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Sample records for pts system-an nmr

  1. Mechanism of phosphoryl transfer and protein-protein interaction in the PTS system-an NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Rajagopal, P.; Klevit, R.E.

    1994-12-01

    HPr and Enzyme IIA{sup Glc} are two of the components of the bacterial PTS (phosphoenolpyruvate: sugar phosphotranferase system) and are involved in the phosphorylation and concomitant translocation of sugars across the membrane. These PTS protein complexes also regulate sugar transport. HPr, phosphorylated at a histidine N1 site by Enzyme I and phosphoenol pyruvate, transfers the phosphoryl group to a histidine N3 position in Enzyme IIA{sup Glc}. HPrs from Gram-positive bacteria undergo regulatory phosphorylation at Ser{sup 46}, whereby phosphorylation of the histidine residue is inhibited. Conversely, histidine phosphorylation inhibits phosphorylation at Ser{sup 46}. HPrs from Gram-negative bacteria possess a serine residue at position 46, but do not undergo regulatory phosphorylation. HPr forms an open-faced sandwich structure with a four-strand S-sheet and 2 to 3 helices lying on top of the sheet. The active-site histidine and Ser{sup 46} occur in conformationally flexible regions. P-His-HPr from the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilus has been investigated by both homonuclear and heteronuclear two-dimensional and three-dimensional NMR experiments using an in-situ enzymatic regeneration system to maintain a constant level of P-His-HPr. The results show that localized conformational changes occur in the vicinity of the active-site histidine and also near Ser{sup 46}. HPr-Enzyme IIA{sup Glc} complexes from both Bacillus subtilis and Gram-negative Escherichia coli were also studied by a variety of {sup 15}N-edited two-dimensional NMR experiments, which were performed on uniformly {sup 15}N-labeled HPr complexed to unlabeled Enzyme IIA{sup Glc}. The complex is in fast exchange with a molecular weight of about 27 kDa. The focus of our work is to assess the changes undergone by HPr (the smaller of the two components), and so all the experiments were performed with excess Enzyme IIA present in the system.

  2. Endosafe(R)-Portable Test System (PTS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maule, Jake; Wainwright, Norm; Burbank, Dan

    2005-01-01

    The Portable Test System (PTS) is a hand-held device for monitoring the presence of potentially hazardous bacteria in the environment. It uses an immunological method derived from the horseshoe crab (Limulus polyphemus) to detect bacterial cell membranes and other molecular components of a cell. Further modifications of the PTS will allow detection of individual hazardous species of bacteria. This study was a follow-up of previous PTS and other immunological tests performed on the KC-135 during 2002-2003 (Maule et al., 2003, J. Gravit. Physiol.) and in the underwater habitat Aquarius during NEEMO 5 (Maule et al., 2005, Appl. Environ. Microbiol in prep.). The experiments described here were part of a final testing phase prior to use of the PTS on the International Space Station (ISS), scheduled for launch on 12A.1 on February 9th 2006. The specific aspects of PTS operation studied were those involving a fluid component: pumping, mixing, incubations and pipetting into the instrument. The PTS uses a stepper motor to move fluid along small channels, which may be affected by reduced gravity.

  3. Next Generation LOCAD-PTS Cartridge Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, H.; Nutter, D.; Weite, E.; Wells, M.; Maule, J.; Damon, M.; Monaco, L.; Steele, A.; Wainwright, N.

    2008-01-01

    Future astrobiology exploration missions will require rapid, point-of-use techniques for surface science experiments and contamination monitoring. The Lab-On-a-Chip Application Development (LOCAD) team is developing operational instruments that advance spaceflight technologies to molecular-based methods. Currently, LOCAD-Portable Test System (PTS) is quantifying levels of the bacterial molecule endotoxin onboard the Internatioal Space Station. Future research and development will focus on more sensitive molecular techniques that expand the number of compounds detected to include beta-glucan from fungal cell walls.

  4. Polytitanium sulfate (PTS): Coagulation application and Ti species detection.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yanxia; Phuntsho, Sherub; Gao, Baoyu; Shon, Hokyong

    2017-02-01

    Interest in the development of inorganic polymerized coagulants is growing; however, there are only limited studies on the synthesis of polytitanium coagulants, which are expected to exhibit improved coagulation efficiency with better floc properties. This study presents the synthesis of polytitanium sulfate (PTS) for potential application in water purification, followed by characterization of PTS flocs and titanium species detection. Stable PTS solutions were successfully synthesized and standard jar tests were conducted to evaluate their coagulation efficiency. Electrospray ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ESI-TOF-MS) speciation analysis revealed that a variety of mononuclear and polynuclear complexes were formed in PTS solution, indicating the polymeric nature of the synthesized coagulant. Floc characteristics were studied through on-line monitoring of floc size using a laser diffraction particle size analyzer. Results showed that PTS had a comparable or in some cases even higher organic matter and particulate removal efficiency than Ti(SO4)2. The effluent pH after PTS coagulation significantly improved toward desirable values closer to neutral pH. Properties of flocs formed by PTS were significantly improved in terms of floc size, growth rate and structure. This study showed that PTS could be an efficient and promising coagulant for water purification, with the additional benefit that its coagulated sludge can be used to recover valuable TiO2 nanoparticles for various commercial applications. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Williams works with LOCAD-PTS in Destiny lab

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-04-01

    ISS014-E-18822 (31 March 2007) --- Astronaut Sunita L. Williams, Expedition 14 flight engineer, works with the Lab-on-a-Chip Application Development-Portable Test System (LOCAD-PTS) experiment in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station. LOCAD-PTS is a handheld device for rapid detection of biological and chemical substances onboard the station.

  6. Williams works with LOCAD-PTS in Destiny lab

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-04-01

    ISS014-E-18811 (31 March 2007) --- Astronaut Sunita L. Williams, Expedition 14 flight engineer, works with the Lab-on-a-Chip Application Development-Portable Test System (LOCAD-PTS) experiment in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station. LOCAD-PTS is a handheld device for rapid detection of biological and chemical substances onboard the station.

  7. Williams works with LOCAD-PTS in Destiny lab

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-04-01

    ISS014-E-18818 (31 March 2007) --- Astronaut Sunita L. Williams, Expedition 14 flight engineer, works with the Lab-on-a-Chip Application Development-Portable Test System (LOCAD-PTS) experiment in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station. LOCAD-PTS is a handheld device for rapid detection of biological and chemical substances onboard the station.

  8. Cerebral blood flow in patients (PTS) exposed to neurotoxic chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Heuser, G.; Mena, I.; Thomas, C.

    1994-05-01

    Exposure to neurotoxic chemicals as pesticides, glues, solvents, etc. are known to induce neurologic and psychiatric symptomatology. We report on 72 pts, 33 young pts, 8 males, and 26 females, age 55 (7) yrs, 15 of them exposed to pesticides, and 37 to solvents. They were studied with quantitative and qualitative analysis of rCBF performed with 30 mCi of Xe-133 (Xe) by inhalation followed by 30 mCi of Tc-HMPAO given IV. Imaging was performed with a brain dedicated system, and distribution of rCBF was assessed with automatic ROI definition, and HMPAO normalized to maximal pixel activity in the brain. Results of Xe rCBF are expressed as mean and (S.D.) in ml/min/100g, and HMPAO as mean and (S.D.) uptake per ROI and compared with age-matched controls, 10 young and 20 elderly individuals, and also to a group of 36 elderly chronic fatigue pts (CFS), and 26 depression pts. CBF was diminished in young and elderly, 45 (7) and 40 (7) ml/min 100g, p<0.02 for both groups. Thus we conclude that pts exposed to chemicals present with diminished CBF, worse in elderly in the right dorsal frontal and parietal lobes, and in young, in left dorsal frontal and temporal lobes. These findings are significantly different from observations in pts and chronic fatigue and depression.

  9. Identification of PTS(Fru) as the major fructose uptake system of Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Voigt, Christine; Bahl, Hubert; Fischer, Ralf-Jörg

    2014-08-01

    As a member of the saccharolytic clostridia, a variety of different carbohydrates like glucose, fructose, or mannose can be used as carbon and energy source by Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824. Thirteen phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase systems (PTS) have been identified in C. acetobutylicum, which are likely to be responsible for the uptake of hexoses, hexitols, or disaccharides. Here, we focus on three PTS which are expected to be involved in the uptake of fructose, PTS(Fru), PTS(ManI), and PTS(ManII). To analyze their individual functions, each PTS was inactivated via homologous recombination or insertional mutagenesis. Standardized comparative batch fermentations in a synthetic medium with glucose, fructose, or mannose as sole carbon source identified PTS(Fru) as primary uptake system for fructose, whereas growth with fructose was not impaired in PTS(ManI) and slightly altered in PTS(ManII)-deficient strains of C. acetobutylicum. The inactivation of PTS(ManI) resulted in slower growth on mannose whereas the loss of PTS(ManII) revealed no phenotype during growth on mannose. This is the first time that it has been shown that PTS(Fru) and PTS(ManI) of C. acetobutylicum are directly involved in fructose and mannose uptake, respectively. Moreover, comprehensive comparison of the fermentation products revealed that the loss of PTS(Fru) prevents the solvent shift as no butanol and only basic levels of acetone and ethanol could be determined.

  10. PTS1 Peroxisomal Import Pathway Plays Shared and Distinct Roles to PTS2 Pathway in Development and Pathogenicity of Magnaporthe oryzae

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiaoyu; Zhang, Zhen; Wang, Yanli; Li, Ling; Chai, Rongyao; Mao, Xueqin; Jiang, Hua; Qiu, Haiping; Du, Xinfa; Lin, Fucheng; Sun, Guochang

    2013-01-01

    Peroxisomes participate in various important metabolisms and are required in pathogenicity of fungal plant pathogens. Peroxisomal matrix proteins are imported from cytoplasm into peroxisomes through peroxisomal targeting signal 1 (PTS1) or peroxisomal targeting signal 2 (PTS2) import pathway. PEX5 and PEX7 genes participate in the two pathways respectively. The involvement of PEX7 mediated PTS2 import pathway in fungal pathogenicity has been documented, while that of PTS1 remains unclear. Through null mutant analysis of MoPEX5, the PEX5 homolog in Magnaporthe oryzae, we report the crucial roles of PTS1 pathway in the development and host infection in the rice blast fungus, and compared with those of PTS2. We found that MoPEX5 disruption specifically blocked the PTS1 pathway. Δmopex5 was unable to use lipids as sole carbon source and lost pathogenicity completely. Similar as Δmopex7, Δmopex5 exhibited significant reduction in lipid utilization and mobilization, appressorial turgor genesis and H2O2 resistance. Additionally, Δmopex5 presented some distinct defects which were undetected in Δmopex7 in vegetative growth, conidial morphogenesis, appressorial morphogenesis and melanization. The results indicated that the PTS1 peroxisomal import pathway, in addition to PTS2, is required for fungal development and pathogenicity of the rice blast fungus, and also, as a main peroxisomal import pathway, played a more predominant role than PTS2. PMID:23405169

  11. Structural insight into the PTS sugar transporter EIIC

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Jason G.; Levin, Elena J.; Zhou, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Background The enzyme IIC component (EIIC) of the phosphotransferase system (PTS) is responsible for selectively transporting sugar molecules across the inner bacterial membrane. This is accomplished in parallel with phosphorylation of the sugar, which prevents efflux of the sugar back across the membrane. This process is a key part of an extensive signaling network that allows bacteria to efficiently utilize preferred carbohydrate sources. Scope of review The goal of this review is to examine the current understanding of the structural features of EIIC and how it mediates concentrative, selective sugar transport. The crystal structure of an N,N’-diacetylchitobiose transporter is used as a structural template for the glucose superfamily of PTS transporters. Major conclusions Comparison of protein sequences in context with the known EIIC structure suggests members of the glucose superfamily of PTS transporters may exhibit variations in topology. Despite these differences, a conserved histidine and glutamate appear to have roles shared across the superfamily in sugar binding and phosphorylation. In the proposed transport model, a rigid body motion between two structural domains and movement of an intracellular loop provide the substrate binding site with alternating access, and reveal a surface required for interaction with the phosphotransfer protein required for catalysis. General significance The structural and functional data discussed here give a preliminary understanding of how transport in EIIC is achieved. However, given the great sequence diversity between varying glucose-superfamily PTS transporters and lack of data on conformational changes needed for transport, additional structures of other members and conformations are still required. PMID:24657490

  12. Diagnostics for Z-pinch implosion experiments on PTS

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, X. D. Huang, X. B. Zhou, S. T. Zhang, S. Q. Dan, J. K. Li, J. Cai, H. C. Wang, K. L. Ouyang, K. Xu, Q. Duan, S. C. Chen, G. H. Wang, M. Feng, S. P. Yang, L. B. Xie, W. P. Deng, J. J.

    2014-12-15

    The preliminary experiments of wire array implosion were performed on PTS, a 10 MA z-pinch driver with a 70 ns rise time. A set of diagnostics have been developed and fielded on PTS to study pinch physics and implosion dynamics of wire array. Radiated power measurement for soft x-rays was performed by multichannel filtered x-ray diode array, and flat spectral responses x-ray diode detector. Total x-ray yield was measured by a calibrated, unfiltered nickel bolometer which was also used to obtain pinch power. Multiple time-gated pinhole cameras were used to produce spatial-resolved images of x-ray self-emission from plasmas. Two time-integrated pinhole cameras were used respectively with 20-μm Be filter and with multilayer mirrors to record images produced by >1-keV and 277±5 eV self-emission. An optical streak camera was used to produce radial implosion trajectories, and an x-ray streak camera paired with a horizontal slit was used to record a continuous time-history of emission with one-dimensional spatial resolution. A frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser (532 nm) was used to produce four frame laser shadowgraph images with 6 ns time interval. We will briefly describe each of these diagnostics and present some typical results from them.

  13. Children's Postdisaster Trajectories of PTS Symptoms: Predicting Chronic Distress.

    PubMed

    La Greca, Annette M; Lai, Betty S; Llabre, Maria M; Silverman, Wendy K; Vernberg, Eric M; Prinstein, Mitchell J

    2013-08-01

    There are no studies of the distinct trajectories of children's psychological distress over the first year after a destructive natural disaster and the determinants of these trajectories. We examined these issues using an existing dataset of children exposed to Hurricane Andrew, one of the most devastating natural disasters in US history. At 3-months postdisaster, 568 children (55 % girls; grades 3-5) residing in areas most directly affected by the hurricane completed measures of hurricane exposure and stressors, social support, coping, and general anxiety. Children also reported major life events occurring since the hurricane (at 7-months) and posttraumatic stress (PTS) symptoms at 3-, 7-, and 10-months postdisaster. Latent growth mixture modeling identified three trajectories of PTS reactions: resilient (37 %), recovering (43 %), and chronic distress (20 %). Predictors of the trajectories were examined. Odds ratios indicated that, compared to the resilient trajectory, girls were more likely to be in the recovering and chronically distressed trajectories, as were children reporting higher anxiety and greater use of coping strategies that reflected poor emotion regulation. Compared to the recovering trajectory, children in the chronically distressed trajectory had greater odds of reporting high anxiety, less social support, more intervening life events, and greater use of poor emotion regulation strategies. Hurricane exposure may be less effective in identifying children who develop chronic postdisaster distress than other child (anxiety, coping) and contextual variables (social support, life events). Effective screening after disasters is critical for identifying youth most in need of limited clinical resources.

  14. The general PTS component HPr determines the preference for glucose over mannitol

    PubMed Central

    Choe, Mangyu; Park, Young-Ha; Lee, Chang-Ro; Kim, Yeon-Ran; Seok, Yeong-Jae

    2017-01-01

    Preferential sugar utilization is a widespread phenomenon in biological systems. Glucose is usually the most preferred carbon source in various organisms, especially in bacteria where it is taken up via the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS). The currently proposed model for glucose preference over non-PTS sugars in enteric bacteria including E. coli is strictly dependent on the phosphorylation state of the glucose-specific PTS component, enzyme IIAGlc (EIIAGlc). However, the mechanism of the preference among PTS sugars is largely unknown in Gram-negative bacteria. Here, we show that glucose preference over another PTS sugar, mannitol, is absolutely dependent on the general PTS component HPr, but not on EIIAGlc, in E. coli. Dephosphorylated HPr accumulates during the transport of glucose and interacts with the mannitol operon regulator, MtlR, to augment its repressor activity. This interaction blocks the inductive effect of mannitol on the mannitol operon expression and results in the inhibition of mannitol utilization. PMID:28225088

  15. A PTS EII mutant library in Group A Streptococcus identifies a promiscuous man-family PTS transporter influencing SLS-mediated hemolysis.

    PubMed

    Sundar, Ganesh S; Islam, Emrul; Gera, Kanika; Le Breton, Yoann; McIver, Kevin S

    2017-02-01

    The Group A Streptococcus (GAS, Streptococcus pyogenes) is a Gram-positive human pathogen that must adapt to unique host environments in order to survive. Links between sugar metabolism and virulence have been demonstrated in GAS, where mutants in the phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system (PTS) exhibited Streptolysin S (SLS)-mediated hemolysis during exponential growth. This early onset hemolysis correlated with an increased lesion size and severity in a murine soft tissue infection model when compared with parental M1T1 MGAS5005. To identify the PTS components responsible for this phenotype, we insertionally inactivated the 14 annotated PTS EIIC-encoding genes in the GAS MGAS5005 genome and subjected this library to metabolic and hemolysis assays to functionally characterize each EIIC. It was found that a few EIIs had a very limited influence on PTS sugar metabolism, whereas others were fairly promiscuous. The mannose-specific EII locus, encoded by manLMN, was expressed as a mannose-inducible operon that exhibited the most influence on PTS sugar metabolism, including mannose. Importantly, components of the mannose-specific EII also acted to prevent the early onset of SLS-mediated hemolysis. Interestingly, these roles were not identical in two different M1T1 GAS strains, highlighting the possible versatility of the PTS to adapt to strain-specific needs. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Williams working on the LOCAD-PTS Experiment in the US Lab during Expedition 15

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-04-30

    ISS015-E-05640 (30 April 2007) --- Astronaut Sunita L. Williams, Expedition 15 flight engineer, works with the Lab-on-a-Chip Application Development-Portable Test System (LOCAD-PTS) experiment in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station. LOCAD-PTS is a handheld device for rapid detection of biological and chemical substances onboard the station.

  17. Williams works on the LOCAD-PTS Experiment in the US Lab during Expedition 15

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-05-05

    ISS015-E-06777 (5 May 2007) --- Astronaut Sunita L. Williams, Expedition 15 flight engineer, works with the Lab-on-a-Chip Application Development-Portable Test System (LOCAD-PTS) experiment in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station. LOCAD-PTS is a handheld device for rapid detection of biological and chemical substances onboard the station.

  18. Williams working on the LOCAD-PTS Experiment in the US Lab during Expedition 15

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-04-30

    ISS015-E-05649 (30 April 2007) --- Astronaut Sunita L. Williams, Expedition 15 flight engineer, works with the Lab-on-a-Chip Application Development-Portable Test System (LOCAD-PTS) experiment in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station. LOCAD-PTS is a handheld device for rapid detection of biological and chemical substances onboard the station.

  19. Application of probabilistic fracture mechanics to the PTS issue

    SciTech Connect

    Cheverton, R.D.; Ball, D.G.

    1985-01-01

    As a part of the NRC effort to obtain a resolution to the PWR PTS issue, a probabilistic approach has been applied that includes a probabilistic fracture-mechanics (PFM) analysis. The PFM analysis is performed with OCA-P, a computer code that performs thermal, stress and fracture-mechanics analyses and estimates the conditional probability of vessel failure, P(F/E), using Monte Carlo techniques. The stress intensity factor (K/sub I/) is calculated for two- and three-dimensional surface flaws using superposition techniques and influence coefficients. Importance-sampling techniques are used, as necessary, to limit to a reasonable value the number of vessels actually calculated. Analyses of three PWR plants indicate that (1) the critical initial flaw depth is very small (5 to 15 mm), (2) the benefit of warm prestressing and the role of crack arrest are transient dependent, (3) crack arrest does not occur for the dominant transients, and (4) the single largest uncertainty in the overall probabilistic analysis is the number of surface flaws per vessel. 30 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. PPero, a Computational Model for Plant PTS1 Type Peroxisomal Protein Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Caiji; Jiang, Liwen; Guo, Dianjing

    2017-01-01

    Well-defined motifs often make it easy to investigate protein function and localization. In plants, peroxisomal proteins are guided to peroxisomes mainly by a conserved type 1 (PTS1) or type 2 (PTS2) targeting signal, and the PTS1 motif is commonly used for peroxisome targeting protein prediction. Currently computational prediction of peroxisome targeted PTS1-type proteins are mostly based on the 3 amino acids PTS1 motif and the adjacent sequence which is less than 14 amino acid residue in length. The potential contribution of the adjacent sequences beyond this short region has never been well investigated in plants. In this work, we develop a bi-profile Bayesian SVM method to extract and learn position-based amino acid features for both PTS1 motifs and their extended adjacent sequences in plants. Our proposed model outperformed other implementations with similar applications and achieved the highest accuracy of 93.6% and 92.6% for Arabidosis and other plant species respectively. A large scale analysis for Arabidopsis, Rice, Maize, Potato, Wheat, and Soybean proteome was conducted using the proposed model and a batch of candidate PTS1 proteins were predicted. The DNA segments corresponding to the C-terminal sequences of 9 selected candidates were cloned and transformed into Arabidopsis for experimental validation, and 5 of them demonstrated peroxisome targeting. PMID:28045983

  1. Potential Virulence Role of the Legionella pneumophila ptsP Ortholog

    PubMed Central

    Higa, Futoshi; Edelstein, Paul H.

    2001-01-01

    We previously identified the Legionella pneumophila ptsP (phosphoenolpyruvate phosphotransferase) ortholog gene as a putative virulence factor in a study of signature-tagged mutagenesis using a guinea pig pneumonia model. In this study, we further defined the phenotypic properties of L. pneumophila ptsP and its complete sequence. The L. pneumophila ptsP was 2,295 bases in length. Its deduced amino acid sequence had high similarity with ptsP orthologs of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Azotobacter vinelandii, and Escherichia coli, with nearly identical lengths. Here we show that while the mutant grew well in laboratory media, it was defective in both lung and spleen multiplication in guinea pigs. It grew slowly in guinea pig alveolar macrophages despite good uptake into the cells. Furthermore, there was minimal growth in a human alveolar epithelial cell line (A549). Transcomplementation of the L. pneumophila ptsP mutant almost completely rescued its growth in alveolar macrophages, in A549 cells, and in guinea pig lung and spleen. The L. pneumophila ptsP mutant was capable of evasion of phagosome-lysosome fusion and resided in ribosome-studded phagosomes. Pore formation activity of the mutant was normal. The L. pneumophila ptsP mutant expressed DotA and IcmX in apparently normal amounts, suggesting that the ptsP mutation did not affect dotA and icmX regulation. In addition, the mutant was resistant to serum and neutrophil killing. Taken together, these findings show that L. pneumophila ptsP is required for full in vivo virulence of L. pneumophila, most probably by affecting intracellular growth. PMID:11447151

  2. PredPlantPTS1: A Web Server for the Prediction of Plant Peroxisomal Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Reumann, Sigrun; Buchwald, Daniela; Lingner, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Prediction of subcellular protein localization is essential to correctly assign unknown proteins to cell organelle-specific protein networks and to ultimately determine protein function. For metazoa, several computational approaches have been developed in the past decade to predict peroxisomal proteins carrying the peroxisome targeting signal type 1 (PTS1). However, plant-specific PTS1 protein prediction methods have been lacking up to now, and pre-existing methods generally were incapable of correctly predicting low-abundance plant proteins possessing non-canonical PTS1 patterns. Recently, we presented a machine learning approach that is able to predict PTS1 proteins for higher plants (spermatophytes) with high accuracy and which can correctly identify unknown targeting patterns, i.e., novel PTS1 tripeptides and tripeptide residues. Here we describe the first plant-specific web server PredPlantPTS1 for the prediction of plant PTS1 proteins using the above-mentioned underlying models. The server allows the submission of protein sequences from diverse spermatophytes and also performs well for mosses and algae. The easy-to-use web interface provides detailed output in terms of (i) the peroxisomal targeting probability of the given sequence, (ii) information whether a particular non-canonical PTS1 tripeptide has already been experimentally verified, and (iii) the prediction scores for the single C-terminal 14 amino acid residues. The latter allows identification of predicted residues that inhibit peroxisome targeting and which can be optimized using site-directed mutagenesis to raise the peroxisome targeting efficiency. The prediction server will be instrumental in identifying low-abundance and stress-inducible peroxisomal proteins and defining the entire peroxisomal proteome of Arabidopsis and agronomically important crop plants. PredPlantPTS1 is freely accessible at ppp.gobics.de. PMID:22969783

  3. Structural characterization of the PTS IIA and IIB proteins associated with pneumococcal fucose utilization.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Melanie A; Hamilton, Aileen M; Boraston, Alisdair B

    2017-05-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae harbors a significant number of transporters, including phosphotransferase (PTS) systems, allowing the bacterium to utilize a number of different carbohydrates for metabolic and other purposes. The genes encoding for one PTS transport system in particular (EII(fuc) ) are found within a fucose utilization operon in S. pneumoniae TIGR4. Here, we report the three-dimensional structures of IIA(fuc) and IIB(fuc) providing evidence that this PTS system belongs to the EII(man) family. Additionally, the predicted metabolic pathway for this distinctive fucose utilization system suggests that EII(fuc) transports the H-disaccharide blood group antigen, which would represent a novel PTS transporter specificity. Proteins 2017; 85:963-968. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. [Repression of the enzyme inducible syntheses in Escherichia coli K12 mutant with a deleted ptsH gene].

    PubMed

    Gershanovich, V N; Il'ina, T S; Rusina, O Iu; Iurovitskaia, N V; Bol'shakova, T N

    1977-01-01

    The genome of lambda phage with thermosensitive repressor was integrated into the pts region of the E. coli chromosome. Such a lysogenic culture behaves as a pts mutant at 30 degrees. Heating of cells of this strain leads to the induction of lambda prophage and formation of deletions in the pts region. A mutant with a deletion covering ptsH gene was isolated after prophage induction. The deletion nature of pts mutation was confirmed in genetic and biochemical experiments. It was shown that the deletion is small and does not involve ptsI and lig genes. The isolated deltaptsH mutant possesses all characteristics of pts mutants: pleiotropic impairment of transport and utilization of a number of carbohydrates, repression of the enzyme inducible synthesis and resistance to catabolite repression with glucose. These data (together with earlier ones) allow us to conclude that the phosphorylated form of HPr is involved (in direct of indirect manner/ in activation of DNA transcription.

  5. Williams works with LOCAD-PTS Experiment Hardware in the US Lab during Expedition 15

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-05-05

    ISS015-E-06773 (5 May 2007) --- Astronaut Sunita L. Williams, Expedition 15 flight engineer, sets up a video camera inside a flame resistant covering to film a chip during Lab-on-a-Chip Application Development-Portable Test System (LOCAD-PTS) Swab Operations in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station.

  6. Contribution of peroxisome-specific isoform of Lon protease in sorting PTS1 proteins to peroxisomes.

    PubMed

    Omi, Sizue; Nakata, Rie; Okamura-Ikeda, Kazuko; Konishi, Hiroaki; Taniguchi, Hisaaki

    2008-05-01

    Using an organelle proteomics approach, we previously studied the rat peroxisome in order to characterize the proteins participating in its biogenesis. A peroxisome-specific isoform of Lon (pLon) protein was accordingly identified. However, the precise role of pLon in peroxisomes remains to be elucidated. Here, we demonstrate that pLon plays a role in processing and activating a specific regulatory protein belonging to the peroxisome targeting signal (PTS) 1-containing proteins. Proteomic analysis of proteins co-immunoprecipitated with Lon suggested that Lon interacts with PMP70 and several enzymes involved in beta-oxidation, including acyl-CoA oxidase (AOX). The processing of AOX for its activation in peroxisomes was strongly inhibited in cells expressing a dominant negative form of pLon. Furthermore, a catalase possessing a modified PTS1 sequence was misdistributed in this cell line. pLon exhibits little, if any, in vitro AOX processing activity, and does not process PTS2-containing 3-ketoacyl-coenzyme A thiolase (PTL). Therefore, pLon may specifically control, sort and process PTS1 proteins. Based on the relationship between pLon and the beta-oxidation enzymes that regulate peroxisomal morphology, the observation of enlarged peroxisomes in cells expressing recombinant pLon suggests that pLon is a critical factor determining peroxisome morphology.

  7. Structural Insights into Cargo Recognition by the Yeast PTS1 Receptor*

    PubMed Central

    Hagen, Stefanie; Drepper, Friedel; Fischer, Sven; Fodor, Krisztian; Passon, Daniel; Platta, Harald W.; Zenn, Michael; Schliebs, Wolfgang; Girzalsky, Wolfgang; Wilmanns, Matthias; Warscheid, Bettina; Erdmann, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    The peroxisomal matrix protein import is facilitated by cycling import receptors that shuttle between the cytosol and the peroxisomal membrane. The import receptor Pex5p mediates the import of proteins harboring a peroxisomal targeting signal of type I (PTS1). Purified recombinant Pex5p forms a dimeric complex with the PTS1-protein Pcs60p in vitro with a KD of 0.19 μm. To analyze the structural basis for receptor-cargo recognition, the PTS1 and adjacent amino acids of Pcs60p were systematically scanned for Pex5p binding by an in vitro site-directed photo-cross-linking approach. The cross-linked binding regions of the receptor were subsequently identified by high resolution mass spectrometry. Most cross-links were found with TPR6, TPR7, as well as the 7C-loop of Pex5p. Surface plasmon resonance analysis revealed a bivalent interaction mode for Pex5p and Pcs60p. Interestingly, Pcs60p lacking its C-terminal tripeptide sequence was efficiently cross-linked to the same regions of Pex5p. The KD value of the interaction of truncated Pcs60p and Pex5p was in the range of 7.7 μm. Isothermal titration calorimetry and surface plasmon resonance measurements revealed a monovalent binding mode for the interaction of Pex5p and Pcs60p lacking the PTS1. Our data indicate that Pcs60p contains a second contact site for its receptor Pex5p, beyond the C-terminal tripeptide. The physiological relevance of the ancillary binding region was supported by in vivo import studies. The bivalent binding mode might be explained by a two-step concept as follows: first, cargo recognition and initial tethering by the PTS1-receptor Pex5p; second, lock-in of receptor and cargo. PMID:26359497

  8. A Novel PTS of Streptococcus mutans is Responsible for Transport of Carbohydrates with α-1,3 linkage

    PubMed Central

    Ajdic, Dragana; Chen, Zhiyun

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The most common type of carbohydrate-transport system in Streptococcus mutans is the phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP)-sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS). We previously showed that fourteen PTSs exist in S. mutans UA159 (Ajdic et al., 2002). Several studies have shown that microorganisms growing in biofilms express different genes as compared to their planktonic counterparts. In this study, we showed that one PTS of S. mutans was expressed in sucrose-grown biofilms. Furthermore, the same PTS was also responsible for the transport and metabolism of disaccharide nigerose (3-O-α-D-glucopyranosyl-D-glucose). Additionally, the results indicate that the studied PTS might be involved in the transport and metabolism of carbohydrates synthesized by glucosyltransferase B (GtfB) and glucosyltransferase C (GtfC) of S. mutans. To our knowledge, this is the first report that shows PTS transport of a disaccharide (and possibly extracellular oligosaccharides) with α-1,3 linkage. PMID:23193985

  9. The DeoR-type transcriptional regulator SugR acts as a repressor for genes encoding the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS) in Corynebacterium glutamicum

    PubMed Central

    Gaigalat, Lars; Schlüter, Jan-Philip; Hartmann, Michelle; Mormann, Sascha; Tauch, Andreas; Pühler, Alfred; Kalinowski, Jörn

    2007-01-01

    Background The major uptake system responsible for the transport of fructose, glucose, and sucrose in Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032 is the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS). The genes encoding PTS components, namely ptsI, ptsH, and ptsF belong to the fructose-PTS gene cluster, whereas ptsG and ptsS are located in two separate regions of the C. glutamicum genome. Due to the localization within and adjacent to the fructose-PTS gene cluster, two genes coding for DeoR-type transcriptional regulators, cg2118 and sugR, are putative candidates involved in the transcriptional regulation of the fructose-PTS cluster genes. Results Four transcripts of the extended fructose-PTS gene cluster that comprise the genes sugR-cg2116, ptsI, cg2118-fruK-ptsF, and ptsH, respectively, were characterized. In addition, it was shown that transcription of the fructose-PTS gene cluster is enhanced during growth on glucose or fructose when compared to acetate. Subsequently, the two genes sugR and cg2118 encoding for DeoR-type regulators were mutated and PTS gene transcription was found to be strongly enhanced in the presence of acetate only in the sugR deletion mutant. The SugR regulon was further characterized by microarray hybridizations using the sugR mutant and its parental strain, revealing that also the PTS genes ptsG and ptsS belong to this regulon. Binding of purified SugR repressor protein to a 21 bp sequence identified the SugR binding site as an AC-rich motif. The two experimentally identified SugR binding sites in the fructose-PTS gene cluster are located within or downstream of the mapped promoters, typical for transcriptional repressors. Effector studies using electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) revealed the fructose PTS-specific metabolite fructose-1-phosphate (F-1-P) as a highly efficient, negative effector of the SugR repressor, acting in the micromolar range. Beside F-1-P, other sugar-phosphates like fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (F-1,6-P

  10. Synthesis and Physicochemical Characterization of D-Tagatose-1-phosphate: The Substrate of the Tagatose-1-Phosphate Kinase TagK in the PTS-mediated D-Tagatose Catabolic Pathway of Bacillus licheniformis

    PubMed Central

    Van der Heiden, Edwige; Delmarcelle, Michaël; Simon, Patricia; Counson, Melody; Galleni, Moreno; Freedberg, Darón I.; Thompson, John; Joris, Bernard; Battistel, Marcos D.

    2015-01-01

    We report the first enzymatic synthesis of D-tagatose-1-phosphate (Tag-1P) by the multi-component PEP-dependent:tag-PTS present in tagatose-grown cells of Klebsiella pneumoniae. Physicochemical characterization by 31P and 1H NMR spectroscopy reveals that, in solution, this derivative is primarily in the pyranose form. Tag-1P was used to characterize the putative tagatose-1-phosphate kinase (TagK) of the Bacillus licheniformis PTS-mediated D-Tagatose catabolic Pathway (Bli-TagP). For this purpose, a soluble protein fusion was obtained with the 6 His-tagged trigger factor (TFHis6) of Escherichia coli. The active fusion enzyme was named TagK-TFHis6. Tag-1P and D-fructose-1-phosphate (Fru-1P) are substrates for the TagK-TFHis6 enzyme, whereas the isomeric derivatives D-tagatose-6-phosphate (Tag-6P) and D-fructose-6-phosphate (Fru-6P) are inhibitors. Studies of catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) reveal that the enzyme specificity is markedly in favor of Tag-1P as substrate. Importantly, we show in vivo that the transfer of the phosphate moiety from PEP to the B. licheniformis tagatose-specific enzyme II (EIITag) in E.coli is inefficient. The capability of the PTS general cytoplasmic components of B. subtilis, HPr and EI, to restore the phosphate transfer is demonstrated. PMID:26159072

  11. Radiation characteristics and implosion dynamics of Z-pinch dynamic hohlraums performed on PTS facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xian Bin; Ren, Xiao Dong; Dan, Jia Kun; Wang, Kun Lun; Xu, Qiang; Zhou, Shao Tong; Zhang, Si Qun; Cai, Hong Chun; Li, Jing; Wei, Bing; Ji, Ce; Feng, Shu Ping; Wang, Meng; Xie, Wei Ping; Deng, Jian Jun

    2017-09-01

    The preliminary experimental results of Z-pinch dynamic hohlraums conducted on the Primary Test Stand (PTS) facility are presented herein. Six different types of dynamic hohlraums were used in order to study the influence of load parameters on radiation characteristics and implosion dynamics, including dynamic hohlraums driven by single and nested arrays with different array parameters and different foams. The PTS facility can deliver a current of 6-8 MA in the peak current and 60-70 ns in the 10%-90% rising time to dynamic hohlraum loads. A set of diagnostics monitor the implosion dynamics of plasmas, the evolution of shock waves in the foam and the axial/radial X-ray radiation, giving the key parameters characterizing the features of dynamic hohlraums, such as the trajectory and related velocity of shock waves, radiation temperature, and so on. The experimental results presented here put our future study on Z-pinch dynamic hohlraums on the PTS facility on a firm basis.

  12. Regulation of Streptococcus mutans PTS Bio by the transcriptional repressor NigR.

    PubMed

    Vujanac, M; Iyer, V S; Sengupta, M; Ajdic, D

    2015-08-01

    Streptococcus mutans is implicated in human dental caries, and the carbohydrate metabolism of this organism plays an important role in the formation of this disease. Carbohydrate transport and metabolism are essential for the survival of S. mutans in the oral cavity. It is known that a unique phosphoenolpyruvate-sugar phosphotransferase system PTS(B) (io) of S. mutans UA159 is expressed in sucrose-grown biofilms (Mol Oral Microbiol 28: 2013; 114). In this study we analyzed the transcriptional regulation of the operon (O(B) (io) ) encoding the PTS(B) (io) and showed that it was repressed by NigR, a LacI-like transcriptional regulator. Using electro-mobility shift assay, we described two operators to which NigR bound with different affinities. We also identified the transcriptional start site and showed that one of the operators overlaps with the promoter and presumably represses initiation of transcription. Mutational analyses revealed the key nucleotides in the operators required for high-affinity binding of NigR. PTS(B) (io) is expressed in S. mutans biofilms so understanding its regulation may provide improved strategies for caries treatment and prevention.

  13. Preliminary investigation on the radiation transfer in dynamic hohlraums on the PTS facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Delong; Ye, Fan; Meng, Shijian; Ning, Jiamin; Qin, Yi; Hu, Qingyuan; Huang, Zhanchang; Yang, Jianlun; Chen, Faxin; Jiang, Shuqing; Ding, Ning; Xu, Rongkun; Xue, Chuang; Zhang, Yang; Sun, Shunkai; Shu, Xiaojian

    2017-09-01

    The radiation transfer in dynamic hohlraums on the PTS facility is preliminarily investigated in this paper. Simulation results show that as the accelerated wire-array plasma impacts onto the foam converter, energy thermalization takes place in a local interaction region near the boundary of the wire-array plasma and the foam converter, and then, high temperature radiation is gradually generated. Its transfer process largely depends on the radiation temperature and the mass density of the converter. When the mass ratio of the wire-array to the converter is near 1.0, the radiation temperature can be increased to about 120 eV with the PTS drive current. In this case, the radiation generated from the interaction region will quickly transfer to the center of the converter. The experimental end-on x-ray images present the overall process of radiation production and transfer of this kind of dynamic hohlraum. As the mass ratio is decreased, the radiation temperature will also be deceased, and the converter will become more opaque to the radiation. In the case of extremely low mass ratios such as lower than 0.3, the peak radiation temperature will be much lower than 100 eV, and the radiation transfers slowly to the interior of the converter and presents large non-uniformity, which is also observed in experiments on the PTS facility.

  14. Growth Inhibition by External Potassium of Escherichia coli Lacking PtsN (EIIANtr) Is Caused by Potassium Limitation Mediated by YcgO

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ravish; Shimada, Tomohiro; Mishra, Vinod K.; Upreti, Suchitra

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The absence of PtsN, the terminal phosphoacceptor of the phosphotransferase system comprising PtsP-PtsO-PtsN, in Escherichia coli confers a potassium-sensitive (Ks) phenotype as the external K+ concentration ([K+]e) is increased above 5 mM. A growth-inhibitory increase in intracellular K+ content, resulting from hyperactivated Trk-mediated K+ uptake, is thought to cause this Ks. We provide evidence that the Ks of the ΔptsN mutant is associated with K+ limitation. Accordingly, the moderate Ks displayed by the ΔptsN mutant was exacerbated in the absence of the Trk and Kup K+ uptake transporters and was associated with reduced cellular K+ content. Conversely, overproduction of multiple K+ uptake proteins suppressed the Ks. Expression of PtsN variants bearing the H73A, H73D, and H73E substitutions of the phosphorylation site histidine of PtsN complemented the Ks. Absence of the predicted inner membrane protein YcgO (also called CvrA) suppressed the Ks, which was correlated with elevated cellular K+ content in the ΔptsN mutant, but the ΔptsN mutation did not alter YcgO levels. Heterologous overexpression of ycgO also led to Ks that was associated with reduced cellular K+ content, exacerbated by the absence of Trk and Kup and alleviated by overproduction of Kup. Our findings are compatible with a model that postulates that Ks in the ΔptsN mutant occurs due to K+ limitation resulting from activation of K+ efflux mediated by YcgO, which may be additionally stimulated by [K+]e, implicating a role for PtsN (possibly its dephosphorylated form) as an inhibitor of YcgO activity. IMPORTANCE This study examines the physiological link between the phosphotransferase system comprising PtsP-PtsO-PtsN and K+ ion metabolism in E. coli. Studies on the physiological defect that renders an E. coli mutant lacking PtsN to be growth inhibited by external K+ indicate that growth impairment results from cellular K+ limitation that is mediated by YcgO, a predicted inner membrane

  15. Inactivation of the PTS as a Strategy to Engineer the Production of Aromatic Metabolites in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Carmona, Susy Beatriz; Moreno, Fabián; Bolívar, Francisco; Gosset, Guillermo; Escalante, Adelfo

    2015-01-01

    Laboratory and industrial cultures of Escherichia coli employ media containing glucose which is mainly transported and phosphorylated by the phosphotransferase system (PTS). In these strains, 50% of the phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP), which results from the catabolism of transported glucose, is used as a phosphate donor for its phosphorylation and translocation by the PTS. This characteristic of the PTS limits the production of industrial biocommodities that have PEP as a precursor. Furthermore, when E. coli is exposed to carbohydrate mixtures, the PTS prevents expression of catabolic and non-PTS transport genes by carbon catabolite repression and inducer exclusion. In this contribution, we discuss the main strategies developed to overcome these potentially limiting effects in production strains. These strategies include adaptive laboratory evolution selection of PTS(-) Glc(+) mutants, followed by the generation of strains that recover their ability to grow with glucose as a carbon source while allowing the simultaneous consumption of more than one carbon source. We discuss the benefits of using alternative glucose transport systems and describe the application of these strategies to E. coli strains with specific genetic modifications in target pathways. These efforts have resulted in significant improvements in the production of diverse biocommodities, including aromatic metabolites, biofuels and organic acids. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Primary experimental results of wire-array Z-pinches on PTS

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, X. B. Zhou, S. T. Ren, X. D. Dan, J. K. Wang, K. L. Zhang, S. Q. Li, J. Xu, Q. Cai, H. C. Duan, S. C. Ouyang, K. Chen, G. H. Ji, C. Wang, M. Feng, S. P. Yang, L. B. Xie, W. P. Deng, J. J.

    2014-12-15

    The Primary Test Stand (PTS) developed at the China Academy of Engineering Physics is a multiterawatt pulsed power driver, which can deliver a ∼10 MA, 70 ns rise-time (10%-90%) current to a short circuit load and has important applications in Z-pinch driven inertial confinement fusion and high energy density physics. In this paper, primary results of tungsten wire-array Z-pinch experiments on PTS are presented. The load geometries investigated include 15-mm-tall cylindrical single and nested arrays with diameter ranging from 14.4-26.4 mm, and consisting of 132∼276 tungsten wires with 5∼10 μm in diameter. Multiple diagnostics were fielded to determine the characteristics of x-ray radiations and to obtain self-emitting images of imploding plasmas. X-ray power up to 80 TW with ∼3 ns FWMH is achieved by using nested wire arrays. The total x-ray energy exceeds 500 kJ and the peak radiation temperature is about 150 eV. Typical velocity of imploding plasmas goes around 3∼5×10{sup 7} cm/s and the radial convergence ratio is between 10 and 20.

  17. Variable length adjacent partitioning for PTS based PAPR reduction of OFDM signal

    SciTech Connect

    Ibraheem, Zeyid T.; Rahman, Md. Mijanur; Yaakob, S. N.; Razalli, Mohammad Shahrazel; Kadhim, Rasim A.

    2015-05-15

    Peak-to-Average power ratio (PAPR) is a major drawback in OFDM communication. It leads the power amplifier into nonlinear region operation resulting into loss of data integrity. As such, there is a strong motivation to find techniques to reduce PAPR. Partial Transmit Sequence (PTS) is an attractive scheme for this purpose. Judicious partitioning the OFDM data frame into disjoint subsets is a pivotal component of any PTS scheme. Out of the existing partitioning techniques, adjacent partitioning is characterized by an attractive trade-off between cost and performance. With an aim of determining effects of length variability of adjacent partitions, we performed an investigation into the performances of a variable length adjacent partitioning (VL-AP) and fixed length adjacent partitioning in comparison with other partitioning schemes such as pseudorandom partitioning. Simulation results with different modulation and partitioning scenarios showed that fixed length adjacent partition had better performance compared to variable length adjacent partitioning. As expected, simulation results showed a slightly better performance of pseudorandom partitioning technique compared to fixed and variable adjacent partitioning schemes. However, as the pseudorandom technique incurs high computational complexities, adjacent partitioning schemes were still seen as favorable candidates for PAPR reduction.

  18. 1H NMR spin-spin relaxation and imaging in porous systems: an application to the morphological study of white portland cement during hydration in the presence of organics.

    PubMed

    Gussoni, M; Greco, F; Bonazzi, F; Vezzoli, A; Botta, D; Dotelli, G; Natali Sora, I; Pelosato, R; Zetta, L

    2004-07-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spin-spin relaxation and imaging have been applied to investigate white Portland cement pastes during hydration in the absence and in the presence of organic solvents. The main organic solvent investigated was methanol, alone or together with the organic waste 2-chloroaniline (2-CA), an aromatic amine representative of an important class of highly toxic compounds. For all the analysed samples, prepared with a solvent-to-cement ratio of 0.4, the decay of the echo magnetization has been fitted by adopting a model that combines an exponential component with a gaussian one. The calculated independent relaxation parameters have been discussed in terms of morphological and dynamical changes that occur during the cement hardening process and pore formation. Three kinds of water molecules: "solid-like" (chemically and physically bound), "liquid-like" (porous trapped) and "free" water, endowed with anisotropic, near isotropic and isotropic motion, respectively, were identified. Spin-echo images collected on the same samples during the hydration kinetics, allowed the changes of water and solvents spatial distribution in the porous network to be monitored, showing percolation phenomena and confirming the multimodal open channels structure of the hardened cement system. Both T(2) relaxation and imaging data indicated that a pronounced delay occurs in the cement hardening when organics are present.

  19. Interdependence of the peroxisome-targeting receptors in Arabidopsis thaliana: PEX7 facilitates PEX5 accumulation and import of PTS1 cargo into peroxisomes.

    PubMed

    Ramón, Naxhiely Martínez; Bartel, Bonnie

    2010-04-01

    Peroxisomes compartmentalize certain metabolic reactions critical to plant and animal development. The import of proteins from the cytosol into the organelle matrix depends on more than a dozen peroxin (PEX) proteins, with PEX5 and PEX7 serving as receptors that shuttle proteins bearing one of two peroxisome-targeting signals (PTSs) into the organelle. PEX5 is the PTS1 receptor; PEX7 is the PTS2 receptor. In plants and mammals, PEX7 depends on PEX5 binding to deliver PTS2 cargo into the peroxisome. In this study, we characterized a pex7 missense mutation, pex7-2, that disrupts both PEX7 cargo binding and PEX7-PEX5 interactions in yeast, as well as PEX7 protein accumulation in plants. We examined localization of peroxisomally targeted green fluorescent protein derivatives in light-grown pex7 mutants and observed not only the expected defects in PTS2 protein import but also defects in PTS1 import. These PTS1 import defects were accompanied by reduced PEX5 accumulation in light-grown pex7 seedlings. Our data suggest that PEX5 and PTS1 import depend on the PTS2 receptor PEX7 in Arabidopsis and that the environment may influence this dependence. These data advance our understanding of the biogenesis of these essential organelles and provide a possible rationale for the retention of the PTS2 pathway in some organisms.

  20. Enhancing human-like collagen accumulation by deleting the major glucose transporter ptsG in recombinant Escherichia coli BL21.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yan'e; Zhang, Tao; Fan, Daidi; Mu, Tingzhen; Xue, Wenjiao; Hui, Junfeng; Ma, Xiaoxuan

    2014-01-01

    Collagen has been proven to be a valuable biomedical material for many medical applications. Human-like collagen (HLC) is a novel important biomedical material with diverse medical applications. In this work, recombinant Escherichia coli BL21 3.7 ∆ptsG was constructed, the characters of ptsG mutant strain were analyzed, and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was applied to investigate the effect of ptsG gene deletion on the transcriptional level of the phosphotransferase system (PTS) genes responsible for glucose transport. The HLC production and cell growth ability were 1.33- and 1.24-fold higher than those of its parent strain in the fermentation medium, respectively, and 1.16- and 1.17-fold in the modified minimal medium individually. The acetate accumulation decreased by 42%-56% compared to its parent strain in the fermentation medium, and 70%-87% in the modified minimal medium. The results of RT-qPCR showed that the transcriptional level of crr, ptsH, ptsI, and blgF in ptsG mutant all decreased dramatically, which inferred a decrease in the glucose uptake rate, but the transcriptional level of FruB and manX increased slightly, which demonstrated the activation of fructose- and mannose-specific transport pathways in the ptsG mutant. This study demonstrates that ptsG deletion is an effective strategy to reduce acetate accumulation and increase biomass and HLC production.

  1. Reducing PAPR of optical OFDM system based on PTS and companding joint algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Yangjing; Li, Ping; Lei, Dongming; Chen, Ailin; Wang, Jinpeng; Zou, Nianyu

    2015-10-01

    Optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) system combines the advantages of both wireless OFDM and optical fiber technology, thus has high spectral efficiency and can effectively resist polarization mode dispersion and chromatic dispersion in fiber link. However, high peak-to-average power ratio (PAPR) is one of the important shortcomings of optical OFDM system, which requires not only amplifiers with a greater dynamic range, but also leads to serious fiber nonlinear effect. So how to reduce PAPR of optical OFDM system is a crucial issue. This work, aiming to reduce PAPR and improving system BER, analyzes suppression technology of PAPR based on optical OFDM system. Firstly, to improve BER, we utilize Partial Transmit Sequence (PTS) algorithm which introduces phase factors b(v) multiplying IFFT converted signals and searches a b(v) which will make PAPR minimum. But this method needs much calculation. Then we exploit companding which can compress amplitude of big OFDM signals and expand small signals. Secondly, simulating the two algorithms respectively and finding two algorithms can suppress PAPR, but the effect has room for improvement. Therefore, an implementation of PTS and companding joint algorithm is proposed, then simulating this method and adding it into optical OFDM system. A system was set up, fiber length setting as 10km, utilizing a MZM modulator and a distributed feedback laser, taking 4QAM and 512points IFFT. The results show that, joint algorithm can reduce PAPR from about 12dB to 8dB, improving the problem of high PAPR, constellation convergence, enhances optical OFDM system transmission performance.

  2. Molecular Recognition of PTS-1 Cargo Proteins by Pex5p: Implications for Protein Mistargeting in Primary Hyperoxaluria

    PubMed Central

    Mesa-Torres, Noel; Tomic, Nenad; Albert, Armando; Salido, Eduardo; Pey, Angel L.

    2015-01-01

    Peroxisomal biogenesis and function critically depends on the import of cytosolic proteins carrying a PTS1 sequence into this organelle upon interaction with the peroxin Pex5p. Recent structural studies have provided important insights into the molecular recognition of cargo proteins by Pex5p. Peroxisomal import is a key feature in the pathogenesis of primary hyperoxaluria type 1 (PH1), where alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase (AGT) undergoes mitochondrial mistargeting in about a third of patients. Here, we study the molecular recognition of PTS1 cargo proteins by Pex5p using oligopeptides and AGT variants bearing different natural PTS1 sequences, and employing an array of biophysical, computational and cell biology techniques. Changes in affinity for Pex5p (spanning over 3–4 orders of magnitude) reflect different thermodynamic signatures, but overall bury similar amounts of molecular surface. Structure/energetic analyses provide information on the contribution of ancillary regions and the conformational changes induced in Pex5p and the PTS1 cargo upon complex formation. Pex5p stability in vitro is enhanced upon cargo binding according to their binding affinities. Moreover, we provide evidence that the rational modulation of the AGT: Pex5p binding affinity might be useful tools to investigate mistargeting and misfolding in PH1 by pulling the folding equilibria towards the native and peroxisomal import competent state. PMID:25689234

  3. Molecular recognition of PTS-1 cargo proteins by Pex5p: implications for protein mistargeting in primary hyperoxaluria.

    PubMed

    Mesa-Torres, Noel; Tomic, Nenad; Albert, Armando; Salido, Eduardo; Pey, Angel L

    2015-02-13

    Peroxisomal biogenesis and function critically depends on the import of cytosolic proteins carrying a PTS1 sequence into this organelle upon interaction with the peroxin Pex5p. Recent structural studies have provided important insights into the molecular recognition of cargo proteins by Pex5p. Peroxisomal import is a key feature in the pathogenesis of primary hyperoxaluria type 1 (PH1), where alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase (AGT) undergoes mitochondrial mistargeting in about a third of patients. Here, we study the molecular recognition of PTS1 cargo proteins by Pex5p using oligopeptides and AGT variants bearing different natural PTS1 sequences, and employing an array of biophysical, computational and cell biology techniques. Changes in affinity for Pex5p (spanning over 3-4 orders of magnitude) reflect different thermodynamic signatures, but overall bury similar amounts of molecular surface. Structure/energetic analyses provide information on the contribution of ancillary regions and the conformational changes induced in Pex5p and the PTS1 cargo upon complex formation. Pex5p stability in vitro is enhanced upon cargo binding according to their binding affinities. Moreover, we provide evidence that the rational modulation of the AGT: Pex5p binding affinity might be useful tools to investigate mistargeting and misfolding in PH1 by pulling the folding equilibria towards the native and peroxisomal import competent state.

  4. Family and Individual Factors Associated with Substance Involvement and PTS Symptoms among Adolescents in Greater New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, Cynthia L.; La Greca, Annette M.; Alexandersson, Anders

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This study examined the influence of hurricane impact as well as family and individual risk factors on posttraumatic stress (PTS) symptoms and substance involvement among clinically referred adolescents affected by Hurricane Katrina. Method: A total of 80 adolescents (87% male; 13-17 years old; mean age = 15.6 years; 38% minorities) and…

  5. New PAPR Reduction in OFDM System Using Hybrid of PTS-APPR Methods with Coded Side Information Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradabpet, Chusit; Yoshizawa, Shingo; Miyanaga, Yoshikazu; Dejhan, Kobchai

    In this paper, we propose a new PAPR reduction by using the hybrid of a partial transmit sequences (PTS) and an adaptive peak power reduction (APPR) methods with coded side information (SI) technique. These methods are used in an Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM) system. The OFDM employs orthogonal sub-carriers for data modulation. These sub-carriers unexpectedly present a large Peak to Average Power Ratio (PAPR) in some cases. In order to reduce PAPR, the sequence of input data is rearranged by PTS. The APPR method is also used to controls the peak level of modulation signals by an adaptive algorithm. A proposed reduction method consists of these two methods and realizes both advantages at the same time. In order to make the optimum condition on PTS for PAPR reduction, a quite large calculation cost must be demanded and thus it is impossible to obtain the optimum PTS. In the proposed method, by using the pseudo-optimum condition with a coded SI technique, the total calculation cost becomes drastically reduced. In simulation results, the proposed method shows the improvement on PAPR and also reveals the high performance on bit error rate (BER) of an OFDM system.

  6. Family and Individual Factors Associated with Substance Involvement and PTS Symptoms among Adolescents in Greater New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, Cynthia L.; La Greca, Annette M.; Alexandersson, Anders

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This study examined the influence of hurricane impact as well as family and individual risk factors on posttraumatic stress (PTS) symptoms and substance involvement among clinically referred adolescents affected by Hurricane Katrina. Method: A total of 80 adolescents (87% male; 13-17 years old; mean age = 15.6 years; 38% minorities) and…

  7. Penicillium chrysogenum Pex5p mediates differential sorting of PTS1 proteins to microbodies of the methylotrophic yeast Hansenula polymorpha.

    PubMed

    Kiel, Jan A K W; van den Berg, Marco; Bovenberg, Roel A L; van der Klei, Ida J; Veenhuis, Marten

    2004-07-01

    We have isolated the Penicillium chrysogenum pex5 gene encoding the receptor for microbody matrix proteins containing a type 1 peroxisomal targeting signal (PTS1). Pc-pex5 contains 2 introns and encodes a protein of approximately 75 kDa. P. chrysogenum pex5 disruptants appear to be highly unstable, show poor growth, and are unable to sporulate asexually. Furthermore, pex5 cells mislocalize a fluorescent PTS1 reporter protein to the cytosol. Pc-pex5 was expressed in a PEX5 null mutant of the yeast Hansenula polymorpha. Detailed analysis demonstrated that the PTS1 proteins dihydroxyacetone synthase and catalase were almost fully imported into microbodies. Surprisingly, alcohol oxidase, which also depends on Pex5p for import into microbodies, remained mainly in the cytosol. Thus, P. chrysogenum Pex5p has a different specificity of cargo recognition than its H. polymorpha counterpart. This was also suggested by the observation that Pc-Pex5p sorted a reporter protein fused to various functional PTS1 signals with different efficiencies.

  8. Family and individual factors associated with substance involvement and PTS symptoms among adolescents in greater New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Cynthia L; La Greca, Annette M; Alexandersson, Anders

    2010-12-01

    This study examined the influence of hurricane impact as well as family and individual risk factors on posttraumatic stress (PTS) symptoms and substance involvement among clinically referred adolescents affected by Hurricane Katrina. A total of 80 adolescents (87% male; 13-17 years old; mean age = 15.6 years; 38% minorities) and their parents were interviewed at the adolescent's intake into substance abuse treatment, 16 to 46 months postdisaster. Independent measures included hurricane impact variables (initial loss/disruption and perceived life threat); demographic and predisaster variables (family income, gender, predisaster adolescent substance use, predisaster trauma exposure, and parental substance abuse); postdisaster family factors (parental psychopathology, family cohesion, and parental monitoring); and postdisaster adolescent delinquency. Hierarchical multivariate regression analyses showed that adolescent substance involvement was associated with higher family income, lower parental monitoring (adolescent report), and more adolescent delinquency. Adolescent-reported PTS symptoms were associated with greater hurricane-related initial loss/disruption, lower family cohesion (adolescent report), and more adolescent delinquency, whereas parent-reported adolescent PTS symptoms were associated with greater parental psychopathology, lower parental monitoring (adolescent report), and lower family cohesion (parent report). The results suggest that hurricane impact was related only to adolescent-reported PTS. However, certain postdisaster family and individual risk factors (low family cohesion and parental monitoring, more adolescent delinquency) were associated both with adolescent substance involvement and with PTS symptoms. Identification of these factors suggests directions for future research as well as potential target areas for screening and intervention with substance-abusing adolescents after disasters. (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved.

  9. In vitro import of peroxisome-targeting signal type 2 (PTS2) receptor Pex7p into peroxisomes.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Non; Hosoi, Ken-ichiro; Mukai, Satoru; Fujiki, Yukio

    2009-05-01

    Pex7p, the peroxisome-targeting signal type 2 (PTS2) receptor, transports PTS2 proteins to peroxisomes from the cytosol. We here established a cell-free Pex7p translocation system. In assays using post-nuclear supernatant fractions each from wild-type CHO-K1 and pex7 ZPG207 cells, 35S-labeled Pex7p was imported into peroxisomes. 35S-Pex7p import was also evident using rat liver peroxisomes. 35S-Pex7p was not imported into peroxisomal remnants from a pex5 ZPG231 defective in PTS2 import and pex2 Z65. When the import of 35S-Pex5pL was inhibited with an excess amount of recombinant Pex5pS, 35S-Pex7p import was concomitantly abrogated, suggesting that Pex5pL was a transporter for Pex7p, unlike a yeast cochaperone, Pex18p. 35S-Pex7p as well as 35S-Pex5p was imported in an ATP-independent manner, whilst the import of PTS1 and PTS2 cargo-proteins was ATP-dependent. Thereby, ATP-independent import of Pex7p implicated that Pex5p export requiring ATP hydrolysis is not a limiting step for its cargo recruitment to peroxisomes. PTS1 protein import was indeed insensitive to N-ethylmaleimide, whereas Pex5p export was N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive. Taken together, the cargo-protein translocation through peroxisomal membrane more likely involves another ATP-requiring step in addition to the Pex5p export. Moreover, upon concurrent import into peroxisomes, 35S-Pex5pL and 35S-Pex7p were detected at mutually distinct ratios in the immunoprecipitates each of the import machinery peroxins including Pex14p, Pex13p, and Pex2p, hence suggesting that Pex7p as well as Pex5p translocated from the initial docking complex to RING complex on peroxisomes.

  10. Increased glucose utilization and cell growth of Corynebacterium glutamicum by modifying the glucose-specific phosphotransferase system (PTS(Glc)) genes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jianzhong; Zhang, Junlan; Liu, Dongdong; Zhang, Weiguo

    2016-12-01

    The phosphoenolpyruvate:glucose phosphotransferase system (PTS(Glc)) is the major pathway of glucose uptake in Corynebacterium glutamicum. This study investigated glucose consumption rate, cell growth, and metabolite changes resulting from modification of PTS(Glc). The classical l-lysine producer C. glutamicum XQ-8 exhibited low glucose consumption, cell growth, and l-lysine production rates, whereas these parameters were significantly increased during cultivating on glucose plus maltose, through inactivation of SugR, or by overexpression of PTS(Glc) genes. XQ-8sugR::cat/pDXW-8-ptsI exhibited the highest increase in glucose consumption, growth rate, and l-lysine production, followed by XQ-8sugR::cat/pDXW-8-ptsG. However, overexpression of ptsH had little effect on the above-mentioned factors. Although co-overexpression of ptsGHI led to the highest glucose consumption, growth rate, and final l-lysine production; the l-lysine production rate was lower than that of XQ-8sugR::cat/pDXW-8-ptsIH. In fed-batch fermentation, XQ-8sugR::cat/pDXW-8-ptsIH had a higher growth rate of 0.54 h(-1) to a dry cell mass of 66 g·L(-1) after 16 h, and had a higher l-lysine production rate of 159.2 g·L(-1) after 36 h. These results indicate that modification of the sugar transport systems improves amino acid production, especially for mutants obtained by repeated physical and (or) chemical mutagenesis. However, modification of these systems needs to be performed on a case-by-case basis.

  11. Characterization of injection wells in a fractured reservoir using PTS logs, Steamboat Hills Geothermal Field, Nevada, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Goranson, Colin; Combs, Jim

    1995-01-26

    The Steamboat Hills Geothermal Field in northwestern Nevada, about 15 km south of Reno, is a shallow (150m to 825m) moderate temperature (155 C to 168 C) liquid-dominated geothermal reservoir situated in highly-fractured granodiorite. Three injection wells were drilled and completed in granodiorite to dispose of spent geothermal fluids from the Steamboat II and III power plants (a 30 MW air-cooled binary-type facility). Injection wells were targeted to depths below 300m to inject spent fluids below producing fractures. First, quasi-static downhole pressure-temperature-spinner (PTS) logs were obtained. Then, the three wells were injection-tested using fluids between 80 C and 106 C at rates from 70 kg/s to 200 kg/s. PTS logs were run both up and down the wells during these injection tests. These PTS surveys have delineated the subsurface fracture zones which will accept fluid. The relative injectivity of the wells was also established. Shut-in interzonal flow within the wells was identified and characterized.

  12. Pex13p is an SH3 protein of the peroxisome membrane and a docking factor for the predominantly cytoplasmic PTs1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Gould, S J; Kalish, J E; Morrell, J C; Bjorkman, J; Urquhart, A J; Crane, D I

    1996-10-01

    Import of newly synthesized PTS1 proteins into the peroxisome requires the PTS1 receptor (Pex5p), a predominantly cytoplasmic protein that cycles between the cytoplasm and peroxisome. We have identified Pex13p, a novel integral peroxisomal membrane from both yeast and humans that binds the PTS1 receptor via a cytoplasmically oriented SH3 domain. Although only a small amount of Pex5p is bound to peroxisomes at steady state (< 5%), loss of Pex13p further reduces the amount of peroxisome-associated Pex5p by approximately 40-fold. Furthermore, loss of Pex13p eliminates import of peroxisomal matrix proteins that contain either the type-1 or type-2 peroxisomal targeting signal but does not affect targeting and insertion of integral peroxisomal membrane proteins. We conclude that Pex13p functions as a docking factor for the predominantly cytoplasmic PTS1 receptor.

  13. [Effects of panaxatriol saponins (PTS) isolated from panax notoginseng on the action potential and delayed rectifier current (Ix) in sheep cardiac Purkinje fibers].

    PubMed

    Li, X J; Fan, J S; Liu, Y W; Zhang, B H

    1993-01-01

    The electrophysiological effects of PTS in sheep cardiac Purkinje fibers were studied. PTS was shown to increase the duration of action potential (APD30, APD50 and APD90) at the concentrations of 2.5 micrograms/ml and 5.0 micrograms/ml. However, the amplitude of action potential (APA) remained unchanged. The result of using double microelectrode voltage clamp method showed that PTS (1.25-10.0 micrograms/ml) depressed the delayed (outward) rectifier current (Ix) in time- and dose-dependent manners, when the holding potential was held at +20 mV, the command potential was held at +10 mV, 0.2 Hz and the clamping time at 1-1.5 s. It may be concluded that the effect of PTS on APD is mainly related to blocking the delayed rectifier potassium channel.

  14. The phosphotransferase system gene ptsI in the endophytic bacterium Bacillus cereus is required for biofilm formation, colonization, and biocontrol against wheat sharp eyespot.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yu-Bin; Chen, Mai; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Miao; Wang, Ying; Huang, Qiu-bin; Wang, Xue; Wang, Gang

    2014-05-01

    Natural resistance of wheat plants to wheat sharp eyespot is inadequate, and new strategies for controlling the disease are required. Biological control is an alternative and attractive way of reducing the use of chemicals in agriculture. In this study, we investigated the biocontrol properties of endophytic bacterium Bacillus cereus strain 0-9, which was isolated from the root systems of healthy wheat varieties. The phosphotransferase system is a major regulator of carbohydrate metabolism in bacteria. Enzyme I is one of the protein components of this system. Specific disruption and complementation of the enzyme I-coding gene ptsI from B. cereus was achieved through homologous recombination. Disruption of ptsI in B. cereus caused a 70% reduction in biofilm formation, a 30.4% decrease in biocontrol efficacy, and a 1000-fold reduction in colonization. The growth of ΔptsI mutant strain on G-tris synthetic medium containing glucose as the exclusive carbon source was also reduced. Wild-type properties could be restored to the ΔptsI mutant strain by ptsI complementation. These results suggested that ptsI may be one of the key genes involved in biofilm formation, colonization, and biocontrol of B. cereus and that B. cereus wild-type strain 0-9 may be an ideal biocontrol agent for controlling wheat sharp eyespot.

  15. NMR of lignins

    Treesearch

    John Ralph; Larry L. Landucci

    2010-01-01

    This chapter will consider the basic aspects and findings of several forms of NMR spectroscopy, including separate discussions of proton, carbon, heteronuclear, and multidimensional NMR. Enhanced focus will be on 13C NMR, because of its qualitative and quantitative importance, followed by NMR’s contributions to our understanding of lignin...

  16. NMR analysis of biodiesel

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Biodiesel is usually analyzed by the various methods called for in standards such as ASTM D6751 and EN 14214. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is not one of these methods. However, NMR, with 1H-NMR commonly applied, can be useful in a variety of applications related to biodiesel. These include monit...

  17. LOCAD-PTS: Operation of a New System for Microbial Monitoring Aboard the International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maule, J.; Wainwright, N.; Steele, A.; Gunter, D.; Flores, G.; Effinger, M.; Danibm N,; Wells, M.; Williams, S.; Morris, H.; Monaco, L.

    2008-01-01

    Microorganisms within the space stations Salyut, Mir and the International Space Station (ISS), have traditionally been monitored with culture-based techniques. These techniques involve growing environmental samples (cabin water, air or surfaces) on agar-type media for several days, followed by visualization of resulting colonies; and return of samples to Earth for ground-based analysis. This approach has provided a wealth of useful data and enhanced our understanding of the microbial ecology within space stations. However, the approach is also limited by the following: i) More than 95% microorganisms in the environment cannot grow on conventional growth media; ii) Significant time lags occur between onboard sampling and colony visualization (3-5 days) and ground-based analysis (as long as several months); iii) Colonies are often difficult to visualize due to condensation within contact slide media plates; and iv) Techniques involve growth of potentially harmful microorganisms, which must then be disposed of safely. This report describes the operation of a new culture-independent technique onboard the ISS for rapid analysis (within minutes) of endotoxin and -1, 3-glucan, found in the cell walls of gram-negative bacteria and fungi, respectively. This technique involves analysis of environmental samples with the Limulus Amebocyte Lysate (LAL) assay in a handheld device. This handheld device and sampling system is known as the Lab-On-a-Chip Application Development Portable Test System (LOCAD-PTS). A poster will be presented that describes a comparative study between LOCAD-PTS analysis and existing culture-based methods onboard the ISS; together with an exploratory survey of surface endotoxin throughout the ISS. It is concluded that while a general correlation between LOCAD-PTS and traditional culture-based methods should not necessarily be expected, a combinatorial approach can be adopted where both sets of data are used together to generate a more complete story of

  18. Regulation of PTS gene expression by the homologous transcriptional regulators, Mlc and NagC, in Escherichia coli (or how two similar repressors can behave differently).

    PubMed

    Plumbridge, J

    2001-07-01

    NagC and Mlc are paralogous transcriptional repressors in E.coli. Unexpectedly they possess almost identical amino acid sequences in their helix-turn-helix (H-T-H), DNA binding motif and they bind to very similar consensus operator targets. Binding to each others sites can be demonstrated in vitro but no cross regulation can be detected in vivo with physiological amounts of the two proteins. Although both proteins are involved in regulating the expression of PTS genes, the characteristics of their repression and induction are very different. NagC is a dual-function, activator-repressor which co-ordinates the metabolism of the amino sugars, N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) and glucosamine, by repressing the divergent nagE-BA operons and by activating the glmUS operon. Repression (and activation) by NagC requires that NagC binds simultaneously to two operators, thus forming a DNA loop. This chelation effect allows use of lower affinity sites which would not individually bind the repressor. The specific inducer for NagC is GlcNAc-6-P, the product of GlcNAc transport by the PTS and a key compound in amino sugar metabolism. Mlc represses several genes implicated in the uptake of glucose; ptsG, ptsHI and manXYZ, and malT, the activator of the mal regulon. Glucose behaves like the inducer but growth on glucose only produces an overall increase in expression for ptsG and ptsHI. All Mlc repressed genes are also controlled by cAMP/CAP, so that glucose affects their transcription in two opposing ways: increasing expression by acting as the inducer for Mlc but decreasing expression by lowering the cAMP/CAP concentration. The Mlc protein is not directly responsive to glucose per se but to the activity status of the PTS. Displacement of Mlc from its binding sites occurs during growth on glucose and other PTS sugars and involves sequestration of the repressor to membranes by binding to dephosphorylated PtsG.

  19. Synbiotic impact of tagatose on viability of Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain GG mediated by the phosphotransferase system (PTS).

    PubMed

    Koh, Ji Hoon; Choi, Seung Hye; Park, Seung Won; Choi, Nag-Jin; Kim, Younghoon; Kim, Sae Hun

    2013-10-01

    Synbiotics, the combination of prebiotics and probiotics, has been shown to produce synergistic effects that promote gastrointestinal well-being of host. Tagatose is a low calorie food ingredient with putative health-promoting benefits. Herein, we investigated its synbiotic impact on the viability of Lactobacillus casei 01 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain GG and the potential mechanism involved. Tagatose, as a synbiotic substrate, enhanced the growth of L. casei 01 and L. rhamnosus strain GG compared to other prebiotics. Other gut-indigenous such as Clostridium spp. readily utilized fructooligosaccharide (FOS), the most widely used functional prebiotics, but not tagatose. Additionally, tagatose enhanced probiotic functions of L. casei 01 and L. rhamnosus strain GG by reinforcing their attachment on HT-29 intestine epithelial cells and enhancing their cholesterol-lowering activities. Whole transcriptome study and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) test showed that the presence of tagatose in L. rhamnosus strain GG caused induction of a large number of genes associated with carbohydrate metabolism including the phosphotransferase system (PTS). Collectively, these results indicate the tagatose enhanced the growth of L. casei 01 and L. rhamnosus strain GG and their probiotic activities by activating tagatose-associated PTS networks. Importantly, this study highlights the potential application of tagatose and L. casei 01 and/or L. rhamnosus strain GG as a synbiotic partner in functional dairy foods (i.e. yogurt and cheese) and therapeutic dietary supplements. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. [Different significance in normal subjects and in glaucoma patients tested with Optopol PTS-910, in the galucoma program].

    PubMed

    Dascalu, Ana Maria; Cherecheanu, Alina Popa; Stana, Daniela; Serban, Dragoş

    2013-01-01

    to quantify the inter-test variability (dB) for the Optopol PTS automated perimeter, Glaucoma Fast threshold program. A prospective study was performed on 166 glaucomatous patients and a control group of 30 normal subjects, tested by complete ophthalmological exam and automated perimetry (Optopol PTS-910). The visual field was tested weekly for 4 consecutive weeks. The visual field defects were classified according to the Aulhorn-Karmeyer descriptive scale. For the control group, the medium inter-test variability was of 1.57 +/- 0.24 dB, lower next to fixation and increasing towards the 50 degree isopter. The medium inter-test variability increases along with the perimetric stage :1.57 +/- 0.66 dB for pre-perimetric glaucoma, 2.13 + 1.04 dB for non-specific defects group, 3.23 + 1.01 dB for the stage 1, 3.52 + 2.61 dB, for the stage 2, 3.65 + 1.19dB for the stage 3 and 5.82 +/- 1.67dB for the stage 4. For the cases of preperimetric glaucoma and non-specific defects, a similar profile of variability to the normal subjects can be observed. For the stages 2-4, the profile of the areas with maxim inter-test variability moves towards the relative scotoma and the surrounding area. A better description of the inter-test variability and the evolution of this intricate parameter of the retinal light sensitivity is useful for the differential diagnostic between the real change and the "background noise" in early detection of the functional progression in glaucoma.

  1. Lectures on pulsed NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Pines, A.

    1988-08-01

    These lectures discuss some recent developments in pulsed NMR, emphasizing fundamental principles with selected illustrative applications. Major topics covered include multiple-quantum spectroscopy, spin decoupling, the interaction of spins with a quantized field, adiabatic rapid passage, spin temperature and statistics of cross-polarization, coherent averaging, and zero field NMR. 32 refs., 56 figs.

  2. Lectures on pulsed NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Pines, A.

    1986-09-01

    These lectures discuss some recent developments in pulsed NMR, emphasizing fundamental principles with selected illustrative applications. Major topics covered include multiple-quantum spectroscopy, spin decoupling, the interaction of spins with a quantized field, adiabatic rapid passage, spin temperature and statistics of cross-polarization, coherent averaging, and zero field NMR. 55 figs.

  3. Rotary echo nutation NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janssen, R.; Tijink, G. A. H.; Veeman, W. S.

    1988-01-01

    A two-dimensional solid state NMR experiment which combines rotary echoes and nutation NMR is investigated and used to study different sodium sites in zeolite NaA. It is shown that with this technique sodium ions with different relaxation rates in the rotating frame can be distinguished.

  4. NMR logging apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, David O; Turner, Peter

    2014-05-27

    Technologies including NMR logging apparatus and methods are disclosed. Example NMR logging apparatus may include surface instrumentation and one or more downhole probes configured to fit within an earth borehole. The surface instrumentation may comprise a power amplifier, which may be coupled to the downhole probes via one or more transmission lines, and a controller configured to cause the power amplifier to generate a NMR activating pulse or sequence of pulses. Impedance matching means may be configured to match an output impedance of the power amplifier through a transmission line to a load impedance of a downhole probe. Methods may include deploying the various elements of disclosed NMR logging apparatus and using the apparatus to perform NMR measurements.

  5. UC Merced NMR Instrumentation Acquisition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-18

    UC Merced NMR Instrumentation Acquisition For the UC Merced NMR Instrumentation Acquisition proposal, a new 400 MHz and an upgraded 500 MHz NMR ...UC Merced NMR Instrumentation Acquisition Report Title For the UC Merced NMR Instrumentation Acquisition proposal, a new 400 MHz and an upgraded 500...MHz NMR have been delivered, installed, and incorporated into research and two lab courses. While no results from these instruments have been

  6. Prognostic scales ISS-RTS-TRISS, PRISM, APACHE II and PTS in decision support of treatment children with severe mechanical trauma.

    PubMed

    Vasilyeva, I V; Shvirev, S L; Arseniev, S B; Zarubina, T V

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to assess a possibility and validity of prognostic scales ISS-RTS-TRISS, PRISM, APACHE II and PTS to be used for the automated calculation in decision support when treating children with severe mechanical traumas. The mentioned scales are used in the Hospital Information System (HIS) MEDIALOG. The retrospective study was conducted using clinical and physiological data collected at the admission and during the first 24 hours of hospitalization in 166 patients. Scales PRISM, APACHE II, ISS-RTS-TRISS were used for calculating the severity of injury and for prognosis in death outcomes. Scale PTS was used for evaluating the severity index only. Our research has shown that ISS-RTS-TRISS has excellent discrimination ability, PRISM and APACHE II prognostic scales have acceptable discrimination ability; moreover, they all have significant calibration ability. PTS scale has acceptable discrimination ability. It has been showed that automated calculation scales ISS-RTS-TRISS, PRISM, APACHE II and PTS are useful for assessing outcomes in children with severe mechanical trauma.

  7. Renal transplant NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Velchik, M.G.; Kressel, H.; Thickman, D.; Alavi, A.

    1985-05-01

    The preliminary results of NMR evaluation of renal transplants (Txs) are reported including correlation with nuclear medicine (NM) and ultrasound (US). Thirteen Txs (8 cadaver (Cd), 5 living related doner (LRD) in 13 patients (6M, 7F) ranging in age from 25-47 (x 35) were evaluated by NM (32), NMR (15) and US (5). Clinical diagnoses included: rejection (8), ATN (2), infarction (1), and normal (2). Of the 8 patients with rejection (5) Cd; 3 LRD) pathologic proof was obtained in 3. An experimental 0.12 T resistive magnet (GE) was used with a partial saturation technique with repetition time (TR) of 143 and 286 msec to provide T1 weighting. T2 weighted information was obtained with a spin echo technique with echo times (TE) of 20, 40, 60 and 80 msec. The NMR appearance of normal Txs consisted of a uniform signal intensity (Tx> pelvic musculature), well-defined internal architecture with good cortical medullary differentiation and normal appearing vessels. The NMR appearance of abnormal transplants consisted of a heterogeneous or overall decrease in signal intensity (kidney muscle) with poor cortical medullary differentiation with or without a halo of decreased signal intensity. Although NMR was able to differentiate normal from abnormal, it was unable to clearly discriminate between ATN and rejection. Advantages of NMR included the ability to demonstrate regional anatomy, vasculature, post operative fluid collections and hematomas, and associated avascular necrosis of the hips.

  8. Cloning and Molecular Analysis of a Mannitol Operon of Phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent Phosphotransferase (PTS) type From Vibrio cholerae O395

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sanath; Smith, Kenneth P.; Floyd, Jody L.; Varela, Manuel F.

    2010-01-01

    A putative mannitol operon of the phosphoenolpyruvate phosphotransferase (PTS) type was cloned from Vibrio cholerae O395 and its activity studied in Escherichia coli. The 3.9 kb operon comprising of three genes is organized as mtlADR. Based on the sequence analysis, these were identified as genes encoding a putative mannitol-specific enzyme IICBA (EIIMtl) component (MtlA), a mannitol-1-phosphate dehydrogenase (MtlD) and a mannitol operon repressor (MtlR). The transport of [3H]mannitol by the cloned mannitol operon in E. coli was 13.8±1.4 nmol/min/mg protein. The insertional inactivation of EIIMtl abolished mannitol and sorbitol transport in V. cholerae O395. Comparison of the mannitol utilization apparatus of V. cholerae with those of Gram-negative and Gram positive bacteria suggests highly conserved nature of the system. MtlA and MtlD exhibit 75% similarity with corresponding sequences of E. coli mannitol operon genes, while MtlR has 63% similarity with MtlR of E. coli. The cloning of V. cholerae mannitol utilization system in an E. coli background will help in elucidating the functional properties of this operon. PMID:21184218

  9. NMR imaging microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-10-01

    In the past several years, proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging has become an established technique in diagnostic medicine and biomedical research. Although much of the work in this field has been directed toward development of whole-body imagers, James Aguayo, Stephen Blackband, and Joseph Schoeninger of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine working with Markus Hintermann and Mark Mattingly of Bruker Medical Instruments, recently developed a small-bore NMR microscope with sufficient resolution to image a single African clawed toad cell (Nature 1986, 322, 190-91). This improved resolution should lead to increased use of NMR imaging for chemical, as well as biological or physiological, applications. The future of NMR microscopy, like that of many other newly emerging techniques, is ripe with possibilities. Because of its high cost, however, it is likely to remain primarily a research tool for some time. ''It's like having a camera,'' says Smith. ''You've got a way to look at things at very fine levels, and people are going to find lots of uses for it. But it is a very expensive technique - it costs $100,000 to add imaging capability once you have a high-resolution NMR, which itself is at least a $300,000 instrument. If it can answer even a few questions that can't be answered any other way, though, it may be well worth the cost.''

  10. Maltose Uptake by the Novel ABC Transport System MusEFGK2I Causes Increased Expression of ptsG in Corynebacterium glutamicum

    PubMed Central

    Henrich, Alexander; Kuhlmann, Nora; Eck, Alexander W.; Krämer, Reinhard

    2013-01-01

    The Gram-positive Corynebacterium glutamicum efficiently metabolizes maltose by a pathway involving maltodextrin and glucose formation by 4-α-glucanotransferase, glucose phosphorylation by glucose kinases, and maltodextrin degradation via maltodextrin phosphorylase and α-phosphoglucomutase. However, maltose uptake in C. glutamicum has not been investigated. Interestingly, the presence of maltose in the medium causes increased expression of ptsG in C. glutamicum by an unknown mechanism, although the ptsG-encoded glucose-specific EII permease of the phosphotransferase system itself is not required for maltose utilization. We identified the maltose uptake system as an ABC transporter encoded by musK (cg2708; ATPase subunit), musE (cg2705; substrate binding protein), musF (cg2704; permease), and musG (cg2703; permease) by combination of data obtained from characterization of maltose uptake and reanalyses of transcriptome data. Deletion of the mus gene cluster in C. glutamicum Δmus abolished maltose uptake and utilization. Northern blotting and reverse transcription-PCR experiments revealed that musK and musE are transcribed monocistronically, whereas musF and musG are part of an operon together with cg2701 (musI), which encodes a membrane protein of unknown function with no homologies to characterized proteins. Characterization of growth and [14C]maltose uptake in the musI insertion strain C. glutamicum IMcg2701 showed that musI encodes a novel essential component of the maltose ABC transporter of C. glutamicum. Finally, ptsG expression during cultivation on different carbon sources was analyzed in the maltose uptake-deficient strain C. glutamicum Δmus. Indeed, maltose uptake by the novel ABC transport system MusEFGK2I is required for the positive effect of maltose on ptsG expression in C. glutamicum. PMID:23543710

  11. Maltose uptake by the novel ABC transport system MusEFGK2I causes increased expression of ptsG in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Henrich, Alexander; Kuhlmann, Nora; Eck, Alexander W; Krämer, Reinhard; Seibold, Gerd M

    2013-06-01

    The Gram-positive Corynebacterium glutamicum efficiently metabolizes maltose by a pathway involving maltodextrin and glucose formation by 4-α-glucanotransferase, glucose phosphorylation by glucose kinases, and maltodextrin degradation via maltodextrin phosphorylase and α-phosphoglucomutase. However, maltose uptake in C. glutamicum has not been investigated. Interestingly, the presence of maltose in the medium causes increased expression of ptsG in C. glutamicum by an unknown mechanism, although the ptsG-encoded glucose-specific EII permease of the phosphotransferase system itself is not required for maltose utilization. We identified the maltose uptake system as an ABC transporter encoded by musK (cg2708; ATPase subunit), musE (cg2705; substrate binding protein), musF (cg2704; permease), and musG (cg2703; permease) by combination of data obtained from characterization of maltose uptake and reanalyses of transcriptome data. Deletion of the mus gene cluster in C. glutamicum Δmus abolished maltose uptake and utilization. Northern blotting and reverse transcription-PCR experiments revealed that musK and musE are transcribed monocistronically, whereas musF and musG are part of an operon together with cg2701 (musI), which encodes a membrane protein of unknown function with no homologies to characterized proteins. Characterization of growth and [(14)C]maltose uptake in the musI insertion strain C. glutamicum IMcg2701 showed that musI encodes a novel essential component of the maltose ABC transporter of C. glutamicum. Finally, ptsG expression during cultivation on different carbon sources was analyzed in the maltose uptake-deficient strain C. glutamicum Δmus. Indeed, maltose uptake by the novel ABC transport system MusEFGK2I is required for the positive effect of maltose on ptsG expression in C. glutamicum.

  12. Diversity of Streptococcus salivarius ptsH Mutants That Can Be Isolated in the Presence of 2-Deoxyglucose and Galactose and Characterization of Two Mutants Synthesizing Reduced Levels of HPr, a Phosphocarrier of the Phosphoenolpyruvate:Sugar Phosphotransferase System

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Suzanne; Brochu, Denis; Vadeboncoeur, Christian

    2001-01-01

    In streptococci, HPr, a phosphocarrier of the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase transport system (PTS), undergoes multiple posttranslational chemical modifications resulting in the formation of HPr(His∼P), HPr(Ser-P), and HPr(Ser-P)(His∼P), whose cellular concentrations vary with growth conditions. Distinct physiological functions are associated with specific forms of HPr. We do not know, however, the cellular thresholds below which these forms become unable to fulfill their functions and to what extent modifications in the cellular concentrations of the different forms of HPr modify cellular physiology. In this study, we present a glimpse of the diversity of Streptococcus salivarius ptsH mutants that can be isolated by positive selection on a solid medium containing 2-deoxyglucose and galactose and identify 13 amino acids that are essential for HPr to properly accomplish its physiological functions. We also report the characterization of two S. salivarius mutants that produced approximately two- and threefoldless HPr and enzyme I (EI) respectively. The data indicated that (i) a reduction in the synthesis of HPr due to a mutation in the Shine-Dalgarno sequence of ptsH reduced ptsI expression; (ii) a threefold reduction in EI and HPr cellular levels did not affect PTS transport capacity; (iii) a twofold reduction in HPr synthesis was sufficient to reduce the rate at which cells metabolized PTS sugars, increase generation times on PTS sugars and to a lesser extent on non-PTS sugars, and impede the exclusion of non-PTS sugars by PTS sugars; (iv) a threefold reduction in HPr synthesis caused a strong derepression of the genes coding for α-galactosidase, β-galactosidase, and galactokinase when the cells were grown at the expense of a PTS sugar but did not affect the synthesis of α-galactosidase when cells were grown at the expense of lactose, a noninducing non-PTS sugar; and (v) no correlation was found between the magnitude of enzyme derepression and

  13. Optimizing Adiabaticity in NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandermause, Jonathan; Ramanathan, Chandrasekhar

    We demonstrate the utility of Berry's superadiabatic formalism for numerically finding control sequences that implement quasi-adiabatic unitary transformations. Using an iterative interaction picture, we design a shortcut to adiabaticity that reduces the time required to perform an adiabatic inversion pulse in liquid state NMR. We also show that it is possible to extend our scheme to two or more qubits to find adiabatic quantum transformations that are allowed by the control algebra, and demonstrate a two-qubit entangling operation in liquid state NMR. We examine the pulse lengths at which the fidelity of these adiabatic transitions break down and compare with the quantum speed limit.

  14. Shiftless NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chin H.; Opella, Stanley J.

    2013-01-01

    The acquisition and analysis of high resolution one- and two- dimensional solid-state NMR spectra without chemical shift frequencies are described. Many variations of Shiftless NMR spectroscopy are feasible. A two-dimensional experiment that correlates 13Cα-15N dipole-dipole and 1H-13Cα dipole-dipole couplings in single crystal and powder samples of the model peptide, 13Cα, 15N-acetylleucine, is demonstrated. In addition to the resolution of resonances from individual sites in a single crystal sample, the bond lengths and angles are characterized by the two-dimensional powder pattern obtained from a polycrystalline sample. PMID:18266429

  15. Expression of the agmatine deiminase pathway in Enterococcus faecalis is activated by the AguR regulator and repressed by CcpA and PTS(Man) systems.

    PubMed

    Suárez, Cristian; Espariz, Martín; Blancato, Víctor S; Magni, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Although the agmatine deiminase system (AgDI) has been investigated in Enterococcus faecalis, little information is available with respect to its gene regulation. In this study we demonstrate that the presence of exogenous agmatine induces the expression of agu genes in this bacterium. In contrast to the homologous and extensively characterized AgDI system of S. mutants, the aguBDAC operon in E. faecalis is not induced in response to low pH. In spite of this, agmatine catabolism in this bacterium contributes by neutralizing the external medium while enhancing bacterial growth. Our results indicate that carbon catabolic repression (CCR) operates on the AgDI system via a mechanism that involves interaction of CcpA and P-Ser-HPr with a cre site found in an unusual position considering the aguB promoter (55 nt upstream the +1 position). In addition, we found that components of the mannose phosphotransferase (PTS(Man)) system also contributed to CCR in E. faecalis since a complete relief of the PTS-sugars repressive effect was observed only in a PTS(Man) and CcpA double defective strain. Our gene context analysis revealed that aguR is present in oral and gastrointestinal microorganisms. Thus, regulation of the aguBDAC operon in E. faecalis seems to have evolved to obtain energy and resist low pH conditions in order to persist and colonize gastrointestinal niches.

  16. A ptsP deficiency in PGPR Pseudomonas fluorescens SF39a affects bacteriocin production and bacterial fitness in the wheat rhizosphere.

    PubMed

    Godino, Agustina; Príncipe, Analía; Fischer, Sonia

    2016-04-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens SF39a is a plant-growth-promoting bacterium isolated from wheat rhizosphere. In this report, we demonstrate that this native strain secretes bacteriocins that inhibit growth of phytopathogenic strains of the genera Pseudomonas and Xanthomonas. An S-type pyocin gene was detected in the genome of strain SF39a and named pys. A non-polar pys::Km mutant was constructed. The bacteriocin production was impaired in this mutant. To identify genes involved in bacteriocin regulation, random transposon mutagenesis was carried out. A miniTn5Km1 mutant, called P. fluorescens SF39a-451, showed strongly reduced bacteriocin production. This phenotype was caused by inactivation of the ptsP gene which encodes a phosphoenolpyruvate phosphotransferase (EI(Ntr)) of the nitrogen-related phosphotransferase system (PTS(Ntr)). In addition, this mutant showed a decrease in biofilm formation and protease production, and an increase in surface motility and pyoverdine production compared with the wild-type strain. Moreover, we investigated the ability of strain SF39a-451 to colonize the wheat rhizosphere under greenhouse conditions. Interestingly, the mutant was less competitive than the wild-type strain in the rhizosphere. To our knowledge, this study provides the first evidence of both the relevance of the ptsP gene in bacteriocin production and functional characterization of a pyocin S in P. fluorescens. Copyright © 2015 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. [Age specific and individual psychological factors of post--traumatic stress (PTS) development of children with after-effects of physical damages indicating medical rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Пятакова, Галина В; Лебедева, Екатерина И; Потявина, Валерия В; Церфус, Диана Н

    children and teenagers having received hard physical damages face a difficult life situation which includes events accompanied by feeling of intensive fear and helplessness. Every child's individual psychological features play an important role in coping with negative psychological after-effects of his/her physical trauma. learning PTS manifestations among children and teenagers with hard physical damages indicating medical rehabilitation. patients of the traumatological department of children's surgery clinic took part in the research: 31 preadolescent children and their parents, 45 teengaers and their parents. Physical damages were received by children clinic's patients in accidents and out of negligence. A survey containing clinical and historical method elements, medical documents; semi-structured interviews for identification of signs of children's post-traumatic stress, a survey for parents for identification of children's traumatic experience, colour matrices and J. Raven black-and-white matrices, S. Rosenzweig frustration tolerance methods (children's and adult version) were used as certain research methods. it was shown that intellectual productivity showings and stable ways of emotional reaction can act as individual psychological factos of PTS development. Age specifics of embeddedness of intellectual features and stable ways of emotional reaction to PTS symptoms development among children and teenagers with hard physical damages. the received results can be used as a base for developing specific approaches for psychological support of children and teenagers having the experience of physical damage and difficult medical rehabilitation.

  18. LMOf2365_0442 Encoding for a Fructose Specific PTS Permease IIA May Be Required for Virulence in L. monocytogenes Strain F2365.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanhong; Yoo, Brian B; Hwang, Cheng-An; Suo, Yujuan; Sheen, Shiowshuh; Khosravi, Parvaneh; Huang, Lihan

    2017-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen that causes listeriosis, which is a major public health concern due to the high fatality rate. LMOf2365_0442, 0443, and 0444 encode for fructose-specific EIIABC components of phosphotransferase transport system (PTS) permease that is responsible for sugar transport. In previous studies, in-frame deletion mutants of a putative fructose-specific PTS permease (LMOf2365_0442, 0443, and 0444) were constructed and analyzed. However, the virulence potential of these deletion mutants has not been studied. In this study, two in vitro methods were used to analyze the virulence potential of these L. monocytogenes deletion mutants. First, invasion assays were used to measure the invasion efficiencies to host cells using the human HT-29 cell line. Second, plaque forming assays were used to measure cell-to-cell spread in host cells. Our results showed that the deletion mutant ΔLMOf2365_0442 had reduced invasion and cell-to-cell spread efficiencies in human cell line compared to the parental strain LMOf2365, indicating that LMOf2365_0442 encoding for a fructose specific PTS permease IIA may be required for virulence in L. monocytogenes strain F2365. In addition, the gene expression levels of 15 virulence and stress-related genes were analyzed in the stationary phase cells of the deletion mutants using RT-PCR assays. Virulence-related gene expression levels were elevated in the deletion mutants ΔLMOf2365_0442-0444 compared to the wild type parental strain LMOf2365, indicating the down-regulation of virulence genes by this PTS permease in L. monocytogenes. Finally, stress-related gene clpC expression levels were also increased in all of the deletion mutants, suggesting the involvement of this PTS permease in stress response. Furthermore, these deletion mutants displayed the same pressure tolerance and the same capacity for biofilm formation compared to the wild-type parental strain LMOf2365. In summary, our findings suggest that the

  19. Modern NMR Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jelinski, Lynn W.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses direct chemical information that can be obtained from modern nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods, concentrating on the types of problems that can be solved. Shows how selected methods provide information about polymers, bipolymers, biochemistry, small organic molecules, inorganic compounds, and compounds oriented in a magnetic…

  20. Modern NMR Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jelinski, Lynn W.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses direct chemical information that can be obtained from modern nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods, concentrating on the types of problems that can be solved. Shows how selected methods provide information about polymers, bipolymers, biochemistry, small organic molecules, inorganic compounds, and compounds oriented in a magnetic…

  1. Autonomous driving in NMR.

    PubMed

    Perez, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    The automatic analysis of NMR data has been a much-desired endeavour for the last six decades, as it is the case with any other analytical technique. This need for automation has only grown as advances in hardware; pulse sequences and automation have opened new research areas to NMR and increased the throughput of data. Full automatic analysis is a worthy, albeit hard, challenge, but in a world of artificial intelligence, instant communication and big data, it seems that this particular fight is happening with only one technique at a time (let this be NMR, MS, IR, UV or any other), when the reality of most laboratories is that there are several types of analytical instrumentation present. Data aggregation, verification and elucidation by using complementary techniques (e.g. MS and NMR) is a desirable outcome to pursue, although a time-consuming one if performed manually; hence, the use of automation to perform the heavy lifting for users is required to make the approach attractive for scientists. Many of the decisions and workflows that could be implemented under automation will depend on the two-way communication with databases that understand analytical data, because it is desirable not only to query these databases but also to grow them in as much of an automatic manner as possible. How these databases are designed, set up and the data inside classified will determine what workflows can be implemented. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Simultaneously cycled NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Parish, David M; Szyperski, Thomas

    2008-04-09

    Simultaneously cycled (SC) NMR was introduced and exemplified by implementing a set of 2-D [1H,1H] SC exclusive COSY (E.COSY) NMR experiments, that is, rf pulse flip-angle cycled (SFC), rf pulse phase cycled (SPC), and pulsed field gradient (PFG) strength cycled (SGC) E.COSY. Spatially selective 1H rf pulses were applied as composite pulses such that all steps of the respective cycles were affected simultaneously in different slices of the sample. This increased the data acquisition speed for an n-step cycle n-fold. A high intrinsic sensitivity was achieved by defining the cycles in a manner that the receiver phase remains constant for all steps of the cycle. Then, the signal resulting from applying the cycle corresponded to the sum of the signals from all steps of the cycle. Hence, the detected free induction decay did not have to be separated into the contributions arising from different slices, and read-out PFGs, which not only greatly reduce sensitivity but also negatively impact lineshapes in the direct dimension, were avoided. The current implementation of SFC E.COSY reached approximately 65% of the intrinsic sensitivity of the conventional phase cycled congener, making this experiment highly attractive whenever conventional data acquisition is sampling limited. Highly resolved SC E.COSY yielding accurate 3J-coupling values was recorded for the 416 Da plant alkaloid tomatidine within 80 min, that is, 12 times faster than with conventional phase cycled E.COSY. SC NMR is applicable for a large variety of NMR experiments and thus promises to be a valuable addition to the arsenal of approaches for tackling the NMR sampling problem to avoid sampling limited data acquisition.

  3. Peroxisomal plant nitric oxide synthase (NOS) protein is imported by peroxisomal targeting signal type 2 (PTS2) in a process that depends on the cytosolic receptor PEX7 and calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Corpas, Francisco J; Barroso, Juan B

    2014-06-05

    Nitric oxide (NO) production in plant peroxisomes by l-arginine-dependent NO synthase activity has been proven. The PEX5 and PEX7 PTS receptors, which recognize PTS1- and PTS2-containing proteins, are localized in the cytosol. Using AtPex5p and AtPex7p knockdown in Arabidopsis by RNA interference (RNAi) designated as pex5i and pex7i, we found that the l-arginine-dependent protein responsible for NO generation in peroxisomes appears to be imported through an N-terminal PTS2. Pharmacological analyzes using a calcium channel blocker and calmodulin (CaM) antagonist show that the import of the peroxisomal NOS protein also depends on calcium and calmodulin.

  4. NMR-restrained docking of a peptidic inhibitor to the N-terminal domain of the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase enzyme I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rognan, Didier; Mukhija, Seema; Folkers, Gerd; Zerbe, Oliver

    2001-02-01

    Starting from the NMR structure of the binary complex between the N-terminal domain of the unphosphorylated enzyme I (EIN) of the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase (PTS) and the histidine-containing phosphocarrier protein (HPr), a molecular model of the phosphorylated transition state of the related complex was established using constrained simulated annealing. The coordinates of the phosphorylated EIN enzyme were then used in a second step for flexible docking of a decapeptide inhibitor of EIN whose enzyme-bound conformation itself was determined by NMR using transferred nuclear Overhauser effects. Two phosphorylation models of the peptide inhibitor were investigated and shown to be both functional. Interestingly, one model is very similar to that of the complex between EIN and its natural substrate HPr. The present study demonstrates that NMR-guided flexible docking constitutes an interesting tool for docking highly flexible peptide ligands and facilitates the upcoming protein-based design of nonpeptide EIN inhibitors for discovering new antibiotics.

  5. 224} studied by NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Furukawa, Y; Fang, X; Kögerler, P

    2014-05-14

    7Li nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies have been performed to investigate magnetic properties and spin dynamics of Mn3+ (S = 2) spins in the giant polyoxometalate molecule {Mn40W224}. The 7Li-NMR line width is proportional to the external magnetic field H as expected in a paramagnetic state above 3 K. Below this temperature the line width shows a sudden increase and is almost independent of H, which indicates freezing of the local Mn3+ spins. The temperature dependence of T1 for both 1H and 7Li reveals slow spin dynamics at low temperatures, consistent with spin freezing. The slow spin dynamics is also evidenced by the observation of a peak of 1/T2 around 3 K, where the fluctuation frequency of spins is of the order of ~200 kHz. An explicit form of the temperature dependence of the fluctuation frequency of Mn3+ spins is derived from the nuclear relaxation data.

  6. NMR imaging of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, H.J.; Rothwell, W.P.

    1988-03-01

    A method for obtaining at least one petrophysical property of a porous material containing therein at least one preselected fluid, is described, comprising: NMR imaging the material to generate signals dependent upon both M(0) and T/sub 1/ and M(0) and T/sub 2/, generating separate M(0), T/sub 1/ and T/sub 2/ images from the signals, and determining at least one petrophysical property from at least one of the images.

  7. NMR Studies of Peroxidases.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veitch, Nigel Charles

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. Peroxidases are a haem-containing group of enzymes with a wide diversity of function within biological systems. While a common characteristic is the ability to catalyse the conversion of hydrogen peroxide to water, it is the accompanying processes of hormone synthesis and degradation which have generated such a high level of interest. However, information at the molecular level is limited to a single well-resolved crystal structure, that of yeast cytochrome c peroxidase. This thesis presents a strategy for the investigation of peroxidase structure and function based on proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, a technique which has the ability to address aspects of both protein structure and protein dynamics in solution. The application of one- and two-dimensional NMR techniques has been developed in the context of plant peroxidases, notably the isoenzyme HRP-C derived from the horseradish root. Characterisation of the proton NMR spectra of HRP -C in resting and ligated states provided new information enabling the structure of the binding site for aromatic donor molecules, such as indole-3-propionic, ferulic and benzhydroxamic acids, to be resolved. In order to overcome difficulties encountered with a protein of the complexity of peroxidase, additional information was obtained from chemical shift parameters and the use of peroxidase variants produced by site-directed mutagenesis. A comparative study using NMR spectroscopy was undertaken for wild-type recombinant HRP-C expressed in Escherichia coli, and two protein variants with substitutions made to residues located on the distal side of the haem pocket, Phe41 to Val and Arg38 to Lys. NMR analyses of a plant peroxidase from barley grains and the fungal peroxidase from Coprinus cinereus were also successful using methods conceived with HRP-C. Examination of three specifically constructed recombinant protein variants of C. cinereus

  8. β-NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Gerald D.

    2014-01-01

    The β-NMR facility at ISAC is constructed specifically for experiments in condensed matter physics with radioactive ion beams. Using co-linear optical pumping, a 8Li + ion beam having a large nuclear spin polarisation and low energy (nominally 30 keV) can be generated. When implanted into materials these ions penetrate to shallow depths comparable to length scales of interest in the physics of surfaces and interfaces between materials. Such low-energy ions can be decelerated with simple electrostatic optics to enable depth-resolved studies of near-surface phenomena over the range of about 2-200 nm. Since the β-NMR signal is extracted from the asymmetry intrinsic to beta-decay and therefore monitors the polarisation of the radioactive probe nuclear magnetic moments, this technique is fundamentally a probe of local magnetism. More generally though, any phenomena which affects the polarisation of the implanted spins by, for example, a change in resonance frequency, line width or relaxation rate can be studied. The β-NMR program at ISAC currently supports a number of experiments in magnetism and superconductivity as well as novel ultra-thin heterostructures exhibiting properties that cannot occur in bulk materials. The general purpose zero/low field and high field spectrometers are configured to perform CW and pulsed RF nuclear magnetic resonance and spin relaxation experiments over a range of temperatures (3-300 K) and magnetic fields (0-9 T).

  9. Temperature-Dependent Expression of phzM and Its Regulatory Genes lasI and ptsP in Rhizosphere Isolate Pseudomonas sp. Strain M18▿

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jiaofang; Xu, Yuquan; Zhang, Hongyan; Li, Yaqian; Huang, Xianqing; Ren, Bin; Zhang, Xuehong

    2009-01-01

    Pseudomonas sp. strain M18, an effective biological control agent isolated from the melon rhizosphere, has a genetic background similar to that of the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. However, the predominant phenazine produced by strain M18 is phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA) rather than pyocyanin (PYO); the quantitative ratio of PCA to PYO is 105 to 1 at 28°C in strain M18, while the ratio is 1 to 2 at 37°C in strain PAO1. We first provided evidence that the differential production of the two phenazines in strains M18 and PAO1 is related to the temperature-dependent and strain-specific expression patterns of phzM, a gene involved in the conversion of PCA to PYO. Transcriptional levels of phzM were measured by quantitative real-time PCR, and the activities of both transcriptional and translational phzM′-′lacZ fusions were determined in strains M18 and PAO1, respectively. Using lasI::Gm and ptsP::Gm inactivation M18 mutants, we further show that expression of the phzM gene is positively regulated by the quorum-sensing protein LasI and negatively regulated by the phosphoenolpyruvate phosphotransferase protein PtsP. Surprisingly, the lasI and ptsP regulatory genes were also expressed in a temperature-dependent and strain-specific manner. The differential production of the phenazines PCA and PYO by strains M18 and PAO1 may be a consequence of selective pressure imposed on P. aeruginosa PAO1 and its relative M18 in the two different niches over a long evolutionary process. PMID:19717631

  10. Role of ptsP, orfT, and sss Recombinase Genes in Root Colonization by Pseudomonas fluorescens Q8r1-96▿

    PubMed Central

    Mavrodi, Olga V.; Mavrodi, Dmitri V.; Weller, David M.; Thomashow, Linda S.

    2006-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens Q8r1-96 produces 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (2,4-DAPG), a polyketide antibiotic that suppresses a wide variety of soilborne fungal pathogens, including Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici, which causes take-all disease of wheat. Strain Q8r1-96 is representative of the D-genotype of 2,4-DAPG producers, which are exceptional because of their ability to aggressively colonize and maintain large populations on the roots of host plants, including wheat, pea, and sugar beet. In this study, three genes, an sss recombinase gene, ptsP, and orfT, which are important in the interaction of Pseudomonas spp. with various hosts, were investigated to determine their contributions to the unusual colonization properties of strain Q8r1-96. The sss recombinase and ptsP genes influence global processes, including phenotypic plasticity and organic nitrogen utilization, respectively. The orfT gene contributes to the pathogenicity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in plants and animals and is conserved among saprophytic rhizosphere pseudomonads, but its function is unknown. Clones containing these genes were identified in a Q8r1-96 genomic library, sequenced, and used to construct gene replacement mutants of Q8r1-96. Mutants were characterized to determine their 2,4-DAPG production, motility, fluorescence, colony morphology, exoprotease and hydrogen cyanide (HCN) production, carbon and nitrogen utilization, and ability to colonize the rhizosphere of wheat grown in natural soil. The ptsP mutant was impaired in wheat root colonization, whereas mutants with mutations in the sss recombinase gene and orfT were not. However, all three mutants were less competitive than wild-type P. fluorescens Q8r1-96 in the wheat rhizosphere when they were introduced into the soil by paired inoculation with the parental strain. PMID:16936061

  11. Soils, Pores, and NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohlmeier, Andreas; Haber-Pohlmeier, Sabina; Haber, Agnes; Sucre, Oscar; Stingaciu, Laura; Stapf, Siegfried; Blümich, Bernhard

    2010-05-01

    Within Cluster A, Partial Project A1, the pore space exploration by means of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) plays a central role. NMR is especially convenient since it probes directly the state and dynamics of the substance of interest: water. First, NMR is applied as relaxometry, where the degree of saturation but also the pore geometry controls the NMR signature of natural porous systems. Examples are presented where soil samples from the Selhausen, Merzenhausen (silt loams), and Kaldenkirchen (sandy loam) test sites are investigated by means of Fast Field Cycling Relaxometry at different degrees of saturation. From the change of the relaxation time distributions with decreasing water content and by comparison with conventional water retention curves we conclude that the fraction of immobile water is characterized by T1 < 5 ms. Moreover, the dependence of the relaxation rate on magnetic field strength allows the identification of 2D diffusion at the interfaces as the mechanism which governs the relaxation process (Pohlmeier et al. 2009). T2 relaxation curves are frequently measured for the rapid characterization of soils by means of the CPMG echo train. Basically, they contain the same information about the pore systems like T1 curves, since mostly the overall relaxation is dominated by surface relaxivity and the surface/volume ratio of the pores. However, one must be aware that T2 relaxation is additionally affected by diffusion in internal gradients, and this can be overcome by using sufficiently short echo times and low magnetic fields (Stingaciu et al. 2009). Second, the logic continuation of conventional relaxation measurements is the 2-dimensional experiment, where prior to the final detection of the CPMG echo train an encoding period is applied. This can be T1-encoding by an inversion pulse, or T2 encoding by a sequence of 90 and 180° pulses. During the following evolution time the separately encoded signals can mix and this reveals information about

  12. NMR studies of protein structure and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, Lewis E.

    2011-12-01

    Recent advances in solution NMR spectroscopy have significantly extended the spectrum of problems that can now be addressed with this technology. In particular, studies of proteins with molecular weights on the order of 100 kDa are now possible at a level of detail that was previously reserved for much smaller systems. An example of the sort of information that is now accessible is provided in a study of malate synthase G, a 723 residue enzyme that has been a focal point of research efforts in my laboratory. Details of the labeling schemes that have been employed and optimal experiments for extraction of structural and dynamics information on this protein are described. NMR studies of protein dynamics, in principle, give insight into the relation between motion and function. A description of deuterium-based spin relaxation methods for the investigation of side chain dynamics is provided. Examples where millisecond (ms) time scale dynamics play an important role and where relaxation dispersion NMR spectroscopy has been particularly informative, including applications involving the membrane enzyme PagP and mutants of the Fyn SH3 domain that fold on a ms time scale, are presented.

  13. NMR in biology and medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Chien, S.; Chien, H.

    1986-01-01

    This volume explores the applications of NMR in basic biological research and in clinical diagnosis. The contributors highlight the capabilities of NMR as a tool for studying living organisms at the molecular and cellular levels and detecting abnormalities in various organ systems. Included are solid-state and high-resolution NMR studies of the molecular structure and dynamic interactions of lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids. The latest developments in NMR zeugmatographic imaging and in musculoskeletal and cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging are detailed. Concluding chapters review the uses of in vivo NMR spectroscopy to study energy metabolism and cellular biochemistry. Emphasis is placed on in vivo NMR spectroscopy studies that elucidate normal metabolic functions and their pathological disturbances.

  14. NMR imaging of the spine

    SciTech Connect

    Han, J.S.; Kaufman, B.; El Yousef, S.J.; Benson, J.E.; Bonstelle, C.T.; Alfidi, R.J.; Haaga, J.R.; Yeung, H.; Huss, R.G.

    1983-12-01

    The usefulness of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) images in the evaluation of spinal disorders below the craniocervical junction was studied. Six normal subjects and 41 patients with various spinal abnormalities were examined. NMR proved capable of demonstrating important normal and pathologic anatomic structures; it was useful in the evaluation of syringohydromyelia and cystic spinal cord tumors, and the bright signal intensity of lipoma was quite impressive. In the evaluation of herniated disk, NMR images offered a new perspective by visualizing abnormal degradation of the signal intensity of the nucleus pulposus itself. NMR images were least valuable in the evaluation of spondylosis and spinal stenosis. Although NMR imaging of the spine is still in a very early developmental stage, the absence of both ionizing radiation and risks associated with contrast material makes it especially attractive as a new diagnostic method. This limited experience with currently available equipment suggests that, with technical refinement, the efficacy of NMR of the spine will increase.

  15. Magic Angle Spinning NMR Metabolomics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhi Hu, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a non-destructive, quantitative, reproducible, untargeted and unbiased method that requires no or minimal sample preparation, and is one of the leading analytical tools for metabonomics research [1-3]. The easy quantification and the no need of prior knowledge about compounds present in a sample associated with NMR are advantageous over other techniques [1,4]. 1H NMR is especially attractive because protons are present in virtually all metabolites and its NMR sensitivity is high, enabling the simultaneous identification and monitoring of a wide range of low molecular weight metabolites.

  16. DNA sequences of the cysK regions of Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli and linkage of the cysK regions to ptsH.

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, C R; Monroe, R S; Ward, K A; Kredich, N M

    1988-01-01

    Nucleotide sequences of the cysK regions of Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli have been determined. A total of 3,812 and 2,595 nucleotides were sequenced from S. typhimurium and E. coli, respectively. Open reading frames of 323 codons were found in both species and were identified as those of cysK by comparison of deduced amino acid sequences with amino- and carboxyl-terminal amino acid analyses of the S. typhimurium cysK gene product O-acetylserine (thiol)-lyase A. The two cysK DNA sequences were 85% identical, and the deduced amino acid sequences were 96% identical. The major transcription initiation sites for cysK were found to be virtually identical in the two organisms, by using primer extension and S1 nuclease protection techniques. The -35 region corresponding to the major transcription start site was TTCCCC in S. typhimurium and TTCCGC in E. coli. The deviation of these sequences from the consensus sequence TTGACA may reflect the fact that cysK is subject to positive control and requires the cysB regulatory protein for expression. Sequences downstream of cysK were found to include ptsH and a portion of ptsI, thus establishing the exact relationship of cysK with these two genes. A 290-codon open reading frame, which may represent the cysZ gene, was identified upstream of cysK. Images PMID:3290198

  17. PTS regulation domain-containing transcriptional activator CelR and sigma factor σ(54) control cellobiose utilization in Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Nie, Xiaoqun; Yang, Bin; Zhang, Lei; Gu, Yang; Yang, Sheng; Jiang, Weihong; Yang, Chen

    2016-04-01

    The phosphoenolpyruvate:carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS) regulation domain (PRD)-containing enhancer binding proteins (EBPs) are an important class of σ(54) -interacting transcriptional activators. Although PRD-containing EBPs are present in many Firmicutes, most of their regulatory functions remain unclear. In this study, the transcriptional regulons of about 50 PRD-containing EBPs in diverse Firmicutes species are reconstructed by using a comparative genomic approach, which contain the genes associated with utilization of β-glucosides, fructose/levan, mannose/glucose, pentitols, and glucosamine/fructosamine. We then present experimental evidence that the cel operon involved in cellobiose utilization is directly regulated by CelR and σ(54) (SigL) in Clostridium acetobutylicum. The predicted three CelR-binding sites and σ(54) promoter elements upstream of the cel operon are verified by in vitro binding assays. We show that CelR has an ATPase activity, which is strongly stimulated by the presence of DNA containing the CelR-binding sites. Moreover, mutations in any one of the three CelR-binding sites significantly decreased the cel promoter activity probably due to the need for all three DNA sites for maximal ATPase activity of CelR. It is suggested that CelR is regulated by PTS-mediated phosphorylation at His-551 and His-829, which exerts a positive effect and an inhibitory effect, respectively, on the CelR activity. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Solution state NMR of lignins

    Treesearch

    John. Ralph; Jane M. Marita; Sally A. Ralph; Ronald D. Hatfield; Fachuang. Lu; Richard M. Ede; Junpeng. Peng; Larry L. Landucci

    1999-01-01

    Despite the rather random and heterogeneous nature of isolated lignins, many of their intimate structural details are revealed by diagnostic NMR experiments. 13C-NMR was recognized early-on as a high-resolution method for detailed structural characterization, aided by the almost exact agreement between chemical shifts of carbons in good low-molecular...

  19. THz Dynamic Nuclear Polarization NMR

    PubMed Central

    Nanni, Emilio A.; Barnes, Alexander B.; Griffin, Robert G.; Temkin, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) increases the sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy by using high frequency microwaves to transfer the polarization of the electrons to the nuclear spins. The enhancement in NMR sensitivity can amount to a factor of well above 100, enabling faster data acquisition and greatly improved NMR measurements. With the increasing magnetic fields (up to 23 T) used in NMR research, the required frequency for DNP falls into the THz band (140–600 GHz). Gyrotrons have been developed to meet the demanding specifications for DNP NMR, including power levels of tens of watts; frequency stability of a few megahertz; and power stability of 1% over runs that last for several days to weeks. Continuous gyrotron frequency tuning of over 1 GHz has also been demonstrated. The complete DNP NMR system must include a low loss transmission line; an optimized antenna; and a holder for efficient coupling of the THz radiation to the sample. This paper describes the DNP NMR process and illustrates the THz systems needed for this demanding spectroscopic application. THz DNP NMR is a rapidly developing, exciting area of THz science and technology. PMID:24639915

  20. THz Dynamic Nuclear Polarization NMR.

    PubMed

    Nanni, Emilio A; Barnes, Alexander B; Griffin, Robert G; Temkin, Richard J

    2011-08-29

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) increases the sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy by using high frequency microwaves to transfer the polarization of the electrons to the nuclear spins. The enhancement in NMR sensitivity can amount to a factor of well above 100, enabling faster data acquisition and greatly improved NMR measurements. With the increasing magnetic fields (up to 23 T) used in NMR research, the required frequency for DNP falls into the THz band (140-600 GHz). Gyrotrons have been developed to meet the demanding specifications for DNP NMR, including power levels of tens of watts; frequency stability of a few megahertz; and power stability of 1% over runs that last for several days to weeks. Continuous gyrotron frequency tuning of over 1 GHz has also been demonstrated. The complete DNP NMR system must include a low loss transmission line; an optimized antenna; and a holder for efficient coupling of the THz radiation to the sample. This paper describes the DNP NMR process and illustrates the THz systems needed for this demanding spectroscopic application. THz DNP NMR is a rapidly developing, exciting area of THz science and technology.

  1. The financing of NMR equipment.

    PubMed

    Frankel, A N

    1984-01-01

    Cost-containment regulations and possible legislative changes in the tax area are creating new environments for the acquisition of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) systems. Shared services, management groups, and free-standing clinics are being established. Creativity in financing will be required to assure the cost-effectiveness of NMR services.

  2. A multicenter comparison study between the Endosafe PTS rapid-release testing system and traditional methods for detecting endotoxin in cell-therapy products.

    PubMed

    Gee, A P; Sumstad, D; Stanson, J; Watson, P; Proctor, J; Kadidlo, D; Koch, E; Sprague, J; Wood, D; Styers, D; McKenna, D; Gallelli, J; Griffin, D; Read, E J; Parish, B; Lindblad, R

    2008-01-01

    Rapid-release testing reduces the waiting period for administration of time-sensitive cell-therapy products. Current assay systems are labor intensive and time consuming. The Endosafe portable test system (PTS) is a chromogenic Limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL) portable endotoxin detection system that provides quantitative results in approximately 15 min. To evaluate Endosafe performance with cell-therapy products, side-by-side testing of traditional LAL systems and the Endosafe system was conducted at the Production Assistance for Cellular Therapies (PACT) facilities and the National Institutes of Health's Department of Transfusion Medicine, USA. Charles River Laboratories provided each center with a PTS reader and two commercially prepared lyophilized reference standard endotoxin (RSE) vials. All samples tested with the Endosafe system used 0.05-5.0 endotoxin unit/mL (EU/mL) sensitivity cartridges provided by Charles River. Each vial was reconstituted with LAL water and tested in triplicate using the Endosafe and in-house LAL methods. Subsequently, each center tested the endotoxin content of standard dilutions of cell-therapy products, thus creating paired test results for each sample. Additionally, fabricated endotoxin-positive samples containing varying concentrations of endotoxin were prepared and shipped to all centers to perform blinded testing. Valid paired results, based on each center's LAL method and the Endosafe system criteria, were analyzed. Endotoxin detection between paired results was equivalent in most cases. The Endosafe system provided reliable results with products typically produced in cell-therapy manufacturing facilities, and would be an appropriate test on which to base the release of time-sensitive cell-therapy products.

  3. The Trehalose Phosphotransferase System (PTS) in E. coli W Can Transport Low Levels of Sucrose that Are Sufficient to Facilitate Induction of the csc Sucrose Catabolism Operon

    PubMed Central

    Steen, Jennifer A.; Bohlke, Nina; Vickers, Claudia E.; Nielsen, Lars K.

    2014-01-01

    Plasticity in substrate acceptance is a well-characterised phenomenon for disaccharide transporters. Sucrose, a non-reducing disaccharide, is usually metabolised via either the permease-mediated chromosomally-encoded sucrose catabolism (csc) regulon or the sucrose phosphotransferase system (PTS). E. coli W is a fast-growing strain which efficiently utilises sucrose at concentrations above 1% via the csc regulon. To examine if sucrose could be metabolised via other routes, a library of transposon mutants was generated and screened on 0.2% sucrose. One mutant identified from this library had an insertion in the repressor for the regulon controlling catabolism of the disaccharide trehalose (treR). A series of mutants was constructed to elucidate the mechanism of sucrose utilization in the treR insertion strain. Analysis of these mutants provided evidence that deletion of TreR enables uptake of sucrose via TreB, an enzyme II protein required for PTS-mediated uptake of trehalose. Once inside the cell, this sucrose is not processed by the TreC hydrolase, nor is it sufficient for growth of the strain. QRT-PCR analysis showed that levels of cscA (invertase) transcript increased in the WΔtreR mutant relative to the wild-type strain when grown under low sucrose conditions. This result suggests that the intracellular sucrose provided by TreB can facilitate de-repression of the csc regulon, leading to increased gene expression, sucrose uptake and sucrose utilization in the treR mutant. PMID:24586369

  4. Two dimensional NMR and NMR relaxation studies of coal structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1989-01-01

    This report covers the progress made on the title project during the past reporting period. Four major areas of inquiry are being pursued. Advanced solid state NMR methods are being developed to assay the distribution of the various important functional groups in coals that determine the reactivity of coals. Other methods are being developed which will also determine how these functional groups are linked together. A third area of investigation concerns how molecular mobility in coals impacts NMR relaxation times, which is important for interpretation of such data in terms of the mobile phase in coals model. Along the same lines the authors are also using these studies to establish protocols for obtaining the best quantitative response from coals in solid state C-13 NMR spectra. The effects of very high MAS rates (>10 kHz) on cross polarization dynamics are also being investigated for similar reasons. The authors have been reinvestigating the prospects of using zero field NMR types of techniques for two dimensional NMR structural analysis of complex organic solids such as coals. Currently MAS spin rates are not sufficiently high to permit zero field in high field NMR for protons in typical organic solids, however they are compatible with {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C dipolar couplings. In collaboration with Dr. Robert Tycko of AT T Bell Laboratories, inventor of the zero field in high field NMR method, the authors have performed the first zero field in high field {sup 13}C NMR experiments. These results are described. 9 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Understanding NMR Chemical Shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jameson, Cynthia J.

    1996-10-01

    The NMR chemical shift serves as a paradigm for molecular electronic properties. We consider the factors that determine the general magnitudes of the shifts, the state of the art in theoretical calculations, the nature of the shielding tensor, and the multidimensional shielding surface that describes the variation of the shielding with nuclear positions. We also examine the nature of the intermolecular shielding surface as a general example of a supermolecule property surface. The observed chemical shift in the zero-pressure limit is determined not only by the value of the shielding at the equilibrium geometry, but the dynamic average over the multidimensional shielding surface during rotation and vibration of the molecule. In the gas, solution, or adsorbed phase it is an average of the intermolecular shielding surface over all the configurations of the molecule with its neighbors. The temperature dependence of the chemical shift in the isolated molecule, the changes upon isotopic substitution, the changes with environment, are well characterized experimentally so that quantum mechanical descriptions of electronic structure and theories related to dynamics averaging of any electronic property can be subjected to stringent test.

  6. Polarization transfer NMR imaging

    DOEpatents

    Sillerud, Laurel O.; van Hulsteyn, David B.

    1990-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) image is obtained with spatial information modulated by chemical information. The modulation is obtained through polarization transfer from a first element representing the desired chemical, or functional, information, which is covalently bonded and spin-spin coupled with a second element effective to provide the imaging data. First and second rf pulses are provided at first and second frequencies for exciting the imaging and functional elements, with imaging gradients applied therebetween to spatially separate the nuclei response for imaging. The second rf pulse is applied at a time after the first pulse which is the inverse of the spin coupling constant to select the transfer element nuclei which are spin coupled to the functional element nuclei for imaging. In a particular application, compounds such as glucose, lactate, or lactose, can be labeled with .sup.13 C and metabolic processes involving the compounds can be imaged with the sensitivity of .sup.1 H and the selectivity of .sup.13 C.

  7. Integrative NMR for biomolecular research.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woonghee; Cornilescu, Gabriel; Dashti, Hesam; Eghbalnia, Hamid R; Tonelli, Marco; Westler, William M; Butcher, Samuel E; Henzler-Wildman, Katherine A; Markley, John L

    2016-04-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful technique for determining structural and functional features of biomolecules in physiological solution as well as for observing their intermolecular interactions in real-time. However, complex steps associated with its practice have made the approach daunting for non-specialists. We introduce an NMR platform that makes biomolecular NMR spectroscopy much more accessible by integrating tools, databases, web services, and video tutorials that can be launched by simple installation of NMRFAM software packages or using a cross-platform virtual machine that can be run on any standard laptop or desktop computer. The software package can be downloaded freely from the NMRFAM software download page ( http://pine.nmrfam.wisc.edu/download_packages.html ), and detailed instructions are available from the Integrative NMR Video Tutorial page ( http://pine.nmrfam.wisc.edu/integrative.html ).

  8. Compact orthogonal NMR field sensor

    DOEpatents

    Gerald, II, Rex E.; Rathke, Jerome W.

    2009-02-03

    A Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor for emitting two orthogonal electro-magnetic fields in a common space. More particularly, a replacement inductor for existing NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) sensors to allow for NMR imaging. The Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor has a conductive coil and a central conductor electrically connected in series. The central conductor is at least partially surrounded by the coil. The coil and central conductor are electrically or electro-magnetically connected to a device having a means for producing or inducing a current through the coil and central conductor. The Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor can be used in NMR imaging applications to determine the position and the associated NMR spectrum of a sample within the electro-magnetic field of the central conductor.

  9. NMR Imaging of Elastomeric Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-11-30

    on ’everse if necessary and identify by block number) FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP nuclear magnetic resonance , imaging, elastomers, tires, composites, porous...correspondence should be addressed 1i ABSTRACT Nuclear magnetic resonance images have been obtained for four porous glass disks of different porosities...INDEX HEADINGS: NMR imaging Porous materials Spin relaxation 2. I0J INTRODUCTION Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging has seen increasing use in the

  10. NMR characterization of thin films

    DOEpatents

    Gerald II, Rex E.; Klingler, Robert J.; Rathke, Jerome W.; Diaz, Rocio; Vukovic, Lela

    2010-06-15

    A method, apparatus, and system for characterizing thin film materials. The method, apparatus, and system includes a container for receiving a starting material, applying a gravitational force, a magnetic force, and an electric force or combinations thereof to at least the starting material, forming a thin film material, sensing an NMR signal from the thin film material and analyzing the NMR signal to characterize the thin film of material.

  11. Optical pumping and xenon NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Raftery, M. Daniel

    1991-11-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of xenon has become an important tool for investigating a wide variety of materials, especially those with high surface area. The sensitivity of its chemical shift to environment, and its chemical inertness and adsorption properties make xenon a particularly useful NMR probe. This work discusses the application of optical pumping to enhance the sensitivity of xenon NMR experiments, thereby allowing them to be used in the study of systems with lower surface area. A novel method of optically-pumping 129Xe in low magnetic field below an NMR spectrometer and subsequent transfer of the gas to high magnetic field is described. NMR studies of the highly polarized gas adsorbed onto powdered samples with low to moderate surface areas are now possible. For instance, NMR studies of optically-pumped xenon adsorbed onto polyacrylic acid show that xenon has a large interaction with the surface. By modeling the low temperature data in terms of a sticking probability and the gas phase xenon-xenon interaction, the diffusion coefficient for xenon at the surface of the polymer is determined. The sensitivity enhancement afforded by optical pumping also allows the NMR observation of xenon thin films frozen onto the inner surfaces of different sample cells. The geometry of the thin films results in interesting line shapes that are due to the bulk magnetic susceptibility of xenon. Experiments are also described that combine optical pumping with optical detection for high sensitivity in low magnetic field to observe the quadrupoler evolution of 131 Xe spins at the surface of the pumping cells. In cells with macroscopic asymmetry, a residual quadrupolar interaction causes a splitting in the 131Xe NMR frequencies in bare Pyrex glass cells and cells with added hydrogen.

  12. Optical pumping and xenon NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Raftery, M.D.

    1991-11-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of xenon has become an important tool for investigating a wide variety of materials, especially those with high surface area. The sensitivity of its chemical shift to environment, and its chemical inertness and adsorption properties make xenon a particularly useful NMR probe. This work discusses the application of optical pumping to enhance the sensitivity of xenon NMR experiments, thereby allowing them to be used in the study of systems with lower surface area. A novel method of optically-pumping [sup 129]Xe in low magnetic field below an NMR spectrometer and subsequent transfer of the gas to high magnetic field is described. NMR studies of the highly polarized gas adsorbed onto powdered samples with low to moderate surface areas are now possible. For instance, NMR studies of optically-pumped xenon adsorbed onto polyacrylic acid show that xenon has a large interaction with the surface. By modeling the low temperature data in terms of a sticking probability and the gas phase xenon-xenon interaction, the diffusion coefficient for xenon at the surface of the polymer is determined. The sensitivity enhancement afforded by optical pumping also allows the NMR observation of xenon thin films frozen onto the inner surfaces of different sample cells. The geometry of the thin films results in interesting line shapes that are due to the bulk magnetic susceptibility of xenon. Experiments are also described that combine optical pumping with optical detection for high sensitivity in low magnetic field to observe the quadrupoler evolution of 131 Xe spins at the surface of the pumping cells. In cells with macroscopic asymmetry, a residual quadrupolar interaction causes a splitting in the [sup 131]Xe NMR frequencies in bare Pyrex glass cells and cells with added hydrogen.

  13. Multispectral Analysis of NMR Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butterfield, R. L.; Vannier, M. W. And Associates; Jordan, D.

    1985-01-01

    Conference paper discusses initial efforts to adapt multispectral satellite-image analysis to nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) scans of human body. Flexibility of these techniques makes it possible to present NMR data in variety of formats, including pseudocolor composite images of pathological internal features. Techniques do not have to be greatly modified from form in which used to produce satellite maps of such Earth features as water, rock, or foliage.

  14. Multispectral Analysis of NMR Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butterfield, R. L.; Vannier, M. W. And Associates; Jordan, D.

    1985-01-01

    Conference paper discusses initial efforts to adapt multispectral satellite-image analysis to nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) scans of human body. Flexibility of these techniques makes it possible to present NMR data in variety of formats, including pseudocolor composite images of pathological internal features. Techniques do not have to be greatly modified from form in which used to produce satellite maps of such Earth features as water, rock, or foliage.

  15. NMR characterization of thin films

    DOEpatents

    Gerald, II, Rex E.; Klingler, Robert J.; Rathke, Jerome W.; Diaz, Rocio; Vukovic, Lela

    2008-11-25

    A method, apparatus, and system for characterizing thin film materials. The method, apparatus, and system includes a container for receiving a starting material, applying a gravitational force, a magnetic force, and an electric force or combinations thereof to at least the starting material, forming a thin film material, sensing an NMR signal from the thin film material and analyzing the NMR signal to characterize the thin film of material.

  16. Medical applications of NMR imaging and NMR spectroscopy with stable isotopes. Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Matwiyoff, N.A.

    1983-01-01

    The current status of NMR imaging and NMR spectroscopy are summarized. For the most part examples from the March 1983 Puerto Rico symposium are used to illustrate the utility of NMR in medicine. 18 refs., 5 figs.

  17. Two dimensional NMR and NMR relaxation studies of coal structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1988-01-01

    This report covers the progress made on the title project during the current reporting period. Four major areas of inquiry are being pursued. Advanced solid state NMR methods are being developed to assay the distribution of the various important functional groups in coals that determine the reactivity of coals. Other methods are being developed which will also determine how these functional groups are linked together. A third area of investigation concerns how molecular mobility in coals impacts NMR relaxation times, which is important for interpretation of such data in terms of the mobile phase in coals model. Along the same lines we are also using these studies to establish protocols for obtaining the best quantitative response from coals in solid state C-13 NMR spectra. This quarter we have focused on variable temperature spin lattice relaxation measurements for several of the Argonne coals. 5 figs.

  18. Two dimensional NMR and NMR relaxation studies of coal structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1988-01-01

    This report covers the progress made on the title project during the current reporting period. Four major areas of inquiry are being pursued. Advanced solid state NMR methods are being developed to assay the distribution of the various important functional groups in coals that determine the reactivity of coals. Other methods are being developed which will also determine how these functional groups are linked together. A third area of investigation concerns how molecular mobility in coals impacts NMR relaxation times, which is important for interpretation of such data in terms of the mobile phase in coals model. Along the same lines we are also using these studies to establish protocols for obtaining the best quantitative response from coals in solid state C-13 NMR spectra. This quarter we have focussed on spin lattice relaxation measurements for several of the Argonne coals. 2 figs., 1 tab.

  19. NMR planar microcoil for microanalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorli, B.; Chateaux, J. F.; Quiquerez, L.; Bouchet-Fakri, L.; Briguet, A.; Morin, P.

    2006-11-01

    This article deals with the analysis of small sample volume by using a planar microcoil and a micromachined cavity. This microcoil is used as a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) radio frequency detection coil in order to perform in vitro NMR analysis of the sample introduced into the microcavity. It is a real challenging task to develop microsystem for NMR spectrum extraction for smaller and smaller sample volume. Moreover, it is advantageous that these microsystems could be integrated in a Micro Total Analysing System (μ -TAS) as an analysing tool. In this paper, NMR theory, description, fabrication process and electrical characterization of planar microcoils receiver are described. Results obtained on NMR microspectroscopy experiments have been performed on water and ethanol, using a 1 mm diameter planar coil. This microcoil is tuned and matched at 85.13 MHz which is the Larmor frequency of proton in a 2 T magnetic field. This paper has been presented at “3e colloque interdisciplinaire en instrumentation (C2I 2004)”, École Normale Supérieure de Cachan, 29 30 janvier 2004.

  20. NMR characterization of shocked quartz

    SciTech Connect

    Boslough, M.B.; Cygan, R.T.; Assink, R.A.; Kirkpatrick, R.J.

    1994-03-01

    We have characterized experimentally and naturally-shocked quartz (both synthetic and natural samples) by solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Relaxation analysis of experimentally-shocked samples provides a means for quantitative characterization of the amorphous/disordered silica component NMR spectra demonstrate that magnetization in both the amorphous and crystalline components follows power-law behavior as a function of recycle time. This observation is consistent with the relaxation of nuclear spins by paramagnetic impurities. A fractal dimension can be extracted from the power-law exponent associated with each phase, and relative abundances can be extracted from integrated intensities of deconvolved peaks. NMR spectroscopy of naturally-shocked sandstone from Meteor Crater, Arizona (USA) led to the discovery of a new amorphous hydroxylated silica phase. Solid state NMR spectra of both experimentally and naturally shocked quartz were unexpectedly rich in microstructural information, especially when combined with relaxation analysis and cross-polarization studies. We suggest solid state NMR as a potentially useful tool for examining shock-induced microstructural changes in other inorganic compounds, with possible implications for shock processing of structural ceramics.

  1. Improving NMR Structures of RNA

    PubMed Central

    Bermejo, Guillermo A.; Clore, G. Marius; Schwieters, Charles D.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Here, we show that modern solution NMR structures of RNA exhibit more steric clashes and conformational ambiguities than their crystallographic X-ray counterparts. To tackle these issues, we developed RNA-ff1, a new force field for structure calculation with Xplor-NIH. Using seven published NMR datasets, RNA-ff1 improves covalent geometry and MolProbity validation criteria for clashes and backbone conformation in most cases, relative to both the previous Xplor-NIH force field and the original structures associated with the experimental data. In addition, with smaller base pair step rises in helical stems, RNA-ff1 structures enjoy more favorable base stacking. Finally, structural accuracy improves in the majority cases, as supported by complete residual dipolar coupling cross-validation. Thus, the reported advances show great promise in bridging the quality gap that separates NMR and X-ray structures of RNA. PMID:27066747

  2. Solution NMR conformation of glycosaminoglycans.

    PubMed

    Pomin, Vitor H

    2014-04-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been giving a pivotal contribution to the progress of glycomics, mostly by elucidating the structural, dynamical, conformational and intermolecular binding aspects of carbohydrates. Particularly in the field of conformation, NOE resonances, scalar couplings, residual dipolar couplings, and chemical shift anisotropy offsets have been the principal NMR parameters utilized. Molecular dynamics calculations restrained by NMR-data input are usually employed in conjunction to generate glycosidic bond dihedral angles. Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are a special class of sulfated polysaccharides extensively studied worldwide. Besides regulating innumerous physiological processes, these glycans are also widely explored in the global market as either clinical or nutraceutical agents. The conformational aspects of GAGs are key regulators to the quality of interactions with the functional proteins involved in biological events. This report discusses the solution conformation of each GAG type analyzed by one or more of the above-mentioned methods.

  3. Carbon Catabolite Repression and the Related Genes of ccpA, ptsH and hprK in Thermoanaerobacterium aotearoense

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Muzi; Lu, Yanping; Wang, Jufang; Li, Shuang; Wang, Xiaoning

    2015-01-01

    The strictly anaerobic, Gram-positive bacterium, Thermoanaerobacterium aotearoense SCUT27, is capable of producing ethanol, hydrogen and lactic acid by directly fermenting glucan, xylan and various lignocellulosically derived sugars. By using non-metabolizable and metabolizable sugars as substrates, we found that cellobiose, galactose, arabinose and starch utilization was strongly inhibited by the existence of 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG). However, the xylose and mannose consumptions were not markedly affected by 2-DG at the concentration of one-tenth of the metabolizable sugar. Accordingly, T. aotearoense SCUT27 could consume xylose and mannose in the presence of glucose. The carbon catabolite repression (CCR) related genes, ccpA, ptsH and hprK were confirmed to exist in T. aotearoense SCUT27 through gene cloning and protein characterization. The highly purified Histidine-containing Protein (HPr) could be specifically phosphorylated at Serine 46 by HPr kinase/phosphatase (HPrK/P) with no need to add fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (FBP) or glucose-6-phosphate (Glc-6-P) in the reaction mixture. The specific protein-interaction of catabolite control protein A (CcpA) and phosphorylated HPr was proved via affinity chromatography in the absence of formaldehyde. The equilibrium binding constant (KD) of CcpA and HPrSerP was determined as 2.22 ± 0.36 nM by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis, indicating the high affinity between these two proteins. PMID:26540271

  4. Two dimensional NMR and NMR relaxation studies of coal structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1990-01-01

    This report covers the progress made on the title project and summarizes the accomplishments for the project period. Four major areas of inquiry have been pursued. Advanced solid state NMR methods are being developed to assay the distribution of the various important functional groups in coals that determine the reactivity of coals. Other methods are being developed which will also determine how these functional groups are linked together. A third area of investigation concerns how molecular mobility in coals impacts NMR relaxation times, which is important for interpretation of such data in terms of the mobile phase in coals model. Along the same lines the authors are also using these studies to establish protocols for obtaining the best quantitative response from coals in solid state C-13 NMR spectra. The effects of very high MAS rates (>10 kHz) on cross polarization dynamics are also being investigated for similar reasons. The authors have concentrated on a theoretical treatment of pairs of tightly coupled spin {1/2} nuclei under magic angle spinning conditions. The average Hamiltonian theory developed here is required for a quantitative understanding of two dimensional NMR experiments of such spin pairs in solids. These experiments in turn provide a means of determining connectivities between resonances in solid state NMR spectra. Development of these techniques will allow us to establish connectivities between functional components in coals. The complete description of these spin dynamics has turned out to be complex, and is necessary to provide a foundation upon which such experiments may be quantitatively interpreted in complex mixtures such as coals. 25 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Two dimensional NMR and NMR relaxation studies of coal structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1989-01-01

    This report covers the progress made on the title project and summarizes the accomplishments for the project period. Four major areas of inquiry have been pursued. Advanced solid state NMR methods are being developed to assay the distribution of the various important functional groups in coals that determine the reactivity of coals. Other methods are being developed which will also determine how these functional groups are linked together. A third area of investigation concern how molecular mobility in coals impacts NMR relaxation times, which is important for interpretation of such data in terms of the mobile phase in coals model. Along the same lines we are also using these studies to establish protocols for obtaining the best quantitative response from coals in solid state C-13 NMR spectra. The effects of very high MAS rates (>10 kHz) on cross polarization dynamics are also being investigated for similar reasons. During the last quarter the authors have concentrated on improvements in cross polarization (CP) sequences with a goal of making the CP process insensitive to experimental conditions such as the magic angle spinning (MAS) rate. In order to be able to use fields the order of 7.0 T or higher, CP efficiency must be maintained at MAS rates of over 10 kHz. The standard sequences have severe limitations at these rates which lead to intensity distortions in {sup 13}C CPMAS spectra. Thus in order to be able to take advantage of the increases in sensitivity and resolution that accompany high field operation, improvements in the NMR methods are required. The new sequences the authors are developing will be especially important for quantitative analysis of coal structure by {sup 13}C solid state NMR at high field strengths. 13 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. "Solvent Effects" in 1H NMR Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavaleiro, Jose A. S.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a simple undergraduate experiment in chemistry dealing with the "solvent effects" in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Stresses the importance of having students learn NMR spectroscopy as a tool in analytical chemistry. (TW)

  7. "Solvent Effects" in 1H NMR Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavaleiro, Jose A. S.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a simple undergraduate experiment in chemistry dealing with the "solvent effects" in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Stresses the importance of having students learn NMR spectroscopy as a tool in analytical chemistry. (TW)

  8. Protein-Inhibitor Interaction Studies Using NMR

    PubMed Central

    Ishima, Rieko

    2015-01-01

    Solution-state NMR has been widely applied to determine the three-dimensional structure, dynamics, and molecular interactions of proteins. The designs of experiments used in protein NMR differ from those used for small-molecule NMR, primarily because the information available prior to an experiment, such as molecular mass and knowledge of the primary structure, is unique for proteins compared to small molecules. In this review article, protein NMR for structural biology is introduced with comparisons to small-molecule NMR, such as descriptions of labeling strategies and the effects of molecular dynamics on relaxation. Next, applications for protein NMR are reviewed, especially practical aspects for protein-observed ligand-protein interaction studies. Overall, the following topics are described: (1) characteristics of protein NMR, (2) methods to detect protein-ligand interactions by NMR, and (3) practical aspects of carrying out protein-observed inhibitor-protein interaction studies. PMID:26361636

  9. Push-through Direction Injectin NMR Automation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and mass spectrometry (MS) are the two major spectroscopic techniques successfully used in metabolomics studies. The non-invasive, quantitative and reproducible characteristics make NMR spectroscopy an excellent technique for detection of endogeno...

  10. Push-through Direction Injectin NMR Automation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and mass spectrometry (MS) are the two major spectroscopic techniques successfully used in metabolomics studies. The non-invasive, quantitative and reproducible characteristics make NMR spectroscopy an excellent technique for detection of endogeno...

  11. Computer Simulation of NMR Spectra.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellison, A.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a PASCAL computer program which provides interactive analysis and display of high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra from spin one-half nuclei using a hard-copy or monitor. Includes general and theoretical program descriptions, program capability, and examples of its use. (Source for program/documentation is included.)…

  12. Deuterium Exchange Kinetics by NMR.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roper, G. C.

    1985-01-01

    Describes a physical chemistry experiment which allows such concepts as kinetics, catalysis, isotope shifts, coupling constants, and the use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) for quantitative work to be covered in the same exercise. Background information, experimental procedures used, and typical results obtained are included. (JN)

  13. Petrophysical applications of NMR imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Rothwell, W.P.; Vinegar, H.J.

    1985-12-01

    A system for obtaining high-resolution NMR images of oil field cores is described. Separate proton density and T/sub 2/ relaxation images are obtained to distinguish spatial variations of fluid-filled porosity and the physical nature of the pores. Results are presented for typical sandstones.

  14. Deuterium Exchange Kinetics by NMR.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roper, G. C.

    1985-01-01

    Describes a physical chemistry experiment which allows such concepts as kinetics, catalysis, isotope shifts, coupling constants, and the use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) for quantitative work to be covered in the same exercise. Background information, experimental procedures used, and typical results obtained are included. (JN)

  15. Two dimensional NMR and NMR relaxation studies of coal structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1992-05-27

    This report covers the progress made on the title project for the project period. Four major areas of inquiry are being pursued. Advanced solid state NMR methods are being developed to assay the distribution of the various important functional groups that determine the reactivity of coals. Special attention is being paid to methods that are compatible with the very high magic angle sample spinning rates needed for operation at the high magnetic field strengths available today. Polarization inversion methods utilizing the difference in heat capacities of small groups of spins are particularly promising. Methods combining proton-proton spin diffusion with {sup 13}C CPMAS readout are being developed to determine the connectivity of functional groups in coals in a high sensitivity relay type of experiment. Additional work is aimed a delineating the role of methyl group rotation in the proton NMR relaxation behavior of coals.

  16. Optimized multiple quantum MAS lineshape simulations in solid state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brouwer, William J.; Davis, Michael C.; Mueller, Karl T.

    2009-10-01

    /Linux Operating system: UNIX/Linux Has the code been vectorised or parallelized?: Yes RAM: Example: (1597 powder angles) × (200 Samples) × (81 F2 frequency pts) × (31 F1 frequency points) = 3.5M, SMP AMD opteron Classification: 2.3 External routines: OCTAVE ( http://www.gnu.org/software/octave/), GNU Scientific Library ( http://www.gnu.org/software/gsl/), OPENMP ( http://openmp.org/wp/) Nature of problem: The optimal simulation and modeling of multiple quantum magic angle spinning NMR spectra, for general systems, especially those with mild to significant disorder. The approach outlined and implemented in C and OCTAVE also produces model parameter error estimates. Solution method: A model for each distinct chemical site is first proposed, for the individual contribution of crystallite orientations to the spectrum. This model is averaged over all powder angles [1], as well as the (stochastic) parameters; isotropic chemical shift and quadrupole coupling constant. The latter is accomplished via sampling from a bi-variate Gaussian distribution, using the Box-Muller algorithm to transform Sobol (quasi) random numbers [2]. A simulated annealing optimization is performed, and finally the non-linear jackknife [3] is applied in developing model parameter error estimates. Additional comments: The distribution contains a script, mqmasOpt.m, which runs in the OCTAVE language workspace. Running time: Example: (1597 powder angles) × (200 Samples) × (81 F2 frequency pts) × (31 F1 frequency points) = 58.35 seconds, SMP AMD opteron. References:S.K. Zaremba, Annali di Matematica Pura ed Applicata 73 (1966) 293. H. Niederreiter, Random Number Generation and Quasi-Monte Carlo Methods, SIAM, 1992. T. Fox, D. Hinkley, K. Larntz, Technometrics 22 (1980) 29.

  17. A new member of ferrous sulfates, FeSO{sub 4}·2H{sub 2}O with PtS topology showing spin-canted long-range antiferromagnetic ordering

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Long; Liu, Wei Cao, Lixin; Su, Ge; Gao, Rongjie; Yang, Hongzhan

    2015-11-15

    A sanderite ferrous sulfate FeSO{sub 4}·2H{sub 2}O has been synthesized by the hydro/solvothermal method. Its crystal structure (Pccn, a=6.3160 Å, b=7.7550 Å, c=8.9880 Å, V=440.2 Å{sup 3}, Z=4) can be regarded as the condensation of alternately corner-shared FeO{sub 4}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2} octahedra and SO{sub 4} tetrahedra with a similar topology of PtS. By structural comparison with the known hydrated ferrous sulfates, the structural relation among them has been noted and discussed in detail. A variable temperature magnetic study shows a spin-canted long-range antiferromagnetic ordering in the low temperature regime, which might result from a possible phase transition during the cooling from the high temperature. - Graphical abstract: As a new number of ferrous sulfates, sanderite FeSO{sub 4}·2H{sub 2}O has been synthesized under hydro/solvothermal conditions, which exhibits a similar topology of PtS. - Highlights: • Sanderite ferrous sulfate has been synthesized. • The topology of its structure is similar to that of PtS. • A structural relation between these hydrated ferrous sulfates is discovered.

  18. SEnD NMR: Sensitivity Enhanced n-Dimensional NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gledhill, John M.; Wand, A. Joshua

    2010-02-01

    Sparse sampling offers tremendous potential for overcoming the time limitations imposed by traditional Cartesian sampling of indirectly detected dimensions of multidimensional NMR data. However, in many instances sensitivity rather than time remains of foremost importance when collecting data on protein samples. Here we explore how to optimize the collection of radial sampled multidimensional NMR data to achieve maximal signal-to-noise. A method is presented that exploits a rigorous definition of the minimal set of radial sampling angles required to resolve all peaks of interest in combination with a fundamental statistical property of radial sampled data. The approach appears general and can achieve a substantial sensitivity advantage over Cartesian sampling for the same total data acquisition time. Termed Sensitivity Enhanced n-Dimensional or SEnD NMR, the method involves three basic steps. First, data collection is optimized using routines to determine a minimal set of radial sampling angles required to resolve frequencies in the radially sampled chemical shift evolution dimensions. Second, appropriate combinations of experimental parameters (transients and increments) are defined by simple statistical considerations in order to optimize signal-to-noise in single angle frequency domain spectra. Finally, the data is processed with a direct multidimensional Fourier transform and a statistical artifact and noise removal step is employed.

  19. Two dimensional NMR and NMR relaxation studies of coal structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1989-01-01

    This report covers the progress made on the title project and summarizes the accomplishments for the project period. Four major areas of inquiry have been pursued. Advanced solid state NMR methods are being developed to assay the distribution of the various important functional groups in coals that determine the reactivity of coals. Other methods are being developed which will also determine how these functional groups are linked together. A third area of investigation concerns how molecular mobility in coals impacts NMR relaxation times, which is important for interpretation of such data in terms of the mobile phase in coal models. Along the same lines the author are also using these studies to establish protocols for obtaining the best quantitative response from coals in solid state C-13 NMR spectra. The effects of very high MAS rates (>10 kHz) on cross polarization dynamics are also being investigated for similar reasons. During the last quarter the authors has concentrated on improvements in cross polarization (CP) sequences with a goal of making the CP process insensitive to experimental conditions such as the Hartmann-Hahn mismatch. It has been found that the usual theories of CP are incorrect, and that the CP process is very heterogeneous in nature. This has significant implications on methods typically used in quantifying {sup 13}C CPMAS spectra of coals. 19 refs., 11 figs.

  20. Recognition of lumbar disk herniation with NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Chafetz, N.I.; Genant, H.K.; Moon, K.L.; Helms, C.A.; Morris, J.M.

    1983-12-01

    Fifteen nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of 14 patients with herniated lumbar intervertebral disks were performed on the UCSF NMR imager. Computed tomographic (CT) scans done on a GE CT/T 8800 or comparable scanner were available at the time of NMR scan interpretation. Of the 16 posterior disk ruptures seen at CT, 12 were recognized on NMR. Diminished nucleus pulposus signal intensity was present in all ruptured disks. In one patient, NMR scans before and after chymopapain injection showed retraction of the protruding part of the disk and loss of signal intensity after chemonucleolysis. Postoperative fibrosis demonstrated by CT in one patient and at surgery in another showed intermediate to high signal intensity on NMR, easily distinguishing it from nearby thecal sac and disk. While CT remains the method of choice for evaluation of the patient with suspected lumbar disk rupture, the results of this study suggest that NMR may play a role in evaluating this common clinical problem.

  1. Sorption isotherm measurements by NMR.

    PubMed

    Leisen, Johannes; Beckham, Haskell W; Benham, Michael

    2002-01-01

    An experimental setup is described for the automated recording of sorption isotherms by NMR experiments at precisely defined levels of relative humidity (RH). Implementation is demonstrated for a cotton fabric; Bloch decays. T1 and T2* relaxation times were measured at predefined steps of increasing and decreasing relative humidities (RHs) so that a complete isotherm of NMR properties was obtained. Bloch decays were analyzed by fitting to relaxation functions consisting or a slow- and a fast-relaxing component. The fraction of slow-relaxing component was greater than the fraction of sorbed moisture determined from gravimetric sorption data. The excess slow-relaxing component was attributed to plasticized segments of the formerly rigid cellulose matrix. T1 and T2* sorption isotherms exhibit hysteresis similar to gravimetric sorption isotherms. However, correlating RH to moisture content (MC) reveals that both relaxation constants depend only on MC, and not on the history of moisture exposure.

  2. Two-dimensional NMR spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, T.C.

    1987-06-01

    This article is the second in a two-part series. In part one (ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY, May 15) the authors discussed one-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra and some relatively advanced nuclear spin gymnastics experiments that provide a capability for selective sensitivity enhancements. In this article and overview and some applications of two-dimensional NMR experiments are presented. These powerful experiments are important complements to the one-dimensional experiments. As in the more sophisticated one-dimensional experiments, the two-dimensional experiments involve three distinct time periods: a preparation period, t/sub 0/; an evolution period, t/sub 1/; and a detection period, t/sub 2/.

  3. NMR Hyperpolarization Techniques for Biomedicine

    PubMed Central

    Nikolaou, Panayiotis; Goodson, Boyd M.

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in NMR hyperpolarization have enabled a wide array of new in vivo molecular imaging modalities—ranging from functional imaging of the lungs to metabolic imaging of cancer. This Concept article explores selected advances in methods for the preparation and use of hyperpolarized contrast agents, many of which are already at or near the phase of their clinical validation in patients. PMID:25470566

  4. Hyperpolarized 131Xe NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stupic, Karl F.; Cleveland, Zackary I.; Pavlovskaya, Galina E.; Meersmann, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Hyperpolarized (hp) 131Xe with up to 2.2% spin polarization (i.e., 5000-fold signal enhancement at 9.4 T) was obtained after separation from the rubidium vapor of the spin-exchange optical pumping (SEOP) process. The SEOP was applied for several minutes in a stopped-flow mode, and the fast, quadrupolar-driven T1 relaxation of this spin I = 3/2 noble gas isotope required a rapid subsequent rubidium removal and swift transfer into the high magnetic field region for NMR detection. Because of the xenon density dependent 131Xe quadrupolar relaxation in the gas phase, the SEOP polarization build-up exhibits an even more pronounced dependence on xenon partial pressure than that observed in 129Xe SEOP. 131Xe is the only stable noble gas isotope with a positive gyromagnetic ratio and shows therefore a different relative phase between hp signal and thermal signal compared to all other noble gases. The gas phase 131Xe NMR spectrum displays a surface and magnetic field dependent quadrupolar splitting that was found to have additional gas pressure and gas composition dependence. The splitting was reduced by the presence of water vapor that presumably influences xenon-surface interactions. The hp 131Xe spectrum shows differential line broadening, suggesting the presence of strong adsorption sites. Beyond hp 131Xe NMR spectroscopy studies, a general equation for the high temperature, thermal spin polarization, P, for spin I⩾1/2 nuclei is presented.

  5. Hyperpolarized 131Xe NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Stupic, Karl F.; Cleveland, Zackary I.; Pavlovskaya, Galina E.; Meersmann, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Hyperpolarized (hp) 131Xe with up to 2.2% spin polarization (i.e., 5000-fold signal enhancement at 9.4 T) was obtained after separation from the rubidium vapor of the spin-exchange optical pumping (SEOP) process. The SEOP was applied for several minutes in a stopped-flow mode, and the fast, quadrupolar-driven T1 relaxation of this spin I = 3/2 noble gas isotope required a rapid subsequent rubidium removal and swift transfer into the high magnetic field region for NMR detection. Because of the xenon density dependent 131Xe quadrupolar relaxation in the gas phase, the SEOP polarization build-up exhibits an even more pronounced dependence on xenon partial pressure than that observed in 129Xe SEOP. 131Xe is the only stable noble gas isotope with a positive gyromagnetic ratio and shows therefore a different relative phase between hp signal and thermal signal compared to all other noble gases. The gas phase 131Xe NMR spectrum displays a surface and magnetic field dependent quadrupolar splitting that was found to have additional gas pressure and gas composition dependence. The splitting was reduced by the presence of water vapor that presumably influences xenon-surface interactions. The hp 131Xe spectrum shows differential line broadening, suggesting the presence of strong adsorption sites. Beyond hp 131Xe NMR spectroscopy studies, a general equation for the high temperature, thermal spin polarization, P, for spin I⩾1/2 nuclei is presented. PMID:21051249

  6. Microcoil NMR spectroscopy: a novel tool for biological high throughput NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hopson, Russell E; Peti, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    Microcoil NMR spectroscopy is based on the increase of coil sensitivity for smaller coil diameters (approximately 1/d). Microcoil NMR probes deliver a remarkable mass-based sensitivity increase (8- to 12-fold) when compared with commonly used 5-mm NMR probes. Although microcoil NMR probes are a well established analytical tool for small molecule liquid-state NMR spectroscopy, after spectroscopy only recently have microcoil NMR probes become available for biomolecular NMR spectroscopy. This chapter highlights differences between commercially available microcoil NMR probes suitable for biomolecular NMR spectroscopy. Furthermore, it provides practical guidance for the use of microcoil probes and shows direct applications for structural biology and structural genomics, such as optimal target screening and structure determination, among others.

  7. Advanced NMR technology for bioscience and biotechnology

    SciTech Connect

    Hammel, P.C.; Hernandez, G.; Trewhella, J.; Unkefer, C.J.; Boumenthal, D.K.; Kennedy, M.A.; Moore, G.J.

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). NMR plays critical roles in bioscience and biotechnology in both imaging and structure determination. NMR is limited, however, by the inherent low sensitivity of the NMR experiment and the demands for spectral resolution required to study biomolecules. The authors addressed both of these issues by working on the development of NMR force microscopy for molecular imaging, and high field NMR with isotope labeling to overcome limitations in the size of biomolecules that can be studied using NMR. A novel rf coil design for NMR force microscopy was developed that increases the limits of sensitivity in magnetic resonance detection for imaging, and the authors demonstrated sub-surface spatial imaging capabilities. The authors also made advances in the miniaturization of two critical NMR force microscope components. They completed high field NMR and isotope labeling studies of a muscle protein complex which is responsible for regulating muscle contraction and is too large for study using conventional NMR approaches.

  8. Scalable NMR spectroscopy with semiconductor chips

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Dongwan; Paulsen, Jeffrey; Sun, Nan; Song, Yi-Qiao; Ham, Donhee

    2014-01-01

    State-of-the-art NMR spectrometers using superconducting magnets have enabled, with their ultrafine spectral resolution, the determination of the structure of large molecules such as proteins, which is one of the most profound applications of modern NMR spectroscopy. Many chemical and biotechnological applications, however, involve only small-to-medium size molecules, for which the ultrafine resolution of the bulky, expensive, and high-maintenance NMR spectrometers is not required. For these applications, there is a critical need for portable, affordable, and low-maintenance NMR spectrometers to enable in-field, on-demand, or online applications (e.g., quality control, chemical reaction monitoring) and co-use of NMR with other analytical methods (e.g., chromatography, electrophoresis). As a critical step toward NMR spectrometer miniaturization, small permanent magnets with high field homogeneity have been developed. In contrast, NMR spectrometer electronics capable of modern multidimensional spectroscopy have thus far remained bulky. Complementing the magnet miniaturization, here we integrate the NMR spectrometer electronics into 4-mm2 silicon chips. Furthermore, we perform various multidimensional NMR spectroscopies by operating these spectrometer electronics chips together with a compact permanent magnet. This combination of the spectrometer-electronics-on-a-chip with a permanent magnet represents a useful step toward miniaturization of the overall NMR spectrometer into a portable platform. PMID:25092330

  9. Solid-state NMR of inorganic semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Yesinowski, James P

    2012-01-01

    Studies of inorganic semiconductors by solid-state NMR vary widely in terms of the nature of the samples investigated, the techniques employed to observe the NMR signal, and the types of information obtained. Compared with the NMR of diamagnetic non-semiconducting substances, important differences often result from the presence of electron or hole carriers that are the hallmark of semiconductors, and whose theoretical interpretation can be involved. This review aims to provide a broad perspective on the topic for the non-expert by providing: (1) a basic introduction to semiconductor physical concepts relevant to NMR, including common crystal structures and the various methods of making samples; (2) discussions of the NMR spin Hamiltonian, details of some of the NMR techniques and strategies used to make measurements and theoretically predict NMR parameters, and examples of how each of the terms in the Hamiltonian has provided useful information in bulk semiconductors; (3) a discussion of the additional considerations needed to interpret the NMR of nanoscale semiconductors, with selected examples. The area of semiconductor NMR is being revitalized by this interest in nanoscale semiconductors, the great improvements in NMR detection sensitivity and resolution that have occurred, and the current interest in optical pumping and spintronics-related studies. Promising directions for future research will be noted throughout.

  10. Development of LC-13C NMR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorn, H. C.; Wang, J. S.; Glass, T. E.

    1986-01-01

    This study involves the development of C-13 nuclear resonance as an on-line detector for liquid chromatography (LC-C-13 NMR) for the chemical characterization of aviation fuels. The initial focus of this study was the development of a high sensitivity flow C-13 NMR probe. Since C-13 NMR sensitivity is of paramount concern, considerable effort during the first year was directed at new NMR probe designs. In particular, various toroid coil designs were examined. In addition, corresponding shim coils for correcting the main magnetic field (B sub 0) homogeneity were examined. Based on these initial probe design studies, an LC-C-13 NMR probe was built and flow C-13 NMR data was obtained for a limited number of samples.

  11. Observation of NMR noise from solid samples

    PubMed Central

    Schlagnitweit, Judith; Dumez, Jean-Nicolas; Nausner, Martin; Jerschow, Alexej; Elena-Herrmann, Bénédicte; Müller, Norbert

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate that proton NMR noise signals, i.e. NMR spectra without excitation by radio frequency, can be obtained from solid samples. Experimental results are shown for static and magic-angle spinning conditions. In addition, a tuning procedure based on the probes’ NMR noise characteristics and similar to the one described previously for liquids probes can also be used to optimize signal-to-noise ratios in 1H-MAS experiments. PMID:20850362

  12. Solid-state NMR spectroscopy of proteins.

    PubMed

    Müller, Henrik; Etzkorn, Manuel; Heise, Henrike

    2013-01-01

    Solid-state NMR spectroscopy proved to be a versatile tool for characterization of structure and dynamics of complex biochemical systems. In particular, magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR came to maturity for application towards structural elucidation of biological macromolecules. Current challenges in applying solid-state NMR as well as progress achieved recently will be discussed in the following chapter focusing on conceptual aspects important for structural elucidation of proteins.

  13. Solid-state NMR and Membrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Opella, Stanley J.

    2015-01-01

    The native environment for a membrane protein is a phospholipid bilayer. Because the protein is immobilized on NMR timescales by the interactions within a bilayer membrane, solid-state NMR methods are essential to obtain high-resolution spectra. Approaches have been developed for both unoriented and oriented samples, however, they all rest on the foundation of the most fundamental aspects solid-state NMR, and the chemical shift and homo- and hetero-nuclear dipole-dipole interactions. Solid-state NMR has advanced sufficiently to enable the structures of membrane proteins to be determined under near-native conditions in phospholipid bilayers. PMID:25681966

  14. Solid-state NMR and membrane proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opella, Stanley J.

    2015-04-01

    The native environment for a membrane protein is a phospholipid bilayer. Because the protein is immobilized on NMR timescales by the interactions within a bilayer membrane, solid-state NMR methods are essential to obtain high-resolution spectra. Approaches have been developed for both unoriented and oriented samples, however, they all rest on the foundation of the most fundamental aspects of solid-state NMR, and the chemical shift and homo- and hetero-nuclear dipole-dipole interactions. Solid-state NMR has advanced sufficiently to enable the structures of membrane proteins to be determined under near-native conditions in phospholipid bilayers.

  15. Quantitative 2D liquid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Giraudeau, Patrick

    2014-06-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) liquid-state NMR has a very high potential to simultaneously determine the absolute concentration of small molecules in complex mixtures, thanks to its capacity to separate overlapping resonances. However, it suffers from two main drawbacks that probably explain its relatively late development. First, the 2D NMR signal is strongly molecule-dependent and site-dependent; second, the long duration of 2D NMR experiments prevents its general use for high-throughput quantitative applications and affects its quantitative performance. Fortunately, the last 10 years has witnessed an increasing number of contributions where quantitative approaches based on 2D NMR were developed and applied to solve real analytical issues. This review aims at presenting these recent efforts to reach a high trueness and precision in quantitative measurements by 2D NMR. After highlighting the interest of 2D NMR for quantitative analysis, the different strategies to determine the absolute concentrations from 2D NMR spectra are described and illustrated by recent applications. The last part of the manuscript concerns the recent development of fast quantitative 2D NMR approaches, aiming at reducing the experiment duration while preserving - or even increasing - the analytical performance. We hope that this comprehensive review will help readers to apprehend the current landscape of quantitative 2D NMR, as well as the perspectives that may arise from it.

  16. NMR studies of isotopically labeled RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Pardi, A.

    1994-12-01

    In summary, the ability to generate NMR quantities of {sup 15}N and {sup 13}C-labeled RNAs has led to the development of heteronuclear multi-dimensional NMR techniques for simplifying the resonance assignment and structure determination of RNAs. These methods for synthesizing isotopically labeled RNAs are only several years old, and thus there are still relatively few applications of heteronuclear multi-dimensional NMR techniques to RNA. However, given the critical role that RNAs play in cellular function, one can expect to see an increasing number of NMR structural studies of biologically active RNAs.

  17. Analytical Applications of NMR: Summer Symposium on Analytical Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borman, Stuart A.

    1982-01-01

    Highlights a symposium on analytical applications of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), discussing pulse Fourier transformation technique, two-dimensional NMR, solid state NMR, and multinuclear NMR. Includes description of ORACLE, an NMR data processing system at Syracuse University using real-time color graphics, and algorithms for…

  18. Analytical Applications of NMR: Summer Symposium on Analytical Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borman, Stuart A.

    1982-01-01

    Highlights a symposium on analytical applications of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), discussing pulse Fourier transformation technique, two-dimensional NMR, solid state NMR, and multinuclear NMR. Includes description of ORACLE, an NMR data processing system at Syracuse University using real-time color graphics, and algorithms for…

  19. Access to NMR Spectroscopy for Two-Year College Students: The NMR Site at Trinity University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Nancy S.; Shanklin, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Students at two-year colleges and small four-year colleges have often obtained their exposure to NMR spectroscopy through "canned" spectra because the cost of an NMR spectrometer, particularly a high-field spectrometer, is prohibitive in these environments. This article describes the design of a NMR site at Trinity University in which…

  20. rNMR: open source software for identifying and quantifying metabolites in NMR spectra

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Ian A; Schommer, Seth C; Markley, John L

    2009-01-01

    Despite the extensive use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) for metabolomics, no publicly available tools have been designed for identifying and quantifying metabolites across multiple spectra. We introduce here a new open source software tool, rNMR, which provides a simple graphics-based method for visualizing, identifying, and quantifying metabolites across multiple one- or two-dimensional NMR spectra. rNMR differs from existing software tools for NMR spectroscopy in that analyses are based on regions of interest (ROIs) rather than peak lists. ROIs contain all of the underlying NMR data within user-defined chemical shift ranges. ROIs can be inspected visually, and they support robust quantification of NMR signals. ROI-based analyses support simultaneous views of metabolite signals from up to hundreds of spectra, and ROI boundaries can be adjusted dynamically to ensure that signals corresponding to assigned atoms are analyzed consistently throughout the dataset. We describe how rNMR greatly reduces the time required for robust bioanalytical analysis of complex NMR data. An rNMR analysis yields a compact and transparent way of archiving the results from a metabolomics study so that it can be examined and evaluated by others. The rNMR website at http://rnmr.nmrfam.wisc.edu offers downloadable versions of rNMR for Windows, Macintosh, and Linux platforms along with extensive help documentation, instructional videos, and sample data. Copyright © 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:19821464

  1. jsNMR: an embedded platform-independent NMR spectrum viewer.

    PubMed

    Vosegaard, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    jsNMR is a lightweight NMR spectrum viewer written in JavaScript/HyperText Markup Language (HTML), which provides a cross-platform spectrum visualizer that runs on all computer architectures including mobile devices. Experimental (and simulated) datasets are easily opened in jsNMR by (i) drag and drop on a jsNMR browser window, (ii) by preparing a jsNMR file from the jsNMR web site, or (iii) by mailing the raw data to the jsNMR web portal. jsNMR embeds the original data in the HTML file, so a jsNMR file is a self-transforming dataset that may be exported to various formats, e.g. comma-separated values. The main applications of jsNMR are to provide easy access to NMR data without the need for dedicated software installed and to provide the possibility to visualize NMR spectra on web sites. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Access to NMR Spectroscopy for Two-Year College Students: The NMR Site at Trinity University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Nancy S.; Shanklin, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Students at two-year colleges and small four-year colleges have often obtained their exposure to NMR spectroscopy through "canned" spectra because the cost of an NMR spectrometer, particularly a high-field spectrometer, is prohibitive in these environments. This article describes the design of a NMR site at Trinity University in which…

  3. Picoliter H-1 NMR Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Minard, Kevin R. ); Wind, Robert A. )

    2002-02-01

    A RF probe that fits inside the bore of a small gradient coil package is described for routine 1H-NMR microscopy measurements on small samples. The probe operates at 500 MHz and houses a 267-um-diameter solenoid transceiver. When used in three dimensional chemical shift imaging (3D-CSI) experiments, the measured signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is shown to be within 20-30 percent of theoretical limits formulated by only considering the solenoid's resistive losses. This is illustrated using a 100-um-diameter globule of triacylglycerols ({approx}900mM) that may be an oocyte precursor in young Xenopus Laevis frogs, and water sample containing choline at a concentration often found in live cells ({approx}33mM). In chemical shift images generated using a few thousand scans, the choline methyl line is found to have an acceptable SNR in resolved from just 5 picoliters in the Xenopus globule. It is concluded that the probe's sensitivity is sufficient for performing 1H-NMR on picoliter-scale volumes in biological cells and tissues.

  4. NMR studies of oriented molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Sinton, S.W.

    1981-11-01

    Deuterium and proton magnetic resonance are used in experiments on a number of compounds which either form liquid crystal mesophases themselves or are dissolved in a liquid crystal solvent. Proton multiple quantum NMR is used to simplify complicated spectra. The theory of nonselective multiple quantum NMR is briefly reviewed. Benzene dissolved in a liquid crystal are used to demonstrate several outcomes of the theory. Experimental studies include proton and deuterium single quantum (..delta..M = +-1) and proton multiple quantum spectra of several molecules which contain the biphenyl moiety. 4-Cyano-4'-n-pentyl-d/sub 11/-biphenyl (5CB-d/sub 11/) is studied as a pure compound in the nematic phase. The obtained chain order parameters and dipolar couplings agree closely with previous results. Models for the effective symmetry of the biphenyl group in 5CB-d/sub 11/ are tested against the experimental spectra. The dihedral angle, defined by the planes containing the rings of the biphenyl group, is found to be 30 +- 2/sup 0/ for 5DB-d/sub 11/. Experiments are also described for 4,4'-d/sub 2/-biphenyl, 4,4' - dibromo-biphenyl, and unsubstituted biphenyl.

  5. Spatial-temporal epidemiology of human Salmonella Enteritidis infections with major phage types (PTs 1, 4, 5b, 8, 13, and 13a) in Ontario, Canada, 2008-2009.

    PubMed

    Varga, Csaba; Pearl, David L; McEwen, Scott A; Sargeant, Jan M; Pollari, Frank; Guerin, Michele T

    2015-12-17

    In Ontario and Canada, the incidence of human Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) infections have increased steadily during the last decade. Our study evaluated the spatial and temporal epidemiology of the major phage types (PTs) of S. Enteritidis infections to aid public health practitioners design effective prevention and control programs. Data on S. Enteritidis infections between January 1, 2008 and December 31, 2009 were obtained from Ontario's disease surveillance system. Salmonella Enteritidis infections with major phage types were classified by their annual health region-level incidence rates (IRs), monthly IRs, clinical symptoms, and exposure settings. A scan statistic was employed to detect retrospective phage type-specific spatial, temporal, and space-time clusters of S. Enteritidis infections. Space-time cluster cases' exposure settings were evaluated to identify common exposures. 1,336 cases were available for analysis. The six most frequently reported S. Enteritidis PTs were 8 (n = 398), 13a (n = 218), 13 (n = 198), 1 (n = 132), 5b (n = 83), and 4 (n = 76). Reported rates of S. Enteritidis infections with major phage types varied by health region and month. International travel and unknown exposure settings were the most frequently reported settings for PT 5b, 4, and 1 cases, whereas unknown exposure setting, private home, food premise, and international travel were the most frequently reported settings for PT 8, 13, and 13a cases. Diarrhea, abdominal pain, and fever were the most commonly reported clinical symptoms. A number of phage type-specific spatial, temporal, and space-time clusters were identified. Space-time clusters of PTs 1, 4, and 5b occurred mainly during the winter and spring months in the North West, North East, Eastern, Central East, and Central West regions. Space-time clusters of PTs 13 and 13a occurred at different times of the year in the Toronto region. Space-time clusters of PT 8

  6. An Integrated Laboratory Project in NMR Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, Reggie L.; Pendley, Bradford D.

    1988-01-01

    Describes an advanced NMR project that can be done with a 60-MHz continuous-wave proton spectrometer. Points out the main purposes are to give students experience in second-order NMR analysis, the simplification of spectra by raising the frequency, and the effect of non-hydrogen nuclei on proton resonances. (MVL)

  7. An Inversion Recovery NMR Kinetics Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Travis J.; Kershaw, Allan D.; Li, Vincent; Wu, Xinping

    2011-01-01

    A convenient laboratory experiment is described in which NMR magnetization transfer by inversion recovery is used to measure the kinetics and thermochemistry of amide bond rotation. The experiment utilizes Varian spectrometers with the VNMRJ 2.3 software, but can be easily adapted to any NMR platform. The procedures and sample data sets in this…

  8. NMR-Profiles of Protein Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Pedrini, Bill; Serrano, Pedro; Mohanty, Biswaranjan; Geralt, Michael; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2014-01-01

    NMR-Profiles are quantitative one-dimensional presentations of two-dimensional [15N,1H]-correlation spectra used to monitor the quality of protein solutions prior to and during NMR structure determinations and functional studies. In our current use in structural genomics projects, a NMR-Profile is recorded at the outset of a structure determination, using a uniformly 15N-labeled micro-scale sample of the protein. We thus assess the extent to which polypeptide backbone resonance assignments can be achieved with given NMR techniques, for example, conventional triple resonance experiments or APSY-NMR. With the availability of sequence-specific polypeptide backbone resonance assignments in the course of the structure determination, an “Assigned NMR-Profile” is generated, which visualizes the variation of the 15N–1H correlation cross peak intensities along the sequence and thus maps the sequence locations of polypeptide segments for which the NMR line shapes are affected by conformational exchange or other processes. The Assigned NMR-Profile provides a guiding reference during later stages of the structure determination, and is of special interest for monitoring the protein during functional studies, where dynamic features may be modulated during physiological functions. PMID:23839514

  9. An Integrated Laboratory Project in NMR Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, Reggie L.; Pendley, Bradford D.

    1988-01-01

    Describes an advanced NMR project that can be done with a 60-MHz continuous-wave proton spectrometer. Points out the main purposes are to give students experience in second-order NMR analysis, the simplification of spectra by raising the frequency, and the effect of non-hydrogen nuclei on proton resonances. (MVL)

  10. NMR Spectroscopy and Its Value: A Primer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veeraraghavan, Sudha

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is widely used by chemists. Furthermore, the use of NMR spectroscopy to solve structures of macromolecules or to examine protein-ligand interactions is popular. Yet, few students entering graduate education in biological sciences have been introduced to this method or its utility. Over the last six…

  11. A Guided Inquiry Approach to NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parmentier, Laura E.; Lisensky, George C.; Spencer, Brock

    1998-04-01

    We present a novel way to introduce NMR spectroscopy into the general chemistry curriculum as part of a week-long aspirin project in our one-semester introductory course. Aspirin is synthesized by reacting salicylic acid and acetic anhydride. Purity is determined by titration and IR and NMR spectroscopy. Students compare IR and NMR spectra of their aspirin product to a series of reference spectra obtained by the class. Students are able to interpret the IR spectra of their aspirin using IR data from previous experiments. NMR is introduced by having students collect 1H NMR spectra of a series of reference compounds chosen to include some of the structural features of aspirin and compare spectra and structures of the reference compounds to develop a correlation chart for chemical shifts. This process is done in small groups using shared class data and is guided by a series of questions designed to relate the different kinds of hydrogen atoms to number and position of peaks in the NMR spectrum. Students then identify the peaks in the NMR spectrum of their aspirin product and relate percent purity by titration with spectral results and percent yield. This is an enjoyable project that combines the synthesis of a familiar material with a guided inquiry-based introduction to NMR spectroscopy.

  12. Using Cloud Storage for NMR Data Distribution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soulsby, David

    2012-01-01

    An approach using Google Groups as method for distributing student-acquired NMR data has been implemented. We describe how to configure NMR spectrometer software so that data is uploaded to a laboratory section specific Google Group, thereby removing bottlenecks associated with printing and processing at the spectrometer workstation. Outside of…

  13. Microslot NMR probe for metabolomics studies.

    PubMed

    Krojanski, Hans Georg; Lambert, Jörg; Gerikalan, Yilmaz; Suter, Dieter; Hergenröder, Roland

    2008-11-15

    A NMR microprobe based on microstrip technology suitable for investigations of volume-limited samples in the low nanoliter range was designed. NMR spectra of sample quantities in the 100 pmol range can be obtained with this probe in a few seconds. The planar geometry of the probe is easily adaptable to the size and geometry requirements of the samples.

  14. An Inversion Recovery NMR Kinetics Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Travis J.; Kershaw, Allan D.; Li, Vincent; Wu, Xinping

    2011-01-01

    A convenient laboratory experiment is described in which NMR magnetization transfer by inversion recovery is used to measure the kinetics and thermochemistry of amide bond rotation. The experiment utilizes Varian spectrometers with the VNMRJ 2.3 software, but can be easily adapted to any NMR platform. The procedures and sample data sets in this…

  15. NMR Spectroscopy and Its Value: A Primer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veeraraghavan, Sudha

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is widely used by chemists. Furthermore, the use of NMR spectroscopy to solve structures of macromolecules or to examine protein-ligand interactions is popular. Yet, few students entering graduate education in biological sciences have been introduced to this method or its utility. Over the last six…

  16. Using Cloud Storage for NMR Data Distribution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soulsby, David

    2012-01-01

    An approach using Google Groups as method for distributing student-acquired NMR data has been implemented. We describe how to configure NMR spectrometer software so that data is uploaded to a laboratory section specific Google Group, thereby removing bottlenecks associated with printing and processing at the spectrometer workstation. Outside of…

  17. NMR investigations of hydrogen in carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, M.; Goze-Bac, C.; Krämer, S.; Mehring, M.; Roth, S.; Bernier, P.

    2002-10-01

    We report proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) measurements on hydrogen loaded single walled carbon nanotubes. The carbon nanotubes were produced with different kinds of catalysts and hydrogen loaded under 23 bar hydrogen pressure. The hydrogen adsorption properties of the carbon nanotube materials were investigated by temperature dependent analysis of the 1H-NMR spectra.

  18. Challenges and perspectives in quantitative NMR.

    PubMed

    Giraudeau, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    This perspective article summarizes, from the author's point of view at the beginning of 2016, the major challenges and perspectives in the field of quantitative NMR. The key concepts in quantitative NMR are first summarized; then, the most recent evolutions in terms of resolution and sensitivity are discussed, as well as some potential future research directions in this field. A particular focus is made on methodologies capable of boosting the resolution and sensitivity of quantitative NMR, which could open application perspectives in fields where the sample complexity and the analyte concentrations are particularly challenging. These include multi-dimensional quantitative NMR and hyperpolarization techniques such as para-hydrogen-induced polarization or dynamic nuclear polarization. Because quantitative NMR cannot be dissociated from the key concepts of analytical chemistry, i.e. trueness and precision, the methodological developments are systematically described together with their level of analytical performance. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. NMR imaging techniques and applications: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottomley, Paul A.

    1982-09-01

    Over the past ten years, a variety of techniques have been proposed and demonstrated that enable the spatial discrimination and mapping of nuclear-magnetic-resonance (NMR) signals in heterogeneous objects. These NMR imaging techniques are currently finding useful application in clinical medicine and physiological chemistry, where their noninvasive, apparently hazard-free nature, and the sensitivity of the NMR signal to the state of biological tissue, are key advantages. This article reviews the historical development, the conceptual basis, and the applications of the various NMR imaging techniques. Qualitative descriptions and illustrations of each technique and an outline of imaging instrumentation are provided. Proton NMR imaging, in medicine, of pathological states such as cancer, imaging of relaxation time, chemical shift and flow parameters, imaging of nuclei other than hydrogen, and potential hazards are discussed and demonstrated with examples.

  20. Rapid sample injection for hyperpolarized NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Sean; Hilty, Christian

    2010-06-14

    Due to its ability to enhance the signal of a single NMR scan by several orders of magnitude, solid-to-liquid state dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) appears well suited for the analysis of minimal amounts of compounds, as well as for the study of rapid chemical reactions. A key requirement in enabling the application of DNP-NMR to typical small-molecule substances encountered in chemistry and biochemistry is the ability to obtain high-resolution spectra, while at the same time minimizing the loss of polarization due to spin relaxation between the separate steps of DNP polarization and NMR measurement. Here, we present data demonstrating the capability of measuring DNP enhanced NMR spectra of compounds with comparably short relaxation times, with only minimal line broadening attributable to the sample transfer process. We discuss the performance characteristics of a sample injection apparatus specifically designed to provide high-resolution DNP-NMR spectra of small molecule compounds.

  1. NMR and MRI apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Clarke, John; Kelso, Nathan; Lee, SeungKyun; Moessle, Michael; Myers, Whittier; McDermott, Robert; ten Haken, Bernard; Pines, Alexander; Trabesinger, Andreas

    2007-03-06

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals are detected in microtesla fields. Prepolarization in millitesla fields is followed by detection with an untuned dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. Because the sensitivity of the SQUID is frequency independent, both signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spectral resolution are enhanced by detecting the NMR signal in extremely low magnetic fields, where the NMR lines become very narrow even for grossly inhomogeneous measurement fields. Additional signal to noise benefits are obtained by use of a low noise polarization coil, comprising litz wire or superconducting materials. MRI in ultralow magnetic field is based on the NMR at ultralow fields. Gradient magnetic fields are applied, and images are constructed from the detected NMR signals.

  2. Unilateral NMR with a barrel magnet.

    PubMed

    Utsuzawa, Shin; Fukushima, Eiichi

    2017-09-01

    Unilateral NMR can examine samples without regard to sample size. It is also an easy path to mobile or portable NMR as well as inexpensive NMR. The objective of this work was to develop unilateral NMR with an improved performance in a sample region that was remote from the apparatus. This was accomplished with the creation of a saddle point where all second derivatives of the main component of the field were nulled. A ∼10cm diameter ∼5cm thick magnet combined with a gradiometer coil on the surface detected signals from a sensitive region that extended ∼2cm from the magnet. The relatively homogeneous field of these unilateral NMR devices allows the measurement of rapidly diffusing spins as well as the use of smaller RF amplifiers, which enhances system mobility. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Robust, integrated computational control of NMR experiments to achieve optimal assignment by ADAPT-NMR.

    PubMed

    Bahrami, Arash; Tonelli, Marco; Sahu, Sarata C; Singarapu, Kiran K; Eghbalnia, Hamid R; Markley, John L

    2012-01-01

    ADAPT-NMR (Assignment-directed Data collection Algorithm utilizing a Probabilistic Toolkit in NMR) represents a groundbreaking prototype for automated protein structure determination by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. With a [(13)C,(15)N]-labeled protein sample loaded into the NMR spectrometer, ADAPT-NMR delivers complete backbone resonance assignments and secondary structure in an optimal fashion without human intervention. ADAPT-NMR achieves this by implementing a strategy in which the goal of optimal assignment in each step determines the subsequent step by analyzing the current sum of available data. ADAPT-NMR is the first iterative and fully automated approach designed specifically for the optimal assignment of proteins with fast data collection as a byproduct of this goal. ADAPT-NMR evaluates the current spectral information, and uses a goal-directed objective function to select the optimal next data collection step(s) and then directs the NMR spectrometer to collect the selected data set. ADAPT-NMR extracts peak positions from the newly collected data and uses this information in updating the analysis resonance assignments and secondary structure. The goal-directed objective function then defines the next data collection step. The procedure continues until the collected data support comprehensive peak identification, resonance assignments at the desired level of completeness, and protein secondary structure. We present test cases in which ADAPT-NMR achieved results in two days or less that would have taken two months or more by manual approaches.

  4. Robust, Integrated Computational Control of NMR Experiments to Achieve Optimal Assignment by ADAPT-NMR

    PubMed Central

    Bahrami, Arash; Tonelli, Marco; Sahu, Sarata C.; Singarapu, Kiran K.; Eghbalnia, Hamid R.; Markley, John L.

    2012-01-01

    ADAPT-NMR (Assignment-directed Data collection Algorithm utilizing a Probabilistic Toolkit in NMR) represents a groundbreaking prototype for automated protein structure determination by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. With a [13C,15N]-labeled protein sample loaded into the NMR spectrometer, ADAPT-NMR delivers complete backbone resonance assignments and secondary structure in an optimal fashion without human intervention. ADAPT-NMR achieves this by implementing a strategy in which the goal of optimal assignment in each step determines the subsequent step by analyzing the current sum of available data. ADAPT-NMR is the first iterative and fully automated approach designed specifically for the optimal assignment of proteins with fast data collection as a byproduct of this goal. ADAPT-NMR evaluates the current spectral information, and uses a goal-directed objective function to select the optimal next data collection step(s) and then directs the NMR spectrometer to collect the selected data set. ADAPT-NMR extracts peak positions from the newly collected data and uses this information in updating the analysis resonance assignments and secondary structure. The goal-directed objective function then defines the next data collection step. The procedure continues until the collected data support comprehensive peak identification, resonance assignments at the desired level of completeness, and protein secondary structure. We present test cases in which ADAPT-NMR achieved results in two days or less that would have taken two months or more by manual approaches. PMID:22427982

  5. NMR Hyperpolarization Techniques of Gases.

    PubMed

    Barskiy, Danila A; Coffey, Aaron M; Nikolaou, Panayiotis; Mikhaylov, Dmitry M; Goodson, Boyd M; Branca, Rosa T; Lu, George J; Shapiro, Mikhail G; Telkki, Ville-Veikko; Zhivonitko, Vladimir V; Koptyug, Igor V; Salnikov, Oleg G; Kovtunov, Kirill V; Bukhtiyarov, Valerii I; Rosen, Matthew S; Barlow, Michael J; Safavi, Shahideh; Hall, Ian P; Schröder, Leif; Chekmenev, Eduard Y

    2017-01-18

    Nuclear spin polarization can be significantly increased through the process of hyperpolarization, leading to an increase in the sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments by 4-8 orders of magnitude. Hyperpolarized gases, unlike liquids and solids, can often be readily separated and purified from the compounds used to mediate the hyperpolarization processes. These pure hyperpolarized gases enabled many novel MRI applications including the visualization of void spaces, imaging of lung function, and remote detection. Additionally, hyperpolarized gases can be dissolved in liquids and can be used as sensitive molecular probes and reporters. This Minireview covers the fundamentals of the preparation of hyperpolarized gases and focuses on selected applications of interest to biomedicine and materials science. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Applications of NMR spectroscopy to systems biochemistry.

    PubMed

    Fan, Teresa W-M; Lane, Andrew N

    2016-02-01

    The past decades of advancements in NMR have made it a very powerful tool for metabolic research. Despite its limitations in sensitivity relative to mass spectrometric techniques, NMR has a number of unparalleled advantages for metabolic studies, most notably the rigor and versatility in structure elucidation, isotope-filtered selection of molecules, and analysis of positional isotopomer distributions in complex mixtures afforded by multinuclear and multidimensional experiments. In addition, NMR has the capacity for spatially selective in vivo imaging and dynamical analysis of metabolism in tissues of living organisms. In conjunction with the use of stable isotope tracers, NMR is a method of choice for exploring the dynamics and compartmentation of metabolic pathways and networks, for which our current understanding is grossly insufficient. In this review, we describe how various direct and isotope-edited 1D and 2D NMR methods can be employed to profile metabolites and their isotopomer distributions by stable isotope-resolved metabolomic (SIRM) analysis. We also highlight the importance of sample preparation methods including rapid cryoquenching, efficient extraction, and chemoselective derivatization to facilitate robust and reproducible NMR-based metabolomic analysis. We further illustrate how NMR has been applied in vitro, ex vivo, or in vivo in various stable isotope tracer-based metabolic studies, to gain systematic and novel metabolic insights in different biological systems, including human subjects. The pathway and network knowledge generated from NMR- and MS-based tracing of isotopically enriched substrates will be invaluable for directing functional analysis of other 'omics data to achieve understanding of regulation of biochemical systems, as demonstrated in a case study. Future developments in NMR technologies and reagents to enhance both detection sensitivity and resolution should further empower NMR in systems biochemical research. Copyright © 2016

  7. Technical Letter Report Development of Flaw Size Distribution Tables Including Effects of Flaw Depth Sizing Errors for Draft 10CFR 50.61a (Alternate PTS Rule) JCN-N6398, Task 4

    SciTech Connect

    Simonen, Fredric A.; Gosselin, Stephen R.; Doctor, Steven R.

    2013-04-22

    This document describes a new method to determine whether the flaws in a particular reactor pressure vessel are consistent with the assumptions regarding the number and sizes of flaws used in the analyses that formed the technical justification basis for the new voluntary alternative Pressurized Thermal Shock (PTS) rule (Draft 10 CFR 50.61a). The new methodology addresses concerns regarding prior methodology because ASME Code Section XI examinations do not detect all fabrication flaws, they have higher detection performance for some flaw types, and there are flaw sizing errors always present (e.g., significant oversizing of small flaws and systematic under sizing of larger flaws). The new methodology allows direct comparison of ASME Code Section XI examination results with values in the PTS draft rule Tables 2 and 3 in order to determine if the number and sizes of flaws detected by an ASME Code Section XI examination are consistent with those assumed in the probabilistic fracture mechanics calculations performed in support of the development of 10 CFR 50.61a.

  8. A microcoil NMR probe for coupling microscale HPLC with on-line NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, R; Kelley, W P; Floyd, P D; Tan, Z J; Webb, A G; Sweedler, J V

    1999-12-01

    An HPLC NMR system is presented that integrates a commercial microbore HPLC system using a 0.5-mm column with a 500-MHz proton NMR spectrometer using a custom NMR probe with an observe volume of 1.1 microL and a coil fill factor of 68%. Careful attention to capillary connections and NMR flow cell design allows on-line NMR detection with no significant loss in separation efficiency when compared with a UV chromatogram. HPLC NMR is performed on mixtures of amino acids and small peptides with analyte injection amounts as small as 750 ng; the separations are accomplished in less than 10 min and individual NMR spectra are acquired with 12 s time resolution. Stopped-flow NMR is achieved by diversion of the chromatographic flow after observation of the beginning of the analyte band within the NMR flow cell. Isolation of the compound of interest within the NMR detection cell allows multidimensional experiments to be performed. A stopped-flow COSY spectrum of the peptide Phe-Ala is acquired in 3.5 h with an injected amount of 5 micrograms.

  9. An introduction to biological NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Marion, Dominique

    2013-11-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for biologists interested in the structure, dynamics, and interactions of biological macromolecules. This review aims at presenting in an accessible manner the requirements and limitations of this technique. As an introduction, the history of NMR will highlight how the method evolved from physics to chemistry and finally to biology over several decades. We then introduce the NMR spectral parameters used in structural biology, namely the chemical shift, the J-coupling, nuclear Overhauser effects, and residual dipolar couplings. Resonance assignment, the required step for any further NMR study, bears a resemblance to jigsaw puzzle strategy. The NMR spectral parameters are then converted into angle and distances and used as input using restrained molecular dynamics to compute a bundle of structures. When interpreting a NMR-derived structure, the biologist has to judge its quality on the basis of the statistics provided. When the 3D structure is a priori known by other means, the molecular interaction with a partner can be mapped by NMR: information on the binding interface as well as on kinetic and thermodynamic constants can be gathered. NMR is suitable to monitor, over a wide range of frequencies, protein fluctuations that play a crucial role in their biological function. In the last section of this review, intrinsically disordered proteins, which have escaped the attention of classical structural biology, are discussed in the perspective of NMR, one of the rare available techniques able to describe structural ensembles. This Tutorial is part of the International Proteomics Tutorial Programme (IPTP 16 MCP).

  10. An Introduction to Biological NMR Spectroscopy*

    PubMed Central

    Marion, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for biologists interested in the structure, dynamics, and interactions of biological macromolecules. This review aims at presenting in an accessible manner the requirements and limitations of this technique. As an introduction, the history of NMR will highlight how the method evolved from physics to chemistry and finally to biology over several decades. We then introduce the NMR spectral parameters used in structural biology, namely the chemical shift, the J-coupling, nuclear Overhauser effects, and residual dipolar couplings. Resonance assignment, the required step for any further NMR study, bears a resemblance to jigsaw puzzle strategy. The NMR spectral parameters are then converted into angle and distances and used as input using restrained molecular dynamics to compute a bundle of structures. When interpreting a NMR-derived structure, the biologist has to judge its quality on the basis of the statistics provided. When the 3D structure is a priori known by other means, the molecular interaction with a partner can be mapped by NMR: information on the binding interface as well as on kinetic and thermodynamic constants can be gathered. NMR is suitable to monitor, over a wide range of frequencies, protein fluctuations that play a crucial role in their biological function. In the last section of this review, intrinsically disordered proteins, which have escaped the attention of classical structural biology, are discussed in the perspective of NMR, one of the rare available techniques able to describe structural ensembles. This Tutorial is part of the International Proteomics Tutorial Programme (IPTP 16 MCP). PMID:23831612

  11. Scalar operators in solid-state NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Boqin

    1991-11-01

    Selectivity and resolution of solid-state NMR spectra are determined by dispersion of local magnetic fields originating from relaxation effects and orientation-dependent resonant frequencies of spin nuclei. Theoretically, the orientation-dependent resonant frequencies can be represented by a set of irreducible tensors. Among these tensors, only zero rank tensors (scalar operators) are capable of providing high resolution NMR spectra. This thesis presents a series of new developments in high resolution solid-state NMR concerning the reconstruction of various scalar operators motion in solid C{sub 60} is analyzed.

  12. An Inversion Recovery NMR Kinetics Experiment.

    PubMed

    Williams, Travis J; Kershaw, Allan D; Li, Vincent; Wu, Xinping

    2011-05-01

    A convenient laboratory experiment is described in which NMR magnetization transfer by inversion recovery is used to measure the kinetics and thermochemistry of amide bond rotation. The experiment utilizes Varian spectrometers with the VNMRJ 2.3 software, but can be easily adapted to any NMR platform. The procedures and sample data sets in this article will enable instructors to use inversion recovery as a laboratory activity in applied NMR classes and provide research students with a convenient template with which to acquire inversion recovery data on research samples.

  13. NMR reaction monitoring in flow synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, M Victoria

    2017-01-01

    Recent advances in the use of flow chemistry with in-line and on-line analysis by NMR are presented. The use of macro- and microreactors, coupled with standard and custom made NMR probes involving microcoils, incorporated into high resolution and benchtop NMR instruments is reviewed. Some recent selected applications have been collected, including synthetic applications, the determination of the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters and reaction optimization, even in single experiments and on the μL scale. Finally, software that allows automatic reaction monitoring and optimization is discussed. PMID:28326137

  14. An Inversion Recovery NMR Kinetics Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Travis J.; Kershaw, Allan D.; Li, Vincent; Wu, Xinping

    2011-01-01

    A convenient laboratory experiment is described in which NMR magnetization transfer by inversion recovery is used to measure the kinetics and thermochemistry of amide bond rotation. The experiment utilizes Varian spectrometers with the VNMRJ 2.3 software, but can be easily adapted to any NMR platform. The procedures and sample data sets in this article will enable instructors to use inversion recovery as a laboratory activity in applied NMR classes and provide research students with a convenient template with which to acquire inversion recovery data on research samples. PMID:21552343

  15. MAS-NMR at very high temperatures.

    PubMed

    van Wüllen, Leo; Schwering, Georg; Naumann, Ernst; Jansen, Martin

    2004-09-01

    We report MAS-NMR experiments at temperatures of approx. 1200 K using a CO(2) laser as the heating device. An internal NMR thermometer based on the (7)Li T1 data of Li(0.24)La(0.54)TiO(3) is used for temperature calibration. Using this setup, temperatures as high as 1191 K could be reached under MAS conditions as confirmed by the melting of Li(2)B(4)O(7) at 1191 K which could be followed by (7)Li-MAS-NMR.

  16. Probing porous media with gas diffusion NMR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mair, R. W.; Wong, G. P.; Hoffmann, D.; Hurlimann, M. D.; Patz, S.; Schwartz, L. M.; Walsworth, R. L.

    1999-01-01

    We show that gas diffusion nuclear magnetic resonance (GD-NMR) provides a powerful technique for probing the structure of porous media. In random packs of glass beads, using both laser-polarized and thermally polarized xenon gas, we find that GD-NMR can accurately measure the pore space surface-area-to-volume ratio, S/V rho, and the tortuosity, alpha (the latter quantity being directly related to the system's transport properties). We also show that GD-NMR provides a good measure of the tortuosity of sandstone and complex carbonate rocks.

  17. MAS NMR of HIV-1 protein assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suiter, Christopher L.; Quinn, Caitlin M.; Lu, Manman; Hou, Guangjin; Zhang, Huilan; Polenova, Tatyana

    2015-04-01

    The negative global impact of the AIDS pandemic is well known. In this perspective article, the utility of magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy to answer pressing questions related to the structure and dynamics of HIV-1 protein assemblies is examined. In recent years, MAS NMR has undergone major technological developments enabling studies of large viral assemblies. We discuss some of these evolving methods and technologies and provide a perspective on the current state of MAS NMR as applied to the investigations into structure and dynamics of HIV-1 assemblies of CA capsid protein and of Gag maturation intermediates.

  18. NMR data-driven structure determination using NMR-I-TASSER in the CASD-NMR experiment.

    PubMed

    Jang, Richard; Wang, Yan; Xue, Zhidong; Zhang, Yang

    2015-08-01

    NMR-I-TASSER, an adaption of the I-TASSER algorithm combining NMR data for protein structure determination, recently joined the second round of the CASD-NMR experiment. Unlike many molecular dynamics-based methods, NMR-I-TASSER takes a molecular replacement-like approach to the problem by first threading the target through the PDB to identify structural templates which are then used for iterative NOE assignments and fragment structure assembly refinements. The employment of multiple templates allows NMR-I-TASSER to sample different topologies while convergence to a single structure is not required. Retroactive and blind tests of the CASD-NMR targets from Rounds 1 and 2 demonstrate that even without using NOE peak lists I-TASSER can generate correct structure topology with 15 of 20 targets having a TM-score above 0.5. With the addition of NOE-based distance restraints, NMR-I-TASSER significantly improved the I-TASSER models with all models having the TM-score above 0.5. The average RMSD was reduced from 5.29 to 2.14 Å in Round 1 and 3.18 to 1.71 Å in Round 2. There is no obvious difference in the modeling results with using raw and refined peak lists, indicating robustness of the pipeline to the NOE assignment errors. Overall, despite the low-resolution modeling the current NMR-I-TASSER pipeline provides a coarse-grained structure folding approach complementary to traditional molecular dynamics simulations, which can produce fast near-native frameworks for atomic-level structural refinement.

  19. NMR data-driven structure determination using NMR-I-TASSER in the CASD-NMR experiment

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Richard; Wang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    NMR-I-TASSER, an adaption of the I-TASSER algorithm combining NMR data for protein structure determination, recently joined the second round of the CASD-NMR experiment. Unlike many molecular dynamics-based methods, NMR-I-TASSER takes a molecular replacement-like approach to the problem by first threading the target through the PDB to identify structural templates which are then used for iterative NOE assignments and fragment structure assembly refinements. The employment of multiple templates allows NMR-I-TASSER to sample different topologies while convergence to a single structure is not required. Retroactive and blind tests of the CASD-NMR targets from Rounds 1 and 2 demonstrate that even without using NOE peak lists I-TASSER can generate correct structure topology with 15 of 20 targets having a TM-score above 0.5. With the addition of NOE-based distance restraints, NMR-I-TASSER significantly improved the I-TASSER models with all models having the TM-score above 0.5. The average RMSD was reduced from 5.29 to 2.14 Å in Round 1 and 3.18 to 1.71 Å in Round 2. There is no obvious difference in the modeling results with using raw and refined peak lists, indicating robustness of the pipeline to the NOE assignment errors. Overall, despite the low-resolution modeling the current NMR-I-TASSER pipeline provides a coarse-grained structure folding approach complementary to traditional molecular dynamics simulations, which can produce fast near-native frameworks for atomic-level structural refinement. PMID:25737244

  20. A ferromagnetic shim insert for NMR magnets - Towards an integrated gyrotron for DNP-NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Herbert; van Bentum, Jan; Maly, Thorsten

    2017-04-01

    In recent years high-field Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) enhanced NMR spectroscopy has gained significant interest. In high-field DNP-NMR experiments (⩾400 MHz 1H NMR, ⩾9.4 T) often a stand-alone gyrotron is used to generate high microwave/THz power to produce sufficiently high microwave induced B1e fields at the position of the NMR sample. These devices typically require a second, stand-alone superconducting magnet to operate. Here we present the design and realization of a ferroshim insert, to create two iso-centers inside a commercially available wide-bore NMR magnet. This work is part of a larger project to integrate a gyrotron into NMR magnets, effectively eliminating the need for a second, stand-alone superconducting magnet.

  1. A ferromagnetic shim insert for NMR magnets - Towards an integrated gyrotron for DNP-NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Herbert; van Bentum, Jan; Maly, Thorsten

    2017-04-01

    In recent years high-field Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) enhanced NMR spectroscopy has gained significant interest. In high-field DNP-NMR experiments (⩾400MHz (1)H NMR, ⩾9.4T) often a stand-alone gyrotron is used to generate high microwave/THz power to produce sufficiently high microwave induced B1e fields at the position of the NMR sample. These devices typically require a second, stand-alone superconducting magnet to operate. Here we present the design and realization of a ferroshim insert, to create two iso-centers inside a commercially available wide-bore NMR magnet. This work is part of a larger project to integrate a gyrotron into NMR magnets, effectively eliminating the need for a second, stand-alone superconducting magnet. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. NMR Analysis of Unknowns: An Introduction to 2D NMR Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alonso, David E.; Warren, Steven E.

    2005-01-01

    A study combined 1D (one-dimensional) and 2D (two-dimensional) NMR spectroscopy to solve structural organic problems of three unknowns, which include 2-, 3-, and 4-heptanone. Results showed [to the first power]H NMR and [to the thirteenth power]C NMR signal assignments for 2- and 3-heptanone were more challenging than for 4-heptanone owing to the…

  3. NMR Analysis of Unknowns: An Introduction to 2D NMR Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alonso, David E.; Warren, Steven E.

    2005-01-01

    A study combined 1D (one-dimensional) and 2D (two-dimensional) NMR spectroscopy to solve structural organic problems of three unknowns, which include 2-, 3-, and 4-heptanone. Results showed [to the first power]H NMR and [to the thirteenth power]C NMR signal assignments for 2- and 3-heptanone were more challenging than for 4-heptanone owing to the…

  4. NMR Methods to Study Dynamic Allostery.

    PubMed

    Grutsch, Sarina; Brüschweiler, Sven; Tollinger, Martin

    2016-03-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy provides a unique toolbox of experimental probes for studying dynamic processes on a wide range of timescales, ranging from picoseconds to milliseconds and beyond. Along with NMR hardware developments, recent methodological advancements have enabled the characterization of allosteric proteins at unprecedented detail, revealing intriguing aspects of allosteric mechanisms and increasing the proportion of the conformational ensemble that can be observed by experiment. Here, we present an overview of NMR spectroscopic methods for characterizing equilibrium fluctuations in free and bound states of allosteric proteins that have been most influential in the field. By combining NMR experimental approaches with molecular simulations, atomistic-level descriptions of the mechanisms by which allosteric phenomena take place are now within reach.

  5. Interfaces in polymer nanocomposites - An NMR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhme, Ute; Scheler, Ulrich

    2016-03-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is applied for the investigation of polymer nanocomposites. Solid-state NMR is applied to study the modification steps to compatibilize layered double hydroxides with non-polar polymers. 1H relaxation NMR gives insight on the polymer dynamics over a wide range of correlation times. For the polymer chain dynamics the transverse relaxation time T2 is most suited. In this presentation we report on two applications of T2 measurements under external mechanical stress. In a low-field system relaxation NMR studies are performed in-situ under uniaxial stress. High-temperature experiments in a Couette cell permit the investigation of the polymer dynamics in the melt under shear flow.

  6. NMR-Assisted Molecular Docking Methodologies.

    PubMed

    Sturlese, Mattia; Bellanda, Massimo; Moro, Stefano

    2015-08-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and molecular docking are regularly being employed as helpful tools of drug discovery research. Molecular docking is an extremely rapid method to evaluate possible binders from a large chemical library in a fast and cheap manner. NMR techniques can directly detect a protein-ligand interaction, can determine the corresponding association constant, and can consistently identify the ligand binding cavity. Consequently, molecular docking and NMR techniques are naturally complementary techniques where the combination of the two has the potential to improve the overall efficiency of drug discovery process. In this review, we would like to summarize the state of the art of docking methods which have been recently bridged to NMR experiments to identify novel and effective therapeutic drug candidates.

  7. Relaxation time estimation in surface NMR

    DOEpatents

    Grunewald, Elliot D.; Walsh, David O.

    2017-03-21

    NMR relaxation time estimation methods and corresponding apparatus generate two or more alternating current transmit pulses with arbitrary amplitudes, time delays, and relative phases; apply a surface NMR acquisition scheme in which initial preparatory pulses, the properties of which may be fixed across a set of multiple acquisition sequence, are transmitted at the start of each acquisition sequence and are followed by one or more depth sensitive pulses, the pulse moments of which are varied across the set of multiple acquisition sequences; and apply processing techniques in which recorded NMR response data are used to estimate NMR properties and the relaxation times T.sub.1 and T.sub.2* as a function of position as well as one-dimensional and two-dimension distributions of T.sub.1 versus T.sub.2* as a function of subsurface position.

  8. A New Microcell Technique for NMR Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Sophia J.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a new laboratory technique for working with small samples of compounds used in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis. Demonstrates how microcells can be constructed for each experiment and samples can be recycled. (TW)

  9. A New Microcell Technique for NMR Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Sophia J.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a new laboratory technique for working with small samples of compounds used in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis. Demonstrates how microcells can be constructed for each experiment and samples can be recycled. (TW)

  10. NMR analysis of compositional heterogeneity in polysaccharides

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Many copolysaccharides are compositionally heterogeneous, and the composition determined by the usual analytical or spectroscopic methods provides only an average value. For some polysaccharides, the NMR data contain copolymer sequence information, such as diad, triad, and tetrad sequence intensiti...

  11. NMR Methods to Study Dynamic Allostery

    PubMed Central

    Grutsch, Sarina; Brüschweiler, Sven; Tollinger, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy provides a unique toolbox of experimental probes for studying dynamic processes on a wide range of timescales, ranging from picoseconds to milliseconds and beyond. Along with NMR hardware developments, recent methodological advancements have enabled the characterization of allosteric proteins at unprecedented detail, revealing intriguing aspects of allosteric mechanisms and increasing the proportion of the conformational ensemble that can be observed by experiment. Here, we present an overview of NMR spectroscopic methods for characterizing equilibrium fluctuations in free and bound states of allosteric proteins that have been most influential in the field. By combining NMR experimental approaches with molecular simulations, atomistic-level descriptions of the mechanisms by which allosteric phenomena take place are now within reach. PMID:26964042

  12. NMR Experiment Factors Numbers with Gauss Sums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehring, Michael; Müller, Klaus; Averbukh, Ilya Sh.; Merkel, Wolfgang; Schleich, Wolfgang P.

    2007-03-01

    We factor the number 157573 using an NMR implementation of Gauss sums. Although the current implementation is classical and scales exponentially, we believe that an extension to the quantum regime using entangled states is possible.

  13. WHNMR--a universal NMR application package.

    PubMed

    Xiaodong, Z; Hongbin, H; Nian, H; Lianfang, S; Chaohui, Y

    1996-06-01

    A PC-based NMR off-line data processing system is developed and described in detail. With this software system, one-dimensional (1D), two-dimensional (2D), and NMR imaging (MRI) data can be processed easily, and give reliable results. By the applications of this system, a versatile software interface is set up to achieve data exchanging and integrated usage with other PC application software and aids the PC to become an effective and powerful workstation.

  14. Modern NMR spectroscopy: a guide for chemists

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, J.K.M.; Hunter, B.K.

    1988-01-01

    The aim of the authors of Modern NMR Spectroscopy is to bridge the communication gap between the chemist and the spectroscopist. The approach is nonmathematical, descriptive, and pictorial. To illustrate the ideas introduced in the text, the authors provide original spectra obtained specially for this purpose. Examples include spectroscopy of protons, carbon, and less receptive nuclei of interest to inorganic chemists. The authors succeed in making high-resolution NMR spectroscopy comprehensible for the average student or chemist.

  15. NMR studies of multiphase flows II

    SciTech Connect

    Altobelli, S.A.; Caprihan, A.; Fukushima, E.

    1995-12-31

    NMR techniques for measurements of spatial distribution of material phase, velocity and velocity fluctuation are being developed and refined. Versions of these techniques which provide time average liquid fraction and fluid phase velocity have been applied to several concentrated suspension systems which will not be discussed extensively here. Technical developments required to further extend the use of NMR to the multi-phase flow arena and to provide measurements of previously unobtainable parameters are the focus of this report.

  16. Frontiers of NMR in Molecular Biology

    SciTech Connect

    1999-08-25

    NMR spectroscopy is expanding the horizons of structural biology by determining the structures and describing the dynamics of blobular proteins in aqueous solution, as well as other classes of proteins including membrane proteins and the polypeptides that form the aggregates diagnostic of prion and amyloid diseases. Significant results are also emerging on DNA and RNA oligomers and their complexes with proteins. This meeting focused attention on key structural questions emanating from molecular biology and how NMR spectroscopy can be used to answer them.

  17. Sparse Sampling Methods In Multidimensional NMR

    PubMed Central

    Mobli, Mehdi; Maciejewski, Mark W.; Schuyler, Adam D.; Stern, Alan S.; Hoch, Jeffrey C.

    2014-01-01

    Although the discrete Fourier transform played an enabling role in the development of modern NMR spectroscopy, it suffers from a well-known difficulty providing high-resolution spectra from short data records. In multidimensional NMR experiments, so-called indirect time dimensions are sampled parametrically, with each instance of evolution times along the indirect dimensions sampled via separate one-dimensional experiments. The time required to conduct multidimensional experiments is directly proportional to the number of indirect evolution times sampled. Despite remarkable advances in resolution with increasing magnetic field strength, multiple dimensions remain essential for resolving individual resonances in NMR spectra of biological macromolecues. Conventional Fourier-based methods of spectrum analysis limit the resolution that can be practically achieved in the indirect dimensions. Nonuniform or sparse data collection strategies, together with suitable non-Fourier methods of spectrum analysis, enable high-resolution multidimensional spectra to be obtained. Although some of these approaches were first employed in NMR more than two decades ago, it is only relatively recently that they have been widely adopted. Here we describe the current practice of sparse sampling methods and prospects for further development of the approach to improve resolution and sensitivity and shorten experiment time in multidimensional NMR. While sparse sampling is particularly promising for multidimensional NMR, the basic principles could apply to other forms of multidimensional spectroscopy. PMID:22481242

  18. Microflow NMR: concepts and capabilities.

    PubMed

    Olson, Dean L; Norcross, James A; O'Neil-Johnson, Mark; Molitor, Paul F; Detlefsen, David J; Wilson, Aaron G; Peck, Timothy L

    2004-05-15

    The principles and parameters to consider when choosing an NMR probe for analysis of a volume- or mass-limited sample are identified and discussed. In particular, a capillary-based microflow probe is described which has a mass sensitivity comparable to cryoprobes (observe volume approximately 40 microL), but with several distinct advantages. The microflow probe has a flowcell volume of 5 microL and an observe volume of 1.5 microL and is equipped with proton and carbon observe channels, deuterium lock, and z-gradient capability. The entire flow path is fused silica; inlet and outlet capillary inner diameters are 50 microm to minimize sample dispersion, making it well-suited to volume-limited samples. An injected sample of 1 nmol of sucrose (0.34 microg in 3 microL, 0.33 mM; MW = 342 g/mol) yields a 1D proton spectrum in 10 min on a spectrometer of 500 MHz or higher. In another example, 15 microg of sucrose (in 3 microL; 15 mM, 45 nmol) is injected and parked in the probe to yield a heteronuclear multiple-quantum coherence (HMQC) spectrum in less than 15 h. The natural product muristerone A (75 microg in 3 microL, 50 mM, 150 nmol; MW = 497 g/mol) was delivered to the flow cell, and a gradient correlation spectroscopy spectrum was acquired in 7 min, a gradient HMQC in 4 h, and a gradient heteronuclear multiple-bond correlation in 11 h. Four basic modes of sample injection into the probe vary in degree of user intervention, speed, solvent consumption, and sample delivery efficiency. Manual, manual-assisted (employing a micropump), automated (using an autosampler), and capillary HPLC modes of operation are described.

  19. Hypothesis driven assessment of an NMR curriculum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cossey, Kimberly

    The goal of this project was to develop a battery of assessments to evaluate an undergraduate NMR curriculum at Penn State University. As a chemical education project, we sought to approach the problem of curriculum assessment from a scientific perspective, while remaining grounded in the education research literature and practices. We chose the phrase hypothesis driven assessment to convey this process of relating the scientific method to the study of educational methods, modules, and curricula. We began from a hypothesis, that deeper understanding of one particular analytical technique (NMR) will increase undergraduate students' abilities to solve chemical problems. We designed an experiment to investigate this hypothesis, and data collected were analyzed and interpreted in light of the hypothesis and several related research questions. The expansion of the NMR curriculum at Penn State was funded through the NSF's Course, Curriculum, and Laboratory Improvement (CCLI) program, and assessment was required. The goal of this project, as stated in the grant proposal, was to provide NMR content in greater depth by integrating NMR modules throughout the curriculum in physical chemistry, instrumental, and organic chemistry laboratory courses. Hands-on contact with the NMR spectrometer and NMR data and repeated exposure of the analytical technique within different contexts (courses) were unique factors of this curriculum. Therefore, we maintained a focus on these aspects throughout the evaluation process. The most challenging and time-consuming aspect of any assessment is the development of testing instruments and methods to provide useful data. After key variables were defined, testing instruments were designed to measure these variables based on educational literature (Chapter 2). The primary variables measured in this assessment were: depth of understanding of NMR, basic NMR knowledge, problem solving skills (HETCOR problem), confidence for skills used in class (within

  20. 33S NMR cryogenic probe for taurine detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobo, Fumio; Takahashi, Masato; Maeda, Hideaki

    2009-03-01

    With the goal of a S33 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probe applicable to in vivo NMR on taurine-biological samples, we have developed the S33 NMR cryogenic probe, which is applicable to taurine solutions. The NMR sensitivity gain relative to a conventional broadband probe is as large as 3.5. This work suggests that improvements in the preamplifier could allow NMR measurements on 100 μM taurine solutions, which is the level of sensitivity necessary for biological samples.

  1. NMR Spectra through the Eyes of a Student: Eye Tracking Applied to NMR Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Topczewski, Joseph J.; Topczewski, Anna M.; Tang, Hui; Kendhammer, Lisa K.; Pienta, Norbert J.

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) plays a key role in introductory organic chemistry, spanning theory, concepts, and experimentation. Therefore, it is imperative that the instruction methods for NMR are both efficient and effective. By utilizing eye tracking equipment, the researchers were able to monitor how second-semester organic…

  2. Performance of the WeNMR CS-Rosetta3 web server in CASD-NMR.

    PubMed

    van der Schot, Gijs; Bonvin, Alexandre M J J

    2015-08-01

    We present here the performance of the WeNMR CS-Rosetta3 web server in CASD-NMR, the critical assessment of automated structure determination by NMR. The CS-Rosetta server uses only chemical shifts for structure prediction, in combination, when available, with a post-scoring procedure based on unassigned NOE lists (Huang et al. in J Am Chem Soc 127:1665-1674, 2005b, doi: 10.1021/ja047109h). We compare the original submissions using a previous version of the server based on Rosetta version 2.6 with recalculated targets using the new R3FP fragment picker for fragment selection and implementing a new annotation of prediction reliability (van der Schot et al. in J Biomol NMR 57:27-35, 2013, doi: 10.1007/s10858-013-9762-6), both implemented in the CS-Rosetta3 WeNMR server. In this second round of CASD-NMR, the WeNMR CS-Rosetta server has demonstrated a much better performance than in the first round since only converged targets were submitted. Further, recalculation of all CASD-NMR targets using the new version of the server demonstrates that our new annotation of prediction quality is giving reliable results. Predictions annotated as weak are often found to provide useful models, but only for a fraction of the sequence, and should therefore only be used with caution.

  3. Comparing NMR and X-ray protein structure: Lindemann-like parameters and NMR disorder.

    PubMed

    Faraggi, Eshel; Dunker, A Keith; Sussman, Joel L; Kloczkowski, Andrzej

    2017-08-08

    Disordered protein chains and segments are fast becoming a major pathway for our understanding of biological function, especially in more evolved species. However, the standard definition of disordered residues: the inability to constrain them in X-ray derived structures, is not easily applied to NMR derived structures. We carry out a statistical comparison between proteins whose structure was resolved using NMR and using X-ray protocols. We start by establishing a connection between these two protocols for obtaining protein structure. We find a close statistical correspondence between NMR and X-ray structures if fluctuations inherent to the NMR protocol are taken into account. Intuitively this tends to lend support to the validity of both NMR and X-ray protocols in deriving biomolecular models that correspond to in vivo conditions. We then establish Lindemann-like parameters for NMR derived structures and examine what order/disorder cutoffs for these parameters are most consistent with X-ray data and how consistent are they. Finally, we find critical value of [Formula: see text] for the best correspondence between X-ray and NMR derived order/disorder assignment, judged by maximizing the Matthews correlation, and a critical value [Formula: see text] if a balance between false positive and false negative prediction is sought. We examine a few non-conforming cases, and examine the origin of the structure derived in X-ray. This study could help in assigning meaningful disorder from NMR experiments.

  4. Temperature imaging by 1H NMR and suppression of convection in NMR probes

    PubMed

    Hedin; Furo

    1998-03-01

    A simple arrangement for suppressing convection in NMR probes is tested experimentally. Diffusion experiments are used to determine the onset of convection and 1H temperature imaging helps to rationalize the somewhat surprising results. A convenient new 1H NMR thermometer, CH2Br2 dissolved in a nematic thermotropic liquid crystal, is presented. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  5. NMR Spectra through the Eyes of a Student: Eye Tracking Applied to NMR Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Topczewski, Joseph J.; Topczewski, Anna M.; Tang, Hui; Kendhammer, Lisa K.; Pienta, Norbert J.

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) plays a key role in introductory organic chemistry, spanning theory, concepts, and experimentation. Therefore, it is imperative that the instruction methods for NMR are both efficient and effective. By utilizing eye tracking equipment, the researchers were able to monitor how second-semester organic…

  6. Use of NMR and NMR Prediction Software to Identify Components in Red Bull Energy Drinks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Andre J.; Shirzadi, Azadeh; Burrow, Timothy E.; Dicks, Andrew P.; Lefebvre, Brent; Corrin, Tricia

    2009-01-01

    A laboratory experiment designed as part of an upper-level undergraduate analytical chemistry course is described. Students investigate two popular soft drinks (Red Bull Energy Drink and sugar-free Red Bull Energy Drink) by NMR spectroscopy. With assistance of modern NMR prediction software they identify and quantify major components in each…

  7. Use of NMR and NMR Prediction Software to Identify Components in Red Bull Energy Drinks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Andre J.; Shirzadi, Azadeh; Burrow, Timothy E.; Dicks, Andrew P.; Lefebvre, Brent; Corrin, Tricia

    2009-01-01

    A laboratory experiment designed as part of an upper-level undergraduate analytical chemistry course is described. Students investigate two popular soft drinks (Red Bull Energy Drink and sugar-free Red Bull Energy Drink) by NMR spectroscopy. With assistance of modern NMR prediction software they identify and quantify major components in each…

  8. Nuclear magnetic resonance apparatus having semitoroidal rf coil for use in topical NMR and NMR imaging

    DOEpatents

    Fukushima, Eiichi; Roeder, Stephen B. W.; Assink, Roger A.; Gibson, Atholl A. V.

    1986-01-01

    An improved nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) apparatus for use in topical magnetic resonance (TMR) spectroscopy and other remote sensing NMR applications includes a semitoroidal radio-frequency (rf) coil. The semitoroidal rf coil produces an effective alternating magnetic field at a distance from the poles of the coil, so as to enable NMR measurements to be taken from selected regions inside an object, particularly including human and other living subjects. The semitoroidal rf coil is relatively insensitive to magnetic interference from metallic objects located behind the coil, thereby rendering the coil particularly suited for use in both conventional and superconducting NMR magnets. The semitoroidal NMR coil can be constructed so that it emits little or no excess rf electric field associated with the rf magnetic field, thus avoiding adverse effects due to dielectric heating of the sample or to any other interaction of the electric field with the sample.

  9. Characterization of heroin samples by 1H NMR and 2D DOSY 1H NMR.

    PubMed

    Balayssac, Stéphane; Retailleau, Emmanuel; Bertrand, Geneviève; Escot, Marie-Pierre; Martino, Robert; Malet-Martino, Myriam; Gilard, Véronique

    2014-01-01

    Twenty-four samples of heroin from different illicit drug seizures were analyzed using proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance ((1)H NMR) and two-dimensional diffusion-ordered spectroscopy (2D DOSY) (1)H NMR. A careful assignment and quantification of (1)H signals enabled a comprehensive characterization of the substances present in the samples investigated: heroin, its main related impurities (6-acetylmorphine, acetylcodeine, morphine, noscapine and papaverine) and cutting agents (caffeine and acetaminophen in nearly all samples as well as lactose, lidocaine, mannitol, piracetam in one sample only), and hence to establish their spectral signatures. The good agreement between the amounts of heroin, noscapine, caffeine and acetaminophen determined by (1)H NMR and gas chromatography, the reference method in forensic laboratories, demonstrates the validity of the (1)H NMR technique. In this paper, 2D DOSY (1)H NMR offers a new approach for a whole characterization of the various components of these complex mixtures.

  10. Calibration of NMR well logs from carbonate reservoirs with laboratory NMR measurements and μXRCT

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, Harris E.; Smith, Megan M.; Hao, Yue; Carroll, Susan A.

    2014-12-31

    The use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) well log data has the potential to provide in-situ porosity, pore size distributions, and permeability of target carbonate CO₂ storage reservoirs. However, these methods which have been successfully applied to sandstones have yet to be completely validated for carbonate reservoirs. Here, we have taken an approach to validate NMR measurements of carbonate rock cores with independent measurements of permeability and pore surface area to volume (S/V) distributions using differential pressure measurements and micro X-ray computed tomography (μXRCT) imaging methods, respectively. We observe that using standard methods for determining permeability from NMR data incorrectly predicts these values by orders of magnitude. However, we do observe promise that NMR measurements provide reasonable estimates of pore S/V distributions, and with further independent measurements of the carbonate rock properties that universally applicable relationships between NMR measured properties may be developed for in-situ well logging applications of carbonate reservoirs.

  11. BOOK REVIEW: NMR Imaging of Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blümich, Bernhard

    2003-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of materials is a field of increasing importance. Applications extend from fundamental science like the characterization of fluid transport in porous rock, catalyst pellets and hemodialysers into various fields of engineering for process optimization and product quality control. While the results of MRI imaging are being appreciated by a growing community, the methods of imaging are far more diverse for materials applications than for medical imaging of human beings. Blümich has delivered the first book in this field. It was published in hardback three years ago and is now offered as a paperback for nearly half the price. The text provides an introduction to MRI imaging of materials covering solid-state NMR spectroscopy, imaging methods for liquid and solid samples, and unusual MRI in terms of specialized approaches to spatial resolution such as an MRI surface scanner. The book represents an excellent and thorough treatment which will help to grow research in materials MRI. Blümich developed the treatise over many years for his research students, graduates in chemistry, physics and engineering. But it may also be useful for medical students looking for a less formal discussion of solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The structure of this book is easy to perceive. The first three chapters cover an introduction, the fundamentals and methods of solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The book starts at the ground level where no previous knowledge about NMR is assumed. Chapter 4 discusses a wide variety of transformations beyond the Fourier transformation. In particular, the Hadamard transformation and the 'wavelet' transformation are missing from most related books. This chapter also includes a description of noise-correlation spectroscopy, which promises the imaging of large objects without the need for extremely powerful radio-frequency transmitters. Chapters 5 and 6 cover basic imaging methods. The following chapter about the use of relaxation and

  12. SedNMR: on the edge between solution and solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Bertini, Ivano; Luchinat, Claudio; Parigi, Giacomo; Ravera, Enrico

    2013-09-17

    Solid-state NMR (SS-NMR) of proteins requires that those molecules be immobilized, usually by crystallization, freezing, or lyophilization. However, self-crowding can also slow molecular rotation sufficiently to prevent the nuclear interactions from averaging. To achieve self-crowding, researchers can use a centrifugal field to create a concentration gradient or use regular ultracentrifugation to produce highly concentrated, gel-like solutions. Thus sedimented solute NMR (SedNMR) provides a simple method to prepare biological samples for SS-NMR experiments with minimal perturbation. This method may also give researchers a way to investigate species that are not otherwise accessible by NMR. We induce the sedimentation in one of two ways: (1) by the extreme centrifugal force exerted during magic angle spinning (MAS-induced sedimentation or in situ) or (2) by an ultracentrifuge (UC-induced sedimentation or ex situ). Sedimentation is particularly useful in situations where it is difficult to obtain protein crystals. Furthermore, because the proteins remain in a largely hydrated state, the sedimented samples may provide SS-NMR spectra that have better resolution than the spectra from frozen solutions or lyophilized powders. If sedimentation is induced in situ, the same protein sample can be used for both solution and SS-NMR studies. Finally, we show that in situ SedNMR can be used to detect the NMR signals of large molecular adducts that have binding constants that are too weak to allow for the selective isolation and crystallization of the complexed species. We can selectively induce sedimentation for the heaviest molecular species. Because the complexed molecules are subtracted from the bulk solution, the reaction proceeds further toward the formation of complexes.

  13. NMR studies of cation transport across membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Shochet, N.R.

    1985-01-01

    /sup 23/Na NMR Studies of cation transport across membranes were conducted both on model and biological membranes. Two ionophores, the carrier monensin and the channel-former gramicidin, were chosen to induce cation transport in large unilamellar phosphatidylcholine vesicles. The distinction between the NMR signals arising from the two sides of the membrane was achieved by the addition of an anionic paramagnetic shift reagent to the outer solution. The kinetics of the cation transport across the membrane was observed simultaneously monitoring the changes in the /sup 23/Na NMR signals of both compartments. Two mathematical models were developed for the estimation of the transport parameters of the monensin- and gramicidin-induced cation transport. The models were able to fit the experimental data very well. A new method for the estimation of the volume trapped inside the vesicles was developed. The method uses the relative areas of the intra- and extravesicular NMR signals arising from a suspension of vesicles bathed in the same medium they contain, as a measure for the relative volumes of these compartments. Sodium transport across biological membranes was studied by /sup 23/ NMR, using suspensions of cultured nerve cells. The sodium influx through voltage-gated channels was studied using the channel modifier batrachotoxin in combination with scorpion toxin.

  14. NMR methodologies in the analysis of blueberries.

    PubMed

    Capitani, Donatella; Sobolev, Anatoly P; Delfini, Maurizio; Vista, Silvia; Antiochia, Riccarda; Proietti, Noemi; Bubici, Salvatore; Ferrante, Gianni; Carradori, Simone; De Salvador, Flavio Roberto; Mannina, Luisa

    2014-06-01

    An NMR analytical protocol based on complementary high and low field measurements is proposed for blueberry characterization. Untargeted NMR metabolite profiling of blueberries aqueous and organic extracts as well as targeted NMR analysis focused on anthocyanins and other phenols are reported. Bligh-Dyer and microwave-assisted extractions were carried out and compared showing a better recovery of lipidic fraction in the case of microwave procedure. Water-soluble metabolites belonging to different classes such as sugars, amino acids, organic acids, and phenolic compounds, as well as metabolites soluble in organic solvent such as triglycerides, sterols, and fatty acids, were identified. Five anthocyanins (malvidin-3-glucoside, malvidin-3-galactoside, delphinidin-3-glucoside, delphinidin-3-galactoside, and petunidin-3-glucoside) and 3-O-α-l-rhamnopyranosyl quercetin were identified in solid phase extract. The water status of fresh and withered blueberries was monitored by portable NMR and fast-field cycling NMR. (1) H depth profiles, T2 transverse relaxation times and dispersion profiles were found to be sensitive to the withering.

  15. Radiation damping in microcoil NMR probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, V. V.

    2006-04-01

    Radiation damping arises from the field induced in the receiver coil by large bulk magnetization and tends to selectively drive this magnetization back to equilibrium much faster than relaxation processes. The demand for increased sensitivity in mass-limited samples has led to the development of microcoil NMR probes that are capable of obtaining high quality NMR spectra with small sample volumes (nL-μL). Microcoil probes are optimized to increase sensitivity by increasing either the sample-to-coil ratio (filling factor) of the probe or quality factor of the detection coil. Though radiation damping effects have been studied in standard NMR probes, these effects have not been measured in the microcoil probes. Here a systematic evaluation of radiation damping effects in a microcoil NMR probe is presented and the results are compared with similar measurements in conventional large volume samples. These results show that radiation-damping effects in microcoil probe is much more pronounced than in 5 mm probes, and that it is critically important to optimize NMR experiments to minimize these effects. As microcoil probes provide better control of the bulk magnetization, with good RF and B0 inhomogeneity, in addition to negligible dipolar field effects due to nearly spherical sample volumes, these probes can be used exclusively to study the complex behavior of radiation damping.

  16. Radiation damping in microcoil NMR probes.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, V V

    2006-04-01

    Radiation damping arises from the field induced in the receiver coil by large bulk magnetization and tends to selectively drive this magnetization back to equilibrium much faster than relaxation processes. The demand for increased sensitivity in mass-limited samples has led to the development of microcoil NMR probes that are capable of obtaining high quality NMR spectra with small sample volumes (nL-microL). Microcoil probes are optimized to increase sensitivity by increasing either the sample-to-coil ratio (filling factor) of the probe or quality factor of the detection coil. Though radiation damping effects have been studied in standard NMR probes, these effects have not been measured in the microcoil probes. Here a systematic evaluation of radiation damping effects in a microcoil NMR probe is presented and the results are compared with similar measurements in conventional large volume samples. These results show that radiation-damping effects in microcoil probe is much more pronounced than in 5 mm probes, and that it is critically important to optimize NMR experiments to minimize these effects. As microcoil probes provide better control of the bulk magnetization, with good RF and B0 inhomogeneity, in addition to negligible dipolar field effects due to nearly spherical sample volumes, these probes can be used exclusively to study the complex behavior of radiation damping.

  17. NMR structural studies on antifreeze proteins.

    PubMed

    Sönnichsen, F D; Davies, P L; Sykes, B D

    1998-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are a structurally diverse class of proteins that bind to ice and inhibit its growth in a noncolligative manner. This adsorption-inhibition mechanism operating at the ice surface results in a lowering of the (nonequilibrium) freezing point below the melting point. A lowering of approximately 1 degree C, which is sufficient to prevent fish from freezing in ice-laden seawater, requires millimolar AFP levels in the blood. The solubility of AFPs at these millimolar concentrations and the small size of the AFPs (typically 3-15 kDa) make them ideal subjects for NMR analysis. Although fish AFPs are naturally abundant, seasonal expression, restricted access to polar fishes, and difficulties in separating numerous similar isoforms have made protein expression the method of choice for producing AFPs for structural studies. Expression of recombinant AFPs has also facilitated NMR analysis by permitting isotopic labeling with 15N and 13C and has permitted mutations to be made to help with the interpretation of NMR data. NMR analysis has recently solved two AFP structures and provided valuable information about the disposition of ice-binding side chains in a third. The potential exists to solve other AFP structures, including the newly described insect AFPs, and to use solid-state NMR techniques to address fundamental questions about the nature of the interaction between AFPs and ice.

  18. Applications of NMR to biological systems

    SciTech Connect

    Baatz, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    This work describes the application of nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry (NMR) for the study of three biological systems, namely, the pulmonary surfactant-associated protein, SPL(pVal), the myocardial calcium slow channel of the perfused guinea pig heart, and the intracellular buffering system of the Leishmania donovani promastigote. Investigations of structural features of bovine SPL(pVal) were performed using one and two-dimensional {sup 1}H-NMR techniques. Delayed Fourier transform {sup 1}H-NMR has been used to study the effects of bovine SPL(pVal) and temperature upon model membrane structure. A model describing the mechanism by which the SPL(pVal) lowers the membrane surface tension has been proposed. In order to study the dependence of the myocardial calcium slow channel activity on adenosine triphosphate levels and intracellular pH, and in vivo {sup 31}P-NMR probe capable of simultaneously and noninvasively monitoring these three parameters was designed. In vivo {sup 31}P-NMR was also applied for the study of the Leishmania donovani promastigote's ability to maintain a pH gradient across its cellular membrane at low extracellular pH.

  19. Magic angle spinning NMR of paramagnetic proteins.

    PubMed

    Knight, Michael J; Felli, Isabella C; Pierattelli, Roberta; Emsley, Lyndon; Pintacuda, Guido

    2013-09-17

    Metal ions are ubiquitous in biochemical and cellular processes. Since many metal ions are paramagnetic due to the presence of unpaired electrons, paramagnetic molecules are an important class of targets for research in structural biology and related fields. Today, NMR spectroscopy plays a central role in the investigation of the structure and chemical properties of paramagnetic metalloproteins, linking the observed paramagnetic phenomena directly to electronic and molecular structure. A major step forward in the study of proteins by solid-state NMR came with the advent of ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) and the ability to use (1)H detection. Combined, these techniques have allowed investigators to observe nuclei that previously were invisible in highly paramagnetic metalloproteins. In addition, these techniques have enabled quantitative site-specific measurement of a variety of long-range paramagnetic effects. Instead of limiting solid-state NMR studies of biological systems, paramagnetism provides an information-rich phenomenon that can be exploited in these studies. This Account emphasizes state-of-the-art methods and applications of solid-state NMR in paramagnetic systems in biological chemistry. In particular, we discuss the use of ultrafast MAS and (1)H-detection in perdeuterated paramagnetic metalloproteins. Current methodology allows us to determine the structure and dynamics of metalloenzymes, and, as an example, we describe solid-state NMR studies of microcrystalline superoxide dismutase, a 32 kDa dimer. Data were acquired with remarkably short times, and these experiments required only a few milligrams of sample.

  20. NMR techniques in the study of cardiovascular structure and functions

    SciTech Connect

    Osbakken, M.; Haselgrove, J.

    1987-01-01

    The chapter titles of this book are: Introduction to NMR Techniques;Theory of NMR Probe Design;Overview of Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Study the Cardiovascular System;Vascular Anatomy and Physiology Studied with NMR Techniques;Assessment of Myocardial Ischemia and Infarction by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging;The Use of MRI in Congenital Heart Disease;Cardiomyopathies and Myocarditis Studied with NMR Techniques;Determination of Myocardial Mechanical Function with Magnetic Resonance Imaging Techniques;Determination of Flow Using NMR Techniques;The Use of Contrast Agents in Cardiac MRI;Can Cardiovascular Disease Be Effectively Evaluated with NMR Spectroscopy. NMR Studies of ATP Synthesis Reactions in the Isolated Heart;Studies of Intermediary Metabolism in the Heart by 13C NMR Spectroscopy;23Na and 39K NMR Spectroscopic Studies of the Intact Beating Heart;and Evaluation of Skeletal Muscle Metabolism in Patients with Congestive Heart Failure Using Phosphorus Nuclear Magnetic Resonance.

  1. NEMS - National Energy Modeling System: An Overview

    EIA Publications

    2009-01-01

    The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2009 a summary description of NEMS and each of its components. NEMS is a computer-based, energy-economy modeling system of energy markets for the midterm period through 2030. The NEMS is used to produce the Annual Energy Outlook.

  2. NEMS - National Energy Modeling System: An Overview

    EIA Publications

    2009-01-01

    The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2009 a summary description of NEMS and each of its components. NEMS is a computer-based, energy-economy modeling system of energy markets for the midterm period through 2030. The NEMS is used to produce the Annual Energy Outlook.

  3. Asymmetric NMR lineshapes and precision magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowan, Brian

    1996-04-01

    In an inhomogeneous magnetic field of asymmetric distribution the observed NMR precession frequency of a liquid will vary with time. We show that the initial frequency corresponds to the mean of the absorption spectrum whereas the final precession frequency corresponds to the peak of the spectrum. Precision magnetometry requires knowledge of the mean so that reliable extrapolation to the zero-time value of the frequency is required. We demonstrate that, as with the narrowing of NMR lines, the effect of atomic motion is to cause the precession frequency to relax in an exponential manner. The importance of these results is discussed in the comparison of proton magnetic resonance in water and NMR in gaseous 0957-0233/7/4/028/img1 for precision magnetometry.

  4. Review of NMR characterization of pyrolysis oils

    DOE PAGES

    Hao, Naijia; Ben, Haoxi; Yoo, Chang Geun; ...

    2016-08-24

    Here, pyrolysis of renewable biomass has been developed as a method to produce green fuels and chemicals in response to energy security concerns as well as to alleviate environmental issues incurred with fossil fuel usage. However, pyrolysis oils still have limited commercial application, mainly because unprocessed oils cannot be readily blended with current petroleum-based transportation fuels. To better understand these challenges, researchers have applied diverse characterization techniques in the development of bio-oil studies. In particular, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a key spectroscopic characterization method through analysis of bio-oil components. This review highlights the NMR strategies for pyrolysis oil characterizationmore » and critically discusses the applications of 1H, 13C, 31P, 19F, and two-dimensional (2-D NMR) analyses such as heteronuclear single quantum correlation (HSQC) in representative pyrolysis oil studies.« less

  5. Review of NMR characterization of pyrolysis oils

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Naijia; Ben, Haoxi; Yoo, Chang Geun; Adhikari, Sushil; Ragauskas, Arthur J.

    2016-08-24

    Here, pyrolysis of renewable biomass has been developed as a method to produce green fuels and chemicals in response to energy security concerns as well as to alleviate environmental issues incurred with fossil fuel usage. However, pyrolysis oils still have limited commercial application, mainly because unprocessed oils cannot be readily blended with current petroleum-based transportation fuels. To better understand these challenges, researchers have applied diverse characterization techniques in the development of bio-oil studies. In particular, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a key spectroscopic characterization method through analysis of bio-oil components. This review highlights the NMR strategies for pyrolysis oil characterization and critically discusses the applications of 1H, 13C, 31P, 19F, and two-dimensional (2-D NMR) analyses such as heteronuclear single quantum correlation (HSQC) in representative pyrolysis oil studies.

  6. A modularized pulse programmer for NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Wenping; Bao, Qingjia; Yang, Liang; Chen, Yiqun; Liu, Chaoyang; Qiu, Jianqing; Ye, Chaohui

    2011-02-01

    A modularized pulse programmer for a NMR spectrometer is described. It consists of a networked PCI-104 single-board computer and a field programmable gate array (FPGA). The PCI-104 is dedicated to translate the pulse sequence elements from the host computer into 48-bit binary words and download these words to the FPGA, while the FPGA functions as a sequencer to execute these binary words. High-resolution NMR spectra obtained on a home-built spectrometer with four pulse programmers working concurrently demonstrate the effectiveness of the pulse programmer. Advantages of the module include (1) once designed it can be duplicated and used to construct a scalable NMR/MRI system with multiple transmitter and receiver channels, (2) it is a totally programmable system in which all specific applications are determined by software, and (3) it provides enough reserve for possible new pulse sequences.

  7. NMR Spectroscopy: Processing Strategies (by Peter Bigler)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Nancy S.

    1998-06-01

    Peter Bigler. VCH: New York, 1997. 249 pp. ISBN 3-527-28812-0. $99.00. This book, part of a four-volume series planned to deal with all aspects of a standard NMR experiment, is almost the exact book I have been hoping to find. My department has acquired, as have hundreds of other undergraduate institutions, high-field NMR instrumentation and the capability of doing extremely sophisticated experiments. However, the training is often a one- or two-day experience in which the material retained by the faculty trained is garbled and filled with holes, not unlike the information our students seem to retain. This text, and the accompanying exercises based on data contained on a CD-ROM, goes a long way to fill in the gaps and clarify misunderstandings about NMR processing.

  8. Review of NMR characterization of pyrolysis oils

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Naijia; Ben, Haoxi; Yoo, Chang Geun; Adhikari, Sushil; Ragauskas, Arthur J.

    2016-08-24

    Here, pyrolysis of renewable biomass has been developed as a method to produce green fuels and chemicals in response to energy security concerns as well as to alleviate environmental issues incurred with fossil fuel usage. However, pyrolysis oils still have limited commercial application, mainly because unprocessed oils cannot be readily blended with current petroleum-based transportation fuels. To better understand these challenges, researchers have applied diverse characterization techniques in the development of bio-oil studies. In particular, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a key spectroscopic characterization method through analysis of bio-oil components. This review highlights the NMR strategies for pyrolysis oil characterization and critically discusses the applications of 1H, 13C, 31P, 19F, and two-dimensional (2-D NMR) analyses such as heteronuclear single quantum correlation (HSQC) in representative pyrolysis oil studies.

  9. NMR phase noise in bitter magnets.

    PubMed

    Sigmund, E E; Calder, E S; Thomas, G W; Mitrović, V F; Bachman, H N; Halperin, W P; Kuhns, P L; Reyes, A P

    2001-02-01

    We have studied the temporal instability of a high field resistive Bitter magnet through nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). This instability leads to transverse spin decoherence in repeated and accumulated NMR experiments as is normally performed during signal averaging. We demonstrate this effect via Hahn echo and Carr--Purcell--Meiboom--Gill (CPMG) transverse relaxation experiments in a 23-T resistive magnet. Quantitative analysis was found to be consistent with separate measurements of the magnetic field frequency fluctuation spectrum, as well as with independent NMR experiments performed in a magnetic field with a controlled instability. Finally, the CPMG sequence with short pulse delays is shown to be successful in recovering the intrinsic spin--spin relaxation even in the presence of magnetic field temporal instability. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  10. Remote tuning of NMR probe circuits.

    PubMed

    Kodibagkar, V D; Conradi, M S

    2000-05-01

    There are many circumstances in which the probe tuning adjustments cannot be located near the rf NMR coil. These may occur in high-temperature NMR, low-temperature NMR, and in the use of magnets with small diameter access bores. We address here circuitry for connecting a fixed-tuned probe circuit by a transmission line to a remotely located tuning network. In particular, the bandwidth over which the probe may be remotely tuned while keeping the losses in the transmission line acceptably low is considered. The results show that for all resonant circuit geometries (series, parallel, series-parallel), overcoupling of the line to the tuned circuit is key to obtaining a large tuning bandwidth. At equivalent extents of overcoupling, all resonant circuit geometries have nearly equal remote tuning bandwidths. Particularly for the case of low-loss transmission line, the tuning bandwidth can be many times the tuned circuit's bandwidth, f(o)/Q. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  11. Solid-state NMR of proteins sedimented by ultracentrifugation

    PubMed Central

    Bertini, Ivano; Luchinat, Claudio; Parigi, Giacomo; Ravera, Enrico; Reif, Bernd; Turano, Paola

    2011-01-01

    Relatively large proteins in solution, spun in NMR rotors for solid samples at typical ultracentrifugation speeds, sediment at the rotor wall. The sedimented proteins provide high-quality solid-state-like NMR spectra suitable for structural investigation. The proteins fully revert to the native solution state when spinning is stopped, allowing one to study them in both conditions. Transiently sedimented proteins can be considered a novel phase as far as NMR is concerned. NMR of transiently sedimented molecules under fast magic angle spinning has the advantage of overcoming protein size limitations of solution NMR without the need of sample crystallization/precipitation required by solid-state NMR. PMID:21670262

  12. Contact replacement for NMR resonance assignment.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Fei; Pandurangan, Gopal; Bailey-Kellogg, Chris

    2008-07-01

    Complementing its traditional role in structural studies of proteins, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is playing an increasingly important role in functional studies. NMR dynamics experiments characterize motions involved in target recognition, ligand binding, etc., while NMR chemical shift perturbation experiments identify and localize protein-protein and protein-ligand interactions. The key bottleneck in these studies is to determine the backbone resonance assignment, which allows spectral peaks to be mapped to specific atoms. This article develops a novel approach to address that bottleneck, exploiting an available X-ray structure or homology model to assign the entire backbone from a set of relatively fast and cheap NMR experiments. We formulate contact replacement for resonance assignment as the problem of computing correspondences between a contact graph representing the structure and an NMR graph representing the data; the NMR graph is a significantly corrupted, ambiguous version of the contact graph. We first show that by combining connectivity and amino acid type information, and exploiting the random structure of the noise, one can provably determine unique correspondences in polynomial time with high probability, even in the presence of significant noise (a constant number of noisy edges per vertex). We then detail an efficient randomized algorithm and show that, over a variety of experimental and synthetic datasets, it is robust to typical levels of structural variation (1-2 AA), noise (250-600%) and missings (10-40%). Our algorithm achieves very good overall assignment accuracy, above 80% in alpha-helices, 70% in beta-sheets and 60% in loop regions. Our contact replacement algorithm is implemented in platform-independent Python code. The software can be freely obtained for academic use by request from the authors.

  13. Contact replacement for NMR resonance assignment

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Fei; Pandurangan, Gopal; Bailey-Kellogg, Chris

    2008-01-01

    Motivation: Complementing its traditional role in structural studies of proteins, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is playing an increasingly important role in functional studies. NMR dynamics experiments characterize motions involved in target recognition, ligand binding, etc., while NMR chemical shift perturbation experiments identify and localize protein–protein and protein–ligand interactions. The key bottleneck in these studies is to determine the backbone resonance assignment, which allows spectral peaks to be mapped to specific atoms. This article develops a novel approach to address that bottleneck, exploiting an available X-ray structure or homology model to assign the entire backbone from a set of relatively fast and cheap NMR experiments. Results: We formulate contact replacement for resonance assignment as the problem of computing correspondences between a contact graph representing the structure and an NMR graph representing the data; the NMR graph is a significantly corrupted, ambiguous version of the contact graph. We first show that by combining connectivity and amino acid type information, and exploiting the random structure of the noise, one can provably determine unique correspondences in polynomial time with high probability, even in the presence of significant noise (a constant number of noisy edges per vertex). We then detail an efficient randomized algorithm and show that, over a variety of experimental and synthetic datasets, it is robust to typical levels of structural variation (1–2 AA), noise (250–600%) and missings (10–40%). Our algorithm achieves very good overall assignment accuracy, above 80% in α-helices, 70% in β-sheets and 60% in loop regions. Availability: Our contact replacement algorithm is implemented in platform-independent Python code. The software can be freely obtained for academic use by request from the authors. Contact: gopal@cs.purdue.edu; cbk@cs.dartmouth.edu PMID:18586716

  14. An NMR Study of Microvoids in Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toy, James; Mattrix, Larry

    1996-01-01

    An understanding of polymer defect structures, like microvoids in polymeric matrices, is most crucial to their fabrication and application potential. In this project guest atoms are introduced into the microvoids in PMR-15 and NMR is used to determine microvoid sizes and locations. Xenon is a relatively inert probe that would normally not be found naturally in polymer or in NMR probe materials. There are two NMR active Xenon isotopes, Xe-129 and Xe-131. The Xe atom has a very high polarizability, which makes it sensitive to the intracrystalline environment of polymers. Interactions between the Xe atoms and the host matrix perturb and Xe electron cloud, deshielding the nuclei, and thereby expanding the range of the observed NMR chemical shifts. This chemical shift range which may be as large as 5000 ppm, permits subtle structural and chemical effects to be studied with high sensitivity. The Xe-129-NMR line shape has been found to vary in response to changes in the pore symmetry of the framework hosts in Zeolites and Clathrasil compounds. Before exposure to Xe gas, the PMR-15 samples were dried in a vacuum oven at 150 C for 48 hours. The samples were then exposed to Xe gas at 30 psi for 72 hours and sealed in glass tubes with 1 atmosphere of Xenon gas. Xenon gas at 1 atmosphere was used to tune up the spectrometer and to set up the appropriate NMR parameters. A series of spectra were obtained interspersed with applications of vacuum and heating to drive out the adsorbed Xe and determine the role of Xe-Xe interactions in the observed chemical shift.

  15. Hyperpolarized Xenon for NMR and MRI Applications

    PubMed Central

    Witte, Christopher; Kunth, Martin; Döpfert, Jörg; Rossella, Federica; Schröder, Leif

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and imaging (MRI) suffer from intrinsic low sensitivity because even strong external magnetic fields of ~10 T generate only a small detectable net-magnetization of the sample at room temperature 1. Hence, most NMR and MRI applications rely on the detection of molecules at relative high concentration (e.g., water for imaging of biological tissue) or require excessive acquisition times. This limits our ability to exploit the very useful molecular specificity of NMR signals for many biochemical and medical applications. However, novel approaches have emerged in the past few years: Manipulation of the detected spin species prior to detection inside the NMR/MRI magnet can dramatically increase the magnetization and therefore allows detection of molecules at much lower concentration 2. Here, we present a method for polarization of a xenon gas mixture (2-5% Xe, 10% N2, He balance) in a compact setup with a ca. 16000-fold signal enhancement. Modern line-narrowed diode lasers allow efficient polarization 7 and immediate use of gas mixture even if the noble gas is not separated from the other components. The SEOP apparatus is explained and determination of the achieved spin polarization is demonstrated for performance control of the method. The hyperpolarized gas can be used for void space imaging, including gas flow imaging or diffusion studies at the interfaces with other materials 8,9. Moreover, the Xe NMR signal is extremely sensitive to its molecular environment 6. This enables the option to use it as an NMR/MRI contrast agent when dissolved in aqueous solution with functionalized molecular hosts that temporarily trap the gas 10,11. Direct detection and high-sensitivity indirect detection of such constructs is demonstrated in both spectroscopic and imaging mode. PMID:22986346

  16. An optical NMR spectrometer for Larmor-beat detection and high-resolution POWER NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempf, J. G.; Marohn, J. A.; Carson, P. J.; Shykind, D. A.; Hwang, J. Y.; Miller, M. A.; Weitekamp, D. P.

    2008-06-01

    Optical nuclear magnetic resonance (ONMR) is a powerful probe of electronic properties in III-V semiconductors. Larmor-beat detection (LBD) is a sensitivity optimized, time-domain NMR version of optical detection based on the Hanle effect. Combining LBD ONMR with the line-narrowing method of POWER (perturbations observed with enhanced resolution) NMR further enables atomically detailed views of local electronic features in III-Vs. POWER NMR spectra display the distribution of resonance shifts or line splittings introduced by a perturbation, such as optical excitation or application of an electric field, that is synchronized with a NMR multiple-pulse time-suspension sequence. Meanwhile, ONMR provides the requisite sensitivity and spatial selectivity to isolate local signals within macroscopic samples. Optical NMR, LBD, and the POWER method each introduce unique demands on instrumentation. Here, we detail the design and implementation of our system, including cryogenic, optical, and radio-frequency components. The result is a flexible, low-cost system with important applications in semiconductor electronics and spin physics. We also demonstrate the performance of our systems with high-resolution ONMR spectra of an epitaxial AlGaAs /GaAs heterojunction. NMR linewidths down to 4.1Hz full width at half maximum were obtained, a 103-fold resolution enhancement relative any previous optically detected NMR experiment.

  17. Sensitive detection of NMR for thin films.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soonchil

    2015-10-01

    NMR can provide valuable information about thin films, but its relatively low sensitivity allows data acquisition only from bulk samples. The sensitivity problem is circumvented by detection schemes with higher sensitivity and/or enhanced polarization. In most of these ingenious techniques, electrons play a central role through hyperfine interactions with the nuclei of interest or the conversion of the spin orientation to an electric charge. The state of the art in NMR is the control of a single nuclear spin state, the complete form of which is one of the ultimate goals of nanotechnology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. (13)C NMR Metabolomics: INADEQUATE Network Analysis.

    PubMed

    Clendinen, Chaevien S; Pasquel, Christian; Ajredini, Ramadan; Edison, Arthur S

    2015-06-02

    The many advantages of (13)C NMR are often overshadowed by its intrinsically low sensitivity. Given that carbon makes up the backbone of most biologically relevant molecules, (13)C NMR offers a straightforward measurement of these compounds. Two-dimensional (13)C-(13)C correlation experiments like INADEQUATE (incredible natural abundance double quantum transfer experiment) are ideal for the structural elucidation of natural products and have great but untapped potential for metabolomics analysis. We demonstrate a new and semiautomated approach called INETA (INADEQUATE network analysis) for the untargeted analysis of INADEQUATE data sets using an in silico INADEQUATE database. We demonstrate this approach using isotopically labeled Caenorhabditis elegans mixtures.

  19. The Quiet Renaissance of Protein NMR

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Paul J.; Chen, Jiang; Cho, Min-Kyu; Kim, Ji-Hun; Lu, Zhenwei; Mathew, Sijo; Peng, Dungeng; Song, Yuanli; Van Horn, Wade D.; Zhuang, Tiandi; Sönnichsen, Frank D.; Sanders, Charles R.

    2013-01-01

    From roughly 1985 through the start of the new millennium, the cutting edge of solution protein nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was to a significant extent driven by the aspiration to determine structures. Here we survey recent advances in protein NMR that herald a renaissance in which a number of its most important applications reflect the broad problem-solving capability displayed by this method during its classical era during the 1970s and early 80s. “Without receivers fitted and kept in order, the air may tingle and thrill with the message, but it will not reach my spirit and consciousness.” Mary Slessor, Calabar, circa 1910 PMID:23368985

  20. Magic Angle Spinning NMR of Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Caitlin; Lu, Manman; Suiter, Christopher L.; Hou, Guangjin; Zhang, Huilan; Polenova, Tatyana

    2015-01-01

    Viruses, relatively simple pathogens, are able to replicate in many living organisms and to adapt to various environments. Conventional atomic-resolution structural biology techniques, X-ray crystallography and solution NMR spectroscopy provided abundant information on the structures of individual proteins and nucleic acids comprising viruses; however, viral assemblies are not amenable to analysis by these techniques because of their large size, insolubility, and inherent lack of long-range order. In this article, we review the recent advances in magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy that enabled atomic-resolution analysis of structure and dynamics of large viral systems and give examples of several exciting case studies. PMID:25919197

  1. New Designs for NMR Core Scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bluemich, B.; Anferova, S.; Talnishnikh, E.; Arnold, J.; Clauser, C.

    2006-12-01

    Within the last ten years, mobile magnetic resonance has moved from the oil field to many new areas of application. While the focus of mobile NMR in the past was on single-sided or inside-out NMR, the advent of tube-shaped Halbach magnets has introduced the conventional outside-in NMR concept to mobile NMR where the object is inside a magnet. Our Halbach magnet is constructed from small magnet blocks at light weight and low cost with a magnetic field sufficiently homogeneous. To automatize NMR measurements, the Halbach magnet is mounted on a sliding table to scan long core sections without human interaction. In homogeneous magnetic fields, the longitudinal relaxation time T1 and even the transverse relaxation time T2 are proportional to the pore diameters of rocks. Hence, the T1 and T2 signals map the pore-size distribution of the studied rock cores. For fully saturated samples the integral of the distribution curve is proportional to porosity. The porosity values from NMR measurements with the Halbach magnet are used to estimate permability. The Halbach magnet can be used for certain sample geometries in combination with exchangeable radio frequency (rf) coils with different diameters from 24 mm up to 80 mm. To measure standard Ocean Drilling Program (ODP)/Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) cores, which have a standard diameter of 60 mm and are split lengthwise after recovery, we use a surface figure-8 rf coil with an inner diameter of 60 mm. Besides 1D T2 measurements, we perform relaxation-relaxation correlation experiments, where T1 and T2 are measured in parallel. In this way, the influence of diffusion on the shape of the T2 distribution function is probed. A gradient coil system was designed to perform Pulsed Field Gradients (PFG) experiments. As the gradient coils restrict the axial access to the magnet, only cylindrical core plugs with 20 mm in diameter can be analysed by PFG NMR methods. The homogeneity of the magnetic field in the sensitive volume

  2. Photoprotein Aequorin Structure Determination by NMR Spectroscopy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-07-09

    AD-A267 066 July 9, 1993 Final Rept. 15 Apr. 1992-31 Dec. 1992 Photoprotein Aequorin Structure Determination by NMR Spectroscopy Grant # N00014-92-J...specific assignments of proteins using homo- and heteronuclear 2D-NMR. Assignments were made for approximately 95% of the 1H and 15N atoms of Bacillus... structure of r-aequorin is included. 028 93-1584993 7 . -,I m!,,•slil Aequorin, bioluminescence, nuclear magnetic reburndie, 3D structure . Unclassified

  3. Tritiation methods and tritium NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Jaiswal, D.K. ); Morimoto, H.; Salijoughian, M.; Williams, P.G. )

    1991-09-01

    We have used a simple process for the production of highly tritiated water and characterized the product species by {sup 1}H and {sup 3}H NMR spectroscopy. The water is readily manipulated and used in subsequent reactions either as T{sub 2}O, CH{sub 3}COOT or CF{sub 3}COOT. Development of tritiated diimide has progressed to the point where cis-hydrogenated products at 1-20 Ci/mmole S.A. are possible. Tri-n-butyl tin tritide has been produced at >95% tritium content and well characterized by multinuclear NMR techniques. 27 refs., 3 figs.

  4. Complete (1) H NMR assignment of cedranolides.

    PubMed

    Perez-Hernandez, Nury; Gordillo-Roman, Barbara; Arrieta-Baez, Daniel; Cerda-Garcia-Rojas, Carlos M; Joseph-Nathan, Pedro

    2017-03-01

    Complete and unambiguous (1) H NMR chemical shift assignment of α-cedrene (2) and cedrol (9), as well as for α-pipitzol (1), isocedrol (10), and the six related compounds 3-8 has been established by iterative full spin analysis using the PERCH NMR software (PERCH Solutions Ltd., Kuopio, Finland). The total sets of coupling constants are described and correlated with the conformational equilibria of the five-membered ring of 1-10, which were calculated using the complete basis set method. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Fourier transform zero field NMR and NQR

    SciTech Connect

    Zax, D.B.

    1984-09-01

    The characterization of the structural and chemical properties of matter, particularly in disordered condensed phases, is a difficult process. Few analytical methods work effectively on polycrystalline or amorphous solids. In many systems the chemical shifts measured by traditional high resolution solid state NMR methods are insufficiently sensitive or the information contained in the dipole-dipole couplings is more important. In these cases Fourier transform zero field magnetic resonance may make an important contribution. Zero field NMR and NQR is the subjecti of this thesis.

  6. NMR on cesium intercalated carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, M.; Goze-Bac, C.; Mehring, M.; Roth, S.; Bernier, P.

    2004-09-01

    Intercalation of single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) bundles with alkali metals is expected to modify the electronic band structure and to raise the Fermi level. We report results from temperature dependent 13C- and 133Cs-NMR measurements on Cs intercalated SWNT. Cs was reversibly intercalated with different stoichiometries. NMR lineshapes as well as relaxation effects are studied and discussed in context of dynamics of alkali ions in SWNT bundles. The results are compared with structural simulations of Cs-ions intercalated in SWNT.

  7. NMR Stark Spectroscopy: New Methods to Calibrate NMR Sensitivity to Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasek, Matthew R.

    The influence of electrostatics on NMR parameters is well accepted. Thus, NMR is a promising route to probe electrical features within molecules and materials. However, applications of NMR Stark effects (E-field induced changes in spin energy levels) have been elusive. I have developed new approaches to resolve NMR Stark effects from an applied E field. This calibrates nuclear probes whose spectral response might later be used to evaluate internal E fields that are critical to function, such as those due to local charge distributions or sample structure. I will present two novel experimental approaches for direct calibration of NMR quadrupolar Stark effects (QSEs). In the first, steady-state (few-second) excitation by an E field at twice the NMR frequency (2ω 0) is used to saturate spin magnetization. The extent of saturation vs. E-field amplitude calibrates the QSE response rate, while measurements vs sample orientation determine tensorial character. The second method instead synchronizes short (few µs) pulses of the 2ω0 E field with a multiple-pulse NMR sequence. This, “POWER” (Perturbations Observed With Enhanced Resolution) approach enables more accurate measure of small QSEs (i.e. few Hz spectral changes). A 2nd key advantage is the ability to define tensorial response without reorienting the sample, but instead varying the phase of the 2ω0 field. I will describe these experiments and my home-built NMR “Stark probe”, employed on a conventional wide-bore solid-state NMR system. Results with GaAs demonstrate each method, while extensions to a wider array of molecular and material systems may now be possible using these methods.

  8. Development of an in Situ NMR Photoreactor To Study Environmental Photochemistry.

    PubMed

    Bliumkin, Liora; Dutta Majumdar, Rudraksha; Soong, Ronald; Adamo, Antonio; Abbatt, Jonathan P D; Zhao, Ran; Reiner, Eric; Simpson, André J

    2016-06-07

    Photochemistry is a key environmental process directly linked to the fate, source, and toxicity of pollutants in the environment. This study explores two approaches for integrating light sources with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy: sample irradiation using a "sunlight simulator" outside the magnet versus direct irradiation of the sample inside the magnet. To assess their applicability, the in situ NMR photoreactors were applied to a series of environmental systems: an atmospheric pollutant (p-nitrophenol), crude oil extracts, and groundwater. The study successfully illustrates that environmentally relevant aqueous photochemical processes can be monitored in situ and in real time using NMR spectroscopy. A range of intermediates and degradation products were identified and matched to the literature. Preliminary measurements of half-lives were also obtained from kinetic curves. The sunlight simulator was shown to be the most suitable model to explore environmental photolytic processes in situ. Other light sources with more intense UV output hold potential for evaluating UV as a remediation alternative in areas such as wastewater treatment plants or oil spills. Finally, the ability to analyze the photolytic fate of trace chemicals at natural abundance in groundwater, using a cryogenic probe, demonstrates the viability of NMR spectroscopy as a powerful and complementary technique for environmental applications in general.

  9. (1)H NMR spectra dataset and solid-state NMR data of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata).

    PubMed

    Alves Filho, Elenilson G; Silva, Lorena M A; Teofilo, Elizita M; Larsen, Flemming H; de Brito, Edy S

    2017-04-01

    In this article the NMR data from chemical shifts, coupling constants, and structures of all the characterized compounds were provided, beyond a complementary PCA evaluation for the corresponding manuscript (E.G. Alves Filho, L.M.A. Silva, E.M. Teofilo, F.H. Larsen, E.S. de Brito, 2017) [3]. In addition, a complementary assessment from solid-state NMR data was provided. For further chemometric analysis, numerical matrices from the raw (1)H NMR data were made available in Microsoft Excel workbook format (.xls).

  10. Recommendations of the wwPDB NMR Validation Task Force

    PubMed Central

    Montelione, Gaetano T.; Nilges, Michael; Bax, Ad; Güntert, Peter; Herrmann, Torsten; Richardson, Jane S.; Schwieters, Charles; Vranken, Wim F.; Vuister, Geerten W.; Wishart, David S.; Berman, Helen M.; Kleywegt, Gerard J.; Markley, John L.

    2013-01-01

    As methods for analysis of biomolecular structure and dynamics using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) continue to advance, the resulting 3D structures, chemical shifts, and other NMR data are broadly impacting biology, chemistry, and medicine. Structure model assessment is a critical area of NMR methods development, and is an essential component of the process of making these structures accessible and useful to the wider scientific community. For these reasons, the Worldwide Protein Data Bank (wwPDB) has convened an NMR Validation Task Force (NMR-VTF) to work with the wwPDB partners in developing metrics and policies for biomolecular NMR data harvesting, structure representation, and structure quality assessment. This paper summarizes the recommendations of the NMR-VTF, and lays the groundwork for future work in developing standards and metrics for biomolecular NMR structure quality assessment. PMID:24010715

  11. Planar microcoil-based microfluidic NMR probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massin, C.; Vincent, F.; Homsy, A.; Ehrmann, K.; Boero, G.; Besse, P.-A.; Daridon, A.; Verpoorte, E.; de Rooij, N. F.; Popovic, R. S.

    2003-10-01

    Microfabricated small-volume NMR probes consisting of electroplated planar microcoils integrated on a glass substrate with etched microfluidic channels are fabricated and tested. 1H NMR spectra are acquired at 300 MHz with three different probes having observed sample volumes of respectively 30, 120, and 470 nL. The achieved sensitivity enables acquisition of an 1H spectrum of 160 μg sucrose in D 2O, corresponding to a proof-of-concept for on-chip NMR spectroscopy. Increase of mass-sensitivity with coil diameter reduction is demonstrated experimentally for planar microcoils. Models that enable quantitative prediction of the signal-to-noise ratio and of the influence of microfluidic channel geometry on spectral resolution are presented and successfully compared to the experimental data. The main factor presently limiting sensitivity for high-resolution applications is identified as being probe-induced static magnetic field distortions. Finally, based on the presented model and measured data, future performance of planar microcoil-based microfluidic NMR probes is extrapolated and discussed.

  12. Planar microcoil-based microfluidic NMR probes.

    PubMed

    Massin, C; Vincent, F; Homsy, A; Ehrmann, K; Boero, G; Besse, P-A; Daridon, A; Verpoorte, E; de Rooij, N F; Popovic, R S

    2003-10-01

    Microfabricated small-volume NMR probes consisting of electroplated planar microcoils integrated on a glass substrate with etched microfluidic channels are fabricated and tested. 1H NMR spectra are acquired at 300 MHz with three different probes having observed sample volumes of respectively 30, 120, and 470 nL. The achieved sensitivity enables acquisition of an 1H spectrum of 160 microg sucrose in D2O, corresponding to a proof-of-concept for on-chip NMR spectroscopy. Increase of mass-sensitivity with coil diameter reduction is demonstrated experimentally for planar microcoils. Models that enable quantitative prediction of the signal-to-noise ratio and of the influence of microfluidic channel geometry on spectral resolution are presented and successfully compared to the experimental data. The main factor presently limiting sensitivity for high-resolution applications is identified as being probe-induced static magnetic field distortions. Finally, based on the presented model and measured data, future performance of planar microcoil-based microfluidic NMR probes is extrapolated and discussed.

  13. Structural Studies of Biological Solids Using NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2011-03-01

    High-resolution structure and dynamics of biological molecules are important in understanding their function. While studies have been successful in solving the structures of water-soluble biomolecules, it has been proven difficult to determine the structures of membrane proteins and fibril systems. Recent studies have shown that solid-state NMR is a promising technique and could be highly valuable in studying such non-crystalline and non-soluble biosystems. I will present strategies to study the structures of such challenging systems and also about the applications of solid-state NMR to study the modes of membrane-peptide interactions for a better assessment of the prospects of antimicrobial peptides as substitutes to antibiotics in the control of human disease. Our studies on the mechanism of membrane disruption by LL-37 (a human antimicrobial peptide), analogs of the naturally occurring antimicrobial peptide magainin2 extracted from the skin of the African frog Xenopus Laevis, and pardaxin will be presented. Solid-state NMR experiments were used to determine the secondary structure, dynamics and topology of these peptides in lipid bilayers. Similarities and difference in the cell-lysing mechanism, and their dependence on the membrane composition, of these peptides will be discussed. Atomic-level resolution NMR structures of amyloidogenic proteins revealing the misfolding pathway and early intermediates that play key roles in amyloid toxicity will also be presented.

  14. Hyperpolarized NMR Probes for Biological Assays

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Sebastian; Jensen, Pernille R.; Karlsson, Magnus; Lerche, Mathilde H.

    2014-01-01

    During the last decade, the development of nuclear spin polarization enhanced (hyperpolarized) molecular probes has opened up new opportunities for studying the inner workings of living cells in real time. The hyperpolarized probes are produced ex situ, introduced into biological systems and detected with high sensitivity and contrast against background signals using high resolution NMR spectroscopy. A variety of natural, derivatized and designed hyperpolarized probes has emerged for diverse biological studies including assays of intracellular reaction progression, pathway kinetics, probe uptake and export, pH, redox state, reactive oxygen species, ion concentrations, drug efficacy or oncogenic signaling. These probes are readily used directly under natural conditions in biofluids and are often directly developed and optimized for cellular assays, thus leaving little doubt about their specificity and utility under biologically relevant conditions. Hyperpolarized molecular probes for biological NMR spectroscopy enable the unbiased detection of complex processes by virtue of the high spectral resolution, structural specificity and quantifiability of NMR signals. Here, we provide a survey of strategies used for the selection, design and use of hyperpolarized NMR probes in biological assays, and describe current limitations and developments. PMID:24441771

  15. Advanced laboratory NMR spectrometer with applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biscegli, Clovis; Panepucci, Horacio; Farach, Horacio A.; Poole, Charles P.

    1982-01-01

    A description is given of an inexpensive NMR spectrometer that is suitable for use in an advanced laboratory course. The application of this spectrometer to the measurement of the oil content in corn seeds and the role of polymerization are presented.

  16. Advanced Laboratory NMR Spectrometer with Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biscegli, Clovis; And Others

    1982-01-01

    A description is given of an inexpensive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometer suitable for use in advanced laboratory courses. Applications to the nondestructive analysis of the oil content in corn seeds and in monitoring the crystallization of polymers are presented. (SK)

  17. Advanced Laboratory NMR Spectrometer with Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biscegli, Clovis; And Others

    1982-01-01

    A description is given of an inexpensive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometer suitable for use in advanced laboratory courses. Applications to the nondestructive analysis of the oil content in corn seeds and in monitoring the crystallization of polymers are presented. (SK)

  18. NMR characterization of polymers: Review and update

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    NMR spectroscopy is a major technique for the characterization and analysis of polymers. A large number of methodologies have been developed in both the liquid and the solid state, and the literature has grown considerably (1-5). The field now covers a broad spectrum of activities, including polym...

  19. Mobile NMR: Measuring Pixels, Images, and Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bluemich, Bernhard

    2007-03-01

    The vision of bringing nuclear magnetic resonance out of the lab to the doctor's office, the chemical reactor, or the manufacturing site is becoming reality with the development of mobile NMR. Pioneered for well logging in the oil industry, the concept has been explored for materials testing in a more systematic way since the introduction of the NMR-MOUSE. This is a small, one-sided access NMR sensor which acquires the information of one pixel from a particular spot of a large object. As the sensor explores the stray-fields of a permanent magnet and an rf coil, the magnetic fields are inhomogeneous and the sensitive volume is limited to the region, where both fields are orthogonal and the Larmor frequency lies within the excitation bandwidth. By shaping the magnet and the coil geometries, the shape of the sensitive volume can be tailored to a thin slice or a larger volume a certain distance away from the sensor surface. In the first case, there is a strong field gradient in the depth direction, and in the second case, a homogeneous sweet spot of the field profile is desired. The first case is suitable for measuring high-resolution depth profiles, while the second case is suitable for chemical shift resolved spectroscopy and volume imaging. The basic concepts of open and closed mobile NMR sensors will be discussed along with applications from testing polymer products, cultural heritage, medical tissue, and rock cores.

  20. Bayesian peak picking for NMR spectra.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yichen; Gao, Xin; Liang, Faming

    2014-02-01

    Protein structure determination is a very important topic in structural genomics, which helps people to understand varieties of biological functions such as protein-protein interactions, protein-DNA interactions and so on. Nowadays, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has often been used to determine the three-dimensional structures of protein in vivo. This study aims to automate the peak picking step, the most important and tricky step in NMR structure determination. We propose to model the NMR spectrum by a mixture of bivariate Gaussian densities and use the stochastic approximation Monte Carlo algorithm as the computational tool to solve the problem. Under the Bayesian framework, the peak picking problem is casted as a variable selection problem. The proposed method can automatically distinguish true peaks from false ones without preprocessing the data. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first effort in the literature that tackles the peak picking problem for NMR spectrum data using Bayesian method. Copyright © 2013. Production and hosting by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Solid-state NMR for bacterial biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichhardt, Courtney; Cegelski, Lynette

    2014-04-01

    Bacteria associate with surfaces and one another by elaborating an extracellular matrix to encapsulate cells, creating communities termed biofilms. Biofilms are beneficial in some ecological niches, but also contribute to the pathogenesis of serious and chronic infectious diseases. New approaches and quantitative measurements are needed to define the composition and architecture of bacterial biofilms to help drive the development of strategies to interfere with biofilm assembly. Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is uniquely suited to the examination of insoluble and complex macromolecular and whole-cell systems. This article highlights three examples that implement solid-state NMR to deliver insights into bacterial biofilm composition and changes in cell-wall composition as cells transition to the biofilm lifestyle. Most recently, solid-state NMR measurements provided a total accounting of the protein and polysaccharide components in the extracellular matrix of an Escherichia coli biofilm and transformed our qualitative descriptions of matrix composition into chemical parameters that permit quantitative comparisons among samples. We present additional data for whole biofilm samples (cells plus the extracellular matrix) that complement matrix-only analyses. The study of bacterial biofilms by solid-state NMR is an exciting avenue ripe with many opportunities and we close the article by articulating some outstanding questions and future directions in this area.

  2. 13C NMR of tunnelling methyl groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detken, A.

    The dipolar interactions between the protons and the central 13C nucleus of a 13CH3 group are used to study rotational tunnelling and incoherent dynamics of such groups in molecular solids. Single-crystal 13C NMR spectra are derived for arbitrary values of the tunnel frequency upsilon t. Similarities to ESR and 2H NMR are pointed out. The method is applied to three different materials. In the hydroquinone/acetonitrile clathrate, the unique features in the 13C NMR spectra which arise from tunnelling with a tunnel frequency that is much larger than the dipolar coupling between the methyl protons and the 13C nucleus are demonstrated, and the effects of incoherent dynamics are studied. The broadening of the 13C resonances is related to the width of the quasi-elastic line in neutron scattering. Selective magnetization transfer experiments for studying slow incoherent dynamics are proposed. For the strongly hindered methyl groups of L-alanine, an upper limit for upsilon is derived from the 13C NMR spectrum. In aspirinTM (acetylsalicylic acid), incoherent reorientations dominate the spectra down to the lowest temperatures studied; their rate apparently increases with decreasing temperature below 25K.

  3. Fourier transform zero field NMR and NQR

    SciTech Connect

    Zax, D.B.

    1985-01-01

    In many systems the chemical shifts measured by traditional high resolution solid state NMR methods are insufficiently sensitive, or the information contained in the dipole-dipole couplings is more important. In these cases, Fourier transform zero field magnetic resonance may make an important contribution. Zero field NMR and NQR is the subject of this thesis. Chapter I presents the quantum mechanical background and notational formalism for what follows. Chapter II gives a brief review of high resolution magnetic resonance methods, with particular emphasis on techniques applicable to dipole-dipole and quadrupolar couplings. Level crossings between spin-1/2 and quadrupolar spins during demagnetization transfer polarization from high to low lambda nuclei. This is the basis of very high sensitivity zero field NQR measurements by field cycling. Chapter III provides a formal presentation of the high resolution Fourier transform zero field NMR method. Theoretical signal functions are calculated for common spin systems, and examples of typical spectra are presented. Chapters IV and V review the experimental progress in zero field NMR of dipole-dipole coupled spin-1/2 nuclei and for quadrupolar spin systems. Variations of the simple experiment describe in earlier chapters that use pulsed dc fields are presented in Chapter VI.

  4. Visualizing transient dark states by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Anthis, Nicholas J; Clore, G Marius

    2015-02-01

    Myriad biological processes proceed through states that defy characterization by conventional atomic-resolution structural biological methods. The invisibility of these 'dark' states can arise from their transient nature, low equilibrium population, large molecular weight, and/or heterogeneity. Although they are invisible, these dark states underlie a range of processes, acting as encounter complexes between proteins and as intermediates in protein folding and aggregation. New methods have made these states accessible to high-resolution analysis by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, as long as the dark state is in dynamic equilibrium with an NMR-visible species. These methods - paramagnetic NMR, relaxation dispersion, saturation transfer, lifetime line broadening, and hydrogen exchange - allow the exploration of otherwise invisible states in exchange with a visible species over a range of timescales, each taking advantage of some unique property of the dark state to amplify its effect on a particular NMR observable. In this review, we introduce these methods and explore two specific techniques - paramagnetic relaxation enhancement and dark state exchange saturation transfer - in greater detail.

  5. Solid-state NMR imaging system

    DOEpatents

    Gopalsami, Nachappa; Dieckman, Stephen L.; Ellingson, William A.

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus for use with a solid-state NMR spectrometer includes a special imaging probe with linear, high-field strength gradient fields and high-power broadband RF coils using a back projection method for data acquisition and image reconstruction, and a real-time pulse programmer adaptable for use by a conventional computer for complex high speed pulse sequences.

  6. Hydrate Shell Growth Measured Using NMR.

    PubMed

    Haber, Agnes; Akhfash, Masoumeh; Loh, Charles K; Aman, Zachary M; Fridjonsson, Einar O; May, Eric F; Johns, Michael L

    2015-08-18

    Benchtop nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) pulsed field gradient (PFG) and relaxation measurements were used to monitor the clathrate hydrate shell growth occurring in water droplets dispersed in a continuous cyclopentane phase. These techniques allowed the growth of hydrate inside the opaque exterior shell to be monitored and, hence, information about the evolution of the shell's morphology to be deduced. NMR relaxation measurements were primarily used to monitor the hydrate shell growth kinetics, while PFG NMR diffusion experiments were used to determine the nominal droplet size distribution (DSD) of the unconverted water inside the shell core. A comparison of mean droplet sizes obtained directly via PFG NMR and independently deduced from relaxation measurements showed that the assumption of the shell model-a perfect spherical core of unconverted water-for these hydrate droplet systems is correct, but only after approximately 24 h of shell growth. Initially, hydrate growth is faster and heat-transfer-limited, leading to porous shells with surface areas larger than that of spheres with equivalent volumes. Subsequently, the hydrate growth rate becomes mass-transfer-limited, and the shells become thicker, spherical, and less porous.

  7. An NMR study of microvoids in polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toy, James; Mattix, Larry

    1995-01-01

    An understanding of polymer defect structures, like microvoids in polymeric matrices, is crucial to their fabrication and application potential. In this project guest atoms are introduced into the microvoids in PMR-15 and NMR is used to determine microvoid sizes and locations. Xenon is a relatively inert probe that would normally be found naturally in polymer or in NMR probe materials. There are two NMR active xenon isotopes, Xe-129 and Xe-131. The Xe atom has a very high polarizability, which makes it sensitive to the intracrystalline environment of polymers. Interactions between the Xe atoms and the host matrix perturb the Xe electron cloud, deshielding the nuclei, and thereby expanding the range of the observed NMR chemical shifts. This chemical shift range which may be as large as 5000 ppm, permits subtle structural and chemical effects to be studied with high sensitivity. The Xe(129)-NMR line shape has been found to vary in response to changes in the pore symmetry of the framework hosts line Zeolites and Clathrasil compounds. Before exposure to Xe gas, the PMR-15 samples were dried in a vacuum oven at 150 C for 48 hours. The samples were then exposed to Xe gas at 30 psi for 72 hours and sealed in glass tubes with 1 atmosphere of xenon gas. Xenon gas at 1 atmosphere was used to tune up the spectrometer and to set up the appropriate NMR parameters. A single Xe-129 line at 83.003498 Mhz (with protons at 300 Mhz) was observed for the gas. With the xenon charged PMR-15 samples, a second broader line is observed 190 ppm downfield from the gas line (also observed). The width of the NMR line from the Xe-129 absorbed in the polymer is at least partially due to the distribution of microvoid sizes. From the chemical shift (relative to the gas line) and the line width, we estimate the average void sizes to be 2.74 +/- 0.20 angstroms. Since Xe-129 has such a large chemical shift range (approximately 5000 ppm), we expect the chemical shift anisotropy to contribute to the

  8. A mobile one-sided NMR sensor with a homogeneous magnetic field: the NMR-MOLE.

    PubMed

    Manz, B; Coy, A; Dykstra, R; Eccles, C D; Hunter, M W; Parkinson, B J; Callaghan, P T

    2006-11-01

    A new portable NMR sensor with a novel one-sided access magnet design, termed NMR-MOLE (MObile Lateral Explorer), has been characterised in terms of sensitivity and depth penetration. The magnet has been designed to be portable and create a volume with a relatively homogeneous magnetic field, 15,000 ppm over a region from 4 to 16 mm away from the probe, with maximum sensitivity at a depth of 10 mm. The proton NMR frequency is 3.3 MHz. We have demonstrated that with this approach a highly sensitive, portable, unilateral NMR sensor can be built. Such a design is especially suited for the characterisation of liquids in situations where unilateral or portable access is required.

  9. Software Library for Bruker TopSpin NMR Data Files

    SciTech Connect

    2016-10-14

    A software library for parsing and manipulating frequency-domain data files that have been processed using the Bruker TopSpin NMR software package. In the context of NMR, the term "processed" indicates that the end-user of the Bruker TopSpin NMR software package has (a) Fourier transformed the raw, time-domain data (the Free Induction Decay) into the frequency-domain and (b) has extracted the list of NMR peaks.

  10. Superoxygenated Water as an Experimental Sample for NMR Relaxometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nestle, Nikolaus; Dakkouri, Marwan; Rauscher, Hubert

    2004-01-01

    The increase in NMR relaxation rates as a result of dissolved paramagnetic species on the sample of superoxygenated drinking water is demonstrated. It is concluded that oxygen content in NMR samples is an important issue and can give rise to various problems in the interpretation of both spectroscopic and NMR imaging or relaxation experiments.

  11. Advances in NMR-based biofluid analysis and metabolite profiling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shucha; Nagana Gowda, G A; Ye, Tao; Raftery, Daniel

    2010-07-01

    Significant improvements in NMR technology and methods have propelled NMR studies to play an important role in a rapidly expanding number of applications involving the profiling of metabolites in biofluids. This review discusses recent technical advances in NMR spectroscopy based metabolite profiling methods, data processing and analysis over the last three years.

  12. Polymeric proanthocyanidins 13C NMR studies of procyanidins

    Treesearch

    Lawrence J. Porter; Roger H. Newman; Lai Yeap Foo; Herbert Wong; Richard W. Hemingway

    1982-01-01

    Proanthocyanidin polymers have been shown to consist entirely of flavan-3-ol units by a combination of techniques including 13C n.m.r. spectroscopy. The 13C n.m.r. spectra of the polymers and related molecules are now considered in more detail. Prior to this study UC n.m.r. data has been published of procyanidins and...

  13. Superoxygenated Water as an Experimental Sample for NMR Relaxometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nestle, Nikolaus; Dakkouri, Marwan; Rauscher, Hubert

    2004-01-01

    The increase in NMR relaxation rates as a result of dissolved paramagnetic species on the sample of superoxygenated drinking water is demonstrated. It is concluded that oxygen content in NMR samples is an important issue and can give rise to various problems in the interpretation of both spectroscopic and NMR imaging or relaxation experiments.

  14. Applications of Diffusion Ordered Spectroscopy (DOSY-NMR)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Diffusion-ordered NMR (DOSY-NMR) is a powerful, but under-utilized, technique for the investigation of mixtures based on translational diffusion rates. DOSY spectra allow for determination by NMR of components that may differ in molecular weight, geometry or complexation. Typical applications coul...

  15. First NMR Experiments in the Hybrid, 40T and beyond: A challenge to traditional NMR instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes, Arneil P.

    2001-03-01

    The recent commissioning of the continuous 45T hybrid magnet at NHMFL has opened new horizon for science but carried with it new challenges that forced NMR spectroscopists to reevaluate the traditional approach to NMR instrumentation. Very recently, a world record frequency at 1.5GHz has been achieved, signaling the new era of NMR probe designs that may someday blur the distinction between the classic NMR and millimeter-wave spectroscopies. No longer can we ignore stray capacitances and exposed leads in the terrain where every millimeter of cable counts. The challenge brought about by ever increasing fields and consequently, frequency, requirements has stimulated ingenuity among scientists. This is eased by accelerated growth in RF communications and computing technologies that made available advanced devices with more speed, power, bandwidth, noise immunity, flexibility, and complexity in small space at very low costs. Utilization of these devices have been paramount consideration in cutting-edge designs at NHMFL for Condensed Matter NMR and will be described in this talk. I will also discuss a number of first >33T NMR experiments to date utilizing the strength of the field to expose, as well as to induce occurrence of, new physical phenomena in condensed matter and which resulted in better understanding of the physics of materials. This work has been a result of continuing collaboration with P. L Kuhns, W. G. Moulton, W. P. Halperin (NU), and W. G. Clark (UCLA). The NHMFL is supported through the National Science Foundation and the State of Florida.

  16. OPENCORE NMR: open-source core modules for implementing an integrated FPGA-based NMR spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Kazuyuki

    2008-06-01

    A tool kit for implementing an integrated FPGA-based NMR spectrometer [K. Takeda, A highly integrated FPGA-based nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 78 (2007) 033103], referred to as the OPENCORE NMR spectrometer, is open to public. The system is composed of an FPGA chip and several peripheral boards for USB communication, direct-digital synthesis (DDS), RF transmission, signal acquisition, etc. Inside the FPGA chip have been implemented a number of digital modules including three pulse programmers, the digital part of DDS, a digital quadrature demodulator, dual digital low-pass filters, and a PC interface. These FPGA core modules are written in VHDL, and their source codes are available on our website. This work aims at providing sufficient information with which one can, given some facility in circuit board manufacturing, reproduce the OPENCORE NMR spectrometer presented here. Also, the users are encouraged to modify the design of spectrometer according to their own specific needs. A home-built NMR spectrometer can serve complementary roles to a sophisticated commercial spectrometer, should one comes across such new ideas that require heavy modification to hardware inside the spectrometer. This work can lower the barrier of building a handmade NMR spectrometer in the laboratory, and promote novel and exciting NMR experiments.

  17. NMR Constraints Analyser: a web-server for the graphical analysis of NMR experimental constraints

    PubMed Central

    Heller, Davide Martin; Giorgetti, Alejandro

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy together with X-ray crystallography, are the main techniques used for the determination of high-resolution 3D structures of biological molecules. The output of an NMR experiment includes a set of lower and upper limits for the distances (constraints) between pairs of atoms. If the number of constraints is high enough, there will be a finite number of possible conformations (models) of the macromolecule satisfying the data. Thus, the more constraints are measured, the better defined these structures will be. The availability of a user-friendly tool able to help in the analysis and interpretation of the number of experimental constraints per residue, is thus of valuable importance when assessing the levels of structure definition of NMR solved biological macromolecules, in particular, when high-quality structures are needed in techniques such as, computational biology approaches, site-directed mutagenesis experiments and/or drug design. Here, we present a free publicly available web-server, i.e. NMR Constraints Analyser, which is aimed at providing an automatic graphical analysis of the NMR experimental constraints atom by atom. The NMR Constraints Analyser server is available from the web-page http://molsim.sci.univr.it/constraint PMID:20513646

  18. NMR Constraints Analyser: a web-server for the graphical analysis of NMR experimental constraints.

    PubMed

    Heller, Davide Martin; Giorgetti, Alejandro

    2010-07-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy together with X-ray crystallography, are the main techniques used for the determination of high-resolution 3D structures of biological molecules. The output of an NMR experiment includes a set of lower and upper limits for the distances (constraints) between pairs of atoms. If the number of constraints is high enough, there will be a finite number of possible conformations (models) of the macromolecule satisfying the data. Thus, the more constraints are measured, the better defined these structures will be. The availability of a user-friendly tool able to help in the analysis and interpretation of the number of experimental constraints per residue, is thus of valuable importance when assessing the levels of structure definition of NMR solved biological macromolecules, in particular, when high-quality structures are needed in techniques such as, computational biology approaches, site-directed mutagenesis experiments and/or drug design. Here, we present a free publicly available web-server, i.e. NMR Constraints Analyser, which is aimed at providing an automatic graphical analysis of the NMR experimental constraints atom by atom. The NMR Constraints Analyser server is available from the web-page http://molsim.sci.univr.it/constraint.

  19. Continuous Flow 1H and 13C NMR Spectroscopy in Microfluidic Stripline NMR Chips

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Microfluidic stripline NMR technology not only allows for NMR experiments to be performed on small sample volumes in the submicroliter range, but also experiments can easily be performed in continuous flow because of the stripline’s favorable geometry. In this study we demonstrate the possibility of dual-channel operation of a microfluidic stripline NMR setup showing one- and two-dimensional 1H, 13C and heteronuclear NMR experiments under continuous flow. We performed experiments on ethyl crotonate and menthol, using three different types of NMR chips aiming for straightforward microfluidic connectivity. The detection volumes are approximately 150 and 250 nL, while flow rates ranging from 0.5 μL/min to 15 μL/min have been employed. We show that in continuous flow the pulse delay is determined by the replenishment time of the detector volume, if the sample trajectory in the magnet toward NMR detector is long enough to polarize the spin systems. This can considerably speed up quantitative measurement of samples needing signal averaging. So it can be beneficial to perform continuous flow measurements in this setup for analysis of, e.g., reactive, unstable, or mass-limited compounds. PMID:28194934

  20. Structural investigations on betacyanin pigments by LC NMR and 2D NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Stintzing, Florian C; Conrad, Jürgen; Klaiber, Iris; Beifuss, Uwe; Carle, Reinhold

    2004-02-01

    Four betacyanin pigments were analysed by LC NMR and subjected to extensive NMR characterisation after isolation. Previously, low pH values were applied for NMR investigations of betalains resulting in rapid degradation of the purified substances thus preventing extensive NMR studies. Consequently, up to now only one single (13)C NMR spectrum of a betalain pigment, namely that of neobetanin (=14,15-dehydrobetanin), was available. Because of its sufficient stability under highly acidic conditions otherwise detrimental for betacyanins, this pigment remained an exemption. Since betalains are most stable in the pH range of 5-7, a new solvent system has been developed allowing improved data acquisition through improved pigment stability at near neutral pH. Thus, not only (1)H, but for the first time also partial (13)C data of betanin, isobetanin, phyllocactin and hylocerenin isolated from red-purple pitaya [Hylocereus polyrhizus (Weber) Britton & Rose, Cactaceae] could be indirectly obtained by gHSQC- and gHMQC-NMR experiments.

  1. Continuous Flow (1)H and (13)C NMR Spectroscopy in Microfluidic Stripline NMR Chips.

    PubMed

    Oosthoek-de Vries, Anna Jo; Bart, Jacob; Tiggelaar, Roald M; Janssen, Johannes W G; van Bentum, P Jan M; Gardeniers, Han J G E; Kentgens, Arno P M

    2017-02-21

    Microfluidic stripline NMR technology not only allows for NMR experiments to be performed on small sample volumes in the submicroliter range, but also experiments can easily be performed in continuous flow because of the stripline's favorable geometry. In this study we demonstrate the possibility of dual-channel operation of a microfluidic stripline NMR setup showing one- and two-dimensional (1)H, (13)C and heteronuclear NMR experiments under continuous flow. We performed experiments on ethyl crotonate and menthol, using three different types of NMR chips aiming for straightforward microfluidic connectivity. The detection volumes are approximately 150 and 250 nL, while flow rates ranging from 0.5 μL/min to 15 μL/min have been employed. We show that in continuous flow the pulse delay is determined by the replenishment time of the detector volume, if the sample trajectory in the magnet toward NMR detector is long enough to polarize the spin systems. This can considerably speed up quantitative measurement of samples needing signal averaging. So it can be beneficial to perform continuous flow measurements in this setup for analysis of, e.g., reactive, unstable, or mass-limited compounds.

  2. The CANDU Reactor System: An Appropriate Technology.

    PubMed

    Robertson, J A

    1978-02-10

    CANDU power reactors are characterized by the combination of heavy water as moderator and pressure tubes to contain the fuel and coolant. Their excellent neutron economy provides the simplicity and low costs of once-through natural-uranium fueling. Future benefits include the prospect of a near-breeder thorium fuel cycle to provide security of fuel supply without the need to develop a new reactor such as the fast breeder. These and other features make the CANDU system an appropriate technology for countries, like Canada, of intermediate economic and industrial capacity.

  3. NMR CHARACTERIZATIONS OF PROPERTIES OF HETEROGENEOUS MEDIA

    SciTech Connect

    C.T. Philip Chang; Changho Choi; Jeromy T. Hollenshead; Rudi Michalak; Jack Phan; Ramon Saavedra; John C. Slattery; Jinsoo Uh; Randi Valestrand; A. Ted Watson; Song Xue

    2005-01-01

    A critical and long-standing need within the petroleum industry is the specification of suitable petrophysical properties for mathematical simulation of fluid flow in petroleum reservoirs (i.e., reservoir characterization). The development of accurate reservoir characterizations is extremely challenging. Property variations may be described on many scales, and the information available from measurements reflect different scales. In fact, experiments on laboratory core samples, well-log data, well-test data, and reservoir-production data all represent information potentially valuable to reservoir characterization, yet they all reflect information about spatial variations of properties at different scales. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and imaging (MRI) provide enormous potential for developing new descriptions and understandings of heterogeneous media. NMR has the rare capability to probe permeable media non-invasively, with spatial resolution, and it provides unique information about molecular motions and interactions that are sensitive to morphology. NMR well-logging provides the best opportunity ever to resolve permeability distributions within petroleum reservoirs. We develop MRI methods to determine, for the first time, spatially resolved distributions of porosity and permeability within permeable media samples that approach the intrinsic scale: the finest resolution of these macroscopic properties possible. To our knowledge, this is the first time that the permeability is actually resolved at a scale smaller than the sample. In order to do this, we have developed a robust method to determine of relaxation distributions from NMR experiments and a novel implementation and analysis of MRI experiments to determine the amount of fluid corresponding to imaging regions, which are in turn used to determine porosity and saturation distributions. We have developed a novel MRI experiment to determine velocity distributions within flowing experiments, and

  4. ABCs of FT NMR, (by John D. Roberts)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, John H.

    2002-11-01

    In summary, there are several good books on NMR that I have read and used in preparing lectures on NMR, and in comparison to these books, this would not be the first book that I would take from my bookshelf to learn NMR. It is an elementary book that does have explanations that may help clarify some topics. For that reason, it may be useful to have in a chemistry library collection. I could envision an NMR course based on this book, but not without using other books to supplement the course. To this end, this book has a very useful appendix that describes several excellent NMR books and journals.

  5. Squid detected NMR and MRI at ultralow fields

    DOEpatents

    Clarke, John; Pines, Alexander; McDermott, Robert F.; Trabesinger, Andreas H.

    2008-12-16

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals are detected in microtesla fields. Prepolarization in millitesla fields is followed by detection with an untuned dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. Because the sensitivity of the SQUID is frequency independent, both signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spectral resolution are enhanced by detecting the NMR signal in extremely low magnetic fields, where the NMR lines become very narrow even for grossly inhomogeneous measurement fields. MRI in ultralow magnetic field is based on the NMR at ultralow fields. Gradient magnetic fields are applied, and images are constructed from the detected NMR signals.

  6. Squid detected NMR and MRI at ultralow fields

    DOEpatents

    Clarke, John; McDermott, Robert; Pines, Alexander; Trabesinger, Andreas Heinz

    2007-05-15

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals are detected in microtesla fields. Prepolarization in millitesla fields is followed by detection with an untuned dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. Because the sensitivity of the SQUID is frequency independent, both signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spectral resolution are enhanced by detecting the NMR signal in extremely low magnetic fields, where the NMR lines become very narrow even for grossly inhomogeneous measurement fields. MRI in ultralow magnetic field is based on the NMR at ultralow fields. Gradient magnetic fields are applied, and images are constructed from the detected NMR signals.

  7. Squid detected NMR and MRI at ultralow fields

    DOEpatents

    Clarke, John; McDermott, Robert; Pines, Alexander; Trabesinger, Andreas Heinz

    2006-05-30

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals are detected in microtesla fields. Prepolarization in millitesla fields is followed by detection with an untuned dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. Because the sensitivity of the SQUID is frequency independent, both signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spectral resolution are enhanced by detecting the NMR signal in extremely low magnetic fields, where the NMR lines become very narrow even for grossly inhomogeneous measurement fields. MRI in ultralow magnetic field is based on the NMR at ultralow fields. Gradient magnetic fields are applied, and images are constructed from the detected NMR signals.

  8. SQUID detected NMR and MRI at ultralow fields

    DOEpatents

    Clarke, John; McDermott, Robert; Pines, Alexander; Trabesinger, Andreas Heinz

    2006-10-03

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals are detected in microtesla fields. Prepolarization in millitesla fields is followed by detection with an untuned dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. Because the sensitivity of the SQUID is frequency independent, both signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spectral resolution are enhanced by detecting the NMR signal in extremely low magnetic fields, where the NMR lines become very narrow even for grossly inhomogeneous measurement fields. MRI in ultralow magnetic field is based on the NMR at ultralow fields. Gradient magnetic fields are applied, and images are constructed from the detected NMR signals.

  9. Sodium ion effect on silk fibroin conformation characterized by solid-state NMR and generalized 2D NMR NMR correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Qing-Xia; Zhou, Ping

    2008-07-01

    In the present work, we investigated Na + ion effect on the silk fibroin (SF) conformation. Samples are Na +-involved regenerated silk fibroin films. 13C CP-MAS NMR demonstrates that as added [Na +] increases, partial silk fibroin conformation transit from helix-form to β-form at certain Na + ion concentration which is much higher than that in Bombyx mori silkworm gland. The generalized two-dimensional NMR-NMR correlation analysis reveals that silk fibroin undergoes several intermediate states during its conformation transition process as [Na +] increase. The appearance order of the intermediates is followed as: helix and/or random coil → helix-like → β-sheet-like → β-sheet, which is the same as that produced by pH decrease from 6.8 to 4.8 in the resultant regenerated silk fibroin films. The binding sites of Na + to silk fibroin might involve the carbonyl oxygen atom of certain amino acids sequence which could promote the formation of β-sheet conformation. Since the Na +sbnd O bond is weak, the ability of Na + inducing the secondary structure transition is weaker than those of Ca 2+, Cu 2+ and even K +. It is maybe a reason why the sodium content is much lower than potassium in the silkworm gland.

  10. NMR shielding calculations across the periodic table: diamagnetic uranium compounds. 2. Ligand and metal NMR.

    PubMed

    Schreckenbach, Georg

    2002-12-16

    In this and a previous article (J. Phys. Chem. A 2000, 104, 8244), the range of application for relativistic density functional theory (DFT) is extended to the calculation of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shieldings and chemical shifts in diamagnetic actinide compounds. Two relativistic DFT methods are used, ZORA ("zeroth-order regular approximation") and the quasirelativistic (QR) method. In the given second paper, NMR shieldings and chemical shifts are calculated and discussed for a wide range of compounds. The molecules studied comprise uranyl complexes, [UO(2)L(n)](+/-)(q); UF(6); inorganic UF(6) derivatives, UF(6-n)Cl(n), n = 0-6; and organometallic UF(6) derivatives, UF(6-n)(OCH(3))(n), n = 0-5. Uranyl complexes include [UO(2)F(4)](2-), [UO(2)Cl(4)](2-), [UO(2)(OH)(4)](2-), [UO(2)(CO(3))(3)](4-), and [UO(2)(H(2)O)(5)](2+). For the ligand NMR, moderate (e.g., (19)F NMR chemical shifts in UF(6-n)Cl(n)) to excellent agreement [e.g., (19)F chemical shift tensor in UF(6) or (1)H NMR in UF(6-n)(OCH(3))(n)] has been found between theory and experiment. The methods have been used to calculate the experimentally unknown (235)U NMR chemical shifts. A large chemical shift range of at least 21,000 ppm has been predicted for the (235)U nucleus. ZORA spin-orbit appears to be the most accurate method for predicting actinide metal chemical shifts. Trends in the (235)U NMR chemical shifts of UF(6-n)L(n) molecules are analyzed and explained in terms of the calculated electronic structure. It is argued that the energy separation and interaction between occupied and virtual orbitals with f-character are the determining factors.

  11. Extending the scope of NMR spectroscopy with microcoil probes.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Frank C; Gronquist, Matthew

    2006-11-06

    Capillary NMR (CapNMR) spectroscopy has emerged as a major breakthrough for increasing the mass-sensitivity of NMR spectroscopic analysis and enabling the combination of NMR spectroscopy with other analytical techniques. Not only is the acquisition of high-sensitivity spectra getting easier but the quality of CapNMR spectra obtained in many small-molecule applications exceeds what can be accomplished with conventional designs. This Minireview discusses current CapNMR technology and its applications for the characterization of mass-limited, small-molecule and protein samples, the rapid screening of small-molecule or protein libraries, as well as hyphenated techniques that combine CapNMR with other analytical methods.

  12. Multiecho scheme advances surface NMR for aquifer characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grunewald, Elliot; Walsh, David

    2013-12-01

    nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is increasingly used as a method to noninvasively characterize aquifers. This technology follows a successful history of NMR logging, applied over decades to estimate hydrocarbon reservoir properties. In contrast to logging, however, surface methods have utilized relatively simple acquisition sequences, from which pore-scale properties may not be reliably and efficiently estimated. We demonstrate for the first time the capability of sophisticated multiecho measurements to rapidly record a surface NMR response that more directly reflects aquifer characteristics. Specifically, we develop an adaptation of the multipulse Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) sequence, widely used in logging, to measure the T2 relaxation response in a single scan. We validate this approach in a field surface NMR data set and by direct comparison with an NMR log. Adoption of the CPMG marked a landmark advancement in the history of logging NMR; we have now realized this same advancement in the surface NMR method.

  13. NMR spectral analysis using prior knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasai, Takuma; Nagata, Kenji; Okada, Masato; Kigawa, Takanori

    2016-03-01

    Signal assignment is a fundamental step for analyses of protein structure and dynamics with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Main-chain signal assignment is achieved with a sequential assignment method and/or an amino-acid selective stable isotope labeling (AASIL) method. Combinatorial selective labeling (CSL) methods, as well as our labeling strategy, stable isotope encoding (SiCode), were developed to reduce the required number of labeled samples, since one of the drawbacks of AASIL is that many samples are needed. Signal overlapping in NMR spectra interferes with amino-acid determination by CSL and SiCode. Since spectral deconvolution by peak fitting with a gradient method cannot resolve closely overlapped signals, we developed a new method to perform both peak fitting and amino acid determination simultaneously, with a replica exchange Monte Carlo method, incorporating prior knowledge of stable-isotope labeling ratios and the amino-acid sequence of the protein.

  14. Protein structure determination from NMR chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Cavalli, Andrea; Salvatella, Xavier; Dobson, Christopher M; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2007-06-05

    NMR spectroscopy plays a major role in the determination of the structures and dynamics of proteins and other biological macromolecules. Chemical shifts are the most readily and accurately measurable NMR parameters, and they reflect with great specificity the conformations of native and nonnative states of proteins. We show, using 11 examples of proteins representative of the major structural classes and containing up to 123 residues, that it is possible to use chemical shifts as structural restraints in combination with a conventional molecular mechanics force field to determine the conformations of proteins at a resolution of 2 angstroms or better. This strategy should be widely applicable and, subject to further development, will enable quantitative structural analysis to be carried out to address a range of complex biological problems not accessible to current structural techniques.

  15. Nuclear spin noise in NMR revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrand, Guillaume; Luong, Michel

    2015-09-07

    The theoretical shapes of nuclear spin-noise spectra in NMR are derived by considering a receiver circuit with finite preamplifier input impedance and a transmission line between the preamplifier and the probe. Using this model, it becomes possible to reproduce all observed experimental features: variation of the NMR resonance linewidth as a function of the transmission line phase, nuclear spin-noise signals appearing as a “bump” or as a “dip” superimposed on the average electronic noise level even for a spin system and probe at the same temperature, pure in-phase Lorentzian spin-noise signals exhibiting non-vanishing frequency shifts. Extensive comparisons to experimental measurements validate the model predictions, and define the conditions for obtaining pure in-phase Lorentzian-shape nuclear spin noise with a vanishing frequency shift, in other words, the conditions for simultaneously obtaining the spin-noise and frequency-shift tuning optima.

  16. Protein Dynamics from NMR and Computer Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qiong; Kravchenko, Olga; Kemple, Marvin; Likic, Vladimir; Klimtchuk, Elena; Prendergast, Franklyn

    2002-03-01

    Proteins exhibit internal motions from the millisecond to sub-nanosecond time scale. The challenge is to relate these internal motions to biological function. A strategy to address this aim is to apply a combination of several techniques including high-resolution NMR, computer simulation of molecular dynamics (MD), molecular graphics, and finally molecular biology, the latter to generate appropriate samples. Two difficulties that arise are: (1) the time scale which is most directly biologically relevant (ms to μs) is not readily accessible by these techniques and (2) the techniques focus on local and not collective motions. We will outline methods using ^13C-NMR to help alleviate the second problem, as applied to intestinal fatty acid binding protein, a relatively small intracellular protein believed to be involved in fatty acid transport and metabolism. This work is supported in part by PHS Grant GM34847 (FGP) and by a fellowship from the American Heart Association (QW).

  17. High Resolution non-Markovianity in NMR

    PubMed Central

    Bernardes, Nadja K.; Peterson, John P. S.; Sarthour, Roberto S.; Souza, Alexandre M.; Monken, C. H.; Roditi, Itzhak; Oliveira, Ivan S.; Santos, Marcelo F.

    2016-01-01

    Memoryless time evolutions are ubiquitous in nature but often correspond to a resolution-induced approximation, i.e. there are correlations in time whose effects are undetectable. Recent advances in the dynamical control of small quantum systems provide the ideal scenario to probe some of these effects. Here we experimentally demonstrate the precise induction of memory effects on the evolution of a quantum coin (qubit) by correlations engineered in its environment. In particular, we design a collisional model in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and precisely control the strength of the effects by changing the degree of correlation in the environment and its time of interaction with the qubit. We also show how these effects can be hidden by the limited resolution of the measurements performed on the qubit. The experiment reinforces NMR as a test bed for the study of open quantum systems and the simulation of their classical counterparts. PMID:27669652

  18. NMR with excitation modulated by Frank sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blümich, Bernhard; Gong, Qingxia; Byrne, Eimear; Greferath, Marcus

    2009-07-01

    Miniaturized NMR is of growing importance in bio-, chemical, and -material sciences. Other than the magnet, bulky components are the radio-frequency power amplifier and the power supply or battery pack. We show that constant flip-angle excitation with phase modulation following a particular type of polyphase perfect sequences results in low peak excitation power at high response peak power. It has ideal power distribution in both the time domain and the frequency domain. A savings in peak excitation power of six orders of magnitude has been realized compared to conventionally pulsed excitation. Among others, the excitation promises to be of use for button-cell operated miniature NMR devices as well as for complying with specific-absorption-rate regulations in high-field medical imaging.

  19. (129)Xe NMR of Mesoporous Silicas

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, M.T.; Asink, R.A.; Kneller, J.M.; Pietrass, T.

    1999-04-23

    The porosities of three mesoporous silica materials were characterized with {sup 129}Xe NMR spectroscopy. The materials were synthesized by a sol-gel process with r = 0, 25, and 70% methanol by weight in an aqueous cetyltrimethylammonium bromide solution. Temperature dependent chemical shifts and spin lattice relaxation times reveal that xenon does not penetrate the pores of the largely disordered (r= 70%) silica. For both r = 0 and 25%, temperature dependent resonances corresponding to physisorbed xenon were observed. An additional resonance for the r = 25% sample was attributed to xenon between the disordered cylindrical pores. 2D NMR exchange experiments corroborate the spin lattice relaxation data which show that xenon is in rapid exchange between the adsorbed and the gas phase.

  20. NMR studies of nucleic acid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Hashimi, Hashim M.

    2013-12-01

    Nucleic acid structures have to satisfy two diametrically opposite requirements; on one hand they have to adopt well-defined 3D structures that can be specifically recognized by proteins; on the other hand, their structures must be sufficiently flexible to undergo very large conformational changes that are required during key biochemical processes, including replication, transcription, and translation. How do nucleic acids introduce flexibility into their 3D structure without losing biological specificity? Here, I describe the development and application of NMR spectroscopic techniques in my laboratory for characterizing the dynamic properties of nucleic acids that tightly integrate a broad set of NMR measurements, including residual dipolar couplings, spin relaxation, and relaxation dispersion with sample engineering and computational approaches. This approach allowed us to obtain fundamental new insights into directional flexibility in nucleic acids that enable their structures to change in a very specific functional manner.

  1. Some nitrogen-14 NMR studies in solids

    SciTech Connect

    Pratum, T.K.

    1983-11-01

    The first order quadrupolar perturbation of the /sup 14/N NMR spectrum yields information regarding the static and dynamic properties of the surrounding electronic environment. Signal to noise problems caused by long /sup 14/N longitudinal relaxation times (T/sub 1/) and small equilibrium polarizations are reduced by rotating frame cross polarization (CP) experiments between /sup 14/N and /sup 1/H. Using quadrupolar echo and CP techniques, the /sup 14/N quadrupolar coupling constants (e/sup 2/qQ/h) and asymmetry parameters (eta) have been obtained for a variety of tetraalkylammonium compounds by observation of their quadrupolar powder patterns at various temperatures. For choline chloride and iodide the /sup 14/N NMR powder patterns exhibit the effects of anisotropic molecular motion, while choline bromide spectra show no such effects.

  2. High Resolution non-Markovianity in NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardes, Nadja K.; Peterson, John P. S.; Sarthour, Roberto S.; Souza, Alexandre M.; Monken, C. H.; Roditi, Itzhak; Oliveira, Ivan S.; Santos, Marcelo F.

    2016-09-01

    Memoryless time evolutions are ubiquitous in nature but often correspond to a resolution-induced approximation, i.e. there are correlations in time whose effects are undetectable. Recent advances in the dynamical control of small quantum systems provide the ideal scenario to probe some of these effects. Here we experimentally demonstrate the precise induction of memory effects on the evolution of a quantum coin (qubit) by correlations engineered in its environment. In particular, we design a collisional model in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and precisely control the strength of the effects by changing the degree of correlation in the environment and its time of interaction with the qubit. We also show how these effects can be hidden by the limited resolution of the measurements performed on the qubit. The experiment reinforces NMR as a test bed for the study of open quantum systems and the simulation of their classical counterparts.

  3. NMR hand-held moisture sensor.

    PubMed

    Prado, P J

    2001-01-01

    An open magnet design, hand-held NMR sensor head is presented. Wood moisture content and cement hydration tests demonstrate the potential of the tool for in-situ material assessment. The magnetic field distribution was adjusted by positioning blocks of permanent magnets using millimeter scale 3-dimensional magnetic field modeling. A low Q-factor circuit was used for spin-echo sequences with short echo times.

  4. NMR in Copper-Oxide Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Varma, C.M.

    1996-10-01

    The anomalous part of the NMR relaxation rate of copper nuclei in the normal state of copper-oxide metals is calculated using the orbital magnetic parts of the fluctuations derived in a recent theory to explain the long wavelength transport anomalies. Oxygen and yttrium reside on lattice sites at which the anomalous contribution is absent at all hole densities. The frequency, momentum dependence, and the form factor of the fluctuations is predicted. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  5. NMR Characterizations of Properties of Heterogeneous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, A. Ted; Phan, Jack; Uh, Jinsoo; Michalak, Rudi; Xue, Song

    2003-01-28

    The overall goal of this project was to develop reliable methods for resolving macroscopic properties important for describing the flow of one or more fluid phases in reservoirs from formation measurements. Completed the facilities to house our new NMR imager, the equipment has been delivered and installed. New experimental designs will provide for more reliable estimation of permeability distributions were evaluated. Designed and built a new core holder to incorporate one of the new experimental designs.

  6. Hypoxia-sensitive NMR contrast agents

    SciTech Connect

    Swartz, H.M.; Chen, K.; Pals, M.; Sentjurc, M.; Morse, P.D. 2d.

    1986-02-01

    The rate of reduction of nitroxides is shown to be more rapid in hypoxic cells. The rate of reduction and the effect of hypoxia on the reduction rate vary for different nitroxides. These findings indicate that it may be feasible to develop in vivo NMR contrast agents that selectively will indicate areas of hypoxia and thereby aid in the detection of disease processes such as neoplasia, ischemia, and inflammation.

  7. Highly flexible pulse programmer for NMR applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dart, J.; Burum, D. P.; Rhim, W. K.

    1980-01-01

    A pulse generator for NMR application is described. Eighteen output channels are provided to allow use in single and double resonance experiments. Complex pulse sequences may be generated by loading instructions into a 256-word by 16-bit program memory. Features of the pulse generator include programmable time delays from 0.5 micros to 1000 s, branching and looping instructions, and the ability to be loaded and operated either manually or from a PDP-11/10 computer.

  8. BetaNMR Experiments on Liquid Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottberg, A.; Stachura, M.; Hemmingsen, L.; Macfarlane, W. A.; Bio-Beta-Nmr Collaboration; Collaps Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    In 2012 betaNMR spectroscopy was successfully applied on liquid samples; an achievement which opens new opportunities in the fields of chemistry and biochemistry. This project was motivated by the need for finding a new experimental approach to directly study biologically highly relevant metal ions, such as Mg(II), Cu(I), Ca(II), and Zn(II), which are silent in most spectroscopic techniques. The resonance spectrum recorded for Mg-31 implanted into an ionic liquid sample showed two resonances which originate from Mg ions occupying two different coordination geometries, illustrating that this technique can discriminate between different structures. This proof-of-principle result lays the foundation for studies of these metal ions at low concentrations and in environments of biological relevance where other methods are silent. The prototype chamber for bio-betaNMR allows for experiments not only on different samples such as: liquids, gels and solids, but also operates at different vacuum environments. In order to exploit the potential of betaNMR on liquid samples, tests with polarized beams of Mg-29 and Mg-31 have recently been performed at the ISAC facility at TRIUMF.

  9. NMR Studies of Dynamic Biomolecular Conformational Ensembles

    PubMed Central

    Torchia, Dennis A.

    2015-01-01

    Multidimensional heteronuclear NMR approaches can provide nearly complete sequential signal assignments of isotopically enriched biomolecules. The availability of assignments together with measurements of spin relaxation rates, residual spin interactions, J-couplings and chemical shifts provides information at atomic resolution about internal dynamics on timescales ranging from ps to ms, both in solution and in the solid state. However, due to the complexity of biomolecules, it is not possible to extract a unique atomic-resolution description of biomolecular motions even from extensive NMR data when many conformations are sampled on multiple timescales. For this reason, powerful computational approaches are increasingly applied to large NMR data sets to elucidate conformational ensembles sampled by biomolecules. In the past decade, considerable attention has been directed at an important class of biomolecules that function by binding to a wide variety of target molecules. Questions of current interest are: “Does the free biomolecule sample a conformational ensemble that encompasses the conformations found when it binds to various targets; and if so, on what time scale is the ensemble sampled?” This article reviews recent efforts to answer these questions, with a focus on comparing ensembles obtained for the same biomolecules by different investigators. A detailed comparison of results obtained is provided for three biomolecules: ubiquitin, calmodulin and the HIV-1 trans-activation response RNA. PMID:25669739

  10. Protein NMR structures refined without NOE data.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Hyojung; Kim, Tae-Rae; Ahn, SeonJoo; Ji, Sunyoung; Lee, Jinhyuk

    2014-01-01

    The refinement of low-quality structures is an important challenge in protein structure prediction. Many studies have been conducted on protein structure refinement; the refinement of structures derived from NMR spectroscopy has been especially intensively studied. In this study, we generated flat-bottom distance potential instead of NOE data because NOE data have ambiguity and uncertainty. The potential was derived from distance information from given structures and prevented structural dislocation during the refinement process. A simulated annealing protocol was used to minimize the potential energy of the structure. The protocol was tested on 134 NMR structures in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) that also have X-ray structures. Among them, 50 structures were used as a training set to find the optimal "width" parameter in the flat-bottom distance potential functions. In the validation set (the other 84 structures), most of the 12 quality assessment scores of the refined structures were significantly improved (total score increased from 1.215 to 2.044). Moreover, the secondary structure similarity of the refined structure was improved over that of the original structure. Finally, we demonstrate that the combination of two energy potentials, statistical torsion angle potential (STAP) and the flat-bottom distance potential, can drive the refinement of NMR structures.

  11. NMR quantum computation with optically polarized molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhulst, Anne; Yannoni, Constantino; Sherwood, Mark; Pomerantz, Drew; Vandersypen, Lieven; Chuang, Isaac

    2000-03-01

    Current methods for bulk NMR quantum computation rely on nuclear spin polarization present at high temperature equilibrium. This presents a challenging obstacle as the probability to find a spin in a specific state decreases exponentially in the number of spins used as qubits, causing a corresponding decrease in the signal to noise ratio of the desired NMR signal. One way to address this problem is to provide an artificial source of high polarization, such as optically pumped ^129Xe. For comparison, thermal equilibrium polarizations are only about 10-3% for ^1H in a typical NMR experiment at room temperature and in a 10 Tesla magnetic field, but with ^129Xe polarizations as high as 18% have been achieved [Happer et. al., Chem.Phys.Lett., 284, p.87-92, Feb 1998]. Using this technique, we prepare hyperpolarized liquid Xe and use it as a solvent for chloroform molecules (CHCl_3). Cross polarization (SPINOE) between ^129Xe and ^1H results in measured enhancements of the proton signal of over 300%, and evidence of transfer to ^13C. These results provide hope for the scalability of quantum computation.

  12. Earth's field NMR; a surface moisture detector?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Eiichi; Altobelli, Stephen; McDowell, Andrew; Zhang, Tongsheng

    2012-10-01

    Earth's field NMR (EFNMR), being free of magnets, would be an ideal teaching medium as well as a mobile NMR technique except for its weak S/N. The common EFNMR apparatus uses a powerful prepolarization field to enhance the spin magnetization before the experiment. We introduce a coil design geared to larger but manageable samples with sufficient sensitivity without prepolarization to move EFNMR closer to routine use and to provide an inexpensive teaching tool. Our coil consists of parallel wires spread out on a plywood to form a current sheet with the current return wires separated so they will not influence the main part of the coil assembly. The sensitive region is a relatively thin region parallel to the coil and close to it. A single turn of the coil is wound to be topologically equivalent to a figure-8. The two crossing segments in the center of a figure-8 form two of the parallel wires of the flat coil. Thus, a two-turn figure-8 has four crossing wires so its topologically equivalent coil will have four parallel wires with currents in phase. Together with the excellent sensitivity, this coil offers outstanding interference rejection because of the figure-8 geometry. An example of such a coil has 328 parallel wires covering a ˜1 meter square plywood which yields a good NMR signal from 26 liters of water spread out roughly over the area of the coil in less than one minute in a nearby park.

  13. In-cell NMR: a topical review

    PubMed Central

    Banci, Lucia

    2017-01-01

    Classical structural biology approaches allow structural characterization of biological macromolecules in vitro, far from their physiological context. Nowadays, thanks to the wealth of structural data available and to technological and methodological advances, the interest of the research community is gradually shifting from pure structural determination towards the study of functional aspects of biomolecules. Therefore, a cellular structural approach is ideally needed to characterize biological molecules, such as proteins, in their native cellular environment and the functional processes that they are involved in. In-cell NMR is a new application of high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy that allows structural and dynamical features of proteins and other macromolecules to be analyzed directly in living cells. Owing to its challenging nature, this methodology has shown slow, but steady, development over the past 15 years. To date, several in-cell NMR approaches have been successfully applied to both bacterial and eukaryotic cells, including several human cell lines, and important structural and functional aspects have been elucidated. In this topical review, the major advances of in-cell NMR are summarized, with a special focus on recent developments in eukaryotic and mammalian cells. PMID:28250949

  14. Guiding automated NMR structure determination using a global optimization metric, the NMR DP score

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yuanpeng Janet; Mao, Binchen; Xu, Fei; Montelione, Gaetano

    2016-01-01

    ASDP is an automated NMR NOE assignment program. It uses a distinct bottom-up topology-constrained network anchoring approach for NOE interpretation, with 2D, 3D and/or 4D NOESY peak lists and resonance assignments as input, and generates unambiguous NOE constraints for iterative structure calculations. ASDP is designed to function interactively with various structure determination programs that use distance restraints to generate molecular models. In the CASD-NMR project, ASDP was tested and further developed using blinded NMR data, including resonance assignments, either raw or manually-curated (refined) NOESY peak list data, and in some cases 15N-1H residual dipolar coupling data. In these blinded tests, in which the reference structure was not available until after structures were generated, the fully-automated ASDP program performed very well on all targets using both the raw and refined NOESY peak list data. Improvements of ASDP relative to its predecessor program for automated NOESY peak assignments, AutoStructure, were driven by challenges provided by these CASD-NMR data. These algorithmic improvements include 1) using a global metric of structural accuracy, the Discriminating Power (DP) score, for guiding model selection during the iterative NOE interpretation process, and 2) identifying incorrect NOESY cross peak assignments caused by errors in the NMR resonance assignment list. These improvements provide a more robust automated NOESY analysis program, ASDP, with the unique capability of being utilized with alternative structure generation and refinement programs including CYANA, CNS, and/or Rosetta. PMID:26081575

  15. CcpNmr AnalysisAssign: a flexible platform for integrated NMR analysis.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Simon P; Fogh, Rasmus H; Boucher, Wayne; Ragan, Timothy J; Mureddu, Luca G; Vuister, Geerten W

    2016-10-01

    NMR spectroscopy is an indispensably powerful technique for the analysis of biomolecules under ambient conditions, both for structural- and functional studies. However, in practice the complexity of the technique has often frustrated its application by non-specialists. In this paper, we present CcpNmr version-3, the latest software release from the Collaborative Computational Project for NMR, for all aspects of NMR data analysis, including liquid- and solid-state NMR data. This software has been designed to be simple, functional and flexible, and aims to ensure that routine tasks can be performed in a straightforward manner. We have designed the software according to modern software engineering principles and leveraged the capabilities of modern graphics libraries to simplify a variety of data analysis tasks. We describe the process of backbone assignment as an example of the flexibility and simplicity of implementing workflows, as well as the toolkit used to create the necessary graphics for this workflow. The package can be downloaded from www.ccpn.ac.uk/v3-software/downloads and is freely available to all non-profit organisations.

  16. Competition STD NMR for the detection of high-affinity ligands and NMR-based screening.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Sen; Liu, Dingjiang; Wyss, Daniel F

    2004-06-01

    The reported competition STD NMR method combines saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR with competition binding experiments to allow the detection of high-affinity ligands that undergo slow chemical exchange on the NMR time-scale. With this technique, the presence of a competing high-affinity ligand in the compound mixture can be detected by the disappearance or reduction of the STD signals of a low-affinity indicator ligand. This is demonstrated on a BACE1 (beta-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1) protein-inhibitor system. This method can also be used to derive an approximate value, or a lower limit, for the dissociation constant of the potential ligand based on the reduction of the signal intensity of the STD indicator, which is illustrated on an HSA (human serum albumin) model system. This leads to important applications of the competition STD NMR method for lead discovery: it can be used (i) for compound library screening against a broad range of drug targets to identify both high- and low-affinity ligands and (ii) to rank order analogs rapidly and derive structure-activity relationships, which are used to optimize these NMR hits into viable drug leads. Copyright 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. HPLC & NMR-based forced degradation studies of ifosfamide: The potential of NMR in stability studies.

    PubMed

    Salman, D; Peron, J-M R; Goronga, T; Barton, S; Swinden, J; Nabhani-Gebara, S

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study is to conduct a forced degradation study on ifosfamide under several stress conditions to investigate the robustness of the developed HPLC method. It also aims to provide further insight into the stability of ifosfamide and its degradation profile using both HPLC and NMR. Ifosfamide solutions (20mg/mL; n=15, 20mL) were stressed in triplicate by heating (70°C), under acidic (pH 1 & 4) and alkaline (pH 10 & 12) conditions. Samples were analysed periodically using HPLC and FT-NMR. Ifosfamide was most stable under weakly acidic conditions (pH 4). NMR results suggested that the mechanism of ifosfamide degradation involves the cleavage of the PN bond. For all stress conditions, HPLC was not able to detect ifosfamide degradation products that were detected by NMR. These results suggest that the developed HPLC method for ifosfamide did not detect the degradation products shown by NMR. It is possible that degradation products co-elute with ifosfamide, do not elute altogether or are not amenable to the detection method employed. Therefore, investigation of ifosfamide stability requires additional techniques that do not suffer from the aforementioned shortcomings. Copyright © 2015 Académie Nationale de Pharmacie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Calibration of NMR well logs from carbonate reservoirs with laboratory NMR measurements and μXRCT

    DOE PAGES

    Mason, Harris E.; Smith, Megan M.; Hao, Yue; ...

    2014-12-31

    The use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) well log data has the potential to provide in-situ porosity, pore size distributions, and permeability of target carbonate CO₂ storage reservoirs. However, these methods which have been successfully applied to sandstones have yet to be completely validated for carbonate reservoirs. Here, we have taken an approach to validate NMR measurements of carbonate rock cores with independent measurements of permeability and pore surface area to volume (S/V) distributions using differential pressure measurements and micro X-ray computed tomography (μXRCT) imaging methods, respectively. We observe that using standard methods for determining permeability from NMR data incorrectlymore » predicts these values by orders of magnitude. However, we do observe promise that NMR measurements provide reasonable estimates of pore S/V distributions, and with further independent measurements of the carbonate rock properties that universally applicable relationships between NMR measured properties may be developed for in-situ well logging applications of carbonate reservoirs.« less

  19. NMR spectroscopy of experimentally shocked single crystal quartz: A reexamination of the NMR shock barometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiske, P. S.; Gratz, A. J.; Nellis, W. J.

    1993-01-01

    Cygan and others report a broadening of the Si-29 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) peak for synthetic quartz powders with increasing shock pressure which they propose as a shock wave barometer for natural systems. These results are expanded by studying single crystal quartz shocked to 12 and 33 GPa using the 6.5 m two-stage light-gas gun at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories. Our NMR results differ substantially from those of Cygan and others and suggest that the proposed shock wave barometer may require refinement. The difference in results between this study and that of Cygan and others is most likely caused by different starting materials (single crystal vs. powder) and different shock loading histories. NMR results from single crystal studies may be more applicable to natural systems.

  20. NMR spectroscopy of experimentally shocked single crystal quartz: A reexamination of the NMR shock barometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiske, P. S.; Gratz, A. J.; Nellis, W. J.

    1993-01-01

    Cygan and others report a broadening of the Si-29 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) peak for synthetic quartz powders with increasing shock pressure which they propose as a shock wave barometer for natural systems. These results are expanded by studying single crystal quartz shocked to 12 and 33 GPa using the 6.5 m two-stage light-gas gun at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories. Our NMR results differ substantially from those of Cygan and others and suggest that the proposed shock wave barometer may require refinement. The difference in results between this study and that of Cygan and others is most likely caused by different starting materials (single crystal vs. powder) and different shock loading histories. NMR results from single crystal studies may be more applicable to natural systems.

  1. Protein Structure Determination Using Protein Threading and Sparse NMR Data

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, O.H.; Einstein, J.R.; Xu, D.; Xu, Y.

    1999-11-14

    It is well known that the NMR method for protein structure determination applies to small proteins and that its effectiveness decreases very rapidly as the molecular weight increases beyond about 30 kD. We have recently developed a method for protein structure determination that can fully utilize partial NMR data as calculation constraints. The core of the method is a threading algorithm that guarantees to find a globally optimal alignment between a query sequence and a template structure, under distance constraints specified by NMR/NOE data. Our preliminary tests have demonstrated that a small number of NMR/NOE distance restraints can significantly improve threading performance in both fold recognition and threading-alignment accuracy, and can possibly extend threading's scope of applicability from structural homologs to structural analogs. An accurate backbone structure generated by NMR-constrained threading can then provide a significant amount of structural information, equivalent to that provided by the NMR method with many NMR/NOE restraints; and hence can greatly reduce the amount of NMR data typically required for accurate structure determination. Our preliminary study suggests that a small number of NMR/NOE restraints may suffice to determine adequately the all-atom structure when those restraints are incorporated in a procedure combining threading, modeling of loops and sidechains, and molecular dynamics simulation. Potentially, this new technique can expand NMR's capability to larger proteins.

  2. Portable microcoil NMR detection coupled to capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Diekmann, Joana; Adams, Kristl L; Klunder, Gregory L; Evans, Lee; Steele, Paul; Vogt, Carla; Herberg, Julie L

    2011-02-15

    High-efficiency separation techniques, such as capillary electrophoresis (CE), coupled to a nondestructive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometer offer the ability to separate, chemically identify, and provide structural information on analytes in small sample volumes. Previous CE-NMR coupled systems utilized laboratory-scale NMR magnets and spectrometers, which require very long separation capillaries. New technological developments in electronics have reduced the size of the NMR system, and small 1-2 T permanent magnets provide the possibilities of a truly portable NMR. The microcoils used in portable and laboratory-scale NMR may offer the advantage of improved mass sensitivity because the limit of detection (LOD) is proportional to the coil diameter. In this work, CE is coupled with a portable, briefcase-sized NMR system that incorporates a microcoil probe and a 1.8 T permanent magnet to measure (19)F NMR spectra. Separations of fluorinated molecules are demonstrated with stopped- and continuous-flow NMR detection. The results demonstrate that coupling CE to a portable NMR instrument is feasible and can provide a low-cost method to obtain structural information on microliter samples. An LOD of 31.8 nmol for perfluorotributylamine with a resolution of 4 ppm has been achieved with this system.

  3. Fast automated protein NMR data collection and assignment by ADAPT-NMR on Bruker spectrometers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woonghee; Hu, Kaifeng; Tonelli, Marco; Bahrami, Arash; Neuhardt, Elizabeth; Glass, Karen C; Markley, John L

    2013-11-01

    ADAPT-NMR (Assignment-directed Data collection Algorithm utilizing a Probabilistic Toolkit in NMR) supports automated NMR data collection and backbone and side chain assignment for [U-(13)C, U-(15)N]-labeled proteins. Given the sequence of the protein and data for the orthogonal 2D (1)H-(15)N and (1)H-(13)C planes, the algorithm automatically directs the collection of tilted plane data from a variety of triple-resonance experiments so as to follow an efficient pathway toward the probabilistic assignment of (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N signals to specific atoms in the covalent structure of the protein. Data collection and assignment calculations continue until the addition of new data no longer improves the assignment score. ADAPT-NMR was first implemented on Varian (Agilent) spectrometers [A. Bahrami, M. Tonelli, S.C. Sahu, K.K. Singarapu, H.R. Eghbalnia, J.L. Markley, PLoS One 7 (2012) e33173]. Because of broader interest in the approach, we present here a version of ADAPT-NMR for Bruker spectrometers. We have developed two AU console programs (ADAPT_ORTHO_run and ADAPT_NMR_run) that run under TOPSPIN Versions 3.0 and higher. To illustrate the performance of the algorithm on a Bruker spectrometer, we tested one protein, chlorella ubiquitin (76 amino acid residues), that had been used with the Varian version: the Bruker and Varian versions achieved the same level of assignment completeness (98% in 20 h). As a more rigorous evaluation of the Bruker version, we tested a larger protein, BRPF1 bromodomain (114 amino acid residues), which yielded an automated assignment completeness of 86% in 55 h. Both experiments were carried out on a 500 MHz Bruker AVANCE III spectrometer equipped with a z-gradient 5 mm TCI probe. ADAPT-NMR is available at http://pine.nmrfam.wisc.edu/ADAPT-NMR in the form of pulse programs, the two AU programs, and instructions for installation and use. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Fast automated protein NMR data collection and assignment by ADAPT-NMR on Bruker spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Woonghee; Hu, Kaifeng; Tonelli, Marco; Bahrami, Arash; Neuhardt, Elizabeth; Glass, Karen C.; Markley, John L.

    2013-11-01

    ADAPT-NMR (Assignment-directed Data collection Algorithm utilizing a Probabilistic Toolkit in NMR) supports automated NMR data collection and backbone and side chain assignment for [U-13C, U-15N]-labeled proteins. Given the sequence of the protein and data for the orthogonal 2D 1H-15N and 1H-13C planes, the algorithm automatically directs the collection of tilted plane data from a variety of triple-resonance experiments so as to follow an efficient pathway toward the probabilistic assignment of 1H, 13C, and 15N signals to specific atoms in the covalent structure of the protein. Data collection and assignment calculations continue until the addition of new data no longer improves the assignment score. ADAPT-NMR was first implemented on Varian (Agilent) spectrometers [A. Bahrami, M. Tonelli, S.C. Sahu, K.K. Singarapu, H.R. Eghbalnia, J.L. Markley, PLoS One 7 (2012) e33173]. Because of broader interest in the approach, we present here a version of ADAPT-NMR for Bruker spectrometers. We have developed two AU console programs (ADAPT_ORTHO_run and ADAPT_NMR_run) that run under TOPSPIN Versions 3.0 and higher. To illustrate the performance of the algorithm on a Bruker spectrometer, we tested one protein, chlorella ubiquitin (76 amino acid residues), that had been used with the Varian version: the Bruker and Varian versions achieved the same level of assignment completeness (98% in 20 h). As a more rigorous evaluation of the Bruker version, we tested a larger protein, BRPF1 bromodomain (114 amino acid residues), which yielded an automated assignment completeness of 86% in 55 h. Both experiments were carried out on a 500 MHz Bruker AVANCE III spectrometer equipped with a z-gradient 5 mm TCI probe. ADAPT-NMR is available at http://pine.nmrfam.wisc.edu/ADAPT-NMR in the form of pulse programs, the two AU programs, and instructions for installation and use.

  5. Incorporation of FT-NMR into Research Infrastructure and Chemistry Curriculum at Bowie State University

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-09

    undergraduate research education. The Eft FT NMR software system consist of two programs: WinPNMR, a data acquisition program and NUTS (Acorn NMR Inc.) A NMR...3 2. Equipment Purchased I. Eft -GENII : The basic proton only EFT90 Fourier Transform NMR includes 1H observation at 90 MHz. It uses an Anasazi...c. Software- The Eft FT NMR software operating systems consist of two NMR programs: i. WinPNMR (Anasazi Instruments Inc.) - A NMR data

  6. Compression to prevent PTS: a controversy?

    PubMed

    Amin, Elham; Joore, Manuela A; ten Cate-Hoek, Arina J

    2016-03-01

    Compression therapy, prescribed as elastic compression stockings, is the cornerstone in the management of post-thrombotic syndrome. The effectiveness of elastic compression stockings has recently been called into question in a large randomized placebo-controlled trial. The findings however may be less contradictory than assumed and presented. The mechanistic substrate for the effectiveness of compression therapy is based on its ability to counteract venous hypertension, which is a central aspect in the pathophysiology of post-thrombotic syndrome. Nevertheless, despite elastic compression stockings a significant percentage (20-50%) of patients develops post-thrombotic syndrome, suggesting that there are other factors to be considered next to compression. Every patient has an individual baseline risk value, constituted of non-modifiable and modifiable risk factors (i.e. age, sex, bodyweight etcetera). Straining patients at risk is therefore crucial. Exploring additional or alternative forms of therapy is desirable as well since these are in addition to the risk factors, costs aspects and quality of life, puzzle pieces in the management of post-thrombotic syndrome, which once pieced together enables multifactorial yet individualized therapy.

  7. On-line NMR detection of microgram quantities of heparin-derived oligosaccharides and their structure elucidation by microcoil NMR.

    PubMed

    Korir, Albert K; Larive, Cynthia K

    2007-08-01

    The isolation and purification of sufficient quantities of heparin-derived oligosaccharides for characterization by NMR is a tedious and time-consuming process. In addition, the structural complexity and microheterogeneity of heparin makes its characterization a challenging task. The improved mass-sensitivity of microcoil NMR probe technology makes this technique well suited for characterization of mass-limited heparin-derived oligosaccharides. Although microcoil probes have poorer concentration sensitivity than conventional NMR probes, this limitation can be overcome by coupling capillary isotachophoresis (cITP) with on-line microcoil NMR detection (cITP-NMR). Strategies to improve the sensitivity of on-line NMR detection through changes in probe design and in the cITP-NMR experimental protocol are discussed. These improvements in sensitivity allow acquisition of cITP-NMR survey spectra facilitating tentative identification of unknown oligosaccharides. Complete structure elucidation for microgram quantities of the purified material can be carried out through acquisition of 2D NMR spectra using a CapNMR microcoil probe.

  8. Direct Comparison of 19F qNMR and 1H qNMR by Characterizing Atorvastatin Calcium Content

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Liu, Zhaoxia; Yang, Huaxin

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance (qNMR) is a powerful tool in measuring drug content because of its high speed, sensitivity, and precision. Most of the reports were based on proton qNMR (1H qNMR) and only a few fluorine qNMR (19F qNMR) were reported. No research has been conducted to directly compare the advantage and disadvantage between these two methods. In the present study, both 19F and 1H qNMR were performed to characterize the content of atorvastatin calcium with the same internal standard. Linearity, precision, and results from two methods were compared. Results showed that 19F qNMR has similar precision and sensitivity to 1H qNMR. Both methods generate similar results compared to mass balance method. Major advantage from 19F qNMR is that the analyte signal is with less or no interference from impurities. 19F qNMR is an excellent approach to quantify fluorine-containing analytes. PMID:27688925

  9. Nondestructive NMR determination of oil composition in transformed canola seeds.

    PubMed

    Hutton, W C; Garbow, J R; Hayes, T R

    1999-12-01

    Magic-angle spinning (MAS) 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a convenient method for nondestructive, quantitative characterization of seed oil composition. We describe results for intact hybrid and transformed canola seeds. The MAS 13C NMR technique complements and agrees with gas chromatography results. The spectral resolution approaches that of neat, liquid oils. MAS 13C NMR data allow quantitative analysis of major oil components, including saturates and oleic, linoleic, and linolenic acyl chains. 13C NMR directly and quantitatively elucidates, triglyceride regiochemistry and acyl chain cis-trans isomers that cannot be quickly detected by other methods. MAS 13C NMR can serve as the primary method for development of near-infrared seed oil calibrations. These NMR methods are nondestructive and attractive for plant-breeding programs or other studies (e.g., functional genomics) where loss of seed viability is inconvenient.

  10. Isotope labeling for NMR studies of macromolecular structure and interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, P.E.

    1994-12-01

    Implementation of biosynthetic methods for uniform or specific isotope labeling of proteins, coupled with the recent development of powerful heteronuclear multidimensional NMR methods, has led to a dramatic increase in the size and complexity of macromolecular systems that are now amenable to NMR structural analysis. In recent years, a new technology has emerged that combines uniform {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N labeling with heteronuclear multidimensional NMR methods to allow NMR structural studies of systems approaching 25 to 30 kDa in molecular weight. In addition, with the introduction of specific {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N labels into ligands, meaningful NMR studies of complexes of even higher molecular weight have become feasible. These advances usher in a new era in which the earlier, rather stringent molecular weight limitations have been greatly surpassed and NMR can begin to address many central biological problems that involve macromolecular structure, dynamics, and interactions.

  11. NMR study of magnetism and superparamagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Shaojie

    The research described in this dissertation is concerned with two different types of magnetic materials. Both types of systems involve competing interactions between transition metal ions. New approaches involving magnetic resonance in the large hyperfine fields at nuclear sites have been developed. The interactions responsible for the properties that have been investigated in the materials studied are geometric frustration in an insulator and ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic interactions in a metal alloy. Further details are given below. The extended kagome frustrated system YBaCo4O7 has 2D kagome and triangular lattices of Co ions stacked along the c-axis. Antiferromagnetic (AF) ordering accompanied by a structural transition has been reported in the literature. From a zero field (ZF) NMR single crystal rotation experiment, we have obtained the Co spin configurations for both the kagome and triangular layers. A 'spin-flop' configuration between the spins on the kagome layer and the spins on the triangular layer is indicated by our results. Our NMR findings are compared with neutron scattering results for this intriguing frustrated AF spin system. The non-stoichiometric oxygenated sister compound YBaCo4O7.1 has application potential for oxygen storage. While, its' magnetic properties are quite different from those of the stoichiometric compound, in spite of their similar structures of alternating kagome and triangular Co layers. Various techniques, including ZF NMR have been used to investigate the spin dynamics and spin configuration in a single crystal of YBaCo4O7.1. A magnetic transition at 80 K is observed, which is interpreted as the freezing out of spins in the triangular layers. At low temperatures (below 50 K), the spin dynamics persists and a fraction of spins in the kagome layers form a viscous spin liquid. Below 10 K, a glass-like spin structure forms and a large distribution of spin correlation times are suggested by nuclear spin lattice relaxation

  12. Lithium Polymer Electrolytes and Solid State NMR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berkeley, Emily R.

    2004-01-01

    Research is being done at the Glenn Research Center (GRC) developing new kinds of batteries that do not depend on a solution. Currently, batteries use liquid electrolytes containing lithium. Problems with the liquid electrolyte are (1) solvents used can leak out of the battery, so larger, more restrictive, packages have to be made, inhibiting the diversity of application and decreasing the power density; (2) the liquid is incompatible with the lithium metal anode, so alternative, less efficient, anodes are required. The Materials Department at GRC has been working to synthesize polymer electrolytes that can replace the liquid electrolytes. The advantages are that polymer electrolytes do not have the potential to leak so they can be used for a variety of tasks, small or large, including in the space rover or in space suits. The polymers generated by Dr. Mary Ann Meador's group are in the form of rod -coil structures. The rod aspect gives the polymer structural integrity, while the coil makes it flexible. Lithium ions are used in these polymers because of their high mobility. The coils have repeating units of oxygen which stabilize the positive lithium by donating electron density. This aids in the movement of the lithium within the polymer, which contributes to higher conductivity. In addition to conductivity testing, these polymers are characterized using DSC, TGA, FTIR, and solid state NMR. Solid state NMR is used in classifying materials that are not soluble in solvents, such as polymers. The NMR spins the sample at a magic angle (54.7') allowing the significant peaks to emerge. Although solid state NMR is a helpful technique in determining bonding, the process of preparing the sample and tuning it properly are intricate jobs that require patience; especially since each run takes about six hours. The NMR allows for the advancement of polymer synthesis by showing if the expected results were achieved. Using the NMR, in addition to looking at polymers, allows for

  13. Lithium Polymer Electrolytes and Solid State NMR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berkeley, Emily R.

    2004-01-01

    Research is being done at the Glenn Research Center (GRC) developing new kinds of batteries that do not depend on a solution. Currently, batteries use liquid electrolytes containing lithium. Problems with the liquid electrolyte are (1) solvents used can leak out of the battery, so larger, more restrictive, packages have to be made, inhibiting the diversity of application and decreasing the power density; (2) the liquid is incompatible with the lithium metal anode, so alternative, less efficient, anodes are required. The Materials Department at GRC has been working to synthesize polymer electrolytes that can replace the liquid electrolytes. The advantages are that polymer electrolytes do not have the potential to leak so they can be used for a variety of tasks, small or large, including in the space rover or in space suits. The polymers generated by Dr. Mary Ann Meador's group are in the form of rod -coil structures. The rod aspect gives the polymer structural integrity, while the coil makes it flexible. Lithium ions are used in these polymers because of their high mobility. The coils have repeating units of oxygen which stabilize the positive lithium by donating electron density. This aids in the movement of the lithium within the polymer, which contributes to higher conductivity. In addition to conductivity testing, these polymers are characterized using DSC, TGA, FTIR, and solid state NMR. Solid state NMR is used in classifying materials that are not soluble in solvents, such as polymers. The NMR spins the sample at a magic angle (54.7') allowing the significant peaks to emerge. Although solid state NMR is a helpful technique in determining bonding, the process of preparing the sample and tuning it properly are intricate jobs that require patience; especially since each run takes about six hours. The NMR allows for the advancement of polymer synthesis by showing if the expected results were achieved. Using the NMR, in addition to looking at polymers, allows for

  14. NMR of platinum catalysts: Double NMR of chemisorbed carbon monoxide and a model for the platinum NMR line shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makowka, Claus D.; Slichter, Charles P.; Sinfelt, J. H.

    1985-05-01

    The authors report observation of the NMR line of 195Pt atoms in the surface layer of small platinum-metal particles on which 13CO has been chemisorbed. The surface 195Pt atoms are resolved from those of 195Pt atoms deeper in the particle by spin-echo double resonance between 195Pt and 13C. The particles, supported on η-alumina, had dispersions (fraction of the atoms that are on the surface) of 26% and 76%. Comparison with 195Pt resonance in Pt carbonyls suggests that the magnitude of the Knight shift of the surface Pt is less than 0.2%. Analysis of the 195Pt spin-lattice relaxation indicates that the small surface Knight shift results from cancellation of 6s and 5d core-polarization contributions as was found theoretically by Weinert and Freeman for clean Pt surfaces. The 13-195Pt indirect spin coupling is found to be very similar to those in diamagnetic platinum carbonyl molecules. The results show that CO bonds via the C atom and verify that concepts from studies of large single crystals are valid for the small particles. The key features of the 195Pt line shapes in these small platinum particles are described by a simple phenomenological model of the spatial Knight-shift variation inside these particles. The model successfully describes the major structure seen in the NMR line shapes of samples with dispersions ranging from 5% to 76%.

  15. Avoiding Problems with Suspensions in NMR Sample Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Saqib; Danish, M.; Mazhar, M.

    1995-07-01

    Many times during the sample preparation for NMR studies solid samples form suspension due to low solubility in duterated solvents. We developed a technique to get rid of this problem easily. Just tighten the lid on the NMR sample tube and seal it with parafilm. Invert the tube and centrifuge it for five minutes. Now the suspension is collected in the lid and the clear sample is ready for NMR analysis in the tube.

  16. Complete NMR analysis of oxytocin in phosphate buffer.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Akiko; Kawasaki, Nana; Fukuhara, Kiyoshi; Okuda, Haruhiro; Yamaguchi, Teruhide

    2010-02-01

    Complete NMR analysis of oxytocin (OXT) in phosphate buffer was elucidated by one-dimensional (1D)- and two-dimensional (2D)-NMR techniques, which involve the assignment of peptide amide NH protons and carbamoyl NH(2) protons. The (1)H-(15)N correlation of seven amide NH protons and three carbamoyl NH(2) protons were also shown by HSQC NMR of OXT without (15)N enrichment.

  17. Fluid-Rock Characterization and Interactions in NMR Well Logging

    SciTech Connect

    Hirasaki, George J.; Mohanty, Kishore K.

    2003-02-10

    The objective of this project was to characterize the fluid properties and fluid-rock interactions that are needed for formation evaluation by NMR well logging. The advances made in the understanding of NMR fluid properties are summarized in a chapter written for an AAPG book on NMR well logging. This includes live oils, viscous oils, natural gas mixtures, and the relation between relaxation time and diffusivity.

  18. NMR Characterizations of Properties of Heterogeneous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Uh, Jinsoo; Phan, Jack; Xue, Dong; Watson, A. Ted

    2003-01-28

    The overall goal of this project was to develop reliable methods for resolving macroscopic properties important for describing the flow of one or more fluid phases in reservoirs from formation measurements. During this reporting period, the determination of surface relaxivity from NMR data was investigated. A new method for determining the surface relaxivity from measured data was developed and tested with data obtained from an Exxon sample. The new method avoids the use of a certain mathematical short-time approximation in the data analysis, which has been shown to be unsuitable.

  19. NMR observation of Tau in Xenopus oocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodart, Jean-François; Wieruszeski, Jean-Michel; Amniai, Laziza; Leroy, Arnaud; Landrieu, Isabelle; Rousseau-Lescuyer, Arlette; Vilain, Jean-Pierre; Lippens, Guy

    2008-06-01

    The observation by NMR spectroscopy of microinjected 15N-labelled proteins into Xenopus laevis oocytes might open the way to link structural and cellular biology. We show here that embedding the oocytes into a 20% Ficoll solution maintains their structural integrity over extended periods of time, allowing for the detection of nearly physiological protein concentrations. We use these novel conditions to study the neuronal Tau protein inside the oocytes. Spectral reproducibility and careful comparison of the spectra of Tau before and after cell homogenization is presented. When injecting Tau protein into immature oocytes, we show that both its microtubule association and different phosphorylation events can be detected.

  20. Quenched Hydrogen Exchange NMR of Amyloid Fibrils.

    PubMed

    Alexandrescu, Andrei T

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are associated with a number of human diseases. These aggregatively misfolded intermolecular β-sheet assemblies constitute some of the most challenging targets in structural biology because to their complexity, size, and insolubility. Here, protocols and controls are described for experiments designed to study hydrogen-bonding in amyloid fibrils indirectly, by transferring information about amide proton occupancy in the fibrils to the dimethyl sulfoxide-denatured state. Since the denatured state is amenable to solution NMR spectroscopy, the method can provide residue-level-resolution data on hydrogen exchange for the monomers that make up the fibrils.

  1. Understanding NMR T2 spectral uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prange, Michael; Song, Yi-Qiao

    2010-05-01

    NMR relaxation and diffusion data analysis commonly uses a wide range of methods from simple exponential fitting to Laplace inversions. The pros and cons of these methods are often the subject of intense debate. We show that the ill-conditioned nature of such analysis gives rise to a range of solutions for every method resulting in uncertainty in the spectral solution. Such uncertainty is in fact characteristic of the inversion method. We show a simple method of sparse spectral representation can be used to improve the statistics of multiple-exponential-based inversion schemes.

  2. Measurement of vorticity diffusion by NMR microscopy.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jennifer R; Callaghan, Paul T

    2010-05-01

    In a Newtonian fluid, vorticity diffuses at a rate determined by the kinematic viscosity. Here we use rapid NMR velocimetry, based on a RARE sequence, to image the time-dependent velocity field on startup of a fluid-filled cylinder and therefore measure the diffusion of vorticity. The results are consistent with the solution to the vorticity diffusion equation where the angular velocity on the outside surface of the fluid, at the cylinder's rotating wall, is fixed. This method is a means of measuring kinematic viscosity for low viscosity fluids without the need to measure stress.

  3. NMR measurements of intracellular ions in hypertension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veniero, Joseph C.; Gupta, R. K.

    1993-08-01

    The NMR methods for the measurement of intracellular free Na+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+, and H+ are introduced. The recent literature is then presented showing applications of these methods to cells and tissues from hypertensive animal model systems, and humans with essential hypertension. The results support the hypothesis of consistent derangement of the intracellular ionic environment in hypertension. The theory that this derangement may be a common link in the disease states of high blood pressure and abnormal insulin and glucose metabolism, which are often associated clinically, is discussed.

  4. In vivo NMR imaging of deuterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, S.; Seelig, J.

    D 2O is used as a contrast agent for studying anatomical images and flow in vivo by deuterium NMR. A deuterium image of the head of a living rat after administration of D 2O (5% v/v) in the drinking water is shown. It was obtained in 14 min with a surface coil and has a spatial resolution of about one millimeter. The application of D 2O as a tracer is discussed and the inflow of heavy water into the brain of a rat is recorded in a time series of deuterium images. Spatially resolved inflow time constants have been determined.

  5. MULTIPLE-QUANTUM NMR IN SOLIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Yen, Y-S.

    1982-11-01

    Time domain multiple-quantum (MQ) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a powerful tool for spectral simplification and for providing new information on molecular dynamics. In this thesis, applications of MQ NMR are presented and show distinctly the advantages of this method over the conventional single-quantum NMR. Chapter 1 introduces the spin Hamiltonians, the density matrix formalism and some basic concepts of MQ NMR spectroscopy. In chapter 2, {sup 14}N double-quantum coherence is observed with high sensitivity in isotropic solution, using only the magnetization of bound protons. Spin echoes are used to obtain the homogeneous double-quantum spectrum and to suppress a large H{sub 2}O solvent signal. Chapter 3 resolves the main difficulty in observing high MQ transitions in solids. Due to the profusion of spin transitions in a solid, individual lines are unresolved. Excitation and detection of high quantum transitions by normal schemes are thus difficult. To ensure that overlapping lines add constructively and thereby to enhance sensitivity, time-reversal pulse sequences are used to generate all lines in phase. Up to 22-quantum {sup 1}H absorption in solid adamantane is observed. A time dependence study shows an increase in spin correlations as the excitation time increased. In chapter 4, a statistical theory of MQ second moments is developed for coupled spins of spin I = 1/2. The model reveals that the ratio of the average dipolar coupling to the rms value largely determines the dependence of second moments on the number of quanta. The results of this model are checked against computer-calculated and experimental second moments, and show good agreement. A simple scheme is proposed in chapter 5 for sensitivity improvement in a MQ experiment. The scheme involves acquiring all of the signal energy available in the detection period by applying pulsed spinlocking and sampling between pulses. Using this technique on polycrystalline adamantane, a large

  6. Analysis of multiple pulse NMR in solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhim, W.-K.; Elleman, D. D.; Vaughan, R. W.

    1973-01-01

    The general problems associated with the removal of the effects of dipolar broadening from solid-state NMR spectra are analyzed. The effects of finite pulse width and H sub 1 inhomogeneity are shown to have limited the resolution of previous pulse cycles, and a new eight-pulse cycle designed to minimize these problems is discussed. Spectra for F-19 in CaF2 taken with this cycle are presented which show residual linewidth near 10 Hz. The feasibility of measuring proton chemical shift tensors is discussed.

  7. NMR-based quantification of organic diphosphates

    PubMed Central

    Lenevich, Stepan

    2010-01-01

    Phosphorylated compounds are ubiquitous in life. Given their central role, many such substrates and analogues have been prepared for subsequent evaluation. Prior to biological experiments, it is typically necessary to determine the concentration of the target molecule in solution. Here we describe a method where concentrations of stock solutions of organic diphosphates and bisphosphonates are quantified using 31P NMR spectroscopy with standard instrumentation using a capillary tube with a secondary standard. The method is specific and is applicable down to a concentration of 200 μM. The capillary tube provides the reference peak for quantification and deuterated solvent for locking. PMID:20833124

  8. Touch NMR: An NMR Data Processing Application for the iPad

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Qiyue; Chen, Zhiwei; Yan, Zhiping; Wang, Cheng; Chen, Zhong

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has become one of the most powerful technologies to aid research in numerous scientific disciplines. With the development of consumer electronics, mobile devices have played increasingly important roles in our daily life. However, there is currently no application available for mobile devices able to…

  9. Extracting protein dynamics information from overlapped NMR signals using relaxation dispersion difference NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Konuma, Tsuyoshi; Harada, Erisa; Sugase, Kenji

    2015-12-01

    Protein dynamics plays important roles in many biological events, such as ligand binding and enzyme reactions. NMR is mostly used for investigating such protein dynamics in a site-specific manner. Recently, NMR has been actively applied to large proteins and intrinsically disordered proteins, which are attractive research targets. However, signal overlap, which is often observed for such proteins, hampers accurate analysis of NMR data. In this study, we have developed a new methodology called relaxation dispersion difference that can extract conformational exchange parameters from overlapped NMR signals measured using relaxation dispersion spectroscopy. In relaxation dispersion measurements, the signal intensities of fluctuating residues vary according to the Carr-Purcell-Meiboon-Gill pulsing interval, whereas those of non-fluctuating residues are constant. Therefore, subtraction of each relaxation dispersion spectrum from that with the highest signal intensities, measured at the shortest pulsing interval, leaves only the signals of the fluctuating residues. This is the principle of the relaxation dispersion difference method. This new method enabled us to extract exchange parameters from overlapped signals of heme oxygenase-1, which is a relatively large protein. The results indicate that the structural flexibility of a kink in the heme-binding site is important for efficient heme binding. Relaxation dispersion difference requires neither selectively labeled samples nor modification of pulse programs; thus it will have wide applications in protein dynamics analysis.

  10. Touch NMR: An NMR Data Processing Application for the iPad

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Qiyue; Chen, Zhiwei; Yan, Zhiping; Wang, Cheng; Chen, Zhong

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has become one of the most powerful technologies to aid research in numerous scientific disciplines. With the development of consumer electronics, mobile devices have played increasingly important roles in our daily life. However, there is currently no application available for mobile devices able to…

  11. Microgram-scale protein structure determination by NMR.

    PubMed

    Aramini, James M; Rossi, Paolo; Anklin, Clemens; Xiao, Rong; Montelione, Gaetano T

    2007-06-01

    Using conventional triple-resonance nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments with a 1 mm triple-resonance microcoil NMR probe, we determined near complete resonance assignments and three-dimensional (3D) structure of the 68-residue Methanosarcina mazei TRAM protein using only 72 mug (6 microl, 1.4 mM) of protein. This first example of a complete solution NMR structure determined using microgram quantities of protein demonstrates the utility of microcoil-probe NMR technologies for protein samples that can be produced in only limited quantities.

  12. Understanding NMR relaxometry of partially water-saturated rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohnke, O.; Jorand, R.; Nordlund, C.; Klitzsch, N.

    2015-06-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry measurements are commonly used to characterize the storage and transport properties of water-saturated rocks. Estimations of these properties are based on the direct link of the initial NMR signal amplitude to porosity (water content) and of the NMR relaxation time to pore size. Herein, pore shapes are usually assumed to be spherical or cylindrical. However, the NMR response at partial water saturation for natural sediments and rocks may differ strongly from the responses calculated for spherical or cylindrical pores, because these pore shapes do not account for water menisci remaining in the corners of desaturated angular pores. Therefore, we consider a bundle of pores with triangular cross sections. We introduce analytical solutions of the NMR equations at partial saturation of these pores, which account for water menisci of desaturated pores. After developing equations that describe the water distribution inside the pores, we calculate the NMR response at partial saturation for imbibition and drainage based on the deduced water distributions. For this pore model, the NMR amplitudes and NMR relaxation times at partial water saturation strongly depend on pore shape, i.e., arising from the capillary pressure and pore shape-dependent water distribution in desaturated pores with triangular cross sections. Even so, the NMR relaxation time at full saturation only depends on the surface-to-volume ratio of the pore. Moreover, we show the qualitative agreement of the saturation-dependent relaxation-time distributions of our model with those observed for rocks and soils.

  13. New generation NMR bioreactor coupled with high-resolution NMR spectroscopy leads to novel discoveries in Moorella thermoaceticum metabolic profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Junfeng; Isern, Nancy G.; Ewing, R James; Liyu, Andrey V.; Sears, Jesse A.; Knapp, Harlan; Iversen, Jens; Sisk, Daniel R.; Ahring, Birgitte K.; Majors, Paul D.

    2014-06-20

    An in-situ nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) bioreactor was developed and employed to monitor microbial metabolism under batch-growth conditions in real time. We selected Moorella thermoacetica ATCC 49707 as a test case. M. thermoacetica (formerly Clostridium thermoaceticum) is a strictly anaerobic, thermophilic, acetogenic, gram-positive bacterium with potential for industrial production of chemicals. The metabolic profiles of M. thermoacetica were characterized during growth in batch mode on xylose (a component of lignocellulosic biomass) using the new generation NMR bioreactor in combination with high-resolution, high sensitivity NMR (HR-NMR) spectroscopy. In-situ NMR measurements were performed using water-suppressed H-1 NMR spectroscopy at an NMR frequency of 500 MHz, and aliquots of the bioreactor contents were taken for 600 MHz HR-NMR spectroscopy at specific intervals to confirm metabolite identifications and expand metabolite coverage. M. thermoacetica demonstrated the metabolic potential to produce formate, ethanol and methanol from xylose, in addition to its known capability of producing acetic acid. Real-time monitoring of bioreactor conditions showed a temporary pH decrease, with a concomitant increase in formic acid during exponential growth. Fermentation experiments performed outside of the magnet showed that the strong magnetic field employed for NMR detection did not significantly affect cell metabolism. Use of the in-situ NMR bioreactor facilitated monitoring of the fermentation process in real time, enabling identification of intermediate and end-point metabolites and their correlation with pH and biomass produced during culture growth. Real-time monitoring of culture metabolism using the NMR bioreactor in combination with the HR-NMR spectroscopy will allow optimization of the metabolism of microorganisms producing valuable bioproducts.

  14. NMR probe for dynamic-angle spinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, K. T.; Chingas, G. C.; Pines, A.

    1991-06-01

    We describe the design of a probe for dynamic-angle spinning (DAS) NMR experiments, comprised of a spinning cylindrical sample holder whose axis may be reoriented rapidly between discrete directions within the bore of a superconducting magnet. This allows the refocusing of nuclear spin magnetization that evolves under anisotropic interactions such as chemical shift anisotropy and quadrupolar coupling, providing high resolution NMR spectra for quadrupolar nuclei in solid materials. The probe includes an axial air delivery system to bearing and drive jets which support and spin a rotor containing the sample. Axis reorientation is accomplished with a pulley attached to the probehead and coupled to a stepping motor outside of the magnet. The choice of motor and gear ratio is based on an analysis of the moments of inertia of the motor and load, the desired angular resolution, and simplicity of design. Control of angular accuracy and precision are discussed, as well as the efficiency of radiofrequency irradiation and detection. High resolution DAS spectra of oxygen-17 and aluminum-27 nuclei in polycrystalline minerals illustrate the experimental capabilities.

  15. Algorithmic cooling and scalable NMR quantum computers

    PubMed Central

    Boykin, P. Oscar; Mor, Tal; Roychowdhury, Vwani; Vatan, Farrokh; Vrijen, Rutger

    2002-01-01

    We present here algorithmic cooling (via polarization heat bath)—a powerful method for obtaining a large number of highly polarized spins in liquid nuclear-spin systems at finite temperature. Given that spin-half states represent (quantum) bits, algorithmic cooling cleans dirty bits beyond the Shannon's bound on data compression, by using a set of rapidly thermal-relaxing bits. Such auxiliary bits could be implemented by using spins that rapidly get into thermal equilibrium with the environment, e.g., electron spins. Interestingly, the interaction with the environment, usually a most undesired interaction, is used here to our benefit, allowing a cooling mechanism. Cooling spins to a very low temperature without cooling the environment could lead to a breakthrough in NMR experiments, and our “spin-refrigerating” method suggests that this is possible. The scaling of NMR ensemble computers is currently one of the main obstacles to building larger-scale quantum computing devices, and our spin-refrigerating method suggests that this problem can be resolved. PMID:11904402

  16. NMR assessment on bone simulated under microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Q.; Qin, Y.

    Introduction Microgravity-induced bone loss has been suggested to be similar to disuse-osteoporosis on Earth which constitutes a challenging public health problem No current non-destructive method can provide the microstructural changes in bone particularly on cortical bone Recently the authors have applied low field nuclear magnetic resonance NMR spin-spin relaxation technique and computational analysis method to determine the porosity pore size distribution and microdamage of cortical bone 1-3 The studies by the authors have shown that this technology can be used to characterize microstructural changes as well as bone water distribution bound and mobile water changes of weightless treated simulating a microgravity condition turkey and mouse cortical bone We further determinate that the NMR spin-spin relaxation time T 2 spectrum derived parameters can be used as descriptions of bone quality e g matrix water distribution and porosity size distributions and alone or in combination with current techniques bone mineral density measurements more accurately predict bone mechanical properties Methods underline Bone sample preparation Two kinds of animal samples were collected and prepared for designed experiments from SUNY Cortical bones of the mid-diaphyses of the ulnae of 1-year-old male turkeys were dissected from freshly slaughtered animals Eight samples were categorized from normal or control and four samples were 4-week disuse treated by functionally isolated osteotomies disuse A total of 12

  17. NMR measurements in solutions of dialkylimidazolium haloaluminates

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, S.; Saboungi, M.L.; Klingler, R.J.; Chen, M.J.; Rathke, J.W.

    1992-06-01

    {sup 27}Al and {sup 35}Cl NMR spectra of AlCl{sub 3}-1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloride (EMIC) melts were measured for initial compositions ranging from 50 to 67 mol % AlCl{sub 3} at various temperatures. It was shown by changing the preaquisition delay time (DE value) that the dominant aluminum species are AlCl{sub 4}{sup {minus}} in the melt formed by mixing 50 mol % with EMIC and Al{sub 2}Cl{sub 7}{sup {minus}} in the 67 mol % AlCl{sub 3} melt. In the equimolar mixture, the chemical shift of {sup 27}Al NMR spectrum is 103.28 ppm and the line width is 22.83Hz. In the 67 mol % AlCl{sub 3} mixture, the chemical shift is 103.41 ppm and the line width is 2624Hz. A third species observed at 97 ppm in the {sup 27}Al spectra for the 55 and 60 mol % AlCl{sub 3} mixtures is identified to be a product of the reaction with residual water. The relaxation rates for each species in the melts were determined.

  18. NMR crystallography: the use of chemical shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Robin K.

    2004-10-01

    Measurements of chemical shifts obtained from magic-angle spinning NMR spectra (together with quantum mechanical computations of shielding) can provide valuable information on crystallography. Examples are given of the determination of crystallographic asymmetric units, of molecular symmetry in the solid-state environment, and of crystallographic space group assignment. Measurements of full tensor components for 199Hg have given additional coordination information. The nature of intermolecular hydrogen bonding in cortisone acetate polymorphs and solvates is obtained from chemical shift information, also involving measurement of the full tensor parameters. The resulting data have been used as restraints, built into the computation algorithm, in the analysis of powder diffraction patterns to give full crystal structures. A combination of quantum mechanical computation of shielding and measurement of proton chemical shifts (obtained by high-speed MAS) leads to the determination of the position of a proton in an intermolecular hydrogen bond. A recently-developed computer program specifically based on crystallographic repetition has been shown to give acceptable results. Moreover, NMR chemical shifts can distinguish between static and dynamic disorder in crystalline materials and can be used to determine modes and rates of molecular exchange motion.

  19. Methods for spatial localization in NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Rath, A.R.

    1985-01-01

    Several unique coil configurations were developed that have applications in nuclear magnetic resonance. These include a number of designs appropriate for use as rf surface coils, and two configurations developed as NMR magnets. The magnetic field profiles were calculated for each of these designs, from which field strength and homogeneity information were obtained. The rf coil configurations modelled include the opposed loop, opposed half loop, bicycle wheel, opposed bicycle wheel, and semi-toroid. The opposed loop design was studied in detail in terms of the theoretical spatial sensitivity and selectivity it offers. A number of NMR experiments were performed to test the validity of these theoretical calculations. This configuration produces a field that is substantially reduced near the coil itself, compared with the field produced by a single loop surface coil, but that rises to a maximum along the coil axis yielding a somewhat homogeneous region that may be used to achieve a degree of spatial localization. Several comparison schemes are used to evaluate the relative advantages and disadvantages of both the single loop and the opposed loop coil. The opposed coil concept also has been applied to the design of magnets. The results of calculations on the homogeneity and field strength possible with an opposed solenoid magnet are presented.

  20. Chromatographic Separation and NMR An Integrated Approach in Pharmaceutical Development.

    PubMed

    Gonnella, Nina C

    2012-01-01

    Over the past 10 years, major improvements in the performance of LC-NMR have been realized. The addition of postcolumn SPE, advances in probe technology including cryogenic probes and microcoil probes, improved solvent suppression pulse sequences, and shielded magnets with better homogeneity have all contributed to rapid advancements in this technology. Application of LC-NMR to problems in pharmaceutical development has had a major impact on structure elucidation studies. LC-NMR has been successfully applied to determine the structures of degradation products, impurities, mixtures of compounds, and metabolites. Use of stop flow techniques with LC-NMR experiments has been a critical means of identifying unstable compounds and studying conformational kinetics. The integration of SPE as an intermediate step between the LC unit and the NMR spectrometer has vastly improved the power of the hyphenated technique in trace analysis applications. Online postcolumn enrichment of chromatographic peaks by SPE dramatically reduces the NMR acquisition times by allowing repeated injections to be trapped onto the same cartridge or different cartridges. Because protonated solvents can be easily removed with a drying procedure, solvents and buffers may be freely chosen for maximizing chromatographic separation without compromising NMR spectral quality. The compound of interest may then be eluted from an SPE cartridge using deuterated organic solvent, which helps to reduce dynamic range issues. When combined with cryogenically cooled microcapillary probes, the sensitivity of the NMR signal increases about 10-fold over conventional room temperature probes, enabling full structure characterization at the microgram level. Heteronuclear experiments with concentrations previously only possible in a limited number of cases have now become standard experiments. The availability of HSQC and HMBC experiments and microcoil/cryogenic technology opens the possibility of using LC-(SPE) NMR for the

  1. Constitutive expression of selected genes from the pentose phosphate and aromatic pathways increases the shikimic acid yield in high-glucose batch cultures of an Escherichia coli strain lacking PTS and pykF

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background During the last two decades many efforts have been directed towards obtaining efficient microbial processes for the production of shikimic acid (SA); however, feeding high amounts of substrate to increase the titer of this compound has invariably rendered low conversion yields, leaving room for improvement of the producing strains. In this work we report an alternative platform to overproduce SA in a laboratory-evolved Escherichia coli strain, based on plasmid-driven constitutive expression of six genes selected from the pentose phosphate and aromatic amino acid pathways, artificially arranged as an operon. Production strains also carried inactivated genes coding for phosphotransferase system components (ptsHIcrr), shikimate kinases I and II (aroK and aroL), pyruvate kinase I (pykF) and the lactose operon repressor (lacI). Results The strong and constitutive expression of the constructed operon permitted SA production from the beginning of the cultures, as evidenced in 1 L batch-mode fermentors starting with high concentrations of glucose and yeast extract. Inactivation of the pykF gene improved SA production under the evaluated conditions by increasing the titer, yield and productivity of this metabolite compared to the isogenic pykF+ strain. The best producing strain accumulated up to 43 g/L of SA in 30 h and relatively low concentrations of acetate and aromatic byproducts were detected, with SA accounting for 80% of the produced aromatic compounds. These results were consistent with high expression levels of the glycolytic pathway and synthetic operon genes from the beginning of fermentations, as revealed by transcriptomic analysis. Despite the consumption of 100 g/L of glucose, the yields on glucose of SA and of total aromatic compounds were about 50% and 60% of the theoretical maximum, respectively. The obtained yields and specific production and consumption rates proved to be constant with three different substrate concentrations. Conclusions

  2. Two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy. Applications for chemists and biochemists

    SciTech Connect

    Croasmun, W.R.; Carlson, R.M.K.

    1987-01-01

    Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (2-D NMR) has become a very powerful class of experiments (in the hands of an adept scientist) with broad adaptability to new situations. It is the product of a happy marriage between modern pulse FT-NMR technology, with its large memory and high-speed computers, and the physicists and chemists who love to manipulate spin systems. Basic 2-D experiments are now a standard capability of modern NMR spectrometers, and this timely book intends to make 2-D NMR users of those who are familiar with normal 1-D NMR. The 2-D NMR goal is correlation of the lines of the observed NMR spectrum with other properties of the system. This book deals with applications to high-resolution spectrum analysis, utilizing either coupling between the NMR-active nuclei or chemical exchange to perform the correlation. The coupling can be scalar (through bonds) or direct through space (within 5 A). The coupling may be homonuclear (between like nuclei) or heteronuclear.

  3. Chemical Equilibrium in Supramolecular Systems as Studied by NMR Spectrometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez-Gaitano, Gustavo; Tardajos, Gloria

    2004-01-01

    Undergraduate students are required to study the chemical balance in supramolecular assemblies constituting two or more interacting species, by using proton NMR spectrometry. A good knowledge of physical chemistry, fundamentals of chemical balance, and NMR are pre-requisites for conducting this study.

  4. Quantitative 13C NMR characterization of fast pyrolysis oils

    DOE PAGES

    Happs, Renee M.; Lisa, Kristina; Ferrell, III, Jack R.

    2016-10-20

    Quantitative 13C NMR analysis of model catalytic fast pyrolysis (CFP) oils following literature procedures showed poor agreement for aromatic hydrocarbons between NMR measured concentrations and actual composition. Furthermore, modifying integration regions based on DEPT analysis for aromatic carbons resulted in better agreement. Solvent effects were also investigated for hydrotreated CFP oil.

  5. Chemical Equilibrium in Supramolecular Systems as Studied by NMR Spectrometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez-Gaitano, Gustavo; Tardajos, Gloria

    2004-01-01

    Undergraduate students are required to study the chemical balance in supramolecular assemblies constituting two or more interacting species, by using proton NMR spectrometry. A good knowledge of physical chemistry, fundamentals of chemical balance, and NMR are pre-requisites for conducting this study.

  6. Bringing NMR and IR Spectroscopy to High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonjour, Jessica L.; Hass, Alisa L.; Pollock, David W.; Huebner, Aaron; Frost, John A.

    2017-01-01

    Development of benchtop, portable Fourier transform nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and infrared (IR) spectrometers has opened up opportunities for creating university-high school partnerships that provide high school students with hands-on experience with NMR and IR instruments. With recent changes to the international baccalaureate chemistry…

  7. Functional groups identified by solid state 13C NMR spectroscopy

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Animal manure is generally high in organic matter intensity so it is well suitable for 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis. Solid-state 13C NMR techniques used in characterizing organic matter and its components include, but are not limited to, cross-polarization /magic angle spinning (CP...

  8. Contributions of Biomolecular NMR to Allosteric Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Skora, Lukasz; Jahnke, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Drug discovery is a complex process, and a variety of technologies contribute to its success. Biophysical methods have gained widespread attention within the last decade, and in particular NMR spectroscopy as the most versatile biophysical method has seen numerous applications and significant impact to drug discovery. Here we summarize the potential of NMR to support drug discovery, and highlight a number of recent applications.

  9. NMR-Metabolic Methodology in the Study of GM Foods

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The 1H NMR methodology used in the study of genetically modified (GM) foodstuff is discussed. The study of transgenic lettuce (Lactuca sativa cv "Luxor") over-expressing the KNAT1 gene from Arabidopsis is presented as a novel study-case. The 1H NMR metabolic profiling was carried out. Twenty-two wat...

  10. What can Lattice QCD theorists learn from NMR spectroscopists?

    SciTech Connect

    George Fleming

    2003-06-01

    Euclidean-time hadron correlation functions computed in Lattice QCD (LQCD) are modeled by a sum of decaying exponentials, reminiscent of the exponentially damped sinusoid models of free induction decay (FID) in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. We present our initial progress in studying how data modeling techniques commonly used in NMR perform when applied to LQCD data.

  11. Fluid-Rock Characterization and Interactions in NMR Well Logging

    SciTech Connect

    George J. Hirasaki; Kishore K. Mohanty

    2005-09-05

    The objective of this report is to characterize the fluid properties and fluid-rock interactions that are needed for formation evaluation by NMR well logging. The advances made in the understanding of NMR fluid properties are summarized in a chapter written for an AAPG book on NMR well logging. This includes live oils, viscous oils, natural gas mixtures, and the relation between relaxation time and diffusivity. Oil based drilling fluids can have an adverse effect on NMR well logging if it alters the wettability of the formation. The effect of various surfactants on wettability and surface relaxivity are evaluated for silica sand. The relation between the relaxation time and diffusivity distinguishes the response of brine, oil, and gas in a NMR well log. A new NMR pulse sequence in the presence of a field gradient and a new inversion technique enables the T{sub 2} and diffusivity distributions to be displayed as a two-dimensional map. The objectives of pore morphology and rock characterization are to identify vug connectivity by using X-ray CT scan, and to improve NMR permeability correlation. Improved estimation of permeability from NMR response is possible by using estimated tortuosity as a parameter to interpolate between two existing permeability models.

  12. Probe for high resolution NMR with sample reorientation

    DOEpatents

    Pines, Alexander; Samoson, Ago

    1990-01-01

    An improved NMR probe and method are described which substantially improve the resolution of NMR measurements made on powdered or amorphous or otherwise orientationally disordered samples. The apparatus mechanically varies the orientation of the sample such that the time average of two or more sets of spherical harmonic functions are zero.

  13. {sup 17}O NMR investigations of oxidative degradation in polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, T.M.; Celina, M.; Assink, R.A.; Gillen, K.T.; Clough, R.L.

    1996-12-31

    We have initiated studies using both solution and solid state magic angle spinning {sup 17}O NMR for a series of oxidatively aged polymers. This short note reports the solution {sup 17}O NMR for oxidatively degraded polypropylene, ethylene-propylene-diene, polyisoprene, and nitrile rubber. Enriched O{sub 2} is used during the accelerated aging. 3 figs, 7 refs.

  14. Advanced solid-state NMR spectroscopy of natural organic matter.

    PubMed

    Mao, Jingdong; Cao, Xiaoyan; Olk, Dan C; Chu, Wenying; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus

    2017-05-01

    Solid-state NMR is essential for the characterization of natural organic matter (NOM) and is gaining importance in geosciences and environmental sciences. This review is intended to highlight advanced solid-state NMR techniques, especially a systematic approach to NOM characterization, and their applications to the study of NOM. We discuss some basics of how to acquire high-quality and quantitative solid-state (13)C NMR spectra, and address some common technical mistakes that lead to unreliable spectra of NOM. The identification of specific functional groups in NOM, primarily based on (13)C spectral-editing techniques, is described and the theoretical background of some recently-developed spectral-editing techniques is provided. Applications of solid-state NMR to investigating nitrogen (N) in NOM are described, focusing on limitations of the widely used (15)N CP/MAS experiment and the potential of improved advanced NMR techniques for characterizing N forms in NOM. Then techniques used for identifying proximities, heterogeneities and domains are reviewed, and some examples provided. In addition, NMR techniques for studying segmental dynamics in NOM are reviewed. We also briefly discuss applications of solid-state NMR to NOM from various sources, including soil organic matter, aquatic organic matter, organic matter in atmospheric particulate matter, carbonaceous meteoritic organic matter, and fossil fuels. Finally, examples of NMR-based structural models and an outlook are provided. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Advanced solid-state NMR spectroscopy of natural organic matter

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Solid-state NMR is essential for the characterization of natural organic matter (NOM) and is gaining importance in geosciences and environmental sciences. This review is intended to highlight advanced solid-state NMR techniques, especially the systematic approach to NOM characterization, and their ...

  16. Bringing NMR and IR Spectroscopy to High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonjour, Jessica L.; Hass, Alisa L.; Pollock, David W.; Huebner, Aaron; Frost, John A.

    2017-01-01

    Development of benchtop, portable Fourier transform nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and infrared (IR) spectrometers has opened up opportunities for creating university-high school partnerships that provide high school students with hands-on experience with NMR and IR instruments. With recent changes to the international baccalaureate chemistry…

  17. Heteronuclear Multidimensional Protein NMR in a Teaching Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Nathan T.

    2016-01-01

    Heteronuclear multidimensional NMR techniques are commonly used to study protein structure, function, and dynamics, yet they are rarely taught at the undergraduate level. Here, we describe a senior undergraduate laboratory where students collect, process, and analyze heteronuclear multidimensional NMR experiments using an unstudied Ig domain (Ig2…

  18. Probe for high resolution NMR with sample reorientation

    DOEpatents

    Pines, A.; Samoson, A.

    1990-02-06

    An improved NMR probe and method are described which substantially improve the resolution of NMR measurements made on powdered or amorphous or otherwise orientationally disordered samples. The apparatus mechanically varies the orientation of the sample such that the time average of two or more sets of spherical harmonic functions are zero. 8 figs.

  19. Heteronuclear Multidimensional Protein NMR in a Teaching Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Nathan T.

    2016-01-01

    Heteronuclear multidimensional NMR techniques are commonly used to study protein structure, function, and dynamics, yet they are rarely taught at the undergraduate level. Here, we describe a senior undergraduate laboratory where students collect, process, and analyze heteronuclear multidimensional NMR experiments using an unstudied Ig domain (Ig2…

  20. CHARACTERIZATION OF METABOLITES IN SMALL FISH BIOFLUIDS AND TISSUES BY NMR SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been utilized for assessing ecotoxicity in small fish models by means of metabolomics. Two fundamental challenges of NMR-based metabolomics are the detection limit and characterization of metabolites (or NMR resonance assignments...

  1. CHARACTERIZATION OF METABOLITES IN SMALL FISH BIOFLUIDS AND TISSUES BY NMR SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been utilized for assessing ecotoxicity in small fish models by means of metabolomics. Two fundamental challenges of NMR-based metabolomics are the detection limit and characterization of metabolites (or NMR resonance assignments...

  2. Dynamics of Antibody Domains Studied by Solution NMR

    PubMed Central

    Vu, Bang K.; Walsh, Joseph D.; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.; Ishima, Rieko

    2012-01-01

    Information on local dynamics of antibodies is important to evaluate stability, to rationally design variants, and to clarify conformational disorders at the epitope binding sites. Such information may also be useful for improved understanding of antigen recognition. NMR can be used for characterization of local protein dynamics at the atomic level through relaxation measurements. Due to the complexity of the NMR spectra, an extensive use of this method is limited to small protein molecules, for example, antibody domains and some scFv. Here, we describe a protocol that was used to study the dynamics of an antibody domain in solution using NMR. We describe protein preparation for NMR studies, NMR sample optimization, signal assignments, and dynamics experiments. PMID:19252840

  3. R: A quantitative measure of NMR signal receiving efficiency.

    PubMed

    Mo, Huaping; Harwood, John; Zhang, Shucha; Xue, Yi; Santini, Robert; Raftery, Daniel

    2009-10-01

    Recognizing that the sensitivity of NMR is influenced by factors such as conductance and dielectric constant of the sample, we propose the receiving efficiency R to characterize how efficiently the NMR signal can be observed from a unit transverse magnetization in a sample under optimal probe tuning and matching conditions. Conveniently, the relative receiving efficiency can be defined as the ratio of the NMR signal induced by a unit transverse magnetization in a sample of interest and a reference solution. Based on the reciprocal relationship between excitation and observation in NMR, the relative receiving efficiency can be correlated with the 90 degrees pulse length (tau(90)). In the special case of perfect probe tuning (impedance matched to 50 Omega), R is inversely proportional to tau(90). Application of the NMR receiving efficiency in quantitative analysis potentially enables a single external concentration reference for almost any sample, eliminating the need to know its exact chemical composition or detailed electromagnetic properties.

  4. WebSpectra: Online NMR and IR Spectra for Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlic, Craig A.; Fam, Barry C.; Miller, Michael M.

    2001-01-01

    WebSpectra is a World Wide Web site at UCLA through which organic chemistry students have convenient access to a library of problems in NMR and IR spectroscopy, ranging in difficulty from introductory to advanced. Students are presented with high-resolution spectra of unknown compounds in addition to the molecular formula. Expandable one-dimensional 1H and 13C NMR spectra are available for all problems and many also include IR, DEPT NMR, and/or COSY NMR spectra. In addition to the spectral problems, WebSpectra provides instructional documents on basic NMR and IR spectroscopy concepts. There is also an IR comparison tool that allows overlays of spectra and a search engine that allows students to locate specific types of compounds based upon name, formula, or functional group. The design and capabilities of this Web-based educational tool are described in this paper.

  5. Earth's field NMR flow meter: preliminary quantitative measurements.

    PubMed

    Fridjonsson, Einar O; Stanwix, Paul L; Johns, Michael L

    2014-08-01

    In this paper we demonstrate the use of Earth's field NMR (EF NMR) combined with a pre-polarising permanent magnet for measuring fast fluid velocities. This time of flight measurement protocol has a considerable history in the literature; here we demonstrate that it is quantitative when employing the Earth's magnetic field for signal detection. NMR signal intensities are measured as a function of flow rate (0-1m/s) and separation distance between the permanent magnet and the EF NMR signal detection. These data are quantitatively described by a flow model, ultimately featuring no free parameters, that accounts for NMR signal modulation due to residence time inside the pre-polarising magnet, between the pre-polarising magnet and the detection RF coil and inside the detection coil respectively. The methodology is subsequently demonstrated with a metallic pipe in the pre-polarising region.

  6. High-resolution, high-pressure NMR studies of proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Jonas, J; Ballard, L; Nash, D

    1998-01-01

    Advanced high-resolution NMR spectroscopy, including two-dimensional NMR techniques, combined with high pressure capability, represents a powerful new tool in the study of proteins. This contribution is organized in the following way. First, the specialized instrumentation needed for high-pressure NMR experiments is discussed, with specific emphasis on the design features and performance characteristics of a high-sensitivity, high-resolution, variable-temperature NMR probe operating at 500 MHz and at pressures of up to 500 MPa. An overview of several recent studies using 1D and 2D high-resolution, high-pressure NMR spectroscopy to investigate the pressure-induced reversible unfolding and pressure-assisted cold denaturation of lysozyme, ribonuclease A, and ubiquitin is presented. Specifically, the relationship between the residual secondary structure of pressure-assisted, cold-denatured states and the structure of early folding intermediates is discussed. PMID:9649405

  7. Studies of organic paint binders by NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spyros, A.; Anglos, D.

    2006-06-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is applied to the study of aged binding media used in paintings, namely linseed oil, egg tempera and an acrylic medium. High resolution 1D and 2D NMR experiments establish the state of hydrolysis and oxidation of the linseed and egg tempera binders after five years of aging, by determining several markers sensitive to the hydrolytic and oxidative processes of the binder lipid fraction. The composition of the acrylic binder co-polymer is determined by 2D NMR spectroscopy, while the identification of a surfactant, poly(ethylene glycol), found in greater amounts in aged acrylic medium, is reported. The non-destructive nature of the proposed analytical NMR methodology, and minimization of the amount of binder material needed through the use of sophisticated cryoprobes and hyphenated LC-NMR techniques, make NMR attractive for the arts analyst, in view of its rapid nature and experimental simplicity.

  8. Optimized fast mixing device for real-time NMR applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, Rémi; Favier, Adrien; Schanda, Paul; Brutscher, Bernhard

    2017-08-01

    We present an improved fast mixing device based on the rapid mixing of two solutions inside the NMR probe, as originally proposed by Hore and coworkers (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 125 (2003) 12484-12492). Such a device is important for off-equilibrium studies of molecular kinetics by multidimensional real-time NMR spectrsocopy. The novelty of this device is that it allows removing the injector from the NMR detection volume after mixing, and thus provides good magnetic field homogeneity independently of the initial sample volume placed in the NMR probe. The apparatus is simple to build, inexpensive, and can be used without any hardware modification on any type of liquid-state NMR spectrometer. We demonstrate the performance of our fast mixing device in terms of improved magnetic field homogeneity, and show an application to the study of protein folding and the structural characterization of transiently populated folding intermediates.

  9. Spatially resolved spectroscopy using tapered stripline NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tijssen, Koen C. H.; Bart, Jacob; Tiggelaar, Roald M.; Janssen, J. W. G. (Hans); Kentgens, Arno P. M.; van Bentum, P. Jan M.

    2016-02-01

    Magnetic field B0 gradients are essential in modern Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy and imaging. Although RF/B1 gradients can be used to fulfill a similar role, this is not used in common practice because of practical limitations in the design of B1 gradient coils. Here we present a new method to create B1 gradients using stripline RF coils. The conductor-width of a stripline NMR chip and the strength of its radiofrequency field are correlated, so a stripline chip can be tapered to produce any arbitrary shaped B1 field gradient. Here we show the characterization of this tapered stripline configuration and demonstrate three applications: magnetic resonance imaging on samples with nL-μL volumes, reaction monitoring of fast chemical reactions (10-2-101 s) and the compensation of B0 field gradients to obtain high-resolution spectra in inhomogeneous magnetic fields.

  10. Two-Dimensional NMR Lineshape Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waudby, Christopher A.; Ramos, Andres; Cabrita, Lisa D.; Christodoulou, John

    2016-04-01

    NMR titration experiments are a rich source of structural, mechanistic, thermodynamic and kinetic information on biomolecular interactions, which can be extracted through the quantitative analysis of resonance lineshapes. However, applications of such analyses are frequently limited by peak overlap inherent to complex biomolecular systems. Moreover, systematic errors may arise due to the analysis of two-dimensional data using theoretical frameworks developed for one-dimensional experiments. Here we introduce a more accurate and convenient method for the analysis of such data, based on the direct quantum mechanical simulation and fitting of entire two-dimensional experiments, which we implement in a new software tool, TITAN (TITration ANalysis). We expect the approach, which we demonstrate for a variety of protein-protein and protein-ligand interactions, to be particularly useful in providing information on multi-step or multi-component interactions.

  11. 2 Novel DNP-NMR Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wind, R. A.; Hall, R. A.; Jurkiewicz, A.; Lock, H.; Maciel, G. E.

    In solids containing both unpaired electrons and nuclear spins, the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) technique can be applied to enhance the NMR signal. DNP requires irradiation at or near the electron Larmor frequency, and in this paper two probes are described to achieve this goal. Two new DNP probes were designed for electromagnets operating at a field of 1.4 T. In one probe, DNP can be combined with CPMAS. Compared to a similar probe reported previously, the main advantage of the new probe is the capability to spin vacuum-sealed samples with an improved filling factor. A second probe is based on an oversize microwave cavity. In this probe, large DNP enhancement factors can be obtained in nonlossy samples, e.g., a 1H enhancement factor of 260 for doped polystyrene.

  12. Two-Dimensional NMR Lineshape Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Waudby, Christopher A.; Ramos, Andres; Cabrita, Lisa D.; Christodoulou, John

    2016-01-01

    NMR titration experiments are a rich source of structural, mechanistic, thermodynamic and kinetic information on biomolecular interactions, which can be extracted through the quantitative analysis of resonance lineshapes. However, applications of such analyses are frequently limited by peak overlap inherent to complex biomolecular systems. Moreover, systematic errors may arise due to the analysis of two-dimensional data using theoretical frameworks developed for one-dimensional experiments. Here we introduce a more accurate and convenient method for the analysis of such data, based on the direct quantum mechanical simulation and fitting of entire two-dimensional experiments, which we implement in a new software tool, TITAN (TITration ANalysis). We expect the approach, which we demonstrate for a variety of protein-protein and protein-ligand interactions, to be particularly useful in providing information on multi-step or multi-component interactions. PMID:27109776

  13. Wideband transmitter for pulse NMR spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Ryskin, E.M.; Amiton, I.P.; Batyr, A.Yu.; Lavrushenkov, V.G.

    1986-10-01

    A wideband pulse transmitter for NMR excitation in fields of up to 2.4 T (except for /sup 1/H, /sup 1/F, /sup 203/Tl, and /sup 205/Tl nuclei) is described. The transmitter provides a pulse power of 400-600 W into a 50-Omega load at frequencies of 2-40 MHz. The transmitter is equipped with a pulse programmer, which allows independent setting, in each of 16 program steps, of pulse durations or pauses of from 10/sup -7/ to 10/sup 3/ sec, output powers of from 0 to -63 dB, and a phase of radio-frequency filling of 0 or 180/sup 0/.

  14. NMR Metabolomics Analysis of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Shulei; Powers, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease, which is characterized by progressive death of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta. Although mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress are linked to PD pathogenesis, its etiology and pathology remain to be elucidated. Metabolomics investigates metabolite changes in biofluids, cell lysates, tissues and tumors in order to correlate these metabolomic changes to a disease state. Thus, the application of metabolomics to investigate PD provides a systematic approach to understand the pathology of PD, to identify disease biomarkers, and to complement genomics, transcriptomics and proteomics studies. This review will examine current research into PD mechanisms with a focus on mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress. Neurotoxin-based PD animal models and the rationale for metabolomics studies in PD will also be discussed. The review will also explore the potential of NMR metabolomics to address important issues related to PD treatment and diagnosis. PMID:26078917

  15. NMR and pulsed field gradient NMR approach of water sorption properties in Nafion at low temperature.

    PubMed

    Guillermo, Armel; Gebel, Gérard; Mendil-Jakani, Hakima; Pinton, Eric

    2009-05-14

    The water uptake and the water self-diffusion coefficient were measured in Nafion membranes at subzero temperatures. NMR spectroscopy was used to precisely quantify the actual concentration of water in membranes as a function of the temperature and their hydration rates at room temperature. We find that below 273 K the water concentration decreases with temperature to reach, at around 220 K, a limit value independent of the initial concentration. This regime is observed if the concentration at room temperature is higher than 10%. Below this concentration no membrane deswelling was observed. The water self-diffusion coefficient, measured by pulsed field gradient NMR in function of the temperature, is determined by the actual concentration C(T) whatever the concentration at room temperature. The concentration variation is attributed to a decrease in the relative humidity RH(T) of the water vapor surrounding the membrane induced by the simultaneous presence of supercooled water inside the membrane and ice outside the membrane.

  16. Crystallographic and Dynamic Aspects of Solid‐State NMR Calibration Compounds: Towards ab Initio NMR Crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaozhou; Tapmeyer, Lukas; Bolte, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The excellent results of dispersion‐corrected density functional theory (DFT‐D) calculations for static systems have been well established over the past decade. The introduction of dynamics into DFT‐D calculations is a target, especially for the field of molecular NMR crystallography. Four 13C ss‐NMR calibration compounds are investigated by single‐crystal X‐ray diffraction, molecular dynamics and DFT‐D calculations. The crystal structure of 3‐methylglutaric acid is reported. The rotator phases of adamantane and hexamethylbenzene at room temperature are successfully reproduced in the molecular dynamics simulations. The calculated 13C chemical shifts of these compounds are in excellent agreement with experiment, with a root‐mean‐square deviation of 2.0 ppm. It is confirmed that a combination of classical molecular dynamics and DFT‐D chemical shift calculation improves the accuracy of calculated chemical shifts. PMID:27276509

  17. Enabling Fast Pseudo-2D NMR Spectral Acquisition for Broadband Homonuclear Decoupling: The EXACT NMR Approach.

    PubMed

    Ndukwe, Ikenna E; Shchukina, Alexandra; Zorin, Vadim; Cobas, Carlos; Kazimierczuk, Krzysztof; Butts, Craig P

    2017-08-05

    Pseudo-2D NMR spectroscopy provides a means of acquiring broadband homonuclear decoupled spectra useful for structural characterization of complex molecules. However, data points concatenated in the direct dimension in these experiments are acquired over incremented time periods-leading to long acquisition times with no sensitivity benefits due to the absence of signal averaging between scans. Herein, the concept of EXACT NMR spectroscopy ("burst" non-uniform sampling of data points) is explored in pseudo-2D experiments with results revealing little or no loss in spectral quality or signal intensity despite the acceleration of acquisition-up to 400 % in some cases. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Solid-state NMR structures of integral membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Patching, Simon G

    2015-01-01

    Solid-state NMR is unique for its ability to obtain three-dimensional structures and to measure atomic-resolution structural and dynamic information for membrane proteins in native lipid bilayers. An increasing number and complexity of integral membrane protein structures have been determined by solid-state NMR using two main methods. Oriented sample solid-state NMR uses macroscopically aligned lipid bilayers to obtain orientational restraints that define secondary structure and global fold of embedded peptides and proteins and their orientation and topology in lipid bilayers. Magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR uses unoriented rapidly spinning samples to obtain distance and torsion angle restraints that define tertiary structure and helix packing arrangements. Details of all current protein structures are described, highlighting developments in experimental strategy and other technological advancements. Some structures originate from combining solid- and solution-state NMR information and some have used solid-state NMR to refine X-ray crystal structures. Solid-state NMR has also validated the structures of proteins determined in different membrane mimetics by solution-state NMR and X-ray crystallography and is therefore complementary to other structural biology techniques. By continuing efforts in identifying membrane protein targets and developing expression, isotope labelling and sample preparation strategies, probe technology, NMR experiments, calculation and modelling methods and combination with other techniques, it should be feasible to determine the structures of many more membrane proteins of biological and biomedical importance using solid-state NMR. This will provide three-dimensional structures and atomic-resolution structural information for characterising ligand and drug interactions, dynamics and molecular mechanisms of membrane proteins under physiological lipid bilayer conditions.

  19. The NMR Chemical Shift: - and Intermolecular Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Dios, Angel Cagandahan

    1992-01-01

    Gas phase NMR measurements were performed to provide a more accurate description of the shielding. These experiments were aimed to provide the finer details of shielding: its dependence on the geometry of the molecule and intermolecular factors. Together with these experiments were ab initio calculations of the shielding designed to deepen our understanding of how the shielding is affected by the internal motions of the molecule as well as interactions among the molecules. The exceptional cases of ^{15 }N in NH_3 and ^{31}P in PH_3 were rigorously studied. The deuterium-induced isotope shifts were found to be dominated by contributions arising from bond extension. The temperature dependence is found to be a combination of contributions coming from centrifugal stretching and bond angle distortion. These cases were compared with ^{13}C in CH_4 and ^{17 }O in H_2O revealing some general characteristics of shielding surfaces. As a model for the intermolecular shift for rare gas atoms, the argon dimer was used. Through a scaling scheme, measured second virial coefficients of the shielding of ^{129}Xe in various collision partners were satisfactorily reproduced from the ab initio shielding function of the argon dimer. The intermolecular shielding function also helped in interpreting gas-to-solution shifts of rare gases and the ^ {129}Xe NMR results from adsorption studies. Lastly, an attempt was made to develop a theory that would explain both intramolecular and intermolecular effects on the chemical shifts. It was discovered that a general shape for the shielding function was possible.

  20. Continuous-wave NMR imaging of solids.

    PubMed

    Lurie, D J; McCallum, S J; Hutchison, J M; Alecci, M

    1996-03-01

    Current pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance methods of imaging samples such as solids with short spin-spin relaxation times are restricted to use with T2 values longer than approximately 10 microseconds. In the present study a method of imaging ultra-short T2 samples using continuous- wave, swept-field NMR is presented that, in principle, will be able to overcome this restriction. The technique is identical to that used in continuous-wave electron paramagnetic resonance imaging of paramagnetic species and involves irradiating the sample continuously with a radiofrequency excitation in the presence of a strong stationary magnetic field gradient. When the main magnetic field is swept over a suitable range, the variation of the NMR absorption signal with applied magnetic field yields a one-dimensional projection of the object under study along the gradient direction. Two- or three-dimensional image data sets may be reconstructed from projections that are obtained by applying the gradient in different directions. Signal-to-noise ratio can be improved by modulating the magnetic field and employing a lock-in amplifier to recover signal variations at the audio modulation frequency. Preliminary experiments were performed using a 7 Tesla magnet and a 300 MHz continuous-wave radiofrequency bridge with lock-in detection. The apparatus is described and the results of pilot experiments that employed vulcanized rubber samples are presented. The ability of the technique to detect short T2 samples was demonstrated by the presence of a background signal from the Perspex former of the birdcage resonator used for signal reception.

  1. Introducing the gNMR Program in an Introductory NMR Spectrometry Course to Parallel Its Use by Spectroscopists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rummey, Jackie M.; Boyce, Mary C.

    2004-01-01

    An approach that is useful to any introductory nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy course is developed. This approach to teaching NMR spectrometry includes spectral simulation along with the traditional elements of hands-on instrument use and structure elucidation to demonstrate the connection between simulating a spectrum and structure…

  2. Introducing the gNMR Program in an Introductory NMR Spectrometry Course to Parallel Its Use by Spectroscopists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rummey, Jackie M.; Boyce, Mary C.

    2004-01-01

    An approach that is useful to any introductory nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy course is developed. This approach to teaching NMR spectrometry includes spectral simulation along with the traditional elements of hands-on instrument use and structure elucidation to demonstrate the connection between simulating a spectrum and structure…

  3. ImatraNMR: Novel software for batch integration and analysis of quantitative NMR spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mäkelä, A. V.; Heikkilä, O.; Kilpeläinen, I.; Heikkinen, S.

    2011-08-01

    Quantitative NMR spectroscopy is a useful and important tool for analysis of various mixtures. Recently, in addition of traditional quantitative 1D 1H and 13C NMR methods, a variety of pulse sequences aimed for quantitative or semiquantitative analysis have been developed. To obtain actual usable results from quantitative spectra, they must be processed and analyzed with suitable software. Currently, there are many processing packages available from spectrometer manufacturers and third party developers, and most of them are capable of analyzing and integration of quantitative spectra. However, they are mainly aimed for processing single or few spectra, and are slow and difficult to use when large numbers of spectra and signals are being analyzed, even when using pre-saved integration areas or custom scripting features. In this article, we present a novel software, ImatraNMR, designed for batch analysis of quantitative spectra. In addition to capability of analyzing large number of spectra, it provides results in text and CSV formats, allowing further data-analysis using spreadsheet programs or general analysis programs, such as Matlab. The software is written with Java, and thus it should run in any platform capable of providing Java Runtime Environment version 1.6 or newer, however, currently it has only been tested with Windows and Linux (Ubuntu 10.04). The software is free for non-commercial use, and is provided with source code upon request.

  4. Improved nuclear magnetic resonance apparatus having semitoroidal rf coil for use in topical NMR and NMR imaging

    DOEpatents

    Fukushima, E.; Roeder, S.B.W.; Assink, R.A.; Gibson, A.A.V.

    1984-01-01

    An improved nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) apparatus for use in topical magnetic resonance (TMR) spectroscopy and other remote sensing NMR applications includes a semitoroidal radio frequency (rf) coil. The semitoroidal rf coil produces an effective alternating magnetic field at a distance from the poles of the coil, so as to enable NMR measurements to be taken from selected regions inside an object, particularly including human and other living subjects. The semitoroidal rf coil is relatively insensitive to magnetic interference from metallic objects located behind the coil, thereby rendering the coil particularly suited for use in both conventional and superconducting NMR magnets. The semitoroidal NMR coil can be constructed so that it emits little or no excess rf electric field associated with the rf magnetic field, thus avoiding adverse effects due to dielectric heating of the sample or to any other interaction of the electric field with the sample.

  5. Internet Technology in Magnetic Resonance: A Common Gateway Interface Program for the World-Wide Web NMR Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buszko, Marian L.; Buszko, Dominik; Wang, Daniel C.

    1998-04-01

    A custom-written Common Gateway Interface (CGI) program for remote control of an NMR spectrometer using a World Wide Web browser has been described. The program, running on a UNIX workstation, uses multiple processes to handle concurrent tasks of interacting with the user and with the spectrometer. The program's parent process communicates with the browser and sends out commands to the spectrometer; the child process is mainly responsible for data acquisition. Communication between the processes is via the shared memory mechanism. The WWW pages that have been developed for the system make use of the frames feature of web browsers. The CGI program provides an intuitive user interface to the NMR spectrometer, making, in effect, a complex system an easy-to-use Web appliance.

  6. Can NMR solve some significant challenges in metabolomics?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagana Gowda, G. A.; Raftery, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    The field of metabolomics continues to witness rapid growth driven by fundamental studies, methods development, and applications in a number of disciplines that include biomedical science, plant and nutrition sciences, drug development, energy and environmental sciences, toxicology, etc. NMR spectroscopy is one of the two most widely used analytical platforms in the metabolomics field, along with mass spectrometry (MS). NMR's excellent reproducibility and quantitative accuracy, its ability to identify structures of unknown metabolites, its capacity to generate metabolite profiles using intact bio-specimens with no need for separation, and its capabilities for tracing metabolic pathways using isotope labeled substrates offer unique strengths for metabolomics applications. However, NMR's limited sensitivity and resolution continue to pose a major challenge and have restricted both the number and the quantitative accuracy of metabolites analyzed by NMR. Further, the analysis of highly complex biological samples has increased the demand for new methods with improved detection, better unknown identification, and more accurate quantitation of larger numbers of metabolites. Recent efforts have contributed significant improvements in these areas, and have thereby enhanced the pool of routinely quantifiable metabolites. Additionally, efforts focused on combining NMR and MS promise opportunities to exploit the combined strength of the two analytical platforms for direct comparison of the metabolite data, unknown identification and reliable biomarker discovery that continue to challenge the metabolomics field. This article presents our perspectives on the emerging trends in NMR-based metabolomics and NMR's continuing role in the field with an emphasis on recent and ongoing research from our laboratory.

  7. Can NMR solve some significant challenges in metabolomics?

    PubMed Central

    Gowda, G.A. Nagana; Raftery, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The field of metabolomics continues to witness rapid growth driven by fundamental studies, methods development, and applications in a number of disciplines that include biomedical science, plant and nutrition sciences, drug development, energy and environmental sciences, toxicology, etc. NMR spectroscopy is one of the two most widely used analytical platforms in the metabolomics field, along with mass spectrometry (MS). NMR's excellent reproducibility and quantitative accuracy, its ability to identify structures of unknown metabolites, its capacity to generate metabolite profiles using intact biospecimens with no need for separation, and its capabilities for tracing metabolic pathways using isotope labeled substrates offer unique strengths for metabolomics applications. However, NMR's limited sensitivity and resolution continue to pose a major challenge and have restricted both the number and the quantitative accuracy of metabolites analyzed by NMR. Further, the analysis of highly complex biological samples has increased the demand for new methods with improved detection, better unknown identification, and more accurate quantitation of larger numbers of metabolites. Recent efforts have contributed significant improvements in these areas, and have thereby enhanced the pool of routinely quantifiable metabolites. Additionally, efforts focused on combining NMR and MS promise opportunities to exploit the combined strength of the two analytical platforms for direct comparison of the metabolite data, unknown identification and reliable biomarker discovery that continue to challenge the metabolomics field. This article presents our perspectives on the emerging trends in NMR-based metabolomics and NMR's continuing role in the field with an emphasis on recent and ongoing research from our laboratory. PMID:26476597

  8. NMR data visualization, processing, and analysis on mobile devices.

    PubMed

    Cobas, Carlos; Iglesias, Isaac; Seoane, Felipe

    2015-08-01

    Touch-screen computers are emerging as a popular platform for many applications, including those in chemistry and analytical sciences. In this work, we present our implementation of a new NMR 'app' designed for hand-held and portable touch-controlled devices, such as smartphones and tablets. It features a flexible architecture formed by a powerful NMR processing and analysis kernel and an intuitive user interface that makes full use of the smart devices haptic capabilities. Routine 1D and 2D NMR spectra acquired in most NMR instruments can be processed in a fully unattended way. More advanced experiments such as non-uniform sampled NMR spectra are also supported through a very efficient parallelized Modified Iterative Soft Thresholding algorithm. Specific technical development features as well as the overall feasibility of using NMR software apps will also be discussed. All aspects considered the functionalities of the app allowing it to work as a stand-alone tool or as a 'companion' to more advanced desktop applications such as Mnova NMR. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Perspectives on paramagnetic NMR from a life sciences infrastructure.

    PubMed

    Ravera, Enrico; Parigi, Giacomo; Luchinat, Claudio

    2017-09-01

    The effects arising in NMR spectroscopy because of the presence of unpaired electrons, collectively referred to as "paramagnetic NMR" have attracted increasing attention over the last decades. From the standpoint of the structural and mechanistic biology, paramagnetic NMR provides long range restraints that can be used to assess the accuracy of crystal structures in solution and to improve them by simultaneous refinements through NMR and X-ray data. These restraints also provide information on structure rearrangements and conformational variability in biomolecular systems. Theoretical improvements in quantum chemistry calculations can nowadays allow for accurate calculations of the paramagnetic data from a molecular structural model, thus providing a tool to refine the metal coordination environment by matching the paramagnetic effects observed far away from the metal. Furthermore, the availability of an improved technology (higher fields and faster magic angle spinning) has promoted paramagnetic NMR applications in the fast-growing area of biomolecular solid-state NMR. Major improvements in dynamic nuclear polarization have been recently achieved, especially through the exploitation of the Overhauser effect occurring through the contact-driven relaxation mechanism: the very large enhancement of the (13)C signal observed in a variety of liquid organic compounds at high fields is expected to open up new perspectives for applications of solution NMR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Molecular dynamics simulations on PGLa using NMR orientational constraints.

    PubMed

    Sternberg, Ulrich; Witter, Raiker

    2015-11-01

    NMR data obtained by solid state NMR from anisotropic samples are used as orientational constraints in molecular dynamics simulations for determining the structure and dynamics of the PGLa peptide within a membrane environment. For the simulation the recently developed molecular dynamics with orientational constraints technique (MDOC) is used. This method introduces orientation dependent pseudo-forces into the COSMOS-NMR force field. Acting during a molecular dynamics simulation these forces drive molecular rotations, re-orientations and folding in such a way that the motional time-averages of the tensorial NMR properties are consistent with the experimentally measured NMR parameters. This MDOC strategy does not depend on the initial choice of atomic coordinates, and is in principle suitable for any flexible and mobile kind of molecule; and it is of course possible to account for flexible parts of peptides or their side-chains. MDOC has been applied to the antimicrobial peptide PGLa and a related dimer model. With these simulations it was possible to reproduce most NMR parameters within the experimental error bounds. The alignment, conformation and order parameters of the membrane-bound molecule and its dimer were directly derived with MDOC from the NMR data. Furthermore, this new approach yielded for the first time the distribution of segmental orientations with respect to the membrane and the order parameter tensors of the dimer systems. It was demonstrated the deuterium splittings measured at the peptide to lipid ratio of 1/50 are consistent with a membrane spanning orientation of the peptide.

  11. Benchmarking NMR experiments: A relational database of protein pulse sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senthamarai, Russell R. P.; Kuprov, Ilya; Pervushin, Konstantin

    2010-03-01

    Systematic benchmarking of multi-dimensional protein NMR experiments is a critical prerequisite for optimal allocation of NMR resources for structural analysis of challenging proteins, e.g. large proteins with limited solubility or proteins prone to aggregation. We propose a set of benchmarking parameters for essential protein NMR experiments organized into a lightweight (single XML file) relational database (RDB), which includes all the necessary auxiliaries (waveforms, decoupling sequences, calibration tables, setup algorithms and an RDB management system). The database is interfaced to the Spinach library ( http://spindynamics.org), which enables accurate simulation and benchmarking of NMR experiments on large spin systems. A key feature is the ability to use a single user-specified spin system to simulate the majority of deposited solution state NMR experiments, thus providing the (hitherto unavailable) unified framework for pulse sequence evaluation. This development enables predicting relative sensitivity of deposited implementations of NMR experiments, thus providing a basis for comparison, optimization and, eventually, automation of NMR analysis. The benchmarking is demonstrated with two proteins, of 170 amino acids I domain of αXβ2 Integrin and 440 amino acids NS3 helicase.

  12. Understanding NMR relaxometry of partially water-saturated rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohnke, O.; Nordlund, C.; Jorand, R.; Klitzsch, N.

    2014-11-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) relaxometry measurements are commonly used to characterize the storage and transport properties of water-saturated rocks. These assessments are based on the proportionality of NMR signal amplitude and relaxation time to porosity (water content) and pore size, respectively. The relationship between pore size and NMR relaxation time depends on pore shape, which is usually assumed to be spherical or cylindrical. However, the NMR response at partial water saturation for natural sediments and rocks differs strongly from the response calculated for spherical or cylindrical pores, because these pore shapes cannot account for water menisci remaining in the corners of de-saturated angular pores. Therefore, we consider a bundle of pores with triangular cross-sections. We introduce analytical solutions of the NMR equations at partial saturation of these pores, which account for water menisci of de-saturated pores. After developing equations that describe the water distribution inside the pores, we calculate the NMR response at partial saturation for imbibition and drainage based on the deduced water distributions. For this pore model, NMR amplitude and NMR relaxation time at partial water saturation strongly depend on pore shape even so the NMR relaxation time at full saturation only depends on the surface to volume ratio of the pore. The pore-shape-dependence at partial saturation arises from the pore shape and capillary pressure dependent water distribution in pores with triangular cross-sections. Moreover, we show the qualitative agreement of the saturation dependent relaxation time distributions of our model with those observed for rocks and soils.

  13. Quantitative structure parameters from the NMR spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei

    DOE PAGES

    Perras, Frederic A.

    2015-12-15

    Here, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is one of the most important characterization tools in chemistry, however, 3/4 of the NMR active nuclei are underutilized due to their quadrupolar nature. This short review centers on the development of methods that use solid-state NMR of quadrupolar nuclei for obtaining quantitative structural information. Namely, techniques using dipolar recoupling as well as the resolution afforded by double-rotation are presented for the measurement of spin–spin coupling between quadrupoles, enabling the measurement of internuclear distances and connectivities.

  14. Xenon for NMR biosensing--inert but alert.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Leif

    2013-01-01

    NMR studies with hyperpolarized xenon as functionalized sensor or contrast agent recently made notable progress in developing a new approach for detecting molecular markers and parameters of biomedical interest. Combining spin polarization enhancement with novel indirect detection schemes easily enables a 10⁷-fold signal gain, thus having promising potential to solve the NMR sensitivity problem in many applications. Though an inert element, ¹²⁹Xe has exquisite NMR properties to sense molecular environments. This review summarizes recent developments in the production of hyperpolarized xenon and the design and detection schemes of xenon biosensors.

  15. Characterization of a chiral nematic mesoporous organosilica using NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, Alan; Shopsowitz, Kevin; Giese, Michael; MacLachlan, Mark; Dong, Ronald; Michal, Carl

    2012-10-01

    Using templation with nanocrystalline cellulose, a mesoporous organosilica film with a chiral nematic pore structure has recently been developed. [1] We have used a variety of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) techniques to characterize the pore structure. The pore size distribution has been found by analyzing the freezing point depression of absorbed water via NMR cryoporometry. The effective longitudinal and transverse pore diameters for diffusing water were investigated with Pulsed-Field Gradient (PFG) NMR and compared to a 1-D connected-pore model. Preliminary data on testing imposed chiral ordering in absorbed liquid crystals is also presented. [4pt] [1] K.E. Shopsowitz et al. JACS 134(2), 867 (2012)

  16. A Force-Detection NMR Sensor in CMOS-MEMS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    Lauterbur. “Design and Analysis of Microcoils for NMR Microscopy.” Journal of Magnetic Resonance B, Vol. 108, pp. 114-124. 1995. 59 [29] Protasis...A Force-Detection NMR Sensor in CMOS-MEMS by Kevin M. Frederick Bachelor of Science, 2001 Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh...REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2003 to 00-00-2003 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE A Force-Detection NMR Sensor in CMOS-MEMS 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b

  17. Parallel receivers and sparse sampling in multidimensional NMR.

    PubMed

    Kupče, Ēriks; Freeman, Ray

    2011-12-01

    The recent introduction of NMR spectrometers with multiple receivers permits spectra from several different nuclear species to be recorded in parallel, and several standard pulse sequences to be combined into a single entity. It is shown how these improvements in the flow and quality of spectral information can be significantly augmented by compressive sensing techniques--controlled aliasing, Hadamard spectroscopy, single-point evaluation of evolution space (SPEED), random sampling, projection-reconstruction, and hyperdimensional NMR. Future developments of these techniques are confidently expected to mitigate one of the most serious limitations in multidimensional NMR--the excessive duration of the measurements. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Quantitative structure parameters from the NMR spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Perras, Frederic A.

    2015-12-15

    Here, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is one of the most important characterization tools in chemistry, however, 3/4 of the NMR active nuclei are underutilized due to their quadrupolar nature. This short review centers on the development of methods that use solid-state NMR of quadrupolar nuclei for obtaining quantitative structural information. Namely, techniques using dipolar recoupling as well as the resolution afforded by double-rotation are presented for the measurement of spin–spin coupling between quadrupoles, enabling the measurement of internuclear distances and connectivities.

  19. Nanoscale NMR and NQR with Nitrogen Vacancy Centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbach, Elana; Lovchinsky, Igor; Sanchez-Yamagishi, Javier; Choi, Soonwon; Bylinskii, Alexei; Dwyer, Bo; Andersen, Trond; Sushkov, Alex; Park, Hongkun; Lukin, Mikhail

    2016-05-01

    Nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) is a powerful tool which is used to detect quadrupolar interaction in nuclear spins with I > 1/2. Conventional NQR and NMR technology, however, rely on measuring magnetic fields from a macroscopic number of spins. Extending NMR and NQR techniques to the nanoscale could allow us to learn structural information about interesting materials and biomolecules. We present recent progress on using Nitrogen-Vacancy (NV) centers in diamond to perform room temperature nanoscale NMR and NQR spectroscopy on small numbers of nuclear spins in hexagonal boron nitride.

  20. Non-aqueous solvents for DNP surface enhanced NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zagdoun, Alexandre; Rossini, Aaron J; Gajan, David; Bourdolle, Adrien; Ouari, Olivier; Rosay, Melanie; Maas, Werner E; Tordo, Paul; Lelli, Moreno; Emsley, Lyndon; Lesage, Anne; Copéret, Christophe

    2012-01-18

    A series of non-aqueous solvents combined with the exogenous biradical bTbK are developed for DNP NMR that yield enhancements comparable to the best available water based systems. 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane appears to be one of the most promising organic solvents for DNP solid-state NMR. Here this results in a reduction in experimental times by a factor of 1000. These new solvents are demonstrated with the first DNP surface enhanced NMR characterization of an organometallic complex supported on a hydrophobic surface.

  1. Capillary toroid cavity detector for high pressure NMR

    DOEpatents

    Gerald, II, Rex E.; Chen, Michael J.; Klingler, Robert J.; Rathke, Jerome W.; ter Horst, Marc

    2007-09-11

    A Toroid Cavity Detector (TCD) is provided for implementing nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of chemical reactions under conditions of high pressures and temperatures. A toroid cavity contains an elongated central conductor extending within the toroid cavity. The toroid cavity and central conductor generate an RF magnetic field for NMR analysis. A flow-through capillary sample container is located within the toroid cavity adjacent to the central conductor to subject a sample material flowing through the capillary to a static magnetic field and to enable NMR spectra to be recorded of the material in the capillary under a temperature and high pressure environment.

  2. NMR studies on polyphosphide Ce6Ni6P17

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, T.; Yamada, H.; Ueda, K.; Mito, T.; Aoyama, Y.; Nakano, T.; Takeda, N.

    2016-02-01

    We report the result of 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies on Ce6Ni6P17. The observed NMR spectra show a Lorentzian-type and an asymmetric shapes, reflecting the local symmetry around each P site in the cubic unit cell. We have identified the observed NMR lines corresponding to three inequivalent P sites and deduced the temperature dependence of the Knight shift for each site. The Knight shifts increase with decreasing temperature down to 1.5 K, indicating a localized spin system of Ce6Ni6P17. Antiferromagnetic correlation between 4f spins is suggested from the negative sign of the Weiss-temperature.

  3. NMR imaging of components and materials for DOE application

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, B.R.

    1993-12-01

    The suitability for using NMR imaging to characterize liquid, polymeric, and solid materials was reviewed. The most attractive applications for NMR imaging appear to be liquid-filled porous samples, partially cured polymers, adhesives, and potting compounds, and composite polymers/high explosives containing components with widely varying thermal properties. Solid-state NMR line-narrowing and signal-enhancing markedly improve the imaging possibilities of true solid and materials. These techniques provide unique elemental and chemical shift information for highly complex materials and complement images with similar spatial resolution, such as X-ray computed tomography (CT).

  4. Structural biology applications of solid state MAS DNP NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbey, Ümit; Oschkinat, Hartmut

    2016-08-01

    Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) has long been an aim for increasing sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, delivering spectra in shorter experiment times or of smaller sample amounts. In recent years, it has been applied in magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR to a large range of samples, including biological macromolecules and functional materials. New research directions in structural biology can be envisaged by DNP, facilitating investigations on very large complexes or very heterogeneous samples. Here we present a summary of state of the art DNP MAS NMR spectroscopy and its applications to structural biology, discussing the technical challenges and factors affecting DNP performance.

  5. Metabolite analysis of Cannabis sativa L. by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Flores-Sanchez, Isvett Josefina; Choi, Young Hae; Verpoorte, Robert

    2012-01-01

    NMR-based metabolomics is an analytical platform, which has been used to classify and analyze Cannabis sativa L. cell suspension cultures and plants. Diverse groups of primary and secondary metabolites were identified by comparing NMR data with reference compounds and/or by structure elucidation using ¹H-NMR, J-resolved, ¹H-¹H COSY, and ¹H-¹³C HMBC spectroscopy. The direct extraction and the extraction by indirect fractionation are two suitable methods for the C. sativa sample preparation. Quantitative analyses could be performed without requiring fractionation or isolation procedures.

  6. NMR contributions to structural dynamics studies of intrinsically disordered proteins☆

    PubMed Central

    Konrat, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are characterized by substantial conformational plasticity. Given their inherent structural flexibility X-ray crystallography is not applicable to study these proteins. In contrast, NMR spectroscopy offers unique opportunities for structural and dynamic studies of IDPs. The past two decades have witnessed significant development of NMR spectroscopy that couples advances in spin physics and chemistry with a broad range of applications. This article will summarize key advances in basic physical-chemistry and NMR methodology, outline their limitations and envision future R&D directions. PMID:24656082

  7. NMR studies of metallic tin confined within porous matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Charnaya, E. V.; Tien, Cheng; Lee, M. K.; Kumzerov, Yu. A.

    2007-04-01

    {sup 119}Sn NMR studies were carried out for metallic tin confined within synthetic opal and porous glass. Tin was embedded into nanoporous matrices in the melted state under pressure. The Knight shift for liquid confined tin was found to decrease with decreasing pore size. Correlations between NMR line shapes, Knight shift, and pore filling were observed. The melting and freezing phase transitions of tin under confinement were studied through temperature dependences of NMR signals upon warming and cooling. Melting of tin within the opal matrix agreed well with the liquid skin model suggested for small isolated particles. The influence of the pore filling on the melting process was shown.

  8. Solid-State NMR Studies of Amyloid Fibril Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tycko, Robert

    2011-05-01

    Current interest in amyloid fibrils stems from their involvement in neurodegenerative and other diseases and from their role as an alternative structural state for many peptides and proteins. Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods have the unique capability of providing detailed structural constraints for amyloid fibrils, sufficient for the development of full molecular models. In this article, recent progress in the application of solid-state NMR to fibrils associated with Alzheimer's disease, prion fibrils, and related systems is reviewed, along with relevant developments in solid-state NMR techniques and technology.

  9. A simple low-cost single-crystal NMR setup.

    PubMed

    Vinding, Mads S; Kessler, Tommy O; Vosegaard, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    A low-cost single-crystal NMR kit is presented along with a web-based post-processing software. The kit consists of a piezo-crystal motor and a goniometer for the crystal, both embedded in a standard wide-bore NMR probe with a 3D printed scaffold. The NMR pulse program controls the angle setting automatically, and the post-processing software incorporates a range of orientation-angle discrepancies present in the kit and other single-crystal setups. Results with a NaNO3 single-crystal show a high degree of reproducibility and excellent agreement with previous findings for the anisotropic quadrupolar interaction.

  10. A simple low-cost single-crystal NMR setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinding, Mads S.; Kessler, Tommy O.; Vosegaard, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    A low-cost single-crystal NMR kit is presented along with a web-based post-processing software. The kit consists of a piezo-crystal motor and a goniometer for the crystal, both embedded in a standard wide-bore NMR probe with a 3D printed scaffold. The NMR pulse program controls the angle setting automatically, and the post-processing software incorporates a range of orientation-angle discrepancies present in the kit and other single-crystal setups. Results with a NaNO3 single-crystal show a high degree of reproducibility and excellent agreement with previous findings for the anisotropic quadrupolar interaction.

  11. NMR Methods, Applications and Trends for Groundwater Evaluation and Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, D. O.; Grunewald, E. D.

    2011-12-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements have a tremendous potential for improving groundwater characterization, as they provide direct detection and measurement of groundwater and unique information about pore-scale properties. NMR measurements, commonly used in chemistry and medicine, are utilized in geophysical investigations through non-invasive surface NMR (SNMR) or downhole NMR logging measurements. Our recent and ongoing research has focused on improving the performance and interpretation of NMR field measurements for groundwater characterization. Engineering advancements have addressed several key technical challenges associated with SNMR measurements. Susceptibility of SNMR measurements to environmental noise has been dramatically reduced through the development of multi-channel acquisition hardware and noise-cancellation software. Multi-channel instrumentation (up to 12 channels) has also enabled more efficient 2D and 3D imaging. Previous limitations in measuring NMR signals from water in silt, clay and magnetic geology have been addressed by shortening the instrument dead-time from 40 ms to 4 ms, and increasing the power output. Improved pulse sequences have been developed to more accurately estimate NMR relaxation times and their distributions, which are sensitive to pore size distributions. Cumulatively, these advancements have vastly expanded the range of environments in which SNMR measurements can be obtained, enabling detection of groundwater in smaller pores, in magnetic geology, in the unsaturated zone, and nearby to infrastructure (presented here in case studies). NMR logging can provide high-resolution estimates of bound and mobile water content and pore size distributions. While NMR logging has been utilized in oil and gas applications for decades, its use in groundwater investigations has been limited by the large size and high cost of oilfield NMR logging tools and services. Recently, engineering efforts funded by the US Department of

  12. The PAW/GIPAW approach for computing NMR parameters: a new dimension added to NMR study of solids.

    PubMed

    Charpentier, Thibault

    2011-07-01

    In 2001, Mauri and Pickard introduced the gauge including projected augmented wave (GIPAW) method that enabled for the first time the calculation of all-electron NMR parameters in solids, i.e. accounting for periodic boundary conditions. The GIPAW method roots in the plane wave pseudopotential formalism of the density functional theory (DFT), and avoids the use of the cluster approximation. This method has undoubtedly revitalized the interest in quantum chemical calculations in the solid-state NMR community. It has quickly evolved and improved so that the calculation of the key components of NMR interactions, namely the shielding and electric field gradient tensors, has now become a routine for most of the common nuclei studied in NMR. Availability of reliable implementations in several software packages (CASTEP, Quantum Espresso, PARATEC) make its usage more and more increasingly popular, maybe indispensable in near future for all material NMR studies. The majority of nuclei of the periodic table have already been investigated by GIPAW, and because of its high accuracy it is quickly becoming an essential tool for interpreting and understanding experimental NMR spectra, providing reliable assignments of the observed resonances to crystallographic sites or enabling a priori prediction of NMR data. The continuous increase of computing power makes ever larger (and thus more realistic) systems amenable to first-principles analysis. In the near future perspectives, as the incorporation of dynamical effects and/or disorder are still at their early developments, these areas will certainly be the prime target.

  13. Protein-Observed Fluorine NMR Is a Complementary Ligand Discovery Method to (1)H CPMG Ligand-Observed NMR.

    PubMed

    Urick, Andrew K; Calle, Luis Pablo; Espinosa, Juan F; Hu, Haitao; Pomerantz, William C K

    2016-11-18

    To evaluate its potential as a ligand discovery tool, we compare a newly developed 1D protein-observed fluorine NMR (PrOF NMR) screening method with the well-characterized ligand-observed (1)H CPMG NMR screen. We selected the first bromodomain of Brd4 as a model system to benchmark PrOF NMR because of the high ligandability of Brd4 and the need for small molecule inhibitors of related epigenetic regulatory proteins. We compare the two methods' hit sensitivity, triaging ability, experiment speed, material consumption, and the potential for false positives and negatives. To this end, we screened 930 fragment molecules against Brd4 in mixtures of five and followed up these studies with mixture deconvolution and affinity characterization of the top hits. In selected examples, we also compare the environmental responsiveness of the (19)F chemical shift to (1)H in 1D-protein observed (1)H NMR experiments. To address concerns of perturbations from fluorine incorporation, ligand binding trends and affinities were verified via thermal shift assays and isothermal titration calorimetry. We conclude that for the protein understudy here, PrOF NMR and (1)H CPMG have similar sensitivity, with both being effective tools for ligand discovery. In cases where an unlabeled protein can be used, 1D protein-observed (1)H NMR may also be effective; however, the (19)F chemical shift remains significantly more responsive.

  14. Jointly deriving NMR surface relaxivity and pore size distributions by NMR relaxation experiments on partially desaturated rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohnke, O.; Hughes, B.

    2014-06-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry is a geophysical method widely used in borehole and laboratory applications to nondestructively infer transport and storage properties of rocks and soils as it is directly sensitive to the water/oil content and pore sizes. However, for inferring pore sizes, NMR relaxometry data need to be calibrated with respect to a surface interaction parameter, surface relaxivity, which depends on the type and mineral constituents of the investigated rock. This study introduces an inexpensive and quick alternative to the classical calibration methods, e.g., mercury injection, pulsed field gradient (PFG) NMR, or grain size analysis, which allows for jointly estimating NMR surface relaxivity and pore size distributions using NMR relaxometry data from partially desaturated rocks. Hereby, NMR relaxation experiments are performed on the fully saturated sample and on a sample partially drained at a known differential pressure. Based on these data, the (capillary) pore radius distribution and surface relaxivity are derived by joint optimization of the Brownstein-Tarr and the Young-Laplace equation assuming parallel capillaries. Moreover, the resulting pore size distributions can be used to predict water retention curves. This inverse modeling approach—tested and validated using NMR relaxometry data measured on synthetic porous borosilicate samples with known petrophysical properties (i.e., permeability, porosity, inner surfaces, pore size distributions)—yields consistent and reproducible estimates of surface relaxivity and pore radii distributions. Also, subsequently calculated water retention curves generally correlate well with measured water retention curves.

  15. Dilute Bicellar Solutions for Structural NMR Work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Struppe, Jochem; Vold, Regitze R.

    1998-12-01

    Deuterium NMR spectroscopy has been employed to characterize the concentration dependence of orientational order in DMPC/DHPC bicellar solutions with molar ratiosq= [DMPC]/[DHPC] = 3.3, 2.7, and 2.3. The stability of a discotic nematic phase can, in general, be predicted from a simple Onsager picture involving the size and concentration of the mesogenic unit, but for the bicellar solutions this model is not adequate. Specifically, macroscopic alignment is observed at total lipid concentrations well below that, 1-10% (w/w) predicted by Onsager's model. Thus the discotic nematic phase is stable to ≈3-5% (w/w) forq= 3.3-2.3, and the bicellar order is highest just before phase separation occurs at the minimum total phospholipid concentration. This implies the presence of a DHPCbic⇄ DHPCsolequilibrium in establishing bicellar size, thereby extending the range of concentrations for which alignment occurs. Bicellar morphology has been verified for a wide range of concentrations, temperatures, andq-values, but as viscosity measurements demonstrate, major morphological changes take place as the temperature is reduced below 30°C.

  16. Native dynamics from diversity in NMR structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammert, Heiko; Onuchic, Jose

    2015-03-01

    Protein function relies on the characteristic dynamics that arise in the protein's unique native structure, controlled by the smooth, funneled energy landscape evolved to enable fast and reliable folding. Structure-based models draw on energy landscape theory to build an ideally funneled energy landscape only from a protein's native structure. Simplified interactions of homogeneous strength are used to eliminate energetic frustration. The dynamics of the model are controlled by geometric constraints imposed by the native fold. The energy landscapes of many actual proteins are smooth enough to let such unfrustrated models describe their folding mechanisms. But conflicting functional demands upon the sequence may introduce sufficient frustration into the energetics to affect the dynamics. For such cases heterogeneous interactions can be optimized based on additional data. We use the diversity among the conformations deposited in a set of NMR structures to estimate the extent of fluctuations in the native state to build an improved model of protein S6. Qualitative modifications bring the observed mechanism into agreement with experiment, and matching of the entire fluctuation profile leads to similar contact maps as optimization based on either phi-values of sequence data.

  17. A multinuclear static NMR study of geopolymerisation

    SciTech Connect

    Favier, Aurélie; Habert, Guillaume; Roussel, Nicolas; D'Espinose de Lacaillerie, Jean-Baptiste

    2015-09-15

    Geopolymers are inorganic binders obtained by alkali activation of aluminosilicates. While the structure of geopolymers is now well understood, the details of the geopolymerisation reaction and their impact on the rheology of the paste remain uncertain. In this work, we follow the elastic properties of a paste made with metakaolin and sodium silicate solution. After the first sharp increase of elastic modulus occurring a few hundred of seconds after mixing and related to the heterogeneous formation of an alumina–silicate gel with a molar ratio Si/Al < 4 located at the grains boundaries, we focus on the progressive increase in elastic modulus on a period of few hours during the setting of the geopolymer. In this study, we combine the study of rheological properties of the paste with {sup 23}Na, {sup 27}Al and {sup 29}Si static NMR measurement in order to better understand the origin of this second increase in elastic modulus. Our results show that, after a few hours, Al and Na evolution in the liquid phase are concomitant. This suggests the precipitation of an aluminosilicate phase where Al is in tetrahedral position and Na compensates the charge. Furthermore, Si speciation confirms this result and allows us to identify the precipitation of a product, which has a chemical composition close to the final composition of geopolymer. This study provides strong evidence for a heterogeneous formation of an aluminosilicate glass directly from the first gel and the silicate solution without the need for a reorganisation of Gel 1 into Gel 2.

  18. Approaches to localized NMR spectroscopy in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Garwood, M.G.

    1985-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques are developed which allow spatially localized spectra to be obtained from living tissue. The localization methods are noninvasive and exploit the enhanced sensitivity afforded by surface coil probes. Techniques are investigated by computer simulation and experimentally verified by the use of phantom samples. The feasibility and utility of the techniques developed in this research are demonstrated by /sup 31/P spatial localization experiments involving various in vivo organs. In the first part of the thesis, two feasible approaches to localized spectroscopy, which were developed by other laboratories are theoretically analyzed by computer simulation. An alternative approach is provided by the rotating frame zeugmatography experiment which affords chemical-shift spectra displayed as a function of penetration distance into the sample. The further modification of the rotating frame experiment is developed, the Fourier series window (FSW) approach, which utilizes various types of window functions to afford localization in one or a few tissue regions of interest with high sensitivity. Theoretical comparisons with depth pulse methods are also included, along with methods to refine adverse off-resonance behavior.

  19. Fat Emulsification Measured Using NMR Transverse Relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marciani, L.; Ramanathan, C.; Tyler, D. J.; Young, P.; Manoj, P.; Wickham, M.; Fillery-Travis, A.; Spiller, R. C.; Gowland, P. A.

    2001-11-01

    This paper presents a novel method of measuring the droplet size in oil-in-water emulsions. It is based on changes in the NMR transverse relaxation rate due to the effect of microscopic magnetic susceptibility differences between fat droplets and the surrounding water. The longitudinal and transverse relaxation rates of a series of emulsions with constant oil volume fraction and five different mean droplet sizes, in the range 0.4-20.9 μm, were measured in vitro at 37°C using EPI. While the longitudinal relaxation rate 1/T1 did not change significantly, 1/T2 was observed to increase with mean droplet size. The measured changes in 1/T2 were found to be in good agreement with results predicted from proton random walk simulations, and were also consistent with analytical solutions based on an outer sphere relaxation model. Measurements of 1/T2 on emulsions with a higher oil volume fraction, and on emulsions of a fixed size where the water phase was doped with gadolinium to modulate the susceptibility difference between the phases, also showed the predicted behavior. As part of this study the susceptibility difference between olive oil and water was measured to be 1.55 ppm.

  20. New NMR tools for protein structure and function: Spin tags for dynamic nuclear polarization solid state NMR.

    PubMed

    Rogawski, Rivkah; McDermott, Ann E

    2017-08-15

    Magic angle spinning solid state NMR studies of biological macromolecules [1-3] have enabled exciting studies of membrane proteins [4,5], amyloid fibrils [6], viruses, and large macromolecular assemblies [7]. Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) provides a means to enhance detection sensitivity for NMR, particularly for solid state NMR, with many recent biological applications and considerable contemporary efforts towards elaboration and optimization of the DNP experiment. This review explores precedents and innovations in biological DNP experiments, especially highlighting novel chemical biology approaches to introduce the radicals that serve as a source of polarization in DNP experiments. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Improvements in Technique of NMR Imaging and NMR Diffusion Measurements in the Presence of Background Gradients.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Jianyu

    In this work, modification of the cosine current distribution rf coil, PCOS, has been introduced and tested. The coil produces a very homogeneous rf magnetic field, and it is inexpensive to build and easy to tune for multiple resonance frequency. The geometrical parameters of the coil are optimized to produce the most homogeneous rf field over a large volume. To avoid rf field distortion when the coil length is comparable to a quarter wavelength, a parallel PCOS coil is proposed and discussed. For testing rf coils and correcting B _1 in NMR experiments, a simple, rugged and accurate NMR rf field mapping technique has been developed. The method has been tested and used in 1D, 2D, 3D and in vivo rf mapping experiments. The method has been proven to be very useful in the design of rf coils. To preserve the linear relation between rf output applied on an rf coil and modulating input for an rf modulating -amplifying system of NMR imaging spectrometer, a quadrature feedback loop is employed in an rf modulator with two orthogonal rf channels to correct the amplitude and phase non-linearities caused by the rf components in the rf system. The modulator is very linear over a large range and it can generate an arbitrary rf shape. A diffusion imaging sequence has been developed for measuring and imaging diffusion in the presence of background gradients. Cross terms between the diffusion sensitizing gradients and background gradients or imaging gradients can complicate diffusion measurement and make the interpretation of NMR diffusion data ambiguous, but these have been eliminated in this method. Further, the background gradients has been measured and imaged. A dipole random distribution model has been established to study background magnetic fields Delta B and background magnetic gradients G_0 produced by small particles in a sample when it is in a B_0 field. From this model, the minimum distance that a spin can approach a particle can be determined by measuring

  2. Ultra-broadband NMR probe: numerical and experimental study of transmission line NMR probe.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Atsushi; Ichikawa, Shinji

    2003-06-01

    We have reinvestigated a transmission line NMR probe first published by Lowe and co-workers in 1970s [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 45 (1974) 631; 48 (1977) 268] numerically and experimentally. The probe is expected to be ultra-broadband, thus might enable new types of solid-state NMR experiments. The NMR probe consists of a coil and capacitors which are connected to the coil at regular intervals. The circuit is the same as a cascaded LC low-pass filter, except there are nonzero mutual inductances between different coil sections. We evaluated the mutual inductances by Neumann's formula and calculated the electrical characteristics of the probe as a function of a carrier frequency. We found that they were almost the same as those of a cascaded LC low-pass filter, when the inductance L of a section was estimated from the inductance of the whole coil divided by the number of the sections, and if C was set to the capacitance in a section. For example, the characteristic impedance of a transmission line coil is given by Z=(L/C)(1/2). We also calculated the magnitude and the distribution of RF magnetic field inside the probe. The magnitude of RF field decreases when the carrier frequency is increased because the phase delay between neighboring sections is proportional to the carrier frequency. For cylindrical coils, the RF field is proportional to (pinu/2nu(d))(1/2)exp(-nu/nu(d)), where the decay frequency nu(d) is determined by the dimensions of the coil. The observed carrier frequency thus must be much smaller than the decay frequency. This condition restricts the size of transmission line coils. We made a cylindrical coil for a 1H NMR probe operating below 400 MHz. It had a diameter 2.3mm and a pitch 1.2mm. Five capacitors of 6pF were connected at every three turns. The RF field strength was 40 and 60 kHz at the input RF power 100 W by a calculation and by experiments, respectively. The calculations showed that the RF field inhomogeneity along the coil axis was caused by a

  3. NMR methods for beer characterization and quality control.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, J E; Gil, A M

    2011-12-01

    The use of high-resolution NMR spectroscopy in the brewing industry is described; most studies having aimed at assessing the composition of beer and its raw materials and correlating it to a variety of quality parameters. First, the application of NMR to the qualitative characterization of beer is reviewed, addressing both targeted and untargeted methods and focusing on both beer extracts and direct beer analysis. A subsequent chapter addresses the NMR studies, which envisage the development of new rapid methods for beer analysis and quality control, such as site-specific natural fractionation-NMR and multivariate data analysis methods for marker search or rapid compound quantification. Finally, possible future perspectives toward a deeper and more complete understanding of beer and its brewing process are discussed. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Recent NMR developments applied to organic-inorganic materials.

    PubMed

    Bonhomme, Christian; Gervais, Christel; Laurencin, Danielle

    2014-02-01

    In this contribution, the latest developments in solid state NMR are presented in the field of organic-inorganic (O/I) materials (or hybrid materials). Such materials involve mineral and organic (including polymeric and biological) components, and can exhibit complex O/I interfaces. Hybrids are currently a major topic of research in nanoscience, and solid state NMR is obviously a pertinent spectroscopic tool of investigation. Its versatility allows the detailed description of the structure and texture of such complex materials. The article is divided in two main parts: in the first one, recent NMR methodological/instrumental developments are presented in connection with hybrid materials. In the second part, an exhaustive overview of the major classes of O/I materials and their NMR characterization is presented. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. A high-pressure NMR probe for aqueous geochemistry.

    PubMed

    Pautler, Brent G; Colla, Christopher A; Johnson, Rene L; Klavins, Peter; Harley, Stephen J; Ohlin, C André; Sverjensky, Dimitri A; Walton, Jeffrey H; Casey, William H

    2014-09-08

    A non-magnetic piston-cylinder pressure cell is presented for solution-state NMR spectroscopy at geochemical pressures. The probe has been calibrated up to 20 kbar using in situ ruby fluorescence and allows for the measurement of pressure dependencies of a wide variety of NMR-active nuclei with as little as 10 μL of sample in a microcoil. Initial (11)B NMR spectroscopy of the H3BO3-catechol equilibria reveals a large pressure-driven exchange rate and a negative pressure-dependent activation volume, reflecting increased solvation and electrostriction upon boron-catecholate formation. The inexpensive probe design doubles the current pressure range available for solution NMR spectroscopy and is particularly important to advance the field of aqueous geochemistry.

  6. Improved hardware and software for single-crystal NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Vosegaard, T; Hald, E; Langer, V; Skov, H J; Daugaard, P; Bildsoe, H; Jakobsen, H J

    1998-11-01

    Design of state-of-the-art instrumentation and software for acquisition and analysis of single-crystal NMR spectra is presented. The design involves highly accurate rotation of a goniometer, and the acquisition of all the spectra for each rotation axis is automatically controlled by the host computer of the spectrometer using a homebuilt interface between the computer and the single-crystal probe. Moreover, a software package (ASICS) for fast and routine assignment/analysis of complex single-crystal spectra has been developed. Employing this equipment, the acquisition and complete analysis of single-crystal NMR spectra may be performed in about the same time as required for powder methods (spinning or static). The hardware and software are compared to recent alternative approaches within single-crystal NMR. Finally, it has been observed that single-crystal NMR techniques may provide the desired data for samples where powder methods fail. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  7. NMR Spectroscopy for Thin Films by Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Won, Soonho; Saun, Seung-Bo; Lee, Soonchil; Lee, SangGap; Kim, Kiwoong; Han, Yunseok

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a fundamental research tool that is widely used in many fields. Despite its powerful applications, unfortunately the low sensitivity of conventional NMR makes it difficult to study thin film or nano-sized samples. In this work, we report the first NMR spectrum obtained from general thin films by using magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM). To minimize the amount of imaging information inevitably mixed into the signal when a gradient field is used, we adopted a large magnet with a flat end with a diameter of 336 μm that generates a homogeneous field on the sample plane and a field gradient in a direction perpendicular to the plane. Cyclic adiabatic inversion was used in conjunction with periodic phase inversion of the frequency shift to maximize the SNR. In this way, we obtained the 19F NMR spectrum for a 34 nm-thick CaF2 thin film. PMID:24217000

  8. A Short Set of Carbon 13-NMR Correlation Tables.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, D. W.

    1985-01-01

    Presents a short set of carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) tables. These tables not only serve pedagogic purposes but also allow students to do calculations rapidly and with acceptable accuracy for a wide variety of compounds. (JN)

  9. A Demonstration of Imaging on an NMR Spectrometer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hull, L. A.

    1990-01-01

    Described is a simple demonstration that relates the techniques of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) used in medicine and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Included are materials, procedures, and probable results. (KR)

  10. Proton NMR Spectra: Deceptively Simple and Deceptively Complex Examples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurst, J. E.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Describes relatively simple nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments that demonstrate unexpected results of the deceptively simple and deceptively complex types. Background information, experimental procedures, and typical results obtained are included. (JN)

  11. Study of correlations in molecular motion by multiple quantum NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, J. H.

    1981-11-01

    The theoretical background of spin Hamiltonians, the density matrix formalism of multiple quantum NMR are discussed as well as creation and detection of multiple quantum coherence by multiple pulse sequence. Prototype multiple quantum spectra of oriented benzene are presented. Redfield relaxation theory and the application of multiple quantum NMR to the study of correlations in fluctuations are considered. An oriented methyl group relaxed by paramagnetic impurities is examined and possible correlated motion between two coupled methyl groups is investigated by multiple quantum NMR. For a six spin system it is shown that the four quantum spectrum is sensitive to two body correlations, and serves a ready test of correlated motion. The spin lattice dynamics of orienting or tunneling methyl groups (CH3 and CD3) at low temperatures and the anisotropic spin lattice relaxation of deuterated hexamethylbenzene, caused by the sixfold reorientation of the molecules are described as well as NMR spectrometers.

  12. Mixing and Matching Detergents for Membrane Protein NMR Structure Determination

    SciTech Connect

    Columbus, Linda; Lipfert, Jan; Jambunathan, Kalyani; Fox, Daniel A.; Sim, Adelene Y.L.; Doniach, Sebastian; Lesley, Scott A.

    2009-10-21

    One major obstacle to membrane protein structure determination is the selection of a detergent micelle that mimics the native lipid bilayer. Currently, detergents are selected by exhaustive screening because the effects of protein-detergent interactions on protein structure are poorly understood. In this study, the structure and dynamics of an integral membrane protein in different detergents is investigated by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The results suggest that matching of the micelle dimensions to the protein's hydrophobic surface avoids exchange processes that reduce the completeness of the NMR observations. Based on these dimensions, several mixed micelles were designed that improved the completeness of NMR observations. These findings provide a basis for the rational design of mixed micelles that may advance membrane protein structure determination by NMR.

  13. A covariance NMR toolbox for MATLAB and OCTAVE.

    PubMed

    Short, Timothy; Alzapiedi, Leigh; Brüschweiler, Rafael; Snyder, David

    2011-03-01

    The Covariance NMR Toolbox is a new software suite that provides a streamlined implementation of covariance-based analysis of multi-dimensional NMR data. The Covariance NMR Toolbox uses the MATLAB or, alternatively, the freely available GNU OCTAVE computer language, providing a user-friendly environment in which to apply and explore covariance techniques. Covariance methods implemented in the toolbox described here include direct and indirect covariance processing, 4D covariance, generalized indirect covariance (GIC), and Z-matrix transform. In order to provide compatibility with a wide variety of spectrometer and spectral analysis platforms, the Covariance NMR Toolbox uses the NMRPipe format for both input and output files. Additionally, datasets small enough to fit in memory are stored as arrays that can be displayed and further manipulated in a versatile manner within MATLAB or OCTAVE.

  14. A Demonstration of Imaging on an NMR Spectrometer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hull, L. A.

    1990-01-01

    Described is a simple demonstration that relates the techniques of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) used in medicine and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Included are materials, procedures, and probable results. (KR)

  15. A Short Set of Carbon 13-NMR Correlation Tables.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, D. W.

    1985-01-01

    Presents a short set of carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) tables. These tables not only serve pedagogic purposes but also allow students to do calculations rapidly and with acceptable accuracy for a wide variety of compounds. (JN)

  16. Proton NMR Spectra: Deceptively Simple and Deceptively Complex Examples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurst, J. E.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Describes relatively simple nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments that demonstrate unexpected results of the deceptively simple and deceptively complex types. Background information, experimental procedures, and typical results obtained are included. (JN)

  17. Study of molecular interactions with 13C DNP-NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerche, Mathilde H.; Meier, Sebastian; Jensen, Pernille R.; Baumann, Herbert; Petersen, Bent O.; Karlsson, Magnus; Duus, Jens Ø.; Ardenkjær-Larsen, Jan H.

    2010-03-01

    NMR spectroscopy is an established, versatile technique for the detection of molecular interactions, even when these interactions are weak. Signal enhancement by several orders of magnitude through dynamic nuclear polarization alleviates several practical limitations of NMR-based interaction studies. This enhanced non-equilibrium polarization contributes sensitivity for the detection of molecular interactions in a single NMR transient. We show that direct 13C NMR ligand binding studies at natural isotopic abundance of 13C gets feasible in this way. Resultant screens are easy to interpret and can be performed at 13C concentrations below μM. In addition to such ligand-detected studies of molecular interaction, ligand binding can be assessed and quantified with enzymatic assays that employ hyperpolarized substrates at varying enzyme inhibitor concentrations. The physical labeling of nuclear spins by hyperpolarization thus provides the opportunity to devise fast novel in vitro experiments with low material requirement and without the need for synthetic modifications of target or ligands.

  18. Metabolic pathway visualization in living yeast by DNP-NMR.

    PubMed

    Meier, Sebastian; Karlsson, Magnus; Jensen, Pernille R; Lerche, Mathilde H; Duus, Jens Ø

    2011-10-01

    Central carbon metabolism of living Saccharomyces cerevisiae is visualized by DNP-NMR. Experiments are conducted as real time assays that detect metabolic bottlenecks, pathway use, reversibility of reactions and reaction mechanisms in vivo with subsecond time resolution.

  19. International NMR-based Environmental Metabolomics Intercomparison Exercise

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several fundamental requirements must be met so that NMR-based metabolomics and the related technique of metabonomics can be formally adopted into environmental monitoring and chemical risk assessment. Here we report an intercomparison exercise which has evaluated the effectivene...

  20. Teaching 1H NMR Spectrometry Using Computer Modeling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Habata, Yoichi; Akabori, Sadatoshi

    2001-01-01

    Molecular modeling by computer is used to display stereochemistry, molecular orbitals, structure of transition states, and progress of reactions. Describes new ideas for teaching 1H NMR spectroscopy using computer modeling. (Contains 12 references.) (ASK)

  1. Method of three-dimensional NMR imaging using selective excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Edelstein, W.A.; Bottomley, P.A.

    1984-02-14

    Selective excitation is used to define a thick planar slab of excited nuclear spins in a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging sample. The thick slab is selected such that the excited spins are contained well within the optimum sensitive region defined by the radio frequency (RF) transmitter and receiver coils. Three-dimensional spatial information of an NMR imaging parameter, such as nuclear spin density or nuclear spin relaxation time, is collected simultaneously from the excited slab and can be used to construct a series of several tomographic section images of the slab. The spatial information is encoded in the NMR signal by application of pulsed gradient magnetic fields subsequent to excitation. Image picture information is obtained from the NMR signals via three-dimensional Fourier transformation.

  2. Error analysis for NMR polymer microstructure measurement without calibration standards.

    PubMed

    Qiu, XiaoHua; Zhou, Zhe; Gobbi, Gian; Redwine, Oscar D

    2009-10-15

    We report an error analysis method for primary analytical methods in the absence of calibration standards. Quantitative (13)C NMR analysis of ethylene/1-octene (E/O) copolymers is given as an example. Because the method is based on a self-calibration scheme established by counting, it is a measure of accuracy rather than precision. We demonstrate it is self-consistent and neither underestimate nor excessively overestimate the experimental errors. We also show the method identified previously unknown systematic biases in a NMR instrument. The method can eliminate unnecessary data averaging to save valuable NMR resources. The accuracy estimate proposed is not unique to (13)C NMR spectroscopy of E/O but should be applicable to all other measurement systems where the accuracy of a subset of the measured responses can be established.

  3. Solid state NMR of porous materials : zeolites and related materials.

    PubMed

    Koller, Hubert; Weiss, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Solid state NMR spectroscopy applied to the science of crystalline micro- and mesoporous silica materials over the past 10 years is reviewed. A survey is provided of framework structure and connectivity analyses from chemical shift effects of various elements in zeolites including heteroatom substitutions, framework defects and pentacoordinated silicon for zeolites containing fluoride ions. New developments in the field of NMR crystallography are included. Spatial host-guest ordering and confinement effects of zeolite-sorbate complexes are outlined, with special emphasis on NMR applications utilizing the heteronuclear dipolar interaction. The characterization of zeolite acid sites and in situ NMR on catalytic conversions is also included. Finally, the motion of extra-framework cations is investigated in two tutorial cases of sodium hopping in sodalite and cancrinite.

  4. International NMR-based Environmental Metabolomics Intercomparison Exercise

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several fundamental requirements must be met so that NMR-based metabolomics and the related technique of metabonomics can be formally adopted into environmental monitoring and chemical risk assessment. Here we report an intercomparison exercise which has evaluated the effectivene...

  5. Applications of high resolution /sup 3/H NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, P.G.

    1987-10-01

    The advantages of tritium as an NMR nucleus are pointed out. Examples of its use are given, including labelled toluene, hydrogenation of ..beta..-methylstyrene, and maltose and its binding proteins. 7 refs., 2 figs. (DLC)

  6. Interfaces in polymer nanocomposites – An NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Böhme, Ute; Scheler, Ulrich

    2016-03-09

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is applied for the investigation of polymer nanocomposites. Solid-state NMR is applied to study the modification steps to compatibilize layered double hydroxides with non-polar polymers. {sup 1}H relaxation NMR gives insight on the polymer dynamics over a wide range of correlation times. For the polymer chain dynamics the transverse relaxation time T{sub 2} is most suited. In this presentation we report on two applications of T{sub 2} measurements under external mechanical stress. In a low-field system relaxation NMR studies are performed in-situ under uniaxial stress. High-temperature experiments in a Couette cell permit the investigation of the polymer dynamics in the melt under shear flow.

  7. Analyzing protein-ligand interactions by dynamic NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mittermaier, Anthony; Meneses, Erick

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy can provide detailed information on protein-ligand interactions that is inaccessible using other biophysical techniques. This chapter focuses on NMR-based approaches for extracting affinity and rate constants for weakly binding transient protein complexes with lifetimes of less than about a second. Several pulse sequences and analytical techniques are discussed, including line-shape simulations, spin-echo relaxation dispersion methods (CPMG), and magnetization exchange (EXSY) experiments.

  8. Diamond Deposition and Defect Chemistry Studied via Solid State NMR

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-30

    same integrated NMR signal, regardless of its chemical environment, provided complete spin-lattice relaxation occurs between averages 3 . Gem -quality...occurs between averages, and broadening from years, a large research effort has been devoted to the study paramagnetic centers is insignificant. Gem ...information on the distribution and motion mond’s durability very attractive. However, while gem - of hydrogen can be obtained from the solid-state NMR

  9. Development and application of proton NMR methodology to lipoprotein analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korhonen, Ari Juhani

    1998-11-01

    The present thesis describes the development of 1H NMR spectroscopy and its applications to lipoprotein analysis in vitro, utilizing biochemical prior knowledge and advanced lineshape fitting analysis in the frequency domain. A method for absolute quantification of lipoprotein lipids and proteins directly from the terminal methyl-CH3 resonance region of 1H NMR spectra of human blood plasma is described. Then the use of NMR methodology in time course studies of the oxidation process of LDL particles is presented. The function of the cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) in lipoprotein mixtures was also assessed by 1H NMR, which allows for dynamic follow-up of the lipid transfer reactions between VLDL, LDL, and HDL particles. The results corroborated the suggestion that neutral lipid mass transfer among lipoproteins is not an equimolar heteroexchange. A novel method for studying lipoprotein particle fusion is also demonstrated. It is shown that the progression of proteolytically (α- chymotrypsin) induced fusion of LDL particles can be followed by 1H NMR spectroscopy and, moreover, that fusion can be distinguished from aggregation. In addition, NMR methodology was used to study the changes in HDL3 particles induced by phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) in HDL3 + PLTP mixtures. The 1H NMR study revealed a gradual production of enlarged HDL particles, which demonstrated that PLTP-mediated remodeling of HDL involves fusion of the HDL particles. These applications demonstrated that the 1H NMR approach offers several advantages both in quantification and in time course studies of lipoprotein-lipoprotein interactions and of enzyme/lipid transfer protein function.

  10. Deuterium incorporation in biomass cell wall components by NMR analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Foston, Marcus B; McGaughey, Joseph; O'Neill, Hugh Michael; Evans, Barbara R; Ragauskas, Arthur J

    2012-01-01

    A commercially available deuterated kale sample was analyzed for deuterium incorporation by ionic liquid solution 2H and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). This protocol was found to effectively measure the percent deuterium incorporation at 33%, comparable to the 31% value determined by combustion. The solution NMR technique also suggested by a qualitative analysis that deuterium is preferentially incorporated into the carbohydrate components of the kale sample.

  11. Flow units from integrated WFT and NMR data

    SciTech Connect

    Kasap, E.; Altunbay, M.; Georgi, D.

    1997-08-01

    Reliable and continuous permeability profiles are vital as both hard and soft data required for delineating reservoir architecture. They can improve the vertical resolution of seismic data, well-to-well stratigraphic correlations, and kriging between the well locations. In conditional simulations, permeability profiles are imposed as the conditioning data. Variograms, covariance functions and other geostatistical indicators are more reliable when based on good quality permeability data. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) logging and Wireline Formation Tests (WFT) separately generate a wealth of information, and their synthesis extends the value of this information further by providing continuous and accurate permeability profiles without increasing the cost. NMR and WFT data present a unique combination because WFTs provide discrete, in situ permeability based on fluid-flow, whilst NMR responds to the fluids in the pore space and yields effective porosity, pore-size distribution, bound and moveable fluid saturations, and permeability. The NMR permeability is derived from the T{sub 2}-distribution data. Several equations have been proposed to transform T{sub 2} data to permeability. Regardless of the transform model used, the NMR-derived permeabilities depend on interpretation parameters that may be rock specific. The objective of this study is to integrate WFT permeabilities with NMR-derived, T{sub 2} distribution-based permeabilities and thereby arrive at core quality, continuously measured permeability profiles. We outlined the procedures to integrate NMR and WFT data and applied the procedure to a field case. Finally, this study advocates the use of hydraulic unit concepts to extend the WFT-NMR derived, core quality permeabilities to uncored intervals or uncored wells.

  12. Cryptophane-Folate Biosensor for 129Xe NMR

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    Cryptophane-Folate Biosensor for 129Xe NMR Najat S. Khan, Brittany A. Riggle, Garry K. Seward, Yubin Bai, and Ivan J. Dmochowski* Department of...cryptophane biosensor was synthesized in 20 nonlinear steps, which included functionalization with folate recognition moiety, solubilizing peptide, and...Cy3 fluorophore. Hyperpolarized 129Xe NMR studies confirmed xenon binding to the folate-conjugated cryptophane. Cellular internalization of biosensor

  13. Fluid-Rock Characterization and Interactions in NMR Well Logging

    SciTech Connect

    Hirasaki, George J.; Mohanty, Kishore K.

    2003-02-10

    The objective of this project was to characterize the fluid properties and fluid-rock interactions which are needed for formation evaluation by NMR well logging. NMR well logging is finding wide use in formation evaluation. The formation parameters commonly estimated were porosity, permeability, and capillary bound water. Special cases include estimation of oil viscosity, residual oil saturation, location of oil/water contact, and interpretation on whether the hydrocarbon is oil or gas.

  14. Quantitative NMR Analysis of Partially Substituted Biodiesel Glycerols

    SciTech Connect

    Nagy, M.; Alleman, T. L.; Dyer, T.; Ragauskas, A. J.

    2009-01-01

    Phosphitylation of hydroxyl groups in biodiesel samples with 2-chloro-4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-1,3,2-dioxaphospholane followed by 31P-NMR analysis provides a rapid quantitative analytical technique for the determination of substitution patterns on partially esterified glycerols. The unique 31P-NMR chemical shift data was established with a series mono and di-substituted fatty acid esters of glycerol and then utilized to characterize an industrial sample of partially processed biodiesel.

  15. 15N NMR of 1,4-dihydropyridine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Goba, Inguna; Liepinsh, Edvards

    2013-07-01

    In this article, we describe the characteristic (15)N and (1)HN NMR chemical shifts and (1)J((15)N-(1)H) coupling constants of various symmetrically and unsymmetrically substituted 1,4-dihydropyridine derivatives. The NMR chemical shifts and coupling constants are discussed in terms of their relationship to structural features such as character and position of the substituent in heterocycle, N-alkyl substitution, nitrogen lone pair delocalization within the conjugated system, and steric effects.

  16. NMR analysis on microfluidic devices by remote detection.

    PubMed

    McDonnell, Erin E; Han, SongI; Hilty, Christian; Pierce, Kimberly L; Pines, Alexander

    2005-12-15

    We present a novel approach to perform high-sensitivity NMR imaging and spectroscopic analysis on microfluidic devices. The application of NMR, the most information-rich spectroscopic technique, to microfluidic devices remains a challenge because the inherently low sensitivity of NMR is aggravated by small fluid volumes leading to low NMR signal and geometric constraints resulting in poor efficiency for inductive detection. We address the latter by physically separating signal detection from encoding of information with remote detection. Thereby, we use a commercial imaging probe with sufficiently large diameter to encompass the entire device, enabling encoding of NMR information at any location on the chip. Because large-diameter coils are too insensitive for detection, we store the encoded information as longitudinal magnetization and flow it into the outlet capillary. There, we detect the signal with optimal sensitivity, using a solenoidal microcoil, and reconstruct the information encoded in the fluid. We present a generally applicable design for a detection-only microcoil probe that can be inserted into the bore of a commercial imaging probe. Using hyperpolarized 129Xe gas, we show that this probe enables sensitive reconstruction of NMR spectroscopic information encoded by the large imaging probe while keeping the flexibility of a large coil.

  17. The development of solid-state NMR of membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Opella, Stanley J

    Most biological functions are carried out in supramolecular assemblies. As a result of their slow reorientation in solution, these assemblies have been resistant to the widely employed solution NMR approaches. The development of solid-state NMR to first of all overcome the correlation time problem and then obtain informative high-resolution spectra of proteins in supramolecular assemblies, such as virus particles and membranes, is described here. High resolution solid-state NMR is deeply intertwined with the history of NMR, and the seminal paper was published in 1948. Although the general principles were understood by the end of the 1950s, it has taken more than fifty years for instrumentation and experimental methods to become equal to the technical problems presented by the biological assemblies of greatest interest. It is now possible to obtain atomic resolution structures of viral coat proteins in virus particles and membrane proteins in phospholipid bilayers by oriented sample solid-state NMR methods. The development of this aspect of the field of solid-state NMR is summarized in this review article.

  18. The development of solid-state NMR of membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Opella, Stanley J.

    2014-01-01

    Most biological functions are carried out in supramolecular assemblies. As a result of their slow reorientation in solution, these assemblies have been resistant to the widely employed solution NMR approaches. The development of solid-state NMR to first of all overcome the correlation time problem and then obtain informative high-resolution spectra of proteins in supramolecular assemblies, such as virus particles and membranes, is described here. High resolution solid-state NMR is deeply intertwined with the history of NMR, and the seminal paper was published in 1948. Although the general principles were understood by the end of the 1950s, it has taken more than fifty years for instrumentation and experimental methods to become equal to the technical problems presented by the biological assemblies of greatest interest. It is now possible to obtain atomic resolution structures of viral coat proteins in virus particles and membrane proteins in phospholipid bilayers by oriented sample solid-state NMR methods. The development of this aspect of the field of solid-state NMR is summarized in this review article. PMID:26069880

  19. High-Resolution NMR Studies of Human Tissue Factor

    PubMed Central

    Nuzzio, Kristin M.; Watt, Eric D.; Boettcher, John M.; Gajsiewicz, Joshua M.; Morrissey, James H.; Rienstra, Chad M.

    2016-01-01

    In normal hemostasis, the blood clotting cascade is initiated when factor VIIa (fVIIa, other clotting factors are named similarly) binds to the integral membrane protein, human tissue factor (TF). The TF/fVIIa complex in turn activates fX and fIX, eventually concluding with clot formation. Several X-ray crystal structures of the soluble extracellular domain of TF (sTF) exist; however, these structures are missing electron density in functionally relevant regions of the protein. In this context, NMR can provide complementary structural information as well as dynamic insights into enzyme activity. The resolution and sensitivity for NMR studies are greatly enhanced by the ability to prepare multiple milligrams of protein with various isotopic labeling patterns. Here, we demonstrate high-yield production of several isotopically labeled forms of recombinant sTF, allowing for high-resolution NMR studies both in the solid and solution state. We also report solution NMR spectra at sub-mM concentrations of sTF, ensuring the presence of dispersed monomer, as well as the first solid-state NMR spectra of sTF. Our improved sample preparation and precipitation conditions have enabled the acquisition of multidimensional NMR data sets for TF chemical shift assignment and provide a benchmark for TF structure elucidation. PMID:27657719

  20. (S)Pinning down protein interactions by NMR

    PubMed Central

    Kunze, Micha Ben Achim; Erlendsson, Simon

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Protein molecules are highly diverse communication platforms and their interaction repertoire stretches from atoms over small molecules such as sugars and lipids to macromolecules. An important route to understanding molecular communication is to quantitatively describe their interactions. These types of analyses determine the amounts and proportions of individual constituents that participate in a reaction as well as their rates of reactions and their thermodynamics. Although many different methods are available, there is currently no single method able to quantitatively capture and describe all types of protein reactions, which can span orders of magnitudes in affinities, reaction rates, and lifetimes of states. As the more versatile technique, solution NMR spectroscopy offers a remarkable catalogue of methods that can be successfully applied to the quantitative as well as qualitative descriptions of protein interactions. In this review we provide an easy‐access approach to NMR for the non‐NMR specialist and describe how and when solution state NMR spectroscopy is the method of choice for addressing protein ligand interaction. We describe very briefly the theoretical background and illustrate simple protein–ligand interactions as well as typical strategies for measuring binding constants using NMR spectroscopy. Finally, this review provides examples of caveats of the method as well as the options to improve the outcome of an NMR analysis of a protein interaction reaction. PMID:28019676