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Sample records for pten dose determine

  1. Subtle variations in Pten dose determine cancer susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Alimonti, Andrea; Carracedo, Arkaitz; Clohessy, John G; Trotman, Lloyd C; Nardella, Caterina; Egia, Ainara; Salmena, Leonardo; Sampieri, Katia; Haveman, William J; Brogi, Edi; Richardson, Andrea L; Zhang, Jiangwen; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo

    2010-05-01

    Cancer susceptibility has been attributed to at least one heterozygous genetic alteration in a tumor suppressor gene (TSG). It has been hypothesized that subtle variations in TSG expression can promote cancer development. However, this hypothesis has not yet been definitively supported in vivo. Pten is a TSG frequently lost in human cancer and mutated in inherited cancer-predisposition syndromes. Here we analyze Pten hypermorphic mice (Pten(hy/+)), expressing 80% normal levels of Pten. Pten(hy/+) mice develop a spectrum of tumors, with breast tumors occurring at the highest penetrance. All breast tumors analyzed here retained two intact copies of Pten and maintained Pten levels above heterozygosity. Notably, subtle downregulation of Pten altered the steady-state biology of the mammary tissues and the expression profiles of genes involved in cancer cell proliferation. We present an alterative working model for cancer development in which subtle reductions in the dose of TSGs predispose to tumorigenesis in a tissue-specific manner.

  2. Subtle variations in Pten dose determine cancer susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Alimonti, Andrea; Carracedo, Arkaitz; Clohessy, John G; Trotman, Lloyd C; Nardella, Caterina; Egia, Ainara; Salmena, Leonardo; Sampieri, Katia; Haveman, William J; Brogi, Edi; Richardson, Andrea L; Zhang, Jiangwen; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo

    2010-01-01

    Cancer susceptibility has been attributed to at least one heterozygous genetic alteration in a tumor suppressor gene (TSG)1. It has been hypothesized that subtle variations in TSG expression can promote cancer development2,3. However, this hypothesis has not yet been definitively supported in vivo. PTEN is a TSG frequently lost in human cancer and mutated in inherited cancer-predisposition syndromes4. Here, we analyze Pten hypermorphic mice (Ptenhy/+), expressing 80% normal levels of Pten. Ptenhy/+ mice develop a spectrum of tumors, with breast tumors occurring at the highest penetrance. All breast tumors analyzed here retained two intact copies of Pten and maintained Pten levels above heterozygosis. Notably, subtle downregulation of Pten altered the steady-state biology of the mammary tissues and the expression profiles of genes involved in cancer cell proliferation. We present an alterative working model for cancer development in which subtle reductions in the dose of TSGs predispose to tumorigenesis in a tissue-specific manner. PMID:20400965

  3. PTEN status is a crucial determinant of the functional outcome of combined MEK and mTOR inhibition in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Milella, Michele; Falcone, Italia; Conciatori, Fabiana; Matteoni, Silvia; Sacconi, Andrea; De Luca, Teresa; Bazzichetto, Chiara; Corbo, Vincenzo; Simbolo, Michele; Sperduti, Isabella; Benfante, Antonina; Del Curatolo, Anais; Cesta Incani, Ursula; Malusa, Federico; Eramo, Adriana; Sette, Giovanni; Scarpa, Aldo; Konopleva, Marina; Andreeff, Michael; McCubrey, James Andrew; Blandino, Giovanni; Todaro, Matilde; Stassi, Giorgio; De Maria, Ruggero; Cognetti, Francesco; Del Bufalo, Donatella; Ciuffreda, Ludovica

    2017-01-01

    Combined MAPK/PI3K pathway inhibition represents an attractive, albeit toxic, therapeutic strategy in oncology. Since PTEN lies at the intersection of these two pathways, we investigated whether PTEN status determines the functional response to combined pathway inhibition. PTEN (gene, mRNA, and protein) status was extensively characterized in a panel of cancer cell lines and combined MEK/mTOR inhibition displayed highly synergistic pharmacologic interactions almost exclusively in PTEN-loss models. Genetic manipulation of PTEN status confirmed a mechanistic role for PTEN in determining the functional outcome of combined pathway blockade. Proteomic analysis showed greater phosphoproteomic profile modification(s) in response to combined MEK/mTOR inhibition in PTEN-loss contexts and identified JAK1/STAT3 activation as a potential mediator of synergistic interactions. Overall, our results show that PTEN-loss is a crucial determinant of synergistic interactions between MAPK and PI3K pathway inhibitors, potentially exploitable for the selection of cancer patients at the highest chance of benefit from combined therapeutic strategies. PMID:28220839

  4. Determining risk of biochemical recurrence in prostate cancer by immunohistochemical detection of PTEN expression and Akt activation.

    PubMed

    Bedolla, Roble; Prihoda, Thomas J; Kreisberg, Jeffrey I; Malik, Shazli N; Krishnegowda, Naveen K; Troyer, Dean A; Ghosh, Paramita M

    2007-07-01

    A considerable fraction of patients who undergo radical prostatectomy as treatment for primary prostate cancer experience biochemical recurrence detected by elevated serum levels of prostate-specific antigen. In this study, we investigate whether loss of expression of the tumor suppressor phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) and the phosphorylated form of the cell survival protein Akt (pAkt) predicts biochemical recurrence. Expression of PTEN and pAkt was detected by immunohistochemistry in paraffin-embedded prostate cancer tissue obtained from men undergoing radical prostatectomy. Outcome was determined by 60-month follow-up determining serum prostate-specific antigen levels. By itself, PTEN was not a good predictor of biochemical recurrence; however, in combination with pAkt, it was a better predictor of the risk of biochemical recurrence compared with pAkt alone. Ninety percent of all cases with high pAkt and negative PTEN were recurrent whereas 88.2% of those with low pAkt and positive PTEN were nonrecurrent. In addition, high Gleason scores resulted in reduced protection from decreased pAkt and increased PTEN. By univariate logistic regression, pAkt alone gives an area under the receiver-operator characteristic curve of 0.82 whereas the area under the receiver-operator characteristic curve for the combination of PTEN, pAkt, and Gleason based on a stepwise selection model is 0.89, indicating excellent discrimination. Our results indicate that loss of PTEN expression, together with increased Akt phosphorylation and Gleason score, is of significant predictive value for determining, at the time of prostatectomy, the risk of biochemical recurrence.

  5. PTEN loss is a context-dependent outcome determinant in obese and non-obese endometrioid endometrial cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Westin, Shannon N.; Ju, Zhenlin; Broaddus, Russell R.; Krakstad, Camilla; Li, Jane; Pal, Navdeep; Lu, Karen H.; Coleman, Robert L.; Hennessy, Bryan T.; Klempner, Samuel J.; Werner, Henrica M. J.; Salvesen, Helga B.; Cantley, Lewis C.; Mills, Gordon B.; Myers, Andrea P.

    2015-01-01

    Endometrial cancer incidence is increasing, due in part to a strong association with obesity. Mutations in the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway, the central relay pathway of insulin signals, occur in the majority of endometrioid adenocarcinomas, the most common form of endometrial cancer. We sought to determine the impact of PI3K pathway alterations on progression free survival in a cohort of endometrioid endometrial cancers. Prognostic utility of PIK3CA, PIK3R1, and PTEN mutations, as well as PTEN protein loss by immunohistochemistry, was explored in the context of patient body mass index. Reverse-phase protein arrays were utilized to assess protein expression based on PTEN status. Among 187 endometrioid endometrial cancers, there were no statistically significant associations between PFS and PIK3CA, PIK3R1, PTEN mutation or loss. When stratified by body mass index, PTEN loss was associated with improved progression free survival (P<0.006) in obese (body mass index ≥ 30) patients. PTEN loss resulted in distinct protein changes: Canonical PI3K pathway activation was observed only in the non-obese population while decreased expression of β-CATENIN and phosphorylated FOXO3A was observed in obese patients. These data suggest the impact of PTEN loss on tumor biology and clinical outcomes must be interpreted in the context of body mass index, and provide a potential explanation for discrepant reports on the effect of PTEN status and obesity on prognosis in endometrial cancer. This reveals a clinically important interaction between metabolic state and tumor genetics that may unveil the biologic underpinning of obesity-related cancers and impact ongoing clinical trials with PI3K pathway inhibitors. PMID:26045339

  6. A phase 1b dose expansion study of the pan-class I PI3K inhibitor buparlisib (BKM120) plus carboplatin and paclitaxel in PTEN deficient tumors and with dose intensified carboplatin and paclitaxel.

    PubMed

    Smyth, Lillian M; Monson, Kelsey R; Jhaveri, Komal; Drilon, Alexander; Li, Bob T; Abida, Wassim; Iyer, Gopa; Gerecitano, John F; Gounder, Mrinal; Harding, James J; Voss, Martin H; Makker, Vicky; Ho, Alan L; Razavi, Pedram; Iasonos, Alexia; Bialer, Philip; Lacouture, Mario E; Teitcher, Jerrold B; Erinjeri, Joseph P; Katabi, Nora; Fury, Matthew G; Hyman, David M

    2017-03-09

    Purpose We previously reported the phase I dose escalation study of buparlisib, a pan-class 1A PI3K inhibitor, combined with platinum/taxane-based chemotherapy in patients with advanced solid tumors. The combination was well tolerated and promising preliminary efficacy was observed in PTEN deficient tumors. This phase I dose expansion study now evaluates buparlisib plus high dose carboplatin and paclitaxel in unselected patients with advanced solid tumors and buparlisib plus standard dose carboplatin and paclitaxel in patients with PTEN deficient tumors (ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01297452). Methods There were two expansion cohorts: Cohort A received continuous buparlisib (100 mg/daily) orally plus high dose carboplatin AUC 6 and paclitaxel 200 mg/m2; Cohort B treated patients with PTEN deficient tumors only and they received the recommended phase II dose (RP2D) of continuous buparlisib (100 mg/daily) orally plus standard dose carboplatin AUC 5 and paclitaxel 175 mg/m2. Both cohorts received chemotherapy intravenously on day 1 of the 21-day cycle with pegfilgrastim support. Primary endpoint in Cohort A was to evaluate the safety and tolerability of chemotherapy dose intensification with buparlisib and in Cohort B was to describe preliminary efficacy of the combination among patients with tumors harboring a PTEN mutation or homozygous deletion. Results 14 subjects were enrolled, 7 in Cohort A and 7 in Cohort B. Dose reductions were required in 5 (71%) and 3 (43%) patients, in cohort A and B respectively. Grade 3 adverse events in Cohort A included lymphopenia (n = 5 [71%]), hyperglycemia (n = 2, [29%]), diarrhea (n = 2, [29%]) and rash (n = 2, [29%]) and in cohort B included lymphopenia (n = 5 [71%]), hyperglycemia (n = 4 [57%]) and neutropenia (n = 2 [29%]. The mean number of cycles on protocol was 6. The overall objective response rate was 14% (2 /14). No objective responses were observed in the PTEN deficient cohort. Four out of 6 patients with

  7. PTEN methylation involved in benzene-induced hematotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Zuo, Xin; Bai, Wenlin; Niu, Piye; Tian, Lin; Gao, Ai

    2014-06-01

    It is well known that benzene is a hematotoxic carcinogen. PTEN promoter methylation is a representative example of transcriptional silencing of tumor suppressor genes. However, the effect of PTEN methylation on benzene-induced hematotoxicity has not yet been elucidated. In this study, the animal model of benzene hematotoxicity was successfully established. WBC significantly decreased in experimental groups (P < 0.01). Compared with the control group, the weight of rats increased slowly and even declined with increasing doses of benzene in the benzene-treated groups. An increase in the level of PTEN methylation was observed in the low dose group, and PTEN methylation level increased significantly in a dose-dependent manner. However, it was interesting that PTEN mRNA expression increased in the low dose group, but declined with increasing doses of benzene. The decrease of tumor suppressor function caused by PTEN methylation may be an important mechanism of benzene hematotoxicity. Furthermore, lymphoblast cell line F32 was incubated by benzene and then treated with 5-aza and TSA, alone or in combination. A dramatic decrease in the PTEN mRNA expression and a significant increase of PTEN methylation level in benzene-treated cells were also shown. PTEN mRNA expression was up regulated and PTEN methylation level was reduced by the epigenetic inhibitors, 5-aza and TSA. In conclusion, PTEN methylation is involved in benzene-induced hematotoxicity through suppressing PTEN mRNA expression.

  8. Timing of the loss of Pten protein determines disease severity in a mouse model of myeloid malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Yan; Webster, Cody; Shao, Lijian; Lensing, Shelly Y.; Ni, Hongyu; Feng, Wei; Colorado, Natalia; Pathak, Rupak; Xiang, Zhifu; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Li, Shaoguang; Zhou, Daohong; Emanuel, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML) is an aggressive pediatric mixed myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasm (MDS/MPN). JMML leukemogenesis is linked to a hyperactivated RAS pathway, with driver mutations in the KRAS, NRAS, NF1, PTPN11, or CBL genes. Previous murine models demonstrated how those genes contributed to the selective hypersensitivity of JMML cells to granulocyte macrophage–colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), a unifying characteristic in the disease. However, it is unclear what causes the early death in children with JMML, because transformation to acute leukemia is rare. Here, we demonstrate that loss of Pten (phosphatase and tensin homolog) protein at postnatal day 8 in mice harboring Nf1 haploinsufficiency results in an aggressive MPN with death at a murine prepubertal age of 20 to 35 days (equivalent to an early juvenile age in JMML patients). The death in the mice was due to organ infiltration with monocytes/macrophages. There were elevated activities of protein kinase B (Akt) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in cells at physiological concentrations of GM-CSF. These were more pronounced in mice with Nf1 haploinsufficiency than in littermates with wild-type Nf1, but this model is insufficient to cause cells to be GM-CSF hypersensitive. This new model represents a murine MPN model with features of a pediatric unclassifiable mixed MDS/MPN and mimics many clinical manifestations of JMML in terms of age of onset, aggressiveness, and organ infiltration with monocytes/macrophages. Our data suggest that the timing of the loss of PTEN protein plays a critical role in determining the disease severity in myeloid malignancies. This model may be useful for studying the pathogenesis of pediatric diseases with alterations in the Ras pathway. PMID:26764354

  9. Targeting the PI3K/PTEN/AKT/mTOR Pathway in Treatment of Sarcoma Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hui Jun; Wang, Xiaochun; Crowe, Philip; Goldstein, David; Yang, Jia-Lin

    2016-11-01

    Sarcoma carries a poor prognosis prompting the need for targeted therapies aimed at deregulated signaling pathways. These include the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway commonly up-regulated in malignancies attributed to loss of PTEN expression. However, PTEN status and activation state of PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway have not been comprehensively studied in sarcoma. The aims of this study were to characterise PTEN and Akt expression in a panel of sarcoma cell lines and then to examine mTOR inhibition using ridaforolimus. PTEN genomic expression was analyzed using Sanger sequencing. PTEN, total Akt (tAkt) and phosphorylated Akt (pAkt) expression were quantified with western blot analysis. Antiproliferative effects of treatment regimens were designed using Chou & Talalay's isobologram and determined with crystal violet assay. Four cell lines had wild-type PTEN (exons 2 to 8), with normal protein expression. The GCT cell line had a missense mutation in exon 6 (C>T), associated with loss of PTEN protein expression. Increased pAkt expression was found in all cell lines following epidermal growth factor (EGF) stimulation, indicating that wild-type PTEN expression in four cell lines did not inhibit constitutive activation of PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway. Nonetheless, all cell lines demonstrated sensitivity to ridaforolimus within a clinically relevant dose-range (half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50)=0.7-10 nM). PTEN mutation is rare in sarcoma cell lines and constitutive activation of PI3K/Akt/mTOR is independent of PTEN status. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  10. Brain patterning perturbations following PTEN loss

    PubMed Central

    Veleva-Rotse, Biliana O.; Barnes, Anthony P.

    2014-01-01

    This review will consider the impact of compromised PTEN signaling in brain patterning. We approach understanding the contribution of PTEN to nervous system development by surveying the findings from the numerous genetic loss-of-function models that have been generated as well as other forms of PTEN inactivation. By exploring the developmental programs influenced by this central transduction molecule, we can begin to understand the molecular mechanisms that shape the developing brain. A wealth of data indicates that PTEN plays critical roles in a variety of stages during brain development. Many of them are considered here including: stem cell proliferation, fate determination, polarity, migration, process outgrowth, myelination and somatic hypertrophy. In many of these contexts, it is clear that PTEN phosphatase activity contributes to the observed effects of genetic deletion or depletion, however recent studies have also ascribed non-catalytic functions to PTEN in regulating cell function. We also explore the potential impact this alternative pool of PTEN may have on the developing brain. Together, these elements begin to form a clearer picture of how PTEN contributes to the emergence of brain structure and binds form and function in the nervous system. PMID:24860420

  11. Pten signaling in gliomas.

    PubMed Central

    Knobbe, Christiane B.; Merlo, Adrian; Reifenberger, Guido

    2002-01-01

    In 1997, the PTEN gene (phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10) was identified as a tumor suppressor gene on the long arm of chromosome 10. Since then, important progress has been made with respect to the understanding of the role of the Pten protein in the normal development of the brain as well as in the molecular pathogenesis of human gliomas. This review summarizes the current state of the art concerning the involvement of aberrant Pten function in the development of different biologic features of malignant gliomas, such as loss of cell-cycle control and uncontrolled cell proliferation, escape from apoptosis, brain invasion, and aberrant neoangiogenesis. Most of the tumor-suppressive properties of Pten are dependent on its lipid phosphatase activity, which inhibits the phosphatidylinositol-3'-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway through dephosphorylation of phosphatidylinositol-(3,4,5)-triphosphate. The additional function of Pten as a dual-specificity protein phosphatase may also play a role in glioma pathogenesis. Besides the wealth of data elucidating the functional roles of Pten, recent studies suggest a diagnostic significance of PTEN gene alterations as a molecular marker for poor prognosis in anaplastic astrocytomas and anaplastic oligodendrogliomas. Furthermore, the possibility of selective targeting of PTEN mutant tumor cells by specific pharmacologic inhibitors of members of the Pten/PI3K/Akt pathway opens up new perspectives for a targeted molecular therapy of malignant gliomas. PMID:12084351

  12. PTEN action in leukemia dictated by the tissue microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Miething, Cornelius; Scuoppo, Claudio; Bosbach, Benedikt; Appelmann, Iris; Nakitandwe, Joy; Ma, Jing; Wu, Gang; Lintault, Laura; Auer, Martina; Premsrirut, Prem K.; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie; Hicks, James; Benveniste, Helene; Speicher, Michael R.; Downing, James R.; Lowe, Scott W.

    2014-01-01

    PTEN encodes a lipid phosphatase that is underexpressed in many cancers owing to deletions, mutations or gene silencing1–3. PTEN dephosphorylates phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-triphosphate (PIP3), thereby opposing the activity of class I phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases (PI3Ks) that mediate growth and survival factors signaling through PI3K effectors such as AKT and mTOR2. To determine whether continued PTEN inactivation is required to maintain malignancy, we generated an RNAi-based transgenic mouse model that allows tetracycline-dependent regulation of PTEN in a time- and tissue-specific manner. Postnatal PTEN knockdown in the hematopoietic compartment produced highly disseminated T-cell leukemia (T-ALL). Surprisingly, reactivation of PTEN mainly reduced T-ALL dissemination but had little effect on tumor load in hematopoietic organs. Leukemia infiltration into the intestine was dependent on CCR9 G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling, which was amplified by PTEN loss. Our results suggest that in the absence of PTEN, GPCRs may play an unanticipated role in driving tumor growth and invasion in an unsupportive environment. They further reveal that the role of PTEN loss in tumor maintenance is not invariant and can be influenced by the tissue microenvironment, thereby producing a form of intratumoral heterogeneity that is independent of cancer genotype. PMID:24805236

  13. Inhibition of Rad51 sensitizes breast cancer cells with wild-type PTEN to olaparib.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qian; Guan, Jiawei; Zhang, Zhiwei; Lv, Jian; Wang, Yulu; Liu, Likun; Zhou, Qi; Mao, Weifeng

    2017-10-01

    PTEN is a tumor suppressor gene well characterized as a phosphatase. However, more evidences demonstrate PTEN functions in DNA repair independent of its phosphatase activity, which affects the efficacy of DNA damage anti-tumoral drugs in treating cancer cells with PTEN variations. Using BT549 breast cancer cells, we studied the roles of PTEN in DNA repair and in sensitization of breast cancer cells to olaparib, a poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitor. Comet assay showed PTEN promoted DNA repair. PTEN-deficient BT549 cells are sensitive to olaparib, which shows the synthetic lethality between PTEN and PARP1. We expressed PTEN in BT549 cells and found PTEN-proficient BT549 cells resist to olaparib. Western blot showed that PTEN up-regulated Rad51 expression, suggesting PTEN promotes DNA repair through Rad51-dependnent homologous recombination. We used 5μM olaparib or 5μM RI-1, a Rad51 inhibitor, to treat PTEN-proficient BT549 cells respectively. The immunofluorescent analysis showed the combination of olaparib and RI-1 induced more than 4-fold of γH2AX foci than either of them. MTT assay showed 5μM RI-1 did not change the survival of PTEN-proficient BT549 cells, however, this dose of RI-1 sensitized PTEN-proficient BT549 cells to olaparib. Consequently, these results demonstrate that inhibition of Rad51 can sensitize BT549 cells with wild type PTEN to olaparib, which would contribute to using PARP inhibitors in individual treatment of breast cancer patients with PTEN variations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Insulin-Like Growth Factor-Type 1 Receptor Inhibitor NVP-AEW541 Enhances Radiosensitivity of PTEN Wild-Type but Not PTEN-Deficient Human Prostate Cancer Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Isebaert, Sofie F.; Swinnen, Johannes V.; McBride, William H.; Haustermans, Karin M.

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: During the past decade, many clinical trials with both monoclonal antibodies and small molecules that target the insulin-like growth factor-type 1 receptor (IGF-1R) have been launched. Despite the important role of IGF-1R signaling in radioresistance, studies of such agents in combination with radiotherapy are lagging behind. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the small molecule IGF-1R kinase inhibitor NVP-AEW541 on the intrinsic radioresistance of prostate cancer cells. Methods and Materials: The effect of NVP-AEW541 on cell proliferation, cell viability, IGF-1R signaling, radiosensitivity, cell cycle distribution, and double strand break repair was determined in three human prostate cancer cell lines (PC3, DU145, 22Rv1). Moreover, the importance of the PTEN pathway status was explored by means of transfection experiments with constitutively active Akt or inactive kinase-dead Akt. Results: NVP-AEW541 inhibited cell proliferation and decreased cell viability in a time-and dose-dependent manner in all three cell lines. Radiosensitization was observed in the PTEN wild-type cell lines DU145 and 22Rv1 but not in the PTEN-deficient PC3 cell line. NVP-AEW541-induced radiosensitization coincided with downregulation of phospho-Akt levels and high levels of residual double strand breaks. The importance of PTEN status in the radiosensitization effect was confirmed by transfection experiments with constitutively active Akt or inactive kinase-dead Akt. Conclusions: NVP-AEW541 enhances the effect of ionizing radiation in PTEN wild-type, but not in PTEN-deficient, prostate cancer cells. Proper patient selection based on the PTEN status of the tumor will be critical to the achievement of optimal results in clinical trials in which the combination of radiotherapy and this IGF-1R inhibitor is being explored.

  15. PTEN at 18: Still Growing.

    PubMed

    Gorbenko, Olena; Stambolic, Vuk

    2016-01-01

    Discovered in 1997, PTEN remains one of the most studied tumor suppressors. In this issue of Methods in Molecular Biology, we assembled a series of papers describing various clinical and experimental approaches to studying PTEN function. Due to its broad expression, regulated subcellular localization, and intriguing phosphatase activity, methodologies aimed at PTEN study have often been developed in the context of mutations affecting various aspects of its regulation, found in patients burdened with PTEN loss-driven tumors. PTEN's extensive posttranslational modifications and dynamic localization pose unique challenges for studying PTEN features in isolation and necessitate considerable development of experimental systems to enable controlled characterization. Nevertheless, ongoing efforts towards the development of PTEN knockout and knock-in animals and cell lines, antibodies, and enzymatic assays have facilitated a huge body of work, which continues to unravel the fascinating biology of PTEN.

  16. Determinants of thiopental induction dose requirements.

    PubMed

    Avram, M J; Sanghvi, R; Henthorn, T K; Krejcie, T C; Shanks, C A; Fragen, R J; Howard, K A; Kaczynski, D A

    1993-01-01

    Dose requirements for thiopental anesthetic induction have significant age- and gender-related variability. We studied the association of the patient characteristics age, gender, weight, lean body mass, and cardiac output with thiopental requirements. Doses of thiopental, infused at 150 mg/min, required to reach both a clinical end-point and an electroencephalographic (EEG) end-point were determined in 30 males and 30 females, aged 18-83 yr. Univariate least squares linear regression analysis revealed outliers in the relationships of age, weight, lean body mass, and cardiac output to thiopental dose at clinical and EEG endpoints. Differential weighting of data points minimized the effect of outliers in the construction of a robust multiple linear regression model of the relationship between several selected independent variables and the dependent variables thiopental dose at clinical and EEG endpoints. The multiple linear regression model for thiopental dose at the clinical end-point selecting the regressor variables age, weight, and gender (R2 = 0.76) was similar to that for age, lean body mass, and gender (R2 = 0.75). Thiopental dose at the EEG endpoint was better described by models selecting the variables age, weight, and cardiac output (R2 = 0.88) or age, lean body mass, and cardiac output (R2 = 0.87). Although cardiac output varied with age, age always remained a selected variable. Because weight and lean body mass differed with gender, their selection as variables in the model eliminated gender as a selected variable or minimized its importance.

  17. PTEN Mediates the Antioxidant Effect of Resveratrol at Nutritionally Relevant Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Inglés, Marta; Gambini, Juan; Miguel, M. Graça; Bonet-Costa, Vicent; Abdelaziz, Kheira M.; El Alami, Marya; Viña, Jose; Borrás, Consuelo

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Antioxidant properties of resveratrol have been intensively studied for the last years, both in vivo and in vitro. Its bioavailability after an oral dose is very low and therefore it is very important to make sure that plasma concentrations of free resveratrol are sufficient enough to be active as antioxidant. Aims. In the present study, using nutritionally relevant concentrations of resveratrol, we aim to confirm its antioxidant capacity on reducing peroxide levels and look for the molecular pathway involved in this antioxidant effect. Methods. We used mammary gland tumor cells (MCF-7), which were pretreated with different concentrations of resveratrol for 48 h, and/or a PTEN inhibitor (bpV: bipy). Hydrogen peroxide levels were determined by fluorimetry, PTEN levels and Akt phosphorylation by Western Blotting, and mRNA expression of antioxidant genes by real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results. Resveratrol treatment for 48 h lowered peroxide levels in MCF-7, even at low nutritional concentrations (1 nM). This effect was mediated by the activation of PTEN/Akt pathway, which resulted in an upregulation of catalase and MnSOD mRNA levels. Conclusion. Resveratrol acts as an antioxidant at nutritionally relevant concentrations by inducing the expression of antioxidant enzymes, through a mechanism involving PTEN/Akt signaling pathway. PMID:24812624

  18. PTEN mediates the antioxidant effect of resveratrol at nutritionally relevant concentrations.

    PubMed

    Inglés, Marta; Gambini, Juan; Miguel, M Graça; Bonet-Costa, Vicent; Abdelaziz, Kheira M; El Alami, Marya; Viña, Jose; Borrás, Consuelo

    2014-01-01

    Antioxidant properties of resveratrol have been intensively studied for the last years, both in vivo and in vitro. Its bioavailability after an oral dose is very low and therefore it is very important to make sure that plasma concentrations of free resveratrol are sufficient enough to be active as antioxidant. In the present study, using nutritionally relevant concentrations of resveratrol, we aim to confirm its antioxidant capacity on reducing peroxide levels and look for the molecular pathway involved in this antioxidant effect. We used mammary gland tumor cells (MCF-7), which were pretreated with different concentrations of resveratrol for 48 h, and/or a PTEN inhibitor (bpV: bipy). Hydrogen peroxide levels were determined by fluorimetry, PTEN levels and Akt phosphorylation by Western Blotting, and mRNA expression of antioxidant genes by real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Resveratrol treatment for 48 h lowered peroxide levels in MCF-7, even at low nutritional concentrations (1 nM). This effect was mediated by the activation of PTEN/Akt pathway, which resulted in an upregulation of catalase and MnSOD mRNA levels. Resveratrol acts as an antioxidant at nutritionally relevant concentrations by inducing the expression of antioxidant enzymes, through a mechanism involving PTEN/Akt signaling pathway.

  19. On determining dose rate constants spectroscopically

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, M.; Rogers, D. W. O.

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: To investigate several aspects of the Chen and Nath spectroscopic method of determining the dose rate constants of {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd seeds [Z. Chen and R. Nath, Phys. Med. Biol. 55, 6089-6104 (2010)] including the accuracy of using a line or dual-point source approximation as done in their method, and the accuracy of ignoring the effects of the scattered photons in the spectra. Additionally, the authors investigate the accuracy of the literature's many different spectra for bare, i.e., unencapsulated {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd sources. Methods: Spectra generated by 14 {sup 125}I and 6 {sup 103}Pd seeds were calculated in vacuo at 10 cm from the source in a 2.7 Multiplication-Sign 2.7 Multiplication-Sign 0.05 cm{sup 3} voxel using the EGSnrc BrachyDose Monte Carlo code. Calculated spectra used the initial photon spectra recommended by AAPM's TG-43U1 and NCRP (National Council of Radiation Protection and Measurements) Report 58 for the {sup 125}I seeds, or TG-43U1 and NNDC(2000) (National Nuclear Data Center, 2000) for {sup 103}Pd seeds. The emitted spectra were treated as coming from a line or dual-point source in a Monte Carlo simulation to calculate the dose rate constant. The TG-43U1 definition of the dose rate constant was used. These calculations were performed using the full spectrum including scattered photons or using only the main peaks in the spectrum as done experimentally. Statistical uncertainties on the air kerma/history and the dose rate/history were Less-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 0.2%. The dose rate constants were also calculated using Monte Carlo simulations of the full seed model. Results: The ratio of the intensity of the 31 keV line relative to that of the main peak in {sup 125}I spectra is, on average, 6.8% higher when calculated with the NCRP Report 58 initial spectrum vs that calculated with TG-43U1 initial spectrum. The {sup 103}Pd spectra exhibit an average 6.2% decrease in the 22.9 keV line relative to the main peak when

  20. PTEN loss in circulating tumour cells correlates with PTEN loss in fresh tumour tissue from castration-resistant prostate cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Punnoose, Elizabeth A; Ferraldeschi, Roberta; Szafer-Glusman, Edith; Tucker, Eric K; Mohan, Sankar; Flohr, Penelope; Riisnaes, Ruth; Miranda, Susana; Figueiredo, Ines; Rodrigues, Daniel Nava; Omlin, Aurelius; Pezaro, Carmel; Zhu, Jin; Amler, Lukas; Patel, Premal; Yan, Yibing; Bales, Natalee; Werner, Shannon L; Louw, Jessica; Pandita, Ajay; Marrinucci, Dena; Attard, Gerhardt; de Bono, Johann

    2015-01-01

    Background: PTEN gene loss occurs frequently in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) and may drive progression through activation of the PI3K/AKT pathway. Here, we developed a novel CTC-based assay to determine PTEN status and examined the correlation between PTEN status in CTCs and matched tumour tissue samples. Methods: PTEN gene status in CTCs was evaluated on an enrichment-free platform (Epic Sciences) by fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH). PTEN status in archival and fresh tumour tissue was evaluated by FISH and immunohistochemistry. Results: Peripheral blood was collected from 76 patients. Matched archival and fresh cancer tissue was available for 48 patients. PTEN gene status detected in CTCs was concordant with PTEN status in matched fresh tissues and archival tissue in 32 of 38 patients (84%) and 24 of 39 patients (62%), respectively. CTC counts were prognostic (continuous, P=0.001). PTEN loss in CTCs associated with worse survival in univariate analysis (HR 2.05; 95% CI 1.17–3.62; P=0.01) and with high lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in metastatic CRPC patients. Conclusions: Our results illustrate the potential use of CTCs as a non-invasive, real-time liquid biopsy to determine PTEN gene status. The prognostic and predictive value of PTEN in CTCs warrants investigation in CRPC clinical trials of PI3K/AKT-targeted therapies. PMID:26379078

  1. [Effect of captopril on expression of PTEN in aorta of aortic-induced hypertensive rats].

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhiqiang; Hu, Ya'e; Liu, Bo; Jiang, Zonglai

    2004-12-01

    This study inquired about the role of tumor suppressor PTEN in the arterial remodeling of Ang II induced hypertension. The expression of PTEN of aorta was examined in the aortic-constricted hypertensive rats (hypertension group), in the aortic-constricted hypertensive rats treated with captopril(hypertension and captopril group), and in the rats having undergone sham operation (control group). At day 28 after surgery, the aortas were collected from the groups. The expression of PTEN mRNA was detected by RT-PCR. The expression and location of PTEN protein were determined by immunohistochemistry. The results showed that the expression of PTEN in aorta of the hypertension group was significantly lower than that of the hypertension and captopril group, and similarly lower than that of the control group. The intensity of PTEN-positive immunohistochemical production in aorta of the hypertension group was weaker than that of the hypertension and captopril group, and likewise, it was weaker than the control. PTEN-positive immunohistochemical production was located in VSMC of aorta. The findings indicated that the expression of PTEN is reduced in hypertensive aorta, that the reduced PTEN experession can be reversed by captopril treatment, that AngII and the increased mechanical strain may participate in regulating expression of PTEN, and that PTEN may play a role in the arterial remodeling induced by hypertension.

  2. Involvement of PTEN in airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation in bronchial asthma.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Yong-Geun; Song, Chang H; Yi, Ho K; Hwang, Pyoung H; Kim, Jong-Suk; Lee, Kyung S; Lee, Yong C

    2003-04-01

    Phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN) is part of a complex signaling system that affects a variety of important cell functions. PTEN blocks the action of PI3K by dephosphorylating the signaling lipid phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-triphosphate. We have used a mouse model for asthma to determine the effect of PI3K inhibitors and PTEN on allergen-induced bronchial inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness. PI3K activity increased significantly after allergen challenge. PTEN protein expression and PTEN activity were decreased in OVA-induced asthma. Immunoreactive PTEN localized in epithelial layers around the bronchioles in control mice. However, this immunoreactive PTEN dramatically disappeared in allergen-induced asthmatic lungs. The increased IL-4, IL-5, and eosinophil cationic protein levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids after OVA inhalation were significantly reduced by the intratracheal administration of PI3K inhibitors or adenoviruses carrying PTEN cDNA (AdPTEN). Intratracheal administration of PI3K inhibitors or AdPTEN remarkably reduced bronchial inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness. These findings indicate that PTEN may play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of the asthma phenotype.

  3. PTEN regulates cilia through Dishevelled

    PubMed Central

    Shnitsar, Iryna; Bashkurov, Mikhail; Masson, Glenn R.; Ogunjimi, Abiodun A.; Mosessian, Sherly; Cabeza, Eduardo Aguiar; Hirsch, Calley L.; Trcka, Daniel; Gish, Gerald; Jiao, Jing; Wu, Hong; Winklbauer, Rudolf; Williams, Roger L.; Pelletier, Laurence; Wrana, Jeffrey L.; Barrios-Rodiles, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    Cilia are hair-like cellular protrusions important in many aspects of eukaryotic biology. For instance, motile cilia enable fluid movement over epithelial surfaces, while primary (sensory) cilia play roles in cellular signalling. The molecular events underlying cilia dynamics, and particularly their disassembly, are not well understood. Phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) is an extensively studied tumour suppressor, thought to primarily act by antagonizing PI3-kinase signalling. Here we demonstrate that PTEN plays an important role in multicilia formation and cilia disassembly by controlling the phosphorylation of Dishevelled (DVL), another ciliogenesis regulator. DVL is a central component of WNT signalling that plays a role during convergent extension movements, which we show here are also regulated by PTEN. Our studies identify a novel protein substrate for PTEN that couples PTEN to regulation of cilia dynamics and WNT signalling, thus advancing our understanding of potential underlying molecular etiologies of PTEN-related pathologies. PMID:26399523

  4. Mesodermal Pten inactivation leads to alveolar capillary dysplasia- like phenotype.

    PubMed

    Tiozzo, Caterina; Carraro, Gianni; Al Alam, Denise; Baptista, Sheryl; Danopoulos, Soula; Li, Aimin; Lavarreda-Pearce, Maria; Li, Changgong; De Langhe, Stijn; Chan, Belinda; Borok, Zea; Bellusci, Saverio; Minoo, Parviz

    2012-11-01

    Alveolar capillary dysplasia (ACD) is a congenital, lethal disorder of the pulmonary vasculature. Phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted from chromosome 10 (Pten) encodes a lipid phosphatase controlling key cellular functions, including stem/progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation; however, the role of PTEN in mesodermal lung cell lineage formation remains unexamined. To determine the role of mesodermal PTEN in the ontogeny of various mesenchymal cell lineages during lung development, we specifically deleted Pten in early embryonic lung mesenchyme in mice. Pups lacking Pten died at birth, with evidence of failure in blood oxygenation. Analysis at the cellular level showed defects in angioblast differentiation to endothelial cells and an accompanying accumulation of the angioblast cell population that was associated with disorganized capillary beds. We also found decreased expression of Forkhead box protein F1 (Foxf1), a gene associated with the ACD human phenotype. Analysis of human samples for ACD revealed a significant decrease in PTEN and increased activated protein kinase B (AKT). These studies demonstrate that mesodermal PTEN has a key role in controlling the amplification of angioblasts as well as their differentiation into endothelial cells, thereby directing the establishment of a functional gas exchange interface. Additionally, these mice could serve as a murine model of ACD.

  5. A Tailored Approach to Prostate Cancer Therapy Based upon PTEN Status

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-01

    were to (1) determine the effect of PARP inhibition on the cellular response to ionizing radiation or docetaxel in DU145 PTEN wild-type vs. PC-3 PTEN...moment in comet assay, clonogenic cell survival and apoptosis assay.  H2AX foci assays revealed that ABT888 in combination with radiation therapy (RT...Body Task 1: Determine how PTEN status impacts the response to DNA damage following chemo/ radiation in the absence or presence of PARP inhibition

  6. The anti-tumor effect of pachymic acid on osteosarcoma cells by inducing PTEN and Caspase 3/7-dependent apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wen, Huilong; Wu, Zhong; Hu, Huidong; Wu, Yixiong; Yang, Gang; Lu, Jiajun; Yang, Guang; Guo, Gang; Dong, Qirong

    2017-08-30

    Pachymic acid (PA) is a lanostane type triterpenoid isolated from Poria cocos, which possesses an anti-tumor effect in breast cancer, prostate cancer, lung cancer, and bladder cancer cells. In this study, we investigated the effect of PA on the growth and apoptosis of human immortalized cell line (HOS) and primary osteosarcoma cells by a Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) and Annexin V and propidium iodide (PI) staining, respectively. Western blot was used to measure the expression of cleaved Caspase 3, PTEN, and AKT, as well as the AKT phosphorylation. The Caspase 3 activity was determined using the Caspase-3 Colorimetric Assay Kit. From the results, PA significantly reduced cell proliferation in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. PA also induced cell apoptosis in a dose-dependent fashion. PA treatment led to increased Caspase 3 activation and PTEN expression, as well as reduced AKT phosphorylation. Moreover, Ac-DEVD-CHO (a Caspase 3/7 inhibitor) pre-treatment or PTEN knockdown partially blocked the effects of PA on cell proliferation and apoptosis. Caspase 3/7 inhibitor had an additive effect with PTEN knockdown. Collectively, our results suggested that induction of apoptosis by PA was mediated in part by PTEN/AKT signaling and Caspase 3/7 activity. This study provides evidence that PA might be useful in the treatment of human osteosarcoma.

  7. PTEN Protein Loss by Immunostaining: Analytic Validation and Prognostic Indicator for a High Risk Surgical Cohort of Prostate Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lotan, Tamara L.; Gurel, Bora; Sutcliffe, Siobhan; Esopi, David; Liu, Wennuan; Xu, Jianfeng; Hicks, Jessica L.; Park, Ben H.; Humphreys, Elizabeth; Partin, Alan W.; Han, Misop; Netto, George J.; Isaacs, William B.; De Marzo, Angelo M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Analytically validated assays to interrogate biomarker status in clinical samples are crucial for personalized medicine. PTEN is a tumor suppressor commonly inactivated in prostate cancer that has been mechanistically linked to disease aggressiveness. Though deletion of PTEN, as detected by cumbersome fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) spot counting assays, is associated with poor prognosis, few studies have validated immunohistochemical (IHC) assays to determine whether loss of PTEN protein is associated with unfavorable disease. Experimental Design PTEN IHC was validated by employing formalin fixed and paraffin embedded isogenic human cell lines containing or lacking intact PTEN alleles. PTEN IHC was 100% sensitive and 97.8% specific for detecting genomic alterations in 58 additional cell lines. PTEN protein loss was then assessed on 376 prostate tumor samples, and PTEN FISH or high resolution SNP microarray analysis was performed on a subset of these cases. Results PTEN protein loss, as assessed as a dichotomous IHC variable, was highly reproducible, correlated strongly with adverse pathologic features (e.g. Gleason score and pathological stage), detected between 75% and 86% of cases with PTEN genomic loss, and was found at times in the absence of apparent genomic loss. In a cohort of 217 high risk surgically treated patients, PTEN protein loss was associated with decreased time to metastasis. Conclusions These studies validate a simple method to interrogate PTEN status in clinical specimens and support the utility of this test in future multi-center studies, clinical trials and ultimately perhaps for routine clinical care. PMID:21878536

  8. Determination of dose distributions and parameter sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, B.A.; Farris, W.T.; Simpson, J.C.

    1992-12-01

    A series of scoping calculations has been undertaken to evaluate the absolute and relative contribution of different radionuclides and exposure pathways to doses that may have been received by individuals living in the vicinity of the Hanford site. This scoping calculation (Calculation 005) examined the contributions of numerous parameters to the uncertainty distribution of doses calculated for environmental exposures and accumulation in foods. This study builds on the work initiated in the first scoping study of iodine in cow's milk and the third scoping study, which added additional pathways. Addressed in this calculation were the contributions to thyroid dose of infants from (1) air submersion and groundshine external dose, (2) inhalation, (3) ingestion of soil by humans, (4) ingestion of leafy vegetables, (5) ingestion of other vegetables and fruits, (6) ingestion of meat, (7) ingestion of eggs, and (8) ingestion of cows' milk from Feeding Regime 1 as described in Calculation 001.

  9. Methods to Study PTEN in Mitochondria and Endoplasmic Reticulum.

    PubMed

    Missiroli, Sonia; Morganti, Claudia; Giorgi, Carlotta; Pinton, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Although PTEN has been widely described as a nuclear and cytosolic protein, in the last 2 years, alternative organelles, such as the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), pure mitochondria, and mitochondria-associated membranes (MAMs), have been recognized as pivotal targets of PTEN activity.Here, we describe different methods that have been used to highlight PTEN subcellular localization.First, a protocol to extract nuclear and cytosolic fractions has been described to assess the "canonical" PTEN localization. Moreover, we describe a protocol for mitochondria isolation with proteinase K (PK) to further discriminate whether PTEN associates with the outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM) or resides within the mitochondria. Finally, we focus our attention on a subcellular fractionation protocol of cells that permits the isolation of MAMs containing unique regions of ER membranes attached to the outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM) and mitochondria without contamination from other organelles. In addition to biochemical fractionations, immunostaining can be used to determine the subcellular localization of proteins; thus, a detailed protocol to obtain good immunofluorescence (IF) is described. The employment of these methodological approaches could facilitate the identification of different PTEN localizations in several physiopathological contexts.

  10. JQ1 suppresses tumor growth via PTEN/PI3K/AKT pathway in endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Haifeng; Li, Jing; Clark, Leslie H.; Jackson, Amanda L.; Zhang, Lu; Guo, Hui; Kilgore, Joshua E.; Gehrig, Paola A.; Zhou, Chunxiao; Bae-Jump, Victoria L.

    2016-01-01

    Overexpression of c-Myc is associated with worse outcomes in endometrial cancer, indicating that c-Myc may be a promising target for endometrial cancer therapy. A novel small molecule, JQ1, has been shown to block BRD4 resulting in inhibition of c-Myc expression and tumor growth. Thus, we investigated whether JQ1 can inhibit endometrial cancer growth in cell culture and xenograft models. In PTEN-positive endometrial cancer cells, JQ1 significantly suppressed cell proliferation via induction of G1 phase arrest and apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner, accompanied by a sharp decline in cyclin D1 and CDK4 protein expression. However, PTEN-negative endometrial cancer cells exhibited intrinsic resistance to JQ1, despite significant c-Myc inhibition. Moreover, we found that PTEN and its downstream PI3K/AKT signaling targets were modulated by JQ1, as evidenced by microarray analysis. Silencing of PTEN in PTEN-positive endometrial cancer cells resulted in resistance to JQ1, while upregulation of PTEN in PTEN-negative endometrial cancer cells increased sensitivity to JQ1. In xenografts models of PTEN-positive and PTEN-knock-in endometrial cancer, JQ1 significantly upregulated the expression of PTEN, blocked the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway and suppressed tumor growth. These effects were attenuated in PTEN-negative and PTEN-knockdown xenograft models. Thus, JQ1 resistance appears to be highly associated with the status of PTEN expression in endometrial cancer. Our findings suggest that targeting BRD4 using JQ1 might serve as a novel therapeutic strategy in PTEN-positive endometrial cancers. PMID:27572308

  11. A practical approach to determine dose metrics for nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Delmaar, Christiaan J E; Peijnenburg, Willie J G M; Oomen, Agnes G; Chen, Jingwen; de Jong, Wim H; Sips, Adriënne J A M; Wang, Zhuang; Park, Margriet V D Z

    2015-05-01

    Traditionally, administered mass is used to describe doses of conventional chemical substances in toxicity studies. For deriving toxic doses of nanomaterials, mass and chemical composition alone may not adequately describe the dose, because particles with the same chemical composition can have completely different toxic mass doses depending on properties such as particle size. Other dose metrics such as particle number, volume, or surface area have been suggested, but consensus is lacking. The discussion regarding the most adequate dose metric for nanomaterials clearly needs a systematic, unbiased approach to determine the most appropriate dose metric for nanomaterials. In the present study, the authors propose such an approach and apply it to results from in vitro and in vivo experiments with silver and silica nanomaterials. The proposed approach is shown to provide a convenient tool to systematically investigate and interpret dose metrics of nanomaterials. Recommendations for study designs aimed at investigating dose metrics are provided.

  12. Curcumin cytotoxicity is enhanced by PTEN disruption in colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lin; Li, Wen-Feng; Wang, Hong-Xiao; Zhao, Hai-Na; Tang, Jia-Jia; Wu, Chang-Jie; Lu, Li-Ting; Liao, Wan-Qin; Lu, Xin-Cheng

    2013-10-28

    To investigate the effects of phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) deficiency on the cytotoxicity of chemotherapeutic agents toward colorectal cancer cells. PTEN-deficient colorectal cancer (CRC) cells were generated by human somatic cell gene targeting using the adeno-associated virus system. The cytotoxic effects of compounds including curcumin, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), dihydroartemisinin (DHA), irinotecan (CPT-11) and oxaliplatin (OXA) on cancer cells were determined using the MTT assay. Enhanced cytotoxicity of curcumin in PTEN-deficient CRC cells was observed, and this was confirmed using clonogenic assays. Apoptosis and cell cycle progression were analyzed by flow cytometry. Levels of apoptosis and cell cycle-related proteins were examined by Western blotting. We developed an isogenic set of CRC cell lines that differed only in their PTEN status. Using this set of cell lines, we found that disruption of the PTEN gene had no effect on the sensitivity of CRC cells to 5-FU, CPT-11, DHA, or OXA, whereas PTEN disruption increased the sensitivity of CRC cells to curcumin. Loss of PTEN did not alter the curcumin-induced apoptosis in CRC cells. However, PTEN deficiency led to an altered pattern of curcumin-mediated cell cycle arrest. In HCT116 PTEN (+/+) cells, curcumin caused a G2/M phase arrest, whereas it caused a G0/G1 phase arrest in HCT116 PTEN (-/-) cells. Levels of cell cycle-related proteins were consistent with these respective patterns of cell cycle arrest. Curcumin shows enhanced cytotoxicity toward PTEN-deficient cancer cells, suggesting that it might be a potential chemotherapeutic agent for cancers harboring PTEN mutations.

  13. Down-modulation of Bcl-2 sensitizes PTEN-mutated prostate cancer cells to starvation and taxanes.

    PubMed

    Calastretti, Angela; Gatti, Giuliana; Quaresmini, Carolina; Bevilacqua, Annamaria

    2014-10-01

    The critical role of PTEN in regulating the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway raises the possibility that targeting downstream effectors of the PI3K pathway, such as Bcl-2, might be an effective anti-proliferative strategy for PTEN-deficient prostate cancer cells. Four prostate cancer cell lines (LNCaP, PC3, DU145, 22Rv1) were assayed for their levels of total Akt and Ser473 phosphorylated Akt (p-Akt) by Western Blotting; their growth rates and sensitivity to different doses of paclitaxel were determined by cell counts after Trypan Blue dye exclusion assay. Cells were subjected to different combinations of starvation (growth factors and/or aminoacids withdrawal), paclitaxel treatment and Bcl-2 silencing by siRNA. Cell viability was evaluated by Trypan Blue dye exclusion assay, Propidium Iodide (PI) and Annexin-V/PI staining. We assessed the sensitivity of different prostate cancer cell lines to starvation and we observed a differential response correlated to the levels of Akt activation. The four prostate cancer cell lines also showed different sensitivity to taxol treatments; LNCaP and 22Rv1 cells were more resistant to paclitaxel than DU145 and PC3 cells. Combining taxol with growth factors and aminoacids deprivation leaded to a more than additive reduction of cell viability compared to single treatments in PTEN-mutant LNCaP cells. Down-modulation of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein by siRNA sensitized LNCaP cells to taxanes and starvation induced cell death. Silencing Bcl-2 in PTEN-mutated prostate cancer cells enhances the apoptotic effects of combined starvation and taxol treatments, indicating that inhibition of Bcl-2 may be of significant value in PTEN-mutant tumor therapy. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Inactivation of tumor suppressor gene pten in early and advanced gallbladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Roa, Iván; de Toro, Gonzalo; Fernández, Fernanda; Game, Anakaren; Muñoz, Sergio; de Aretxabala, Xabier; Javle, Milind

    2015-08-21

    PTEN is a tumor suppressor gene that regulates the PTEN/PI3k/AKT/mTOR pathway, which is frequently altered in human cancers including gallbladder cancer (GBC). To determine the frequency of PTEN expression in GBC and to establish its relation to clinical and morphological parameters and survival in GBC. The immunohistochemical expression of PTEN was studied in 108 GBC. All the cases included areas of non-tumor mucosa adjacent to the tumor. The group was comprised of 108 patients, 91 women (84.3%) and 17 men (15.7%) with an average age of 65.2 years (SD ± 12.3 years). Thirty-five cases (33%) were early carcinomas (EC) and the remaining 73 (67%) were advanced cases (AC). All the internal controls were positive (moderate or intense in 96.3%). Only in three AC (4.1%) was there a complete absence of PTEN immunohistochemical expression. There were no significant differences in relation between PTEN expression and tumor infiltration or degree of differentiation. The three patients with PTEN inactivation died before 10 months; however, the other patients with AC had a survival of 53% at 10 months. Loss of PTEN expression was observed in 4.1% of the advanced GBC. All the patients with this alteration died before 10 months. PTEN inactivation could be a rare event, but with a poor prognosis in advanced GBC.

  15. High Throughput Determination of Critical Human Dosing ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    High throughput toxicokinetics (HTTK) is a rapid approach that uses in vitro data to estimate TK for hundreds of environmental chemicals. Reverse dosimetry (i.e., reverse toxicokinetics or RTK) based on HTTK data converts high throughput in vitro toxicity screening (HTS) data into predicted human equivalent doses that can be linked with biologically relevant exposure scenarios. Thus, HTTK provides essential data for risk prioritization for thousands of chemicals that lack TK data. One critical HTTK parameter that can be measured in vitro is the unbound fraction of a chemical in plasma (Fub). However, for chemicals that bind strongly to plasma, Fub is below the limits of detection (LOD) for high throughput analytical chemistry, and therefore cannot be quantified. A novel method for quantifying Fub was implemented for 85 strategically selected chemicals: measurement of Fub was attempted at 10%, 30%, and 100% of physiological plasma concentrations using rapid equilibrium dialysis assays. Varying plasma concentrations instead of chemical concentrations makes high throughput analytical methodology more likely to be successful. Assays at 100% plasma concentration were unsuccessful for 34 chemicals. For 12 of these 34 chemicals, Fub could be quantified at 10% and/or 30% plasma concentrations; these results imply that the assay failure at 100% plasma concentration was caused by plasma protein binding for these chemicals. Assay failure for the remaining 22 chemicals may

  16. Hyperactivity of Newborn Pten Knock-out Neurons Results from Increased Excitatory Synaptic Drive

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Michael R.; DeSpenza, Tyrone; Li, Meijie; Gulledge, Allan T.

    2015-01-01

    Developing neurons must regulate morphology, intrinsic excitability, and synaptogenesis to form neural circuits. When these processes go awry, disorders, including autism spectrum disorder (ASD) or epilepsy, may result. The phosphatase Pten is mutated in some patients having ASD and seizures, suggesting that its mutation disrupts neurological function in part through increasing neuronal activity. Supporting this idea, neuronal knock-out of Pten in mice can cause macrocephaly, behavioral changes similar to ASD, and seizures. However, the mechanisms through which excitability is enhanced following Pten depletion are unclear. Previous studies have separately shown that Pten-depleted neurons can drive seizures, receive elevated excitatory synaptic input, and have abnormal dendrites. We therefore tested the hypothesis that developing Pten-depleted neurons are hyperactive due to increased excitatory synaptogenesis using electrophysiology, calcium imaging, morphological analyses, and modeling. This was accomplished by coinjecting retroviruses to either “birthdate” or birthdate and knock-out Pten in granule neurons of the murine neonatal dentate gyrus. We found that Pten knock-out neurons, despite a rapid onset of hypertrophy, were more active in vivo. Pten knock-out neurons fired at more hyperpolarized membrane potentials, displayed greater peak spike rates, and were more sensitive to depolarizing synaptic input. The increased sensitivity of Pten knock-out neurons was due, in part, to a higher density of synapses located more proximal to the soma. We determined that increased synaptic drive was sufficient to drive hypertrophic Pten knock-out neurons beyond their altered action potential threshold. Thus, our work contributes a developmental mechanism for the increased activity of Pten-depleted neurons. PMID:25609613

  17. In prostate cancer needle biopsies, detections of PTEN loss by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and by immunohistochemistry (IHC) are concordant and show consistent association with upgrading.

    PubMed

    Picanço-Albuquerque, C G; Morais, C L; Carvalho, F L F; Peskoe, S B; Hicks, J L; Ludkovski, O; Vidotto, T; Fedor, H; Humphreys, E; Han, M; Platz, E A; De Marzo, A M; Berman, D M; Lotan, T L; Squire, J A

    2016-05-01

    The prognostic value of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) loss in prostate cancer has primarily been evaluated by either fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) or immunohistochemistry (IHC). Previously, we found that PTEN loss by IHC was associated with increased risk of upgrading from biopsy (Gleason 3 + 3) to prostatectomy (Gleason 7+). Now, using an evaluable subset of 111 patients with adjacent biopsy sections, we analyzed the association between PTEN deletion in cancer and the odds of upgrading by a highly sensitive and specific four-color FISH assay. We also compared the concordance of PTEN loss by IHC and PTEN deletion by FISH. PTEN deletion was found in 27 % (12/45) of upgraded cases compared with 11 % (7/66) of controls (P = 0.03). Cancers with PTEN deletions were more likely to be upgraded than those without deletions (adjusting for age odds ratio = 3.40, 95 % confidence interval 1.14-10.11). With respect to concordance, of 93 biopsies with PTEN protein detected by IHC, 89 (96 %) had no PTEN deletion by FISH, and of 18 biopsies without PTEN protein by IHC, 15 had homozygous or hemizygous PTEN deletion by FISH. Only 4 biopsies of the 93 (4 %) with PTEN protein intact had PTEN deletion by FISH. When the regions of uncertainty in these biopsies were systematically studied by FISH, intra-tumoral variation of PTEN deletion was found, which could account for variation in immunoreactivity. Thus, FISH provides a different approach to determining PTEN loss when IHC is uncertain. Both FISH and IHC are concordant, showing consistent positive associations between PTEN loss and upgrading.

  18. Characterization of cryptic splicing in germline PTEN intronic variants in Cowden syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hannah Jinlian; Romigh, Todd; Sesock, Kaitlin; Eng, Charis

    2017-10-01

    Germline mutations in the tumor-suppressor gene PTEN predispose to subsets of Cowden syndrome (CS), Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba syndrome, and autism. Evidence-based classification of PTEN variants as either deleterious or benign is urgently needed for accurate molecular diagnosis and gene-informed genetic counseling. We studied 34 different germline PTEN intronic variants from 61 CS patients, characterized their PTEN mRNA processing, and analyzed PTEN expression and downstream readouts of P-AKT and P-ERK1/2. While we found that many mutations near splice junctions result in exon skipping, we also identified the presence of cryptic splicing that resulted in premature termination or a shift in isoform usage. PTEN protein expression is significantly lower in the group with splicing changes while P-AKT, but not P-ERK1/2, is significantly increased. Our observations of these PTEN intronic variants should contribute to the determination of pathogenicity of PTEN intronic variants and aid in genetic counseling. © 2017 The Authors. Human Mutation published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Efficacy of targeted AKT inhibition in genetically engineered mouse models of PTEN-deficient prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    De Velasco, Marco A; Kura, Yurie; Yoshikawa, Kazuhiro; Nishio, Kazuto; Davies, Barry R; Uemura, Hirotsugu

    2016-03-29

    The PI3K/AKT pathway is frequently altered in advanced human prostate cancer mainly through the loss of functional PTEN, and presents as potential target for personalized therapy. Our aim was to determine the therapeutic potential of the pan-AKT inhibitor, AZD5363, in PTEN-deficient prostate cancer. Here we used a genetically engineered mouse (GEM) model of PTEN-deficient prostate cancer to evaluate the in vivo pharmacodynamic and antitumor activity of AZD5363 in castration-naïve and castration-resistant prostate cancer. An additional GEM model, based on the concomitant inactivation of PTEN and Trp53 (P53), was established as an aggressive model of advanced prostate cancer and was used to further evaluate clinically relevant endpoints after treatment with AZD5363. In vivo pharmacodynamic studies demonstrated that AZD5363 effectively inhibited downstream targets of AKT. AZD5363 monotherapy significantly reduced growth of tumors in castration-naïve and castration-resistant models of PTEN-deficient prostate cancer. More importantly, AZD5363 significantly delayed tumor growth and improved overall survival and progression-free survival in PTEN/P53 double knockout mice. Our findings demonstrate that AZD5363 is effective against GEM models of PTEN-deficient prostate cancer and provide lines of evidence to support further investigation into the development of treatment strategies targeting AKT for the treatment of PTEN-deficient prostate cancer.

  20. Deletion of PTEN produces deficits in conditioned fear and increases fragile X mental retardation protein.

    PubMed

    Lugo, Joaquin N; Smith, Gregory D; Morrison, Jessica B; White, Jessika

    2013-11-15

    The phosphatase and tensin homolog detected on chromosome 10 (PTEN) gene product modulates activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT pathway. The PI3K pathway has been found to be involved in the regulation of the fragile X mental retardation protein, which is important for long-term depression and in the formation of new memories. We used delayed fear conditioning and trace fear conditioning to determine learning and memory deficits in neuron subset-specific Pten (NS-Pten) conditional knockout (KO) mice. We found that NS-Pten KO mice had deficits in contextual learning and trace conditioning, but did not have deficits in the ability to learn a conditioned stimulus. Furthermore, we found increased levels in the total and phosphorylated forms of the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) in the hippocampus of NS-Pten KO mice.

  1. Ir-192 HDR transit dose and radial dose function determination using alanine/EPR dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzmán Calcina, Carmen S.; de Almeida, Adelaide; Oliveira Rocha, José R.; Abrego, Felipe Chen; Baffa, Oswaldo

    2005-03-01

    Source positioning close to the tumour in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy is not instantaneous. An increment of dose will be delivered during the movement of the source in the trajectory to its static position. This increment is the transit dose, often not taken into account in brachytherapeutic treatment planning. The transit dose depends on the prescribed dose, number of treatment fractions, velocity and activity of the source. Combining all these factors, the transit dose can be 5% higher than the prescribed absorbed dose value (Sang-Hyun and Muller-Runkel, 1994 Phys. Med. Biol. 39 1181 8, Nath et al 1995 Med. Phys. 22 209 34). However, it cannot exceed this percentage (Nath et al 1995). In this work, we use the alanine-EPR (electron paramagnetic resonance) dosimetric system using analysis of the first derivative of the signal. The transit dose was evaluated for an HDR system and is consistent with that already presented for TLD dosimeters (Bastin et al 1993 Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys. 26 695 702). Also using the same dosimetric system, the radial dose function, used to evaluate the geometric dose degradation around the source, was determined and its behaviour agrees better with those obtained by Monte Carlo simulations (Nath et al 1995, Williamson and Nath 1991 Med. Phys. 18 434 48, Ballester et al 1997 Med. Phys. 24 1221 8, Ballester et al 2001 Phys. Med. Biol. 46 N79 90) than with TLD measurements (Nath et al 1990 Med. Phys. 17 1032 40).

  2. Measured dose to ovaries and testes from Hodgkin's fields and determination of genetically significant dose

    SciTech Connect

    Niroomand-Rad, A.; Cumberlin, R. )

    1993-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine the genetically significant dose from therapeutic radiation exposure with Hodgkin's fields by estimating the doses to ovaries and testes. Phantom measurements were performed to verify estimated doses to ovaries and testes from Hodgkin's fields. Thermoluminescent LiF dosimeters (TLD-100) of 1 x 3 x 3 mm[sup 3] dimensions were embedded in phantoms and exposed to standard mantle and paraaortic fields using Co-60, 4 MV, 6 MV, and 10 MV photon beams. The results show that measured doses to ovaries and testes are about two to five times higher than the corresponding graphically estimated doses for Co-60 and 4 MVX photon beams as depicted in ICRP publication 44. In addition, the measured doses to ovaries and testes are about 30% to 65% lower for 10 MV photon beams than for their corresponding Co-60 photon beams. The genetically significant dose from Hodgkin's treatment (less than 0.01 mSv) adds about 4% to the genetically significant dose contribution to medical procedures and adds less than 1% to the genetically significant dose from all sources. Therefore, the consequence to society is considered to be very small. The consequences for the individual patient are, likewise, small. 28 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. KRAS and BRAF Mutations and PTEN Expression Do Not Predict Efficacy of Cetuximab-Based Chemoradiotherapy in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Erben, Philipp; Stroebel, Philipp; Horisberger, Karoline; Popa, Juliana; Bohn, Beatrice; Hanfstein, Benjamin; Kaehler, Georg; Kienle, Peter; Post, Stefan; Wenz, Frederik; Hochhaus, Andreas

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Mutations in KRAS and BRAF genes as well as the loss of expression of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) (deleted on chromosome 10) are associated with impaired activity of antibodies directed against epidermal growth factor receptor in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. The predictive and prognostic value of the KRAS and BRAF point mutations as well as PTEN expression in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) treated with cetuximab-based neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy is unknown. Methods and Materials: We have conducted phase I and II trials of the combination of weekly administration of cetuximab and irinotecan and daily doses of capecitabine in conjunction with radiotherapy (45 Gy plus 5.4 Gy) in patients with LARC (stage uT3/4 or uN+). The status of KRAS and BRAF mutations was determined with direct sequencing, and PTEN expression status was determined with immunohistochemistry testing of diagnostic tumor biopsies. Tumor regression was evaluated by using standardized regression grading, and disease-free survival (DFS) was calculated according to the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: A total of 57 patients were available for analyses. A total of 31.6% of patients carried mutations in the KRAS genes. No BRAF mutations were found, while the loss of PTEN expression was observed in 9.6% of patients. Six patients achieved complete remission, and the 3-year DFS rate was 73%. No correlation was seen between tumor regression or DFS rate and a single marker or a combination of all markers. Conclusions: In the present series, no BRAF mutation was detected. The presence of KRAS mutations and loss of PTEN expression were not associated with impaired response to cetuximab-based chemoradiotherapy and 3-year DFS.

  4. The synergistic effect of Mig-6 and Pten ablation on endometrial cancer development and progression.

    PubMed

    Kim, T H; Franco, H L; Jung, S Y; Qin, J; Broaddus, R R; Lydon, J P; Jeong, J-W

    2010-07-01

    Ablation of Mig-6 in the murine uterus leads to the development of endometrial hyperplasia and estrogen-induced endometrial cancer. An additional endometrial cancer mouse model is generated by the ablation of phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted from chromosome 10 (Pten) (either as heterozygotes or by conditional uterine ablation). To determine the interplay between Mig-6 and the PTEN/phosphoinositide 3-kinase signaling pathway during endometrial tumorigenesis, we generated mice with Mig-6 and Pten conditionally ablated in progesterone receptor-positive cells (PR(cre/+)Mig-6(f/f)Pten(f/f); Mig-6(d/d)Pten(d/d)). The ablation of both Mig-6 and Pten dramatically accelerated the development of endometrial cancer compared with the single ablation of either gene. The epithelium of Mig-6(d/d)Pten(d/d) mice showed a significant decrease in the number of apoptotic cells compared with Pten(d/d) mice. The expression of the estrogen-induced apoptotic inhibitors Birc1 was significantly increased in Mig-6(d/d)Pten(d/d) mice. We identified extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 (ERK2) as an MIG-6 interacting protein by coimmunoprecipitation and demonstrated that the level of ERK2 phosphorylation was increased upon Mig-6 ablation either singly or in combination with Pten ablation. These results suggest that Mig-6 exerts a tumor-suppressor function in endometrial cancer by promoting epithelial cell apoptosis through the downregulation of the estrogen-induced apoptosis inhibitors Birc1 and the inhibition of ERK2 phosphorylation.

  5. Metformin inhibits inflammatory response via AMPK-PTEN pathway in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun Ae; Choi, Hyoung Chul

    2012-09-07

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammation of the coronary arteries. Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) stimulated by cytokines and chemokines accelerate the inflammatory response and migrate to the injured endothelium during the progression of atherosclerosis. Activation of AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK), a key sensor maintaining metabolic homeostasis, suppresses the inflammatory response. However, how AMPK regulates the inflammatory response is poorly understood. To identify the mechanism of this response, we focused on phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN), which is a negative regulator of inflammation. We investigated that activation of AMPK-induced PTEN expression and suppression of the inflammatory response through the AMPK-PTEN pathway in VSMCs. We treated with the well-known AMPK activator metformin to induce PTEN expression. PTEN was induced by metformin (2mM) and inhibited by compound C (10 μM) and AMPK siRNA. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) was used to induce inflammation. The inflammatory response was confirmed by cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression, and activation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB. Metformin suppressed COX-2 and iNOS mRNA and protein expression dose dependently. Treatment with compound C and bpv (pic) in the presence of metformin, iNOS and COX-2 protein expression increased. NF-κB activation decreased in response to metformin and was restored by inhibiting AMPK and PTEN. Inhibiting AMPK and PTEN restored ROS levels stimulated with TNF-α. Taken together, PTEN could be a possible downstream regulator of AMPK, and the AMPK-PTEN pathway might be important in the regulation of the inflammatory response in VSMCs.

  6. Analysis of PTEN, BRAF and PI3K status for determination of benefit from cetuximab therapy in metastatic colorectal cancer patients refractory to chemotherapy with wild-type KRAS.

    PubMed

    Tural, Deniz; Batur, Sebnem; Erdamar, Sibel; Akar, Emre; Kepil, Nuray; Mandel, Nil Molinas; Serdengeçti, Süheyla

    2014-02-01

    We investigated predictive values of BRAF, PI3K and PTEN in cetuximab responses in KRAS wild-type (+) chemotherapy refractory, metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. Primary tumour tissues of 41 KRAS wild-type mCRC patients receiving cetuximab-based chemotherapy were investigated for PI3K, PTEN, KRAS and BRAF mutations. Progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) periods were calculated with Kaplan-Meier method and the Cox proportional hazards model was used. PTEN and PI3K expressions were 63 and 42 %, respectively. BRAF mutation was observed as 9.8 % among patients. Tumours with BRAF mutation had statistically lower response rates (RR) for cetuximab-based treatment than tumours with BRAF wild type (0 vs. 58 %, p = 0.02). PTEN expressing tumours had statistically higher RR for cetuximab-based treatment than tumours with PTEN loss (42 vs. 12 %, p = 0.04). PI3K expression had worse significant effect on cetuximab RR than PI3K non-expressed tumours (15 vs. 44 %, p = 0.023). Median PFS was significantly longer in patients with PTEN expression (14 months) than in patients with PTEN loss (5 months) (HR, 0.4; p = 0.028). Median PFS was significantly longer in patients with PI3K non-expression (15.2 months) than in patients with PI3K expression (4.1 months) (HR, 0.31; p = 0.001). Significant difference in PFS and OS between patients with BRAF mutated and BRAF wild-type tumours was not detected. However, patients with PTEN expression had significantly longer OS (15.1 months) than patients with PTEN loss tumour (9.9 months) (HR, 0.34; p = 0.008). Patients without PI3K expression had significantly longer OS (18.2 months) than patients with PI3K expression (10.1 months) (HR, 0.27; p = 0.001). Multivariate analyses revealed that PTEN expression (HR, 0.48; p = 0.02) and absence of PI3K expression (HR, 0.2; p = 0.001) were independent prognostic factors for increased PFS. Similarly, PTEN overexpression (HR, 0.62; p = 0.03) and absence of PI3K expression (HR, 0

  7. Activation of nuclear PTEN by inhibition of Notch signaling induces G2/M cell cycle arrest in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, S-J; Lee, H-W; Baek, J-H; Cho, Y-H; Kang, H G; Jeong, J S; Song, J; Park, H-S; Chun, K-H

    2016-01-14

    Mutation in PTEN has not yet been detected, but its function as a tumor suppressor is inactivated in many cancers. In this study we determined that, activated Notch signaling disables PTEN by phosphorylation and thereby contributes to gastric tumorigenesis. Notch inhibition by small interfering RNA or γ-secretase inhibitor (GSI) induced mitotic arrest and apoptosis in gastric cancer cells. Notch inhibition induced dephosphorylation in the C-terminal domain of PTEN, which led to PTEN nuclear localization. Overexpression of activated Notch1-induced phosphorylation of PTEN and reversed GSI-induced mitotic arrest. Dephosphorylated nuclear PTEN caused prometaphase arrest by interaction with the cyclin B1-CDK1 complex, resulting in their accumulation in the nucleus and subsequent apoptosis. We found a correlation between high expression levels of Notch1 and low survival rates and, similarly, between reduced nuclear PTEN expression and increasing the TNM classification of malignant tumours stages in malignant tissues from gastric cancer patients. The growth of Notch1-depleted gastric tumors was significantly retarded in xenografted mice, and in addition, PTEN deletion restored growth similar to control tumors. We also demonstrated that combination treatment with GSI and chemotherapeutic agents significantly reduced the orthotopically transplanted gastric tumors in mice without noticeable toxicity. Overall, our findings suggest that inhibition of Notch signaling can be employed as a PTEN activator, making it a potential target for gastric cancer therapy.

  8. Serum Response Factor Regulates Expression of PTEN through a Micro-RNA Network in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Horita, Henrick N; Simpson, Peter A.; Ostriker, Allison; Furgeson, Seth; Van Putten, Vicki; Weiser-Evans, Mary C.M.; Nemenoff, Raphael A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Serum response factor (SRF) is a critical transcription factor in smooth muscle cells (SMC) controlling differentiation and proliferation. Our previous work demonstrated that depleting SRF in cultured SMC decreased expression of SMC markers, but increased proliferation and inflammatory mediators. A similar phenotype has been observed in SMC silenced for PTEN, suggesting that SRF and PTEN may lie on a common pathway. Our goal was to determine the effect of SRF depletion on PTEN levels, and define mechanisms mediating this effect. Methods and Results In SRF-silenced SMC, PTEN protein, but not mRNA levels were decreased, suggesting post-transcriptional regulation. Re-introduction of PTEN into SRF-depleted SMC reversed increases in proliferation and cytokine/chemokine production, but had no effect on SMC marker expression. SRF-depleted cells showed decreased levels of miR-143, and increased miR-21, which was sufficient to suppress PTEN. Increased miR-21 expression was dependent on induction of FRA-1, which is a direct target of miR-143. Introducing miR-143 into SRF-depleted SMC reduced FRA-1 expression and miR-21 levels and restored PTEN expression. Conclusions SRF regulates PTEN expression in SMC through a miR network involving miR-143, targeting FRA-1, which regulates miR-21. Cross talk between SRF and PTEN likely represents a critical axis in phenotypic remodeling of SMC. PMID:21940949

  9. Metformin inhibits inflammatory response via AMPK-PTEN pathway in vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sun Ae; Choi, Hyoung Chul

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PTEN was induced by metformin and inhibited by compound C and AMPK siRNA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Metformin suppressed TNF-{alpha}-induced COX-2 and iNOS mRNA expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Compound C and bpv (pic) increased iNOS and COX-2 protein expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NF-{kappa}B activation was restored by inhibiting AMPK and PTEN. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AMPK and PTEN regulated TNF-{alpha}-induced ROS production in VSMCs. -- Abstract: Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammation of the coronary arteries. Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) stimulated by cytokines and chemokines accelerate the inflammatory response and migrate to the injured endothelium during the progression of atherosclerosis. Activation of AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK), a key sensor maintaining metabolic homeostasis, suppresses the inflammatory response. However, how AMPK regulates the inflammatory response is poorly understood. To identify the mechanism of this response, we focused on phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN), which is a negative regulator of inflammation. We investigated that activation of AMPK-induced PTEN expression and suppression of the inflammatory response through the AMPK-PTEN pathway in VSMCs. We treated with the well-known AMPK activator metformin to induce PTEN expression. PTEN was induced by metformin (2 mM) and inhibited by compound C (10 {mu}M) and AMPK siRNA. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-{alpha}) was used to induce inflammation. The inflammatory response was confirmed by cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression, and activation of nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B. Metformin suppressed COX-2 and iNOS mRNA and protein expression dose dependently. Treatment with compound C and bpv (pic) in the presence of metformin, iNOS and COX-2 protein expression increased. NF-{kappa}B activation decreased in response to metformin and was restored by inhibiting AMPK

  10. 10 CFR 20.2104 - Determination of prior occupational dose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Determination of prior occupational dose. 20.2104 Section 20.2104 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION STANDARDS FOR PROTECTION AGAINST RADIATION Records § 20... of the transmitted report cannot be established. (d) The licensee shall record the exposure...

  11. 10 CFR 20.2104 - Determination of prior occupational dose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Determination of prior occupational dose. 20.2104 Section 20.2104 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION STANDARDS FOR PROTECTION AGAINST RADIATION Records § 20... of the transmitted report cannot be established. (d) The licensee shall record the exposure...

  12. 10 CFR 20.2104 - Determination of prior occupational dose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Determination of prior occupational dose. 20.2104 Section 20.2104 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION STANDARDS FOR PROTECTION AGAINST RADIATION Records § 20... of the transmitted report cannot be established. (d) The licensee shall record the exposure...

  13. 10 CFR 20.2104 - Determination of prior occupational dose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Determination of prior occupational dose. 20.2104 Section 20.2104 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION STANDARDS FOR PROTECTION AGAINST RADIATION Records § 20... of the transmitted report cannot be established. (d) The licensee shall record the exposure...

  14. 10 CFR 20.2104 - Determination of prior occupational dose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Determination of prior occupational dose. 20.2104 Section 20.2104 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION STANDARDS FOR PROTECTION AGAINST RADIATION Records § 20... of the transmitted report cannot be established. (d) The licensee shall record the exposure...

  15. Importin-11 keeps PTEN safe from harm.

    PubMed

    Leslie, Nick R

    2017-03-06

    In this issue, Chen et al. (2017. J. Cell Biol. https://doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201604025) show that Importin-11 traffics the tumor suppressor PTEN into the nucleus and in so doing protects it from cytoplasmic proteins that cause PTEN degradation. This work helps explain the nuclear accumulation of PTEN observed in many healthy tissues and, because Ipo11 mutant mice develop lung tumors, also implicates Importin-11 as a novel tumor suppressor.

  16. Elevated Plasma Succinate Among PTEN, SDHB and SDHD Mutation Positive Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Hobert, Judith A.; Mester, Jessica L.; Moline, Jessica; Eng, Charis

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Cowden Syndrome (CS) results from germline mutations in phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN) and from variants in succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) B and D subunits. We hypothesized that succinate accumulation may be common among individuals with SDH variants/mutations and those with PTEN mutations. Methods Urine and blood were collected from individuals meeting full or partial CS diagnostic criteria, those with paraganglioma or a known susceptibility PGL-associated gene mutation and succinate was measured. PTEN, SDHB, SDHC, and SDHD-genes were sequenced from genomic DNA. Results Elevated plasma succinate was observed in 13/21 (62%) individuals with germline PTEN, SDHB or SDHD mutations compared to 5/32 (16%) controls (p<0.001); 10/15 (67%) individuals with pathogenic PTEN mutations, but in <20% of mutation negative individuals meeting identical criteria; and among individuals with mutations in SDHB (1/1, 100%) and SDHD (2/5, 40%). Conclusions Our data suggest that mutations in PTEN, SDHB and SDHD reduce catalytic activity of SDH and result in succinate accumulation and identify a common biochemical alteration between these two patient populations. Plasma organic acid analysis may provide an effective and inexpensive screening method to determine when more expensive gene sequencing of PTEN and SDH-genes is warranted. PMID:22261759

  17. PTEN deficiency mediates a reciprocal response to IGF-1 and mTOR inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Mukund; Gomez, Nicholas C.; McFadden, Andrew W.; Moats-Staats, Billie M.; Wu, Sam; Rojas, Andres; Sapp, Travis; Simon, Jeremy M.; Smith, Scott V.; Kaiser-Rogers, Kathleen; Davis, Ian J.

    2014-01-01

    Recent evidence implicates the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) pathway in development of Ewing Sarcoma, a highly malignant bone and soft tissue tumor that primarily affects children and young adults. Despite promising results from preclinical studies of therapies that target this pathway, early phase clinical trials have shown that a significant fraction of patients do not benefit, suggesting that cellular factors determine tumor sensitivity. Using FAIRE-seq, a chromosomal deletion of the PTEN locus in a Ewing sarcoma cell line was identified. In primary tumors PTEN deficiency was observed in a large subset of cases, although not mediated by large chromosomal deletions. PTEN loss resulted in hyper-activation of the AKT signaling pathway. PTEN rescue led to decreased proliferation, inhibition of colony formation, and increased apoptosis. Strikingly, PTEN loss decreased sensitivity to IGF-1R inhibitors but increased responsiveness to temsirolimus, a potent mTOR inhibitor, as marked by induction of autophagy. These results suggest that PTEN is lost in a significant fraction of primary tumors and this deficiency may have therapeutic consequences by concurrently attenuating responsiveness to IGF-1R inhibition while increasing activity of mTOR inhibitors. The identification of PTEN status in the tumors of patients with recurrent disease could help guide the selection of therapies. PMID:24994750

  18. Mesodermal Pten inactivation leads to alveolar capillary dysplasia-like phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Tiozzo, Caterina; Carraro, Gianni; Al Alam, Denise; Baptista, Sheryl; Danopoulos, Soula; Li, Aimin; Lavarreda-Pearce, Maria; Li, Changgong; De Langhe, Stijn; Chan, Belinda; Borok, Zea; Bellusci, Saverio; Minoo, Parviz

    2012-01-01

    Alveolar capillary dysplasia (ACD) is a congenital, lethal disorder of the pulmonary vasculature. Phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted from chromosome 10 (Pten) encodes a lipid phosphatase controlling key cellular functions, including stem/progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation; however, the role of PTEN in mesodermal lung cell lineage formation remains unexamined. To determine the role of mesodermal PTEN in the ontogeny of various mesenchymal cell lineages during lung development, we specifically deleted Pten in early embryonic lung mesenchyme in mice. Pups lacking Pten died at birth, with evidence of failure in blood oxygenation. Analysis at the cellular level showed defects in angioblast differentiation to endothelial cells and an accompanying accumulation of the angioblast cell population that was associated with disorganized capillary beds. We also found decreased expression of Forkhead box protein F1 (Foxf1), a gene associated with the ACD human phenotype. Analysis of human samples for ACD revealed a significant decrease in PTEN and increased activated protein kinase B (AKT). These studies demonstrate that mesodermal PTEN has a key role in controlling the amplification of angioblasts as well as their differentiation into endothelial cells, thereby directing the establishment of a functional gas exchange interface. Additionally, these mice could serve as a murine model of ACD. PMID:23023706

  19. Fluence-to-dose confusion regarding external stochastic dose determination within the DOE complex.

    SciTech Connect

    Shores, E. F.; Brown, T. H.

    2002-01-01

    The Department of Energy's (DOE) occupational radiation protection dose limits are specified in 10 CFR 835 (hereafter referred to as 'regulation'). Ambiguity in the regulation regarding designation of dose and fluence-to-dose conversion factors leads to confusion and disagreement regarding the appropriate choice of conversion factors. Three primary dose quantities of relevance are absorbed dose, D, quality factor, Q, and the product of those, called dose equivalent, H. The modifier Q is intended to express the long-term fatal cancer causing potential of different radiation types and generally increases with energy for neutrons. For photons, Q is close to unity regardless of energy. In principle, H could be estimated by incorporating a phantom and relevant Q values in a radiation-transport model. In practice, this would entail too much model complexity and computer time. The evaluator of H instead relies on pre-calculated energy-dependent fluence-to-dose conversion factors. Three primary sets of fluence-to-dose conversion factors are commonly used to determine stochastic dose for neutrons and photons: (1) ANSI/ANS-6.1.1-1977 that incorporates the NCRP-38 data for neutrons and sets based on Claiborne and Wells for photons, (2) ANSI/ANS -6.1.1-1991 that are based on and nearly identical to the neutron and photon sets in ICRP -51, and (3) neutron and photon sets in ICRP-74. The first set is maximum H values in a 30-cm diameter cylinder phantom for neutrons and in a 30-cm thick slab phantom for photons. The second set is effective dose equivalent, HE, derived from an anthropomorphic phantom by summing the products of tissue dose equivalents, HT, and tissue weighting factors, w{sub T}. The third set is effective dose, E, also derived from an anthropomorphic phantom by summing the products of H{sub T} and w{sub T}. E is functionally identical to H{sub E} except H{sub T} is the product of D and the radiation weighting factor, w{sub R}, which is similar in meaning to Q.

  20. Low-Dose Radiation Cataract and Genetic Determinants of Radiosensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Kleiman, Norman Jay

    2013-11-30

    The lens of the eye is one of the most radiosensitive tissues in the body. Ocular ionizing radiation exposure results in characteristic, dose related, progressive lens changes leading to cataract formation. While initial, early stages of lens opacification may not cause visual disability, the severity of such changes progressively increases with dose until vision is impaired and cataract extraction surgery may be required. Because of the transparency of the eye, radiation induced lens changes can easily be followed non-invasively over time. Thus, the lens provides a unique model system in which to study the effects of low dose ionizing radiation exposure in a complex, highly organized tissue. Despite this observation, considerable uncertainties remain surrounding the relationship between dose and risk of developing radiation cataract. For example, a growing number of human epidemiological findings suggest significant risk among various groups of occupationally and accidentally exposed individuals and confidence intervals that include zero dose. Nevertheless, questions remain concerning the relationship between lens opacities, visual disability, clinical cataract, threshold dose and/or the role of genetics in determining radiosensitivity. Experimentally, the response of the rodent eye to radiation is quite similar to that in humans and thus animal studies are well suited to examine the relationship between radiation exposure, genetic determinants of radiosensitivity and cataractogenesis. The current work has expanded our knowledge of the low-dose effects of X-irradiation or high-LET heavy ion exposure on timing and progression of radiation cataract and has provided new information on the genetic, molecular, biochemical and cell biological features which contribute to this pathology. Furthermore, findings have indicated that single and/or multiple haploinsufficiency for various genes involved in DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoint control, such as Atm, Brca1 or Rad9

  1. Roles of PTEN with DNA Repair in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Ogino, Mako; Ichimura, Mayuko; Nakano, Noriko; Minami, Akari; Kitagishi, Yasuko; Matsuda, Satoru

    2016-06-15

    Oxidative stress is considered to play key roles in aging and pathogenesis of many neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease, which could bring DNA damage by cells. The DNA damage may lead to the cell apoptosis, which could contribute to the degeneration of neuronal tissues. Recent evidence suggests that PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog on chromosome 10) may be involved in the pathophysiology of the neurodegenerative disorders. Since PTEN expression appears to be one dominant determinant of the neuronal cell death, PTEN should be a potential molecular target of novel therapeutic strategies against Parkinson's disease. In addition, defects in DNA damage response and DNA repair are often associated with modulation of hormone signaling pathways. Especially, many observations imply a role for estrogen in a regulation of the DNA repair action. In the present review, we have attempted to summarize the function of DNA repair molecules at a viewpoint of the PTEN signaling pathway and the hormone related functional modulation of cells, providing a broad interpretation on the molecular mechanisms for treatment of Parkinson's disease. Particular attention will be paid to the mechanisms proposed to explain the health effects of food ingredients against Parkinson's disease related to reduce oxidative stress for an efficient therapeutic intervention.

  2. Rb1 and Pten Co-Deletion in Osteoblast Precursor Cells Causes Rapid Lipoma Formation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Filtz, Emma A.; Emery, Ann; Lu, Huarui; Forster, Colleen L.; Karasch, Chris; Hallstrom, Timothy C.

    2015-01-01

    The Rb and Pten tumor suppressor genes are important regulators of bone development and both are frequently mutated in the bone cancer osteosarcoma (OS). To determine if Rb1 and Pten synergize as tumor suppressor genes for osteosarcoma, we co-deleted them in osteoprogenitor cells. Surprisingly, we observed rapid development of adipogenic but not osteosarcoma tumors in the ΔRb1/Pten mice. ΔPten solo deleted mice also developed lipoma tumors but at a much reduced frequency and later onset than those co-deleted for Rb1. Pten deletion also led to a marked increase in adipocytes in the bone marrow. To better understand the function of Pten in bone development in vivo, we conditionally deleted Pten in OSX+ osteoprogenitor cells using OSX-Cre mice. μCT analysis revealed a significant thickening of the calvaria and an increase in trabeculae volume and number in the femur, consistent with increased bone formation in these mice. To determine if Pten and Rb1 deletion actively promotes adipogenic differentiation, we isolated calvarial cells from Ptenfl/fl and Ptenfl/fl; Rb1fl/fl mice, infected them with CRE or GFP expressing adenovirus, treated with differentiation media. We observed slightly increased adipogenic, and osteogenic differentiation in the ΔPten cells. Both phenotypes were greatly increased upon Rb1/Pten co-deletion. This was accompanied by an increase in expression of genes required for adipogenesis. These data indicate that Pten deletion in osteoblast precursors is sufficient to promote frequent adipogenic, but only rare osteogenic tumors. Rb1 hetero- or homo-zygous co-deletion greatly increases the incidence and the rapidity of onset of adipogenic tumors, again, with only rare osteosarcoma tumors. PMID:26317218

  3. Determination of behaviorally effective tobacco constituent doses in rats.

    PubMed

    Wiley, Jenny L; Marusich, Julie A; Thomas, Brian F; Jackson, Kia J

    2015-03-01

    While nicotine has been established as the primary addictive drug that promotes tobacco use, recent peer-reviewed studies suggest that tobacco smoke contains additional chemical constituents that may have addictive potential. Additional research is necessary to determine the addictive potential of these tobacco constituents individually and in combination with tobacco smoke condensate; however, the behaviorally effective constituent doses necessary to conduct such studies are unclear. The primary objective of this study was to conduct behavioral studies in adult rats to determine the relevant behaviorally effective doses of the tobacco constituents, cotinine, myosmine, and anatabine to be used in future studies assessing the addictive potential of these compounds. Separate groups of adult male Sprague Dawley rats were treated with vehicle, nicotine, or various doses of cotinine, mysomine, or anatabine. Effects on locomotor activity were measured in 10-min bins for 60min. Nicotine (0.8mg/kg) produced a biphasic effect on locomotor activity, with hypoactivity during the first 10min and hyperactivity at 40-50min. In contrast, cotinine (0.1mg/kg) and myosmine (10-50mg/kg) decreased activity without a later increase. Anatabine significantly increased locomotor activity at 1mg/kg, but decreased it at 10mg/kg. Prominent effects on overt behavior were observed at anatabine doses of 10mg/kg and above. Nicotine, cotinine, myosmine, and anatabine produced distinct time- and dose-dependent patterns of effects on locomotor activity. Results from the study will aid in the selection of relevant doses for future studies assessing the addictive potential of these non-nicotine tobacco constituents. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. How accurately can the peak skin dose in fluoroscopy be determined using indirect dose metrics?

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, A. Kyle; Ensor, Joe E.; Pasciak, Alexander S.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Skin dosimetry is important for fluoroscopically-guided interventions, as peak skin doses (PSD) that result in skin reactions can be reached during these procedures. There is no consensus as to whether or not indirect skin dosimetry is sufficiently accurate for fluoroscopically-guided interventions. However, measuring PSD with film is difficult and the decision to do so must be madea priori. The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy of different types of indirect dose estimates and to determine if PSD can be calculated within ±50% using indirect dose metrics for embolization procedures. Methods: PSD were measured directly using radiochromic film for 41 consecutive embolization procedures at two sites. Indirect dose metrics from the procedures were collected, including reference air kerma. Four different estimates of PSD were calculated from the indirect dose metrics and compared along with reference air kerma to the measured PSD for each case. The four indirect estimates included a standard calculation method, the use of detailed information from the radiation dose structured report, and two simplified calculation methods based on the standard method. Indirect dosimetry results were compared with direct measurements, including an analysis of uncertainty associated with film dosimetry. Factors affecting the accuracy of the different indirect estimates were examined. Results: When using the standard calculation method, calculated PSD were within ±35% for all 41 procedures studied. Calculated PSD were within ±50% for a simplified method using a single source-to-patient distance for all calculations. Reference air kerma was within ±50% for all but one procedure. Cases for which reference air kerma or calculated PSD exhibited large (±35%) differences from the measured PSD were analyzed, and two main causative factors were identified: unusually small or large source-to-patient distances and large contributions to reference air kerma from cone

  5. Committed effective dose determination in southern Brazilian cereal flours.

    PubMed

    Scheibel, V; Appoloni, C R

    2013-01-01

    The health impact of radionuclide ingestion from foodstuffs was evaluated by the committed effective doses determined in eight commercial samples of South-Brazilian cereal flours (soy, wheat, cornmeal, cassava, rye, oat, barley and rice flours). The radioactivity traces of (228)Th, (228)Ra, (226)Ra, (40)K, (7)Be and (137)Cs were measured by gamma-ray spectrometry employing an HPGe detector of 66 % relative efficiency. The efficiency curve has taken into account the differences in densities and chemical composition between the matrix and the certified sample. The highest concentration levels of (228)Th and (40)K were 3.5±0.4 and 1469±17 Bq kg(-1) for soy flour, respectively, within the 95 % confidence level. The lower limit of detection for (137)Cs ranged from 0.04 to 0.4 Bq kg(-1). The highest committed effective dose was 0.36 μSv.y(-1) for (228)Ra in cassava flour (adults). All committed effective doses determined at the present work were lower than the International Atomic Energy Agency dose limit of 1 mSv.y(-1), to the public exposure.

  6. PI3K isoform dependence of PTEN-deficient tumors can be altered by the genetic context

    PubMed Central

    Schmit, Fabienne; Utermark, Tamara; Zhang, Sen; Wang, Qi; Von, Thanh; Roberts, Thomas M.; Zhao, Jean J.

    2014-01-01

    There has been increasing interest in the use of isoform-selective inhibitors of phosphatidylinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) in cancer therapy. Using conditional deletion of the p110 catalytic isoforms of PI3K to predict sensitivity of cancer types to such inhibitors, we and others have demonstrated that tumors deficient of the phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) are often dependent on the p110β isoform of PI3K. Because human cancers usually arise due to multiple genetic events, determining whether other genetic alterations might alter the p110 isoform requirements of PTEN-null tumors becomes a critical question. To investigate further the roles of p110 isoforms in PTEN-deficient tumors, we used a mouse model of ovarian endometrioid adenocarcinoma driven by concomitant activation of the rat sarcoma protein Kras, which is known to activate p110α, and loss of PTEN. In this model, ablation of p110β had no effect on tumor growth, whereas p110α ablation blocked tumor formation. Because ablation of PTEN alone is often p110β dependent, we wondered if the same held true in the ovary. Because PTEN loss alone in the ovary did not result in tumor formation, we tested PI3K isoform dependence in ovarian surface epithelium (OSE) cells deficient in both PTEN and p53. These cells were indeed p110β dependent, whereas OSEs expressing activated Kras with or without PTEN loss were p110α dependent. Furthermore, isoform-selective inhibitors showed a similar pattern of the isoform dependence in established KrasG12D/PTEN-deficient tumors. Taken together, our data suggest that, whereas in some tissues PTEN-null tumors appear to inherently depend on p110β, the p110 isoform reliance of PTEN-deficient tumors may be altered by concurrent mutations that activate p110α. PMID:24737887

  7. Post-translational regulation of PTEN catalytic function and protein stability in the hibernating 13-lined ground squirrel.

    PubMed

    Wu, Cheng-Wei; Bell, Ryan A; Storey, Kenneth B

    2015-11-01

    The insulin signaling pathway functions as a major regulator of many metabolic and cellular functions, and has been shown to be reversibly suppressed in many species during hibernation. This study characterized the regulation of PTEN phosphatase, a negative regulator of the insulin receptor network, over the torpor-arousal cycle of hibernation in the skeletal muscle of Ictidomys tridecemlineatus. Western blotting and RT-PCR were used to analyze post-translational and transcriptional regulations of PTEN respectively. Enzymatic activities were determined by the malachite green assay, while protein stability was assessed the using pulse-proteolysis method. During torpor, the ratio of non-phosphorylated PTEN (S380/T382/T383) was significantly elevated by 1.4-fold during late torpor compared with euthermic controls; this was coupled with an increase in substrate affinity for PIP3 (by 56%) in late torpor. Two proteolytic cleavage PEST motifs were identified in the C-terminus that overlapped with the phosphorylation sites of PTEN; pulse-proteolysis analysis of PTEN protein showed a decrease in protein stability during late torpor (Cm of urea decreased by 21%). Furthermore, the increase in PTEN activity observed was correlated with a decrease in PDK-1 phosphorylation by 32%, suggesting a downstream effect of PTEN activation during torpor. Transcriptional analysis showed that mRNA expression of pten and pdk-1 remain unchanged during hibernation, suggesting post-translation modification as the primary regulatory mechanism of PTEN function. Phosphorylation plays an important role in the regulation of PTEN enzymatic activity and protein stability. Activation of PTEN during torpor can regulate insulin signaling during periods of low energy state. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Determination of the prescription dose for biradionuclide permanent prostate brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Nuttens, V E; Lucas, S

    2008-12-01

    A model based on the linear quadratic model that has been corrected for repopulation, sublethal cell damage repair, and RBE effect has been used to determine the prescription dose for prostate permanent brachytherapy using seeds loaded with a mixture of 103Pd and 125I or a mixture of 103Pd and 131Cs. The prescription dose was determined by comparing the tumor cell survival fractions between the considered biradionuclide seed implant and one monoradionuclide seed implant chosen from 103Pd, 125I, and 131Cs. Prostate edema is included in the model. The influence of the value of the radiobiological parameters and RBE were also investigated. Two mixtures of radionuclides were considered: 103Pd0.75-125I0.25 and 103Pd0.25-131Cs0.75, where the subscripts indicate the fractions of total initial internal activity in the biradionuclide seed. These fractions were selected in order to obtain a dose distribution that lies between that of 103Pd and 125I/131Cs. As expected, the computed prescription dose values are dependent on the model parameters (edema half-life and magnitude, radiobiogical parameters, and RBE). The radionuclide used as a benchmark also has a strong impact on the derived prescribed dose. The large uncertainties in the radiobiological parameters and RBE values produce big errors in the computed prescribed dose. Averaged over the range of all the parameters and depending on the radionuclide used as a benchmark (in subscript), the derived prescription dose for the first mixture (PdI) would be: D(PdI)(Pd)=142(+15)(-16) Gy and D(PdI)(I)=142(+6)(-8) Gy; and D(PdCs)(Pd)=128(+13)(-13) Gy and D(PdCs)(Cs)=115(+6)(-7) Gy for the PdCs mixture. The uncertainties could be reduced if the radiobiological parameters and RBE value were known more accurately. However, as edema characteristics are patient dependent and can be obtained only after the treatment, an unpredictable error is unavoidable.

  9. Determination of the prescription dose for biradionuclide permanent prostate brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Nuttens, V. E.; Lucas, S.

    2008-12-15

    A model based on the linear quadratic model that has been corrected for repopulation, sublethal cell damage repair, and RBE effect has been used to determine the prescription dose for prostate permanent brachytherapy using seeds loaded with a mixture of {sup 103}Pd and {sup 125}I or a mixture of {sup 103}Pd and {sup 131}Cs. The prescription dose was determined by comparing the tumor cell survival fractions between the considered biradionuclide seed implant and one monoradionuclide seed implant chosen from {sup 103}Pd, {sup 125}I, and {sup 131}Cs. Prostate edema is included in the model. The influence of the value of the radiobiological parameters and RBE were also investigated. Two mixtures of radionuclides were considered: {sup 103}Pd{sub 0.75}-{sup 125}I{sub 0.25} and {sup 103}Pd{sub 0.25}-{sup 131}Cs{sub 0.75}, where the subscripts indicate the fractions of total initial internal activity in the biradionuclide seed. These fractions were selected in order to obtain a dose distribution that lies between that of {sup 103}Pd and {sup 125}I/{sup 131}Cs. As expected, the computed prescription dose values are dependent on the model parameters (edema half-life and magnitude, radiobiogical parameters, and RBE). The radionuclide used as a benchmark also has a strong impact on the derived prescribed dose. The large uncertainties in the radiobiological parameters and RBE values produce big errors in the computed prescribed dose. Averaged over the range of all the parameters and depending on the radionuclide used as a benchmark (in subscript), the derived prescription dose for the first mixture (PdI) would be: D{sub Pd}{sup PdI}=142{sub -16}{sup +15} Gy and D{sub I}{sup PdI}=142{sub -8}{sup +6} Gy; and D{sub Pd}{sup PdCs}=128{sub -13}{sup +13} Gy and D{sub Cs}{sup PdCs}=115{sub -7}{sup +6} Gy for the PdCs mixture. The uncertainties could be reduced if the radiobiological parameters and RBE value were known more accurately. However, as edema characteristics are patient

  10. Methods of determining the effective dose in dental radiology.

    PubMed

    Thilander-Klang, Anne; Helmrot, Ebba

    2010-01-01

    A wide variety of X-ray equipment is used today in dental radiology, including intra-oral, orthopantomographic, cephalometric, cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and computed tomography (CT). This raises the question of how the radiation risks resulting from different kinds of examinations should be compared. The risk to the patient is usually expressed in terms of effective dose. However, it is difficult to determine its reliability, and it is difficult to make comparisons, especially when different modalities are used. The classification of the new CBCT units is also problematic as they are sometimes classified as CT units. This will lead to problems in choosing the best dosimetric method, especially when the examination geometry resembles more on an ordinary orthopantomographic examination, as the axis of rotation is not at the centre of the patient, and small radiation field sizes are used. The purpose of this study was to present different methods for the estimation of the effective dose from the equipment currently used in dental radiology, and to discuss their limitations. The methods are compared based on commonly used measurable and computable dose quantities, and their reliability in the estimation of the effective dose.

  11. Analytic validation of a clinical-grade PTEN immunohistochemistry assay in prostate cancer by comparison with PTEN FISH.

    PubMed

    Lotan, Tamara L; Wei, Wei; Ludkovski, Olga; Morais, Carlos L; Guedes, Liana B; Jamaspishvili, Tamara; Lopez, Karen; Hawley, Sarah T; Feng, Ziding; Fazli, Ladan; Hurtado-Coll, Antonio; McKenney, Jesse K; Simko, Jeffrey; Carroll, Peter R; Gleave, Martin; Lin, Daniel W; Nelson, Peter S; Thompson, Ian M; True, Lawrence D; Brooks, James D; Lance, Raymond; Troyer, Dean; Squire, Jeremy A

    2016-08-01

    PTEN loss is a promising prognostic and predictive biomarker in prostate cancer. Because it occurs most commonly via PTEN gene deletion, we developed a clinical-grade, automated, and inexpensive immunohistochemical assay to detect PTEN loss. We studied the sensitivity and specificity of PTEN immunohistochemistry relative to four-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for detection of PTEN gene deletion in a multi-institutional cohort of 731 primary prostate tumors. Intact PTEN immunostaining was 91% specific for the absence of PTEN gene deletion (549/602 tumors with two copies of the PTEN gene by FISH showed intact expression of PTEN by immunohistochemistry) and 97% sensitive for the presence of homozygous PTEN gene deletion (absent PTEN protein expression by immunohistochemistry in 65/67 tumors with homozygous deletion). PTEN immunohistochemistry was 65% sensitive for the presence of hemizygous PTEN gene deletion, with protein loss in 40/62 hemizygous tumors. We reviewed the 53 cases where immunohistochemistry showed PTEN protein loss and FISH showed two intact copies of the PTEN gene. On re-review, there was ambiguous immunohistochemistry loss in 6% (3/53) and failure to analyze the same tumor area by both methods in 34% (18/53). Of the remaining discordant cases, 41% (13/32) revealed hemizygous (n=8) or homozygous (n=5) PTEN gene deletion that was focal in most cases (11/13). The remaining 19 cases had two copies of the PTEN gene detected by FISH, representing truly discordant cases. Our automated PTEN immunohistochemistry assay is a sensitive method for detection of homozygous PTEN gene deletions. Immunohistochemistry screening is particularly useful to identify cases with heterogeneous PTEN gene deletion in a subset of tumor glands. Mutations, small insertions, or deletions and/or epigenetic or microRNA-mediated mechanisms may lead to PTEN protein loss in tumors with normal or hemizygous PTEN gene copy number.

  12. Analytic Validation of a Clinical-Grade PTEN Immunohistochemistry Assay in Prostate Cancer by Comparison to PTEN FISH

    PubMed Central

    Lotan, Tamara L.; Wei, Wei; Ludkovski, Olga; Morais, Carlos L.; Guedes, Liana B.; Jamaspishvili, Tamara; Lopez, Karen; Hawley, Sarah T.; Feng, Ziding; Fazli, Ladan; Hurtado-Coll, Antonio; McKenney, Jesse K.; Simko, Jeffrey; Carroll, Peter R.; Gleave, Martin; Lin, Daniel W.; Nelson, Peter S.; Thompson, Ian M.; True, Lawrence D.; Brooks, James D.; Lance, Raymond; Troyer, Dean; Squire, Jeremy A.

    2016-01-01

    PTEN loss is a promising prognostic and predictive biomarker in prostate cancer. Because it occurs most commonly via PTEN gene deletion, we developed a clinical-grade, automated and inexpensive immunohistochemical assay to detect PTEN loss. We studied the sensitivity and specificity of PTEN immunohistochemistry relative to 4-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for detection of PTEN gene deletion in a multi-institutional cohort of 731 primary prostate tumors. Intact PTEN immunostaining was 91% specific for absence of PTEN gene deletion, (549/602 tumors with 2 copies of the PTEN gene by FISH showed intact expression of PTEN by immunohistochemistry) and 97% sensitive for presence of homozygous PTEN gene deletion (absent PTEN protein expression by immunohistochemistry in 65/67 tumors with homozygous deletion). PTEN immunohistochemistry was 65% sensitive for presence of hemizygous PTEN gene deletion, with protein loss in 40/62 hemizygous tumors. We reviewed the 53 cases where immunohistochemistry showed PTEN protein loss and FISH showed 2 intact copies of the PTEN gene. On re-review, there was ambiguous immunohistochemistry loss in 6% (3/53) and failure to analyze the same tumor area by both methods in 34% (18/53). Of the remaining discordant cases, 41% (13/32) revealed hemizygous (n=8) or homozygous (n=5) PTEN gene deletion that was focal in most cases (11/13). The remaining 19 cases had 2 copies of the PTEN gene by FISH, representing truly discordant cases. Our automated PTEN immunohistochemistry assay is a sensitive method for detection of homozygous PTEN gene deletions. Immunohistochemistry screening is particularly useful to identify cases with heterogeneous PTEN gene deletion in a subset of tumor glands. Mutations, small insertions or deletions and/or epigenetic or microRNA-mediated mechanisms may lead to PTEN protein loss in tumors with normal or hemizygous PTEN gene copy number. PMID:27174589

  13. Concepts for dose determination in flat-detector CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyriakou, Yiannis; Deak, Paul; Langner, Oliver; Kalender, Willi A.

    2008-07-01

    Flat-detector computed tomography (FD-CT) scanners provide large irradiation fields of typically 200 mm in the cranio-caudal direction. In consequence, dose assessment according to the current definition of the computed tomography dose index CTDIL=100 mm, where L is the integration length, would demand larger ionization chambers and phantoms which do not appear practical. We investigated the usefulness of the CTDI concept and practical dosimetry approaches for FD-CT by measurements and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. An MC simulation tool (ImpactMC, VAMP GmbH, Erlangen, Germany) was used to assess the dose characteristics and was calibrated with measurements of air kerma. For validation purposes measurements were performed on an Axiom Artis C-arm system (Siemens Medical Solutions, Forchheim, Germany) equipped with a flat detector of 40 cm × 30 cm. The dose was assessed for 70 kV and 125 kV in cylindrical PMMA phantoms of 160 mm and 320 mm diameter with a varying phantom length from 150 to 900 mm. MC simulation results were compared to the values obtained with a calibrated ionization chambers of 100 mm and 250 mm length and to thermoluminesence (TLD) dose profiles. The MCs simulations were used to calculate the efficiency of the CTDIL determination with respect to the desired CTDI∞. Both the MC simulation results and the dose distributions obtained by MC simulation were in very good agreement with the CTDI measurements and with the reference TLD profiles, respectively, to within 5%. Standard CTDI phantoms which have a z-extent of 150 mm underestimate the dose at the center by up to 55%, whereas a z-extent of >=600 mm appears to be sufficient for FD-CT; the baseline value of the respective profile was within 1% to the reference baseline. As expected, the measurements with ionization chambers of 100 mm and 250 mm offer a limited accuracy, whereas an increased integration length of >=600 mm appeared to be necessary to approximate CTDI∞ in within 1%. MC simulations

  14. Poly-ADP ribosylation of PTEN by tankyrases promotes PTEN degradation and tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nan; Zhang, Yajie; Han, Xin; Liang, Ke; Wang, Jiadong; Feng, Lin; Wang, Wenqi; Songyang, Zhou; Lin, Chunru; Yang, Liuqing; Yu, Yonghao

    2015-01-01

    PTEN [phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-trisphosphate phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted from chromosome 10], a phosphatase and critical tumor suppressor, is regulated by numerous post-translational modifications, including phosphorylation, ubiquitination, acetylation, and SUMOylation, which affect PTEN localization and protein stability. Here we report ADP-ribosylation as a new post-translational modification of PTEN. We identified PTEN as a novel substrate of tankyrases, which are members of the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs). We showed that tankyrases interact with and ribosylate PTEN, which promotes the recognition of PTEN by a PAR-binding E3 ubiquitin ligase, RNF146, leading to PTEN ubiquitination and degradation. Double knockdown of tankyrase1/2 stabilized PTEN, resulting in the subsequent down-regulation of AKT phosphorylation and thus suppressed cell proliferation and glycolysis in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. Furthermore, tankyrases were up-regulated and negatively correlated with PTEN expression in human colon carcinomas. Together, our study revealed a new regulation of PTEN and highlighted a role for tankyrases in the PTEN–AKT pathway that can be explored further for cancer treatment. PMID:25547115

  15. Bufalin Inhibits HCT116 Colon Cancer Cells and Its Orthotopic Xenograft Tumor in Mice Model through Genes Related to Apoptotic and PTEN/AKT Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jie; Chen, Chao; Wang, Shiying; Zhang, Yong; Yin, Peihao; Gao, Zhongxiang; Xu, Jie; Feng, Dianxu; Zuo, Qinsong; Zhao, Ronghua; Chen, Teng

    2015-01-01

    Aims. To investigate the anticolorectal cancer (CRC) effects of Bufalin, a bioactive polyhydroxysteroid from Venenum Bufonis, using HCT116 human CRC cell and an established orthotopic xenograft model in mice, and to explore the mechanisms of action. Material and Methods. Cultured HCT116 cells or BALB/c mice with orthotopic tumor were treated by Bufalin (positive control: 5-FU). Cell proliferation, apoptosis, and cycling were determined by MTT, Annexin V/PI staining, and flow cytometry, respectively. In mice, tumor inhibition rate and animal survival were calculated. The expressions of PTEN/phosphate-PTEN, AKT/phosphate-AKT, Bad, Bcl-xl, Bax, or Caspase-3 in cells and/or tumors were determined by Western blot or immunohistochemical staining. Results. Bufalin significantly inhibited cell proliferation and induced cell apoptosis and cycle arrest in a dose/time-dependent manner. In the animal model, Bufalin treatment resulted in significant inhibition of tumor growth and prolonged survival. In the Bufalin-treated cultured cells and/or xenograft tumors, the expressions of PTEN, Bad, Bax, and Caspase-3 were significantly increased, while p-AKT and Bcl-xL significantly decreased. Conclusions. Our results indicate that Bufalin inhibit cell proliferation and orthotopic tumor growth by inducing cell apoptosis through the intrinsic apoptotic pathway, which is of pivotal significance in the identification of an anticancer drug that may synergize with Bufalin. PMID:26770191

  16. Determining Effective Methadone Doses for Individual Opioid-Dependent Patients

    PubMed Central

    Trafton, Jodie A; Minkel, Jared; Humphreys, Keith

    2006-01-01

    Background Randomized clinical trials of methadone maintenance have found that on average high daily doses are more effective for reducing heroin use, and clinical practice guidelines recommend 60 mg/d as a minimum dosage. Nevertheless, many clinicians report that some patients can be stably maintained on lower methadone dosages to optimal effect, and clinic dosing practices vary substantially. Studies of individual responses to methadone treatment may be more easily translated into clinical practice. Methods and Findings A volunteer sample of 222 opioid-dependent US veterans initiating methadone treatment was prospectively observed over the year after treatment entry. In the 168 who achieved at least 1 mo of heroin abstinence, methadone dosages on which patients maintained heroin-free urine samples ranged from 1.5 mg to 191.2 mg (median = 69 mg). Among patients who achieved heroin abstinence, higher methadone dosages were predicted by having a diagnosis of posttraumatic stress disorder or depression, having a greater number of previous opioid detoxifications, living in a region with lower average heroin purity, attending a clinic where counselors discourage dosage reductions, and staying in treatment longer. These factors predicted 42% of the variance in dosage associated with heroin abstinence. Conclusions Effective and ineffective methadone dosages overlap substantially. Dosing guidelines should focus more heavily on appropriate processes of dosage determination rather than solely specifying recommended dosages. To optimize therapy, methadone dosages must be titrated until heroin abstinence is achieved. PMID:16448216

  17. Radon Dose Determination for Cave Guides in Czech Republic

    SciTech Connect

    Thinova, Lenka; Rovenska, Katerina

    2008-08-07

    According to recommended approach there are six (from total of twelve) open-to-public caves in Czech Republic, reaching near to an effective lung-dose of 6mSv/year. A conservative approach for estimating the potential effective lung-dose in caves (or underground) is based on two season's measurements, using solid state alpha track detector (Kodak in plastic diffusion chamber). The obtained dataset is converted into an annual effective dose, in agreement with the ICRP65 recommendation, using the 'cave factor' 1.5. The value of 'cave factor' which depends on the spectrum of aerosol particles, or on the proportional representation of the unattached/attached ratio (6.5 : 93.5 for residential places, 13.6 : 86.4 for caves due to lower concentration of free aerosols) and on the equilibrium factor. Thus conversion factor is 1.5 times higher in comparison with ICRP 65. Is this correct? Because a more precisely determined dose value would have a significant impact on radon remedies, or on restricting the time workers stay underground, a series of measurement was initiated in 2003 with the aim to specify input data, computation and errors in effective dose assessment in each one of the evaluated caves separately. The enhancement of personal dosimetry for underground work places includes a study of the given questions, from the following points of view in each cave: continual radon measurement; regular measurements of radon and its daughters to estimate the equilibrium factor and the presence of free {sup 218}Po; regular indoor air flow measurements to study the location of the radon supply and its transfer among individual areas of the cave; natural radioactive element content evaluation in subsoil and in water inside/outside, a study of the radon sources in the cave; determination of the free fraction from continual unattached and attached fraction measurement (grid and filter); thoron measurement. Air flow measurements provide very interesting information about the origin

  18. Pancreas-specific Pten deficiency causes partial resistance to diabetes and elevated hepatic AKT signaling.

    PubMed

    Tong, Zan; Fan, Yan; Zhang, Weiqi; Xu, Jun; Cheng, Jing; Ding, Mingxiao; Deng, Hongkui

    2009-06-01

    PTEN, a negative regulator of the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/AKT pathway, is an important modulator of insulin signaling. To determine the metabolic function of pancreatic Pten, we generated pancreas-specific Pten knockout (PPKO) mice. PPKO mice had enlarged pancreas and elevated proliferation of acinar cells. They also exhibited hypoglycemia, hypoinsulinemia, and altered amino metabolism. Notably, PPKO mice showed delayed onset of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes and sex-biased resistance to high-fat-diet (HFD)-induced diabetes. To investigate the mechanism for the resistance to HFD-induced hyperglycemia in PPKO mice, we evaluated AKT phosphorylation in major insulin-responsive tissues: the liver, muscle, and fat. We found that Pten loss in the pancreas causes the elevation of AKT signaling in the liver. The phosphorylation of AKT and its downstream substrate GSK3beta was increased in the liver of PPKO mice, while PTEN level was decreased without detectable excision of Pten allele in the liver of PPKO mice. Proteomics analysis revealed dramatically decreased level of 78-kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78) in the liver of PPKO mice, which may also contribute to the lower blood glucose level of PPKO mice fed with HFD. Together, our findings reveal a novel response in the liver to pancreatic defect in metabolic regulation, adding a new dimension to understanding diabetes resistance.

  19. 10 CFR 20.1203 - Determination of external dose from airborne radioactive material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Determination of external dose from airborne radioactive... RADIATION Occupational Dose Limits § 20.1203 Determination of external dose from airborne radioactive material. Licensees shall, when determining the dose from airborne radioactive material, include the...

  20. 10 CFR 20.1203 - Determination of external dose from airborne radioactive material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Determination of external dose from airborne radioactive... RADIATION Occupational Dose Limits § 20.1203 Determination of external dose from airborne radioactive material. Licensees shall, when determining the dose from airborne radioactive material, include the...

  1. Posttranslational Regulation of Membrane Type 1-Matrix Metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) in Mouse PTEN Null Prostate Cancer Cells: Enhanced Surface Expression and Differential O-Glycosylation of MT1-MMP1

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seaho; Huang, Wei; Mottillo, Emilio P.; Sohail, Anjum; Ham, Yoon-Ah; Conley-LaComb, M. Katie; Kim, Chong Jai; Tzivion, Guri; Kim, Hyeong-Reh Choi; Wang, Shihua; Chen, Yong Q.; Fridman, Rafael

    2010-01-01

    Membrane type 1 (MT1)-matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) is a membrane-tethered MMP that has been shown to play a key role in promoting cancer cell invasion. MT1-MMP is highly expressed in bone metastasis of prostate cancer (PC) patients and promotes intraosseous tumor growth of PC cells in mice. The majority of metastatic prostate cancers harbor loss-of-function mutations or deletions of the tumor suppressor PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome ten). However, the role of PTEN inactivation in MT1-MMP expression in PC cells has not been examined. In this study, prostate epithelial cell lines derived from mice that are either heterozygous (PTEN+/-) or homozygous (PTEN-/-) for PTEN deletion or harboring a wild type PTEN (PTEN+/+) were used to investigate the expression of MT1-MMP. We found that biallelic loss of PTEN is associated with posttranslational regulation of MT1-MMP protein in mouse PC cells. PTEN-/- PC cells display higher levels of MT1-MMP at the cell surface when compared to PTEN+/+ and PTEN+/- cells and consequently exhibited enhanced migratory and collagen-invasive activities. MT1-MMP displayed by PTEN-/- cells is differentially O-glycosylated and exhibits a slow rate of turnover. MT1-MMP expression in PTEN-/- cells is under control of the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway, as determined using pharmacological inhibitors. Interestingly, rapamycin, an mTOR inhibitor, up-regulates MT1-MMP expression in PTEN+/+ cells via PI3K activity. Collectively, these data in a mouse prostate cell system uncover for the first time a novel and complex relationship between PTEN loss-mediated PI3K/AKT activation and posttranslational regulation of MT1-MMP, which may play a role in PC progression. PMID:20620173

  2. Apc, but not obesity, synergizes with PTEN to drive intestinal stem cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Tabrizian, Tahmineh; Wang, Donghai; Guan, Fangxia; Hu, Zunju; Beck, Amanda; Delahaye, Fabien; Huffman, Derek M

    2017-03-28

    Obesity is a major risk factor for colorectal cancer and can accelerate Lgr5+ intestinal stem cell (ISC)-derived tumorigenesis following inactivation of Apc. However, whether non-canonical pathways involving PI3K-Akt signaling in ISCs can lead to tumor formation, and if this can be further exacerbated by obesity is unknown. Despite the synergy between Pten and Apc inactivation in epithelial cells on intestinal tumor formation, their combined role in Lgr5+-ISCs, which are the most rapidly dividing ISC population in the intestine, is unknown. Lgr5+-GFP mice were provided low-fat diet (LFD) or high-fat diet (HFD) for 8 mo and the transcriptome was evaluated in Lgr5+-ISCs. For tumor studies, Lgr5+-GFP and Lgr5+-GFP Ptenflox/flox mice were tamoxifen treated to inactivate Pten in ISCs and provided LFD or HFD until 14-15 mo of age. Finally, various combinations of Lgr5+-ISC specific, Apc and Pten-deleted mice were generated, and evaluated for histopathology and survival. HFD did not overtly alter Akt signaling in ISCs, but did increase other metabolic pathways. Pten deficiency, but not HFD, increased BrdU positive cells in the small intestine (P<0.05). However, combining Pten and Apc deficiency synergistically increased proliferative markers, tumor pathology and mortality, in a dose-dependent fashion (P<0.05). In summary, we show that HFD alone fails to drive Akt signaling in ISCs and that Pten deficiency, is dispensable as a tumor suppressor in Lgr5+-ISCs. However, combining Pten and Apc deficiency in ISCs synergistically increases proliferation, tumor formation, and mortality. Thus, aberrant Wnt/β-catenin, rather than PI3K-Akt signaling, is requisite for obesity to drive Lgr5+ISC-derived tumorigenesis.

  3. A functional network of the tumor suppressors APC, hDlg, and PTEN, that relies on recognition of specific PDZ-domains.

    PubMed

    Sotelo, Natalia S; Valiente, Miguel; Gil, Anabel; Pulido, Rafael

    2012-08-01

    APC and PTEN are tumor suppressor proteins that bind through their C-termini to the PDZ domain containing-hDlg scaffolding protein. We have found that co-expression of PTEN and hDlg enhanced the negative regulation of the PI3K/Akt pathway by PTEN, indicating the physiologic importance of these interactions. APC and PTEN share other PDZ domain containing-interacting partners, including the MAGI scaffolding proteins and the MAST family of protein kinases. Mutational analysis revealed that the C-terminal PDZ-binding motifs from APC and PTEN were differentially recognized by distinct PDZ domains. APC bound to the three PDZ domains from hDlg, whereas PTEN mainly bound to PDZ-2/hDlg. This indicates the existence of overlapping, but distinct PDZ-domain recognition patterns by APC and PTEN. Furthermore, a ternary complex formed by APC, PTEN, and hDlg was detected, suggesting that hDlg may serve as a platform to bring in proximity APC and PTEN tumor suppressor activities. In line with this, tumor-related mutations targeting the PDZ-2/hDlg domain diminished its interaction with APC and PTEN. Our results expand the PDZ-domain counterparts for the tumor suppressor APC, show that APC and PTEN share PDZ-domain partners but have individual molecular determinants for specific recognition of PDZ domains, and suggest the participation of the tumor suppressors APC, PTEN, and hDlg in PDZ-domain interaction networks which may be relevant in oncogenesis. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. PTEN: History of a Tumor Suppressor.

    PubMed

    Salmena, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    Starting from the discovery of "inhibitory chromosomes" by Theodor Boveri to the finding by Henry Harris that fusing a normal cell to a cancer cell reduced tumorigenic potential, the notion of tumor suppression was recognized well before any tumor-suppressor genes were discovered. Although not the first to be revealed, PTEN has been demonstrated to be one of the most frequently altered tumor suppressors in cancer. This introductory chapter provides a historical perspective on our current understanding of PTEN including some of the seminal discoveries in the tumor suppressor field, the events leading to PTEN's discovery, and an introduction to some of the most important researchers and their studies which have shed light on PTEN biology and function as we know it today.

  5. Overexpression of miR-21 promotes the proliferation and migration of cervical cancer cells via the inhibition of PTEN.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jingjie; Zhang, Wei; Lv, Qiongying; Zhu, Dingjun

    2015-06-01

    The oncogenic miR-21 has been widely recognized to promote the development and progression of various types of malignant tumors, but not cervical cancers. The aim of this study was to examine the expression of miR-21 and PTEN in cervical cancer specimens using quantitative PCR. The miR-21 level was then manipulated in the cervical cancer lines and the regulation of miR-21 on the proliferation, migration and invasion of cervical cancer cells was determined. Additionally, we determined the role of PTEN in the miR-21-regulated proliferation, migration and invasion of cervical cancer cells. miR-21 was upregulated in the cervical cancer specimens, negatively correlating with the PTEN mRNA level. Transfection of the miR-21 mimics was markedly promoted, whereas the miR-21 inhibitor suppressed the proliferation, migration and invasion of cervical cancer cells, with a significant inhibition of PTEN expression. In addition, the overexpression of PTEN markedly inhibited the proliferation and migration of the cervical cancer cells. The present study showed the upregulation of miR-21 in invasive cervical cancers, and confirmed the promotion of miR-21 with regard to the proliferation, migration and invasion in cervical cancer cells via inhibiting the PTEN expression. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to confirm that the miR-21/PTEN pathway promotes cervical cancer.

  6. DOSE TO CURIE DETERMINATION FOR CONTAINERS WITH MEASURABLE CS-137

    SciTech Connect

    RATHBUN LA; ANDERSON JD; SWAN RJ

    2010-12-03

    The Next Generation Retrieval (NGR) project will retrieve suspect transuranic (TRU) waste containers from Trenches 17 and 27 in the 218-E-12B (12B) burial ground. The trenches were in operation from May 1970 through October 1972. A portion of the retrieved containers that will require shipment to and acceptance at a treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) facility and the containers will be either remote-handled (RH) and/or contact-handled (CH). The method discussed in this document will be used for the RH and some of the CH containers to determine the radionuclide inventory. Waste disposition (shipment and TSD acceptance) requires that the radioactive content be characterized for each container. Source-term estimates using high resolution, shielded, gamma-ray scan assay techniques cannot be performed on a number of RH and other containers with high dose rates from {sup 137}Cs-{sup 137m}Ba. This document provides the method to quantify the radioactive inventory of fission product gamma emitters within the containers based on the surface dose rate measurements taken in the field with hand-held survey instruments.

  7. PTEN degradation after ischemic stroke: a double-edged sword.

    PubMed

    Li, W; Huang, R; Chen, Z; Yan, L-J; Simpkins, J W; Yang, S-H

    2014-08-22

    Tumor suppressor phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) is highly expressed in neurons and PTEN inhibition has been reported to be neuroprotective against ischemic stroke in experimental models. On the other hand, PTEN deletion has been shown to lead to cognitive impairment. In the current study, we examined the expression and functions of PTEN in an ischemic stroke rodent model. We found rapid S-nitrosylation and degradation of PTEN after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. PTEN degradation leads to activation of Akt. PTEN partial deletion or PTEN inhibition increased the expression of GABAA receptor (GABAAR) γ2 subunit and enhanced GABAA receptor current. After cerebral ischemia, increased expression of GABAAR γ2 subunit was observed in the ischemia region and the penumbra area. We also observed PTEN loss in astrocytes after cerebral ischemia. Astrocytic PTEN partial knockout increased astrocyte activation and exacerbated ischemic damage. We speculated that ischemic stroke induced neuronal PTEN degradation, hence enhanced GABAA receptor-medicated neuronal activity inhibition which could attenuate excitotoxicity and provide neuroprotection during the acute phase after stroke, while inhibiting long-term functional recovery and contributing to vascular cognitive impairment after stroke. On the other hand, ischemic stroke induced astrocytic PTEN loss and enhanced ischemic damage and astrogliosis. Taken together, our study indicates that ischemic stroke induces rapid PTEN degradation in both neurons and astrocytes which play both protective and detrimental action in a spatiotemporal- and cell-type-dependent manner. Our study provides critical insight for targeting PTEN signaling pathway for stroke treatment.

  8. PTEN inhibitors: an evaluation of current compounds.

    PubMed

    Spinelli, Laura; Lindsay, Yvonne E; Leslie, Nicholas R

    2015-01-01

    Small molecule inhibitors of many classes of enzymes, including phosphatases, have widespread use as experimental tools and as therapeutics. Efforts to develop inhibitors against the lipid phosphatase and tumour suppressor, PTEN, was for some time limited by concerns that their use as therapy could result in increased risk of cancer. However, the accumulation of evidence that short term PTEN inhibition may be valuable in conditions such as nerve injury has raised interest. Here we investigate the inhibition of PTEN by four available PTEN inhibitors, bpV(phen), bpV(pic), VO-OHpic and SF1670 and compared this inhibition with that of only 3 other related enzymes, the tyrosine phosphatase SHP1 and the phosphoinositide phosphatases INPP4A and INPP4B. Even with this very small number of comparators, for all compounds, inhibition of multiple enzymes was observed and with all three vanadate compounds, this was similar or more potent than the inhibition of PTEN. In particular, the bisperoxovanadate compounds were found to inhibit PTEN poorly in the presence of reducing agents including the cellular redox buffer glutathione.

  9. Pten Regulates Epithelial Cytodifferentiation during Prostate Development

    PubMed Central

    Lokody, Isabel B.; Francis, Jeffrey C.; Gardiner, Jennifer R.; Erler, Janine T.; Swain, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    Gene expression and functional studies have indicated that the molecular programmes involved in prostate development are also active in prostate cancer. PTEN has been implicated in human prostate cancer and is frequently mutated in this disease. Here, using the Nkx3.1:Cre mouse strain and a genetic deletion approach, we investigate the role of Pten specifically in the developing mouse prostate epithelia. In contrast to its role in other developing organs, this gene is dispensable for the initial developmental processes such as budding and branching. However, as cytodifferentiation progresses, abnormal luminal cells fill the ductal lumens together with augmented epithelial proliferation. This phenotype resembles the hyperplasia seen in postnatal Pten deletion models that develop neoplasia at later stages. Consistent with this, gene expression analysis showed a number of genes affected that are shared with Pten mutant prostate cancer models, including a decrease in androgen receptor regulated genes. In depth analysis of the phenotype of these mice during development revealed that loss of Pten leads to the precocious differentiation of epithelial cells towards a luminal cell fate. This study provides novel insight into the role of Pten in prostate development as part of the process of coordinating the differentiation and proliferation of cell types in time and space to form a functional organ. PMID:26076167

  10. Methods in the Study of PTEN Structure: X-Ray Crystallography and Hydrogen Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Masson, Glenn R; Burke, John E; Williams, Roger L

    2016-01-01

    Despite its small size and deceptively simple domain organization, PTEN remains a challenging structural target due to its N- and C-terminal intrinsically disordered segments, and the conformational heterogeneity caused by phosphorylation of its C terminus. Using hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS), it is possible to probe the conformational dynamics of the disordered termini, and also to determine how PTEN binds to lipid membranes. Here, we describe how to purify recombinant, homogenously dephosphorylated PTEN from a eukaryotic system for subsequent investigation with HDX-MS or crystallography.

  11. Identification of novel PTEN-binding partners: PTEN interaction with fatty acid binding protein FABP4.

    PubMed

    Gorbenko, O; Panayotou, G; Zhyvoloup, A; Volkova, D; Gout, I; Filonenko, V

    2010-04-01

    PTEN is a tumor suppressor with dual protein and lipid-phosphatase activity, which is frequently deleted or mutated in many human advanced cancers. Recent studies have also demonstrated that PTEN is a promising target in type II diabetes and obesity treatment. Using C-terminal PTEN sequence in pEG202-NLS as bait, yeast two-hybrid screening on Mouse Embryo, Colon Cancer, and HeLa cDNA libraries was carried out. Isolated positive clones were validated by mating assay and identified through automated DNA sequencing and BLAST database searches. Sequence analysis revealed a number of PTEN-binding proteins linking this phosphatase to a number of different signaling cascades, suggesting that PTEN may perform other functions besides tumor-suppressing activity in different cell types. In particular, the interplay between PTEN function and adipocyte-specific fatty-acid-binding protein FABP4 is of notable interest. The demonstrable tautology of PTEN to FABP4 suggested a role for this phosphatase in the regulation of lipid metabolism and adipocyte differentiation. This interaction was further studied using coimmunoprecipitation and gel-filtration assays. Finally, based on Biacore assay, we have calculated the K(D) of PTEN-FABP4 complex, which is around 2.8 microM.

  12. Mechanistic Rationale to Target PTEN-Deficient Tumor Cells with Inhibitors of the DNA Damage Response Kinase ATM.

    PubMed

    McCabe, Nuala; Hanna, Conor; Walker, Steven M; Gonda, David; Li, Jie; Wikstrom, Katarina; Savage, Kienan I; Butterworth, Karl T; Chen, Clark; Harkin, D Paul; Prise, Kevin M; Kennedy, Richard D

    2015-06-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is an important signaling molecule in the DNA damage response (DDR). ATM loss of function can produce a synthetic lethal phenotype in combination with tumor-associated mutations in FA/BRCA pathway components. In this study, we took an siRNA screening strategy to identify other tumor suppressors that, when inhibited, similarly sensitized cells to ATM inhibition. In this manner, we determined that PTEN and ATM were synthetically lethal when jointly inhibited. PTEN-deficient cells exhibited elevated levels of reactive oxygen species, increased endogenous DNA damage, and constitutive ATM activation. ATM inhibition caused catastrophic DNA damage, mitotic cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis specifically in PTEN-deficient cells in comparison with wild-type cells. Antioxidants abrogated the increase in DNA damage and ATM activation in PTEN-deficient cells, suggesting a requirement for oxidative DNA damage in the mechanism of cell death. Lastly, the ATM inhibitor KU-60019 was specifically toxic to PTEN mutant cancer cells in tumor xenografts and reversible by reintroduction of wild-type PTEN. Together, our results offer a mechanistic rationale for clinical evaluation of ATM inhibitors in PTEN-deficient tumors. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  13. Short term feeding of a high fat diet exerts an additive effect on hepatocellular damage and steatosis in liver-specific PTEN knockout mice

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Hepatospecific deletion of PTEN results in constitutive activation of Akt and increased lipogenesis. In mice, the addition of a high fat diet (HFD) downregulates lipogenesis. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of a HFD on hepatocellular damage induced by deletion of PTEN. Twelve-week...

  14. Role of PTEN in TNFα induced insulin resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Bulger, David A.; Conley, Jermaine; Conner, Spencer H.; Majumdar, Gipsy; Solomon, Solomon S.

    2015-06-05

    Aims/hypothesis: PTEN may play a reversible role in TNFα induced insulin resistance, which has been linked to obesity-associated insulin resistance (IR). Methods: Western blots for PTEN and p-Akt were performed on H-411E liver cells incubated with insulin, TNFα, and in selected experiments VO-OHpic vanadium complex in the presence and absence of PTEN siRNA. Total PTEN was compared to β-actin loading control and p-Akt was compared to total Akt. Results: Western blot and Real Time RT-PCR experiments showed increased PTEN after TNFα treatment (p = 0.04); slightly decreased PTEN after insulin treatment; and slightly increased PTEN after insulin + TNFα treatment. PTEN siRNA markedly inhibited the TNFα-induced increase in PTEN (p < 0.01) without significantly changing the p-Akt levels. The vanadium complex, exhibiting insulin-like effects, also significantly prevented the TNFα-induced increase in PTEN. Combining insulin and VO-OHpic was additive, providing both proof of concept and insight into mechanism. Discussion: The PTEN increase due to TNFα treatment was reversible by both PTEN siRNA knockdown and VO-OHpic treatment. Thus, PTEN is identified as a potential new therapeutic target for reducing IR in Type 2 DM. - Highlights: • TNFα treatment induced a significant increase in PTEN in H-411E liver cells. • PTEN siRNA knockdown prevented this effect. • VO-OHpic (vanadium complex) treatment, like insulin, decreased PTEN protein levels. • Thus, PTEN is identified as a potential therapeutic target in DM Type 2.

  15. Prostate Cancer-Specific and Potent Antitumor Effect of a DD3-Controlled Oncolytic Virus Harboring the PTEN Gene

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Miao; Cao, Xin; Xu, Hai-neng; Fan, Jun-kai; Huang, Hong-ling; Yang, Dong-qin; Li, Yu-hua; Wang, Jian; Li, Runsheng; Liu, Xin-Yuan

    2012-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a major health problem for men in Western societies. Here we report a Prostate Cancer-Specific Targeting Gene-Viro-Therapy (CTGVT-PCa), in which PTEN was inserted into a DD3-controlled oncolytic viral vector (OV) to form Ad.DD3.E1A.E1B(Δ55)-(PTEN) or, briefly, Ad.DD3.D55-PTEN. The woodchuck post-transcriptional element (WPRE) was also introduced at the downstream of the E1A coding sequence, resulting in much higher expression of the E1A gene. DD3 is one of the most prostate cancer-specific genes and has been used as a clinical bio-diagnostic marker. PTEN is frequently inactivated in primary prostate cancers, which is crucial for prostate cancer progression. Therefore, the Ad.DD3.D55-PTEN has prostate cancer specific and potent antitumor effect. The tumor growth rate was almost completely inhibited with the final tumor volume after Ad.DD3.D55-PTEN treatment less than the initial volume at the beginning of Ad.DD3.D55-PTEN treatment, which shows the powerful antitumor effect of Ad.DD3.D55-PTEN on prostate cancer tumor growth. The CTGVT-PCa construct reported here killed all of the prostate cancer cell lines tested, such as DU145, 22RV1 and CL1, but had a reduced or no killing effect on all the non-prostate cancer cell lines tested. The mechanism of action of Ad.DD3.D55-PTEN was due to the induction of apoptosis, as detected by TUNEL assays and flow cytometry. The apoptosis was mediated by mitochondria-dependent and -independent pathways, as determined by caspase assays and mitochondrial membrane potential. PMID:22509396

  16. PTEN and TRP53 independently suppress Nanog expression in spermatogonial stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kuijk, Ewart W; van Mil, Alain; Brinkhof, Bas; Penning, Louis C; Colenbrander, Ben; Roelen, Bernard A J

    2010-07-01

    Mammalian spermatogonial stem cells are a special type of adult stem cells because they can contribute to the next generation. Knockout studies have indicated a role for TRP53 and PTEN in insulating male germ cells from pluripotency, but the mechanism by which this is achieved is largely unknown. To get more insight in these processes, an RNAi experiment was performed on the mouse spermatogonial stem cell line GSDG1. Lipofectaminemediated transfection of siRNAs directed against Trp53 and Pten resulted in decreased expression levels as determined by quantitative RT-PCR and immunoblotting. The effects of knockdown were examined by determining the expression levels of genes that are involved in reprogramming and pluripotency of cells, specifically Nanog, Eras, c-Myc, Klf4, Oct4, and Sox2. Additionally, the effects of TRP53 or PTEN knockdown on Plzf and Ddx4 expression were measured, which are highly expressed in spermatogonial stem cells and differentiating male germ cells, respectively. The main finding of this study is that knockdown of Trp53 and Pten independently resulted in significantly higher expression levels of the pluripotency-associated gene Nanog, and we hypothesize that TRP53 and PTEN mediated repression is important for the insulation of male germ cells from pluripotency.

  17. Determination of radionuclides and pathways contributing to cumulative dose. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project: Dose code recovery activities, Calculation 004

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, B.A.

    1992-12-01

    A series of scoping calculations has been undertaken to evaluate the absolute and relative contributions of different radionuclides and exposure pathways to doses that may have been received by individuals living in the vicinity of the Hanford Site. This scoping calculation (Calculation 004) examined the contributions of numerous radionuclides to cumulative dose via environmental exposures and accumulation in foods. Addressed in this calculation were the contributions to organ and effective dose of infants and adults from (1) air submersion and groundshine external dose, (2) inhalation, (3) ingestion of soil by humans, (4) ingestion of leafy vegetables, (5) ingestion of other vegetables and fruits, (6) ingestion of meat, (7) ingestion of eggs, and (8) ingestion of cows` milk from Feeding Regime 1, as described in calculation 002. This calculation specifically addresses cumulative radiation doses to infants and adults resulting from releases occurring over the period 1945 through 1972.

  18. PTEN function: the long and the short of it.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Benjamin D; Hodakoski, Cindy; Barrows, Douglas; Mense, Sarah M; Parsons, Ramon E

    2014-04-01

    Phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN) is a phosphatase that is frequently altered in cancer. PTEN has phosphatase-dependent and -independent roles, and genetic alterations in PTEN lead to deregulation of protein synthesis, the cell cycle, migration, growth, DNA repair, and survival signaling. PTEN localization, stability, conformation, and phosphatase activity are controlled by an array of protein-protein interactions and post-translational modifications. Thus, PTEN-interacting and -modifying proteins have profound effects on the tumor suppressive functions of PTEN. Moreover, recent studies identified mechanisms by which PTEN can exit cells, via either exosomal export or secretion, and act on neighboring cells. This review focuses on modes of PTEN protein regulation and ways in which perturbations in this regulation may lead to disease.

  19. Somatic mutation analysis of KRAS, BRAF, HER2 and PTEN in EGFR mutation-negative non-small cell lung carcinoma: determination of frequency, distribution pattern and identification of novel deletion in HER2 gene from Indian patients.

    PubMed

    Bhaumik, Sangeet; Ahmad, Firoz; Das, Bibhu Ranjan

    2016-10-01

    Somatic mutations of KRAS, BRAF, HER2, PTEN genes are the most important molecular markers after the EGFR gene mutation. The current study evaluated the frequency and distribution pattern of KRAS, BRAF, HER2, PTEN mutation in Indian non-small cell lung carcinoma patients. The frequency of KRAS, BRAF, HER2, PTEN mutations was 6.4 % (14/204), 1.5 % (3/204), 1.5 % (3/204), 0 % (0/204), respectively. KRAS, BRAF, HER2 mutations were more prevalent in males than in females. KRAS and HER2 showed a trend of a higher frequency of mutation in the age group of <60 years, whereas BRAF mutations were more frequent in the age group of ≥60 years. Sequencing analysis of KRAS gene revealed c.34G>T (G12C) (n = 8), c.35G>A (G12D) (n = 3), c.35G>T (G12 V) (n = 1) and c.34G>T (G12C)/c.41T>C (V14A) (n = 2) mutations. Three different BRAF mutations (L584P: n = 1, V600E: n = 1, K601E: n = 1) were detected. Two cases harboured c.2324_2325ins12 (ATACGTGATGGC duplication) in HER2 gene, and one case was positive for NG_007503.2 (NM_001005862.2):c.2218-4del. It is less certain, but still quite possible that this mutation will affect splicing as the deletion of one C actually brings in one additional purine into the region. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates an instance of diverse nature of KRAS, BRAF, HER2 and PTEN gene in Indian patients and confirms that the frequency of these gene mutations varies globally. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first Indian study to evaluate KRAS, BRAF, HER2 and PTEN gene mutations.

  20. Boron dose determination for BNCT using Fricke and EPR dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Wielopolski, L.; Ciesielski, B.

    1995-02-01

    In Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) the dominant dose delivered to the tumor is due to {alpha} and {sup 7}Li charged particles resulting from a neutron capture by {sup 10}B and is referred to herein as the boron dose. Boron dose is directly attributable to the following two independent factors, one boron concentration and the neutron capture energy dependent cross section of boron, and two the energy spectrum of the neutrons that interact with boron. The neutron energy distribution at a given point is dictated by the incident neutron energy distribution, the depth in tissue, geometrical factors such as beam size and patient`s dimensions. To account for these factors can be accommodated by using Monte Carlo theoretical simulations. However, in conventional experimental BNCT dosimetry, e.g., using TLDs or ionization chambers, it is only possible to estimate the boron dose. To overcome some of the limitations in the conventional dosimetry, modifications in ferrous sulfate dosimetry (Fricke) and Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) dosimetry in alanine, enable to measure specifically boron dose in a mixed gamma neutron radiation fields. The boron dose, in either of the dosimeters, is obtained as a difference between measurements with boronated and unboronated dosimeters. Since boron participates directly in the measurements, the boron dosimetry reflects the true contribution, integral of the neutron energy spectrum with boron cross section, of the boron dose to the total dose. Both methods are well established and used extensively in dosimetry, they are presented briefly here.

  1. Dickkopf-1 (DKK1) phosphatase and tensin homolog on chromosome 10 (PTEN) crosstalk via microRNA interference in the diabetic heart.

    PubMed

    Ling, Shukuan; Birnbaum, Yochai; Nanhwan, Manjyot K; Thomas, Bejoy; Bajaj, Mandeep; Li, Yu; Li, Yinghui; Ye, Yumei

    2013-05-01

    Competitive endogenous RNAs (ceRNAs) regulate mRNA transcripts containing common microRNA (miRNA) recognition elements (MREs) through sequestration of shared miRNAs. Interactions of ceRNA have been demonstrated in cancerous cells. However, a paucity of information is available relative to the interactions of ceRNAs interaction in diabetes mellitus and the myocardium. The purpose of this study is to assess the potential role of DKK1 and PTEN in ceRNA regulation utilizing their common miRNAs in diabetic cardiomyocytes. The interactions' regulation between PTEN and DKK1 were determined in two diabetic models in vivo (streptozotocin-induced type-1 DM mice and db/db mice) and in vitro (human cardiomyocytes cells exposed to hyperglycemia). The levels of DKK1 and PTEN (mRNA and protein) were upregulated in parallel in all three diabetic models. DKK1 modulates PTEN protein levels in a miRNA and 3'UTR-dependent manner. RNAi-mediated DKK1 gene silencing resulted in a decreased PTEN expression and vice versa. The effect was blocked when Dicer was inhibited. Silencing either PTEN or DKK1 resulted in an increase of the availabilities of shared miRNAs. The silencing of either PTEN or DKKI resulted in a suppression end of the luciferase-PTEN 3'UTR activity. However, the over expression of DKK1 3'UTR or PTEN 3'UTR resulted in an increase in the activity. The attenuation of DKK1 increased AKT phosphorylation, improved glucose uptake and decreased apoptosis in HCMs exposed to hyperglycemia. The effects were blocked by PI3K inhibition. DKK1 and PTEN transcripts are co-upregulated in DM and hyperglycemia. DKK1 and PTEN serve as ceRNA, affecting the expression of each other via competition for miRNAs binding.

  2. Determination of radionuclides and pathways contributing to cumulative dose

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, B.A.

    1992-12-01

    A series of scoping calculations has been undertaken to evaluate the absolute and relative contributions of different radionuclides and exposure pathways to doses that may have been received by individuals living in the vicinity of the Hanford Site. This scoping calculation (Calculation 004) examined the contributions of numerous radionuclides to cumulative dose via environmental exposures and accumulation in foods. Addressed in this calculation were the contributions to organ and effective dose of infants and adults from (1) air submersion and groundshine external dose, (2) inhalation, (3) ingestion of soil by humans, (4) ingestion of leafy vegetables, (5) ingestion of other vegetables and fruits, (6) ingestion of meat, (7) ingestion of eggs, and (8) ingestion of cows' milk from Feeding Regime 1, as described in calculation 002. This calculation specifically addresses cumulative radiation doses to infants and adults resulting from releases occurring over the period 1945 through 1972.

  3. Somatic mutation of PTEN in bladder carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Aveyard, J S; Skilleter, A; Habuchi, T; Knowles, M A

    1999-01-01

    The tumour suppressor gene PTEN/MMAC1, which is mutated or homozygously deleted in glioma, breast and prostate cancer, is mapped to a region of 10q which shows loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in bladder cancer. We screened 123 bladder tumours for LOH in the region of PTEN. In 53 informative muscle invasive tumours (≥ pT2), allele loss was detected in 13 (24.5%) and allelic imbalance in four tumours (overall frequency 32%). LOH was found in four of 60 (6.6%) informative, non-invasive tumours (pTa/pT1). We screened 63 muscle invasive tumours for PTEN mutations by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis and for homozygous deletion by duplex quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Two homozygous deletions were identified but no mutations. Of 15 bladder tumour cell lines analysed, three showed homozygous deletion of all or part of the PTEN gene, but none had mutations detectable by SSCP analysis. Our results indicate that PTEN is involved in the development of some bladder tumours. The low frequency of mutation of the retained allele in tumours with 10q23 LOH suggests that there may be another predominant mechanism of inactivation of the second allele, for example small intragenic deletions, that hemizygosity may be sufficient for phenotypic effect, or that there is another target gene at 10q23. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10360673

  4. PTEN-PDZ domain interactions: binding of PTEN to PDZ domains of PTPN13.

    PubMed

    Sotelo, Natalia S; Schepens, Jan T G; Valiente, Miguel; Hendriks, Wiljan J A J; Pulido, Rafael

    2015-05-01

    Protein modular interactions mediated by PDZ domains are essential for the establishment of functional protein networks controlling diverse cellular functions. The tumor suppressor PTEN possesses a C-terminal PDZ-binding motif (PDZ-BM) that is recognized by a specific set of PDZ domains from scaffolding and regulatory proteins. Here, we review the current knowledge on PTEN-PDZ domain interactions and tumor suppressor networks, describe methodology suitable to analyze these interactions, and report the binding of PTEN and the PDZ domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase PTPN13. Yeast two-hybrid and GST pull-down analyses showed that PTEN binds to PDZ2/PTPN13 domain in a manner that depends on the specific PTPN13 PDZ domain arrangement involving the interdomain region between PDZ1 and PDZ2. Furthermore, a specific binding profile of PTEN to PDZ2/PTPN13 domain was observed by mutational analysis of the PTEN PDZ-BM. Our results disclose a PDZ-mediated physical interaction of PTEN and PTPN13 with potential relevance in tumor suppression and cell homeostasis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Nuclear PTEN levels and G2 progression in melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Abraham I.; Romigh, Todd; Waite, Kristin A.; Eng, Charis

    2009-01-01

    The phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) exerts its function, in part, by negatively regulating the well-known phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/AKT signaling pathway. Previous histological work has suggested that alterations in the nuclear/cytoplasmic compartmentalization of PTEN may play a role in the development and progression of melanoma. In this study, we examined the nuclear/cytoplasmic compartmentalization of PTEN in melanoma cell lines and its correlation with the cell cycle. Studies were performed in melanoma cells lines using classic cell biological techniques. In contrast to breast cancer cell lines, we found that increased levels of nuclear PTEN levels correlate with G2 rather than with G1 arrest. In WM164 and SKmel28 cells, overexpression of PTEN protein did not significantly increase the number of cells in the G2 phase. Differential CDC2 phosphorylation levels in cells that overexpressed PTEN compared with those where PTEN was downregulated suggest some involvement of PTEN in G2 checkpoint regulation. The data suggest that although nuclear PTEN levels correlate with the G2 phase, the role of PTEN in modulating G2/M arrest is not limiting. Further, the specific cell cycle phase regulated by nuclear PTEN is cell-type dependent. Taken together, our observations suggest that in melanoma, nuclear PTEN is involved in G2 progression possibly through the modulation of CDC2, opening up a new arena for investigation. PMID:19478684

  6. Determining the optimal dose in the development of anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Mathijssen, Ron H J; Sparreboom, Alex; Verweij, Jaap

    2014-05-01

    Identification of the optimal dose remains a key challenge in drug development. For cytotoxic drugs, the standard approach is based on identifying the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) in phase I trials and incorporating this to subsequent trials. However, this strategy does not take into account important aspects of clinical pharmacology. For targeted agents, the dose-effect relationships from preclinical studies are less obvious, and it is important to change the way these agents are developed to avoid recommending drug doses for different populations without evidence of differential antitumour effects in different diseases. The use of expanded cohorts in phase I trials to better define MTD and refine dose optimization should be further explored together with a focus on efficacy rather than toxicity-based predictions. Another key consideration in dose optimization is related to interindividual pharmacokinetic variability. High variability in intra-individual pharmacokinetics has been observed for many orally-administered drugs, especially those with low bioavailability, which might complicate identification of dose-effect relationships. End-organ dysfunction, interactions with other prescription drugs, herbal supplements, adherence, and food intake can influence pharmacokinetics. It is important these variables are identified during early clinical trials and considered in the development of further phase II and subsequent large-scale phase III studies.

  7. Determination of dose distributions and parameter sensitivity. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project; dose code recovery activities; Calculation 005

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, B.A.; Farris, W.T.; Simpson, J.C.

    1992-12-01

    A series of scoping calculations has been undertaken to evaluate the absolute and relative contribution of different radionuclides and exposure pathways to doses that may have been received by individuals living in the vicinity of the Hanford site. This scoping calculation (Calculation 005) examined the contributions of numerous parameters to the uncertainty distribution of doses calculated for environmental exposures and accumulation in foods. This study builds on the work initiated in the first scoping study of iodine in cow`s milk and the third scoping study, which added additional pathways. Addressed in this calculation were the contributions to thyroid dose of infants from (1) air submersion and groundshine external dose, (2) inhalation, (3) ingestion of soil by humans, (4) ingestion of leafy vegetables, (5) ingestion of other vegetables and fruits, (6) ingestion of meat, (7) ingestion of eggs, and (8) ingestion of cows` milk from Feeding Regime 1 as described in Calculation 001.

  8. The synergistic effect of Mig-6 and Pten ablation on endometrial cancer development and progression

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Hoon; Franco, Heather L.; Jung, Sung Yun; Qin, Jun; Broaddus, Russell R.; Lydon, John P.; Jeong, Jae-Wook

    2014-01-01

    Ablation of Mig-6 in the murine uterus leads to the development of endometrial hyperplasia and estrogen-induced endometrial cancer. An additional endometrial cancer mouse model is generated by ablation of Pten (either as heterozygotes or by conditional uterine ablation). To determine the interplay between Mig-6 and the PTEN/PI3K signaling pathway during endometrial tumorigenesis, we have generated mice with Mig-6 and Pten conditionally ablated in progesterone receptor positive cells (PRcre/+Mig-6f/fPtenf/f ; Mig-6d/dPtend/d). The ablation of both Mig-6 and Pten dramatically accelerated the development of endometrial cancer compared to single ablation of either gene. The epithelium of Mig-6d/dPtend/d mice showed a significant decrease in the number of apoptotic cells compared to Ptend/d mice. The expression of the estrogen-induced apoptotic inhibitors Birc1 was significantly increased in the Mig-6d/dPtend/d mice. We identified ERK2 as a MIG-6 interacting protein by co-immunoprecipitation and demonstrated that the level of ERK2 phosphorylation was increased upon Mig-6 ablation either singly or in combination with Pten ablation. These results suggest that Mig-6 exerts a tumor suppressor function in endometrial cancer by promoting epithelial cell apoptosis through the down-regulation of the estrogen-induced apoptosis inhibitors Birc1 and the inhibition of ERK2 phosphorylation. PMID:20418913

  9. Reciprocal positive regulation between TRPV6 and NUMB in PTEN-deficient prostate cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sung-Young; Hong, Chansik; Wie, Jinhong; Kim, Euiyong; Kim, Byung Joo; Ha, Kotdaji; Cho, Nam-Hyuk; Kim, In-Gyu; Jeon, Ju-Hong; So, Insuk

    2014-04-25

    Highlights: • TRPV6 interacts with tumor suppressor proteins. • Numb has a selective effect on TRPV6, depending on the prostate cancer cell line. • PTEN is a novel regulator of TRPV6–Numb complex. - Abstract: Calcium acts as a second messenger and plays a crucial role in signaling pathways involved in cell proliferation. Recently, calcium channels related to calcium influx into the cytosol of epithelial cells have attracted attention as a cancer therapy target. Of these calcium channels, TRPV6 is overexpressed in prostate cancer and is considered an important molecule in the process of metastasis. However, its exact role and mechanism is unclear. NUMB, well-known tumor suppressor gene, is a novel interacting partner of TRPV6. We show that NUMB and TRPV6 have a reciprocal positive regulatory relationship in PC-3 cells. We repeated this experiment in two other prostate cancer cell lines, DU145 and LNCaP. Interestingly, there were no significant changes in TRPV6 expression following NUMB knockdown in DU145. We revealed that the presence or absence of PTEN was the cause of NUMB–TRPV6 function. Loss of PTEN caused a positive correlation of TRPV6–NUMB expression. Collectively, we determined that PTEN is a novel interacting partner of TRPV6 and NUMB. These results demonstrated a novel relationship of NUMB–TRPV6 in prostate cancer cells, and show that PTEN is a novel regulator of this complex.

  10. Trp53 inactivation leads to earlier phaeochromocytoma formation in pten knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Korpershoek, Esther; Kloosterhof, Nanne K; Ziel-van der Made, Angelique; Korsten, Hanneke; Oudijk, Lindsey; Trapman, Jan; Dinjens, Winand N M; de Krijger, Ronald R

    2012-12-01

    Phaeochromocytomas (PCCs) are benign neuroendocrine tumours of the adrenal medulla. Approximately 10% of PCC patients develop metastases, but this frequency is much higher in specific subtypes of patients. The reliable diagnosis of malignant PCC can only be made after identification of a metastasis. To study the effect of Trp53 inactivation on PCC pathogenesis in Pten KO mice, we investigated the adrenals of a large cohort of mice with conditional monoallelic and biallelic inactivation of Trp53 and Pten. The adrenal weights were determined for all mice, and in a proportion of these mice, immunohistochemistry for tyrosine hydroxylase and dopamine β-hydroxylase was performed on the adrenals and corresponding lungs. Finally, comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) was performed. The histological and immunohistochemical results confirmed that the adrenal tumours were PCCs. Inactivation of one or both alleles of Trp53 resulted in earlier tumour occurrence in the Pten(loxP/loxP) mice as well as in the Pten(loxP/+) mice. In addition, lung metastases were found in up to 67% of mice. The CGH results showed that the most frequent genomic alterations were loss of chromosome 19 (86%) and gain of chromosome 15 (71%). In this study, we have shown that Pten/Trp53 KO mice showed metastatic PCC at high frequency and primary tumours occurred at younger ages in mice with Trp53 inactivation. Therefore, the present model appears to be a suitable model that might allow the preclinical study of new therapeutics for these tumours.

  11. Determination of radionuclides and pathways contributing to dose in 1945

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, B.A.

    1992-12-01

    A series of scoping calculations has been undertaken to evaluate the absolute and relative contributions of different radionuclides and exposure pathways to doses that may have been received by individuals living in the vicinity of the Hanford Site. This scoping calculation (Calculation 003) examined the contributions of numerous radionuclides to dose via environmental exposures and accumulation in foods. This study builds on the work initiated in the first scoping study of iodine in cow's milk (calculation 001). Addressed in this calculation were the contributions to organ and effective dose of infants and adults from (1) air submersion and groundshine external dose, (2) inhalation, (3) ingestion of soil by humans, (4) ingestion of leafy vegetables, (5) ingestion of other vegetables and fruits, (6) ingestion of meat, (7) ingestion of eggs, and (8) ingestion of cows' milk from Feeding Regime 1, as described in Calculation 001.

  12. Alanine Dosimetry Accurately Determines Radiation Dose in Nonhuman Primates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-01

    b) utility of CIP in managing postirradiation infection related to bacterial translocation from the alimentary canal, and (c) side effects of...sequelae seen after these ra- diation doses and prior to death (and at post mortem) is infection , generally of an endog- enous origin arising from...promised situations, can result in opportu- nistic infections . Radiation dose selection Taken together, these data support the use of 6.5 Gy cobalt-60

  13. Determining organ doses from computed tomography scanners using cadaveric subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griglock, Thomas M.

    The use of computed tomographic (CT) imaging has increased greatly since its inception in 1972. Technological advances have increased both the applicability of CT exams for common health problems as well as the radiation doses used to perform these exams. The increased radiation exposures have garnered much attention in the media and government agencies, and have brought about numerous attempts to quantify the amount of radiation received by patients. While the overwhelming majority of these attempts have focused on creating models of the human body (physical or computational), this research project sought to directly measure the radiation inside an actual human being. Three female cadaveric subjects of varying sizes were used to represent live patients. Optically-stimulated luminescent (OSL) dosimeters were used to measure the radiation doses. A dosimeter placement system was developed, tested, and optimized to allow accurate and reproducible placement of the dosimeters within the cadaveric subjects. A broad-beam, 320-slice, volumetric CT scanner was utilized to perform all CT exams, including five torso exams, four cardiac exams, and three organ perfusion exams. Organ doses ranged in magnitude from less than 1 to over 120 mGy, with the largest doses measured for perfusion imaging. A methodology has been developed that allows fast and accurate measurement of actual organ doses resulting from CT exams. The measurements made with this methodology represent the first time CT organ doses have been directly measured within a human body. These measurements are of great importance because they allow comparison to the doses measured using previous methods, and can be used to more accurately assess the risks from CT imaging.

  14. Role of the Tumor Suppressor PTEN in Antioxidant Responsive Element-mediated Transcription and Associated Histone Modifications

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Kensuke; Iwasaki, Kenta; Sugiyama, Hiroyuki

    2009-01-01

    Coordinated regulation of PI3-kinase (PI3K) and the tumor suppressor phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) plays a pivotal role in various cell functions. PTEN is deficient in many cancer cells, including Jurkat human leukemia. Here, we demonstrate that the status of PTEN determines cellular susceptibility to oxidative stress through antioxidant-responsive element (ARE)-mediated transcription of detoxification genes. We found that ferritin H transcription was robustly induced in tert-butylhydroquinone (t-BHQ)-treated Jurkat cells via an ARE, and it was due to PTEN deficiency. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that p300/CREB-binding protein (CBP) histone acetyltransferases and Nrf2 recruitment to the ARE and Bach1 release were blocked by the PI3K inhibitor LY294002, along with the partial inhibition of Nrf2 nuclear accumulation. Furthermore, acetylations of histone H3 Lys9 and Lys18, and deacetylation of Lys14 were associated with the PI3K-dependent ARE activation. Consistently, PTEN restoration in Jurkat cells inhibited t-BHQ–mediated expression of ferritin H and another ARE-regulated gene NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1. Conversely, PTEN knockdown in K562 cells enhanced the response to t-BHQ. The PTEN status under t-BHQ treatment affected hydrogen peroxide-mediated caspase-3 cleavage. The PI3K-dependent ferritin H induction was observed by treatment with other ARE-activating agents ethoxyquin and hemin. Collectively, the status of PTEN determines chromatin modifications leading to ARE activation. PMID:19158375

  15. PTEN status mediates 2ME2 anti-tumor efficacy in preclinical glioblastoma models: role of HIF1α suppression

    PubMed Central

    Muh, Carrie R.; Joshi, Shweta; Singh, Alok R.; Kesari, Santosh; Durden, Donald L.; Makale, Milan T.

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common brain cancer and is highly lethal in both adults and children. 2-methoxyestradiol (2ME2) is a microtubule inhibitor that potently inhibits HIF1α, GBM angiogenesis and tumor growth in preclinical models. In patients, 2ME2 exhibits low toxicity and promising but inconsistent efficacy. Given its preclinical potency and its tolerability in patients, we sought to determine whether 2ME2 therapy could be enhanced by addressing resistance via combination therapy, and with biomarkers to identify responsive glioma subgroups. We demonstrate that the PTEN-PI3K axis regulates HIF1α in glioma models. We utilized isogenic-pairs of glioma cell lines, deficient in PTEN or stably reconstituted with PTEN, to determine the role of PTEN in 2ME2 sensitivity in vitro and in vivo. Chou-Talalay synergy studies reveal significant synergy when a pan-PI3K inhibitor is combined with 2ME2. This synergistic activity was correlated with a synergistic suppression of HIF1α accumulation under hypoxic conditions in glioma models. In vivo, 2ME2 markedly inhibited tumor-induced angiogenesis and significantly reduced tumor growth only in a PTEN reconstituted GBM models in both subcutaneous and orthotopic intracranial mouse models. Collectively, these results: (1) suggest that PTEN status predicts sensitivity to 2ME2 and (2) justify exploration of 2ME2 combined with panPI3K inhibitors for the treatment of this intractable brain cancer. PMID:24162827

  16. Kinases, tails and more: regulation of PTEN function by phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Fragoso, Rita; Barata, João T

    2015-05-01

    Phosphorylation regulates the conformation, stability, homo- and heterotypic protein interactions, localization, and activity of the tumor suppressor PTEN. From a simple picture, at the beginning of this millennium, recognizing that CK2 phosphorylated PTEN at the C-terminus and thereby impacted on PTEN stability and activity, research has led to a significantly more complex scenario today, where for instance GSK3, Plk3, ATM, ROCK or Src-family kinases are also gaining the spotlight in this evolving play. Here, we review the current knowledge on the kinases that phosphorylate PTEN, and on the impact that specific phosphorylation events have on PTEN function. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Determination of minimum effective dose and optimal dosing schedule for liposomal curcumin in a xenograft human pancreatic cancer model.

    PubMed

    Mach, Claire M; Mathew, Lata; Mosley, Scott A; Kurzrock, Razelle; Smith, Judith A

    2009-06-01

    Curcumin is a food chemical present in tumeric (Curcuma longa) that has pharmacological activity to suppress carcinogenesis and inhibits multiple signaling pathways such as nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB), cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) and interleukin-8 (IL-8). Oral curcumin has poor oral bioavailability limiting its clinical activity; however, a patent pending liposomal formulation of curcumin was developed to improve drug delivery and has demonstrated activity in multiple cancers. This study was designed to determine the minimum effective dose (MED) as well as the optimal dosing schedule of liposomal curcumin in a xenograft mouse model of human pancreatic cancer. The MED determination and optimal schedule was evaluated in female athymic nude mice injected subcutaneously with MiaPaCa-2 cells. Dosing was initiated at an average tumor size of 5mm. For the MED, mice were treated with the following dose levels of liposomal curcumin: no treatment, liposome only, 1 mg/kg, 2 mg/kg, 5 mg/kg, 10 mg/kg, 20 mg/kg and 40 mg/kg given by tail vein injection three times weekly for 28 days. For the optimum dosing schedule, three additional schedules were evaluated and compared to the control of three times weekly; daily (five days per week), every four days, and weekly for 28 days. All mice were weighed and tumor measurements taken three times weekly to evaluate toxicity and efficacy. The 20 mg/kg dose had the greatest decrease in tumor growth at 52% decrease in tumor growth when compared to no treatment control mice. MED was determined to be 20 mg/kg and was used for the optimal dosing schedule determination. Daily dosing and three times per week dosing had greater inhibition of tumor growth with no discernable difference than once weekly or every 4 day dosing. No toxicity was observed at any dose or schedule. The MED for liposomal curcumin is 20 mg/kg given once daily three times per week to achieve optimal tumor growth inhibition. This was dose recommended for additional

  18. A PTEN inhibitor displays preclinical activity against hepatocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Augello, Giuseppa; Puleio, Roberto; Emma, Maria Rita; Cusimano, Antonella; Loria, Guido R.; McCubrey, James A.; Montalto, Giuseppe; Cervello, Melchiorre

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) gene is considered a tumor suppressor gene. However, PTEN mutations rarely occur in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), whereas heterozygosity of PTEN, resulting in reduced PTEN expression, has been observed in 32–44% of HCC patients. In the present study, we investigated the effects of the small molecule PTEN inhibitor VO-OHpic in HCC cells. VO-OHpic inhibited cell viability, cell proliferation and colony formation, and induced senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity in Hep3B (low PTEN expression) and to a lesser extent in PLC/PRF/5 (high PTEN expression) cells, but not in PTEN-negative SNU475 cells. VO-OHpic synergistically inhibited cell viability when combined with PI3K/mTOR and RAF/MEK/ERK pathway inhibitors, but only in Hep3B cells, and significantly inhibited tumor growth in nude mice bearing xenografts of Hep3B cells. Therefore, we demonstrated for the first time that VO-OHpic inhibited cell growth and induced senescence in HCC cells with low PTEN expression, and that the combination of VO-OHpic with PI3K/mTOR and RAF/MEK/ERK inhibitors resulted in a more effective tumor cell kill. Our findings, hence, provide proof-of-principle evidence that pharmacological inhibition of PTEN may represent a promising approach for HCC therapy in a subclass of patients with a low PTEN expression. PMID:26794644

  19. PTEN function, the long and the short of it

    PubMed Central

    Hopkins, Benjamin D.; Hodakoski, Cindy; Barrows, Doug; Mense, Sarah; Parsons, Ramon E.

    2014-01-01

    Phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN) is a phosphatase that is frequently altered in cancer. PTEN has phosphatase-dependent and - independent roles; and genetic alterations in PTEN lead to deregulation of protein synthesis, cell cycle, migration, growth, DNA repair, and survival signaling. PTEN localization, stability, conformation, and phosphatase activity are controlled by an array of protein-protein interactions and post-translational modifications. Thus, PTEN-interacting and modifying proteins have profound effects on PTEN’s tumor suppressive functions. Moreover, recent studies identified mechanisms by which PTEN can exit cells, either via exosomal export or secretion, and act on neighboring cells. This review focuses on modes of PTEN protein regulation and ways in which perturbations in this regulation may lead to disease. PMID:24656806

  20. Evaluation of AKT phosphorylation and PTEN loss and their correlation with the resistance of rituximab in DLBCL.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yihui; Zhang, Pengyu; Gao, Yi; Fan, Huijie; Zhang, Mingzhi; Wu, Jingjing

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common subtype of lymphoma with quite high mortality. PTEN/PI3K/AKT signal pathway is constitutively activated and plays an oncogenic role in most tumors including non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). Since rituximab used in chemotherapy has been proved to improve the survival of DLBCL patients, rituximab resistance is a common clinical challenge in the treatment of DLBCL. The aims of the present study are to determine the different levels of several important biomarkers of PTEN/PI3K/AKT pathway in DLBCL patients who are resistant or sensitive to rituximab treatment, and investigate the potential clinical application of these biomarkers. 48 patients with DLBCL who were treated by rituximab-based chemotherapy were divided into 2 groups according to their reactions to rituximab. The expression of p-AKT, PTEN, and Ki-67 protein in 48 DLBCL tissues were detected using immunohistochemistry and analyzed for the clinical pathological significance and the resistance to rituximab. Meanwhile, PTEN gene deletion was detected also by FISH, and mutation of PIK3CA was performed by sequencing analysis. Activation of p-AKT in 12 of 48 (25.0%) and loss expression of PTEN in 15 of 48 (31.3%) DLBCL species were observed. P-AKT activation (P<0.05) and loss of PTEN expression (P<0.05) were significantly associative with high Ki-67 index. P-AKT and PTEN expression showed a significant negative correlation in all 48 DLBCL patients (r=-0.450, P<0.05), and the Spearman correlation coefficient in the resistant group (r=-0.769, P<0.05) was greater than in the sensitive group (r=-0.691, P<0.05). Regulation of PTEN/PI3K/AKT signal pathway participates in the progression of DLBCL, and may be involved in the development of the resistance to rituximab for some DLBCL patients.

  1. [Experimental study of up-regulating PTEN gene on increasing the chemosensitivity in K562/ADM cells].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong; Yang, Liang-chun; Cao, Li-zhi; Yang, Ming-hua; Xie, Min; Zhu, Shan; Zeng, Pei; Yu, Yan

    2012-05-01

    To investigate the mechanism of decreasing the K562/ADM cells chemosensitivity by up-regulating expression of PTEN gene. K562/ADM cells were transient transfected with pGFP-PTEN or vector. The level of PTEN in K562/ADM cells was assayed by Western blot and RT-PCR. Cell viability on K562/ADM was determined by MTT assay. Cell apoptosis by flow cytometry. Activity of caspase-3 by Caspase Colorimetric Assay Kit. The proteins expression of LC3-I/II, Beclin1, p-Akt, p-p70S6K by Western blot. The autophagic vacuoles by MDC stain and Electron microscopy. (1) The mRNA and protein levels of PTEN in K562/ADM cells transfected with pGFP-PTEN were significantly increased compared with the control (untreated and transfected with empty vector). (2) Enhanced expression of PTEN by gene transfection resulted in a reversal of resistance to ADM. Compared with empty vector group, cell viability decreased from (94.07 ± 2.6)% to (53.83 ± 4.2)%, the cell apoptotic rate increased from (11.89 ± 1.7)% to (43.69 ± 2.3)%, meanwhile, pretreated with caspase-3 inhibitor (Z-DEVE-FMK) didn't completely inhibit the cytotoxicity of ADM to K562/ADM cells. (3) After treated with ADM for 12 and 24 h, the activities of caspase-3 in PTEN-transfected K562/ADM cells increased compared with those in pGFP-transfected K562/ADM cells \\[(2.27 ± 0.13) vs (1.19 ± 0.14)\\] at 12h, \\[(3.15 ± 0.08) vs (1.48 ± 0.05)\\] at 24 h (P < 0.05). (4) The protein levels of LC3-II and Beclin1 in K562/ADM cells transfected with pGFP-PTEN were increased by 83% and 18% respectively, and the protein levels of p-Akt and p-p70S6K were declined by 96% and 87% respectively, compared with those in K562/ADM cells transfected with pGFP plasmid. (5) The upregulation of PTEN in K562/ADM cells improved the number of autophagic vacuoles compared with the empty vector group. The upregulation of PTEN expression increases the chemosensitivity of K562/ADM to ADM, which may related with the inhibition of PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway induced by

  2. Involvement of PTEN promoter methylation in cerebral cavernous malformations.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yuan; Wloch, Andreas; Wu, Qun; Peters, Christian; Pagenstecher, Axel; Bertalanffy, Helmut; Sure, Ulrich

    2009-03-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are prevalent cerebral vascular lesions involving aberrant angiogenesis. However, the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. Phosphatase and tension homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN), a tumor suppressor, is frequently deficient in various pathologies due to mutation or epigenetic alterations. PTEN promoter hypermethylation is a major epigenetic silencing mechanism leading to activation of angiogenesis in tumors. The present study aimed to investigate whether PTEN promoter methylation was involved in CCMs. PTEN promoter methylation was detected in surgical specimens of CCMs (n=69) by methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction. The methylation status was correlated to the clinical manifestations and to PTEN expression, which was analyzed by both Western blot and immunohistochemistry. To investigate the endothelial proliferation and the potential signaling pathways affected by PTEN methylation, proliferating cell nuclear antigen as well as phosphor-Akt and phosphor-Erk1,2 were detected by immunofluorescence and Western blot, respectively, in CCM specimens. Methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction revealed PTEN promoter methylation in 15.9% CCMs. Strikingly, 5 of 6 familial CCMs showed PTEN promoter methylation (83.3%), which was significantly higher than in sporadic cases (9.4%; P<0.001). In addition, PTEN promoter methylation appeared more frequently in multiple CCMs, including familial cases (46.7%), than that in single-lesioned CCMs (11.8%; P<0.05). Immunostaining and Western blot revealed a more significant PTEN downregulation in PTEN-methylated CCMs in comparison to PTEN-unmethylated CCMs. Reduced PTEN expression was inversely correlated to the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen and to the activation of Erk1,2, but not of Akt. We reported here for the first time the involvement of PTEN promoter methylation in CCMs, particularly in familial CCMs, suggesting this epigenetic alteration as a

  3. Physical Foundations of PTEN/Phosphoinositide Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gericke, Arne; Jiang, Zhiping; Redfern, Roberta E.; Kooijman, Edgar E.; Ross, Alonzo H.

    2009-03-01

    Phosphoinositides act as signaling molecules by recruiting critical effectors to specific subcellular membranes to regulate cell proliferation, apoptosis and cytoskeletal reorganization, which requires a tight regulation of phosphoinositide generation and turnover as well as a high degree of compartmentalization. PTEN is a phosphatase specific for the 3 position of the phosophoinositide ring that is deleted or mutated in many different disease states. PTEN association with membranes requires the interaction of its C2 domain with phosphatidylserine and the interaction of its N-terminal end with phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphophate (PI(4,5)P2). We have investigated PTEN/PI(4,5)P2 interaction and found that Lys13 is crucial for the observed binding. We also found that the presence of cholesterol enhances PTEN binding to mixed PI(4,5)P2/POPC vesicles. Fluorescence microscopy experiments utilizing GUVs yielded results consistent with enhanced phosphoinositide domain formation in the presence of cholesterol. These experiments were accompanied by zeta potential measurements and solid state MAS ^31P-NMR experiments aimed at investigating the ionization behavior of phosphoinositides.

  4. Differential thiol oxidation of the signaling proteins Akt, PTEN or PP2A determines whether Akt phosphorylation is enhanced or inhibited by oxidative stress in C2C12 myotubes derived from skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Tan, Pearl Lin; Shavlakadze, Tea; Grounds, Miranda D; Arthur, Peter G

    2015-05-01

    Oxidative stress, caused by excess reactive oxygen species (ROS), has been hypothesized to cause or exacerbate skeletal muscle wasting in a number of diseases and chronic conditions. ROS, such as hydrogen peroxide, have the potential to affect signal transduction pathways such as the phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase (PI3 K)/Akt pathway that regulates protein synthesis. Previous studies have found contradictory outcomes for the effect of ROS on the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway, where oxidative stress can either enhance or inhibit Akt phosphorylation. The apparent contradictions could reflect differences in experimental cell types or types of ROS treatments. We replicate both effects in myotubes of cultured skeletal muscle C2C12 cells, and show that increased oxidative stress can either inhibit or enhance Akt phosphorylation. This differential response could be explained: thiol oxidation of Akt, but not the phosphatases PTEN or PP2A, caused a decline in Akt phosphorylation; whereas the thiol oxidation of Akt, PTEN and PP2A increased Akt phosphorylation. These observations indicate that a more complete understanding of the effects of oxidative stress on a signal transduction pathway comes not only from identifying the proteins susceptible to thiol oxidation, but also their relative sensitivity to ROS.

  5. [Pathogenic role of PTEN tumor suppressor gene in ovarian cancer associated to endometriosis].

    PubMed

    Castiblanco G, Adriana; Pires N, Yumay; Wistuba O, Ignacio; Riquelme S, Erick; Andrade M, Leonardo; Corvalán R, Alejandro

    2006-03-01

    Endometrioid carcinoma and clear cell carcinoma of the ovary are associated to endometriosis. Somatic mutations of PTEN (10q23.3) are present in endometrial endometrioid carcinoma. Therefore, these mutations could be also present in ovarian tumors. Molecular studies show that solitary endometriotic cysts are monoclonal, have aneuploid DNA, have a loss of 9p,11q and 22q heterozygosity (LOH) and a higher cellular proliferation index of the epithelial component. To determine the cellular proliferation index using Ki 67, the immunohistochemical expression of PTEN and LOH in patients with ovarian endometriosis without atypia (EN), ovarian endometriosis with atypia (EA) and endometriosis with adjacent ovarian carcinoma (ET). Paraffin embedded samples of 37 endometrioid and clear cell carcinomas of the ovary (CC/CE), 15 solitary ovarian EN and 15 ovarian EA, were studied. Expression of Ki 67 and PTEN was measured by immunohistochemistry. LOH of 10q23.3 locus was measured by polymerase chain reaction. Ki 67 was 5.5 and 2.3% in EA and EN, respectively (p <0.005). There was a histological correlation between EA and a higher cellular proliferation index. PTEN was negative in 5 of 15 EN, 9 of 15 EA and 30 of 37 CE/CC. There was a correlation between LOH and loss of PTEN protein in EN, EA and ET (60%). Negative expression on PTEN in EN; EA; ET and CE/CC is a manifestation of the inactivation of this gene. The mechanisms that cause this inactivation, must be elucidated.

  6. Quantitative determination of phosgene doses by reflectometric badge readout.

    PubMed

    Niessner, Reinhard

    2010-07-01

    Commercial phosgene dosimeter badges are lacking precise and sensitive analysis when used only by visual comparison to a color reference. To meet the discussed occupational standard set to 54 ppm min, objective quantification by reflectance measurement is proposed. At 573 nm, the pink dye ("Koenig's salt") formed at the membrane surface by reaction of phosgene, and aromatic amine shows a strict linear relationship in reflectance between doses of 10 and 300 ppm min. The detection limit is calculated to 29 ppm min.

  7. Determination of canine dose conversion factors in mixed neutron and gamma radiation fields. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, B.A.; Bhatt, R.C.; Myska, J.C.; Holland, B.K.

    1996-07-01

    The primary objective of mixed-field neutron/gamma radiation dosimetry in canine irradiation experiments conducted at the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute (AFRRI) is to determine the absorbed midline tissue dose (MLT) at the region of interest in the canine. A dose conversion factor (DCF) can be applied to free-in-air (FIA) dose measurements to estimate the MLT doses to canines. This report is a summary of the measured DCFs that were used to determine the MLT doses in canines at AFRRI from 1979 to 1992.

  8. Molecular Evolution of PTEN Pseudogenes in Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jingsi; Ning, Ruihong; Zeng, Bo; Li, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) is a tumor-suppressor gene. PTEN pseudogene (PTENp) acts as an endogenous RNA, which regulates its parental gene by competitively binding to the 3’ UTR of PTEN gene in the human. Despite the importance of this pseudogene, little is known about the molecular evolution of PTENp in mammals. In this study, we identified 37 pseudogenes from 65 mammalian genomes. Among them, 32 were from rodents or primates. Phylogenetic analyse showed a complex evolutionary history of this gene family. Some PTENps were shared both in primates and rodents. However, some PTENps were shown to be species-specific, such as the tasmanian devil PTENp1, nine banded armadillo PTENp1 and gibbon PTENp1. Most interestingly, the naked mole rat (NMR), an anticancer model organism, possessed 17 copies of PTENps, which were classified into four clades based on the phylogenetic analyses. Furthermore, we found that all the 3’UTR of PTEN and PTENps shared common microRNA (MicroRNA) binding sites in NMR, based on our prediction of specific MicroRNA binding sites. Our findings suggested that multiple gene duplications have occurred in the formation of PTEN/PTENp gene family during the evolution of mammals. Some PTENps were relatively ancient and were shared by primates and rodents; others were newly originated through species- specific gene duplications. PTENps in NMR may function as competitive endogenous RNAs (ceRNAs) to regulate their counterpart genes by competing for common MicroRNAs, which may be one of the interpretations for the cancer resistance in NMR. PMID:27936183

  9. Determination of cytotoxic thermal dose during HIFU ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandlall, Sacha D.; Bazán-Peregrino, Miriam; Mo, Steven; Coussios, Constantin-C.

    2012-10-01

    Thermal dose has been proposed for various hyperthermic cancer treatment modalities as a measure of heat-induced cell and tissue damage. However, many of the models that are currently used for calculating thermal dose have not been validated or suitably adapted for the elevated temperatures and rates of heating encountered during ablation by High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU). This work quantifies the performance of the widely employed Cumulative Equivalent Minutes at 43°C (CEM43) thermal dose metric under HIFU-relevant heating. A total of 36 agar phantoms were embedded with different human cancer cell lines (PC3, 22RV1, or ZR75.1) as well as calcein AM and propidium iodide assays. The phantoms were cast in sterile molds with internal dimensions of 7 cm × 7 cm × 2 mm. Using a water bath, 12 of the phantoms were treated with mild hyperthermia (43-46°C for up to 60 minutes), while another 12 were subjected to HIFU-relevant temperature profiles (60-80°C peak temperature, 2-3°C/s peak heating rate). In each of the remaining 12 phantoms, 8 HIFU exposures were carried out in a 37°C water tank (1.067 MHz, 95% duty cycle, 3-6 MPa peak rarefaction pressure, 2-20 s exposure duration). Cavitation emissions were monitored passively with a detector transducer that was confocally and co-axially aligned with the HIFU source. Cell death was quantified by measuring the locally averaged fluorescence intensity of the assays relative to unheated and severely heat-shocked phantoms. The results show that the CEM43 dose required to achieve the same level of heat-induced cell death varies considerably across cell lines, and that inertial cavitation can cause significant mechanical damage at ablation-relevant intensities even when no significant thermal dose is delivered (CEM43 < 5 s). These findings demonstrate the need for improved models of cell death at ablation-relevant temperatures.

  10. Beside P53 and PTEN: Identification of molecular alterations of the RAS/MAPK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways in high-grade serous ovarian carcinomas to determine potential novel therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shuhui; Cavazza, Elisa; Barlier, Catherine; Salleron, Julia; Filhine-Tresarrieu, Pierre; Gavoilles, Céline; Merlin, Jean-Louis; Harlé, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Despite great histological and molecular heterogeneity, the clinical management of high-grade ovarian carcinomas remains unspecialized. As a major subgroup, high-grade serous ovarian carcinomas (HGSOCs) require novel therapies. In addition to utilizing conventional histological prognostic markers and performing oncogenetic investigations, the molecular diagnostic method of next generation sequencing (NGS) was performed to identify ‘druggable’ targets that could provide access to innovative therapy. The present study was performed in 45 HGSOC patients (mean age, 59.1 years; range, 25–87 years) with histologically proven HGSOC. Breast cancer 1/2 (BRCA1/2) germline mutations were screened in 17 patients with a familial or personal history of cancer, which was justified by oncogenetic investigations. Tumor protein 53 (P53) and phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) expression were assessed in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues using immunohistochemistry. Somatic mutations of Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog, neuroblastoma RAS viral oncogene homolog (NRAS), B-Raf proto-oncogene, serine/threonine kinase, phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase catalytic subunit α (PIK3CA) and MET proto-oncogene, receptor tyrosine kinase (MET) were screened using NGS on DNA extracts from frozen tumor specimens obtained at diagnosis. With a median follow-up of 38 months (range, 6–93 months), 20 patients are alive, 10 patients are disease-free and 14 patients progressed within 6 months following platinum-based therapy. P53 overexpression was detected in 67% of patients and PTEN loss was detected in 38% of the patients. The overexpression of mutant P53 was found to be associated with a longer progression-free and overall survival. In total, 2 NRAS (exon 3), 3 PIK3CA (exon 5 and 10) and 5 MET mutations (exons 14 and 18) were detected. In HGSOCs, in addition to P53 and PTEN alterations, somatic genetic abnormalities can be detected using NGS and provide molecular

  11. Apoptosis-induced effects of extract from Artemisia annua Linné by modulating PTEN/p53/PDK1/Akt/ signal pathways through PTEN/p53-independent manner in HCT116 colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Ji; Kim, Guen Tae; Kim, Bo Min; Lim, Eun Gyeong; Kim, Sang-Yong; Kim, Young Min

    2017-04-28

    The extracts from Artemisia annua Linné (AAE) has been known to possess various functions including anti-bacterial, anti-virus and anti-oxidant effects. However, the mechanism of those effects of AAE is not well known. Pursuantly, we determined the apoptotic effects of extract of AAE in HCT116 cell. In this study, we suggested that AAE may exert cancer cell apoptosis through PTEN/PDK1/Akt/p53signal pathway and mitochondria-mediated apoptotic proteins. We measured 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay, Hoechst 33342 staining, Annexin V-PI staining, Mitopotential assay, immunofluorescence (IF) and Western blotting. Accordingly, our study showed that AAE treatment to HCT116 cells resulted in inhibition of PDK1, Akt, MDM2, Bcl-2, and pro-caspase 3 as well as activation of PTEN, p53-upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA), Bax and Bak expression. Also we measured in vivo assay that xenograft model, H&E assay, TUNEL assay and IHC. AAE induced apoptosis via PTEN/p53/PDK1/Akt signal pathways through PTEN/p53-independent manner. AAE inhibit cell viability and increase LDH release in HCT116 colon cancer cell. Also, AAE increase apoptotic bodies, caspase -3,7 activation and reduces mitochondria membrane potential. AAE regulates cytochrome c translocation to the cytoplasm and Bax translocation to the mitochondrial membrane in an Immunofluorescence staining and increase PTEN and p53 expression in an in vivo tumor xenograft model. To elucidate the role of the PTEN/p53/PDK1/Akt signal pathways in cancer control, we conditionally inactivated PTEN/p53/PDK1/Akt signal pathways. We used inhibitors of PTEN, p53, PDK1, Akt. In consequence, these results indicate that AAE induced apoptosis by means of a mitochondrial event through the regulation of proteins such as Bax, Bak and cytochrome c in PDK1/Akt signaling pathways via PTEM/p53-independent manner. We confirmed the apoptotic effect of extracts of AAE by

  12. Systemic elevation of PTEN induces a tumor suppressive metabolic state

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Cao, Isabel; Song, Min Sup; Hobbs, Robin M.; Laurent, Gaelle; Giorgi, Carlotta; de Boer, Vincent C.J.; Anastasiou, Dimitrios; Ito, Keisuke; Sasaki, Atsuo T.; Rameh, Lucia; Carracedo, Arkaitz; Vander Heiden, Matthew G.; Cantley, Lewis C.; Pinton, Paolo; Haigis, Marcia C.; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Decremental loss of PTEN results in cancer susceptibility and tumor progression. In turn this raises the possibility that PTEN elevation might be an attractive option for cancer prevention and therapy. We have generated several transgenic mouse lines with variably elevated PTEN expression levels, taking advantage of BAC (Bacterial Artificial Chromosome)-mediated transgenesis. Super-PTEN mutants are viable and show reduced body size due to decreased cell number, with no effect on cell size. Unexpectedly, PTEN elevation at the organism level results in healthy metabolism characterized by increased energy expenditure and reduced body fat accumulation. Cells derived from these mice show reduced glucose and glutamine uptake, increased mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, and are resistant to oncogenic transformation. Mechanistically we find that PTEN elevation orchestrates this metabolic switch by regulating PI3K-dependent and independent pathways, and negatively impacts two of the most pronounced metabolic features of tumor cells: glutaminolysis and the Warburg effect. PMID:22401813

  13. Expression and significance of PTEN in canine mammary gland tumours.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Changwei; Lin, Degui; Wang, Jinqiu; Wang, Lei

    2008-10-01

    To explore the expression and clinical importance of the anti-oncogene phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) in canine mammary gland tumours, PTEN expression was compared in 50 cases of canine mammary tumour and four examples of normal mammary tissue using real-time quantitative PCR. PTEN expression was similar in benign mammary tumours and normal mammary tissues (P>0.05), but was lower in malignant tumours than in normal mammary tissues or benign mammary tumours (P<0.001). PTEN expression was also low in the lymph node metastases of malignant mammary tumours. The expression profile of PTEN in malignant mammary tumours compared to those without lymph node metastasis varied significantly. Low-level PETN expression might play an important role in carcinogenesis and the progression of canine mammary tumours, and PTEN protein detection might be useful in evaluating tumour development and prognosis.

  14. The determination of the penetrating radiation dose at Hanford

    SciTech Connect

    Rathbun, L.A.

    1989-09-01

    Most of the thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and other devices that have been used to measure environmental radiation on the Hanford Site have measured natural background levels of radiation. Measurements of offsite environmental radiation near the boundary of the Hanford Site have often indicated higher doses than onsite measurements have. However, the converse has been found when radiation measurements from the cities and communities of southeastern Washington were compared with onsite measurements. The historical trends described for environmental TLD data have been better defined in this study by compiling the TLD data for selected locations over a 6-year period (1983 to 1988). The ongoing Hanford Environmental Surveillance Program also provides radionuclide concentrations in soil based on samples collected by technicians at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and sent to a commercial laboratory for analyses. As part of the study described in this report, a portable gamma spectroscopy system was used in the field to identify concentrations of gamma-emitting radionuclides in the soil at various locations on the Hanford Site and in the surrounding area. This work began in 1986. Supplemental radiation measurements were made with a microprocessor-based survey meter and large NaI detector. 20 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Austrian results from Matroshka poncho and organ dose determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajek, M.; Bergmann, R.; Fugger, M.; Vana, N.

    Cosmic rays in low-earth orbits LEO primarily consist of high-energy charged particles originating from galactic cosmic radiation GCR energetic solar particle events SPE and trapped radiation belts These radiations of high linear energy transfer LET generally inflict greater biological damage than that resulting from typical terrestrial radiation hazards Particle and energy spectra are attenuated in interaction processes within shielding structures and within the human body Reliable assessment of health risks to astronaut crews is pivotal in the design of future expeditions into interplanetary space and requires knowledge of absorbed radiation doses in critical radiosensitive organs and tissues The European Space Agency ESA Matroshka experiment---conducted under the aegis of the German Aerospace Center DLR ---is aimed at simulating an astronaut s body during extravehicular activities EVA Matroshka basically consists of a human phantom torso attached to a base structure and covered with a protective carbon-fibre container acting as a spacesuit model The phantom is divided into 33 tissue-equivalent polyurethane slices of specific density for tissue and organs Natural bones are embedded Channels and cut-outs enable accommodation of active and passive radiation monitors The torso is dressed by a skin-equivalent poncho which is also designed for dosimeter integration The phantom houses in total 7 active and more than 6000 passive radiation sensors Thereof the Atomic Institute of the Austrian Universities ATI provided more than

  16. Effects of 14-day oral low dose selenium nanoparticles and selenite in rat-as determined by metabolite pattern determination.

    PubMed

    Hadrup, Niels; Loeschner, Katrin; Skov, Kasper; Ravn-Haren, Gitte; Larsen, Erik H; Mortensen, Alicja; Lam, Henrik R; Frandsen, Henrik L

    2016-01-01

    Selenium (Se) is an essential element with a small difference between physiological and toxic doses. To provide more effective and safe Se dosing regimens, as compared to dosing with ionic selenium, nanoparticle formulations have been developed. However, due to the nano-formulation, unexpected toxic effects may occur. We used metabolite pattern determination in urine to investigate biological and/or toxic effects in rats administered nanoparticles and for comparison included ionic selenium at an equimolar dose in the form of sodium selenite. Low doses of 10 and 100 fold the recommended human high level were employed to study the effects at borderline toxicity. Evaluations of all significantly changed putative metabolites, showed that Se nanoparticles and sodium selenite induced similar dose dependent changes of the metabolite pattern. Putative identified metabolites included increased decenedioic acid and hydroxydecanedioic acid for both Se formulations whereas dipeptides were only increased for selenite. These effects could reflect altered fatty acid and protein metabolism, respectively.

  17. Effects of 14-day oral low dose selenium nanoparticles and selenite in rat—as determined by metabolite pattern determination

    PubMed Central

    Loeschner, Katrin; Skov, Kasper; Ravn-Haren, Gitte; Larsen, Erik H.; Mortensen, Alicja; Lam, Henrik R.; Frandsen, Henrik L.

    2016-01-01

    Selenium (Se) is an essential element with a small difference between physiological and toxic doses. To provide more effective and safe Se dosing regimens, as compared to dosing with ionic selenium, nanoparticle formulations have been developed. However, due to the nano-formulation, unexpected toxic effects may occur. We used metabolite pattern determination in urine to investigate biological and/or toxic effects in rats administered nanoparticles and for comparison included ionic selenium at an equimolar dose in the form of sodium selenite. Low doses of 10 and 100 fold the recommended human high level were employed to study the effects at borderline toxicity. Evaluations of all significantly changed putative metabolites, showed that Se nanoparticles and sodium selenite induced similar dose dependent changes of the metabolite pattern. Putative identified metabolites included increased decenedioic acid and hydroxydecanedioic acid for both Se formulations whereas dipeptides were only increased for selenite. These effects could reflect altered fatty acid and protein metabolism, respectively. PMID:27781177

  18. Oncogenic PTEN functions and models in T-cell malignancies.

    PubMed

    Tesio, M; Trinquand, A; Macintyre, E; Asnafi, V

    2016-07-28

    PTEN is a protein phosphatase that is crucial to prevent the malignant transformation of T-cells. Although a numerous mechanisms regulate its expression and function, they are often altered in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemias and T-cell lymphomas. As such, PTEN inactivation frequently occurs in these malignancies, where it can be associated with chemotherapy resistance and poor prognosis. Different Pten knockout models recapitulated the development of T-cell leukaemia/lymphoma, demonstrating that PTEN loss is at the center of a complex oncogenic network that sustains and drives tumorigenesis via the activation of multiple signalling pathways. These aspects and their therapeutic implications are discussed in this review.

  19. The PTEN/NRF2 axis promotes human carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Rojo, Ana I; Rada, Patricia; Mendiola, Marta; Ortega-Molina, Ana; Wojdyla, Katarzyna; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina; Hardisson, David; Serrano, Manuel; Cuadrado, Antonio

    2014-12-20

    A recent study conducted in mice reported that liver-specific knockout of tumor suppressor Pten augments nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (NRF2) transcriptional activity. Here, we further investigated how phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) controls NRF2 and the relevance of this pathway in human carcin ogenesis. Drug and genetic targeting to PTEN and phosphoproteomics approaches indicated that PTEN leads to glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3)-mediated phosphorylation of NRF2 at residues Ser(335) and Ser(338) and subsequent beta-transducin repeat containing protein (β-TrCP)-dependent but Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (KEAP1)-independent degradation. Rescue experiments in PTEN-deficient cells and xerographs in athymic mice indicated that loss of PTEN leads to increased NRF2 signature which provides a proliferating and tumorigenic advantage. Tissue microarrays from endometrioid carcinomas showed that 80% of PTEN-negative tumors expressed high levels of NRF2 or its target heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). These results uncover a new mechanism of oncogenic activation of NRF2 by loss of its negative regulation by PTEN/GSK-3/β-TrCP that may be relevant to a large number of tumors, including endometrioid carcinomas. Increased activity of NRF2 due to loss of PTEN is instrumental in human carcinogenesis and represents a novel therapeutic target.

  20. PTEN stabilizes TOP2A and regulates the DNA decatenation

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Xi; Song, Chang; Du, Xiao; Zhang, Cong; Liu, Yu; Liang, Ling; He, Jinxue; Lamb, Kristy; Shen, Wen H.; Yin, Yuxin

    2015-01-01

    PTEN is a powerful tumor suppressor that antagonizes the cytoplasmic PI3K-AKT pathway and suppresses cellular proliferation. PTEN also plays a role in the maintenance of genomic stability in the nucleus. Here we report that PTEN facilitates DNA decatenation and controls a decatenation checkpoint. Catenations of DNA formed during replication are decatenated by DNA topoisomerase II (TOP2), and this process is actively monitored by a decatenation checkpoint in G2 phase. We found that PTEN deficient cells form ultra-fine bridges (UFBs) during anaphase and these bridges are generated as a result of insufficient decatenation. We show that PTEN is physically associated with a decatenation enzyme TOP2A and that PTEN influences its stability through OTUD3 deubiquitinase. In the presence of PTEN, ubiquitination of TOP2A is inhibited by OTUD3. Deletion or deficiency of PTEN leads to down regulation of TOP2A, dysfunction of the decatenation checkpoint and incomplete DNA decatenation in G2 and M phases. We propose that PTEN controls DNA decatenation to maintain genomic stability and integrity. PMID:26657567

  1. The PTEN/NRF2 Axis Promotes Human Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Rada, Patricia; Mendiola, Marta; Ortega-Molina, Ana; Wojdyla, Katarzyna; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina; Hardisson, David; Serrano, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: A recent study conducted in mice reported that liver-specific knockout of tumor suppressor Pten augments nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (NRF2) transcriptional activity. Here, we further investigated how phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) controls NRF2 and the relevance of this pathway in human carcin ogenesis. Results: Drug and genetic targeting to PTEN and phosphoproteomics approaches indicated that PTEN leads to glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3)-mediated phosphorylation of NRF2 at residues Ser335 and Ser338 and subsequent beta-transducin repeat containing protein (β-TrCP)-dependent but Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (KEAP1)-independent degradation. Rescue experiments in PTEN-deficient cells and xerographs in athymic mice indicated that loss of PTEN leads to increased NRF2 signature which provides a proliferating and tumorigenic advantage. Tissue microarrays from endometrioid carcinomas showed that 80% of PTEN-negative tumors expressed high levels of NRF2 or its target heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). Innovation: These results uncover a new mechanism of oncogenic activation of NRF2 by loss of its negative regulation by PTEN/GSK-3/β-TrCP that may be relevant to a large number of tumors, including endometrioid carcinomas. Conclusion: Increased activity of NRF2 due to loss of PTEN is instrumental in human carcinogenesis and represents a novel therapeutic target. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 2498–2514. PMID:24892215

  2. Loss of PTEN promotes resistance to T cell-mediated immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Weiyi; Chen, Jie Qing; Liu, Chengwen; Malu, Shruti; Creasy, Caitlin; Tetzlaff, Michael T; Xu, Chunyu; McKenzie, Jodi A; Zhang, Chunlei; Liang, Xiaoxuan; Williams, Leila J; Deng, Wanleng; Chen, Guo; Mbofung, Rina; Lazar, Alexander J; Torres-Cabala, Carlos A; Cooper, Zachary A; Chen, Pei-Ling; Tieu, Trang N; Spranger, Stefani; Yu, Xiaoxing; Bernatchez, Chantale; Forget, Marie-Andree; Haymaker, Cara; Amaria, Rodabe; McQuade, Jennifer L; Glitza, Isabella C; Cascone, Tina; Li, Haiyan S; Kwong, Lawrence N; Heffernan, Timothy P; Hu, Jianhua; Bassett, Roland L; Bosenberg, Marcus W; Woodman, Scott E; Overwijk, Willem W; Lizée, Gregory; Roszik, Jason; Gajewski, Thomas F; Wargo, Jennifer A; Gershenwald, Jeffrey E; Radvanyi, Laszlo; Davies, Michael A; Hwu, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    T cell-mediated immunotherapies are promising cancer treatments. However, most patients still fail to respond to these therapies. The molecular determinants of immune resistance are poorly understood. We show that loss of PTEN in tumor cells in preclinical models of melanoma inhibits T cell-mediated tumor killing and decreases T cell trafficking into tumors. In patients, PTEN loss correlates with decreased T cell infiltration at tumor sites, reduced likelihood of successful T cell expansion from resected tumors, and inferior outcomes with PD-1 inhibitor therapy. PTEN loss in tumor cells increased the expression of immunosuppressive cytokines, resulting in decreased T cell infiltration in tumors, and inhibited autophagy, which decreased T cell-mediated cell death. Treatment with a selective PI3Kβ inhibitor improved the efficacy of both anti-PD-1 and anti-CTLA4 antibodies in murine models. Together these findings demonstrate that PTEN loss promotes immune resistance and support the rationale to explore combinations of immunotherapies and PI3K-AKT pathway inhibitors. PMID:26645196

  3. Roles of PTEN with DNA Repair in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ogino, Mako; Ichimura, Mayuko; Nakano, Noriko; Minami, Akari; Kitagishi, Yasuko; Matsuda, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is considered to play key roles in aging and pathogenesis of many neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s disease, which could bring DNA damage by cells. The DNA damage may lead to the cell apoptosis, which could contribute to the degeneration of neuronal tissues. Recent evidence suggests that PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog on chromosome 10) may be involved in the pathophysiology of the neurodegenerative disorders. Since PTEN expression appears to be one dominant determinant of the neuronal cell death, PTEN should be a potential molecular target of novel therapeutic strategies against Parkinson’s disease. In addition, defects in DNA damage response and DNA repair are often associated with modulation of hormone signaling pathways. Especially, many observations imply a role for estrogen in a regulation of the DNA repair action. In the present review, we have attempted to summarize the function of DNA repair molecules at a viewpoint of the PTEN signaling pathway and the hormone related functional modulation of cells, providing a broad interpretation on the molecular mechanisms for treatment of Parkinson’s disease. Particular attention will be paid to the mechanisms proposed to explain the health effects of food ingredients against Parkinson’s disease related to reduce oxidative stress for an efficient therapeutic intervention. PMID:27314344

  4. An integrative genomic and proteomic analysis of PIK3CA, PTEN and AKT mutations in breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Stemke-Hale, Katherine; Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana Maria; Lluch, Ana; Neve, Richard M.; Kuo, Wen-Lin; Davies, Michael; Carey, Mark; Hu, Zhi; Guan, Yinghui; Sahin, Aysegul; Symmans, W. Fraser; Pusztai, Lajos; Nolden, Laura K.; Horlings, Hugo; Berns, Katrien; Hung, Mien-Chie; van de Vijver, Marc J.; Valero, Vicente; Gray, Joe W.; Bernards, Rene; Mills, Gordon B.; Hennessy, Bryan T.

    2008-05-06

    Phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT pathway aberrations are common in cancer. By applying mass spectroscopy-based sequencing and reverse phase protein arrays to 547 human breast cancers and 41 cell lines, we determined the subtype specificity and signaling effects of PIK3CA, AKT and PTEN mutations, and the effects of PIK3CA mutations on responsiveness to PI3K inhibition in-vitro and on outcome after adjuvant tamoxifen. PIK3CA mutations were more common in hormone receptor positive (33.8%) and HER2-positive (24.6%) than in basal-like tumors (8.3%). AKT1 (1.4%) and PTEN (2.3%) mutations were restricted to hormone receptor-positive cancers with PTEN protein levels also being significantly lower in hormone receptor-positive cancers. Unlike AKT1 mutations, PIK3CA (39%) and PTEN (20%) mutations were more common in cell lines than tumors, suggesting a selection for these but not AKT1 mutations during adaptation to culture. PIK3CA mutations did not have a significant impact on outcome in 166 hormone receptor-positive breast cancer patients after adjuvant tamoxifen. PIK3CA mutations, in comparison with PTEN loss and AKT1 mutations, were associated with significantly less and indeed inconsistent activation of AKT and of downstream PI3K/AKT signaling in tumors and cell lines, and PTEN loss and PIK3CA mutation were frequently concordant, suggesting different contributions to pathophysiology. PTEN loss but not PIK3CA mutations rendered cells sensitive to growth inhibition by the PI3K inhibitor LY294002. Thus, PI3K pathway aberrations likely play a distinct role in the pathogenesis of different breast cancer subtypes. The specific aberration may have implications for the selection of PI3K-targeted therapies in hormone receptor-positive breast cancer.

  5. TNF-α induces vascular insulin resistance via positive modulation of PTEN and decreased Akt/eNOS/NO signaling in high fat diet-fed mice.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Rafael Menezes; Neves, Karla Bianca; Mestriner, Fabíola Leslie; Louzada-Junior, Paulo; Bruder-Nascimento, Thiago; Tostes, Rita C

    2016-08-25

    High fat diet (HFD) induces insulin resistance in various tissues, including the vasculature. HFD also increases plasma levels of TNF-α, a cytokine that contributes to insulin resistance and vascular dysfunction. Considering that the enzyme phosphatase and tension homologue (PTEN), whose expression is increased by TNF-α, reduces Akt signaling and, consequently, nitric oxide (NO) production, we hypothesized that PTEN contributes to TNF-α-mediated vascular resistance to insulin induced by HFD. Mechanisms underlying PTEN effects were determined. Mesenteric vascular beds were isolated from C57Bl/6J and TNF-α KO mice submitted to control or HFD diet for 18 weeks to assess molecular mechanisms by which TNF-α and PTEN contribute to vascular dysfunction. Vasodilation in response to insulin was decreased in HFD-fed mice and in ex vivo control arteries incubated with TNF-α. TNF-α receptors deficiency and TNF-α blockade with infliximab abolished the effects of HFD and TNF-α on insulin-induced vasodilation. PTEN vascular expression (total and phosphorylated isoforms) was increased in HFD-fed mice. Treatment with a PTEN inhibitor improved insulin-induced vasodilation in HFD-fed mice. TNF-α receptor deletion restored PTEN expression/activity and Akt/eNOS/NO signaling in HFD-fed mice. TNF-α induces vascular insulin resistance by mechanisms that involve positive modulation of PTEN and inhibition of Akt/eNOS/NO signaling. Our findings highlight TNF-α and PTEN as potential targets to limit insulin resistance and vascular complications associated with obesity-related conditions.

  6. Characterization of PTEN mutations in brain cancer reveals that pten mono-ubiquitination promotes protein stability and nuclear localization.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jr-M; Schiapparelli, P; Nguyen, H-N; Igarashi, A; Zhang, Q; Abbadi, S; Amzel, L M; Sesaki, H; Quiñones-Hinojosa, A; Iijima, M

    2017-03-06

    PTEN is a PIP3 phosphatase that antagonizes oncogenic PI3-kinase signalling. Due to its critical role in suppressing the potent signalling pathway, it is one of the most mutated tumour suppressors, especially in brain tumours. It is generally thought that PTEN deficiencies predominantly result from either loss of expression or enzymatic activity. By analysing PTEN in malignant glioblastoma primary cells derived from 16 of our patients, we report mutations that block localization of PTEN at the plasma membrane and nucleus without affecting lipid phosphatase activity. Cellular and biochemical analyses as well as structural modelling revealed that two mutations disrupt intramolecular interaction of PTEN and open its conformation, enhancing polyubiquitination of PTEN and decreasing protein stability. Moreover, promoting mono-ubiquitination increases protein stability and nuclear localization of mutant PTEN. Thus, our findings provide a molecular mechanism for cancer-associated PTEN defects and may lead to a brain cancer treatment that targets PTEN mono-ubiquitination.Oncogene advance online publication, 6 March 2017; doi:10.1038/onc.2016.493.

  7. Determination of transit dose profile for a {sup 192}Ir HDR source

    SciTech Connect

    Fonseca, G. P.; Antunes, P. C. G.; Yoriyaz, H.

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: Several studies have reported methodologies to calculate and correct the transit dose component of the moving radiation source for high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy planning systems. However, most of these works employ the average source speed, which varies significantly with the measurement technique used, and does not represent a realistic speed profile, therefore, providing an inaccurate dose determination. In this work, the authors quantified the transit dose component of a HDR unit based on the measurement of the instantaneous source speed to produce more accurate dose values. Methods: The Nucletron microSelectron-HDR Ir-192 source was characterized considering the Task Group 43 (TG-43U1) specifications. The transit dose component was considered through the calculation of the dose distribution using a Monte Carlo particle transport code, MCNP5, for each source position and correcting it by the source speed. The instantaneous source speed measurements were performed in a previous work using two optical fibers connected to a photomultiplier and an oscilloscope. Calculated doses were validated by comparing relative dose profiles with those obtained experimentally using radiochromic films. Results: TG-43U1 source parameters were calculated to validate the Monte Carlo simulations. These agreed with the literature, with differences below 1% for the majority of the points. Calculated dose profiles without transit dose were also validated by comparison with ONCENTRA{sup Registered-Sign} Brachy v. 3.3 dose values, yielding differences within 1.5%. Dose profiles obtained with MCNP5 corrected using the instantaneous source speed profile showed differences near dwell positions of up to 800% in comparison to values corrected using the average source speed, but they are in good agreement with the experimental data, showing a maximum discrepancy of approximately 3% of the maximum dose. Near a dwell position the transit dose is about 22% of the dwell dose delivered

  8. PI(4,5)P2-Mediated Cell Signaling: Emerging Principles and PTEN as a Paradigm for Regulatory Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Gericke, Arne; Leslie, Nicholas R.; Lösche, Mathias; Ross, Alonzo H.

    2013-01-01

    PI(4,5)P2 (phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate) is a relatively common anionic lipid that regulates cellular functions by multiple mechanisms. Hydrolysis of PI(4,5)P2 by phospholipase C yields inositol trisphosphate and diacylglycerol. Phosphorylation by phosphoinositide 3-kinase yields PI(3,4,5)P3, which is a potent signal for survival and proliferation. Also, PI(4,5)P2 can bind directly to integral and peripheral membrane proteins. As an example of regulation by PI(4,5)P2, we discuss phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) in detail. PTEN is an important tumor suppressor and hydrolyzes PI(3,4,5)P3. PI(4,5)P2 enhances PTEN association with the plasma membrane and activates its phosphatase activity. This is a critical regulatory mechanism, but a detailed description of this process from a structural point of view is lacking. The disordered lipid bilayer environment hinders structural determinations of membrane-bound PTEN. A new method to analyze membrane-bound protein measures neutron reflectivity for proteins bound to tethered phospholipid membranes. These methods allow determination of the orientation and shape of membrane-bound proteins. In combination with molecular dynamics simulations, these studies will provide crucial structural information that can serve as a foundation for our understanding of PTEN regulation in normal and pathological processes. PMID:23775692

  9. Determination of the feasibility of reducing the spatial domain of the HEDR dose code. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project: Dose code recovery activities, Calculation 006

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, B.A.; Snyder, S.F.

    1992-12-01

    A series of scoping calculations has been undertaken to evaluate the doses that may have been received by individuals living in the vicinity of the Hanford site. The primary impetus for this scoping calculation was to determine if large areas of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project atmospheric domain could be excluded from detailed calculation because the atmospheric transport of radionuclides from Hanford resulted in no (or negligible) deposition in those areas. The secondary impetus was to investigate whether an intermediate screen could be developed to reduce the data storage requirements by taking advantage of locations with periods of ``effectively zero`` deposition. This scoping calculation (Calculation 006) examined the spatial distribution of potential doses resulting from releases in the year 1945. This study builds on the work initiated in the first scoping study, of iodine in cow`s milk, and the third scoping study, which added additional pathways. Addressed in this calculation were the contributions to thyroid dose of infants from (1) air submersion and groundshine external dose, (2) inhalation, (3) ingestion of soil by humans, (4) ingestion of leafy vegetables, (5) ingestion of other vegetables and fruits, and (6) ingestion of meat, (7) ingestion of eggs, and (8) ingestion of cow`s milk from Feeding Regime 1 as described in scoping calculation 001.

  10. Determination of Giardia lamblia cyst infective dose for the Mongolian gerbil (Meriones unguiculatus).

    PubMed

    Schaefer, F W; Johnson, C H; Hsu, C H; Rice, E W

    1991-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the 50% infective dose for Giardia lamblia (CDC:0284:1) cysts in Mongolian gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus). The log10 50% infective dose results calculated by probit analysis and the Spearman-Karber method were 2.45 and 2.50, respectively.

  11. Determination of Giardia lamblia cyst infective dose for the Mongolian gerbil (Meriones unguiculatus).

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, F W; Johnson, C H; Hsu, C H; Rice, E W

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the 50% infective dose for Giardia lamblia (CDC:0284:1) cysts in Mongolian gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus). The log10 50% infective dose results calculated by probit analysis and the Spearman-Karber method were 2.45 and 2.50, respectively. PMID:1768111

  12. The RhoA-ROCK-PTEN pathway as a molecular switch for anchorage dependent cell behavior.

    PubMed

    Yang, Seungwon; Kim, Hyun-Man

    2012-04-01

    The proliferation of anchorage-dependent cells of mesenchymal origin requires the attachment of the cells to substrates. Thus, cells that are poorly attached to substrates exhibit retarded cell cycle progression or apoptotic death. A major disadvantage of most polymers used in tissue engineering is their hydrophobicity; hydrophobic surfaces do not allow cells to attach firmly and, therefore, do not allow normal proliferation rates. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanism underlying the reduced proliferation rate of cells that are poorly attached to substrates. There was an inverse relationship between the activity of the small GTPase RhoA (RhoA) and the cell proliferation rate. RhoA activity correlated inversely with the strength of cell adhesion to the substrates. The high RhoA activity in the cells poorly attached to substrates caused an increase in the activity of Rho-associated kinase (ROCK), a well-known effector of RhoA that upregulated the activity of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN). The resulting activated PTEN downregulated Akt activity, which is essential for cell proliferation. Thus, the cells that were poorly attached to substrates showed low levels of cell proliferation because the RhoA-ROCK-PTEN pathway was hyperactive. In addition, RhoA activity seemed to be related to focal adhesion kinase (FAK) activity. Weak FAK activity in these poorly attached cells failed to downregulate the high RhoA activity that restrained cell proliferation. Interestingly, reducing the expression of any component of the RhoA-ROCK-PTEN pathway rescued the proliferation rate without physico-chemical surface modifications. Based on these results, we suggest that the RhoA-ROCK-PTEN pathway acts as a molecular switch to control cell proliferation and determine anchorage dependence. In cells that are poorly attached to substrates, its inhibition is sufficient to restore cell proliferation without the need for physico-chemical modification of the material

  13. Effects of PTEN and Nogo Codeletion on Corticospinal Axon Sprouting and Regeneration in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Geoffroy, Cédric G.; Lorenzana, Ariana O.; Kwan, Jeffrey P.; Lin, Kyle; Ghassemi, Omeed; Ma, Andrew; Xu, Nuo; Creger, Daniel; Liu, Kai; He, Zhigang

    2015-01-01

    Axons in the adult CNS have poor ability to grow after injury, impeding functional recovery in patients of spinal cord injury. This has been attributed to both a developmental decline in neuron-intrinsic growth ability and the presence of extrinsic growth inhibitors. We previously showed that genetic deletion of Nogo, an extrinsic inhibitor, promoted axonal sprouting from uninjured corticospinal tract (CST) neurons but not regeneration from injured CST neurons, whereas genetic deletion of PTEN, an intrinsic inhibitor, promoted both CST sprouting and regeneration. Here we test the hypothesis that combining an elevation of neuron-intrinsic growth ability and a reduction of extrinsic growth inhibition by genetic codeletion of PTEN and Nogo may further improve injury-induced axonal growth. In an apparent paradox, additionally deleting Nogo further enhanced CST regeneration but not sprouting in PTEN-deleted mice. Enhanced CST regeneration and sprouting in PTEN and PTEN/Nogo-deleted mice were associated with no or only temporary improvement in functional recovery. Our data illustrate that neuron-intrinsic and -extrinsic factors regulate axon regeneration and sprouting in complex ways and provide proof-of-principle evidence that targeting both can further improve regeneration. Neuron-intrinsic growth ability is an important determinant of neuronal responsiveness to changes in extrinsic growth inhibition, such that an elevated intrinsic growth state is a prerequisite for reducing extrinsic inhibition to take effect on CST regeneration. Meanwhile, additional strategies are required to unleash the full potential for functional recovery with enhanced axon regeneration and/or sprouting. PMID:25904793

  14. 10 CFR 20.1203 - Determination of external dose from airborne radioactive material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... exposure to the radioactive cloud (see appendix B to part 20, footnotes 1 and 2). Note: Airborne... cloud of airborne radioactive material is not relatively uniform. The determination of the deep-dose...

  15. 10 CFR 20.1203 - Determination of external dose from airborne radioactive material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... exposure to the radioactive cloud (see appendix B to part 20, footnotes 1 and 2). Note: Airborne... cloud of airborne radioactive material is not relatively uniform. The determination of the deep-dose...

  16. 10 CFR 20.1203 - Determination of external dose from airborne radioactive material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... exposure to the radioactive cloud (see appendix B to part 20, footnotes 1 and 2). Note: Airborne... cloud of airborne radioactive material is not relatively uniform. The determination of the deep-dose...

  17. MicroRNA-29 regulates high-glucose-induced apoptosis in human retinal pigment epithelial cells through PTEN.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiaohui; Zhou, Xiyuan; Liu, Danning; Yun, Lixia; Zhang, Lina; Chen, Xiaohai; Chai, Qinghe; Li, Langen

    2016-04-01

    Hyperglycemia or high-glucose (HG)-induced apoptosis in human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells is a characteristic process in diabetic retinopathy. In our study, we examined whether microRNA-29 (miR-29) may regulate HG-induced RPE cell apoptosis. Human RPE cell line, ARPE-19 cells, was treated with various high concentration of glucose in vitro. HG-induced RPE cell apoptosis was examined by terminal deoxynucleotide transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay and miR-29 gene expression by quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR). miR-29 was then downregulated in RPE cells, and its effect on HG-induced apoptosis was examined by TUNEL assay and western blot assay on caspase-7 protein. Association of miR-29 on its downstream target, PTEN, in HG-induced RPE cell apoptosis was evaluated by dual-luciferase assay and qRT-PCR. PTEN was silenced in RPE cells. The effects of PTEN downregulation on miR-29-mediated HG-induced RPE cell apoptosis were also examined by TUNEL and western blot assays. HG induced significant apoptosis in RPE cells in a dose-dependent manner. miR-29 was upregulated by HG in RPE cells. miR-29 downregulation protected HG-induced apoptosis and reduced the production of caspase-7 protein in RPE cells. PTEN was shown to be directly downregulated by HG and then upregulated by miR-29 downregulation in RPE cells. Small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated PTEN downregulation reversed the protective effect of miR-29 downregulation on HG-induced RPE cell apoptosis. This study demonstrates that miR-29, through inverse association of PTEN, plays an important role in the process of HG-induced apoptosis in RPE cells.

  18. Hypoxia-induced modulation of PTEN activity and EMT phenotypes in lung cancers.

    PubMed

    Kohnoh, Takashi; Hashimoto, Naozumi; Ando, Akira; Sakamoto, Koji; Miyazaki, Shinichi; Aoyama, Daisuke; Kusunose, Masaaki; Kimura, Motohiro; Omote, Norihito; Imaizumi, Kazuyoshi; Kawabe, Tsutomu; Hasegawa, Yoshinori

    2016-01-01

    Persistent hypoxia stimulation, one of the most critical microenvironmental factors, accelerates the acquisition of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) phenotypes in lung cancer cells. Loss of phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted from chromosome 10 (PTEN) expression might accelerate the development of lung cancer in vivo. Recent studies suggest that tumor microenvironmental factors might modulate the PTEN activity though a decrease in total PTEN expression and an increase in phosphorylation of the PTEN C-terminus (p-PTEN), resulting in the acquisition of the EMT phenotypes. Nevertheless, it is not known whether persistent hypoxia can modulate PTEN phosphatase activity or whether hypoxia-induced EMT phenotypes are negatively regulated by the PTEN phosphatase activity. We aimed to investigate hypoxia-induced modulation of PTEN activity and EMT phenotypes in lung cancers. Western blotting was performed in five lung cancer cell lines to evaluate total PTEN expression levels and the PTEN activation. In a xenograft model of lung cancer cells with endogenous PTEN expression, the PTEN expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. To examine the effect of hypoxia on phenotypic alterations in lung cancer cells in vitro, the cells were cultured under hypoxia. The effect of unphosphorylated PTEN (PTEN4A) induction on hypoxia-induced EMT phenotypes was evaluated, by using a Dox-dependent gene expression system. Lung cancer cells involving the EMT phenotypes showed a decrease in total PTEN expression and an increase in p-PTEN. In a xenograft model, loss of PTEN expression was observed in the tumor lesions showing tissue hypoxia. Persistent hypoxia yielded an approximately eight-fold increase in the p-PTEN/PTEN ratio in vitro. PTEN4A did not affect stabilization of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α. PTEN4A blunted hypoxia-induced EMT via inhibition of β-catenin translocation into the cytoplasm and nucleus. Our study strengthens the therapeutic possibility that

  19. Nondestructive determination of boron doses in semiconductor materials using neutron depth profiling

    SciTech Connect

    Uenlue, K.; Saglam, M.; Wehring, B.W.

    1996-12-31

    The physical and electrical properties of semiconductor materials are greatly effected by implantation of boron and other elements. The dose and depth distribution of boron in the near surface region and across interfacial boundaries determine the quality of semiconductor devices. Therefore, a number of analytical techniques has been developed in the last two decades to measure boron doses and depth profiles in semiconductor materials. Neutron Depth Profiling (NDP) is one of the techniques which is capable of determining the boron dose as well as the concentration distribution in the near surface region of semiconductor materials. NDP is a nuclear technique which is based on the absorption reaction of thermal/cold neutrons by certain isotopes of low mass elements e.g., boron-10. In this study, boron doses in semiconductor materials were measured using NDP. The results will be used to complement the measurements done with other techniques and provide a basis for accurate dose calibration of commercial ion implant systems.

  20. Cowden syndrome-associated germline SDHD variants alter PTEN nuclear translocation through SRC-induced PTEN oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Wanfeng; He, Xin; Ni, Ying; Ngeow, Joanne; Eng, Charis

    2015-01-01

    Germline mutations in the PTEN tumor-suppressor gene and germline variations in succinate dehydrogenase subunit D gene (SDHD-G12S, SDHD-H50R) are associated with a subset of Cowden syndrome and Cowden syndrome-like individuals (CS/CSL) and confer high risk of breast, thyroid and other cancers. However, very little is known about the underlying crosstalk between SDHD and PTEN in CS-associated thyroid cancer. Here, we show SDHD-G12S and SDHD-H50R lead to impaired PTEN function through alteration of its subcellular localization accompanied by resistance to apoptosis and induction of migration in both papillary and follicular thyroid carcinoma cell lines. Other studies have shown elevated proto-oncogene tyrosine kinase (SRC) activity in invasive thyroid cancer cells; so, we explore bosutinib, a specific inhibitor for SRC, to explore SRC as a mediator of SDH-PTEN crosstalk in this context. We show that SRC inhibition could rescue SDHD dysfunction-induced cellular phenotype and tumorigenesis only when wild-type PTEN is expressed, in thyroid cancer lines. Patient lymphoblast cells carrying either SDHD-G12S or SDHD-H50R also show increased nuclear PTEN and more oxidized PTEN after hydrogen peroxide treatment. Like in thyroid cells, bosutinib decreases oxidative PTEN in patient lymphoblast cells carrying SDHD variants, but not in patients carrying both SDHD variants and PTEN truncating mutations. In summary, our data suggest a novel mechanism whereby SDHD germline variants SDHD-G12S or SDHD-H50R induce thyroid tumorigenesis mediated by PTEN accumulation in the nucleus and may shed light on potential treatment with SRC inhibitors like bosutinib in PTEN-wild-type SDHD-variant/mutation positive CS/CSL patients and sporadic thyroid neoplasias. PMID:25149476

  1. Inhibitory effect of atorvastatin on the cell growth of cardiac myxomas via the PTEN and PHLPP2 phosphatase signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xing-Li; Yang, Ding-You; Tan, Duan-Jun; Yao, Heng-Chen; Chai, Wenhui; Peng, Li

    2013-08-01

    Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) is a molecule with strong proliferative effects, and statins have been reported to exhibit antitumor effects based on clinical and experimental studies. However, their effects on cardiac myxoma (CM) cells and the underlying signaling mechanism(s) are largely unknown. Therefore, we investigated whether the protein/lipid phosphatases and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN) and pleckstrin homology domain leucine-rich repeat phosphatase 1 and 2 (PHLPP1 and 2) are involved in the proliferative effect of IGF-1 on CM cells and the pharmacological impact of atorvastatin. The activity of PTEN and PHLPPs was determined using specific substrate diC16PIP3 and pNPP. We found that IGF-1 enhanced CM cell proliferation and inhibited both PTEN and PHLPP2 activity in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Atorvastatin acted counter to IGF-1 and reversed the above effects mediated by IGF-1. Both IGF-1 and atorvastatin did not affect the activity of PHLPP1 and the protein expression of the three phosphatases. The results suggest that IGF-1 may exert its proliferative effects by negatively regulating the PTEN/PHLPP2 signaling pathway in CM cells, and atorvastatin may be a potential drug for the treatment of CM by enhancing the activity of PTEN and PHLPP2.

  2. A Smad3-PTEN regulatory loop controls proliferation and apoptotic responses to TGF-β in mouse endometrium.

    PubMed

    Eritja, Nuria; Felip, Isidre; Dosil, Mari Alba; Vigezzi, Lucia; Mirantes, Cristina; Yeramian, Andree; Navaridas, Raúl; Santacana, Maria; Llobet-Navas, David; Yoshimura, Akihiko; Nomura, Masatoshi; Encinas, Mario; Matias-Guiu, Xavier; Dolcet, Xavi

    2017-08-01

    The TGF-β/Smad and the PI3K/AKT signaling pathways are important regulators of proliferation and apoptosis, and their alterations lead to cancer development. TGF-β acts as a tumor suppressor in premalignant cells, but it is a tumor promoter for cancerous cells. Such dichotomous actions are dictated by different cellular contexts. Here, we have unveiled a PTEN-Smad3 regulatory loop that provides a new insight in the complex cross talk between TGF-β/Smad and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways. We demonstrate that TGF-β triggers apoptosis of wild-type polarized endometrial epithelial cells by a Smad3-dependent activation of PTEN transcription, which results in the inhibition of PI3K/AKT signaling pathway. We show that specific Smad3 knockdown or knockout reduces basal and TGF-β-induced PTEN expression in endometrial cells, resulting in a blockade of TGF-β-induced apoptosis and an enhancement of cell proliferation. Likewise Smad3 deletion, PTEN knockout prevents TGF-β-induced apoptosis and increases cell proliferation by increasing PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling. In summary, our results demonstrate that Smad3-PTEN signaling axis determine cellular responses to TGF-β.

  3. PARK2 Depletion Connects Energy and Oxidative Stress to PI3K/Akt Activation via PTEN S-Nitrosylation.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Amit; Anjomani-Virmouni, Sara; Koundouros, Nikos; Dimitriadi, Maria; Choo-Wing, Rayman; Valle, Adamo; Zheng, Yuxiang; Chiu, Yu-Hsin; Agnihotri, Sameer; Zadeh, Gelareh; Asara, John M; Anastasiou, Dimitrios; Arends, Mark J; Cantley, Lewis C; Poulogiannis, George

    2017-03-16

    PARK2 is a gene implicated in disease states with opposing responses in cell fate determination, yet its contribution in pro-survival signaling is largely unknown. Here we show that PARK2 is altered in over a third of all human cancers, and its depletion results in enhanced phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt (PI3K/Akt) activation and increased vulnerability to PI3K/Akt/mTOR inhibitors. PARK2 depletion contributes to AMPK-mediated activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), enhanced levels of reactive oxygen species, and a concomitant increase in oxidized nitric oxide levels, thereby promoting the inhibition of PTEN by S-nitrosylation and ubiquitination. Notably, AMPK activation alone is sufficient to induce PTEN S-nitrosylation in the absence of PARK2 depletion. Park2 loss and Pten loss also display striking cooperativity to promote tumorigenesis in vivo. Together, our findings reveal an important missing mechanism that might account for PTEN suppression in PARK2-deficient tumors, and they highlight the importance of PTEN S-nitrosylation in supporting cell survival and proliferation under conditions of energy deprivation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Susceptibility of PTEN-positive metastatic tumors to small interfering RNA targeting the mammalian target of rapamycin.

    PubMed

    Koide, Hiroyuki; Asai, Tomohiro; Kato, Hiroki; Yonenaga, Norihito; Yokota, Masafumi; Ando, Hidenori; Dewa, Takehisa; Nango, Mamoru; Maeda, Noriyuki; Oku, Naoto

    2015-01-01

    PTEN-positive tumors are not susceptible to the treatment with rapamycin, an inhibitor of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Here, we determined the susceptibility of PTEN-positive cells to small interfering RNA for mTOR (si-mTOR) by using a novel liposomal delivery system. We prepared dicetyl phosphate-tetraethylenepentamine-based polycation liposomes (TEPA-PCL) decorated with polyethylene glycol (PEG) grafting Ala-Pro-Arg-Pro-Gly (APRPG), a VRGFR-1-targeting peptide. APRPG-PEG-decorated TEPA-PCL carrying si-mTOR (APRPG-TEPA-PCL/si-mTOR) had an antiproliferative effect against B16F10 murine melanoma cells (PTEN-positive) and significantly inhibited both the proliferation and tube formation of mouse 2H-11 endothelial-like cells (PTEN-positive). APRPG-TEPA-PCL/si-mTOR treatment did not induce Akt phosphorylation (Ser473) in either B16F10 or 2H-11 cells although there was strong phosphorylation of Akt in response to rapamycin treatment. Intravenous injection of APRPG-TEPA-PCL/si-mTOR significantly suppressed the tumor growth compared with rapamycin treatment in mice bearing B16F10 melanoma. These findings suggest that APRPG-TEPA-PCL/si-mTOR is useful for the treatment of PTEN-positive tumors.

  5. Synthetic Lethal Gene for PTEN as a Therapeutic Target

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    patients and prepare PTEN-deficient cells. We will then screen genes that play critical roles in the PTEN pathway using a technique called shRNA library ... screening , with or without radiation treatment of these cells. When we identify a gene, we will then test the effect of such gene in an animal model to

  6. MicroRNA-106b promotes pituitary tumor cell proliferation and invasion through PI3K/AKT signaling pathway by targeting PTEN.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Kai; Zhang, Tingrong; Fan, YanDong; Serick; Du, Guojia; Wu, Pengfei; Geng, Dangmurenjiafu

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the expression of microRNA-106b (miR-106b) and phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) in pituitary tumor and to confirm whether miR-106b promotes proliferation and invasion of pituitary tumor cells through the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway by targeted regulation of PTEN expression, and thereby to find new targets for the treatment of pituitary tumor. Fifty-five cases of pituitary tumor tissue samples were collected, including 29 cases of invasive pituitary tumor, non-invasive 26 cases, and 8 normal pituitaries. The expression level of miR-106b in pituitary tumor tissue was detected by quantitative real-time PCR, and the expression of PTEN protein was detected by immunohistochemistry. PTEN 3'-untranslated region (UTR) luciferase vector was constructed, and dual-luciferase reporter gene assay was employed to examine the effect of miR-106b on PTEN 3'-UTR luciferase activity. AtT-20 cells were transfected with miR-106b mimics, miR-106b inhibitor, PTEN expression plasmid, and miR-106b mimics + PTEN expression plasmid respectively, and the changes in cellular proliferation and invasion were observed via MTT method and transwell assay respectively. PTEN messenger RNA (mRNA) expression was determined by quantitative real-time PCR, and western blotting was performed to detect the expression of PTEN, PI3K, AKT, and pAKT. miR-106b showed up-regulation in invasive pituitary tumor tissue: the expression level was significantly up-regulated compared with normal tissues and the non-invasive pituitary tumor tissue (P < 0.05). The positive rate of PTEN protein expression in invasive pituitary tumor tissues was significantly lower than in normal and non-invasive tissues (P < 0.01). Dual-luciferase reporter gene assay showed that miR-106b could bind to the 3'-UTR of PTEN specifically and significantly inhibited the luciferase activity, cutting the 46 % (P < 0.01). Down-regulation of miR-106b or up-regulation of

  7. PTEN expression is a prognostic marker for patients with non-small cell lung cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jian; Hu, Cheng-Ping; He, Bi-Xiu; Chen, Xi; Lu, Xiao-Xiao; Xie, Ming-Xuan; Li, Wei; He, Shu-Ya; You, Shao-Jin; Chen, Qiong

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) is a known tumor suppressor in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). By performing a systematic review and meta-analysis of the literature, we determined the prognostic value of decreased PTEN expression in patients with NSCLC. We comprehensively and systematically searched through multiple online databases up to May 22, 2016 for NSCLC studies reporting on PTEN expression and patient survival outcome. Several criteria, including the Newcastle-Ottawa Quality Assessment Scale (NOS), were used to discriminate between studies. In total, 23 eligible studies with a total of 2,505 NSCLC patients were included in our meta-analysis. Our results demonstrated that decreased expression of PTEN correlated with poor overall survival in NSCLC patients and was indicative of a poor prognosis for disease-free survival and progression-free survival in patients with NSCLC. PMID:27506936

  8. Clinical Implications for Germline PTEN Spectrum Disorders.

    PubMed

    Ngeow, Joanne; Sesock, Kaitlin; Eng, Charis

    2017-06-01

    Patients with PTEN hamartoma tumor syndrome (PHTS) may present to a variety of different subspecialties with benign and malignant clinical features. They have increased lifetime risks of breast, endometrial, thyroid, renal, and colon cancers, as well as neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism spectrum disorder. Patients and affected family members can be offered gene-directed surveillance and management. Patients who are unaffected can be spared unnecessary investigations. With longitudinal follow-up, we are likely to identify other non-cancer manifestations associated with PHTS such as metabolic, immunologic, and neurologic features. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Role of PTEN in the Tumor Microenvironment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    growth and survival f actors, chem okines, structural components of the ECM and enzym es that contro l its turnover. In breast tum ors, strom al...components of the ECM as well as enzymes that control its turn- over6,7. Despite extensive evidence for a role of the tumour stroma in carcinogenesis...protein phosphatase activity. Adv Enzyme Regul 49:190–196. 7. Nelen MR, et al. (1997) Germline mutations in the PTEN/MMAC1 gene in patients with Cowden

  10. A study to determine the nitroglycerin ointment dose and dosing interval that best promote the healing of chronic anal fissures.

    PubMed

    Bailey, H Randolph; Beck, David E; Billingham, Richard P; Binderow, Sander R; Gottesman, Lester; Hull, Tracy L; Larach, Sergio W; Margolin, David A; Milsom, Jeffrey W; Potenti, Fabio M; Rafferty, Janice F; Riff, Dennis S; Sands, Lawrence R; Senagore, Anthony; Stamos, Michael J; Yee, Laurence F; Young-Fadok, Tonia M; Gibbons, Robert D

    2002-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the optimal dose and dosing interval of nitroglycerin ointment to heal chronic anal fissures. A randomized, double-blind study of intra-anally applied nitroglycerin ointment (Anogesic) was conducted in 17 centers in 304 patients with chronic anal fissures. The patients were randomly assigned to one of eight treatment regimens (0.0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.4 percent nitroglycerin ointment applied twice or three times per day), for up to eight weeks. A dose-measuring device standardized the delivery of 374 mg ointment. Healing of fissures (complete reepithelialization) was assessed by physical examination using an observer unaware of treatment allocation. The subjects assessed pain intensity daily by completing a diary containing a visual analog scale for average pain intensity for the day, the worst pain intensity for the day, and pain intensity at the last defecation. There were no significant differences in fissure healing among any of the treatment groups; all groups, including placebo had a healing rate of approximately 50 percent. This rate of placebo response was inexplicably higher than previously reported in the literature. Treatment with 0.4 percent (1.5 mg) nitroglycerin ointment was associated with a significant (P < 0.0002) decrease in average pain intensity compared with vehicle as assessed by patients with a visual analog scale. The decreases were observed by Day 4 of treatment. At 8 weeks the magnitude of the difference between 0.4 percent nitroglycerin and control was a 21 percent reduction in average pain. Treatment was well tolerated, with only 3.29 percent of patients discontinuing treatment because of headache. Headaches were the primary adverse event and were dose related. Nitroglycerin ointment did not alter healing but significantly and rapidly reduced the pain associated with chronic anal fissures.

  11. Computational determination of absorbed dose distributions from multiple volumetric gamma ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chuanyu; Inanc, Feyzi

    2002-05-01

    Determination of absorbed dose distributions is very important in brachytherapy procedures. The typical computation involves superposition of absorbed dose distributions from a single seed to compute the combined absorbed dose distribution formed by multiple seeds. This approach does not account for the shadow effect caused by the metallic nature of volumetric radioactive seeds. Since this shadow effect will cause deviations from the targeted dose distribution, it may have important implications on the success of the procedures. We demonstrated accuracy of our deterministic algorithms for isotropic point sources in the past. We will show that we now have the capability of computing absorbed dose distributions from multiple volumetric seeds and demonstrate that our results are quite close to the results published in the literature.

  12. Experimental determination of the radiation dose limit for cryocooled protein crystals

    PubMed Central

    Owen, Robin Leslie; Rudiño-Piñera, Enrique; Garman, Elspeth F.

    2006-01-01

    Radiation damage to cryocooled protein crystals during x-ray structure determination has become an inherent part of macromolecular diffraction data collection at third-generation synchrotrons. Generally, radiation damage is an undesirable component of the experiment and can result in erroneous structural detail in the final model. The characterization of radiation damage thus has become an important area for structural biologists. The calculated dose limit of 2 × 107 Gy for the diffracting power of cryocooled protein crystals to drop by half has been experimentally evaluated at a third-generation synchrotron source. Successive data sets were collected from four holoferritin and three apoferritin crystals. The absorbed dose for each crystal was calculated by using the program raddose after measurement of the incident photon flux and determination of the elemental crystal composition by micro-particle-induced x-ray emission. Degradation in diffraction quality and specific structural changes induced by synchrotron radiation then could be compared directly with absorbed dose for different dose/dose rate regimes: a 10% lifetime decrease for a 10-fold dose rate increase was observed. Remarkable agreement both between different crystals of the same type and between apoferritin and holoferritin was observed for the dose required to reduce the diffracted intensity by half (D1/2). From these measurements, a dose limit of D1/2 = 4.3 (±0.3) ×107 Gy was obtained. However, by considering other data quality indicators, an intensity reduction to Iln2 = ln2 × I0, corresponding to an absorbed dose of 3.0 × 107 Gy, is recommended as an appropriate dose limit for typical macromolecular crystallography experiments. PMID:16549763

  13. Beta skin dose determination using TLDs, Monte-Carlo calculations, and extrapolation chamber.

    PubMed

    Ben-Shachar, B; Levine, S H; Hoffman, J M

    1989-12-01

    The beta doses produced by 90Sr-Y and 204 Tl beta sources were determined using three methods: Monte-Carlo calculations, measurements with TLDs, and measurements with an extrapolation chamber. Excellent agreement was obtained by all three methods, except a TLD nonlinear response to beta s was observed, which gives doses approximately 20% high for the 90Sr-Y source and 5% low for the 204Tl source. Also, analyses performed with low-energy beta s using these methods can determine errors in shield thickness covering TLD elements. Direct measurement of skin dose is not possible by the TLDs because the minimum shield thickness for the elements is 13 mg cm-2. A thinner shield for the elements must be used or the data must be extrapolated. Presently, thinner shields for TLD elements are not available, and the thick shields can lead to significant errors in skin dose when exposed to low-energy beta s.

  14. Pharmacopeial methodologies for determining aerodynamic mass distributions of ultra-high dose inhaler medicines.

    PubMed

    Wong, William; Crapper, John; Chan, Hak-Kim; Traini, Daniela; Young, Paul M

    2010-03-11

    Three different impactor methodologies, the Andersen cascade impactor (ACI), next-generation impactor (NGI) and multistage-liquid impinger (MSLI) were studied to determine their performance when testing ultra-high dose dry powder formulations. Cumulative doses of spray-dried mannitol (Aridol) were delivered to each impactor at a flow rate of 60Lmin(-1) (up to a max dose of 800mg delivering 20 sequential 40mg capsules). In general, total drug collected in both the ACI and NGI falls below the range 85-115% of label claim criteria recommended by the United States of America Food and Drug Administration (FDA) at nominal mannitol doses exceeding 20mg and 200mg, respectively. In comparison analysis of the MSLI data, over a 5-800mg cumulative dosing range, indicated that the percentage of nominal dose recovered from the MSLI was within the +/-15% limits set in this study. Furthermore all samples, apart from the 5mg and 10mg analysis were within 5% of the nominal cumulative dose. While the MSLI is not routinely used for regulatory submission, the use of this impinger when studying ultra-high dose formulations should be considered as a complementary and comparative source of aerosol deposition data.

  15. PTEN loss defines a PI3K/AKT pathway-dependent germinal center subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Pfeifer, Matthias; Grau, Michael; Lenze, Dido; Wenzel, Sören-Sebastian; Wolf, Annette; Wollert-Wulf, Brigitte; Dietze, Kerstin; Nogai, Hendrik; Storek, Benjamin; Madle, Hannelore; Dörken, Bernd; Janz, Martin; Dirnhofer, Stephan; Hummel, Michael; Tzankov, Alexandar; Lenz, Georg

    2013-01-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) represents a heterogeneous diagnostic category with distinct molecular subtypes that can be defined by gene expression profiling. However, even within these defined subtypes, heterogeneity prevails. To further elucidate the pathogenesis of these entities, we determined the expression of the tumor suppressor phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) in 248 primary DLBCL patient samples. These analyses revealed that loss of PTEN was detectable in 55% of germinal center B-cell-like (GCB) DLBCLs, whereas this abnormality was found in only 14% of non-GCB DLBCL patient samples. In GCB DLBCL, the PTEN status was inversely correlated with activation of the oncogenic PI3K/protein kinase B (AKT) pathway in both DLBCL cell lines and primary patient samples. Reexpression of PTEN induced cytotoxicity in PTEN-deficient GCB DLBCL cell line models by inhibiting PI3K/AKT signaling, indicating an addiction to this pathway in this subset of GCB DLBCLs. PI3K/AKT inhibition induced down-regulation of the transcription factor MYC. Reexpression of MYC rescued GCB DLBCL cells from PTEN-induced toxicity, identifying a regulatory mechanism of MYC expression in DLBCL. Finally, pharmacologic PI3K inhibition resulted in toxicity selectively in PTEN-deficient GCB DLBCL lines. Collectively, our results indicate that PTEN loss defines a PI3K/AKT-dependent GCB DLBCL subtype that is addicted to PI3K and MYC signaling and suggest that pharmacologic inhibition of PI3K might represent a promising therapeutic approach in these lymphomas. PMID:23840064

  16. PTEN loss defines a PI3K/AKT pathway-dependent germinal center subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Pfeifer, Matthias; Grau, Michael; Lenze, Dido; Wenzel, Sören-Sebastian; Wolf, Annette; Wollert-Wulf, Brigitte; Dietze, Kerstin; Nogai, Hendrik; Storek, Benjamin; Madle, Hannelore; Dörken, Bernd; Janz, Martin; Dirnhofer, Stephan; Lenz, Peter; Hummel, Michael; Tzankov, Alexandar; Lenz, Georg

    2013-07-23

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) represents a heterogeneous diagnostic category with distinct molecular subtypes that can be defined by gene expression profiling. However, even within these defined subtypes, heterogeneity prevails. To further elucidate the pathogenesis of these entities, we determined the expression of the tumor suppressor phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) in 248 primary DLBCL patient samples. These analyses revealed that loss of PTEN was detectable in 55% of germinal center B-cell-like (GCB) DLBCLs, whereas this abnormality was found in only 14% of non-GCB DLBCL patient samples. In GCB DLBCL, the PTEN status was inversely correlated with activation of the oncogenic PI3K/protein kinase B (AKT) pathway in both DLBCL cell lines and primary patient samples. Reexpression of PTEN induced cytotoxicity in PTEN-deficient GCB DLBCL cell line models by inhibiting PI3K/AKT signaling, indicating an addiction to this pathway in this subset of GCB DLBCLs. PI3K/AKT inhibition induced down-regulation of the transcription factor MYC. Reexpression of MYC rescued GCB DLBCL cells from PTEN-induced toxicity, identifying a regulatory mechanism of MYC expression in DLBCL. Finally, pharmacologic PI3K inhibition resulted in toxicity selectively in PTEN-deficient GCB DLBCL lines. Collectively, our results indicate that PTEN loss defines a PI3K/AKT-dependent GCB DLBCL subtype that is addicted to PI3K and MYC signaling and suggest that pharmacologic inhibition of PI3K might represent a promising therapeutic approach in these lymphomas.

  17. PI3K-PTEN dysregulation leads to mTOR-driven upregulation of the core clock gene BMAL1 in normal and malignant epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Camila S; Almeida, Luciana O; Guimarães, Douglas M; Martins, Manoela D; Papagerakis, Petros; Papagerakis, Silvana; Leopoldino, Andreia M; Castilho, Rogerio M; Squarize, Cristiane H

    2016-07-05

    Dysfunctional clock signaling is observed in a variety of pathological conditions. Many members of the clock gene family are upregulated in tumor cells. Here, we explored the consequences of a commonly disrupted signaling pathway in head and neck cancer on the regulation of circadian clock genes. PTEN is a key molecular controller of the PI3K signaling, and loss of PTEN function is often observed in a variety of cancers. Our main goal was to determine whether PTEN regulates circadian clock signaling. We found that oxidation-driven loss of PTEN function resulted in the activation of mTOR signaling and activation of the core clock protein BMAL1 (also known as ARNTL). The PTEN-induced BMAL1 upregulation was further confirmed using small interference RNA targeting PTEN, and in vivo conditional depletion of PTEN from the epidermis. We observed that PTEN-driven accumulation of BMAL1 was mTOR-mediated and that administration of Rapamycin, a specific mTOR inhibitor, resulted in in vivo rescue of normal levels of BMAL1. Accumulation of BMAL1 by deletion of PER2, a Period family gene, was also rescued upon in vivo administration of mTOR inhibitor. Notably, BMAL1 regulation requires mTOR regulatory protein Raptor and Rictor. These findings indicate that mTORC1 and mTORC2 complex plays a critical role in controlling BMAL1, establishing a connection between PI3K signaling and the regulation of circadian rhythm, ultimately resulting in deregulated BMAL1 in tumor cells with disrupted PI3K signaling.

  18. Effect of phosphatase and tensin homology deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) gene transfection on reversal of multidrug resistance in K562/ADM cells.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhiyong; Yang, Ning; Liang, Wentong; Yan, Xiaoyan; Li, Lin; Pan, Ling

    2012-07-01

    The phosphatase and tensin homology deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) gene is a novel tumor suppressor gene of the phosphatase family. Studies have shown that the PTEN gene is probably involved in human malignant disease pathogenesis, multidrug resistance, angiogenesis and extramedullary infiltration. This study was designed to investigate the effect of wild-type PTEN gene transfection on drug resistance reversal in K562/ADM leukemia cells in vitro and the possible mechanism. A recombinant adenovirus containing green fluorescent protein gene and wild-type PTEN gene (Ad-PTEN-GFP) or a recombined adenovirus containing green fluorescent protein gene only (Ad-GFP) was transfected into K562/ADM cells. These cells were then treated with different concentrations of adriamycin, cytarabine or arsenic trioxide, respectively. The half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) of each drug was detected by MTT assay and the drug resistance reversal factor (RF) was calculated. The proliferation inhibition rate of these K562/ADM cells treated with or without the above-mentioned drugs was determined by MTT assay and the apoptosis rate was evaluated by flow cytometry. PTEN, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), I-κB, p53, multidrug resistance genes MDR1 and MRP, and apoptosis related genes Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and Bax mRNA levels were detected by real-time fluorescence relative-quantification reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (FQ-PCR). PTEN, Akt, p-Akt and NF-κB (p65) protein levels were detected by Western blot. Results showed that PTEN gene transfection could increase the sensitivity of K562/ADM cells to chemotherapeutic drugs. The drug resistance reversal index of adriamycin, cytarabine and arsenic trioxide was 3.8-fold, 2.65-fold and 2.64-fold, respectively, after PTEN gene transfection. NF-κB, MDR1, Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL mRNA levels as well as p-Akt and NF-κB (p65) protein levels were down-regulated, while p53 and Bax mRNA levels were up-regulated in K562/ADM cells after

  19. Analysis of PTEN ubiquitylation and SUMOylation using molecular traps.

    PubMed

    Lang, Valérie; Aillet, Fabienne; Da Silva-Ferrada, Elisa; Xolalpa, Wendy; Zabaleta, Lorea; Rivas, Carmen; Rodriguez, Manuel S

    2015-05-01

    The function of the tumour suppressor phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) is tightly controlled by post-translational modifications (PTMs) including ubiquitin or Small Ubiquitin-related MOdifiers (SUMO). It is known that SUMOylation by SUMO-1, SUMO-2/-3, mono- or polyubiquitylation have a distinct impact on PTEN activity, localisation and/or stability, however the molecular mechanisms governing these processes are still unclear. Studying PTM regulated events has always been a difficult task due to their labile nature. Here, we propose an update on the role of these PTMs on PTEN function, as well as a methodological overview on the use of molecular traps named SUMO Binding Entities (SUBEs) or Tandem Ubiquitin Binding Entities (TUBEs) to capture SUMOylated or Ubiquitylated forms of PTEN respectively. When combined with in vitro SUMOylation or Ubiquitylation assays, the use of molecular traps facilitate the detection of modified forms of PTEN. SUMO and ubiquitin-traps are also suitable to capture endogenously modified forms of PTEN after expression of E3 ligases or treatment with chemical inhibitors. This versatile approach represents an interesting alternative to explore PTEN regulation by SUMO and ubiquitin under physiological or pathological conditions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. [Expression of PTEN in Myocardial Tissue in Coronary Heart Disease].

    PubMed

    Li, Xue-rong; He, Yong; Lei, Yu-jia; Qin, Xe-he; Wei, Qing-tao; Pan, Xin-min; Li, Li-juan; Zhang, Lin

    2016-04-01

    To observe the expression of phosphatase and tensin homology deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN) in myocardial tissue in patients with coronary heart disease, and explore the relevance between the expression of PTEN and the occurrence and development of coronary heart disease. A total of 16 death cases with pathological diagnosis of coronary heart disease were collected as experimental group, and 19 cases without myocardial lesions were selected as control group. The expression of PTEN protein and its mRNA were detected by immunohistochemistry and real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR respectively. The correlation between the expression of PTEN and the pathogenesis of coronary heart disease was analyzed. The expression of PTEN protein in myocardium in cases with coronary heart disease was significantly lower compared with the control group (P < 0.05). There was no statistical difference of the expression of PTEN mRNA between experimental and control group (P > 0.05). PTEN may be involved in the occurrence and development of coronary heart disease.

  1. High-grade glioma formation results from postnatal pten loss or mutant epidermal growth factor receptor expression in a transgenic mouse glioma model.

    PubMed

    Wei, Qingxia; Clarke, Laura; Scheidenhelm, Danielle K; Qian, Baoping; Tong, Amanda; Sabha, Nesrin; Karim, Zia; Bock, Nicholas A; Reti, Robert; Swoboda, Rolf; Purev, Enkhtsetseg; Lavoie, Jean-Francois; Bajenaru, M Livia; Shannon, Patrick; Herlyn, Dorothee; Kaplan, David; Henkelman, R Mark; Gutmann, David H; Guha, Abhijit

    2006-08-01

    High-grade gliomas are devastating brain tumors associated with a mean survival of <50 weeks. Two of the most common genetic changes observed in these tumors are overexpression/mutation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) vIII and loss of PTEN/MMAC1 expression. To determine whether somatically acquired EGFRvIII expression or Pten loss accelerates high-grade glioma development, we used a previously characterized RasB8 glioma-prone mouse strain, in which these specific genetic changes were focally introduced at 4 weeks of age. We show that both postnatal EGFRvIII expression and Pten inactivation in RasB8 mice potentiate high-grade glioma development. Moreover, we observe a concordant loss of Pten and EGFR overexpression in nearly all high-grade gliomas induced by either EGFRvIII introduction or Pten inactivation. This novel preclinical model of high-grade glioma will be useful in evaluating brain tumor therapies targeted to the pathways specifically dysregulated by EGFR expression or Pten loss.

  2. Ubiquitin E3 ligase Nedd4-1 acts as a downstream target of PI3K/PTEN-mTORC1 signaling to promote neurite growth

    PubMed Central

    Hsia, Hung-En; Kumar, Rohit; Luca, Rossella; Takeda, Michiko; Courchet, Julien; Nakashima, Jonathan; Wu, Shumin; Goebbels, Sandra; An, Wenlin; Eickholt, Britta J.; Polleux, Franck; Rotin, Daniela; Wu, Hong; Rossner, Moritz J.; Bagni, Claudia; Rhee, Jeong-Seop; Brose, Nils; Kawabe, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Protein ubiquitination is a core regulatory determinant of neural development. Previous studies have indicated that the Nedd4-family E3 ubiquitin ligases Nedd4-1 and Nedd4-2 may ubiquitinate phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) and thereby regulate axonal growth in neurons. Using conditional knockout mice, we show here that Nedd4-1 and Nedd4-2 are indeed required for axonal growth in murine central nervous system neurons. However, in contrast to previously published data, we demonstrate that PTEN is not a substrate of Nedd4-1 and Nedd4-2, and that aberrant PTEN ubiquitination is not involved in the impaired axon growth upon deletion of Nedd4-1 and Nedd4-2. Rather, PTEN limits Nedd4-1 protein levels by modulating the activity of mTORC1, a protein complex that controls protein synthesis and cell growth. Our data demonstrate that Nedd4-family E3 ligases promote axonal growth and branching in the developing mammalian brain, where PTEN is not a relevant substrate. Instead, PTEN controls neurite growth by regulating Nedd4-1 expression. PMID:25157163

  3. BRADOS - Dose determination in the Russian segment of the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajek, M.; Berger, T.; Fürstner, M.; Fugger, M.; Vana, N.; Akatov, Y.; Shurshakov, V.; Arkhangelsky, V.

    Absorbed dose and dose-average linear energy transfer (LET) were assessed by means of LiF: Mg, Ti thermoluminescence (TL) detectors at different locations onboard the Russian segment (RS) of the International Space Station (ISS) in the timeframe between February and November 2001, i.e. for 248 days. Based on calibrations of the employed detectors in a variety of heavy-ion beams, mainly at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator (HIMAC) in Chiba, Japan, the measured absorbed dose values could be corrected for the TL dose registration efficiency in the radiation climate onboard the ISS. Various strategies for efficiency correction are discussed. For the specific case the efficiency correction accounted for a reduction by nearly 20 % in dose, implying that without proper consideration of the TL efficiency behaviour the absorbed dose inside the ISS would be overestimated. The dose-average LET was derived from TLD-700 measurements evaluated according to the well-established high-temperature ratio (HTR) method which analyzes the TL emission in the temperature range between 248 and 310 C. According to the shielding distribution, the efficiency-corrected absorbed dose was found to vary between 155 μ Gy/d for panel N 457 (RS-ISS toilet) and 230 μ Gy/d for panel N 443 (RS-ISS starboard cabin). The determined LET indicated a modification of the spectral composition of the onboard radiation field for the different exposure locations. Arrangement of TLD-600 and TLD-700 in pair allowed also some information about the neutron component to be drawn. Experimentally determined absorbed dose values are compared with model calculations by means of a self-developed code, using as input data detailed shielding distributions and proton fluxes from AP-8 and JPL algorithms.

  4. Actin dynamics is rapidly regulated by the PTEN and PIP2 signaling pathways leading to myocyte hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Li, Jieli; Tanhehco, Elaine J; Russell, Brenda

    2014-12-01

    Mature cardiac myocytes are terminally differentiated, and the heart has limited capacity to replace lost myocytes. Thus adaptation of myocyte size plays an important role in the determination of cardiac function. The hypothesis tested is that regulation of the dynamic exchange of actin leads to cardiac hypertrophy. ANG II was used as a hypertrophic stimulant in mouse heart and neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVMs) in culture for assessment of a mechanism for regulation of actin dynamics by phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2). Actin dynamics in NRVMs rapidly increased in a PIP2-dependent manner, measured by imaging and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP). A significant increase in PIP2 levels was found by immunoblotting in both adult mouse heart tissue and cultured NRVMs. Inhibition of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) in NRVMs markedly blunted ANG II-induced increases in actin dynamics, the PIP2 level, and cell size. Furthermore, PTEN activity was dramatically upregulated in ANG II-treated NRVMs but downregulated when PTEN inhibitors were used. The time course of the rise in the PIP2 level was inversely related to the fall in the PIP3 level, which was significant by 30 min in ANG II-treated NRVMs. However, significant translocation of PTEN to the plasma membrane occurred by 10 min, suggesting a crucial initial step for PTEN for the cellular responses to ANG II. In conclusion, PTEN and PIP2 signaling may play an important role in myocyte hypertrophy by the regulation of actin filament dynamics, which is induced by ANG II stimulation. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  5. Actin dynamics is rapidly regulated by the PTEN and PIP2 signaling pathways leading to myocyte hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jieli; Tanhehco, Elaine J.

    2014-01-01

    Mature cardiac myocytes are terminally differentiated, and the heart has limited capacity to replace lost myocytes. Thus adaptation of myocyte size plays an important role in the determination of cardiac function. The hypothesis tested is that regulation of the dynamic exchange of actin leads to cardiac hypertrophy. ANG II was used as a hypertrophic stimulant in mouse heart and neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVMs) in culture for assessment of a mechanism for regulation of actin dynamics by phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2). Actin dynamics in NRVMs rapidly increased in a PIP2-dependent manner, measured by imaging and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP). A significant increase in PIP2 levels was found by immunoblotting in both adult mouse heart tissue and cultured NRVMs. Inhibition of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) in NRVMs markedly blunted ANG II-induced increases in actin dynamics, the PIP2 level, and cell size. Furthermore, PTEN activity was dramatically upregulated in ANG II-treated NRVMs but downregulated when PTEN inhibitors were used. The time course of the rise in the PIP2 level was inversely related to the fall in the PIP3 level, which was significant by 30 min in ANG II-treated NRVMs. However, significant translocation of PTEN to the plasma membrane occurred by 10 min, suggesting a crucial initial step for PTEN for the cellular responses to ANG II. In conclusion, PTEN and PIP2 signaling may play an important role in myocyte hypertrophy by the regulation of actin filament dynamics, which is induced by ANG II stimulation. PMID:25260617

  6. High-grade fimbrial-ovarian carcinomas are unified by altered p53, PTEN and PAX2 expression.

    PubMed

    Roh, Michael H; Yassin, Yosuf; Miron, Alexander; Mehra, Karishma K; Mehrad, Mitra; Monte, Nicolas M; Mutter, George L; Nucci, Marisa R; Ning, Geng; Mckeon, Frank D; Hirsch, Michelle S; Wa, Xian; Crum, Christopher P

    2010-10-01

    High-grade endometrioid and serous carcinomas of the ovary and fallopian tube are responsible for the majority of cancer deaths and comprise a spectrum that includes early or localized (tubal intraepithelial carcinoma) and advanced (invasive or metastatic) disease. We subdivided a series of these tumors into three groups, (1) classic serous, (2) mixed serous and endometrioid and (3) endometrioid carcinomas and determined: (1) the frequencies of coexisting tubal intraepithelial carcinoma, (2) frequency of a dominant ovarian mass suggesting an ovarian origin and (3) immuno-localization of WT-1, p53, PTEN, PAX2 and p16(ink4). All tumors were analyzed for p53 mutations. Thirty six, 25 and 8% of groups 1-3 were associated with tubal intraepithelial carcinoma (P=0.09) and 34, 45 and 62% predominated in one ovary (P=0.028), respectively. Differences in frequencies of diffuse p53 immunostaining (85-93%), WT-1 (70-98%) and p16(ink4) positivity (69-75%) were not significant for all groups. Greater than 95% reduction in PAX2 and PTEN occurred in 67-75 and 5-12%, respectively; however, PAX2 and PTEN staining intensity, when present, was often heterogeneous, highlighting different tumor populations. PAX2 and PTEN expression were markedly reduced or absent in 12 of 12 and 4 of 12 tubal intraepithelial carcinomas. In summary, high-grade müllerian carcinomas share identical frequencies of altered or reduced expression of p53, PTEN and PAX2, all of which can be appreciated in tubal intraepithelial carcinomas. Because only a subset of these tumors appears to arise in the fallopian tube, attention to expression of these biomarkers in the ovary and other müllerian sites might facilitate the identification of other carcinogenic pathways. PAX2 and PTEN, in addition to p53 and p16(ink4), comprise a potentially important gene combination in high-grade pelvic carcinogenesis.

  7. Prognostic value of ERG, PTEN, CRISP3 and SPINK1 in predicting biochemical recurrence in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    NOH, BYEONG-JOO; SUNG, JI-YOUN; KIM, YOUN WHA; CHANG, SUNG-GOO; PARK, YONG-KOO

    2016-01-01

    The established prognostic factors associated with prostatic adenocarcinoma are the Gleason score, pathological T staging and serum prostatic-specific antigen (PSA) level. However, these prognostic factors alone are not sufficient for predicting prognostic characteristics, including early stage or advanced prostate cancer, presence of metastasis or disease-related mortality. The purpose of the present study was to simultaneously evaluate the prognostic value and associations of four biomarkers, namely, transcriptional regulator ERG (ERG), phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN), cysteine-rich secretory protein 3 (CRISP3) and serine protease inhibitor Kazal type I (SPINK1), and to conduct risk stratification of prostate cancer for use in patient management. A total of 68 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded, prostate cancer samples from radical prostatectomies were obtained in the Kyung Hee University Hospital (Seoul, Korea) and were studied immunohistochemically for ERG, PTEN, CRISP3 and SPINK1 to determine the proportion and intensity of staining. SPINK1 expression was mutually exclusive of ERG expression (P=0.001). The loss of PTEN and high CRISP3 expression are unfavorable indicators for prostate cancer, as PTEN loss was associated with shorter biochemical recurrence (BCR) (P=0.039), and high CRISP3 expression was associated with increased BCR (P<0.001) and cancer-related mortalities (P=0.011). Using the combination of low PTEN and high CRISP3 expression enables attention to be focused on patients who exhibit a poor prognosis. Subgrouping of patients, into high-risk and low-risk categories, was correlated with BCR-free survival in prostate cancer upon multivariate analysis (P=0.030). Overall, low PTEN and high CRISP3 expression significantly characterize the subgroups of prostate cancer that have a poor prognosis for BCR. PMID:27284364

  8. Identification and Validation of PTEN Complex, Associated Proteins

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    in [19]. PIP3 is the major substrate of PTEN. PTEN interacts and dephosphorylates the D3 hydroxyl subunit of PI-3,4,5-P (PIP3) to give PI-4,5-P [20...It is also capable of interacting and dephosphorylating other phosphoinositides, like PI-3-P, PI- 3,4-P2, Ins-1,3,4-P3, but with a lower affinity...membrane binding [26, 27]. Our group was the first to demonstrate that PTEN is modified by phosphorylation at the C-terminus by Casein Kinase-2

  9. Is patient size important in dose determination and optimization in cardiology?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reay, J.; Chapple, C. L.; Kotre, C. J.

    2003-12-01

    Patient dose determination and optimization have become more topical in recent years with the implementation of the Medical Exposures Directive into national legislation, the Ionising Radiation (Medical Exposure) Regulations. This legislation incorporates a requirement for new equipment to provide a means of displaying a measure of patient exposure and introduces the concept of diagnostic reference levels. It is normally assumed that patient dose is governed largely by patient size; however, in cardiology, where procedures are often very complex, the significance of patient size is less well understood. This study considers over 9000 cardiology procedures, undertaken throughout the north of England, and investigates the relationship between patient size and dose. It uses simple linear regression to calculate both correlation coefficients and significance levels for data sorted by both room and individual clinician for the four most common examinations, left ventrical and/or coronary angiography, single vessel stent insertion and single vessel angioplasty. This paper concludes that the correlation between patient size and dose is weak for the procedures considered. It also illustrates the use of an existing method for removing the effect of patient size from dose survey data. This allows typical doses and, therefore, reference levels to be defined for the purposes of dose optimization.

  10. 131 iodine gamma dose determination in the thyroid gland using two geometrical shapes: a comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betka, A.; Bentabet, A.; Azbouche, A.; Fenineche, N.; Adjiri, A.; Dib, A.

    2015-05-01

    In order to study the internal gamma dose, we used a Monte Carlo code ‘Penelope’ simulation with two geometrical models (cylindrical and spherical). The deposited energy was determined via the loss of energy calculated from the quantum theory for inelastic collisions based on the first-order (plane-wave) Born approximation for charged particles with individual atoms and molecules. Our results show that the cylindrical geometry is more suitable for carrying out such a study. Moreover, we developed an analytical expression for the 131 iodine gamma dose (the energy deposited per photon absorbed dose). This latter could be considered as an important tool for evaluating the gamma dose without going through stochastic models.

  11. Determination of effective doses in image-guided radiation therapy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyone, Y. Y.; Suriyapee, S.; Sanghangthum, T.; Oonsiri, S.; Tawonwong, T.

    2016-03-01

    The organ and effective doses in image-guided radiotherapy system are determined in this study. For 2D imaging, incident air kerma (Ki) was measured by 6cc ionization chamber with Accu-Pro dosimeter. The entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) was calculated by multiplying Ki with backscatter factor. The effective dose was calculated by multiplying ESAK with conversion coefficient. For 3D imaging, computed tomography/cone-beam dose index (CTDI/CBDI) measurements were performed by using 100mm pencil ionization chamber with Accu-Pro dosimeter. The dose index in air and in CTDI phantom from planning CT and cone- beam CT were measured. Then, effective dose was calculated by ImPACT software. The effective doses from 2D conventional simulator for anteroposterior and lateral projections were 01 and 0.02mSv for head, 0.15 and 0.16mSv for thorax, 0.22 and 0.21mSv for pelvis, respectively. The effective doses from 3D, planning CT and CBCT, were 3.3 and 0.1mSv for head, 13 and 2.4mSv for thorax and 7.2 and 4.9mSv for pelvis, respectively. Based on 30 fractions of treatment course, total effective dose (3D CT, 2D setup verification and 6 times CBCT) of head, thorax and pelvis were 3.93, 27.71 and 37.03mSv, respectively. Therefore, IGRT should be administered with significant parameters to reduce the dose.

  12. Carbetocin at elective Cesarean delivery: a randomized controlled trial to determine the effective dose.

    PubMed

    Cordovani, Daniel; Balki, Mrinalini; Farine, Dan; Seaward, Gareth; Carvalho, Jose C A

    2012-08-01

    The primary objective of our study was to determine the minimum intravenous dose of carbetocin required to produce adequate uterine contraction in 95% of women (effective dose [ED](95)) undergoing elective Cesarean delivery (CD). Eighty term pregnant women with low risk for postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) undergoing elective CD under spinal anesthesia were randomly allocated to receive carbetocin intravenously in doses of 80 μg, 90 μg, 100 μg, 110 μg, or 120 μg upon delivery. The consultant obstetrician evaluated the efficacy of the patient's uterine tone as satisfactory or unsatisfactory. In case of unsatisfactory uterine tone, additional uterotonics were administered as per routine institutional practice. Side effects were monitored during the study period. The main outcome measure was satisfactory uterine tone at two minutes after carbetocin administration. Satisfactory uterine tone was obtained in 70 subjects (87%) within the dose range of 80-120 μg of carbetocin. It was not possible to calculate the ED(95) of carbetocin due to the even distribution of women with satisfactory uterine tone across all dose groups (P = 0.99). Similarly, the side effects were similar across all dose groups. There was a high overall incidence of hypotension (55%) following the administration of carbetocin. In women at low risk for PPH undergoing elective CD, carbetocin doses of 80-120 μg are similarly effective. There is a high incidence of hypotension associated with carbetocin in these doses, and further studies with doses lower than 80 μg are warranted to assess the balance of efficacy and side effects. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01262742).

  13. Plasma Membrane Permeabilization by 60- and 600-ns Electric Pulses Is Determined by the Absorbed Dose

    PubMed Central

    Ibey, Bennett L.; Xiao, Shu; Schoenbach, Karl H.; Murphy, Michael R.; Pakhomov, Andrei G.

    2008-01-01

    We explored how the effect of plasma membrane permeabilization by nanosecond-duration electric pulses (nsEP) depends on the physical characteristics of exposure. The resting membrane resistance (Rm) and membrane potential (MP) were measured in cultured GH3 and CHO cells by conventional whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Intact cells were exposed to a single nsEP (60 or 600 ns duration, 0-22 kV/cm), followed by patch-clamp measurements after a 2-3 min delay. Consistent with earlier findings, nsEP caused long-lasting Rm decrease, accompanied by the loss of MP. The threshold for these effects was about 6 kV/cm for 60 ns pulses, and about 1 kV/cm for 600 ns pulses. Further analysis established that it was neither pulse duration nor the E-field amplitude per se, but the absorbed dose that determined the magnitude of the biological effect. In other words, exposure to nsEP at either pulse duration caused equal effects if the absorbed doses were equal. The threshold absorbed dose to produce plasma membrane effects in either GH3 or CHO cells at either pulse duration was found to be at or below 10 mJ/g. Despite being determined by the dose, the nsEP effect clearly is not thermal, as the maximum heating at the threshold dose is less than 0.01 °C. The use of the absorbed dose as a universal exposure metric may help to compare and quantify nsEP sensitivity of different cell types and of cells in different physiological conditions. The absorbed dose may also prove to be a more useful metric than the incident E-field in determining safety limits for high peak, lowaverage power EMF emissions. PMID:18839412

  14. A procedure to determine the planar integral spot dose values of proton pencil beam spots

    SciTech Connect

    Anand, Aman; Sahoo, Narayan; Zhu, X. Ronald; Sawakuchi, Gabriel O.; Poenisch, Falk; Amos, Richard A.; Ciangaru, George; Titt, Uwe; Suzuki, Kazumichi; Mohan, Radhe; Gillin, Michael T.

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: Planar integral spot dose (PISD) of proton pencil beam spots (PPBSs) is a required input parameter for beam modeling in some treatment planning systems used in proton therapy clinics. The measurement of PISD by using commercially available large area ionization chambers, like the PTW Bragg peak chamber (BPC), can have large uncertainties due to the size limitation of these chambers. This paper reports the results of our study of a novel method to determine PISD values from the measured lateral dose profiles and peak dose of the PPBS. Methods: The PISDs of 72.5, 89.6, 146.9, 181.1, and 221.8 MeV energy PPBSs were determined by area integration of their planar dose distributions at different depths in water. The lateral relative dose profiles of the PPBSs at selected depths were measured by using small volume ion chambers and were investigated for their angular anisotropies using Kodak XV films. The peak spot dose along the beam's central axis (D{sub 0}) was determined by placing a small volume ion chamber at the center of a broad field created by the superposition of spots at different locations. This method allows eliminating positioning uncertainties and the detector size effect that could occur when measuring it in single PPBS. The PISD was then calculated by integrating the measured lateral relative dose profiles for two different upper limits of integration and then multiplying it with corresponding D{sub 0}. The first limit of integration was set to radius of the BPC, namely 4.08 cm, giving PISD{sub RBPC}. The second limit was set to a value of the radial distance where the profile dose falls below 0.1% of the peak giving the PISD{sub full}. The calculated values of PISD{sub RBPC} obtained from area integration method were compared with the BPC measured values. Long tail dose correction factors (LTDCFs) were determined from the ratio of PISD{sub full}/PISD{sub RBPC} at different depths for PPBSs of different energies. Results: The spot profiles were

  15. Caffeine activates tumor suppressor PTEN in sarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Miwa, Shinji; Sugimoto, Naotoshi; Shirai, Toshiharu; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Nishida, Hideji; Ohnari, Issei; Takeuchi, Akihiko; Yachie, Akihiro; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki

    2011-08-01

    The tumor suppressor phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) is a negative regulator of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway. Akt activation exerts a strong anti-apoptotic effect and inhibits key pro-apoptotic proteins. We investigated the effect of caffeine in the prevention of tumor cell proliferation and induction of cell death. We found that caffeine induced increased intracellular cAMP levels, PTEN activation and Akt inactivation, which together prevented proliferation of human osteosarcoma cells (MG63) and fibrosarcoma cells (HT1080). PTEN knockdown by siRNA reduced the effects of caffeine on Akt inactivation in osteosarcoma cells. These results indicate that the tumor suppressor PTEN signaling pathway contributes to the growth-inhibitory effect of caffeine on sarcoma cells. Our data suggest that caffeine and other drugs that act on this pathway could have promising therapeutic effects in the treatment of sarcoma patients.

  16. Pharmacological dose of alpha-tocopherol induces cardiotoxicity in Wistar rats determined by echocardiography and histology

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The effect of pharmacological dose of alpha-tocopherol on heart health was determined in Wistar rats. Animals were randomly assigned to either C (control, n = 11) or E (alpha-tocopherol, n = 11) group. Animals received corn oil (C) or alpha-tocopherol dissolved in corn oil (250 mg alpha-tocopherol/[...

  17. Determination of the median lethal dose of botulinum serotype E in channel catfish fingerlings

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The median lethal dose of botulinum serotype E in 5.3-g channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus fingerlings was determined. Five tanks (five fish/tank) were assigned to each of the following treatment groups: 70, 50, 35, 25, or 15 pg of purified botulinum serotype E. Fish were injected intracoelomically...

  18. Absolute dose determination in high-energy electron beams: Comparison of IAEA dosimetry protocols

    PubMed Central

    Sathiyan, S.; Ravikumar, M.

    2008-01-01

    In this study, absorbed doses were measured and compared for high-energy electrons (6, 9, 12, 16, and 20 MeV) using International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Technical Reports Series No. 277 (TRS), TRS 381, and TRS 398 dosimetry protocols. Absolute dose measurements were carried out using FC65-G Farmer chamber and Nordic Association of Clinical Physicists (NACP) parallel plate chamber with DOSE1 electrometer in WP1-D water phantom for reference field size of 15 × 15 cm2 at 100 cm source-to-surface distance. The results show that the difference between TRS 398 and TRS 381 was about 0.24% to 1.3% depending upon the energy, and the maximum difference between TRS 398 and TRS 277 was 1.5%. The use of cylindrical chamber in electron beam gives the maximum dose difference between the TRS 398 and TRS 277 in the order of 1.4% for energies above 10 MeV (R50 > 4 g/cm2). It was observed that the accuracy of dose estimation was better with the protocols based on the water calibration procedures, as no conversion quantities are involved for conversion of dose from air to water. The cross-calibration procedure of parallel plate chamber with high-energy electron beams is recommended as it avoids pwall correction factor entering into the determination of kQ,Qo. PMID:19893700

  19. Conversion coefficients for determination of dispersed photon dose during radiotherapy: NRUrad input code for MCNP

    PubMed Central

    Krstic, D.; Nikezic, D.

    2017-01-01

    Radiotherapy is a common cancer treatment module, where a certain amount of dose will be delivered to the targeted organ. This is achieved usually by photons generated by linear accelerator units. However, radiation scattering within the patient’s body and the surrounding environment will lead to dose dispersion to healthy tissues which are not targets of the primary radiation. Determination of the dispersed dose would be important for assessing the risk and biological consequences in different organs or tissues. In the present work, the concept of conversion coefficient (F) of the dispersed dose was developed, in which F = (Dd/Dt), where Dd was the dispersed dose in a non-targeted tissue and Dt is the absorbed dose in the targeted tissue. To quantify Dd and Dt, a comprehensive model was developed using the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) package to simulate the linear accelerator head, the human phantom, the treatment couch and the radiotherapy treatment room. The present work also demonstrated the feasibility and power of parallel computing through the use of the Message Passing Interface (MPI) version of MCNP5. PMID:28362837

  20. Conversion coefficients for determination of dispersed photon dose during radiotherapy: NRUrad input code for MCNP.

    PubMed

    Shahmohammadi Beni, Mehrdad; Ng, C Y P; Krstic, D; Nikezic, D; Yu, K N

    2017-01-01

    Radiotherapy is a common cancer treatment module, where a certain amount of dose will be delivered to the targeted organ. This is achieved usually by photons generated by linear accelerator units. However, radiation scattering within the patient's body and the surrounding environment will lead to dose dispersion to healthy tissues which are not targets of the primary radiation. Determination of the dispersed dose would be important for assessing the risk and biological consequences in different organs or tissues. In the present work, the concept of conversion coefficient (F) of the dispersed dose was developed, in which F = (Dd/Dt), where Dd was the dispersed dose in a non-targeted tissue and Dt is the absorbed dose in the targeted tissue. To quantify Dd and Dt, a comprehensive model was developed using the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) package to simulate the linear accelerator head, the human phantom, the treatment couch and the radiotherapy treatment room. The present work also demonstrated the feasibility and power of parallel computing through the use of the Message Passing Interface (MPI) version of MCNP5.

  1. Carbetocin at elective Cesarean delivery: a sequential allocation trial to determine the minimum effective dose.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mubeen; Balki, Mrinalini; Ahmed, Iram; Farine, Dan; Seaward, Gareth; Carvalho, Jose C A

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the intravenous dose of carbetocin required to produce effective uterine contraction in 90% of females (ED90) undergoing elective Cesarean delivery (CD) under spinal anesthesia. We conducted a double-blind dose-finding study of carbetocin. Forty females undergoing elective CD received carbetocin intravenously upon delivery of the fetus. The dose of carbetocin for each patient was determined according to a biased-coin up-and-down sequential allocation scheme designed to cluster doses close to ED90. The initial dose was 10 μg, with increments/decrements of 5 μg. The anesthesiologist, obstetrician, and patient were blinded to the dose. The obstetrician assessed the uterine tone at one-minute intervals for five minutes after carbetocin administration. In case of unsatisfactory tone, additional uterotonics were administered. The primary outcome was requirement for additional intraoperative uterotonics. Secondary outcomes were postoperative requirement for additional uterotonics within 24 hr of delivery, estimated blood loss and side effects. The ED90 of carbetocin was 14.8 μg (95% confidence interval 13.7 to 15.8). Thirty-seven patients (92.5%) had adequate uterine tone with no requirement of additional intraoperative uterotonics. Two patients (5%) required postoperative uterotonics within 24 hr. The overall mean (SD) estimated blood loss was 786 (403) mL and the overall incidence of hypotension (decrease in systolic blood pressure ≥ 20% baseline) was 37.5%. Based on our study, the ED90 of carbetocin at elective CD is less than one-fifth the currently recommended dose of 100 μg. This study was registered at clinicaltrials.gov (NCT-01651130).

  2. Carbetocin at elective Cesarean delivery: a randomized controlled trial to determine the effective dose, part 2.

    PubMed

    Anandakrishnan, Suresh; Balki, Mrinalini; Farine, Dan; Seaward, Gareth; Carvalho, Jose C A

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the intravenous dose of carbetocin required to produce effective uterine contraction in 95% of women (ED95) undergoing elective Cesarean delivery under spinal anesthesia. One hundred and twenty term pregnant women at low risk for postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) undergoing elective Cesarean delivery under spinal anesthesia were randomly allocated to receive carbetocin in doses of 20, 40, 60, 80, or 100 μg iv upon delivery of the fetus. The obstetrician evaluated the efficacy of uterine tone as satisfactory or unsatisfactory, and in case of unsatisfactory tone, additional uterotonics were administered as per routine institutional practice. The primary outcome measure was satisfactory uterine tone at two minutes after carbetocin administration, and the secondary outcomes were the estimated blood loss, need for additional uterotonic agents within 24 hr, and side effects. Overall satisfactory uterine tone at two minutes was observed in 94.2% (113/120) of the women, and there was no difference across the different study groups. It was not possible to calculate the ED95 of carbetocin due to the even distribution of women with unsatisfactory uterine tone at two minutes across all dose groups (P = 0.60). Additional uterotonics within 24 hr were required in 13% (16/120) of the women. Side effects were similar across all dose groups, with an overall 42.5% incidence of hypotension following the administration of carbetocin. In women at low risk for PPH undergoing elective Cesarean delivery under spinal anesthesia, carbetocin is similarly effective in doses of 20-100 μg. There is a high incidence of hypotension associated with carbetocin in these doses. Further dose-finding studies are warranted, including doses lower than 20 μg. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01428817).

  3. Myeloid PTEN deficiency impairs tumor-immune surveillance via immune-checkpoint inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Kuttke, M.; Sahin, E.; Pisoni, J.; Percig, S.; Vogel, A.; Kraemmer, D.; Hanzl, L.; Brunner, J. S.; Paar, H.; Soukup, K.; Halfmann, A.; Dohnal, A. M.; Steiner, C. W.; Blüml, S.; Basilio, J.; Hochreiter, B.; Salzmann, M.; Hoesel, B.; Lametschwandtner, G.; Eferl, R.; Schmid, J. A.; Schabbauer, G.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tumor–host interaction is determined by constant immune surveillance, characterized by tumor infiltration of myeloid and lymphoid cells. A malfunctioning or diverted immune response promotes tumor growth and metastasis. Recent advances had been made, by treating of certain tumor types, such as melanoma, with T-cell checkpoint inhibitors. This highlights the importance of understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the crosstalk between tumors and their environment, in particular myeloid and lymphoid cells. Our aim was to study the contribution of the myeloid PI3K/PTEN-signaling pathway in the regulation of tumor-immune surveillance in murine models of cancer. We made use of conditional PTEN-deficient mice, which exhibit sustained activation of the PI3K-signaling axis in a variety of myeloid cell subsets such as macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs). In colitis-associated colon cancer (CAC), mice deficient in myeloid PTEN showed a markedly higher tumor burden and decreased survival. We attributed this observation to the increased presence of immune-modulatory conventional CD8α+ DCs in the spleen, whereas other relevant myeloid cell subsets were largely unaffected. Notably, we detected enhanced surface expression of PD-L1 and PD-L2 on these DCs. As a consequence, tumoricidal T-cell responses were hampered or redirected. Taken together, our findings indicated an unanticipated role for the PI3K/PTEN-signaling axis in the functional regulation of splenic antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Our data pointed at potential, indirect, tumoricidal effects of subclass-specific PI3K inhibitors, which are currently under clinical investigation for treatment of tumors, via myeloid cell activation. PMID:27622019

  4. Potential value of PTEN in predicting cetuximab response in colorectal cancer: An exploratory study

    PubMed Central

    Razis, Evangelia; Briasoulis, Evangelos; Vrettou, Eleni; Skarlos, Dimosthenis V; Papamichael, Dimitrios; Kostopoulos, Ioannis; Samantas, Epaminontas; Xanthakis, Ioannis; Bobos, Mattheos; Galanidi, Eleni; Bai, Maria; Gikonti, Ioanna; Koukouma, Alona; Kafiri, Georgia; Papakostas, Pavlos; Kalogeras, Konstantine T; Kosmidis, Paris; Fountzilas, George

    2008-01-01

    Background The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is over-expressed in 70–75% of colorectal adenocarcinomas (CRC). The anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody cetuximab has been approved for the treatment of metastatic CRC, however tumor response to cetuximab has not been found to be associated with EGFR over-expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC). The aim of this study was to explore EGFR and the downstream effector phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) as potential predictors of response to cetuximab. Methods CRC patients treated with cetuximab by the Hellenic Cooperative Oncology group, whose formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor tissue was available, were included. Tissue was tested for EGFR and PTEN by IHC and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Results Eighty-eight patients were identified and 72 were included based on the availability of tissue blocks with adequate material for analysis on them. All patients, except one, received cetuximab in combination with chemotherapy. Median follow-up was 53 months from diagnosis and 17 months from cetuximab initiation. At the time of the analysis 53% of the patients had died. Best response was complete response in one and partial response in 23 patients. In 16 patients disease stabilized. Lack of PTEN gene amplification was associated with more responses to cetuximab and longer time to progression (p = 0.042). Conclusion PTEN could be one of the molecular determinants of cetuximab response. Due to the heterogeneity of the population and the retrospective nature of the study, our results are hypothesis generating and should be approached with caution. Further prospective studies are needed to validate this finding. PMID:18700047

  5. AIF inhibits tumor metastasis by protecting PTEN from oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Shao-Ming; Guo, Meng; Xiong, Zhong; Yu, Yun; Zhao, Xu-Yun; Zhang, Fei-Fei; Chen, Guo-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) exerts dual roles on cell death and survival, but its substrates as a putative oxidoreductase and roles in tumorigenesis remain elusive. Here, we report that AIF physically interacts with and inhibits the oxidation of phosphatase and tensin homolog on chromosome ten (PTEN), a tumor suppressor susceptible for oxidation-mediated inactivation. More intriguingly, we also identify PTEN as a mitochondrial protein and the ectopic expression of mitochondrial targeting sequence-carrying PTEN almost completely inhibits Akt phosphorylation in PTEN-deficient cells. AIF knockdown causes oxidation-mediated inactivation of the lipid phosphatase activity of PTEN, with ensuing activation of Akt kinase, phosphorylation of the Akt substrate GSK-3β, and activation of β-catenin signaling in cancer cells. Through its effect on β-catenin signaling, AIF inhibits epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) and metastasis of cancer cells in vitro and in orthotopically implanted xenografts. Accordingly, the expression of AIF is correlated with the survival of human patients with cancers of multiple origins. These results identify PTEN as the substrate of AIF oxidoreductase and reveal a novel function for AIF in controlling tumor metastasis. PMID:26415504

  6. Molecular Analysis of AFP and HSA Interactions with PTEN Protein.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Mingyue; Lin, Bo; Zhou, Peng; Li, Mengsen

    2015-01-01

    Human cytoplasmic alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) has been classified as a member of the albuminoid gene family. The protein sequence of AFP has significant homology to that of human serum albumin (HSA), but its biological characteristics are vastly different from HSA. The AFP functions as a regulator in the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (AKT) pathway, but HSA plays a key role as a transport protein. To probe their molecular mechanisms, we have applied colocalization, coimmunoprecipitation (co-IP), and molecular docking approaches to analyze the differences between AFP and HSA. The data from colocalization and co-IP displayed a strong interaction between AFP and PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog), demonstrating that AFP did bind to PTEN, but HSA did not. The molecular docking study further showed that the AFP domains I and III could contact with PTEN. In silicon substitutions of AFP binding site residues at position 490M/K and 105L/R corresponding to residues K490 and R105 in HSA resulted in steric clashes with PTEN residues R150 and K46, respectively. These steric clashes may explain the reason why HSA cannot bind to PTEN. Ultimately, the experimental results and the molecular modeling data from the interactions of AFP and HSA with PTEN will help us to identify targets for designing drugs and vaccines against human hepatocellular carcinoma.

  7. A method to determine the planar dose distributions in patient undergone radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cilla, S.; Viola, P.; Augelli, B. G.; D'Onofrio, G.; Grimaldi, L.; Craus, M.; Digesù, C.; Deodato, F.; Macchia, G.; Morganti, A. G.; Fidanzio, A.; Azario, L.; Piermattei, A.

    2008-06-01

    A 2D-array equipped with 729 vented plane parallel ion-chambers has been calibrated as a portal dose detector for radiotherapy in vivo measurements. The array has been positioned by a radiographic film stand at 120 cm from the source orthogonal to the radiotherapy beam delivered with the gantry angle at 180°. The collision between the 2D-array and the patient's couch have been avoided. In this work, using the measurements of the portal detector, we present a method to reconstruct the dose variations in the patient treated with step and shoot intensity-modulated beams (IMRT) for head-neck tumours. For this treatment morphological changes often occur during the fractionated therapy. In a first step an in-house software supplied the comparison between the measured portal dose and the one computed by a commercial treatment planning system within the field of view of the computed tomography (CT) scanner. For each patient, the percentage Pγ of chambers, where the comparison is in agreement within a selected acceptance criteria, was determined 8 times. At the first radiotherapy fraction the γ-index analysis supplied Pγ values of about 95%, within acceptance criteria in terms of dose-difference, ΔD, and distance-agreement, Δd, that was equal to 5% and 4 mm, respectively. These acceptance criteria were taken into account for small errors in the patient's set-up reproducibility and for the accuracy of the portal dose calculated by the treatment planning system (TPS) in particular when the beam was attenuated by inhomogeneous tissues and the shape of the head-neck body contours were irregular. During the treatment, some patients showed a reduction of the Pγ below 90% because due to radiotherapy treatment there was a change of the patient's morphology. In a second step a method, based on dosimetric measurements that used standard phantoms, supplied the percentage dose variations in a coronal plane of the patient using the percentage dose variations measured by the 2D

  8. Comparison of challenge models for determining the colonization dose of Campylobacter jejuni in broiler chicks.

    PubMed

    Line, J; Hiett, K; Conlan, A

    2008-09-01

    Coprophagous activity is normal among broiler chickens. The purpose of this study was to compare an individually housed chick model (where bird-to-bird coprophagia was prevented) to a group-housed chick model (where bird-to-bird coprophagia was allowed) for determining estimates of the number of Campylobacter jejuni RM1221 necessary to colonize 50% of broiler chicks inoculated (colonization dose 50% or CD(50)). Campylobacter jejuni RM1221 was orally administered in measured doses to newly hatched chicks. The chicks were housed either individually in cages designed to minimize coprophagous activity or in isolation units containing groups of birds where coprophagia was allowed. The birds were killed and analyzed for Campylobacter in the ceca on d 7 postinoculation. The CD(50) was calculated, and results from the 2 models were compared. Elimination of transmission of Campylobacter, through coprophagia or other means, led to a more clear determination of the estimated CD(50) of about 524 cfu of C. jejuni RM1221 as demonstrated in the individually housed chick model. Bayesian inference based on the beta-Poisson statistical modeling procedures were found to be superior to standard single-hit dose-response modeling for estimation of the CD(50). This study demonstrated that the individual bird challenge model is superior to the group challenge model for trials designed to determine colonization dose.

  9. Dose-response relationship of temozolomide, determined by the Pig-a, comet, and micronucleus assay.

    PubMed

    Guérard, M; Johnson, G; Dertinger, S; Duran-Pacheco, G; Funk, J; Zeller, A

    2017-02-15

    Temozolomide (TMZ), a monofunctional alkylating agent, was selected as a model compound to determine its quantitative genotoxic dose-response relationship in different tissues (blood, liver, and jejunum) and endpoints [Pig-a-, comet-, and micronucleus assay (MNT)] in male rats. TMZ was administered p.o. over 5 consecutive days (day 1-5), followed by a treatment-free period of 50 days (day 6-56) and a final administration prior to necropsy (day 57-59). TMZ showed a dose-dependent increase in DNA damage in all interrogated endpoints. A statistically significant increase in Pig-a mutant phenotypes was observed on day 44 starting at 7.5 mg/kg/day for mutant reticulocytes (for RET(CD59-)) and at 3.75 mg/kg/day for mutant red blood cells (RBC(CD59-)), respectively. In addition, a statistically significant increase in cytogenetic damage, as measured by micronucleated reticulocytes, was observed starting at 3.75 mg/kg/day on day 3 and 1.5 mg/kg/day on day 59. DNA strand breaks, as detected by the comet assay, showed a dose-dependent and statistically significant increase in liver, blood, and jejunum starting at doses of 3.75, 3.75, and 7.5 mg/kg/day, respectively. The dose-response relationships of the Pig-a, MNT, and comet data were analyzed for possible points of departure (PoD) using the benchmark-dose (BMD) software PROAST with different critical effect sizes (CES) (BMD0.1, BMD0.5, BMD1, and BMD1SD). Overall, PoD values show a high concordance between different tissues and endpoints, underlining the suitability of this experimental design to explore quantitative dose-response relationships in a variety of different tissues and endpoints, while minimizing animal use.

  10. Chicken embryo lethality assay for determining the lethal dose and virulence of Enterococcus faecalis.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Ana E; Barz, Martin; Icken, Wiebke; Cavero, David; Sharifi, A Reza; Voss, Matthias; Preisinger, Rudolf; Buxadé, Carlos

    2017-10-01

    Enterococcus faecalis is the major pathogen found in field cases of amyloid arthropathy in chickens. Given the need for a better understanding of the virulence mechanisms of the causative strains, the embryo lethality assay (ELA) is proposed in the present study as a model to evaluate the virulence of E. faecalis strains, specifically the pathogenic avian strain K923/96, which was previously related with amyloid arthropathy. Hence, 0.2 ml of five doses of the cited strain (from 2.5 to 2500 colony-forming units (CFU) per ml) were inoculated into the allantoic cavity of 10-day-old embryos. The embryo mortality rate (EMR) was determined by daily candling of the eggs over a period of seven days and based on this information the median lethal dose (LD50) was calculated. The ELA was repeated four times on a sample of 3443 eggs. The infectious dose showed a significant effect on the EMR. The EMR with the doses of 2.5, 5, 25, 250 and 2500 CFU/ml was 43%, 45%, 63%, 90% and 93%, respectively. The estimated dose at LD50 was 6.6 CFU/ml. As expected, the higher the infectious dose, the greater the EMR and the lower the embryo survival time. The highest EMR was recorded after three and four days post-inoculation in all doses. In conclusion, these results can be used as a basis for further researches on the E. faecalis virulence. In order to corroborate its model capacity to predict the virulence of this bacterium, more ELAs with different E. faecalis strains are required.

  11. Determination of the efficiency of commercially available dose calibrators for beta-emitters.

    PubMed

    Valley, Jean-François; Bulling, Shelley; Leresche, Michel; Wastiel, Claude

    2003-03-01

    The goals of this investigation are to determine whether commercially available dose calibrators can be used to measure the activity of beta-emitting radionuclides used in pain palliation and to establish whether manufacturer-supplied calibration factors are appropriate for this purpose. Six types of commercially available dose calibrators were studied. Dose calibrator response was controlled for 5 gamma-emitters used for calibration or typically encountered in routine use. For the 4 most commonly used beta-emitters ((32)P, (90)Sr, (90)Y, and (169)Er) dose calibrator efficiency was determined in the syringe geometry used for clinical applications. Efficiency of the calibrators was also measured for (153)Sm and (186)Re, 2 beta-emitters with significant gamma-contributions. Source activities were traceable to national standards. All calibrators measured gamma-emitters with a precision of +/-10%, in compliance with Swiss regulatory requirements. For beta-emitters, dose calibrator intrinsic efficiency depends strongly on the maximal energy of the beta-spectrum and is notably low for (169)Er. Manufacturer-supplied calibration factors give accurate results for beta-emitters with maximal beta-energy in the middle-energy range (1 MeV) but are not appropriate for use with low-energy ((169)Er) or high-energy ((90)Y) beta-emitters. beta-emitters with significant gamma-contributions behave like gamma-emitters. Commercially available dose calibrators have an intrinsic efficiency that is sufficient for the measurement of beta-emitters, including beta-emitters with a low maximum beta-energy. Manufacturer-supplied calibration factors are reliable for gamma-emitters and beta-emitters in the middle-energy range. For low- and high-energy beta-emitters, the use of manufacturer-supplied calibration factors introduces significant measurement inaccuracy.

  12. Determination of threshold adverse effect doses of percutaneous VX exposure in African green monkeys.

    PubMed

    Genovese, Raymond F; Benton, Bernard J; Oubre, John L; Byers, Christopher E; Jakubowski, E Michael; Mioduszewski, Robert J; Settle, Timothy J; Steinbach, Thomas J

    2011-01-11

    Percutaneous exposure to the chemical warfare nerve agent VX was evaluated in African green monkeys (n=9). Doses of VX (7.5-100 μg/kg) were applied to the skin for 60 min and residual agent was quantified (before decontamination) to estimate the absorbed dose. Monkeys were evaluated for the presence or absence of clinical signs of toxicity and blood was sampled periodically (30 min--12 weeks) following exposure to measure the degree of circulating acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition. Monkeys were also evaluated for behavioral changes from VX exposure using a serial probe recognition (SPR) task. The lowest observable adverse effect level (LOAEL) for the production of major clinical signs was determined to be 42.22 μg/kg (absorbed dose estimate=17.36 μg/kg) and the LOAEL for AChE inhibition was 13.33 μg/kg (absorbed dose estimate=6.53 μg/kg). Behavioral performance was unaffected at doses that, while producing substantial AChE inhibition, did not produce clinical signs. VX represents a substantial threat as a contact hazard and these results complement previous studies using the percutaneous route of exposure with VX and extend the findings to a non-human primate species.

  13. Radiation dose determines the method for quantification of DNA double strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Bulat, Tanja; Keta, Otilija; Korićanac, Lela; Žakula, Jelena; Petrović, Ivan; Ristić-Fira, Aleksandra; Todorović, Danijela

    2016-03-01

    Ionizing radiation induces DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) that trigger phosphorylation of the histone protein H2AX (γH2AX). Immunofluorescent staining visualizes formation of γH2AX foci, allowing their quantification. This method, as opposed to Western blot assay and Flow cytometry, provides more accurate analysis, by showing exact position and intensity of fluorescent signal in each single cell. In practice there are problems in quantification of γH2AX. This paper is based on two issues: the determination of which technique should be applied concerning the radiation dose, and how to analyze fluorescent microscopy images obtained by different microscopes. HTB140 melanoma cells were exposed to γ-rays, in the dose range from 1 to 16 Gy. Radiation effects on the DNA level were analyzed at different time intervals after irradiation by Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence microscopy. Immunochemically stained cells were visualized with two types of microscopes: AxioVision (Zeiss, Germany) microscope, comprising an ApoTome software, and AxioImagerA1 microscope (Zeiss, Germany). Obtained results show that the level of γH2AX is time and dose dependent. Immunofluorescence microscopy provided better detection of DSBs for lower irradiation doses, while Western blot analysis was more reliable for higher irradiation doses. AxioVision microscope containing ApoTome software was more suitable for the detection of γH2AX foci.

  14. Redox Signaling via Oxidative Inactivation of PTEN Modulates Pressure-Dependent Myogenic Tone in Rat Middle Cerebral Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Gebremedhin, Debebe; Terashvili, Maia; Wickramasekera, Nadi; Zhang, David X.; Rau, Nicole; Miura, Hiroto; Harder, David R.

    2013-01-01

    The present study examined the level of generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and roles of inactivation of the phosphatase PTEN and the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway in response to an increase in intramural pressure-induced myogenic cerebral arterial constriction. Step increases in intraluminal pressure of cannulated cerebral arteries induced myogenic constriction and concomitant formation of superoxide (O2.−) and its dismutation product hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as determined by fluorescent HPLC analysis, microscopic analysis of intensity of dihydroethidium fluorescence and attenuation of pressure-induced myogenic constriction by pretreatment with the ROS scavenger 4,hydroxyl-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine1-oxyl (tempol) or Mito-tempol or MitoQ in the presence or absence of PEG-catalase. An increase in intraluminal pressure induced oxidation of PTEN and activation of Akt. Pharmacological inhibition of endogenous PTEN activity potentiated pressure-dependent myogenic constriction and caused a reduction in NPo of a 238 pS arterial KCa channel current and an increase in [Ca2+]i level in freshly isolated cerebral arterial muscle cells (CAMCs), responses that were attenuated by Inhibition of the PI3K/Akt pathway. These findings demonstrate an increase in intraluminal pressure induced increase in ROS production triggered redox-sensitive signaling mechanism emanating from the cross-talk between oxidative inactivation of PTEN and activation of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway that involves in the regulation of pressure-dependent myogenic cerebral arterial constriction. PMID:23861911

  15. Fibronectin induction abrogates the BRAF inhibitor response of BRAF V600E/PTEN-null melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Fedorenko, I V; Abel, E V; Koomen, J M; Fang, B; Wood, E R; Chen, Y A; Fisher, K J; Iyengar, S; Dahlman, K B; Wargo, J A; Flaherty, K T; Sosman, J A; Sondak, V K; Messina, J L; Gibney, G T; Smalley, K S M

    2016-03-10

    The mechanisms by which some melanoma cells adapt to Serine/threonine-protein kinase B-Raf (BRAF) inhibitor therapy are incompletely understood. In the present study, we used mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomics to determine how BRAF inhibition remodeled the signaling network of melanoma cell lines that were BRAF mutant and PTEN null. Short-term BRAF inhibition was associated with marked changes in fibronectin-based adhesion signaling that were PTEN dependent. These effects were recapitulated through BRAF siRNA knockdown and following treatment with chemotherapeutic drugs. Increased fibronectin expression was also observed in mouse xenograft models as well as specimens from melanoma patients undergoing BRAF inhibitor treatment. Analysis of a melanoma tissue microarray showed loss of PTEN expression to predict for a lower overall survival, with a trend for even lower survival being seen when loss of fibronectin was included in the analysis. Mechanistically, the induction of fibronectin limited the responses of these PTEN-null melanoma cell lines to vemurafenib, with enhanced cytotoxicity observed following the knockdown of either fibronectin or its receptor α5β1 integrin. This in turn abrogated the cytotoxic response to BRAF inhibition via increased AKT signaling, which prevented the induction of cell death by maintaining the expression of the pro-survival protein Mcl-1. The protection conveyed by the induction of FN expression could be overcome through combined treatment with a BRAF and PI3K inhibitor.

  16. Fibronectin induction abrogates the BRAF inhibitor response of BRAF V600E/PTEN-null melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Fedorenko, Inna V.; Abel, Ethan V.; Koomen, John M.; Fang, Bin; Wood, Elizabeth R.; Chen, Y. Ann; Fisher, Kate J.; Iyengar, Sanjana; Dahlman, Kimberly B.; Wargo, Jennifer A.; Flaherty, Keith T.; Sosman, Jeffrey A.; Sondak, Vernon K.; Messina, Jane L.; Gibney, Geoffrey T.; Smalley, Keiran S.M.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms by which some melanoma cells adapt to BRAF inhibitor therapy are incompletely understood. In the present study, we used mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomics to determine how BRAF inhibition remodeled the signaling network of melanoma cell lines that were BRAF-mutant and PTEN-null. Short-term BRAF inhibition was associated with marked changes in fibronectin-based adhesion signaling that were PTEN-dependent. These effects were recapitulated through BRAF siRNA knockdown and following treatment with chemotherapeutic drugs. Increased fibronectin expression was also observed in mouse xenograft models as well as specimens from melanoma patients undergoing BRAF inhibitor treatment. Analysis of a melanoma TMA showed loss of PTEN expression to predict for a lower overall survival, with a trend for even lower survival being seen when loss of fibronectin was included in the analysis. Mechanistically, the induction of fibronectin limited the responses of these PTEN-null melanoma cell lines to vemurafenib, with enhanced cytotoxicity observed following the knockdown of either fibronectin or its receptor α5β1 integrin. This in turn abrogated the cytotoxic response to BRAF inhibition via increased AKT signaling, which prevented the induction of cell death by maintaining the expression of the pro-survival protein Mcl-1. The protection conveyed by the induction of fibronectin expression could be overcome through combined treatment with a BRAF and PI3K inhibitor. PMID:26073081

  17. DNMT1-mediated PTEN hypermethylation confers hepatic stellate cell activation and liver fibrogenesis in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Bian, Er-Bao; Huang, Cheng; Ma, Tao-Tao; Tao, Hui; Zhang, Hui; Cheng, Chang; Lv, Xiong-Wen; Li, Jun

    2012-10-01

    Hepatic stellate cell (HSC) activation is an essential event during liver fibrogenesis. Phosphatase and tension homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN), a tumor suppressor, is a negative regulator of this process. PTEN promoter hypermethylation is a major epigenetic silencing mechanism in tumors. The present study aimed to investigate whether PTEN promoter methylation was involved in HSC activation and liver fibrosis. Treatment of activated HSCs with the DNA methylation inhibitor 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (5-azadC) decreased aberrant hypermethylation of the PTEN gene promoter and prevented the loss of PTEN expression that occurred during HSC activation. Silencing DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) gene also decreased the PTEN gene promoter methylation and upregulated the PTEN gene expression in activated HSC-T6 cells. In addition, knockdown of DNMT1 inhibited the activation of both ERK and AKT pathways in HSC-T6 cells. These results suggest that DNMT1-mediated PTEN hypermethylation caused the loss of PTEN expression, followed by the activation of the PI3K/AKT and ERK pathways, resulting in HSC activation. Highlights: ► PTEN methylation status and loss of PTEN expression ► DNMT1 mediated PTEN hypermethylation. ► Hypermethylation of PTEN contributes to the activation of ERK and AKT pathways.

  18. PTEN inhibits PREX2-catalyzed activation of RAC1 to restrain tumor cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Mense, Sarah M; Barrows, Douglas; Hodakoski, Cindy; Steinbach, Nicole; Schoenfeld, David; Su, William; Hopkins, Benjamin D; Su, Tao; Fine, Barry; Hibshoosh, Hanina; Parsons, Ramon

    2015-03-31

    The tumor suppressor PTEN restrains cell migration and invasion by a mechanism that is independent of inhibition of the PI3K pathway and decreased activation of the kinase AKT. PREX2, a widely distributed GEF that activates the GTPase RAC1, binds to and inhibits PTEN. We used mouse embryonic fibroblasts and breast cancer cell lines to show that PTEN suppresses cell migration and invasion by blocking PREX2 activity. In addition to metabolizing the phosphoinositide PIP₃, PTEN inhibited PREX2-induced invasion by a mechanism that required the tail domain of PTEN, but not its lipid phosphatase activity. Fluorescent nucleotide exchange assays revealed that PTEN inhibited the GEF activity of PREX2 toward RAC1. PREX2 is a frequently mutated GEF in cancer, and examination of human tumor data showed that PREX2 mutation was associated with high PTEN expression. Therefore, we tested whether cancer-derived somatic PREX2 mutants, which accelerate tumor formation of immortalized melanocytes, were inhibited by PTEN. The three stably expressed, somatic PREX2 cancer mutants that we tested were resistant to PTEN-mediated inhibition of invasion but retained the ability to inhibit the lipid phosphatase activity of PTEN. In vitro analysis showed that PTEN did not block the GEF activity of two PREX2 cancer mutants and had a reduced binding affinity for the third. Thus, PTEN antagonized migration and invasion by restraining PREX2 GEF activity, and PREX2 mutants are likely selected in cancer to escape PTEN-mediated inhibition of invasion.

  19. Absorbed dose determination in kilovoltage X-ray synchrotron radiation using alanine dosimeters.

    PubMed

    Butler, D J; Lye, J E; Wright, T E; Crossley, D; Sharpe, P H G; Stevenson, A W; Livingstone, J; Crosbie, J C

    2016-12-01

    Alanine dosimeters from the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) in the UK were irradiated using kilovoltage synchrotron radiation at the imaging and medical beam line (IMBL) at the Australian Synchrotron. A 20 × 20 mm(2) area was irradiated by scanning the phantom containing the alanine through the 1 mm × 20 mm beam at a constant velocity. The polychromatic beam had an average energy of 95 keV and nominal absorbed dose to water rate of 250 Gy/s. The absorbed dose to water in the solid water phantom was first determined using a PTW Model 31014 PinPoint ionization chamber traceable to a graphite calorimeter. The alanine was read out at NPL using correction factors determined for (60)Co, traceable to NPL standards, and a published energy correction was applied to correct for the effect of the synchrotron beam quality. The ratio of the doses determined by alanine at NPL and those determined at the synchrotron was 0.975 (standard uncertainty 0.042) when alanine energy correction factors published by Waldeland et al. (Waldeland E, Hole E O, Sagstuen E and Malinen E, Med. Phys. 2010, 37, 3569) were used, and 0.996 (standard uncertainty 0.031) when factors by Anton et al. (Anton M, Büermann L., Phys Med Biol. 2015 60 6113-29) were used. The results provide additional verification of the IMBL dosimetry.

  20. Determination of hydroxyl radical production in aqueous solutions irradiated to clinically significant doses

    SciTech Connect

    Sagone, A.L. Jr.; Democko, C.; Clark, L.; Kartha, M.

    1983-02-01

    Decarboxylation of /sup 14/C-carboxylbenzoic acid in aqueous solutions after low-dose irradiation has been used to determine the relative magnitude of oxidation reactions and estimate the hydroxyl radicals produced. The G CO/sub 2/ values determined from these measurements of 0.4 to 1.0 mM solutions of benzoic acid after x-ray doses of 1000 rads ranged from 0.72 to 0.77, in excellent agreement with values reported by authors using much higher doses of radiation. Superoxide dismutase and catalase, known scavengers of superoxide and hydrogen peroxide, respectively, did not show impairment of the oxidation of benzoic acid. On the other hand, biologically significant concentrations of phenol and mannitol appear to impair the radiation-induced oxidation of benzoic acid, indicating that the process is secondary to a reaction with OH . . We found that serum and glucose, common cell media contents, are potent OH . scavengers. These observations indicate that the oxidation of benzoic acid can be as a reliable method to estimate OH . with radiation doses of clinically significant magnitudes. In addition, these results suggest that the radiation induced by OH . in cell systems can be significantly modified by the type of buffer used.

  1. Determination of key radionuclides and parameters related to dose from the Columbia River pathway. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, B.A.

    1993-03-01

    A series of scoping calculations has been undertaken to evaluate the absolute and relative contributions of different radionuclides and exposure pathways to doses that may have been received by individuals living in the vicinity of the Hanford Site. These scoping calculations may include some radionuclides and pathways that were included in the Phase 1 Columbia River pathway dose evaluations, as well as other potential exposure pathways being evaluated for possible inclusion in future Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project (HEDR) modeling efforts. This scoping calculation (Calculation 009) examines the contributions of numerous radionuclides to dose via environmental exposures and accumulation in water, fish, and other aquatic biota. Addressed in these calculations are the contributions to effective dose from (1) external exposure to contaminated river water, ( 2) ingestion of contaminated drinking water, and (3) ingestion of contaminated resident Columbia River fish. Additional information on contamination of anadromous fish and waterfowl is provided.

  2. Interaction of the androgen receptor, ETV1 and PTEN pathways in mouse prostate varies with pathological stage and predicts cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Jake; Brogley, Michele; Palanisamy, Nallasivam; Mehra, Rohit; Ittmann, Michael M.; Li, Jun Z.; Tomlins, Scott A.; Robins, Diane M.

    2015-01-01

    To examine the impact of common somatic mutations in prostate cancer (PCa) on androgen receptor (AR) signaling, mouse models were designed to perturb sequentially the AR, ETV1 and PTEN pathways. Mice with "humanized" AR (hAR) alleles that modified AR transcriptional strength by varying polyglutamine tract (Q-tract) length were crossed with mice expressing a prostate-specific, AR-responsive ETV1 transgene (ETV1Tg). While hAR allele did not grossly affect ETV1-induced neoplasia, ETV1 strongly antagonized global AR regulation and repressed critical androgen-induced differentiation and tumor suppressor genes, such as Nkx3-1 and Hoxb13. When Pten was varied to determine its impact on disease progression, mice lacking one Pten allele (Pten+/−) developed more frequent prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN). Yet only those with the ETV1 transgene progressed to invasive adenocarcinoma. Furthermore, progression was more frequent with the short Q-tract (stronger) AR, suggesting that the AR, ETV1 and PTEN pathways cooperate in aggressive disease. On the Pten+/− background, ETV1 had markedly less effect on AR target genes. However, a strong inflammatory gene expression signature, notably upregulation of Cxcl16, was induced by ETV1. Comparison of mouse and human patient data stratified by presence of ETS fusion genes highlighted additional factors, some not previously associated with prostate cancer but for which targeted therapies are in development for other diseases. In sum, concerted use of these mouse models illuminates the complex interplay of AR, ETV1 and PTEN pathways in pre-cancerous neoplasia and early tumorigenesis, disease stages difficult to analyze in man. PMID:25631336

  3. Carbetocin at Cesarean delivery for labour arrest: a sequential allocation trial to determine the effective dose.

    PubMed

    Nguyen-Lu, Nhathien; Carvalho, Jose Carlos Almeida; Farine, Dan; Seaward, Gareth; Ye, Xiang Y; Balki, Mrinalini

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the effective dose 90% (ED90) of carbetocin to provide adequate uterine tone at Cesarean delivery (CD) for labour arrest. We conducted a double-blind dose-finding study of carbetocin using a biased-coin up-and-down design in women undergoing CD for labour arrest under epidural anesthesia. Forty healthy term pregnant women who had received at least three hours of oxytocin infusion during labour were recruited for the study. Carbetocin was administered intravenously upon delivery of the anterior shoulder of the fetus. The first patient received 20 µg, and the dose for the subsequent patient was determined according to the response of the previous patient as per the biased-coin allocation scheme using increments or decrements of 20 µg (maximum 140 µg). Uterine tone was assessed by the obstetrician and rated as satisfactory or unsatisfactory throughout the intraoperative period. The primary outcome was satisfactory uterine tone with no need for additional uterotonic drugs intraoperatively. Secondary outcomes included use of additional uterotonic drugs postoperatively in the first 24 hr, estimated blood loss, and adverse effects. The ED90 of carbetocin to produce adequate uterine tone was estimated at 121 µg (95% confidence interval [CI]: 111 to 130; 99% CI: 108 to 133) using the truncated Dixon and Mood (DM) method. The isotonic estimator of ED90 was 140 µg; however, the observed response rate across all doses was < 90%. Also, the 95% CI of the DM estimator is likely to have lower than expected coverage, while the 99% CI may have about 90% coverage. Therefore, these results should be interpreted with caution. The overall median (range) estimated blood loss was 1,014 (104-2,436) mL. The overall incidence of hypotension and tachycardia were 45% and 57.5%, respectively. At a dose of 140 µg, the incidence of tachycardia and intraoperative arrhythmias was 76% and 14%, respectively. The ED90 of carbetocin at CD for labour

  4. Lifetime Cancer Risks in Individuals with Germline PTEN Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Min-Han; Mester, Jessica L.; Ngeow, Joanne; Rybicki, Lisa A.; Orloff, Mohammed S.; Eng, Charis

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Age-adjusted cancer incidence and age-related penetrance studies have helped guide cancer risk assessment and management. PTEN Hamartoma-Tumor Syndrome (PHTS) is a term encompassing subsets of several clinical syndromes with germline mutations in the PTEN tumor suppressor gene. We conducted the first prospective study to clarify corresponding cancer risks to shed biological insights on human germline PTEN mutations, and to better inform current surveillance recommendations based on expert opinion. Methods A series of 3,399 individuals meeting relaxed International Cowden Consortium PHTS criteria were prospectively recruited; 368 individuals were found to have deleterious germline PTEN mutations. Age-adjusted standardized incidence ratio (SIR) calculations and genotype-phenotype analyses were performed. Results Elevated SIRs were found for carcinomas of the breast (25.4, 95%C.I. 19.8-32.0), thyroid (51.1, 38.1-67.1), endometrium (42.9, 28.1-62.8), colorectum (10.3, 5.6-17.4), and kidney (30.6, 17.8-49.4), and melanoma (8.5, 4.1–15.6). Estimated lifetime risks were, respectively, 85.2% (95%C.I. 71.4%-99.1%), 35.2% (19.7%-50.7%), 28.2% (17.1%-39.3%), 9.0% (3.8-%14.1%), 33.6% (10.4%–56.9%) and 6% (1.6%-9.4%). Promoter mutations were associated with breast cancer, while colorectal cancer was associated with nonsense mutations. Conclusion Lifetime risks for a variety of cancers, now extending to colorectal cancer, kidney cancer and melanoma, are increased in patients with PTEN mutations. The genotype-phenotype associations here may provide new insights on PTEN structure and function. We propose a comprehensive approach to surveillance of patients with PTEN mutations. PMID:22252256

  5. Determination of the implantation dose in silicon wafers by X-ray fluorescence analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Klockenkaemper, R.; Becker, M.; Bubert, H.; Burba, P. ); Palmetshofer, L. )

    1990-08-01

    The ion dose implanted in silicon wafers was determined by X-ray fluorescence analysis after the implantation process. As only near-surface layers below 1-{mu}m thickness were considered, the calibration could be carried out with external standards consisting of thin films of doped gelatine spread on pure wafers. Dose values for Cr and Co were determined between 4 {times} 10{sup 15} and 2 {times} 10{sup 17} atoms/cm{sup 2}, the detection limits being about 3 {times} 10{sup 14} atoms/cm{sup 2}. The results are precise and accurate apart from a residual scatter of less than 7%. This was confirmed by flame atomic absorption spectrometry after volatilization of the silicon matrix as SiF{sub 4}. It was found that ion-current measurements carried out during the implantation process can have considerable systematic errors.

  6. Dose-Dependent Mutation Rates Determine Optimum Erlotinib Dosing Strategies for EGFR Mutant Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lin L.; Li, Fei; Pao, William; Michor, Franziska

    2015-01-01

    Background The advent of targeted therapy for cancer treatment has brought about a paradigm shift in the clinical management of human malignancies. Agents such as erlotinib used for EGFR-mutant non-small cell lung cancer or imatinib for chronic myeloid leukemia, for instance, lead to rapid tumor responses. Unfortunately, however, resistance often emerges and renders these agents ineffective after a variable amount of time. The FDA-approved dosing schedules for these drugs were not designed to optimally prevent the emergence of resistance. To this end, we have previously utilized evolutionary mathematical modeling of treatment responses to elucidate the dosing schedules best able to prevent or delay the onset of resistance. Here we expand on our approaches by taking into account dose-dependent mutation rates at which resistant cells emerge. The relationship between the serum drug concentration and the rate at which resistance mutations arise can lead to non-intuitive results about the best dose administration strategies to prevent or delay the emergence of resistance. Methods We used mathematical modeling, available clinical trial data, and different considerations of the relationship between mutation rate and drug concentration to predict the effectiveness of different dosing strategies. Results We designed several distinct measures to interrogate the effects of different treatment dosing strategies and found that a low-dose continuous strategy coupled with high-dose pulses leads to the maximal delay until clinically observable resistance. Furthermore, the response to treatment is robust against different assumptions of the mutation rate as a function of drug concentration. Conclusions For new and existing targeted drugs, our methodology can be employed to compare the effectiveness of different dose administration schedules and investigate the influence of changing mutation rates on outcomes. PMID:26536620

  7. Neutron activation analysis for reference determination of the implantation dose of cobalt ions

    SciTech Connect

    Garten, R.P.H.; Bubert, H.; Palmetshofer, L.

    1992-05-15

    The authors prepared depth profilling reference materials by cobalt ion implantation at an ion energy of 300 keV into n-type silicon. The implanted Co dose was then determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) giving an analytical dynamic range of almost 5 decades and uncertainty of 1.5%. This form of analysis allows sources of error (beam spreading, misalignment) to be corrected. 70 refs., 3 tabs.

  8. Determination of minimal erythema dose and anomalous reactions to UVA radiation by skin phototype.

    PubMed

    Pérez Ferriols, A; Aguilera, J; Aguilera, P; de Argila, D; Barnadas, M A; de Cabo, X; Carrrascosa, J M; de Gálvez Aranda, M V; Gardeazábal, J; Giménez-Arnau, A; Lecha, M; Lorente, J; Martínez-Lozano, J A; Rodríguez Granados, M T; Sola, Y; Utrillas, M P

    2014-10-01

    Phototesting is a technique that assesses the skin's sensitivity to UV radiation by determining the smallest dose of radiation capable of inducing erythema (minimal erythema dose [MED]) and anomalous responses to UV-A radiation. No phototesting protocol guidelines have been published to date. This was a multicenter prospective cohort study in which 232 healthy volunteers were recruited at 9 hospitals. Phototests were carried out with solar simulators or fluorescent broadband UV-B lamps. Each individual received a total of 5 or 6 incremental doses of erythemal radiation and 4 doses of UV-A radiation. The results were read at 24hours. At hospitals where solar simulators were used, the mean (SD) MED values were 23 (8), 28 (4), 35 (4), and 51 (6) mJ/cm(2) for skin phototypes i to iv, respectively. At hospitals where broadband UV-B lamps were used, these values were 28 (5), 32 (3), and 34 (5) mJ/cm(2) for phototypes ii to iv, respectively. MED values lower than 7, 19, 27, and 38 mJ/cm(2) obtained with solar simulators were considered to indicate a pathologic response for phototypes I to IV, respectively. MED values lower than 18, 24, and 24mJ/cm(2) obtained with broadband UV-B lamps were considered to indicate a pathologic response for phototypes ii to iv, respectively. No anomalous responses were observed at UV-A radiation doses of up to 20J/cm(2). Results were homogeneous across centers, making it possible to standardize diagnostic phototesting for the various skin phototypes and establish threshold doses that define anomalous responses to UV radiation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y AEDV. All rights reserved.

  9. PTEN regulates EG5 to control spindle architecture and chromosome congression during mitosis

    PubMed Central

    He, Jinxue; Zhang, Zhong; Ouyang, Meng; Yang, Fan; Hao, Hongbo; Lamb, Kristy L.; Yang, Jingyi; Yin, Yuxin; Shen, Wen H.

    2016-01-01

    Architectural integrity of the mitotic spindle is required for efficient chromosome congression and accurate chromosome segregation to ensure mitotic fidelity. Tumour suppressor PTEN has multiple functions in maintaining genome stability. Here we report an essential role of PTEN in mitosis through regulation of the mitotic kinesin motor EG5 for proper spindle architecture and chromosome congression. PTEN depletion results in chromosome misalignment in metaphase, often leading to catastrophic mitotic failure. In addition, metaphase cells lacking PTEN exhibit defects of spindle geometry, manifested prominently by shorter spindles. PTEN is associated and co-localized with EG5 during mitosis. PTEN deficiency induces aberrant EG5 phosphorylation and abrogates EG5 recruitment to the mitotic spindle apparatus, leading to spindle disorganization. These data demonstrate the functional interplay between PTEN and EG5 in controlling mitotic spindle structure and chromosome behaviour during mitosis. We propose that PTEN functions to equilibrate mitotic phosphorylation for proper spindle formation and faithful genomic transmission. PMID:27492783

  10. Impact of photon cross section uncertainties on Monte Carlo-determined depth-dose distributions.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, E; David, M; deAlmeida, C E; Bernal, M A

    2016-09-01

    This work studies the impact of systematic uncertainties associated to interaction cross sections on depth dose curves determined by Monte Carlo simulations. The corresponding sensitivity factors are quantified by changing cross sections by a given amount and determining the variation in the dose. The influence of total and partial photon cross sections is addressed. Partial cross sections for Compton and Rayleigh scattering, photo-electric effect, and pair production have been accounted for. The PENELOPE code was used in all simulations. It was found that photon cross section sensitivity factors depend on depth. In addition, they are positive and negative for depths below and above an equilibrium depth, respectively. At this depth, sensitivity factors are null. The equilibrium depths found in this work agree very well with the mean free path of the corresponding incident photon energy. Using the sensitivity factors reported here, it is possible to estimate the impact of photon cross section uncertainties on the uncertainty of Monte Carlo-determined depth dose curves. Copyright © 2016 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. An absolute dose determination of helical tomotherapy accelerator, TomoTherapy High-Art II.

    PubMed

    Bailat, Claude J; Buchillier, Thierry; Pachoud, Marc; Moeckli, Raphaël; Bochud, François O

    2009-09-01

    A helical tomotherapy accelerator presents a dosimetric challenge because, to this day, there is no internationally accepted protocol for the determination of the absolute dose. Because of this reality, we investigated the different alternatives for characterizing and measuring the absolute dose of such an accelerator. We tested several dosimetric techniques with various metrological traceabilities as well as using a number of phantoms in static and helical modes. Firstly, the relationship between the reading of ionization chambers and the absorbed dose is dependent on the beam quality value of the photon beam. For high energy photons, the beam quality is specified by the tissue phantom ratio (TPR20,10) and it is therefore necessary to know the TPR20,10 to calculate the dose delivered by a given accelerator. This parameter is obtained through the ratio of the absorbed dose at 20 and 10 cm depths in water and was measured in the particular conditions of the tomotherapy accelerator. Afterward, measurements were performed using the ionization chamber (model A1SL) delivered as a reference instrument by the vendor. This chamber is traceable in absorbed dose to water in a Co-60 beam to a water calorimeter of the American metrology institute (NIST). Similarly, in Switzerland, each radiotherapy department is directly traceable to the Swiss metrology institute (METAS) in absorbed dose to water based on a water calorimeter. For our research, this traceability was obtained by using an ionization chamber traceable to METAS (model NE 2611A), which is the secondary standard of our institute. Furthermore, in order to have another fully independent measurement method, we determined the dose using alanine dosimeters provided by and traceable to the British metrology institute (NPL); they are calibrated in absorbed dose to water using a graphite calorimeter. And finally, we wanted to take into account the type of chamber routinely used in clinical practice and therefore measured the

  12. An absolute dose determination of helical tomotherapy accelerator, TomoTherapy High-Art II

    SciTech Connect

    Bailat, Claude J.; Buchillier, Thierry; Pachoud, Marc; Moeckli, Raphaeel; Bochud, Francois O.

    2009-09-15

    Purpose: A helical tomotherapy accelerator presents a dosimetric challenge because, to this day, there is no internationally accepted protocol for the determination of the absolute dose. Because of this reality, we investigated the different alternatives for characterizing and measuring the absolute dose of such an accelerator. We tested several dosimetric techniques with various metrological traceabilities as well as using a number of phantoms in static and helical modes. Methods: Firstly, the relationship between the reading of ionization chambers and the absorbed dose is dependent on the beam quality value of the photon beam. For high energy photons, the beam quality is specified by the tissue phantom ratio (TPR{sub 20,10}) and it is therefore necessary to know the TPR{sub 20,10} to calculate the dose delivered by a given accelerator. This parameter is obtained through the ratio of the absorbed dose at 20 and 10 cm depths in water and was measured in the particular conditions of the tomotherapy accelerator. Afterward, measurements were performed using the ionization chamber (model A1SL) delivered as a reference instrument by the vendor. This chamber is traceable in absorbed dose to water in a Co-60 beam to a water calorimeter of the American metrology institute (NIST). Similarly, in Switzerland, each radiotherapy department is directly traceable to the Swiss metrology institute (METAS) in absorbed dose to water based on a water calorimeter. For our research, this traceability was obtained by using an ionization chamber traceable to METAS (model NE 2611A), which is the secondary standard of our institute. Furthermore, in order to have another fully independent measurement method, we determined the dose using alanine dosimeters provided by and traceable to the British metrology institute (NPL); they are calibrated in absorbed dose to water using a graphite calorimeter. And finally, we wanted to take into account the type of chamber routinely used in clinical

  13. SU-E-T-91: Correction Method to Determine Surface Dose for OSL Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, T; Higgins, P

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: OSL detectors are commonly used in clinic due to their numerous advantages, such as linear response, negligible energy, angle and temperature dependence in clinical range, for verification of the doses beyond the dmax. Although, due to the bulky shielding envelope, this type of detectors fails to measure skin dose, which is an important assessment of patient ability to finish the treatment on time and possibility of acute side effects. This study aims to optimize the methodology of determination of skin dose for conventional accelerators and a flattening filter free Tomotherapy. Methods: Measurements were done for x-ray beams: 6 MV (Varian Clinac 2300, 10×10 cm{sup 2} open field, SSD = 100 cm) and for 5.5 MV (Tomotherapy, 15×40 cm{sup 2} field, SAD = 85 cm). The detectors were placed at the surface of the solid water phantom and at the reference depth (dref=1.7cm (Varian 2300), dref =1.0 cm (Tomotherapy)). The measurements for OSLs were related to the externally exposed OSLs measurements, and further were corrected to surface dose using an extrapolation method indexed to the baseline Attix ion chamber measurements. A consistent use of the extrapolation method involved: 1) irradiation of three OSLs stacked on top of each other on the surface of the phantom; 2) measurement of the relative dose value for each layer; and, 3) extrapolation of these values to zero thickness. Results: OSL measurements showed an overestimation of surface doses by the factor 2.31 for Varian 2300 and 2.65 for Tomotherapy. The relationships: SD{sup 2300} = 0.68 × M{sup 2300}-12.7 and SDτoμo = 0.73 × Mτoμo-13.1 were found to correct the single OSL measurements to surface doses in agreement with Attix measurements to within 0.1% for both machines. Conclusion: This work provides simple empirical relationships for surface dose measurements using single OSL detectors.

  14. Validation of OSLD and a treatment planning system for surface dose determination in IMRT treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuang, Audrey H.; Olch, Arthur J.

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of skin dose determination for composite multibeam 3D conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatments using optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters (OSLDs) and Eclipse treatment planning system. Methods: Surface doses measured by OSLDs in the buildup region for open field 6 MV beams, either perpendicular or oblique to the surface, were evaluated by comparing against dose measured by Markus Parallel Plate (PP) chamber, surface diodes, and calculated by Monte Carlo simulations. The accuracy of percent depth dose (PDD) calculation in the buildup region from the authors’ Eclipse system (Version 10), which was precisely commissioned in the buildup region and was used with 1 mm calculation grid, was also evaluated by comparing to PP chamber measurements and Monte Carlo simulations. Finally, an anthropomorphic pelvic phantom was CT scanned with OSLDs in place at three locations. A planning target volume (PTV) was defined that extended close to the surface. Both an 8 beam 3DCRT and IMRT plan were generated in Eclipse. OSLDs were placed at the CT scanned reference locations to measure the skin doses and were compared to diode measurements and Eclipse calculations. Efforts were made to ensure that the dose comparison was done at the effective measurement points of each detector and corresponding locations in CT images. Results: The depth of the effective measurement point is 0.8 mm for OSLD when used in the buildup region in a 6 MV beam and is 0.7 mm for the authors’ surface diode. OSLDs and Eclipse system both agree well with Monte Carlo and/or Markus PP ion chamber and/or diode in buildup regions in 6 MV beams with normal or oblique incidence and across different field sizes. For the multiple beam 3DCRT plan and IMRT plans, the differences between OSLDs and Eclipse calculations on the surface of the anthropomorphic phantom were within 3% and distance-to-agreement less than 0.3 mm

  15. Phosphorylation of PTEN at STT motif is associated with DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Misra, Sandip; Mukherjee, Ananda; Karmakar, Parimal

    2014-12-01

    Phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome Ten (PTEN), a tumor suppressor protein participates in multiple cellular activities including DNA repair. In this work we found a relationship between phosphorylation of carboxy (C)-terminal STT motif of PTEN and DNA damage response. Ectopic expression of C-terminal phospho-mutants of PTEN, in PTEN deficient human glioblastoma cells, U87MG, resulted in reduced viability and DNA repair after etoposide induced DNA damage compared to cells expressing wild type PTEN. Also, after etoposide treatment phosphorylation of PTEN increased at C-terminal serine 380 and threonine 382/383 residues in PTEN positive HEK293T cells and wild type PTEN transfected U87MG cells. One-step further, DNA damage induced phosphorylation of PTEN was confirmed by immunoprecipitation of total PTEN from cellular extract followed by immunobloting with phospho-specific PTEN antibodies. Additionally, phospho-PTEN translocated to nucleus after etoposide treatment as revealed by indirect immunolabeling. Further, phosphorylation dependent nuclear foci formation of PTEN was observed after ionizing radiation or etoposide treatment which colocalized with γH2AX. Additionally, etoposide induced γH2AX, Mre11 and Ku70 foci persisted for a longer period of times in U87MG cells after ectopic expression of PTEN C-terminal phospho-mutant constructs compared to wild type PTEN expressing cells. Thus, our findings strongly suggest that DNA damage induced phosphorylation of C-terminal STT motif of PTEN is necessary for DNA repair. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Synergistic effect of olaparib with combination of cisplatin on PTEN-deficient lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Minami, Daisuke; Takigawa, Nagio; Takeda, Hiromasa; Takata, Minoru; Ochi, Nobuaki; Ichihara, Eiki; Hisamoto, Akiko; Hotta, Katsuyuki; Tanimoto, Mitsune; Kiura, Katsuyuki

    2013-02-01

    PARP enzyme plays a key role in the cellular machinery responsible for DNA damage repair. PTEN is a tumor-suppressor gene deactivating PI3K downstream of EGFR signaling. We hypothesize that PTEN-deficient lung cancer cells suppressed DNA damage signaling and that the absence of PTEN can sensitize these cells to a concurrent treatment of a DNA-damaging agent (cisplatin) and a PARP inhibitor (olaparib). To investigate the effect of olaparib and cisplatin on PTEN-deficient lung tumors, two EGFR-mutant (deletion in exon19) non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines, PC-9 (PTEN wild-type) and H1650 (PTEN loss), were used. We transfected intact PTEN gene into H1650 cells (H1650(PTEN+)) and knocked down PTEN expression in the PC-9 cells (PC-9(PTEN-)) using short hairpin RNA (shRNA). Combination of cisplatin with olaparib showed a synergistic effect in vitro according to the combination index in H1650 cells. Restoration of PTEN in the H1650 cells decreased sensitivity to the combination. Ablation of PTEN in PC-9 cells increased sensitivity to olaparib and cisplatin. We also examined the effectiveness of cisplatin and olaparib in a xenograft model using H1650 and PC-9(PTEN-) cells. The combination of cisplatin with olaparib was more effective than each agent individually. This effect was not observed in a xenograft model using H1650(PTEN+) and PC-9 cells. Mechanistic investigations revealed that PTEN deficiency caused reductions in nuclear RAD51 and RPA focus formation and phosphorylated Chk1 and Mre11. Thus, genetic inactivation of PTEN led to the suppression of DNA repair.

  17. Lognormal model for determining dose-response curves from epidemiological data and for health risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Saltzman, B E

    2001-07-01

    A practical method is proposed for determining human dose-response curves based on reasonable assumptions and simplifications. The epidemiological data needed are the fractions of the population suffering an adverse response from exposures to two or more patterns of fluctuating concentrations of a pollutant, and the statistical parameters of each pattern. The method calculates the two parameters of the threshold type dose-response curve of the pollutant, represented by a cumulative lognormal distribution. This distribution was derived from a reasonable statistical model. The calculation does not require any arbitrary safety factors and yields central values. The dose-response parameters then may be used to calculate the health risk rate of exposure to any other fluctuating concentration pattern. Another method is proposed to select appropriate threshold limit values (TLVs) using calculations involving these parameters. Examples are given to illustrate the calculations. Results with hypothetical data gave apparently reasonable results. They showed the importance not only of the geometric mean concentration but also of the geometric standard deviations of both the concentrations and of the dose-response curve, that greatly influence the results. It is believed that results of useful accuracy should be obtained. Health risk rates are readily understood. They are useful for cost-benefit calculations. Relative rates can be used to compare the hazards of different operations and different plants. The method may make possible the development of standards specifying maximum allowable risk rates.

  18. Microdosimetric measurements for neutron-absorbed dose determination during proton therapy.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Andújar, Angélica; Deluca, Paul M; Thornton, Allan F; Fitzek, Markus; Hecksel, Draik; Farr, Jonathan

    2012-08-01

    This work presents microdosimetric measurements performed at the Midwest Proton Radiotherapy Institute in Bloomington, Indiana, USA. The measurements were done simulating clinical setups with a water phantom and for a variety of stopping targets. The water phantom was irradiated by a proton spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) and by a proton pencil beam. Stopping target measurements were performed only for the pencil beam. The targets used were made of polyethylene, brass and lead. The objective of this work was to determine the neutron-absorbed dose for a passive and active proton therapy delivery, and for the interactions of the proton beam with materials typically in the beam line of a proton therapy treatment nozzle. Neutron doses were found to be higher at 45° and 90° from the beam direction for the SOBP configuration by a factor of 1.1 and 1.3, respectively, compared with the pencil beam. Meanwhile, the pencil beam configuration produced neutron-absorbed doses 2.2 times higher at 0° than the SOBP. For stopping targets, lead was found to dominate the neutron-absorbed dose for most angles due to a large production of low-energy neutrons emitted isotropically.

  19. Microdosimetric measurements for neutron-absorbed dose determination during proton therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Andújar, Angélica; DeLuca, Paul M.; Thornton, Allan F.; Fitzek, Markus; Hecksel, Draik; Farr, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    This work presents microdosimetric measurements performed at the Midwest Proton Radiotherapy Institute in Bloomington, Indiana, USA. The measurements were done simulating clinical setups with a water phantom and for a variety of stopping targets. The water phantom was irradiated by a proton spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) and by a proton pencil beam. Stopping target measurements were performed only for the pencil beam. The targets used were made of polyethylene, brass and lead. The objective of this work was to determine the neutron-absorbed dose for a passive and active proton therapy delivery, and for the interactions of the proton beam with materials typically in the beam line of a proton therapy treatment nozzle. Neutron doses were found to be higher at 45° and 90° from the beam direction for the SOBP configuration by a factor of 1.1 and 1.3, respectively, compared with the pencil beam. Meanwhile, the pencil beam configuration produced neutron-absorbed doses 2.2 times higher at 0° than the SOBP. For stopping targets, lead was found to dominate the neutron-absorbed dose for most angles due to a large production of low-energy neutrons emitted isotropically. PMID:22334761

  20. Pulmonary hypertension secondary to left-heart failure involves peroxynitrite-induced downregulation of PTEN in the lung.

    PubMed

    Ravi, Yazhini; Selvendiran, Karuppaiyah; Naidu, Shan K; Meduru, Sarath; Citro, Lucas A; Bognár, Balázs; Khan, Mahmood; Kálai, Tamás; Hideg, Kálmán; Kuppusamy, Periannan; Sai-Sudhakar, Chittoor B

    2013-03-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) that occurs after left-heart failure (LHF), classified as Group 2 PH, involves progressive pulmonary vascular remodeling induced by smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation. However, mechanisms involved in the activation of SMCs remain unknown. The objective of this study was to determine the involvement of peroxynitrite and phosphatase-and-tensin homolog on chromosome 10 (PTEN) in vascular SMC proliferation and remodeling in the LHF-induced PH (LHF-PH). LHF was induced by permanent ligation of left anterior descending coronary artery in rats for 4 weeks. MRI, ultrasound, and hemodynamic measurements were performed to confirm LHF and PH. Histopathology, Western blot, and real-time polymerase chain reaction analyses were used to identify key molecular signatures. Therapeutic intervention was demonstrated using an antiproliferative compound, HO-3867. LHF-PH was confirmed by significant elevation of pulmonary artery pressure (mean pulmonary artery pressure/mm Hg: 35.9±1.8 versus 14.8±2.0, control; P<0.001) and vascular remodeling. HO-3867 treatment decreased mean pulmonary artery pressure to 22.6±0.8 mm Hg (P<0.001). Substantially higher levels of peroxynitrite and significant loss of PTEN expression were observed in the lungs of LHF rats when compared with control. In vitro studies using human pulmonary artery SMCs implicated peroxynitrite-mediated downregulation of PTEN expression as a key mechanism of SMC proliferation. The results further established that HO-3867 attenuated LHF-PH by decreasing oxidative stress and increasing PTEN expression in the lung. In conclusion, peroxynitrite and peroxynitrite-mediated PTEN inactivation seem to be key mediators of lung microvascular remodeling associated with PH secondary to LHF.

  1. Identification of PTEN mutations in metastatic melanoma specimens

    PubMed Central

    Celebi, J. T.; Shendrik, I.; Silvers, D.; Peacocke, M.

    2000-01-01

    CONTEXT—PTEN, a tumour suppressor gene located on chromosome 10q23, develops somatic mutations in various tumours and tumour cell lines including brain, endometrium, prostate, breast, kidney, thyroid, liver, and melanoma.
OBJECTIVES—To investigate the mutational profile of this gene further, as well as its role in tumour progression in melanoma.
DESIGN, SETTINGS—We examined 21 metastatic melanoma samples for 10q23 allelic losses and PTEN sequence alterations. Additionally, we screened these samples for mutations in CDKN2A, a gene in which alterations are well documented in primary melanoma as well as in the germline of familial melanoma.
RESULTS—Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at 10q23 was observed in 33% (7/21) of the samples tested. We identified four sequence alterations in PTEN (19%) and two in CDKN2A (9.5%). Of interest, only one case showed mutations in both genes.
CONCLUSIONS—These data support the notion that PTEN alterations occur in some metastatic melanomas, and that mutation of this gene plays a role in the progression of some forms of melanoma.


Keywords: PTEN; CDKN2A; melanoma PMID:10978354

  2. Discovery and functional characterization of a neomorphic PTEN mutation

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Helio A.; Leitner, Michael G.; Sos, Martin L.; Mavrantoni, Angeliki; Rychkova, Anna; Johnson, Jeffrey R.; Newton, Billy W.; Yee, Muh-Ching; De La Vega, Francisco M.; Ford, James M.; Krogan, Nevan J.; Shokat, Kevan M.; Oliver, Dominik; Halaszovich, Christian R.; Bustamante, Carlos D.

    2015-01-01

    Although a variety of genetic alterations have been found across cancer types, the identification and functional characterization of candidate driver genetic lesions in an individual patient and their translation into clinically actionable strategies remain major hurdles. Here, we use whole genome sequencing of a prostate cancer tumor, computational analyses, and experimental validation to identify and predict novel oncogenic activity arising from a point mutation in the phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) tumor suppressor protein. We demonstrate that this mutation (p.A126G) produces an enzymatic gain-of-function in PTEN, shifting its function from a phosphoinositide (PI) 3-phosphatase to a phosphoinositide (PI) 5-phosphatase. Using cellular assays, we demonstrate that this gain-of-function activity shifts cellular phosphoinositide levels, hyperactivates the PI3K/Akt cell proliferation pathway, and exhibits increased cell migration beyond canonical PTEN loss-of-function mutants. These findings suggest that mutationally modified PTEN can actively contribute to well-defined hallmarks of cancer. Lastly, we demonstrate that these effects can be substantially mitigated through chemical PI3K inhibitors. These results demonstrate a new dysfunction paradigm for PTEN cancer biology and suggest a potential framework for the translation of genomic data into actionable clinical strategies for targeted patient therapy. PMID:26504226

  3. A METHODOLOGY FOR DETERMINING THE DOSE RATE FOR BOUNDING MASS LIMITS IN A 9977 PACKAGING

    SciTech Connect

    Abramczyk, G.; Bellamy, S.; Nathan, S.; Loftin, B.

    2012-05-24

    The Small Gram Quantity (SGQ) concept is based on the understanding that the hazards associated with the shipment of a radioactive material are directly proportional to its mass. This study describes a methodology that estimates the acceptable masses for several neutron and gamma emitting isotopes that can be shipped in a 9977 Package compliant with the Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71 (10CFR71) external radiation level limits. 10CFR71.33 states that a shipping application identifies the radioactive and fissile materials at their maximum quantity and provides an evaluation demonstrating compliance with the external radiation standards. Since rather small amounts of some isotopes emit sufficiently strong radiation to produce a large external dose rate, quantifying of the dose rate for a proposed content is a challenging issue for the SGQ approach. It is essential to quantify external radiation levels from several common gamma and neutron sources that can be safely placed in a specific packaging, to ensure compliance with federal regulations. A methodology was established for determining the dose rate for bounding mass limits for a set of isotopes in the Model 9977 Shipping Package. Calculations were performed to estimate external radiation levels using the MCNP radiation transport code to develop a set of response multipliers (Green's functions) for 'dose per source particle' for each neutron and photon spectral group. The source spectrum from one gram of each isotope was folded with the response multipliers to generate the dose rate per gram of each isotope in the 9977 shipping package and its associated shielded containers. The maximum amount of a single isotope that could be shipped within the regulatory limits for dose rate at the surface was determined. For a package containing a mixture of isotopes, the acceptability for shipment can be determined by a sum of fractions approach. Furthermore, the results of this analysis can be easily

  4. Role for loss of nuclear PTEN in a harbinger of brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Nosaka, Ryo; Yamasaki, Fumiyuki; Saito, Taiichi; Takayasu, Takeshi; Kolakshyapati, Manish; Amatya, Vishwa Jeet; Takeshima, Yukio; Sugiyama, Kazuhiko; Kurisu, Kaoru

    2017-10-01

    Earlier studies proposed phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) acts as a 3'-specific phosphatidylinositol phosphatase and inhibits the PI3K pathway. Recent reports show that PTEN mRNA expression is significantly downregulated in brain metastases compared to primary breast cancer. We focused on the differential expression of nuclear and cytoplasmic PTEN between primary tumors and brain metastases. We retrospectively studied 30 patients with histologically confirmed primary tumors and brain metastases. PTEN and PDK1 expression levels were examined by immunohistochemical staining and categorized as negative, positive, or strong positive expression. The difference in PTEN expression levels were compared, and the values with P<0.05 were considered statistically significant. Expression of cytoplasmic PTEN was 100% at primary site, and 70% at brain metastases. Expression of nuclear PTEN was 87% at primary site, and 20% at brain metastases. Study results demonstrated that PTEN expression levels in brain metastases are lower compared with that of primary tumors. Especially, nuclear PTEN expression was significantly downregulated in various brain metastases. Higher PDK1 expression at brain metastases also confirmed the down regulation of PTEN function. Our findings indicate that decreased PTEN function by loss of nuclear PTEN expression may be associated with brain metastases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Activating PTEN by COX-2 inhibitors antagonizes radiation-induced AKT activation contributing to radiosensitization

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Zhen; Gan, Ye-Hua

    2015-05-01

    Radiotherapy is still one of the most effective nonsurgical treatments for many tumors. However, radioresistance remains a major impediment to radiotherapy. Although COX-2 inhibitors can induce radiosensitization, the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. In this study, we showed that COX-2 selective inhibitor celecoxib enhanced the radiation-induced inhibition of cell proliferation and apoptosis in HeLa and SACC-83 cells. Treatment with celecoxib alone dephosphorylated phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN), promoted PTEN membrane translocation or activation, and correspondingly dephosphorylated or inactivated protein kinase B (AKT). By contrast, treatment with radiation alone increased PTEN phosphorylation, inhibited PTEN membrane translocation and correspondingly activated AKT in the two cell lines. However, treatment with celecoxib or another COX-2 selective inhibitor (valdecoxib) completely blocked radiation-induced increase of PTEN phosphorylation, rescued radiation-induced decrease in PTEN membrane translocation, and correspondingly inactivated AKT. Moreover, celecoxib could also upregulate PTEN protein expression by downregulating Sp1 expression, thereby leading to the activation of PTEN transcription. Our results suggested that COX-2 inhibitors could enhance radiosensitization at least partially by activating PTEN to antagonize radiation-induced AKT activation. - Highlights: • COX-2 inhibitor, celecoxib, could enhance radiosensitization. • Radiation induced PTEN inactivation (phosphorylation) and AKT activation. • COX-2 inhibitor induced PTEN expression and activation, and inactivated AKT. • COX-2 inhibitor enhanced radiosensitization through activating PTEN.

  6. Impact of Ketamine on Learning and Memory Function, Neuronal Apoptosis and Its Potential Association with miR-214 and PTEN in Adolescent Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaobin; Yang, Xiaoling; Wang, Maohua; Zhang, Chunxiang; Zhou, Shuzhi; Tang, Ni

    2014-01-01

    Ketamine, an N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, is used as a general pediatric anesthetic and anti-depressive drug. Recent studies suggest that ketamine enhances neuronal apoptosis in developing rats. The goal of this study is to explore whether ketamine could result in learning and memory impairment and neurodegeneration in adolescent rats, and if so, whether the effects of ketamine are associated with miR-214 and PTEN expression. Fifty-day-old SD rats were randomly divided into three groups receiving ketamine at 30, or 80 mg/kg, i.p. or saline for seven consecutive days. Twenty-four hours after the last treatment, learning and memory function were tested by the Morris water maze. The rats were then decapitated, and the brains were isolated for detection of neuronal apoptosis and protein PTEN expression by TUNEL and immunohistochemistry respectively. Expression levels of the miR-214 and PTEN in the hippocampus were measured by qRT-PCR and western blot analysis respectively. Ketamine administered to the adolescent rats at a dose of 80 mg/kg rather than the lower dose of 30 mg/kg caused learning and memory impairment, increased the number of apoptotic cells in the hippocampal CA1 region, cerebral cortex and subcortical region, decreased the miR-214 levels and increased PTEN protein expression in hippocampus. The results suggest that ketamine at a dose of 80 mg/kg in the adolescent rats is able to induce the learning and memory impairment and neurodegeneration, in which the down-regulation of miR-214 and high expression of PTEN protein may be involved. PMID:24914689

  7. Anthelmintic efficacy and dose determination of Albizia anthelmintica against gastrointestinal nematodes in naturally infected Ugandan sheep.

    PubMed

    Gradé, J T; Arble, B L; Weladji, R B; Van Damme, P

    2008-11-07

    Weight loss, stunted growth, and death caused by gastrointestinal parasites are major constraints to livestock productivity, especially in tropical and developing countries where regular use, and misuse, of anthelmintics has led to nematode resistance. Albizia anthelmintica Brong. (Fabaceae) is traditionally employed throughout East Africa to treat helminth parasitosis in livestock. Reported efficacy has varied from 90% against mixed nematodes to just 19% against Haemonchus contortus alone. The objective of this study was to assess the anthelmintic effect of A. anthelmintica against naturally occurring infections of mixed gastrointestinal parasites, and to establish an effective treatment dose, in sheep under pastoral field conditions of northern Uganda. A. anthelmintica bark was collected and prepared according to local custom and packed into gel capsules. Fifty-five young female local mixed-breed lambs were randomly assigned to six groups, including a positive control group that received levamisole (synthetic anthelmintic) and a negative control group that received no treatment. Following the World Association for the Advancement of Veterinary Parasitology (WAAVP) dose determination guidelines, the other four groups were treated with varying doses of A. anthelmintica. Statistical analyses (using generalized linear models) were performed to assess treatment effect. There was a significant treatment (group) effect on parasite egg/oocyte counts per gram (EPG) for nematodes, but not for coccidia. The most effective dose against nematodes (0.8g, 58.7mg/kg) closely approximates what is usually given by traditional healers, 0.9g/adult sheep. It provided major and significant reduction in EPG as compared to the negative control. Anthelmintic efficacy was estimated using percent faecal egg count reduction (FECR). Other than the positive control, animals in the standard dose group showed the greatest decline in shedding of nematode eggs, with an FECR of 78%. This study

  8. [Study of immutable variables determining rHuEPO dose requirements on hemodialysis patients].

    PubMed

    Gascón, A; Virto, R; Lou, L M; Pernaute, R; Moreno, R; Pérez, J; Aladrén, M J; Moragrega, B; Castillón, E; Gómez, R; Vives, P J; Alvarez, R; García, F J; Castilla, J; Gutiérrez Colón, J A

    2005-01-01

    Patients receiving recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) therapy show wide variability in their responsiveness to the drug. Variables that affect rHuEPO dose requirements can be broadly divided into modificable and immutable characteristics. Most of the scientific research on rHuEPO hyporesponsiveness has focused on modificable variables (iron status, dialysis adequacy), while immutable variables such as gender, etiology of chronic renal failure (CRF) and age have been insufficiently explored. A cross sectional study was performed in order to evaluate if immutable patient characteristics determine rHuEPO dose requirements among 215 patients (52% males; mean age 66 +/- 14 years) on hemodialysis (HD) for more than twelve months. Data were collected at 10 hemodialysis units in Aragon. Patients were divided into three groups according to their gender, their cause of CRF (diabetic nephropathy, vascular nephropathy, tubulointerstitial nephropathy and primary glomerulonephritis) and their age (younger than 60 years, from 60 to 75 years, older than 75 years). Despite a similar dose of rHuEPO, women had lower mean hemoglobin (11.1 +/- 1.5 versus 11.6 +/- 1.7 g/dl; p = 0.0258) than men. The greater hemoglobin in men than women may be attributed to greater serum albumin in men (3.5 +/- 0.3 versus 3.7 +/- 0.3 mg/dl; p = 0.0001). Requirements of rHuEPO were higher in the patients with etiology of primary glomerulonephritis compared with those with the other etiologies, even those with diabetic nephropathy (p = 0.0374). The rHuE-PO doses required to obtain similar hemoglobin levels were higher in patients younger than 60 years (p = 0.0249). We conclude that women, patients with primary glomerulonephritis as cause of CRF, and patients younger than 60 years showed the highest requirements of rHuEPO doses.

  9. PACKAGING CERTIFICATION PROGRAM METHODOLOGY FOR DETERMINING DOSE RATES FOR SMALL GRAM QUANTITIES IN SHIPPING PACKAGINGS

    SciTech Connect

    Nathan, S.; Loftin, B.; Abramczyk, G.; Bellamy, S.

    2012-05-09

    The Small Gram Quantity (SGQ) concept is based on the understanding that small amounts of hazardous materials, in this case radioactive materials (RAM), are significantly less hazardous than large amounts of the same materials. This paper describes a methodology designed to estimate an SGQ for several neutron and gamma emitting isotopes that can be shipped in a package compliant with 10 CFR Part 71 external radiation level limits regulations. These regulations require packaging for the shipment of radioactive materials, under both normal and accident conditions, to perform the essential functions of material containment, subcriticality, and maintain external radiation levels within the specified limits. By placing the contents in a helium leak-tight containment vessel, and limiting the mass to ensure subcriticality, the first two essential functions are readily met. Some isotopes emit sufficiently strong photon radiation that small amounts of material can yield a large dose rate outside the package. Quantifying the dose rate for a proposed content is a challenging issue for the SGQ approach. It is essential to quantify external radiation levels from several common gamma and neutron sources that can be safely placed in a specific packaging, to ensure compliance with federal regulations. The Packaging Certification Program (PCP) Methodology for Determining Dose Rate for Small Gram Quantities in Shipping Packagings provides bounding shielding calculations that define mass limits compliant with 10 CFR 71.47 for a set of proposed SGQ isotopes. The approach is based on energy superposition with dose response calculated for a set of spectral groups for a baseline physical packaging configuration. The methodology includes using the MCNP radiation transport code to evaluate a family of neutron and photon spectral groups using the 9977 shipping package and its associated shielded containers as the base case. This results in a set of multipliers for 'dose per particle' for

  10. Analysis of Potassium in Bricks--Determining the Dose Rate from {sup 40}K for Thermoluminescence Dating

    SciTech Connect

    Musilek, Ladislav; Polach, Tomas; Trojek, Tomas

    2008-08-07

    Thermoluminescence (TL) dating is based on accumulating the natural radiation dose in the material of a dated artefact (brick, pottery, etc.), and comparing the dose accumulated during the lifetime of the object with the dose rate within the sample collected for TL measurement. Determining the dose rate from natural radionuclides in materials is one of the most important and most difficult parts of the technique. The most important radionuclides present are usually nuclides of the uranium and thorium decay series and {sup 40}K. An analysis of the total potassium concentration enables us to determine the {sup 40}K content effectively, and from this it is possible to calculate the dose rate originating from this radiation source. X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis can be used to determine the potassium concentration in bricks rapidly and efficiently. The procedure for analysing potassium, examples of results of dose rate calculation and possible sources of error are described here.

  11. Method to determine the position-dependant metal correction factor for dose-rate equivalent laser testing of semiconductor devices

    DOEpatents

    Horn, Kevin M.

    2013-07-09

    A method reconstructs the charge collection from regions beneath opaque metallization of a semiconductor device, as determined from focused laser charge collection response images, and thereby derives a dose-rate dependent correction factor for subsequent broad-area, dose-rate equivalent, laser measurements. The position- and dose-rate dependencies of the charge-collection magnitude of the device are determined empirically and can be combined with a digital reconstruction methodology to derive an accurate metal-correction factor that permits subsequent absolute dose-rate response measurements to be derived from laser measurements alone. Broad-area laser dose-rate testing can thereby be used to accurately determine the peak transient current, dose-rate response of semiconductor devices to penetrating electron, gamma- and x-ray irradiation.

  12. Improving Dose Determination Accuracy in Nonstandard Fields of the Varian TrueBeam Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyun, Megan A.

    In recent years, the use of flattening-filter-free (FFF) linear accelerators in radiation-based cancer therapy has gained popularity, especially for hypofractionated treatments (high doses of radiation given in few sessions). However, significant challenges to accurate radiation dose determination remain. If physicists cannot accurately determine radiation dose in a clinical setting, cancer patients treated with these new machines will not receive safe, accurate and effective treatment. In this study, an extensive characterization of two commonly used clinical radiation detectors (ionization chambers and diodes) and several potential reference detectors (thermoluminescent dosimeters, plastic scintillation detectors, and alanine pellets) has been performed to investigate their use in these challenging, nonstandard fields. From this characterization, reference detectors were identified for multiple beam sizes, and correction factors were determined to improve dosimetric accuracy for ionization chambers and diodes. A validated computational (Monte Carlo) model of the TrueBeam(TM) accelerator, including FFF beam modes, was also used to calculate these correction factors, which compared favorably to measured results. Small-field corrections of up to 18 % were shown to be necessary for clinical detectors such as microionization chambers. Because the impact of these large effects on treatment delivery is not well known, a treatment planning study was completed using actual hypofractionated brain, spine, and lung treatments that were delivered at the UW Carbone Cancer Center. This study demonstrated that improperly applying these detector correction factors can have a substantial impact on patient treatments. This thesis work has taken important steps toward improving the accuracy of FFF dosimetry through rigorous experimentally and Monte-Carlo-determined correction factors, the validation of an important published protocol (TG-51) for use with FFF reference fields, and a

  13. Determination of radionuclides and pathways contributing to dose in 1945. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project: Dose code recovery activities, Calculation 003

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, B.A.

    1992-12-01

    A series of scoping calculations has been undertaken to evaluate the absolute and relative contributions of different radionuclides and exposure pathways to doses that may have been received by individuals living in the vicinity of the Hanford Site. This scoping calculation (Calculation 003) examined the contributions of numerous radionuclides to dose via environmental exposures and accumulation in foods. This study builds on the work initiated in the first scoping study of iodine in cow`s milk (calculation 001). Addressed in this calculation were the contributions to organ and effective dose of infants and adults from (1) air submersion and groundshine external dose, (2) inhalation, (3) ingestion of soil by humans, (4) ingestion of leafy vegetables, (5) ingestion of other vegetables and fruits, (6) ingestion of meat, (7) ingestion of eggs, and (8) ingestion of cows` milk from Feeding Regime 1, as described in Calculation 001.

  14. Determination of the contribution of livestock water ingestion to dose from the cow-milk pathway. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project: Dose code recovery activities, Calculation 002

    SciTech Connect

    Ikenberry, T.A.

    1992-12-01

    As part of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project, a series of calculations has been undertaken to evaluate the absolute and relative contribution of different exposure pathways to thyroid doses that may have been received by individuals living in the vicinity of the Hanford Site. These evaluations include some pathways that were included in the Phase I air-pathway dose evaluations (HEDR staff 1991, page xx), as well as other potential exposure pathways being evaluated for possible inclusion in the future HEDR modeling efforts. This calculation (002) examined the possible doses that may have been received by individuals who drank milk from cows that drank from sources of water (stock tanks and farm ponds) exposed to iodine-131 in the atmosphere during 1945.

  15. Correlation between NDRG1 and PTEN expression in endometrial carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiawei; Li, Shuxia; Yang, Zhaorui; Lu, Guangzhong; Hu, Honghui

    2008-04-01

    N-myc Downstream-Regulated Gene 1 (NDRG1) is known as a differentiation-related gene that plays important roles in cell differentiation, organ formation, and embryonic development. NDRG1 has recently been shown to be associated with carcinogenesis and tumor progression in a wide variety of tumors. Phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted from chromosome (PTEN), a phosphatase and tensin homolog located on chromosome 10, is shown to be a tumor suppressor and is often mutated or deleted in various tumor cells, particularly in endometrial carcinoma. Using an immunohistochemical approach, we investigated the expression of NDRG1 and PTEN in normal endometrium, atypical hyperplasia, and endometrial carcinoma. All tumor tissues harvested in this study were derived from endometrioid carcinoma Type I, that were estrogen-related. Our results demonstrate that the expression of NDRG1 was up-regulated in 5/40 (12.5%), 18/34 (52.94%), and 86/103 (83.5%) normal endometrium, atypical hyperplasia, and endometrial carcinoma cases, respectively (P < 0.01), while in 6/40 (15%), 20/34 (58.82%), and 89/103 (86.41%) normal endometrium, atypical hyperplasia, and endometrial carcinoma cases, respectively. PTEN expression was significantly decreased (P < 0.01). Statistical analyzes demonstrated a positive correlation between NDRG1 up-regulation and PTEN down-regulation (P < 0.01). The expression of NDRG1 had no correlation with the differentiation degree of the tumor cells, lymph-node metastasis, and/or abdominal cavity implantation (P > 0.05). Our results indicated that development of endometrial carcinoma is associated with an overexpression of NDRG1 and the loss of PTEN expression. Identification of changes in the NDRG1 and PTEN expression may be a significant diagnostic tool for the early detection of endometrial carcinoma.

  16. A PTEN-regulated checkpoint regulates surface delivery of delta opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Shiwarski, Daniel J; Tipton, Alycia; Giraldo, Melissa D; Schmidt, Brigitte F; Gold, Michael S; Pradhan, Amynah A; Puthenveedu, Manojkumar A

    2017-03-06

    The delta opioid receptor (δR) is a promising alternate target for pain management, because δR agonists show decreased abuse potential compared to current opioid analgesics that target the mu opioid receptor. A critical limitation in developing δR as an analgesic target, however, is that δR agonists show relatively low efficacy in vivo, requiring the use of high doses that often cause adverse effects such as convulsions. Here we tested whether intracellular retention of δR in sensory neurons contributes to this low δR agonist efficacy in vivo by limiting surface δR expression. Using direct visualization of δR trafficking and localization, we define a phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN)-regulated checkpoint that retains δR in the Golgi and decreases surface delivery in rat and mice sensory neurons. PTEN inhibition releases δR from this checkpoint and stimulates delivery of exogenous and endogenous δR to the neuronal surface both in vitro and in vivo PTEN inhibition in vivo increases the percentage of TG neurons expressing δR on the surface, and allows efficient δR-mediated antihyperalgesia in mice. Together, we define a critical role for PTEN in regulating the surface delivery and bioavailability of the δR, explain the low efficacy of δR agonists in vivo, and provide evidence that active δR relocation is a viable strategy to increase δR antinociception.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENTOpioid analgesics like morphine, which target the mu opioid receptor (μR), have been the mainstay of pain management, but their use is highly limited by adverse effects and their variable efficacy in chronic pain. Identifying alternate analgesic targets is therefore of great significance. While the delta opioid receptor (δR) is an attractive option, a critical limiting factor in developing δR as a target has been the low efficacy of δR agonists. Why δR agonists show low efficacy is still under debate. This study provides mechanistic and functional data that intracellular

  17. PTEN overexpression improves cisplatin-resistance of human ovarian cancer cells through upregulating KRT10 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Huijuan; Wang, Ke; Liu, Wenxin; Hao, Quan

    2014-02-07

    Highlights: • Overexpression of PTEN enhanced the sensitivity of C13K cells to cisplatin. • KRT10 is a downstream molecule of PTEN involved in the resistance-reversing effect. • Overexpression of KRT10 enhanced the chemosensitivity of C13K cells to cisplatin. - Abstract: Multi-drug resistance (MDR) is a common cause of the failure of chemotherapy in ovarian cancer. PTEN, a tumor suppressor gene, has been demonstrated to be able to reverse cisplatin-resistance in ovarian cancer cell line C13K. However, the downstream molecules of PTEN involved in the resistance-reversing effect have not been completely clarified. Therefore, we screened the downstream molecules of PTEN and studied their interactions in C13K ovarian cancer cells using a 3D culture model. Firstly, we constructed an ovarian cancer cell line stably expressing PTEN, C13K/PTEN. MTT assay showed that overexpression of PTEN enhanced the sensitivity of C13K cells to cisplatin, but not to paclitaxel. Then we examined the differently expressed proteins that interacted with PTEN in C13K/PTEN cells with or without cisplatin treatment by co-immunoprecipitation. KRT10 was identified as a differently expressed protein in cisplatin-treated C13K/PTEN cells. Further study confirmed that cisplatin could induce upregulation of KRT10 mRNA and protein in C13K/PTEN cells and there was a directly interaction between KRT10 and PTEN. Forced expression of KRT10 in C13K cells also enhanced cisplatin-induced proliferation inhibition and apoptosis of C13K cells. In addition, KRT10 siRNA blocked cisplatin-induced proliferation inhibition of C13K/PTEN cells. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that KRT10 is a downstream molecule of PTEN which improves cisplatin-resistance of ovarian cancer and forced KRT10 overexpression may also act as a therapeutic method for overcoming MDR in ovarian cancer.

  18. A photon spectrometric dose-rate constant determination for the Advantage Pd-103 brachytherapy source

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Zhe Jay; Bongiorni, Paul; Nath, Ravinder

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: Although several dosimetric characterizations using Monte Carlo simulation and thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) have been reported for the new Advantage Pd-103 source (IsoAid, LLC, Port Richey, FL), no AAPM consensus value has been established for the dosimetric parameters of the source. The aim of this work was to perform an additional dose-rate constant ({Lambda}) determination using a recently established photon spectrometry technique (PST) that is independent of the published TLD and Monte Carlo techniques. Methods: Three Model IAPD-103A Advantage Pd-103 sources were used in this study. The relative photon energy spectrum emitted by each source along the transverse axis was measured using a high-resolution germanium spectrometer designed for low-energy photons. For each source, the dose-rate constant was determined from its emitted energy spectrum. The PST-determined dose-rate constant ({sub PST}{Lambda}) was then compared to those determined by TLD ({sub TLD}{Lambda}) and Monte Carlo ({sub MC}{Lambda}) techniques. A likely consensus {Lambda} value was estimated as the arithmetic mean of the average {Lambda} values determined by each of three different techniques. Results: The average {sub PST}{Lambda} value for the three Advantage sources was found to be (0.676{+-}0.026) cGyh{sup -1} U{sup -1}. Intersource variation in {sub PST}{Lambda} was less than 0.01%. The {sub PST}{Lambda} was within 2% of the reported {sub MC}{Lambda} values determined by PTRAN, EGSnrc, and MCNP5 codes. It was 3.4% lower than the reported {sub TLD}{Lambda}. A likely consensus {Lambda} value was estimated to be (0.688{+-}0.026) cGyh{sup -1} U{sup -1}, similar to the AAPM consensus values recommended currently for the Theragenics (Buford, GA) Model 200 (0.686{+-}0.033) cGyh{sup -1} U{sup -1}, the NASI (Chatsworth, CA) Model MED3633 (0.688{+-}0.033) cGyh{sup -1} U{sup -1}, and the Best Medical (Springfield, VA) Model 2335 (0.685{+-}0.033) cGyh{sup -1} U{sup -1} {sup 103}Pd

  19. Formononetin inhibits human bladder cancer cell proliferation and invasiveness via regulation of miR-21 and PTEN.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yiying; Zhang, Xing; Li, Zhengzhao; Yan, Haibiao; Qin, Jian; Li, Tianyu

    2017-03-22

    The isoflavone formononetin is the main active component of Astragalus membranaceus and possesses anti-tumorigenic properties. However, the role of formononetin in human bladder cancer (BCa) has not been fully elucidated. The aim of the present study was to investigate the anti-tumor effects of formononetin on BCa cells and its potential molecular mechanism. T24 cells were treated with different concentrations of formononetin, and then the cell proliferation was assessed by MTT assay, cell apoptosis by Hoechst 33258 stain assay, cell invasiveness by transwell invasion assay, microRNA-21 (miR-21) expression by real-time PCR and the protein level of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) and phosphorylated homolog of Akt (p-Akt) by western blotting. The results showed that formononetin significantly inhibited the proliferation of T24 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. T24 cells treated with formononetin displayed obvious morphological changes of apoptosis and lower invasiveness. In addition, miR-21 expression was significantly decreased in formononetin-treated T24 cells, followed by increase of PTEN, and down-regulation of p-Akt. Collectively, these results suggest that formononetin exerts an anti-carcinogenic effect on BCa in vitro, which might be due to miR-21-mediated regulation of the PTEN/Akt pathway.

  20. A computer model to determine the primary contributors to relative radiation dose received by astronauts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazareth, Otto W.; Divadeenam, M.; Ludewig, Hans; Powell, James R.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes a computer model which was used to determine the relative radiation dose of protons of different energies. In the future, the model will be extended to calculate the dosage received by an astronaut during a specific mission to Mars, and within a spacecraft with specific materials and with a specific geometry. The framework for the calculations centered on the computer program HETC, a Monte Carlo transport code for computing the properties of high energy nucleon-meson cascades in matter. It is valid up to several hundred GeV. It was found that protons in the energy range from 50 to 200 MeV are the largest contributor to the radiation dose to a human inside an Al structure 1 cm thick. Other studies have predicted a dose-equivalent of several Sv (several hundred rem) to each crew member during the voyage. LD50 is the amount of radiation required to produce death in 50% of the organisms within 30 days. Since LD50 is 4.5 Sv (450 rem) for people, several Sv is a relatively high value.

  1. Determination of the median toxic dose of type C botulism in lactating dairy cows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moeller, R.B.; Puschner, B.; Walker, R.L.; Rocke, T.; Galey, F.D.; Cullor, J.S.; Ardans, A.A.

    2003-01-01

    Because of the difficulty in identifying botulinum toxin in cattle, it is hypothesized that cattle are sensitive to levels of toxin below the detection limits of current diagnostic techniques (the mouse protection bioassay and the immunostick enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay [ELISA] for type C botulinum toxin). Using an up-down method for toxicologic testing, the median toxic dose (MTD50) for cattle was determined. Four lactating Holstein cows were dosed at 0.125 or 0.25 ng/kg with Clostridium botulinum type C toxin and failed to develop clinical signs of botulism during the 7-day observation period. Three cows given 0.50 ng/kg of toxin developed clinical signs of botulism. From these results, the MTD50 was calculated at 0.388 ng/kg (3.88 mouse lethal doses/kg) using the trim-logit method. These results suggest that cattle are 12.88 times more sensitive to type C botulinum toxin than a mouse on a per kilogram weight basis. The mouse protection bioassay and the immunostick ELISA for type C botulinum toxin failed to identify the presence of the toxin in the serum, blood, and milk samples taken from all 7 animals.

  2. Phase I study to determine the maximal tolerated dose and dose-limiting toxicities of orally administered idarubicin in dogs with lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Vail, D M; Husbands, B D; Kamerling, S G; Simpson, H; Kurzman, I D; McDonnell, A

    2012-01-01

    Idarubicin, a PO bioavailable anthracycline antibiotic-class chemotherapeutic, could have substantial convenience advantages over currently available similar class agents in use that require IV delivery. The primary objective of this study was to determine the maximally tolerated dose (MTD), dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs), and basic pharmacokinetic parameters of oral idarubicin exposure in dogs with lymphoma after a single oral dose. A secondary objective was to document preliminary antitumor efficacy in an expanded treatment cohort using the established MTD. Client-owned dogs with measurable lymphoma. Dogs (n = 31) were enrolled in a prospective open label phase I study of oral idarubicin. By means of a 3 + 3 cohort design, dose escalations were made with 3 dogs per dose level, and the MTD was established based on the number of patients experiencing a DLT. Plasma concentrations of idarubicin and idarubicinol were determined by postdose sampling. Assessment of antitumor efficacy focused on evaluation of accessible, measurable lymph nodes and skin lesions by modified RECIST guidelines. The MTD in dogs > 15 kg body weight was 22 mg/m(2) . Adverse hematologic events (neutropenia and thrombocytopenia) were the predominant DLT and generally correlated with higher plasma concentrations of idarubicin and idarubicinol. PO administered idarubicin was generally well-tolerated and had preliminary antitumor activity in dogs with lymphoma. Furthermore, the potential clinical advantage of a safe and efficacious oral anthracycline alternative supports further investigations of this agent in repeated-dose, randomized clinical trials. Copyright © 2012 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  3. A computer model to determine the primary contributors to relative radiation dose received by astronauts

    SciTech Connect

    Lazareth, O.W.; Divadeenam, M.; Ludewig, H.; Powell, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a computer model which was used to determine the relative radiation dose of protons of different energies. In the future, the model will be extended to calculate the dosage received by an astronaut during a specific mission to Mars, and within a spacecraft with specific materials and with a specific geometry. The framework for the calculations centered on the computer program HETC, a Monte Carlo transport code for computing the properties of high energy nucleon-meson cascades in matter. It is valid up to several hundred GeV. 8 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Determination of the cosmic-ray-induced neutron flux and ambient dose equivalent at flight altitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pazianotto, M. T.; Cortés-Giraldo, M. A.; Federico, C. A.; Gonçalez, O. L.; Quesada, J. M.; Carlson, B. V.

    2015-07-01

    There is interest in modeling the atmosphere in the South Atlantic Magnetic Anomaly in order to obtain information about the cosmic-ray induced neutron spectrum and angular distribution as functions of altitude. In this work we use the Monte Carlo codes MCNPX and Geant4 to determine the cosmic-ray-induced neutron flux in the atmosphere produced by the cosmic ray protons incident on the top of the atmosphere and to estimate the ambient dose equivalent rate as function of altitude. The results present a reasonable conformity to other codes (QARM and EXPACS) based on other parameterizations.

  5. [Morphometric research in determining the absorbed dose in the lungs formed from aspirated radionuclides].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, A E; Uvarova, E I

    1989-01-01

    Macro- and microtopography of the distribution of aspirated colloidal 144CeF3 in autographs of rabbit lung total sections were examined with the help of a monitoring-measuring device "Videoplan" and microcomputer. Quantitative assessment of photoemulsion-blackening areas at the site of radionuclide concentration has confirmed that aspirated radionuclides are distributed in the lungs according to the same laws as nonradioactive aerosols: the relation of total microvolumes of actually irradiated pulmonary tissue to the entire lung volume long after radionuclide entry is shown; a possibility to use these data for determination of an actually absorbed dose in microvolumes of pulmonary tissue during aspiration of radionuclides is considered.

  6. Toxicity and dose determination of quillaja saponin, aluminum hydroxide and squalene in olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus).

    PubMed

    Vinay, Tharabenahalli-Nagaraju; Park, Chang-Su; Kim, Heung-Yun; Jung, Sung-Ju

    2014-03-15

    Adjuvants are substances added to vaccines to enhance the immune response of a given antigen. Most of the adjuvants are toxic at certain doses, and toxicity varies in different species. Moreover, there are no standard dosage limits set for adjuvant use in fish vaccines. We evaluated the acute toxicity, serum enzymes (AST/ALT) indicating hepatic injury and histopathological changes due to intra-peritoneal administration of different concentrations of a panel of adjuvants including quillaja saponin, aluminum hydroxide, squalene emulsion and Freund's incomplete adjuvant (FIA) with a dose ranging study of saponin (500, 160, 50, 16 and 5μgfish(-1)), aluminum hydroxide (5000, 1600, 500, 160 and 50μgfish(-1)), squalene emulsion (20, 10 and 5%), and FIA to determine the acceptable dosage for vaccination in olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) fingerlings measuring 4.66±0.41g, 8.47±0.42cm. Saponin was highly toxic with a LD50 of approximately 105μgfish(-1) (22.4mgkg(-1)) causing severe histological damage and AST level was high at dose above 16μgfish(-1) and ALT, specific for liver damage was high only at 160μgfish(-1) (11U/L) and was safe at 5μgfish(-1). Aluminum hydroxide was toxic at 5000μgfish(-1) and was acceptable at dose below 1600μgfish(-1) with moderate histology and AST/ALT levels similar with control. Squalene emulsion showed increased inflammation at 20% and 10% emulsions and the inflammatory response was mild at a concentration of 5% oil emulsion and AST/ALT levels being similar to control in 10% and 5% emulsions and elevated in 20% on both sampling days. FIA was not lethal, but induced severe inflammation at injection site and around blood vessels. In comparison to FIA, saponin found to be safe at dose of 5μgfish(-1), aluminum hydroxide below 1600μgfish(-1), and squalene at 5% emulsion and could be accepted for vaccination studies. These results provide an insight for the selection of safer dose of adjuvants for intra-peritoneal vaccination of

  7. Determination of (210)Po in calcium supplements and the possible related dose assessment to the consumers.

    PubMed

    Strumińska-Parulska, Dagmara I

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this pioneer study was to investigate the most popular calcium supplements as a potential additional source of polonium (210)Po in human diet. The analyzed calcium pharmaceutics contained organic or inorganic calcium compounds; some from natural sources as mussels' shells, fish extracts, or sedimentary rocks. The objectives of this research were to investigate the naturally occurring (210)Po activity concentrations in calcium supplements, find the correlations between (210)Po concentration in medicament and calcium chemical form, and calculate the effective radiation dose connected to analyzed calcium supplement consumption. As results showed, (210)Po concentrations in natural origin calcium supplements (especially sedimentary rocks) were higher than the other analyzed. Also the results of (210)Po analysis obtained for inorganic forms of calcium supplements were higher. The highest (210)Po activity concentrations were determined in mineral tablets made from sedimentary rocks: dolomite and chalk - 3.88 ± 0.22 and 3.36 ± 0.10 mBq g(-1) respectively; while the lowest in organic calcium compounds: calcium lactate and calcium gluconate - 0.07 ± 0.02 and 0.17 ± 0.01 mBq g(-1). The annual effective radiation doses from supplements intake were estimated as well. The highest annual radiation dose from (210)Po taken with 1 tablet of calcium supplement per day was connected to sample made from chalk - 2.5 ± 0.07 μSv year(-1), while the highest annual radiation dose from (210)Po taken with 1 g of pure calcium per day was connected to dolomite - 12.7 ± 0.70 μSv year(-1).

  8. [Frequency of stable chromosomal aberrations determined by FISH in 49 Chernobyl nuclear accident liquidators exposed to various doses of radiation].

    PubMed

    Pilinskaia, M A; Dybskiĭ, S S

    2001-01-01

    FISH technique was tested on the 49 liquidators of the Chernobyl Accident. Groups were formed according to average group exposure doses and/or individual ones determined by the method of EPR. The essential variability of spontaneous and irradiation-induced frequencies of reciprocal translocations was observed. In groups with the lowest EPR-doses (below 25 cGy) the average cytogenetic dose was considerably higher then doses determined by EPR-method. The best coincidences between average in-group EPR- and FISH-doses were in the group with 25-50 cGy doses for "acute irradiation" model and in the group with 50-100 cGy and higher for "chronic irradiation" model.

  9. ST-246 antiviral efficacy in a nonhuman primate monkeypox model: determination of the minimal effective dose and human dose justification.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Robert; Goff, Arthur; Frimm, Annie; Corrado, Michael L; Hensley, Lisa E; Byrd, Chelsea M; Mucker, Eric; Shamblin, Josh; Bolken, Tove' C; Wlazlowski, Carly; Johnson, Wendy; Chapman, Jennifer; Twenhafel, Nancy; Tyavanagimatt, Shanthakumar; Amantana, Adams; Chinsangaram, Jarasvech; Hruby, Dennis E; Huggins, John

    2009-05-01

    Therapeutics for the treatment of pathogenic orthopoxvirus infections are being sought. In the absence of patients with disease, animal models of orthopoxvirus disease are essential for evaluation of the efficacies of antiviral drugs and establishment of the appropriate dose and duration of human therapy. Infection of nonhuman primates (NHP) by the intravenous injection of monkeypox virus has been used to evaluate a promising therapeutic drug candidate, ST-246. ST-246 administered at 3 days postinfection (which corresponds to the secondary viremia stage of disease) at four different doses (from 100 mg/kg of body weight down to 3 mg/kg) once a day for 14 days was able to offer NHP 100% protection from a lethal infection with monkeypox virus and reduce the viral load and lesion formation. In NHP, the administration of ST-246 at a dose of 10 mg/kg/day for 14 days resulted in levels of blood exposure comparable to the levels attained in humans administered 400 mg in the fed state. These results suggest that administration of an oral dosage of 400 mg once daily for 14 days will be effective for the prevention or treatment of smallpox or monkeypox infections in humans.

  10. AKT activation promotes PTEN hamartoma tumor syndrome–associated cataract development

    PubMed Central

    Sellitto, Caterina; Li, Leping; Gao, Junyuan; Robinson, Michael L.; Lin, Richard Z.; Mathias, Richard T.; White, Thomas W.

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in the human phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) gene cause PTEN hamartoma tumor syndrome (PHTS), which includes cataract development among its diverse clinical pathologies. Currently, it is not known whether cataract formation in PHTS patients is secondary to other systemic problems, or the result of the loss of a critical function of PTEN within the lens. We generated a mouse line with a lens-specific deletion of Pten (PTEN KO) and identified a regulatory function for PTEN in lens ion transport. Specific loss of PTEN in the lens resulted in cataract. PTEN KO lenses exhibited a progressive age-related increase in intracellular hydrostatic pressure, along with, increased intracellular sodium concentrations, and reduced Na+/K+-ATPase activity. Collectively, these defects lead to lens swelling, opacities and ultimately organ rupture. Activation of AKT was highly elevated in PTEN KO lenses compared to WT mice. Additionally, pharmacological inhibition of AKT restored normal Na+/K+-ATPase activity in primary cultured lens cells and reduced lens pressure in intact lenses from PTEN KO animals. These findings identify a direct role for PTEN in the regulation of lens ion transport through an AKT-dependent modulation of Na+/K+-ATPase activity, and provide a new animal model to investigate cataract development in PHTS patients. PMID:24270425

  11. PTEN Controls the DNA Replication Process through MCM2 in Response to Replicative Stress.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jiawen; Liang, Jing; Li, Jiaju; Li, Yunqiao; Liang, Hui; Zhao, Xuyang; McNutt, Michael A; Yin, Yuxin

    2015-11-17

    PTEN is a tumor suppressor frequently mutated in human cancers. PTEN inhibits the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-AKT cascade, and nuclear PTEN guards the genome by multiple mechanisms. Here, we report that PTEN physically associates with the minichromosome maintenance complex component 2 (MCM2), which is essential for DNA replication. Specifically, PTEN dephosphorylates MCM2 at serine 41 (S41) and restricts replication fork progression under replicative stress. PTEN disruption results in unrestrained fork progression upon replication stalling, which is similar to the phenotype of cells expressing the phosphomimic MCM2 mutant S41D. Moreover, PTEN is necessary for prevention of chromosomal aberrations under replication stress. This study demonstrates that PTEN regulates DNA replication through MCM2 and loss of PTEN function leads to replication defects and genomic instability. We propose that PTEN plays a critical role in maintaining genetic stability through a replication-specific mechanism, and this is a crucial facet of PTEN tumor suppressor activity. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Subcellular targeting and dynamic regulation of PTEN: implications for neuronal cells and neurological disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kreis, Patricia; Leondaritis, George; Lieberam, Ivo; Eickholt, Britta J.

    2014-01-01

    PTEN is a lipid and protein phosphatase that regulates a diverse range of cellular mechanisms. PTEN is mainly present in the cytosol and transiently associates with the plasma membrane to dephosphorylate PI(3,4,5)P3, thereby antagonizing the PI3-Kinase signaling pathway. Recently, PTEN has been shown to associate also with organelles such as the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), the mitochondria, or the nucleus, and to be secreted outside of the cell. In addition, PTEN dynamically localizes to specialized sub-cellular compartments such as the neuronal growth cone or dendritic spines. The diverse localizations of PTEN imply a tight temporal and spatial regulation, orchestrated by mechanisms such as posttranslational modifications, formation of distinct protein–protein interactions, or the activation/recruitment of PTEN downstream of external cues. The regulation of PTEN function is thus not only important at the enzymatic activity level, but is also associated to its spatial distribution. In this review we will summarize (i) recent findings that highlight mechanisms controlling PTEN movement and sub-cellular localization, and (ii) current understanding of how PTEN localization is achieved by mechanisms controlling posttranslational modification, by association with binding partners and by PTEN structural or activity requirements. Finally, we will discuss the possible roles of compartmentalized PTEN in developing and mature neurons in health and disease. PMID:24744697

  13. Nuclear trafficking of Pten after brain injury leads to neuron survival not death.

    PubMed

    Goh, Choo-Peng; Putz, Ulrich; Howitt, Jason; Low, Ley-Hian; Gunnersen, Jenny; Bye, Nicole; Morganti-Kossmann, Cristina; Tan, Seong-Seng

    2014-02-01

    There is controversy whether accumulation of the tumor suppressor PTEN protein in the cell nucleus under stress conditions such as trauma and stroke causes cell death. A number of in vitro studies have reported enhanced apoptosis in neurons possessing nuclear PTEN, with the interpretation that its nuclear phosphatase activity leads to reduction of the survival protein phospho-Akt. However, there have been no in vivo studies to show that nuclear PTEN in neurons under stress is detrimental. Using a mouse model of injury, we demonstrate here that brain trauma altered the nucleo-cytoplasmic distribution of Pten, resulting in increased nuclear Pten but only in surviving neurons near the lesion. This event was driven by Ndfip1, an adaptor and activator of protein ubiquitination by Nedd4 E3 ligases. Neurons next to the lesion with nuclear PTEN were invariably negative for TUNEL, a marker for cell death. These neurons also showed increased Ndfip1 which we previously showed to be associated with neuron survival. Biochemical assays revealed that overall levels of Pten in the affected cortex were unchanged after trauma, suggesting that Pten abundance globally had not increased but rather Pten subcellular location in affected neurons had changed. Following experimental injury, the number of neurons with nuclear Pten was reduced in heterozygous mice (Ndfip1(+/-)) although lesion volumes were increased. We conclude that nuclear trafficking of Pten following injury leads to neuron survival not death.

  14. Pten Inactivation Accelerates Oncogenic K-ras-Initiated Tumorigenesis in a Mouse Model of Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Iwanaga, Kentaro; Yang, Yanan; Raso, Maria Gabriela; Ma, Lijiang; Hanna, Amy E.; Thilaganathan, Nishan; Moghaddam, Seyed; Evans, Christopher M.; Li, Huaiguang; Cai, Wei-Wen; Sato, Mitsuo; Minna, John D.; Wu, Hong; Creighton, Chad J.; Demayo, Francesco J.; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Kurie, Jonathan M.

    2009-01-01

    Phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted from chromosome 10 (Pten) is expressed aberrantly in non-small cell lung cancer cells, but the role of Pten in lung neoplasia has not been fully elucidated. In this study, we used a genetic approach to inactivate Pten in the bronchial epithelium of mice. Although, by itself, Pten inactivation had no discernible effect on bronchial epithelial histology, it accelerated lung tumorigenesis initiated by oncogenic K-ras, causing more rapid lethality than that induced by oncogenic K-ras alone (8 weeks versus 24 weeks of median duration of survival, respectively). Lung tumors arose in K-ras mutant, Pten-deficient mice that rapidly obstructed bronchial lumina and replaced alveolar spaces. Relative to K-ras mutant tumors, the K-ras mutant, Pten-deficient tumors exhibited more advanced histologic severity and more prominent inflammation and vascularity. Thus, Pten inactivation cooperated with oncogenic K-ras in promoting lung tumorigenesis. PMID:18281487

  15. Pten is necessary for the quiescence and maintenance of adult muscle stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Feng; Bi, Pengpeng; Wang, Chao; Shan, Tizhong; Nie, Yaohui; Ratliff, Timothy L.; Gavin, Timothy P.; Kuang, Shihuan

    2017-01-01

    Satellite cells (SCs) are myogenic stem cells required for regeneration of adult skeletal muscles. A proper balance among quiescence, activation and differentiation is essential for long-term maintenance of SCs and their regenerative function. Here we show a function of Pten (phosphatase and tensin homologue) in quiescent SCs. Deletion of Pten in quiescent SCs leads to their spontaneous activation and premature differentiation without proliferation, resulting in depletion of SC pool and regenerative failure. However, prior to depletion, Pten-null activated SCs can transiently proliferate upon injury and regenerate injured muscles, but continually decline during regeneration, suggesting an inability to return to quiescence. Mechanistically, Pten deletion increases Akt phosphorylation, which induces cytoplasmic translocation of FoxO1 and suppression of Notch signalling. Accordingly, constitutive activation of Notch1 prevents SC depletion despite Pten deletion. Our findings delineate a critical function of Pten in maintaining SC quiescence and reveal an interaction between Pten and Notch signalling. PMID:28094257

  16. A pseudogene long noncoding RNA network regulates PTEN transcription and translation in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Johnsson, Per; Ackley, Amanda; Vidarsdottir, Linda; Lui, Weng-Onn; Corcoran, Martin; Grandér, Dan; Morris, Kevin V.

    2013-01-01

    PTEN is a tumor suppressor gene that has been shown to be under the regulatory control of a PTEN pseudogene expressed noncoding RNA, PTENpg1. Here, we characterize a previously unidentified PTENpg1 encoded antisense RNA (asRNA), which regulates PTEN transcription and PTEN mRNA stability. We find two PTENpg1 asRNA isoforms, alpha and beta. The alpha isoform functions in trans, localizes to the PTEN promoter, and epigenetically modulates PTEN transcription by the recruitment of DNMT3a and EZH2. In contrast, the beta isoform interacts with PTENpg1 through an RNA:RNA pairing interaction, which affects PTEN protein output via changes of PTENpg1 stability and microRNA sponge activity. Disruption of this asRNA-regulated network induces cell cycle arrest and sensitizes cells to doxorubicin, suggesting a biological function for the respective PTENpg1 expressed asRNAs. PMID:23435381

  17. Conformational stability and catalytic activity of PTEN variants linked to cancers and autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Sean B; Raines, Ronald T

    2015-02-24

    Phosphoinositides are membrane components that play critical regulatory roles in mammalian cells. The enzyme PTEN, which catalyzes the dephosphorylation of the phosphoinositide PIP3, is damaged in most sporadic tumors. Mutations in the PTEN gene have also been linked to autism spectrum disorders and other forms of delayed development. Here, human PTEN is shown to be on the cusp of unfolding under physiological conditions. Variants of human PTEN linked to somatic cancers and disorders on the autism spectrum are shown to be impaired in their conformational stability, catalytic activity, or both. Those variants linked only to autism have activity higher than the activity of those linked to cancers. PTEN-L, which is a secreted trans-active isoform, has conformational stability greater than that of the wild-type enzyme. These data indicate that PTEN is a fragile enzyme cast in a crucial role in cellular metabolism and suggest that PTEN-L is a repository for a critical catalytic activity.

  18. Use of an artificial pancreas as a tool to determine subcutaneous insulin doses in juvenile diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lambert, A E; Buysschaert, M; Lambotte, L

    1979-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to examine the feasibility of determining the most appropriate subcutaneous insulin treatment in unstable diabetes on the basis of the circadian hormonal profile delivered by an artificial pancreas. The metabolic control of 11 brittle diabetic subjects, as assessed by the M value and the MAGE index (used as indexes of blood glucose control and of glycemic fluctuations, respectively), was compared during a 5-day period before and after a 24-h connection to the artificial pancreas. The usual insulin treatment was continued to that day. Examination of the insulin pattern revealed by the artificial pancreas suggested that a valid scheme for subsequent treatment should consist of two daily injections of a mixture of short-acting and intermediate-acting insulins, which was administered to the patients beginning with the injection given after the artificial pancreas onwards. The new insulin regimen was characterized by a total daily dose that increased from 0.93 +/- 0.10 to 1.20 +/- 0.10 U/kg body weight (mean +/- SEM; P less than 0.005) as well as by a higher proportion of the dose given as regular insulin (37.1 +/- 6.9% before vs. 56.0 +/- 2.1% after; P less than 0.05). These changes led to a better control of blood glucose in 10 patients, as evidenced by a decrease of both the M value and the mean of all blood glucose levels. The mean MAGE index was not decreased, however, by the new insulin program, thereby suggesting that the lability of the disease remained unabated. These results indicate that subcutaneous treatment consisting of two daily injections of regular and intermediate-acting insulins and comprising 50 to 60% of the former could improve the metabolic control in unstable diabetes. The artifical pancreas provided a rapid and simple means to determine the appropriate doses for each type of insulin.

  19. PTEN mRNA expression is less pronounced in left- than right-sided colon cancer: a retrospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Kuramochi, Hidekazu; Nakamura, Ayako; Nakajima, Go; Kaneko, Yuka; Araida, Tatsuo; Yamamoto, Masakazu; Hayashi, Kazuhiko

    2016-06-13

    Several recent studies have reported that patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) whose primary tumor is located in left side of the colon have more favorable responses to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antibody therapy than those with right-sided tumors. However, the mechanism for this phenomenon is unknown. Fifty-two cases of primary CRC with liver metastases were analyzed in this retrospective study. The mRNA levels of 19 signal transduction genes in both primary tumor and liver metastases were measured by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The purposes of this study were (1) to determine the correspondence between signal transduction gene expressions in primary tumors and corresponding liver metastases, and (2) to determine whether expression levels of these genes differ by primary tumor location. mRNA expression levels of 14 of 19 signal transduction genes, including PTEN, ERBB2, MET, HGF, AREG, and EREG, showed significant correlations between the primary tumor and corresponding liver metastases. When the mRNA levels of the primary tumors were compared by tumor location, only PTEN mRNA expression differed significantly between left and right-sided CRC (median PTEN expression: left 1.00 vs. right 1.68; p = 0.017). When rectal cancers were separated from left-sided colon cancers, PTEN mRNA levels increased progressively from rectum to right-sided colon (median; rectum 0.84, left colon 1.23, right colon 1.68, p = 0.013). PTEN mRNA expression in liver metastases also differed significantly according to primary tumor location (median; left 0.92 vs. right 1.27, p = 0.048). There was no difference in overall survival between patients with high versus low levels of PTEN mRNA (p = 0.59). Our data suggest that the PIK3/AKT/mTOR pathway is more active in left- than right-sided CRC, which provides a possible explanation for the fact that efficacy of anti-EGFR therapy differs by location of primary tumor.

  20. Calculation algorithm for determination of dose versus LET using recombination method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrzyńska, Magdalena

    2015-09-01

    Biological effectiveness of any type of radiation can be related to absorbed dose versus linear energy transfer (LET) associated with the particular radiation field. In complex radiation fields containing neutrons, especially in fields of high-energy particles or in stray radiation fields, radiation quality factor can be determined using detectors which response depends on LET. Recombination chambers, which are high-pressure, tissue equivalent ionization chambers operating under conditions of initial recombination of ions form a class of such detectors. Recombination Microdosimetric Method (RMM) is based on analysis of the shape of current-voltage characteristic (saturation curve) of recombination chamber. The ion collection process in the chamber is described by theoretical formula that contains a number of coefficients which depend on LET. The coefficients are calculated by fitting the shape of the theoretical curve to the experimental data. The purpose of the present project was to develop such a program for determination of radiation quality factor, basing on calculation of dose distribution versus LET using RMM.

  1. Determination of photon conversion factors relating exposure and dose for several extremity phantom designs

    SciTech Connect

    Roberson, P.L.; Eichner, F.N.; Reece, W.D.

    1986-09-01

    This report presents the results of measurements of dosimetric properties of simple extremity phantoms suitable for use in extremity dosimeter performance testing. Two sizes of phantoms were used in this study. One size represented the forearm or lower leg and the other size represented the finger or toe. For both phantom sizes, measurements were performed on solid plastic phantoms and on phantoms containing simulated bone material to determine the effect of backscattered radiations from the bone on the surface dose. Exposure-to-dose conversion factors (C/sub x/ factors) were determined for photon energies ranging from 16 to 1250 keV (average for /sup 60/Co). The effect of the presence of a phantom was also measured for a /sup 90/Sr//sup 90/Y source. Significant differences in the measured C/sub x/ factors were found among the phantoms investigated. The factors for the finger-sized phantoms were uniformly less than for the arm-sized phantoms.

  2. Shielding application of perturbation theory to determine changes in neutron and gamma doses due to changes in shield layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fieno, D.

    1972-01-01

    Perturbation theory formulas were derived and applied to determine changes in neutron and gamma-ray doses due to changes in various radiation shield layers for fixed sources. For a given source and detector position, the perturbation method enables dose derivatives with respect to density, or equivalently thickness, for every layer to be determined from one forward and one inhomogeneous adjoint calculation. A direct determination without the perturbation approach would require two forward calculations to evaluate the dose derivative due to a change in a single layer. Hence, the perturbation method for obtaining dose derivatives requires fewer computations for design studies of multilayer shields. For an illustrative problem, a comparison was made of the fractional change in the dose per unit change in the thickness of each shield layer in a two-layer spherical configuration as calculated by perturbation theory and by successive direct calculations; excellent agreement was obtained between the two methods.

  3. PCP METHODOLOGY FOR DETERMINING DOSE RATES FOR SMALL GRAM QUANTITIES IN SHIPPING PACKAGINGS

    SciTech Connect

    Nathan, S.

    2011-08-23

    The Small Gram Quantity (SGQ) concept is based on the understanding that small amounts of hazardous materials, in this case radioactive materials, are significantly less hazardous than large amounts of the same materials. This study describes a methodology designed to estimate an SGQ for several neutron and gamma emitting isotopes that can be shipped in a package compliant with 10 CFR Part 71 external radiation level limits regulations. These regulations require packaging for the shipment of radioactive materials perform, under both normal and accident conditions, the essential functions of material containment, subcriticality, and maintain external radiation levels within regulatory limits. 10 CFR 71.33(b)(1)(2)&(3) state radioactive and fissile materials must be identified and their maximum quantity, chemical and physical forms be included in an application. Furthermore, the U.S. Federal Regulations require application contain an evaluation demonstrating the package (i.e., the packaging and its contents) satisfies the external radiation standards for all packages (10 CFR 71.31(2), 71.35(a), & 71.47). By placing the contents in a He leak-tight containment vessel, and limiting the mass to ensure subcriticality, the first two essential functions are readily met. Some isotopes emit sufficiently strong photon radiation that small amounts of material can yield a large external dose rate. Quantifying of the dose rate for a proposed content is a challenging issue for the SGQ approach. It is essential to quantify external radiation levels from several common gamma and neutron sources that can be safely placed in a specific packaging, to ensure compliance with federal regulations. The Packaging Certification Program (PCP) Methodology for Determining Dose Rate for Small Gram Quantities in Shipping Packagings described in this report provides bounding mass limits for a set of proposed SGQ isotopes. Methodology calculations were performed to estimate external radiation levels

  4. Novel, gross chromosomal alterations involving PTEN cooperate with allelic loss in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Reid, Alison H M; Attard, Gerhardt; Brewer, Daniel; Miranda, Susana; Riisnaes, Ruth; Clark, Jeremy; Hylands, Lucy; Merson, Sue; Vergis, Roy; Jameson, Charles; Høyer, Søren; Sørenson, Karina Dalsgaard; Borre, Michael; Jones, Chris; de Bono, Johann S; Cooper, Colin S

    2012-06-01

    There is increasing evidence that multiple chromosomal rearrangements occur in prostate cancer. PTEN loss is considered to be a key event in prostate carcinogenesis but the mechanisms of loss remain to be fully elucidated. We hypothesised that gross rearrangements may exist that cause disruption of the PTEN gene in the absence of genomic deletion. We therefore designed a novel fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) assay with probes overlying regions 3' and 5' of PTEN and a third probe overlying the gene. We aimed to identify both genomic deletions and gross rearrangements of PTEN that would be overlooked by previously reported single-probe FISH assays. We proceeded to evaluate a tissue microarray with radical prostatectomy and trans-urethral resection of the prostate specimens from 187 patients. We identified PTEN genomic loss in 45/150 (30%) radical prostatectomy patients and 16/37 (43%) trans-urethral resection of the prostate patients. Importantly, our assay detected novel chromosomal alterations in the PTEN gene (characterised by splitting of FISH signals) in 13 tumours (6.9% of all prostate cancers; 21% of PTEN-lost cancers). All PTEN-rearranged tumours had genomic loss at the other allele and had no expression of PTEN by immunohistochemistry. PTEN-rearranged tumours were significantly more likely to have an underlying ERG rearrangement. Our assay differentiated loss of the probe overlying PTEN in isolation or in combination with either one of or both the probes overlying the 3' and 5' regions. This gave an indication of the size of genomic loss and we observed considerable inter-tumoural heterogeneity in the extent of genomic loss in PTEN-lost tumours. In summary, gross rearrangements of the PTEN locus occur in prostate cancer and can be detected by a 'break-apart' FISH assay. This observation could explain the absence of PTEN protein expression in a subgroup of tumours previously classified as having heterozygous genomic loss using single

  5. The mechanism involved in the loss of PTEN expression in NSCLC tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Gang; Zhao, Jingfeng; Peng, Xianjing; Liang, Jian; Deng, Xin; Chen, Yuxiang

    2012-02-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Radiation stimulates PTEN reexpression in NSCLC independent of p53 activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PTEN reexpression is mediated by miR-29b overexpression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-29b regulates Dnmts expression in NSCLC tumor cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Target therapy could be established by overexpressing miR-29b expression. -- Abstract: Loss of PTEN expression is observed in most non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC). However, the mechanism by which PTEN expression is regulated in NSCLC has not been fully elucidated. In this study, we investigated the role of DNA methyltransferases (Dnmts), microRNA-29b (miR-29b), and anti-miR-29b inhibitor in PTEN promoter methylation and PTEN gene expression in H358 NSCLC cells in vitro and in vivo. PTEN mRNA was measured by RT-PCR. PTEN and Dnmts protein levels were measured by Western blot. miR-29b expression was detected by Northern blot. A xenograft H358 tumor mouse model was established by subcutaneously inoculating H358 cells into the right hind limbs of nude mice. We found that radiation induced cell apoptosis and hypomethylation in PTEN promoter, PTEN and miR-29b expression, and downregulation of Dnmt1, 3a and 3b expression in H358 tumor cells. The effect of radiation on gene expression and apoptosis was blocked by anti-miR-29b inhibitor. In the xenograft H358 tumor model, anti-miR-29b inhibitor reversed radiation-induced tumor growth delay, PTEN reexpression and downregulation of Dnmts expression. Our study suggested that miR-29b is an upstream molecule of PTEN. miR-29b regulates PTEN gene expression through downregulating Dnmts expression and subsequently induces hypomethylation in PTEN promoter. Targeting therapy could be established in NSCLC by upregulating miR-29b expression.

  6. Enzymatic Analysis of PTEN Ubiquitylation by WWP2 and NEDD4-1 E3 Ligases

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zan; Thomas, Stefani N.; Bolduc, David M.; Jiang, Xuejun; Zhang, Xiangbin; Wolberger, Cynthia; Cole, Philip A.

    2016-01-01

    PTEN is a lipid phosphatase that converts phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-phosphate (PIP3) to phosphatidylinositol 4,5-phosphate (PIP2) and plays a critical role in the regulation of tumor growth. PTEN is subject to regulation by a variety of post-translational modifications, including phosphorylation on a C-terminal cluster of four Ser/Thr residues (380, 382, 383, and 385) and ubiquitylation by various E3 ligases, including NEDD4-1 and WWP2. It has previously been shown that C-terminal phosphorylation of PTEN can increase its cellular half-life. Using in vitro ubiquitin transfer assays, we show that WWP2 is more active than NEDD4-1 in ubiquitylating unphosphorylated PTEN. The mapping of ubiquitylation sites in PTEN by mass spectrometry showed that both NEDD4-1 and WWP2 can target a broad range of Lys residues in PTEN, although NEDD4-1 versus WWP2 showed a stronger preference for ubiquitylating PTEN's C2 domain. Whereas tetraphosphorylation of PTEN did not significantly affect its ubiquitylation by NEDD4-1, it inhibited PTEN ubiquitylation by WWP2. Single-turnover and pull-down experiments suggested that tetraphosphorylation of PTEN appears to weaken its interaction with WWP2. These studies reveal how the PTEN E3 ligases WWP2 and NEDD4-1 exhibit distinctive properties in Lys selectivity and sensitivity to PTEN phosphorylation. Our findings also provide a molecular mechanism for the connection between PTEN Ser/Thr phosphorylation and PTEN's cellular stability. PMID:27295432

  7. TMPRSS2-ERG and PTEN loss in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Squire, Jeremy A

    2009-05-01

    Two studies show that the common recurrent gene fusion between TMPRSS2 and ERG promotes prostate cancer in both mouse and humans when PTEN is concurrently lost. In human prostate cancer, the presence of both these aberrations may be indicative of poor prognosis, suggesting that preclinical therapeutic research should target both of these pathways.

  8. Modulation in Activation and Expression of PTEN, Akt1, and PDK1: Further Evidence Demonstrating Altered Phosphoinositide 3-kinase Signaling in Postmortem Brain of Suicide Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Dwivedi, Yogesh; Rizavi, Hooriyah S.; Zhang, Hui; Roberts, Rosalinda C.; Conley, Robert R.; Pandey, Ghanshyam N.

    2010-01-01

    Background Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI 3-K) signaling plays a crucial role in neuronal growth and plasticity. Recently, we demonstrated that suicide brain is associated with decreased activation and expression of selective catalytic and regulatory subunits of PI 3-K. The present investigation examined the regulation and functional significance of compromised PI 3-K in suicide brain at the level of upstream phosphatase and tensin homolog on chromosome ten (PTEN) and downstream substrates 3-phosphoinositide-dependent kinase 1 (PDK1) and Akt. Method mRNA expression of Akt1, Akt3, PTEN, and PDK1 by competitive RT-PCR; protein expression of Akt1, Akt3, PTEN, PDK1, phosphorylated-Akt1 (Ser473), phosphorylated-Akt1(Thr308), phosphorylated-PDK1, and phosphorylated-PTEN by Western blot; and catalytic activities of Akt1, Akt3, and PDK1 by enzymatic assays were determined in prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus obtained from suicide subjects and nonpsychiatric controls. Results No significant changes in the expression of Akt1 or Akt3 were observed; however, catalytic activity of Akt1, but not of Akt3, was decreased in PFC and hippocampus of suicide subjects, which was associated with decreased phosphorylation of Akt1 at Ser473 and Thr308. The catalytic activity of PDK1 and the level of phosphorylated-PDK1 were also decreased in both brain areas without any change in expression levels of PDK1. On the other hand, mRNA and protein expression of PTEN was increased, whereas the level of phosphorylated-PTEN was decreased. Conclusion Our study demonstrates abnormalities in PI 3-K signaling at several levels in brain of suicide subjects and suggests the possible involvement of aberrant PI 3-K/Akt signaling in the pathogenic mechanisms of suicide. PMID:20163786

  9. A high-throughput screen with isogenic PTEN+/+ and PTEN-/- cells identifies CID1340132 as a novel compound that induces apoptosis in PTEN and PIK3CA mutant human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui-Fang; Keeton, Adam; Vitolo, Michele; Maddox, Clinton; Rasmussen, Lynn; Hobrath, Judith; White, E Lucille; Park, Ben Ho; Piazza, Gary A; Kim, Jung-Sik; Waldman, Todd

    2011-04-01

    The PTEN tumor suppressor gene is one of the most commonly mutated genes in human cancer. Because inactivation of PTEN is a somatic event, PTEN mutations represent an important genetic difference between cancer cells and normal cells and therefore a potential anticancer drug target. However, it remains a substantial challenge to identify compounds that target loss-of-function events such as mutations of tumor suppressors. In an effort to identify small molecules that preferentially kill cells with mutations of PTEN, the authors developed and implemented a high-throughput, paired cell-based screen composed of parental HCT116 cells and their PTEN gene-targeted derivatives. From 138 758 compounds tested, two hits were identified, and one, N'-[(1-benzyl-1H-indol-3-yl)methylene]benzenesulfonohydrazide (CID1340132), was further studied using a variety of cell-based models, including HCT116, MCF10A, and HEC1A cells with targeted deletion of either their PTEN or PIK3CA genes. Preferential killing of PTEN and PIK3CA mutant cells was accompanied by DNA damage, inhibition of DNA synthesis, and apoptosis. Taken together, these data validate a cell-based screening approach for identifying lead compounds that target cells with specific tumor suppressor gene mutations and describe a novel compound with preferential killing activity toward PTEN and PIK3CA mutant cells.

  10. Relevance of miR-21 in regulation of tumor suppressor gene PTEN in human cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Peralta-Zaragoza, Oscar; Deas, Jessica; Meneses-Acosta, Angélica; De la O-Gómez, Faustino; Fernández-Tilapa, Gloria; Gómez-Cerón, Claudia; Benítez-Boijseauneau, Odelia; Burguete-García, Ana; Torres-Poveda, Kirvis; Bermúdez-Morales, Victor Hugo; Madrid-Marina, Vicente; Rodríguez-Dorantes, Mauricio; Hidalgo-Miranda, Alfredo; Pérez-Plasencia, Carlos

    2016-03-14

    Expression of the microRNA miR-21 has been found to be altered in almost all types of cancers and it has been classified as an oncogenic microRNA or oncomir. Due to the critical functions of its target proteins in various signaling pathways, miR-21 is an attractive target for genetic and pharmacological modulation in various cancers. Cervical cancer is the second most common cause of death from cancer in women worldwide and persistent HPV infection is the main etiologic agent. This malignancy merits special attention for the development of new treatment strategies. In the present study we analyze the role of miR-21 in cervical cancer cells. To identify the downstream cellular target genes of upstream miR-21, we silenced endogenous miR-21 expression in a cervical intraepithelial neoplasia-derived cell lines using siRNAs. The effect of miR-21 on gene expression was assessed in cervical cancer cells transfected with the siRNA expression plasmid pSIMIR21. We identified the tumor suppressor gene PTEN as a target of miR-21 and determined the mechanism of its regulation throughout reporter construct plasmids. Using this model, we analyzed the expression of miR-21 and PTEN as well as functional effects such as autophagy and apoptosis induction. In SiHa cells, there was an inverse correlation between miR-21 expression and PTEN mRNA level as well as PTEN protein expression in cervical cancer cells. Transfection with the pSIMIR21 plasmid increased luciferase reporter activity in construct plasmids containing the PTEN-3'-UTR microRNA response elements MRE21-1 and MRE21-2. The role of miR-21 in cell proliferation was also analyzed in SiHa and HeLa cells transfected with the pSIMIR21 plasmid, and tumor cells exhibited markedly reduced cell proliferation along with autophagy and apoptosis induction. We conclude that miR-21 post-transcriptionally down-regulates the expression of PTEN to promote cell proliferation and cervical cancer cell survival. Therefore, it may be a potential

  11. Clinical outcome of henipavirus infection in hamsters is determined by the route and dose of infection.

    PubMed

    Rockx, Barry; Brining, Douglas; Kramer, Joshua; Callison, Julie; Ebihara, Hideki; Mansfield, Keith; Feldmann, Heinz

    2011-08-01

    Nipah virus (NiV) and Hendra virus (HeV) are emerging zoonotic viruses and the causative agents of severe respiratory disease and encephalitis in humans. Little is known about the mechanisms that govern the development of respiratory and neurological disease. Using a hamster model of lethal NiV and HeV infection, we describe the role of the route and dose of infection on the clinical outcome and determine virus tropism and host responses following infection. Infection of hamster with a high dose of NiV or HeV resulted in acute respiratory distress. NiV initially replicated in the upper respiratory tract epithelium, whereas HeV initiated infection primarily in the interstitium. In contrast, infection with a low dose of NiV or HeV resulted in the development of neurological signs and more systemic spread of the virus through involvement of the endothelium. The development of neurological signs coincided with disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and expression of tumor necrosis alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin 1 β (IL-1β). In addition, interferon-inducible protein 10 (IP-10) was identified as playing an important role in NiV and HeV pathogenesis. These studies reveal novel information on the development and progression of NiV and HeV clinical disease, provide a mechanism for the differences in transmission observed between NiV and HeV outbreaks, and identify specific cytokines and chemokines that serve as important targets for treatment.

  12. Determination of the threshold dose distribution in photodynamic action from in vitro experiments.

    PubMed

    de Faria, Clara Maria Gonçalves; Inada, Natalia Mayumi; Kurachi, Cristina; Bagnato, Vanderlei Salvador

    2016-09-01

    The concept of threshold in photodynamic action on cells or microorganisms is well observed in experiments but not fully explored on in vitro experiments. The intercomparison between light and used photosensitizer among many experiments is also poorly evaluated. In this report, we present an analytical model that allows extracting from the survival rate experiments the data of the threshold dose distribution, ie, the distribution of energies and photosensitizer concentration necessary to produce death of cells. Then, we use this model to investigate photodynamic therapy (PDT) data previously published in literature. The concept of threshold dose distribution instead of "single value of threshold" is a rich concept for the comparison of photodynamic action in different situations, allowing analyses of its efficiency as well as determination of optimized conditions for PDT. We observed that, in general, as it becomes more difficult to kill a population, the distribution tends to broaden, which means it presents a large spectrum of threshold values within the same cell type population. From the distribution parameters (center peak and full width), we also observed a clear distinction among cell types regarding their response to PDT that can be quantified. Comparing data obtained from the same cell line and used photosensitizer (PS), where the only distinct condition was the light source's wavelength, we found that the differences on the distribution parameters were comparable to the differences on the PS absorption. At last, we observed evidence that the threshold dose distribution matches the curve of apoptotic activity for some PSs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Determination of the absorbed dose and the average LET of space radiation in dependence on shielding conditions.

    PubMed

    Vana, N; Schoner, W; Noll, M; Fugger, M; Akatov, Y; Shurshakov, V

    1999-01-01

    The HTR method, developed for determination of absorbed dose and average LET of mixed radiation fields in space, was applied during several space missions on space station MIR, space shuttles and satellites. The method utilises the changes of peak height ratios in the glow curves in dependence on the linear energy transfer LET. Due to the small size of the dosemeters the evaluation of the variation of absorbed dose and average LET in dependence on the position of the dosemeters inside the space station is possible. The dose and LET distribution was determined during the experiment ADLET where dosemeters were exposed in two positions with different shielding conditions and during two following experiments (MIR-95, MIR-96) using six positions inside the space station. The results were compared with the shielding conditions of the positions. Calculations of the absorbed dose were carried out for comparison. Results have shown that the average LET increases with increasing absorbing thickness while the absorbed dose decreases.

  14. The QDREC web server: determining dose-response characteristics of complex macroparasites in phenotypic drug screens.

    PubMed

    Asarnow, Daniel; Rojo-Arreola, Liliana; Suzuki, Brian M; Caffrey, Conor R; Singh, Rahul

    2015-05-01

    Neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) caused by helminths constitute some of the most common infections of the world's poorest people. The etiological agents are complex and recalcitrant to standard techniques of molecular biology. Drug screening against helminths has often been phenotypic and typically involves manual description of drug effect and efficacy. A key challenge is to develop automated, quantitative approaches to drug screening against helminth diseases. The quantal dose-response calculator (QDREC) constitutes a significant step in this direction. It can be used to automatically determine quantitative dose-response characteristics and half-maximal effective concentration (EC50) values using image-based readouts from phenotypic screens, thereby allowing rigorous comparisons of the efficacies of drug compounds. QDREC has been developed and validated in the context of drug screening for schistosomiasis, one of the most important NTDs. However, it is equally applicable to general phenotypic screening involving helminths and other complex parasites. QDREC is publically available at: http://haddock4.sfsu.edu/qdrec2/. Source code and datasets are at: http://tintin.sfsu.edu/projects/phenotypicAssays.html. rahul@sfsu.edu. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Modeling and simulation in dose determination for biodefense products approved under the FDA animal rule.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Kimberly L; Krudys, K; Seo, S K; Florian, J

    2017-04-01

    Development of effective medical countermeasures for biodefense is vital to United States biopreparedness and response in the age of terrorism, both foreign and domestic. A traditional drug development pathway toward approval is not possible for most biodefense-related indications, creating the need for alternative development pathways such as the FDA's Animal Rule. Under this unique regulatory mechanism, FDA-approval is based on adequate and well-controlled animal studies when it is neither ethical nor feasible to conduct human efficacy studies. Translation of animal efficacy findings to humans is accomplished by use of modeling and simulation techniques. Pharmacokinetic and exposure-response modeling allow effective dosing regimens in humans to be identified, which are expected to produce similar benefit to that observed in animal models of disease. In this review, the role of modeling and simulation in determining the human dose for biodefense products developed under the Food and Drug Administration's Animal Rule regulatory pathway is discussed, and case studies illustrating the utility of modeling and simulation in this area of development are presented.

  16. Using Monte Carlo simulation to determine optimal dosing regimen for cefetamet sodium for injection.

    PubMed

    Li, Caizheng; Sun, Jiayu; Miao, Jia; Qin, Yongping; Wang, Ying; Yu, Rujia; Xiao, Yonghong

    2016-06-01

    The objective of the study was to use Monte Carlo simulation to determine the optimal treatment dosing regimen of the cefetamet sodium for injection by analysing the pharmacokinetics (PK) parameters in healthy Chinese volunteers, and antibacterial activity in vitro was also examined. A three-cross Latin square single-dose PK study was designed. Twelve healthy volunteers were randomized to receive 500, 1000, and 2000 mg of cefetamet sodium for IV infusion over 30 minutes in three periods sequentially; and the washout time in between periods was 3 days. The drug concentrations in plasma were analysed by high-performance liquid chromatography, and the PK parameters were calculated using DAS2.0 PK software. The peak concentrations (Cmax) at 0.5 hours were 37.78±7.29, 76.18±12.81, and 149.32±29.94 mg/l, the areas under concentration-time curve (AUC0-t) were 69.75±14.44, 139.06±22.62, and 278.54±53.12 mg h/l, and the elimination half-life (t1/2) were 1.69±0.19, 1.69±0.27, and 1.81±0.23 hours for 500, 1000, and 2000 mg of cefetamet sodium for injection, respectively. The disposition of cefetamet was appear to fit a two-compartment model with linear kinetics. Antibacterial activity in vitro showed that most Gram-negative bacteria, including non-extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBL)-producing Enterobacter, Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis, and Neisseria gonorrhoeae, were sensitive to cefetamet. The result of Monte Carlo simulation showed that the probability of target attainment for bactericidal response (%fT>MIC≧50%) for susceptible bacteria was reached at all three dosing regimens of 500 mg, q6h, 1000 and 2000 mg, q8h and q6h. Considering the efficacy, safety, and pharmacoeconomy comprehensively, we recommended the dosing regimen of 500 mg, q6h for further clinical treatment based on the principle of minimum daily dosage.

  17. MicroRNA-486-dependent modulation of DOCK3/PTEN/AKT signaling pathways improves muscular dystrophy-associated symptoms.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Matthew S; Casar, Juan Carlos; Motohashi, Norio; Vieira, Natássia M; Eisenberg, Iris; Marshall, Jamie L; Gasperini, Molly J; Lek, Angela; Myers, Jennifer A; Estrella, Elicia A; Kang, Peter B; Shapiro, Frederic; Rahimov, Fedik; Kawahara, Genri; Widrick, Jeffrey J; Kunkel, Louis M

    2014-06-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is caused by mutations in the gene encoding dystrophin, which results in dysfunctional signaling pathways within muscle. Previously, we identified microRNA-486 (miR-486) as a muscle-enriched microRNA that is markedly reduced in the muscles of dystrophin-deficient mice (Dmdmdx-5Cv mice) and in DMD patient muscles. Here, we determined that muscle-specific transgenic overexpression of miR-486 in muscle of Dmdmdx-5Cv mice results in reduced serum creatine kinase levels, improved sarcolemmal integrity, fewer centralized myonuclei, increased myofiber size, and improved muscle physiology and performance. Additionally, we identified dedicator of cytokinesis 3 (DOCK3) as a miR-486 target in skeletal muscle and determined that DOCK3 expression is induced in dystrophic muscles. DOCK3 overexpression in human myotubes modulated PTEN/AKT signaling, which regulates muscle hypertrophy and growth, and induced apoptosis. Furthermore, several components of the PTEN/AKT pathway were markedly modulated by miR-486 in dystrophin-deficient muscle. Skeletal muscle-specific miR-486 overexpression in Dmdmdx-5Cv animals decreased levels of DOCK3, reduced PTEN expression, and subsequently increased levels of phosphorylated AKT, which resulted in an overall beneficial effect. Together, these studies demonstrate that stable overexpression of miR-486 ameliorates the disease progression of dystrophin-deficient skeletal muscle.

  18. Determination of dose-build-up thickness for absorbed dose measurement in high energy electron-photon radiation at electron storage rings.

    PubMed

    Nair, Haridas G; Dev, Vipin; Nayak, M K; Thakkar, K K; Sarkar, P K; Sharma, D N

    2006-01-01

    Radiation field during accidental electron beam loss near electron storage rings comprises of high-energy electrons and bremsstrahlung photons. Due to high-energy nature of the radiation, the absorbed dose is expected to build up with depth of the body of an exposed worker and hence absorbed dose measurements in 30 cm water/tissue equivalent phantom is essential. Carrying out the measurements with in such phantoms is not practically feasible for routine applications and hence the use of an equivalent solid material around the dosemeters would be convenient. Monte Carlo calculations have been carried out in order to determine the dose-build-up thickness required in copper and lead, corresponding to the maximum absorbed within 30 cm depth of water in such radiation fields. Equivalent build-up thickness calculated for a case was verified by measurement using an ion chamber detector. The results are found to be in agreement within +/-20%.

  19. High-resolution Structures of Protein-Membrane Complexes by Neutron Reflection and MD Simulation: Membrane Association of the PTEN Tumor Suppressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lösche, Matthias

    2012-02-01

    The lipid matrix of biomembranes is an in-plane fluid, thermally and compositionally disordered leaflet of 5 nm thickness and notoriously difficult to characterize in structural terms. Yet, biomembranes are ubiquitous in the cell, and membrane-bound proteins are implicated in a variety of signaling pathways and intra-cellular transport. We developed methodology to study proteins associated with model membranes using neutron reflection measurements and showed recently that this approach can resolve the penetration depth and orientation of membrane proteins with ångstrom resolution if their crystal or NMR structure is known. Here we apply this technology to determine the membrane bindung and unravel functional details of the PTEN phosphatase, a key player in the PI3K apoptosis pathway. PTEN is an important regulatory protein and tumor suppressor that performs its phosphatase activity as an interfacial enzyme at the plasma membrane-cytoplasm boundary. Acting as an antagonist to phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) in cell signaling, it is deleted in many human cancers. Despite its importance in regulating the levels of the phosphoinositoltriphosphate PI(3,4,5)P3, there is little understanding of how PTEN binds to membranes, is activated and then acts as a phosphatase. We investigated the structure and function of PTEN by studying its membrane affinity and localization on in-plane fluid, thermally disordered synthetic membrane models. The membrane association of the protein depends strongly on membrane composition, where phosphatidylserine (PS) and phosphatidylinositol diphosphate (PI(4,5)P2) act synergetically in attracting the enzyme to the membrane surface. Membrane affinities depend strongly on membrane fluidity, which suggests multiple binding sites on the protein for PI(4,5)P2. Neutron reflection measurements show that the PTEN phosphatase ``scoots'' along the membrane surface (penetration < 5 å) but binds the membrane tightly with its two major domains, the C2 and

  20. The experimental determination of C lambda using an absorbed dose calorimeter.

    PubMed

    Williams, P C

    1980-01-01

    The absorbed dose conversion factors, C lambda, were introduced, by Greene and Massey, as an interim measure until a primary standard for high energy photon dosimetry could be established. The theoretical basis of these factors has been discussed extensively and a more rigorous definition has emerged. Experiments have been carried out to determine the values of C lambda, for a Tufnol walled, Baldwin-Farmer ionisation chamber over a range of energies from cobalt-60 to 12 MV. The experimental results, based on measurements with a calorimeter, presented here support the more rigorous definition but it is shown that the values obtained depend, to a small extent, on the assumptions made about the detailed construction of the ionisation chamber for which C lambda is measured.

  1. RECOVERY OF A TRITIATED LANA SAMPLE FOR DOSE CONVERSION FACTOR DETERMINATION

    SciTech Connect

    Staack, G.

    2010-11-12

    The purpose of this work is to develop a technical basis for both estimating the dose of a worker exposed to respirable tritiated LaNi{sub 4.25}Al{sub 0.75} (LANA) and implementing hazard appropriate controls. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has agreed to provide Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute (LRRI) with a tritiated LANA sample. LRRI will determine the particle size distribution (PSD) as well as perform dissolution rate studies on the sample in serum ultrafiltrate (SUF), a simulated lung fluid. The rate of tritium release from the sample will be measured over a three month period. Tritium release rate information will be used to calculate a DCF for respirable tritiated LANA.

  2. PTEN mutations in endometrial carcinomas: a molecular and clinicopathologic analysis of 38 cases.

    PubMed

    Bussaglia, E; del Rio, E; Matias-Guiu, X; Prat, J

    2000-03-01

    PTEN mutations have been reported to be frequent in endometrioid carinomas of the endometrium (EEC). Some correlation has been found between PTEN mutations and the presence of microsatellite instability (MI) in EEC, but no convincing cause-effect relationship for such association has been offered. DNA of 38 patients with endometrial carcinoma (EC) was extracted from blood and from fresh-frozen and paraffin-embedded tumor tissue. PTEN mutations were detected by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis and DNA sequencing. Results were correlated with MI status and clinicopathologic data. PTEN mutations were detected in 17 tumors (44.7%), and they were more frequent in endometrioid (EEC) (17 of 33, 51.5%) than in nonendometrioid carcinomas (NEEC) (0 of 5, 0%). PTEN mutational spectrum differed between MI+ and MItumors. PTEN mutations were detected in 9 of 15 MI+ tumors (60%), but in only 8 of 23 MI- neoplasms (34.8%). In EC with MI, PTEN mutations were detected in short coding mononucleotide repeats (A)s and (A)6 in 4 of 9 carcinomas (44.4%). These results confirm that PTEN is an important target gene in endometrial carcinogenesis. The occurrence of PTEN mutations in short coding mononucleotide repeats in MI-positive tumors suggests that these mutations may be secondary to deficiencies in mismatch repair and gives some explanation for the frequent presence of PTEN mutations in these tumors.

  3. Coordinate suppression of B cell lymphoma by PTEN and SHIP phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Miletic, Ana V; Anzelon-Mills, Amy N; Mills, David M; Omori, Sidne A; Pedersen, Irene M; Shin, Dong-Mi; Ravetch, Jeffrey V; Bolland, Silvia; Morse, Herbert C; Rickert, Robert C

    2010-10-25

    The inositol phosphatases phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) and Src homology 2 domain-containing inositol phosphatase (SHIP) negatively regulate phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)-mediated growth, survival, and proliferation of hematopoietic cells. Although deletion of PTEN in mouse T cells results in lethal T cell lymphomas, we find that animals lacking PTEN or SHIP in B cells show no evidence of malignancy. However, concomitant deletion of PTEN and SHIP (bPTEN/SHIP(-/-)) results in spontaneous and lethal mature B cell neoplasms consistent with marginal zone lymphoma or, less frequently, follicular or centroblastic lymphoma. bPTEN/SHIP(-/-) B cells exhibit enhanced survival and express more MCL1 and less Bim. These cells also express low amounts of p27(kip1) and high amounts of cyclin D3 and thus appear poised to undergo proliferative expansion. Unlike normal B cells, bPTEN/SHIP(-/-) B cells proliferate to the prosurvival factor B cell activating factor (BAFF). Interestingly, although BAFF availability may promote lymphoma progression, we demonstrate that BAFF is not required for the expansion of transferred bPTEN/SHIP(-/-) B cells. This study reveals that PTEN and SHIP act cooperatively to suppress B cell lymphoma and provides the first direct evidence that SHIP is a tumor suppressor. As such, assessment of both PTEN and SHIP function are relevant to understanding the etiology of human B cell malignancies that exhibit augmented activation of the PI3K pathway.

  4. Pharmacological dose of {alpha}-tocopherol induces cardiotoxicity in Wistar rats determined by echocardiography and histology.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Maria Carolina M O; Matsubara, Beatriz B; Matsubara, Luiz S; Correa, Camila R; Pereira, Elenize J; Moreira, Priscila L; Carvalho, Flavio A; Burini, Caio H; Padovani, Carlos R; Yeum, Kyung-Jin; Ferreira, Ana Lucia A

    2011-10-01

    The effect of pharmacological dose of α-tocopherol on heart health was determined in Wistar rats. Animals were randomly assigned to either C (control, n = 11) or E (α-tocopherol, n = 11) group. Animals received corn oil (C) or α-tocopherol dissolved in corn oil (250 mg α-tocopherol/[kg body wt/day]) (E) by gavage for a 7-week period. Rats underwent echocardiogram and were analyzed for cardiomyocyte histology and cardiac α-tocopherol absorption at the end of the study period. As compared to the C group, α-tocopherol-supplemented group showed significantly (p < 0.05) lower body weight (E, 412.8 g vs C, 480.3 g) and total cardiac weight (E, 0.94 g vs C, 1.08 g); cardiomyocyte histological impairment; smaller left ventricle (LV) (LV end-diastolic diameter (E, 7.22 mm vs C, 7.37 mm), lower LV systolic [left ventricle fractional shortening (E, 47.6% vs C, 53.6%) and ejection fraction ratio (E, 85.4 vs C, 89.9)] and diastolic [early peak velocities of diastolic transmitral flow (E, 64.6 cm/sec vs C, 75.1 cm/sec)] function. The α-tocopherol uptake in target tissue was confirmed by determination of α-tocopherol concentration medians in cardiac tissue (E, 109.91 nmol/kg vs C, 52.09 nmol/kg). The current study indicates that pharmacological dose of α-tocopherol supplementation can induce cardiotoxicity in healthy rats.

  5. PTEN induces apoptosis and cavitation via HIF-2-dependent Bnip3 upregulation during epithelial lumen formation

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Y; Liu, J; Saadat, S; Tian, X; Han, Y; Fong, G-H; Pandolfi, P P; Lee, L Y; Li, S

    2015-01-01

    The tumor suppressor phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) dephosphorylates PIP3 and antagonizes the prosurvival PI3K-Akt pathway. Targeted deletion of PTEN in mice led to early embryonic lethality. To elucidate its role in embryonic epithelial morphogenesis and the underlying mechanisms, we used embryonic stem cell-derived embryoid body (EB), an epithelial cyst structurally similar to the periimplantation embryo. PTEN is upregulated during EB morphogenesis in parallel with apoptosis of core cells, which mediates EB cavitation. Genetic ablation of PTEN causes Akt overactivation, apoptosis resistance and cavitation blockade. However, rescue experiments using mutant PTEN and pharmacological inhibition of Akt suggest that the phosphatase activity of PTEN and Akt are not involved in apoptosis-mediated cavitation. Instead, hypoxia-induced upregulation of Bnip3, a proapoptotic BH3-only protein, mediates PTEN-dependent apoptosis and cavitation. PTEN inactivation inhibits hypoxia- and reactive oxygen species-induced Bnip3 elevation. Overexpression of Bnip3 in PTEN-null EBs rescues apoptosis of the core cells. Mechanistically, suppression of Bnip3 following PTEN loss is likely due to reduction of hypoxia-inducible factor-2α (HIF-2α) because forced expression of an oxygen-stable HIF-2α mutant rescues Bnip3 expression and apoptosis. Lastly, we show that HIF-2α is upregulated by PTEN at both transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. Ablation of prolyl hydroxylase domain-containing protein 2 (PHD2) in normal EBs or inhibition of PHD activities in PTEN-null EBs stabilizes HIF-2α and induces Bnip3 and caspase-3 activation. Altogether, these results suggest that PTEN is required for apoptosis-mediated cavitation during epithelial morphogenesis by regulating the expression of HIF-2α and Bnip3. PMID:25394489

  6. PTEN inhibits PREX2-catalyzed activation of RAC1 to restrain tumor cell invasion

    PubMed Central

    Mense, Sarah M.; Barrows, Douglas; Hodakoski, Cindy; Steinbach, Nicole; Schoenfeld, David; Su, William; Hopkins, Benjamin D.; Su, Tao; Fine, Barry; Hibshoosh, Hanina; Parsons, Ramon

    2016-01-01

    The tumor suppressor PTEN restrains cell migration and invasion by a mechanism that is independent of inhibition of the PI3K pathway and decreased activation of the kinase AKT. PREX2, a widely distributed GEF that activates the GTPase RAC1, binds to and inhibits PTEN. We used mouse embryonic fibroblasts and breast cancer cell lines to show that PTEN suppresses cell migration and invasion by blocking PREX2 activity. In addition to metabolizing the phosphoinositide PIP3, PTEN inhibited PREX2-induced invasion by a mechanism that required the tail domain of PTEN, but not its lipid phosphatase activity. Fluorescent nucleotide exchange assays revealed that PTEN inhibited the GEF activity of PREX2 toward RAC1. PREX2 is a frequently mutated GEF in cancer, and examination of human tumor data showed that PREX2 mutation was associated with high PTEN expression. Therefore, we tested whether cancer-derived somatic PREX2 mutants, which accelerate tumor formation of immortalized melanocytes, were inhibited by PTEN. The three stably expressed, somatic PREX2 cancer mutants that we tested were resistant to PTEN-mediated inhibition of invasion but retained the ability to inhibit the lipid phosphatase activity of PTEN. In vitro analysis showed that PTEN did not block the GEF activity of two PREX2 cancer mutants and had a reduced binding affinity for the third. Thus, PTEN antagonized migration and invasion by restraining PREX2 GEF activity, and PREX2 mutants are likely selected in cancer to escape PTEN-mediated inhibition of invasion. PMID:25829446

  7. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modeling for the determination of a cimicoxib dosing regimen in the dog

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cimicoxib is a new coxib anti-inflammatory drug for use in the dog. To determine a preclinical dosage regimen for cimicoxib in dog, a reversible model of kaolin–induced paw inflammation was used. Dosage regimens were established using pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) modeling approach (indirect response model). Results Analgesic, anti-inflammatory and antipyretic endpoints investigated with the inflammation model established the efficacy of cimicoxib at a dose of 2 mg/kg administered orally (single dose) in 12 beagle dogs. For both the oral and IV route of administration two groups of dogs to be identified namely Poor Metabolizers (PM) and Extensive Metabolizers (EM).The terminal half-life after oral administration was 8.0 ± 0.6 h for the PM and 4.6 ± 2.6 h for the EM groups, with the corresponding values after the IV route being 5.6 ± 1.7 h and 2.7 ± 0.9 h (mean ± SD). The main pharmacodynamic parameters (potency, efficacy, and sensitivity) were estimated for four endpoints (body temperature, creeping speed, ground vertical reaction force and clinical lameness score). The plasma concentration corresponding to half the maximum of the indirect effect were 239 μg/L for creeping speed, 284 μg/L for the lameness score, 161 μg/L for the ground reaction vertical force and 193 μg/L for the body temperature. To document possible polymorphism of the cimicoxib disposition in the target dog population, cimicoxib was administered by the intravenous route to 40 dogs (four different sized breeds). The cimicoxib half-lives in these 40 dogs were of same order of the magnitude as those of the EM beagle dogs. Thus pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters obtained from the EM beagle dogs were selected to simulate the dose-effect relationship of cimicoxib after an oral administration allowing a dosage regimen to be selected for confirmation by a clinical trial. Conclusions Cimicoxib was an efficacious anti-inflammatory, antipyretic and analgesic drug

  8. A GREEN'S FUNCTION APPROACH FOR DETERMINING DOSE RATES FOR SMALL GRAM QUANTITIES IN SHIPPING PACKAGINGS

    SciTech Connect

    Nathan, S.

    2012-06-14

    The Small Gram Quantity (SGQ) concept is based on the understanding that small amounts of hazardous materials, in this case radioactive materials (RAM), are significantly less hazardous than large amounts of the same materials. This paper describes a methodology designed to estimate an SGQ for several neutron and gamma emitting isotopes that can be shipped in a package in compliance with 10 CFR Part 71 external radiation level limits regulations. The neutron and photon sources were calculated using both ORIGEN-S and RASTA. The response from a unit source in each neutron and photon group was calculated using MCNP5 with each unshielded and shielded container configuration. Effects of self-shielding on both neutron and photon response were evaluated by including either plutonium oxide or iron in the source region for the case with no shielded container. For the cases of actinides mixed with light elements, beryllium is the bounding light element. The added beryllium (10 to 90 percent of the actinide mass) in the cases studied represents between 9 and 47 percent concentration of the total mixture mass. For beryllium concentrations larger than 50 percent, the increase in the neutron source term and dose rate tend to increase at a much lower rate than at concentrations lower than 50%. The intimately mixed actinide-beryllium form used in these models is very conservative and thus the limits presented in this report are practical bounds on the mass that can be safely shipped. The calculated dose rate from one gram of each isotope was then used to determin the maximum amount of a single isotope that could be shipped in the Model 9977 Package (or packagings having the same or larger external dimensions as well as similar structural materials) and have the external radiation level within the regulatory dose limits at the surface of the package. The estimates of the mass limits presented would also serve as conservative limits for both the Models 9975 and 9978 packages. If a

  9. 11β-HSD1 Modulates LPS-Induced Innate Immune Responses in Adipocytes by Altering Expression of PTEN

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Wenfang; Tian, Xue; Xiang, Qing; Chu, Kedan; Wei, Yicong; Deng, Jingti; Zhang, Shaoping; Brown, John

    2015-01-01

    Inhibition of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1) represents a therapeutic target for treating hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes. Here, we investigate the effects of 11β-HSD1 on the innate immune response of adipocytes to produce proinflammatory cytokines. The 11β-HSD1 inhibitor emodin, or 11β-HSD1-targeted small interfering RNA, dose dependently suppressed IL-6, IL-1β, and TNF-α expression in lipopolysaccharide-treated 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Inhibiting 11β-HSD1 also reduced phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) expression, a negative regulator of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase effects, whereas 1pM cortisone or dexamethasone induced IL-6 and PTEN levels. PTEN-targeted small interfering RNA decreased IL-6, IL-1β, and TNF-α without affecting 11β-HSD1 levels. Correspondingly, emodin increased phosphorylated protein kinase B (p-PKB) (Ser473) to PKB ratio but not p-PKB (Thr308) to PKB ratio. Emodin did not increase the p-PKB (Ser473) to PKB ratio when the rapamycin-insensitive companion of mTOR was depleted, further supporting the involvement of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 2 in PKB phosphorylation. Moreover, emodin suppressed phosphorylated inhibitor of κB α (p-IκBα) to IκBα ratio and reduced nuclear factor κ B subunit p50 in the nuclear fraction. In contrast, 1pM cortisone or dexamethasone decreased p-PKB (Ser473) to PKB ratio, increased p-IκBα to IκBα ratio, and increased nuclear NF-κB subunit p50. Additionally, wortmannin had similar effects on IL-6, p-PKB (Ser473) to PKB ratio, and p-IκBα to IκBα ratio as 1pM cortisone or dexamethasone. Finally, emodin treatment of streptozotocin diabetic rats on a high-fat diet reduced levels of IL-6, PTEN, Cluster of Differentiation 68, and the ratio of p-IκBα to IκBα in visceral fat, indicating that our findings in vitro may also apply to visceral fat in vivo. Together, these results suggest that inhibiting 11β-HSD1 reduces lipopolysaccharide-induced proinflammatory innate

  10. 11β-HSD1 modulates LPS-induced innate immune responses in adipocytes by altering expression of PTEN.

    PubMed

    Lai, Wenfang; Tian, Xue; Xiang, Qing; Chu, Kedan; Wei, Yicong; Deng, Jingti; Zhang, Shaoping; Brown, John; Hong, Guizhu

    2015-04-01

    Inhibition of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1) represents a therapeutic target for treating hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes. Here, we investigate the effects of 11β-HSD1 on the innate immune response of adipocytes to produce proinflammatory cytokines. The 11β-HSD1 inhibitor emodin, or 11β-HSD1-targeted small interfering RNA, dose dependently suppressed IL-6, IL-1β, and TNF-α expression in lipopolysaccharide-treated 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Inhibiting 11β-HSD1 also reduced phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) expression, a negative regulator of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase effects, whereas 1pM cortisone or dexamethasone induced IL-6 and PTEN levels. PTEN-targeted small interfering RNA decreased IL-6, IL-1β, and TNF-α without affecting 11β-HSD1 levels. Correspondingly, emodin increased phosphorylated protein kinase B (p-PKB) (Ser473) to PKB ratio but not p-PKB (Thr308) to PKB ratio. Emodin did not increase the p-PKB (Ser473) to PKB ratio when the rapamycin-insensitive companion of mTOR was depleted, further supporting the involvement of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 2 in PKB phosphorylation. Moreover, emodin suppressed phosphorylated inhibitor of κB α (p-IκBα) to IκBα ratio and reduced nuclear factor κ B subunit p50 in the nuclear fraction. In contrast, 1pM cortisone or dexamethasone decreased p-PKB (Ser473) to PKB ratio, increased p-IκBα to IκBα ratio, and increased nuclear NF-κB subunit p50. Additionally, wortmannin had similar effects on IL-6, p-PKB (Ser473) to PKB ratio, and p-IκBα to IκBα ratio as 1pM cortisone or dexamethasone. Finally, emodin treatment of streptozotocin diabetic rats on a high-fat diet reduced levels of IL-6, PTEN, Cluster of Differentiation 68, and the ratio of p-IκBα to IκBα in visceral fat, indicating that our findings in vitro may also apply to visceral fat in vivo. Together, these results suggest that inhibiting 11β-HSD1 reduces lipopolysaccharide-induced proinflammatory innate

  11. Identification of a Novel lincRNA-p21-miR-181b-PTEN Signaling Cascade in Liver Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Fujun; Lu, Zhongqiu; Chen, Bicheng

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we found that long intergenic noncoding RNA-p21 (lincRNA-p21) inhibits hepatic stellate cell (HSC) activation and liver fibrosis via p21. However, the underlying mechanism of the antifibrotic role of lincRNA-p21 in liver fibrosis remains largely unknown. Here, we found that lincRNA-p21 expression was significantly downregulated during liver fibrosis. In LX-2 cells, the reduction of lincRNA-p21 induced by TGF-β1 was in a dose- and time-dependent manner. lincRNA-p21 expression was reduced in liver tissues from patients with liver cirrhosis when compared with that of healthy controls. Notably, lincRNA-p21 overexpression contributed to the suppression of HSC activation. lincRNA-p21 suppressed HSC proliferation and induced a significant reduction in α-SMA and type I collagen. All these effects induced by lincRNA-p21 were blocked down by the loss of PTEN, suggesting that lincRNA-p21 suppressed HSC activation via PTEN. Further study demonstrated that microRNA-181b (miR-181b) was involved in the effects of lincRNA-p21 on HSC activation. The effects of lincRNA-p21 on PTEN expression and HSC activation were inhibited by miR-181b mimics. We demonstrated that lincRNA-p21 enhanced PTEN expression by competitively binding miR-181b. In conclusion, our results disclose a novel lincRNA-p21-miR-181b-PTEN signaling cascade in liver fibrosis and suggest lincRNA-p21 as a promising molecular target for antifibrosis therapy. PMID:27610008

  12. Identification of a Novel lincRNA-p21-miR-181b-PTEN Signaling Cascade in Liver Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fujun; Lu, Zhongqiu; Chen, Bicheng; Dong, Peihong; Zheng, Jianjian

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we found that long intergenic noncoding RNA-p21 (lincRNA-p21) inhibits hepatic stellate cell (HSC) activation and liver fibrosis via p21. However, the underlying mechanism of the antifibrotic role of lincRNA-p21 in liver fibrosis remains largely unknown. Here, we found that lincRNA-p21 expression was significantly downregulated during liver fibrosis. In LX-2 cells, the reduction of lincRNA-p21 induced by TGF-β1 was in a dose- and time-dependent manner. lincRNA-p21 expression was reduced in liver tissues from patients with liver cirrhosis when compared with that of healthy controls. Notably, lincRNA-p21 overexpression contributed to the suppression of HSC activation. lincRNA-p21 suppressed HSC proliferation and induced a significant reduction in α-SMA and type I collagen. All these effects induced by lincRNA-p21 were blocked down by the loss of PTEN, suggesting that lincRNA-p21 suppressed HSC activation via PTEN. Further study demonstrated that microRNA-181b (miR-181b) was involved in the effects of lincRNA-p21 on HSC activation. The effects of lincRNA-p21 on PTEN expression and HSC activation were inhibited by miR-181b mimics. We demonstrated that lincRNA-p21 enhanced PTEN expression by competitively binding miR-181b. In conclusion, our results disclose a novel lincRNA-p21-miR-181b-PTEN signaling cascade in liver fibrosis and suggest lincRNA-p21 as a promising molecular target for antifibrosis therapy.

  13. PIASxα ligase enhances SUMO1 modification of PTEN protein as a SUMO E3 ligase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weibin; Chen, Yifan; Wang, Shuya; Hu, Ningguang; Cao, Zhengyi; Wang, Wengong; Tong, Tanjun; Zhang, Xiaowei

    2014-02-07

    The tumor suppressor PTEN plays a critical role in the regulation of multiple cellular processes that include survival, cell cycle, proliferation, and apoptosis. PTEN is frequently mutated or deleted in various human cancer cells to promote tumorigenesis. PTEN is regulated by SUMOylation, but the SUMO E3 ligase involved in the SUMOylation of PTEN remains unclear. Here, we demonstrated that PIASxα is a SUMO E3 ligase for PTEN. PIASxα physically interacted with PTEN both in vitro and in vivo. Their interaction depended on the integrity of phosphatase and C2 domains of PTEN and the region of PIASxα comprising residues 134-347. PIASxα enhanced PTEN protein stability by reducing PTEN ubiquitination, whereas the mutation of PTEN SUMO1 conjugation sites neutralized the effect of PIASxα on PTEN protein half-life. Functionally, PIASxα, as a potential tumor suppressor, negatively regulated the PI3K-Akt pathway through stabilizing PTEN protein. Overexpression of PIASxα led to G0/G1 cell cycle arrest, thus triggering cell proliferation inhibition and tumor suppression, whereas PIASxα knockdown or deficiency in catalytic activity abolished the inhibition. Together our studies suggest that PIASxα is a novel SUMO E3 ligase for PTEN, and it positively regulates PTEN protein level in tumor suppression.

  14. Exposure reductions encouraged by the determination of the effective dose equivalent for non-uniform exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Matheny, M.D.; Brown, C.G.; Dyer, S.G.

    1994-08-01

    DOE Order 5480.11 requires calculation of the effective dose equivalent (EDE) due to non-uniform radiation fields using ICRP-26 weighting factors. To comply with this requirement, Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) developed a simple dose calculation scheme based on a draft report by the External Dosimetry Working Group of the Health Physics Society Standards Committee. The calculations involved are fairly simple and provide a conservative dose estimate. The resulting EDE estimate provides a much better representation of the risk to the monitored individual than the more prevalent practice of assigning the highest measured dose. Details of the dose assessment methodology are included as an attachment.

  15. [Inhibitory effects of tumor suppressor gene PTEN on proliferation and metastasis of breast cancer ZR-75-1 cells].

    PubMed

    Lin, Guan-Ping; Li, Xiang-Yong; Huang, Jin-Wen; Xiong, Liang; Zhou, Ke-Yuan

    2007-10-01

    Tumor suppressor gene PTEN could not only inhibit the proliferation of cancer cells, but also inhibit their metastasis. However, the mechanism is still unclear. This study was to investigate the effects of PTEN gene on the proliferation and metastasis of human breast cancer ZR-75-1 cells, and explore the mechanisms. Wild-type PTEN (wt-PTEN) plasmid and phosphatase-defective PTEN (G129R-PTEN) plasmid were transfected into ZR-75-1 cells by liposome, respectively. Cell proliferation was detected by MTT assay. Transfected cells were selected by puromycin. The expression of PTEN protein was detected by Western blot. Cell adhesion and invasion were tested by adhesion test and invasion test. The proliferation inhibition rate was significantly higher in wt-PTEN-transfected ZR-75-1 cells than in untransfected cells and G129R-PTEN-transfected cells (42.7% vs. 0% and 2.7%, P<0.01); there was no significant difference between untransfected cells and G129R-PTEN-transfected cells(P>0.05). The proliferation inhibition of ZR-75-1 cells was enhanced along with the increase of culture time and concentration of wt-PTEN. wt-PTEN also induced cell apoptosis. PTEN protein was expressed efficiently in the cells transfected with either wt-PTEN or G129R-PTEN. The inhibition rates of adhesion and invasion were significantly higher in wt-PTEN-transfected cells than in G129R-PTEN-transfected cells (65.7% vs. 8.8%, 70.4% vs. 6.9%, P<0.01). Wild-type PTEN gene with dual-specific phosphatase activity can inhibit the proliferation and metastasis of ZR-75-1 cells.

  16. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Progression in Rats is Accelerated by Splenic Regulation of Liver PTEN/AKT

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ziming; Li, Naishu; Wang, Biao; Lin, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aim: The spleen has been reported to participate in the development of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), but the mechanism has not been fully characterized. This study aims to elucidate how the spleen affects the development of NAFLD in a rat model. Materials and Methods: Following either splenectomy or sham operation, male Sprague–Dawley (SD) rats were fed a high-fat diet to drive the development of NAFLD; animals fed a normal diet were used as controls. Two months after surgery, livers and blood samples were collected. Serum lipids were measured; liver histology, phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) gene expression, and the ratio of pAkt/Akt were determined. Results: Splenectomy increased serum lipids, except triglyceride (TG) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL), in animals fed either a high-fat or normal diet. Furthermore, splenectomy significantly accelerated hepatic steatosis. Western blot analysis and real-time polymerase chain reaction showed splenectomy induced significant downregulation of PTEN expression and a high ratio of pAkt/Akt in the livers. Conclusions: The spleen appears to play a role in the development of NAFLD, via a mechanism involving downregulation of hepatic PTEN expression. PMID:26228367

  17. Evaluation of a ferret-specific formula for determining body surface area to improve chemotherapeutic dosing.

    PubMed

    Jones, Krista L; Granger, L Abbigail; Kearney, Michael T; da Cunha, Anderson F; Cutler, Daniel C; Shapiro, Meredith E; Tully, Thomas N; Shiomitsu, Keijiro

    2015-02-01

    To use CT-derived measurements to create a ferret-specific formula for body surface area (BSA) to improve chemotherapeutic dosing. 25 adult ferrets (19 live and 6 cadavers). Live subjects were weighed, and body measurements were obtained by each of 3 observers while ferrets were awake and anesthetized. Computed tomography was performed, and a 3-D surface model was constructed with open-source imaging software, from which BSA was estimated. The CT-derived values were compared with BSA calculated on the basis of the traditional tape method for 6 cadavers. To further validate CT analysis software, 11 geometric shapes were scanned and their CT-derived values compared with those calculated directly via geometric formulas. Agreement between methods of surface area estimation was assessed with linear regression. Ferret-specific formulas for BSA were determined with nonlinear regression models. Repeatability among the 3 observers was good for all measurements, but some measurements differed significantly between awake and anesthetized ferrets. Excellent agreement was found between measured versus CT-derived surface area of shapes, traditional tape- versus CT-derived BSA of ferret cadavers, and CT-derived BSA of cadavers with and without monitoring equipment. All surface area formulas performed relatively similarly. CT-derived BSA measurements of ferrets obtained via open-source imaging software were reliable. On the basis of study results, the recommended formula for BSA in ferrets would be 9.94 × (body weight)(2/3); however, this represented a relatively minor difference from the feline-derived formula currently used by most practitioners and would result in little practical change in drug doses.

  18. PTEN functions to 'prioritize' chemotactic cues and prevent 'distraction' in migrating neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Heit, Bryan; Robbins, Stephen M; Downey, Charlene M; Guan, Zhiwen; Colarusso, Pina; Miller, B Joan; Jirik, Frank R; Kubes, Paul

    2008-07-01

    Neutrophils encounter and 'prioritize' many chemoattractants in their pursuit of bacteria. Here we tested the possibility that the phosphatase PTEN is responsible for the prioritization of chemoattractants. Neutrophils induced chemotaxis by two separate pathways, the phosphatidylinositol-3-OH kinase (PI(3)K) phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) pathway, and the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, with the p38 pathway dominating over the PI(3)K pathway. Pten(-/-) neutrophils could not prioritize chemoattractants and were 'distracted' by chemokines when moving toward bacterial chemoattractants. In opposing gradients, PTEN became distributed throughout the cell circumference, which inhibited all PI(3)K activity, thus permitting 'preferential' migration toward bacterial products via phospholipase A(2) and p38. Such prioritization was defective in Pten(-/-) neutrophils, which resulted in defective bacterial clearance in vivo. Our data identify a PTEN-dependent mechanism in neutrophils to prioritize, 'triage' and integrate responses to multiple chemotactic cues.

  19. PTEN modulates EGFR late endocytic trafficking and degradation by dephosphorylating Rab7

    PubMed Central

    Shinde, Swapnil Rohidas; Maddika, Subbareddy

    2016-01-01

    Tumour suppressor phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) is a lipid phosphatase that negatively regulates growth factor-induced survival signalling. Here, we demonstrate that PTEN attenuates epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signalling by promoting late endosome maturation by virtue of its protein phosphatase activity. Loss of PTEN impairs the transition of ligand-bound EGFR from early to late endosomes. We unveil Rab7, a critical GTPase for endosome maturation, as a functional PTEN interacting partner. PTEN dephosphorylates Rab7 on two conserved residues S72 and Y183, which are necessary for GDP dissociation inhibitor (GDI)-dependent recruitment of Rab7 on to late endosomes and subsequent maturation. Thus, our findings reveal PTEN-dependent endosome maturation through phosphoregulation of Rab7 as an important route of controlling EGFR signalling. PMID:26869029

  20. WE-E-18A-03: How Accurately Can the Peak Skin Dose in Fluoroscopy Be Determined Using Indirect Dose Metrics?

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, A; Pasciak, A

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Skin dosimetry is important for fluoroscopically-guided interventions, as peak skin doses (PSD) that Result in skin reactions can be reached during these procedures. The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy of different indirect dose estimates and to determine if PSD can be calculated within ±50% for embolization procedures. Methods: PSD were measured directly using radiochromic film for 41 consecutive embolization procedures. Indirect dose metrics from procedures were collected, including reference air kerma (RAK). Four different estimates of PSD were calculated and compared along with RAK to the measured PSD. The indirect estimates included a standard method, use of detailed information from the RDSR, and two simplified calculation methods. Indirect dosimetry was compared with direct measurements, including an analysis of uncertainty associated with film dosimetry. Factors affecting the accuracy of the indirect estimates were examined. Results: PSD calculated with the standard calculation method were within ±50% for all 41 procedures. This was also true for a simplified method using a single source-to-patient distance (SPD) for all calculations. RAK was within ±50% for all but one procedure. Cases for which RAK or calculated PSD exhibited large differences from the measured PSD were analyzed, and two causative factors were identified: ‘extreme’ SPD and large contributions to RAK from rotational angiography or runs acquired at large gantry angles. When calculated uncertainty limits [−12.8%, 10%] were applied to directly measured PSD, most indirect PSD estimates remained within ±50% of the measured PSD. Conclusions: Using indirect dose metrics, PSD can be determined within ±50% for embolization procedures, and usually to within ±35%. RAK can be used without modification to set notification limits and substantial radiation dose levels. These results can be extended to similar procedures, including vascular and interventional oncology

  1. Determination of Radiation Energy Response for Thermoluminescent Dosimeter TLD-100: Determination of Organ Dose in Diagnostic Radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Deda, Antoneta; Telhaj, Ervis

    2009-04-19

    TLD-100 (thermoluminescent dosimeter) cards (chips) were calibrated using X-rays with energies of 25-250 kV produced by a Cs-137 source. The energy responses of lithium fluoride crystals for different energies of X-rays were studied. QA/QC was then performed in the Albanian Ionizing Radiation Metrology Laboratory. Based on the QA/QC results, the chips were used to study the doses to different organs in diagnostic radiology. Organ dose was evaluated after calculation of e dose in air (Kair), using an ionizing chamber.

  2. Equivalent square formula for determining the surface dose of rectangular field from 6 MV therapeutic photon beam.

    PubMed

    Apipunyasopon, Lukkana; Srisatit, Somyot; Phaisangittisakul, Nakorn

    2013-09-06

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the use of the equivalent square formula for determining the surface dose from a rectangular photon beam. A 6 MV therapeutic photon beam delivered from a Varian Clinac 23EX medical linear accelerator was modeled using the EGS4nrc Monte Carlo simulation package. It was then used to calculate the dose in the build-up region from both square and rectangular fields. The field patterns were defined by various settings of the X- and Y-collimator jaw ranging from 5 to 20 cm. Dose measurements were performed using a thermoluminescence dosimeter and a Markus parallel-plate ionization chamber on the four square fields (5 × 5, 10 × 10, 15 × 15, and 20 × 20 cm2). The surface dose was acquired by extrapolating the build-up doses to the surface. An equivalent square for a rectangular field was determined using the area-to-perimeter formula, and the surface dose of the equivalent square was estimated using the square-field data. The surface dose of square field increased linearly from approximately 10% to 28% as the side of the square field increased from 5 to 20 cm. The influence of collimator exchange on the surface dose was found to be not significant. The difference in the percentage surface dose of the rectangular field compared to that of the relevant equivalent square was insignificant and can be clinically neglected. The use of the area-to-perimeter formula for an equivalent square field can provide a clinically acceptable surface dose estimation for a rectangular field from a 6 MV therapy photon beam.

  3. A shielding application of perturbation theory to determine changes in neutron and gamma doses due to changes in shield layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fieno, D.

    1972-01-01

    The perturbation theory for fixed sources was applied to radiation shielding problems to determine changes in neutron and gamma ray doses due to changes in various shield layers. For a given source and detector position the perturbation method enables dose derivatives due to all layer changes to be determined from one forward and one inhomogeneous adjoint calculation. The direct approach requires two forward calculations for the derivative due to a single layer change. Hence, the perturbation method for obtaining dose derivatives permits an appreciable savings in computation for a multilayered shield. For an illustrative problem, a comparison was made of the fractional change in the dose per unit change in the thickness of each shield layer as calculated by perturbation theory and by successive direct calculations; excellent agreement was obtained between the two methods.

  4. Cooperativity Between Oncogenic PKC Epsilon and Pten Loss in Prostate Cancer Progression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    pathway that correlates with motility and metastasis. Based on our preliminary data, PKCε overexpression and Pten loss individually and synergically confer...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0535 TITLE: Cooperativity Between Oncogenic PKC Epsilon and Pten Loss in Prostate Cancer Progression PRINCIPAL...Sep 2015 - 29 Sep 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Cooperativity Between Oncogenic PKC Epsilon and Pten Loss in Prostate Cancer

  5. Germline disruption of Pten localization causes enhanced sex-dependent social motivation and increased glial production.

    PubMed

    Tilot, Amanda K; Gaugler, Mary K; Yu, Qi; Romigh, Todd; Yu, Wanfeng; Miller, Robert H; Frazier, Thomas W; Eng, Charis

    2014-06-15

    PTEN Hamartoma Tumor Syndrome (PHTS) is an autosomal-dominant genetic condition underlying a subset of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) with macrocephaly. Caused by germline mutations in PTEN, PHTS also causes increased risks of multiple cancers via dysregulation of the PI3K and MAPK signaling pathways. Conditional knockout models have shown that neural Pten regulates social behavior, proliferation and cell size. Although much is known about how the intracellular localization of PTEN regulates signaling in cancer cell lines, we know little of how PTEN localization influences normal brain physiology and behavior. To address this, we generated a germline knock-in mouse model of cytoplasm-predominant Pten and characterized its behavioral and cellular phenotypes. The homozygous Pten(m3m4) mice have decreased total Pten levels including a specific drop in nuclear Pten and exhibit region-specific increases in brain weight. The Pten(m3m4) model displays sex-specific increases in social motivation, poor balance and normal recognition memory-a profile reminiscent of some individuals with high functioning ASD. The cytoplasm-predominant protein caused cellular hypertrophy limited to the soma and led to increased NG2 cell proliferation and accumulation of glia. The animals also exhibit significant astrogliosis and microglial activation, indicating a neuroinflammatory phenotype. At the signaling level, Pten(m3m4) mice show brain region-specific differences in Akt activation. These results demonstrate that differing alterations to the same autism-linked gene can cause distinct behavioral profiles. The Pten(m3m4) model is the first murine model of inappropriately elevated social motivation in the context of normal cognition and may expand the range of autism-related behaviors replicated in animal models.

  6. VP22 mediates intercellular trafficking and enhances the in vitro antitumor activity of PTEN.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xian; Xu, Zhengmin; Lei, Jun; Li, Tingting; Wang, Yan

    2015-07-01

    PTEN acts as a phosphatidylinositol phosphatase with a possible role in the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT pathway. Mutations in PTEN are frequent and their presence is associated with poor prognosis in breast cancer, which is the most common type of non-cutaneous malignancy in females. Delivery of the tumor suppressor PTEN gene represents a powerful strategy for breast cancer therapy, but a present limitation of gene therapy is the ability to deliver sufficient quantities of active proteins to target cells. The capacity of HSV-1VP22 fusion proteins to spread from the primary transduced cell to surrounding cells could improve gene therapeutics, particularly in cancer. To assess the potential efficacy of VP22 as a gene therapy for breast cancer, expression vectors for N- and C-terminal PTEN-VP22 fusion proteins were constructed. VP22‑mediated intercellular transport and antitumor efficacy in BT549 (PTEN-null) breast tumor cells were investigated. The results showed that PTEN-VP22 has the same spreading abilities as VP22. In cell proliferation and apoptosis assays, PTEN-VP22 gene transfer induces a stronger anti-proliferative effect and apoptotic activity compared with PTEN gene transfer alone. In addition, VP22 enhanced the PTEN‑mediated decrease in the level of phosphorylated AKT. The results show that PTEN-VP22 can spread in vitro and PTEN-VP22 gene induces significantly greater antitumor activity than the PTEN gene alone. This study confirms the utility of VP22-mediated delivery in vitro and suggests that PTEN-VP22 may have applications in breast cancer gene therapy.

  7. Pten deficiency in brain causes defects in synaptic structure, transmission and plasticity, and myelination abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, Melissa M.; Bayazitov, Ildar T.; Zakharenko, Stanislav S.; Baker, Suzanne J.

    2008-01-01

    The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling pathway modulates growth, proliferation and cell survival in diverse tissue types and plays specialized roles in the nervous system including influences on neuronal polarity, dendritic branching and synaptic plasticity. The tumor-suppressor phosphatase with tensin homology (PTEN) is the central negative regulator of the PI3K pathway. Germline PTEN mutations result in cancer predisposition, macrocephaly and benign hamartomas in many tissues, including Lhermitte-Duclos disease, a cerebellar growth disorder. Neurological abnormalities including autism, seizures and ataxia have been observed in association with inherited PTEN mutation with variable penetrance. It remains unclear how loss of PTEN activity contributes to neurological dysfunction. To explore the effects of Pten deficiency on neuronal structure and function, we analyzed several ultra-structural features of Pten-deficient neurons in Pten conditional knockout mice. Using Golgi stain to visualize full neuronal morphology, we observed that increased size of nuclei and somata in Pten-deficient neurons was accompanied by enlarged caliber of neuronal projections and increased dendritic spine density. Electron microscopic evaluation revealed enlarged abnormal synaptic structures in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum. Severe myelination defects included thickening and unraveling of the myelin sheath surrounding hypertrophic axons in the corpus callosum. Defects in myelination of axons of normal caliber were observed in the cerebellum, suggesting intrinsic abnormalities in Pten-deficient oligodendrocytes. We did not observe these abnormalities in wild-type or conditional Pten heterozygous mice. Moreover, conditional deletion of Pten drastically weakened synaptic transmission and synaptic plasticity at excitatory synapses between CA3 and CA1 pyramidal neurons in the hippocampus. These data suggest that Pten is involved in mechanisms that control development of

  8. The tumor suppressor PTEN regulates motor responses to striatal dopamine in normal and Parkinsonian animals.

    PubMed

    Stavarache, Mihaela A; Musatov, Sergei; McGill, Marlon; Vernov, Mary; Kaplitt, Michael G

    2015-10-01

    Phosphatase and Tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) is a dual lipid-protein phosphatase known primarily as a growth preventing tumor suppressor. PTEN is also expressed in neurons, and pathways modulated by PTEN can influence neuronal function. Here we report a novel function of PTEN as a regulator of striatal dopamine signaling in a model of Parkinson's disease (PD). Blocking PTEN expression with an adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector expressing a small hairpin RNA (shRNA) resulted in reduced responses of cultured striatal neurons to dopamine, which appeared to be largely due to reduction in D2 receptor activation. Co-expression of shRNA-resistant wild-type and mutant forms of PTEN indicated that the lipid-phosphatase activity was essential for this effect. In both normal and Parkinsonian rats, inhibition of striatal PTEN in vivo resulted in motor dysfunction and impaired responses to dopamine, particularly D2 receptor agonists. Expression of PTEN mutants confirmed the lipid-phosphatase activity as critical, while co-expression of a dominant-negative form of Akt overcame the PTEN shRNA effect. These results identify PTEN as a key mediator of striatal responses to dopamine, and suggest that drugs designed to potentiate PTEN expression or activity, such as cancer chemotherapeutics, may also be useful for improving striatal responses to dopamine in conditions of dopamine depletion such as PD. This also suggests that strategies which increase Akt or decrease PTEN expression or function, such as growth factors to prevent neuronal death, may have a paradoxical effect on neurological functioning by inhibiting striatal responses to dopamine.

  9. ΔNp63α regulates keratinocyte proliferation by controlling PTEN expression and localization.

    PubMed

    Leonard, M K; Kommagani, R; Payal, V; Mayo, L D; Shamma, H N; Kadakia, M P

    2011-12-01

    ΔNp63α, implicated as an oncogene, is upregulated by activated Akt, part of a well-known cell survival pathway. Inhibition of Akt activation by phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) and the presence of putative p63-binding sites in the pten promoter led us to investigate whether ΔNp63α regulates PTEN expression. Knockdown of ΔNp63α led to increases in PTEN levels and loss of activated Akt, while overexpression of ΔNp63α decreased PTEN levels and elevated active Akt. The repression of PTEN by ΔNp63α occurs independently of p53 status, as loss of ΔNp63α increases PTEN expression in cell lines with and without functional p53. In addition, decreased levels of ΔNp63α resulted in an increase in nuclear PTEN. Conversely, in vivo nuclear PTEN was absent in the proliferative basal layer of the epidermis where ΔNp63α expression is highest. Additionally, we show that in keratinocytes a balance between ΔNp63α and PTEN regulates Akt activation and maintains normal proliferation rates. This balance is disrupted in non-melanoma skin cancers through increased ΔNp63α levels, and could enhance proliferation and subsequent neoplastic development. Our studies show that ΔNp63α negatively regulates PTEN, thereby providing a feedback loop between PTEN, Akt and ΔNp63α, which has an integral role in skin cancer development.

  10. The ISG15-specific protease USP18 regulates stability of PTEN

    PubMed Central

    Mustachio, Lisa Maria; Kawakami, Masanori; Lu, Yun; Rodriguez-Canales, Jaime; Mino, Barbara; Behrens, Carmen; Wistuba, Ignacio; Bota-Rabassedas, Neus; Yu, Jun; Lee, J. Jack; Roszik, Jason; Zheng, Lin; Liu, Xi; Freemantle, Sarah J.; Dmitrovsky, Ethan

    2017-01-01

    The ubiquitin-like modifier interferon-stimulated gene 15 (ISG15) is implicated in both oncogenic and tumor suppressive programs. Yet, few ISGylation substrates are known and functionally validated in cancer biology. We previously found specific oncoproteins were substrates of ISGylation and were stabilized by the ISG15-specific deubiquitinase (DUB) ubiquitin specific peptidase 18 (USP18). Using reverse-phase protein arrays (RPPAs), this study reports that engineered loss of the DUB USP18 destabilized the tumor suppressor protein phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) in both murine and human lung cancer cell lines. In contrast, engineered gain of USP18 expression in these same lung cancer cell lines stabilized PTEN protein. Using the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide (CHX), USP18 knockdown was shown to destabilize PTEN whereas USP18 overexpression stabilized PTEN protein. Interestingly, repression of USP18 decreased cytoplasmic PTEN relative to nuclear PTEN protein levels. We sought to identify mechanisms engaged in this PTEN protein destabilization using immunoprecipitation assays and found ISG15 directly conjugated with PTEN. To confirm translational relevance of this work, USP18 and PTEN immunohistochemical expression were compared in comprehensive lung cancer arrays. There was a significant (P < 0.0001) positive correlation and association between PTEN and USP18 protein expression profiles in human lung cancers. Taken together, this study identified PTEN as a previously unrecognized substrate of the ISGylation post-translational modification pathway. The deconjugase USP18 serves as a novel regulator of PTEN stability. This indicates inhibition of ISGylation is therapeutically relevant in cancers. PMID:27980214

  11. Adult-onset deletion of Pten increases islet mass and beta cell proliferation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kai-Ting; Bayan, Jennifer-Ann; Zeng, Ni; Aggarwal, Richa; He, Lina; Peng, Zhechu; Kassa, Anketse; Kim, Melissa; Luo, Zhiou; Shi, Zhenrong; Medina, Vivian; Boddupally, Keerthi; Stiles, Bangyan L.

    2013-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Adult beta cells have a diminished ability to proliferate. Phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) is a lipid phosphatase that antagonises the function of the mitogenic phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway. The objective of this study was to understand the role of PTEN and PI3K signalling in the maintenance of beta cells postnatally. Methods We developed a Ptenlox/lox; Rosa26lacZ; RIP-CreER+ model that permitted us to induce Pten deletion by treatment with tamoxifen in mature animals. We evaluated islet mass and function as well as beta cell proliferation in 3- and 12-month-old mice treated with tamoxifen (Pten deleted) vs mice treated with vehicle (Pten control). Results Deletion of Pten in juvenile (3-month-old) beta cells significantly induced their proliferation and increased islet mass. The expansion of islet mass occurred concomitantly with the enhanced ability of the Pten-deleted mice to maintain euglycaemia in response to streptozotocin treatment. In older mice (>12 months of age), deletion of Pten similarly increased islet mass and beta cell proliferation. This novel finding suggests that PTEN-regulated mechanisms may override the age-onset diminished ability of beta cells to respond to mitogenic stimulation. We also found that proteins regulating G1/S cell-cycle transition, such as cyclin D1, cyclin D2, p27 and p16, were altered when PTEN was lost, suggesting that they may play a role in PTEN/PI3K-regulated beta cell proliferation in adult tissue. Conclusions/interpretation The signals regulated by the PTEN/PI3K pathway are important for postnatal maintenance of beta cells and regulation of their proliferation in adult tissues. PMID:24162585

  12. Acid Ceramidase Promotes Nuclear Export of PTEN through Sphingosine 1-Phosphate Mediated Akt Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Beckham, Thomas H.; Cheng, Joseph C.; Lu, Ping; Marrison, S. Tucker; Norris, James S.; Liu, Xiang

    2013-01-01

    The tumor suppressor PTEN is now understood to regulate cellular processes at the cytoplasmic membrane, where it classically regulates PI3K signaling, as well as in the nucleus where multiple roles in controlling cell cycle and genome stability have been elucidated. Mechanisms that dictate nuclear import and, less extensively, nuclear export of PTEN have been described, however the relevance of these processes in disease states, particularly cancer, remain largely unknown. We investigated the impact of acid ceramidase on the nuclear-cytoplasmic trafficking of PTEN. Immunohistochemical analysis of a human prostate tissue microarray revealed that nuclear PTEN was lost in patients whose tumors had elevated acid ceramidase. We found that acid ceramidase promotes a reduction in nuclear PTEN that is dependent upon sphingosine 1-phosphate-mediated activation of Akt. We were further able to show that sphingosine 1-phosphate promotes formation of a complex between Crm1 and PTEN, and that leptomycin B prevents acid ceramidase and sphingosine 1-phosphate mediated loss of nuclear PTEN, suggesting an active exportin-mediated event. To investigate whether the tumor promoting aspects of acid ceramidase in prostate cancer depend upon its ability to export PTEN from the nucleus, we used enforced nuclear expression of PTEN to study docetaxel-induced apoptosis and cell killing, proliferation, and xenoengraftment. Interestingly, while acid ceramidase was able to protect cells expressing wild type PTEN from docetaxel, promote proliferation and xenoengraftment, acid ceramidase had no impact in cells expressing PTEN-NLS. These findings suggest that acid ceramidase, through sphingosine 1-phosphate, promotes nuclear export of PTEN as a means of promoting tumor formation, cell proliferation, and resistance to therapy. PMID:24098536

  13. Molecular cloning and characterization of PTEN in the orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides).

    PubMed

    Luo, Sheng-Wei; Wang, Wei-Na; Xie, Ren-Chong; Xie, Fu-Xing; Kong, Jing-Rong; Xiao, Yu-Chao; Huang, Di; Sun, Zuo-Ming; Liu, Yuan; Wang, Cong

    2016-11-01

    PTEN is a key tumor suppressor gene that can play a regulatory role in the cellular proliferation, survival and apoptosis. In this study, the full-length PTEN (EcPTEN) was obtained, containing a 5'UTR of 745 bp, an ORF of 1269 bp and a 3'UTR of 106 bp. The EcPTEN gene encoded a polypeptide of 422 amino acids with an estimated molecular mass of 49.14 KDa and a predicted isoelectric point (pI) of 6.34. The deduced amino acid sequence analysis showed that EcPTEN comprised the conserved residues and the characteristic domains known to the critical functionality of PTEN. qRT-PCR analysis revealed that EcPTEN mRNA was broadly expressed in all the examined tissues, while the highest expression level was observed in liver, followed by the expression in blood, kidney, spleen, heart, gill, muscle and intestine. The groupers challenged with Vibrio alginolyticus showed a sharp increase of EcPTEN mRNA expression in immune tissues. In addition, western blotting analysis confirmed that the up-regulation of EcPTEN protein expression was steadily induced in liver. Subcellular localization analysis indicated that EcPTEN was localized in both nucleus and cytoplasm. Overexpression of EcPTEN can activate the apoptotic cascade and abrogate NF-kB, AP-1, Stat3 and Myc promoter activity in Hela cells. These results indicated that EcPTEN harboring highly-conserved domains with a close sequence similarity to those of PTP superfamily may disrupt the mammalian signalings and play a regulatory role in the apoptotic process.

  14. Adenovirus mediated homozygous endometrial epithelial Pten deletion results in aggressive endometrial carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, Ayesha; Ellenson, Lora Hedrick

    2011-07-01

    Pten is the most frequently mutated gene in uterine endometriod carcinoma (UEC) and its precursor complex atypical hyperplasia (CAH). Because the mutation frequency is similar in CAH and UEC, Pten mutations are thought to occur relatively early in endometrial tumorigenesis. Previous work from our laboratory using the Pten{sup +/-} mouse model has demonstrated somatic inactivation of the wild type allele of Pten in both CAH and UEC. In the present study, we injected adenoviruses expressing Cre into the uterine lumen of adult Pten floxed mice in an attempt to somatically delete both alleles of Pten specifically in the endometrium. Our results demonstrate that biallelic inactivation of Pten results in an increased incidence of carcinoma as compared to the Pten{sup +/-} mouse model. In addition, the carcinomas were more aggressive with extension beyond the uterus into adjacent tissues and were associated with decreased expression of nuclear ER{alpha} as compared to associated CAH. Primary cultures of epithelial and stromal cells were prepared from uteri of Pten floxed mice and Pten was deleted in vitro using Cre expressing adenovirus. Pten deletion was evident in both the epithelial and stromal cells and the treatment of the primary cultures with estrogen had different effects on Akt activation as well as Cyclin D3 expression in the two purified components. This study demonstrates that somatic biallelic inactivation of Pten in endometrial epithelium in vivo results in an increased incidence and aggressiveness of endometrial carcinoma compared to mice carrying a germline deletion of one allele and provides an important in vivo and in vitro model system for understanding the genetic underpinnings of endometrial carcinoma.

  15. Photon spectrometry for the determination of the dose-rate constant of low-energy photon-emitting brachytherapy sources.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhe Jay; Nath, Ravinder

    2007-04-01

    Accurate determination of dose-rate constant (lambda) for interstitial brachytherapy sources emitting low-energy photons (< 50 keV) has remained a challenge in radiation dosimetry because of the lack of a suitable absolute dosimeter for accurate measurement of the dose rates near these sources. Indeed, a consensus value of lambda taken as the arithmetic mean of the dose-rate constants determined by different research groups and dosimetry techniques has to be used at present for each source model in order to minimize the uncertainties associated with individual determinations of lambda. Because the dosimetric properties of a source are fundamentally determined by the characteristics of the photons emitted by the source, a new technique based on photon spectrometry was developed in this work for the determination of dose-rate constant. The photon spectrometry technique utilized a high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometer to measure source-specific photon characteristics emitted by the low-energy sources and determine their dose-rate constants based on the measured photon-energy spectra and known dose-deposition properties of mono-energetic photons in water. This technique eliminates many of the difficulties arising from detector size, the energy dependence of detector sensitivity, and the use of non-water-equivalent solid phantoms in absolute dose rate measurements. It also circumvents the uncertainties that might be associated with the source modeling in Monte Carlo simulation techniques. It was shown that the estimated overall uncertainty of the photon spectrometry technique was less than 4%, which is significantly smaller than the reported 8-10% uncertainty associated with the current thermo-luminescent dosimetry technique. In addition, the photon spectrometry technique was found to be stable and quick in lambda determination after initial setup and calibration. A dose-rate constant can be determined in less than two hours for each source. These features make it

  16. Suppression of Prostate Tumors by INK4C and PTEN

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    develop pituitary adenomas , as revealed by autopsy, and nearly all lesions develop in the an- terior lobe, not the intermediate lobe (10). The...small size and noninvasive nature. Although the mortality rate is low, pituitary adenomas cause various symptoms, such as inappropriate hormone secretion...vention of both MEN and pituitary adenoma . Accelerated thyroid tumorigenesis in p18/ Pten/ mice. Thyroid tissues contain large follicles

  17. Identification and Validation of PTEN Complex, Associated Proteins

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-11-01

    Rosalia construct was transcribed and translated using a wheat germ lysate transcription/translation system to generate an unphosphorylated protein...efficient using the wheat germ lysate transcription/translation, system the new antisera immunoprecipitated the protein as well as the C54 Ab, especially...pSGL-PTEN was in vitro translated in a Rabbit reticolocyte lysate system (A) or in a wheat germ system (B) in the presence of radioactively labeled

  18. Prognostic value of PTEN loss in men with conservatively managed localised prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cuzick, J; Yang, Z H; Fisher, G; Tikishvili, E; Stone, S; Lanchbury, J S; Camacho, N; Merson, S; Brewer, D; Cooper, C S; Clark, J; Berney, D M; Møller, H; Scardino, P; Sangale, Z

    2013-01-01

    Background: The natural history of prostate cancer is highly variable and difficult to predict. We report on the prognostic value of phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) loss in a cohort of 675 men with conservatively managed prostate cancer diagnosed by transurethral resection of the prostate. Methods: The PTEN status was assayed by immunohistochemistry (PTEN IHC) and fluorescent in situ hybridisation (PTEN FISH). The primary end point was death from prostate cancer. Results: The PTEN IHC loss was observed in 18% cases. This was significantly associated with prostate cancer death in univariate analysis (hazard ratio (HR)=3.51; 95% CI 2.60–4.73; P=3.1 × 10−14). It was highly predictive of prostate cancer death in the 50% of patients with a low risk score based on Gleason score, PSA, Ki-67 and extent of disease (HR=7.4; 95% CI 2.2–24.6; P=0.012) ), but had no prognostic value in the higher risk patients. The PTEN FISH loss was only weakly associated with PTEN IHC loss (κ=0.5). Both PTEN FISH loss and amplification were univariately predictive of death from prostate cancer, but this was not maintained in the multivariate analyses. Conclusion: In low-risk patients, PTEN IHC loss adds prognostic value to Gleason score, PSA, Ki-67 and extent of disease. PMID:23695019

  19. Expression of PPARγ and PTEN in human colorectal cancer: An immunohistochemical study using tissue microarray methodology.

    PubMed

    Lin, Mao Song; Huang, Jun Xing; Chen, Wei Chang; Zhang, Bao Feng; Fang, Jing; Zhou, Qiong; Hu, Ying; Gao, Heng Jun

    2011-11-01

    Although aberrations of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) and phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) expression have been identified in several other cancer types, certain previous studies have revealed that PPARγ is abundant in normal and malignant tissue in the colon. The question of whether aberrant PTEN is involved in the initial stage or is a later event during colorectal carcinogenesis remains controversial. Relatively few studies have focused on the correlation of expression of PPARγ and PTEN in various tissues. In the present study, paraffin-embedded blocks from 139 patients with CRC, 18 adenomatous polyps and 50 paired paracancerous benign mucosas were selected and analysed in 4 tissue microarray (TMA) blocks comprising 104, 72, 130 and 54 cores, respectively. Expression of PPARγ and PTEN was examined using immunohistochemical staining on TMAs. There were no significant differences in the expression of PPARγ (P=0.055) and PTEN (P=0.100) between the colorectal cancers, adenomas and paracancerous mucosas. However, correlations of PPARγ expression with clinical stage (P=0.004) and PTEN expression with histological grade (P=0.006) and distant metastasis (P=0.015) were demonstrated in the CRC specimens. Although the differences in PPARγ and PTEN protein expression in human colorectal cancer may not be considered as early diagnostic markers, our results indicate that CRCs with a low expression or deletion of PTEN may progress towards invasion and even metastasis; thus, PTEN may have potential as a prognostic marker in human CRC.

  20. Selective neuronal PTEN deletion: can we take the brakes off of growth without losing control?

    PubMed

    Gutilla, Erin A; Steward, Oswald

    2016-08-01

    The limited ability for injured adult axons to regenerate is a major cause for limited functional recovery after injury to the nervous system, motivating numerous efforts to uncover mechanisms capable of enhancing regeneration potential. One promising strategy involves deletion or knockdown of the phosphatase and tensin (PTEN) gene. Conditional genetic deletion of PTEN before, immediately following, or several months after spinal cord injury enables neurons of the corticospinal tract (CST) to regenerate their axons across the lesion, which is accompanied by enhanced recovery of skilled voluntary motor functions mediated by the CST. Although conditional genetic deletion or knockdown of PTEN in neurons enables axon regeneration, PTEN is a well-known tumor suppressor and mutations of the PTEN gene disrupt brain development leading to neurological abnormalities including macrocephaly, seizures, and early mortality. The long-term consequences of manipulating PTEN in the adult nervous system, as would be done for therapeutic intervention after injury, are only now being explored. Here, we summarize evidence indicating that long-term deletion of PTEN in mature neurons does not cause evident pathology; indeed, cortical neurons that have lived without PTEN for over 1 year appear robust and healthy. Studies to date provide only a first look at potential negative consequences of PTEN deletion or knockdown, but the absence of any detectable neuropathology supports guarded optimism that interventions to enable axon regeneration after injury are achievable.

  1. Selective neuronal PTEN deletion: can we take the brakes off of growth without losing control?

    PubMed Central

    Gutilla, Erin A.; Steward, Oswald

    2016-01-01

    The limited ability for injured adult axons to regenerate is a major cause for limited functional recovery after injury to the nervous system, motivating numerous efforts to uncover mechanisms capable of enhancing regeneration potential. One promising strategy involves deletion or knockdown of the phosphatase and tensin (PTEN) gene. Conditional genetic deletion of PTEN before, immediately following, or several months after spinal cord injury enables neurons of the corticospinal tract (CST) to regenerate their axons across the lesion, which is accompanied by enhanced recovery of skilled voluntary motor functions mediated by the CST. Although conditional genetic deletion or knockdown of PTEN in neurons enables axon regeneration, PTEN is a well-known tumor suppressor and mutations of the PTEN gene disrupt brain development leading to neurological abnormalities including macrocephaly, seizures, and early mortality. The long-term consequences of manipulating PTEN in the adult nervous system, as would be done for therapeutic intervention after injury, are only now being explored. Here, we summarize evidence indicating that long-term deletion of PTEN in mature neurons does not cause evident pathology; indeed, cortical neurons that have lived without PTEN for over 1 year appear robust and healthy. Studies to date provide only a first look at potential negative consequences of PTEN deletion or knockdown, but the absence of any detectable neuropathology supports guarded optimism that interventions to enable axon regeneration after injury are achievable. PMID:27651754

  2. The nuclear transport receptor Importin-11 is a tumor suppressor that maintains PTEN protein

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Muhan; Nowak, Dawid G.; Narula, Navneet; Watrud, Kaitlin; Herzka, Tali M.; Zheng, Wu; Ebbesen, Saya H.; Wang, Victoria M.Y.; Nasar, Abu; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Wilkinson, John E.; Powers, Scott; Sordella, Raffaella; Altorki, Nasser K.; Stiles, Brendon M.

    2017-01-01

    Phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) protein levels are critical for tumor suppression. However, the search for a recurrent cancer-associated gene alteration that causes PTEN degradation has remained futile. In this study, we show that Importin-11 (Ipo11) is a transport receptor for PTEN that is required to physically separate PTEN from elements of the PTEN degradation machinery. Mechanistically, we find that the E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme and IPO11 cargo, UBE2E1, is a limiting factor for PTEN degradation. Using in vitro and in vivo gene-targeting methods, we show that Ipo11 loss results in degradation of Pten, lung adenocarcinoma, and neoplasia in mouse prostate with aberrantly high levels of Ube2e1 in the cytoplasm. These findings explain the correlation between loss of IPO11 and PTEN protein in human lung tumors. Furthermore, we find that IPO11 status predicts disease recurrence and progression to metastasis in patients choosing radical prostatectomy. Thus, our data introduce the IPO11 gene as a tumor-suppressor locus, which is of special importance in cancers that still retain at least one intact PTEN allele. PMID:28193700

  3. Dysregulation of AKT Pathway by SMYD2-Mediated Lysine Methylation on PTEN.

    PubMed

    Nakakido, Makoto; Deng, Zhenzhong; Suzuki, Takehiro; Dohmae, Naoshi; Nakamura, Yusuke; Hamamoto, Ryuji

    2015-04-01

    Phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN), one of the well-characterized tumor suppressor proteins, counteracts the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-AKT pathway through its unique lipid phosphatase activity. The functions of PTEN are regulated by a variety of posttranslational modifications such as acetylation, oxidation, ubiquitylation, phosphorylation, and SUMOylation. However, methylation of PTEN has not been reported so far. In this study, we demonstrated that the oncogenic protein lysine methyltransferase SET and MYND domain containing 2 (SMYD2) methylates PTEN at lysine 313 in vitro and in vivo. Knockdown of SMYD2 suppressed the cell growth of breast cancer cells and attenuated phosphorylation levels of AKT, indicating that SMYD2-mediated methylation negatively regulates PTEN tumor suppressor activity and results in activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-AKT pathway. Furthermore, PTEN protein with lysine 313 substitution diminished phosphorylation of PTEN at serine 380, which is known to inactivate tumor suppressor functions of PTEN. Taken together, our findings unveil a novel mechanism of PTEN dysregulation regulated by lysine methylation in human cancer. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The nuclear transport receptor Importin-11 is a tumor suppressor that maintains PTEN protein.

    PubMed

    Chen, Muhan; Nowak, Dawid G; Narula, Navneet; Robinson, Brian; Watrud, Kaitlin; Ambrico, Alexandra; Herzka, Tali M; Zeeman, Martha E; Minderer, Matthias; Zheng, Wu; Ebbesen, Saya H; Plafker, Kendra S; Stahlhut, Carlos; Wang, Victoria M Y; Wills, Lorna; Nasar, Abu; Castillo-Martin, Mireia; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Wilkinson, John E; Powers, Scott; Sordella, Raffaella; Altorki, Nasser K; Mittal, Vivek; Stiles, Brendon M; Plafker, Scott M; Trotman, Lloyd C

    2017-03-06

    Phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) protein levels are critical for tumor suppression. However, the search for a recurrent cancer-associated gene alteration that causes PTEN degradation has remained futile. In this study, we show that Importin-11 (Ipo11) is a transport receptor for PTEN that is required to physically separate PTEN from elements of the PTEN degradation machinery. Mechanistically, we find that the E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme and IPO11 cargo, UBE2E1, is a limiting factor for PTEN degradation. Using in vitro and in vivo gene-targeting methods, we show that Ipo11 loss results in degradation of Pten, lung adenocarcinoma, and neoplasia in mouse prostate with aberrantly high levels of Ube2e1 in the cytoplasm. These findings explain the correlation between loss of IPO11 and PTEN protein in human lung tumors. Furthermore, we find that IPO11 status predicts disease recurrence and progression to metastasis in patients choosing radical prostatectomy. Thus, our data introduce the IPO11 gene as a tumor-suppressor locus, which is of special importance in cancers that still retain at least one intact PTEN allele.

  5. PTEN controls glandular morphogenesis through a juxtamembrane β-Arrestin1/ARHGAP21 scaffolding complex

    PubMed Central

    Evergren, Emma; Blondel-Tepaz, Elodie; Baillie, George S; Scott, Mark GH

    2017-01-01

    PTEN controls three-dimensional (3D) glandular morphogenesis by coupling juxtamembrane signaling to mitotic spindle machinery. While molecular mechanisms remain unclear, PTEN interacts through its C2 membrane-binding domain with the scaffold protein β-Arrestin1. Because β-Arrestin1 binds and suppresses the Cdc42 GTPase-activating protein ARHGAP21, we hypothesize that PTEN controls Cdc42 -dependent morphogenic processes through a β-Arrestin1-ARHGAP21 complex. Here, we show that PTEN knockdown (KD) impairs β-Arrestin1 membrane localization, β-Arrestin1-ARHGAP21 interactions, Cdc42 activation, mitotic spindle orientation and 3D glandular morphogenesis. Effects of PTEN deficiency were phenocopied by β-Arrestin1 KD or inhibition of β-Arrestin1-ARHGAP21 interactions. Conversely, silencing of ARHGAP21 enhanced Cdc42 activation and rescued aberrant morphogenic processes of PTEN-deficient cultures. Expression of the PTEN C2 domain mimicked effects of full-length PTEN but a membrane-binding defective mutant of the C2 domain abrogated these properties. Our results show that PTEN controls multicellular assembly through a membrane-associated regulatory protein complex composed of β-Arrestin1, ARHGAP21 and Cdc42. PMID:28749339

  6. PTEN is required to maintain luminal epithelial homeostasis and integrity in the adult mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Shore, Amy N; Chang, Chi-Hsuan; Kwon, Oh-Joon; Weston, Matthew C; Zhang, Mei; Xin, Li; Rosen, Jeffrey M

    2016-01-01

    In the mammary gland, PTEN loss in luminal and basal epithelial cells results in differentiation defects and enhanced proliferation, leading to the formation of tumors with basal epithelial characteristics. In breast cancer, PTEN loss is associated with a hormone receptor-negative, basal-like subtype that is thought to originate in a luminal epithelial cell. Here, we show that luminal-specific PTEN loss results in distinct effects on epithelial homeostasis and mammary tumor formation. Luminal PTEN loss increased proliferation of hormone receptor-negative cells, thereby decreasing the percentage of hormone receptor-positive cells. Moreover, luminal PTEN loss led to misoriented cell divisions and mislocalization of cells to the intraluminal space of mammary ducts. Despite their elevated levels of activated AKT, Pten-null intraluminal cells showed increased levels of apoptosis. One year after Pten deletion, the ducts had cleared and no palpable mammary tumors were detected. These data establish PTEN as a critical regulator of luminal epithelial homeostasis and integrity in the adult mammary gland, and further show that luminal PTEN loss alone is not sufficient to promote the progression of mammary tumorigenesis.

  7. Propofol Prevents Hippocampal Neuronal Loss and Memory Impairment in Cerebral Ischemia Injury Through Promoting PTEN Degradation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin; Du, Ye-Mu; Xu, Feng; Liu, Dai; Wang, Yuan-Lin

    2016-09-01

    Neuroprotective effect of propofol against cerebral ischemia injury was widely investigated. However, its mechanisms remain unclear. Phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (AKT) signaling pathway is supposed as a cell survival pathway, and phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN) is a negative regulator of AKT phosphorylation. Whether PTEN was involved in the protective effect of propofol against cerebral ischemia injury was not elucidated. In this study, the function of PTEN in the acute phase of cerebral ischemia injury was investigated. Our data showed that propofol promoted the PTEN degradation in the acute phase of cerebral ischemia injury and concurrently activated AKT phosphorylation. The increase of ubiquitinated PTEN caused by cerebral ischemia injury were degraded in propofol-pretreated rats. Moreover, we evidenced that proteasome activity was stimulated in propofol-treated rats. These data pointed that PTEN degradation was facilitated in the acute phase after propofol treatment possibly through activating ubiquitin-proteasome system. Therefore, we applied PTEN inhibitor-bpV before cerebral ischemia injury. Like propofol, bpV pretreatment also mitigated cerebral ischemia injury-induced cell loss in CA1 region and memory impairment. Taken together, our data suggest that PTEN degradation is neuroprotective against cerebral ischemia injury and propofol facilitates PTEN degradation to prevent hippocampal neuronal loss and memory deficit in cerebral ischemia injury.

  8. PTEN expression in colorectal adenomas: relationship to morphology and cell heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Bendib, Mouna; Badescu, Alina; Handra-Luca, Adriana

    2015-03-01

    Colorectal adenomas are the most frequent benign colorectal tumors. These tumors are characterized by dysplasia, low and high grade, the latter having the potential to evolve to adenocarcinoma. The aim of this study was to study the expression patterns of PTEN protein in a series of colorectal adenomas and the relationships to cell proliferation and CD133, marker of stem phenotype. Colorectal adenomas were studied for the immunohistochemical expression of PTEN on tissue microarrays. PTEN expression was analysed with regard to morphological features and with regard to the Ki67 and CD133-positive cell compartments by using the Kendall rank-correlation test. PTEN was expressed in 92% adenomas, either in a cytoplasmic or nuclear pattern. Cytoplasmic PTEN was correlated to cytoplasmic CD133 (p = 0.02, tau 0.191) while nuclear PTEN to decreased adenoma size and to tubular architecture (p = 0.01, τ-0.184 and p = 0.01, τ-0.183). Nuclear PTEN was also correlated to low grade intraepithelial neoplasia, while global PTEN (nuclear or cytoplasmic) was correlated to the presence of a decreased Ki67-positive component but with marginal significance (p = 0.06, τ-0.144 and p = 0.07, τ-0.213). The results of this study suggest a role for PTEN in colorectal adenoma morphogenesis and cell protein heterogeneity, being correlated to decreased size, tubular architecture and a high CD133-positive component. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. The effect of androgens on ovarian follicle maturation: Dihydrotestosterone suppress FSH-stimulated granulosa cell proliferation by upregulating PPARγ-dependent PTEN expression.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mei-Jou; Chou, Chia-Hung; Chen, Shee-Uan; Yang, Wei-Shiung; Yang, Yu-Shih; Ho, Hong-Nerng

    2015-12-17

    Intraovarian hyperandrogenism is one of the determining factors of follicular arrest in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Using androgenized rat models, we investigated the effects of androgens on metabolism, as well as on factors involved in follicular arrest and the reduced number of estrus cycles. The dihydrotestosterone (DHT)-treated rats had fewer estrus cycles, higher numbers of large arrested follicles and an increased in body weight gain compared with the dehydroepiandrostenedione (DHEA)- and placebo-treated rats. In cultured rat granulosa cells, DHT suppressed follicle stimulating hormone (FSH)-induced granulosa cell proliferation and increased the accumulation of cells in the G2/M phase. DHT decreased phosphorylated Akt (p-Akt) and cyclin D1 levels through increasing PTEN. DHT-promoted PTEN expression was regulated by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) in granulosa cells. Meanwhile, in the large follicles of the DHT-treated rats, the expressions of PPARγ and PTEN were higher, but the expression of p-Akt and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) were lower. Conclusively, DHT and DHEA produced differential effects on metabolism in prepubertal female rats like clinical manifestations of women with PCOS. DHT treatment may affect ovarian follicular maturation by altering granulosa cell proliferation through the regulation of enhancing PPARγ dependent PTEN/p-Akt expression in the granulosa cells.

  10. Downregulation of miR-221/222 by a microRNA sponge promotes apoptosis in oral squamous cell carcinoma cells through upregulation of PTEN.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lijie; Jiang, Fangfang; Chen, Xijuan; Liu, Zifeng; Ouyang, Ying; Zhao, Wei; Yu, Dongsheng

    2016-12-01

    MicroRNA-221 and microRNA-222 (miR-221/222) have been identified as oncogenes and confirmed to be overexpressed in various types of cancer. However, the regulation mechanism of miR-221/222 in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) remains to be fully elucidated. Previously, an miR-221/222 sponge was successfully constructed and its effect on the downregulation of miR-221/222 expression was investigated. In the present study, the dual luciferase reporter assay revealed a phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) deletion on chromosome 10 to be a target gene of miR-221/222. It was also demonstrated that miR-221/222 suppression by transfection with an miR-221/222 sponge in vitro resulted in upregulation of PTEN. Notably, the proliferation and invasiveness of the miR-221/222 sponge-transfected cells was significantly inhibited, while apoptosis was promoted, when determined by Cell Counting Kit-8, Transwell assays and flow cytometry. The results of the present study prove that miR-221/222 may downregulate the expression of PTEN in OSCC cells and function as oncogenes, providing a novel insight into the underlying mechanism of OSCC tumorigenesis. The present study suggests that upregulating the expression of PTEN by downregulation of miR-221/222 may be a potential treatment for OSCC.

  11. The effect of androgens on ovarian follicle maturation: Dihydrotestosterone suppress FSH-stimulated granulosa cell proliferation by upregulating PPARγ-dependent PTEN expression.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mei-Jou; Chou, Chia-Hung; Chen, Shee-Uan; Yang, Wei-Shiung; Yang, Yu-Shih; Ho, Hong-Nerng

    2015-01-01

    Intraovarian hyperandrogenism is one of the determining factors of follicular arrest in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Using androgenized rat models, we investigated the effects of androgens on metabolism, as well as on factors involved in follicular arrest and the reduced number of estrus cycles. The dihydrotestosterone (DHT)-treated rats had fewer estrus cycles, higher numbers of large arrested follicles and an increased in body weight gain compared with the dehydroepiandrostenedione (DHEA)- and placebo-treated rats. In cultured rat granulosa cells, DHT suppressed follicle stimulating hormone (FSH)-induced granulosa cell proliferation and increased the accumulation of cells in the G2/M phase. DHT decreased phosphorylated Akt (p-Akt) and cyclin D1 levels through increasing PTEN. DHT-promoted PTEN expression was regulated by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) in granulosa cells. Meanwhile, in the large follicles of the DHT-treated rats, the expressions of PPARγ and PTEN were higher, but the expression of p-Akt and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) were lower. Conclusively, DHT and DHEA produced differential effects on metabolism in prepubertal female rats like clinical manifestations of women with PCOS. DHT treatment may affect ovarian follicular maturation by altering granulosa cell proliferation through the regulation of enhancing PPARγ dependent PTEN/p-Akt expression in the granulosa cells. PMID:26674985

  12. Quantitative and dynamic analysis of PTEN phosphorylation by NMR.

    PubMed

    Cordier, Florence; Chaffotte, Alain; Wolff, Nicolas

    2015-05-01

    The dual lipid and protein phosphatase PTEN is a tumor suppressor controlling key biological processes, such as cell growth, proliferation and neuro-survival. Its activity and intracellular trafficking is finely regulated notably by multi-site phosphorylation of its C-terminal tail. The reversible and highly dynamic character of these regulatory events confers a temporal dimension to the cell for triggering crucial decisions. In this review, we describe how a recently developed time-resolved NMR spectroscopy approach unveils the dynamic establishment of the phosphorylation events of PTEN C-terminal tail controlled by CK2 and GSK3β kinases. Two cascades of reactions have been identified, in vitro and in extracts of human neuroblastoma cells. They are triggered independently on two nearby clusters of sites (S380-S385 and S361-S370) and occur on different timescales. In each cascade, the reactions follow an ordered model with a distributive kinetic mechanism. The vision of these cascades as two delay timers activating distinct or time-delayed regulatory responses gives a temporal dimension on PTEN regulation and is discussed in relation to the known functional roles of each cluster. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Simultaneous haploinsufficiency of Pten and Trp53 tumor suppressor genes accelerates tumorigenesis in a mouse model of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Couto, Suzana S.; Cao, Mei; Duarte, Paulo C.; Banach-Petrosky, Whitney; Wang, Shunyou; Romanienko, Peter; Wu, Hong; Cardiff, Robert D.; Abate-Shen, Cory; Cunha, Gerald R.

    2010-01-01

    Tumor suppressor gene PTEN is important in the initiation and progression of human prostate carcinoma, whereas the role of TP53 remains controversial. Since Pten/Trp53 double conditional knockout mice show earlier onset and fast progression of prostate cancer when compared to Pten knockout mice, we asked whether heterozygosity of these two tumor suppressor genes was sufficient to accelerate prostatic tumorigenesis. To answer this question we examined prostatic lesion progression of Pten/Trp53 double heterozygous mice and a series of controls such as Pten heterozygous, Pten conditional knockout, Trp53 heterozygous and Trp53 knockout mice. Tissue recombination of adult prostatic epithelium coupled with embryonic rat seminal vesicle mesenchyme was used as a tool to stimulate prostatic epithelial proliferation. In our study, high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) was found with high frequency at 8 weeks post-tissue recombination transplantation. PIN lesions in Pten/Trp53 double heterozygous mice were more severe than those seen in Pten heterozygous alone. Furthermore, morphologic features attributable to Pten or Trp53 loss appeared to be enhanced in double heterozygous tissues. LOH analysis of Pten and Trp53 in genomic DNA collected from high-grade PIN lesions in Pten heterozygous and Pten/Trp53 double heterozygous mice showed an intact wild-type allele for both genes in all samples examined. In conclusion, simultaneous heterozygosity of Pten and Trp53 accelerates prostatic tumorigenesis in this mouse model of prostate cancer independently of loss of heterozygosity of either gene. PMID:19281769

  14. Determination of Radiation Absorbed Dose to Primary Liver Tumors and Normal Liver Tissue Using Post-Radioembolization (90)Y PET.

    PubMed

    Srinivas, Shyam M; Natarajan, Navin; Kuroiwa, Joshua; Gallagher, Sean; Nasr, Elie; Shah, Shetal N; DiFilippo, Frank P; Obuchowski, Nancy; Bazerbashi, Bana; Yu, Naichang; McLennan, Gordon

    2014-01-01

    Radioembolization with Yttrium-90 ((90) Y) microspheres is becoming a more widely used transcatheter treatment for unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Using post-treatment (90) Y positron emission tomography/computerized tomography (PET/CT) scans, the distribution of microspheres within the liver can be determined and quantitatively assessed. We studied the radiation dose of (90) Y delivered to liver and treated tumors. This retrospective study of 56 patients with HCC, including analysis of 98 liver tumors, measured and correlated the dose of radiation delivered to liver tumors and normal liver tissue using glass microspheres (TheraSpheres(®)) to the frequency of complications with modified response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (mRECIST). (90) Y PET/CT and triphasic liver CT scans were used to contour treated tumor and normal liver regions and determine their respective activity concentrations. An absorbed dose factor was used to convert the measured activity concentration (Bq/mL) to an absorbed dose (Gy). The 98 studied tumors received a mean dose of 169 Gy (mode 90-120 Gy; range 0-570 Gy). Tumor response by mRECIST criteria was performed for 48 tumors that had follow-up scans. There were 21 responders (mean dose 215 Gy) and 27 non-responders (mean dose 167 Gy). The association between mean tumor absorbed dose and response suggests a trend but did not reach statistical significance (p = 0.099). Normal liver tissue received a mean dose of 67 Gy (mode 60-70 Gy; range 10-120 Gy). There was a statistically significant association between absorbed dose to normal liver and the presence of two or more severe complications (p = 0.036). Our cohort of patients showed a possible dose-response trend for the tumors. Collateral dose to normal liver is non-trivial and can have clinical implications. These methods help us understand whether patient adverse events, treatment success, or treatment failure can be attributed to the

  15. A study to determine the pharmacokinetics of gatifloxacin following a single oral dose.

    PubMed

    Mandal, U; Musmade, P; Ghosh, A; Chakraborty, Mita; Jayakumar, M; Rajan, D Senthil; Chakravarty, M; Pal, T K; Chattaraj, T K; Roy, Krishnangshu; Banerjee, S N

    2004-09-01

    Gatifloxacin is a broad spectrum fluoroquinolone that offers enhanced Gram-positive activity and anaerobic coverage to other fluoroquinolones. The pharmacokinetic parameters (Cmax, AUCo-t, tmax) of this drug have been evaluated to compare the single dose (400mg) bioavailability of gatifloxacin with the reference formulation. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with U-V detector set at 290 nm has been used to determine plasma concentration of 12 human volunteers as per DCGI (Drug Controller General of India) guidelines. The method has been validated over a linear range of 0.25 to 8 microg/ml from plasma. The minimum quantifiable concentration has been set at 0.25 microg/ml (% CV < 10%). The pharmacokinetic parameters are: Cmax = 4.366 +/- 0.44 microg/ml at tmax = 1.83 +/- 0.44 hour, AUCO0-t = 25.26 +/- 2.91 microg hour/ml, AUCo-inf = 33.68 +/- 4.31 microg hour/ml, Kel = 0.094 +/- 0.024/hour and t1/2 = 8.0 +/- 1.92 hour.

  16. Dose, duration, and pattern of nicotine administration as determinants of behavioral dependence in rats.

    PubMed

    Vann, Robert E; Balster, Robert L; Beardsley, Patrick M

    2006-03-01

    Relatively little is known about the role of dose, duration, and pattern of nicotine exposure in the development of dependence. Disruption of learned behavior during antagonist-precipitated withdrawal can be a sensitive, quantitative measure of behavioral dependence. The present study sought to determine whether behavioral dependence upon nicotine could be induced in rats and, if so, what exposure conditions were essential for inducing it. Our primary focus was on whether continuous exposure over several days was necessary to produce dependence. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were trained to lever press under fixed-ratio 10 schedules of food reinforcement during daily, 15-min experimental sessions. Nicotine was then administered s.c. via osmotic minipumps that delivered various nicotine dosage regimens, some including 24-h nicotine-free periods, to manipulate pattern of exposure. The presence of dependence was tested with challenges with the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist, mecamylamine, or during spontaneous withdrawal. After 7 days of 3, 6, and 12 mg kg(-1) day(-1) nicotine administration, response rates were significantly reduced in nicotinized, but not in saline-treated rats following mecamylamine challenges. Subsequent studies demonstrated that 4 days, but not 3 days, of cumulative 3 mg kg(-1) day(-1) nicotine administration was sufficient to induce dependence. The induction of dependence could be prevented by imposing a nicotine-free period between the first and second days during these 4-day regimens but not at other times. Behavioral dependence upon nicotine can be induced in the rat, and its induction is dependent upon its cumulative duration and pattern of exposure suggesting that tobacco dependencies could be controlled by similar determinants.

  17. Cytoplasmic p27Kip1 counteracts the pro-apoptotic function of the open conformation of PTEN by retention and destabilization of PTEN outside of the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Andrés-Pons, Amparo; Gil, Anabel; Oliver, María D; Sotelo, Natalia-Soledad; Pulido, Rafael

    2012-02-01

    The tumor suppressor activity of p27Kip1 takes place in the cell nucleus by inhibitory binding to cyclin/CDK complexes. p27Kip1 can also be localized in the cytoplasm, where it has been proposed to have oncogenic properties. Here, we describe a novel role for cytoplasmic p27Kip1 which could account for its activity as an oncoprotein by negative regulation of the PTEN tumor suppressor. p27Kip1 physically interacted with the open conformation of PTEN, which is competent to enter the nucleus. In mammalian cells, cytoplasmic p27Kip1 retained to nuclear-targeted PTEN in the cytoplasm. This retention was exerted by the C-terminal p27Kip1 region, and was independent of cyclin/CDK-binding. The nuclear accumulation of PTEN triggered by pro-apoptotic TNFα treatment was abolished by cytoplasmic p27Kip1. Furthermore, conformationally-open PTEN displayed diminished protein stability and pro-apoptotic activity in the presence of cytoplasmic p27Kip1. Our results support a conformationally-dependent model of cytoplasmic retention and negative regulation of the activity of nuclear PTEN by oncogenic cytoplasmic p27Kip1, and suggest the existence of reciprocal mechanisms to regulate the levels of both p27Kip1 and PTEN. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Radon in indoor air of primary schools: determinant factors, their variability and effective dose.

    PubMed

    Madureira, Joana; Paciência, Inês; Rufo, João; Moreira, André; de Oliveira Fernandes, Eduardo; Pereira, Alcides

    2016-04-01

    Radon is a radioactive gas, abundant in granitic areas, such as in the city of Porto at the north-east of Portugal. This gas is a recognized carcinogenic agent, being appointed by the World Health Organization as the leading cause of lung cancer after smoking. The aim of this preliminary survey was to determine indoor radon concentrations in public primary schools, to analyse the main factors influencing their indoor concentration levels and to estimate the effective dose in students and teachers in primary schools. Radon concentrations were measured in 45 classrooms from 13 public primary schools located in Porto, using CR-39 passive radon detectors for about 2-month period. In all schools, radon concentrations ranged from 56 to 889 Bq/m(3) (mean = 197 Bq/m(3)). The results showed that the limit of 100 Bq/m(3) established by WHO IAQ guidelines was exceeded in 92 % of the measurements, as well as 8 % of the measurements exceeded the limit of 400 Bq/m(3) established by the national legislation. Moreover, the mean annual effective dose was calculated as 1.25 mSv/y (ranging between 0.58 and 3.07 mSv/y), which is below the action level (3-10 mSv). The considerable variability of radon concentration observed between and within floors indicates a need to monitor concentrations in several rooms for each floor. A single radon detector for each room can be used, provided that the measurement error is considerably lower than variability of radon concentration between rooms. The results of the present survey will provide useful baseline data for adopting safety measures and dealing effectively with radiation emergencies. In particular, radon remediation techniques should be used in buildings located in the highest radon risk areas of Portugal. The results obtained in the current study concerning radon levels and their variations will be useful to optimize the design of future research surveys.

  19. Determination of dose rate from Chernobyl-derived radiocaesium in Estonian soil.

    PubMed

    Lust, M; Realo, E

    2012-10-01

    The deposition and vertical depth distribution of 134Cs and 137Cs in the natural undisturbed soil profiles down to 20-25 cm were studied at locations in the North Eastern Estonia, which were most strongly affected by the Chernobyl fallout in 1986. The total depositions were estimated based on summing the sampled and measured activities of 134Cs and 137Cs in all sections of soil profiles. The Chernobyl 137Cs deposition values varied considerably from site to site and the range was from 3.9 kBq m(-2) to 50.2 kBq m(-2), with the average of 22.8 kBq m(-2) for the region (reference data May 1, 1986). The ratio of total activities, A(134Cs)/A(137Cs), varied in the range from 0.47 to 0.55. Using a compartment model and the observed data on the 134Cs and 137Cs activity concentrations (Bq m(-2)) in four compartments, 0-1 cm, 1-5 cm, 5-15 cm and 15-30 cm, of soil collected in 1991-2003, the approximate residence half-times of radiocaesium in soil were determined. The latter increased from 3.7 y in the top-most compartment to 8.6 y and 36.4 y in the deeper compartments, respectively. The time dependence of the external gamma-dose rate at the height of 1 m above a flat ground area arising from the deposited and migrating radiocaesium was calculated using the modeled data on the 134Cs and 137Cs activity in soil compartments. Considering the total depositions of radiocaesium in soil from the Chernobyl 1986 accident, the 50 year effective doses caused by external gamma exposure varied in the range from 0.13 mSv to 1.74 mSv, with the mean of 0.79 mSv in the region. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Role of PTEN in Oxidative Stress and DNA Damage in the Liver of Whole-Body Pten Haplodeficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bankoglu, Ezgi Eyluel; Tschopp, Oliver; Schmitt, Johannes; Burkard, Philipp; Jahn, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and obesity are frequently associated with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and with an elevated cancer incidence. The molecular mechanisms of carcinogenesis in this context are only partially understood. High blood insulin levels are typical in early T2DM and excessive insulin can cause elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and genomic instability. ROS are important for various cellular functions in signaling and host defense. However, elevated ROS formation is thought to be involved in cancer induction. In the molecular events from insulin receptor binding to genomic damage, some signaling steps have been identified, pointing at the PI3K/AKT pathway. For further elucidation Phosphatase and Tensin homolog (Pten), a tumour suppressor phosphatase that plays a role in insulin signaling by negative regulation of PI3K/AKT and its downstream targets, was investigated here. Dihydroethidium (DHE) staining was used to detect ROS formation in immortalized human hepatocytes. Comet assay and micronucleus test were performed to investigate genomic damage in vitro. In liver samples, DHE staining and western blot detection of HSP70 and HO-1 were performed to evaluate oxidative stress response. DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) were detected by immunohistostaining. Inhibition of PTEN with the pharmacologic inhibitor VO-OHpic resulted in increased ROS production and genomic damage in a liver cell line. Knockdown of Pten in a mouse model yielded increased oxidative stress levels, detected by ROS levels and expression of the two stress-proteins HSP70 and HO-1 and elevated genomic damage in the liver, which was significant in mice fed with a high fat diet. We conclude that PTEN is involved in oxidative stress and genomic damage induction in vitro and that this may also explain the in vivo observations. This further supports the hypothesis that the PI3K/AKT pathway is responsible for damaging effects of high levels of insulin. PMID:27893783

  1. Determinants of personal ultraviolet-radiation exposure doses on a sun holiday.

    PubMed

    Petersen, B; Thieden, E; Philipsen, P A; Heydenreich, J; Wulf, H C; Young, A R

    2013-05-01

    A great number of journeys to sunny destinations are sold to the Danish population every year. We suspect that this travel considerably increases personal annual ultraviolet-radiation (UVR) exposure doses. This is important because such exposure is the main cause of skin cancer, and studies have shown a correlation between intermittent solar UVR exposure and malignant melanoma. To prospectively monitor the behaviour of a group of sun seekers during a winter sun holiday and to study the impact of behaviour on personal UVR exposure doses. In this observational study 25 Danish sun seekers were closely monitored by on-site investigators for 6 days during a winter sun holiday in the Canary Islands, thus avoiding the possible recall bias of retrospective studies with questionnaires. The volunteers recorded their location, clothing and sunscreen use in diaries, and their UVR doses were measured by personal UVR dosimeters worn on the wrist. This resulted in 3450 half-hour registrations during 150 participation days. On average, each volunteer received a total UVR dose of 57 standard erythema doses over 6 days, which is 43% of the annual UVR dose of a Danish indoor worker. Their exposed body area, sunscreen use and percentage of body with sunscreen application were positively correlated with their personal UVR doses, and there was also a strong relationship between location and UVR doses received. The behaviour of the volunteers had a major impact on their personal UVR doses. Our results emphasize the importance of changing the behaviour of sun seekers with protanning attitudes to reduce their personal annual UVR exposure doses, and possibly their risk of skin cancer. © 2013 The Authors. BJD © 2013 British Association of Dermatologists.

  2. Construction and validation of a dose-response curve using the comet assay to determine human radiosensitivity to ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Güerci, A; Zúñiga, L; Marcos, R

    2011-01-01

    Individual radiosensitivity is an individual characteristic associated with an increased reaction to ionizing radiation. The purpose of our work is to establish a dose-response curve useful to classify individuals as radiosensitive or radioresistant. Thus, a dose-response curve was constructed by measuring in vitro responses to increasing doses (0 to 8 Gy) of gamma radiation in the comet assay. The obtained curve fit well with a linear equation in the range of 0 to 8 Gy. The overall dose-response curve was constructed for percent DNA in tail, as a measure of the genetic damage induced by irradiation. To probe the goodness of the constructed curve, a validation study was carried out with whole blood from two donors in a blind study. Results show that, for the two applied doses (2 and 6 Gy), the obtained values fit well inside the interval of confidence of the curve. In conclusion, our results demonstrate the usefulness of the comet assay in determining individual responses to defined doses of gamma radiation. The standard dose-response curve constructed may be used to detect individuals departing from reference values.

  3. Interactions of Phosphatase and Tensin Homologue (PTEN) Proteins with Phosphatidylinositol Phosphates: Insights from Molecular Dynamics Simulations of PTEN and Voltage Sensitive Phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) and the Ciona intestinalis voltage sensitive phosphatase (Ci-VSP) are both phosphatidylinositol phosphate (PIP) phosphatases that contain a C2 domain. PTEN is a tumor suppressor protein that acts as a phosphatase on PIP3 in mammalian cell membranes. It contains two principal domains: a phosphatase domain (PD) and a C2 domain. Despite detailed structural and functional characterization, less is known about its mechanism of interaction with PIP-containing lipid bilayers. Ci-VSP consists of an N-terminal transmembrane voltage sensor domain and a C-terminal PTEN domain, which in turn contains a PD and a C2 domain. The nature of the interaction of the PTEN domain of Ci-VSP with membranes has not been well established. We have used multiscale molecular dynamics simulations to define the interaction mechanisms of PTEN and of the Ci-VSP PTEN domains with PIP-containing lipid bilayers. Our results suggest a novel mechanism of association of the PTEN with such bilayers, in which an initial electrostatics-driven encounter of the protein and bilayer is followed by reorientation of the protein to optimize its interactions with PIP molecules in the membrane. Although a PIP3 molecule binds close to the active site of PTEN, our simulations suggest a further conformational change of the protein may be required for catalytically productive binding to occur. Ci-VSP interacted with membranes in an orientation comparable to that of PTEN but bound directly to PIP-containing membranes without a subsequent reorientation step. Again, PIP3 bound close to the active site of the Ci-VSP PD, but not in a catalytically productive manner. Interactions of Ci-VSP with the bilayer induced clustering of PIP molecules around the protein. PMID:24588644

  4. Interactions of phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) proteins with phosphatidylinositol phosphates: insights from molecular dynamics simulations of PTEN and voltage sensitive phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Kalli, Antreas C; Devaney, Isabel; Sansom, Mark S P

    2014-03-25

    The phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) and the Ciona intestinalis voltage sensitive phosphatase (Ci-VSP) are both phosphatidylinositol phosphate (PIP) phosphatases that contain a C2 domain. PTEN is a tumor suppressor protein that acts as a phosphatase on PIP3 in mammalian cell membranes. It contains two principal domains: a phosphatase domain (PD) and a C2 domain. Despite detailed structural and functional characterization, less is known about its mechanism of interaction with PIP-containing lipid bilayers. Ci-VSP consists of an N-terminal transmembrane voltage sensor domain and a C-terminal PTEN domain, which in turn contains a PD and a C2 domain. The nature of the interaction of the PTEN domain of Ci-VSP with membranes has not been well established. We have used multiscale molecular dynamics simulations to define the interaction mechanisms of PTEN and of the Ci-VSP PTEN domains with PIP-containing lipid bilayers. Our results suggest a novel mechanism of association of the PTEN with such bilayers, in which an initial electrostatics-driven encounter of the protein and bilayer is followed by reorientation of the protein to optimize its interactions with PIP molecules in the membrane. Although a PIP3 molecule binds close to the active site of PTEN, our simulations suggest a further conformational change of the protein may be required for catalytically productive binding to occur. Ci-VSP interacted with membranes in an orientation comparable to that of PTEN but bound directly to PIP-containing membranes without a subsequent reorientation step. Again, PIP3 bound close to the active site of the Ci-VSP PD, but not in a catalytically productive manner. Interactions of Ci-VSP with the bilayer induced clustering of PIP molecules around the protein.

  5. AXAOTHER XL -- A spreadsheet for determining doses for incidents caused by tornadoes or high-velocity straight winds

    SciTech Connect

    Simpkins, A.A.

    1996-09-01

    AXAOTHER XL is an Excel Spreadsheet used to determine dose to the maximally exposed offsite individual during high-velocity straight winds or tornado conditions. Both individual and population doses may be considered. Potential exposure pathways are inhalation and plume shine. For high-velocity straight winds the spreadsheet has the capability to determine the downwind relative air concentration, however for the tornado conditions, the user must enter the relative air concentration. Theoretical models are discussed and hand calculations are performed to ensure proper application of methodologies. A section has also been included that contains user instructions for the spreadsheet.

  6. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic modeling to determine the dose of ST-246 to protect against smallpox in humans.

    PubMed

    Leeds, Janet M; Fenneteau, Frederique; Gosselin, Nathalie H; Mouksassi, Mohamad-Samer; Kassir, Nastya; Marier, J F; Chen, Yali; Grosenbach, Doug; Frimm, Annie E; Honeychurch, Kady M; Chinsangaram, Jarasvech; Tyavanagimatt, Shanthakumar R; Hruby, Dennis E; Jordan, Robert

    2013-03-01

    Although smallpox has been eradicated, the United States government considers it a "material threat" and has funded the discovery and development of potential therapeutic compounds. As reported here, the human efficacious dose for one of these compounds, ST-246, was determined using efficacy studies in nonhuman primates (NHPs), together with pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic analysis that predicted the appropriate dose and exposure levels to provide therapeutic benefit in humans. The efficacy analysis combined the data from studies conducted at three separate facilities that evaluated treatment following infection with a closely related virus, monkeypox virus (MPXV), in a total of 96 NHPs. The effect of infection on ST-246 pharmacokinetics in NHPs was applied to humans using population pharmacokinetic models. Exposure at the selected human dose of 600 mg is more than 4-fold higher than the lowest efficacious dose in NHPs and is predicted to provide protection to more than 95% of the population.

  7. Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Modeling To Determine the Dose of ST-246 To Protect against Smallpox in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Leeds, Janet M.; Fenneteau, Frederique; Gosselin, Nathalie H.; Mouksassi, Mohamad-Samer; Kassir, Nastya; Marier, J. F.; Chen, Yali; Grosenbach, Doug; Frimm, Annie E.; Honeychurch, Kady M.; Chinsangaram, Jarasvech; Tyavanagimatt, Shanthakumar R.; Jordan, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Although smallpox has been eradicated, the United States government considers it a “material threat” and has funded the discovery and development of potential therapeutic compounds. As reported here, the human efficacious dose for one of these compounds, ST-246, was determined using efficacy studies in nonhuman primates (NHPs), together with pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic analysis that predicted the appropriate dose and exposure levels to provide therapeutic benefit in humans. The efficacy analysis combined the data from studies conducted at three separate facilities that evaluated treatment following infection with a closely related virus, monkeypox virus (MPXV), in a total of 96 NHPs. The effect of infection on ST-246 pharmacokinetics in NHPs was applied to humans using population pharmacokinetic models. Exposure at the selected human dose of 600 mg is more than 4-fold higher than the lowest efficacious dose in NHPs and is predicted to provide protection to more than 95% of the population. PMID:23254433

  8. Direct absorbed dose to water determination based on water calorimetry in scanning proton beam delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Sarfehnia, A.; Clasie, B.; Chung, E.; Lu, H. M.; Flanz, J.; Cascio, E.; Engelsman, M.; Paganetti, H.; Seuntjens, J.

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: The aim of this manuscript is to describe the direct measurement of absolute absorbed dose to water in a scanned proton radiotherapy beam using a water calorimeter primary standard. Methods: The McGill water calorimeter, which has been validated in photon and electron beams as well as in HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy, was used to measure the absorbed dose to water in double scattering and scanning proton irradiations. The measurements were made at the Massachusetts General Hospital proton radiotherapy facility. The correction factors in water calorimetry were numerically calculated and various parameters affecting their magnitude and uncertainty were studied. The absorbed dose to water was compared to that obtained using an Exradin T1 Chamber based on the IAEA TRS-398 protocol. Results: The overall 1-sigma uncertainty on absorbed dose to water amounts to 0.4% and 0.6% in scattered and scanned proton water calorimetry, respectively. This compares to an overall uncertainty of 1.9% for currently accepted IAEA TRS-398 reference absorbed dose measurement protocol. The absorbed dose from water calorimetry agrees with the results from TRS-398 well to within 1-sigma uncertainty. Conclusions: This work demonstrates that a primary absorbed dose standard based on water calorimetry is feasible in scattered and scanned proton beams.

  9. Phase space determination from measured dose data for intraoperative electron radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Herranz, E; Herraiz, J L; Ibáñez, P; Pérez-Liva, M; Puebla, R; Cal-González, J; Guerra, P; Rodríguez, R; Illana, C; Udías, J M

    2015-01-07

    A procedure to characterize beams of a medical linear accelerator for their use in Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations for intraoperative electron radiation therapy (IOERT) is presented. The procedure relies on dose measurements in homogeneous media as input, avoiding the need for detailed simulations of the accelerator head. An iterative algorithm (EM-ML) has been employed to extract the relevant details of the phase space (PHSP) of the particles coming from the accelerator, such as energy spectra, spatial distribution and angle of emission of particles. The algorithm can use pre-computed dose volumes in water and/or air, so that the machine-specific tuning with actual data can be performed in a few minutes. To test the procedure, MC simulations of a linear accelerator with typical IOERT applicators and energies, have been performed and taken as reference. A solution PHSP derived from the dose produced by the simulated accelerator has been compared to the reference PHSP. Further, dose delivered by the simulated accelerator for setups not included in the fit of the PHSP were compared to the ones derived from the solution PHSP. The results show that it is possible to derive from dose measurements PHSP accurate for IOERT MC dose estimations.

  10. Determinants of Quality of Life in High-Dose Benzodiazepine Misusers

    PubMed Central

    Tamburin, Stefano; Federico, Angela; Faccini, Marco; Casari, Rebecca; Morbioli, Laura; Sartore, Valentina; Mirijello, Antonio; Addolorato, Giovanni; Lugoboni, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    Benzodiazepines (BZDs) are among the most widely prescribed drugs in developed countries, but they have a high potential for tolerance, dependence and misuse. High-dose BZD misuse represents an emerging addiction phenomenon, but data on quality of life (QoL) in high-dose BZD misusers are scant. This study aimed to explore QoL in high-dose BZD misuse. We recruited 267 high-dose BZD misusers, compared the QoL scores in those who took BZD only to poly-drug misusers, and explored the role of demographic and clinical covariates through multivariable analysis. Our data confirmed worse QoL in high-dose BZD misusers and showed that (a) QoL scores were not negatively influenced by the misuse of alcohol or other drugs, or by coexisting psychiatric disorders; (b) demographic variables turned out to be the most significant predictors of QoL scores; (c) BZD intake significantly and negatively influenced QoL. Physical and psychological dimensions of QoL are significantly lower in high-dose BZD misusers with no significant effect of comorbidities. Our data suggest that the main reason for poor QoL in these patients is high-dose BZD intake per se. QoL should be considered among outcome measures in these patients. PMID:28054975

  11. Determination of optimal dose of arginine vasopressin in hemorrhagic shock in dogs.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jong-Hyun; Park, Chul; Hahm, Dae-Hyun; Lee, Hye-Jung; Park, Hee-Myung

    2007-07-01

    The hemodynamic effects of vasopressin of high/low doses on dogs were investigated using experimentally induced hemorrhagic shock model. Experimental groups were categorized according to administered doses of vasopressin (0.1, 0.4 and 1.6 IU/kg) and hemodynamic parameters were measured before and after the graded-dose administration of vasopressin. Administration of high- and middle-dose vasopressin (0.4 and 1.6 IU/kg) showed superior increase in blood pressure and systemic vascular resistance, compared with those of low-dose one (0.1 IU/kg). Results of systolic arterial pressure and mean arterial pressure in 1.6 IU/kg-administered group revealed lower efficacy than that in 0.4 IU/kg group in spite of administration of higher dose. This study demonstrates that 0.4 IU/kg of vasopressin can be used as the most effective dose for improving hemodynamic condition in the decompensatory phase of hemorrhagic shock in dogs.

  12. Promoter region methylation and loss of protein expression of PTEN and significance in cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    QI, QIUFENG; LING, YANG; ZHU, MING; ZHOU, LINYAN; WAN, MEIZHEN; BAO, YANQING; LIU, YONGPING

    2014-01-01

    The genetic basis underlying cervical tumorigenesis and progression are largely unknown. Phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) is a tumor suppressor gene, and genetic changes of PTEN occurs in various types of cancer suggesting that the inactivation of PTEN may play an important role in the pathogenesis of a variety of human malignancies. In the present study, 102 cervical cancer specimens were examined for the expression of the PTEN gene and promoter methylation using methylation-specific-polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. The PTEN gene mutation was also assessed using PCR single-strand conformational polymorphism. We examined the correlation between PTEN expression and its associated methylation status and the clinical characteristics of cervical cancer. The results showed that there was one case of an A to G point mutation on exon 9 of the PTEN gene in the cervical cancer tissues. This mutation caused the change of aspartic acid to glycine, and the rate of mutation was 1%. The PTEN gene methylation rate of cervical cancer was 62% (63/102) and the rate was associated with the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage, cell differentiation, tumor size and lymph node metastasis (P<0.05). The positive rate of PTEN expression was 49% (50/102) in cervical carcinoma and the PTEN expression between stage I–II and III–IV [60 (27/45) vs. 40% (23/57)] was statistically significant (P<0.01). The PTEN gene expression between the metastasis and no lymph node metastasis groups [26 (10/38) vs. 63% (40/64)] was significantly different (P<0.01). The PTEN gene promoter methylation and its protein expression had a significant correlation (P=0.042). These results suggest that hypermethylation can inactivate the transcription of PTEN and reduce its protein expression. Downregulated PTEN expression is involved in the pathogenesis, invasion and metastasis of cervical cancer, possibly by regulating the balance between apoptosis and proliferation

  13. Expression of PTEN in mycosis fungoides and correlation with loss of heterozygosity.

    PubMed

    Katona, Terrence M; Smoller, Bruce R; Webb, Alden L; Hattab, Eyas M; Khalil, Ahmed; Hiatt, Kim M

    2013-07-01

    Mycosis fungoides (MF) exhibits a variety of underlying molecular defects including aberrations involving the PTEN tumor suppressor gene. Specifically, loss of heterozygosity of PTEN has been previously demonstrated. We hypothesize that abnormalities of PTEN may result in altered immunohistochemical expression of its protein product. Thirty-six MF specimens were stained with monoclonal antibody against PTEN protein. The percentage of nuclei retaining PTEN expression and the staining intensity was recorded. Average percentage of lymphoma cells retaining expression of the PTEN protein was 92% within patch-stage lesions, 81.4% in plaque-stage lesions, and 81.1% in tumor-stage lesions. Average intensity of staining for patch-stage lesions was 2.90, 2.50 for plaque lesions and 2.44 for tumor lesions. Cases lacking loss of heterozygozity at PTEN (n = 6) had an average expression of 81% and an average intensity of staining of 2.42. Whereas, cases with loss of heterozygozity at PTEN (n = 6) had an average expression of 75% of cells with an average staining intensity of 2.33. The percentage of cells retaining PTEN and staining intensity decrease from patch- to plaque-stage lesions, whereas both parameters show mild diminution in tumor lesions compared with plaque lesions. PTEN expression in a small sample seems to correlate with previous demonstration of loss of heterozygosity at the molecular level. Although a trend for loss of PTEN expression exists with histologic progression of MF, the effect is modest and may not represent the pivotal defect in MF pathogenesis.

  14. Rescue of glandular dysmorphogenesis in PTEN-deficient colorectal cancer epithelium by PPARγ-targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Jagan, I; Fatehullah, A; Deevi, R K; Bingham, V; Campbell, F C

    2013-03-07

    Disruption of glandular architecture associates with poor clinical outcome in high-grade colorectal cancer (CRC). Phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN) regulates morphogenic growth of benign MDCK (Madin Darby Canine Kidney) cells through effects on the Rho-like GTPase cdc42 (cell division cycle 42). This study investigates PTEN-dependent morphogenesis in a CRC model. Stable short hairpin RNA knockdown of PTEN in Caco-2 cells influenced expression or localization of cdc42 guanine nucleotide exchange factors and inhibited cdc42 activation. Parental Caco-2 cells formed regular hollow gland-like structures (glands) with a single central lumen, in three-dimensional (3D) cultures. Conversely, PTEN-deficient Caco-2 ShPTEN cells formed irregular glands with multiple abnormal lumens as well as intra- and/or intercellular vacuoles evocative of the high-grade CRC phenotype. Effects of targeted treatment were investigated. Phosphatidinylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) modulating treatment did not affect gland morphogenesis but did influence gland number, gland size and/or cell size within glands. As PTEN may be regulated by the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ), cultures were treated with the PPARγ ligand rosiglitazone. This treatment enhanced PTEN expression, cdc42 activation and rescued dysmorphogenesis by restoring single lumen formation in Caco-2 ShPTEN glands. Rosiglitazone effects on cdc42 activation and Caco-2 ShPTEN gland development were attenuated by cotreatment with GW9662, a PPARγ antagonist. Taken together, these studies show PTEN-cdc42 regulation of lumen formation in a 3D model of human CRC glandular morphogenesis. Treatment by the PPARγ ligand rosiglitazone, but not PI3K modulators, rescued colorectal glandular dysmorphogenesis of PTEN deficiency.

  15. PTEN loss is associated with a poor response to trastuzumab in HER2-overexpressing gastroesophageal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Deguchi, Yasunori; Okabe, Hiroshi; Oshima, Nobu; Hisamori, Shigeo; Minamiguchi, Sachiko; Muto, Manabu; Sakai, Yoshiharu

    2017-05-01

    Although trastuzumab improves the outcome of patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-overexpressing gastric or gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma (collectively referred to as "gastroesophageal adenocarcinoma"; GEA), no clinical response is observed in a substantial population of patients. A predictive biomarker of trastuzumab response is required. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the hyperactivation of the downstream phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway, due to phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) loss or PIK3CA mutations, could provide trastuzumab resistance in GEA. Expression of HER2 and PTEN, and PIK3CA gene mutations were screened in 264 surgically resected GEA specimens. The effects of PTEN knockdown on the response to trastuzumab on cell viability, HER2 downstream signaling, apoptosis, and cell cycle were evaluated in HER2-overexpressing NCI-N87 gastric adenocarcinoma and OE19 esophageal adenocarcinoma cell lines. Inhibition of xenograft tumor growth by trastuzumab was investigated in OE19 cells with or without PTEN knockdown. The PTEN expression and objective response were analyzed in 23 GEA patients who received trastuzumab-based therapy. PTEN loss was identified in 34.5 % of HER2-overexpressing GEA patients, whereas PIK3CA mutations were rare (5.6 %). Trastuzumab-mediated growth suppression, apoptosis, and G1 cell cycle arrest were inhibited by PTEN knockdown through Akt activation in NCI-N87 and OE19 cells. PTEN knockdown impaired the antiproliferative effect of trastuzumab in OE19 xenograft models. A clinical response was observed in 50 % of PTEN-positive tumors (9 of 18) but in no tumors with PTEN loss (none of 5). PTEN loss was frequently found in HER2-overexpressing tumors, and was associated with a poor response to trastuzumab-based therapy in patients with GEA.

  16. Comparison of various techniques for the exact determination of absorbed dose in heavy ion fields using passive detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, T.; Reitz, G.; Hajek, M.; Vana, N.

    Passive thermoluminescent detectors (TLDs) are commonly applied for the determination of absorbed dose in routine radiation protection. The usage of TLDs in heavy ion fields, e.g. for treatment planing in radiotherapy or in space dosimetry, requires the detailed knowledge of the efficiency of these detectors to the ion under study in dependence on the LET of the ion. This is due to the fact, that the detection efficiency of TLDs changes with increasing LET. This would lead - if the changing efficiency of the TL- material is not taken into account - to a measured deviation of the absorbed dose. In the framework of the ICCHIBAN project - which was started as an intercomparison of passive and active detector systems used for dose determination in space - "Blind" exposures were carried out. No information about dose and ion species was given for the investigators. Three different methods were used for the efficiency correction of TLDs after the BLIND exposures. The first method used the different LET efficiency of the TL-materials LiF: Mg, Ti and LiF:Mg, Cu,P to determine the LET and based on this value the efficiency of the LiF: Mg, Ti dosemeters. The second method used the high temperature emissions in LiF: Mg, Ti for the efficiency correction. The third method applied used a combination of TLDs and CR-39 track etch detectors to determine the total absorbed dose during the BLIND exposures. The paper will discuss the threee methods, and focus on the applicability for the usage of these methods for dose determination and recalculation in space dosimetry.

  17. Comparison of various techniques for the exact determination of absorbed dose in heavy ion fields using passive detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, T.; Reitz, G.; Hajek, M.; Vana, N.

    Passive thermoluminescent detectors (TLDs) are commonly applied for the determination of absorbed dose in routine radiation protection. The usage of TLDs in heavy ion fields, e.g., in space dosimetry or for treatment planing in radiotherapy, requires the detailed knowledge of the efficiency of these detectors to the ion under study in dependence on the LET of the ion. This is due to the fact, that the detection efficiency of TLDs changes with increasing LET. If the changing efficiency of the TL-material is not taken into account, this would lead to a deviation of the measured absorbed dose. In the framework of the ICCHIBAN project - which was started as an intercomparison of passive and active detector systems used for dose determination in space - "BLIND" exposures were carried out. No information about dose and ion species was given to the investigators. Three different methods were used for the efficiency correction of TLDs after the BLIND exposures. The first method used the different LET efficiency of the TL-materials LiF:Mg, Ti and LiF:Mg, Cu, P to determine the LET and from this LET the efficiency of the LiF:Mg, Ti dosemeters. The second method used the high temperature emissions in LiF:Mg, Ti for the efficiency correction. The third method used a combination of TLDs and CR-39 track etch detectors to determine the total absorbed dose during the BLIND exposures. The paper will discuss the three methods, and focus on their applicability to precise dose determination and recalculation in space dosimetry.

  18. Dose to the Developing Dentition During Therapeutic Irradiation: Organ at Risk Determination and Clinical Implications

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Reid F.; Schneider, Ralf A.; Albertini, Francesca; Lomax, Antony J.; Ares, Carmen; Goitein, Gudrun; Hug, Eugen B.

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: Irradiation of pediatric facial structures can cause severe impairment of permanent teeth later in life. We therefore focused on primary and permanent teeth as organs at risk, investigating the ability to identify individual teeth in children and infants and to correlate dose distributions with subsequent dental toxicity. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 14 pediatric patients who received a maximum dose >20 Gy(relative biological effectiveness, RBE) to 1 or more primary or permanent teeth between 2003 and 2009. The patients (aged 1-16 years) received spot-scanning proton therapy with 46 to 66 Gy(RBE) in 23 to 33 daily fractions for a variety of tumors, including rhabdomyosarcoma (n=10), sarcoma (n=2), teratoma (n=1), and carcinoma (n=1). Individual teeth were contoured on axial slices from planning computed tomography (CT) scans. Dose-volume histogram data were retrospectively obtained from total calculated delivered treatments. Dental follow-up information was obtained from external care providers. Results: All primary teeth and permanent incisors, canines, premolars, and first and second molars were identifiable on CT scans in all patients as early as 1 year of age. Dose-volume histogram analysis showed wide dose variability, with a median 37 Gy(RBE) per tooth dose range across all individuals, and a median 50 Gy(RBE) intraindividual dose range across all teeth. Dental follow-up revealed absence of significant toxicity in 7 of 10 patients but severe localized toxicity in teeth receiving >20 Gy(RBE) among 3 patients who were all treated at <4 years of age. Conclusions: CT-based assessment of dose distribution to individual teeth is feasible, although delayed calcification may complicate tooth identification in the youngest patients. Patterns of dental dose exposure vary markedly within and among patients, corresponding to rapid dose falloff with protons. Severe localized dental toxicity was observed in a few patients receiving the

  19. Dose to the developing dentition during therapeutic irradiation: organ at risk determination and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Reid F; Schneider, Ralf A; Albertini, Francesca; Lomax, Antony J; Ares, Carmen; Goitein, Gudrun; Hug, Eugen B

    2013-05-01

    Irradiation of pediatric facial structures can cause severe impairment of permanent teeth later in life. We therefore focused on primary and permanent teeth as organs at risk, investigating the ability to identify individual teeth in children and infants and to correlate dose distributions with subsequent dental toxicity. We retrospectively reviewed 14 pediatric patients who received a maximum dose >20 Gy(relative biological effectiveness, RBE) to 1 or more primary or permanent teeth between 2003 and 2009. The patients (aged 1-16 years) received spot-scanning proton therapy with 46 to 66 Gy(RBE) in 23 to 33 daily fractions for a variety of tumors, including rhabdomyosarcoma (n=10), sarcoma (n=2), teratoma (n=1), and carcinoma (n=1). Individual teeth were contoured on axial slices from planning computed tomography (CT) scans. Dose-volume histogram data were retrospectively obtained from total calculated delivered treatments. Dental follow-up information was obtained from external care providers. All primary teeth and permanent incisors, canines, premolars, and first and second molars were identifiable on CT scans in all patients as early as 1 year of age. Dose-volume histogram analysis showed wide dose variability, with a median 37 Gy(RBE) per tooth dose range across all individuals, and a median 50 Gy(RBE) intraindividual dose range across all teeth. Dental follow-up revealed absence of significant toxicity in 7 of 10 patients but severe localized toxicity in teeth receiving >20 Gy(RBE) among 3 patients who were all treated at <4 years of age. CT-based assessment of dose distribution to individual teeth is feasible, although delayed calcification may complicate tooth identification in the youngest patients. Patterns of dental dose exposure vary markedly within and among patients, corresponding to rapid dose falloff with protons. Severe localized dental toxicity was observed in a few patients receiving the largest doses of radiation at the youngest ages; however

  20. Determination of prescription dose for Cs-131 permanent implants using the BED formalism including resensitization correction

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Wei Molloy, Janelle; Aryal, Prakash; Feddock, Jonathan; Randall, Marcus

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: The current widely used biological equivalent dose (BED) formalism for permanent implants is based on the linear-quadratic model that includes cell repair and repopulation but not resensitization (redistribution and reoxygenation). The authors propose a BED formalism that includes all the four biological effects (4Rs), and the authors propose how it can be used to calculate appropriate prescription doses for permanent implants with Cs-131. Methods: A resensitization correction was added to the BED calculation for permanent implants to account for 4Rs. Using the same BED, the prescription doses with Au-198, I-125, and Pd-103 were converted to the isoeffective Cs-131 prescription doses. The conversion factor F, ratio of the Cs-131 dose to the equivalent dose with the other reference isotope (F{sub r}: with resensitization, F{sub n}: without resensitization), was thus derived and used for actual prescription. Different values of biological parameters such as α, β, and relative biological effectiveness for different types of tumors were used for the calculation. Results: Prescription doses with I-125, Pd-103, and Au-198 ranging from 10 to 160 Gy were converted into prescription doses with Cs-131. The difference in dose conversion factors with (F{sub r}) and without (F{sub n}) resensitization was significant but varied with different isotopes and different types of tumors. The conversion factors also varied with different doses. For I-125, the average values of F{sub r}/F{sub n} were 0.51/0.46, for fast growing tumors, and 0.88/0.77 for slow growing tumors. For Pd-103, the average values of F{sub r}/F{sub n} were 1.25/1.15 for fast growing tumors, and 1.28/1.22 for slow growing tumors. For Au-198, the average values of F{sub r}/F{sub n} were 1.08/1.25 for fast growing tumors, and 1.00/1.06 for slow growing tumors. Using the biological parameters for the HeLa/C4-I cells, the averaged value of F{sub r} was 1.07/1.11 (rounded to 1.1), and the averaged value of F

  1. Apoptosis induced by the methanol extract of Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge in non-small cell lung cancer through PTEN-mediated inhibition of PI3K/Akt pathway.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yin-Tao; Zhong, Wei; Sun, Pei; Wang, Dong; Wang, Chen; Hu, Li-Min; Qian, Jun-Qiang

    2017-03-22

    Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge, a well-known traditional Chinese medicinal (TCM) plant, has been used to treat cardiovascular diseases since thousands of years. Many studies reported that the active component tanshinones displayed a variety of biological activities: anti-thrombous, anti-allergic, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and anti-tumor promoting. But the mechanism of how the active components working still need to be clarified. The anti-tumor effect of compounds of tanshinone (CTN), the methanol extract of Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge roots, was investigated. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of CTN on the growth inhibition, apoptosis and molecular targets of human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). CTN-induced cytotoxicity was determined by MTT assay. The cell survival was evaluated using clonogenic survival assay. The morphology of Glc-82 cells after treatment with CTN was determined by fluorescence microscopy. Cell cycle distribution was revealed by flow cytometry. The apoptotic cells were quantified with annexin V-FITC/PI staining and flow cytometry, and observed using Hoechst 33258 staining and TUNEL assays. The expression levels of proteins were analyzed using western blot. Tumor growth was assessed by subcutaneous inoculation of cells into BALB/c nude mice. CTN inhibited the proliferation of NSCLC in a dose-dependent manner and induced both early and late apoptosis. Treatment of Glc-82 cells with CTN (5-80μg/ml) significantly (p<0.05) suppressed the cell proliferation in a concentration and time-dependent manner. CTN induced significant (p<0.05) and dose-dependent apoptosis of Glc-82 cells. Cell cycle assay showed that CTN induced a G2/M phase arrest, and significantly (p<0.05) increased expression of p53 and p21, actived caspase-3/9 and PARP1, which suggest the involvement of the mitochondria in the apoptotic signals. In addition, CTN decreased expression of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2, Bcl-xl and increased expression of the pro

  2. A novel class of PTEN protein in Arabidopsis displays unusual phosphoinositide phosphatase activity and efficiently binds phosphatidic acid.

    PubMed

    Pribat, Anne; Sormani, Rodnay; Rousseau-Gueutin, Mathieu; Julkowska, Magdalena M; Testerink, Christa; Joubès, Jerôme; Castroviejo, Michel; Laguerre, Michel; Meyer, Christian; Germain, Véronique; Rothan, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome ten) proteins are dual phosphatases with both protein and phosphoinositide phosphatase activity. They modulate signalling pathways controlling growth, metabolism and apoptosis in animals and are implied in several human diseases. In the present paper we describe a novel class of PTEN pro-teins in plants, termed PTEN2, which comprises the AtPTEN (Arabidopsis PTEN) 2a and AtPTEN2b proteins in Arabidopsis. Both display low in vitro tyrosine phosphatase activity. In addition, AtPTEN2a actively dephosphorylates in vitro the 3' phosphate group of PI3P (phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate), PI(3,4)P2 (phosphatidylinositol 3,4-bisphosphate) and PI(3,5)P2 (phosphatidylinositol 3,5-bisphosphate). In contrast with animal PTENs, PI(3,4,5)P3 (phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate) is a poor substrate. Site-directed mutagenesis of AtPTEN2a and molecular modelling of protein-phosphoinositide interactions indicated that substitutions at the PTEN2 core catalytic site of the Lys267 and Gly268 residues found in animals, which are critical for animal PTEN activity, by Met267 and Ala268 found in the eudicot PTEN2 are responsible for changes in substrate specificity. Remarkably, the AtPTEN2a protein also displays strong binding activity for PA (phosphatidic acid), a major lipid second messenger in plants. Promoter::GUS (β-glucuronidase) fusion, transcript and protein analyses further showed the transcriptional regulation of the ubiquitously expressed AtPTEN2a and AtPTEN2b by salt and osmotic stress. The results of the present study suggest a function for this novel class of plant PTEN proteins as an effector of lipid signalling in plants.

  3. Determination of the contribution of livestock water ingestion to dose from the cow-milk pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Ikenberry, T.A.

    1992-12-01

    As part of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project, a series of calculations has been undertaken to evaluate the absolute and relative contribution of different exposure pathways to thyroid doses that may have been received by individuals living in the vicinity of the Hanford Site. These evaluations include some pathways that were included in the Phase I air-pathway dose evaluations (HEDR staff 1991, page xx), as well as other potential exposure pathways being evaluated for possible inclusion in the future HEDR modeling efforts. This calculation (002) examined the possible doses that may have been received by individuals who drank milk from cows that drank from sources of water (stock tanks and farm ponds) exposed to iodine-131 in the atmosphere during 1945.

  4. Determining organ dose conversion coefficients for external neutron irradiation by using a voxel mouse model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaomin; Xie, Xiangdong; Qu, Decheng; Ning, Jing; Zhou, Hongmei; Pan, Jie; Yang, Guoshan

    2016-03-01

    A set of fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients has been calculated for neutrons with energies <20 MeV using a developed voxel mouse model and Monte Carlo N-particle code (MCNP), for the purpose of neutron radiation effect evaluation. The calculation used 37 monodirectional monoenergetic neutron beams in the energy range 10(-9) MeV to 20 MeV, under five different source irradiation configurations: left lateral, right lateral, dorsal-ventral, ventral-dorsal, and isotropic. Neutron fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients for selected organs of the body were presented in the paper, and the effect of irradiation geometry conditions, neutron energy and the organ location on the organ dose was discussed. The results indicated that neutron dose conversion coefficients clearly show sensitivity to irradiation geometry at neutron energy below 1 MeV.

  5. Determining organ dose conversion coefficients for external neutron irradiation by using a voxel mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaomin; Xie, Xiangdong; Qu, Decheng; Ning, Jing; Zhou, Hongmei; Pan, Jie; Yang, Guoshan

    2016-01-01

    A set of fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients has been calculated for neutrons with energies <20 MeV using a developed voxel mouse model and Monte Carlo N-particle code (MCNP), for the purpose of neutron radiation effect evaluation. The calculation used 37 monodirectional monoenergetic neutron beams in the energy range 10−9 MeV to 20 MeV, under five different source irradiation configurations: left lateral, right lateral, dorsal–ventral, ventral–dorsal, and isotropic. Neutron fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients for selected organs of the body were presented in the paper, and the effect of irradiation geometry conditions, neutron energy and the organ location on the organ dose was discussed. The results indicated that neutron dose conversion coefficients clearly show sensitivity to irradiation geometry at neutron energy below 1 MeV. PMID:26661852

  6. A Biodosimeter for Multiparametric Determination of Radiation Dose, Radiation Quality, and Radiation Risk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richmond, Robert; Cruz, Angela; Jansen, Heather; Bors, Karen

    2003-01-01

    Predicting risk of human cancer following exposure of an individual or a population to ionizing radiation is challenging. To an approximation, this is because uncertainties of uniform absorption of dose and the uniform processing of dose-related damage at the cellular level within a complex set of biological variables degrade the confidence of predicting the delayed expression of cancer as a relatively rare event. Cellular biodosimeters that simultaneously report: 1) the quantity of absorbed dose after exposure to ionizing radiation, 2) the quality of radiation delivering that dose, and 3) the risk of developing cancer by the cells absorbing that dose would therefore be useful. An approach to such a multiparametric biodosimeter will be reported. This is the demonstration of a dose responsive field effect of enhanced expression of keratin 18 (K18) in cultures of human mammary epithelial cells irradiated with cesium-1 37 gamma-rays. Dose response of enhanced K18 expression was experimentally extended over a range of 30 to 90 cGy for cells evaluated at mid-log phase. K18 has been reported to be a marker for tumor staging and for apoptosis, and thereby serves as an example of a potential marker for cancer risk, where the reality of such predictive value would require additional experimental development. Since observed radiogenic increase in expression of K18 is a field effect, ie., chronically present in all cells of the irradiated population, it may be hypothesized that K18 expression in specific cells absorbing particulate irradiation, such as the high-LET-producing atomic nuclei of space radiation, will report on both the single-cell distributions of those particles amongst cells within the exposed population, and that the relatively high dose per cell delivered by densely ionizing tracks of those intersecting particles will lead to cell-specific high-expression levels of K18, thereby providing analytical end points that may be used to resolve both the quantity and

  7. A Biodosimeter for Multiparametric Determination of Radiation Dose, Radiation Quality, and Radiation Risk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richmond, Robert; Cruz, Angela; Jansen, Heather; Bors, Karen

    2003-01-01

    Predicting risk of human cancer following exposure of an individual or a population to ionizing radiation is challenging. To an approximation, this is because uncertainties of uniform absorption of dose and the uniform processing of dose-related damage at the cellular level within a complex set of biological variables degrade the confidence of predicting the delayed expression of cancer as a relatively rare event. Cellular biodosimeters that simultaneously report: 1) the quantity of absorbed dose after exposure to ionizing radiation, 2) the quality of radiation delivering that dose, and 3) the risk of developing cancer by the cells absorbing that dose would therefore be useful. An approach to such a multiparametric biodosimeter will be reported. This is the demonstration of a dose responsive field effect of enhanced expression of keratin 18 (K18) in cultures of human mammary epithelial cells irradiated with cesium-1 37 gamma-rays. Dose response of enhanced K18 expression was experimentally extended over a range of 30 to 90 cGy for cells evaluated at mid-log phase. K18 has been reported to be a marker for tumor staging and for apoptosis, and thereby serves as an example of a potential marker for cancer risk, where the reality of such predictive value would require additional experimental development. Since observed radiogenic increase in expression of K18 is a field effect, ie., chronically present in all cells of the irradiated population, it may be hypothesized that K18 expression in specific cells absorbing particulate irradiation, such as the high-LET-producing atomic nuclei of space radiation, will report on both the single-cell distributions of those particles amongst cells within the exposed population, and that the relatively high dose per cell delivered by densely ionizing tracks of those intersecting particles will lead to cell-specific high-expression levels of K18, thereby providing analytical end points that may be used to resolve both the quantity and

  8. Determination of the Infectious Dose of Helicobacter pylori during Primary and Secondary Infection in Rhesus Monkeys (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Solnick, Jay V.; Hansen, Lori M.; Canfield, Don R.; Parsonnet, Julie

    2001-01-01

    We sought to determine the infectious dose of Helicobacter pylori during primary and secondary infection in the rhesus monkey and to determine whether preinoculation acid suppression is necessary to produce colonization. Mixed inoculation with three human-derived strains showed that H. pylori J166 is particularly adapted to colonization of rhesus monkeys, since it outcompeted two other strains. The minimum infectious dose of H. pylori J166 was 104 bacteria in specific-pathogen (H. pylori)-free monkeys. Rechallenge of these monkeys after antibiotic therapy was characterized by a 10- to 100-fold decrease in bacterial load compared to primary infection, but with little change in the infectious dose. Acid suppression prior to inoculation was not necessary for colonization to occur. These results provide a basis for future animal experiments using more ecologically relevant conditions of inoculation and suggest that reduction in bacterial load rather than complete protection may be a more realistic goal for H. pylori vaccination. PMID:11598063

  9. Determination of alpha dose rate profile at the HLW nuclear glass/water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mougnaud, S.; Tribet, M.; Rolland, S.; Renault, J.-P.; Jégou, C.

    2015-07-01

    Alpha irradiation and radiolysis can affect the alteration behavior of High Level Waste (HLW) nuclear glasses. In this study, the way the energy of alpha particles, emitted by a typical HLW glass, is deposited in water at the glass/water interface is investigated, with the aim of better characterizing the dose deposition at the glass/water interface during water-induced leaching mechanisms. A simplified chemical composition was considered for the nuclear glass under study, wherein the dose rate is about 140 Gy/h. The MCNPX calculation code was used to calculate alpha dose rate and alpha particle flux profiles at the glass/water interface in different systems: a single glass grain in water, a glass powder in water and a water-filled ideal crack in a glass package. Dose rate decreases within glass and in water as distance to the center of the grain increases. A general model has been proposed to fit a dose rate profile in water and in glass from values for dose rate in glass bulk, alpha range in water and linear energy transfer considerations. The glass powder simulation showed that there was systematic overlapping of radiation fields for neighboring glass grains, but the water dose rate always remained lower than the bulk value. Finally, for typical ideal cracks in a glass matrix, an overlapping of irradiation fields was observed while the crack aperture was lower than twice the alpha range in water. This led to significant values for the alpha dose rate within the crack volume, as long as the aperture remained lower than 60 μm.

  10. Fast-neutron and photon doses determined with proportional counters and ionization chambers

    SciTech Connect

    DeLuca, P.M. Jr.; Higgins, P.D.; Schell, M.C.; Pearson, D.W.

    1981-01-01

    A /sup 60/Co teletherapy source has recently been coupled to an existing source of fast neutrons. These sources may be operated to provide precise and controlled mixtures of photons and neutrons. In this work we report the application of paired miniature proportional counters to n/..gamma.. dose separation. Graphite- and A150 plastic-walled proportional counters were employed. Results are compared to dose values deduced from a cnventional A150 plastic ionization chamber and a neutron insensitive GM counter.

  11. PTEN posttranslational inactivation and hyperactivation of the PI3K/Akt pathway sustain primary T cell leukemia viability

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Ana; Yunes, J. Andrés; Cardoso, Bruno A.; Martins, Leila R.; Jotta, Patrícia Y.; Abecasis, Miguel; Nowill, Alexandre E.; Leslie, Nick R.; Cardoso, Angelo A.; Barata, Joao T.

    2008-01-01

    Mutations in the phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) gene leading to PTEN protein deletion and subsequent activation of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway are common in cancer. Here we show that PTEN inactivation in human T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cells is not always synonymous with PTEN gene lesions and diminished protein expression. Samples taken from patients with T-ALL at the time of diagnosis very frequently showed constitutive hyperactivation of the PI3K/Akt pathway. In contrast to immortalized cell lines, most primary T-ALL cells did not harbor PTEN gene alterations, displayed normal PTEN mRNA levels, and expressed higher PTEN protein levels than normal T cell precursors. However, PTEN overexpression was associated with decreased PTEN lipid phosphatase activity, resulting from casein kinase 2 (CK2) overexpression and hyperactivation. In addition, T-ALL cells had constitutively high levels of ROS, which can also downmodulate PTEN activity. Accordingly, both CK2 inhibitors and ROS scavengers restored PTEN activity and impaired PI3K/Akt signaling in T-ALL cells. Strikingly, inhibition of PI3K and/or CK2 promoted T-ALL cell death without affecting normal T cell precursors. Overall, our data indicate that T-ALL cells inactivate PTEN mostly in a nondeletional, posttranslational manner. Pharmacological manipulation of these mechanisms may open new avenues for T-ALL treatment. PMID:18830414

  12. Determination of florfenicol dose rate in feed for control of mortality in nile tilapia Oreochromis nilotica infected with streptococcus iniae

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A dose titration study was conducted to determine the dosage of florfenicol (FFC) in feed to control Streptococcus iniae-associated mortality in Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus. Six tanks were assigned to each of five treatments: (1) not challenged with S. iniae and fed unmedicated feed; (2) chal...

  13. Interactions between PTEN and receptor tyrosine kinase pathways and their implications for glioma therapy

    PubMed Central

    Abounader, Roger

    2009-01-01

    Gliomas are the most common and deadly form of malignant primary brain tumors. Loss of the tumor-suppressor PTEN and activation of the receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) EGF receptor, c-Met, PDGF receptor and VEGF receptor are among the most common molecular dysfunctions associated with glioma malignancy. PTEN interacts with RTK-dependent signaling at multiple levels. These include the ability of PTEN to counteract PI3K activation by RTKs, as well as possible effects of PTEN on RTK activation of the MAPK pathway and RTK-dependent gene-expression regulation. Consequently, PTEN expression affects RTK-induced malignancy. Importantly, the PTEN status was recently found to be critical for the outcome of RTK-targeted clinical therapies that have been developed recently. Combining RTK-targeted therapies with therapies aimed at counteracting the effects of PTEN loss, such as mTOR inhibition, might also have therapeutic advantage. This article reviews the known molecular and functional interactions between PTEN and RTK pathways and their implications for glioma therapy. PMID:19192961

  14. Soy peptide lunasin induces pten-mediated apoptosis in human breast cancer cells

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The tumor suppressor PTEN inhibits the AKT signaling pathway whose unrestrained activity underlies many human malignancies. Previously we showed that dietary intake of soy protein isolate (SPI) enhanced PTEN expression in mammary tissue of rats with lower NMU-induced mammary tumor incidence relative...

  15. Planarian PTEN homologs regulate stem cells and regeneration through TOR signaling.

    PubMed

    Oviedo, Néstor J; Pearson, Bret J; Levin, Michael; Sánchez Alvarado, Alejandro

    2008-01-01

    We have identified two genes, Smed-PTEN-1 and Smed-PTEN-2, capable of regulating stem cell function in the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea. Both genes encode proteins homologous to the mammalian tumor suppressor, phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN). Inactivation of Smed-PTEN-1 and -2 by RNA interference (RNAi) in planarians disrupts regeneration, and leads to abnormal outgrowths in both cut and uncut animals followed soon after by death (lysis). The resulting phenotype is characterized by hyperproliferation of neoblasts (planarian stem cells), tissue disorganization and a significant accumulation of postmitotic cells with impaired differentiation capacity. Further analyses revealed that rapamycin selectively prevented such accumulation without affecting the normal neoblast proliferation associated with physiological turnover and regeneration. In animals in which PTEN function is abrogated, we also detected a significant increase in the number of cells expressing the planarian Akt gene homolog (Smed-Akt). However, functional abrogation of Smed-Akt in Smed-PTEN RNAi-treated animals does not prevent cell overproliferation and lethality, indicating that functional abrogation of Smed-PTEN is sufficient to induce abnormal outgrowths. Altogether, our data reveal roles for PTEN in the regulation of planarian stem cells that are strikingly conserved to mammalian models. In addition, our results implicate this protein in the control of stem cell maintenance during the regeneration of complex structures in planarians.

  16. PTEN deficiency reprogrammes human neural stem cells towards a glioblastoma stem cell-like phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Shunlei; Yuan, Guohong; Liu, Xiaomeng; Ren, Ruotong; Li, Jingyi; Zhang, Weizhou; Wu, Jun; Xu, Xiuling; Fu, Lina; Li, Ying; Yang, Jiping; Zhang, Weiqi; Bai, Ruijun; Yi, Fei; Suzuki, Keiichiro; Gao, Hua; Esteban, Concepcion Rodriguez; Zhang, Chuanbao; Belmonte, Juan Carlos Izpisua; Chen, Zhiguo; Wang, Xiaomin; Jiang, Tao; Qu, Jing; Tang, Fuchou; Liu, Guang-Hui

    2015-01-01

    PTEN is a tumour suppressor frequently mutated in many types of cancers. Here we show that targeted disruption of PTEN leads to neoplastic transformation of human neural stem cells (NSCs), but not mesenchymal stem cells. PTEN-deficient NSCs display neoplasm-associated metabolic and gene expression profiles and generate intracranial tumours in immunodeficient mice. PTEN is localized to the nucleus in NSCs, binds to the PAX7 promoter through association with cAMP responsive element binding protein 1 (CREB)/CREB binding protein (CBP) and inhibits PAX7 transcription. PTEN deficiency leads to the upregulation of PAX7, which in turn promotes oncogenic transformation of NSCs and instates ‘aggressiveness' in human glioblastoma stem cells. In a large clinical database, we find increased PAX7 levels in PTEN-deficient glioblastoma. Furthermore, we identify that mitomycin C selectively triggers apoptosis in NSCs with PTEN deficiency. Together, we uncover a potential mechanism of how PTEN safeguards NSCs, and establish a cellular platform to identify factors involved in NSC transformation, potentially permitting personalized treatment of glioblastoma. PMID:26632666

  17. Nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) signaling regulates PTEN expression and intestinal cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qingding; Zhou, Yuning; Jackson, Lindsey N.; Johnson, Sara M.; Chow, Chi-Wing; Evers, B. Mark

    2011-01-01

    The nuclear factor of activated T cell (NFAT) proteins are a family of transcription factors (NFATc1–c4) involved in the regulation of cell differentiation and adaptation. Previously we demonstrated that inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase or overexpression of PTEN enhanced intestinal cell differentiation. Here we show that treatment of intestinal-derived cells with the differentiating agent sodium butyrate (NaBT) increased PTEN expression, NFAT binding activity, and NFAT mRNA expression, whereas pretreatment with the NFAT signaling inhibitor cyclosporine A (CsA) blocked NaBT-mediated PTEN induction. Moreover, knockdown of NFATc1 or NFATc4, but not NFATc2 or NFATc3, attenuated NaBT-induced PTEN expression. Knockdown of NFATc1 decreased PTEN expression and increased the phosphorylation levels of Akt and downstream targets Foxo1 and GSK-3α/β. Furthermore, overexpression of NFATc1 or the NFATc4 active mutant increased PTEN and p27kip1 expression and decreased Akt phosphorylation. In addition, pretreatment with CsA blocked NaBT-mediated induction of intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP) activity and villin and p27kip1 expression; knockdown of either NFATc1 or NFATc4 attenuated NaBT-induced IAP activity. We provide evidence showing that NFATc1 and NFATc4 are regulators of PTEN expression. Importantly, our results suggest that NFATc1 and NFATc4 regulation of intestinal cell differentiation may be through PTEN regulation. PMID:21148296

  18. Disruption of PKB signaling restores polarity to cells lacking tumor suppressor PTEN

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Ming; Iijima, Miho; Kamimura, Yoichiro; Chen, Lingfeng; Long, Yu; Devreotes, Peter

    2011-01-01

    By limiting phosphotidylinositol 3,4,5-triphosphate (PIP3) levels, tumor suppressor PTEN not only controls cell growth but also maintains cell polarity required for cytokinesis and chemotaxis. To identify the critical targets of PIP3 that link it to the cytoskeleton, we deleted secondary genes to reverse the deficiencies of pten- cells in Dictyostelium. The polarity defects in pten- cells correlate with elevated phosphorylations of PKB substrates. Deletion of AKT orthologue, PkbA, or a subunit of its activator TORC2, reduced the phosphorylations and suppressed the cytokinesis and chemotaxis defects in pten- cells. In these double mutants, the excessive PIP3 levels and, presumably, activation of other PIP3-binding proteins had little or no effect on the cytoskeleton. In bands with increased phosphorylation in pten- cells, we found PKB substrates, PI5K, GefS, GacG, and PakA. Disruption of PakA in pten- cells restored a large fraction of the cells to normal behavior. Consistently, expression of phosphomimetic PakA in pten- cells exacerbated the defects but nonphosphorylatable PakA had no effect. Thus, among many putative PTEN- and PIP3-dependent events, phosphorylation of PKB substrates is the key downstream regulator of cell polarity. PMID:21169559

  19. Systematic analysis of the PTEN 5′ leader identifies a major AUU initiated proteoform

    PubMed Central

    Tzani, Ioanna; Ivanov, Ivaylo P.; Andreev, Dmitri E.; Dmitriev, Ruslan I.; Dean, Kellie A.; Baranov, Pavel V.; Atkins, John F.; Loughran, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Abundant evidence for translation within the 5′ leaders of many human genes is rapidly emerging, especially, because of the advent of ribosome profiling. In most cases, it is believed that the act of translation rather than the encoded peptide is important. However, the wealth of available sequencing data in recent years allows phylogenetic detection of sequences within 5′ leaders that have emerged under coding constraint and therefore allow for the prediction of functional 5′ leader translation. Using this approach, we previously predicted a CUG-initiated, 173 amino acid N-terminal extension to the human tumour suppressor PTEN. Here, a systematic experimental analysis of translation events in the PTEN 5′ leader identifies at least two additional non-AUG-initiated PTEN proteoforms that are expressed in most human cell lines tested. The most abundant extended PTEN proteoform initiates at a conserved AUU codon and extends the canonical AUG-initiated PTEN by 146 amino acids. All N-terminally extended PTEN proteoforms tested retain the ability to downregulate the PI3K pathway. We also provide evidence for the translation of two conserved AUG-initiated upstream open reading frames within the PTEN 5′ leader that control the ratio of PTEN proteoforms. PMID:27249819

  20. Dose and Hg species determine the T-helper cell activation in murine autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Havarinasab, Said; Björn, Erik; Ekstrand, Jimmy; Hultman, Per

    2007-01-05

    Inorganic mercury (mercuric chloride--HgCl(2)) induces in mice an autoimmune syndrome (HgIA) with T cell-dependent polyclonal B cell activation and hypergammaglobulinemia, dose- and H-2-dependent production of autoantibodies targeting the 34 kDa nucleolar protein fibrillarin (AFA), and systemic immune-complex deposits. The organic mercury species methylmercury (MeHg) and ethylmercury (EtHg--in the form of thimerosal) induce AFA, while the other manifestations of HgIA seen after treatment with HgCl(2) are present to varying extent. Since these organic Hg species are converted to the autoimmunogen Hg(2+) in the body, their primary autoimmunogen potential is uncertain and the subject of this study. A moderate dose of HgCl(2) (8 mg/L drinking water--internal dose 148 micro gHg/kg body weight [bw]/day) caused the fastest AFA response, while the induction was delayed after higher (25 mg/L) and lower (1.5 and 3 mg/L) doses. The lowest dose of HgCl(2) inducing AFA was 1.5 mg/L drinking water which corresponded to a renal Hg(2+) concentration of 0.53 micro g/g. Using a dose of 8 mg HgCl(2)/L this threshold concentration was reached within 24 h, and a consistent AFA response developed after 8-10 days. The time lag for the immunological part of the reaction leading to a consistent AFA response was therefore 7-9 days. A dose of thimerosal close to the threshold dose for induction of AFA (2 mg/L drinking water--internal dose 118 micro gHg/kg bw per day), caused a renal Hg(2+) concentration of 1.8 micro g/g. The autoimmunogen effect of EtHg might therefore be entirely due to Hg(2+) formed from EtHg in the body. The effect of organic and inorganic Hg species on T-helper type 1 and type 2 cells during induction of AFA was assessed as the presence and titre of AFA of the IgG1 and IgG2a isotype, respectively. EtHg induced a persistent Th1-skewed response irrespectively of the dose and time used. A low daily dose of HgCl(2) (1.5-3 mg/L) caused a Th1-skewed AFA response, while a

  1. Determine the Dose Distribution Using Ultrasound Parameters in MAGIC-f Polymer Gels.

    PubMed

    Masoumi, Hossein; Mokhtari-Dizaji, Manijhe; Arbabi, Azim; Bakhshandeh, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    In this study, using methacrylic and ascorbic acid in gelatin initiated by copper (MAGIC-f) polymer gel after megavoltage energy exposure, the sensitivity of the ultrasound velocity and attenuation coefficient dose-dependent parameters was evaluated. The MAGIC-f polymer gel was irradiated under 1.25 MeV cobalt-60, ranging from 0 to 60 Gy in 2-Gy steps, and received dose uniformity and accuracy of ±2%. After calibration of the ultrasonic systems with a frequency of 500 kHz, the parameters of ultrasound velocity and attenuation coefficient of the irradiated gel samples were measured. According to the dose-response curve, the ability of ultrasonic parameters was evaluated in dose rate readings. Based on a 4-order polynomial curve, fitted on the dose-response parameters of ultrasound velocity and attenuation coefficient and observed at 24 hours after irradiation, ultrasonic parameters had more sensitivity. The sensitivity of the dose-velocity and dose-attenuation coefficient curves was observed as 50 m/s/Gy and 0.06 dB/MHz/Gy over the linear range of 4 to 44 Gy, respectively. The ultrasonic parameters at 5°C, 15°C, and 25°C on the gel dosimeter after 0 to 60 Gy irradiation showed that readings at 25°C have higher sensitivity compared to 15°C and 5°C. Maximum sensitivity time and temperature readings of the MAGIC-f ultrasonic parameters were concluded 24 hours after irradiation and at a temperature of 25°C.

  2. Determination of gonad doses during robotic stereotactic radiosurgery for various tumor sites

    SciTech Connect

    Zorlu, Faruk; Dugel, Gozde; Ozyigit, Gokhan; Hurmuz, Pervin; Cengiz, Mustafa; Yildiz, Ferah; Akyol, Fadil; Gurkaynak, Murat

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: The authors evaluated the absorbed dose received by the gonads during robotic stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for the treatment of different tumor localizations. Methods: The authors measured the gonad doses during the treatment of head and neck, thoracic, abdominal, or pelvic tumors in both RANDO phantom and actual patients. The computerized tomography images were transferred to the treatment planning system. The contours of tumor and critical organs were delineated on each slice, and treatment plans were generated. Measurements for gonad doses were taken from the geometric projection of the ovary onto the skin for female patients, and from the scrotal skin for male patients by attaching films and Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). SRS was delivered with CyberKnife (Accuray Inc., Sunnyvale, CA). Results: The median gonadal doses with TLD and film dosimeter in actual patients were 0.19 Gy (range, 0.035-2.71 Gy) and 0.34 Gy (range, 0.066-3.18 Gy), respectively. In the RANDO phantom, the median ovarian doses with TLD and film dosimeter were 0.08 Gy (range, 0.03-0.159 Gy) and 0.05 Gy (range, 0.015-0.13 Gy), respectively. In the RANDO phantom, the median testicular doses with TLD and film dosimeter were 0.134 Gy (range 0.056-1.97 Gy) and 0.306 Gy (range, 0.065-2.25 Gy). Conclusions: Gonad doses are below sterility threshold in robotic SRS for different tumor localizations. However, particular attention should be given to gonads during robotic SRS for pelvic tumors.

  3. Neonatal serum magnesium concentrations are determined by total maternal dose of magnesium sulfate administered for neuroprotection.

    PubMed

    Borja-Del-Rosario, Pamela; Basu, Sudeepta Kumar; Haberman, Shoshana; Bhutada, Alok; Rastogi, Shantanu

    2014-03-01

    Antenatal magnesium in preterm labor for neuroprotection decreases the incidence of cerebral palsy. However, there are no guidelines on the dose and duration of magnesium infusion for neuroprotection. As increased neonatal serum magnesium concentrations may be related to higher risk of morbidity and mortality, the role of total amount of magnesium and maternal serum magnesium concentrations associated with safe neonatal serum magnesium concentrations is not known. A retrospective study was conducted on 289 mothers who received antenatal magnesium for neuroprotection as a loading dose of 4-6 g infused over 30 min, followed by a maintenance infusion of 1-2 g/h. Total magnesium dose infused to the mother and maternal serum magnesium concentrations were correlated with neonatal serum magnesium concentrations. Of the 289 mothers, 192 mother/baby dyads had all three measurements (maternal total magnesium dose, and maternal and neonatal serum magnesium concentrations). Magnesium infusion was continued beyond 24 h in 60 mothers. Total maternal magnesium dose at 24 and 48 h of infusion correlated with neonatal serum magnesium concentrations (r=0.55, P<0.0001 and r=0.35, P<0.0001, respectively), but not with maternal serum magnesium concentrations (r=0.004, P=0.98 and r=0.14, P=0.21). However, there was no correlation between the maternal and neonatal serum magnesium concentrations (r=0.10, P=0.15). Total dose of magnesium infused to the mother correlates with neonatal serum magnesium concentrations. To keep neonatal serum magnesium concentrations within a range that is effective for neuroprotection and safe for the neonates, the total dose received by the mother needs to be monitored and limited.

  4. Effects of dose rates on radiation-induced replenishment of intestinal stem cells determined by Lgr5 lineage tracing

    PubMed Central

    Otsuka, Kensuke; Iwasaki, Toshiyasu

    2015-01-01

    An understanding of the dynamics of intestinal Lgr5+ stem cells is important for elucidating the mechanism of colonic cancer development. We previously established a method for evaluating Lgr5+ stem cells by tamoxifen-dependent Lgr5-lineage tracing and showed that high-dose-rate radiation stimulated replenishment of colonic stem cells. In this study, we evaluated the effects of low-dose-rate radiation on stem cell maintenance. Tamoxifen (4OHT)-injected Lgr5-EGFP-IRES-CreERT2 × ROSA-LSL-LacZ mice were used, LacZ-labeled colonic crypts were enumerated, and the loss of LacZ+ crypts under low-dose-rate radiation was estimated. After 4OHT treatment, the number of LacZ-labeled Lgr5+ stem cells was higher in the colon of infant mice than in adult mice. The percentage of LacZ-labeled crypts in infant mice rapidly decreased after 4OHT treatment. However, the percentage of labeled crypts plateaued at ∼2% at 4 weeks post-treatment and remained unchanged for up to 7 months. Thus, it will be advantageous to evaluate the long-term effects of low-dose-rate radiation. Next, we determined the percentages of LacZ-labeled crypts irradiated with 1 Gy administered at different dose rates. As reported in our previous study, mice exposed to high-dose-rate radiation (30 Gy/h) showed a marked replenishment (P = 0.04). However, mice exposed to low-dose-rate radiation (0.003 Gy/h) did not exhibit accelerated stem-cell replenishment (P = 0.47). These findings suggest the percentage of labeled crypts can serve as a useful indicator of the effects of dose rate on the stem cell pool. PMID:25832104

  5. Determination of surface dose rate of indigenous (32)P patch brachytherapy source by experimental and Monte Carlo methods.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sudhir; Srinivasan, P; Sharma, S D; Saxena, Sanjay Kumar; Bakshi, A K; Dash, Ashutosh; Babu, D A R; Sharma, D N

    2015-09-01

    Isotope production and Application Division of Bhabha Atomic Research Center developed (32)P patch sources for treatment of superficial tumors. Surface dose rate of a newly developed (32)P patch source of nominal diameter 25 mm was measured experimentally using standard extrapolation ionization chamber and Gafchromic EBT film. Monte Carlo model of the (32)P patch source along with the extrapolation chamber was also developed to estimate the surface dose rates from these sources. The surface dose rates to tissue (cGy/min) measured using extrapolation chamber and radiochromic films are 82.03±4.18 (k=2) and 79.13±2.53 (k=2) respectively. The two values of the surface dose rates measured using the two independent experimental methods are in good agreement to each other within a variation of 3.5%. The surface dose rate to tissue (cGy/min) estimated using the MCNP Monte Carlo code works out to be 77.78±1.16 (k=2). The maximum deviation between the surface dose rates to tissue obtained by Monte Carlo and the extrapolation chamber method is 5.2% whereas the difference between the surface dose rates obtained by radiochromic film measurement and the Monte Carlo simulation is 1.7%. The three values of the surface dose rates of the (32)P patch source obtained by three independent methods are in good agreement to one another within the uncertainties associated with their measurements and calculation. This work has demonstrated that MCNP based electron transport simulations are accurate enough for determining the dosimetry parameters of the indigenously developed (32)P patch sources for contact brachytherapy applications.

  6. Effects of dose rates on radiation-induced replenishment of intestinal stem cells determined by Lgr5 lineage tracing.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Kensuke; Iwasaki, Toshiyasu

    2015-07-01

    An understanding of the dynamics of intestinal Lgr5(+) stem cells is important for elucidating the mechanism of colonic cancer development. We previously established a method for evaluating Lgr5(+) stem cells by tamoxifen-dependent Lgr5-lineage tracing and showed that high-dose-rate radiation stimulated replenishment of colonic stem cells. In this study, we evaluated the effects of low-dose-rate radiation on stem cell maintenance. Tamoxifen (4OHT)-injected Lgr5-EGFP-IRES-Cre(ERT2) × ROSA-LSL-LacZ mice were used, LacZ-labeled colonic crypts were enumerated, and the loss of LacZ(+) crypts under low-dose-rate radiation was estimated. After 4OHT treatment, the number of LacZ-labeled Lgr5(+) stem cells was higher in the colon of infant mice than in adult mice. The percentage of LacZ-labeled crypts in infant mice rapidly decreased after 4OHT treatment. However, the percentage of labeled crypts plateaued at ∼2% at 4 weeks post-treatment and remained unchanged for up to 7 months. Thus, it will be advantageous to evaluate the long-term effects of low-dose-rate radiation. Next, we determined the percentages of LacZ-labeled crypts irradiated with 1 Gy administered at different dose rates. As reported in our previous study, mice exposed to high-dose-rate radiation (30 Gy/h) showed a marked replenishment (P = 0.04). However, mice exposed to low-dose-rate radiation (0.003 Gy/h) did not exhibit accelerated stem-cell replenishment (P = 0.47). These findings suggest the percentage of labeled crypts can serve as a useful indicator of the effects of dose rate on the stem cell pool.

  7. Function of PTEN during the formation and maintenance of neuronal circuits in the brain.

    PubMed

    van Diepen, Michiel T; Eickholt, Britta J

    2008-01-01

    PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10) is a tumor suppressor that can inhibit proliferation and migration and controls apoptosis in a number of cell types, mainly through inhibition of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling pathway. Patients carrying inactivating mutations of PTEN show a prevalence to develop tumors that can coincide with neurological defects such as mental retardation, ataxia and seizures. A number of in vitro and in vivo studies were instrumental in uncovering a direct correlation between deregulated PI3K/PTEN signaling and changes in neuronal morphogenesis, which is likely to have profound bearings upon the pathogenesis of neurological symptoms. This review outlines recent work on the function of PTEN during vertebrate brain development and the current understanding of the signaling pathways downstream of PTEN that control neuronal connectivity in the brain. (c) 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Asymmetric PTEN Distribution Regulated by Spatial Heterogeneity in Membrane-Binding State Transitions

    PubMed Central

    Matsuoka, Satomi; Shibata, Tatsuo; Ueda, Masahiro

    2013-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms that underlie asymmetric PTEN distribution at the posterior of polarized motile cells and regulate anterior pseudopod formation were addressed by novel single-molecule tracking analysis. Heterogeneity in the lateral mobility of PTEN on a membrane indicated the existence of three membrane-binding states with different diffusion coefficients and membrane-binding lifetimes. The stochastic state transition kinetics of PTEN among these three states were suggested to be regulated spatially along the cell polarity such that only the stable binding state is selectively suppressed at the anterior membrane to cause local PTEN depletion. By incorporating experimentally observed kinetic parameters into a simple mathematical model, the asymmetric PTEN distribution can be explained quantitatively to illustrate the regulatory mechanisms for cellular asymmetry based on an essential causal link between individual stochastic reactions and stable localizations of the ensemble. PMID:23326224

  9. HER2 overcomes PTEN (loss)-induced senescence to cause aggressive prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Imran; Patel, Rachana; Singh, Lukram Babloo; Nixon, Colin; Seywright, Morag; Barnetson, Robert J.; Brunton, Valerie G.; Muller, William J.; Edwards, Joanne; Sansom, Owen J.; Leung, Hing Y.

    2011-01-01

    Prostate cancer (CaP) is the most common cancer among adult men in the Western world. Better insight into its tumor-activating pathways may facilitate the development of targeted therapies. In this study, we show that patients who develop prostate tumors with low levels of PTEN and high levels of HER2/3 have a poor prognosis. This is functionally relevant, as targeting Her2 activation to the murine prostate cooperates with Pten loss and drives CaP progression. Mechanistically, this is associated with activation of the MAPK pathway and abrogation of the Pten loss-induced cellular senescence program. Importantly, inhibition of MEK function strongly suppressed proliferation within these tumors by restoring the Pten loss-induced cellular senescence program. Taken together, these data suggest that stratification of CaP patients for HER2/3 and PTEN status could identify patients with aggressive CaP who may respond favorably to MEK inhibition. PMID:21930937

  10. PTENpred: A Designer Protein Impact Predictor for PTEN-related Disorders.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Sean B; Raines, Ronald T

    2016-12-01

    Connecting a genotype with a phenotype can provide immediate advantages in the context of modern medicine. Especially useful would be an algorithm for predicting the impact of nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the gene for PTEN, a protein that is implicated in most human cancers and connected to germline disorders that include autism. We have developed a protein impact predictor, PTENpred, that integrates data from multiple analyses using a support vector machine algorithm. PTENpred can predict phenotypes related to a human PTEN mutation with high accuracy. The output of PTENpred is designed for use by biologists, clinicians, and laymen, and features an interactive display of the three-dimensional structure of PTEN. Using knowledge about the structure of proteins, in general, and the PTEN protein, in particular, enables the prediction of consequences from damage to the human PTEN gene. This algorithm, which can be accessed online, could facilitate the implementation of effective therapeutic regimens for cancer and other diseases.

  11. Reprogramming of the Tumor Microenvironment by Stromal Pten-regulated miR-320

    PubMed Central

    Bronisz, A; Godlewski, J; Wallace, JA; Merchant, AS; Nowicki, MO; Mathsyaraja, H; Srinivasan, R; Trimboli, AJ; Martin, CK; Li, F; Yu, L; Fernandez, SA; Pécot, T; Rosol, TJ; Cory, S; Hallett, M; Park, M; Piper, MG; Marsh, CB; Yee, LD; Jimenez, RE; Nuovo, G; Lawler, SE; Chiocca, EA; Leone, G; Ostrowski, MC

    2011-01-01

    Phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome ten (Pten) in stromal fibroblasts suppresses epithelial mammary tumors, but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unknown. Using proteomic and expression profiling, we show that Pten loss from mammary stromal fibroblasts activates an oncogenic secretome that orchestrates the transcriptional reprogramming of other cell types in the microenvironment. Downregulation of miR-320 and upregulation of one of its direct targets, ETS2, are critical events in Pten-deleted stromal fibroblasts responsible for inducing this oncogenic secretome, which in turn promotes tumor angiogenesis and tumor cell invasion. Expression of the Pten-miR-320-Ets2 regulated secretome distinguished human normal breast stroma from tumor stroma and robustly correlated with recurrence in breast cancer patients. This work reveals miR-320 as a critical component of the Pten tumor suppressor axis that acts in stromal fibroblasts to reprogram the tumor microenvironment and curtail tumor progression. PMID:22179046

  12. Cryptosporidium parvum: determination of ID₅₀ and the dose-response relationship in experimentally challenged dairy calves.

    PubMed

    Zambriski, J A; Nydam, D V; Wilcox, Z J; Bowman, D D; Mohammed, H O; Liotta, J L

    2013-10-18

    The objectives were to determine the median infective dose (ID₅₀) of Cryptosporidium parvum and to describe the dose-response relationship including associated clinical illness in experimentally challenged dairy calves. Within the first 24h of life, 27 test calves were experimentally challenged with C. parvum oocysts and 3 control calves were sham dosed. Test calves received 1 of 8 possible doses (25, 50, 100, 500, 1 × 10(3), 1 × 10(4), 1 × 10(5), and 1 × 10(6) oocysts). All 27 test calves developed diarrhea. Fecal oocyst shedding occurred in 25 (92.6%) test calves and in 0 control calves. The 2 non-shedding test calves both received 25 oocysts. There was an inverse relationship between dose and time to onset of fecal oocyst shedding (P=0.005). There was no relationship found between dose and duration (P=0.2) or cessation (P=0.3) of fecal oocyst shedding. In addition, there was not a significant relationship between log-dose and the log-peak oocysts (P=0.2) or log-total oocysts (P=0.5) counted/g of feces across the dose groups. There was a positive dose-response relationship between log-dose and diarrhea (P=0.01). However, when controlling for other factors, such as onset and cessation of fecal oocyst shedding, dose was not a significant predictor of diarrhea (P=0.5). Onset and cessation of fecal oocyst shedding were found to be the best predictors of diarrhea (P=0.0006 and P=0.04, respectively). The ID₅₀ for fecal oocyst shedding was 5.8 oocysts, for diarrhea was 9.7 oocysts, and for fecal oocyst shedding with diarrhea was 16.6 oocysts. Given that the ID₅₀ of C. parvum is far less than would be excreted into the environment by a naturally infected calf, prevention and control of cryptosporidiosis is a formidable challenge.

  13. Application of solid state integrating dosemeters to the determination of biologically equivalent doses in space.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, H

    2002-01-01

    If the biological responses are well approximated by the efficiencies of solid-state integrating dosemeters (SSID), the biologically equivalent doses can be simply estimated using SSID. For demonstrating the applicability of this method to space radiation dosimetry, biologically equivalent doses for two biological endpoints (enzyme inactivation and cell survival) were evaluated in the 8.8 d Shuttle-Mir mission (STS-89) using three commercial thermoluminescence dosemeters: Mg2SiO4:Tb, BeO:Na and 7LiF:Mg,Ti. The approximate biologically equivalent doses at two positions in the Spacehab module were found to be significantly different for trypsin inactivation, whereas they were almost identical for mammalian cell survival.

  14. [Determining the optimal fluorine dose in the drinking water of the South Center hydrological region of Haiti].

    PubMed

    Emmanuel, Evens; Fanfan, Pierre N; Louis, Régine; Michel, Gérard-Alain

    2002-01-01

    This study aims at determining the optimal dose of fluorine in the drinking water in the South Center region of Haiti. This region has an average daily temperature ranging from 17 to 33 C. Water samples were collected from November 15th to December 20th 2000 on the water resource of some of the counties of the hydrological South Center region of Haiti. The results show that the concentration of fluorine in this region varies between 0 and 0.83 mg/litre. However, the calculated optimal dose based on the temperature measured show that fluorine concentration of water should be between 0.7 and 1 mg/litre.

  15. Radiobiological Determination of Dose Escalation and Normal Tissue Toxicity in Definitive Chemoradiation Therapy for Esophageal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Samantha; Partridge, Mike; Carrington, Rhys; Hurt, Chris; Crosby, Thomas; Hawkins, Maria A.

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the trade-off in tumor coverage and organ-at-risk sparing when applying dose escalation for concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CRT) of mid-esophageal cancer, using radiobiological modeling to estimate local control and normal tissue toxicity. Methods and Materials: Twenty-one patients with mid-esophageal cancer were selected from the SCOPE1 database (International Standard Randomised Controlled Trials number 47718479), with a mean planning target volume (PTV) of 327 cm{sup 3}. A boost volume, PTV2 (GTV + 0.5 cm margin), was created. Radiobiological modeling of tumor control probability (TCP) estimated the dose required for a clinically significant (+20%) increase in local control as 62.5 Gy/25 fractions. A RapidArc (RA) plan with a simultaneously integrated boost (SIB) to PTV2 (RA{sub 62.5}) was compared to a standard dose plan of 50 Gy/25 fractions (RA{sub 50}). Dose-volume metrics and estimates of normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) for heart and lungs were compared. Results: Clinically acceptable dose escalation was feasible for 16 of 21 patients, with significant gains (>18%) in tumor control from 38.2% (RA{sub 50}) to 56.3% (RA{sub 62.5}), and only a small increase in predicted toxicity: median heart NTCP 4.4% (RA{sub 50}) versus 5.6% (RA{sub 62.5}) P<.001 and median lung NTCP 6.5% (RA{sub 50}) versus 7.5% (RA{sub 62.5}) P<.001. Conclusions: Dose escalation to the GTV to improve local control is possible when overlap between PTV and organ-at-risk (<8% heart volume and <2.5% lung volume overlap for this study) generates only negligible increase in lung or heart toxicity. These predictions from radiobiological modeling should be tested in future clinical trials.

  16. Determining and Managing Fetal Radiation Dose from Diagnostic Radiology Procedures in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Cavdar, Iffet; Seven, Mehmet; Uslu, Lebriz; Yeyin, Nami; Tanyildizi, Handan; Abuqbeitah, Mohammad; Acikgoz, A. Serdar; Tuten, Abdullah; Demir, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Objective We intended to calculate approximate fetal doses in pregnant women who underwent diagnostic radiology procedures and to evaluate the safety of their pregnancies. Materials and Methods We contacted hospitals in different cities in Turkey where requests for fetal dose calculation are usually sent. Fetal radiation exposure was calculated for 304 cases in 218 pregnant women with gestational ages ranging from 5 days to 19 weeks, 2 days. FetDose software (ver. 4.0) was used in fetal dose calculations for radiographic and computed tomography (CT) procedures. The body was divided into three zones according to distance from the fetus. The first zone consisted of the head area, the lower extremities below the knee, and the upper extremities; the second consisted of the cervicothoracic region and upper thighs; and the third consisted of the abdominopelvic area. Fetal doses from radiologic procedures between zones were compared using the Kruskal-Wallis test and a Bonferroni-corrected Mann-Whitney U-test. Results The average fetal doses from radiography and CT in the first zone were 0.05 ± 0.01 mGy and 0.81 ± 0.04 mGy, respectively; 0.21 ± 0.05 mGy and 1.77 ± 0.22 mGy, respectively, in the second zone; and 6.42 ± 0.82 mGy and 22.94 ± 1.28 mGy, respectively, in the third zone (p < 0.001). Our results showed that fetal radiation exposures in our group of pregnant women did not reach the level (50 mGy) that is known to increase risk for congenital anomalies. Conclusion Fetal radiation exposure in the diagnostic radiology procedures in our study did not reach risk levels that might have indicated abortion. PMID:26576117

  17. The Radiation Dose Determination of the Pulsed X-ray Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miloichikova, I.; Stuchebrov, S.; Zhaksybayeva, G.; Wagner, A.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper the radiation dose measurement technique of the pulsed X-ray source RAP-160-5 is described. The dose rate measurement results from the pulsed X-ray beams at the different distance between the pulsed X-ray source focus and the detector obtained with the help of the thermoluminescent detectors DTL-02, the universal dosimeter UNIDOS E equipped with the plane-parallel ionization chamber type 23342, the dosimeter-radiometer DKS-96 and the radiation dosimeter AT 1123 are demonstrated. The recommendations for the dosimetry measurements of the pulsed X-ray generator RAP-160-5 under different radiation conditions are proposed.

  18. Nuclear medicine dose equivalent a method for determination of radiation risk

    SciTech Connect

    Huda, W.

    1986-12-01

    Conventional nuclear medicine dosimetry involves specifying individual organ doses. The difficulties that can arise with this approach to radiation dosimetry are discussed. An alternative scheme is described that is based on the ICRP effective dose equivalent, H/sub E/, and which is a direct estimate of the average radiation risk to the patient. The mean value of H/sub E/ for seven common /sup 99m/Tc nuclear medicine procedures is 0.46 rem and the average radiation risk from this level of exposure is estimated to be comparable to the risk from smoking approx. 28 packs of cigarettes or driving approx. 1300 miles.

  19. Molecular characterization and function of a PTEN gene from Litopenaeus vannamei after Vibrio alginolyticus challenge.

    PubMed

    Xie, C-y; Kong, J-r; Zhao, C-s; Xiao, Y-c; Peng, T; Liu, Y; Wang, W-n

    2016-06-01

    PTEN, a tumor suppressor gene, suppresses cell survival, growth, apoptosis, cell migration and DNA damage repair by inhibiting the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway. In this study, the full-length Litopenaeus vannamei PTEN (LvPTEN) cDNA was obtained, containing a 5'UTR of 59bp, an ORF of 1269bp and a 3'UTR of 146bp besides the poly (A) tail. The PTEN gene encoded a protein of 422 amino acids with an estimated molecular mass of 48.3 KDa and a predicted isoelectric point (pI) of 7.6. Subcellular localization analysis revealed that LvPTEN was distributed in both cytoplasm and nucleus, and the tissue distribution patterns showed that LvPTEN was ubiquitously expressed in all the examined tissues. Vibrio alginolyticus challenge induced upregulation of LvPTEN expression. Moreover, RNAi knock-down of LvPTEN in vivo significantly increased the expression of LvAKT mRNA, while reducing that of the downstream apoptosis genes LvP53 and LvCaspase3. LvPTEN knock-down also caused a sharp increase in cumulative mortality, bacterial numbers, and DNA damage in the hemolymph of L. vannamei following V. alginolyticus challenge, together with a sharp decrease in the total hemocyte count (THC). These results suggested that LvPTEN may participate in apoptosis via the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway in L. vannamei, and play an important role in shrimp innate immunity.

  20. Loss of PTEN causes SHP2 activation, making lung cancer cells unresponsive to IFN-γ

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chia-Ling; Chiang, Tzu-Hui; Tseng, Po-Chun; Wang, Yu-Chih; Lin, Chiou-Feng

    2015-10-23

    Src homology-2 domain-containing phosphatase (SHP) 2, an oncogenic phosphatase, inhibits type II immune interferon (IFN)-γ signaling by subverting signal transducers and activators of transcription 1 tyrosine phosphorylation and activation. For cancer immunoediting, this study aimed to investigate the decrease of phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN), a tumor suppressor protein, leading to cellular impairment of IFN-γ signaling. In comparison with human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells, the natural PTEN loss in another human lung adenocarcinoma line, PC14PE6/AS2 cells, presents reduced responsiveness in IFN-γ-induced IFN regulatory factor 1 activation and CD54 expression. Artificially silencing PTEN expression in A549 cells also caused cells to be unresponsive to IFN-γ without affecting IFN-γ receptor expression. IFN-γ-induced inhibition of cell proliferation and cytotoxicity were demonstrated in A549 cells but were defective in PC14PE6/AS2 cells and in PTEN-deficient A549 cells. Aberrant activation of SHP2 by ROS was specifically shown in PC14PE6/AS2 cells and PTEN-deficient A549 cells. Inhibiting ROS and SHP2 rescued cellular responses to IFN-γ-induced cytotoxicity and inhibition of cell proliferation in PC14PE6/AS2 cells. These results demonstrate that a decrease in PTEN facilitates ROS/SHP2 signaling, causing lung cancer cells to become unresponsive to IFN-γ. - Highlights: • This study demonstrates that PTEN decrease causes cellular unresponsive to IFN-γ. • Lung cancer cells with PTEN deficiency show unresponsive to IFN-γ signaling. • PTEN decrease inhibits IFN-γ-induced CD54, cell proliferation inhibition, and cytotoxicity. • ROS-mediated SHP2 activation makes PTEN-deficient cells unresponsive to IFN-γ.

  1. In Vitro and In Vivo Effects of Tumor Suppressor Gene PTEN on Endometriosis: An Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Juan; Zhu, Qiaoying; Jia, Xuemei; Yu, Ningzhu; Li, Qian

    2016-01-01

    Background Endometriosis can cause dysmenorrhea and infertility. Its pathogenesis has not yet been clarified and its treatment continues to pose enormous challenges. The protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTEN) gene is a tumor suppressor gene. The aim of this study was to investigate the role and significance of PTEN protein in the occurrence, development, and treatment of endometriosis through changes in apoptosis rate, cell cycle, and angiogenesis. Material/Methods PTEN was overexpressed and silenced in lentiviral vectors and inserted into primary endometrial cells. The changes in cell cycle and apoptosis in the different PTEN expression groups were evaluated using flow cytometry. Vessel growth mimicry was observed using 3-dimensional culture. A human-mouse chimeric endometriosis model was constructed using SCID mice. Hematoxylin and eosin staining and immunohistochemistry were used to detect pathological changes in ectopic endometrial tissues and the expression of VEGF protein in a human-mouse chimeric endometriosis mouse model. Results PTEN overexpression significantly increased apoptosis and inhibited the cell cycle compared with the silenced and control groups. Furthermore, cells expressing low PTEN levels were better able to undergo vasculogenic mimicry, and exhibited significantly increased angiogenesis compared to cells overexpressing PTEN. We found that ectopic foci were more easily formed in the endometrial tissue of SCID mice with low PTEN expression, and the VEGF expression in this group was relatively high. Conclusions PTEN inhibits the occurrence and development of endometriosis by regulating angiogenesis and the apoptosis and cell cycle of endometrial cells; therefore, we propose that the PTEN gene can be used to treat endometriosis. PMID:27744455

  2. Loss of CDH1 and Pten accelerates cellular invasiveness and angiogenesis in the mouse uterus.

    PubMed

    Lindberg, Mallory E; Stodden, Genna R; King, Mandy L; MacLean, James A; Mann, Jordan L; DeMayo, Francesco J; Lydon, John P; Hayashi, Kanako

    2013-07-01

    E-cadherin (CDH1) is a cell adhesion molecule that coordinates key morphogenetic processes regulating cell growth, cell proliferation, and apoptosis. Loss of CDH1 is a trademark of the cellular event epithelial to mesenchymal transition, which increases the metastatic potential of malignant cells. PTEN is a tumor-suppressor gene commonly mutated in many human cancers, including endometrial cancer. In the mouse uterus, ablation of Pten induces epithelial hyperplasia, leading to endometrial carcinomas. However, loss of Pten alone does not affect longevity until around 5 mo. Similarly, conditional ablation of Cdh1 alone does not predispose mice to cancer. In this study, we characterized the impact of dual Cdh1 and Pten ablation (Cdh1(d/d) Pten(d/d)) in the mouse uterus. We observed that Cdh1(d/d) Pten(d/d) mice died at Postnatal Days 15-19 with massive blood loss. Their uteri were abnormally structured with curly horns, disorganized epithelial structure, and increased cell proliferation. Co-immunostaining of KRT8 and ACTA2 showed invasion of epithelial cells into the myometrium. Further, the uteri of Cdh1(d/d) Pten(d/d) mice had prevalent vascularization in both the endometrium and myometrium. We also observed reduced expression of estrogen and progesterone receptors, loss of cell adherens, and tight junction molecules (CTNNB1 and claudin), as well as activation of AKT in the uteri of Cdh1(d/d) Pten(d/d) mice. However, complex hyperplasia was not found in the uteri of Cdh1(d/d) Pten(d/d) mice. Collectively, these findings suggest that ablation of Pten with Cdh1 in the uterus accelerates cellular invasiveness and angiogenesis and causes early death.

  3. Myeloid-specific deletion of tumor suppressor PTEN augments neutrophil transendothelial migration during inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sarraj, Bara; Massberg, Steffen; Li, Yitang; Kasorn, Anongnard; Subramanian, Kulandayan; Loison, Fabien; Silberstein, Leslie E; von Andrian, Ulrich; Luo, Hongbo R

    2009-06-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PIP(3)) is a second messenger that is involved in a number of cell activities including cell growth, proliferation, and motility. PIP(3) is produced by PI3K and regulated by PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10) and SHIP lipid phosphatases. Evidence from our experiments shows that enhanced PIP(3) production results in elevated neutrophil recruitment under inflammatory conditions. However, the mechanism of this elevation is not well understood. We used intravital video microscopy to investigate neutrophil recruitment in the cremaster venules of wild-type and PTEN knockout (KO) mice. Neutrophil transmigration was augmented in PTEN KO mice 4 h after TNF-alpha intrascrotal injection. PTEN KO neutrophils also showed significantly enhanced transmigration 2 h after MIP-2 intrascrotal injection, an effect that dramatically decreased when PI3K or Src kinase inhibitor treatments preceded MIP-2 stimulation. Similarly, fMLP superfusion of the cremaster muscle lead to enhanced emigration in PTEN KO mice. The observed elevation in neutrophil emigration was likely caused by increased speed of crawling, crossing the venular wall, and migrating through the muscular tissue in PTEN KO mice because the effect of PTEN depletion on neutrophil rolling or adhesion was minimal. Interestingly, chemoattractant-induced release of gelatinase and elastase was also elevated in PTEN null neutrophils, providing a potential mechanism for the enhanced neutrophil migration in the PTEN KO mice. Collectively, these results demonstrate that PTEN deletion in neutrophils enhances their invasivity and recruitment to inflamed sites more likely by raising the cell physical capability to cross the vascular and tissue barriers.

  4. A robust method for determining the absorbed dose to water in a phantom for low-energy photon radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, T.

    2011-06-01

    The application of more and more low-energy photon radiation in brachytherapy—either in the form of low-dose-rate radioactive seeds such as Pd-103 or I-125 or in the form of miniature x-ray tubes—has induced greater interest in determining the absorbed dose to water in water in this energy range. As it seems to be hardly feasible to measure the absorbed dose with calorimetric methods in this low energy range, ionometric methods are the preferred choice. However, the determination of the absorbed dose to water in water by ionometric methods is difficult in this energy range. With decreasing energy, the relative uncertainty of the photon cross sections increases and as the mass energy transfer coefficients show a steep gradient, the spectra of the radiation field must be known precisely. In this work two ionometric methods to determine the absorbed dose to water are evaluated with respect to their sensitivity to the uncertainties of the spectra and of the atomic database. The first is the measurement of the air kerma free in air and the application of an MC-based conversion factor to the absorbed dose to water. The second is the determination of the absorbed dose to water by means of an extrapolation chamber as an integral part of a phantom. In the complementing MC-calculations, two assortments of spectra each of which is based on a separate unfolding procedure were used as well as two kinds of databases: the standard PEGS and the recently implemented NIST database of EGSnrc. Experimental results were obtained by using a parallel-plate graphite extrapolation chamber and a free-air chamber. In the case when the water kerma in a phantom is determined from the measurements of air kerma free in air, differences in the order of 10% were found, according to which the database or the kind of spectrum is used. In contrast to this, for the second method, the differences found were about 0.5%.

  5. Experimental determination of the dose rate constant for selected 125I- and 192Ir-brachytherapy sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selbach, Hans-Joachim; Bambynek, Markus; Aubineau-Lanièce, Isabelle; Gabris, Frantisek; Stefano Guerra, Antonio; Toni, Maria Pia; de Pooter, Jacco; Sander, Thorsten; Schneider, Thorsten

    2012-10-01

    In 2008, the European project ‘T2.J06, Increasing cancer treatment efficacy using 3D brachytherapy’ was launched. One of the main goals of the Joint Research Project was the experimental determination of the dose rate constant Λ to allow the linkage between the air kerma strength or reference air kerma rate currently used for the source characterization and the ‘new’ absorbed dose rate to water with an uncertainty of <3% (k = 1) for some selected brachytherapy sources. The results obtained by five National Metrology Institutes (NMI) for four different types of brachytherapy sources are presented and compared with consensus data published in the literature. A further goal of the project was to develop a calibration chain for the transfer of the new reference quantity to the end user, minimizing the uncertainty. A first direct calibration in terms of absorbed dose rate to water of a secondary standard and the dissemination to the hospitals is presented.

  6. Determination of in vitro lung solubility and intake-to-dose conversion factor for tritiated lanthanum nickel aluminum alloy.

    PubMed

    Farfán, Eduardo B; Labone, Thomas R; Staack, Gregory C; Cheng, Yung-Sung; Zhou, Yue; Varallo, Thomas P

    2012-09-01

    A sample of tritiated lanthanum nickel aluminum alloy (LaNi4.25Al0.75 or LANA.75) similar to that used at the Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities was analyzed to estimate the particle size distribution of this metal tritide powder and the rate at which this material dissolves in the human respiratory tract after it is inhaled. This information is used to calculate the committed effective dose received by a worker after inhaling the material. These doses, which were calculated using the same methodology given in the U.S. Department of Energy Tritium Handbook, are presented as inhalation intake-to-dose conversion factors (DCF). The DCF for this metal tritide was determined to be 9.4 × 10 Sv Bq, which is less than the DCF for tritiated water. Therefore, the radiation worker bioassay programs designed for tritiated water are adequate to monitor for intakes of this material.

  7. Automatic counting of chromosome fragments for the determination of radiation dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Warren E.; Leung, Billy C.; Leary, James F.

    1991-04-01

    A correlation exists between chromosome breakage and radiation exposure so that counting chromosome fragments can provide a measure of the radiation dose to an organism. We describe our method for automatically counting prematurely condensed chromosome fragments from microscope images of the exploded nucleus. An alternative perhaps more promising non-imaging approach using flow karyotyping is also discussed. 1 .

  8. A Meta-Analysis To Determine the Dose Response for Strength Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhea, Matthew R.; Alvar, Brent A.; Burkett, Lee N.; Ball, Stephen D.

    2003-01-01

    Examined the quantitative dose-response relationship for strength development by calculating the magnitude of gains elicited by various levels of training intensity, frequency, and volume; thus clarifying the effort to benefit ratio. A meta-analysis of 140 studies with 1,433 effect sizes (ES) was conducted. ES demonstrated different responses…

  9. Non-invasive determination of the irradiation dose in fingers using low-frequency EPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zdravkova, M.; Crokart, N.; Trompier, F.; Beghein, N.; Gallez, B.; Debuyst, R.

    2004-07-01

    Several reports in the literature have described the effects of radiation in workers who exposed their fingers to intense radioactive sources. The radiation injuries occurring after local exposure to a high dose (20 to 100 Gy) could lead to the need for amputation. Follow-up of victims needs to be more rational with a precise knowledge of the irradiated area that risks tissue degradation and necrosis. It has been described previously that X-band electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy could be used to assess the dose in irradiated amputated fingers. Here, we propose the use of low-frequency EPR spectroscopy to evaluate non-invasively the absorbed dose. Low-frequency microwaves are indeed less absorbed by water and penetrate more deeply into living material (~10 mm in tissues using 1 GHz spectrometers). This work presents preliminary results obtained with baboon and human fingers compared with human dry phalanxes placed inside a surface-coil resonator. The EPR signal increased linearly with the dose. The ratio of the slopes of the dry bone to whole finger linear regression lines was around 5. The detection limit achievable with the present spectrometer and resonator is around 60 Gy, which is well within the range of accidentally exposed fingers. It is likely that the detection limit could be improved in the future, thanks to further technical spectrometer and resonator developments as well as to appropriate spectrum deconvolution into native and dosimetric signals.

  10. A Meta-Analysis To Determine the Dose Response for Strength Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhea, Matthew R.; Alvar, Brent A.; Burkett, Lee N.; Ball, Stephen D.

    2003-01-01

    Examined the quantitative dose-response relationship for strength development by calculating the magnitude of gains elicited by various levels of training intensity, frequency, and volume; thus clarifying the effort to benefit ratio. A meta-analysis of 140 studies with 1,433 effect sizes (ES) was conducted. ES demonstrated different responses…

  11. Estrogen receptor alpha drives proliferation in PTEN-deficient prostate carcinoma by stimulating survival signaling, MYC expression and altering glucose sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Takizawa, Itsuhiro; Lawrence, Mitchell G; Balanathan, Preetika; Rebello, Richard; Pearson, Helen B; Garg, Elika; Pedersen, John; Pouliot, Normand; Nadon, Robert; Watt, Matthew J; Taylor, Renea A; Humbert, Patrick; Topisirovic, Ivan; Larsson, Ola; Risbridger, Gail P; Furic, Luc

    2015-01-20

    While high doses of estrogen, in combination with androgens, can initiate prostate cancer (PCa) via activation of the estrogen receptor α (ERα), the role of ERα in PCa cells within established tumors is largely unknown. Here we show that expression of ERα is increased in high grade human PCa. Similarly, ERα is elevated in mouse models of aggressive PCa driven by MYC overexpression or deletion of PTEN. Within the prostate of PTEN-deficient mice, there is a progressive pattern of ERα expression: low in benign glands, moderate in tumors within the dorsal, lateral and ventral lobes, and high in tumors within the anterior prostate. This expression significantly correlates with the proliferation marker Ki67. Furthermore, in vitro knockdown of ERα in cells derived from PTEN-deficient tumors causes a significant and sustained decrease in proliferation. Depletion of ERα also reduces the activity of the PI3K and MAPK pathways, both downstream targets of non-genomic ERα action. Finally, ERα knockdown reduces the levels of the MYC protein and lowers the sensitivity of cellular proliferation to glucose withdrawal, which correlates with decreased expression of the glucose transporter GLUT1. Collectively, these results demonstrate that ERα orchestrates proliferation and metabolism to promote the neoplastic growth of PCa cells.

  12. Determination of highest no effect dose (HNED) for local anaesthetic responses to procaine, cocaine, bupivacaine and benzocaine.

    PubMed

    Harkins, J D; Mundy, G D; Stanley, S; Woods, W E; Rees, W A; Thompson, K N; Tobin, T

    1996-01-01

    The highest no effect doses (HNEDs) for the local anaesthetic (LA) effects of procaine, cocaine, bupivacaine and benzocaine were determined using the heat lamp/hoof withdrawal model of Kamerling et al. (1985b) and the abaxial sesamoid block model of local anaesthesia. The heat lamp rapidly (4 or 5 s) increased the temperature of the superficial skin layers of the pastern to about 90 degrees C, at which point the animal sharply withdrew its hoof. Effective LA blockade precluded this response and superficial skin temperatures exceeded 120 degrees C. Thermal stimulus experiments were routinely terminated after 10 s of exposure to prevent undue tissue damage. Following abaxial sesamoid block with bupivacaine, the HNED for that drug was about 0.25 mg/site. Increasing the dose to 2 mg/site apparently produced complete and prolonged LA blockade. Analogous work showed that the HNED for procaine was about 2.5 mg/site. Similarly, the dose response curve for procaine was parallel with that of bupivacaine but was shifted 10-fold to the right. The duration of the LA response following procaine injection was less than for bupivacaine with the statistically significant response following 40 mg/site injection lasting less than 45 min. Cocaine was less potent than procaine, showing a shallower dose response curve. The HNED for cocaine was less than 5 mg/site, although at this dose the duration of action was extremely short (< 7.5 min). Benzocaine had no significant LA action when a dose of 800 mg was applied topically as a 5% preparation. These results show that the HNEDs for bupivacaine and procaine are remarkably low, that cocaine is somewhat less potent as a LA than might be expected, and that 5% topical benzocaine has no significant pharmacology. The small doses of bupivacaine and procaine producing effective local anaesthesia suggests that developing plasma thresholds for these agents is likely to be very challenging.

  13. Maximizing strength development in athletes: a meta-analysis to determine the dose-response relationship.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Mark D; Rhea, Matthew R; Alvar, Brent A

    2004-05-01

    The efficiency, safety, and effectiveness of strength training programs are paramount for sport conditioning. Therefore, identifying optimal doses of the training variables allows for maximal gains in muscular strength to be elicited per unit of time and also for the reduction in risk of overtraining and/or overuse injuries. A quantified dose-response relationship for the continuum of training intensities, frequencies, and volumes has been identified for recreationally trained populations but has yet to be identified for competitive athletes. The purpose of this analysis was to identify this relationship in collegiate, professional, and elite athletes. A meta-analysis of 37 studies with a total of 370 effect sizes was performed to identify the dose-response relationship among competitive athletes. Criteria for study inclusion were (a) participants must have been competitive athletes at the collegiate or professional level, (b) the study must have employed a strength training intervention, and (c) the study must have included necessary data to calculate effect sizes. Effect size data demonstrate that maximal strength gains are elicited among athletes who train at a mean training intensity of 85% of 1 repetition maximum (1RM), 2 days per week, and with a mean training volume of 8 sets per muscle group. The current data exhibit different dose-response trends than previous meta-analytical investigations with trained and untrained nonathletes. These results demonstrate explicit dose-response trends for maximal strength gains in athletes and may be directly used in strength and conditioning venues to optimize training efficiency and effectiveness.

  14. Absorbed Dose Determination Using Experimental and Analytical Predictions of X-Ray Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, D. L.; Carruth, Ralph (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Electron beam welding in a vacuum is a technology that NASA is investigating as a joining technique for manufacture of space structures. This investigation characterizes the x-ray environment due to operation of an in-vacuum electron beam welding tool and provides recommendations for adequate shielding for astronauts performing the in-vacuum electron beam welding. NASA, in a joint venture with the Russian Space Agency, was scheduled to perform a series of welding in space experiments on board the U.S. Space Shuttle. This series of experiments was named the international space welding experiment (ISWE). The hardware associated with the ISWE was leased to NASA by the Paton Welding Institute (PWI) in Ukraine for ground-based welding experiments in preparation for flight. Two ground tests were scheduled, using the ISWE electron beam welding tool, to characterize the radiation exposure to an astronaut during the operation of the ISWE. These radiation exposure tests used thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD's) shielded with material currently used by astronauts during extravehicular activities to measure the radiation dose. The TLD's were exposed to x-ray radiation generated by operation of the ISWE in-vacuum electron beam welding tool. This investigation was the first known application of TLD's to measure absorbed dose from x rays of energy less than 10 keV. The ISWE hardware was returned to Ukraine before the issue of adequate shielding for the astronauts was completely verified. Therefore, alternate experimental and analytical methods were developed to measure and predict the x-ray spectral and intensity distribution generated by ISWE electron beam impact with metal. These x-ray spectra were normalized to an equivalent ISWE exposure, then used to calculate the absorbed radiation dose to astronauts. These absorbed dose values were compared to TLD measurements obtained during actual operation of the ISWE in-vacuum electron beam welding tool. The calculated absorbed dose

  15. Occupational ingestion of P-32: the value of monitoring techniques to determine dose. A case report.

    PubMed

    McCunney, R J; Masse, F; Galanek, M

    1999-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to described the analytical methods used to assess the internal dose from a P-32-labeled compound that was inadvertently ingested. Bioassay data, using the International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP)-30 model, enabled the calculation of internal dose. Whole body counting (WBC) and urinary measurement with liquid scintillation counting were utilized to estimate the amount of radioactive material deposited in body organs. This metabolic model assumes that 80% of the material ingested is absorbed through the gastrointestinal tract because P-32 is soluble. The time of the intake, a critical variable in this method, was estimated on the basis of urine contamination of clothing. Twenty-four-hour urine sampling over a 6-week period, coupled with daily WBC over the same period, was performed. Because P-32 does not emit photons, WBC relied on measuring the bremsstrahlung radiation produced as a result of interaction of beta radiation with the body's tissues. A P-32-spiked phantom was used as a control. Over the 6-week monitoring period, urinary results indicated an ingestion of 560 microCi of P-32, whereas WBC estimated on intake of 580 microCi. An assessment of the laboratory where the accident occurred indicated that approximately 600 microCi of radioactive phosphorous wa