the Linac facility as well as some steel samples were taken to quantify the specific activities of the structures. The results show that the most important long-lived radionuclides include 22 Na, 46Sc, 54 Mn, 57Co, 60 Co, 65Zn, 152 Eu and 154Eu, depending on the location and composition of the material. The specific activities at the Linac facility range from 1.15E-01 to 765.31 muCi/Kg. The annual effective dose equivalent was assessed to be 2.44 mSv y-1 (0.244 rem y-1 ), which is about 5% of the Annual EDE limits to workers.

  11. MicroRNA-486-dependent modulation of DOCK3/PTEN/AKT signaling pathways improves muscular dystrophy-associated symptoms.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Matthew S; Casar, Juan Carlos; Motohashi, Norio; Vieira, Natássia M; Eisenberg, Iris; Marshall, Jamie L; Gasperini, Molly J; Lek, Angela; Myers, Jennifer A; Estrella, Elicia A; Kang, Peter B; Shapiro, Frederic; Rahimov, Fedik; Kawahara, Genri; Widrick, Jeffrey J; Kunkel, Louis M

    2014-06-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is caused by mutations in the gene encoding dystrophin, which results in dysfunctional signaling pathways within muscle. Previously, we identified microRNA-486 (miR-486) as a muscle-enriched microRNA that is markedly reduced in the muscles of dystrophin-deficient mice (Dmdmdx-5Cv mice) and in DMD patient muscles. Here, we determined that muscle-specific transgenic overexpression of miR-486 in muscle of Dmdmdx-5Cv mice results in reduced serum creatine kinase levels, improved sarcolemmal integrity, fewer centralized myonuclei, increased myofiber size, and improved muscle physiology and performance. Additionally, we identified dedicator of cytokinesis 3 (DOCK3) as a miR-486 target in skeletal muscle and determined that DOCK3 expression is induced in dystrophic muscles. DOCK3 overexpression in human myotubes modulated PTEN/AKT signaling, which regulates muscle hypertrophy and growth, and induced apoptosis. Furthermore, several components of the PTEN/AKT pathway were markedly modulated by miR-486 in dystrophin-deficient muscle. Skeletal muscle-specific miR-486 overexpression in Dmdmdx-5Cv animals decreased levels of DOCK3, reduced PTEN expression, and subsequently increased levels of phosphorylated AKT, which resulted in an overall beneficial effect. Together, these studies demonstrate that stable overexpression of miR-486 ameliorates the disease progression of dystrophin-deficient skeletal muscle.

  12. Association of PTEN mutation with HPV-negative adenocarcinoma of the uterine cervix.

    PubMed

    Minaguchi, Takeo; Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki; Nakagawa, Shunsuke; Yasugi, Toshiharu; Yano, Tetsu; Iwase, Haruko; Mizutani, Katsumi; Shiromizu, Kenji; Ohmi, Kazuo; Watanabe, Yoh; Noda, Kiichiro; Nishiu, Mieko; Nakamura, Yusuke; Taketani, Yuji

    2004-07-01

    Serous, mucinous, endometrioid, and clear cell adenocarcinomas arise from reproductive organs of mullerian origin. Although the mutation of PTEN, a tumor suppressor, is known to be involved in tumorigenesis of endometrioid adenocarcinomas of the endometrium and ovary, the role of PTEN alteration in endometrioid adenocarcinoma of the cervix remains to be investigated. To elucidate the molecular pathogenesis of cervical adenocarcinoma and adenosquamous carcinoma, and in particular to examine the potential role of PTEN mutation in endometrioid-type cancer of the cervix, we analyzed 32 cervical adeno- or adenosquamous carcinomas (8 endometrioid adenocarcinomas, 14 mucinous adenocarcinomas and 10 adenosquamous carcinomas) for PTEN mutations and HPV infections. PTEN mutation was detected in 2 of 8 (25.0%) endometrioid cases, 2 of 14 (14.3%) mucinous cases, and none of 10 (0%) adenosquamous cases. HPV DNA was detected in 11 out of 18 (61.1%) PTEN wild-type adenocarcinomas and 8 out of 10 (80.0%) adenosquamous carcinomas. Among 11 HPV-negative adenocarcinomas, 40.0% (2/5) endometrioid cases and 33.3% (2/6) mucinous cases were shown to be PTEN mutated, while no cases (0/21) were PTEN-mutant in the remainder (i.e. adenosquamous carcinomas and HPV-positive adenocarcinomas). The current observations suggest that PTEN mutation is frequently detected in HPV-negative adenocarcinomas of the cervix and the most prevalent occurrence of PTEN mutation in endometrioid subtype is keeping with endometrial and ovarian carcinomas.

  13. Association between TLR4 and PTEN Involved in LPS-TLR4 Signaling Response.

    PubMed

    Yin, Huahua; Tan, Yan; Wu, Xiaofeng; Yan, Hong; Liu, Feng; Yao, Yuanzhang; Jiang, Jianxin; Wan, Qi; Li, Lei

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we explored the potential mechanisms of how PTEN regulating LPS induced TLR4 signaling pathway. The initial findings from ELISA demonstrate that PTEN influences TNF-α secretion by its lipid phosphatase activity. Subsequently, western blot, immunoprecipitation assay, and immunofluorescence were performed to explore the activation process of PTEN by stimulation with LPS. As early as 20 minutes after LPS stimulation, reduced phosphorylation of PTEN was found obviously. Accordingly, the whole cell-scattered PTEN translocated towards the cell membrane 20 minutes after stimulating with LPS. Moreover, the weak physical association between PTEN and TLR4 in resting RAW264.7 cells increased gradually after the stimulation of LPS. Furthermore, our study showed PTEN decreased LPS-induced Akt activity and upregulated NF-κB-dependent gene transcription, identifying indirectly that the PTEN could regulate the activation of NF-κB by its downstream Akt kinase. In summary, our study illustrates the potential signal transduction process of PTEN while stimulated by LPS: by increasing the association of TLR4, PTEN recruits to its phosphoinositide substrate PI(3,4,5)P3 located on the cell membrane and exerts its dephosphorylated function and subsequently depresses the activity of downstream molecule Akt and results in activation of NF-κB, followed by the secretion of inflammatory mediators TNF-α. PMID:27563672

  14. Association between TLR4 and PTEN Involved in LPS-TLR4 Signaling Response

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Huahua; Tan, Yan; Wu, Xiaofeng; Yan, Hong; Liu, Feng; Yao, Yuanzhang; Jiang, Jianxin; Wan, Qi

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we explored the potential mechanisms of how PTEN regulating LPS induced TLR4 signaling pathway. The initial findings from ELISA demonstrate that PTEN influences TNF-α secretion by its lipid phosphatase activity. Subsequently, western blot, immunoprecipitation assay, and immunofluorescence were performed to explore the activation process of PTEN by stimulation with LPS. As early as 20 minutes after LPS stimulation, reduced phosphorylation of PTEN was found obviously. Accordingly, the whole cell-scattered PTEN translocated towards the cell membrane 20 minutes after stimulating with LPS. Moreover, the weak physical association between PTEN and TLR4 in resting RAW264.7 cells increased gradually after the stimulation of LPS. Furthermore, our study showed PTEN decreased LPS-induced Akt activity and upregulated NF-κB-dependent gene transcription, identifying indirectly that the PTEN could regulate the activation of NF-κB by its downstream Akt kinase. In summary, our study illustrates the potential signal transduction process of PTEN while stimulated by LPS: by increasing the association of TLR4, PTEN recruits to its phosphoinositide substrate PI(3,4,5)P3 located on the cell membrane and exerts its dephosphorylated function and subsequently depresses the activity of downstream molecule Akt and results in activation of NF-κB, followed by the secretion of inflammatory mediators TNF-α. PMID:27563672

  15. PTEN is involved in modulation of vasculogenesis in early chick embryos.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Wang, Xiao-Yu; Wu, Ting; Chuai, Manli; Lee, Kenneth Ka Ho; Wang, Li-Jing; Yang, Xuesong

    2013-06-15

    PTEN is a tumor suppressor gene that is mutated and/or deleted in many types of tumor. This gene also plays a very distinct role in the early stages of embryonic development such as cell migration, proliferation and migration. Nevertheless, little is known of the function of PTEN in vasculogenesis during chick embryonic development. In this study, we used in situ hybridization to first demonstrate the expression pattern of PTEN during gastrulation. PTEN was found mainly expressed in the blood islands of area opaca, the neural tube and mesodermal structures. Overexpression of PTEN obstructed the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) process in the primitive streak. EMT is the first prerequisite required for the emigration of hemangioblasts during vasculogenesis. When PTEN expression was silenced, we observed that it produced an adverse effect on mesodermal cell emigration to the extra-embryonic blood islands. In addition, we also demonstrated that even if the perturbed-PTEN cells did not affect the formation of blood islands, migrant mesodermal cells overexpressing wt PTEN-GFP had difficulties integrating into the blood islands. Instead, these cells were either localized on the periphery of the blood islands or induced to differentiate into endothelial cells if they managed to integrate into blood islands. Development of the intra-embryonic primary vascular plexus was also affected by overexpression of PTEN. We proposed that it was elevated PTEN lipid phosphatase activity that was responsible for the morphogenetic defects induced by PTEN overexpression. In this context, we did not find PTEN affecting VEGF signaling. In sum, our study has provided evidence that PTEN is involved in vasculogenesis during the early stages of chick embryo development.

  16. PTEN's regulation of VEGF and VEGFR1 expression and its clinical significance in myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Zhiyong, Cheng; Wentong, Liang; Xiaoyang, Yang; Ling, Pan

    2012-06-01

    Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) acts as a novel tumor suppressor gene. PTEN protein plays an important role in regulating proliferation, apoptosis, invasion, and migration of many cancer cells. PTEN also modulates angiogenesis mediated by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) via down-regulating PI3K/Akt pathway in many solid tumors. However, the effects of PTEN on VEGF and VEGFR1 (FLT1)-mediated angiogenesis, migration, invasion of leukemia cells, and its clinical significance are still unknown in myeloid leukemia. Therefore, we investigated the effect of PTEN on PI3K/Akt and VEGF/FLT1 pathways by transfecting wild-type PTEN gene to induce high expression of wild-type PTEN gene and protein in chronic myelogenous leukemia cell line K562 cells. We also observed the correlation between the expression levels of PTEN and VEGF/FLT1 and its clinical significance in myeloid leukemia patients. We found that the expression reconstitution of wild-type PTEN had significant effect on inhibiting proliferation, migration, and invasion abilities of K562 cells via down-regulation of Akt phosphorylation and inhibition of VEGF/FLT1 expression. In myeloid leukemia patients, a negative correlation was found between the expression level of PTEN mRNA and that of VEGF and FLT1 mRNA. Down-regulation of PTEN expression accompanied by up-regulation of VEGF and FLT1 mRNA indicated a higher tendency of extramedullary disease in acute myeloid leukemia patients. In conclusion, PTEN could modulate the function of VEGF/VEGFR signaling pathway down-regulation of Akt phosphorylation and that PTEN would be a candidate target to be addressed for inhibiting angiogenesis along with the treatment of myeloid leukemia.

  17. PTEN induces apoptosis and cavitation via HIF-2-dependent Bnip3 upregulation during epithelial lumen formation

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Y; Liu, J; Saadat, S; Tian, X; Han, Y; Fong, G-H; Pandolfi, P P; Lee, L Y; Li, S

    2015-01-01

    The tumor suppressor phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) dephosphorylates PIP3 and antagonizes the prosurvival PI3K-Akt pathway. Targeted deletion of PTEN in mice led to early embryonic lethality. To elucidate its role in embryonic epithelial morphogenesis and the underlying mechanisms, we used embryonic stem cell-derived embryoid body (EB), an epithelial cyst structurally similar to the periimplantation embryo. PTEN is upregulated during EB morphogenesis in parallel with apoptosis of core cells, which mediates EB cavitation. Genetic ablation of PTEN causes Akt overactivation, apoptosis resistance and cavitation blockade. However, rescue experiments using mutant PTEN and pharmacological inhibition of Akt suggest that the phosphatase activity of PTEN and Akt are not involved in apoptosis-mediated cavitation. Instead, hypoxia-induced upregulation of Bnip3, a proapoptotic BH3-only protein, mediates PTEN-dependent apoptosis and cavitation. PTEN inactivation inhibits hypoxia- and reactive oxygen species-induced Bnip3 elevation. Overexpression of Bnip3 in PTEN-null EBs rescues apoptosis of the core cells. Mechanistically, suppression of Bnip3 following PTEN loss is likely due to reduction of hypoxia-inducible factor-2α (HIF-2α) because forced expression of an oxygen-stable HIF-2α mutant rescues Bnip3 expression and apoptosis. Lastly, we show that HIF-2α is upregulated by PTEN at both transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. Ablation of prolyl hydroxylase domain-containing protein 2 (PHD2) in normal EBs or inhibition of PHD activities in PTEN-null EBs stabilizes HIF-2α and induces Bnip3 and caspase-3 activation. Altogether, these results suggest that PTEN is required for apoptosis-mediated cavitation during epithelial morphogenesis by regulating the expression of HIF-2α and Bnip3. PMID:25394489

  18. Determination of the absorbed dose and the average LET of space radiation in dependence on shielding conditions.

    PubMed

    Vana, N; Schoner, W; Noll, M; Fugger, M; Akatov, Y; Shurshakov, V

    1999-01-01

    The HTR method, developed for determination of absorbed dose and average LET of mixed radiation fields in space, was applied during several space missions on space station MIR, space shuttles and satellites. The method utilises the changes of peak height ratios in the glow curves in dependence on the linear energy transfer LET. Due to the small size of the dosemeters the evaluation of the variation of absorbed dose and average LET in dependence on the position of the dosemeters inside the space station is possible. The dose and LET distribution was determined during the experiment ADLET where dosemeters were exposed in two positions with different shielding conditions and during two following experiments (MIR-95, MIR-96) using six positions inside the space station. The results were compared with the shielding conditions of the positions. Calculations of the absorbed dose were carried out for comparison. Results have shown that the average LET increases with increasing absorbing thickness while the absorbed dose decreases.

  19. Identification of a Novel lincRNA-p21-miR-181b-PTEN Signaling Cascade in Liver Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fujun; Lu, Zhongqiu; Chen, Bicheng; Dong, Peihong; Zheng, Jianjian

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we found that long intergenic noncoding RNA-p21 (lincRNA-p21) inhibits hepatic stellate cell (HSC) activation and liver fibrosis via p21. However, the underlying mechanism of the antifibrotic role of lincRNA-p21 in liver fibrosis remains largely unknown. Here, we found that lincRNA-p21 expression was significantly downregulated during liver fibrosis. In LX-2 cells, the reduction of lincRNA-p21 induced by TGF-β1 was in a dose- and time-dependent manner. lincRNA-p21 expression was reduced in liver tissues from patients with liver cirrhosis when compared with that of healthy controls. Notably, lincRNA-p21 overexpression contributed to the suppression of HSC activation. lincRNA-p21 suppressed HSC proliferation and induced a significant reduction in α-SMA and type I collagen. All these effects induced by lincRNA-p21 were blocked down by the loss of PTEN, suggesting that lincRNA-p21 suppressed HSC activation via PTEN. Further study demonstrated that microRNA-181b (miR-181b) was involved in the effects of lincRNA-p21 on HSC activation. The effects of lincRNA-p21 on PTEN expression and HSC activation were inhibited by miR-181b mimics. We demonstrated that lincRNA-p21 enhanced PTEN expression by competitively binding miR-181b. In conclusion, our results disclose a novel lincRNA-p21-miR-181b-PTEN signaling cascade in liver fibrosis and suggest lincRNA-p21 as a promising molecular target for antifibrosis therapy. PMID:27610008

  20. Identification of a Novel lincRNA-p21-miR-181b-PTEN Signaling Cascade in Liver Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Fujun; Lu, Zhongqiu; Chen, Bicheng

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we found that long intergenic noncoding RNA-p21 (lincRNA-p21) inhibits hepatic stellate cell (HSC) activation and liver fibrosis via p21. However, the underlying mechanism of the antifibrotic role of lincRNA-p21 in liver fibrosis remains largely unknown. Here, we found that lincRNA-p21 expression was significantly downregulated during liver fibrosis. In LX-2 cells, the reduction of lincRNA-p21 induced by TGF-β1 was in a dose- and time-dependent manner. lincRNA-p21 expression was reduced in liver tissues from patients with liver cirrhosis when compared with that of healthy controls. Notably, lincRNA-p21 overexpression contributed to the suppression of HSC activation. lincRNA-p21 suppressed HSC proliferation and induced a significant reduction in α-SMA and type I collagen. All these effects induced by lincRNA-p21 were blocked down by the loss of PTEN, suggesting that lincRNA-p21 suppressed HSC activation via PTEN. Further study demonstrated that microRNA-181b (miR-181b) was involved in the effects of lincRNA-p21 on HSC activation. The effects of lincRNA-p21 on PTEN expression and HSC activation were inhibited by miR-181b mimics. We demonstrated that lincRNA-p21 enhanced PTEN expression by competitively binding miR-181b. In conclusion, our results disclose a novel lincRNA-p21-miR-181b-PTEN signaling cascade in liver fibrosis and suggest lincRNA-p21 as a promising molecular target for antifibrosis therapy. PMID:27610008

  1. Identification of a Novel lincRNA-p21-miR-181b-PTEN Signaling Cascade in Liver Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Fujun; Lu, Zhongqiu; Chen, Bicheng

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we found that long intergenic noncoding RNA-p21 (lincRNA-p21) inhibits hepatic stellate cell (HSC) activation and liver fibrosis via p21. However, the underlying mechanism of the antifibrotic role of lincRNA-p21 in liver fibrosis remains largely unknown. Here, we found that lincRNA-p21 expression was significantly downregulated during liver fibrosis. In LX-2 cells, the reduction of lincRNA-p21 induced by TGF-β1 was in a dose- and time-dependent manner. lincRNA-p21 expression was reduced in liver tissues from patients with liver cirrhosis when compared with that of healthy controls. Notably, lincRNA-p21 overexpression contributed to the suppression of HSC activation. lincRNA-p21 suppressed HSC proliferation and induced a significant reduction in α-SMA and type I collagen. All these effects induced by lincRNA-p21 were blocked down by the loss of PTEN, suggesting that lincRNA-p21 suppressed HSC activation via PTEN. Further study demonstrated that microRNA-181b (miR-181b) was involved in the effects of lincRNA-p21 on HSC activation. The effects of lincRNA-p21 on PTEN expression and HSC activation were inhibited by miR-181b mimics. We demonstrated that lincRNA-p21 enhanced PTEN expression by competitively binding miR-181b. In conclusion, our results disclose a novel lincRNA-p21-miR-181b-PTEN signaling cascade in liver fibrosis and suggest lincRNA-p21 as a promising molecular target for antifibrosis therapy.

  2. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Progression in Rats is Accelerated by Splenic Regulation of Liver PTEN/AKT

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ziming; Li, Naishu; Wang, Biao; Lin, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aim: The spleen has been reported to participate in the development of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), but the mechanism has not been fully characterized. This study aims to elucidate how the spleen affects the development of NAFLD in a rat model. Materials and Methods: Following either splenectomy or sham operation, male Sprague–Dawley (SD) rats were fed a high-fat diet to drive the development of NAFLD; animals fed a normal diet were used as controls. Two months after surgery, livers and blood samples were collected. Serum lipids were measured; liver histology, phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) gene expression, and the ratio of pAkt/Akt were determined. Results: Splenectomy increased serum lipids, except triglyceride (TG) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL), in animals fed either a high-fat or normal diet. Furthermore, splenectomy significantly accelerated hepatic steatosis. Western blot analysis and real-time polymerase chain reaction showed splenectomy induced significant downregulation of PTEN expression and a high ratio of pAkt/Akt in the livers. Conclusions: The spleen appears to play a role in the development of NAFLD, via a mechanism involving downregulation of hepatic PTEN expression. PMID:26228367

  3. RECOVERY OF A TRITIATED LANA SAMPLE FOR DOSE CONVERSION FACTOR DETERMINATION

    SciTech Connect

    Staack, G.

    2010-11-12

    The purpose of this work is to develop a technical basis for both estimating the dose of a worker exposed to respirable tritiated LaNi{sub 4.25}Al{sub 0.75} (LANA) and implementing hazard appropriate controls. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has agreed to provide Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute (LRRI) with a tritiated LANA sample. LRRI will determine the particle size distribution (PSD) as well as perform dissolution rate studies on the sample in serum ultrafiltrate (SUF), a simulated lung fluid. The rate of tritium release from the sample will be measured over a three month period. Tritium release rate information will be used to calculate a DCF for respirable tritiated LANA.

  4. A GREEN'S FUNCTION APPROACH FOR DETERMINING DOSE RATES FOR SMALL GRAM QUANTITIES IN SHIPPING PACKAGINGS

    SciTech Connect

    Nathan, S.

    2012-06-14

    The Small Gram Quantity (SGQ) concept is based on the understanding that small amounts of hazardous materials, in this case radioactive materials (RAM), are significantly less hazardous than large amounts of the same materials. This paper describes a methodology designed to estimate an SGQ for several neutron and gamma emitting isotopes that can be shipped in a package in compliance with 10 CFR Part 71 external radiation level limits regulations. The neutron and photon sources were calculated using both ORIGEN-S and RASTA. The response from a unit source in each neutron and photon group was calculated using MCNP5 with each unshielded and shielded container configuration. Effects of self-shielding on both neutron and photon response were evaluated by including either plutonium oxide or iron in the source region for the case with no shielded container. For the cases of actinides mixed with light elements, beryllium is the bounding light element. The added beryllium (10 to 90 percent of the actinide mass) in the cases studied represents between 9 and 47 percent concentration of the total mixture mass. For beryllium concentrations larger than 50 percent, the increase in the neutron source term and dose rate tend to increase at a much lower rate than at concentrations lower than 50%. The intimately mixed actinide-beryllium form used in these models is very conservative and thus the limits presented in this report are practical bounds on the mass that can be safely shipped. The calculated dose rate from one gram of each isotope was then used to determin the maximum amount of a single isotope that could be shipped in the Model 9977 Package (or packagings having the same or larger external dimensions as well as similar structural materials) and have the external radiation level within the regulatory dose limits at the surface of the package. The estimates of the mass limits presented would also serve as conservative limits for both the Models 9975 and 9978 packages. If a

  5. PTEN modulates EGFR late endocytic trafficking and degradation by dephosphorylating Rab7

    PubMed Central

    Shinde, Swapnil Rohidas; Maddika, Subbareddy

    2016-01-01

    Tumour suppressor phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) is a lipid phosphatase that negatively regulates growth factor-induced survival signalling. Here, we demonstrate that PTEN attenuates epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signalling by promoting late endosome maturation by virtue of its protein phosphatase activity. Loss of PTEN impairs the transition of ligand-bound EGFR from early to late endosomes. We unveil Rab7, a critical GTPase for endosome maturation, as a functional PTEN interacting partner. PTEN dephosphorylates Rab7 on two conserved residues S72 and Y183, which are necessary for GDP dissociation inhibitor (GDI)-dependent recruitment of Rab7 on to late endosomes and subsequent maturation. Thus, our findings reveal PTEN-dependent endosome maturation through phosphoregulation of Rab7 as an important route of controlling EGFR signalling. PMID:26869029

  6. RNA interference mediated pten knock-down inhibit the formation of polycystic ovary.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Jie-Xiu; Luo, Tao; Sun, Hui-Yun; Huang, Jian; Tang, Dan-Feng; Wu, Lei; Zheng, Yue-Hui; Zheng, Li-Ping

    2013-08-01

    Pten (phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10), a kind of tumor suppressor gene, plays important roles in female reproductive system. But its expression and roles in the formation of polycystic ovaries are yet to be known. In this study, we constructed a rat model of PCOS using norethindrone and HCG injections and found the expressions of pten mRNA and PTEN protein increased significantly in the polycystic ovary tissue by immunohistochemistry, RT-PCR, and western blot. Furthermore, the results showed that in vivo ovaries could be effectively transfected by lentiviral vectors through the ovarian microinjection method and indicated that pten shRNA may inhibit the formation of polycystic ovaries by pten down-regulation. Our study provides new information regarding the role of PTEN in female reproductive disorders, such as polycystic ovary syndrome.

  7. Redox Modulation of PTEN Phosphatase Activity by Hydrogen Peroxide and Bisperoxidovanadium Complexes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang-Uk; Hahne, Gernot; Hanske, Jonas; Bange, Tanja; Bier, David; Rademacher, Christoph; Hennig, Sven; Grossmann, Tom N

    2015-11-01

    PTEN is a dual-specificity protein tyrosine phosphatase. As one of the central tumor suppressors, a thorough regulation of its activity is essential for proper cellular homeostasis. The precise implications of PTEN inhibition by reactive oxygen species (e.g. H2 O2 ) and the subsequent structural consequences remain elusive. To study the effects of PTEN inhibition, bisperoxidovanadium (bpV) complexes serve as important tools with the potential for the treatment of nerve injury or cardiac ischemia. However, their mode of action is unknown, hampering further optimization and preventing therapeutic applications. Based on protein crystallography, mass spectrometry, and NMR spectroscopy, we elucidate the molecular basis of PTEN inhibition by H2O2 and bpV complexes. We show that both molecules inhibit PTEN via oxidative mechanisms resulting in the formation of the same intramolecular disulfide, therefore enabling the reactivation of PTEN under reductive conditions.

  8. Redox Modulation of PTEN Phosphatase Activity by Hydrogen Peroxide and Bisperoxidovanadium Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chang-Uk; Hahne, Gernot; Hanske, Jonas; Bange, Tanja; Bier, David; Rademacher, Christoph; Hennig, Sven; Grossmann, Tom N

    2015-01-01

    PTEN is a dual-specificity protein tyrosine phosphatase. As one of the central tumor suppressors, a thorough regulation of its activity is essential for proper cellular homeostasis. The precise implications of PTEN inhibition by reactive oxygen species (e.g. H2O2) and the subsequent structural consequences remain elusive. To study the effects of PTEN inhibition, bisperoxidovanadium (bpV) complexes serve as important tools with the potential for the treatment of nerve injury or cardiac ischemia. However, their mode of action is unknown, hampering further optimization and preventing therapeutic applications. Based on protein crystallography, mass spectrometry, and NMR spectroscopy, we elucidate the molecular basis of PTEN inhibition by H2O2 and bpV complexes. We show that both molecules inhibit PTEN via oxidative mechanisms resulting in the formation of the same intramolecular disulfide, therefore enabling the reactivation of PTEN under reductive conditions. PMID:26418532

  9. PTEN modulates EGFR late endocytic trafficking and degradation by dephosphorylating Rab7.

    PubMed

    Shinde, Swapnil Rohidas; Maddika, Subbareddy

    2016-01-01

    Tumour suppressor phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) is a lipid phosphatase that negatively regulates growth factor-induced survival signalling. Here, we demonstrate that PTEN attenuates epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signalling by promoting late endosome maturation by virtue of its protein phosphatase activity. Loss of PTEN impairs the transition of ligand-bound EGFR from early to late endosomes. We unveil Rab7, a critical GTPase for endosome maturation, as a functional PTEN interacting partner. PTEN dephosphorylates Rab7 on two conserved residues S72 and Y183, which are necessary for GDP dissociation inhibitor (GDI)-dependent recruitment of Rab7 on to late endosomes and subsequent maturation. Thus, our findings reveal PTEN-dependent endosome maturation through phosphoregulation of Rab7 as an important route of controlling EGFR signalling. PMID:26869029

  10. Defective PTEN regulation contributes to B cell hyperresponsiveness in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiang-ni; Ye, Yan-xia; Niu, Jing-wen; Li, Yang; Li, Xin; You, Xin; Chen, Hua; Zhao, Li-dan; Zeng, Xiao-feng; Zhang, Feng-chun; Tang, Fu-lin; He, Wei; Cao, Xue-tao; Zhang, Xuan; Lipsky, Peter E

    2014-07-23

    PTEN regulates normal signaling through the B cell receptor (BCR). In systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), enhanced BCR signaling contributes to increased B cell activity, but the role of PTEN in human SLE has remained unclear. We performed fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis in B cells from SLE patients and found that all SLE B cell subsets, except for memory B cells, showed decreased expression of PTEN compared with B cells from healthy controls. Moreover, the level of PTEN expression was inversely correlated with disease activity. We then explored the mechanisms governing PTEN regulation in SLE B cells. Notably, in normal but not SLE B cells, interleukin-21 (IL-21) induced PTEN expression and suppressed Akt phosphorylation induced by anti-immunoglobulin M and CD40L stimulation. However, this deficit was not primarily at the signaling or the transcriptional level, because IL-21-induced STAT3 (signal transducer and activator of transcription 3) phosphorylation was intact and IL-21 up-regulated PTEN mRNA in SLE B cells. Therefore, we examined the expression of candidate microRNAs (miRs) that could regulate PTEN: SLE B cells were found to express increased levels of miR-7, miR-21, and miR-22. These miRs down-regulated the expression of PTEN, and IL-21 stimulation increased the expression of miR-7 and miR-22 in both normal and SLE B cells. Indeed, a miR-7 antagomir corrected PTEN-related abnormalities in SLE B cells in a manner dependent on PTEN. Therefore, defective miR-7 regulation of PTEN contributes to B cell hyperresponsiveness in SLE and could be a new target of therapeutic intervention.

  11. Igf2 ligand dependency of Pten(+/-) developmental and tumour phenotypes in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Church, D N; Phillips, B R; Stuckey, D J; Barnes, D J; Buffa, F M; Manek, S; Clarke, K; Harris, A L; Carter, E J; Hassan, A B

    2012-08-01

    The tumour suppressor PTEN is a key negative regulator of the PI3K-Akt pathway, and is frequently either reduced or lost in human tumours. Murine genetic studies have confirmed that reduction of Pten promotes tumourigenesis in multiple organs, and demonstrated dependency of tumour development on the activation of downstream components such as Akt. Insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) act via IGF1R to activate the PI3K-Akt pathway, and are commonly upregulated in cancer. A context-dependent interplay between IGFs and PTEN exists in normal tissue and tumours; increased IGF2 ligand supply induces Pten expression creating an autoregulatory negative feedback loop, whereas complete loss of PTEN may either cooperate with IGF overexpression in tumour promotion, or result in desensitisation to IGF ligand. However, it remains unknown whether neoplasia associated with Pten loss is dependent on upstream IGF ligand supply in vivo. We evaluated this by generation of Pten(+/-) mice with differing allelic dosage of Igf2, an imprinted gene encoding the potent embryonic and tumour growth factor Igf2. We show that biallelic Igf2 supply potentiates a previously unreported Pten(+/-) placental phenotype and results in strain-dependent cardiac hyperplasia and neonatal lethality. Importantly, we also show that the effects of Pten loss in vivo are modified by Igf2 supply, as lack of Igf2 results in extended survival and delayed tumour development while biallelic supply is associated with reduced lifespan and accelerated neoplasia in females. Furthermore, we demonstrate that reduction of PTEN protein to heterozygote levels in human MCF7 cells is associated with increased proliferation in response to IGF2, and does not result in desensitisation to IGF2 signalling. These data indicate that the effects of Pten loss at heterozygote levels commonly observed in human tumours are modified by Igf2 ligand, and emphasise the importance of the evaluation of upstream pathways in tumours with Pten loss

  12. Adenovirus mediated homozygous endometrial epithelial Pten deletion results in aggressive endometrial carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, Ayesha; Ellenson, Lora Hedrick

    2011-07-01

    Pten is the most frequently mutated gene in uterine endometriod carcinoma (UEC) and its precursor complex atypical hyperplasia (CAH). Because the mutation frequency is similar in CAH and UEC, Pten mutations are thought to occur relatively early in endometrial tumorigenesis. Previous work from our laboratory using the Pten{sup +/-} mouse model has demonstrated somatic inactivation of the wild type allele of Pten in both CAH and UEC. In the present study, we injected adenoviruses expressing Cre into the uterine lumen of adult Pten floxed mice in an attempt to somatically delete both alleles of Pten specifically in the endometrium. Our results demonstrate that biallelic inactivation of Pten results in an increased incidence of carcinoma as compared to the Pten{sup +/-} mouse model. In addition, the carcinomas were more aggressive with extension beyond the uterus into adjacent tissues and were associated with decreased expression of nuclear ER{alpha} as compared to associated CAH. Primary cultures of epithelial and stromal cells were prepared from uteri of Pten floxed mice and Pten was deleted in vitro using Cre expressing adenovirus. Pten deletion was evident in both the epithelial and stromal cells and the treatment of the primary cultures with estrogen had different effects on Akt activation as well as Cyclin D3 expression in the two purified components. This study demonstrates that somatic biallelic inactivation of Pten in endometrial epithelium in vivo results in an increased incidence and aggressiveness of endometrial carcinoma compared to mice carrying a germline deletion of one allele and provides an important in vivo and in vitro model system for understanding the genetic underpinnings of endometrial carcinoma.

  13. PTEN Phosphorylation and Nuclear Export Mediate Free Fatty Acid-Induced Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yong; Zhou, Hillary; Wu, Ke; Lee, Sangkyu; Li, Ruijin

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aim: Oxidative stress induced by free fatty acids (FFA) contributes to metabolic syndrome-associated development of cardiovascular diseases, yet molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. This study aimed at establishing whether phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) and its subcellular location play a role in FFA-induced endothelial oxidative stress. Results: Exposing human endothelial cells (ECs) with FFA activated mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)/S6K pathway, and upon activation, S6K directly phosphorylated PTEN at S380. Phosphorylation of PTEN increased its interaction with its deubiquitinase USP7 in the nucleus, leading to PTEN deubiquitination and nuclear export. The reduction of PTEN in the nucleus, in turn, decreased p53 acetylation and transcription, reduced the expression of the p53 target gene glutathione peroxidase-1 (GPX1), resulting in reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation and endothelial damage. Finally, C57BL/6J mice fed with high-fat atherogenic diet (HFAD) showed PTEN nuclear export, decreased p53 and GPX1 protein expressions, elevated levels of ROS, and significant lesions in aortas. Importantly, inhibition of mTOR or S6K effectively blocked these effects, suggesting that mTOR/S6K pathway mediates HFAD-induced oxidative stress and vascular damage via PTEN/p53/GPX1 inhibition in vivo. Innovation: Our study demonstrated for the first time that S6K directly phosphorylated PTEN at S380 under high FFA conditions, and this phosphorylation mediated FFA-induced endothelial oxidative stress. Furthermore, we showed that S380 phosphorylation affected PTEN monoubiquitination and nuclear localization, providing the first example of coordinated regulation of PTEN nuclear localization via phosphorylation and ubiquitination. Conclusion: Our studies provide a novel mechanism by which hyperlipidemia causes vascular oxidative damage through the phosphorylation of PTEN, blocking of PTEN nuclear function, and inhibition

  14. WE-E-18A-03: How Accurately Can the Peak Skin Dose in Fluoroscopy Be Determined Using Indirect Dose Metrics?

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, A; Pasciak, A

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Skin dosimetry is important for fluoroscopically-guided interventions, as peak skin doses (PSD) that Result in skin reactions can be reached during these procedures. The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy of different indirect dose estimates and to determine if PSD can be calculated within ±50% for embolization procedures. Methods: PSD were measured directly using radiochromic film for 41 consecutive embolization procedures. Indirect dose metrics from procedures were collected, including reference air kerma (RAK). Four different estimates of PSD were calculated and compared along with RAK to the measured PSD. The indirect estimates included a standard method, use of detailed information from the RDSR, and two simplified calculation methods. Indirect dosimetry was compared with direct measurements, including an analysis of uncertainty associated with film dosimetry. Factors affecting the accuracy of the indirect estimates were examined. Results: PSD calculated with the standard calculation method were within ±50% for all 41 procedures. This was also true for a simplified method using a single source-to-patient distance (SPD) for all calculations. RAK was within ±50% for all but one procedure. Cases for which RAK or calculated PSD exhibited large differences from the measured PSD were analyzed, and two causative factors were identified: ‘extreme’ SPD and large contributions to RAK from rotational angiography or runs acquired at large gantry angles. When calculated uncertainty limits [−12.8%, 10%] were applied to directly measured PSD, most indirect PSD estimates remained within ±50% of the measured PSD. Conclusions: Using indirect dose metrics, PSD can be determined within ±50% for embolization procedures, and usually to within ±35%. RAK can be used without modification to set notification limits and substantial radiation dose levels. These results can be extended to similar procedures, including vascular and interventional oncology

  15. The effect of androgens on ovarian follicle maturation: Dihydrotestosterone suppress FSH-stimulated granulosa cell proliferation by upregulating PPARγ-dependent PTEN expression.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mei-Jou; Chou, Chia-Hung; Chen, Shee-Uan; Yang, Wei-Shiung; Yang, Yu-Shih; Ho, Hong-Nerng

    2015-12-17

    Intraovarian hyperandrogenism is one of the determining factors of follicular arrest in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Using androgenized rat models, we investigated the effects of androgens on metabolism, as well as on factors involved in follicular arrest and the reduced number of estrus cycles. The dihydrotestosterone (DHT)-treated rats had fewer estrus cycles, higher numbers of large arrested follicles and an increased in body weight gain compared with the dehydroepiandrostenedione (DHEA)- and placebo-treated rats. In cultured rat granulosa cells, DHT suppressed follicle stimulating hormone (FSH)-induced granulosa cell proliferation and increased the accumulation of cells in the G2/M phase. DHT decreased phosphorylated Akt (p-Akt) and cyclin D1 levels through increasing PTEN. DHT-promoted PTEN expression was regulated by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) in granulosa cells. Meanwhile, in the large follicles of the DHT-treated rats, the expressions of PPARγ and PTEN were higher, but the expression of p-Akt and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) were lower. Conclusively, DHT and DHEA produced differential effects on metabolism in prepubertal female rats like clinical manifestations of women with PCOS. DHT treatment may affect ovarian follicular maturation by altering granulosa cell proliferation through the regulation of enhancing PPARγ dependent PTEN/p-Akt expression in the granulosa cells.

  16. The effect of androgens on ovarian follicle maturation: Dihydrotestosterone suppress FSH-stimulated granulosa cell proliferation by upregulating PPARγ-dependent PTEN expression.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mei-Jou; Chou, Chia-Hung; Chen, Shee-Uan; Yang, Wei-Shiung; Yang, Yu-Shih; Ho, Hong-Nerng

    2015-01-01

    Intraovarian hyperandrogenism is one of the determining factors of follicular arrest in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Using androgenized rat models, we investigated the effects of androgens on metabolism, as well as on factors involved in follicular arrest and the reduced number of estrus cycles. The dihydrotestosterone (DHT)-treated rats had fewer estrus cycles, higher numbers of large arrested follicles and an increased in body weight gain compared with the dehydroepiandrostenedione (DHEA)- and placebo-treated rats. In cultured rat granulosa cells, DHT suppressed follicle stimulating hormone (FSH)-induced granulosa cell proliferation and increased the accumulation of cells in the G2/M phase. DHT decreased phosphorylated Akt (p-Akt) and cyclin D1 levels through increasing PTEN. DHT-promoted PTEN expression was regulated by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) in granulosa cells. Meanwhile, in the large follicles of the DHT-treated rats, the expressions of PPARγ and PTEN were higher, but the expression of p-Akt and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) were lower. Conclusively, DHT and DHEA produced differential effects on metabolism in prepubertal female rats like clinical manifestations of women with PCOS. DHT treatment may affect ovarian follicular maturation by altering granulosa cell proliferation through the regulation of enhancing PPARγ dependent PTEN/p-Akt expression in the granulosa cells. PMID:26674985

  17. Selective neuronal PTEN deletion: can we take the brakes off of growth without losing control?

    PubMed Central

    Gutilla, Erin A.; Steward, Oswald

    2016-01-01

    The limited ability for injured adult axons to regenerate is a major cause for limited functional recovery after injury to the nervous system, motivating numerous efforts to uncover mechanisms capable of enhancing regeneration potential. One promising strategy involves deletion or knockdown of the phosphatase and tensin (PTEN) gene. Conditional genetic deletion of PTEN before, immediately following, or several months after spinal cord injury enables neurons of the corticospinal tract (CST) to regenerate their axons across the lesion, which is accompanied by enhanced recovery of skilled voluntary motor functions mediated by the CST. Although conditional genetic deletion or knockdown of PTEN in neurons enables axon regeneration, PTEN is a well-known tumor suppressor and mutations of the PTEN gene disrupt brain development leading to neurological abnormalities including macrocephaly, seizures, and early mortality. The long-term consequences of manipulating PTEN in the adult nervous system, as would be done for therapeutic intervention after injury, are only now being explored. Here, we summarize evidence indicating that long-term deletion of PTEN in mature neurons does not cause evident pathology; indeed, cortical neurons that have lived without PTEN for over 1 year appear robust and healthy. Studies to date provide only a first look at potential negative consequences of PTEN deletion or knockdown, but the absence of any detectable neuropathology supports guarded optimism that interventions to enable axon regeneration after injury are achievable. PMID:27651754

  18. Selective neuronal PTEN deletion: can we take the brakes off of growth without losing control?

    PubMed

    Gutilla, Erin A; Steward, Oswald

    2016-08-01

    The limited ability for injured adult axons to regenerate is a major cause for limited functional recovery after injury to the nervous system, motivating numerous efforts to uncover mechanisms capable of enhancing regeneration potential. One promising strategy involves deletion or knockdown of the phosphatase and tensin (PTEN) gene. Conditional genetic deletion of PTEN before, immediately following, or several months after spinal cord injury enables neurons of the corticospinal tract (CST) to regenerate their axons across the lesion, which is accompanied by enhanced recovery of skilled voluntary motor functions mediated by the CST. Although conditional genetic deletion or knockdown of PTEN in neurons enables axon regeneration, PTEN is a well-known tumor suppressor and mutations of the PTEN gene disrupt brain development leading to neurological abnormalities including macrocephaly, seizures, and early mortality. The long-term consequences of manipulating PTEN in the adult nervous system, as would be done for therapeutic intervention after injury, are only now being explored. Here, we summarize evidence indicating that long-term deletion of PTEN in mature neurons does not cause evident pathology; indeed, cortical neurons that have lived without PTEN for over 1 year appear robust and healthy. Studies to date provide only a first look at potential negative consequences of PTEN deletion or knockdown, but the absence of any detectable neuropathology supports guarded optimism that interventions to enable axon regeneration after injury are achievable.

  19. Molecular Features of Phosphatase and Tensin Homolog (PTEN) Regulation by C-terminal Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zan; Dempsey, Daniel R; Thomas, Stefani N; Hayward, Dawn; Bolduc, David M; Cole, Philip A

    2016-07-01

    PTEN is a tumor suppressor that functions to negatively regulate the PI3K/AKT pathway as the lipid phosphatase for phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-triphosphate. Phosphorylation of a cluster of Ser/Thr residues (amino acids 380-385) on the C-terminal tail serves to alter the conformational state of PTEN from an open active state to a closed inhibited state, resulting in a reduction of plasma membrane localization and inhibition of enzyme activity. The relative contribution of each phosphorylation site to PTEN autoinhibition and the structural basis for the conformational closure is still unclear. To further the structural understanding of PTEN regulation by C-terminal tail phosphorylation, we used protein semisynthesis to insert stoichiometric and site-specific phospho-Ser/Thr(s) in the C-terminal tail of PTEN. Additionally, we employed photo-cross-linking to map the intramolecular PTEN interactions of the phospho-tail. Systematic evaluation of the PTEN C-tail phospho-cluster showed autoinhibition, and conformational closure was influenced by the aggregate effect of multiple phospho-sites rather than dominated by a single phosphorylation site. Moreover, photo-cross-linking suggested a direct interaction between the PTEN C-tail and a segment in the N-terminal region of the catalytic domain. Mutagenesis experiments provided additional insights into how the PTEN phospho-tail interacts with both the C2 and catalytic domains.

  20. Propofol Prevents Hippocampal Neuronal Loss and Memory Impairment in Cerebral Ischemia Injury Through Promoting PTEN Degradation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin; Du, Ye-Mu; Xu, Feng; Liu, Dai; Wang, Yuan-Lin

    2016-09-01

    Neuroprotective effect of propofol against cerebral ischemia injury was widely investigated. However, its mechanisms remain unclear. Phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (AKT) signaling pathway is supposed as a cell survival pathway, and phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN) is a negative regulator of AKT phosphorylation. Whether PTEN was involved in the protective effect of propofol against cerebral ischemia injury was not elucidated. In this study, the function of PTEN in the acute phase of cerebral ischemia injury was investigated. Our data showed that propofol promoted the PTEN degradation in the acute phase of cerebral ischemia injury and concurrently activated AKT phosphorylation. The increase of ubiquitinated PTEN caused by cerebral ischemia injury were degraded in propofol-pretreated rats. Moreover, we evidenced that proteasome activity was stimulated in propofol-treated rats. These data pointed that PTEN degradation was facilitated in the acute phase after propofol treatment possibly through activating ubiquitin-proteasome system. Therefore, we applied PTEN inhibitor-bpV before cerebral ischemia injury. Like propofol, bpV pretreatment also mitigated cerebral ischemia injury-induced cell loss in CA1 region and memory impairment. Taken together, our data suggest that PTEN degradation is neuroprotective against cerebral ischemia injury and propofol facilitates PTEN degradation to prevent hippocampal neuronal loss and memory deficit in cerebral ischemia injury.

  1. PTEN is required to maintain luminal epithelial homeostasis and integrity in the adult mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Shore, Amy N; Chang, Chi-Hsuan; Kwon, Oh-Joon; Weston, Matthew C; Zhang, Mei; Xin, Li; Rosen, Jeffrey M

    2016-01-01

    In the mammary gland, PTEN loss in luminal and basal epithelial cells results in differentiation defects and enhanced proliferation, leading to the formation of tumors with basal epithelial characteristics. In breast cancer, PTEN loss is associated with a hormone receptor-negative, basal-like subtype that is thought to originate in a luminal epithelial cell. Here, we show that luminal-specific PTEN loss results in distinct effects on epithelial homeostasis and mammary tumor formation. Luminal PTEN loss increased proliferation of hormone receptor-negative cells, thereby decreasing the percentage of hormone receptor-positive cells. Moreover, luminal PTEN loss led to misoriented cell divisions and mislocalization of cells to the intraluminal space of mammary ducts. Despite their elevated levels of activated AKT, Pten-null intraluminal cells showed increased levels of apoptosis. One year after Pten deletion, the ducts had cleared and no palpable mammary tumors were detected. These data establish PTEN as a critical regulator of luminal epithelial homeostasis and integrity in the adult mammary gland, and further show that luminal PTEN loss alone is not sufficient to promote the progression of mammary tumorigenesis.

  2. Dysregulation of AKT Pathway by SMYD2-Mediated Lysine Methylation on PTEN.

    PubMed

    Nakakido, Makoto; Deng, Zhenzhong; Suzuki, Takehiro; Dohmae, Naoshi; Nakamura, Yusuke; Hamamoto, Ryuji

    2015-04-01

    Phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN), one of the well-characterized tumor suppressor proteins, counteracts the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-AKT pathway through its unique lipid phosphatase activity. The functions of PTEN are regulated by a variety of posttranslational modifications such as acetylation, oxidation, ubiquitylation, phosphorylation, and SUMOylation. However, methylation of PTEN has not been reported so far. In this study, we demonstrated that the oncogenic protein lysine methyltransferase SET and MYND domain containing 2 (SMYD2) methylates PTEN at lysine 313 in vitro and in vivo. Knockdown of SMYD2 suppressed the cell growth of breast cancer cells and attenuated phosphorylation levels of AKT, indicating that SMYD2-mediated methylation negatively regulates PTEN tumor suppressor activity and results in activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-AKT pathway. Furthermore, PTEN protein with lysine 313 substitution diminished phosphorylation of PTEN at serine 380, which is known to inactivate tumor suppressor functions of PTEN. Taken together, our findings unveil a novel mechanism of PTEN dysregulation regulated by lysine methylation in human cancer. PMID:25925379

  3. Controlling PTEN (Phosphatase and Tensin Homolog) Stability: A DOMINANT ROLE FOR LYSINE 66.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Amit; Leslie, Nicholas R

    2016-08-26

    Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) is a phosphoinositide lipid phosphatase and one of the most frequently disrupted tumor suppressors in many forms of cancer, with even small reductions in the expression levels of PTEN promoting cancer development. Although the post-translational ubiquitination of PTEN can control its stability, activity, and localization, a detailed understanding of how PTEN ubiquitination integrates with other cellular regulatory processes and may be dysregulated in cancer has been hampered by a poor understanding of the significance of ubiquitination at individual sites. Here we show that Lys(66) is not required for cellular activity, yet dominates over other PTEN ubiquitination sites in the regulation of protein stability. Notably, combined mutation of other sites (Lys(13), Lys(80), and Lys(289)) has relatively little effect on protein expression, protein stability, or PTEN polyubiquitination. The present work identifies a key role for Lys(66) in the regulation of PTEN expression and provides both an opportunity to improve the stability of PTEN as a protein therapy and a mechanistic basis for efforts to stabilize endogenous PTEN. PMID:27405757

  4. Selective neuronal PTEN deletion: can we take the brakes off of growth without losing control?

    PubMed Central

    Gutilla, Erin A.; Steward, Oswald

    2016-01-01

    The limited ability for injured adult axons to regenerate is a major cause for limited functional recovery after injury to the nervous system, motivating numerous efforts to uncover mechanisms capable of enhancing regeneration potential. One promising strategy involves deletion or knockdown of the phosphatase and tensin (PTEN) gene. Conditional genetic deletion of PTEN before, immediately following, or several months after spinal cord injury enables neurons of the corticospinal tract (CST) to regenerate their axons across the lesion, which is accompanied by enhanced recovery of skilled voluntary motor functions mediated by the CST. Although conditional genetic deletion or knockdown of PTEN in neurons enables axon regeneration, PTEN is a well-known tumor suppressor and mutations of the PTEN gene disrupt brain development leading to neurological abnormalities including macrocephaly, seizures, and early mortality. The long-term consequences of manipulating PTEN in the adult nervous system, as would be done for therapeutic intervention after injury, are only now being explored. Here, we summarize evidence indicating that long-term deletion of PTEN in mature neurons does not cause evident pathology; indeed, cortical neurons that have lived without PTEN for over 1 year appear robust and healthy. Studies to date provide only a first look at potential negative consequences of PTEN deletion or knockdown, but the absence of any detectable neuropathology supports guarded optimism that interventions to enable axon regeneration after injury are achievable.

  5. Prognostic value of PTEN loss in men with conservatively managed localised prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cuzick, J; Yang, Z H; Fisher, G; Tikishvili, E; Stone, S; Lanchbury, J S; Camacho, N; Merson, S; Brewer, D; Cooper, C S; Clark, J; Berney, D M; Møller, H; Scardino, P; Sangale, Z

    2013-01-01

    Background: The natural history of prostate cancer is highly variable and difficult to predict. We report on the prognostic value of phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) loss in a cohort of 675 men with conservatively managed prostate cancer diagnosed by transurethral resection of the prostate. Methods: The PTEN status was assayed by immunohistochemistry (PTEN IHC) and fluorescent in situ hybridisation (PTEN FISH). The primary end point was death from prostate cancer. Results: The PTEN IHC loss was observed in 18% cases. This was significantly associated with prostate cancer death in univariate analysis (hazard ratio (HR)=3.51; 95% CI 2.60–4.73; P=3.1 × 10−14). It was highly predictive of prostate cancer death in the 50% of patients with a low risk score based on Gleason score, PSA, Ki-67 and extent of disease (HR=7.4; 95% CI 2.2–24.6; P=0.012) ), but had no prognostic value in the higher risk patients. The PTEN FISH loss was only weakly associated with PTEN IHC loss (κ=0.5). Both PTEN FISH loss and amplification were univariately predictive of death from prostate cancer, but this was not maintained in the multivariate analyses. Conclusion: In low-risk patients, PTEN IHC loss adds prognostic value to Gleason score, PSA, Ki-67 and extent of disease. PMID:23695019

  6. Propofol Prevents Hippocampal Neuronal Loss and Memory Impairment in Cerebral Ischemia Injury Through Promoting PTEN Degradation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin; Du, Ye-Mu; Xu, Feng; Liu, Dai; Wang, Yuan-Lin

    2016-09-01

    Neuroprotective effect of propofol against cerebral ischemia injury was widely investigated. However, its mechanisms remain unclear. Phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (AKT) signaling pathway is supposed as a cell survival pathway, and phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN) is a negative regulator of AKT phosphorylation. Whether PTEN was involved in the protective effect of propofol against cerebral ischemia injury was not elucidated. In this study, the function of PTEN in the acute phase of cerebral ischemia injury was investigated. Our data showed that propofol promoted the PTEN degradation in the acute phase of cerebral ischemia injury and concurrently activated AKT phosphorylation. The increase of ubiquitinated PTEN caused by cerebral ischemia injury were degraded in propofol-pretreated rats. Moreover, we evidenced that proteasome activity was stimulated in propofol-treated rats. These data pointed that PTEN degradation was facilitated in the acute phase after propofol treatment possibly through activating ubiquitin-proteasome system. Therefore, we applied PTEN inhibitor-bpV before cerebral ischemia injury. Like propofol, bpV pretreatment also mitigated cerebral ischemia injury-induced cell loss in CA1 region and memory impairment. Taken together, our data suggest that PTEN degradation is neuroprotective against cerebral ischemia injury and propofol facilitates PTEN degradation to prevent hippocampal neuronal loss and memory deficit in cerebral ischemia injury. PMID:27480093

  7. Controlling PTEN (Phosphatase and Tensin Homolog) Stability: A DOMINANT ROLE FOR LYSINE 66.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Amit; Leslie, Nicholas R

    2016-08-26

    Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) is a phosphoinositide lipid phosphatase and one of the most frequently disrupted tumor suppressors in many forms of cancer, with even small reductions in the expression levels of PTEN promoting cancer development. Although the post-translational ubiquitination of PTEN can control its stability, activity, and localization, a detailed understanding of how PTEN ubiquitination integrates with other cellular regulatory processes and may be dysregulated in cancer has been hampered by a poor understanding of the significance of ubiquitination at individual sites. Here we show that Lys(66) is not required for cellular activity, yet dominates over other PTEN ubiquitination sites in the regulation of protein stability. Notably, combined mutation of other sites (Lys(13), Lys(80), and Lys(289)) has relatively little effect on protein expression, protein stability, or PTEN polyubiquitination. The present work identifies a key role for Lys(66) in the regulation of PTEN expression and provides both an opportunity to improve the stability of PTEN as a protein therapy and a mechanistic basis for efforts to stabilize endogenous PTEN.

  8. PTEN is required to maintain luminal epithelial homeostasis and integrity in the adult mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Shore, Amy N; Chang, Chi-Hsuan; Kwon, Oh-Joon; Weston, Matthew C; Zhang, Mei; Xin, Li; Rosen, Jeffrey M

    2016-01-01

    In the mammary gland, PTEN loss in luminal and basal epithelial cells results in differentiation defects and enhanced proliferation, leading to the formation of tumors with basal epithelial characteristics. In breast cancer, PTEN loss is associated with a hormone receptor-negative, basal-like subtype that is thought to originate in a luminal epithelial cell. Here, we show that luminal-specific PTEN loss results in distinct effects on epithelial homeostasis and mammary tumor formation. Luminal PTEN loss increased proliferation of hormone receptor-negative cells, thereby decreasing the percentage of hormone receptor-positive cells. Moreover, luminal PTEN loss led to misoriented cell divisions and mislocalization of cells to the intraluminal space of mammary ducts. Despite their elevated levels of activated AKT, Pten-null intraluminal cells showed increased levels of apoptosis. One year after Pten deletion, the ducts had cleared and no palpable mammary tumors were detected. These data establish PTEN as a critical regulator of luminal epithelial homeostasis and integrity in the adult mammary gland, and further show that luminal PTEN loss alone is not sufficient to promote the progression of mammary tumorigenesis. PMID:26526198

  9. Selective neuronal PTEN deletion: can we take the brakes off of growth without losing control?

    PubMed

    Gutilla, Erin A; Steward, Oswald

    2016-08-01

    The limited ability for injured adult axons to regenerate is a major cause for limited functional recovery after injury to the nervous system, motivating numerous efforts to uncover mechanisms capable of enhancing regeneration potential. One promising strategy involves deletion or knockdown of the phosphatase and tensin (PTEN) gene. Conditional genetic deletion of PTEN before, immediately following, or several months after spinal cord injury enables neurons of the corticospinal tract (CST) to regenerate their axons across the lesion, which is accompanied by enhanced recovery of skilled voluntary motor functions mediated by the CST. Although conditional genetic deletion or knockdown of PTEN in neurons enables axon regeneration, PTEN is a well-known tumor suppressor and mutations of the PTEN gene disrupt brain development leading to neurological abnormalities including macrocephaly, seizures, and early mortality. The long-term consequences of manipulating PTEN in the adult nervous system, as would be done for therapeutic intervention after injury, are only now being explored. Here, we summarize evidence indicating that long-term deletion of PTEN in mature neurons does not cause evident pathology; indeed, cortical neurons that have lived without PTEN for over 1 year appear robust and healthy. Studies to date provide only a first look at potential negative consequences of PTEN deletion or knockdown, but the absence of any detectable neuropathology supports guarded optimism that interventions to enable axon regeneration after injury are achievable. PMID:27651754

  10. Activating PTEN by COX-2 inhibitors antagonizes radiation-induced AKT activation contributing to radiosensitization.

    PubMed

    Meng, Zhen; Gan, Ye-Hua

    2015-05-01

    Radiotherapy is still one of the most effective nonsurgical treatments for many tumors. However, radioresistance remains a major impediment to radiotherapy. Although COX-2 inhibitors can induce radiosensitization, the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. In this study, we showed that COX-2 selective inhibitor celecoxib enhanced the radiation-induced inhibition of cell proliferation and apoptosis in HeLa and SACC-83 cells. Treatment with celecoxib alone dephosphorylated phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN), promoted PTEN membrane translocation or activation, and correspondingly dephosphorylated or inactivated protein kinase B (AKT). By contrast, treatment with radiation alone increased PTEN phosphorylation, inhibited PTEN membrane translocation and correspondingly activated AKT in the two cell lines. However, treatment with celecoxib or another COX-2 selective inhibitor (valdecoxib) completely blocked radiation-induced increase of PTEN phosphorylation, rescued radiation-induced decrease in PTEN membrane translocation, and correspondingly inactivated AKT. Moreover, celecoxib could also upregulate PTEN protein expression by downregulating Sp1 expression, thereby leading to the activation of PTEN transcription. Our results suggested that COX-2 inhibitors could enhance radiosensitization at least partially by activating PTEN to antagonize radiation-induced AKT activation.

  11. Intramuscular relative dose response (RDR) determination of liver vitamin A stores in rats.

    PubMed

    Zachman, R D; Chen, X M

    1991-02-01

    This study questioned whether the relative dose response (RDR) method to detect liver stores of vitamin A could be used by intramuscular administration of the vitamin. Vitamin A-deficient and reference rat serum retinol levels were determined by HPLC at zero time and then again 5 h after an intramuscular injection of 5.25 mumol/kg retinyl palmitate. The RDR percentage was calculated: [(A5-A0)/(A5)] x 100. The 5-h RDR was determined in 20 deficient and 16 reference diet rats and a clear relationship to liver retinyl palmitate concentration was demonstrated. At a liver retinyl palmitate concentration of less than 0.105 mumol/g, all RDR values were greater than 20%. When the liver retinyl palmitate was greater than 0.122 mumol/g the RDR was less than 20%. This study suggests that the intramuscular RDR is a valid tool for estimating liver retinyl palmitate in populations in which the oral RDR cannot be administered. PMID:1825326

  12. miR-148a-3p overexpression contributes to glomerular cell proliferation by targeting PTEN in lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Qingjuan, Liu; Xiaojuan, Feng; Wei, Zhang; Chao, Wu; Pengpeng, Kang; Hongbo, Li; Sanbing, Zhang; Jun, Hao; Min, Yang; Shuxia, Liu

    2016-03-15

    The objective of this study was to investigate the role of miR-148a-3p in lupus nephritis (LN) based on data from previous studies and a microRNA assay. We evaluated the miR-148a-3p expression level in LN renal tissues and blood serum to determine its clinicopathological significance and effect on glomerular cell proliferation. Then, we collected renal glomeruli from LN mice and determined the miR-148a-3p, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and PCNA/Thy1 expression. We performed functional analyses of miR-148a-3p in vitro and in vivo. We also investigated the target gene of miR-148a-3p in LN. The results showed that miR-148a-3p expression levels were significantly higher not only in glomeruli but also in the blood serum during LN and increased in the glomeruli of LN mice and that at the same time there was positive correlation between miR-148a-3p and PCNA expression of glomruli. Overexpression of miR-148a-3p accelerated cell proliferation and PCNA expression, while a miR-148a-3p inhibitor inhibited cell proliferation via the Akt/cyclin D1 pathway. Furthermore, miR-148a-3p overexpression reduced the phosphatase and tensin homology deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN) expression level, while miR-148a-3p silencing increased its expression in high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1)-induced mouse mesangial cells (MMCs). Luciferase assays demonstrated that miR-148a-3p could directly bind to the PTEN 3'-UTR. PTEN overexpression inhibited MMC proliferation considerably, resembling the results observed during miR-148a-3p inhibition. Reducing miR-148a-3p expression upregulated PTEN in the glomeruli and improved renal function in LN mice. Thus miR-148a-3p may promote proliferation and contribute to LN progression by targeting PTEN.

  13. MicroRNA-214 Inhibits Left Ventricular Remodeling in an Acute Myocardial Infarction Rat Model by Suppressing Cellular Apoptosis via the Phosphatase and Tensin Homolog (PTEN).

    PubMed

    Yang, Xingwei; Qin, Yanjun; Shao, Suxia; Yu, Yueqing; Zhang, Chongyang; Dong, Hua; Lv, Guangwei; Dong, Shimin

    2016-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to determine the role of miR-214 on left ventricular remodeling of rat heart with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and to further investigate the underlying mechanism of miR-214-mediated myocardial protection. AMI was induced in which adenovirus-expressing miR-214 (Ad-miR-214), anti-miR-214, or Ad-GFP had been delivered into rats hearts 4 days prior, while a phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) inhibitor was administered via intra-peritoneal injection 30 minutes prior to AMI. Changes in hemodynamic parameters were detected and recorded. Left ventricular (LV) dimensions and LV/BW were measured. Quantitative RT-PCR was used to determine the miR-214 expression levels of the myocytes in the infarcted, border, and non-infarcted areas of the LV. Myocardial infarct size was also measured. Flow cytometry analysis was performed to examine cellular apoptosis. Western blot analysis was performed to examine PTEN expression. The results showed that miR-214 was upregulated in both border and infarcted areas. Myocardial cell apoptosis was decreased in the Ad-miR-214 group, but was increased in the anti-miR-214 group, while there were no differences among the Ad-GFP-group, PTEN-ad-miR-214 group, or PTEN-anti-miR-214 group. Myocardial infarct size, LV dimensions, heart rate (HR), and LV end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP) were decreased while the maximal rates of rise or decline in blood pressure in the ventricular chamber (± dp/dt) and LV systolic pressure (LVSP) were increased in the Ad-miR-214 group, all of which exhibited opposite changes in the anti-miR-214 group. PTEN was downregulated in the Ad-miR-214 group and upregulated in the anti-miR-214 group. PTEN was decreased in both the border and infarcted areas compared with non-infarcted areas. The study results suggest that Ad-miR-214 improves LV remodeling and decreases the apoptosis of myocardial cells through PTEN, suggesting a possible mechanism by which Ad-miR-214 functions in protecting

  14. Quantitative and dynamic analysis of PTEN phosphorylation by NMR.

    PubMed

    Cordier, Florence; Chaffotte, Alain; Wolff, Nicolas

    2015-05-01

    The dual lipid and protein phosphatase PTEN is a tumor suppressor controlling key biological processes, such as cell growth, proliferation and neuro-survival. Its activity and intracellular trafficking is finely regulated notably by multi-site phosphorylation of its C-terminal tail. The reversible and highly dynamic character of these regulatory events confers a temporal dimension to the cell for triggering crucial decisions. In this review, we describe how a recently developed time-resolved NMR spectroscopy approach unveils the dynamic establishment of the phosphorylation events of PTEN C-terminal tail controlled by CK2 and GSK3β kinases. Two cascades of reactions have been identified, in vitro and in extracts of human neuroblastoma cells. They are triggered independently on two nearby clusters of sites (S380-S385 and S361-S370) and occur on different timescales. In each cascade, the reactions follow an ordered model with a distributive kinetic mechanism. The vision of these cascades as two delay timers activating distinct or time-delayed regulatory responses gives a temporal dimension on PTEN regulation and is discussed in relation to the known functional roles of each cluster. PMID:25449899

  15. PTEN Deletion Enhances the Regenerative Ability of Adult Corticospinal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kai; Lu, Yi; Lee, Jae K.; Samara, Ramsey; Willenberg, Rafer; Sears-Kraxberger, Ilse; Tedeschi, Andrea; Park, Kevin Kyungsuk; Jin, Duo; Cai, Bin; Xu, Bengang; Connolly, Lauren; Steward, Oswald; Zheng, Binhai; He, Zhigang

    2010-01-01

    Despite the essential role of the corticospinal tract (CST) in controlling voluntary movements, successful regeneration of large numbers of injured CST axons beyond a spinal cord lesion has never been achieved. Here we demonstrate a critical involvement of PTEN/mTOR in controlling the regenerative capacity of mouse corticospinal neurons. Upon the completion of development, the regrowth potential of CST axons lost and this is accompanied by a down-regulation of mTOR activity in corticospinal neurons. Axonal injury further diminishes neuronal mTOR activity in these neurons. Forced up-regulation of mTOR activity in corticospinal neurons by conditional deletion of PTEN, a negative regulator of mTOR, enhances compensatory sprouting of uninjured CST axons and even more strikingly, enables successful regeneration of a cohort of injured CST axons past a spinal cord lesion. Furthermore, these regenerating CST axons possess the ability to reform synapses in spinal segments distal to the injury. Thus, modulating neuronal intrinsic PTEN/mTOR activity represents a potential therapeutic strategy for promoting axon regeneration and functional repair after adult spinal cord injury. PMID:20694004

  16. Cell type-specific targeted mutations of Kras and Pten document proliferation arrest in granulosa cells versus oncogenic insult to ovarian surface epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Fan, Heng-Yu; Liu, Zhilin; Paquet, Marilene; Wang, Jinrong; Lydon, John P; DeMayo, Francesco J; Richards, JoAnne S

    2009-08-15

    The small G-protein KRAS is crucial for mediating gonadotropin-induced events associated with ovulation. However, constitutive expression of KrasG12D in granulosa cells disrupted normal follicle development leading to the persistence of abnormal follicle-like structures containing nonmitotic cells. To determine what factors mediate this potent effect of KrasG12D, gene profiling analyses were done. We also analyzed KrasG12D;Cyp19-Cre and KrasG12;Pgr-Cre mutant mouse models that express Cre prior to or after the initiation of granulosa cell differentiation, respectively. KrasG12D induced cell cycle arrest in granulosa cells of the KrasG12D;Cyp19-Cre mice but not in the KrasG12D;Pgr-Cre mice, documenting the cell context-specific effect of KrasG12D. Expression of KrasG12D silenced the Kras gene, reduced cell cycle activator genes, and impaired the expression of granulosa cell and oocyte-specific genes. Conversely, levels of PTEN and phosphorylated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) increased markedly in the mutant granulosa cells. Because disrupting Pten in granulosa cells leads to increased proliferation and survival, Pten was disrupted in the KrasG12D mutant mice. The Pten/Kras mutant mice were infertile but lacked granulosa cell tumors. By contrast, the Ptenfl/fl;KrasG12D;Amhr2-Cre mice developed aggressive ovarian surface epithelial cell tumors that did not occur in the Ptenfl/fl;KrasG12D;Cyp19-Cre or Ptenfl/fl;KrasG12D;Pgr-Cre mouse strains. These data document unequivocally that Amhr2-Cre is expressed in and mediates allelic recombination of oncogenic genes in ovarian surface epithelial cells. That KrasG12D/Pten mutant granulosa cells do not transform but rather undergo cell cycle arrest indicates that they resist the oncogenic insults of Kras/Pten by robust self-protecting mechanisms that silence the Kras gene and elevate PTEN and phosphorylated p38 MAPK.

  17. Down-regulation of PTEN by HCV core protein through activating nuclear factor-κB

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Li, Rong-Qing; Feng, Xu-Dong; Zhang, Yan-Hua; Wang, Li

    2014-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein is an important causative agent in HCV related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Tumor suppressor gene PTEN appears to act in the liver at the crossroad of processes controlling cell proliferation. In this study we investigated the effect of the HCV core protein on the PTEN pathway in hepatocarcinogenesis. The HCV core was transfected stably into HepG2 cell. The effect of HCV core on cell proliferation and viability were detected by 3-(4, 5)-dimethylthiahiazo-(-z-y1)-3, 5-di-phenytetrazoliumromide (MTT) assay, clonogenic survival assay and Fluorescence Activating Cell Sorter (FACS) analysis. The expressions of PTEN were detected by real time RT-PCR and/or Western blot analysis, also the mechanism of down-regulation of PTEN was explored by western blot, luciferase assay and RNA interference. We found the HCV core promoted cell proliferation, survival and G2/M phase accumulation. It downregulated PTEN at mRNA and protein level and activated PTEN downstream gene Akt accompanied with NF-κB activation. Furthermore, the inhibition of HCV core by its specific shRNAs decreased the effect of growth promotion and G2/M phase arrest, inhibited the expression of nuclear p65 and increased PTEN expression. The activity of PTEN was restored when treated with NF-κB inhibitor PDTC. By luciferase assay we found that NF-κB inhibited PTEN promoter transcription activity directly in HCV core cells, while PDTC was contrary. Our study suggests that HCV proteins could modulate PTEN by activating NF-κB. Furthermore strategies designed to restore the expression of PTEN may be promising therapies for preventing HCV dependent hepatocarcinogenesis. PMID:25550771

  18. Acetaminophen determination in low-dose pharmaceutical syrup by NIR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ziémons, E; Mantanus, J; Lebrun, P; Rozet, E; Evrard, B; Hubert, Ph

    2010-11-01

    The aim of the present study was first to develop a robust near infrared (NIR) calibration model able to determine the acetaminophen content of a low-dose syrup formulation (2%, w/v). Therefore, variability sources such as production campaigns, batches, API concentration, syrup basis, operators and sample temperatures were introduced in the calibration set. A prediction model was then built using partial least square (PLS) regression. First derivative followed by standard normal variate (SNV) were chosen as signal pre-processing. Based on the random subsets cross-validation, 4 PLS factors were selected for the prediction model. The method was then validated for an API concentration ranging from 16 to 24 mg/mL (1.6-2.4%, w/v) using an external validation set. The 0.26 mg/mL RMSEP suggested the global accuracy of the model. The accuracy profile obtained from the validation results, based on tolerance intervals, confirmed the adequate accuracy of the results generated by the method all over the investigated API concentration range. Finally, the NIR model was used to monitor in real time the API concentration while mixing syrups containing various amounts of API, a good agreement was found between the NIR method and the theoretical concentrations. PMID:20609544

  19. Determination of a safe and effective ultraviolet B radiant dose in budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus): a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Lupu, Corina; Robins, Stephanie

    2013-12-01

    The object of this study was to establish a minimum dose of ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation capable of producing an erythemal reaction in budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus), to determine a threshold dose of UVB for vitamin D photoconversion, and to investigate the use of safer UVB wavelengths. In each of 5 experiments of this study, 20 birds were divided into a control group (n = 10) and a UVB irradiated group (n = 10). Light sources that provide broadband UVB wavelengths (280-315 nm) and narrowband UVB (310-320 nm) were used. Varied doses of UVB radiation were administered to budgerigars by altering exposure time and irradiance. Safety was determined by observing body weight and incidence of photokeratitis and photodermatitis. Efficacy was evaluated by measuring changes in serum 25-hydroxycholecalciferol levels. Serum corticosterone was measured in 1 experiment to monitor stress levels. The results demonstrated that exposure to 180 mJ/cm2 broadband UVB induced vitamin D photoconversion, decreased body weights, and increased serum corticosterone levels. At these wavelengths, UVB-induced lesions were observed. A broadband UVB of 150 to 300 mJ/cm2 was determined as the minimum erythema dose, and the threshold dose for vitamin D photoconversion was calculated to be in the range of 113-225 mJ/cm2. No erythemal lesions or vitamin D photoconversion took place after exposure to up to 1730 mJ/cm2 narrowband UVB radiation. A minimum erythema dose and a threshold dose for vitamin D conversion need to be determined for each species if phototherapy is to be considered as a safe and effective therapeutic or husbandry tool. PMID:24640928

  20. Quantitative analysis of dose distribution to determine optimal width of respiratory gating window using Gafchromic EBT2 film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sung Hyun; Kim, Kum Bae; Kim, Mi-Sook; Yoo, Hyung-Jun; Park, Seungwoo; Jung, Haijo; Ji, Young Hoon; Yi, Chul-Young

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the dependence of the dose distribution on the width of the respiratory gating window by using radiochromic Gafchromic EBT2 film. An in-house three-dimensional breathing simulator was used with a 4-s cycle and a 3-cm movement. The gamma index and the 50, 95, and 20-80% dose distributions were individually analyzed with regard to static, 100 (full motion), 60, 40, 30, 20, and 15% respiratory gating windows. In addition, dose differences based on the different extents of exposure were compared and analyzed along with total beam delivery time. Dose distributions became increasingly similar to the static value with decreasing respiratory gating window width. The extent differences from the static case for the low-dose region were not significant; neither were the extent differences for the high-dose region and 30, 20, and 15% gating windows (P = 0.388, 0.275, respectively). However, the 40% gating window showed a significant difference (P = 0.001). Moreover, the treatment time for the 30% gating window was reduced by more than half compared to that for the 15% gating window. Thus, the 30% window would be a reasonable choice for maximizing the range of the gating window while markedly decreasing the dose difference and the treatment time.

  1. AXAOTHER XL -- A spreadsheet for determining doses for incidents caused by tornadoes or high-velocity straight winds

    SciTech Connect

    Simpkins, A.A.

    1996-09-01

    AXAOTHER XL is an Excel Spreadsheet used to determine dose to the maximally exposed offsite individual during high-velocity straight winds or tornado conditions. Both individual and population doses may be considered. Potential exposure pathways are inhalation and plume shine. For high-velocity straight winds the spreadsheet has the capability to determine the downwind relative air concentration, however for the tornado conditions, the user must enter the relative air concentration. Theoretical models are discussed and hand calculations are performed to ensure proper application of methodologies. A section has also been included that contains user instructions for the spreadsheet.

  2. Radon in indoor air of primary schools: determinant factors, their variability and effective dose.

    PubMed

    Madureira, Joana; Paciência, Inês; Rufo, João; Moreira, André; de Oliveira Fernandes, Eduardo; Pereira, Alcides

    2016-04-01

    Radon is a radioactive gas, abundant in granitic areas, such as in the city of Porto at the north-east of Portugal. This gas is a recognized carcinogenic agent, being appointed by the World Health Organization as the leading cause of lung cancer after smoking. The aim of this preliminary survey was to determine indoor radon concentrations in public primary schools, to analyse the main factors influencing their indoor concentration levels and to estimate the effective dose in students and teachers in primary schools. Radon concentrations were measured in 45 classrooms from 13 public primary schools located in Porto, using CR-39 passive radon detectors for about 2-month period. In all schools, radon concentrations ranged from 56 to 889 Bq/m(3) (mean = 197 Bq/m(3)). The results showed that the limit of 100 Bq/m(3) established by WHO IAQ guidelines was exceeded in 92 % of the measurements, as well as 8 % of the measurements exceeded the limit of 400 Bq/m(3) established by the national legislation. Moreover, the mean annual effective dose was calculated as 1.25 mSv/y (ranging between 0.58 and 3.07 mSv/y), which is below the action level (3-10 mSv). The considerable variability of radon concentration observed between and within floors indicates a need to monitor concentrations in several rooms for each floor. A single radon detector for each room can be used, provided that the measurement error is considerably lower than variability of radon concentration between rooms. The results of the present survey will provide useful baseline data for adopting safety measures and dealing effectively with radiation emergencies. In particular, radon remediation techniques should be used in buildings located in the highest radon risk areas of Portugal. The results obtained in the current study concerning radon levels and their variations will be useful to optimize the design of future research surveys.

  3. Radon in indoor air of primary schools: determinant factors, their variability and effective dose.

    PubMed

    Madureira, Joana; Paciência, Inês; Rufo, João; Moreira, André; de Oliveira Fernandes, Eduardo; Pereira, Alcides

    2016-04-01

    Radon is a radioactive gas, abundant in granitic areas, such as in the city of Porto at the north-east of Portugal. This gas is a recognized carcinogenic agent, being appointed by the World Health Organization as the leading cause of lung cancer after smoking. The aim of this preliminary survey was to determine indoor radon concentrations in public primary schools, to analyse the main factors influencing their indoor concentration levels and to estimate the effective dose in students and teachers in primary schools. Radon concentrations were measured in 45 classrooms from 13 public primary schools located in Porto, using CR-39 passive radon detectors for about 2-month period. In all schools, radon concentrations ranged from 56 to 889 Bq/m(3) (mean = 197 Bq/m(3)). The results showed that the limit of 100 Bq/m(3) established by WHO IAQ guidelines was exceeded in 92 % of the measurements, as well as 8 % of the measurements exceeded the limit of 400 Bq/m(3) established by the national legislation. Moreover, the mean annual effective dose was calculated as 1.25 mSv/y (ranging between 0.58 and 3.07 mSv/y), which is below the action level (3-10 mSv). The considerable variability of radon concentration observed between and within floors indicates a need to monitor concentrations in several rooms for each floor. A single radon detector for each room can be used, provided that the measurement error is considerably lower than variability of radon concentration between rooms. The results of the present survey will provide useful baseline data for adopting safety measures and dealing effectively with radiation emergencies. In particular, radon remediation techniques should be used in buildings located in the highest radon risk areas of Portugal. The results obtained in the current study concerning radon levels and their variations will be useful to optimize the design of future research surveys. PMID:26100326

  4. Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Modeling To Determine the Dose of ST-246 To Protect against Smallpox in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Leeds, Janet M.; Fenneteau, Frederique; Gosselin, Nathalie H.; Mouksassi, Mohamad-Samer; Kassir, Nastya; Marier, J. F.; Chen, Yali; Grosenbach, Doug; Frimm, Annie E.; Honeychurch, Kady M.; Chinsangaram, Jarasvech; Tyavanagimatt, Shanthakumar R.; Jordan, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Although smallpox has been eradicated, the United States government considers it a “material threat” and has funded the discovery and development of potential therapeutic compounds. As reported here, the human efficacious dose for one of these compounds, ST-246, was determined using efficacy studies in nonhuman primates (NHPs), together with pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic analysis that predicted the appropriate dose and exposure levels to provide therapeutic benefit in humans. The efficacy analysis combined the data from studies conducted at three separate facilities that evaluated treatment following infection with a closely related virus, monkeypox virus (MPXV), in a total of 96 NHPs. The effect of infection on ST-246 pharmacokinetics in NHPs was applied to humans using population pharmacokinetic models. Exposure at the selected human dose of 600 mg is more than 4-fold higher than the lowest efficacious dose in NHPs and is predicted to provide protection to more than 95% of the population. PMID:23254433

  5. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic modeling to determine the dose of ST-246 to protect against smallpox in humans.

    PubMed

    Leeds, Janet M; Fenneteau, Frederique; Gosselin, Nathalie H; Mouksassi, Mohamad-Samer; Kassir, Nastya; Marier, J F; Chen, Yali; Grosenbach, Doug; Frimm, Annie E; Honeychurch, Kady M; Chinsangaram, Jarasvech; Tyavanagimatt, Shanthakumar R; Hruby, Dennis E; Jordan, Robert

    2013-03-01

    Although smallpox has been eradicated, the United States government considers it a "material threat" and has funded the discovery and development of potential therapeutic compounds. As reported here, the human efficacious dose for one of these compounds, ST-246, was determined using efficacy studies in nonhuman primates (NHPs), together with pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic analysis that predicted the appropriate dose and exposure levels to provide therapeutic benefit in humans. The efficacy analysis combined the data from studies conducted at three separate facilities that evaluated treatment following infection with a closely related virus, monkeypox virus (MPXV), in a total of 96 NHPs. The effect of infection on ST-246 pharmacokinetics in NHPs was applied to humans using population pharmacokinetic models. Exposure at the selected human dose of 600 mg is more than 4-fold higher than the lowest efficacious dose in NHPs and is predicted to provide protection to more than 95% of the population.

  6. PTEN overexpression attenuates angiogenic processes of endothelial cells by blockade of endothelin-1/endothelin B receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Hsiao-Mei; Lin, Chun-Yao; Lam, Hing-Chung; Lin, Pey-Ru; Chan, Hoi-Hung; Tseng, Jui-Cheng; Sun, Cheuk-Kwan; Hsu, Te-Fa; Wu, Chia-Ching; Yang, Chao-Yuh; Hsu, Ching-Mei; Tai, Ming-Hong

    2012-04-01

    Arteriovenous (AV) graft is frequently used as vascular access in hemodialysis patients. However, clotting or thrombosis of AV grafts often occurs and requires surgical removal. At present, the molecular pathogenesis underlying thrombosis of AV graft is not clear. The PTEN/Akt signaling has been implicated in the pathogenesis of vascular diseases. In this study, elevated PTEN expression and concomitant Akt inactivation was observed in endothelium of atherosclerotic brachial arteries from hemodialysis patients. To investigate whether PTEN upregulation affects endothelial function, adenovirus-mediated PTEN (Ad-PTEN) overexpression was performed in aorta rings and cultured endothelial cells. It was found that PTEN overexpression potently inhibited the microvessel sprouting in aorta rings and the angiogenic activities of endothelial cells including migration and tube formation. On the contrary, PTEN knockdown by RNA interference promoted the endothelial migration and reversed the Ad-PTEN-induced inhibition of endothelial migration. Expression analysis showed that PTEN overexpression attenuated the expression of endothelin-1 (ET-1) and endothelin B receptor (ETBR) in endothelial cells at transcriptional levels. However, exogenous ET-1 supply only partially reversed the PTEN-induced inhibition of migration and tube formation. This was delineated due to that PTEN overexpression also perturbed endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activation and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) release. In summary, PTEN upregulation induces endothelial dysfunction by attenuating the availability and signaling of multiple angiogenic pathways in endothelial cells, thereby may contribute to thrombosis of AV graft.

  7. PTEN posttranslational inactivation and hyperactivation of the PI3K/Akt pathway sustain primary T cell leukemia viability

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Ana; Yunes, J. Andrés; Cardoso, Bruno A.; Martins, Leila R.; Jotta, Patrícia Y.; Abecasis, Miguel; Nowill, Alexandre E.; Leslie, Nick R.; Cardoso, Angelo A.; Barata, Joao T.

    2008-01-01

    Mutations in the phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) gene leading to PTEN protein deletion and subsequent activation of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway are common in cancer. Here we show that PTEN inactivation in human T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cells is not always synonymous with PTEN gene lesions and diminished protein expression. Samples taken from patients with T-ALL at the time of diagnosis very frequently showed constitutive hyperactivation of the PI3K/Akt pathway. In contrast to immortalized cell lines, most primary T-ALL cells did not harbor PTEN gene alterations, displayed normal PTEN mRNA levels, and expressed higher PTEN protein levels than normal T cell precursors. However, PTEN overexpression was associated with decreased PTEN lipid phosphatase activity, resulting from casein kinase 2 (CK2) overexpression and hyperactivation. In addition, T-ALL cells had constitutively high levels of ROS, which can also downmodulate PTEN activity. Accordingly, both CK2 inhibitors and ROS scavengers restored PTEN activity and impaired PI3K/Akt signaling in T-ALL cells. Strikingly, inhibition of PI3K and/or CK2 promoted T-ALL cell death without affecting normal T cell precursors. Overall, our data indicate that T-ALL cells inactivate PTEN mostly in a nondeletional, posttranslational manner. Pharmacological manipulation of these mechanisms may open new avenues for T-ALL treatment. PMID:18830414

  8. Evaluation of the benchmark dose for point of departure determination for a variety of chemical classes in applied regulatory settings.

    PubMed

    Izadi, Hoda; Grundy, Jean E; Bose, Ranjan

    2012-05-01

    Repeated-dose studies received by the New Substances Assessment and Control Bureau (NSACB) of Health Canada are used to provide hazard information toward risk calculation. These studies provide a point of departure (POD), traditionally the NOAEL or LOAEL, which is used to extrapolate the quantity of substance above which adverse effects can be expected in humans. This project explored the use of benchmark dose (BMD) modeling as an alternative to this approach for studies with few dose groups. Continuous data from oral repeated-dose studies for chemicals previously assessed by NSACB were reanalyzed using U.S. EPA benchmark dose software (BMDS) to determine the BMD and BMD 95% lower confidence limit (BMDL(05) ) for each endpoint critical to NOAEL or LOAEL determination for each chemical. Endpoint-specific benchmark dose-response levels , indicative of adversity, were consistently applied. An overall BMD and BMDL(05) were calculated for each chemical using the geometric mean. The POD obtained from benchmark analysis was then compared with the traditional toxicity thresholds originally used for risk assessment. The BMD and BMDL(05) generally were higher than the NOAEL, but lower than the LOAEL. BMDL(05) was generally constant at 57% of the BMD. Benchmark provided a clear advantage in health risk assessment when a LOAEL was the only POD identified, or when dose groups were widely distributed. Although the benchmark method cannot always be applied, in the selected studies with few dose groups it provided a more accurate estimate of the real no-adverse-effect level of a substance.

  9. Noncatalytic PTEN missense mutation predisposes to organ-selective cancer development in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Caserta, Enrico; Egriboz, Onur; Wang, Hui; Martin, Chelsea; Koivisto, Christopher; Pecót, Thierry; Kladney, Raleigh D.; Shen, Changxian; Shim, Kang-Sup; Pham, Thac; Karikomi, Matthew K.; Mauntel, Melissa J.; Majumder, Sarmila; Cuitino, Maria C.; Tang, Xing; Srivastava, Arunima; Yu, Lianbo; Wallace, Julie; Mo, Xiaokui; Park, Morag; Fernandez, Soledad A.; Pilarski, Robert; La Perle, Krista M.D.; Rosol, Thomas J.; Coppola, Vincenzo; Castrillon, Diego H.; Timmers, Cynthia; Cohn, David E.; O'Malley, David M.; Backes, Floor; Suarez, Adrian A.; Goodfellow, Paul; Chamberlin, Helen M.; Macrae, Erin R.; Shapiro, Charles L.; Ostrowski, Michael C.; Leone, Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    Inactivation of phosphatase and tensin homology deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) is linked to increased PI3K–AKT signaling, enhanced organismal growth, and cancer development. Here we generated and analyzed Pten knock-in mice harboring a C2 domain missense mutation at phenylalanine 341 (PtenFV), found in human cancer. Despite having reduced levels of PTEN protein, homozygous PtenFV/FV embryos have intact AKT signaling, develop normally, and are carried to term. Heterozygous PtenFV/+ mice develop carcinoma in the thymus, stomach, adrenal medulla, and mammary gland but not in other organs typically sensitive to Pten deficiency, including the thyroid, prostate, and uterus. Progression to carcinoma in sensitive organs ensues in the absence of overt AKT activation. Carcinoma in the uterus, a cancer-resistant organ, requires a second clonal event associated with the spontaneous activation of AKT and downstream signaling. In summary, this PTEN noncatalytic missense mutation exposes a core tumor suppressor function distinct from inhibition of canonical AKT signaling that predisposes to organ-selective cancer development in vivo. PMID:26302789

  10. PTEN deficiency reprogrammes human neural stem cells towards a glioblastoma stem cell-like phenotype.

    PubMed

    Duan, Shunlei; Yuan, Guohong; Liu, Xiaomeng; Ren, Ruotong; Li, Jingyi; Zhang, Weizhou; Wu, Jun; Xu, Xiuling; Fu, Lina; Li, Ying; Yang, Jiping; Zhang, Weiqi; Bai, Ruijun; Yi, Fei; Suzuki, Keiichiro; Gao, Hua; Esteban, Concepcion Rodriguez; Zhang, Chuanbao; Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos; Chen, Zhiguo; Wang, Xiaomin; Jiang, Tao; Qu, Jing; Tang, Fuchou; Liu, Guang-Hui

    2015-01-01

    PTEN is a tumour suppressor frequently mutated in many types of cancers. Here we show that targeted disruption of PTEN leads to neoplastic transformation of human neural stem cells (NSCs), but not mesenchymal stem cells. PTEN-deficient NSCs display neoplasm-associated metabolic and gene expression profiles and generate intracranial tumours in immunodeficient mice. PTEN is localized to the nucleus in NSCs, binds to the PAX7 promoter through association with cAMP responsive element binding protein 1 (CREB)/CREB binding protein (CBP) and inhibits PAX7 transcription. PTEN deficiency leads to the upregulation of PAX7, which in turn promotes oncogenic transformation of NSCs and instates 'aggressiveness' in human glioblastoma stem cells. In a large clinical database, we find increased PAX7 levels in PTEN-deficient glioblastoma. Furthermore, we identify that mitomycin C selectively triggers apoptosis in NSCs with PTEN deficiency. Together, we uncover a potential mechanism of how PTEN safeguards NSCs, and establish a cellular platform to identify factors involved in NSC transformation, potentially permitting personalized treatment of glioblastoma. PMID:26632666

  11. Soy peptide lunasin induces pten-mediated apoptosis in human breast cancer cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The tumor suppressor PTEN inhibits the AKT signaling pathway whose unrestrained activity underlies many human malignancies. Previously we showed that dietary intake of soy protein isolate (SPI) enhanced PTEN expression in mammary tissue of rats with lower NMU-induced mammary tumor incidence relative...

  12. Systematic analysis of the PTEN 5' leader identifies a major AUU initiated proteoform.

    PubMed

    Tzani, Ioanna; Ivanov, Ivaylo P; Andreev, Dmitri E; Dmitriev, Ruslan I; Dean, Kellie A; Baranov, Pavel V; Atkins, John F; Loughran, Gary

    2016-05-01

    Abundant evidence for translation within the 5' leaders of many human genes is rapidly emerging, especially, because of the advent of ribosome profiling. In most cases, it is believed that the act of translation rather than the encoded peptide is important. However, the wealth of available sequencing data in recent years allows phylogenetic detection of sequences within 5' leaders that have emerged under coding constraint and therefore allow for the prediction of functional 5' leader translation. Using this approach, we previously predicted a CUG-initiated, 173 amino acid N-terminal extension to the human tumour suppressor PTEN. Here, a systematic experimental analysis of translation events in the PTEN 5' leader identifies at least two additional non-AUG-initiated PTEN proteoforms that are expressed in most human cell lines tested. The most abundant extended PTEN proteoform initiates at a conserved AUU codon and extends the canonical AUG-initiated PTEN by 146 amino acids. All N-terminally extended PTEN proteoforms tested retain the ability to downregulate the PI3K pathway. We also provide evidence for the translation of two conserved AUG-initiated upstream open reading frames within the PTEN 5' leader that control the ratio of PTEN proteoforms.

  13. Mutational spectra of PTEN/MMAC1 gene: a tumor suppressor with lipid phosphatase activity.

    PubMed

    Ali, I U; Schriml, L M; Dean, M

    1999-11-17

    PTEN/MMAC1 (phosphatase, tensin homologue/mutated in multiple advanced cancers) is a tumor suppressor protein that has sequence homology with dual-specificity phosphatases, which are capable of dephosphorylating both tyrosine phosphate and serine/threonine phosphate residues on proteins. The in vivo function of PTEN/MMAC1 appears to be dephosphorylation of phosphotidylinositol 3,4, 5-triphosphate. The PTEN/MMAC1 gene is mutated in the germline of patients with rare autosomal dominant cancer syndromes and in subsets of specific cancers. Here we review the mutational spectra of the PTEN/MMAC1 gene in tumors from various tissues, especially endometrium, brain, prostate, and ovary, in which the gene is inactivated very frequently. Germline and somatic mutations in the PTEN/MMAC1 gene occur mostly in the protein coding region and involve the phosphatase domain and poly(A)(6) stretches. Compared with germline alterations found in the PTEN/MMAC1 gene, there is a substantially increased frequency of frameshift mutations in tumors. Glioblastomas and endometrial carcinomas appear to have distinct mutational spectra, probably reflecting differences in the underlying mechanisms of inactivation of the PTEN/MMAC1 gene in the two tissue types. Also, depending on the tissue type, the gene appears to be involved in the initiation or the progression of cancers. Further understanding of PTEN/MMAC1 gene mutations in different tumors and the physiologic consequences of these mutations is likely to open up new therapeutic opportunities for targeting this critical gene.

  14. Loss of Pten promotes angiogenesis and enhanced vegfaa expression in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Choorapoikayil, Suma; Weijts, Bart; Kers, Rianne; de Bruin, Alain; den Hertog, Jeroen

    2013-09-01

    Angiogenesis, the emergence of vessels from an existing vascular network, is pathologically associated with tumor progression and is of great interest for therapeutic intervention. PTEN is a frequently mutated tumor suppressor and has been linked to the progression of many types of tumors, including hemangiosarcomas in zebrafish. Here, we report that mutant zebrafish embryos lacking functional Pten exhibit enhanced angiogenesis, accompanied by elevated levels of phosphorylated Akt (pAkt). Inhibition of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) by LY294002 treatment and application of sunitinib, a widely used anti-angiogenic compound, suppressed enhanced angiogenesis in Pten mutants. Vegfaa has a crucial role in angiogenesis and vegfaa expression was upregulated in embryos lacking functional Pten. Interestingly, vegfaa expression was also upregulated in hemangiosarcomas from haploinsufficient adult zebrafish Pten mutants. Elevated vegfaa expression in mutant embryos lacking functional Pten was suppressed by LY294002. Surprisingly, sunitinib treatment dramatically enhanced vegfaa expression in Pten mutant embryos, which might account for tumor relapse in human patients who are treated with sunitinib. Combined treatment with suboptimal concentrations of sunitinib and LY294002 rescued enhanced angiogenesis in pten mutant embryos without the dramatic increase in vegfaa expression, suggesting a new approach for therapeutic intervention in VEGFR-signaling-dependent tumors.

  15. Systematic analysis of the PTEN 5′ leader identifies a major AUU initiated proteoform

    PubMed Central

    Tzani, Ioanna; Ivanov, Ivaylo P.; Andreev, Dmitri E.; Dmitriev, Ruslan I.; Dean, Kellie A.; Baranov, Pavel V.; Atkins, John F.; Loughran, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Abundant evidence for translation within the 5′ leaders of many human genes is rapidly emerging, especially, because of the advent of ribosome profiling. In most cases, it is believed that the act of translation rather than the encoded peptide is important. However, the wealth of available sequencing data in recent years allows phylogenetic detection of sequences within 5′ leaders that have emerged under coding constraint and therefore allow for the prediction of functional 5′ leader translation. Using this approach, we previously predicted a CUG-initiated, 173 amino acid N-terminal extension to the human tumour suppressor PTEN. Here, a systematic experimental analysis of translation events in the PTEN 5′ leader identifies at least two additional non-AUG-initiated PTEN proteoforms that are expressed in most human cell lines tested. The most abundant extended PTEN proteoform initiates at a conserved AUU codon and extends the canonical AUG-initiated PTEN by 146 amino acids. All N-terminally extended PTEN proteoforms tested retain the ability to downregulate the PI3K pathway. We also provide evidence for the translation of two conserved AUG-initiated upstream open reading frames within the PTEN 5′ leader that control the ratio of PTEN proteoforms. PMID:27249819

  16. PTEN deficiency reprogrammes human neural stem cells towards a glioblastoma stem cell-like phenotype.

    PubMed

    Duan, Shunlei; Yuan, Guohong; Liu, Xiaomeng; Ren, Ruotong; Li, Jingyi; Zhang, Weizhou; Wu, Jun; Xu, Xiuling; Fu, Lina; Li, Ying; Yang, Jiping; Zhang, Weiqi; Bai, Ruijun; Yi, Fei; Suzuki, Keiichiro; Gao, Hua; Esteban, Concepcion Rodriguez; Zhang, Chuanbao; Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos; Chen, Zhiguo; Wang, Xiaomin; Jiang, Tao; Qu, Jing; Tang, Fuchou; Liu, Guang-Hui

    2015-12-03

    PTEN is a tumour suppressor frequently mutated in many types of cancers. Here we show that targeted disruption of PTEN leads to neoplastic transformation of human neural stem cells (NSCs), but not mesenchymal stem cells. PTEN-deficient NSCs display neoplasm-associated metabolic and gene expression profiles and generate intracranial tumours in immunodeficient mice. PTEN is localized to the nucleus in NSCs, binds to the PAX7 promoter through association with cAMP responsive element binding protein 1 (CREB)/CREB binding protein (CBP) and inhibits PAX7 transcription. PTEN deficiency leads to the upregulation of PAX7, which in turn promotes oncogenic transformation of NSCs and instates 'aggressiveness' in human glioblastoma stem cells. In a large clinical database, we find increased PAX7 levels in PTEN-deficient glioblastoma. Furthermore, we identify that mitomycin C selectively triggers apoptosis in NSCs with PTEN deficiency. Together, we uncover a potential mechanism of how PTEN safeguards NSCs, and establish a cellular platform to identify factors involved in NSC transformation, potentially permitting personalized treatment of glioblastoma.

  17. Decrease in PTEN and increase in Akt expression and neuron size in aged rat spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues De Amorim, Miguel Augusto; Garcia-Segura, Luis Miguel; Goya, Rodolfo Gustavo; Portiansky, Enrique Leo

    2010-01-01

    PTEN is a tumor suppressor gene known to play an important role in the regulation of cell size. In this study we compared PTEN expression in the spinal cord of young (5 mo.) versus aged (32 mo.) female rats and correlated them with alterations in neuron size and morphology in the same animals. Total and phosphorylated PTEN (pPTEN) as well as its downstream target phosphorylated Akt (pAkt) were assessed by western blotting. Spinal cord neurons were morphometrically characterized. Total PTEN, pPTEN and total Akt expression were significantly higher in young rats than in aged animals. Expression of pAkt was stronger in aged animals. A significant increase in neuronal size was observed in large motoneurons of aged as compared with young rats. Our data show that in the spinal cord of rats, neuronal PTEN expression diminishes with advanced age while neuronal size increases. These results suggest that in the spinal cord, an age-related reduction in PTEN and increase of pAkt expression may be involved in the progressive enlargement of neurons. PMID:20347952

  18. Determination of the temporal resolution required for the HEDR dose code

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, B.A.; Simpson, J.C.

    1992-12-01

    A series of scoping calculations has been undertaken to evaluate the radiation doses that may have-been received by individuals living in the vicinity of the Hanford site. This scoping calculation (Calculation 008) examined the potential for changes in the uncertainty distributions of potential doses from releases in the year 1945 as a function of temporal resolution of the intermediate data storage. This study builds on the work initiated in the fifth scoping calculation, which addressed the uncertainty of the dose estimates at a point; the sixth calculation, which extrapolated the doses throughout the atmospheric transport domain; and the seventh, which evaluated the spatial scales across the domain. A projection of dose to representative individuals throughout the proposed HEDR atmospheric transport domain was prepared on the basis of the HEDR source term. Addressed in this calculation were the contributions to iodine-131 thyroid dose of infants from (1) air submersion and groundshine external dose, (2) inhalation, (3) ingestion of soil by humans, (4) ingestion of leafy vegetables, (5) ingestion of other vegetables and fruits, (6) ingestion of meat, (7) ingestion of eggs, and ingestion of cow's milk.

  19. Direct absorbed dose to water determination based on water calorimetry in scanning proton beam delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Sarfehnia, A.; Clasie, B.; Chung, E.; Lu, H. M.; Flanz, J.; Cascio, E.; Engelsman, M.; Paganetti, H.; Seuntjens, J.

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: The aim of this manuscript is to describe the direct measurement of absolute absorbed dose to water in a scanned proton radiotherapy beam using a water calorimeter primary standard. Methods: The McGill water calorimeter, which has been validated in photon and electron beams as well as in HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy, was used to measure the absorbed dose to water in double scattering and scanning proton irradiations. The measurements were made at the Massachusetts General Hospital proton radiotherapy facility. The correction factors in water calorimetry were numerically calculated and various parameters affecting their magnitude and uncertainty were studied. The absorbed dose to water was compared to that obtained using an Exradin T1 Chamber based on the IAEA TRS-398 protocol. Results: The overall 1-sigma uncertainty on absorbed dose to water amounts to 0.4% and 0.6% in scattered and scanned proton water calorimetry, respectively. This compares to an overall uncertainty of 1.9% for currently accepted IAEA TRS-398 reference absorbed dose measurement protocol. The absorbed dose from water calorimetry agrees with the results from TRS-398 well to within 1-sigma uncertainty. Conclusions: This work demonstrates that a primary absorbed dose standard based on water calorimetry is feasible in scattered and scanned proton beams.

  20. Determination of the spatial resolution required for the HEDR dose code

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, B.A.; Simpson, J.C.

    1992-12-01

    A series of scoping calculations has been undertaken to evaluate the doses that may have been received by individuals living in the vicinity of the Hanford site. This scoping calculation (Calculation 007) examined the spatial distribution of potential doses resulting from releases in the year 1945. This study builds on the work initiated in the first scoping calculation, of iodine in cow's milk; the third scoping calculation, which added additional pathways; the fifth calculation, which addressed the uncertainty of the dose estimates at a point; and the sixth calculation, which extrapolated the doses throughout the atmospheric transport domain. A projection of dose to representative individuals throughout the proposed HEDR atmospheric transport domain was prepared on the basis of the HEDR source term. Addressed in this calculation were the contributions to iodine-131 thyroid dose of infants from (1) air submersion and groundshine external dose, (2) inhalation, (3) ingestion of soil by humans, (4) ingestion of leafy vegetables, (5) ingestion of other vegetables and fruits, (6) ingestion of meat, (7) ingestion of eggs, and (8) ingestion of cows' milk from-Feeding Regime 1 as described in scoping calculation 001.

  1. Determination of radiation sterilization dose of disposable needles based on D 10 values and AAMI recommendation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazsó, L. G.; Dám, A.; Molnár, A.; Daróczy, E.

    The initial microbiological contamination and the radiosensitivity of micro-organisms isolated from disposable needles were studied. Radiation sterilization dose was calculated from maximum initial count, D 10 values and according to the Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation Process Control Guidelines for Radiation Sterilization of Medical Devices, respectively. For complete sterilization these doses vary between 16.6 to 17.2 kGy, including 10 -6 sterility assurance level. Consideration was given to decrease the "magic" 25 kGy as a minimum radiation sterilization dose.

  2. Dose to the Developing Dentition During Therapeutic Irradiation: Organ at Risk Determination and Clinical Implications

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Reid F.; Schneider, Ralf A.; Albertini, Francesca; Lomax, Antony J.; Ares, Carmen; Goitein, Gudrun; Hug, Eugen B.

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: Irradiation of pediatric facial structures can cause severe impairment of permanent teeth later in life. We therefore focused on primary and permanent teeth as organs at risk, investigating the ability to identify individual teeth in children and infants and to correlate dose distributions with subsequent dental toxicity. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 14 pediatric patients who received a maximum dose >20 Gy(relative biological effectiveness, RBE) to 1 or more primary or permanent teeth between 2003 and 2009. The patients (aged 1-16 years) received spot-scanning proton therapy with 46 to 66 Gy(RBE) in 23 to 33 daily fractions for a variety of tumors, including rhabdomyosarcoma (n=10), sarcoma (n=2), teratoma (n=1), and carcinoma (n=1). Individual teeth were contoured on axial slices from planning computed tomography (CT) scans. Dose-volume histogram data were retrospectively obtained from total calculated delivered treatments. Dental follow-up information was obtained from external care providers. Results: All primary teeth and permanent incisors, canines, premolars, and first and second molars were identifiable on CT scans in all patients as early as 1 year of age. Dose-volume histogram analysis showed wide dose variability, with a median 37 Gy(RBE) per tooth dose range across all individuals, and a median 50 Gy(RBE) intraindividual dose range across all teeth. Dental follow-up revealed absence of significant toxicity in 7 of 10 patients but severe localized toxicity in teeth receiving >20 Gy(RBE) among 3 patients who were all treated at <4 years of age. Conclusions: CT-based assessment of dose distribution to individual teeth is feasible, although delayed calcification may complicate tooth identification in the youngest patients. Patterns of dental dose exposure vary markedly within and among patients, corresponding to rapid dose falloff with protons. Severe localized dental toxicity was observed in a few patients receiving the

  3. Determination of prescription dose for Cs-131 permanent implants using the BED formalism including resensitization correction

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Wei Molloy, Janelle; Aryal, Prakash; Feddock, Jonathan; Randall, Marcus

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: The current widely used biological equivalent dose (BED) formalism for permanent implants is based on the linear-quadratic model that includes cell repair and repopulation but not resensitization (redistribution and reoxygenation). The authors propose a BED formalism that includes all the four biological effects (4Rs), and the authors propose how it can be used to calculate appropriate prescription doses for permanent implants with Cs-131. Methods: A resensitization correction was added to the BED calculation for permanent implants to account for 4Rs. Using the same BED, the prescription doses with Au-198, I-125, and Pd-103 were converted to the isoeffective Cs-131 prescription doses. The conversion factor F, ratio of the Cs-131 dose to the equivalent dose with the other reference isotope (F{sub r}: with resensitization, F{sub n}: without resensitization), was thus derived and used for actual prescription. Different values of biological parameters such as α, β, and relative biological effectiveness for different types of tumors were used for the calculation. Results: Prescription doses with I-125, Pd-103, and Au-198 ranging from 10 to 160 Gy were converted into prescription doses with Cs-131. The difference in dose conversion factors with (F{sub r}) and without (F{sub n}) resensitization was significant but varied with different isotopes and different types of tumors. The conversion factors also varied with different doses. For I-125, the average values of F{sub r}/F{sub n} were 0.51/0.46, for fast growing tumors, and 0.88/0.77 for slow growing tumors. For Pd-103, the average values of F{sub r}/F{sub n} were 1.25/1.15 for fast growing tumors, and 1.28/1.22 for slow growing tumors. For Au-198, the average values of F{sub r}/F{sub n} were 1.08/1.25 for fast growing tumors, and 1.00/1.06 for slow growing tumors. Using the biological parameters for the HeLa/C4-I cells, the averaged value of F{sub r} was 1.07/1.11 (rounded to 1.1), and the averaged value of F

  4. Pten loss promotes MAPK pathway dependency in HER2/neu breast carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Ebbesen, Saya H.; Scaltriti, Maurizio; Bialucha, Carl U.; Morse, Natasha; Kastenhuber, Edward R.; Wen, Hannah Y.; Dow, Lukas E.; Baselga, José; Lowe, Scott W.

    2016-01-01

    Loss of the tumor suppressor gene PTEN is implicated in breast cancer progression and resistance to targeted therapies, and is thought to promote tumorigenesis by activating PI3K signaling. In a transgenic model of breast cancer, Pten suppression using a tetracycline-regulatable short hairpin (sh)RNA cooperates with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2/neu), leading to aggressive and metastatic disease with elevated signaling through PI3K and, surprisingly, the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. Restoring Pten function is sufficient to down-regulate both PI3K and MAPK signaling and triggers dramatic tumor regression. Pharmacologic inhibition of MAPK signaling produces similar effects to Pten restoration, suggesting that the MAPK pathway contributes to the maintenance of advanced breast cancers harboring Pten loss. PMID:26929372

  5. Determination of the contribution of livestock water ingestion to dose from the cow-milk pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Ikenberry, T.A.

    1992-12-01

    As part of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project, a series of calculations has been undertaken to evaluate the absolute and relative contribution of different exposure pathways to thyroid doses that may have been received by individuals living in the vicinity of the Hanford Site. These evaluations include some pathways that were included in the Phase I air-pathway dose evaluations (HEDR staff 1991, page xx), as well as other potential exposure pathways being evaluated for possible inclusion in the future HEDR modeling efforts. This calculation (002) examined the possible doses that may have been received by individuals who drank milk from cows that drank from sources of water (stock tanks and farm ponds) exposed to iodine-131 in the atmosphere during 1945.

  6. Determining organ dose conversion coefficients for external neutron irradiation by using a voxel mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaomin; Xie, Xiangdong; Qu, Decheng; Ning, Jing; Zhou, Hongmei; Pan, Jie; Yang, Guoshan

    2016-01-01

    A set of fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients has been calculated for neutrons with energies <20 MeV using a developed voxel mouse model and Monte Carlo N-particle code (MCNP), for the purpose of neutron radiation effect evaluation. The calculation used 37 monodirectional monoenergetic neutron beams in the energy range 10−9 MeV to 20 MeV, under five different source irradiation configurations: left lateral, right lateral, dorsal–ventral, ventral–dorsal, and isotropic. Neutron fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients for selected organs of the body were presented in the paper, and the effect of irradiation geometry conditions, neutron energy and the organ location on the organ dose was discussed. The results indicated that neutron dose conversion coefficients clearly show sensitivity to irradiation geometry at neutron energy below 1 MeV. PMID:26661852

  7. A Biodosimeter for Multiparametric Determination of Radiation Dose, Radiation Quality, and Radiation Risk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richmond, Robert; Cruz, Angela; Jansen, Heather; Bors, Karen

    2003-01-01

    Predicting risk of human cancer following exposure of an individual or a population to ionizing radiation is challenging. To an approximation, this is because uncertainties of uniform absorption of dose and the uniform processing of dose-related damage at the cellular level within a complex set of biological variables degrade the confidence of predicting the delayed expression of cancer as a relatively rare event. Cellular biodosimeters that simultaneously report: 1) the quantity of absorbed dose after exposure to ionizing radiation, 2) the quality of radiation delivering that dose, and 3) the risk of developing cancer by the cells absorbing that dose would therefore be useful. An approach to such a multiparametric biodosimeter will be reported. This is the demonstration of a dose responsive field effect of enhanced expression of keratin 18 (K18) in cultures of human mammary epithelial cells irradiated with cesium-1 37 gamma-rays. Dose response of enhanced K18 expression was experimentally extended over a range of 30 to 90 cGy for cells evaluated at mid-log phase. K18 has been reported to be a marker for tumor staging and for apoptosis, and thereby serves as an example of a potential marker for cancer risk, where the reality of such predictive value would require additional experimental development. Since observed radiogenic increase in expression of K18 is a field effect, ie., chronically present in all cells of the irradiated population, it may be hypothesized that K18 expression in specific cells absorbing particulate irradiation, such as the high-LET-producing atomic nuclei of space radiation, will report on both the single-cell distributions of those particles amongst cells within the exposed population, and that the relatively high dose per cell delivered by densely ionizing tracks of those intersecting particles will lead to cell-specific high-expression levels of K18, thereby providing analytical end points that may be used to resolve both the quantity and

  8. Determination of florfenicol dose rate in feed for control of mortality in nile tilapia Oreochromis nilotica infected with streptococcus iniae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A dose titration study was conducted to determine the dosage of florfenicol (FFC) in feed to control Streptococcus iniae-associated mortality in Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus. Six tanks were assigned to each of five treatments: (1) not challenged with S. iniae and fed unmedicated feed; (2) chal...

  9. Genetic effects induced by neutrons in Drosophila melanogaster I. Determination of absorbed dose.

    PubMed

    Delfin, A; Paredes, L C; Zambrano, F; Guzmán-Rincón, J; Ureña-Nuñez, F

    2001-12-01

    A method to obtain the absorbed dose in Drosophila melanogaster irradiated in the thermal column facility of the Triga Mark III Reactor has been developed. The method is based on the measurements of neutron activation of gold foils produced by neutron capture to obtain the neutron fluxes. These fluxes, combined with the calculations of kinetic energy released per unit mass, enables one to obtain the absorbed doses in Drosophila melanogaster. PMID:11761104

  10. Adenovirus-mediated transfer of the PTEN gene inhibits human colorectal cancer growth in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Saito, Y; Swanson, X; Mhashilkar, A M; Oida, Y; Schrock, R; Branch, C D; Chada, S; Zumstein, L; Ramesh, R

    2003-11-01

    The tumor-suppressor gene PTEN encodes a multifunctional phosphatase that is mutated in a variety of human cancers. PTEN inhibits the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway and downstream functions, including activation of Akt/protein kinase B (PKB), cell survival, and cell proliferation in tumor cells carrying mutant- or deletion-type PTEN. In such tumor cells, enforced expression of PTEN decreases cell proliferation through cell-cycle arrest at G1 phase accompanied, in some cases, by induction of apoptosis. More recently, the tumor-suppressive effect of PTEN has been reported in ovarian and thyroid tumors that are wild type for PTEN. In the present study, we examined the tumor-suppressive effect of PTEN in human colorectal cancer cells that are wild type for PTEN. Adenoviral-mediated transfer of PTEN (Ad-PTEN) suppressed cell growth and induced apoptosis significantly in colorectal cancer cells (DLD-1, HT29, and SW480) carrying wtPTEN than in normal colon fibroblast cells (CCD-18Co) carrying wtPTEN. This suppression was induced through downregulation of the Akt/PKB pathway, dephosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and cell-cycle arrest at the G2/M phase, but not the G1 phase. Furthermore, treatment of human colorectal tumor xenografts (HT-29, and SW480) with Ad-PTEN resulted in significant (P=0.01) suppression of tumor growth. These results indicate that Ad-PTEN exerts its tumor-suppressive effect on colorectal cancer cells through inhibition of cell-cycle progression and induction of cell death. Thus Ad-PTEN may be a potential therapeutic for treatment of colorectal cancers. PMID:14528320

  11. In Vitro and In Vivo Effects of Tumor Suppressor Gene PTEN on Endometriosis: An Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Juan; Zhu, Qiaoying; Jia, Xuemei; Yu, Ningzhu; Li, Qian

    2016-01-01

    Background Endometriosis can cause dysmenorrhea and infertility. Its pathogenesis has not yet been clarified and its treatment continues to pose enormous challenges. The protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTEN) gene is a tumor suppressor gene. The aim of this study was to investigate the role and significance of PTEN protein in the occurrence, development, and treatment of endometriosis through changes in apoptosis rate, cell cycle, and angiogenesis. Material/Methods PTEN was overexpressed and silenced in lentiviral vectors and inserted into primary endometrial cells. The changes in cell cycle and apoptosis in the different PTEN expression groups were evaluated using flow cytometry. Vessel growth mimicry was observed using 3-dimensional culture. A human-mouse chimeric endometriosis model was constructed using SCID mice. Hematoxylin and eosin staining and immunohistochemistry were used to detect pathological changes in ectopic endometrial tissues and the expression of VEGF protein in a human-mouse chimeric endometriosis mouse model. Results PTEN overexpression significantly increased apoptosis and inhibited the cell cycle compared with the silenced and control groups. Furthermore, cells expressing low PTEN levels were better able to undergo vasculogenic mimicry, and exhibited significantly increased angiogenesis compared to cells overexpressing PTEN. We found that ectopic foci were more easily formed in the endometrial tissue of SCID mice with low PTEN expression, and the VEGF expression in this group was relatively high. Conclusions PTEN inhibits the occurrence and development of endometriosis by regulating angiogenesis and the apoptosis and cell cycle of endometrial cells; therefore, we propose that the PTEN gene can be used to treat endometriosis. PMID:27744455

  12. PTEN Inhibition Improves Muscle Regeneration in Mice Fed a High-Fat Diet

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhaoyong; Wang, Huiling; Lee, In Hee; Modi, Swati; Wang, Xiaonan; Du, Jie; Mitch, William E.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Mechanisms impairing wound healing in diabetes are poorly understood. To identify mechanisms, we induced insulin resistance by chronically feeding mice a high-fat diet (HFD). We also examined the regulation of phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PIP3) during muscle regeneration because augmented IGF-1 signaling can improve muscle regeneration. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Muscle regeneration was induced by cardiotoxin injury, and we evaluated satellite cell activation and muscle maturation in HFD-fed mice. We also measured PIP3 and the enzymes regulating its level, IRS-1–associated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and PTEN. Using primary cultures of muscle, we examined how fatty acids affect PTEN expression and how PTEN knockout influences muscle growth. Mice with muscle-specific PTEN knockout were used to examine how the HFD changes muscle regeneration. RESULTS The HFD raised circulating fatty acids and impaired the growth of regenerating myofibers while delaying myofiber maturation and increasing collagen deposition. These changes were independent of impaired proliferation of muscle progenitor or satellite cells but were principally related to increased expression of PTEN, which reduced PIP3 in muscle. In cultured muscle cells, palmitate directly stimulated PTEN expression and reduced cell growth. Knocking out PTEN restored cell growth. In mice, muscle-specific PTEN knockout improved the defects in muscle repair induced by HFD. CONCLUSIONS Insulin resistance impairs muscle regeneration by preventing myofiber maturation. The mechanism involves fatty acid–stimulated PTEN expression, which lowers muscle PIP3. If similar pathways occur in diabetic patients, therapeutic strategies directed at improving the repair of damaged muscle could include suppression of PTEN activity. PMID:20200318

  13. Microenvironment-induced PTEN loss by exosomal microRNA primes brain metastasis outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Zhang, Siyuan; Yao, Jun; Lowery, Frank J; Zhang, Qingling; Huang, Wen-Chien; Li, Ping; Li, Min; Wang, Xiao; Zhang, Chenyu; Wang, Hai; Ellis, Kenneth; Cheerathodi, Mujeeburahiman; McCarty, Joseph H; Palmieri, Diane; Saunus, Jodi; Lakhani, Sunil; Huang, Suyun; Sahin, Aysegul A; Aldape, Kenneth D; Steeg, Patricia S; Yu, Dihua

    2015-11-01

    The development of life-threatening cancer metastases at distant organs requires disseminated tumour cells' adaptation to, and co-evolution with, the drastically different microenvironments of metastatic sites. Cancer cells of common origin manifest distinct gene expression patterns after metastasizing to different organs. Clearly, the dynamic interaction between metastatic tumour cells and extrinsic signals at individual metastatic organ sites critically effects the subsequent metastatic outgrowth. Yet, it is unclear when and how disseminated tumour cells acquire the essential traits from the microenvironment of metastatic organs that prime their subsequent outgrowth. Here we show that both human and mouse tumour cells with normal expression of PTEN, an important tumour suppressor, lose PTEN expression after dissemination to the brain, but not to other organs. The PTEN level in PTEN-loss brain metastatic tumour cells is restored after leaving the brain microenvironment. This brain microenvironment-dependent, reversible PTEN messenger RNA and protein downregulation is epigenetically regulated by microRNAs from brain astrocytes. Mechanistically, astrocyte-derived exosomes mediate an intercellular transfer of PTEN-targeting microRNAs to metastatic tumour cells, while astrocyte-specific depletion of PTEN-targeting microRNAs or blockade of astrocyte exosome secretion rescues the PTEN loss and suppresses brain metastasis in vivo. Furthermore, this adaptive PTEN loss in brain metastatic tumour cells leads to an increased secretion of the chemokine CCL2, which recruits IBA1-expressing myeloid cells that reciprocally enhance the outgrowth of brain metastatic tumour cells via enhanced proliferation and reduced apoptosis. Our findings demonstrate a remarkable plasticity of PTEN expression in metastatic tumour cells in response to different organ microenvironments, underpinning an essential role of co-evolution between the metastatic cells and their microenvironment during

  14. Determination of surface dose rate of indigenous (32)P patch brachytherapy source by experimental and Monte Carlo methods.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sudhir; Srinivasan, P; Sharma, S D; Saxena, Sanjay Kumar; Bakshi, A K; Dash, Ashutosh; Babu, D A R; Sharma, D N

    2015-09-01

    Isotope production and Application Division of Bhabha Atomic Research Center developed (32)P patch sources for treatment of superficial tumors. Surface dose rate of a newly developed (32)P patch source of nominal diameter 25 mm was measured experimentally using standard extrapolation ionization chamber and Gafchromic EBT film. Monte Carlo model of the (32)P patch source along with the extrapolation chamber was also developed to estimate the surface dose rates from these sources. The surface dose rates to tissue (cGy/min) measured using extrapolation chamber and radiochromic films are 82.03±4.18 (k=2) and 79.13±2.53 (k=2) respectively. The two values of the surface dose rates measured using the two independent experimental methods are in good agreement to each other within a variation of 3.5%. The surface dose rate to tissue (cGy/min) estimated using the MCNP Monte Carlo code works out to be 77.78±1.16 (k=2). The maximum deviation between the surface dose rates to tissue obtained by Monte Carlo and the extrapolation chamber method is 5.2% whereas the difference between the surface dose rates obtained by radiochromic film measurement and the Monte Carlo simulation is 1.7%. The three values of the surface dose rates of the (32)P patch source obtained by three independent methods are in good agreement to one another within the uncertainties associated with their measurements and calculation. This work has demonstrated that MCNP based electron transport simulations are accurate enough for determining the dosimetry parameters of the indigenously developed (32)P patch sources for contact brachytherapy applications.

  15. Association of PTEN gene polymorphisms with liver cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong-Guang; Liu, Fang-Feng; Zhu, Hua-Qiang; Zhou, Xu; Lu, Jun; Chang, Hong; Hu, Jin-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To find out if there are any relationship between three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) gene (rs1234213, rs1234220, and rs2299939) and the susceptibility of liver cancer. Methods: Genotypes of the three SNPs in the PTEN gene were achieved utilizing polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method. Comparison of genotypes and alleles distribution differences between the case and the control subjects was accomplished with χ2 test. The analysis of linkage disequilibrium (LD) and haplotypes of the three SNPs was performed using SHEsis software. We adopted odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) to show the relative risk of liver cancer. Results: TC genotype and C allele of rs1234220 polymorphism showed much more frequently in cases than in controls, reflecting that the TC genotype and the C allele may be linked to the increased risk of liver cancer (OR=2.225, 95% CI=1.178-4.204; OR=1.941, 95% CI=1.124-3.351). Rs2299939 polymorphism showed an opposite result that the GT genotype probably reduce the risk of liver cancer (OR=0.483, 95% CI=0.259-0.900). Statistical significance was not found in the distribution differences of the genotypes of rs1234213 between two groups. LD and haplotype analysis results of the three SNPs showed that the T-C-G haplotype frequency was much higher in cases than in healthy objects, which proved that the T-C-G haplotype might be a susceptibility haplotype for liver cancer (OR=3.750, 95% CI=1.396-10.077). Conclusions: PTEN gene polymorphisms might relate to liver cancer risk. PMID:26823866

  16. Determination of gonad doses during robotic stereotactic radiosurgery for various tumor sites

    SciTech Connect

    Zorlu, Faruk; Dugel, Gozde; Ozyigit, Gokhan; Hurmuz, Pervin; Cengiz, Mustafa; Yildiz, Ferah; Akyol, Fadil; Gurkaynak, Murat

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: The authors evaluated the absorbed dose received by the gonads during robotic stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for the treatment of different tumor localizations. Methods: The authors measured the gonad doses during the treatment of head and neck, thoracic, abdominal, or pelvic tumors in both RANDO phantom and actual patients. The computerized tomography images were transferred to the treatment planning system. The contours of tumor and critical organs were delineated on each slice, and treatment plans were generated. Measurements for gonad doses were taken from the geometric projection of the ovary onto the skin for female patients, and from the scrotal skin for male patients by attaching films and Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). SRS was delivered with CyberKnife (Accuray Inc., Sunnyvale, CA). Results: The median gonadal doses with TLD and film dosimeter in actual patients were 0.19 Gy (range, 0.035-2.71 Gy) and 0.34 Gy (range, 0.066-3.18 Gy), respectively. In the RANDO phantom, the median ovarian doses with TLD and film dosimeter were 0.08 Gy (range, 0.03-0.159 Gy) and 0.05 Gy (range, 0.015-0.13 Gy), respectively. In the RANDO phantom, the median testicular doses with TLD and film dosimeter were 0.134 Gy (range 0.056-1.97 Gy) and 0.306 Gy (range, 0.065-2.25 Gy). Conclusions: Gonad doses are below sterility threshold in robotic SRS for different tumor localizations. However, particular attention should be given to gonads during robotic SRS for pelvic tumors.

  17. Determine the Dose Distribution Using Ultrasound Parameters in MAGIC-f Polymer Gels.

    PubMed

    Masoumi, Hossein; Mokhtari-Dizaji, Manijhe; Arbabi, Azim; Bakhshandeh, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    In this study, using methacrylic and ascorbic acid in gelatin initiated by copper (MAGIC-f) polymer gel after megavoltage energy exposure, the sensitivity of the ultrasound velocity and attenuation coefficient dose-dependent parameters was evaluated. The MAGIC-f polymer gel was irradiated under 1.25 MeV cobalt-60, ranging from 0 to 60 Gy in 2-Gy steps, and received dose uniformity and accuracy of ±2%. After calibration of the ultrasonic systems with a frequency of 500 kHz, the parameters of ultrasound velocity and attenuation coefficient of the irradiated gel samples were measured. According to the dose-response curve, the ability of ultrasonic parameters was evaluated in dose rate readings. Based on a 4-order polynomial curve, fitted on the dose-response parameters of ultrasound velocity and attenuation coefficient and observed at 24 hours after irradiation, ultrasonic parameters had more sensitivity. The sensitivity of the dose-velocity and dose-attenuation coefficient curves was observed as 50 m/s/Gy and 0.06 dB/MHz/Gy over the linear range of 4 to 44 Gy, respectively. The ultrasonic parameters at 5°C, 15°C, and 25°C on the gel dosimeter after 0 to 60 Gy irradiation showed that readings at 25°C have higher sensitivity compared to 15°C and 5°C. Maximum sensitivity time and temperature readings of the MAGIC-f ultrasonic parameters were concluded 24 hours after irradiation and at a temperature of 25°C.

  18. Concomitant Inhibition of PI3Kβ and BRAF or MEK in PTEN-Deficient/BRAF-Mutant Melanoma Treatment: Preclinical Assessment of SAR260301 Oral PI3Kβ-Selective Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Bonnevaux, Hélène; Lemaitre, Olivier; Vincent, Loic; Levit, Mikhail N; Windenberger, Fanny; Halley, Frank; Delorme, Cécile; Lengauer, Christoph; Garcia-Echeverria, Carlos; Virone-Oddos, Angela

    2016-07-01

    Class IA PI3K pathway activation resulting from PTEN deficiency has been associated with lack of sensitivity of melanoma to BRAF kinase inhibitors. Although previous studies have shown synergistic activity when pan-PI3K inhibitors were combined with MAPK inhibitors in the treatment of melanoma exhibiting concurrent genetic abnormalities, overlapping adverse events in patients limit optimal dosing and clinical application. With the aim of specifically targeting PTEN-deficient cancers and minimizing the potential for on-target toxicity when inhibiting multiple PI3K isoforms, we developed a program to discover PI3Kβ-selective kinase inhibitors and identified SAR260301 as a potent PI3Kβ-selective, orally available compound, which is now in clinical development. Herein, we provide a detailed biological characterization of SAR260301, and show that this compound has outstanding biochemical and cellular selectivity for the PI3Kβ isoform versus the α, δ, and γ isoforms and a large panel of protein and lipid kinases. We demonstrate that SAR260301 blocks PI3K pathway signaling preferentially in PTEN-deficient human tumor models, and has synergistic antitumor activity when combined with vemurafenib (BRAF inhibitor) or selumetinib (MEK inhibitor) in PTEN-deficient/BRAF-mutated human melanoma tumor models. Combination treatments were very well tolerated, suggesting the potential for a superior safety profile at optimal dosing using selective compounds to inhibit multiple signaling pathways. Together, these experiments provide a preclinical proof-of-concept for safely combining inhibitors of PI3Kβ and BRAF or MEK kinase modulators to improve antitumor activity in PTEN-deficient/BRAF-mutant melanoma, and support the evaluation of SAR260301-based combinations in clinical studies. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(7); 1460-71. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27196754

  19. [Relationship between PTEN mutations and protein kinase B phosphorylation caused by insulin or recombinant human epidermal growth factor stimulation].

    PubMed

    Zhong, Hailan; Hu, Xianfu; Lin, Jianhua

    2016-08-01

    Objective To study the effect of phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) mutations on protein kinase B (Akt) phosphorylation of CNE-1 nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell line. Methods CNE-1 cells were cultured in RPMI1640 medium containing 100 mL/L fetal calf serum, and then transfected with wild-type PTEN (wtPTEN), mutant PTEN C124S and mutant PTEN G129E plasmid separately. After overnight serum starvation, the cells were stimulated with 0.15 IU/mL insulin or 0.3 μg/mL recombinant human epidermal growth factor (rhEGF). At last, Akt phosphorylation was evaluated by Western blotting. Results Insulin or rhEGF stimulation led to Akt activation in CNE-1 cells. The wtPTEN inhibited insulin- or rhEGF-stimulated phosphorylation of Akt. PTEN C124S mutant activated insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of Akt, but not rhEGF-stimulated phosphorylation of Akt. PTEN G129E mutant inhibited insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of Akt. Conclusion The wtPTEN inhibited insulin- or rhEGF-stimulated phosphorylation of Akt, while PTEN C124S and G129E mutants failed to activate the phosphorylation of Akt consistently. This suggested PTEN mutations might not be correlated with activated Akt.

  20. Determining and Managing Fetal Radiation Dose from Diagnostic Radiology Procedures in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Cavdar, Iffet; Seven, Mehmet; Uslu, Lebriz; Yeyin, Nami; Tanyildizi, Handan; Abuqbeitah, Mohammad; Acikgoz, A. Serdar; Tuten, Abdullah; Demir, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Objective We intended to calculate approximate fetal doses in pregnant women who underwent diagnostic radiology procedures and to evaluate the safety of their pregnancies. Materials and Methods We contacted hospitals in different cities in Turkey where requests for fetal dose calculation are usually sent. Fetal radiation exposure was calculated for 304 cases in 218 pregnant women with gestational ages ranging from 5 days to 19 weeks, 2 days. FetDose software (ver. 4.0) was used in fetal dose calculations for radiographic and computed tomography (CT) procedures. The body was divided into three zones according to distance from the fetus. The first zone consisted of the head area, the lower extremities below the knee, and the upper extremities; the second consisted of the cervicothoracic region and upper thighs; and the third consisted of the abdominopelvic area. Fetal doses from radiologic procedures between zones were compared using the Kruskal-Wallis test and a Bonferroni-corrected Mann-Whitney U-test. Results The average fetal doses from radiography and CT in the first zone were 0.05 ± 0.01 mGy and 0.81 ± 0.04 mGy, respectively; 0.21 ± 0.05 mGy and 1.77 ± 0.22 mGy, respectively, in the second zone; and 6.42 ± 0.82 mGy and 22.94 ± 1.28 mGy, respectively, in the third zone (p < 0.001). Our results showed that fetal radiation exposures in our group of pregnant women did not reach the level (50 mGy) that is known to increase risk for congenital anomalies. Conclusion Fetal radiation exposure in the diagnostic radiology procedures in our study did not reach risk levels that might have indicated abortion. PMID:26576117

  1. Radiobiological Determination of Dose Escalation and Normal Tissue Toxicity in Definitive Chemoradiation Therapy for Esophageal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Samantha; Partridge, Mike; Carrington, Rhys; Hurt, Chris; Crosby, Thomas; Hawkins, Maria A.

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the trade-off in tumor coverage and organ-at-risk sparing when applying dose escalation for concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CRT) of mid-esophageal cancer, using radiobiological modeling to estimate local control and normal tissue toxicity. Methods and Materials: Twenty-one patients with mid-esophageal cancer were selected from the SCOPE1 database (International Standard Randomised Controlled Trials number 47718479), with a mean planning target volume (PTV) of 327 cm{sup 3}. A boost volume, PTV2 (GTV + 0.5 cm margin), was created. Radiobiological modeling of tumor control probability (TCP) estimated the dose required for a clinically significant (+20%) increase in local control as 62.5 Gy/25 fractions. A RapidArc (RA) plan with a simultaneously integrated boost (SIB) to PTV2 (RA{sub 62.5}) was compared to a standard dose plan of 50 Gy/25 fractions (RA{sub 50}). Dose-volume metrics and estimates of normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) for heart and lungs were compared. Results: Clinically acceptable dose escalation was feasible for 16 of 21 patients, with significant gains (>18%) in tumor control from 38.2% (RA{sub 50}) to 56.3% (RA{sub 62.5}), and only a small increase in predicted toxicity: median heart NTCP 4.4% (RA{sub 50}) versus 5.6% (RA{sub 62.5}) P<.001 and median lung NTCP 6.5% (RA{sub 50}) versus 7.5% (RA{sub 62.5}) P<.001. Conclusions: Dose escalation to the GTV to improve local control is possible when overlap between PTV and organ-at-risk (<8% heart volume and <2.5% lung volume overlap for this study) generates only negligible increase in lung or heart toxicity. These predictions from radiobiological modeling should be tested in future clinical trials.

  2. Selective deletion of Pten in pancreatic beta cells leads to increased islet mass and resistance to STZ-induced diabetes.

    PubMed

    Stiles, Bangyan L; Kuralwalla-Martinez, Christine; Guo, Wei; Gregorian, Caroline; Wang, Ying; Tian, Jide; Magnuson, Mark A; Wu, Hong

    2006-04-01

    Phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) is a lipid phosphatase. PTEN inhibits the action of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase and reduces the levels of phosphatidylinositol triphosphate, a crucial second messenger for cell proliferation and survival, as well as insulin signaling. In this study, we deleted Pten specifically in the insulin producing beta cells during murine pancreatic development. Pten deletion leads to increased cell proliferation and decreased cell death, without significant alteration of beta-cell differentiation. Consequently, the mutant pancreas generates more and larger islets, with a significant increase in total beta-cell mass. PTEN loss also protects animals from developing streptozotocin-induced diabetes. Our data demonstrate that PTEN loss in beta cells is not tumorigenic but beneficial. This suggests that modulating the PTEN-controlled signaling pathway is a potential approach for beta-cell protection and regeneration therapies. PMID:16537919

  3. Selective deletion of Pten in pancreatic beta cells leads to increased islet mass and resistance to STZ-induced diabetes.

    PubMed

    Stiles, Bangyan L; Kuralwalla-Martinez, Christine; Guo, Wei; Gregorian, Caroline; Wang, Ying; Tian, Jide; Magnuson, Mark A; Wu, Hong

    2006-04-01

    Phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) is a lipid phosphatase. PTEN inhibits the action of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase and reduces the levels of phosphatidylinositol triphosphate, a crucial second messenger for cell proliferation and survival, as well as insulin signaling. In this study, we deleted Pten specifically in the insulin producing beta cells during murine pancreatic development. Pten deletion leads to increased cell proliferation and decreased cell death, without significant alteration of beta-cell differentiation. Consequently, the mutant pancreas generates more and larger islets, with a significant increase in total beta-cell mass. PTEN loss also protects animals from developing streptozotocin-induced diabetes. Our data demonstrate that PTEN loss in beta cells is not tumorigenic but beneficial. This suggests that modulating the PTEN-controlled signaling pathway is a potential approach for beta-cell protection and regeneration therapies.

  4. Nuclear medicine dose equivalent a method for determination of radiation risk

    SciTech Connect

    Huda, W.

    1986-12-01

    Conventional nuclear medicine dosimetry involves specifying individual organ doses. The difficulties that can arise with this approach to radiation dosimetry are discussed. An alternative scheme is described that is based on the ICRP effective dose equivalent, H/sub E/, and which is a direct estimate of the average radiation risk to the patient. The mean value of H/sub E/ for seven common /sup 99m/Tc nuclear medicine procedures is 0.46 rem and the average radiation risk from this level of exposure is estimated to be comparable to the risk from smoking approx. 28 packs of cigarettes or driving approx. 1300 miles.

  5. The Radiation Dose Determination of the Pulsed X-ray Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miloichikova, I.; Stuchebrov, S.; Zhaksybayeva, G.; Wagner, A.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper the radiation dose measurement technique of the pulsed X-ray source RAP-160-5 is described. The dose rate measurement results from the pulsed X-ray beams at the different distance between the pulsed X-ray source focus and the detector obtained with the help of the thermoluminescent detectors DTL-02, the universal dosimeter UNIDOS E equipped with the plane-parallel ionization chamber type 23342, the dosimeter-radiometer DKS-96 and the radiation dosimeter AT 1123 are demonstrated. The recommendations for the dosimetry measurements of the pulsed X-ray generator RAP-160-5 under different radiation conditions are proposed.

  6. Experimental determination of the dose rate constant for selected 125I- and 192Ir-brachytherapy sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selbach, Hans-Joachim; Bambynek, Markus; Aubineau-Lanièce, Isabelle; Gabris, Frantisek; Stefano Guerra, Antonio; Toni, Maria Pia; de Pooter, Jacco; Sander, Thorsten; Schneider, Thorsten

    2012-10-01

    In 2008, the European project ‘T2.J06, Increasing cancer treatment efficacy using 3D brachytherapy’ was launched. One of the main goals of the Joint Research Project was the experimental determination of the dose rate constant Λ to allow the linkage between the air kerma strength or reference air kerma rate currently used for the source characterization and the ‘new’ absorbed dose rate to water with an uncertainty of <3% (k = 1) for some selected brachytherapy sources. The results obtained by five National Metrology Institutes (NMI) for four different types of brachytherapy sources are presented and compared with consensus data published in the literature. A further goal of the project was to develop a calibration chain for the transfer of the new reference quantity to the end user, minimizing the uncertainty. A first direct calibration in terms of absorbed dose rate to water of a secondary standard and the dissemination to the hospitals is presented.

  7. Application of egs4 computer code for determination of gamma ray spectrum and dose rate distribution in gammacell 220

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raisali, G. R.; Sohrabpour, M.

    1993-10-01

    The EGS4 a Monte Carlo electron-photon transport simulation package together with a locally developed computer program "GCELL" has been used to simulate the transport of the gamma rays in Gammacell 220. An additional lead attenuator has been inserted in the chamber, has been included for those cases where lower dose rates were required. For three cases of 0, 1.35 and 4.0 cm thickness of added lead attenuators, the gamma spectrum, and dose rate distribution inside the chamber have been determined. For the case of no attenuator present, the main shield around the source cage has been included in the simulation program and its albedo effects have been investigated. The calculated dose rate distribution in the Gammacell chamber has been compared against measurements carried out with Fricke, PMMA and Gafchromic film dosimeters.

  8. Determination of in vitro lung solubility and intake-to-dose conversion factor for tritiated lanthanum nickel aluminum alloy.

    PubMed

    Farfán, Eduardo B; Labone, Thomas R; Staack, Gregory C; Cheng, Yung-Sung; Zhou, Yue; Varallo, Thomas P

    2012-09-01

    A sample of tritiated lanthanum nickel aluminum alloy (LaNi4.25Al0.75 or LANA.75) similar to that used at the Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities was analyzed to estimate the particle size distribution of this metal tritide powder and the rate at which this material dissolves in the human respiratory tract after it is inhaled. This information is used to calculate the committed effective dose received by a worker after inhaling the material. These doses, which were calculated using the same methodology given in the U.S. Department of Energy Tritium Handbook, are presented as inhalation intake-to-dose conversion factors (DCF). The DCF for this metal tritide was determined to be 9.4 × 10 Sv Bq, which is less than the DCF for tritiated water. Therefore, the radiation worker bioassay programs designed for tritiated water are adequate to monitor for intakes of this material.

  9. A novel model-based approach for dose determination of glycopyrronium bromide in COPD

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Glycopyrronium bromide (NVA237) is an inhaled long-acting muscarinic antagonist in development for treatment of COPD. This study compared the efficacy and safety of once-daily (OD) and twice-daily (BID) glycopyrronium bromide regimens, using a novel model-based approach, in patients with moderate-to-severe COPD. Methods Double-blind, randomized, dose-finding trial with an eight-treatment, two-period, balanced incomplete block design. Patients (smoking history ≥10 pack-years, post-bronchodilator FEV1 ≥30% and <80% predicted, FEV1/FVC <0.7) were randomized to one of 16 independent sequences for 28 days. Primary endpoint: mean trough FEV1 at Day 28. Results 385 patients (mean age 61.2 years; mean post-bronchodilator FEV1 53% predicted) were randomized; 88.6% completed. All OD and BID dosing regimens produced dose-dependent bronchodilation; at Day 28, increases in mean trough FEV1 versus placebo were statistically significant for all regimens, ranging from 51 mL (glycopyrronium bromide 12.5 μg OD) to 160 mL (glycopyrronium bromide 50 μg BID). Pharmacodynamic steady-state was reached by Day 7. There was a small separation (≤37 mL) between BID and OD dose–response curves for mean trough FEV1 at steady-state in favour of BID dosing. Over 24 hours, separation between OD and BID regimens was even smaller (FEV1 AUC0-24h maximum difference for equivalent daily dose regimens: 8 mL). Dose–response results for FEV1 at 12 hours, FEV1 AUC0-12h and FEV1 AUC0-4h at steady-state showed OD regimens provided greater improvement over placebo than BID regimens for total daily doses of 25 μg, 50 μg and 100 μg, while the reverse was true for OD versus BID regimens from 12–24 hours. The 12.5 μg BID dose produced a marginally higher improvement in trough FEV1 versus placebo than 50 μg OD, however, the response at 12 hours over placebo was suboptimal (74 mL). Glycopyrronium bromide was safe and well tolerated at all doses

  10. Experimental determination of the lateral dose response functions of detectors to be applied in the measurement of narrow photon-beam dose profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppinga, D.; Meyners, J.; Delfs, B.; Muru, A.; Harder, D.; Poppe, B.; Looe, HK

    2015-12-01

    This study aims at the experimental determination of the detector-specific 1D lateral dose response function K(x) and of its associated rotational symmetric counterpart K(r) for a set of high-resolution detectors presently used in narrow-beam photon dosimetry. A combination of slit-beam, radiochromic film, and deconvolution techniques served to accomplish this task for four detectors with diameters of their sensitive volumes ranging from 1 to 2.2 mm. The particular aim of the experiment was to examine the existence of significant negative portions of some of these response functions predicted by a recent Monte-Carlo-simulation (Looe et al 2015 Phys. Med. Biol. 60 6585-607). In a 6 MV photon slit beam formed by the Siemens Artiste collimation system and a 0.5 mm wide slit between 10 cm thick lead blocks serving as the tertiary collimator, the true cross-beam dose profile D(x) at 3 cm depth in a large water phantom was measured with radiochromic film EBT3, and the detector-affected cross-beam signal profiles M(x) were recorded with a silicon diode, a synthetic diamond detector, a miniaturized scintillation detector, and a small ionization chamber. For each detector, the deconvolution of the convolution integral M(x)  =  K(x)  ∗  D(x) served to obtain its specific 1D lateral dose response function K(x), and K(r) was calculated from it. Fourier transformations and back transformations were performed using function approximations by weighted sums of Gaussian functions and their analytical transformation. The 1D lateral dose response functions K(x) of the four types of detectors and their associated rotational symmetric counterparts K(r) were obtained. Significant negative curve portions of K(x) and K(r) were observed in the case of the silicon diode and the diamond detector, confirming the Monte-Carlo-based prediction (Looe et al 2015 Phys. Med. Biol. 60 6585-607). They are typical for the perturbation of the secondary electron field by a detector with

  11. Non-invasive determination of the irradiation dose in fingers using low-frequency EPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zdravkova, M.; Crokart, N.; Trompier, F.; Beghein, N.; Gallez, B.; Debuyst, R.

    2004-07-01

    Several reports in the literature have described the effects of radiation in workers who exposed their fingers to intense radioactive sources. The radiation injuries occurring after local exposure to a high dose (20 to 100 Gy) could lead to the need for amputation. Follow-up of victims needs to be more rational with a precise knowledge of the irradiated area that risks tissue degradation and necrosis. It has been described previously that X-band electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy could be used to assess the dose in irradiated amputated fingers. Here, we propose the use of low-frequency EPR spectroscopy to evaluate non-invasively the absorbed dose. Low-frequency microwaves are indeed less absorbed by water and penetrate more deeply into living material (~10 mm in tissues using 1 GHz spectrometers). This work presents preliminary results obtained with baboon and human fingers compared with human dry phalanxes placed inside a surface-coil resonator. The EPR signal increased linearly with the dose. The ratio of the slopes of the dry bone to whole finger linear regression lines was around 5. The detection limit achievable with the present spectrometer and resonator is around 60 Gy, which is well within the range of accidentally exposed fingers. It is likely that the detection limit could be improved in the future, thanks to further technical spectrometer and resonator developments as well as to appropriate spectrum deconvolution into native and dosimetric signals.

  12. The association of PTEN hypermethylation and breast cancer: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Shanshan; Chen, Jiansi; Mo, Xianwei

    2016-01-01

    Objective Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) deleted on chromosome 10, as a tumor suppressor gene, is crucial for the development of both familial and sporadic breast cancer (BC). The aim of this study was to perform a meta-analysis to evaluate the clinicopathological significance of PTEN promoter hypermethylation in BC. Methods A comprehensive literature search was made in PubMed, Embase, Google Scholar, Chinese database (China National Knowledge Infrastructure [CNKI]), and Web of Science. The analysis of pooled data was performed with Review Manager 5.2. The fixed-effects or random-effects models were used to evaluate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results The meta-analysis included eight studies and a total of 923 patients. The frequency of PTEN promoter hypermethylation was significantly increased in ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) compared to normal breast tissues (OR =22.53, P=0.0002 and OR =22.86, P<0.00001, respectively). However, the frequency of PTEN promoter hypermethylation was similar between IDC and DCIS. Additionally, PTEN methylation was not significantly correlated to estrogen receptor (ER) or human epidermal growth factor type 2 (HER-2) status in patients with BC. Conclusion PTEN promoter hypermethylation is significantly associated with the risk of DCIS and IDC, suggesting PTEN promoter hypermethylation is a valuable biomarker for diagnosis of BC.

  13. Regulation of the activity of the tumor suppressor PTEN by thioredoxin in Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Zuohe; Saghafi, Negin; Gokhale, Vijay; Brabant, Marc; Meuillet, Emmanuelle J. . E-mail: emeuillet@azcc.arizona.edu

    2007-04-01

    Human Thioredoxin-1 (hTrx-1) is a small redox protein with a molecular weight of 12 kDa that contains two cysteine residues found in its catalytic site. HTrx-1 plays an important role in cell growth, apoptosis, and cancer patient prognosis. Recently, we have demonstrated that hTrx-1 binds to the C2 domain of the human tumor suppressor, PTEN, in a redox dependent manner. This binding leads to the inhibition of PTEN lipid phosphatase activity in mammalian tissue culture systems. In this study, we show that over-expression of hTrx-1 in Drosophila melanogaster promotes cell growth and proliferation during eye development as measured by eye size and ommatidia size. Furthermore, hTrx-1 rescues the small eye phenotype induced by the over-expression of PTEN. We demonstrate that this rescue of the PTEN-induced eye size phenotype requires cysteine-218 in the C2 domain of PTEN. We also show that hTrx-1 over-expression results in increased Akt phosphorylation in fly head extracts supporting our observations that the hTrx-1-induced eye size increase results from the inhibition of PTEN activity. Our study confirms the redox regulation of PTEN through disulfide bond formation with the hTrx-1 in Drosophila and suggests conserved mechanisms for thioredoxins and their interactions with the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase signaling pathway in humans and fruit flies.

  14. PTEN enhances the sensitivity of human hepatocellular carcinoma cells to sorafenib.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Zhi-Ping; Xu, Rui; Lv, Yi; Tian, Tao; Wang, Wen-Juan; Guo, Hui; Nan, Ke-Jun

    2012-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a complex and heterogeneous tumor with several genomic alterations and ranks as the third highest cause of cancer-related death globally. The unresectable or metastatic HCC has very poor prognosis. Although multikinase inhibitor sorafenib can increase the survival of patients with advanced HCC, it is becoming apparent that combination therapies are critical to overcome the complex genomic aberrations in HCC. PTEN, as one of the most commonly inactivated genes in HCC, exerts a wide range of antitumor effects. In this study, we found that PTEN was downregulated in HCC tissues, especially in those tissues with extrahepatic metastasis. And negative PTEN expression cases showed increased proliferation activity. Overexpression of PTEN significantly reduced the proliferation of tumor cells HepG2. In addition, HepG2 cells transfected with PTEN were more sensitive to sorafenib in terms of its ability to inhibit proliferation and to induce apoptosis. Moreover, overexpression of PTEN decreased phosphorylation of MEK, a key downstream effector of RAF/MEK/ERK cascade, and levels of cyclin D1, antiapoptotic Bcl-2, and VEGF. These observations indicated that combination therapies with sorafenib and PTEN overexpression have potential to further improve therapeutic options for HCC.

  15. PTEN opposes negative selection and enables oncogenic transformation of pre-B cells.

    PubMed

    Shojaee, Seyedmehdi; Chan, Lai N; Buchner, Maike; Cazzaniga, Valeria; Cosgun, Kadriye Nehir; Geng, Huimin; Qiu, Yi Hua; von Minden, Marcus Dühren; Ernst, Thomas; Hochhaus, Andreas; Cazzaniga, Giovanni; Melnick, Ari; Kornblau, Steven M; Graeber, Thomas G; Wu, Hong; Jumaa, Hassan; Müschen, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) is a negative regulator of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and protein kinase B (AKT) signaling pathway and a potent tumor suppressor in many types of cancer. To test a tumor suppressive role for PTEN in pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), we induced Cre-mediated deletion of Pten in mouse models of pre-B ALL. In contrast to its role as a tumor suppressor in other cancers, loss of one or both alleles of Pten caused rapid cell death of pre-B ALL cells and was sufficient to clear transplant recipient mice of leukemia. Small-molecule inhibition of PTEN in human pre-B ALL cells resulted in hyperactivation of AKT, activation of the p53 tumor suppressor cell cycle checkpoint and cell death. Loss of PTEN function in pre-B ALL cells was functionally equivalent to acute activation of autoreactive pre-B cell receptor signaling, which engaged a deletional checkpoint for the removal of autoreactive B cells. We propose that targeted inhibition of PTEN and hyperactivation of AKT triggers a checkpoint for the elimination of autoreactive B cells and represents a new strategy to overcome drug resistance in human ALL.

  16. Mice Lacking Pten in Osteoblasts Have Improved Intramembranous and Late Endochondral Fracture Healing

    PubMed Central

    Burgers, Travis A.; Hoffmann, Martin F.; Collins, Caitlyn J.; Zahatnansky, Juraj; Alvarado, Martin A.; Morris, Michael R.; Sietsema, Debra L.; Mason, James J.; Jones, Clifford B.; Ploeg, Heidi L.; Williams, Bart O.

    2013-01-01

    The failure of an osseous fracture to heal (development of a non-union) is a common and debilitating clinical problem. Mice lacking the tumor suppressor Pten in osteoblasts have dramatic and progressive increases in bone volume and density throughout life. Since fracture healing is a recapitulation of bone development, we investigated the process of fracture healing in mice lacking Pten in osteoblasts (Ocn-cretg/+;Ptenflox/flox). Mid-diaphyseal femoral fractures induced in wild-type and Ocn-cretg/+;Ptenflox/flox mice were studied via micro-computed tomography (µCT) scans, biomechanical testing, histological and histomorphometric analysis, and protein expression analysis. Ocn-cretg/+;Ptenflox/flox mice had significantly stiffer and stronger intact bones relative to controls in all cohorts. They also had significantly stiffer healing bones at day 28 post-fracture (PF) and significantly stronger healing bones at days 14, 21, and 28 PF. At day 7 PF, the proximal and distal ends of the Pten mutant calluses were more ossified. By day 28 PF, Pten mutants had larger and more mineralized calluses. Pten mutants had improved intramembranous bone formation during healing originating from the periosteum. They also had improved endochondral bone formation later in the healing process, after mature osteoblasts are present in the callus. Our results indicate that the inhibition of Pten can improve fracture healing and that the local or short-term use of commercially available Pten-inhibiting agents may have clinical application for enhancing fracture healing. PMID:23675511

  17. The association of PTEN hypermethylation and breast cancer: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Shanshan; Chen, Jiansi; Mo, Xianwei

    2016-01-01

    Objective Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) deleted on chromosome 10, as a tumor suppressor gene, is crucial for the development of both familial and sporadic breast cancer (BC). The aim of this study was to perform a meta-analysis to evaluate the clinicopathological significance of PTEN promoter hypermethylation in BC. Methods A comprehensive literature search was made in PubMed, Embase, Google Scholar, Chinese database (China National Knowledge Infrastructure [CNKI]), and Web of Science. The analysis of pooled data was performed with Review Manager 5.2. The fixed-effects or random-effects models were used to evaluate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results The meta-analysis included eight studies and a total of 923 patients. The frequency of PTEN promoter hypermethylation was significantly increased in ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) compared to normal breast tissues (OR =22.53, P=0.0002 and OR =22.86, P<0.00001, respectively). However, the frequency of PTEN promoter hypermethylation was similar between IDC and DCIS. Additionally, PTEN methylation was not significantly correlated to estrogen receptor (ER) or human epidermal growth factor type 2 (HER-2) status in patients with BC. Conclusion PTEN promoter hypermethylation is significantly associated with the risk of DCIS and IDC, suggesting PTEN promoter hypermethylation is a valuable biomarker for diagnosis of BC. PMID:27672335

  18. Suppression of cellular proliferation and invasion by the concerted lipid and protein phosphatase activities of PTEN

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Lindsay; Maccario, Helene; Perera, Nevin M.; Yang, Xuesong; Spinelli, Laura; Tibarewal, Priyanka; Glancy, Ben; Gray, Alex; Weijer, Cornelis J.; Downes, C. Peter; Leslie, Nick R.

    2009-01-01

    PTEN is a tumour suppressor with phosphatase activity in vitro against both lipids and proteins and other potential non-enzymatic mechanisms of action. Although the importance of PTEN’s lipid phosphatase activity in regulating the PI3K signalling pathway is recognised, the significance of PTEN’s other mechanisms of action is currently unclear. Here, we describe the systematic identification of a PTEN mutant, PTEN Y138L, with activity against lipid, but not soluble substrates. Using this mutant we provide evidence for the interfacial activation of PTEN against lipid substrates. We also show that when re-expressed at physiological levels in PTEN null U87MG glioblastoma cells the protein phosphatase activity of PTEN is not required to regulate cellular PtdInsP3 levels or the downstream protein kinase Akt/PKB. Finally, in 3D Matrigel cultures of U87MG cells similarly re-expressing PTEN mutants, both the protein and lipid phosphatase activities were required to inhibit invasion, but either activity alone significantly inhibited proliferation, albeit only weakly for the protein phosphatase activity. Our data provides a novel tool to address the significance of PTEN’s separable lipid and protein phosphatase activities and suggest that both activities act to suppress proliferation and act together to suppress invasion. PMID:19915616

  19. Hidden association of Cowden syndrome, PTEN mutation and meningioma frequency

    PubMed Central

    Yakubov, Eduard; Ghoochani, Ali; Buslei, Rolf; Buchfelder, Michael; Eyüpoglu, Ilker Y.; Savaskan, Nicolai

    2016-01-01

    Cowden syndrome (CS) is clinically presented by multiple hamartomas, often with mucocutaneous lesions, goiter, breast cancer and gastrointestinal polyps. CS is a genetic disorder of autosomal dominant inheritance and is one distinct syndrome of the phosphatase and tensin homolog on chromosome 10 (PTEN) hamartoma tumor spectrum. Noteworthy, PTEN germline mutations are related to a wide range of brain tumors. We performed a systematic analysis and review of the medical literature for Cowden syndrome and meningioma and additionally present the case of a 29-year- old CS patient diagnosed with multiple meningiomas. We found strong evidence for high incidence of brain tumors in CS patients. In particular meningiomas and gangliocytomas/Lhermitte-Duclos disease were often associated with 8% and 9% respectively in CS patients. Since aberrations in chromosome 10q are associated with meningiomas, it is likely that the underlying mutations in CS drive to a certain extent neoplastic meningioma growth. We propose to include meningiomas and brain tumors in the major criteria spectrum of CS-related disorders. This could warrant early diagnosis of brain lesions and close therapy, as well as better monitoring of patients with CS. PMID:27489861

  20. Determination of Optimal Amikacin Dosing Regimens for Pediatric Patients With Burn Wound Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tian; Stockmann, Chris; Healy, Daniel P; Olson, Jared; Wead, Stephanie; Neely, Alice N; Kagan, Richard J; Spigarelli, Michael G; Sherwin, Catherine M T

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to develop optimal amikacin dosing regimens for the empirical treatment of Gram-negative bacterial sepsis in pediatric patients with burn injuries. A pharmacodynamic (PD) target in which the peak concentration (Cmax) is ≥8 times the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) (Cmax/MIC ≥ 8) is reflective of optimal bactericidal activity and has been used to predict clinical outcomes. Population pharmacokinetic modeling was performed in NONMEM 7.2 for pediatric patients with and without burn injuries. Amikacin pharmacokinetic parameters were compared between the two groups and multiple dosing regimens were simulated using MATLAB to achieve the PD target in ≥90% of patients with burn injuries. The pharmacokinetic analysis included 282 amikacin concentrations from 70 pediatric patients with burn injuries and 99 concentrations from 32 pediatric patients without burns. A one-compartment model with first-order elimination described amikacin pharmacokinetics well for both groups. Clearance (CL) was significantly higher in patients with burn injuries than in patients without (7.22 vs 5.36 L/h, P < .001). The volume of distribution (V) was also significantly increased in patients with burn injuries (22.7 vs 18.7 L, P < .01). Weight significantly influenced amikacin CL (P < .001) and V (P < .001) for both groups. Model-based simulations showed that a higher amikacin dose (≥25 mg/kg) achieved a Cmax/MIC ≥8 in ≥90% of patients with assumed infections of organisms with an MIC = 8 mg/L. Amikacin pharmacokinetics are altered in patients with burn injuries, including a significant increase in CL and V. In simulations, increased doses (≥25 mg/kg) led to improved PD target attainment rates. Further clinical evaluation of this proposed dosing regimen is warranted to assess clinical and microbiological outcomes in pediatric patients with burn wound sepsis.

  1. Pharmacokinetics of Single- and Multiple-Dose Oral Clarithromycin in Soft Tissues Determined by Microdialysis▿

    PubMed Central

    Traunmüller, Friederike; Zeitlinger, Markus; Zeleny, Petra; Müller, Markus; Joukhadar, Christian

    2007-01-01

    The antimicrobial spectrum of clarithromycin renders this antibiotic a frequently used option in the treatment of skin and soft-tissue infections. In most cases, these infections are caused by extracellularly proliferating microorganisms. Thus, clarithromycin concentrations achieved in the interstitial space are considered particularly important for clinical efficacy. In the present study, clarithromycin concentrations in plasma and interstitial-space fluid of subcutaneous adipose tissue and skeletal muscle of six healthy male volunteers were assessed by means of the microdialysis technique after oral single-dose administration of 250 mg and multiple doses of 500 mg of clarithromycin twice a day (b.i.d.). The ratios of the area under the concentration-time curve of free clarithromycin from 0 to 24 h calculated for a single dose of 250 mg (fAUC0-24) in interstitial-space fluid to the fAUC0-24 in plasma were 0.29 ± 0.17 and 0.42 ± 0.18 for subcutis and skeletal muscle, respectively. For 500 mg of clarithromycin at the steady state (3 to 5 days of intake twice daily), the fAUC0-24(b.i.d.) ratios at the steady state were 0.39 ± 0.04 and 0.41 ± 0.19 for subcutis and skeletal muscle, respectively. The half-life was around 2 h after a single dose but increased to approximately 4 h in plasma and tissues after repetitive clarithromycin administration. Based on subsequently performed pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic calculations, a dosing regimen of 500 mg b.i.d. may be ineffective in the treatment of soft-tissue infections caused by pathogens with a drug MIC higher than 0.125 mg/liter. PMID:17606673

  2. Pharmacokinetics of single- and multiple-dose oral clarithromycin in soft tissues determined by microdialysis.

    PubMed

    Traunmüller, Friederike; Zeitlinger, Markus; Zeleny, Petra; Müller, Markus; Joukhadar, Christian

    2007-09-01

    The antimicrobial spectrum of clarithromycin renders this antibiotic a frequently used option in the treatment of skin and soft-tissue infections. In most cases, these infections are caused by extracellularly proliferating microorganisms. Thus, clarithromycin concentrations achieved in the interstitial space are considered particularly important for clinical efficacy. In the present study, clarithromycin concentrations in plasma and interstitial-space fluid of subcutaneous adipose tissue and skeletal muscle of six healthy male volunteers were assessed by means of the microdialysis technique after oral single-dose administration of 250 mg and multiple doses of 500 mg of clarithromycin twice a day (b.i.d.). The ratios of the area under the concentration-time curve of free clarithromycin from 0 to 24 h calculated for a single dose of 250 mg (fAUC(0-24)) in interstitial-space fluid to the fAUC(0-24) in plasma were 0.29 +/- 0.17 and 0.42 +/- 0.18 for subcutis and skeletal muscle, respectively. For 500 mg of clarithromycin at the steady state (3 to 5 days of intake twice daily), the fAUC(0-24(b.i.d.)) ratios at the steady state were 0.39 +/- 0.04 and 0.41 +/- 0.19 for subcutis and skeletal muscle, respectively. The half-life was around 2 h after a single dose but increased to approximately 4 h in plasma and tissues after repetitive clarithromycin administration. Based on subsequently performed pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic calculations, a dosing regimen of 500 mg b.i.d. may be ineffective in the treatment of soft-tissue infections caused by pathogens with a drug MIC higher than 0.125 mg/liter. PMID:17606673

  3. Absorbed Dose Determination Using Experimental and Analytical Predictions of X-Ray Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, D. L.; Carruth, Ralph (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Electron beam welding in a vacuum is a technology that NASA is investigating as a joining technique for manufacture of space structures. This investigation characterizes the x-ray environment due to operation of an in-vacuum electron beam welding tool and provides recommendations for adequate shielding for astronauts performing the in-vacuum electron beam welding. NASA, in a joint venture with the Russian Space Agency, was scheduled to perform a series of welding in space experiments on board the U.S. Space Shuttle. This series of experiments was named the international space welding experiment (ISWE). The hardware associated with the ISWE was leased to NASA by the Paton Welding Institute (PWI) in Ukraine for ground-based welding experiments in preparation for flight. Two ground tests were scheduled, using the ISWE electron beam welding tool, to characterize the radiation exposure to an astronaut during the operation of the ISWE. These radiation exposure tests used thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD's) shielded with material currently used by astronauts during extravehicular activities to measure the radiation dose. The TLD's were exposed to x-ray radiation generated by operation of the ISWE in-vacuum electron beam welding tool. This investigation was the first known application of TLD's to measure absorbed dose from x rays of energy less than 10 keV. The ISWE hardware was returned to Ukraine before the issue of adequate shielding for the astronauts was completely verified. Therefore, alternate experimental and analytical methods were developed to measure and predict the x-ray spectral and intensity distribution generated by ISWE electron beam impact with metal. These x-ray spectra were normalized to an equivalent ISWE exposure, then used to calculate the absorbed radiation dose to astronauts. These absorbed dose values were compared to TLD measurements obtained during actual operation of the ISWE in-vacuum electron beam welding tool. The calculated absorbed dose

  4. Enhanced lymphocyte interferon (IFN)-γ responses in a PTEN mutation-negative Cowden disease kindred

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, R; Fatehullah, A; Jagan, I; Deevi, R K; Bingham, V; Irvine, A E; Armstrong, M; Morrison, P J; Dimmick, I; Stewart, R; Campbell, F C

    2011-01-01

    Identification of immune modifiers of inherited cancer syndromes may provide a rationale for preventive therapy. Cowden disease (CD) is a genetically heterogeneous inherited cancer syndrome that arises predominantly from germline phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) mutation and increased phosphoinositide 3-kinase/mammalian target of rapamycin (PI3K/mTOR) signalling. However, many patients with classic CD diagnostic features are mutation-negative for PTEN (PTEN M-Neg). Interferon (IFN)-γ can modulate the PI3K/mTOR pathway, but its association with PTEN M-Neg CD remains unclear. This study assessed IFN-γ secretion by multi-colour flow cytometry in a CD kindred that was mutation-negative for PTEN and other known susceptibility genes. Because IFN-γ responses may be regulated by killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) and respective human leucocyte antigen (HLA) ligands, KIR/HLA genotypes were also assessed. Activating treatments induced greater IFN-γ secretion in PTEN M-Neg CD peripheral blood lymphocytes versus healthy controls. Increased frequency of activating KIR genes, potentially activating KIR/HLA compound genotypes and reduced frequency of inhibitory genotypes, were found in the PTEN M-Neg CD kindred. Differences of IFN-γ secretion were observed among PTEN M-Neg CD patients with distinct KIR/HLA compound genotypes. Taken together, these findings show enhanced lymphocyte secretion of IFN-γ that may influence the PI3K/mTOR CD causal molecular pathway in a PTEN mutation-negative CD kindred. PMID:21361912

  5. Endogenous S-sulfhydration of PTEN helps protect against modification by nitric oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Ohno, Kazuki; Okuda, Kosaku; Uehara, Takashi

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • PTEN is S-sulfhydrated endogenously in SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells. • Preventing this modification by knocking down CBS renders PTEN sensitive to NO. • pAkt levels are increased significantly in CBS siRNA-transfected cells. • H{sub 2}S functions as an endogenous regulator of PTEN in neuronal cells. - Abstract: Hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) is a gaseous regulatory factor produced by several enzymes, and plays a pivotal role in processes such as proliferation or vasodilation. Recent reports demonstrated the physiological and pathophysiological functions of H{sub 2}S in neurons. PTEN is a target of nitric oxide (NO) or hydrogen peroxide, and the oxidative modification of cysteine (Cys) residue(s) attenuates its enzymatic activity. In the present study, we assessed the effect of H{sub 2}S on the direct modification of PTEN and the resulting downstream signaling. A modified biotin switch assay in SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells revealed that PTEN is S-sulfhydrated endogenously. Subsequently, site-directed mutagenesis demonstrated that both Cys71 and Cys124 in PTEN are targets for S-sulfhydration. Further, the knockdown of cystathionine β-synthetase (CBS) using siRNA decreased this modification in a manner that was correlated to amount of H{sub 2}S. PTEN was more sensitive to NO under these conditions. These results suggest that the endogenous S-sulfhydration of PTEN via CBS/H{sub 2}S plays a role in preventing the S-nitrosylation that would inhibition its enzymatic activity under physiological conditions.

  6. Preliminary investigations on the determination of three-dimensional dose distributions using scintillator blocks and optical tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Kroll, Florian; Karsch, Leonhard; Pawelke, Jörg

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: Clinical QA in teletherapy as well as the characterization of experimental radiation sources for future medical applications requires effective methods for measuring three-dimensional (3D) dose distributions generated in a water-equivalent medium. Current dosimeters based on ionization chambers, diodes, thermoluminescence detectors, radiochromic films, or polymer gels exhibit various drawbacks: High quality 3D dose determination is either very sophisticated and expensive or requires high amounts of effort and time for the preparation or read out. New detectors based on scintillator blocks in combination with optical tomography are studied, since they have the potential to facilitate the desired cost-effective, transportable, and long-term stable dosimetry system that is able to determine 3D dose distributions with high spatial resolution in a short time.Methods: A portable detector prototype was set up based on a plastic scintillator block and four digital cameras. During irradiation the scintillator emits light, which is detected by the fixed cameras. The light distribution is then reconstructed by optical tomography, using maximum-likelihood expectation maximization. The result of the reconstruction approximates the 3D dose distribution. First performance tests of the prototype using laser light were carried out. Irradiation experiments were performed with ionizing radiation, i.e., bremsstrahlung (6 to 21 MV), electrons (6 to 21 MeV), and protons (68 MeV), provided by clinical and research accelerators.Results: Laser experiments show that the current imaging properties differ from the design specifications: The imaging scale of the optical systems is position dependent, ranging from 0.185 mm/pixel to 0.225 mm/pixel. Nevertheless, the developed dosimetry method is proven to be functional for electron and proton beams. Induced radiation doses of 50 mGy or more made 3D dose reconstructions possible. Taking the imaging properties into account, determined

  7. Determination of Organ Doses in Radioiodine Therapy using Monte Carlo Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Shahbazi-Gahrouei, Daryoush; Ayat, Saba

    2015-01-01

    Radioactive iodine treatment is a type of internal radiotherapy that has been used effectively for the treatment of differentiated thyroid cancer after thyroidectomy. The limit of this method is its affects on critical organs, and hence dosimetry is necessary to consider the risk of this treatment. Scope of this work is the measurement of absorbed doses of critical organs by Monte Carlo simulation and comparing the results with other methods of dosimetry such as direct dosimetry and Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) method. To calculate absorbed doses of vital organs (thyroid, sternum and cervical vertebrae) via Monte Carlo, a mathematical phantom was used. Since iodine 131 (131I) emmits photon and beta particle, *F8 tallies, which give results in MeV were applied and the results were later converted to cGy by dividing by the mass within the cell and multiplying by 1.6E-8. The absorbed dose obtained by Monte Carlo simulations for 100, 150 and 175 mCi administered 131I was found to be 388.0, 427.9 and 444.8 cGy for thyroid, 208.7, 230.1 and 239.3 cGy for sternum and 272.1, 299.9 and 312.1 cGy for cervical vertebrae. The results of Monte Carlo simulation method had no significant difference with the results obtained via direct dosimetry using thermoluminescent dosimeter-100 and MIRD method. Hence, Monte Carlo is a suitable method for dosimetry in radioiodine therapy. PMID:25709539

  8. Determination of Organ Doses in Radioiodine Therapy using Monte Carlo Simulation.

    PubMed

    Shahbazi-Gahrouei, Daryoush; Ayat, Saba

    2015-01-01

    Radioactive iodine treatment is a type of internal radiotherapy that has been used effectively for the treatment of differentiated thyroid cancer after thyroidectomy. The limit of this method is its affects on critical organs, and hence dosimetry is necessary to consider the risk of this treatment. Scope of this work is the measurement of absorbed doses of critical organs by Monte Carlo simulation and comparing the results with other methods of dosimetry such as direct dosimetry and Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) method. To calculate absorbed doses of vital organs (thyroid, sternum and cervical vertebrae) via Monte Carlo, a mathematical phantom was used. Since iodine 131 ((131)I) emmits photon and beta particle, *F8 tallies, which give results in MeV were applied and the results were later converted to cGy by dividing by the mass within the cell and multiplying by 1.6E-8. The absorbed dose obtained by Monte Carlo simulations for 100, 150 and 175 mCi administered (131)I was found to be 388.0, 427.9 and 444.8 cGy for thyroid, 208.7, 230.1 and 239.3 cGy for sternum and 272.1, 299.9 and 312.1 cGy for cervical vertebrae. The results of Monte Carlo simulation method had no significant difference with the results obtained via direct dosimetry using thermoluminescent dosimeter-100 and MIRD method. Hence, Monte Carlo is a suitable method for dosimetry in radioiodine therapy.

  9. Peptide Dose and/or Structure in Vaccines as a Determinant of T Cell Responses.

    PubMed

    Leggatt, Graham R

    2014-07-02

    While T cells recognise the complex of peptide and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) at the cell surface, changes in the dose and/or structure of the peptide component can have profound effects on T cell activation and function. In addition, the repertoire of T cells capable of responding to any given peptide is variable, but broader than a single clone. Consequently, peptide parameters that affect the interaction between T cells and peptide/MHC have been shown to select particular T cell clones for expansion and this impacts on clearance of disease. T cells with high functional avidity are selected on low doses of peptide, while low avidity T cells are favoured in high peptide concentrations. Altering the structure of the peptide ligand can also influence the selection and function of peptide-specific T cell clones. In this review, we will explore the evidence that the choice of peptide dose or the structure of the peptide are critical parameters in an effective vaccine designed to activate T cells.

  10. Biological monitoring to determine worker dose in a butadiene processing plant

    SciTech Connect

    Bechtold, W.E.; Hayes, R.B.

    1995-12-01

    Butadiene (BD) is a reactive gas used extensively in the rubber industry and is also found in combustion products. Although BD is genotoxic and acts as an animal carcinogen, the evidence for carcinogenicity in humans is limited. Extrapolation from animal studies on BD carcinogenicity to risk in humans has been controversial because of uncertainties regarding relative biologic exposure and related effects in humans vs. experimental animals. To reduce this uncertainty, a study was designed to characterize exposure to BD at a polymer production facility and to relate this exposure to mutational and cytogenetic effects. Biological monitoring was used to better assess the internal dose of BD received by the workers. Measurement of 1,2-dihydroxy-4-(N-acetylcysteinyl) butane (M1) in urine served as the biomarker in this study. M1 has been shown to correlate with area monitoring in previous studies. Most studies that relate exposure to a toxic chemical with its biological effects rely on exposure concentration as the dose metric; however, exposure concentration may or may not reflect the actual internal dose of the chemical.

  11. The AKT inhibitor AZD5363 is selectively active in PI3KCA mutant gastric cancer, and sensitizes a patient-derived gastric cancer xenograft model with PTEN loss to Taxotere

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Activation of the PI3K/AKT pathway is a common phenomenon in cancer due to multiple mechanisms, including mutation of PI3KCA, loss or mutation of PTEN, or over-expression of receptor tyrosine kinases. We recently developed a novel AKT kinase inhibitor, AZD5363, and demonstrated that HGC27, a cell line harboring both PI3KCA mutation and PTEN loss, displayed the greatest sensitivity to this AKT inhibitor in vitro and in vivo. Case preparation To further elucidate the correlation between AZD5363 response and genetic alterations in gastric cancer (GC) and identify GC patients with both PI3KCA mutations and PTEN loss, we investigated the effects of pharmacological inhibition of AKT on a panel of 20 GC cell lines and genetic aberrations in tumor samples from a cohort of Chinese GC patients. We demonstrated that GC cells with PI3KCA mutations were selectively sensitive to AZD5363. Disease linkage studies showed that PI3KCA activating mutations or PTEN loss were found in 2.7% (4/150) and 23% (14/61) of Chinese GC patients respectively. To further dissect the role of PI3KCA mutation and PTEN loss in response to AKT inhibition, we tested the antitumor activity of AZD5363 in two patient-derived GC xenograft (PDGCX) models harboring either PI3KCA mutation or PTEN loss. Our data indicated that AZD5363 monotherapy treatment led to a moderate response in the PI3KCA mutant PDGCX model. Whilst monotherapy AZD5363 or Taxotere were ineffective in the PTEN negative PDGCX model, significant anti-tumor activity was observed when AZD5363 was combined with Taxotere. Conclusion Our results indicated that PI3KCA mutation is an important determinant of response to AKT inhibition in GC and combination with AZD5363 can overcome innate resistance to Taxotere in a PTEN loss PDGCX model. It is suggested that AKT inhibitor is an attractive option for treatment of a new segment of GC patients with aberrant PI3K/AKT signaling. PMID:24088382

  12. Solid phase ELISA for determination of the virus dose dependent sensitivity of human cytomegalovirus to antiviral drugs in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ståhle, E L; Schloss, L; Sundqvist, V A; Brytting, M; Hökeberg, I; Cox, S; Wahren, B; Linde, A

    1998-12-01

    The main problems in determining the true in vivo susceptibility of human cytomegalovirus (CMV) to antiviral compounds are the influence of the size of the viral inoculum, the variation in the replication capacity of different CMV strains and the subjective evaluation of the inhibition of viral growth in the plaque assay. In this study, a specific assay was developed which reproducibly determines the sensitivity of primary isolates of CMV. The assay includes simultaneous virus titration and determination of the antiviral sensitivity. When individual virus doses were evaluated, the IC50 was generally dependent on the virus dose, except for resistant isolates, where the IC50 did not change irrespective of the dose of virus. The novel method of IC50 calculation takes into account all values derived from the linear part of the inhibition curve. This may better reflect the in vivo conditions, where the antiviral drug encounters different amounts of virus in different organs. Two human fibroblast-derived cell lines showed similar results.

  13. MicroRNA-486–dependent modulation of DOCK3/PTEN/AKT signaling pathways improves muscular dystrophy–associated symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Matthew S.; Casar, Juan Carlos; Motohashi, Norio; Vieira, Natássia M.; Eisenberg, Iris; Marshall, Jamie L.; Gasperini, Molly J.; Lek, Angela; Myers, Jennifer A.; Estrella, Elicia A.; Kang, Peter B.; Shapiro, Frederic; Rahimov, Fedik; Kawahara, Genri; Widrick, Jeffrey J.; Kunkel, Louis M.

    2014-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is caused by mutations in the gene encoding dystrophin, which results in dysfunctional signaling pathways within muscle. Previously, we identified microRNA-486 (miR-486) as a muscle-enriched microRNA that is markedly reduced in the muscles of dystrophin-deficient mice (Dmdmdx-5Cv mice) and in DMD patient muscles. Here, we determined that muscle-specific transgenic overexpression of miR-486 in muscle of Dmdmdx-5Cv mice results in reduced serum creatine kinase levels, improved sarcolemmal integrity, fewer centralized myonuclei, increased myofiber size, and improved muscle physiology and performance. Additionally, we identified dedicator of cytokinesis 3 (DOCK3) as a miR-486 target in skeletal muscle and determined that DOCK3 expression is induced in dystrophic muscles. DOCK3 overexpression in human myotubes modulated PTEN/AKT signaling, which regulates muscle hypertrophy and growth, and induced apoptosis. Furthermore, several components of the PTEN/AKT pathway were markedly modulated by miR-486 in dystrophin-deficient muscle. Skeletal muscle–specific miR-486 overexpression in Dmdmdx-5Cv animals decreased levels of DOCK3, reduced PTEN expression, and subsequently increased levels of phosphorylated AKT, which resulted in an overall beneficial effect. Together, these studies demonstrate that stable overexpression of miR-486 ameliorates the disease progression of dystrophin-deficient skeletal muscle. PMID:24789910

  14. Absorbed dose determination using experimental and analytical predictions of x-ray spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, David Lee

    1999-10-01

    Electron beam welding in a vacuum is a technology that NASA is investigating as a joining technique for manufacture of space structures. The interaction of energetic electrons with metal produces x-rays. This investigation characterizes the x-ray environment due to operation of an in-vacuum electron beam welding tool and provides recommendations for adequate radiation shielding for astronauts performing the in-vacuum electron beam welding. NASA, in a joint venture with the Russian Space Agency, was scheduled to perform a series of welding in space experiments on board the United States Space Shuttle. This series of experiments was named the International Space Welding Experiment (ISWE). The hardware associated with the ISWE was leased to NASA, by the Paton Welding Institute (PWI) in Ukraine, for ground based welding experiments in preparation for flight. Two ground tests were scheduled, using the ISWE electron beam welding tool, to characterize the radiation exposure to an astronaut during the operation of the ISWE. These radiation exposure tests used Thermoluminescence Dosimeters (TLD's) shielded with material currently used by astronauts during Extra Vehicular Activities (EVA) to measure the radiation dose. The TLD's were exposed to x- ray radiation generated by operation of the ISWE in- vacuum electron beam welding tool. This investigation was the first known application of TLD's to measure absorbed dose from x-rays of energy less than 10 keV. The ISWE hardware was returned to Ukraine before the issue of adequate shielding for the astronauts was completely verified. Therefore alternate experimental and analytical methods were developed to measure and predict the x-ray spectral and intensity distribution generated by ISWE electron beam impact with metal. These x-ray spectra were normalized to an equivalent ISWE exposure then used to calculate the absorbed radiation dose to astronauts. These absorbed dose values were compared to TLD measurements obtained during

  15. Occupational ingestion of P-32: the value of monitoring techniques to determine dose. A case report.

    PubMed

    McCunney, R J; Masse, F; Galanek, M

    1999-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to described the analytical methods used to assess the internal dose from a P-32-labeled compound that was inadvertently ingested. Bioassay data, using the International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP)-30 model, enabled the calculation of internal dose. Whole body counting (WBC) and urinary measurement with liquid scintillation counting were utilized to estimate the amount of radioactive material deposited in body organs. This metabolic model assumes that 80% of the material ingested is absorbed through the gastrointestinal tract because P-32 is soluble. The time of the intake, a critical variable in this method, was estimated on the basis of urine contamination of clothing. Twenty-four-hour urine sampling over a 6-week period, coupled with daily WBC over the same period, was performed. Because P-32 does not emit photons, WBC relied on measuring the bremsstrahlung radiation produced as a result of interaction of beta radiation with the body's tissues. A P-32-spiked phantom was used as a control. Over the 6-week monitoring period, urinary results indicated an ingestion of 560 microCi of P-32, whereas WBC estimated on intake of 580 microCi. An assessment of the laboratory where the accident occurred indicated that approximately 600 microCi of radioactive phosphorous was missing. The total effective dose equivalent was estimated at 4.8 rem (48 mSv). On the basis of this study, the ICRP model appears to fit the data obtained from urine measurements and WBC. No symptoms were noted from the ingestion of 580 microCi. The committed organ doses were well within the occupational nonstochastic limits of 50 (0.5 Sv) permitted by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. These results were confirmed by NUREG/CR-4884 and commercial software (CINDY). This report confirms the value of using the ICRP-30 model with urinary measurements and WBC to estimate the dose received as a result of ingestion of radioactive P-32. PMID:10529943

  16. Loss of tumour suppressor PTEN expression in renal injury initiates SMAD3- and p53-dependent fibrotic responses.

    PubMed

    Samarakoon, Rohan; Helo, Sevann; Dobberfuhl, Amy D; Khakoo, Nidah S; Falke, Lucas; Overstreet, Jessica M; Goldschmeding, Roel; Higgins, Paul J

    2015-08-01

    Deregulation of the tumour suppressor PTEN occurs in lung and skin fibrosis and diabetic and ischaemic renal injury. However, the potential role of PTEN and associated mechanisms in the progression of kidney fibrosis is unknown. Tubular and interstitial PTEN expression was dramatically decreased in several models of renal injury, including aristolochic acid nephropathy (AAN), streptozotocin (STZ)-mediated injury and ureteral unilateral obstruction (UUO), correlating with Akt, p53 and SMAD3 activation and fibrosis. Stable silencing of PTEN in HK-2 human tubular epithelial cells induced dedifferentiation and CTGF, PAI-1, vimentin, α-SMA and fibronectin expression, compared to HK-2 cells expressing control shRNA. Furthermore, PTEN knockdown stimulated Akt, SMAD3 and p53(Ser15) phosphorylation, with an accompanying decrease in population density and an increase in epithelial G1 cell cycle arrest. SMAD3 or p53 gene silencing or pharmacological blockade partially suppressed fibrotic gene expression and relieved growth inhibition orchestrated by deficiency or inhibition of PTEN. Similarly, shRNA suppression of PAI-1 rescued the PTEN loss-associated epithelial proliferative arrest. Moreover, TGFβ1-initiated fibrotic gene expression is further enhanced by PTEN depletion. Combined TGFβ1 treatment and PTEN silencing potentiated epithelial cell death via p53-dependent pathways. Thus, PTEN loss initiates tubular dysfunction via SMAD3- and p53-mediated fibrotic gene induction, with accompanying PAI-1-dependent proliferative arrest, and cooperates with TGFβ1 to induce the expression of profibrotic genes and tubular apoptosis.

  17. PTEN regulates angiogenesis and VEGF expression through phosphatase-dependent and -independent mechanisms in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Tian, Tao; Nan, Ke-Jun; Wang, Shu-Hong; Liang, Xuan; Lu, Chuang-Xin; Guo, Hui; Wang, Wen-Juan; Ruan, Zhi-Ping

    2010-07-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a typical hypervascular tumor, and increased levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) are associated with progression of HCC. Tumor suppression gene PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10), an important antagonist of the phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K)/adenosine triphosphate-dependent tyrosine kinase (Akt) pathway, is also commonly lost or mutated in HCC. However, the effect of PTEN on VEGF-mediated angiogenesis in HCC remains unknown. To explore this relationship, we expressed a panel of PTEN mutants in human HCC cells with low expression of PTEN (HepG2 cells). Overexpression of PTEN in HepG2 cells resulted in the downregulation of proliferation and migration of cocultured endothelial cells and decreased expression of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) and VEGF. Similarly, using a nude mouse model, we demonstrated that PTEN decreased expression of HIF-1 and VEGF and suppressed HepG2-induced angiogenesis. This inhibitory effect was not observed in cells expressing a phosphatase-deficient PTEN mutant, suggesting that PTEN inhibits angiogenesis and VEGF through a phosphatase-dependent pathway. Strikingly, reintroducing the C2 domain of PTEN also resulted in a significant decrease in angiogenesis and VEGF expression, although it did not affect Akt phosphorylation or HIF-1 expression. In summary, this study suggests the novel viewpoint that PTEN suppresses angiogenesis and VEGF expression in HCC through both phosphatase-dependent and -independent mechanisms.

  18. PTEN Increases Autophagy and Inhibits the Ubiquitin-Proteasome Pathway in Glioma Cells Independently of its Lipid Phosphatase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Errafiy, Rajaa; Aguado, Carmen; Ghislat, Ghita; Esteve, Juan M.; Gil, Anabel; Loutfi, Mohammed; Knecht, Erwin

    2013-01-01

    Two major mechanisms of intracellular protein degradation, autophagy and the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, operate in mammalian cells. PTEN, which is frequently mutated in glioblastomas, is a tumor suppressor gene that encodes a dual specificity phosphatase that antagonizes the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase class I/AKT/mTOR pathway, which is a key regulator of autophagy. Here, we investigated in U87MG human glioma cells the role of PTEN in the regulation of autophagy and the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, because both are functionally linked and are relevant in cancer progression. Since U87MG glioma cells lack a functional PTEN, we used stable clones that express, under the control of a tetracycline-inducible system (Tet-on), wild-type PTEN and two of its mutants, G129E-PTEN and C124S-PTEN, which, respectively, lack the lipid phosphatase activity only and both the lipid and the protein phosphatase activities of this protein. Expression of PTEN in U87MG glioma cells decreased proteasome activity and also reduced protein ubiquitination. On the contrary, expression of PTEN increased the autophagic flux and the lysosomal mass. Interestingly, and although PTEN negatively regulates the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase class I/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway by its lipid phosphatase activity, both effects in U87MG cells were independent of this activity. These results suggest a new mTOR-independent signaling pathway by which PTEN can regulate in opposite directions the main mechanisms of intracellular protein degradation. PMID:24349488

  19. Experimental determination of particle range and dose distribution in thick targets through fragmentation reactions of stable heavy ions.

    PubMed

    Inaniwa, Taku; Kohno, Toshiyuki; Tomitani, Takehiro; Urakabe, Eriko; Sato, Shinji; Kanazawa, Mitsutaka; Kanai, Tatsuaki

    2006-09-01

    In radiation therapy with highly energetic heavy ions, the conformal irradiation of a tumour can be achieved by using their advantageous features such as the good dose localization and the high relative biological effectiveness around their mean range. For effective utilization of such properties, it is necessary to evaluate the range of incident ions and the deposited dose distribution in a patient's body. Several methods have been proposed to derive such physical quantities; one of them uses positron emitters generated through projectile fragmentation reactions of incident ions with target nuclei. We have proposed the application of the maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) method to a detected annihilation gamma-ray distribution for determination of the range of incident ions in a target and we have demonstrated the effectiveness of the method with computer simulations. In this paper, a water, a polyethylene and a polymethyl methacrylate target were each irradiated with stable (12)C, (14)N, (16)O and (20)Ne beams. Except for a few combinations of incident beams and targets, the MLE method could determine the range of incident ions R(MLE) with a difference between R(MLE) and the experimental range of less than 2.0 mm under the circumstance that the measurement of annihilation gamma rays was started just after the irradiation of 61.4 s and lasted for 500 s. In the process of evaluating the range of incident ions with the MLE method, we must calculate many physical quantities such as the fluence and the energy of both primary ions and fragments as a function of depth in a target. Consequently, by using them we can obtain the dose distribution. Thus, when the mean range of incident ions is determined with the MLE method, the annihilation gamma-ray distribution and the deposited dose distribution can be derived simultaneously. The derived dose distributions in water for the mono-energetic heavy-ion beams of four species were compared with those measured with an

  20. Direct determination of the absorbed dose to water from 125I low dose-rate brachytherapy seeds using the new absorbed dose primary standard developed at ENEA-INMRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toni, M. P.; Pimpinella, M.; Pinto, M.; Quini, M.; Cappadozzi, G.; Silvestri, C.; Bottauscio, O.

    2012-10-01

    Low-intensity radioactive sources emitting low-energy photons are used in the clinic for low dose-rate brachytherapy treatments of tumours. The dosimetry of these sources is based on reference air kerma rate measurements. The absorbed dose rate to water at the reference depth d0 = 1 cm, \\dot {D}_{w,1\\,cm} , is then obtained by a conversion procedure with a large relative standard uncertainty of about 5%. This paper describes a primary standard developed at ENEA-INMRI to directly measure \\dot {D}_{w,1\\,cm} due to LDR sources. The standard is based on a large-angle and variable-volume ionization chamber, embedded in a graphite phantom and operating under ‘wall-less air chamber’ conditions. A set of correction and conversion factors, based on experiments and Monte Carlo simulations, are determined to obtain the value of Dw,1 cm from measurements of increment of ionization current with increasing chamber volume. The relative standard uncertainty on \\dot {D}_{w,1\\,cm} is 2.6%, which is appreciably lower than the current uncertainty. Characteristics of the standard, its associated uncertainty budget, and some experimental results are given for 125I BEBIG I25.S16.C brachytherapy seeds. Finally, results of the experimental determination of the dose-rate constant Λ1 cm, traceable to the Dw,1 cm and the low-energy air kerma ENEA-INMRI standards, are given. The relative standard uncertainty on Λ1 cm is 2.9%, appreciably lower than the typical uncertainty (4.8%) of the values available in the literature.

  1. Doxycyclin ameliorates a starvation-induced germline tumor in C. elegans daf-18/PTEN mutant background.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Tim; Qi, Wenjing; Schindler, Verena; Runkel, Eva Diana; Baumeister, Ralf

    2014-08-01

    Managing available resources is a key necessity of each organism to cope with the environment. The nematode C. elegans responds to nutritional deprivation or harsh environmental conditions with a multitude of developmental adaptations, among them a starvation-induced quiescence at early larval development (L1). daf-18, the C. elegans homolog of the human tumor suppressor gene PTEN, is essential for the maintenance of survival and germline stem cell arrest during the L1 diapause. We show here that daf-18 mutants, independently to their failure to maintain G2 arrest of the primordial germ cells, develop a gonad phenotype after refeeding. This highly penetrant gonadal phenotype is further enhanced by a mutation in shc-1, encoding a protein homologous to the human adaptor ShcA. Features of this phenotype are a tumor-like phenotype encompassing hyper-proliferation of germ cell nuclei and disruption/invasion of the basement membrane surrounding the gonad. The penetrance of this phenotype is reduced by decreasing starvation temperature. In addition, it is also ameliorated in a dose-dependent way by exposure to the antibiotic doxycyclin either during starvation or during subsequent refeeding. Since, in eukaryotic cells, doxycyclin specifically blocks mitochondrial translation, our results suggest that daf-18 and shc-1;daf-18 mutants fail to adapt mitochondrial activity to reduced nutritional availability during early larval developing. PMID:24746511

  2. Evaluation of an abbreviated impactor for fine particle fraction (FPF) determination of metered dose inhalers (MDI).

    PubMed

    Guo, Changning; Ngo, Diem; Ahadi, Shafiq; Doub, William H

    2013-09-01

    Abbreviated impactors have been developed recently to allow more rapid evaluation of inhalation products as alternates to the eight-stage Andersen Cascade Impactor (ACI) which has been widely used in the pharmaceutical industry for assessing aerodynamic particle size distribution. In this paper, a two-stage abbreviated impactor, Westech Fine Particle Dose Impactor (WFPD), was used to characterize the aerodynamic particle size of metered dose inhaler (MDI) products, and the results were compared with those obtained using the standard eight-stage ACI. Seven commercial MDI products, with different propellants (chlorofluorocarbon/hydrofluoroalkane) and formulation types (suspension/solution, dry/normal/wet), were tested in this study by both WFPD and ACI. Substantially equivalent measures of fine particle fraction were obtained for most of the tested MDI products, but larger coarse particle fraction and extra-fine particle fraction values were measured from WFPD relative to those measured using the ACI. Use of the WFPD also produced more wall loss than the ACI. Therefore, it is recommended that the system suitability be evaluated on a product-by-product basis to establish substantial equivalency before implementing an abbreviated impactor measurement methodology for routine use in inhaler product characterization. PMID:23780781

  3. Minimum ion-beam exposure-dose determination for chemically amplified resist from printed dot matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Bruenger, W. H.; Leung, K.; Lee, Y.; Hudek, P.; Rangelow, I. W.; Stangl, G.

    1999-11-01

    Matrices of 90 nm dots have been printed into high-sensitivity positive resist (UVII HS, Shipley) with an ion projection system (IMS Vienna) to investigate the influence of shot noise on the printing probability of dots. Dot defect probability increases with diminishing ion dose following a Poisson distribution which demonstrates that shot noise is the dominating effect. The minimum ion numbers per dot to generate 50% defect probability are N{sub crit}=115 for standard resist treatment. This corresponds to N=165 for smaller defect probabilities of 10{sup -4}. Resist sensitivity was decreased with postexposure bake temperatures of 110 degree sign C instead of 140 degree sign C to improve the resolution capability of the resist. Under these conditions, and an additional resist top coat, N{sub crit}=130 ions per dot have been measured. The article demonstrates that ion projection lithography is not limited by shot noise at minimum resolution elements of 90 nm diam. The corresponding exposure doses are 0.3 {mu}C/cm2. (c) 1999 American Vacuum Society.

  4. Evaluation of an abbreviated impactor for fine particle fraction (FPF) determination of metered dose inhalers (MDI).

    PubMed

    Guo, Changning; Ngo, Diem; Ahadi, Shafiq; Doub, William H

    2013-09-01

    Abbreviated impactors have been developed recently to allow more rapid evaluation of inhalation products as alternates to the eight-stage Andersen Cascade Impactor (ACI) which has been widely used in the pharmaceutical industry for assessing aerodynamic particle size distribution. In this paper, a two-stage abbreviated impactor, Westech Fine Particle Dose Impactor (WFPD), was used to characterize the aerodynamic particle size of metered dose inhaler (MDI) products, and the results were compared with those obtained using the standard eight-stage ACI. Seven commercial MDI products, with different propellants (chlorofluorocarbon/hydrofluoroalkane) and formulation types (suspension/solution, dry/normal/wet), were tested in this study by both WFPD and ACI. Substantially equivalent measures of fine particle fraction were obtained for most of the tested MDI products, but larger coarse particle fraction and extra-fine particle fraction values were measured from WFPD relative to those measured using the ACI. Use of the WFPD also produced more wall loss than the ACI. Therefore, it is recommended that the system suitability be evaluated on a product-by-product basis to establish substantial equivalency before implementing an abbreviated impactor measurement methodology for routine use in inhaler product characterization.

  5. PTEN and PI3K/AKT in non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Ramírez, Cristina; Cañadas-Garre, Marisa; Molina, Miguel Ángel; Faus-Dáder, María José; Calleja-Hernández, Miguel Ángel

    2015-11-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. In the last years, the identification of activating EGFR mutations, conferring increased sensitivity and disease response to tyrosine kinase inhibitors, has changed the prospect of NSCLC patients. The PTEN/PI3K/AKT pathway regulates multiple cellular functions, including cell growth, differentiation, proliferation, survival, motility, invasion and intracellular trafficking. Alterations in this pathway, mainly PTEN inactivation, have been associated with resistance to EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy and lower survival in NSCLC patients. In this review, we will briefly discuss the main PTEN/PI3K/AKT pathway alterations found in NSCLC, as well as the cell processes regulated by PTEN/PI3K/AKT leading to tumorigenesis.

  6. In situ protocol for the determination of dose-response effect of low-fluoride dentifrices on enamel remineralization

    PubMed Central

    AFONSO, Rebeca Lima; PESSAN, Juliano Pelim; IGREJA, Bruna Babler; CANTAGALLO, Camila Fernandes; DANELON, Marcelle; DELBEM, Alberto Carlos Botazzo

    2013-01-01

    No in situ protocol has assessed the dose-response effects of fluoride dentifrices involving low-fluoride formulations. Objective To assess the ability of an in situ remineralization model in determining dose-response effects of dentifrices containing low fluoride concentrations ([F]) on bovine enamel. Material and Methods Volunteers wore palatal appliances containing demineralized enamel blocks and brushed their teeth and devices with the dentifrices supplied (double-blind, crossover protocol) separately for 3 and 7 days. Surface hardness (SH), integrated subsurface hardness (ΔKHN) and [F] in enamel were determined. Data were analyzed by ANOVA, Tukey's test and Pearson's correlation (p<0.05). Results Dose-response relationships were verified between [F] in dentifrices and SH, ΔKHN and enamel [F]. Higher correlation coefficients between enamel [F] and SH and ΔKHN were obtained for the 3-day period. Significant differences in SH and ΔKHN were observed among all groups for the 3-day period, but not between 0-275, 275-550, and 550-1,100 µg F/g dentifrices for the 7-day period, nor between 3- and 7-day periods for the 1,100 µg F/g groups. Conclusions Considering that the peak remineralization capacity of the conventional dentifrice (1,100 µg F/g) was achieved in 3 days, this experimental period could be used in future studies assessing new dentifrice formulations, especially at low-fluoride concentrations. PMID:24473718

  7. Either Kras activation or Pten loss similarly enhance the dominant-stable CTNNB1-induced genetic program to promote granulosa cell tumor development in the ovary and testis.

    PubMed

    Richards, J S; Fan, H-Y; Liu, Z; Tsoi, M; Laguë, M-N; Boyer, A; Boerboom, D

    2012-03-22

    WNT, RAS or phosphoinositide 3-kinase signaling pathways control specific stages of ovarian follicular development. To analyze the functional interactions of these pathways in granulosa cells during follicular development in vivo, we generated specific mutant mouse models. Stable activation of the WNT signaling effector β-catenin (CTNNB1) in granulosa cells results in the formation of premalignant lesions that develop into granulosa cell tumors (GCTs) spontaneously later in life or following targeted deletion of the tumor suppressor gene Pten. Conversely, expression of oncogenic KRAS(G12D) dramatically arrests proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis in granulosa cells, and consequently, small abnormal follicle-like structures devoid of oocytes accumulate in the ovary. Because of the potent anti-proliferative effects of KRAS(G12D) in granulosa cells, we sought to determine whether KRAS(G12D) would block precancerous lesion and tumor formation in follicles of the CTNNB1-mutant mice. Unexpectedly, transgenic Ctnnb1;Kras-mutant mice exhibited increased GC proliferation, decreased apoptosis and impaired differentiation and developed early-onset GCTs leading to premature death in a manner similar to the Ctnnb1;Pten-mutant mice. Microarray and reverse transcription-PCR analyses revealed that gene regulatory processes induced by CTNNB1 were mostly enhanced by either KRAS activation or Pten loss in remarkably similar patterns and degree. The concomitant activation of CTNNB1 and KRAS in Sertoli cells also caused testicular granulosa cell tumors that showed gene expression patterns that partially overlapped those observed in GCTs of the ovary. Although the mutations analyzed herein have not yet been linked to adult GCTs in humans, they may be related to juvenile GCTs or to tumors in other tissues where CTNNB1 is mutated. Importantly, the results provide strong evidence that CTNNB1 is the driver in these contexts and that KRAS(G12D) and Pten loss promote the program set

  8. Determination of an optimal dose of medetomidine-ketamine-buprenorphine for anaesthesia in the Cape ground squirrel (Xerus inauris).

    PubMed

    Jouber, K E; Serfontein, T; Scantlebury, M; Manjerovice, M B; Bateman, P W; Bennett, N C; Waterman, J M

    2011-06-01

    The optimal dose of medetomidine-ketamine-buprenorphine was determined in 25 Cape ground squirrels (Xerus inauris) undergoing surgical implantation of a temperature logger into the abdominal cavity. At the end of anaesthesia, the squirrels were given atipamezole intramuscularly to reverse the effects of medetomidine. The mean dose of medetomidine was 67.6 +/- 9.2microg/kg, ketamine 13.6 +/- 1.9 mg/kg and buprenorphine 0.5 +/- 0.06 microg/kg. Induction time was 3.1 +/- 1.4 min. This produced surgical anaesthesia for 21 +/- 4.2 min. Atipamezole 232 +/- 92 microg/kg produced a rapid recovery. Squirrels were sternally recumbent in 3.5 +/- 2.2 min.

  9. PTEN Phosphatase-Independent Maintenance of Glandular Morphology in a Predictive Colorectal Cancer Model System1

    PubMed Central

    Jagan, Ishaan C; Deevi, Ravi K; Fatehullah, Aliya; Topley, Rebecca; Eves, Joshua; Stevenson, Michael; Loughrey, Maurice; Arthur, Kenneth; Campbell, Frederick Charles

    2013-01-01

    Organotypic models may provide mechanistic insight into colorectal cancer (CRC) morphology. Three-dimensional (3D) colorectal gland formation is regulated by phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) coupling of cell division cycle 42 (cdc42) to atypical protein kinase C (aPKC). This study investigated PTEN phosphatase-dependent and phosphatase-independent morphogenic functions in 3D models and assessed translational relevance in human studies. Isogenic PTEN-expressing or PTEN-deficient 3D colorectal cultures were used. In translational studies, apical aPKC activity readout was assessed against apical membrane (AM) orientation and gland morphology in 3D models and human CRC. We found that catalytically active or inactive PTEN constructs containing an intact C2 domain enhanced cdc42 activity, whereas mutants of the C2 domain calcium binding region 3 membrane-binding loop (M-CBR3) were ineffective. The isolated PTEN C2 domain (C2) accumulated in membrane fractions, but C2 M-CBR3 remained in cytosol. Transfection of C2 but not C2 M-CBR3 rescued defective AM orientation and 3D morphogenesis of PTEN-deficient Caco-2 cultures. The signal intensity of apical phospho-aPKC correlated with that of Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factor-1 (NHERF-1) in the 3D model. Apical NHERF-1 intensity thus provided readout of apical aPKC activity and associated with glandular morphology in the model system and human colon. Low apical NHERF-1 intensity in CRC associated with disruption of glandular architecture, high cancer grade, and metastatic dissemination. We conclude that the membrane-binding function of the catalytically inert PTEN C2 domain influences cdc42/aPKC-dependent AM dynamics and gland formation in a highly relevant 3D CRC morphogenesis model system. PMID:24348097

  10. SAHA-induced loss of tumor suppressor Pten gene promotes thyroid carcinogenesis in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xuguang; Kim, Dong Wook; Zhao, Li; Willingham, Mark C; Cheng, Sheue-Yann

    2016-07-01

    Thyroid cancer is on the rise. Novel approaches are needed to improve the outcome of patients with recurrent and advanced metastatic thyroid cancers. FDA approval of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA; vorinostat), an inhibitor of histone deacetylase, for the treatment of hematological malignancies led to the clinical trials of vorinostat for advanced thyroid cancer. However, patients were resistant to vorinostat treatment. To understand the molecular basis of resistance, we tested the efficacy of SAHA in two mouse models of metastatic follicular thyroid cancer: Thrb(PV/PV) and Thrb(PV/PV)Pten(+/-) mice. In both, thyroid cancer is driven by overactivation of PI3K-AKT signaling. However, the latter exhibit more aggressive cancer progression due to haplodeficiency of the tumor suppressor, the Pten gene. SAHA had no effects on thyroid cancer progression in Thrb(PV/PV) mice, indicative of resistance to SAHA. Unexpectedly, thyroid cancer progressed in SAHA-treated Thrb(PV/PV)Pten(+/-) mice with accelerated occurrence of vascular invasion, anaplastic foci, and lung metastasis. Molecular analyses showed further activated PI3K-AKT in thyroid tumors of SAHA-treated Thrb(PV/PV)Pten(+/-) mice, resulting in the activated effectors, p-Rb, CDK6, p21(Cip1), p-cSrc, ezrin, and matrix metalloproteinases, to increase proliferation and invasion of tumor cells. Single-molecule DNA analysis indicated that the wild-type allele of the Pten gene was progressively lost, whereas carcinogenesis progressed in SAHA-treated Thrb(PV/PV)Pten(+/-) mice. Thus, this study has uncovered a novel mechanism by which SAHA-induced loss of the tumor suppressor Pten gene to promote thyroid cancer progression. Effectors downstream of the Pten loss-induced signaling may be potential targets to overcome resistance of thyroid cancer to SAHA.

  11. Global DNA methylation and PTEN hypermethylation alterations in lung tissues from human silicosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xianan; Jia, Xiaowei; Mei, Liangying; Zheng, Min; Yu, Chen

    2016-01-01

    Background Silicosis is a respiratory disease caused by long-term silica dust exposure. Our previous study has demonstrated that silica mediates the activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN)/serine or threonine kinase (AKT)/mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK)/AP-1 pathway in human embryo lung fibroblasts (HELFs). The purpose of this study is to identify genome-wide aberrant DNA methylation profiling in lung tissues from silicosis patients. Methods We performed Illumina Human Methylation 450K Beadchip arrays to investigate the methylation alteration in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) lung specimens, immunohistochemistry to detect the level of c-Jun and PTEN proteins; methylation specific PCR (MS-PCR) to identify PTEN and c-Jun promoter methylation in HELFs. Results We found 86,770 CpG sites and 79,660 CpG sites significantly differed in methylation status in early-stage and advanced-stage compared with GEO normal lung methylation data. Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) analysis revealed the methylated status of MAPK signaling pathway was considered changed. The number of PTEN and c-Jun CpG promoter methylated-sites were increased in advanced-stage. Early-stage showed the positive expression of c-Jun and PTEN protein and negative or mild expression in advanced-stage. PTEN promoter was no differentially methylated and c-Jun promoter differed at 12 and 24 h in HELFs. Conclusions Abnormal DNA methylation on genome-scale was implicated in silicosis, and PTEN promoter hypermethylation might be associated with decrease of PTEN protein. PMID:27621875

  12. Global DNA methylation and PTEN hypermethylation alterations in lung tissues from human silicosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xianan; Jia, Xiaowei; Mei, Liangying; Zheng, Min; Yu, Chen

    2016-01-01

    Background Silicosis is a respiratory disease caused by long-term silica dust exposure. Our previous study has demonstrated that silica mediates the activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN)/serine or threonine kinase (AKT)/mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK)/AP-1 pathway in human embryo lung fibroblasts (HELFs). The purpose of this study is to identify genome-wide aberrant DNA methylation profiling in lung tissues from silicosis patients. Methods We performed Illumina Human Methylation 450K Beadchip arrays to investigate the methylation alteration in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) lung specimens, immunohistochemistry to detect the level of c-Jun and PTEN proteins; methylation specific PCR (MS-PCR) to identify PTEN and c-Jun promoter methylation in HELFs. Results We found 86,770 CpG sites and 79,660 CpG sites significantly differed in methylation status in early-stage and advanced-stage compared with GEO normal lung methylation data. Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) analysis revealed the methylated status of MAPK signaling pathway was considered changed. The number of PTEN and c-Jun CpG promoter methylated-sites were increased in advanced-stage. Early-stage showed the positive expression of c-Jun and PTEN protein and negative or mild expression in advanced-stage. PTEN promoter was no differentially methylated and c-Jun promoter differed at 12 and 24 h in HELFs. Conclusions Abnormal DNA methylation on genome-scale was implicated in silicosis, and PTEN promoter hypermethylation might be associated with decrease of PTEN protein.

  13. PTEN inhibition to facilitate intrinsic regenerative outgrowth of adult peripheral axons.

    PubMed

    Christie, Kimberly J; Webber, Christine A; Martinez, Jose A; Singh, Bhagat; Zochodne, Douglas W

    2010-07-01

    In vivo regeneration of peripheral neurons is constrained and rarely complete, and unfortunately patients with major nerve trunk transections experience only limited recovery. Intracellular inhibition of neuronal growth signals may be among these constraints. In this work, we investigated the role of PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10) during regeneration of peripheral neurons in adult Sprague Dawley rats. PTEN inhibits phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3-K)/Akt signaling, a common and central outgrowth and survival pathway downstream of neuronal growth factors. While PI3-K and Akt outgrowth signals were expressed and activated within adult peripheral neurons during regeneration, PTEN was similarly expressed and poised to inhibit their support. PTEN was expressed in neuron perikaryal cytoplasm, nuclei, regenerating axons, and Schwann cells. Adult sensory neurons in vitro responded to both graded pharmacological inhibition of PTEN and its mRNA knockdown using siRNA. Both approaches were associated with robust rises in the plasticity of neurite outgrowth that were independent of the mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) pathway. Importantly, this accelerated outgrowth was in addition to the increased outgrowth generated in neurons that had undergone a preconditioning lesion. Moreover, following severe nerve transection injuries, local pharmacological inhibition of PTEN or siRNA knockdown of PTEN at the injury site accelerated axon outgrowth in vivo. The findings indicated a remarkable impact on peripheral neuron plasticity through PTEN inhibition, even within a complex regenerative milieu. Overall, these findings identify a novel route to propagate intrinsic regeneration pathways within axons to benefit nerve repair.

  14. Convergent loss of PTEN leads to clinical resistance to a PI(3)Kα inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Juric, Dejan; Castel, Pau; Griffith, Malachi; Griffith, Obi L; Won, Helen H; Ellis, Haley; Ebbesen, Saya H; Ainscough, Benjamin J; Ramu, Avinash; Iyer, Gopa; Shah, Ronak H; Huynh, Tiffany; Mino-Kenudson, Mari; Sgroi, Dennis; Isakoff, Steven; Thabet, Ashraf; Elamine, Leila; Solit, David B; Lowe, Scott W; Quadt, Cornelia; Peters, Malte; Derti, Adnan; Schegel, Robert; Huang, Alan; Mardis, Elaine R; Berger, Michael F; Baselga, José; Scaltriti, Maurizio

    2015-02-12

    Broad and deep tumour genome sequencing has shed new light on tumour heterogeneity and provided important insights into the evolution of metastases arising from different clones. There is an additional layer of complexity, in that tumour evolution may be influenced by selective pressure provided by therapy, in a similar fashion to that occurring in infectious diseases. Here we studied tumour genomic evolution in a patient (index patient) with metastatic breast cancer bearing an activating PIK3CA (phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase, catalytic subunit alpha, PI(3)Kα) mutation. The patient was treated with the PI(3)Kα inhibitor BYL719, which achieved a lasting clinical response, but the patient eventually became resistant to this drug (emergence of lung metastases) and died shortly thereafter. A rapid autopsy was performed and material from a total of 14 metastatic sites was collected and sequenced. All metastatic lesions, when compared to the pre-treatment tumour, had a copy loss of PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog) and those lesions that became refractory to BYL719 had additional and different PTEN genetic alterations, resulting in the loss of PTEN expression. To put these results in context, we examined six other patients also treated with BYL719. Acquired bi-allelic loss of PTEN was found in one of these patients, whereas in two others PIK3CA mutations present in the primary tumour were no longer detected at the time of progression. To characterize our findings functionally, we examined the effects of PTEN knockdown in several preclinical models (both in cell lines intrinsically sensitive to BYL719 and in PTEN-null xenografts derived from our index patient), which we found resulted in resistance to BYL719, whereas simultaneous PI(3)K p110β blockade reverted this resistance phenotype. We conclude that parallel genetic evolution of separate metastatic sites with different PTEN genomic alterations leads to a convergent PTEN-null phenotype resistant

  15. Germline disruption of Pten localization causes enhanced sex-dependent social motivation and increased glial production

    PubMed Central

    Tilot, Amanda K.; Gaugler, Mary K.; Yu, Qi; Romigh, Todd; Yu, Wanfeng; Miller, Robert H.; Frazier, Thomas W.; Eng, Charis

    2014-01-01

    PTEN Hamartoma Tumor Syndrome (PHTS) is an autosomal-dominant genetic condition underlying a subset of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) with macrocephaly. Caused by germline mutations in PTEN, PHTS also causes increased risks of multiple cancers via dysregulation of the PI3K and MAPK signaling pathways. Conditional knockout models have shown that neural Pten regulates social behavior, proliferation and cell size. Although much is known about how the intracellular localization of PTEN regulates signaling in cancer cell lines, we know little of how PTEN localization influences normal brain physiology and behavior. To address this, we generated a germline knock-in mouse model of cytoplasm-predominant Pten and characterized its behavioral and cellular phenotypes. The homozygous Ptenm3m4 mice have decreased total Pten levels including a specific drop in nuclear Pten and exhibit region-specific increases in brain weight. The Ptenm3m4 model displays sex-specific increases in social motivation, poor balance and normal recognition memory—a profile reminiscent of some individuals with high functioning ASD. The cytoplasm-predominant protein caused cellular hypertrophy limited to the soma and led to increased NG2 cell proliferation and accumulation of glia. The animals also exhibit significant astrogliosis and microglial activation, indicating a neuroinflammatory phenotype. At the signaling level, Ptenm3m4 mice show brain region-specific differences in Akt activation. These results demonstrate that differing alterations to the same autism-linked gene can cause distinct behavioral profiles. The Ptenm3m4 model is the first murine model of inappropriately elevated social motivation in the context of normal cognition and may expand the range of autism-related behaviors replicated in animal models. PMID:24470394

  16. Determination of the Optimal Dose Reduction Level via Iterative Reconstruction Using 640-Slice Volume Chest CT in a Pig Model

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xingli; Wang, Jingshi; Liu, Qin; Zhao, Pengfei; Hou, Yang; Ma, Yue; Guo, Qiyong

    2015-01-01

    Aim To determine the optimal dose reduction level of iterative reconstruction technique for paediatric chest CT in pig models. Materials and Methods 27 infant pigs underwent 640-slice volume chest CT with 80kVp and different mAs. Automatic exposure control technique was used, and the index of noise was set to SD10 (Group A, routine dose), SD12.5, SD15, SD17.5, SD20 (Groups from B to E) to reduce dose respectively. Group A was reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP), and Groups from B to E were reconstructed using iterative reconstruction (IR). Objective and subjective image quality (IQ) among groups were compared to determine an optimal radiation reduction level. Results The noise and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in Group D had no significant statistical difference from that in Group A (P = 1.0). The scores of subjective IQ in Group A were not significantly different from those in Group D (P>0.05). There were no obvious statistical differences in the objective and subjective index values among the subgroups (small, medium and large subgroups) of Group D. The effective dose (ED) of Group D was 58.9% lower than that of Group A (0.20±0.05mSv vs 0.48±0.10mSv, p <0.001). Conclusions In infant pig chest CT, using iterative reconstruction can provide diagnostic image quality; furthermore, it can reduce the dosage by 58.9%. PMID:25764485

  17. Experimental determination of the energy response of alanine pellets in the high dose rate 192Ir spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeken, B.; Cuypers, R.; Goossens, J.; Van den Weyngaert, D.; Verellen, D.

    2011-10-01

    An experimental determination of the energy correction factor for alanine/paraffin pellets in the 192Ir spectrum at varying distances from the source is presented. Alanine dosimeters were irradiated in water under full scatter conditions with a high dose rate (HDR) 192Ir source (Flexisource), using a dedicated holder. Up to six line sources (catheters) fit in a regular pattern at fixed radial distances from the holder axis, the alanine detector being placed at the centre of the holder. The HDR source was stepping every 0.5 cm within a trocar needle within ± 3.0 cm around the medial plane through the detector in order to achieve dose homogeneity within the detector volume. The energy correction factor of alanine/paraffin pellets in 192Ir relative to 60Co was experimentally determined as the inverse ratio of the dose to water measured in water around the 192Ir source to the dose to water calculated in water using the TG-43 formalism. The pellets were read out with a Bruker EMXmicro spectrometer (X-band). The amplitude of the central line in the alanine absorption spectrum from pellets irradiated within the 192Ir spectrum was directly compared with the amplitude from 60Co-irradiated pellets. The energy correction factors of Harwell pellets irradiated in the 192Ir spectrum are 1.029 ± 0.02, 1.027 ± 0.02 and 1.045 ± 0.02 at a mean weighted source-detector distance of 2.0, 2.9 and 5.3 cm, respectively. The experimentally obtained values for the energy response are 1.3% lower compared to the theoretical values for radial distances smaller than 3 cm.

  18. Use of AERIN code for determining internal doses of transuranic isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    King, W.C.

    1980-06-13

    The AERIN computer code is a mathematical expression of the ICRP Lung Model. The code was developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to compute the body organ burdens and absorbed radiation doses resulting from the inhalation of transuranic isotopes and to predict the amount of activity excreted in the urine and feces as a function of time. Over forty cases of internal exposure have been studied using the AERIN code. The code, as modified, has proven to be extremely versatile. The case studies presented demonstrate the excellent correlation that can be obtained between code predictions and observed bioassay data. In one case study a discrepancy was observed between an in vivo count of the whole body and the application of the code using urine and fecal data as input. The discrepancy was resolved by in vivo skull counts that showed the code had predicted the correct skeletal burden.

  19. Glioma cell VEGFR-2 confers resistance to chemotherapeutic and antiangiogenic treatments in PTEN-deficient glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Kessler, Tobias; Sahm, Felix; Blaes, Jonas; Osswald, Matthias; Rübmann, Petra; Milford, David; Urban, Severino; Jestaedt, Leonie; Heiland, Sabine; Bendszus, Martin; Hertenstein, Anne; Pfenning, Philipp-Niclas; Ruiz de Almodóvar, Carmen; Wick, Antje; Winkler, Frank; von Deimling, Andreas; Platten, Michael; Wick, Wolfgang; Weiler, Markus

    2015-10-13

    Loss of the tumor suppressor phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) is a prerequisite for tumor cell-specific expression of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR)-2 in glioblastoma defining a subgroup prone to develop evasive resistance towards antiangiogenic treatments. Immunohistochemical analysis of human tumor tissues showed VEGFR-2 expression in glioma cells in 19% of specimens examined, mainly in the infiltration zone. Glioma cell VEGFR-2 positivity was restricted to PTEN-deficient tumor specimens. PTEN overexpression reduced VEGFR-2 expression in vitro, as well as knock-down of raptor or rictor. Genetic interference with VEGFR-2 revealed proproliferative, antiinvasive and chemoprotective functions for VEGFR-2 in glioma cells. VEGFR-2-dependent cellular effects were concomitant with activation of 'kappa-light-chain-enhancer' of activated B-cells, protein kinase B, and N-myc downstream regulated gene 1. Two-photon in vivo microscopy revealed that expression of VEGFR-2 in glioma cells hampers antiangiogenesis. Bevacizumab induces a proinvasive response in VEGFR-2-positive glioma cells. Patients with PTEN-negative glioblastomas had a shorter survival after initiation of bevacizumab therapy compared with PTEN-positive glioblastomas. Conclusively, expression of VEGFR-2 in glioma cells indicates an aggressive glioblastoma subgroup developing early resistance to temozolomide or bevacizumab. Loss of PTEN may serve as a biomarker identifying those tumors upfront by routine neuropathological methods.

  20. Myeloid PTEN deficiency protects livers from ischemia reperfusion injury by facilitating M2 macrophage differentiation.

    PubMed

    Yue, Shi; Rao, Jianhua; Zhu, Jianjun; Busuttil, Ronald W; Kupiec-Weglinski, Jerzy W; Lu, Ling; Wang, Xuehao; Zhai, Yuan

    2014-06-01

    Although the role of phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) in regulating cell proliferation is well established, its function in immune responses remains to be fully appreciated. In the current study, we analyzed myeloid-specific PTEN function in regulating tissue inflammatory immune response in a murine liver partial warm ischemia model. Myeloid-specific PTEN knockout (KO) resulted in liver protection from ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI) by deviating the local innate immune response against ischemia reperfusion toward the regulatory type: expression of proinflammatory genes was selectively decreased and anti-inflammatory IL-10 was simultaneously increased in ischemia reperfusion livers of PTEN KO mice compared with those of wild-type (WT) mice. PI3K inhibitor and IL-10-neutralizing Abs, but not exogenous LPS, recreated liver IRI in these KO mice. At the cellular level, Kupffer cells and peritoneal macrophages isolated from KO mice expressed higher levels of M2 markers and produced lower TNF-α and higher IL-10 in response to TLR ligands than did their WT counterparts. They had enhanced Stat3- and Stat6-signaling pathway activation, but diminished Stat1-signaling pathway activation, in response to TLR4 stimulation. Inactivation of Kupffer cells by gadolinium chloride enhanced proinflammatory immune activation and increased IRI in livers of myeloid PTEN KO mice. Thus, myeloid PTEN deficiency protects livers from IRI by facilitating M2 macrophage differentiation. PMID:24771857

  1. PTENα, a PTEN isoform translated through alternative initiation, regulates mitochondrial function and energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Liang, Hui; He, Shiming; Yang, Jingyi; Jia, Xinying; Wang, Pan; Chen, Xi; Zhang, Zhong; Zou, Xiajuan; McNutt, Michael A; Shen, Wen Hong; Yin, Yuxin

    2014-05-01

    PTEN is one of the most frequently mutated genes in human cancer. It is known that PTEN has a wide range of biological functions beyond tumor suppression. Here, we report that PTENα, an N-terminally extended form of PTEN, functions in mitochondrial metabolism. Translation of PTENα is initiated from a CUG codon upstream of and in-frame with the coding region of canonical PTEN. Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2A (eIF2A) controls PTENα translation, which requires a CUG-centered palindromic motif. We show that PTENα induces cytochrome c oxidase activity and ATP production in mitochondria. TALEN-mediated somatic deletion of PTENα impairs mitochondrial respiratory chain function. PTENα interacts with canonical PTEN to increase PINK1 protein levels and promote energy production. Our studies demonstrate the importance of eIF2A-mediated alternative translation for generation of protein diversity in eukaryotic systems and provide insights into the mechanism by which the PTEN family is involved in multiple cellular processes.

  2. PTEN downregulates p75NTR expression by decreasing DNA-binding activity of Sp1

    SciTech Connect

    Rankin, Sherri L.; Guy, Clifford S.; Mearow, Karen M.

    2009-02-13

    p75NTR is expressed throughout the nervous system and its dysregulation is associated with pathological conditions. We have recently demonstrated a signalling cascade initiated by laminin (LN), which upregulates PTEN and downregulates p75NTR. Here we investigate the mechanism by which PTEN modulates p75NTR. Studies using PTEN mutants show that its protein phosphatase activity directly modulates p75NTR protein expression. Nuclear relocalization of PTEN subsequent to LN stimulation suggests transcriptional control of p75NTR expression, which was confirmed following EMSA and ChIP analysis of Sp1 transcription factor binding activity. LN and PTEN independently decrease the DNA-binding ability of PTEN to the p75NTR promoter. Sp1 regulation of p75NTR occurs via dephosphorylation of Sp1, thus reducing p75NTR transcription and protein expression. This mechanism represents a novel regulatory pathway which controls the expression level of a receptor with broad implications not only for the development of the nervous system but also for progression of pathological conditions.

  3. Is STAT3 and PTEN Expression Altered in Canine Prostate Cancer?

    PubMed

    Lin, H-Y; Palmieri, C

    2016-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) are, respectively, an oncogene and tumour suppressor gene whose dysregulated expression in human prostate cancer is associated with increased malignancy and poor prognosis. Both markers were evaluated in 12 samples of canine benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and 17 canine prostatic carcinomas (PCs) by immunohistochemistry, to understand their possible role in canine prostate carcinogenesis. STAT3 was expressed in 25% and 82.35% of BPH and PC, respectively, with a significantly higher number of STAT3-positive cells in malignant compared with hyperplastic lesions. Three PCs had occasional nuclear expression of STAT3. PTEN was expressed in BPH and PC with a similar distribution and percentage of positive cells; however, four PCs were PTEN negative. Solid PCs contained more STAT3-positive and fewer PTEN-positive cells compared with the other subtypes. A reduced number of PTEN-positive cells was observed in PCs with a high Gleason score (GS10), while no association was demonstrated between STAT3 expression and Gleason score. The data suggest that overexpression of STAT3 and downregulation of PTEN may be an important step in canine prostate carcinogenesis and both markers may be related to the histological subtypes of PC and the degree of differentiation of neoplastic cells.

  4. Expression and significance of PTEN and VEGF in canine mammary gland tumours.

    PubMed

    Qiu, C W; Lin, D G; Wang, J Q; Li, C Y; Deng, G Z

    2008-08-01

    To investigate the relationship between the expression of the PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosometen) and VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) and the clinicopathological features in canine mammary gland tumours, the expression levels of PTEN and VEGF protein were assessed in 50 cases of canine mammary gland tumours tissues and 4 cases of normal mammary gland tissues with using immunohistochemical method. The over-expression rate of PTEN protein was 100% in normal and well-differentiated mammary gland tissues and 67% in breast cancer cases respectively with a significant difference between the two groups (P<0.01). Expression of PTEN was not related to age and tumour size, but closely correlated to lymph node metastasis (P<0.01). The over-expression rate of VEGF protein was 33.3% in normal mammary gland tissues, and 78% in canine mammary gland tumours with a significant difference between the two groups (P<0.01). Expression of VEGF was not related to age or tumour size, but closely correlated with lymph node metastasis and clinical stage (P<0.05). Therefore the combination detection of PTEN and VEGF could serve as an important index to estimate the biological behavior and prognosis of canine mammary gland tumours. Reduced expression of PTEN might be involved in carcinogenesis and progression of canine breast cancer by up-regulating the VEGF expression to enhance angiogenesis.

  5. Relationship between PTEN and VEGF expression and clinicopathological characteristics in HCC.

    PubMed

    Mi, Denghai; Yi, Jilin; Liu, Enyu; Li, Xingrui

    2006-01-01

    To investigate the expressions and significance of the tumor suppressor gene phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome ten protein (PTEN) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and to analyze the relationship between their expressions and the tumor's invasion and their peri-carcinomatous tissues, the correlation of their expressions with the tumor's clinicopathological characteristics and invasion potential were studied. Our study showed that the expression level of PTEN in HCC was remarkably lower than that in peri-carcinomatous liver tissues, while the expressions of both VEGF and MVD were higher than that in peri-carcinomatous liver tissues. Correlation analysis revealed that the expression of PTEN was negatively related to the progression of the pathological differentiation and invasion of tumor, whereas the expressions of VEGF and MVD were positively related. Moreover, there was a negative relationship between the expression of PTEN and the expressions of VEGF and MVD, and a positive one between VEGF and MVD. The expressions of PTEN and VEGF may reveal the degree of differentiation and the invasive potential of HCC tissues. The mechanism by which the lack of PTEN expression probably induces abnormal hyperexpression of VEGF may play an important role in the invasion and metastasis of HCC.

  6. PTEN deletion from adult-generated dentate granule cells disrupts granule cell mossy fiber axon structure.

    PubMed

    LaSarge, Candi L; Santos, Victor R; Danzer, Steve C

    2015-03-01

    Dysregulation of the mTOR-signaling pathway is implicated in the development of temporal lobe epilepsy. In mice, deletion of PTEN from hippocampal dentate granule cells leads to mTOR hyperactivation and promotes the rapid onset of spontaneous seizures. The mechanism by which these abnormal cells initiate epileptogenesis, however, is unclear. PTEN-knockout granule cells develop abnormally, exhibiting morphological features indicative of increased excitatory input. If these cells are directly responsible for seizure genesis, it follows that they should also possess increased output. To test this prediction, dentate granule cell axon morphology was quantified in control and PTEN-knockout mice. Unexpectedly, PTEN deletion increased giant mossy fiber bouton spacing along the axon length, suggesting reduced innervation of CA3. Increased width of the mossy fiber axon pathway in stratum lucidum, however, which likely reflects an unusual increase in mossy fiber axon collateralization in this region, offsets the reduction in boutons per axon length. These morphological changes predict a net increase in granule cell innervation of CA3. Increased diameter of axons from PTEN-knockout cells would further enhance granule cell communication with CA3. Altogether, these findings suggest that amplified information flow through the hippocampal circuit contributes to seizure occurrence in the PTEN-knockout mouse model of temporal lobe epilepsy.

  7. PTEN deletion from adult-generated dentate granule cells disrupts granule cell mossy fiber axon structure

    PubMed Central

    LaSarge, Candi L.; Santos, Victor R; Danzer, Steve C.

    2015-01-01

    Dysregulation of the mTOR-signaling pathway is implicated in the development of temporal lobe epilepsy. In mice, deletion of PTEN from hippocampal dentate granule cells leads to mTOR hyperactivation and promotes the rapid onset of spontaneous seizures. The mechanism by which these abnormal cells initiate epileptogenesis, however, is unclear. PTEN-knockout granule cells develop abnormally, exhibiting morphological features indicative of increased excitatory input. If these cells are directly responsible for seizure genesis, it follows that they should also possess increased output. To test this prediction, dentate granule cell axon morphology was quantified in control and PTEN-knockout mice. Unexpectedly, PTEN deletion increased giant mossy fiber bouton spacing along the axon length, suggesting reduced innervation of CA3. Increased width of the mossy fiber axon pathway in stratum lucidum, however, which likely reflects an unusual increase in mossy fiber axon collateralization in this region, offset the reduction in boutons per axon length. These morphological changes predicts a net increase in granule cell >> CA3 innervation. Increased diameter of axons from PTEN-knockout cells would further enhance granule cell >> CA3 communication. Altogether, these findings suggest that amplified information flow through the hippocampal circuit contributes to seizure occurrence in the PTEN-knockout mouse model of temporal lobe epilepsy. PMID:25600212

  8. Pten deletion in adult neural stem/progenitor cells enhances constitutive neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gregorian, Caroline; Nakashima, Jonathan; Le Belle, Janel; Ohab, John; Kim, Rachel; Liu, Annie; Smith, Kate Barzan; Groszer, Matthias; Garcia, A Denise; Sofroniew, Michael V; Carmichael, S Thomas; Kornblum, Harley I; Liu, Xin; Wu, Hong

    2009-02-11

    Here we show that conditional deletion of Pten in a subpopulation of adult neural stem cells in the subependymal zone (SEZ) leads to persistently enhanced neural stem cell self-renewal without sign of exhaustion. These Pten null SEZ-born neural stem cells and progenies can follow the endogenous migration, differentiation, and integration pathways and contribute to constitutive neurogenesis in the olfactory bulb. As a result, Pten deleted animals have increased olfactory bulb mass and enhanced olfactory function. Pten null cells in the olfactory bulb can establish normal connections with peripheral olfactory epithelium and help olfactory bulb recovery from acute damage. Following a focal stroke, Pten null progenitors give rise to greater numbers of neuroblasts that migrate to peri-infarct cortex. However, in contrast to the olfactory bulb, no significant long-term survival and integration can be observed, indicating that additional factors are necessary for long-term survival of newly born neurons after stroke. These data suggest that manipulating PTEN-controlled signaling pathways may be a useful step in facilitating endogenous neural stem/progenitor expansion for the treatment of disorders or lesions in regions associated with constitutive neurogenesis. PMID:19211894

  9. PTENα is a PTEN isoform Translated through Alternative Initiation and Regulates Mitochondrial Function

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Hui; He, Shiming; Yang, Jingyi; Jia, Xinying; Wang, Pan; Chen, Xi; Zhang, Zhong; Zou, Xiajuan; McNutt, Michael A.; Shen, Wen Hong; Yin, Yuxin

    2014-01-01

    Summary PTEN is one of the most frequently mutated genes in human cancer. It is known that PTEN has a wide range of biological functions beyond tumor suppression. Here we report that PTENα, an N-terminally extended form of PTEN, functions in metabolism. Translation of PTENα is initiated from a CUG codon upstream of and in-frame with the coding region of canonical PTEN. Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2A (eIF2A) controls PTENα translation and a CUG-centered palindromic motif is required in this process. PTENα induces cytochrome c oxidase activity and ATP production in mitochondria. TALEN-mediated somatic deletion of PTENα impairs mitochondrial respiratory chain function. We show that PTENα interacts with canonical PTEN to increase PINK1 and promote energy production. These data provide insights into the mechanism by which the PTEN family is involved in multiple cellular processes. Our studies suggest that mammalian cells can use alternate translation initiation mechanisms to generate protein isoforms. PMID:24768297

  10. Cross talk between miR-214 and PTEN attenuates glomerular hypertrophy under diabetic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoxia; Shen, E.; Wang, Yanzhe; Li, Junhui; Cheng, Dongsheng; Chen, Yuqiang; Gui, Dingkun; Wang, Niansong

    2016-01-01

    Glomerular mesangial cells (MCs) hypertrophy is one of the earliest pathological abnormalities in diabetic nephropathy (DN), which correlates with eventual glomerulosclerosis. This study aimed to investigate the therapeutic role of miRNA in diabetic glomerular MCs hypertrophy and synthesis of extracellular matrix (ECM). Microarray analysis revealed a significant up-regulation of miR-214 in the renal cortex of diabetic db/db mice, which was confirmed by real-time PCR of isolated glomeruli and primary cultured human MCs. In vitro studies showed that inhibition of miR-214 significantly reduced expression of α-SMA, SM22 and collagen IV, and partially restored phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) protein level in high glucose-stimulated human MCs. Furthermore, we identified PTEN as the target of miR-214 by a luciferase assay in HEK293 cells. Moreover, overexpression of PTEN ameliorated miR-214-mediated diabetic MC hypertrophy while knockdown of PTEN mimicked the MC hypertrophy. In vivo study further confirmed that inhibition of miR-214 significantly decreased the expression of SM22, α-SMA and collagen IV, partially restored PTEN level, and attenuated albuminuria and mesangial expansion in db/db mice. In conclusion, cross talk between miR-214 and PTEN attenuated glomerular hypertrophy under diabetic conditions in vivo and in vitro. Therefore, miR-214 may represent a novel therapeutic target for DN. PMID:27549568

  11. Plk1 Phosphorylation of PTEN Causes a Tumor-Promoting Metabolic State

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhiguo; Li, Jie; Bi, Pengpeng; Lu, Ying; Burcham, Grant; Elzey, Bennett D.; Ratliff, Timothy; Konieczny, Stephen F.; Ahmad, Nihal; Kuang, Shihuan

    2014-01-01

    One outcome of activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway is increased aerobic glycolysis, but the upstream signaling events that regulate the PI3K pathway, and thus the Warburg effect, are elusive. Increasing evidence suggests that Plk1, a cell cycle regulator, is also involved in cellular events in addition to mitosis. To test whether Plk1 contributes to activation of the PI3K pathway, and thus aerobic glycolysis, we examined potential targets of Plk1 and identified PTEN as a Plk1 substrate. We hypothesize that Plk1 phosphorylation of PTEN leads to its inactivation, activation of the PI3K pathway, and the Warburg effect. Our data show that overexpression of Plk1 leads to activation of the PI3K pathway and enhanced aerobic glycolysis. In contrast, inhibition of Plk1 causes markedly reduced glucose metabolism in mice. Mechanistically, we show that Plk1 phosphorylation of PTEN and Nedd4-1, an E3 ubiquitin ligase of PTEN, results in PTEN inactivation. Finally, we show that Plk1 phosphorylation of PTEN promotes tumorigenesis in both its phosphatase-dependent and -independent pathways, revealing potentially new drug targets to arrest tumor cell growth. PMID:25047839

  12. mTOR Signaling Feedback Modulates Mammary Epithelial Differentiation and Restrains Invasion Downstream of PTEN Loss

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Susmita; Varela, Lidenys; Sood, Akshay; Park, Ben Ho; Lotan, Tamara L.

    2013-01-01

    Oncogenic signaling pathways are tightly regulated by negative feedback circuits and relief of these circuits represents a common mechanism of tumor drug resistance. Although the significance of these feedback pathways for signal transduction is evident, their relevance for cellular differentiation and morphogenesis in a genetically-defined context is unclear. In this study, we used isogenic benign mammary organotypic cultures to interrogate the role of mTOR-mediated negative feedback in the specific setting of PTEN inactivation. We found that mTOR signaling promoted basal-like differentiation and repressed nuclear hormone receptor expression after short-term PTEN loss in murine cell cultures analyzed ex vivo. Unexpectedly, we found that PTEN inactivation inhibited growth factor-induced epithelial invasion, and that downstream mTOR-mediated signaling feedback was both necessary and sufficient for this effect. Mechanistically, using isogenic MCF10A cells with and without somaticPTEN deletion, we showed that mTOR inhibition promoted EGF-mediated epithelial invasion by de-repressing upstream EGFR, SRC and PI3K signaling. In addition to offering new signal transduction insights, these results bring to light a number of important and potentially clinically relevant cellular consequences of mTOR inhibition in the specific context of PTEN loss, including modulation of hormone and growth factor responsiveness and promotion of epithelial invasion. Our findings prompt future investigations of the possibility that mTOR inhibitor therapy may not only be ineffective but even deleterious in tumors with PTEN loss. PMID:23774212

  13. Dormant Intestinal Stem Cells are Regulated by PTEN and Nutritional Status

    PubMed Central

    Richmond, Camilla A.; Shah, Manasvi S.; Deary, Luke T.; Trotier, Danny C.; Thomas, Horatio; Ambruzs, Dana M.; Jiang, Lijie; Whiles, Bristol B.; Rickner, Hannah D.; Montgomery, Robert K.; Tovaglieri, Alessio; Carlone, Diana L.; Breault, David T.

    2015-01-01

    The cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying adaptive changes to physiological stress within the intestinal epithelium remain poorly understood. Here, we show that PTEN, a negative regulator of the PI3K→AKT→mTORC1 signaling pathway, is an important regulator of dormant intestinal stem cells (dISCs). Acute nutrient deprivation leads to transient PTEN phosphorylation within d-ISCs and a corresponding increase in their number. This release of PTEN inhibition renders d-ISCs functionally poised to contribute to the regenerative response during re-feeding via cell-autonomous activation of the PI3K→AKT→mTORC1 pathway. Consistent with its role in mediating cell survival, PTEN is required for d-ISC maintenance at baseline, and intestines lacking PTEN have diminished regenerative capacity following irradiation. Our results highlight a PTEN-dependent mechanism for d-ISC maintenance and further demonstrate the role of d-ISCs in the intestinal response to stress. PMID:26686631

  14. Cross talk between miR-214 and PTEN attenuates glomerular hypertrophy under diabetic conditions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoxia; Shen, E; Wang, Yanzhe; Li, Junhui; Cheng, Dongsheng; Chen, Yuqiang; Gui, Dingkun; Wang, Niansong

    2016-01-01

    Glomerular mesangial cells (MCs) hypertrophy is one of the earliest pathological abnormalities in diabetic nephropathy (DN), which correlates with eventual glomerulosclerosis. This study aimed to investigate the therapeutic role of miRNA in diabetic glomerular MCs hypertrophy and synthesis of extracellular matrix (ECM). Microarray analysis revealed a significant up-regulation of miR-214 in the renal cortex of diabetic db/db mice, which was confirmed by real-time PCR of isolated glomeruli and primary cultured human MCs. In vitro studies showed that inhibition of miR-214 significantly reduced expression of α-SMA, SM22 and collagen IV, and partially restored phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) protein level in high glucose-stimulated human MCs. Furthermore, we identified PTEN as the target of miR-214 by a luciferase assay in HEK293 cells. Moreover, overexpression of PTEN ameliorated miR-214-mediated diabetic MC hypertrophy while knockdown of PTEN mimicked the MC hypertrophy. In vivo study further confirmed that inhibition of miR-214 significantly decreased the expression of SM22, α-SMA and collagen IV, partially restored PTEN level, and attenuated albuminuria and mesangial expansion in db/db mice. In conclusion, cross talk between miR-214 and PTEN attenuated glomerular hypertrophy under diabetic conditions in vivo and in vitro. Therefore, miR-214 may represent a novel therapeutic target for DN. PMID:27549568

  15. Pten deletion in adult neural stem/progenitor cells enhances constitutive neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gregorian, Caroline; Nakashima, Jonathan; Le Belle, Janel; Ohab, John; Kim, Rachel; Liu, Annie; Smith, Kate Barzan; Groszer, Matthias; Garcia, A Denise; Sofroniew, Michael V; Carmichael, S Thomas; Kornblum, Harley I; Liu, Xin; Wu, Hong

    2009-02-11

    Here we show that conditional deletion of Pten in a subpopulation of adult neural stem cells in the subependymal zone (SEZ) leads to persistently enhanced neural stem cell self-renewal without sign of exhaustion. These Pten null SEZ-born neural stem cells and progenies can follow the endogenous migration, differentiation, and integration pathways and contribute to constitutive neurogenesis in the olfactory bulb. As a result, Pten deleted animals have increased olfactory bulb mass and enhanced olfactory function. Pten null cells in the olfactory bulb can establish normal connections with peripheral olfactory epithelium and help olfactory bulb recovery from acute damage. Following a focal stroke, Pten null progenitors give rise to greater numbers of neuroblasts that migrate to peri-infarct cortex. However, in contrast to the olfactory bulb, no significant long-term survival and integration can be observed, indicating that additional factors are necessary for long-term survival of newly born neurons after stroke. These data suggest that manipulating PTEN-controlled signaling pathways may be a useful step in facilitating endogenous neural stem/progenitor expansion for the treatment of disorders or lesions in regions associated with constitutive neurogenesis.

  16. A recessive form of extreme macrocephaly and mild intellectual disability complements the spectrum of PTEN hamartoma tumor syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Schürmann, Manfred; Chen, Hannah; Händel, Norman; Reis, André; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Uhlig, Holm H.; Jamra, Rami Abou

    2015-01-01

    PTEN hamartoma tumor syndrome (PHTS) is caused by heterozygous variants in PTEN and is characterised by tumor predisposition, macrocephaly, and cognition impairment. Bi-allelic loss of PTEN activity has not been reported so far and animal models suggest that bi-allelic loss of PTEN activity is embryonically lethal. Here we report the identification of a novel homozygous variant in PTEN, NM_000314.4; c.545T>C; p.Leu182Ser, in two adolescent siblings with severe macrocephaly and mild intellectual disability. The variant is predicted to be damaging and is associated with significantly increased phospho-S6 downstream of PTEN. The absence of tumors in the two homozygous siblings as well as lack of symptoms of PHTS in the heterozygous carriers of the family suggest that this particular variant is functionally hypomorphic rather than deleterious. PMID:26443266

  17. Oocyte-specific deletion of Pten in mice reveals a stage-specific function of PTEN/PI3K signaling in oocytes in controlling follicular activation.

    PubMed

    Jagarlamudi, Krishna; Liu, Lian; Adhikari, Deepak; Reddy, Pradeep; Idahl, Annika; Ottander, Ulrika; Lundin, Eva; Liu, Kui

    2009-07-09

    Immature ovarian primordial follicles are essential for maintenance of the reproductive lifespan of female mammals. Recently, it was found that overactivation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling in oocytes of primordial follicles by an oocyte-specific deletion of Pten (phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome ten), the gene encoding PI3K negative regulator PTEN, results in premature activation of the entire pool of primordial follicles, indicating that activation of the PI3K pathway in oocytes is important for control of follicular activation. To investigate whether PI3K signaling in oocytes of primary and further developed follicles also plays a role at later stages in follicular development and ovulation, we conditionally deleted the Pten gene from oocytes of primary and further developed follicles by using transgenic mice expressing zona pellucida 3 (Zp3) promoter-mediated Cre recombinase. Our results show that Pten was efficiently deleted from oocytes of primary and further developed follicles, as indicated by the elevated phosphorylation of the major PI3K downstream component Akt. However, follicular development was not altered and oocyte maturation was also normal, which led to normal fertility with unaltered litter size in the mutant mice. Our data indicate that properly controlled PTEN/PI3K-Akt signaling in oocytes is essential for control of the development of primordial follicles whereas overactivation of PI3K signaling in oocytes does not appear to affect the development of growing follicles. This suggests that there is a stage-specific function of PTEN/PI3K signaling in mouse oocytes that controls follicular activation.

  18. Long-term consequences of conditional genetic deletion of PTEN in the sensorimotor cortex of neonatal mice.

    PubMed

    Gutilla, Erin A; Buyukozturk, Melda M; Steward, Oswald

    2016-05-01

    Targeted deletion of the phosphatase and tensin homolog on chromosome ten (PTEN) gene in the sensorimotor cortex of neonatal mice enables robust regeneration of corticospinal tract (CST) axons following spinal cord injury as adults. Here, we assess the consequences of long-term conditional genetic PTEN deletion on cortical structure and neuronal morphology and screen for neuropathology. Mice with a LoxP-flanked exon 5 of the PTEN gene (PTENf/f mice) received AAV-Cre injections into the sensorimotor cortex at postnatal day 1 (P1) and were allowed to survive for up to 18months. As adults, mice were assessed for exploratory activity (open field), and motor coordination using the Rotarod®. Some mice received injections of Fluorogold into the spinal cord to retrogradely label the cells of origin of the CST. Brains were prepared for neurohistology and immunostained for PTEN and phospho-S6, which is a downstream marker of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) activation. Immunostaining revealed a focal area of PTEN deletion affecting neurons in all cortical layers, although in some cases PTEN expression was maintained in many small-medium sized neurons in layers III-IV. Neurons lacking PTEN were robustly stained for pS6. Cortical thickness was significantly increased and cortical lamination was disrupted in the area of PTEN deletion. PTEN-negative layer V neurons that give rise to the CST, identified by retrograde labeling, were larger than neurons with maintained PTEN expression, and the relative area occupied by neuropil vs. cell bodies was increased. There was no evidence of tumor formation or other neuropathology. Mice with PTEN deletion exhibited open field activity comparable to controls and there was a trend for impaired Rotarod performance (not statistically significant). Our findings indicate that early postnatal genetic deletion of PTEN that is sufficient to enable axon regeneration by adult neurons causes neuronal hypertrophy but no other detectable

  19. Targeted deletion of PTEN in cardiomyocytes renders cardiac contractile dysfunction through interruption of Pink1-AMPK signaling and autophagy.

    PubMed

    Roe, Nathan D; Xu, Xihui; Kandadi, Machender R; Hu, Nan; Pang, Jiaojiao; Weiser-Evans, Mary C M; Ren, Jun

    2015-02-01

    Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) deleted from chromosome 10 has been implicated in the maintenance of cardiac homeostasis although the underlying mechanism(s) remains elusive. We generated a murine model of cardiomyocyte-specific knockout of PTEN to evaluate cardiac geometry and contractile function, as well as the effect of metformin on PTEN deficiency-induced cardiac anomalies, if any. Cardiac histology, autophagy and related signaling molecules were evaluated. Cardiomyocyte-specific PTEN deletion elicited cardiac hypertrophy and contractile anomalies (echocardiographic and cardiomyocyte contractile dysfunction) associated with compromised intracellular Ca(2+) handling. PTEN deletion-induced cardiac hypertrophy and contractile anomalies were associated with dampened phosphorylation of PTEN-inducible kinase 1 (Pink1) and AMPK. Interestingly, administration of AMPK activator metformin (200mg/kg/d, in drinking H2O for 4weeks) rescued against PTEN deletion-induced geometric and functional defects as well as interrupted autophagy and autophagic flux in the heart. Moreover, metformin administration partially although significantly attenuated PTEN deletion-induced accumulation of superoxide. RNA interference against Pink1 in H9C2 myoblasts overtly increased intracellular ATP levels and suppressed AMPK phosphorylation, confirming the role of AMPK as a downstream target for PTEN-Pink1. Further scrutiny revealed that activation of AMPK and autophagy using metformin and rapamycin, respectively, rescued against PTEN deletion-induced mechanical anomalies with little additive effect. These data demonstrated that cardiomyocyte-specific deletion of PTEN leads to the loss of Pink1-AMPK signaling, development of cardiac hypertrophy and contractile defect. Activation of AMPK rescued against PTEN deletion-induced cardiac anomalies associated with restoration of autophagy and autophagic flux. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Autophagy and protein quality control

  20. Determination of a site-specific reference dose for methylmercury for fish-eating populations.

    PubMed

    Shipp, A M; Gentry, P R; Lawrence, G; Van Landingham, C; Covington, T; Clewell, H J; Gribben, K; Crump, K

    2000-11-01

    Environmental risk-management decisions in the U.S. involving potential exposures to methylmercury currently use a reference dose (RfD) developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). This RfD is based on retrospective studies of an acute poisoning incident in Iraq in which grain contaminated with a methylmercury fungicide was inadvertently used in the baking of bread. The exposures, which were relatively high but lasted only a few months, were associated with neurological effects in both adults (primarily paresthesia) and infants (late walking, late talking, etc.). It is generally believed that the developing fetus represents a particularly sensitive subpopulation for the neurological effects of methylmercury. The USEPA derived an RfD of 0.1 microg/kg/day based on benchmark dose (BMD) modeling of the combined neurological endpoints reported for children exposed in utero. This RfD included an uncertainty factor of 10 to consider human pharmacokinetic variability and database limitations (lack of data on multigeneration effects or possible long-term sequelae of perinatal exposure). Alcoa signed an Administrative Order of Consent for the conduct of a remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) at their Point Comfort Operations and the adjacent Lavaca Bay in Texas to address the effects of historical discharges of mercury-containing wastewater. In cooperation with the Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission and USEPA Region VI, Alcoa conducted a baseline risk assessment to assess potential risk to human health and the environment. As a part of this assessment. Alcoa pursued the development of a site-specific RfD for methylmercury to specifically address the potential human health effects associated with the ingestion of contaminated finfish and shellfish from Lavaca Bay. Application of the published USEPA RfD to this site is problematic; while the study underlying the RfD represented acute exposure to relatively high concentrations of

  1. Determination of a site-specific reference dose for methylmercury for fish-eating populations.

    PubMed

    Shipp, A M; Gentry, P R; Lawrence, G; Van Landingham, C; Covington, T; Clewell, H J; Gribben, K; Crump, K

    2000-11-01

    Environmental risk-management decisions in the U.S. involving potential exposures to methylmercury currently use a reference dose (RfD) developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). This RfD is based on retrospective studies of an acute poisoning incident in Iraq in which grain contaminated with a methylmercury fungicide was inadvertently used in the baking of bread. The exposures, which were relatively high but lasted only a few months, were associated with neurological effects in both adults (primarily paresthesia) and infants (late walking, late talking, etc.). It is generally believed that the developing fetus represents a particularly sensitive subpopulation for the neurological effects of methylmercury. The USEPA derived an RfD of 0.1 microg/kg/day based on benchmark dose (BMD) modeling of the combined neurological endpoints reported for children exposed in utero. This RfD included an uncertainty factor of 10 to consider human pharmacokinetic variability and database limitations (lack of data on multigeneration effects or possible long-term sequelae of perinatal exposure). Alcoa signed an Administrative Order of Consent for the conduct of a remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) at their Point Comfort Operations and the adjacent Lavaca Bay in Texas to address the effects of historical discharges of mercury-containing wastewater. In cooperation with the Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission and USEPA Region VI, Alcoa conducted a baseline risk assessment to assess potential risk to human health and the environment. As a part of this assessment. Alcoa pursued the development of a site-specific RfD for methylmercury to specifically address the potential human health effects associated with the ingestion of contaminated finfish and shellfish from Lavaca Bay. Application of the published USEPA RfD to this site is problematic; while the study underlying the RfD represented acute exposure to relatively high concentrations of

  2. Determinants of times of appearance of radium-induced osteosarcomas in humans: age at appearance and dose

    SciTech Connect

    Stebbings, J.H.; Lucas, H.F.

    1983-01-01

    Determinants of time-until-tumor for osteosarcoma in US radium cases have been reevaluated. Classically, a minimum induction period (latency period) of about five years has been recognized, but not an expression period. Lack of long induction periods at igh doses has been ascribed to scarcity of subjects at risk. Recent experiments have suggested that induction periods are directly lengthened as doses decrease. Reanalyses of time-until-tumor data for 57 measured female osteosarcoma cases exposed to /sup 226/Ra and /or /sup 228/Ra support new interpretations: time-until-tumor for osteosarcomas is best described by age at tumor appearance, not by induction period; age at diagnosis increases as estimated initial radium intake decreases; and, there exists an expression period which can be truncated at the low end by the minimum induction period (or by age at exposure). The downturn in sarcoma incidence at very high doses is describable as the truncation of the expression period on its early side by the minimum induction period. These results depend strongly on the assumption of homogeneity of time-until-tumor processes in diial workers and in iatrogenic radium exposure cases.

  3. Role of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 dose in determining rat 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 production

    SciTech Connect

    Vieth, R.; McCarten, K.; Norwich, K.H. )

    1990-05-01

    To understand the relationships among (1) the dose of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) in vivo, (2) the activity of 1-hydroxylase in renal mitochondria, and (3) the production of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D) in vivo, we gave rats different chronic or acute doses of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25(OH)D3). We followed the metabolism of intracardially administered (25-hydroxy-26,27-methyl-3H)cholecalciferol (25(OH)(3H)D3) for 24 h before killing by measuring extracts of serum by chromatography. Specific activity of 1-hydroxylase in kidney was measured at death. In rats given 0-2,000 pmol 25(OH)D3 chronically by mouth, there was a dose-dependent decline in the percent of serum radioactivity made up of 1,25-dihydroxy-(26,27-methyl-3H)cholecalciferol (1,25(OH)2(3H)D3) as well as a decline in mitochondrial 1-hydroxylase, and these correlated significantly (r = 0.83, P less than 0.001). Serum %1,25(OH)2(3H)D3 in this experiment ranged from 0.8 to 42%. A small part of this range could be accounted for by a faster metabolic clearance rate (MCR) of 1,25(OH)2D3 from rats supplemented with 25(OH)D3 (MCR, 2.12 +/- 0.10 ml/min) compared with rats restricted in vitamin D (MCR, 0.94 +/- 0.06 ml/min, P less than 0.001). The activity of 1-hydroxylase was by far the major factor determining serum %1,25(OH)2(3H)D3. When different acute doses of 25(OH)D3 were given to rats with identical specific activities of 1-hydroxylase, the resulting 1,25(OH)2D3 concentrations in serum correlated with the 25(OH)D3 dose (r = 0.99, P less than 0.001). We conclude that the behavior of 1-hydroxylase in vivo is analogous to the classic behavior in vitro of an enzyme functioning below its Michaelis constant (Km). The amount of 1-hydroxylase present in renal mitochondria determines the fraction (not simply the quantity) of 25(OH)D metabolized to 1,25(OH)2D3 in vivo.

  4. Nuclear PTEN regulates the APC-CDH1 tumor-suppressive complex in a phosphatase-independent manner.

    PubMed

    Song, Min Sup; Carracedo, Arkaitz; Salmena, Leonardo; Song, Su Jung; Egia, Ainara; Malumbres, Marcos; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo

    2011-01-21

    PTEN is a frequently mutated tumor suppressor gene that opposes the PI3K/AKT pathway through dephosphorylation of phosphoinositide-3,4,5-triphosphate. Recently, nuclear compartmentalization of PTEN was found as a key component of its tumor-suppressive activity; however its nuclear function remains poorly defined. Here we show that nuclear PTEN interacts with APC/C, promotes APC/C association with CDH1, and thereby enhances the tumor-suppressive activity of the APC-CDH1 complex. We find that nuclear exclusion but not phosphatase inactivation of PTEN impairs APC-CDH1. This nuclear function of PTEN provides a straightforward mechanistic explanation for the fail-safe cellular senescence response elicited by acute PTEN loss and the tumor-suppressive activity of catalytically inactive PTEN. Importantly, we demonstrate that PTEN mutant and PTEN null states are not synonymous as they are differentially sensitive to pharmacological inhibition of APC-CDH1 targets such as PLK1 and Aurora kinases. This finding identifies a strategy for cancer patient stratification and, thus, optimization of targeted therapies. PAPERCLIP:

  5. Upregulation of PTEN suppresses invasion in Tca8113 tongue cancer cells through repression of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT).

    PubMed

    Xie, Siming; Lu, Zhiyuan; Lin, Yanzhu; Shen, Lijia; Yin, Cao

    2016-05-01

    We previously discovered that the expression of the tumor suppressor phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) was downregulated in the majority patients with tongue squamous cell carcinoma (TSCC). The aim of this study was to investigate the role of PTEN overexpression in the regulation of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of the tongue squamous carcinoma cell line Tca8113 as well as explore the underlying mechanism. GV230 (containing the PTEN gene) and empty vectors were transfected into Tca8113 cells. After stable transfection, the messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels of PTEN were validated using quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) and Western blot analysis. The growth and cell cycle were analyzed using Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) and flow cytometry, respectively. The invasion ability was measured with a transwell assay. The effects of PTEN overexpression on EMT and Hedgehog signaling were assessed by comparing Tca8113-PTEN cells with control and negative control cell groups. We found that PTEN expression was significantly upregulated after transfection. Meanwhile, upregulated PTEN inhibited the proliferation and invasion of Tca8113 cells. In addition, we observed changes in the EMT- and Hedgehog-associated proteins. These data demonstrated that PTEN upregulation could reduce invasion by inhibiting the process of EMT in Tca8113 cells, which might be related to the Hedgehog signaling pathway.

  6. A Critical Role of the PTEN/PDGF Signaling Network for the Regulation of Radiosensitivity in Adenocarcinoma of the Prostate

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, Michael; Najy, Abdo J.; Snyder, Michael; Movilla, Lisa S.; Kim, Hyeong-Reh Choi

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Loss or mutation of the phosphate and tensin homologue (PTEN) is a common genetic abnormality in prostate cancer (PCa) and induces platelet-derived growth factor D (PDGF D) signaling. We examined the role of the PTEN/PDGF axis on radioresponse using a murine PTEN null prostate epithelial cell model. Methods and Materials: PTEN wild-type (PTEN{sup +/+}) and PTEN knockout (PTEN{sup −/−}) murine prostate epithelial cell lines were used to examine the relationship between the PTEN status and radiosensitivity and also to modulate the PDGF D expression levels. PTEN{sup −/−} cells were transduced with a small hairpin RNA (shRNA) lentiviral vector containing either scrambled nucleotides (SCRM) or sequences targeted to PDGF D (shPDGF D). Tumorigenesis and morphogenesis of these cell lines were evaluated in vivo via subcutaneous injection of male nude mice and in vitro using Matrigel 3-dimensional (3D) culture. Effects of irradiation on clonogenic survival, cell migration, and invasion were measured with respect to the PTEN status and the PDGF D expression level. In addition, apoptosis and cell cycle redistribution were examined as potential mechanisms for differences seen. Results: PTEN{sup −/−} cells were highly tumorigenic in animals and effectively formed foci in 3D culture. Importantly, loss of PDGF D in these cell lines drastically diminished these phenotypes. Furthermore, PTEN{sup −/−} cells demonstrated increased clonogenic survival in vitro compared to PTEN{sup +/+}, and attenuation of PDGF D significantly reversed this radioresistant phenotype. PTEN{sup −/−} cells displayed greater migratory and invasive potential at baseline as well as after irradiation. Both the basal and radiation-induced migratory and invasive phenotypes in PTEN{sup −/−} cells required PDGF D expression. Interestingly, these differences were independent of apoptosis and cell cycle redistribution, as they showed no significant difference. Conclusions: We propose

  7. Nuclear PTEN regulates the APC-CDH1 tumor suppressive complex in a phosphatase-independent manner

    PubMed Central

    Song, Min Sup; Carracedo, Arkaitz; Salmena, Leonardo; Song, Su Jung; Egia, Ainara; Malumbres, Marcos; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY PTEN is a frequently mutated tumor suppressor gene that opposes the PI3K-AKT pathway through dephosphorylation of phosphoinositide-3,4,5-triphosphate. Recently, nuclear compartmentalization of PTEN was found as a key component of its tumor suppressive activity, however its nuclear function remains poorly defined. Here we show that nuclear PTEN interacts with APC/C, promotes APC/C association with CDH1, and thereby enhances the tumor suppressive activity of the APC-CDH1 complex. We find that nuclear exclusion but not phosphatase inactivation of PTEN impairs APC-CDH1. This nuclear function of PTEN provides a straightforward mechanistic explanation for the fail-safe cellular senescence response elicited by acute PTEN loss and the tumor suppressive activity of catalytically-inactive PTEN. Importantly, we demonstrate that PTEN-mutant and PTEN-null states are not synonymous since they are differentially sensitive to pharmacological inhibition of APC-CDH1 targets such as PLK1 and Aurora Kinases. This finding identifies a strategy for cancer patient stratification and thus, optimization of targeted therapies. PMID:21241890

  8. Plk1 Protein Phosphorylates Phosphatase and Tensin Homolog (PTEN) and Regulates Its Mitotic Activity during the Cell Cycle*

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Byeong Hyeok; Pagano, Michele; Dai, Wei

    2014-01-01

    PTEN is a well known tumor suppressor through the negative regulation of the PI3K signaling pathway. Here we report that PTEN plays an important role in regulating mitotic timing, which is associated with increased PTEN phosphorylation in the C-terminal tail and its localization to chromatin. Pulldown analysis revealed that Plk1 physically interacted with PTEN. Biochemical studies showed that Plk1 phosphorylates PTEN in vitro in a concentration-dependent manner and that the phosphorylation was inhibited by Bi2635, a Plk1-specific inhibitor. Deletional and mutational analyses identified that Plk1 phosphorylated Ser-380, Thr-382, and Thr-383, but not Ser-385, a cluster of residues known to affect the PTEN stability. Interestingly, a combination of molecular and genetic analyses revealed that only Ser-380 was significantly phosphorylated in vivo and that Plk1 regulated the phosphorylation, which was associated with the accumulation of PTEN on chromatin. Moreover, expression of phospho-deficient mutant, but not wild-type PTEN, caused enhanced mitotic exit. Taken together, our studies identify Plk1 as an important regulator of PTEN during the cell cycle. PMID:24706748

  9. PTEN Depletion Decreases Disease Severity and Modestly Prolongs Survival in a Mouse Model of Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Little, Daniel; Valori, Chiara F; Mutsaers, Chantal A; Bennett, Ellen J; Wyles, Matthew; Sharrack, Basil; Shaw, Pamela J; Gillingwater, Thomas H; Azzouz, Mimoun; Ning, Ke

    2015-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is the second most common genetic cause of death in childhood. However, no effective treatment is available to halt disease progression. SMA is caused by mutations in the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene. We previously reported that PTEN depletion leads to an increase in survival of SMN-deficient motor neurons. Here, we aimed to establish the impact of PTEN modulation in an SMA mouse model in vivo. Initial experiments using intramuscular delivery of adeno-associated vector serotype 6 (AAV6) expressing shRNA against PTEN in an established mouse model of severe SMA (SMNΔ7) demonstrated the ability to ameliorate the severity of neuromuscular junction pathology. Subsequently, we developed self-complementary AAV9 expressing siPTEN (scAAV9-siPTEN) to allow evaluation of the effect of systemic suppression of PTEN on the disease course of SMA in vivo. Treatment with a single injection of scAAV9-siPTEN at postnatal day 1 resulted in a modest threefold extension of the lifespan of SMNΔ7 mice, increasing mean survival to 30 days, compared to 10 days in untreated mice. Our data revealed that systemic PTEN depletion is an important disease modifier in SMNΔ7 mice, and therapies aimed at lowering PTEN expression may therefore offer a potential therapeutic strategy for SMA. PMID:25369768

  10. Upregulation of PTEN suppresses invasion in Tca8113 tongue cancer cells through repression of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT).

    PubMed

    Xie, Siming; Lu, Zhiyuan; Lin, Yanzhu; Shen, Lijia; Yin, Cao

    2016-05-01

    We previously discovered that the expression of the tumor suppressor phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) was downregulated in the majority patients with tongue squamous cell carcinoma (TSCC). The aim of this study was to investigate the role of PTEN overexpression in the regulation of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of the tongue squamous carcinoma cell line Tca8113 as well as explore the underlying mechanism. GV230 (containing the PTEN gene) and empty vectors were transfected into Tca8113 cells. After stable transfection, the messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels of PTEN were validated using quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) and Western blot analysis. The growth and cell cycle were analyzed using Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) and flow cytometry, respectively. The invasion ability was measured with a transwell assay. The effects of PTEN overexpression on EMT and Hedgehog signaling were assessed by comparing Tca8113-PTEN cells with control and negative control cell groups. We found that PTEN expression was significantly upregulated after transfection. Meanwhile, upregulated PTEN inhibited the proliferation and invasion of Tca8113 cells. In addition, we observed changes in the EMT- and Hedgehog-associated proteins. These data demonstrated that PTEN upregulation could reduce invasion by inhibiting the process of EMT in Tca8113 cells, which might be related to the Hedgehog signaling pathway. PMID:26649861

  11. Expression of the Androgen Receptor, pAkt, and pPTEN in Breast Cancer and Their Potential in Prognostication1

    PubMed Central

    Sultana, Aisha; Idress, Romana; Naqvi, Zulfiqar Ali; Azam, Iqbal; Khan, Shaista; Siddiqui, Anwar Ali; Lalani, El-Nasir

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Importance of androgen receptor (AR) as an independent prognostic marker in Pakistani women with breast cancer (BCa) remains unexplored. Our aim was to identify the expression and potential prognostic value of AR, its upstream regulator (pAkt) and target gene (pPTEN) in invasive BCa. METHODS This study used a cohort of 200 Pakistani women with invasive BCa diagnosed during 2002-2011. Expression of AR, pAkt and pPTEN was determined on formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissue sections by immunohistochemistry. The association of AR, pAkt and pPTEN with clinicopathological parameters was determined. Survival analyses were undertaken on patients with ≥ 5 years of follow-up (n = 82). RESULTS Expression of AR, pAkt and pPTEN was observed in 47.5%, 81.3% and 50.6% of patients, respectively. AR-expressing tumors were low or intermediate in grade (P < .001) and expressed ER (P = .002) and PR (P = .001). Patients with AR+ tumors had significantly higher OS (Mean OS = 10.2 ± 0.465 years) compared to patients with AR− tumors (Mean OS = 5.8 ± 0.348 years) (P = .047). Furthermore, AR-positivity was associated with improved OS in patients receiving endocrine therapy (P = .020). Patients with AR+ /pAkt+ /pPTEN− tumors, had increased OS (Mean OS = 7.1 ± 0.535 years) compared to patients with AR−/pAkt+/pPTEN− tumors (Mean OS = 5.1 ± 0.738 years). CONCLUSION AR-expressing tumors are frequently characterized by low or intermediate grade tumors, expressing ER and PR. In addition, expression of AR, pAkt and pPTEN, could be considered in prognostication of patients with invasive BCa. PMID:24831579

  12. Microenvironment-induced PTEN loss by exosomal microRNA primes brain metastasis outgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jun; Lowery, Frank J.; Zhang, Qingling; Huang, Wen-Chien; Li, Ping; Li, Min; Wang, Xiao; Zhang, Chenyu; Wang, Hai; Ellis, Kenneth; Cheerathodi, Mujeeburahiman; McCarty, Joseph H.; Palmieri, Diane; Saunus, Jodi; Lakhani, Sunil; Huang, Suyun; Sahin, Aysegul A.; Aldape, Kenneth D.; Steeg, Patricia S.; Yu, Dihua

    2016-01-01

    Summary Development of life-threatening cancer metastases at distant organs requires disseminated tumor cells’ adaptation to and co-evolution with the drastically different microenvironments of metastatic sites1. Cancer cells of common origin manifest distinct gene expression patterns after metastasizing to different organs2. Clearly, the dynamic interplay between metastatic tumor cells and extrinsic signals at individual metastatic organ sites critically impacts the subsequent metastatic outgrowth3,4. Yet, it is unclear when and how disseminated tumor cells acquire the essential traits from the microenvironment of metastatic organs that prime their subsequent outgrowth. Here we show that primary tumor cells with normal expression of PTEN, an important tumor suppressor, lose PTEN expression after dissemination to the brain, but not to other organs. PTEN level in PTEN-loss brain metastatic tumor cells is restored after leaving brain microenvironment. This brain microenvironment-dependent, reversible PTEN mRNA and protein down-regulation is epigenetically regulated by microRNAs (miRNAs) from astrocytes. Mechanistically, astrocyte-derived exosomes mediate an intercellular transfer of PTEN-targeting miRNAs to metastatic tumor cells, while astrocyte-specific depletion of PTEN-targeting miRNAs or blockade of astrocyte exosome secretion rescues the PTEN loss and suppresses brain metastasis in vivo. Furthermore, this adaptive PTEN loss in brain metastatic tumor cells leads to an increased secretion of cytokine chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2), which recruits Iba1+ myeloid cells that reciprocally enhance outgrowth of brain metastatic tumor cells via enhanced proliferation and reduced apoptosis. Our findings demonstrate a remarkable plasticity of PTEN expression in metastatic tumor cells in response to different organ microenvironments, underpinning an essential role of co-evolution between the metastatic cells and their microenvironment during the adaptive metastatic

  13. Characterization of chlamydial genital infection resulting from sexual transmission from male to female guinea pigs and determination of infectious dose.

    PubMed

    Rank, Roger G; Bowlin, Anne K; Reed, Ronald L; Darville, Toni

    2003-11-01

    A major problem in the study of chlamydial genital infections in animal models has been the use of varied doses of chlamydiae for infection in different laboratories. It is clearly desirable to use a dose which approximates that of natural sexual infection, but that dose to date has not been determined because of the inability of researchers to quantify chlamydiae in semen. Fortunately, sexual transmission of chlamydiae has been described for the guinea pig model of infection with the chlamydial agent of guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis (GPIC). In this study, we undertook to determine the approximate infection dose in actual sexual transmission by comparing the kinetics of infection in female guinea pigs acquired via sexual contact to those of genital infections induced artificially with known quantities of chlamydiae. Groups of guinea pigs were infected intravaginally with 10(4), 10(3), 10(2), and 10(1) inclusion-forming units (IFU) of GPIC, and the kinetics of the infection were determined. Infection with 10(2) IFU produced infections with lower peak levels than those in animals receiving 10(4) or 10(3) IFU. Seventy percent of animals receiving 10(2) IFU became infected, while 100 and 79% of animals receiving 10(4) and 10(3) IFU, respectively, became infected. Animals receiving 10(2) IFU also had a longer incubation period. Of 19 animals that mated with infected males, 63.2% became infected, with an infection course which was not significantly different than that of the 10(2)-IFU-infected group. The data suggest that female guinea pigs received approximately 10(2) IFU by sexual transmission. Of interest was the observation that the guinea pigs infected by sexual transmission shed organisms for a significantly shorter time period than that of any group that was artificially infected. This result suggests that there may be factors associated with semen which passively transfer antimicrobial activity to the female or enhance the innate host response in the female

  14. Determination of Radioisotope Content by Measurement of Waste Package Dose Rates - 13394

    SciTech Connect

    Souza, Daiane Cristini B.; Gimenes Tessaro, Ana Paula; Vicente, Roberto

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this communication is to report the observed correlation between the calculated air kerma rates produced by radioactive waste drums containing untreated ion-exchange resin and activated charcoal slurries with the measured radiation field of each package. Air kerma rates at different distances from the drum surface were calculated with the activity concentrations previously determined by gamma spectrometry of waste samples and the estimated mass, volume and geometry of solid and liquid phases of each waste package. The water content of each waste drum varies widely between different packages. Results will allow determining the total activity of wastes and are intended to complete the previous steps taken to characterize the radioisotope content of wastes packages. (authors)

  15. Effect of TIMP1 transfection on PTEN expression in human kidney proximal tubular cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, J X; Cai, G Y; Chen, X M; Liu, H; Chen, X; Peng, Y M; Liu, F Y; Li, Z; Shi, S Z

    2015-12-21

    To explore the role of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) tissue inhibitor in the mechanisms of kidney aging, we observed the effects of sense and antisense transfection of TIMP-1 and of metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitors on phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and Flk-1 expression in TIMP-1 transgenic human proximal tubular epithelial cells (HKCs). Transfected HKCs were co-incubated with 100 μM MMP-2 and MMP-9 inhibitor III for 24 h to affect enzyme inhibition. TIMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-9, PTEN, VEGF, and Flk-1 mRNA expression was detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. PTEN, VEGF, and Flk-1 protein expression in cells of each experimental group was measured by indirect immunofluorescence. We found that PTEN expression was up-regulated (P < 0.05) in the sense TIMP-1-transfected group (P < 0.05) compared with the non-transfected and empty vector groups, and that expression of VEGF and Flk-1 was down-regulated (P < 0.05). In contrast, the antisense TIMP-1 transgenic group showed the opposite results (P < 0.05). No significant differences in expression of PTEN, VEGF, or Flk-1 were observed among the MMP- 2/MMP-9 inhibitor III, non-transfected, and empty vector groups (P > 0.05). These results suggest that in the progression of renal aging, high expression of TIMP-1 up-regulates PTEN expression through an MMP-independent pathway, and subsequently down-regulates the expression of VEGF and Flk-1, indicating that PTEN and TIMP-1 are involved in the aging-associated impairment of renal angiogenesis. Our study provides a theoretical basis for further exploration of the mechanism underlying TIMP- 1 participation in renal aging progression.

  16. PTEN expression in ovine granulosa cells increases during terminal follicular growth.

    PubMed

    Froment, Pascal; Bontoux, Martine; Pisselet, Claudine; Monget, Philippe; Dupont, Joëlle

    2005-04-25

    In the present paper, we have studied the expression of the Phosphatase and TENsin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) and its putative biological role in the sheep ovary. We found by Northern-blot, immunohistochemistry and immunoblot that PTEN is highly expressed in granulosa cells from large differentiated follicles (LF) in comparison with small proliferating follicles (SF) (P < 0.001), with no clear effect of follicle quality. Moreover, the PTEN lipid phosphatase activity is also higher in LF than in SF (P < 0.01). In contrast, levels of the phosphorylated form of AKT (pAKT) are lower in LF than in SF (P < 0.0001). IGF-I and insulin but not FSH, LH or forskolin are able to stimulate the expression of PTEN mRNA (P < 0.001) and protein by ovine granulosa cells after 48 h of culture in vitro. An IGF-1 time course analysis showed that expression of PTEN protein appeared after 12h of culture, concomitant with the fall of the pAKT levels, which peaked after 6h of stimulation with IGF-I. Moreover, transfection experiments showed that overexpression of PTEN in ovine granulosa cells induced a decrease and an increase in E2F and p27 promoter activity, respectively (P < 0.05). Overall, our present data show for the first time that the expression of PTEN increases during terminal follicular growth. This increase, that might be induced by IGF-I but not FSH, would participate in the proliferation/differentiation transition of ovine granulosa cells in differentiating follicles.

  17. Joint loss of PAX2 and PTEN expression in endometrial precancers and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Monte, Nicolas M.; Webster, Kaitlyn A.; Neuberg, Donna; Dressler, Gregory R.; Mutter, George L.

    2010-01-01

    Latent endometrial carcinoma precancers are normal appearing endometrial glands with sporadic loss of tumor suppressor gene function such as PTEN. Progression to carcinoma is inefficient and requires additional genetic damage that creates a histologic precursor lesion called endometrial intraepithelial neoplasia (EIN). In this study, we examined loss of PAX2 expression, a gene required for embryonic uterine development, during endometrial carcinogenesis. Normal proliferative, EIN, and malignant (endometrial adenocarcinoma) endometrial tissues were immunostained for PTEN and PAX2. Proliferative samples with loss of protein in at least one gland were scored as latent precancers. EIN and cancer lesions were scored by the majority pattern. Overall prevalence and topography of joint PAX2-PTEN expression loss was examined. The prevalence of PAX2 protein loss in the sequence of normal to precancer to cancer was 36%, 71%, and 77% respectively, and for PTEN 49%, 44%, and 68%. Normal endometrial prevalence of PAX2 or PTEN deficient latent precancers was unaffected by biopsy indication, but increased significantly with age. Coincident loss of PAX2 and PTEN expression in an individual normal endometrium was seen in 21% of patients, but usually involved different glands. Coincident loss was more common in precancers (31%) and carcinoma (55%), in which case both markers were protein null in an overlapping clonal distribution. PAX2 and PTEN protein loss occur independently and accumulate with increasing age in latent precancers of normal premenopausal endometrium. Loss of function of both genes in an overlapping distribution characterizes clinical emergence of a premalignant lesion which is carried forward to carcinoma. PMID:20631067

  18. Male breast cancer in Cowden syndrome patients with germline PTEN mutations

    PubMed Central

    Fackenthal, J.; Marsh, D.; Richardson, A.; Cummings, S.; Eng, C.; Robinson, B.; Olopade, O.

    2001-01-01

    Cowden syndrome (CS) (OMIM 158350) is a multiple hamartoma syndrome associated with germline mutations in the PTEN tumour suppressor gene. While CS is characterised most commonly by non-cancerous lesions (mucocutaneous trichilemmomas, acral and palmoplantar keratoses, and papillomatous papules), it is also associated with an increased susceptibility to breast cancer (in females) and thyroid cancer, as well as non-cancerous conditions of the breast and thyroid. Here we report two cases of male breast cancer occurring in patients with classical CS phenotypes and germline PTEN mutations. The first subject was diagnosed with CS indicated primarily by mucocutaneous papillomatosis, facial trichilemmomas, and macrocephaly with frontal bossing at the age of 31 years. He developed breast cancer at 41 years and subsequently died of the disease. A PTEN mutation, c.802delG, was identified in this subject, yet none of his family members showed evidence of a CS phenotype, suggesting that this PTEN mutation may be a de novo occurrence. The second subject had a CS phenotype including multiple trichilemmomas and thyroid adenoma, developed male breast cancer at 43 years, and died of the disease at 57 years. He was a carrier of a PTEN mutation c.347-351delACAAT that cosegregated with the CS phenotype in affected family members. These two cases of male breast cancer associated with germline PTEN mutations and the CS phenotype suggest that CS may be associated with an increased risk of early onset male as well as female breast cancer.


Keywords: PTEN; male breast cancer; Cowden syndrome PMID:11238682

  19. Glandular epithelial AR inactivation enhances PTEN deletion-induced uterine pathology.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jaesung Peter; Zheng, Yu; Handelsman, David J; Simanainen, Ulla

    2016-05-01

    Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) deletion induces uterine pathology, whereas androgen actions via androgen receptor (AR) support uterine growth and therefore may modify uterine cancer risk. We hypothesized that the androgen actions mediated via uterine glandular epithelial AR could modify PTEN deletion-induced uterine pathology. To test our hypothesis, we developed uterine glandular epithelium-specific PTEN and/or AR knockout mouse models comparing the uterine pathology among wild-type (WT), glandular epithelium-specific AR inactivation (ugeARKO), PTEN deletion (ugePTENKO), and the combined PTEN and AR knockout (ugePTENARKO) female mice. The double knockout restricted to glandular epithelium showed that AR inactivation enhanced PTEN deletion-induced uterine pathology with development of intraepithelial neoplasia by 20 weeks of age. In ugePTENARKO, 6/10 (60%) developed intraepithelial neoplasia, whereas 3/10 (30%) developed only glandular hyperplasia in ugePTENKO uterus. No uterine pathology was observed in WT (n=8) and ugeARKO (n=7) uteri. Uterine weight was significantly (P=0.002) increased in ugePTENARKO (374±97 mg (mean±s.e.)) compared with WT (97±6 mg), ugeARKO (94±12 mg), and ugePTENKO (205±33 mg). Estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) and P-AKT expression was modified by uterine pathology but did not differ between ugePTENKO and ugePTENARKO, suggesting that its expressions are not directly affected by androgens. However, progesterone receptor (PR) expression was reduced in ugePTENARKO compared to ugePTENKO uterus, suggesting that PR expression could be regulated by glandular epithelial AR inactivation. In conclusion, glandular epithelial AR inactivation (with persistent stromal AR action) enhanced PTEN deletion-induced uterine pathology possibly by downregulating PR expression in the uterus.

  20. Determination of the Median Lethal Dose and Electrophoretic Pattern of Hottentotta saulcyi (Scorpiones, Buthidae) Scorpion Venom

    PubMed Central

    Yağmur, Ersen Aydın; Özkan, Özcan; Karaer, K Zafer

    2015-01-01

    Background: In this study, we investigated the lethal potency, electrophoretic protein pattern and in vivo effects of Hottentotta saulcyi scorpion venom in mice. Methods: Scorpions were collected at night, by using a UV lamp from Mardin Province, Turkey. Venom was obtained from mature H. saulcyi scorpions by electrical stimulation of the telson. The lethality of the venom was determined by i.v. injections using Swiss mice. In vivo effects of the venom were assessed by using the intraperitoneal route (ip) injections into mice (20±1g) and monitored for 24 h. The protein profiles of the scorpion venom were analyzed by NuPAGE® Novex® 4–12 % gradient Bis-Tris gel followed by Coomassie blue staining. Results: The lethal assay of the venom was 0.73 mg/kg in mice. We determined the electrophoretic protein pattern of this scorpion venom to be 4, 6, 9, 31, 35, 40, 46 and 69 kDa by SDS-PAGE. Analysis of electrophoresis indicated that H. saulcyi scorpion intoxicated mice exhibited autonomic nervous system symptoms (tachypnea, restlessness, hyperexcitability, convulsions, salivation, lacrimation, weakness). Conclusions: Hottentotta saulcyi scorpion venom includes short-chain neurotoxins and long-chain neurotoxins according to the electrophoretic protein patterns. The stings of H. saulcyi scorpion must be considered of risk for humans in the southeastern region, Turkey. PMID:26623435

  1. PTEN-induction in U251 glioma cells decreases the expression of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-2

    SciTech Connect

    Levitt, Randy J.; Georgescu, Maria-Magdalena; Pollak, Michael . E-mail: michael.pollak@mcgill.ca

    2005-11-04

    PTEN is a tumor suppressor gene whose loss of function is observed in {approx}40-50% of human cancers. Although insulin-like growth factor binding protein-2 (IGFBP-2) was classically described as a growth inhibitor, multiple recent reports have shown an association of overexpression and/or high serum levels of IGFBP-2 with poor prognosis of several malignancies, including gliomas. Using an inducible PTEN expression system in the PTEN-null glioma cell line U251, we demonstrate that PTEN-induction is associated with reduced proliferation, increased apoptosis, and a substantial reduction of the high levels of IGFBP-2 expression. The PTEN-induced decrease in IGFBP-2 expression could be mimicked with the PI3-kinase inhibitor LY294002, indicating that the lipid phosphatase activity of PTEN is responsible for the observed effect. However, the rapamycin analog CCI-779 did not affect IGFBP-2 expression, suggesting that the PTEN-induced decrease in IGFBP-2 expression is not attributable to decreased mTOR signalling. Recombinant human IGFBP-2 was unable to rescue U251-PTEN cells from the antiproliferative effects of PTEN, and IGFBP-2 siRNA did not affect the IGF-dependent or -independent growth of this cell line. These results suggest that the clinical data linking IGFBP-2 expression to poor prognosis may arise, at least in part, because high levels of IGFBP-2 expression correlate with loss of function of PTEN, which is well known to lead to aggressive behavior of gliomas. Our results motivate translational research regarding the relationship between IGFBP-2 expression and loss of function of PTEN.

  2. Prognostic impact and the relevance of PTEN copy number alterations in patients with advanced colorectal cancer (CRC) receiving bevacizumab.

    PubMed

    Price, Timothy J; Hardingham, Jennifer E; Lee, Chee K; Townsend, Amanda R; Wrin, Joseph W; Wilson, Kate; Weickhardt, Andrew; Simes, Robert J; Murone, Carmel; Tebbutt, Niall C

    2013-06-01

    Loss of phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) expression may be prognostic in colorectal cancer (CRC) and may have a correlation with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression via hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) alpha, and the PI3K/mTOR pathways. We therefore have explored the prognostic association of PTEN loss and the potential that PTEN loss may be predictive of outcome with bevacizumab. Patients enrolled in the AGITG MAX trial, a randomized Phase III trial of capecitabine (C) +/- bevacizumab (B) (+/- mitomycin C [M]) with available tissues were analyzed for PTEN expression (loss vs. no loss) as assessed using a Taqman® copy number assay (CNA). Of the original 471 patients enrolled, tissues from 302 (64.1%) patients were analyzed. PTEN loss was observed in 38.7% of patients. There was no relationship between PTEN loss and KRAS or BRAF mutation. PTEN status was not prognostic for progression-free survival (PFS) or overall survival (OS) in multivariate analyses adjusting for other baseline factors; loss versus no loss PFS hazard ratio (HR) 0.9 (0.7-1.16), OS HR 1.04 (0.79-1.38). PTEN was not prognostic when assessed by KRAS and BRAF status. By using the comparison of C versus CB+CBM, PTEN status was not significantly predictive of the effectiveness of B for PFS or OS. PTEN status was not prognostic for survival in advanced colorectal cancer, irrespective of KRAS or BRAF status. PTEN status did not significantly predict different benefit with bevacizumb therapy.

  3. Determination of threshold dose with delta-aminolevulinic acid-induced porphyrins for effective photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritsch, Clemens; Abels, Christoph; Bolsen, Klaus; Ruzicka, Thomas; Goetz, Alwin E.; Goerz, Guenter

    1995-03-01

    In this study the metabolism in tumors and various tissues of intravenously administered (delta) -aminolevulinic acid was investigated. Amelanotic melanoma (A-Mel-3) were implanted in the dorsal skin of Syrian golden hamsters. Distribution and metabolism of i.v. injected (delta) -aminolevulinic acid in blood was studied by determination of (delta) - aminolevulinic acid and protoporphyrin concentration in red blood cells. In addition extraction of various tissues, e.g. tumor, liver, kidney, and normal skin was performed, to verify fluorescence kinetic studies by determination of total porphyrin concentration by photometry and of distribution of the porphyrin metabolites by HPLC. In untreated animals the total porphyrin concentration in all tissues examined were comparably low. In red blood cells the maximal concentration of (delta) -aminolevulinic acid as well as protoporphyrin was detected 45 min after i.v. injection of (delta) -aminolevulinic acid. Porphyrins accumulated in melanoma reaching a maximum tumor:skin tissue ratio of 6.9:1 at 45 min after i.v. injection of (delta) -aminolevulinic acid. A second high tumor:skin tissue ratio of 5.7:1 could be measured at 24 h after injection, but at this point in time the protoporphyrin content in normal skin was higher than 45 min after injection. The kidney may not be strongly affected by i.v. administration of (delta) -aminolevulinic acid, whereas the liver reveals an accumulation of porphyrins, e.g. protoporphyrin. Concluding from these results in this experimental tumor model, i.v. administration of (delta) -aminolevulinic acid seems to be a promising modality to perform photodynamic therapy more effectively and more selectively by irradiation 45 - 180 min after injection of (delta) -aminolevulinic acid.

  4. Phototaxis in the ciliated protozoan Ophryoglena flava: dose-effect curves and action spectrum determination.

    PubMed

    Cadetti, L; Marroni, F; Marangoni, R; Kuhlmann, H W; Gioffré, D; Colombetti, G

    2000-08-01

    The sensitivity of positive phototactic orientation of cells of the ciliated protozoan Ophryoglena flava has been measured for white light, broad-band blue and red light, and narrow-band monochromatic light, using a laboratory-developed computer aided system. The white-light fluence rate-response curve shows that there is no negative phototaxis in the fluence rate range investigated (0-15 W/m2) and no adaptation phenomena; it is very well fitted by a hyperbolic function; the fluence rate curves under broad band blue and red light (full width at half maximum, FWHM= 100 nm) can be fitted by the same model. The saturation level is, within experimental errors, the same for the three curves, indicating that there are no chromaticity effects and that if there is more than one photoreceptor pigment, they act independently of each other. The fluence rate-response curves determined under narrow band monochromatic light (FWHM = 10 nm) can also be fitted by the same model and show, within experimental errors, the same saturation level. An action spectrum for positive phototaxis at 10-nm intervals has been calculated from fluence rate-response curves: it shows three maxima, at 420, 540 and 590 nm. This action spectrum is significantly different from the ones for photomotile responses in Blepharisma japonicum, Stentor coeruleus and Chlamydodon mnemosyne, whereas it resembles the ones of Paramecium bursaria and Fabrea salina. PMID:11100836

  5. Identification of Androgen Receptor Splice Variants in the Pten Deficient Murine Prostate Cancer Model.

    PubMed

    Liang, Mengmeng; Adisetiyo, Helty; Li, Xiuqing; Liu, Xiuqing; Liu, Ren; Gill, Parkash; Roy-Burman, Pradip; Jones, Jeremy O; Mulholland, David J

    2015-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) variants are associated with resistance to anti androgen therapy both in human prostate cancer cell lines and clinical samples. These observations support the hypothesis that AR isoform accumulation is a consequence of selective therapeutic pressure on the full length AR. The Pten deficient prostate cancer model proceeds with well-defined kinetics including progression to castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). While surgical castration and enzalutamide treatments yield an initial therapeutic response, Pten-/-epithelia continue to proliferate yielding locally invasive primary tumor pathology. That most epithelium remains AR positive, but ligand independent, suggests the presence of oncogenic AR variants. To address this hypothesis, we have used a panel of recently described Pten-/- tumor cell lines derived from both from hormone intact (E4, E8) and castrated Pten mutants (cE1, cE2) followed by RACE PCR to identify and characterize three novel truncated, amino terminus containing AR variants (mAR-Va, b, c). Variants appear not only conserved throughout progression but are correlated with nearly complete loss of full length AR (AR-FL) at castrate androgen levels. The overexpression of variants leads to enhanced transcriptional activity of AR while knock down studies show reduced transcriptional output. Collectively, the identification of truncated AR variants in the conditional PTEN deletion model supports a role for maintaining the CRPC phenotype and provides further therapeutic applications of this preclinical model. PMID:26196517

  6. Simultaneous loss of the DLC1 and PTEN tumor suppressors enhances breast cancer cell migration

    SciTech Connect

    Heering, Johanna; Erlmann, Patrik; Olayioye, Monilola A.

    2009-09-10

    The phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) gene is a tumor suppressor frequently deleted or mutated in sporadic tumors of the breast, prostate, endometrium and brain. The protein acts as a dual specificity phosphatase for lipids and proteins. PTEN loss confers a growth advantage to cells, protects from apoptosis and favors cell migration. The deleted in liver cancer 1 (DLC1) gene has emerged as a novel tumor suppressor downregulated in a variety of tumor types including those of the breast. DLC1 contains a Rho GTPase activating domain that is involved in the inhibition of cell proliferation, migration and invasion. To investigate how simultaneous loss of PTEN and DLC1 contributes to cell transformation, we downregulated both proteins by RNA interference in the non-invasive MCF7 breast carcinoma cell line. Joint depletion of PTEN and DLC1 resulted in enhanced cell migration in wounding and chemotactic transwell assays. Interestingly, both proteins were found to colocalize at the plasma membrane and interacted physically in biochemical pulldowns and coimmunoprecipitations. We therefore postulate that the concerted local inactivation of signaling pathways downstream of PTEN and DLC1, respectively, is required for the tight control of cell migration.

  7. Power of PTEN/AKT: Molecular switch between tumor suppressors and oncogenes

    PubMed Central

    XIE, YINGQIU; NAIZABEKOV, SANZHAR; CHEN, ZHANLIN; TOKAY, TURSONJAN

    2016-01-01

    An increasing amount of evidence has shown that tumor suppressors can become oncogenes, or vice versa, but the mechanism behind this is unclear. Recent findings have suggested that phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) is one of the powerful switches for the conversion between tumor suppressors and oncogenes. PTEN regulates a number of cellular processes, including cell death and proliferation, through the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/protein kinase B/mammalian target of rapamycin (PI3K/AKT/mTOR) pathway. Furthermore, a number of studies have suggested that PTEN deletions may alter various functions of certain tumor suppressor and oncogenic proteins. The aim of the present review was to analyze specific cases driven by PTEN loss/AKT activation, including aberrant signaling pathways and novel drug targets for clinical application in personalized medicine. The findings illustrate how PTEN loss and/or AKT activation switches MDM2-dependent p53 downregulation, and induces conversion between oncogene and tumor suppressor in enhancer of zeste homolog 2, BTB domain-containing 7A, alternative reading frame 2, p27 and breast cancer 1, early onset, through multiple mechanisms. This review highlights the genetic basis of complex drug targets and provides insights into the rationale of precision cancer therapy. PMID:27347153