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Sample records for ptz seizure threshold

  1. The modulatory effect of nitric oxide in pro- and anti-convulsive effects of vasopressin in PTZ-induced seizures threshold in mice.

    PubMed

    Javadian, Nina; Rahimi, Nastaran; Javadi-Paydar, Mehrak; Doustimotlagh, Amir Hossein; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza

    2016-10-01

    Vasopressin neuropeptides play an important role in the several cognitive, social, and neuroendocrine functions. Also, several studies report the involvement of nitrergic system in the vasopressin functions in central nervous system. This study investigates the effect of Arginine-Vasopressin (AVP) in pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)-induced seizures threshold and the probable role of nitric oxide (NO). AVP is administered intraperitoneally (0.01-20μg/kg, i.p.) 30min before induction of seizures. Administration of AVP (0.1μg/kg) significantly lowered the PTZ-induced seizures threshold. But, administration of AVP (10 and 20μg/kg) increased the seizures threshold, significantly. Pretreatment of SR 49059 (V1a receptor antagonist, 2mg/kg, i.p.) just reversed the pro-convulsant effect of AVP. Meanwhile, SSR 149415 (V1b receptor antagonist, 10mg/kg, i.p.) pretreatment reversed both pro-and anti-convulsant effects of AVP. The nitric oxide precursor, L-arginine (60mg/kg, i.p.) increased pro-convulsant effect of AVP, but did not change anticonvulsant activity. The nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor L-NAME (10mg/kg, i.p.) reversed both pro- and anti-convulsant effect of AVP. Selective inducible NOS inhibitor, aminoguanidine (100mg/kg, i.p.) just reversed the anti-convulsant effects of AVP. The results of the present study showed nitric oxide system may contribute to the biphasic effects of AVP on PTZ-induced seizures. V1a receptor may modulate only the proconvulsive effect. While, V1b receptors can mediate both the pro- and anti-convulsive effect of AVP. PMID:27497813

  2. PTZ-induced seizures in rats: effects of age and strain.

    PubMed

    Klioueva, I A; van Luijtelaar, E L; Chepurnova, N E; Chepurnov, S A

    2001-02-01

    The susceptibility to pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)-induced seizures during postnatal ontogeny [postnatal day (PN) 10-220] was investigated in two rat strains. The WAG/Rij strain, genetically prone for developing generalized absence epilepsy, and Wistar rats were tested and compared at PN 10, 26, 30, 70, 90, 125, and 220 on the PTZ-convulsive threshold. A subconvulsive dose of 25-mg/kg PTZ was administered every 15 min, and the occurrence of clonic and tonic-clonic seizures was scored. The 10-day-old pups were quite sensitive to PTZ and showed mainly clonic seizures. The highest threshold and latency of PTZ-induced clonic and tonic-clonic convulsions were observed at PN 26 in both strains. From that age onwards, the seizure threshold significantly decreased and reached a minimum at PN 220. Between strain comparisons showed that WAG/Rij rats have a lower tonic-clonic seizure threshold than Wistar rats. The data indicate that changes in susceptibility first quickly decreases until PN 26-30 and then tend to monotonically increase with age, and that genetically prone nonconvulsive WAG/Rij rats are more vulnerable to convulsive seizures induced by PTZ than Wistar rats. PMID:11274687

  3. Rapamycin suppresses PTZ-induced seizures at different developmental stages of zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Siebel, Anna Maria; Menezes, Fabiano Peres; da Costa Schaefer, Isabel; Petersen, Bárbara Dutra; Bonan, Carla Denise

    2015-12-01

    The mTORC1 complex integrates different inputs from intracellular and extracellular signals to control various cellular processes. Therefore, any disruption in the mTORC1 pathway could promote different neurological disorders. mTORC1 overactivation has been verified in different genetic and acquired epilepsy animal models. Therefore, inhibitors of this complex could have both antiepileptogenic and antiseizure effects. In our study, we investigated the effects of rapamycin pretreatment on pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizures in zebrafish. Our results have shown that the latency to reach the tonic-clonic stage (stage III) of progressive behavioral alterations shown during PTZ-induced seizures was prolonged in larval (7days post fertilization, 7dpf), juvenile (45days post fertilization, 45dpf) and adult (6-8months) zebrafish after pretreatment with rapamycin. Furthermore, rapamycin pretreatment did not alter the locomotor activity in zebrafish. Therefore, the results obtained in our study indicate that rapamycin pretreatment is an important mechanism to control the progress of seizures in zebrafish throughout different developmental stages (larval, juvenile, and adult). Taken as a whole, our data support that rapamycin has immediate antiseizure effects and could be a potential alternative therapy for seizure control in epilepsy.

  4. Evaluation of the pentylenetetrazole seizure threshold test in epileptic mice as surrogate model for drug testing against pharmacoresistant seizures.

    PubMed

    Töllner, Kathrin; Twele, Friederike; Löscher, Wolfgang

    2016-04-01

    Resistance to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) is a major problem in epilepsy therapy, so that development of more effective AEDs is an unmet clinical need. Several rat and mouse models of epilepsy with spontaneous difficult-to-treat seizures exist, but because testing of antiseizure drug efficacy is extremely laborious in such models, they are only rarely used in the development of novel AEDs. Recently, the use of acute seizure tests in epileptic rats or mice has been proposed as a novel strategy for evaluating novel AEDs for increased antiseizure efficacy. In the present study, we compared the effects of five AEDs (valproate, phenobarbital, diazepam, lamotrigine, levetiracetam) on the pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) seizure threshold in mice that were made epileptic by pilocarpine. Experiments were started 6 weeks after a pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus. At this time, control seizure threshold was significantly lower in epileptic than in nonepileptic animals. Unexpectedly, only one AED (valproate) was less effective to increase seizure threshold in epileptic vs. nonepileptic mice, and this difference was restricted to doses of 200 and 300 mg/kg, whereas the difference disappeared at 400mg/kg. All other AEDs exerted similar seizure threshold increases in epileptic and nonepileptic mice. Thus, induction of acute seizures with PTZ in mice pretreated with pilocarpine does not provide an effective and valuable surrogate method to screen drugs for antiseizure efficacy in a model of difficult-to-treat chronic epilepsy as previously suggested from experiments with this approach in rats. PMID:26930359

  5. Citrus aurantium increases seizure latency to PTZ induced seizures in zebrafish thru NMDA and mGluR's I and II

    PubMed Central

    Rosa-Falero, Coral; Torres-Rodríguez, Stephanie; Jordán, Claudia; Licier, Rígel; Santiago, Yolimar; Toledo, Zuleyma; Santiago, Marely; Serrano, Kiara; Sosa, Jeffrey; Ortiz, José G.

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy is a serious neurological condition and pharmacotherapy is not effective for all patients and causes serious adverse effects and pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions. Natural products and ethnobotanical resources can help develop new therapeutic options for conditions like epilepsy. In Puerto Rico, ethnobotanical resources highlight the anxiolytic properties of a tea like preparation made from the leaves of the Citrus aurantium tree or bitter orange. Studies performed with essential oils from the peel of the fruit have shown to increase seizure latency to pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) and maximal electroshock seizure in mice. We characterized the extract composition, and used a model of PTZ induces seizures in the zebrafish and a receptor-ligand binding assay to determine if this preparation has anticonvulsant properties and its mechanism of action. We determined that the aqueous extract made from the leaves of the C. aurantium tree contains hesperidin, neohesperidin, and neohesperidin dihydrochalcone. Using our zebrafish model, we determined that exposure to the C. aurantium 28 mg/mL extract in aquarium water increases seizure latency by 119% compared to controls. We ruled out a mechanism involving GABAA receptors using the selective antagonist gabazine. We used two approaches to study the role of glutamate in the mechanism of the C. aurantium extract. The ligand binding assay revealed C. aurantium extracts at concentrations of 0.42 to 5.6 mg/mL significantly reduced [3H]Glu binding indicating an interaction with glutamate receptors, in particular with NMDA receptors and mGluR II. This interaction was confirmed with our animal model using selective receptor antagonists and we identified an interaction with mGluR I, not observed in the ligand binding experiment. These study provide evidence of the anticonvulsant properties of the aqueous extract made from the leaves of the C. aurantium tree and a mechanism involving NMDA and mGluR's I and II. PMID

  6. Neuroprotective Effect of Lycopene Against PTZ-induced Kindling Seizures in Mice: Possible Behavioural, Biochemical and Mitochondrial Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Manveen; Kumar, Anil

    2016-02-01

    Oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction are the major contributing factors in the pathophysiology of various neurological disorders. Recently, antioxidant therapies aimed at reducing oxidative stress gained a considerable attention in epilepsy treatment. Lycopene, a carotenoid antioxidant, has received scientific interest in recent years. So, the present study has been designed to evaluate the neuroprotective effect of lycopene against the pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)-induced kindling epilepsy. Laca mice received lycopene (2.5, 5 and 10 mg/kg) and sodium valproate for a period of 29 days and PTZ (40 mg/kg i.p (Intraperitoneal)) injection on alternative days. Various behavioural (kindling score), biochemical parameters (lipid peroxidation, superoxide dismutase, reduced glutathione, catalase and nitrite) and mitochondrial enzyme complex activities (I, II and IV) were assessed in the brain. Results depicted that repeated administration of a sub-convulsive dose of PTZ (40 mg/kg) significantly increased kindling score, oxidative damage and impaired mitochondrial enzyme complex activities (I, II and IV) as compared with naive animals. Lycopene (5 and 10 mg/kg) and sodium valproate (100 mg/kg) treatment for a duration of 29 days significantly attenuated kindling score, reversed oxidative damage and restored mitochondrial enzyme complex activities (I, II and IV) as compared with control. Thus, present study demonstrates the neuroprotective potential of lycopene in PTZ-induced kindling in mice.

  7. Antiapoptotic and neuroprotective role of Curcumin in Pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) induced kindling model in rat.

    PubMed

    Saha, Lekha; Chakrabarti, Amitava; Kumari, Sweta; Bhatia, Alka; Banerjee, Dibyojyoti

    2016-02-01

    Kindling, a sub threshold chemical or electrical stimulation, increases seizure duration and enhances accompanied behavior until it reaches a sort of equilibrium state. The present study aimed to explore the effect of curcumin on the development of kindling in PTZ kindled rats and its role in apoptosis and neuronal damage. In a PTZ kindled Wistar rat model, different doses of curcumin (100, 200 and 300 mg/kg) were administrated orally one hour before the PTZ injections on alternate day during the whole kindling days. The following parameters were compared between control and experimental groups: the course of kindling, stages of seizures, Histopathological scoring of hippocampus, antioxidant parameters in the hippocampus, DNA fragmentation and caspase-3 expression in hippocampus, and neuron-specific enolase in the blood. One way ANOVA followed by Bonferroni post hoc analysis and Fischer's Exact test were used for statistical analyses. PTZ, 30 mg/kg, induced kindling in rats after 32.0 ± 1.4 days. Curcumin showed dose-dependent anti-seizure effect. Curcumin (300 mg/kg) significantly increased the latency to myoclonic jerks, clonic seizures as well as generalized tonic-clonic seizures, improved the seizure score and decreased the number of myoclonic jerks. PTZ kindling induced a significant neuronal injury, oxidative stress and apoptosis which were reversed by pretreatment with curcumin in a dose-dependent manner. Our study suggests that curcumin has a potential antiepileptogenic effect on kindling-induced epileptogenesis.

  8. The role of potassium BK channels in anticonvulsant effect of cannabidiol in pentylenetetrazole and maximal electroshock models of seizure in mice.

    PubMed

    Shirazi-zand, Zahra; Ahmad-Molaei, Leila; Motamedi, Fereshteh; Naderi, Nima

    2013-07-01

    Cannabidiol is a nonpsychoactive member of phytocannabinoids that produces various pharmacological effects that are not mediated through putative CB1/CB2 cannabinoid receptors and their related effectors. In this study, we examined the effect of the i.c.v. administration of potassium BK channel blocker paxilline alone and in combination with cannabidiol in protection against pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)- and maximal electroshock (MES)-induced seizure in mice. In the PTZ-induced seizure model, i.c.v. administration of cannabidiol caused a significant increase in seizure threshold compared with the control group. Moreover, while i.c.v. administration of various doses of paxilline did not produce significant change in the PTZ-induced seizure threshold in mice, coadministration of cannabidiol and paxilline attenuated the antiseizure effect of cannabidiol in PTZ-induced tonic seizures. In the MES model of seizure, both cannabidiol and paxilline per se produced significant increase in percent protection against electroshock-induced seizure. However, coadministration of cannabidiol and paxilline did not produce significant interaction in their antiseizure effect in the MES test. The results of the present study showed a protective effect of cannabidiol in both PTZ and MES models of seizure. These results suggested a BK channel-mediated antiseizure action of cannabidiol in PTZ model of seizure. However, such an interaction might not exist in MES-induced convulsion.

  9. Effect of mobile phone radiation on pentylenetetrazole-induced seizure threshold in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kouchaki, Ebrahim; Motaghedifard, Morteza; Banafshe, Hamid Reza

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Scientific interest in potential mobile phone impact on human brain and performance has significantly increased in recent years. The present study was designed to evaluate the effects of mobile phone radiation on seizure threshold in mice. Materials and methods: BALB/c male mice were randomly divided into three groups: control, acute, and chronic mobile phone radiation for 30, 60, and 90 min with frequency 900 to 950 MHz and pulse of 217 Hz. The chronic group received 30 days of radiation, while the acute group received only once. The intravenous infusion of pentylenetetrazole (5 mg/ml) was used to induce seizure signs. Results: Although acute mobile radiation did not change seizure threshold, chronic radiation decreased the clonic and tonic seizure thresholds significantly. Conclusion: Our data suggests that the continued and prolonged contact with the mobile phone radiation might increase the risk of seizure attacks and should be limited. PMID:27635206

  10. Effect of mobile phone radiation on pentylenetetrazole-induced seizure threshold in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kouchaki, Ebrahim; Motaghedifard, Morteza; Banafshe, Hamid Reza

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Scientific interest in potential mobile phone impact on human brain and performance has significantly increased in recent years. The present study was designed to evaluate the effects of mobile phone radiation on seizure threshold in mice. Materials and methods: BALB/c male mice were randomly divided into three groups: control, acute, and chronic mobile phone radiation for 30, 60, and 90 min with frequency 900 to 950 MHz and pulse of 217 Hz. The chronic group received 30 days of radiation, while the acute group received only once. The intravenous infusion of pentylenetetrazole (5 mg/ml) was used to induce seizure signs. Results: Although acute mobile radiation did not change seizure threshold, chronic radiation decreased the clonic and tonic seizure thresholds significantly. Conclusion: Our data suggests that the continued and prolonged contact with the mobile phone radiation might increase the risk of seizure attacks and should be limited.

  11. [Effect of citicoline on the development of chronic epileptization of the brain (pentylenetetrazole kindling) and acute seizures reaction of kindled mice C57Bl/6].

    PubMed

    Kuznetzova, L V; Karpova, M N; Zinkovsky, K A; Klishina, N V

    2014-01-01

    In experiments on mice C57Bl/6 was studied effects of citicoline (500 mg/kg, i.p.) on development of chronically epileptization of the brain--pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) kindling (30 mg/kg PTZ, i.p. during 24 days) and on acute generalized seizures (i.v., 1% solution of PTZ with the speed of 0.01 ml/s). It was shown that daily injection of citicoline an hour before the introduction of PTZ had no effect on development of chronically epileptization of the brain --PTZ-kindling (the latency of seizures appearance and their severity). However, citicoIine posses anticonvulsive effects on acute seizures in kindled mice. In animals with increased seizure susceptibility of the brain caused by kindling and severity of seizures 2-3 points injection citicoline after 14 days of kindling had anticonvulsive effect, increasing the threshold clonic seizures. Injection of citicoline during 24 days of kindled animals and severity of seizures 3-5 points caused the increase of thresholds as clonic and tonic phase of seizures with lethal outcome. Thus, the anticonvulsant effect of citicoline more pronounced in the long-term use.

  12. Determining minimally important change thresholds for the Seizure Severity Questionnaire (SSQ).

    PubMed

    Cramer, Joyce A; de la Loge, Christine; Brabant, Yves; Borghs, Simon

    2014-02-01

    The Seizure Severity Questionnaire (SSQ) was developed to evaluate changes in seizure severity and bothersomeness. Determination of a threshold value reflecting meaningful patient benefit on the SSQ would improve clinical interpretation of scale results. The objective of this analysis was to define a minimally important change (MIC) threshold for the SSQ, using data from patients with treatment-resistant partial-onset seizures from two clinical trials (N=776). Minimally important change thresholds were calculated using standard anchor-based methods, with the Patient Global Impression of Change (PGIC) score as the anchor with the categories of 'much improved,' 'minimally improved,' 'much worsened,' and 'minimally worsened' combined. The calculated MIC thresholds (range: 0.34 to 0.50) suggest that a 0.48-point change in the SSQ total score reflects a clinically meaningful change in seizure severity from the patients' perspective.

  13. Pharmacological and genetic manipulation of kappa opioid receptors: effects on cocaine- and pentylenetetrazol-induced convulsions and seizure kindling.

    PubMed

    Kaminski, Rafal M; Witkin, Jeffrey M; Shippenberg, Toni S

    2007-03-01

    The present study used pharmacological and gene ablation techniques to examine the involvement of kappa opioid receptors (KOPr) in modulating the convulsant effects of two mechanistically different drugs: cocaine and pentylenetetrazol (PTZ; GABA-A receptor antagonist) in mice. Systemic administration of the selective KOPr-1 agonist, U69593 (0.16-0.6mg/kg; s.c.), failed to modify cocaine-evoked convulsions or cocaine kindling. Similarly, no alteration in responsiveness to cocaine was observed in wild-type mice that received the selective KOPr-1 antagonist, nor-binaltorphimine (nor-BNI; 5mg/kg) or in mice lacking the gene encoding KOPr-1. In contrast to cocaine, U69593 attenuated the seizures induced by acute or repeated PTZ administration. Nor-BNI decreased the threshold for PTZ-evoked seizures and increased seizure incidence during the initial induction of kindling relative to controls. Decreased thresholds for PTZ-induced seizures were also observed in KOPr-1 knock out mice. Together, these data demonstrate an involvement of endogenous KOPr systems in modulating vulnerability to the convulsant effects of PTZ but not cocaine. Furthermore, they demonstrate that KOPr-1 activation protects against acute and kindled seizures induced by this convulsant. Finally, the results of our study suggest that KOPr-1 antagonists will not have therapeutic utility against cocaine-induced seizures, while they may prove beneficial in attenuating several actions of cocaine that have been linked to its abuse.

  14. Seizures

    MedlinePlus

    ... two or more seizures may be diagnosed with epilepsy , also known as seizure disorder. Seizure Basics Under ... over and over might indicate the ongoing condition epilepsy . Febrile seizures can happen in children younger than ...

  15. Seizures

    MedlinePlus

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy First Aid: Seizures KidsHealth > For Parents > First Aid: Seizures Print A A A Text Size en ... Seizures Febrile Seizures Brain and Nervous System Epilepsy First Aid: Febrile Seizures Word! Seizure Epilepsy Epilepsy Contact Us ...

  16. Pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) kindling model of epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Dhir, Ashish

    2012-01-01

    This unit describes a protocol to perform chemical kindling in mice. Kindling is a chronic animal model of epilepsy that has been extensively studied to understand the process of epileptogenesis and discover novel anti-epileptic compounds. Kindling is a phenomenon where a sub-convulsive stimulus (either chemical or electrical), if applied repetitively and intermittently, will ultimately lead to the generation of full-blown convulsions. Kindling can be induced either by (1) electrical stimulation of different brain regions (electrical kindling) or (2) using various chemical agents (chemical kindling). This unit discusses in detail the methodology to execute pentylenetetrazol (PTZ; a GABA(A) receptor antagonist)-induced chemical kindling in mice. PTZ is administered chronically at a sub-convulsive dose for a number of days. Seizure score is calculated after each PTZ injection. The effect of test/reference compounds can be tested by administering them either prior to the initiation of kindling (pre-kindling phase) or after animals are fully kindled (post-kindling phase).

  17. Systemic availability of guanidinoacetate affects GABAA receptor function and seizure threshold in GAMT deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Schulze, A; Tran, C; Levandovskiy, V; Patel, V; Cortez, M A

    2016-08-01

    Deficiency of guanidinoacetate methyltransferase (GAMT) causes creatine depletion and guanidinoacetate accumulation in brain with the latter deemed to be responsible for the severe seizure disorder seen in affected patients. We studied electrical brain activity and GABAA mediated mechanisms of B6J.Cg-Gamt(tm1Isb) mice. Electrocorticographic (ECoG) monitoring of pharmacological treatments with ornithine (5 % in drinking water for 5-18 days) and/or Picrotoxin (PTX) (a GABAA receptor antagonist) (1.5 mg/kg, I.P.) in Gamt(MUT) and Gamt(WT) groups [n = 3, mean age (SEM) = 6.9 (0.2) weeks]. Mice were fitted with two frontal and two parietal epidural electrodes under ketamine/xylazine anesthesia. Baseline and test recordings were performed for determination of seizure activity over a 2 h period. The ECoG baseline of Gamt(MUT) exhibited an abnormal monotonous cortical rhythm (7-8 Hz) with little variability during awake and sleep states compared to wild type recordings. Ornithine treatment and also PTX administration led to a relative normalization of the Gamt(MUT) ECoG phenotype. Gamt(WT) on PTX exhibited electro-behavioral seizures, whereas the Gamt(MUT) did not have PTX induced seizures at the same PTX dose. Gamt(MUT) treated with both ornithine and PTX did not show electro-behavioral seizures while ornithine elevated the PTX seizure threshold of Gamt(MUT) mice even further. These data demonstrate: (1) that there is expression of electrical seizure activity in this Gamt-deficient transgenic mouse strain, and (2) that the systemic availability of guanidinoacetate affects GABAA receptor function and seizure thresholds. These findings are directly and clinically relevant for patients with a creatine-deficiency syndrome due to genetic defects in GAMT and provide a rational basis for a combined ornithine/picrotoxin therapeutic intervention.

  18. Mouth breathing increases the pentylenetetrazole-induced seizure threshold in mice: a role for ATP-sensitive potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Niaki, Seyed Esfandiar Akhavan; Shafaroodi, Hamed; Ghasemi, Mehdi; Shakiba, Bijan; Fakhimi, Ali; Dehpour, Ahamd Reza

    2008-08-01

    Nasal obstruction and consequent mouth breathing have been shown to change the acid-base balance, producing respiratory acidosis. Additionally, there exists a large body of evidence maintaining that acidosis affects the activity of ATP-sensitive potassium (K(ATP)) channels, which play a crucial role in the function of the central nervous system (CNS), for example, in modulating seizure threshold. Thus, in the study described here, we examined whether mouth breathing, induced by surgical ligation of nostrils, could affect the seizure threshold induced by pentylenetetrazole in male NMRI mice. Using the selective K(ATP) channel opener (diazoxide) and blocker (glibenclamide), we also evaluated the possible role of K(ATP) channels in this process. Our data revealed that seizure threshold was increased 6 to 72 hours after nasal obstruction, reaching a peak 48 hours afterward, compared with either control or sham-operated mice (P<0.01). There was a significant decrease in pH of arterial blood samples and increase in CO(2) partial pressure (PCO(2)) during this time. Systemic injection of glibenclamide (1 and 2mg/kg, ip, daily) significantly prevented the increase in seizure threshold in 48-hour bilaterally nasally obstructed mice, whereas it had no effect on seizure threshold in sham-operated mice. Systemic injection of diazoxide (25mg/kg, ip, daily) had no effect on seizure threshold in all groups, whereas higher doses (50 and 100mg/kg, ip, daily) significantly increased seizure threshold in both 48-hour-obstructed and sham-operated mice. The decrease in seizure threshold induced by glibenclamide (2mg/kg, ip, daily) was prevented by diazoxide (25mg/kg, ip, daily). These results demonstrate for the first time that mouth breathing, which could result in respiratory acidosis, increases seizure threshold in mice and K(ATP) channels may play a role in this effect.

  19. Experiencing neonatal maternal separation increased the seizure threshold in adult male mice: Involvement of the opioid system.

    PubMed

    Amini-Khoei, Hossein; Amiri, Shayan; Shirzadian, Armin; Haj-Mirzaian, Arya; Alijanpour, Sakineh; Rahimi-Balaei, Maryam; Mohammadi-Asl, Ali; Hassanipour, Mahsa; Mehr, Shahram Ejtemaie; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza

    2015-11-01

    Experiencing early-life stress has been considered as a potent risk factor for the development of many of brain disorders, including seizures. Intervening mechanisms through which neonatal maternal separation (MS) alters the seizure susceptibility in adulthood have not been well studied. In the current study, by applying 180 min of MS stress (PND 2-14), we determined the seizure susceptibility and considered the role of the opioid system. Maternal separation increased the seizure threshold, and administration of anticonvulsant/proconvulsant doses of morphine (1 and 30 mg/kg, respectively) reversed the impact of MS. Using tail flick and hot plate tests, we exposed animals to 30 min Restraint stress (RS) and found that MS decreased the pain threshold, suggesting the hyporesponsiveness of the opioid system. These results supported the abnormal seizure activity observed in the MS mice and suggested that abnormalities in the opioid system following MS alter seizure susceptibility in later life. PMID:26409126

  20. Morphine modulates the effects of histamine H1 and H3 receptors on seizure susceptibility in pentylenetetrazole-induced seizure model of mice.

    PubMed

    Amini-Khoei, Hossein; Rahimi-Balaei, Maryam; Amiri, Shayan; Haj-Mirzaian, Arya; Hassanipour, Mahsa; Shirzadian, Armin; Gooshe, Maziar; Alijanpour, Sakineh; Mehr, Shahram Ejtemaie; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza

    2015-12-15

    Histamine regulates release of neurotransmitters such as dopamine, serotonin, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamate and also is involved in several functions in central nervous system (CNS). It has been shown that histamine participates in disorders like seizure. It has been well documented that morphine dose-dependently induces anti or proconvulsant effects. In the current study, we firstly showed that morphine (1mg/kg) exerts anticonvulsant effects which significantly reversed by naltrexone administration. Secondly, we determined seizure threshold for H1 and H3 receptors agonists and antagonists in mouse model of pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced clonic seizures. Our results showed that activation of H1 receptors by 2-(2-Pyridyl)-ethylamine exerts anticonvulsant properties while inhibition of H1 receptors by pyrilamine maleate induced proconvulsant effects. Furthermore, we showed that immepip dihydrobromide, a H3 receptor agonist, increased seizure susceptibility to PTZ whereas thioperamide, a H3 receptor antagonist increased seizure threshold. We also revealed that pretreatment with morphine potently reversed the effects of histaminergic system on seizure threshold suggesting the involvement of opioid system in alteration of seizure threshold by histaminergic drugs.

  1. Effect of taurine on chemoshock seizure thresholds in lead-exposed animals

    SciTech Connect

    Huxtable, R.J.; Shindo, S.; Nakagawa, K.

    1986-03-01

    The high levels of taurine found in developing brain have led to postulates that taurine is involved in brain maturation. The authors have examined the effect of taurine on the chemoshock threshold of rats reared in the presence of the environmental toxin, lead. Within 24 h of giving birth, dams were placed on one of four regimens: Group P received 0.4% lead acetate in the drinking water; Group T received 3% taurine in drinking water; Group PT received both taurine and lead acetate; and Group C received distilled water. The pups were weaned at 21 days, but maintained on the same treatments. Pentylene tetrazole seizure thresholds were determined at 42 days. Thresholds in Group P were significantly depressed relative to Group C (56.0 mg/kg v 79.9 mg/kg). Taurine supplementation had no effect on threshold (T = 72.7 mg/kg). However, thresholds in Group PT were significantly higher than those of Group P (PT = 85.2 mg/kg). These data show that whereas taurine was without effect on the threshold of animals not stressed by exposure to lead, it had a protective effect on exposed animals. As human neonates are unable to synthesize taurine, the findings reinforce the concept of taurine being a conditionally essential nutrient in developing humans.

  2. Clavulanic acid does not affect convulsions in acute seizure tests in mice.

    PubMed

    Gasior, Maciej; Socała, Katarzyna; Nieoczym, Dorota; Wlaź, Piotr

    2012-01-01

    Clavulanic acid (CLAV) inhibits bacterial β-lactamases and is commonly used to aid antibiotic therapy. Prompted by the initial evidence suggestive of the potential anticonvulsant and neuroprotective properties of CLAV, the present study was undertaken to systematically evaluate its acute effects on seizure thresholds in seizure tests typically used in primary screening of potential antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). In the present study, 6-Hz seizure threshold, maximal electroshock seizure threshold (MEST) test, and intravenous pentylenetetrazole (i.v. PTZ) seizure tests were used to determine anticonvulsant effects of intraperitoneally (i.p.) administered CLAV in mice. Acute effects on motor coordination and muscle strength were assessed in the chimney and grip-strength tests, respectively. Doses of CLAV studied in the present study were either comparable or extended the doses reported in the literature to be effective against kainic acid-induced convulsions in mice or behaviorally active in rodents and monkeys. CLAV had no effect on seizure thresholds in the 6-Hz (64 ng/kg to 1 mg/kg) and MEST (64 ng/kg to 5 mg/kg) seizure tests. Similarly, CLAV had no effect on seizure thresholds for i.v. PTZ-induced myoclonic twitch, clonic convulsions, and tonic convulsions (64 ng/kg to 5 mg/kg). Finally, CLAV (64 ng/kg to 5 mg/kg) had no effect on the motor performance and muscle strength in the chimney and grip-strength tests, respectively. In summary, CLAV failed to affect seizure thresholds in three seizure tests in mice. Although the results of the present study do not support further development of CLAV as an AED, its beneficial effects in chronic epilepsy models warrant further evaluation owing to its, for example, potential neuroprotective properties.

  3. Time-course and dose-response relationships of imperatorin in the mouse maximal electroshock seizure threshold model.

    PubMed

    Luszczki, Jarogniew J; Glowniak, Kazimierz; Czuczwar, Stanislaw J

    2007-09-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the anticonvulsant effects of imperatorin (a furanocoumarin isolated from fruits of Angelica archangelica) in the mouse maximal electroshock seizure threshold model. The threshold for electroconvulsions in mice was determined at several times: 15, 30, 60 and 120 min after i.p. administration of imperatorin at increasing doses of 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 and 100 mg/kg. The evaluation of time-course relationship for imperatorin in the maximal electroshock seizure threshold test revealed that the agent produced its maximum antielectroshock action at 30 min after its i.p. administration. In this case, imperatorin at doses of 50 and 100 mg/kg significantly raised the threshold for electroconvulsions in mice by 38 and 68% (P<0.05 and P<0.001), respectively. The antiseizure effects produced by imperatorin at 15, 60 and 120 min after its systemic (i.p.) administration were less expressed than those observed for imperatorin injected 30 min before the maximal electroshock seizure threshold test. Based on this study, one can conclude that imperatorin produces the anticonvulsant effect in the maximal electroshock seizure threshold test in a dose-dependent manner. PMID:17602770

  4. Dcx reexpression reduces subcortical band heterotopia and seizure threshold in an animal model of neuronal migration disorder.

    PubMed

    Manent, Jean-Bernard; Wang, Yu; Chang, Yoonjeung; Paramasivam, Murugan; LoTurco, Joseph J

    2009-01-01

    Disorders of neuronal migration can lead to malformations of the cerebral neocortex that greatly increase the risk of seizures. It remains untested whether malformations caused by disorders in neuronal migration can be reduced by reactivating cellular migration and whether such repair can decrease seizure risk. Here we show, in a rat model of subcortical band heterotopia (SBH) generated by in utero RNA interference of the Dcx gene, that aberrantly positioned neurons can be stimulated to migrate by reexpressing Dcx after birth. Restarting migration in this way both reduces neocortical malformations and restores neuronal patterning. We further find that the capacity to reduce SBH continues into early postnatal development. Moreover, intervention after birth reduces the convulsant-induced seizure threshold to a level similar to that in malformation-free controls. These results suggest that disorders of neuronal migration may be eventually treatable by reengaging developmental programs both to reduce the size of cortical malformations and to reduce seizure risk.

  5. Comparative effects of centrophenoxine on the picrotoxin convulsive-seizure threshold in non-irradiated and irradiated mice.

    PubMed

    Georgiev, V P; Petkova, B P

    1978-01-01

    A comparative study is made of the effect of centrophenoxine (CP) on the picrotoxin convulsive-seizure threshold (PCST) in non-irradiated and irradiated 3 and 7 days previously male mice. It is found that the CP appliked intracerebroventricularly in doses of 200 and 400 micrograms/mouse (weight 18-22 g), increases PCST. In non-irradiated mice the PCST-increasing effect of CP occurs rapidly (5 min) and it is brief (it can be observed until the 15th min). When the irradiation is performed three days previously, the PCST-increasing effect of CP is prolonged (it is observed until the 6th hour after its application). When the irradiation is performed seven days previously the characteristic features of the PCST-increasing effect of CP are similar to those in the early stage (3 days), the only difference being that the duration of the effect is prolonged to 120 min. Generally, these specificities of the CP effect are valid for all three phases of the convulsive seizure (general excitation, clonic convulsive seizure and tonic convulsive seizure.

  6. Combined sub-threshold dosages of phenobarbital and low-frequency stimulation effectively reduce seizures in amygdala-kindled rats.

    PubMed

    Asgari, Azam; Semnanian, Saeed; Atapour, Nafiseh; Shojaei, Amir; Moradi, Homeira; Mirnajafi-Zadeh, Javad

    2014-08-01

    Low-frequency stimulation (LFS) is a potential therapy utilized in patients who do not achieve satisfactory control of seizures with pharmacological treatments. Here, we investigated the interaction between anticonvulsant effects of LFS and phenobarbital (a commonly used medicine) on amygdala-kindled seizures in rats. Animals were kindled by electrical stimulation of basolateral amygdala in a rapid manner (12 stimulations/day). Fully kindled animals randomly received one of the three treatment choices: phenobarbital (1, 2, 3, 4 and 8 mg/kg; i.p.; 30 min before kindling stimulation), LFS (one or 4 packages contained 100 or 200 monophasic square wave pulses, 0.1-ms pulse duration at 1 Hz, immediately before kindling stimulation) or a combination of both (phenobarbital at 3 mg/kg and LFS). Phenobarbital alone at the doses of 1, 2 and 3 mg/kg had no significant effect on the main seizure parameters. LFS application always produced anticonvulsant effects unless applied with the pattern of one package of 100 pulses, which is considered as non-effective. All the seizure parameters were significantly reduced when phenobarbital (3 mg/kg) was administered prior to the application of the non-effective pattern of LFS. Phenobarbital (3 mg/kg) also increased the anticonvulsant actions of the effective LFS pattern. Our results provide an evidence of a positive cumulative anticonvulsant effect of LFS and phenobarbital, suggesting a potential combination therapy at sub-threshold dosages of phenobarbital and LFS to achieve a satisfactory clinical effect.

  7. Proconvulsant effects of estriol, the third estrogen, in the mouse PTZ-kindling model.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Aakifa; Vohora, Divya

    2014-10-01

    The effect of estriol, the third estrogen, was evaluated for its effect on pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-kindling model of epileptogenesis in mice followed by evaluation on kindling-induced changes in cognitive and motor functions. Kindling was induced by once every 2 days treatment with PTZ (25 mg/kg, i.p.) for 5 weeks. The seizure severity during induction of kindling and percentage incidence of animals kindled at the end of 5 weeks was recorded. Motor function was assessed using a grip strength meter while spatial memory was assessed in a cross maze. Estriol (0.005 and 0.01 mg/kg i.p.) reduced the time for induction of kindling from 5 weeks to 3 and 2 weeks for male and female mice respectively and enhanced the percentage incidence of seizures. Clomiphene (0.9 mg/kg i.p.) delayed the development of kindling and produced anticonvulsant effects. It also partially reversed the proconvulsant effects of estriol. On grip strength test and spontaneous alternation behaviour, a significant decline was observed in kindled mice which was further reduced by pre-treatment with estriol. Both clomiphene and diazepam were unable to reverse the reduced GS of PTZ-kindled mice but enhanced the percentage alternation of such animals. The study shows that estriol has powerful proconvulsant effects. Its administration in hormone replacement therapy or other indications, thus, requires careful monitoring in patients susceptible to epileptic seizures. The anticonvulsant effects of clomiphene requires further investigations.

  8. Montelukast reduces seizures in pentylenetetrazol-kindled mice

    PubMed Central

    Fleck, J.; Temp, F.R.; Marafiga, J.R.; Jesse, A.C.; Milanesi, L.H.; Rambo, L.M.; Mello, C.F.

    2016-01-01

    Cysteinyl leukotrienes (CysLTs) have been implicated in seizures and kindling; however, the effect of CysLT receptor antagonists on seizure frequency in kindled animals and changes in CysLT receptor expression after pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)-induced kindling have not been investigated. In this study, we evaluated whether the CysLT1 inverse agonist montelukast, and a classical anticonvulsant, phenobarbital, were able to reduce seizures in PTZ-kindled mice and alter CysLT receptor expression. Montelukast (10 mg/kg, sc) and phenobarbital (20 mg/kg, sc) increased the latency to generalized seizures in kindled mice. Montelukast increased CysLT1 immunoreactivity only in non-kindled, PTZ-challenged mice. Interestingly, PTZ challenge decreased CysLT2 immunoreactivity only in kindled mice. CysLT1 antagonists appear to emerge as a promising adjunctive treatment for refractory seizures. Nevertheless, additional studies are necessary to evaluate the clinical implications of this research. PMID:26909785

  9. Montelukast reduces seizures in pentylenetetrazol-kindled mice.

    PubMed

    Fleck, J; Temp, F R; Marafiga, J R; Jesse, A C; Milanesi, L H; Rambo, L M; Mello, C F

    2016-01-01

    Cysteinyl leukotrienes (CysLTs) have been implicated in seizures and kindling; however, the effect of CysLT receptor antagonists on seizure frequency in kindled animals and changes in CysLT receptor expression after pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)-induced kindling have not been investigated. In this study, we evaluated whether the CysLT1 inverse agonist montelukast, and a classical anticonvulsant, phenobarbital, were able to reduce seizures in PTZ-kindled mice and alter CysLT receptor expression. Montelukast (10 mg/kg, sc) and phenobarbital (20 mg/kg, sc) increased the latency to generalized seizures in kindled mice. Montelukast increased CysLT1 immunoreactivity only in non-kindled, PTZ-challenged mice. Interestingly, PTZ challenge decreased CysLT2 immunoreactivity only in kindled mice. CysLT1 antagonists appear to emerge as a promising adjunctive treatment for refractory seizures. Nevertheless, additional studies are necessary to evaluate the clinical implications of this research. PMID:26909785

  10. The effects of Nigella sativa on neural damage after pentylenetetrazole induced seizures in rats.

    PubMed

    Seghatoleslam, Masoumeh; Alipour, Fatemeh; Shafieian, Reihaneh; Hassanzadeh, Zahra; Edalatmanesh, Mohammad Amin; Sadeghnia, Hamid Reza; Hosseini, Mahmoud

    2016-07-01

    Nigella sativa (NS) has been suggested to have neuroprotective and anti-seizures properties. The aim of current study was to investigate the effects of NS hydro-alcoholic extract on neural damage after pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) - induced repeated seizures. The rats were divided into five groups: (1) control (saline), (2) PTZ (50 mg/kg, i.p.), (3-5) PTZ-NS 100, PTZ-NS 200 and PTZ-NS 400 (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg of NS extract respectively, 30 min prior to each PTZ injection on 5 consecutive days). The passive avoidance (PA) test was done and the brains were then removed for histological measurements. The PTZ-NS 100, PTZ-NS 200 and PTZ-NS 400 groups had lower seizure scores than PTZ group (P < 0.01 and P < 0.001). The latency to enter the dark compartment by the animals of PTZ group was lower than control in PA test (P < 0.01). Pre-treatment by 400 mg/kg of the extract increased the latency to enter the dark compartment (P < 0.05). Meanwhile, different doses of the extract inhibited production of dark neurons in different regions of hippocampus (P < 0.001). The present study allows us to suggest that the NS possesses a potential ability to prevent hippocampal neural damage which is accompanied with improving effects on memory. PMID:27419091

  11. Conditional Disabled-1 Deletion in Mice Alters Hippocampal Neurogenesis and Reduces Seizure Threshold.

    PubMed

    Korn, Matthew J; Mandle, Quinton J; Parent, Jack M

    2016-01-01

    Many animal models of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) exhibit altered neurogenesis arising from progenitors within the dentate gyrus subgranular zone (SGZ). Aberrant integration of new neurons into the existing circuit is thought to contribute to epileptogenesis. In particular, adult-born neurons that exhibit ectopic migration and hilar basal dendrites (HBDs) are suggested to be pro-epileptogenic. Loss of reelin signaling may contribute to these morphological changes in patients with epilepsy. We previously demonstrated that conditional deletion of the reelin adaptor protein, disabled-1 (Dab1), from postnatal mouse SGZ progenitors generated dentate granule cells (DGCs) with abnormal dendritic development and ectopic placement. To determine whether the early postnatal loss of reelin signaling is epileptogenic, we conditionally deleted Dab1 in neural progenitors and their progeny on postnatal days 7-8 and performed chronic video-EEG recordings 8-10 weeks later. Dab1-deficient mice did not have spontaneous seizures but exhibited interictal epileptiform abnormalities and a significantly reduced latency to pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus. After chemoconvulsant treatment, over 90% of mice deficient for Dab1 developed generalized motor convulsions with tonic-clonic movements, rearing, and falling compared to <20% of wild-type mice. Recombination efficiency, measured by Cre reporter expression, inversely correlated with time to the first sustained seizure. These pro-epileptogenic changes were associated with decreased neurogenesis and increased numbers of hilar ectopic DGCs. Interestingly, neurons co-expressing the Cre reporter comprised a fraction of these hilar ectopic DGCs cells, suggesting a non-cell autonomous effect for the loss of reelin signaling. We also noted a dispersion of the CA1 pyramidal layer, likely due to hypomorphic effects of the conditional Dab1 allele, but this abnormality did not correlate with seizure susceptibility. These findings suggest that

  12. Adenosine receptor modulation of seizure susceptibility in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Szot, P.

    1987-01-01

    Adenosine is considered to be a neuromodulator or cotransmitter in the periphery and CNS. This neuromodulatory action of adenosine may be observed as an anticonvulsant effect. Dose-response curves for R-phenylisopropyladenosine (PIA), cycohexyladenosine (CHA), 2-chloroadenosine (2-ClAdo), N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA) and S-PIA were generated against PTZ seizure thresholds in the rat. The rank order of potency for adenosine agonists to elevate PTZ seizure threshold was R-PIA > 2-ClAdo > NECA > CHA > S-PIA. R-PIA was approximately 80-fold more potent than S-PIA. This 80-fold difference in potency between the diasteriomers of PIA was consistent with an A{sub 1} adenoise receptor-mediated response. The anticonvulsant action of 2-ClAdo was reversed by pretreatment with theoplylline. Chronic administration of theophylline significantly increased the specific binding of {sup 3}H-cyclohexyladenosine in membranes of the cerebral cortex and cerebellum of the rat. Chronic exposure to theophylline produced a significant increase in the densities of both the high- and low-affinity forms of A{sub 1} adenosine receptors in the cerebral cortex.

  13. Possible nitric oxide mechanism in the protective effect of hesperidin against pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced kindling and associated cognitive dysfunction in mice.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anil; Lalitha, Sree; Mishra, Jitendriya

    2013-10-01

    Epilepsy is a complex neurological disorder manifested by recurrent episodes of convulsive seizures, loss of consciousness, and sensory disturbances. Pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced kindling primarily represents a model of generalized epilepsy. The present study has been undertaken to evaluate the neuroprotective potential of hesperidin and its interaction with nitric oxide modulators against PTZ-induced kindling and associated cognitive dysfunction in mice. The experimental protocol comprised of eleven groups (n=6), where a subconvulsive dose of PTZ (40 mg/kg, i.p.) had been administered every other day for a period of 12 days, and seizure episodes were noted after each PTZ injection over a period of 30 min. The memory performance tests were carried out on days 13 and 14 followed by the estimation of biochemical and mitochondrial parameters. Chronic administration of a subconvulsive dose of PTZ resulted in an increase in convulsive activity culminating in generalized clonic-tonic seizures, as revealed by a progressive increase in seizure score as well as alteration in antioxidant enzyme levels (lipid peroxidation, nitrite, glutathione, super oxide dismutase, and catalase) and mitochondrial complex (I, II, and IV) activities, whereas chronic treatment with hesperidin (200 mg/kg) significantly attenuated these behavioral, biochemical, and mitochondrial alterations. Further, treatment with l-arginine (100 mg/kg) or l-NAME (10 mg/kg) in combination with hesperidin significantly modulated the protective effect of hesperidin which was significant as compared to their effects per se in PTZ-treated animals. Thus, the present study suggests a possible involvement of the NO-cGMP pathway in the neuroprotective effect of hesperidin in PTZ-kindled mice.

  14. Critical Evaluation of P2X7 Receptor Antagonists in Selected Seizure Models

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Wolfgang; Franke, Heike; Krügel, Ute; Müller, Heiko; Dinkel, Klaus; Lord, Brian; Letavic, Michael A.; Henshall, David C.; Engel, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    The ATP-gated P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) is a non-selective cation channel which senses high extracellular ATP concentrations and has been suggested as a target for the treatment of neuroinflammation and neurodegenerative diseases. The use of P2X7R antagonists may therefore be a viable approach for treating CNS pathologies, including epileptic disorders. Recent studies showed anticonvulsant potential of P2X7R antagonists in certain animal models. To extend this work, we tested three CNS-permeable P2X7R blocker (Brilliant Blue G, AFC-5128, JNJ-47965567) and a natural compound derivative (tanshinone IIA sulfonate) in four well-characterized animal seizure models. In the maximal electroshock seizure threshold test and the pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) seizure threshold test in mice, none of the four compounds demonstrated anticonvulsant effects when given alone. Notably, in combination with carbamazepine, both AFC-5128 and JNJ-47965567 increased the threshold in the maximal electroshock seizure test. In the PTZ-kindling model in rats, useful for testing antiepileptogenic activities, Brilliant Blue G and tanshinone exhibited a moderate retarding effect, whereas the potent P2X7R blocker AFC-5128 and JNJ-47965567 showed a significant and long-lasting delay in kindling development. In fully kindled rats, the investigated compounds revealed modest effects to reduce the mean seizure stage. Furthermore, AFC-5128- and JNJ-47965567-treated animals displayed strongly reduced Iba 1 and GFAP immunoreactivity in the hippocampal CA3 region. In summary, our results show that P2X7R antagonists possess no remarkable anticonvulsant effects in the used acute screening tests, but can attenuate chemically-induced kindling. Further studies would be of interest to support the concept that P2X7R signalling plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of epileptic disorders. PMID:27281030

  15. Increased seizure latency and decreased severity of pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures in mice after essential oil administration.

    PubMed

    Koutroumanidou, Eleni; Kimbaris, Athanasios; Kortsaris, Alexandros; Bezirtzoglou, Eugenia; Polissiou, Moschos; Charalabopoulos, Konstantinos; Pagonopoulou, Olga

    2013-01-01

    The effect of pretreatment with essential oils (EOs) from eight aromatic plants on the seizure latency and severity of pentylenetetrazol- (PTZ-) induced seizures in mice was evaluated. Weight-dependent doses of Rosmarinus officinalis, Ocimum basilicum, Mentha spicata, Mentha pulegium, Lavandula angustifolia, Mentha piperita, Origanum dictamnus, and Origanum vulgare, isolated from the respective aromatic plants from NE Greece, were administered 60 minutes prior to intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of a lethal dose of PTZ to eight respective groups of Balb-c mice. Control group received only one i.p. PTZ injection. Motor and behavioral activity of the animals after EOs administration, development of tonic-clonic seizures, seizure latency and severity, and percentage of survival after PTZ administration were determined for each group. All groups of mice treated with the EOs showed reduced activity and stability after the administration of the oil, except for those treated with O. vulgare (100% mortality after the administration of the oil). After PTZ administration, mice from the different groups showed increased latency and reduced severity of seizures (ranging from simple twitches to complete seizures). Mice who had received M. piperita demonstrated no seizures and 100% survival. The different drastic component and its concentration could account for the diversity of anticonvulsant effects. PMID:23819045

  16. Effect of clobenpropit, a centrally acting histamine H3-receptor antagonist, on electroshock- and pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures in mice.

    PubMed

    Fischer, W; van der Goot, H

    1998-01-01

    The anticonvulsant activity of clobenpropit, an isothiourea derivative of histamine and potent H3-receptor antagonist, was investigated in two representative seizure models in mice. In the maximal electroshock seizure threshold test, clobenpropit dose-dependently raised the electroconvulsive threshold for tonic (hindlimb extension) seizures, but a significant increase of about 15% was determined only at the high dose of 40 mg/kg i.p. The protective action of this drug was reduced by immepip and (R)-alpha-methylhistamine, selective H3-receptor agonists. In co-medication with two standard antiepileptics, clobenpropit (20 and 40 mg/kg) significantly increased the anticonvulsant effectiveness of carbamazepine and tended to increase the effectiveness of valproate. Additional studies indicated that the high dose of clobenpropit also significantly enhanced the plasma carbamazepine concentration. One the other hand, in the s.c. PTZ seizure threshold test clobenpropit revealed no protective effects. In the rotarod ataxia test, impaired motor function was observed at 80 mg/kg clobenpropit. In conclusion, the present findings indicated no pronounced anticonvulsant effects of clobenpropit against generalized tonic as well as clonic seizures.

  17. Subchronic treatment with antiepileptic drugs modifies pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures in mice: Its correlation with benzodiazepine receptor binding

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Luisa

    2008-01-01

    Experiments using male CD1 mice were carried out to investigate the effects of subchronic (daily administration for 8 days) pretreatments with drugs enhancing GABAergic transmission (diazepam, 10 mg/kg, ip; gabapentin, 100 mg/kg, po; or vigabatrin, 500 mg/kg, po) on pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)-induced seizures, 24 h after the last injection. Subchronic administration of diazepam reduced latencies to clonus, tonic extension and death induced by PTZ. Subchronic vigabatrin produced enhanced latency to the first clonus but faster occurrence of tonic extension and death induced by PTZ. Subchronic gabapentin did not modify PTZ-induced seizures. Autoradiography experiments revealed reduced benzodiazepine receptor binding in several brain areas after subchronic treatment with diazepam or gabapentin, whereas subchronic vigabatrin did not induce significant receptor changes. The present results indicate differential effects induced by the subchronic administration of diazepam, vigabatrin, and gabapentin on the susceptibility to PTZ-induced seizures, benzodiazepine receptor binding, or both. PMID:18830436

  18. Acute seizure suppression by transcranial direct current stimulation in rats

    PubMed Central

    Dhamne, Sameer C; Ekstein, Dana; Zhuo, Zhihong; Gersner, Roman; Zurakowski, David; Loddenkemper, Tobias; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Jensen, Frances E; Rotenberg, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Objective Cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a focal neuromodulation technique that suppresses cortical excitability by low-amplitude constant electrical current, and may have an antiepileptic effect. Yet, tDCS has not been tested in status epilepticus (SE). Furthermore, a combined tDCS and pharmacotherapy antiseizure approach is unexplored. We therefore examined in the rat pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) SE model whether cathodal tDCS (1) suppresses seizures, (2) augments lorazepam (LZP) efficacy, and (3) enhances GABAergic cortical inhibition. Methods Experiment 1 aimed to identify an effective cathodal tDCS intensity. Rats received intraperitoneal PTZ followed by tDCS (sham, cathodal 1 mA, or cathodal 0.1 mA; for 20 min), and then a second PTZ challenge. In Experiment 2, two additional animal groups received a subtherapeutic LZP dose after PTZ, and then verum or sham tDCS. Clinical and electroencephalography (EEG) epileptic activity were compared between all groups. In Experiment 3, we measured GABA-mediated paired-pulse inhibition of the motor evoked potential by paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (ppTMS) in rats that received PTZ or saline, and either verum or sham tDCS. Results Cathodal 1 mA tDCS (1) reduced EEG spike bursts, and suppressed clinical seizures after the second PTZ challenge, (2) in combination with LZP was more effective in seizure suppression and improved the clinical seizure outcomes compared to either tDCS or LZP alone, and (3) prevented the loss of ppTMS motor cortex inhibition that accompanied PTZ injection. Interpretation These results suggest that cathodal 1 mA tDCS alone and in combination with LZP can suppress seizures by augmenting GABAergic cortical inhibition. PMID:26339678

  19. Investigation of the effects of tianeptine and fluoxetine on pentylenetetrazole-induced seizures in rats.

    PubMed

    Ceyhan, Mert; Kayir, Hakan; Uzbay, I Tayfun

    2005-03-01

    The effects of tianeptine and fluoxetine on pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizures in rats were investigated. Female Wistar rats (172-278 g) were used in the study. Tianeptine (1.25, 2.5, 5, 10 and 20 mg/kg) and fluoxetine (2.5, 5, 10 and 20 mg/kg) or saline were injected to rats intraperitoneally 30 min before PTZ (50 mg/kg) injections. Immediately after PTZ administrations, latency and intensity of the PTZ-induced seizures was recorded and scored, respectively. Fluoxetine (2.5-20 mg/kg) did not produce any significant difference in latency and intensity of the PTZ-induced seizures. Although tianeptine (1.25-20 mg/kg) also did not affect the latency time, it produced significant attenuations in the intensity of the seizures. Tianeptine did not cause any significant change in the locomotor activity of the rats. The results of this preliminary study suggest that tianeptine but not fluoxetine has some inhibitory effects on PTZ-induced seizures in rats.

  20. A Missense Mutation of the Gene Encoding Synaptic Vesicle Glycoprotein 2A (SV2A) Confers Seizure Susceptibility by Disrupting Amygdalar Synaptic GABA Release

    PubMed Central

    Tokudome, Kentaro; Okumura, Takahiro; Terada, Ryo; Shimizu, Saki; Kunisawa, Naofumi; Mashimo, Tomoji; Serikawa, Tadao; Sasa, Masashi; Ohno, Yukihiro

    2016-01-01

    Synaptic vesicle glycoprotein 2A (SV2A) is specifically expressed in the membranes of synaptic vesicles and modulates action potential-dependent neurotransmitter release. To explore the role of SV2A in the pathogenesis of epileptic disorders, we recently generated a novel rat model (Sv2aL174Q rat) carrying a missense mutation of the Sv2a gene and showed that the Sv2aL174Q rats were hypersensitive to kindling development (Tokudome et al., 2016). Here, we further conducted behavioral and neurochemical studies to clarify the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the seizure vulnerability in Sv2aL174Q rats. Sv2aL174Q rats were highly susceptible to pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizures, yielding a significantly higher seizure scores and seizure incidence than the control animals. Brain mapping analysis of Fos expression, a biological marker of neural excitation, revealed that the seizure threshold level of PTZ region-specifically elevated Fos expression in the amygdala in Sv2aL174Q rats. In vivo microdialysis study showed that the Sv2aL174Q mutation preferentially reduced high K+ (depolarization)-evoked GABA release, but not glutamate release, in the amygdala. In addition, specific control of GABA release by SV2A was supported by its predominant expression in GABAergic neurons, which were co-stained with antibodies against SV2A and glutamate decarboxylase 1. The present results suggest that dysfunction of SV2A by the missense mutation elevates seizure susceptibility in rats by preferentially disrupting synaptic GABA release in the amygdala, illustrating the crucial role of amygdalar SV2A-GABAergic system in epileptogenesis. PMID:27471467

  1. A Missense Mutation of the Gene Encoding Synaptic Vesicle Glycoprotein 2A (SV2A) Confers Seizure Susceptibility by Disrupting Amygdalar Synaptic GABA Release.

    PubMed

    Tokudome, Kentaro; Okumura, Takahiro; Terada, Ryo; Shimizu, Saki; Kunisawa, Naofumi; Mashimo, Tomoji; Serikawa, Tadao; Sasa, Masashi; Ohno, Yukihiro

    2016-01-01

    Synaptic vesicle glycoprotein 2A (SV2A) is specifically expressed in the membranes of synaptic vesicles and modulates action potential-dependent neurotransmitter release. To explore the role of SV2A in the pathogenesis of epileptic disorders, we recently generated a novel rat model (Sv2a(L174Q) rat) carrying a missense mutation of the Sv2a gene and showed that the Sv2a(L174Q) rats were hypersensitive to kindling development (Tokudome et al., 2016). Here, we further conducted behavioral and neurochemical studies to clarify the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the seizure vulnerability in Sv2a(L174Q) rats. Sv2a(L174Q) rats were highly susceptible to pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizures, yielding a significantly higher seizure scores and seizure incidence than the control animals. Brain mapping analysis of Fos expression, a biological marker of neural excitation, revealed that the seizure threshold level of PTZ region-specifically elevated Fos expression in the amygdala in Sv2a(L174Q) rats. In vivo microdialysis study showed that the Sv2a(L174Q) mutation preferentially reduced high K(+) (depolarization)-evoked GABA release, but not glutamate release, in the amygdala. In addition, specific control of GABA release by SV2A was supported by its predominant expression in GABAergic neurons, which were co-stained with antibodies against SV2A and glutamate decarboxylase 1. The present results suggest that dysfunction of SV2A by the missense mutation elevates seizure susceptibility in rats by preferentially disrupting synaptic GABA release in the amygdala, illustrating the crucial role of amygdalar SV2A-GABAergic system in epileptogenesis. PMID:27471467

  2. Febrile Seizures

    MedlinePlus

    ... or prolonged seizures are a risk factor for epilepsy but most children who experience febrile seizures do ... develop the reoccurring seizures that re characteristic of epilepsy. Certain children who have febrile seizures face an ...

  3. Febrile Seizures

    MedlinePlus

    ... febrile seizure does not mean a child has epilepsy, since that disorder is characterized by reoccurring seizures ... outcome but carry an increased risk of developing epilepsy. How common are febrile seizures? Febrile seizures are ...

  4. Absence seizure

    MedlinePlus

    Seizure - petit mal; Seizure - absence; Petit mal seizure; Epilepsy - absence seizure ... Abou-Khalil BW, Gallagher MJ, Macdonald RL. Epilepsies. In: Daroff ... Practice . 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 101. ...

  5. Effects of extremely low frequency electromagnetic field (50 Hz) on pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures in mice.

    PubMed

    Fadakar, Kaveh; Saba, Valiallah; Farzampour, Shahrokh

    2013-06-01

    The electromagnetic fields (EMF) have various behavioral and biological effects on human body. There are growing concerns about the consequences of exposure to EMF. However, some studies have shown beneficial effects of these waves on human. In this paper, we study the effect of acute, sub acute and long-term exposure to 50 Hz, 0.1 mT magnetic fields (MF) on the seizure induction threshold in mice. 64 mice are used and divided into four groups. Eight mice in any group were selected to be exposed to MF for specific duration and the others were used as a control group. The duration of the applied exposures was as follows: (1) 1 day (acute), (2) 3 days (sub acute), (3) 2 weeks (sub acute), (4) 1 month (long term). The mice were exposed 2 h for a day. After exposure, the pentylentetrazol (PTZ) is injected to the mice to induce seizure and the needed dose for the seizure induction threshold is measured. In the acute exposure, the threshold to induce seizure in the exposed and sham-exposed groups was 44.25 and 46.5 mg, respectively, while the difference was not significant (p value = 0.5). In the sub acute exposure (3 days), the mean amount of drug to induce seizure was 47.38 mg in the exposed and 43.88 mg in the sham-exposed groups, however, the difference was not significant (p value = 0.3). The results were 52.38 and 46.75 mg after 2 weeks of exposure which were not significantly different either (p value = 0.2). After 1 month of exposure to MF, the threshold for the induction of seizure was significantly increased (p value < 0.05). The mean dosage to induce seizure in the exposed and control group was 54.3 and 45.75 mg, respectively. However, considering the p value, the difference in the seizure induction threshold between the exposed and sham-exposed groups after acute and sub acute exposure was not significant, analyzing the effects of acute, sub acute and long-term exposures totally indicates that increasing the exposure time increases the

  6. Anti-seizure activity of flower extracts of Nepeta bractaeta in Swiss albino mice.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Jalal Uddin; Parray, Shabir Ahmad; Aslam, Mohammad; Ansari, Shahid; Nizami, Qudsia; Khanam, Razia; Siddiqui, Aisha; Ahmad, Mohd Aftab

    2012-01-01

    Epilepsy is a neurological disorder characterized by unprovoked, recurring seizures that disrupts the nervous system and can cause mental and physical dysfunction. Based on the ethno pharmacological information of the plant, the methanolic and aqueous extracts of the flowers of Nepeta bractaeta was evaluated for its antiepileptic activity. The methanolic and aqueous extracts of the flowers of Nepeta bracteata were observed for their antiepileptic activity by increased current Electroshock seizures (ICES) test and Pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) test using Swiss albino mice. Both the extracts showed significant activity in ICES and PTZ induced convulsions in comparison to control. In ICES model, NBAE at higher dose showed 16.7 % and NBME at higher dose showed 33.3 % protection against seizure and in PTZ model, NBME at higher dose showed 33.3 % protection against seizure. From the experiments performed, it can be said that Nepeta bractaeta does possess anticonvulsant property.

  7. Anti-seizure activity of flower extracts of Nepeta bractaeta in Swiss albino mice.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Jalal Uddin; Parray, Shabir Ahmad; Aslam, Mohammad; Ansari, Shahid; Nizami, Qudsia; Khanam, Razia; Siddiqui, Aisha; Ahmad, Mohd Aftab

    2012-01-01

    Epilepsy is a neurological disorder characterized by unprovoked, recurring seizures that disrupts the nervous system and can cause mental and physical dysfunction. Based on the ethno pharmacological information of the plant, the methanolic and aqueous extracts of the flowers of Nepeta bractaeta was evaluated for its antiepileptic activity. The methanolic and aqueous extracts of the flowers of Nepeta bracteata were observed for their antiepileptic activity by increased current Electroshock seizures (ICES) test and Pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) test using Swiss albino mice. Both the extracts showed significant activity in ICES and PTZ induced convulsions in comparison to control. In ICES model, NBAE at higher dose showed 16.7 % and NBME at higher dose showed 33.3 % protection against seizure and in PTZ model, NBME at higher dose showed 33.3 % protection against seizure. From the experiments performed, it can be said that Nepeta bractaeta does possess anticonvulsant property. PMID:27540346

  8. The Effects of Nigella Sativa Hydro-alcoholic Extract on Memory and Brain Tissues Oxidative Damage after Repeated Seizures in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Vafaee, Farzaneh; Hosseini, Mahmoud; Hassanzadeh, Zahra; Edalatmanesh, Mohammad Amin; Sadeghnia, Hamid Reza; Seghatoleslam, Masoumeh; Mousavi, Seyed Mojtaba; Amani, Atefeh; Shafei, Mohammad Naser

    2015-01-01

    Regarding the therapeutic properties of Nigella sativa (NS), the effects of the plant hydro – alcoholic extract on learning, memory and brain tissues oxidative damage were investigated in penthylenetetrazole (PTZ) - induced repeated seizures. There were 4 experimental groups including: 1- control group; received saline, 2- PTZ group ; received saline and PTZ (50 mg/Kg, i.p) , 3-PTZ- NS 200 and 4- PTZ- NS 400 ; received 200 and 400 mg/Kg of NS extract respectively, before PTZ injection in 5 consecutive days. Seizure scores were lower in PTZ – NS 200 and 400, furthermore the seizure onset latencies were higher in these groups than PTZ group (P<0.05 and P<0.01 ). In Morris water maze, the time spent in target quadrant by PTZ group was lower than control group (P<0.05); while, 400 mg/Kg of the extract increased it (P<0.01). In the passive avoidance test, delay time to enter the dark by PTZ group was lower than control at 1 and 24 hours after training (P<0.01- P<0.001); while, 400 mg/Kg of the extract increased it (P<0.05). The total thiol concentration in hippocampal and cortical tissues of PTZ group was reduced while, MDA concentration was higher than control (p<0.05 - p<0.001). Administration of the extract increased the total thiol and decreased the MDA concentrations (p<0.01- p<0.001). It is concluded that the hydro-alcoholic extract of NS possess beneficial effects on learning and memory impairments in repeated seizures model which is accompanied by antioxidant effects in the brain. PMID:25901163

  9. Seizures triggered by pentylenetetrazol in marmosets made chronically epileptic with pilocarpine show greater refractoriness to treatment.

    PubMed

    Pontes, Josy Carolina C; Lima, Thiago Z; Queiroz, Claudio M; Cinini, Simone M; Blanco, Miriam M; Mello, Luiz E

    2016-10-01

    The efficiency of most of the new antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) on clinical trials still falls short the success reported in pre-clinical studies, possibly because the validity of the animal models is insufficient to fully represent the human pathology. To improve the translational value for testing AEDs, we propose the use of non-human primates. Here, we suggest that triggering limbic seizures with low doses of PTZ in pilocarpine-treated marmosets might provide a more effective basis for the development of AED. Marmosets with epileptic background were more susceptible to seizures induced by PTZ, which were at least 3 times longer and more severe (about 6 times greater frequency of generalized seizures) in comparison to naïve peers. Accordingly, PTZ-induced seizures were remarkably less attenuated by AEDs in epileptic than naïve marmosets. While phenobarbital (40mg/kg) virtually abolished seizures regardless of the animal's background, carbamazepine (120mg/kg) and valproic acid (400mg/kg) could not prevent PTZ-induced seizures in epileptic animals with the same efficiency as observed in naïve peers. VPA was less effective regarding the duration of individual seizures in epileptic animals, as assessed in ECoG (p=0.05). Similarly following CBZ treatment, the behavioral manifestation of generalized seizures lasted longer in epileptic (p<0.05), which were also more frequent than in the naïve group (p<0.05). As expected, epileptic marmosets experiencing stronger seizures showed more NPY- and ΔFosB-immunostained neurons in a number of brain areas associated with the generation and spread of limbic seizures. Our results suggest that PTZ induced seizures over an already existing epileptic background constitutes a reliable and controllable mean for the screening of new AEDs.

  10. Glatiramer acetate, an anti-demyelination drug, reduced rats' epileptic seizures induced by pentylenetetrazol via protection of myelin sheath.

    PubMed

    You, Yu; Zhao, Yaqun; Bai, Hui; Liu, Zhiliang; Meng, Fanxin; Zhang, Hua; Xu, Ruxiang

    2013-06-14

    Glatiramer acetate (GA) is a clinically prescribed immunomodulator drug used to treat demyelinating disease like multiple sclerosis (MS). Persistent down-regulation in the expression of myelin sheath proteins has been observed in both rats with pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) induced chronic epilepsy and some clinical epilepsy patients. Hypothetically, protection of myelin sheath by pharmaceutical means in the process of epilepsy might, to some extent, be helpful to control epileptic seizures. Therefore, we tried to use GA to treat PTZ-induced epilepsy rats. GA treatment successfully protected rats' myelin sheath from demyelination in the process of PTZ-induced epileptic seizures. Notably, electroencephalogram (EEG) monitoring demonstrated that GA-treated epilepsy rats showed significantly lowered epileptiform discharges. Correspondingly, behavioral recording showed reduced frequency of seizures in GA-treated epilepsy rats. The results indicate that epilepsy associated demyelination may be a contributing factor in seizures behavior, and early intervention with anti-demyelination drugs may be beneficial to reduce the severity of seizures behavior.

  11. Effects of Luteolin on Liver, Kidney and Brain in Pentylentetrazol-Induced Seizures: Involvement of Metalloproteinases and NOS Activities

    PubMed Central

    Birman, Hüsniye; Dar, Kadriye Akgün; Kapucu, Ayşegül; Acar, Samet; Üzüm, Gülay

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Flavonoids are an important group of recognized antioxidants in plants. Luteolin (LUT) is a natural flavonoid in the plant kingdom. This study was aimed to investigate the effects of the LUT in the liver, kidney and brain of pentylentetrazol (PTZ)-induced seizure and the relationship between nitric oxide synthases (iNOS, eNOS) and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP2, MMP9). Materials and Methods: LUT (10 mg/kg) was given intraperitoneally during two weeks prior to seizure induction. A single dose PTZ 80 mg/kg i.p. was administered and seizures were observed and evaluated with regard to latency, frequency and stage for one hour. Results: Seizure frequen cy after PTZ administration was significantly decreased in LUT pretreated rats (p<0.05). An increase of immunhistochemical reactions of iNOS and MMP2, but a decrease of eNOS activity, were observed in rat hippocampus and peripheral tissues during the PTZ induced seizures. LUT pretreatment reversed the iNOS and MMP2 activity to the control levels and significantly increased the eNOS activity (p<0.001). Conclusion: LUT seems to have an effective role in reducing the seizure frequency and a protective role on peripheral organ injury in animal models of seizure. The protective effect of LUT in seizures and the seizure induced peripheral tissue damage warrant further investigations. PMID:25206993

  12. Febrile seizures

    MedlinePlus

    ... does not have a history of seizure disorders (epilepsy). A tonic-clonic seizure involves the entire body. ... no evidence that they cause death, brain damage, epilepsy, or learning problems. Most children outgrow febrile seizures ...

  13. Capparis ovata modulates brain oxidative toxicity and epileptic seizures in pentylentetrazol-induced epileptic rats.

    PubMed

    Nazıroğlu, Mustafa; Akay, Mehmet Berk; Çelik, Ömer; Yıldırım, Muhammed İkbal; Balcı, Erdinç; Yürekli, Vedat Ali

    2013-04-01

    It has been widely suggested that oxidative stress products play an important role in the pathophysiology of epilepsy. Capparis ovata (C. ovata) may useful treatment of epilepsy because it contains antioxidant flavonoids. The current study was designed to determine the effects of C. ovata on lipid peroxidation, antioxidant levels and electroencephalography (EEG) records in pentylentetrazol (PTZ)-induced epileptic rats. Thirty-two rats were randomly divided into four groups. First group was used as control although second group was PTZ group. Oral 100 and 200 mg/kg C. ovata were given to rats constituting the third and fourth groups for 7 days before PTZ administration. Second, third and forth groups received 60 mg/kg PTZ for induction of epilepsy. Three hours after administration of PTZ, EEG records, brain cortex and blood samples were taken all groups. The lipid peroxidation levels of the brain cortex, number of spikes and epileptiform discharges of EEG were higher in PTZ group than in control and C. ovata group whereas they were decreased by C. ovata administration. Vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin E and β-carotene concentrations of brain cortex and latency to first spike of EEG were decreased by the PTZ administration although the brain cortex and plasma vitamin concentrations, and brain cortex and erythrocyte glutathione and glutathione peroxidase values were increased in PTZ + 100 and PTZ + 200 mg C. ovata groups. In conclusion, C. ovata administration caused protection against the PTZ-induced brain oxidative toxicity by inhibiting free radical and epileptic seizures, and supporting antioxidant redox system.

  14. Panchagavya Ghrita, an Ayurvedic formulation attenuates seizures, cognitive impairment and oxidative stress in pentylenetetrazole induced seizures in rats.

    PubMed

    Joshi, R; Reeta, K H; Sharma, S K; Tripathi, M; Gupta, Y K

    2015-07-01

    Panchagavya Ghrita (PG), according to Ayurvedic formulary of India (AFI), is used to treat epilepsy (apasmara), fever (jvara), mania (unmade) and jaundice (kamala). In the present study, we examined its effect on convulsions, oxidative stress and cognitive impairment in pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) induced seizures in rats. PG @ 250, 500, 1000, 2000 and 4000 mg/kg was administered orally for 7 days to male Wistar rats. On day 7, PTZ (60 mg/kg) was injected intraperitoneally 2 h after the last dose of PG. Sodium valproate (300 mg/kg) was used as positive control. Latency to myoclonic jerks, clonus and generalized tonic clonic seizures (GTCS) were recorded for seizure severity. Cognitive impairment was assessed using elevated plus maze and passive avoidance tests. Malondialdehyde and reduced glutathione levels were measured in rat brain. The results have shown that pretreatment with PG @ 500, 1000, 2000 and 4000 mg/kg exhibited 16.6, 33.3, 50 and 100% protection against occurrence of GTCS. The pretreatment with PG has significantly improved cognitive functions and the oxidative stress induced by seizures demonstrating its protective effect against PTZ induced seizures, and further, use of PG as an anticonvulsant in Ayurvedic system of medicine. PMID:26245029

  15. Panchagavya Ghrita, an Ayurvedic formulation attenuates seizures, cognitive impairment and oxidative stress in pentylenetetrazole induced seizures in rats.

    PubMed

    Joshi, R; Reeta, K H; Sharma, S K; Tripathi, M; Gupta, Y K

    2015-07-01

    Panchagavya Ghrita (PG), according to Ayurvedic formulary of India (AFI), is used to treat epilepsy (apasmara), fever (jvara), mania (unmade) and jaundice (kamala). In the present study, we examined its effect on convulsions, oxidative stress and cognitive impairment in pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) induced seizures in rats. PG @ 250, 500, 1000, 2000 and 4000 mg/kg was administered orally for 7 days to male Wistar rats. On day 7, PTZ (60 mg/kg) was injected intraperitoneally 2 h after the last dose of PG. Sodium valproate (300 mg/kg) was used as positive control. Latency to myoclonic jerks, clonus and generalized tonic clonic seizures (GTCS) were recorded for seizure severity. Cognitive impairment was assessed using elevated plus maze and passive avoidance tests. Malondialdehyde and reduced glutathione levels were measured in rat brain. The results have shown that pretreatment with PG @ 500, 1000, 2000 and 4000 mg/kg exhibited 16.6, 33.3, 50 and 100% protection against occurrence of GTCS. The pretreatment with PG has significantly improved cognitive functions and the oxidative stress induced by seizures demonstrating its protective effect against PTZ induced seizures, and further, use of PG as an anticonvulsant in Ayurvedic system of medicine.

  16. Anticonvulsant activity of the antidepressant drug, tianeptine, against pentylenetetrazole-induced seizures mitigates cognitive impairment in rats.

    PubMed

    Reeta, Kh; Prabhakar, Pankaj; Gupta, Yogendra K

    2016-10-01

    Treatment of depression, a common comorbidity in patients with epilepsy, is restricted as certain antidepressants are considered to be proconvulsants. In contrast, anticonvulsant effects have been reported with some antidepressants. In the present study, the effect of tianeptine, an antidepressant, was evaluated against pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizures, cognitive impairment and oxidative stress in rats. Tianeptine was administered in three doses (20, 40 and 80 mg/kg) 30 min before PTZ (60 mg/kg, intraperitoneally). MK801, an N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonist, and naloxone, an opioid receptor antagonist, were administered with tianeptine to evaluate the involvement of N-methyl-D-aspartate and opioid receptors, respectively. Morris water maze, elevated plus maze and passive avoidance tests were performed for behavioural assessment. Brain malondialdehyde and reduced glutathione levels were estimated as markers of oxidative stress. Tianeptine showed dose-dependent protection against PTZ seizures. Coadministration of tianeptine with MK801 potentiated the anticonvulsant effect of tianeptine. The protective effect of tianeptine against PTZ seizures was mitigated when tianeptine was administered with naloxone. Impairment of learning and memory by PTZ was prevented by tianeptine. Tianeptine also attenuated the seizure-induced increased oxidative stress. Thus, tianeptine showed an anticonvulsant effect along with amelioration of seizure-induced cognitive impairment and oxidative stress. Hence, tianeptine could be a useful drug in epileptic patients with depression, with the advantage of having both antidepressant and antiepileptic effects.

  17. Anticonvulsant activity of the antidepressant drug, tianeptine, against pentylenetetrazole-induced seizures mitigates cognitive impairment in rats.

    PubMed

    Reeta, Kh; Prabhakar, Pankaj; Gupta, Yogendra K

    2016-10-01

    Treatment of depression, a common comorbidity in patients with epilepsy, is restricted as certain antidepressants are considered to be proconvulsants. In contrast, anticonvulsant effects have been reported with some antidepressants. In the present study, the effect of tianeptine, an antidepressant, was evaluated against pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizures, cognitive impairment and oxidative stress in rats. Tianeptine was administered in three doses (20, 40 and 80 mg/kg) 30 min before PTZ (60 mg/kg, intraperitoneally). MK801, an N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonist, and naloxone, an opioid receptor antagonist, were administered with tianeptine to evaluate the involvement of N-methyl-D-aspartate and opioid receptors, respectively. Morris water maze, elevated plus maze and passive avoidance tests were performed for behavioural assessment. Brain malondialdehyde and reduced glutathione levels were estimated as markers of oxidative stress. Tianeptine showed dose-dependent protection against PTZ seizures. Coadministration of tianeptine with MK801 potentiated the anticonvulsant effect of tianeptine. The protective effect of tianeptine against PTZ seizures was mitigated when tianeptine was administered with naloxone. Impairment of learning and memory by PTZ was prevented by tianeptine. Tianeptine also attenuated the seizure-induced increased oxidative stress. Thus, tianeptine showed an anticonvulsant effect along with amelioration of seizure-induced cognitive impairment and oxidative stress. Hence, tianeptine could be a useful drug in epileptic patients with depression, with the advantage of having both antidepressant and antiepileptic effects. PMID:27561095

  18. Effects of the Aqueous Extract of Anethum graveolens Leaves on Seizure Induced by Pentylenetetrazole in Mice

    PubMed Central

    ARASH, Akaberi; MOHAMMAD, Mohammad-Zadeh; JAMAL, Mirmoosavi Seyed; MOHAMMAD, Tazari Ali; AZAM, Abarashi

    2013-01-01

    Background: In this study, the aqueous extract of Anethum graveolens (dill) leaves was studied for its effects on treating convulsions and epilepsy, by using a pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) kindling model. The evaluated plant has a traditional medical reputation for profound anticonvulsant activities, additionally, dill has been claimed to exhibit anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties. Methods: For the PTZ kindling induction, mice were given a dose of PTZ (37 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) every other day, and seizure stages were precisely recorded. During and after kindling, the effects of the non-toxic doses of the aqueous extracts (100, 250, and 400 mg/kg) on seizure latency in stage 2 (S2L), seizure latency in stage 4 (S4L), and seizure duration in stage 5 (S5D) were measured. Results: The aqueous extract of dill leaves had a noticeable anticonvulsant effect. The 400 mg/kg dose of the extract sample decreased with S5D (P < 0.05), and increased with S2L and S4L significantly (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01, respectively). Conclusion: The obtained data shows that the aqueous extract possesses anticonvulsant activity against seizure induced by PTZ. The presence of anticonvulsant compounds in this medicinal herb suggests further activity and guided fractionation studies in order to introduce this plant as a valuable source of anticonvulsant agents. PMID:24643194

  19. Role of cinnarizine and nifedipine on anticonvulsant effect of sodium valproate and carbamazepine in maximal electroshock and pentylenetetrazole model of seizures in mice

    PubMed Central

    Brahmane, Ranjana I.; Wanmali, Vikrant V.; Pathak, Swanand S.; Salwe, Kartik J.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of calcium channel blockers (CCBs) cinnarizine and nifedipine on maximal electroshock (MES)-induced and pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced convulsions and also their effect in combination with conventional antiepileptic drugs (CAED). Materials and Methods: For this study, Swiss albino mice were used. Effects of cinnarizine (30 mg/kg), nifedipine (5 mg/kg), sodium valproate (300 mg/kg) and carbamazepine (8 mg/kg) alone and in combination were studied in MES and PTZ seizure models. Abolition of hind limb tonic extension was an index of anticonvulsant activity in MES, while for PTZ seizures, failure to observe even a single episode of tonic spasm for 5 s duration for 1 h was the index. With this, percentage protection was calculated and statistical analysis was carried out using Fisher’s exact test (Ovvind Langsrud software, German version). Results: In MES seizures, augmented effects were obtained when cinnarizine was combined with sodium valproate, i.e. 100%. In PTZ-induced seizures, augmented effects were obtained when nifedipine was combined with sodium valproate, i.e. 100%. Thus, cinnarizine added to sodium valproate therapy produces significant protection against MES seizures while nifedipine added to sodium valproate therapy produces significant protection against PTZ seizures. Conclusion: The results provide a lead for potential benefit of adding CCBs to sodium valproate in the treatment of epilepsy, which needs to be explored further. PMID:21350614

  20. [Ecstatic seizures].

    PubMed

    Likhachev, S A; Astapenko, A V; Osos, E L; Zmachynskaya, O L; Gvishch, T G

    2015-01-01

    Ecstatic seizures is a rare manifestation of epilepsy. They were described for the first time by F.M. Dostoevsky. Currently, the description of ecstatic seizures is possible to find in the scientific literature. The description of the own observation of a patient with emotional-affective seizures is presented. A role of the anterior insular cortex in the ecstatic seizures origin is discussed. The similarities between the feelings reported during ecstatic seizures and the feelings experienced under the effect of stimulant addictive drugs are described. The possible reasons of the low frequency of emotional-affective seizures are considered. PMID:26356170

  1. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in large doses attenuate seizures, cognitive impairment, and hippocampal oxidative DNA damage in young kindled rats.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Wahab, Basel A; Al-Qahtani, Jobran M; El-Safty, Samy A

    2015-01-01

    Omega-3 (OM3) dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids have promising seizure-protective effects, as well as enhancing effects of cognitive development and memory-related learning. This study aimed to explore the effect of large doses of OM3 on cognitive impairment and hippocampal oxidative DNA damage produced by seizures in epileptic children using a PTZ-kindled young rat model. Cognitive functions, biomarkers of oxidative stress, and DNA damage were assessed in PTZ-kindled young rats (30 mg/kg, i.p. once every other day for 13 injections) pretreated with OM3 (200-500 mg/kg, p.o.). Pretreatment with OM3 at the tested doses significantly attenuated PTZ-induced seizures and decreased cognitive impairment in both passive avoidance and elevated plus maze tests in the PTZ-kindled rats. Moreover, OM3 significantly attenuated the increase in hippocampal malondialdehyde and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) levels, as well as the decrease in reduced glutathione (GSH) levels and GSH-peroxidase activity induced by PTZ kindling, in a dose-related manner. Relatively large dose levels of OM3 (200-500 mg/kg) effectively attenuated seizures and their associated cognitive deficits, and reduced oxidative stress and hippocampal DNA damage in PTZ-kindled young rats.

  2. Determination of feature generation methods for PTZ camera object tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, Daniel D.; Black, Jonathan T.

    2012-06-01

    Object detection and tracking using computer vision (CV) techniques have been widely applied to sensor fusion applications. Many papers continue to be written that speed up performance and increase learning of artificially intelligent systems through improved algorithms, workload distribution, and information fusion. Military application of real-time tracking systems is becoming more and more complex with an ever increasing need of fusion and CV techniques to actively track and control dynamic systems. Examples include the use of metrology systems for tracking and measuring micro air vehicles (MAVs) and autonomous navigation systems for controlling MAVs. This paper seeks to contribute to the determination of select tracking algorithms that best track a moving object using a pan/tilt/zoom (PTZ) camera applicable to both of the examples presented. The select feature generation algorithms compared in this paper are the trained Scale-Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT) and Speeded Up Robust Features (SURF), the Mixture of Gaussians (MoG) background subtraction method, the Lucas- Kanade optical flow method (2000) and the Farneback optical flow method (2003). The matching algorithm used in this paper for the trained feature generation algorithms is the Fast Library for Approximate Nearest Neighbors (FLANN). The BSD licensed OpenCV library is used extensively to demonstrate the viability of each algorithm and its performance. Initial testing is performed on a sequence of images using a stationary camera. Further testing is performed on a sequence of images such that the PTZ camera is moving in order to capture the moving object. Comparisons are made based upon accuracy, speed and memory.

  3. Resveratrol lacks protective activity against acute seizures in mouse models.

    PubMed

    Tomaciello, Francesca; Leclercq, Karine; Kaminski, Rafal M

    2016-10-01

    Resveratrol (3,4',5-stilbenetriol) is a natural product having diverse anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. The compound has a wide spectrum of pharmacological and metabolic activity, including cardioprotective, neuroprotective, anticarcinogenic and anti-aging effects reported in numerous studies. Some reports also suggest potential anticonvulsant properties of resveratrol. In the present study, we used in mice three different seizure models which are routinely applied in preclinical drug discovery. The protective effects of resveratrol were evaluated in the pentylenetetrazole (PTZ), maximal electroshock (MES) and 6-Hz electrical seizure models. Resveratrol (up to 300mg/kg) administered ip (5-60min pre-treatment time) remained without any protective activity against seizures induced in these models. There was only a trend towards a delay in seizure latency, which reached statistical significance after treatment with resveratrol (100mg/kg; 15min) in case of tonic convulsions induced by PTZ. Phenobarbital (PHB, ip, 45min), used as a reference compound, displayed a clear-cut and dose-dependent protection against seizures in all the models. The ED50 values obtained with PHB were as follows: 7.3mg/kg (PTZ model), 13.3mg/kg (MES model) and 29.7mg/kg (6-Hz model). The present data demonstrate that an acute treatment with resveratrol does not provide any significant protection in three seizure models which collectively are able to detect anticonvulsants with diverse mechanisms of action. However, it cannot be excluded that chronic treatment with resveratrol may offer some protection in these or other seizure models.

  4. Thymoquinone and vitamin C attenuates pentylenetetrazole-induced seizures via activation of GABAB1 receptor in adult rats cortex and hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Ikram; Badshah, Haroon; Naseer, Muhammad Imran; Lee, Hae Young; Kim, Myeong Ok

    2015-03-01

    Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder that leads to neuronal excitability and provoke various forms of cellular reorganization in the brain. In this study, we investigate the anti-convulsant and neuroprotective effects of thymoquinone (TQ) and vitamin C against pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced generalized seizures. Epileptic seizures were induced in adult rats using systemic intraperitoneal injections of PTZ (50 mg/kg) for 7 days. Animals pretreated with either TQ or vitamin C or in combination attenuated PTZ-induced seizures and mortality in rats as well neurodegeneration in the cells. Compared to PTZ, TQ and vitamin C significantly prolonged the onset of seizures (p > 0.05) as well decrease the high-grade seizures. Analysis of electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings revealed that TQ or vitamin C supplementation significantly reduced polyspike and epileptiform discharges. Epileptic seizures caused a decline in expression of gamma-aminobutyric acid B1 receptor (GABAB1R) (p > 0.05), unchanged expression of protein kinase A (PKA), decreased calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) (p > 0.05) and inhibit the phosphorylation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) (p > 0.05) in cortex and hippocampus, respectively, compared with control. Changes in expression of GABAB1R, CaMKII and CREB by PTZ were reversed by TQ and vitamin C supplementation. Moreover, PTZ significantly increased Bax, decreased Bcl-2 expression and finally the activation of caspase-3. TQ and vitamin C pretreatment reversed all these deleterious effects induced by PTZ. TQ and vitamin C showed anticonvulsant effects via activation of GABAB1R/CaMKII/CREB pathway and suggest a potential therapeutic role in epilepsy. PMID:25429759

  5. Thymoquinone and vitamin C attenuates pentylenetetrazole-induced seizures via activation of GABAB1 receptor in adult rats cortex and hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Ikram; Badshah, Haroon; Naseer, Muhammad Imran; Lee, Hae Young; Kim, Myeong Ok

    2015-03-01

    Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder that leads to neuronal excitability and provoke various forms of cellular reorganization in the brain. In this study, we investigate the anti-convulsant and neuroprotective effects of thymoquinone (TQ) and vitamin C against pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced generalized seizures. Epileptic seizures were induced in adult rats using systemic intraperitoneal injections of PTZ (50 mg/kg) for 7 days. Animals pretreated with either TQ or vitamin C or in combination attenuated PTZ-induced seizures and mortality in rats as well neurodegeneration in the cells. Compared to PTZ, TQ and vitamin C significantly prolonged the onset of seizures (p > 0.05) as well decrease the high-grade seizures. Analysis of electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings revealed that TQ or vitamin C supplementation significantly reduced polyspike and epileptiform discharges. Epileptic seizures caused a decline in expression of gamma-aminobutyric acid B1 receptor (GABAB1R) (p > 0.05), unchanged expression of protein kinase A (PKA), decreased calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) (p > 0.05) and inhibit the phosphorylation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) (p > 0.05) in cortex and hippocampus, respectively, compared with control. Changes in expression of GABAB1R, CaMKII and CREB by PTZ were reversed by TQ and vitamin C supplementation. Moreover, PTZ significantly increased Bax, decreased Bcl-2 expression and finally the activation of caspase-3. TQ and vitamin C pretreatment reversed all these deleterious effects induced by PTZ. TQ and vitamin C showed anticonvulsant effects via activation of GABAB1R/CaMKII/CREB pathway and suggest a potential therapeutic role in epilepsy.

  6. Effect of age and anticonvulsants on seizure threshold during bilateral electroconvulsive therapy with brief-pulse stimulus: A chart-based analysis

    PubMed Central

    Nitturkar, Abhishek R.; Sinha, Preeti; Bagewadi, Virupakshappa I.; Thirthalli, Jagadisha

    2016-01-01

    Background: Efficacy and adverse effects of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) depend on the extent to which the electrical stimulus exceeds patients' seizure thresholds (STs). Titration method of estimating ST is recommended. Age and co-prescribed anticonvulsants (ACs) are known to affect ST. Literature on ST in bilateral ECT (BLECT) is sparse. Objective: To explore the clinical and demographic determinants of ST in a clinically representative sample of patients prescribed with BLECT. Materials and Methods: ECT records of 640 patients who received BLECT in 2011 in an academic psychiatric setting were studied. Demographic, clinical, pharmacological, and ECT details were analyzed. As per the standard practice, during the 1st ECT session, ST was determined by titration method, starting with 30 milli-Coulombs (mC) and increasing by 30 mC and thence in steps of 60 mC. Increase in ST over up to 6th session of ECT was noted. Receiver operating characteristic curve was used to find age cut-off with high specificity for ST ≥120 mC. The associations of ST and increase in ST with the age cut-off and other clinical factors were assessed using Chi-square test and logistic regression analysis. Results: The mean age was 30.98 years (+11.23 years) and mean ST at 1st ECT session was 130.36 mC (+51.96 mC). There was significantly high positive correlation (r = 0.37, P < 0.001) between age and ST. Cut-off age of 45 years had high specificity: Only 4.6% of those older than 45 years had ST <120 mC. Higher proportion of patients on AC had ST ≥120 mC. These associations were seen even after controlling for potential confounds of each other using logistic regression analysis. The results were similar for increase in ST over the course of ECT. Sex, diagnosis, use of antipsychotics, antidepressants, lithium, and benzodiazepines (BZPs) had no effect on ST or its increase. Conclusions: For BLECT using brief-pulse stimulus, ST depends on age and use of AC. For patients above the age of 45

  7. Environmental enrichment restores cognitive deficits induced by prenatal maternal seizure.

    PubMed

    Xie, Tao; Wang, Wei-ping; Jia, Li-jing; Mao, Zhuo-feng; Qu, Zhen-zhen; Luan, Shao-qun; Kan, Min-chen

    2012-08-27

    Maternal seizure has adverse effects on brain histology as well as on learning and memory ability in progeny. An enriched environment (EE) is known to promote structural changes in the brain and improve cognitive and motor deficits following a variety of brain injuries. Whether EE treatment in early postnatal periods could restore cognitive impairment induced by prenatal maternal seizure is unknown. Adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly separated into two groups and were injected intraperitoneally either saline or pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) for 30 days. Then the fully kindled rats and control animals were allowed to mate. PTZ administration was continued until delivery, while the control group received saline at the same time. After weaning at postnatal day 22, one-half of the male offspring in the control and in the prenatal maternal group were given the environmental enrichment treatment through all the experiments until they were tested. Morris water maze testing was performed at 8 weeks of age. Western blot and synaptic ultrastructure analysis were then performed. We found that EE treatment reversed spatial learning deficits induced by prenatal maternal seizure. An EE also reversed the changes in synaptic ultrastructure following prenatal maternal seizure. In addition, prenatal maternal seizure significantly decreased phosphorylation states of cAMP response element binding (CREB) in the hippocampus, whereas EE reversed this reduced expression. These findings suggest that EE treatment on early postnatal periods could be a potential therapy for improving cognitive deficits induced by prenatal maternal seizure.

  8. Pentylenetetrazol-induced seizure-like behavior and neural hyperactivity in the medicinal leech.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Elizabeth; Burrell, Brian

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the capacity of a known pro-epileptic drug, pentylenetetrazol (PTZ), to elicit seizure-like activity in the medicinal leech, Hirudo verbana. During in vivo experiments, PTZ elicited increased motor activity in a concentration-dependent manner with the highest concentration (10 mM) eliciting episodes of highly uncoordinated exploratory and swimming behavior. Co-application of the anti-epileptic drug, phenytoin, failed to reduce the absolute amount of PTZ-induced motor behavior, but was able to prevent expression of abnormal exploratory and swimming behaviors. During in vitro experiments in which extracellular recordings of connective nerve activity were made, bath application of 1 μM PTZ in Mg(2+)-free saline elicited a significant increase in spontaneous activity. This PTZ-induced increase in activity was completely inhibited by phenytoin. Interestingly, PTZ-induced hyperactivity was also blocked by co-application of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoyl glycerol and the selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitor (SSRI) fluoxetine. These findings suggest that the leech can be a useful system in which to study potential anti-epileptic treatments.

  9. Effects of hydroalcoholic extract of Coriandrum sativum on oxidative damage in pentylenetetrazole-induced seizures in rats

    PubMed Central

    Karami, Reza; Hosseini, Mahmoud; Mohammadpour, Toktam; Ghorbani, Ahmad; Sadeghnia, Hamid Reza; Rakhshandeh, Hassan; Vafaee, Farzaneh; Esmaeilizadeh, Mahdi

    2015-01-01

    Background: An important role for oxidative stress, as a consequence of epileptic seizures, has been suggested. Coriandrum sativum has been shown that have antioxidant effects. Central nervous system depressant effects of C. sativum have also been reported. In this study, the effects of hydroalcoholic extract of aerial parts of the plants on brain tissues oxidative damages following seizures induced by pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) was investigated in rats. Methods: The rats were divided into five groups and treated: (1) Control (saline), (2) PTZ (90 mg/kg, i.p.), (3-5) three doses (100, 500 and 1000 mg/kg of C. sativum extract (CSE) before PTZ. Latencies to the first minimal clonic seizures (MCS) and the first generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS) were recorded. The cortical and hippocampal tissues were then removed for biochemical measurements. Results: The extract significantly increased the MCS and GTCS latencies (P < 0.01, P < 0.001) following PTZ-induced seizures. The malondialdehyde (MDA) levels in both cortical and hippocampal tissues of PTZ group were significantly higher than those of the control animals (P < 0.001). Pretreatment with the extract prevented elevation of the MDA levels (P < 0.010–P < 0.001). Following PTZ administration, a significant reduction in total thiol groups was observed in both cortical and hippocampal tissues (P < 0.050). Pre-treatment with the 500 mg/kg of the extract caused a significant prevention of decreased in total thiol concentration in the cortical tissues (P < 0.010). Conclusion: The present study showed that the hydroalcoholic extract of the aerial parts of C. sativum possess significant antioxidant and anticonvulsant activities. PMID:26056549

  10. Unconstrained Iris Acquisition and Recognition Using COTS PTZ Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venugopalan, Shreyas; Savvides, Marios

    2010-12-01

    Uniqueness of iris patterns among individuals has resulted in the ubiquity of iris recognition systems in virtual and physical spaces, at high security facilities around the globe. Traditional methods of acquiring iris patterns in commercial systems scan the iris when an individual is at a predetermined location in front of the scanner. Most state-of-the-art techniques for unconstrained iris acquisition in literature use expensive custom equipment and are composed of a multicamera setup, which is bulky, expensive, and requires calibration. This paper investigates a method of unconstrained iris acquisition and recognition using a single commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) pan-tilt-zoom (PTZ) camera, that is compact and that reduces the cost of the final system, compared to other proposed hierarchical multicomponent systems. We employ state-of-the-art techniques for face detection and a robust eye detection scheme using active shape models for accurate landmark localization. Additionally, our system alleviates the need for any calibration stage prior to its use. We present results using a database of iris images captured using our system, while operating in an unconstrained acquisition mode at 1.5 m standoff, yielding an iris diameter in the 150-200 pixels range.

  11. Dopey's seizure.

    PubMed

    Dan, B; Christiaens, F

    1999-06-01

    Angelman syndrome is a neurogenetic condition namely characterized by developmental delay, virtual absence of expressive verbal language, peculiar organization of movement, seizures and happy demeanor. This syndrome has been recognized since 1965, but it seems that Walt Disney presented an original depiction of it in his first full-length animated film, including myoclonic jerks and an apparently generalized tonic-clonic seizure.

  12. Musicogenic seizures.

    PubMed

    Avanzini, Giuliano

    2003-11-01

    Eighty-seven reports of patients with seizures induced by listening and/or playing music and one personal observation are reviewed. Music-induced (or musicogenic) seizures are currently classified among the reflex seizures precipitated by complex stimuli. According to the available information, they are defined as focal seizures due to a discharge involving lateral and mesial temporal and orbitofrontal areas. The specific musical component responsible for seizure precipitation is still undetermined. An important role is attributed to the emotional aspect of music. The existence of this rare disorder should be borne in mind by neurologists, who should also be aware of the existing musical test batteries that may help in understanding better the nature of triggering mechanisms responsible for this unique pathological condition. The implementations of the results of ongoing investigations on brain processing of musical information will advance our understanding of the mechanisms responsible for the transition from interictal to ictal phases of epilepsy. PMID:14681120

  13. The role for nitric oxide on the effects of hydroalcoholic extract of Achillea wilhelmsii on seizure

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Mahmoud; Harandizadeh, Fatemeh; Niazmand, Saeed; Soukhtanloo, Mohammad; Faizpour, Azadeh; Ghasemabady, Marzieh

    2014-01-01

    Objective : Nitric oxide (NO) plays an important role both as a consequence and as a cause of epileptic seizures. Regarding the central nervous system depressant effects of Achillea wilhelmsii (A. wilhelmsii), as well the effects of the plant on NO, this study was aimed to elucidate the possible role for nitric oxide on the effects of hydroalcoholic extract of A. wilhelmsii on pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizures. Materials and Methods: Fifty-six male Wistar rats were divided into 7 groups (n=8 in each group) and treated with (1) normal saline, (2) normal saline before pentylenetetrazole (PTZ, 90 mg/kg), (3-7) A. wilhelmsii extract (100, 200, 400, 800, and 1200 mg/kg) before PTZ. Latency to first minimal colonic seizure (MCS) and the first generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS) as well as the mortality rate were recorded. The brain tissues were then removed for biochemical measurements. Fisher’s exact probability test as well as analysis of variance (ANOVA), followed by Tukey’s test were used for statistical evaluation. Results: Treatment with 100- 1200 mg/kg of the extract did not affect MCS latencies. 400 mg/kg of the extract prolonged GTCS latency (p<0.001), however, the lower and higher doses were not effective. Nitric oxide metabolites concentrations in the hippocampal tissues of the animals treated with 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg of the extract were increased compared with saline (p<0.05-p<0.01). Conclusion: The present study showed that hydroalcoholic extract of A. wilhelmsii affects NO metabolites in brain tissues as well the severity of seizures in PTZ-induced seizure model. PMID:25068139

  14. Effect of magnesium sulfate on hyperthermia and pentylen-tetrazol-induced seizure in developing rats

    PubMed Central

    Ghadimkhani, Maryam; Saboory, Ehsan; Roshan-Milani, Shiva; Mohammdi, Sedra; Rasmi, Yousef

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Febrile seizures (FS) are the most common type of convulsive events among children. Its prevalence has been estimated to be 2-5% in children between 3 months and 5 years old. Also, blood and CSF magnesium levels have been demonstrated to be reduced in children with FS. This study investigates the effect of MgSo4 pretreatment on the behaviors caused by hyperthermia (HT) and effect of these two on pentylen-tetrazol (PTZ)-induced seizure later in life. Materials and Methods: Thirty two Wistar rats were assigned to 2 groups: saline-hyperthermia-pentylentetrazol (SHP) and magnesium-hyperthermia-pentylentetrazol (MHP). In both groups, HT was induced at the age of 18-19 days old. Before the HT, MHP group received MgSo4 and SHP group received normal saline intraperitoneally (IP). Behaviors of the rats were recorded during the HT. Then, in half of each group (n=8) at the age of 25-26 days old and in other half at the age of 78-79 days, seizure was induced by PTZ. Results: The HT successfully caused convulsive behaviors in the rats and pretreatment with MgSo4 before HT attenuated HT-induced convulsive behaviors. PTZ-induced seizures a week later was more severe than those of 2 months later. Conclusion: It can be concluded that pretreatment with MgSO4 inhibits HT-induced seizure and, in a long run, this intervention reduced PTZ-induced seizure later in life. PMID:27482341

  15. Dopey's seizure.

    PubMed

    Dan, B; Christiaens, F

    1999-06-01

    Angelman syndrome is a neurogenetic condition namely characterized by developmental delay, virtual absence of expressive verbal language, peculiar organization of movement, seizures and happy demeanor. This syndrome has been recognized since 1965, but it seems that Walt Disney presented an original depiction of it in his first full-length animated film, including myoclonic jerks and an apparently generalized tonic-clonic seizure. PMID:10452923

  16. Hierarchical ensemble of background models for PTZ-based video surveillance.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ning; Wu, Hefeng; Lin, Liang

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we study a novel hierarchical background model for intelligent video surveillance with the pan-tilt-zoom (PTZ) camera, and give rise to an integrated system consisting of three key components: background modeling, observed frame registration, and object tracking. First, we build the hierarchical background model by separating the full range of continuous focal lengths of a PTZ camera into several discrete levels and then partitioning the wide scene at each level into many partial fixed scenes. In this way, the wide scenes captured by a PTZ camera through rotation and zoom are represented by a hierarchical collection of partial fixed scenes. A new robust feature is presented for background modeling of each partial scene. Second, we locate the partial scenes corresponding to the observed frame in the hierarchical background model. Frame registration is then achieved by feature descriptor matching via fast approximate nearest neighbor search. Afterwards, foreground objects can be detected using background subtraction. Last, we configure the hierarchical background model into a framework to facilitate existing object tracking algorithms under the PTZ camera. Foreground extraction is used to assist tracking an object of interest. The tracking outputs are fed back to the PTZ controller for adjusting the camera properly so as to maintain the tracked object in the image plane. We apply our system on several challenging scenarios and achieve promising results.

  17. Generalized tonic-clonic seizure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Seizure - grand mal; Grand mal seizure; Seizure - generalized; Epilepsy - generalized seizure ... occur as part of a repeated, chronic illness (epilepsy). Some seizures are due to psychological problems (psychogenic).

  18. Cognitive performance and convulsion risk after experimentally-induced febrile-seizures in rat.

    PubMed

    Rajab, Ebrahim; Abdeen, Zahra; Hassan, Zuhair; Alsaffar, Yousif; Mandeel, Mohammad; Al Shawaaf, Fatima; Al-Ansari, Sali; Kamal, Amer

    2014-05-01

    Many reports indicated that small percentage of children with febrile seizures develop epilepsy and cognitive disorders later in adulthood. In addition, the neuronal network of the hippocampus was reported to be deranged in adult animals after being exposed to hyperthermia-induced seizures in their neonatal life. The aims of this study were to investigate (1) latency and probability of seizures, (2) spatial learning and memory, in adult rats after neonatal hyperthermia-induced febrile seizures (FS). Prolonged FS were elicited in 10-day old, male Sprague Dawleys (n=11/group) by exposure to heated air (48-52 °C) for 30 min; control rats were exposed to 30 °C air. After 1.5 months the animal's cognitive performance was assessed by 5 day trial in the Morris water maze. In another experiment the latency and probability of seizures were measured in response to pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) injections (increased doses ranged from 7 to 140 mg/kg; i.p.). In water maze, both groups showed improvements in escape latency and distance swam to reach the platform; effects were significantly greater in control versus hyperthermia-treated animals on days 3 and 4. Latency and probability of PTZ-induced seizures were shorter and higher respectively, in hyperthermia-treated animals compared to controls. We concluded that FS in neonatal rats leads to enhanced susceptibility for seizures, as well as cognitive deficits in adults.

  19. [Pentylenetetrazole kindling in rats: whether neurodegeneration is associated with manifestations of seizure activity?].

    PubMed

    Pavlova, T V; Iakovleva, A A; Stepanichev, M Iu; Guliaeva, N V

    2005-07-01

    Structural changes in neurons and oxidative stress in hippocampus were studied in rats "tolerant" (TR) and susceptible (SR) to tonic and clonic seizures in pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) kindling. The number of normal neurons was significantly decreased in CA1 subfield of TR hippocampus after 11 injections of PTZ, while in SR neuronal cell loss was evident in CA1 and fascia dentata. In both groups, neuronal cell loss was accompanied by increase in damaged neuron number in CA4 subfield. After 21 injections of PTZ, the decrease in normal neuron number was revealed in CA1 subfield of both TR and SR, while the number of damaged neurons was above the control level in hippocampal subfields CA1 and CA4 in TR only. Glutathione level was decreased in hippocampus of both TR and SR as compared with control rats. Thus, rats tolerant to PTZ-induced convulsions demonstrated oxidative stress and neurodegeneration in hippocampus. The results suggest that, in PTZ kindling model, oxidative damage of neurons resulting in neurodegeneration in hippocampus is not directly related to the convulsive activity.

  20. Integration of multispectral face recognition and multi-PTZ camera automated surveillance for security applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chung-Hao; Yao, Yi; Chang, Hong; Koschan, Andreas; Abidi, Mongi

    2013-06-01

    Due to increasing security concerns, a complete security system should consist of two major components, a computer-based face-recognition system and a real-time automated video surveillance system. A computerbased face-recognition system can be used in gate access control for identity authentication. In recent studies, multispectral imaging and fusion of multispectral narrow-band images in the visible spectrum have been employed and proven to enhance the recognition performance over conventional broad-band images, especially when the illumination changes. Thus, we present an automated method that specifies the optimal spectral ranges under the given illumination. Experimental results verify the consistent performance of our algorithm via the observation that an identical set of spectral band images is selected under all tested conditions. Our discovery can be practically used for a new customized sensor design associated with given illuminations for an improved face recognition performance over conventional broad-band images. In addition, once a person is authorized to enter a restricted area, we still need to continuously monitor his/her activities for the sake of security. Because pantilt-zoom (PTZ) cameras are capable of covering a panoramic area and maintaining high resolution imagery for real-time behavior understanding, researches in automated surveillance systems with multiple PTZ cameras have become increasingly important. Most existing algorithms require the prior knowledge of intrinsic parameters of the PTZ camera to infer the relative positioning and orientation among multiple PTZ cameras. To overcome this limitation, we propose a novel mapping algorithm that derives the relative positioning and orientation between two PTZ cameras based on a unified polynomial model. This reduces the dependence on the knowledge of intrinsic parameters of PTZ camera and relative positions. Experimental results demonstrate that our proposed algorithm presents substantially

  1. Effects of endogenous histamine on seizure development of pentylenetetrazole-induced kindling in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li-San; Chen, Zhong; Huang, Yu-Wen; Hu, Wei-Wei; Wei, Er-Qing; Yanai, Kazuhiko

    2003-09-01

    This study was performed to investigate whether or not endogenous histamine can protect seizure development of pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced kindling in rats. An intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection with clobenpropit (5 and 10 microg), a representative H(3)-antagonist, significantly prolonged the onset of kindling and inhibited the seizure stages in a dose-dependent manner. Its action was significantly reversed by both immepip (2 microg, i.c.v.), an H(3)-agonist, and alpha-fluoromethylhistidine (alpha-FMH, 10 microg, i.c.v.), a selective histidine decarboxylase inhibitor. alpha-FMH (20 microg, i.c.v.) and pyrilamine (1 and 5 mg/kg i.p.), a classical H(1)-antagonist, markedly augmented the severity of seizure development of PTZ-induced kindling. Therefore, these results indicate that brain endogenous histamine plays a certain protective role on seizure development of PTZ-induced kindling in rats, and that its protective roles are mediated by H(1)-receptors.

  2. Wnt/β-catenin signaling mediates the seizure-facilitating effect of postischemic reactive astrocytes after pentylenetetrazole-kindling.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jialei; Zhang, Xiufen; Wu, Yin; Zhao, Bo; Liu, Xunyuan; Pan, Yuanhang; Liu, Yonghong; Ding, Yuqiang; Qiu, Mengsheng; Wang, Ya-Zhou; Zhao, Gang

    2016-06-01

    Ischemia not only leads to tissue damage, but also induces seizures, which in turn worsens the outcome of ischemia. Recent studies have revealed the impaired homeostatic functions of reactive astrocytes, which were thought to facilitate the development of seizures. However, how this phenotype of reactive astrocytes is regulated remains unclear. Here, using pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-kindling model, we investigated the roles of reactive astrocytes and their intracellular Wnt/β-catenin signaling in the ischemia-increased seizure susceptibility. Our data showed that somatosensory cortical ischemia significantly increased the susceptibility to PTZ-induced seizure. Genetic ablation of Nestin-positive reactive astrocytes significantly decreased the incidence and severity of seizures. By using a Wnt signaling reporter mice line Topgal mice, we found that Wnt/β-catenin signaling was upregulated in reactive astrocytes after ischemia. Depletion of β-catenin in reactive astrocytes significantly decreased the susceptibility of seizures and the expression of c-Fos induced by PTZ in the ischemic cortex. Overexpression of β-catenin in reactive astrocytes, in contrast, significantly increased seizure susceptibility and the expression of c-Fos. Furthermore, the expression of aquaporin-4 (AQP-4) and inwardly rectifying K(+) channel 4.1 (Kir4.1), two molecules reportedly associated with seizure development, was oppositely affected in reactive astrocytes with β-catenin depletion or overexpression. Taken together, these data indicated that astrocytic Wnt/β-catenin signaling accounts, at least partially, for the ischemia-increased seizure susceptibility. Inhibiting Wnt/β-catenin signaling may be utilized in the future for preventing postischemic seizures.

  3. Partial (focal) seizure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Jacksonian seizure; Seizure - partial (focal); Temporal lobe seizure; Epilepsy - partial seizures ... Abou-Khalil BW, Gallagher MJ, Macdonald RL. Epilepsies. In: Daroff ... Practice . 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 101. ...

  4. Nitric oxide content measured by ESR-spectroscopy in the rat brain is increased during pentylenetetrazole-induced seizures.

    PubMed

    Bashkatova, V; Vitskova, G; Narkevich, V; Vanin, A; Mikoyan, V; Rayevsky, K

    2000-06-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) content in rat cerebral cortex was measured using Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. A nearly fivefold elevation in NO content was found at the peak time of pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizures. The administration of N-nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA), a competitive inhibitor of NO-synthase, at the dose of 250 mg/kg, completely prevented the NO increase induced by PTZ, although clonic convulsions in the animals have been observed. L-NNA (10 mg/kg) was shown to delay the onset of clonic seizures as well as to shorten the latency of the first convulsive twitch. The level of lipid peroxidation secondary products measured as the content of thiobarbituric acid reactive species (TBARS) was increased in the cerebral cortex of PTZ-treated rats. L-NNA (250 mg/kg) failed to prevent the increased TBARS level produced by PTZ. The results support the notion that NO may play a trigger role in the pathophysiology of convulsive seizures. PMID:10984194

  5. Controlling Seizures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    This article describes how an implantable device could greatly improve the quality of life for people with epilepsy. Gabe Anderson was diagnosed with bilateral heterotopia, a congenital condition that can lead to the onset of complex partial seizures stemming from both hemispheres of the brain. In early 2004, Gabe became one of the first 35…

  6. Lipopolysaccharide potentiates hyperthermia-induced seizures

    PubMed Central

    Eun, Baik-Lin; Abraham, Jayne; Mlsna, Lauren; Kim, Min Jung; Koh, Sookyong

    2015-01-01

    Background Prolonged febrile seizures (FS) have both acute and long-lasting effects on the developing brain. Because FS are often associated with peripheral infection, we aimed to develop a preclinical model of FS that simulates fever and immune activation in order to facilitate the implementation of targeted therapy after prolonged FS in young children. Methods The innate immune activator lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was administered to postnatal day 14 rat (200 μg/kg) and mouse (100 μg/kg) pups 2–2.5 h prior to hyperthermic seizures (HT) induced by hair dryer or heat lamp. To determine whether simulation of infection enhances neuronal excitability, latency to seizure onset, threshold temperature and total number of seizures were quantified. Behavioral seizures were correlated with electroencephalographic changes in rat pups. Seizure-induced proinflammatory cytokine production was assessed in blood samples at various time points after HT. Seizure-induced microglia activation in the hippocampus was quantified using Cx3cr1GFP/+ mice. Results Lipopolysaccharide priming increased susceptibility of rats and mice to hyperthemic seizures and enhanced seizure-induced proinflammatory cytokine production and microglial activation. Conclusions Peripheral inflammation appears to work synergistically with hyperthermia to potentiate seizures and to exacerbate seizure-induced immune responses. By simulating fever, a regulated increase in body temperature from an immune challenge, we developed a more clinically relevant animal model of prolonged FS. PMID:26357586

  7. Automated seizure detection using EKG.

    PubMed

    Osorio, Ivan

    2014-03-01

    Changes in heart rate, most often increases, are associated with the onset of epileptic seizures and may be used in lieu of cortical activity for automated seizure detection. The feasibility of this aim was tested on 241 clinical seizures from 81 subjects admitted to several Epilepsy Centers for invasive monitoring for evaluation for epilepsy surgery. The performance of the EKG-based seizure detection algorithm was compared to that of a validated algorithm applied to electrocorticogram (ECoG). With the most sensitive detection settings [threshold T: 1.15; duration D: 0 s], 5/241 seizures (2%) were undetected (false negatives) and with the highest [T: 1.3; D: 5 s] settings, the number of false negative detections rose to 34 (14%). The rate of potential false positive (PFP) detections was 9.5/h with the lowest and 1.1/h with the highest T, D settings. Visual review of 336 ECoG segments associated with PFPs revealed that 120 (36%) were associated with seizures, 127 (38%) with bursts of epileptiform discharges and only 87 (26%) were true false positives. Electrocardiographic (EKG)-based seizure onset detection preceded clinical onset by 0.8 s with the lowest and followed it by 13.8 s with the highest T, D settings. Automated EKG-based seizure detection is feasible and has potential clinical utility given its ease of acquisition, processing, high signal/noise and ergonomic advantages viz-a-viz EEG (electroencephalogram) or ECoG. Its use as an "electronic" seizure diary will remedy in part, the inaccuracies of those generated by patients/care-givers in a cost-effective manner.

  8. Unilateral Hypothalamus Inactivation Prevents PTZ Kindling Development through Hippocampal Orexin Receptor 1 Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Akbari, Nasibe; Salmani, Mahmoud Elahdadi; Goudarzvand, Mahdi; LashkarBoluki, Taghi; Goudarzi, Iran; Abrari, Kataneh

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Epilepsy is a neural disorder in which abnormal plastic changes during short and long term periods lead to increased excitability of brain tissue. Kindling is an animal model of epileptogenesis which results in changes of synaptic plasticity due to repetitive electrical or chemical sub-convulsive stimulations of the brain. Lateral hypothalamus, as the main niche of orexin neurons with extensive projections, is involved in sleep and wakefulness and so it affects the excitability of the brain. Therefore, we investigated whether lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) inactivation or orexin-A receptor blocking could change convulsive behavior of acute and kindled PTZ treated animals and if glutamate has a role in this regard. Methods Kindling was induced by 40 mg/kg PTZ, every 48 hours up to 13 injections to each rat. Three consecutive stages 4 or 5 of convulsive behavior were used to ensure kindling. Lidocaine was injected stereotaxically to inactivate LHA, unilaterally. SB334867 used for orexin receptor 1 (OX1R) blocking administered in CSF. Results We demonstrated that LHA inactivation prevented PTZ kindling and hence, excitability evolution. Hippocampal glutamate content was decreased due to LHA inactivation, OX1R antagonist infusion, lidocaine injection and kindled groups. In accordance, OX1R antagonist (SB334867) and lidocaine injection decreased PTZ single dose induced convulsive behavior. While orexin-A i.c.v. infusion increased hippocampal glutamate content, it did not change PTZ induced convulsive intensity. Discussion It is concluded that LHA inactivation prevented kindling development probably through orexin receptor antagonism. CSF orexin probably acts as an inhibitory step on convulsive intensity through another unknown process. PMID:25436086

  9. Anticonvulsant activity of β-caryophyllene against pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Cleide Correia; de Oliveira, Clarissa Vasconcelos; Grigoletto, Jéssica; Ribeiro, Leandro Rodrigo; Funck, Vinícius Rafael; Grauncke, Ana Cláudia Beck; de Souza, Thaíze Lopes; Souto, Naieli Schiefelbein; Furian, Ana Flávia; Menezes, Irwin Rose Alencar; Oliveira, Mauro Schneider

    2016-03-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that plant-derived extracts and their isolated components are useful for treatment of seizures and, hence, constitute a valuable source of new antiepileptic drugs with improved efficacy and better adverse effect profile. β-Caryophyllene is a natural bicyclic sesquiterpene that occurs in a wide range of plant species and displays a number of biological actions, including neuroprotective activity. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that β-caryophyllene displays anticonvulsant effects. In addition, we investigated the effect of β-caryophyllene on behavioral parameters and on seizure-induced oxidative stress. Adult C57BL/6 mice received increasing doses of β-caryophyllene (0, 10, 30, or 100mg/kg). After 60 min, we measured the latencies to myoclonic and generalized seizures induced by pentylenetetrazole (PTZ, 60 mg/kg). We found that β-caryophyllene increased the latency to myoclonic jerks induced by PTZ. This result was confirmed by electroencephalographic analysis. In a separate set of experiments, we found that mice treated with an anticonvulsant dose of β-caryophyllene (100mg/kg) displayed an improved recognition index in the object recognition test. This effect was not accompanied by behavioral changes in the open-field, rotarod, or forced swim tests. Administration of an anticonvulsant dose of β-caryophyllene (100mg/kg) did not prevent PTZ-induced oxidative stress (i.e., increase in the levels of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances or the decrease in nonprotein thiols content). Altogether, the present data suggest that β-caryophyllene displays anticonvulsant activity against seizures induced by PTZ in mice. Since no adverse effects were observed in the same dose range of the anticonvulsant effect, β-caryophyllene should be further evaluated in future development of new anticonvulsant drugs. PMID:26827298

  10. Nitric oxide mediates the anticonvulsant effects of thalidomide on pentylenetetrazole-induced clonic seizures in mice.

    PubMed

    Payandemehr, Borna; Rahimian, Reza; Gooshe, Maziar; Bahremand, Arash; Gholizadeh, Ramtin; Berijani, Sina; Ahmadi-Dastgerdi, Mohammad; Aminizade, Mehdi; Sarreshte-Dari, Ali; Dianati, Vahid; Amanlou, Massoud; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza

    2014-05-01

    Thalidomide is an old glutamic acid derivative which was initially used as a sedative medication but withdrawn from the market due to the high incidence of teratogenicity. Recently, it has reemerged because of its potential for counteracting number of diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders. Other than the antiemetic and hypnotic aspects, thalidomide exerts some anticonvulsant properties in experimental settings. However, the underlying mechanisms of thalidomide actions are not fully realized yet. Some investigations revealed that thalidomide could elicit immunomodulatory or neuromodulatory properties by affecting different targets, including cytokines (such as TNF α), neurotransmitters, and nitric oxide (NO). In this regard, we used a model of clonic seizure induced by pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) in male NMRI mice to investigate whether the anticonvulsant effect of thalidomide is affected through modulation of the l-arginine-nitric oxide pathway or not. Injection of a single effective dose of thalidomide (10 mg/kg, i.p. or higher) significantly increased the seizure threshold (P<0.05). On the one hand, pretreatment with low and per se noneffective dose of l-arginine [NO precursor] (10, 30 and 60 mg/kg) prevented the anticonvulsant effect of thalidomide. On the other hand, NOS inhibitors [l-NAME and 7-NI] augmented the anticonvulsant effect of a subeffective dose of thalidomide (1 and 5 mg/kg, i.p.) at relatively low doses. Meanwhile, several doses of aminoguanidine [an inducible NOS inhibitor] (20, 50 and 100 mg/kg) failed to alter the anticonvulsant effect of thalidomide significantly. In summary, our findings demonstrated that the l-arginine-nitric oxide pathway can be involved in the anticonvulsant properties of thalidomide, and the role of constitutive nNOS is prominent in the reported neuroprotective feature.

  11. Classification of compounds for prevention of NMDLA-induced seizures/mortality, or maximal electroshock and pentylenetetrazol seizures in mice and antagonism of MK801 binding in vitro.

    PubMed

    Palmer, G C; Harris, E W; Ray, R; Stagnitto, M L; Schmiesing, R J

    1992-01-01

    Intravenous injection of N-methyl-D,L-aspartic acid (NMDLA) into mice produces characteristic convulsions followed by death. The present study was designed to determine the degree of blockade of these seizures/mortality by compounds acting at various subsites on the N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor complex (competitive and noncompetitive antagonists, as well as inhibitors of the strychnine-insensitive glycine subsite, and Zn++ subsite agonists), and also calcium channel blockers, clinically used anticonvulsants, plus selected compounds with activities or structures similar to specific agents chosen. Activity among compounds was correlated to in vitro potency regarding inhibition of binding of MK801 to the ionic channel subsite associated with the NMDA receptor. Furthermore, all compounds were examined for antiseizure properties with respect to tonic hindlimb extension elicited by maximal electroshock (MES) and clonus induced by pentylenetetrazol (PTZ). Drugs were subsequently classified according to their spectra of efficacy in these tests. The following characteristics emerged: 1) agents active at all 3 NMDA mechanisms (convulsions/mortality/MK801 binding) plus MES and PTZ, were MK801 and CPP [3-(2-carboxypiperazin-4-yl) propyl-1-phosphonic acid]; 2) active at all the NMDA mechanisms and MES were ketamine and dextromethorphan; 3) active against NMDLA-induced convulsions/mortality, MES and PTZ, but not MK801 binding, were doxepin, desipramine and diazepam; 4) active against NMDLA-induced convulsions/mortality and MES were des-Me-doxepin, flunarizine and remacemide; 5) active against NMDLA-induced convulsions/mortality and PTZ was nisoldipine; 6) active against only NMDLA-induced convulsions/mortality were chlorpheniramine and iproniazid; 7) active in the MES and PTZ tests were phenobarbital, pentobarbital and valproate; 8) active in the MES test alone were phenytoin and carbamazepine; 9) active against PTZ only was ethosuximide; 10) active only in the in

  12. Omega 3 polyunsaturated fatty acids enhance the protective effect of levetiracetam against seizures, cognitive impairment and hippocampal oxidative DNA damage in young kindled rats.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Wahab, Basel A; Shaikh, Ibrahim A; Khateeb, Masood M; Habeeb, Shafiuddin M

    2015-08-01

    Levetiracetam (LEV) is a unique, effective, relatively safe antiepileptic drug that preferentially interacts with synaptic vesicle protein 2A (SV2A). This study aimed to explore the effect of combined treatment of LEV with omega 3 (OM3) on cognitive impairment and hippocampal oxidative stress and DNA damage induced by seizures in the PTZ-kindled young rat model. Cognitive functions, biomarkers of oxidative stress, and DNA damage were assessed in PTZ-kindled young rats pretreated with single and combined treatment of LEV (30mg/kg, i.p.) and OM3 (200mg/kg, p.o.). Pretreatment with LEV and OM3 at the tested doses significantly attenuated PTZ-induced seizures and decreased cognitive impairment in both passive avoidance and elevated plus maze tests in the PTZ-kindled rats. Moreover, the increase in hippocampal glutamate, malondialdehyde and 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) levels, as well as the decrease in reduced glutathione (GSH) levels and GSH-peroxidase and superoxide dismutase activities induced by PTZ kindling, significantly decreased. These effects were higher with combined treatment of LEV with OM3 and significantly more than the observed effects of single LEV or OM3. In conclusion, the combined treatment of LEV with OM3 is more effective in seizure control and alleviating the cognitive impairment induced by PTZ kindling in the young rat model, the effects that result from the decrease in hippocampal oxidative stress and DNA damage which can be attributed to the antioxidant properties of both LEV and OM3. These results may be promising for the use of LEV and OM3 combination in the treatment of epileptic children.

  13. The effects of different fractions of Coriandrum sativum on pentylenetetrazole-induced seizures and brain tissues oxidative damage in rats

    PubMed Central

    Anaeigoudari, Akbar; Hosseini, Mahmoud; Karami, Reza; Vafaee, Farzaneh; Mohammadpour, Toktam; Ghorbani, Ahmad; Sadeghnia, Hamid Reza

    2016-01-01

    Objective: In the present work, the effects of different fractions of Coriandrum sativum (C. sativum), on pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizures and brain tissues oxidative damage were investigated in rats. Materials and Methods: The rats were divided into the following groups: (1) vehicle, (2) PTZ (90 mg/kg), (3) water fraction (WF) of C. sativum (25 and 100 mg/kg), (4) n-butanol fraction (NBF) of C. sativum (25 and 100 mg/kg), and (5) ethyl acetate fraction (EAF) of C. sativum (25 and 100 mg/kg). Results: The first generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS) latency in groups treated with 100 mg /kg of WF or EAF was significantly higher than that of PTZ group (p<0.01). In contrast to WF, the EAF and NBF were not effective in increasing the first minimal clonic seizure (MCS) latency. Malondialdehyde (MDA) levels in both cortical and hippocampal tissues of PTZ group were significantly higher than those of control animals (p<0.001). Pretreatment with WF, NBF, or EAF resulted in a significant reduction in the MDA levels of hippocampi (p<0.01 - p<0.001). Following PTZ administration, a significant reduction in total thiol groups was observed in the brain tissues (p<0.05). Pretreatment with WF and NBF significantly elevated thiol concentrations in cortical and hippocampal tissues, respectively (p<0.05). Conclusion: The present study showed that different fractions of C. sativum possess antioxidant activity in the brain and WF and EAF of this plant have anticonvulsant effects. PMID:27222836

  14. Seizure Disorders in Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Seizures that cause a loss of consciousness and violent, jerking movements, called grand mal seizures , are especially ... of seizure that causes loss of consciousness and violent, jerking movements. Intrauterine Device: A small device that ...

  15. Differential operator in seizure detection.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Kaushik

    2012-01-01

    Differential operators can detect significant changes in signals. This has been utilized to enhance the contrast of the seizure signatures in depth EEG or ECoG. We have actually taken normalized exponential of absolute value of single or double derivative of epileptic ECoG. This in short we call differential filtering. Windowed variance operation has been performed to automatically detect seizure onset on differentially filtered signal. A novel method for determining the duration of seizure has also been proposed. Since all operations take only linear time, the whole method is extremely fast. Seven empirical parameters have been introduced whose patient specific thresholding brings down the rate of false detection to a bare minimum. Results of implementation of the methods on the ECoG data of four epileptic patients have been reported with an ROC curve analysis. High value of the area under the ROC curve indicates excellent detection performance.

  16. Treadmill exercise protects against pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures and oxidative stress after traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Silva, Luiz Fernando Almeida; Hoffmann, Maurício Scopel; Gerbatin, Rogério da Rosa; Fiorin, Fernando da Silva; Dobrachinski, Fernando; Mota, Bibiana Castagna; Wouters, Angelica Terezinha Barth; Pavarini, Saulo Petinatti; Soares, Félix Alexandre Antunes; Fighera, Michele Rechia; Royes, Luiz Fernando Freire

    2013-07-15

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of acquired epilepsy, and significant resources are required to develop a better understanding of the pathologic mechanism as targets for potential therapies. Thus, we decided to investigate whether physical exercise after fluid percussion injury (FPI) protects from oxidative and neurochemical alterations as well as from behavioral electroencephalographic (EEG) seizures induced by subeffective convulsive doses of pentylenetetrazol (PTZ; 35 mg/kg). Behavioral and EEG recordings revealed that treadmill physical training increased latency to first clonic and tonic-clonic seizures, attenuated the duration of generalized seizures, and protected against the increase of PTZ-induced Racine scale 5 weeks after neuronal injury. EEG recordings also revealed that physical exercise prevented PTZ-induced amplitude increase in TBI animals. Neurochemical analysis showed that exercise training increased glutathione/oxidized glutathione ratio and glutathione levels per se. Exercise training was also effective against alterations in the redox status, herein characterized by lipid peroxidation (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances), protein carbonyl increase, as well as the inhibition of superoxide dismutase and Na⁺,K⁺-ATPase activities after FPI. On the other hand, histologic analysis with hematoxylin and eosin revealed that FPI induced moderate neuronal damage in cerebral cortex 4 weeks after injury and that physical exercise did not protect against neuronal injury. These data suggest that the ability of physical exercise to reduce FPI-induced seizures is not related to its protection against neuronal damage; however, the effective protection of selected targets, such as Na⁺/K⁺-ATPase elicited by physical exercise, may represent a new line of treatment for post-traumatic seizure susceptibility.

  17. Treadmill Exercise Protects Against Pentylenetetrazol-Induced Seizures and Oxidative Stress after Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Luiz Fernando Almeida; Hoffmann, Maurício Scopel; Gerbatin, Rogério da Rosa; Fiorin, Fernando da Silva; Dobrachinski, Fernando; Mota, Bibiana Castagna; Wouters, Angelica Terezinha Barth; Pavarini, Saulo Petinatti; Soares, Félix Alexandre Antunes; Fighera, Michele Rechia

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of acquired epilepsy, and significant resources are required to develop a better understanding of the pathologic mechanism as targets for potential therapies. Thus, we decided to investigate whether physical exercise after fluid percussion injury (FPI) protects from oxidative and neurochemical alterations as well as from behavioral electroencephalographic (EEG) seizures induced by subeffective convulsive doses of pentylenetetrazol (PTZ; 35 mg/kg). Behavioral and EEG recordings revealed that treadmill physical training increased latency to first clonic and tonic-clonic seizures, attenuated the duration of generalized seizures, and protected against the increase of PTZ-induced Racine scale 5 weeks after neuronal injury. EEG recordings also revealed that physical exercise prevented PTZ-induced amplitude increase in TBI animals. Neurochemical analysis showed that exercise training increased glutathione/oxidized glutathione ratio and glutathione levels per se. Exercise training was also effective against alterations in the redox status, herein characterized by lipid peroxidation (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances), protein carbonyl increase, as well as the inhibition of superoxide dismutase and Na+,K+-ATPase activities after FPI. On the other hand, histologic analysis with hematoxylin and eosin revealed that FPI induced moderate neuronal damage in cerebral cortex 4 weeks after injury and that physical exercise did not protect against neuronal injury. These data suggest that the ability of physical exercise to reduce FPI-induced seizures is not related to its protection against neuronal damage; however, the effective protection of selected targets, such as Na+/K+-ATPase elicited by physical exercise, may represent a new line of treatment for post-traumatic seizure susceptibility. PMID:23530735

  18. Seizures and Teens: Stress, Sleep, & Seizures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shafer, Patricia Osborne

    2007-01-01

    Most parents are used to erratic sleep patterns and mood swings in their teenagers. When these occur in an adolescent with seizures, however, the parent may wonder if sleep and mood problems are related to seizures. Sorting out the cause and effects of sleep in an adolescent with seizures can be confusing. Since stress can be a contributor to both…

  19. Seizure susceptibility of neuropeptide-Y null mutant mice in amygdala kindling and chemical-induced seizure models.

    PubMed

    Shannon, Harlan E; Yang, Lijuan

    2004-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) administered exogenously is anticonvulsant, and, NPY null mutant mice are more susceptible to kainate-induced seizures. In order to better understand the potential role of NPY in epileptogenesis, the present studies investigated the development of amygdala kindling, post-kindling seizure thresholds, and anticonvulsant effects of carbamazepine and levetiracetam in 129S6/SvEv NPY(+/+) and NPY(-/-) mice. In addition, susceptibility to pilocarpine- and kainate-induced seizures was compared in NPY(+/+) and (-/-) mice. The rate of amygdala kindling development did not differ in the NPY(-/-) and NPY(+/+) mice either when kindling stimuli were presented once daily for at least 20 days, or, 12 times daily for 2 days. However, during kindling development, the NPY(-/-) mice had higher seizure severity scores and longer afterdischarge durations than the NPY(+/+) mice. Post-kindling, the NPY(-/-) mice had markedly lower afterdischarge thresholds and longer afterdischarge durations than NPY (+/+) mice. Carbamazepine and levetiracetam increased the seizure thresholds of both NPY (-/-) and (+/+) mice. In addition, NPY (-/-) mice had lower thresholds for both kainate- and pilocarpine-induced seizures. The present results in amygdala kindling and chemical seizure models suggest that NPY may play a more prominent role in determining seizure thresholds and severity of seizures than in events leading to epileptogenesis. In addition, a lack of NPY does not appear to confer drug-resistance in that carbamazepine and levetiracetam were anticonvulsant in both wild type (WT) and NPY null mutant mice.

  20. In-depth performance analysis of an EEG based neonatal seizure detection algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Mathieson, S.; Rennie, J.; Livingstone, V.; Temko, A.; Low, E.; Pressler, R.M.; Boylan, G.B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To describe a novel neurophysiology based performance analysis of automated seizure detection algorithms for neonatal EEG to characterize features of detected and non-detected seizures and causes of false detections to identify areas for algorithmic improvement. Methods EEGs of 20 term neonates were recorded (10 seizure, 10 non-seizure). Seizures were annotated by an expert and characterized using a novel set of 10 criteria. ANSeR seizure detection algorithm (SDA) seizure annotations were compared to the expert to derive detected and non-detected seizures at three SDA sensitivity thresholds. Differences in seizure characteristics between groups were compared using univariate and multivariate analysis. False detections were characterized. Results The expert detected 421 seizures. The SDA at thresholds 0.4, 0.5, 0.6 detected 60%, 54% and 45% of seizures. At all thresholds, multivariate analyses demonstrated that the odds of detecting seizure increased with 4 criteria: seizure amplitude, duration, rhythmicity and number of EEG channels involved at seizure peak. Major causes of false detections included respiration and sweat artefacts or a highly rhythmic background, often during intermediate sleep. Conclusion This rigorous analysis allows estimation of how key seizure features are exploited by SDAs. Significance This study resulted in a beta version of ANSeR with significantly improved performance. PMID:27072097

  1. The antidepressant sertraline prevents the behavioral and EEG changes induced in two animal models of seizures.

    PubMed

    Sitges, María; Aldana, Blanca I; Gómez, Carlos D; Nekrassov, Vladimir

    2012-12-01

    In order to investigate a potential anticonvulsive action of sertraline (i.p.), its effects on seizures, EEG epileptiform activity and EEG amplitude increases induced by two convulsive agents were evaluated and compared with the effects of carbamazepine. Around 20 min following 4-aminopyridine (4-AP, 2.5 mg/kg, i.p.), tonic-clonic seizures and epileptiform activity were observed in control animals. A single sertraline pre-injection of 2.5 mg/kg, but not of 0.75 mg/kg, prevented these changes to 4-AP. Repeated daily administration of 0.75 mg/kg for one week, however, effectively inhibited the changes induced by 4-AP. The first generalized tonic-clonic seizure and EEG changes in response to pentylenetetrazole (PTZ, 50 mg/kg, i.p.) were observed near the first minute in control animals. Single sertraline doses above 5 mg/kg prevented the PTZ-induced changes. Moreover, a single carbamazepine dose of 25 mg/kg (i.p.), but not of 15 mg/kg, prevented the changes induced by the above convulsive agents. An anti-seizure action of the antidepressant sertraline is strongly suggested by these findings.

  2. Beta Lactams Antibiotic Ceftriaxone Modulates Seizures, Oxidative Stress and Connexin 43 Expression in Hippocampus of Pentylenetetrazole Kindled Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hussein, Abdelaziz M.; Ghalwash, Mohammed; Magdy, Khaled; Abulseoud, Osama A.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose: This study aimed to investigate the effect of ceftriaxone on oxidative stress and gap junction protein (connexin 43, Cx-43) expression in pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) induced kindling model. Methods: Twenty four Sprague dawely rats were divided into 3 equal groups (a) normal group: normal rats. (b) PTZ kindled group: received PTZ at the dose of 50 mg/kg via intraperitoneal injection (i.p.) every other day for 2 weeks (c) ceftriaxone treated group: received ceftriaxone at the dose 200 mg\\kg/12 hrs via i.p. injection daily from the 6th dose of PTZ for 3 days. Racine score, latency before beginning the first myoclonic jerk and duration of the jerks used as parameters of behavioral assessment. Immunohistopathological study for Cx-43 expression in hippocampus and measurement of markers of oxidative stress (malondialdehyde [MDA], low reduced glutathione [GSH] and catalase [CAT]) in hippocampal neurons were done. Results: PTZ kindling was associated with behavioral changes (in the form high stage of Racine score, long seizure duration and short latency for the first jerk), enhanced oxidative stress state (as demonstrated by high MDA, low GSH and CAT) and up regulation of Cx43 in hippocampal regions. While, ceftriaxone treatment ameliorated, significantly, PTZ-induced convulsions and caused significant improvement in oxidative stress markers and Cx-43 expression in hippocamal regions (p < 0.05). Conclusions: These findings support the anticonvulsive effects of some beta-lactams antibiotics which could offer a possible contributor in the basic treatment of temporal lobe epilepsy. This effect might be due to reduction of oxidative stress and Cx43 expression. PMID:27390674

  3. NMDA receptor NR2B subunits contribute to PTZ-kindling-induced hippocampal astrocytosis and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xinjian; Dong, Jingde; Shen, Kai; Bai, Ying; Zhang, Yuan; Lv, Xuan; Chao, Jie; Yao, Honghong

    2015-05-01

    The N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor plays an important role in the pathophysiology of several neurological diseases, including epilepsy. The present study investigated the effect of NMDA receptor NR2B subunits on pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-kindling-induced pathological and biochemical events in mice. Our results showed that PTZ-kindling up-regulates the expression of NMDA receptor NR2B subunits in the hippocampus and that kindled mice were characterized by significant astrocytosis and neuron loss in the hippocampus. Oxidative stress, including excessive malondialdehyde (MDA) production and decreased enzymatic activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX), were detected in the hippocampus after the mice were fully kindled. Additionally, expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the hippocampus was found to be up-regulated in PTZ-kindled mice. However, selectively blocking NMDA receptor NR2B subunits by ifenprodil significantly suppressed PTZ-kindling-induced hippocampal astrocytosis, oxidative stress and neuron loss. Furthermore, blocking NMDA receptor NR2B subunits also abolished PTZ-kindling-induced BDNF expression. These results indicate that NMDA receptor NR2B subunits contribute to epilepsy-associated pathological and biochemical events, including hippocampal astrocytosis, oxidative stress and neuron loss, and these events might be correlated with up-regulation of BDNF expression.

  4. Interaction of prenatal stress and morphine alters prolactin and seizure in rat pups.

    PubMed

    Saboory, Ehsan; Ebrahimi, Loghman; Roshan-Milani, Shiva; Hashemi, Paria

    2015-10-01

    Prenatal exposure to stress and morphine has complicated effects on epileptic seizure. In the present study, effect of prenatal forced-swim stress and morphine co-administration on pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) induced epileptic behaviors and prolactin blood level (PBL) was investigated in rat offspring. Pregnant Wistar rats were divided to four groups of control-saline, control-morphine, stressed-saline and stressed-morphine. In the stressed group, pregnant rats were placed in 25°C water on gestation days 17, 18 and 19 (GD17, GD18 and GD19) for 30 min. In the morphine/saline group, pregnant rats received morphine (10, 12 and 15 mg/kg, IP, on GD17, GD18 and GD19, respectively) or saline (1 ml, IP). In the morphine/saline-stressed group, the rats received morphine or saline and then exposed to stress. On postnatal days 6 and 15 (P6 and P15), blood samples were obtained and PBL was determined. At P15 and P25, the rest of the pups was injected with PTZ to induce seizure. Then, epileptic behaviors of each rat were observed individually. Latency of first convulsion decreased in control-morphine and stressed-saline groups while increased in stressed-morphine rats compared to control-saline group on P15 (P=0.04). Number of tonic-clonic seizures significantly increased in control-morphine and stressed-saline rats compared to control-saline group at P15 (P=0.02). PBL increased in stressed-saline, control-morphine and stress-morphine groups compared to control-saline rats. It can be concluded that prenatal exposure of rats to forced-swim stress and morphine changed their susceptibility to PTZ-induced seizure and PBL during infancy and prepubertal period. Co-administration of morphine attenuated effect of stress on epileptic behaviors.

  5. Effect of Ethanolic Extract of Indigofera tinctoria on Chemically-Induced Seizures and Brain GABA Levels in Albino Rats

    PubMed Central

    Garbhapu, Asuntha; Yalavarthi, Prasannaraju; Koganti, Prasad

    2011-01-01

    Objective(s) Indigofera tinctoria Linn. of Fabaceae family is claimed to be useful to control epileptic seizures in the Indian system of folkore medicine. This study was designed to evaluate tinctoria and to verify the claim. Materials and Methods Seizures were induced in male albino rats with pentylenetetrazole (PTZ). The test group animals were administered ethanolic extract of Indigofera tinctoria (EEIT) orally. The time of onset and duration of clonic convulsions were recorded. Maximal electroshock seizures (MES) were induced in animals. The duration of hind limb tonic extension (HLTE) was recorded. GABA levels and GABA transaminase activity in brain were estimated. Results In PTZ model, EEIT significantly (P< 0.01, P< 0.001) delayed the onset of convulsions and reduced the duration of seizures in a dose dependent manner. A significant (P< 0.05) reduction in the duration of HLTE at higher doses of EEIT was observed in MES model. Increase in brain GABA levels was observed on treatment with EEIT at 500 and 1000 mg/kg doses, suggested that the plant may be acting by facilitating GABAergic transmission. A significant reduction (P< 0.05) in the activity of brain GABA transaminase was observed at higher doses. No neurotoxic signs were observed with rotarod test, pentobarbital induced sleeping time, locomotor activity and haloperidol-induced catalepsy. Conclusion The ethanolic extract of tinctoria was found to be useful to control and treat the variety of seizures. PMID:23493444

  6. The role of interleukin-1β in the pentylenetetrazole-induced kindling of seizures, in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Kołosowska, Karolina; Maciejak, Piotr; Szyndler, Janusz; Turzyńska, Danuta; Sobolewska, Alicja; Płaźnik, Adam

    2014-05-15

    Because the contribution of inflammatory mediators to seizure disorders is unclear, we investigated the changes in the expression of interleukin-1β (IL-β) and its receptor - IL-1 receptor type 1 (IL-1R1), tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in the rat hippocampus at different stages of pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced kindling. The occurrence and progressive development of seizures were induced by repeated systemic administration of PTZ, a non-competitive antagonist of the γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptor at a subconvulsive dose of 30 mg/kg. We also examined the effects of continuous intracerebroventricular administration of IL-1β and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in this model of epilepsy using subcutaneously implanted osmotic mini-pumps. We observed enhanced IL-1R1 expression in the dentate gyrus (DG) at different stages of kindling, whereas the elevated IL-1β level was distinctive to fully kindled seizures. We did not detect significant changes in the concentration of IL-6 or TNF-α throughout the kindling process. LPS accelerated transiently the process of kindling, while IL-1β showed a predisposition to delay kindling acquisition. Our study supports the concept of seizure-related modifications in brain cytokine production during epileptogenesis. Although some evidence indicates a proconvulsant property of IL-1β activity, it cannot be ruled out that the alterations in IL-1 system reflect the activation of endogenous protective mechanisms with respect to the kindling of seizures.

  7. Huperzine A prophylaxis against pentylenetetrazole-induced seizures in rats is associated with increased cortical inhibition.

    PubMed

    Gersner, R; Ekstein, D; Dhamne, S C; Schachter, S C; Rotenberg, A

    2015-11-01

    Huperzine A (HupA) is a naturally occurring compound found in the firmoss Huperzia serrata. While HupA is a potent acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, its full pharmacologic profile is incompletely described. Since previous works suggested a capacity for HupA to prophylax against seizures, we tested the HupA antiepileptic potential in pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) rat epilepsy model and explored its mechanism of action by spectral EEG analysis and by paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (ppTMS), a measure of GABA-mediated intracortical inhibition. We tested whether HupA suppresses seizures in the rat PTZ acute seizure model, and quantified latency to first myoclonus and to generalized tonic-clonic seizure, and spike frequency on EEG. Additionally, we measured power in the EEG gamma frequency band which is associated with GABAergic cortical interneuron activation. Then, as a step toward further examining the HupA antiepileptic mechanism of action, we tested long-interval intracortical inhibition (LICI) using ppTMS coupled with electromyography to assess whether HupA augments GABA-mediated paired-pulse inhibition of the motor evoked potential. We also tested whether the HupA effect on paired-pulse inhibition was central or peripheral by comparison of outcomes following administration of HupA or the peripheral acetylcholinesterase inhibitor pyridostigmine. We also tested whether the HupA effect was dependent on central muscarinic or GABAA receptors by co-administration of HupA and atropine or PTZ, respectively. In tests of antiepileptic potential, HupA suppressed seizures and epileptic spikes on EEG. Spectral EEG analysis also revealed enhanced gamma frequency band power with HupA treatment. By ppTMS we found that HupA increases intracortical inhibition and blocks PTZ-induced cortical excitation. Atropine co-administration with HupA did not alter HupA-induced intracortical inhibition suggesting independent of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors mechanism in this model

  8. Neonatal seizures induced by pentylenetetrazol or kainic acid disrupt primary cilia growth on developing mouse cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Parker, Alexander K; Le, Megan M; Smith, Tyler S; Hoang-Minh, Lan B; Atkinson, Eric W; Ugartemendia, George; Semple-Rowland, Susan; Coleman, Jason E; Sarkisian, Matthew R

    2016-08-01

    Neonatal or early-life seizures (ELS) are often associated with life-long neurophysiological, cognitive and behavioral deficits, but the underlying mechanisms contributing to these deficits remain poorly understood. Newborn, post-migratory cortical neurons sprout ciliary buds (procilia) that mature into primary cilia. Disruption of the growth or signaling capabilities of these cilia has been linked to atypical neurite outgrowth from neurons and abnormalities in neuronal circuitry. Here, we tested the hypothesis that generalized seizures induced by pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) or kainic acid (KA) during early postnatal development impair neuronal and/or glial ciliogenesis. Mice received PTZ (50 or 100mg/kg), KA (2mg/kg), or saline either once at birth (P0), or once daily from P0 to P4. Using immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy, the cilia of neurons and glia were examined at P7, P14, and P42. A total of 83 regions were analyzed, representing 13 unique neocortical and hippocampal regions. Neuronal cilia were identified by co-expression of NeuN and type 3 adenylyl cyclase (ACIII) or somatostatin receptor 3 (SSTR3), while glial cilia were identified by co-expression of GFAP, Arl13b, and gamma-tubulin. We found that PTZ exposure at either P0 or from P0 to P4 induced convulsive behavior, followed by acute and lasting effects on neuronal cilia lengths that varied depending on the cortical region, PTZ dose, injection frequency, and time post-PTZ. Both increases and decreases in neuronal cilia length were observed. No changes in the length of glial cilia were observed under any of the test conditions. Lastly, we found that a single KA seizure at P0 led to similar abnormalities in neuronal cilia lengths. Our results suggest that seizure(s) occurring during early stages of cortical development induce persistent and widespread changes in neuronal cilia length. Given the impact neuronal cilia have on neuronal differentiation, ELS-induced changes in ciliogenesis may

  9. Risk factors for oxygen toxicity seizures in hyperbaric oxygen therapy: case reports from multiple institutions.

    PubMed

    Seidel, Ruthanna; Carroll, Christopher; Thompson, Debra; Diem, Rena G; Yeboah, Kwabena; Hayes, A J; Hall, Brett; Whelan, Harry T

    2013-01-01

    Oxygen toxicity seizures are a rare but recognized complication of hyperbaric oxygen (HBO2) therapy. Many patients undergoing HBO2 therapy have medical conditions or are taking medications that could contribute to seizures. Previous literature has not extensively reported on these factors in patients experiencing oxygen toxicity seizures. We conducted a chart review at several hyperbaric oxygen centers in the Milwaukee, Wisc., area to explore whether the patients who experienced seizures in the hyperbaric chamber had other medical comorbidities or were on medications which lowered their seizure threshold, thereby contributing to oxygen toxicity seizures. There were a total of seven cases of seizures in five patients. Each patient had risk factors for seizures, including hypercapnia secondary to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, narcotic withdrawal, alcohol dependence, and antidepressant, tramadol or cephalosporin/ceftriaxone use. We hypothesize that patients who experience oxygen toxicity seizures may have other factors which contribute to the development of these seizures.

  10. Dreaming of seizures.

    PubMed

    Vercueil, Laurent

    2005-08-01

    Could some dreams and temporal lobe seizures share an intrinsic neuronal network? At the interplay of emotion, memory, dream, and temporal lobe seizure, we report on a patient with a left dysplastic amygdala and temporal lobe epilepsy who presented with a typical seizure while dreaming. Neuronal networks subserving affective states are suggested to be involved in emotional dream, memory recall, and amygdalo-hippocampal seizures.

  11. Naringin ameliorates pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures and associated oxidative stress, inflammation, and cognitive impairment in rats: possible mechanisms of neuroprotection.

    PubMed

    Golechha, Mahaveer; Sarangal, Vikas; Bhatia, Jagriti; Chaudhry, Uma; Saluja, Daman; Arya, Dharmveer Singh

    2014-12-01

    Oxidative stress and cognitive impairment are associated with PTZ-induced convulsions. Naringin is a bioflavonoid present in the grapefruit. It is a potent antioxidant, and we evaluated its effect on PTZ-induced convulsions. Rats were pretreated with normal saline, naringin (20, 40, and 80 mg/kg, i.p.), or diazepam (5mg/kg, i.p.) 30 min prior to the administration of PTZ. The administration of PTZ induced myoclonic jerks and generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTSs). We observed that naringin significantly prolonged the induction of myoclonic jerks dose-dependently. Naringin (80 mg/kg, i.p.) pretreatment protected all rats, and this protective effect was annulled by the GABAA receptor antagonist, flumazenil. In addition, naringin reduced brain MDA and TNF-α levels and conserved GSH. The pretreatment also enhanced the performance of rats in the passive avoidance task. Our observations highlight the antioxidant, antiinflammatory, and anticonvulsant potential of naringin. Also, naringin modulates the GABAA receptor to produce anticonvulsant effects and to ameliorate cognitive impairment.

  12. Effects of cell phone radiation on lipid peroxidation, glutathione and nitric oxide levels in mouse brain during epileptic seizure.

    PubMed

    Esmekaya, Meric Arda; Tuysuz, Mehmet Zahid; Tomruk, Arın; Canseven, Ayse G; Yücel, Engin; Aktuna, Zuhal; Keskil, Semih; Seyhan, Nesrin

    2016-09-01

    The objective of the this study was to evaluate the effects of cellular phone radiation on oxidative stress parameters and oxide levels in mouse brain during pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) induced epileptic seizure. Eight weeks old mice were used in the study. Animals were distributed in the following groups: Group I: Control group treated with PTZ, Group II: 15min cellular phone radiation+PTZ treatment+30min cellular phone radiation, Group III: 30min cellular phone radiation+PTZ treatment+30min cellular phone radiation. The RF radiation was produced by a 900MHz cellular phone. Lipid peroxidation, which is the indicator of oxidative stress was quantified by measuring the formation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS). The glutathione (GSH) levels were determined by the Ellman method. Tissue total nitric oxide (NOx) levels were obtained using the Griess assay. Lipid peroxidation and NOx levels of brain tissue increased significantly in group II and III compared to group I. On the contrary, GSH levels were significantly lower in group II and III than group I. However, no statistically significant alterations in any of the endpoints were noted between group II and Group III. Overall, the experimental findings demonstrated that cellular phone radiation may increase the oxidative damage and NOx level during epileptic activity in mouse brain.

  13. Effects of cell phone radiation on lipid peroxidation, glutathione and nitric oxide levels in mouse brain during epileptic seizure.

    PubMed

    Esmekaya, Meric Arda; Tuysuz, Mehmet Zahid; Tomruk, Arın; Canseven, Ayse G; Yücel, Engin; Aktuna, Zuhal; Keskil, Semih; Seyhan, Nesrin

    2016-09-01

    The objective of the this study was to evaluate the effects of cellular phone radiation on oxidative stress parameters and oxide levels in mouse brain during pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) induced epileptic seizure. Eight weeks old mice were used in the study. Animals were distributed in the following groups: Group I: Control group treated with PTZ, Group II: 15min cellular phone radiation+PTZ treatment+30min cellular phone radiation, Group III: 30min cellular phone radiation+PTZ treatment+30min cellular phone radiation. The RF radiation was produced by a 900MHz cellular phone. Lipid peroxidation, which is the indicator of oxidative stress was quantified by measuring the formation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS). The glutathione (GSH) levels were determined by the Ellman method. Tissue total nitric oxide (NOx) levels were obtained using the Griess assay. Lipid peroxidation and NOx levels of brain tissue increased significantly in group II and III compared to group I. On the contrary, GSH levels were significantly lower in group II and III than group I. However, no statistically significant alterations in any of the endpoints were noted between group II and Group III. Overall, the experimental findings demonstrated that cellular phone radiation may increase the oxidative damage and NOx level during epileptic activity in mouse brain. PMID:26836107

  14. Search and Seizure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Kenneth T.

    This paper examines the practice of search and seizure from a legal perspective. All issues concerning lawful or unlawful search and seizure, whether in a public school or otherwise, are predicated upon the Fourth Amendment to the United States Constitution. The terms "search,""seizure,""probable cause,""reasonable suspicion," and "exclusionary…

  15. Novel Vitamin K analogues suppress seizures in zebrafish and mouse models of epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Rahn, Jennifer J.; Bestman, Jennifer E.; Josey, Benjamin J.; Inks, Elizabeth S.; Stackley, Krista D.; Rogers, Carolyn E.; Chou, C. James; Chan, Sherine S. L.

    2014-01-01

    Epilepsy is a debilitating disease affecting 1-2% of the world’s population. Despite this high prevalence, 30% of patients suffering from epilepsy are not successfully managed by current medication suggesting a critical need for new anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs). In an effort to discover new therapeutics for the management of epilepsy, we began our study by screening drugs that, like some currently used AEDs, inhibit HDACs using a well-established larval zebrafish model. In this model, 7-day post fertilization (dpf) larvae are treated with the widely used seizure-inducing compound pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) which stimulates a rapid increase in swimming behavior previously determined to be a measurable manifestation of seizures. In our first screen, we tested a number of different HDAC inhibitors and found that one, NQN1, significantly decreased swim activity to levels equal to that of VPA. We continued to screen structurally related compounds including Vitamin K3 (VK3) and a number of novel Vitamin K (VK) analogues. We found that VK3 was a robust inhibitor of the PTZ-induced swim activity, as were several of our novel compounds. Three of these compounds were subsequently tested on mouse seizure models at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) Anticonvulsant Screening Program. Compound 2h reduced seizures particularly well in the minimal clonic seizure (6 Hz) and corneal kindled mouse models of epilepsy, with no observable toxicity. As VK3 affects mitochondrial function, we tested the effects of our compounds on mitochondrial respiration and ATP production in a mouse hippocampal cell line. We demonstrate that these compounds affect ATP metabolism and increase total cellular ATP. Our data indicate the potential utility of these and other VK analogues for prevention of seizures and suggest the potential mechanism for this protection may lie in the ability of these compounds to affect energy production. PMID:24291671

  16. Limbic system seizures and aggressive behavior (superkindling effects).

    PubMed

    Andy, O J; Velamati, S

    1978-01-01

    This study was done to further analyze the neural mechanisms underlying aggressive behavior associated with psychomotor or temporal lobe seizures. The studies revealed that superkindling the aggressive system by sequential stimulations at seizure-inducing thresholds, of two or more sites in the limbic, hypothalamic, and basal ganglia structures facilitated the production of aggressive seizures. Aggressive behavior in the freely moving cat was evaluated in relation to the occurrence of hissing and growling during stimulation, after-discharge and postictal period. The behavior was correlated with the frequency of the elicited seizures and the seizure durations. Aggression did develop as a component behavioral manifestation of the limbic (psychomotor) seizure. Development of aggressive seizures was facilitated by "priming" the aggressive system. Optimum levels of aggressive behavior occurred with seizures of medium duration. Catecholamine blockers tended to attentuate the occurrence of aggression, whereas the agonist tended to facilitate it. Once the aggressive system was rendered hyperexcitable, exteroceptive stimuli also evoked aggressive attack behavior. It was concluded that repeatedly recurring limbic system seizures through superkindling mechanisms can eventually render the limbic-basal ganglia-preoptico-hypothalamic aggressive system hyper-responsive to both recurring seizures and to exteroceptive stimuli with resulting aggressive behavior with or without an accompanying seizure. PMID:571080

  17. Video game induced seizures.

    PubMed

    Ferrie, C D; De Marco, P; Grünewald, R A; Giannakodimos, S; Panayiotopoulos, C P

    1994-08-01

    Fifteen patients who experienced epileptic seizures while playing video games are described together with a review of 20 cases in the English literature. Nine of the 15 cases and all but two of the reported cases experienced their first seizure while playing video games. Two thirds of patients had idiopathic generalised epilepsy and mainly reported generalised tonic clonic seizures, but some had typical absence seizures and myoclonic jerks while playing video games. In this series, 30% with idiopathic generalised epilepsy had juvenile myoclonic epilepsy. Overall, 70% of patients with idiopathic generalised epilepsy were photosensitive to intermittent photic stimulation and the mechanism of seizure provocation was probably similar to that of television induced seizures, although sensitivity to specific patterns was sometimes important. Two children had self induced video game seizures. Non-photic factors such as excitement, fatigue, sleep deprivation, cognitive processing, and diurnal variation in susceptibility seemed to be important seizure precipitants, particularly in non-photo-sensitive patients. Twenty nine per cent of patients had partial (mainly occipital) video game associated seizures. Occipital spikes were common in the EEG of these patients. Photosensitivity to intermittent photic stimulation may have been important in two patients but in the others, who all played arcade video games, other mechanisms need to be considered. Video game associated seizures are a feature of several epileptic syndromes and differ in precipitants and appropriate management.

  18. Athletes with seizure disorders.

    PubMed

    Knowles, Byron Don; Pleacher, Michael D

    2012-01-01

    Individuals with seizure disorders have long been restricted from participation in certain sporting activities. Those with seizure disorders are more likely than their peers to have a sedentary lifestyle and to develop obesity. Regular participation in physical activity can improve both physical and psychosocial outcomes for persons with seizure disorders. Seizure activity often is reduced among those patients who regularly engage in aerobic activity. Recent literature indicates that the diagnosis of seizure disorders remains highly stigmatizing in the adolescent population. Persons with seizure disorders may be more accepted by peer groups if they are allowed to participate in sports and recreational activities. Persons with seizure disorders are encouraged to participate in regular aerobic activities. They may participate in team sports and contact or collision activities provided that they utilize appropriate protective equipment. There seems to be no increased risk of injury or increasing seizure activity as the result of such participation. Persons with seizure disorders still are discouraged from participating in scuba diving and skydiving. The benefits of participation in regular sporting activity far outweigh any risk to the athlete with a seizure disorder who chooses to participate in sports.

  19. On the nature of seizure dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Stacey, William C.; Quilichini, Pascale P.; Ivanov, Anton I.

    2014-01-01

    Seizures can occur spontaneously and in a recurrent manner, which defines epilepsy; or they can be induced in a normal brain under a variety of conditions in most neuronal networks and species from flies to humans. Such universality raises the possibility that invariant properties exist that characterize seizures under different physiological and pathological conditions. Here, we analysed seizure dynamics mathematically and established a taxonomy of seizures based on first principles. For the predominant seizure class we developed a generic model called Epileptor. As an experimental model system, we used ictal-like discharges induced in vitro in mouse hippocampi. We show that only five state variables linked by integral-differential equations are sufficient to describe the onset, time course and offset of ictal-like discharges as well as their recurrence. Two state variables are responsible for generating rapid discharges (fast time scale), two for spike and wave events (intermediate time scale) and one for the control of time course, including the alternation between ‘normal’ and ictal periods (slow time scale). We propose that normal and ictal activities coexist: a separatrix acts as a barrier (or seizure threshold) between these states. Seizure onset is reached upon the collision of normal brain trajectories with the separatrix. We show theoretically and experimentally how a system can be pushed toward seizure under a wide variety of conditions. Within our experimental model, the onset and offset of ictal-like discharges are well-defined mathematical events: a saddle-node and homoclinic bifurcation, respectively. These bifurcations necessitate a baseline shift at onset and a logarithmic scaling of interspike intervals at offset. These predictions were not only confirmed in our in vitro experiments, but also for focal seizures recorded in different syndromes, brain regions and species (humans and zebrafish). Finally, we identified several possible biophysical

  20. Seizures induced by music.

    PubMed

    Ogunyemi, A O; Breen, H

    1993-01-01

    Musicogenic epilepsy is a rare disorder. Much remains to be learned about the electroclinical features. This report describes a patient who has been followed at our institution for 17 years, and was investigated with long-term telemetered simultaneous video-EEG recordings. She began to have seizures at the age of 10 years. She experienced complex partial seizures, often preceded by elementary auditory hallucination and complex auditory illusion. The seizures occurred in relation to singing, listening to music or thinking about music. She also had occasional generalized tonic clonic seizures during sleep. There was no significant antecedent history. The family history was negative for epilepsy. The physical examination was unremarkable. CT and MRI scans of the brain were normal. During long-term simultaneous video-EEG recordings, clinical and electrographic seizure activities were recorded in association with singing and listening to music. Mathematical calculation, copying or viewing geometric patterns and playing the game of chess failed to evoke seizures.

  1. Effects of tianeptine on onset time of pentylenetetrazole-induced seizures in mice: possible role of adenosine A1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Uzbay, Tayfun I; Kayir, Hakan; Ceyhan, Mert

    2007-02-01

    Depression is a common psychiatric problem in epileptic patients. Thus, it is important that an antidepressant agent has anticonvulsant activity. This study was organized to investigate the effects of tianeptine, an atypical antidepressant, on pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizure in mice. A possible contribution of adenosine receptors was also evaluated. Adult male Swiss-Webster mice (25-35 g) were subjects. PTZ (80 mg/kg, i.p.) was injected to mice 30 min after tianeptine (2.5-80 mg/kg, i.p.) or saline administration. The onset times of 'first myoclonic jerk' (FMJ) and 'generalized clonic seizures' (GCS) were recorded. Duration of 600 s was taken as a cutoff time in calculation of the onset time of the seizures. To evaluate the contribution of adenosine receptors in the effect of tianeptine, a nonspecific adenosine receptor antagonist caffeine, a specific A1 receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX), a specific A2A receptor antagonist 8-(3-chlorostyryl) caffeine (CSC) or their vehicles were administered to the mice 15 min before tianeptine (80 mg/kg) or saline treatments. Tianeptine (40 and 80 mg/kg) pretreatment significantly delayed the onset time of FMJ and GCS. Caffeine (10-60 mg/kg, i.p.) dose-dependently blocked the retarding effect of tianeptine (80 mg/kg) on the onset times of FMJ and GCS. DPCPX (20 mg/kg) but not CSC (1-8 mg/kg) blocked the effect of tianeptine (80 mg/kg) on FMJ. Our results suggest that tianeptine delayed the onset time of PTZ-induced seizures via adenosine A1 receptors in mice. Thus, this drug may be a useful choice for epileptic patients with depression.

  2. Role of Adenosine Signaling on Pentylenetetrazole-Induced Seizures in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Siebel, Anna Maria; Menezes, Fabiano Peres; Capiotti, Katiucia Marques; Kist, Luiza Wilges; Schaefer, Isabel da Costa; Frantz, Juliana Zanetti; Bogo, Maurício Reis; Da Silva, Rosane Souza

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Adenosine is a well-known endogenous modulator of neuronal excitability with anticonvulsant properties. Thus, the modulation exerted by adenosine might be an effective tool to control seizures. In this study, we investigated the effects of drugs that are able to modulate adenosinergic signaling on pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizures in adult zebrafish. The adenosine A1 receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX) decreased the latency to the onset of the tonic-clonic seizure stage. The adenosine A1 receptor agonist cyclopentyladenosine (CPA) increased the latency to reach the tonic-clonic seizure stage. Both the adenosine A2A receptor agonist and antagonist, CGS 21680 and ZM 241385, respectively, did not promote changes in seizure parameters. Pretreatment with the ecto-5′nucleotidase inhibitor adenosine 5′-(α,β-methylene) diphosphate (AMPCP) decreased the latency to the onset of the tonic-clonic seizure stage. However, when pretreated with the adenosine deaminase (ADA) inhibitor, erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl)-adenine (EHNA), or with the nucleoside transporter (NT) inhibitors, dipyridamole and S-(4-Nitrobenzyl)-6-thioinosine (NBTI), animals showed longer latency to reach the tonic-clonic seizure status. Finally, our molecular analysis of the c-fos gene expression corroborates these behavioral results. Our findings indicate that the activation of adenosine A1 receptors is an important mechanism to control the development of seizures in zebrafish. Furthermore, the actions of ecto-5′-nucleotidase, ADA, and NTs are directly involved in the control of extracellular adenosine levels and have an important role in the development of seizure episodes in zebrafish. PMID:25560904

  3. Role of adenosine signaling on pentylenetetrazole-induced seizures in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Siebel, Anna Maria; Menezes, Fabiano Peres; Capiotti, Katiucia Marques; Kist, Luiza Wilges; da Costa Schaefer, Isabel; Frantz, Juliana Zanetti; Bogo, Maurício Reis; Da Silva, Rosane Souza; Bonan, Carla Denise

    2015-04-01

    Adenosine is a well-known endogenous modulator of neuronal excitability with anticonvulsant properties. Thus, the modulation exerted by adenosine might be an effective tool to control seizures. In this study, we investigated the effects of drugs that are able to modulate adenosinergic signaling on pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizures in adult zebrafish. The adenosine A1 receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX) decreased the latency to the onset of the tonic-clonic seizure stage. The adenosine A1 receptor agonist cyclopentyladenosine (CPA) increased the latency to reach the tonic-clonic seizure stage. Both the adenosine A2A receptor agonist and antagonist, CGS 21680 and ZM 241385, respectively, did not promote changes in seizure parameters. Pretreatment with the ecto-5'nucleotidase inhibitor adenosine 5'-(α,β-methylene) diphosphate (AMPCP) decreased the latency to the onset of the tonic-clonic seizure stage. However, when pretreated with the adenosine deaminase (ADA) inhibitor, erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl)-adenine (EHNA), or with the nucleoside transporter (NT) inhibitors, dipyridamole and S-(4-Nitrobenzyl)-6-thioinosine (NBTI), animals showed longer latency to reach the tonic-clonic seizure status. Finally, our molecular analysis of the c-fos gene expression corroborates these behavioral results. Our findings indicate that the activation of adenosine A1 receptors is an important mechanism to control the development of seizures in zebrafish. Furthermore, the actions of ecto-5'-nucleotidase, ADA, and NTs are directly involved in the control of extracellular adenosine levels and have an important role in the development of seizure episodes in zebrafish.

  4. Genes, Seizures & Epilepsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Alica M.

    2006-01-01

    The chance that someone will develop any disease is influenced by heredity and environment. Epilepsy is not an exception. Everybody inherits a unique degree of susceptibility to seizures. About 3 percent of the United States population is prone to seizures and will get epilepsy at some point of their lives (1). Two thirds of the people with…

  5. Brain redox imaging in the pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced kindling model of epilepsy by using in vivo electron paramagnetic resonance and a nitroxide imaging probe.

    PubMed

    Emoto, Miho C; Yamato, Mayumi; Sato-Akaba, Hideo; Yamada, Ken-ichi; Fujii, Hirotada G

    2015-11-01

    Much evidence supports the idea that oxidative stress is involved in the pathogenesis of epilepsy, and therapeutic interventions with antioxidants are expected as adjunct antiepileptic therapy. The aims of this study were to non-invasively obtain spatially resolved redox data from control and pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced kindled mouse brains by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) imaging and to visualize the brain regions that are sensitive to oxidative damage. After infusion of the redox-sensitive imaging probe 3-methoxycarbonyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-piperidine-1-oxyl (MCP), a series of EPR images of PTZ-induced mouse heads were measured. Based on the pharmacokinetics of the reduction reaction of MCP in the mouse heads, the pixel-based rate constant of its reduction reaction was calculated as an index of redox status in vivo and mapped as a redox map. The obtained redox map showed heterogeneity in the redox status in PTZ-induced mouse brains compared with control. The co-registered image of the redox map and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for both control and PTZ-induced mice showed a clear change in the redox status around the hippocampus after PTZ. To examine the role of antioxidants on the brain redox status, the levels of antioxidants were measured in brain tissues of control and PTZ-induced mice. Significantly lower concentrations of glutathione in the hippocampus of PTZ-kindled mice were detected compared with control. From the results of both EPR imaging and the biochemical assay, the hippocampus was found to be susceptible to oxidative damage in the PTZ-induced animal model of epilepsy.

  6. Huperzine A Provides Robust and Sustained Protection against Induced Seizures in Scn1a Mutant Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Jennifer C.; Dutton, Stacey B. B.; Collins, Stephen D.; Schachter, Steven; Escayg, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    De novo loss-of-function mutations in the voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC) SCN1A (encoding Nav1.1) are the main cause of Dravet syndrome (DS), a catastrophic early-life encephalopathy associated with prolonged and recurrent early-life febrile seizures (FSs), refractory afebrile epilepsy, cognitive and behavioral deficits, and a 15–20% mortality rate. SCN1A mutations also lead to genetic epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+), which is an inherited disorder characterized by early-life FSs and the development of a range of adult epilepsy subtypes. Current antiepileptic drugs often fail to protect against the severe seizures and behavioral and cognitive deficits found in patients with SCN1A mutations. To address the need for more efficacious treatments for SCN1A-derived epilepsies, we evaluated the therapeutic potential of Huperzine A, a naturally occurring reversible acetylcholinesterase inhibitor. In CF1 mice, Hup A (0.56 or 1 mg/kg) was found to confer protection against 6 Hz-, pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-, and maximal electroshock (MES)-induced seizures. Robust protection against 6 Hz-, MES-, and hyperthermia-induced seizures was also achieved following Hup A administration in mouse models of DS (Scn1a+/−) and GEFS+ (Scn1aRH/+). Furthermore, Hup A-mediated seizure protection was sustained during 3 weeks of daily injections in Scn1aRH/+ mutants. Finally, we determined that muscarinic and GABAA receptors play a role in Hup A-mediated seizure protection. These findings indicate that Hup A might provide a novel therapeutic strategy for increasing seizure resistance in DS and GEFS+, and more broadly, in other forms of refractory epilepsy. PMID:27799911

  7. Seizures in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Born, H A

    2015-02-12

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) increases the risk for late-onset seizures and neuronal network abnormalities. An elevated co-occurrence of AD and seizures has been established in the more prevalent sporadic form of AD. Recent evidence suggests that nonconvulsive network abnormalities, including seizures and other electroencephalographic abnormalities, may be more commonly found in patients than previously thought. Patients with familial AD are at an even greater risk for seizures, which have been found in patients with mutations in PSEN1, PSEN2, or APP, as well as with APP duplication. This review also provides an overview of seizure and electroencephalography studies in AD mouse models. The amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide has been identified as a possible link between AD and seizures, and while Aβ is known to affect neuronal activity, the full-length amyloid precursor protein (APP) and other APP cleavage products may be important for the development and maintenance of cortical network hyperexcitability. Nonconvulsive epileptiform activity, such as seizures or network abnormalities that are shorter in duration but may occur with higher frequency, may contribute to cognitive impairments characteristic of AD, such as amnestic wandering. Finally, the review discusses recent studies using antiepileptic drugs to rescue cognitive deficits in AD mouse models and human patients. Understanding the mechanistic link between epileptiform activity and AD is a research area of growing interest. Further understanding of the connection between neuronal hyperexcitability and Alzheimer's as well as the potential role of epileptiform activity in the progression of AD will be beneficial for improving treatment strategies.

  8. Aspartame and seizures.

    PubMed

    Jobe, P C; Dailey, J W

    1993-10-01

    It has been hypothesized that the dietary sweetener aspartame (L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester) might promote seizures and this hypothesis has been argued in the published literature. The current manuscript reviews the biochemical, neurochemical and behavioral experiments that have been carried out in order to assess the hypothesis linking aspartame with seizure promotion. We conclude that convulsive seizures are not caused by orally administered aspartame in rodents or in primates, including humans. Early reports of seizure facilitation by aspartame in several rodent models were not confirmed by later and more careful experimentation. Proconvulsive effects were absent in humans and other mammals with epilepsy and those without epilepsy. Lack of convulsive liability was evident, even when doses many fold higher than those consumed in the human diet, were used in experimental paradigms. Studies of aspartame in absence seizures are not as complete as those in convulsive seizures, but available evidence in humans does not document an association between absence seizure incidence and aspartame usage.

  9. Intrinsic neural circuits between dorsal midbrain neurons that control fear-induced responses and seizure activity and nuclei of the pain inhibitory system elaborating postictal antinociceptive processes: a functional neuroanatomical and neuropharmacological study.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Renato L; Ferreira, Célio M R; Ribeiro, Sandro J; Carvalho, Andressa D; Elias-Filho, Daoud H; Garcia-Cairasco, Norberto; Coimbra, Norberto Cysne

    2005-02-01

    The blockade of GABA-mediated Cl(-) influx with pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) was used in the present work to induce seizures in Rattus norvegicus. The aim of this work was to study the involvement of monoamines in the antinociception induced by convulsions elicited by peripheral administration of PTZ (64 mg/kg). The analgesia was measured by the tail-flick test in seven or eight Wistar rats per group. Convulsions were followed by statistically significant increase in the tail-flick latencies (TFL), at least for 120 min of the postictal period. Peripheral administration of methysergide (0.5, 1, 2, and 3 mg/kg) caused a significant decrease in the TFL in seizing animals, as compared to controls, in all postictal periods studied. These findings were corroborated by the pretreatment with ketanserin, a 5-HT(2A/2C)-serotonergic/alpha(1)-noradrenergic receptors antagonist, at the same doses. Peripheral administration of yohimbine (0.5, 1, 2, and 3 mg/kg), alpha(2)-noradrenergic antagonist, also decreased the postictal analgesia either at initial or more terminal periods of the postictal analgesia. These data were corroborated with peripheral administrations of propranolol, a beta-noradrenergic receptor blocker that caused a decrease in the postictal analgesia consistently in later stages (after the first 20-min post-tonic-clonic convulsive reactions) of the post-seizure analgesia, except for the highest dose. These results indicate that monoamines may be involved in the postictal analgesia. The blockade of 5-HT(2A/2C)-serotoninergic, alpha(1)-noradrenergic, or alpha(2)-noradrenergic receptors before tonic clonic seizure-induced analgesia antagonized the increase in the nociceptive threshold caused by seizures in initial steps of the temporal antinociceptive curve, as compared to the blockade of beta-noradrenergic ones. These findings suggest that the recruitment of alpha-noradrenergic receptor and serotonergic receptors was made immediately after convulsions and in other

  10. Epilepsy or seizures - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... You should still plan ahead for the possible dangers of a certain activity. DO NOT do any ... seizure would put you or someone else in danger. Wear a medical alert bracelet. Tell family members, ...

  11. Psychogenic (nonepileptic) seizures.

    PubMed

    Krumholz, Allan; Hopp, Jennifer

    2006-07-01

    Psychogenic (nonepileptic) seizures are among the most common and serious of all psychogenic neurological disorders. They account for approximately 20% of all intractable seizure disorders referred to comprehensive epilepsy centers and present with a reported annual incidence of approximately 4% that of true epilepsy. These events are serious and disabling. Indeed, compared with patients with true epilepsy, patients with psychogenic seizures exhibit more frequent, severe, and disabling seizures as well as a poorer quality of life. The diagnosis and management of psychogenic seizures remain challenging, although advances in video electroencephalographic (EEG) monitoring have improved the ability of physicians to identify these disorders accurately. The prognosis of these patients is still relatively poor, and a good outcome seems dependent on a young age at diagnosis, early diagnosis, less severe psychological comorbidities, and continued follow-up and management by the diagnosing neurologist or clinician. Additional psychological or psychiatric assessment may be beneficial, particularly in elucidating the etiology of the disorder as well as identifying comorbid disorders, and may help in the long-term management of these patients. This review presents the history, epidemiology, differential diagnosis, and management of psychogenic seizures, with particular attention to the use of diagnostic testing, including video EEG monitoring.

  12. Consciousness of seizures and consciousness during seizures: are they related?

    PubMed

    Detyniecki, Kamil; Blumenfeld, Hal

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances have been made in the network mechanisms underlying impairment of consciousness during seizures. However, less is known about patient awareness of their own seizures. Studying patient reports or documentation of their seizures is currently the most commonly utilized mechanism to scientifically measure patient awareness of seizures. The purpose of this review is to summarize the available evidence regarding the accuracy of patient seizure counts and identify the variables that may influence unreliable seizure reporting. Several groups looking at patient documentation of seizures during continuous EEG monitoring show that patients do not report as many as 50% of their seizures. These studies also suggest that seizures accompanied by loss of consciousness, arising from the left hemisphere or the temporal lobe, or occurring during sleep are associated with significantly reduced reporting. Baseline memory performance does not appear to have a major influence on the accuracy of seizure report. Further prospective studies using validated ictal behavioral testing as well as using correlation with newer electrophysiological and neuroimaging techniques for seizure localization are needed to more fully understand the mechanisms of underreporting of seizures. Better methods to alert caregivers about unrecognized seizures and to improve seizure documentation are under investigation.

  13. Metallothionein expression in the rat brain following KA and PTZ treatment.

    PubMed

    Juárez-Rebollar, Daniel; Manjarrez, Joaquín; Nava-Ruíz, Concepción; Zaga-Clavellina, Verónica; Flores-Espinosa, Pilar; Heras-Romero, Yesica; Díaz-Ruíz, Araceli; Méndez-Armenta, Marisela

    2015-09-01

    Epilepsy is a neurological disorder that has been associated with oxidative stress therefore epilepsy models have been develop such as kainic acid and pentylenetetrazol are usually used to understanding of the molecular mechanisms of this disease. We examined the metallothionein expression in rat brains of treated with kainic acid and pentylenetetrazol. Increase in metallothionein and nitrotirosyne immunoreactivity of both seizures epilepsy models was observed. Moreover, we show a significant increase on levels of MT expression. These results suggest that the increase of metallothionein expression is related with kainic acid and pentylenetetrazol treatments as response to damage mediated by oxidative stress.

  14. Metallothionein expression in the rat brain following KA and PTZ treatment.

    PubMed

    Juárez-Rebollar, Daniel; Manjarrez, Joaquín; Nava-Ruíz, Concepción; Zaga-Clavellina, Verónica; Flores-Espinosa, Pilar; Heras-Romero, Yesica; Díaz-Ruíz, Araceli; Méndez-Armenta, Marisela

    2015-09-01

    Epilepsy is a neurological disorder that has been associated with oxidative stress therefore epilepsy models have been develop such as kainic acid and pentylenetetrazol are usually used to understanding of the molecular mechanisms of this disease. We examined the metallothionein expression in rat brains of treated with kainic acid and pentylenetetrazol. Increase in metallothionein and nitrotirosyne immunoreactivity of both seizures epilepsy models was observed. Moreover, we show a significant increase on levels of MT expression. These results suggest that the increase of metallothionein expression is related with kainic acid and pentylenetetrazol treatments as response to damage mediated by oxidative stress. PMID:26318565

  15. Febrile and other occasional seizures.

    PubMed

    Bast, T; Carmant, L

    2013-01-01

    Seizures with fever that result from encephalitis or meningitis usually occur late in the course of febrile illness, and are focal and prolonged. Febrile seizures are by far the most common affecting 5% of the population, followed by posttraumatic seizures and those observed in the setting of a toxic, infectious, or metabolic encephalopathy. This chapter reviews the clinical presentation of the three most common forms, due to fever, trauma, and intoxication. Febrile seizures carry no cognitive or mortality risk. Recurrence risk is increased by young age, namely before 1 year of age. Febrile seizures that persist after the age of 6 years are usually part of the syndrome of Generalized epilepsy febrile seizures plus. These febrile seizures have a strong link with epilepsy since non-febrile seizures may occur later in the same patient and in other members of the same family with an autosomal dominant transmission. Complex febrile seizures, i.e., with focal or prolonged manifestations or followed by focal defect, are related to later mesial temporal epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis; risk factors are seizure duration and brain malformation. Prophylactic treatment is usually not required in febrile seizures. Early onset of complex seizures is the main indication for AED prophylaxis. Early posttraumatic seizures, i.e., within the first week, are often focal and indicate brain trauma: contusion, hematoma, 24 hours amnesia, and depressed skull fracture are major factors of posttraumatic epilepsy. Prophylaxis with antiepileptic drugs is not effective. Various psychotropic drugs, including antiepileptics, may cause seizures.

  16. Seizure-induced neglect.

    PubMed Central

    Heilman, K M; Howell, G J

    1980-01-01

    A man with intermittent right parieto-occipital seizures was monitored by electroencephalography while he received 60 trials of being touched on the right, left, or both hands. Half of the trials were given during a focal seizure, and half were given interictally. While the patient was having seizures, he appropriately responded to all 10 stimuli delivered to the right hand, but four of 10 responses were incorrect (allaesthetic) when he was stimulated on the left. With bilateral simultaneous stimulation he neglected the left hand in all 10 trials. His interictal performance was flawless. When given a line-bisection task on two occasions during a seizure, the patient attempted to make a mark to the left of the entire sheet of paper. Immediately postictally he made a mark at the right end of the line. The case illustrates that focal seizures may induce elements of the neglect syndrome and that attention (to contralateral stimuli) and intention to perform (in the contralateral hemispatial field) may be dissociable phenomena. PMID:6777464

  17. Failure of aspartame to affect seizure susceptibility in kindled rats.

    PubMed

    Cain, D P; Boon, F; Bevan, M

    1989-04-01

    The effect of aspartame administered by gavage to rats on amygdala and hippocampal kindled seizures was assessed. Despite the administration of a wide range of doses (25-2000 mg/kg) no evidence for an effect of aspartame on afterdischarge threshold or seizure strength was obtained when testing was done at a time when serum and brain levels of neutral amino acids are known to be significantly elevated as a result of this treatment. There is controversy whether dietary aspartame (N-L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine 1-methyl ester), a food additive sweetner, can lead to seizures in susceptible humans and in laboratory animals. A proseizure effect of high consumption of aspartame has been alleged (Wurtman, 1985; Walton, 1986) and denied (Gaull, 1985). Recent studies using mice have yielded mixed results. Thus, Kim and Kim (1986) and Pinto and Maher (1988) observed potentiating effects of high loads of aspartame on chemically induced seizures, but Nevins, Arnolde and Haigler (1986) observed no effect on chemical and ECS seizures. We used the electrical kindling model of epilepsy to assess whether aspartame can alter seizure threshold or strength in rats. The kindled response is highly repeatable and stable and has been shown to be sensitive to a large variety of pharmacological treatments (Racine, 1978) and to dietary manipulation (McCann, Cain and Philbrick, 1983).

  18. IS A GRANDMAL SEIZURE NECESSARY AND SUFFICIENT FOR THE EFFICACY OF ELECTRO CONVULSIVE THERAPY?

    PubMed Central

    Verghese, Abraham

    2000-01-01

    This paper highlights the recent research findings which suggest that the old teaching that a grandma! seizure is both necessary and sufficient for the efficacy of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is not correct. It is necessary; but not sufficient. The stimulus intensity should be adjusted so that it is far above the seizure threshold in order to get maximum efficacy of ECT. PMID:21407909

  19. Tuberculoma-Induced Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Salway, R. James; Sangani, Shruti; Parekh, Samira; Bhatt, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Seizures in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients can be caused by a wide variety of opportunistic infections, and, especially in developing countries, tuberculosis (TB) should be high on the differential. In India, TB is the most common opportunistic infection in HIV and it can have several different central nervous system manifestations, including intracranial tuberculomas. In this case, an HIV patient presenting with new-onset seizure and fever was diagnosed with tuberculous meningitis and multiple intracranial tuberculomas. The patient received standard TB medications, steroids, and anticonvulsants in the emergency department and was admitted for further care. PMID:26587082

  20. SEIZURE AND EPILEPSY: STUDIES OF SEIZURE DISORDERS IN DROSOPHILA

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Louise; Howlett, Iris C.; Rusan, Zeid M.; Tanouye, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Despite the frequency of seizure disorders in the human population, the genetic and physiological basis for these defects has been difficult to resolve. Although many genetic contributions to seizure susceptibility have been identified, these involve disparate biological processes, many of which are not neural specific. The large number and heterogeneous nature of the genes involved makes it difficult to understand the complex factors underlying the etiology of seizure disorders. Examining the effect known genetic mutations have on seizure susceptibility is one approach that may prove fruitful. This approach may be helpful in both understanding how different physiological processes affect seizure susceptibility and identifying novel therapeutic treatments. We review here factors contributing to seizure susceptibility in Drosophila, a genetically tractable system that provides a model for human seizure disorders. Seizure-like neuronal activities and behaviors in the fruit fly are described, as well as a set of mutations that exhibit features resembling some human epilepsies and render the fly sensitive to seizures. Especially interesting are descriptions of a novel class of mutations that are second-site mutations that act as seizure suppressors. These mutations revert epilepsy phenotypes back to the wild-type range of seizure susceptibility. The genes responsible for seizure suppression are cloned with the goal of identifying targets for lead compounds that may be developed into new antiepileptic drugs. PMID:21906534

  1. Seizures and Teens: Sorting Out Seizures--Part Two

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devinsky, Orrin

    2006-01-01

    In adolescents, diagnosing seizures can be challenging and can lead to many pitfalls. Because seizures are episodic and unpredictable events, they usually do not occur in the doctor's office. Thus, a diagnosis of epilepsy is usually based on information presented by the person with seizures and their family. Together with results of diagnostic…

  2. Epileptic seizures: Quakes of the brain?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osorio, Ivan; Frei, Mark G.; Sornette, Didier; Milton, John; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2010-08-01

    A dynamical analogy supported by five scale-free statistics (the Gutenberg-Richter distribution of event sizes, the distribution of interevent intervals, the Omori and inverse Omori laws, and the conditional waiting time until the next event) is shown to exist between two classes of seizures (“focal” in humans and generalized in animals) and earthquakes. Increments in excitatory interneuronal coupling in animals expose the system’s dependence on this parameter and its dynamical transmutability: moderate increases lead to power-law behavior of seizure energy and interevent times, while marked ones to scale-free (power-law) coextensive with characteristic scales and events. The coextensivity of power law and characteristic size regimes is predicted by models of coupled heterogeneous threshold oscillators of relaxation and underscores the role of coupling strength in shaping the dynamics of these systems.

  3. Methanol extract of Ficus platyphylla ameliorates seizure severity, cognitive deficit and neuronal cell loss in pentylenetetrazole-kindled mice.

    PubMed

    Chindo, Ben A; Schröder, Helmut; Becker, Axel

    2015-01-15

    Decoctions of Ficus plathyphylla are used in Nigeria's folk medicine to manage epilepsy for many years and their efficacies are widely acclaimed among the rural communities of Northern Nigeria. In this study, we examined the ameliorative effects of the standardized methanol extract of Ficus platyphylla (FP) stem bark on seizure severity, cognitive deficit and neuronal cell loss in pentylenetetrazole-kindled mice. The (35)S-GTPγS, glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid receptors binding properties of the extract were also evaluated. Male CD-1 mice were kindled with an initial subeffective dose of pentylenetetrazole (PTZ, 37.5mg/kg, i.p.) for a total of 13 convulsant injections and the treatment groups concurrently received FP (100 and 200mg/kg). Control animals received the same number of saline injections. Twenty-four h after kindling completion the animals' learning performance was tested in a two-way shuttle-box. The animals were challenged with another subeffective dose of PTZ (32.5mg/kg, i.p.) on day 7 after kindling completion. Animals were sacrificed a day after the challenged experiment and the brains were processed for histological investigation. FP ameliorates seizure severity, cognitive deficits and neuronal cell loss in PTZ kindled mice. Components of the extract showed affinity for GABAergic and glutamatergic receptors. Glutamate release was diminished and the (35)S-GTPγS binding assay revealed no intrinsic activity at glutamatergic receptors. Our results revealed that FP contains psychoactive secondary metabolites with anticonvulsant properties, thus supporting the isolation and development of the biologically active components of this medicinal plant as antiepileptic agents.

  4. Effects of hypoxia-induced neonatal seizures on acute hippocampal injury and later-life seizure susceptibility and anxiety-related behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Alvarez, Natalia; Jimenez-Mateos, Eva M; Dunleavy, Mark; Waddington, John L; Boylan, Geraldine B; Henshall, David C

    2015-11-01

    Seizures are common during the neonatal period, often due to hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy and may contribute to acute brain injury and the subsequent development of cognitive deficits and childhood epilepsy. Here we explored short- and long-term consequences of neonatal hypoxia-induced seizures in 7 day old C57BL/6J mice. Seizure activity, molecular markers of hypoxia and histological injury were investigated acutely after hypoxia and response to chemoconvulsants and animal behaviour was explored at adulthood. Hypoxia was induced by exposing pups to 5% oxygen for 15 min (global hypoxia). Electrographically defined seizures with behavioral correlates occurred in 95% of these animals and seizures persisted for many minutes after restitution of normoxia. There was minimal morbidity or mortality. Pre- or post-hypoxia injection of phenobarbital (50mg/kg) had limited efficacy at suppressing seizures. The hippocampus from neonatal hypoxia-seizure mice displayed increased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and the immediate early gene c-fos, minimal histological evidence of cell injury and activation of caspase-3 in scattered neurons. Behavioral analysis of mice five weeks after hypoxia-induced seizures detected novel anxiety-related and other behaviors, while performance in a spatial memory test was similar to controls. Seizure threshold tests with kainic acid at six weeks revealed that mice previously subject to neonatal hypoxia-induced seizures developed earlier, more frequent and longer-duration seizures. This study defines a set of electro-clinical, molecular, pharmacological and behavioral consequences of hypoxia-induced seizures that indicate short- and long-term deleterious outcomes and may be a useful model to investigate the pathophysiology and treatment of neonatal seizures in humans.

  5. Effects of hypoxia-induced neonatal seizures on acute hippocampal injury and later-life seizure susceptibility and anxiety-related behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Alvarez, Natalia; Jimenez-Mateos, Eva M; Dunleavy, Mark; Waddington, John L; Boylan, Geraldine B; Henshall, David C

    2015-11-01

    Seizures are common during the neonatal period, often due to hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy and may contribute to acute brain injury and the subsequent development of cognitive deficits and childhood epilepsy. Here we explored short- and long-term consequences of neonatal hypoxia-induced seizures in 7 day old C57BL/6J mice. Seizure activity, molecular markers of hypoxia and histological injury were investigated acutely after hypoxia and response to chemoconvulsants and animal behaviour was explored at adulthood. Hypoxia was induced by exposing pups to 5% oxygen for 15 min (global hypoxia). Electrographically defined seizures with behavioral correlates occurred in 95% of these animals and seizures persisted for many minutes after restitution of normoxia. There was minimal morbidity or mortality. Pre- or post-hypoxia injection of phenobarbital (50mg/kg) had limited efficacy at suppressing seizures. The hippocampus from neonatal hypoxia-seizure mice displayed increased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and the immediate early gene c-fos, minimal histological evidence of cell injury and activation of caspase-3 in scattered neurons. Behavioral analysis of mice five weeks after hypoxia-induced seizures detected novel anxiety-related and other behaviors, while performance in a spatial memory test was similar to controls. Seizure threshold tests with kainic acid at six weeks revealed that mice previously subject to neonatal hypoxia-induced seizures developed earlier, more frequent and longer-duration seizures. This study defines a set of electro-clinical, molecular, pharmacological and behavioral consequences of hypoxia-induced seizures that indicate short- and long-term deleterious outcomes and may be a useful model to investigate the pathophysiology and treatment of neonatal seizures in humans. PMID:26341542

  6. Adaptive Thresholds

    SciTech Connect

    Bremer, P. -T.

    2014-08-26

    ADAPT is a topological analysis code that allow to compute local threshold, in particular relevance based thresholds for features defined in scalar fields. The initial target application is vortex detection but the software is more generally applicable to all threshold based feature definitions.

  7. Ion dynamics during seizures

    PubMed Central

    Raimondo, Joseph V.; Burman, Richard J.; Katz, Arieh A.; Akerman, Colin J.

    2015-01-01

    Changes in membrane voltage brought about by ion fluxes through voltage and transmitter-gated channels represent the basis of neural activity. As such, electrochemical gradients across the membrane determine the direction and driving force for the flow of ions and are therefore crucial in setting the properties of synaptic transmission and signal propagation. Ion concentration gradients are established by a variety of mechanisms, including specialized transporter proteins. However, transmembrane gradients can be affected by ionic fluxes through channels during periods of elevated neural activity, which in turn are predicted to influence the properties of on-going synaptic transmission. Such activity-induced changes to ion concentration gradients are a feature of both physiological and pathological neural processes. An epileptic seizure is an example of severely perturbed neural activity, which is accompanied by pronounced changes in intracellular and extracellular ion concentrations. Appreciating the factors that contribute to these ion dynamics is critical if we are to understand how a seizure event evolves and is sustained and terminated by neural tissue. Indeed, this issue is of significant clinical importance as status epilepticus—a type of seizure that does not stop of its own accord—is a life-threatening medical emergency. In this review we explore how the transmembrane concentration gradient of the six major ions (K+, Na+, Cl−, Ca2+, H+and HCO3−) is altered during an epileptic seizure. We will first examine each ion individually, before describing how multiple interacting mechanisms between ions might contribute to concentration changes and whether these act to prolong or terminate epileptic activity. In doing so, we will consider how the availability of experimental techniques has both advanced and restricted our ability to study these phenomena. PMID:26539081

  8. Anticonvulsant effects of N-arachidonoyl-serotonin, a dual fatty acid amide hydrolase enzyme and transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1 (TRPV1) channel blocker, on experimental seizures: the roles of cannabinoid CB1 receptors and TRPV1 channels.

    PubMed

    Vilela, Luciano R; Medeiros, Daniel C; de Oliveira, Antonio Carlos P; Moraes, Marcio F; Moreira, Fabricio A

    2014-10-01

    Selective blockade of anandamide hydrolysis, through the inhibition of the FAAH enzyme, has anticonvulsant effects, which are mediated by CB1 receptors. Anandamide, however, also activates TRPV1 channels, generally with an opposite outcome on neuronal modulation. Thus, we suggested that the dual FAAH and TRPV1 blockade with N-arachidonoyl-serotonin (AA-5-HT) would be efficacious in inhibiting pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizures in mice. We also investigated the contribution of CB1 activation and TRPV1 blockade to the overt effect of AA-5-HT. In the first experiment, injection of AA-5-HT (0.3-3.0 mg/kg) delayed the onset and reduced the duration of PTZ (60 mg)-induced seizures in mice. These effects were reversed by pre-treatment with the CB1 antagonist, AM251 (1.0-3.0 mg/kg). Finally, we observed that administration of the selective TRPV1 antagonist, SB366791 (0.1-1 mg/kg), did not entirely mimic AA-5-HT effects. In conclusion, AA-5-HT alleviates seizures in mice, an effect inhibited by CB1 antagonism, but not completely mimicked by TRPV1 blockage, indicating that the overall effect of AA-5-HT seems to depend mainly on CB1 receptors. This may represent a new strategy for the development of drugs against seizures, epilepsies and related syndromes.

  9. Serotonin neurones have anti-convulsant effects and reduce seizure-induced mortality

    PubMed Central

    Buchanan, Gordon F; Murray, Nicholas M; Hajek, Michael A; Richerson, George B

    2014-01-01

    Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) is the leading cause of death in patients with refractory epilepsy. Defects in central control of breathing are important contributors to the pathophysiology of SUDEP, and serotonin (5-HT) system dysfunction may be involved. Here we examined the effect of 5-HT neurone elimination or 5-HT reduction on seizure risk and seizure-induced mortality. Adult Lmx1bf/f/p mice, which lack >99% of 5-HT neurones in the CNS, and littermate controls (Lmx1bf/f) were subjected to acute seizure induction by maximal electroshock (MES) or pilocarpine, variably including electroencephalography, electrocardiography, plethysmography, mechanical ventilation or pharmacological therapy. Lmx1bf/f/p mice had a lower seizure threshold and increased seizure-induced mortality. Breathing ceased during most seizures without recovery, whereas cardiac activity persisted for up to 9 min before terminal arrest. The mortality rate of mice of both genotypes was reduced by mechanical ventilation during the seizure or 5-HT2A receptor agonist pretreatment. The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor citalopram reduced mortality of Lmx1bf/f but not of Lmx1bf/f/p mice. In C57BL/6N mice, reduction of 5-HT synthesis with para-chlorophenylalanine increased MES-induced seizure severity but not mortality. We conclude that 5-HT neurones raise seizure threshold and decrease seizure-related mortality. Death ensued from respiratory failure, followed by terminal asystole. Given that SUDEP often occurs in association with generalised seizures, some mechanisms causing death in our model might be shared with those leading to SUDEP. This model may help determine the relationship between seizures, 5-HT system dysfunction, breathing and death, which may lead to novel ways to prevent SUDEP. PMID:25107926

  10. Neto2-null mice have impaired GABAergic inhibition and are susceptible to seizures

    PubMed Central

    Mahadevan, Vivek; Dargaei, Zahra; Ivakine, Evgueni A.; Hartmann, Anna-Maria; Ng, David; Chevrier, Jonah; Ormond, Jake; Nothwang, Hans Gerd; McInnes, Roderick R.; Woodin, Melanie A.

    2015-01-01

    Neto2 is a transmembrane protein that interacts with the neuron-specific K+-Cl− cotransporter (KCC2) in the central nervous system (CNS). Efficient KCC2 transport is essential for setting the neuronal Cl− gradient, which is required for fast GABAergic inhibition. Neto2 is required to maintain the normal abundance of KCC2 in neurons, and increases KCC2 function by binding to the active oligomeric form of this cotransporter. In the present study, we characterized GABAergic inhibition and KCC2-mediated neuronal chloride homeostasis in pyramidal neurons from adult hippocampal slices. Using gramicidin perforated patch clamp recordings we found that the reversal potential for GABA (EGABA) was significantly depolarized. We also observed that surface levels of KCC2 and phosphorylation of KCC2 serine 940 (Ser940) were reduced in Neto2−/− neurons compared to wild-type controls. To examine GABAergic inhibition we recorded spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs) and found that Neto2−/− neurons had significant reductions in both their amplitude and frequency. Based on the critical role of Neto2 in regulating GABAergic inhibition we rationalized that Neto2-null mice would be prone to seizure activity. We found that Neto2-null mice demonstrated a decrease in the latency to pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizures and an increase in seizure severity. PMID:26441539

  11. Neto2-null mice have impaired GABAergic inhibition and are susceptible to seizures.

    PubMed

    Mahadevan, Vivek; Dargaei, Zahra; Ivakine, Evgueni A; Hartmann, Anna-Maria; Ng, David; Chevrier, Jonah; Ormond, Jake; Nothwang, Hans Gerd; McInnes, Roderick R; Woodin, Melanie A

    2015-01-01

    Neto2 is a transmembrane protein that interacts with the neuron-specific K(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter (KCC2) in the central nervous system (CNS). Efficient KCC2 transport is essential for setting the neuronal Cl(-) gradient, which is required for fast GABAergic inhibition. Neto2 is required to maintain the normal abundance of KCC2 in neurons, and increases KCC2 function by binding to the active oligomeric form of this cotransporter. In the present study, we characterized GABAergic inhibition and KCC2-mediated neuronal chloride homeostasis in pyramidal neurons from adult hippocampal slices. Using gramicidin perforated patch clamp recordings we found that the reversal potential for GABA (EGABA) was significantly depolarized. We also observed that surface levels of KCC2 and phosphorylation of KCC2 serine 940 (Ser940) were reduced in Neto2(-/-) neurons compared to wild-type controls. To examine GABAergic inhibition we recorded spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs) and found that Neto2(-/-) neurons had significant reductions in both their amplitude and frequency. Based on the critical role of Neto2 in regulating GABAergic inhibition we rationalized that Neto2-null mice would be prone to seizure activity. We found that Neto2-null mice demonstrated a decrease in the latency to pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizures and an increase in seizure severity. PMID:26441539

  12. Seizures Following Traumatic Brain Injury in Childhood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Dennis

    This guide provides information on seizures in students with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and offers guidelines for classroom management. First, a classification system for seizures is presented with specific types of seizures explained. Post-traumatic seizures are specifically addressed as is the importance of seizure prevention when possible.…

  13. Seizure activity post organophosphate exposure.

    PubMed

    Tattersall, John

    2009-01-01

    Electrographic seizures are a feature of organophosphate anticholinesterase intoxication. Clinical studies of pesticide poisonings suggest that seizures are more common in children than in adults. Since flaccid paralysis, a characteristic sign of organophosphate poisoning, can mask convulsions, the most reliable indicator of seizures is the electroencephalogram, but this has not been widely used in clinical studies. Seizures can rapidly progress to status epilepticus, contributing to mortality and, in survivors, to neuronal damage and neurological impairment. Anticonvulsant drugs can significantly reduce the lethal and toxic effects of these compounds. A benzodiazepine, usually diazepam, is the treatment currently indicated for control of seizures. Animal studies have indicated that the early phase of seizure activity (0-5 min after seizure onset) is purely cholinergic, predominantly involving muscarinic mechanisms. Seizure activity subsequently progresses through mixed cholinergic and noncholinergic modulation (5-40 min) into a final noncholinergic phase. Neuropathology caused by seizures is most likely associated with glutamatergic excitotoxicity. Future prospects for improved treatments include new benzodiazepines, glutamate receptor antagonists, antimuscarinics with additional antiglutamatergic activity and adenosine receptor antagonists.

  14. Seizures and Teens: The Practical Aspects of Managing Seizure Medications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shafer, Patricia Osborne; Israel, Beth

    2007-01-01

    Medications are the primary treatment for epilepsy, yet many teens and their families have problems managing seizure medicines. Fear of side effects, difficulties remembering to take medicines and figuring out how to take them are common challenges. Unfortunately, not taking medicine as prescribed can lead to breakthrough seizures, which in turn…

  15. Mianserin and convulsive seizures

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, J. Guy; Glen-Bott, Mary

    1983-01-01

    1 Forty patients have been reported to the Committee on Safety of Medicines (CSM) because of convulsions occurring during treatment with mianserin, suggesting that this drug is more epileptogenic than tricyclic antidepressants. 2 Details concerning 83% of these cases were obtained in a questionnaire study carried out in collaboration with the CSM and compared with those of a control group. 3 Ratings of the relationship between drug and effect carried out by neurologists and J.G.E. showed considerable variations and confidence of a causal connection in only a minority of patients. 4 As the CSM data do not allow for a reliable assessment of the relative epileptogenic effects of antidepressants, a comparison has been made between unpublished work on seizures occurring during treatment with imipramine and amitriptyline and published research on mianserin. This suggests that mianserin is no more epileptogenic than tricyclic antidepressants. 5 Factors that might predispose to seizures include relevant family and past medical history, starting treatment, a change in dose, benzodiazepine withdrawal and concomitant treatment with other drugs that have epileptogenic properties. PMID:6824561

  16. The Impact of Psychoactive Drugs on Seizures and Antiepileptic Drugs.

    PubMed

    Habibi, Mitra; Hart, Felecia; Bainbridge, Jacquelyn

    2016-08-01

    Psychiatric comorbidities are very common in patients with epilepsy, and in fact, a bidirectional relationship between epilepsy and some psychiatric disorders have been identified. However, despite their high prevalence, these comorbidities are not routinely recognized or adequately treated causing a significant burden for these patients. Atypical presentations of some of these psychiatric comorbidities in epilepsy, the concern that some psychotropic drugs may lower seizure threshold worsening frequency of seizures, possibility of many drug-drug interactions, and the negative impact of some antiepileptic drugs on psychiatric conditions are some of the challenges faced by clinicians. Although the main focus in epilepsy has remained on treatment of seizures, acknowledgment of these comorbidities and their timely diagnosis and appropriate treatment not only can impact patients' quality of life but also may improve their response to antiepileptic therapies. PMID:27315249

  17. Recurrent seizures after lidocaine ingestion

    PubMed Central

    Aminiahidashti, Hamed; Laali, Abolghasem; Nosrati, Nazanin; Jahani, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Lidocaine has a concentration-dependent effect on seizures. Concentrations above 15 μg/mL frequently result in seizures in laboratory animals and human. We report a case of central nervous system (CNS) lidocaine toxicity and recurrent seizure after erroneous ingestion of lidocaine solution. A 4-year-old boy presented to the Emergency Department of Imam Hospital of Sari in December 2013 due to tonic-clonic generalized seizures approximately 30 min ago. 3 h before seizure, his mother gave him 2 spoons (amount 20–25 cc) lidocaine hydrochloride 2% solution instead of pediatric gripe by mistake. Seizure with generalized tonic-clonic occurred 3 times in home. Neurological examination was essentially unremarkable except for the depressed level of consciousness. Personal and medical history was unremarkable. There was no evidence of intracranial ischemic or hemorrhagic lesions in computed tomography scan. There were no further seizures, the condition of the patient remained stable, and he was discharged 2 days after admission. The use of viscous lidocaine may result in cardiovascular and CNS toxicity, particularly in children. Conservative management is the best option for treatment of lidocaine induced seizure. PMID:25709968

  18. Recurrent seizures after lidocaine ingestion.

    PubMed

    Aminiahidashti, Hamed; Laali, Abolghasem; Nosrati, Nazanin; Jahani, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Lidocaine has a concentration-dependent effect on seizures. Concentrations above 15 μg/mL frequently result in seizures in laboratory animals and human. We report a case of central nervous system (CNS) lidocaine toxicity and recurrent seizure after erroneous ingestion of lidocaine solution. A 4-year-old boy presented to the Emergency Department of Imam Hospital of Sari in December 2013 due to tonic-clonic generalized seizures approximately 30 min ago. 3 h before seizure, his mother gave him 2 spoons (amount 20-25 cc) lidocaine hydrochloride 2% solution instead of pediatric gripe by mistake. Seizure with generalized tonic-clonic occurred 3 times in home. Neurological examination was essentially unremarkable except for the depressed level of consciousness. Personal and medical history was unremarkable. There was no evidence of intracranial ischemic or hemorrhagic lesions in computed tomography scan. There were no further seizures, the condition of the patient remained stable, and he was discharged 2 days after admission. The use of viscous lidocaine may result in cardiovascular and CNS toxicity, particularly in children. Conservative management is the best option for treatment of lidocaine induced seizure. PMID:25709968

  19. [Reflex seizures, cinema and television].

    PubMed

    Olivares-Romero, Jesús

    2015-12-16

    In movies and television series are few references to seizures or reflex epilepsy even though in real life are an important subgroup of total epileptic syndromes. It has performed a search on the topic, identified 25 films in which they appear reflex seizures. Most seizures observed are tonic-clonic and visual stimuli are the most numerous, corresponding all with flashing lights. The emotions are the main stimuli in higher level processes. In most cases it is not possible to know if a character suffers a reflex epilepsy or suffer reflex seizures in the context of another epileptic syndrome. The main conclusion is that, in the movies, the reflex seizures are merely a visual reinforcing and anecdotal element without significant influence on the plot. PMID:26662874

  20. [Reflex seizures, cinema and television].

    PubMed

    Olivares-Romero, Jesús

    2015-12-16

    In movies and television series are few references to seizures or reflex epilepsy even though in real life are an important subgroup of total epileptic syndromes. It has performed a search on the topic, identified 25 films in which they appear reflex seizures. Most seizures observed are tonic-clonic and visual stimuli are the most numerous, corresponding all with flashing lights. The emotions are the main stimuli in higher level processes. In most cases it is not possible to know if a character suffers a reflex epilepsy or suffer reflex seizures in the context of another epileptic syndrome. The main conclusion is that, in the movies, the reflex seizures are merely a visual reinforcing and anecdotal element without significant influence on the plot.

  1. Audiogenic reflex seizures in cats

    PubMed Central

    Lowrie, Mark; Bessant, Claire; Harvey, Robert J; Sparkes, Andrew; Garosi, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to characterise feline audiogenic reflex seizures (FARS). Methods An online questionnaire was developed to capture information from owners with cats suffering from FARS. This was collated with the medical records from the primary veterinarian. Ninety-six cats were included. Results Myoclonic seizures were one of the cardinal signs of this syndrome (90/96), frequently occurring prior to generalised tonic–clonic seizures (GTCSs) in this population. Other features include a late onset (median 15 years) and absence seizures (6/96), with most seizures triggered by high-frequency sounds amid occasional spontaneous seizures (up to 20%). Half the population (48/96) had hearing impairment or were deaf. One-third of cats (35/96) had concurrent diseases, most likely reflecting the age distribution. Birmans were strongly represented (30/96). Levetiracetam gave good seizure control. The course of the epilepsy was non-progressive in the majority (68/96), with an improvement over time in some (23/96). Only 33/96 and 11/90 owners, respectively, felt the GTCSs and myoclonic seizures affected their cat’s quality of life (QoL). Despite this, many owners (50/96) reported a slow decline in their cat’s health, becoming less responsive (43/50), not jumping (41/50), becoming uncoordinated or weak in the pelvic limbs (24/50) and exhibiting dramatic weight loss (39/50). These signs were exclusively reported in cats experiencing seizures for >2 years, with 42/50 owners stating these signs affected their cat’s QoL. Conclusions and relevance In gathering data on audiogenic seizures in cats, we have identified a new epilepsy syndrome named FARS with a geriatric onset. Further studies are warranted to investigate potential genetic predispositions to this condition. PMID:25916687

  2. Predicting Epileptic Seizures in Advance

    PubMed Central

    Moghim, Negin; Corne, David W.

    2014-01-01

    Epilepsy is the second most common neurological disorder, affecting 0.6–0.8% of the world's population. In this neurological disorder, abnormal activity of the brain causes seizures, the nature of which tend to be sudden. Antiepileptic Drugs (AEDs) are used as long-term therapeutic solutions that control the condition. Of those treated with AEDs, 35% become resistant to medication. The unpredictable nature of seizures poses risks for the individual with epilepsy. It is clearly desirable to find more effective ways of preventing seizures for such patients. The automatic detection of oncoming seizures, before their actual onset, can facilitate timely intervention and hence minimize these risks. In addition, advance prediction of seizures can enrich our understanding of the epileptic brain. In this study, drawing on the body of work behind automatic seizure detection and prediction from digitised Invasive Electroencephalography (EEG) data, a prediction algorithm, ASPPR (Advance Seizure Prediction via Pre-ictal Relabeling), is described. ASPPR facilitates the learning of predictive models targeted at recognizing patterns in EEG activity that are in a specific time window in advance of a seizure. It then exploits advanced machine learning coupled with the design and selection of appropriate features from EEG signals. Results, from evaluating ASPPR independently on 21 different patients, suggest that seizures for many patients can be predicted up to 20 minutes in advance of their onset. Compared to benchmark performance represented by a mean S1-Score (harmonic mean of Sensitivity and Specificity) of 90.6% for predicting seizure onset between 0 and 5 minutes in advance, ASPPR achieves mean S1-Scores of: 96.30% for prediction between 1 and 6 minutes in advance, 96.13% for prediction between 8 and 13 minutes in advance, 94.5% for prediction between 14 and 19 minutes in advance, and 94.2% for prediction between 20 and 25 minutes in advance. PMID:24911316

  3. Treating acute seizures with benzodiazepines: does seizure duration matter?

    PubMed

    Naylor, David E

    2014-10-01

    Several clinical trials have shown improved seizure control and outcome by early initiation of treatment with benzodiazepines, before arrival in the emergency department and before intravenous access can be established. Here, evidence is provided and reviewed for rapid treatment of acute seizures in order to avoid the development of benzodiazepine pharmacoresistance and the emergence of self-sustaining status epilepticus. Alterations in the physiology, pharmacology, and postsynaptic level of GABA-A receptors can develop within minutes to an hour and hinder the ability of synaptic inhibition to stop seizures while also impairing the efficacy of GABAergic agents, such as benzodiazepines, to boost impaired inhibition. In addition, heightened excitatory transmission further exacerbates the inhibitory/excitatory balance and makes seizure control even more resistant to treatment. The acute increase in the surface expression of NMDA receptors during prolonged seizures also may cause excitotoxic injury, cell death, and other pathological expressions and re-arrangements of receptor subunits that all contribute to long-term sequelae such as cognitive impairment and chronic epilepsy. In conclusion, a short window of opportunity exists when seizures are maximally controlled by first-line benzodiazepine treatment. After that, multiple pathological mechanisms quickly become engaged that make seizures increasingly more difficult to control with high risk for long-term harm.

  4. The effects of inferior olive lesion on strychnine seizure

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, M.C.; Chung, E.Y.; Van Woert, M.H. )

    1990-10-01

    Bilateral inferior olive lesions, produced by systemic administration of the neurotoxin 3-acetylpyridine (3AP) produce a proconvulsant state specific for strychnine-induced seizures and myoclonus. We have proposed that these phenomena are mediated through increased excitation of cerebellar Purkinje cells, through activation of glutamate receptors, in response to climbing fiber deafferentation. An increase in quisqualic acid (QA)-displaceable ({sup 3}H)AMPA ((RS)-alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazole-4-propionic acid) binding in cerebella from inferior olive-lesioned rats was observed, but no difference in ({sup 3}H)AMPA binding displaced by glutamate, kainic acid (KA) or glutamate diethylester (GDEE) was seen. The excitatory amino acid antagonists GDEE and MK-801 ((+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo(a,d)cyclo-hepten-5,10 imine) were tested as anticonvulsants for strychnine-induced seizures in 3AP inferior olive-lesioned and control rats. Neither drug effected seizures in control rats, however, both GDEE and MK-801 produced a leftward shift in the strychnine-seizure dose-response curve in 3AP inferior olive-lesioned rats. GDEE also inhibited strychnine-induced myoclonus in the lesioned group, while MK-801 had no effect on myoclonus. The decreased threshold for strychnine-induced seizures and myoclonus in the 3AP-inferior olive-lesioned rats may be due to an increase in glutamate receptors as suggested by the ({sup 3}H)AMPA binding data.

  5. Pharmacological effects of phenylalanine on seizure susceptibility: an overview.

    PubMed

    Sze, P Y

    1989-02-01

    The effects of excessive doses of phenylalanine on seizure susceptibility were examined in animal models in the past, primarily because of their relevance to phenylketonuria. It was thought that such effects might involve brain monoaminergic mechanisms. Recently, this issue has been pursued with a renewed interest but for a different reason. The dipeptide sweetener, aspartame, contains a phenylalanine residue. In the last three years, a number of studies involving as many as nine animal models of seizures have reexamined the effects of phenylalanine (and aspartame) on seizure thresholds. Data from these studies are in general agreement that aspartame at dosage levels below 1,000 mg/kg, or phenylalanine at equimolar doses, is without an effect on seizure susceptibility in animals. When the dosage level of aspartame reaches 1,000 mg/kg, the findings between various laboratories and from different animal models of seizures are inconsistent, showing either no effect or a proconvulsant effect. The Acceptable Daily Intake of aspartame in humans set by the Food and Drug Administration is 50 mg/kg/day. Thus, the data from the excessive bolus doses in rodents do not appear to be relevant to human use. This article provides a detailed review of the data from both early and recent studies and points out the methodological problems apparent at such high doses.

  6. In silico validation and structure activity relationship study of a series of pyridine-3-carbohydrazide derivatives as potential anticonvulsants in generalized and partial seizures.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Reema; Sara, Udai Vir Singh; Khosa, Ratan Lal; Stables, James; Jain, Jainendra

    2013-06-01

    A series of twelve compounds (Compounds RNH1-RNH12) of acid hydrazones of pyridine-3-carbohydrazide or nicotinic acid hydrazide was synthesized and evaluated for anticonvulsant activity by MES, scPTZ, minimal clonic seizure and corneal kindling seizure test. Neurotoxicity was also determined for these compounds by rotarod test. Results showed that halogen substitution at meta and para position of phenyl ring exhibited better protection than ortho substitution. Compounds RNH4 and RNH12, were found to be the active analogs displaying 6Hz ED50 of 75.4 and 14.77 mg/kg while the corresponding MES ED50 values were 113.4 and 29.3 mg/kg respectively. In addition, compound RNH12 also showed scPTZ ED50 of 54.2 mg/kg. In the series, compound RNH12 with trifluoromethoxy substituted phenyl ring was the most potent analog exhibiting protection in all four animal models of epilepsy. Molecular docking study has also shown significant binding interactions of these two compounds with 1OHV, 2A1H and 1PBQ receptors. Thus, N-[(meta or para halogen substituted) benzylidene] pyridine-3-carbohydrazides could be used as lead compounds in anticonvulsant drug design and discovery.

  7. A Hypothesis Regarding the Molecular Mechanism Underlying Dietary Soy-Induced Effects on Seizure Propensity

    PubMed Central

    Westmark, Cara Jean

    2014-01-01

    Numerous neurological disorders including fragile X syndrome, Down syndrome, autism, and Alzheimer’s disease are co-morbid with epilepsy. We have observed elevated seizure propensity in mouse models of these disorders dependent on diet. Specifically, soy-based diets exacerbate audiogenic-induced seizures in juvenile mice. We have also found potential associations between the consumption of soy-based infant formula and seizure incidence, epilepsy comorbidity, and autism diagnostic scores in autistic children by retrospective analyses of medical record data. In total, these data suggest that consumption of high levels of soy protein during postnatal development may affect neuronal excitability. Herein, we present our theory regarding the molecular mechanism underlying soy-induced effects on seizure propensity. We hypothesize that soy phytoestrogens interfere with metabotropic glutamate receptor signaling through an estrogen receptor-dependent mechanism, which results in elevated production of key synaptic proteins and decreased seizure threshold. PMID:25232349

  8. Determination of seizure propagation across microdomains using spectral measures of causality.

    PubMed

    Basu, Ishita; Kudela, Pawel; Anderson, William S

    2014-01-01

    The use of microelectrode arrays to measure electrical activity from the surface of the brain is increasingly being investigated as a means to improve seizure focus localization. In this work, we determine seizure propagation across microdomains sampled by such microelectrode arrays and compare the results using two widely used frequency domain measures of causality, namely the partial directed coherence and the directed direct transfer function. We show that these two measures produce very similar propagation patterns for simulated microelectrode activity over a relatively smaller number of channels. However as the number of channels increases, partial directed coherence produces better estimates of the actual propagation pattern. Additionally, we apply these two measures to determine seizure propagation over microelectrode arrays measured from a patient undergoing intracranial monitoring for seizure focus localization and find very similar patterns which also agree with a threshold based reconstruction during seizure onset. PMID:25571448

  9. Resected Brain Tissue, Seizure Onset Zone and Quantitative EEG Measures: Towards Prediction of Post-Surgical Seizure Control

    PubMed Central

    Andrzejak, Ralph G.; Hauf, Martinus; Pollo, Claudio; Müller, Markus; Weisstanner, Christian; Wiest, Roland; Schindler, Kaspar

    2015-01-01

    Background Epilepsy surgery is a potentially curative treatment option for pharmacoresistent patients. If non-invasive methods alone do not allow to delineate the epileptogenic brain areas the surgical candidates undergo long-term monitoring with intracranial EEG. Visual EEG analysis is then used to identify the seizure onset zone for targeted resection as a standard procedure. Methods Despite of its great potential to assess the epileptogenicty of brain tissue, quantitative EEG analysis has not yet found its way into routine clinical practice. To demonstrate that quantitative EEG may yield clinically highly relevant information we retrospectively investigated how post-operative seizure control is associated with four selected EEG measures evaluated in the resected brain tissue and the seizure onset zone. Importantly, the exact spatial location of the intracranial electrodes was determined by coregistration of pre-operative MRI and post-implantation CT and coregistration with post-resection MRI was used to delineate the extent of tissue resection. Using data-driven thresholding, quantitative EEG results were separated into normally contributing and salient channels. Results In patients with favorable post-surgical seizure control a significantly larger fraction of salient channels in three of the four quantitative EEG measures was resected than in patients with unfavorable outcome in terms of seizure control (median over the whole peri-ictal recordings). The same statistics revealed no association with post-operative seizure control when EEG channels contributing to the seizure onset zone were studied. Conclusions We conclude that quantitative EEG measures provide clinically relevant and objective markers of target tissue, which may be used to optimize epilepsy surgery. The finding that differentiation between favorable and unfavorable outcome was better for the fraction of salient values in the resected brain tissue than in the seizure onset zone is consistent

  10. Nanoparticle formulation improves the anticonvulsant effect of clonazepam on the pentylenetetrazole-induced seizures: behavior and electroencephalogram.

    PubMed

    Leyva-Gómez, Gerardo; González-Trujano, María Eva; López-Ruiz, Edith; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Wekslerg, Babette; Romero, Ignacio; Miller, Florence; Delie, Florence; Allémann, Eric; Quintanar-Guerrero, David

    2014-08-01

    To document the efficacy of clonazepam (CLZ) either free as a solution or loaded in solid lipid nanoparticles (CLZ-SLN) or mixed micelles (CLZ-MM), the in vitro blood-brain barrier permeability of the formulations was determined. Behavior and/or electroencephalograms (EEGs) of rodents receiving treatments were also studied. The in vitro permeability of CLZ increased when associated with SLN, but decreased in the case of MM. The occurrence of the pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizures in mice was significantly prevented by CLZ, even when exposed a lower dose of CLZ-SLN after administration by the oral route. The behavioral severity and EEGs showing the PTZ-induced paroxystic activity in rats diminished significantly in the presence of CLZ alone (0.3 mg/kg), and were almost totally prevented in the rats treated with CLZ-SLN (equivalent to 0.3 mg/kg). The frequency, duration, and spreading of the spikes-wave of rats treated with CLZ-SLN decreased significantly as compared with CLZ alone, CLZ-MM, or the vehicle. These results show an in vitro-in vivo correlation in the enhanced blood-brain barrier permeability of SLN formulation, and a contribution of MM to the carrier effect of drugs toward the bloodstream and brain, where this pharmaceutical formulation of CLZ-SLN improves the anticonvulsant effect of this benzodiazepine, thus offering additional advantages after oral administration.

  11. Semiological seizure classification: before and after video-EEG monitoring of seizures.

    PubMed

    Hirfanoglu, Tugba; Serdaroglu, Ayse; Cansu, Ali; Bilir, Erhan; Gucuyener, Kivilcim

    2007-04-01

    The study objective was to assess the applicability and reliability of the semiological seizure classification in children with epilepsy in outpatient clinics. Ninety patients (age range, 2-16 years) who experienced clinical seizures during prolonged video-electroencephalogram (EEG) monitoring were evaluated. Semiological seizure classification was performed, first based on history obtained from parents of the patient during outpatient follow-up visits and then based on video EEG-monitoring. Kappa statistics (kappa) were used to evaluate the consistency of the two rounds of semiological seizure classification. Classification based on history yielded the following distribution: simple motor seizures (66.3%), aura (28%), complex motor seizures (15.8%), special seizures (15.8%), dialeptic seizures (9.3%), and autonomic seizures (3.7%). Classification based on video EEG-monitoring yielded a different distribution: simple motor seizures (55.7%), complex motor seizures (26.9%), automotor seizures (26.9%), aura (23%), dialeptic seizures (22.1%), special seizures (9.6%), and autonomic seizures (1.9%). Negative myoclonic seizures (kappa = 1, P = 0.000) and hypermotor seizures (kappa = 0.85, P = 0.000) had excellent consistency; somatosensory aura (kappa = 0.26, P = 0.012) and automotor seizures (kappa = 0.28, P = 0.004) had the lowest consistency. The families or doctors often defined simple motor seizures (decrease of 10.6% from before to after monitoring, kappa = 0.44); the proportion of complex motor seizures changed rather from before to after monitoring (11.1%, kappa = 0.33). Generally, parents can describe seizures quite well. We suggest that semiological seizure classification is a reliable method applicable for everyday use during outpatient visits, especially if seizure semiology is evaluated individually for each component or if the semiological seizure classification is modified or refined for some seizure components (tonic, clonic, versive, conscious, automotor

  12. Occipital seizures imitating migraine aura.

    PubMed Central

    Panayiotopoulos, C P; Sharoqi, I A; Agathonikou, A

    1997-01-01

    Three cases are reported in which symptoms of occipital seizures resembled the visual aura of migraine. Careful recording of the characteristics and timing of such visual effects will often resolve the diagnostic dilemma. PMID:9204019

  13. Ranolazine overdose-induced seizures.

    PubMed

    Akil, Nour; Bottei, Edward; Kamath, Sameer

    2015-12-01

    Ranolazine is a new anti-anginal medication that was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2006 for patients with symptomatic chronic angina despite optimized therapy. This paper presents a case report of a fifteen year old male patient admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit after ranolazine overdose ingestion. He had recurrent new onset seizures that are most likely due to ranolazine overdose. Seizures have never been reported with ranolazine use or abuse. PMID:26072257

  14. Neocortical very fast oscillations (ripples, 80-200 Hz) during seizures: intracellular correlates.

    PubMed

    Grenier, François; Timofeev, Igor; Steriade, Mircea

    2003-02-01

    Multi-site field potential and intracellular recordings from various neocortical areas were used to study very fast oscillations or ripples (80-200 Hz) during electrographic seizures in cats under ketamine-xylazine anesthesia. The animals displayed spontaneously occurring and electrically induced seizures comprising spike-wave complexes (2-3 Hz) and fast runs (10-20 Hz). Neocortical ripples had much higher amplitudes during seizures than during the slow oscillation preceding the onset of seizures. A series of experimental data from the present study supports the hypothesis that ripples are implicated in seizure initiation. Ripples were particularly strong at the onset of seizures and halothane, which antagonizes the occurrence of ripples, also blocked seizures. The firing of electrophysiologically defined cellular types was phase-locked with ripples in simultaneously recorded field potentials. This indicates that ripples during paroxysmal events are associated with a coordination of firing in a majority of neocortical neurons. This was confirmed with dual intracellular recordings. Based on the amplitude that neocortical ripples reach during paroxysmal events, we propose a mechanism by which neocortical ripples during normal network activity could actively participate in the initiation of seizures on reaching a certain threshold amplitude. This mechanism involves a vicious feedback loop in which very fast oscillations in field potentials are a reflection of synchronous action potentials, and in turn these oscillations help generate and synchronize action potentials in adjacent neurons through electrical interactions.

  15. Early seizures in acute stroke

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Chraa; Kissani, Najib

    2015-01-01

    Early seizures (ES) may complicate the clinical course of patients with acute stroke. The aim of this study was to assess the frequency and the predictive factors for early seizures as well the clinical outcome in patients with first-ever stroke. A total of 352 consecutive patients with first-ever stroke, admitted to our department, were included in this retrospective study. Early seizures were defined as seizures occurring within 7 days from acute stroke. Patients with history of epilepsy were excluded. About 47 patients (13%) had early seizure, and 8 had a status epilepticus. We had 28 women and 19 men. The mean age was 71.6 ± 14.6. They were significantly more common in patients with cortical involvement, severe and large stroke, and in patient with cortical associated hemorrhage. ES were associated with an increase in adverse outcome (mortality and disability). Early seizures occured in about 13% of patients with acute stroke. In these patients hemorrhagic transformation is a predictive factor for ES. ES seem to be associated with a worse outcome after acute stroke. PMID:26097640

  16. Tobacco smoking, epilepsy, and seizures.

    PubMed

    Rong, Lingling; Frontera, Alfred T; Benbadis, Selim R

    2014-02-01

    Tobacco smoking is considered the greatest risk factor for death caused by noncommunicable diseases. In contrast to extensive research on the association between tobacco smoking and diseases such as heart attack, stroke, and cancers, studies on the association between tobacco smoking and seizures or epilepsy are insufficient. The exact roles tobacco smoking and nicotine use play in seizures or epilepsy have not been well reviewed. We reviewed available literature and found that 1) there are vast differences between tobacco smoke and nicotine based on their components and their effects on seizures or epilepsy; 2) the seizure risk in acute active tobacco smokers, women who smoke during pregnancy, electronic cigarette smokers, and the role of smoking in sudden unexplained/unexpected death in epilepsy remain unclear; 3) seizure risks are higher in acute secondhand smokers, chronic active smokers, and babies whose mothers smoke; 4) tobacco smoke protects against seizures in animal models whereas nicotine exerts mixed effects in animals; and 5) tobacco smoking agents can be noneffective, proconvulsant, or anticonvulsant. Finally, the opportunities for future research on this topic is discussed.

  17. Metformin protects against seizures, learning and memory impairments and oxidative damage induced by pentylenetetrazole-induced kindling in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ran-Ran; Xu, Xiao-Chen; Xu, Fei; Zhang, Wei-Li; Zhang, Wen-Lin; Liu, Liang-Min; Wang, Wei-Ping

    2014-06-13

    Cognitive impairment, the most common and severe comorbidity of epilepsy, greatly diminishes the quality of life. However, current therapeutic interventions for epilepsy can also cause untoward cognitive effects. Thus, there is an urgent need for new kinds of agents targeting both seizures and cognition deficits. Oxidative stress is considered to play an important role in epileptogenesis and cognitive deficits, and antioxidants have a putative antiepileptic potential. Metformin, the most commonly prescribed antidiabetic oral drug, has antioxidant properties. This study was designed to evaluate the ameliorative effects of metformin on seizures, cognitive impairment and brain oxidative stress markers observed in pentylenetetrazole-induced kindling animals. Male C57BL/6 mice were administered with subconvulsive dose of pentylenetetrazole (37 mg/kg, i.p.) every other day for 14 injections. Metformin was injected intraperitoneally in dose of 200mg/kg along with alternate-day PTZ. We found that metformin suppressed the progression of kindling, ameliorated the cognitive impairment and decreased brain oxidative stress. Thus the present study concluded that metformin may be a potential agent for the treatment of epilepsy as well as a protective medicine against cognitive impairment induced by seizures.

  18. Kinetics of drug action in disease states. XXXIII: Disparate effects of pentylenetetrazol in rats as a function of renal disease model and pharmacologic endpoint.

    PubMed

    Ramzan, I; Levy, G

    1989-02-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine if the pharmacodynamics of the central nervous system stimulant pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) are altered in renal dysfunction. Female rats subjected to bilateral ureteral ligation (with sham-operated controls) or injected with uranyl nitrate (with saline injected controls) were infused intravenously with PTZ until the onset of either a minimal (myoclonic jerk) or maximal (tonic hindlimb extension) seizure. Neither chemically nor surgically induced renal dysfunction caused a change in the concentrations of PTZ in CSF, serum, or brain at onset of minimal seizures. When PTZ was infused to onset of maximal seizures, the rats with chemically induced renal dysfunction required higher concentrations, whereas the ureter-ligated rats convulsed at lower concentrations of PTZ than did the corresponding control animals. Thus, the effects of experimental renal dysfunction on the convulsant action of PTZ are dependent on both the disease model and the endpoint used for the pharmacodynamic measurement. Apparently, renal dysfunction did not affect the PTZ-induced seizure threshold, but inhibited the spread of seizures. The increased sensitivity of ureter-ligated rats may be due to their pronounced retention of water, since water loading is known to increase seizure susceptibility.

  19. [Martin Luther's seizure disorder].

    PubMed

    Feldmann, H

    1989-01-01

    Martin Luther's diseases are well documented, because he used to discuss them freely in his letters. There is also a wealth of evidence through reports by his friends. Most of his diseases were common and well known to the contemporary physicians, who accordingly interpreted them correctly: bladder stones, chronic constipation, hemorrhoids. Luther's death obviously was due to a coronary thrombosis. During the last 19 years of his life, in addition to these "natural diseases", Luther also suffered from recurring attacks of a peculiar symptomatology. Luther himself and his friends considered these seizures to be no "natural disease", but Satan punching his flesh, and he compared them to St. Paul's disease (2. Cor. 12). The first of these attacks occurred on July 6, 1527, when Luther was 43 years of age. It began with a roaring tinnitus in his left ear, which increased dramatically and seemed to occupy the left half of his head. Then a state of sickness and collapse followed, however, consciousness was retained throughout the whole period. After a night's rest all the symptoms had subsided, except the tinnitus, which, from that day on, continued for all the following years in varying intensity. Similar attacks with increase of the tinnitus and vertigo as the leading symptoms, seized Luther at irregular intervals and distressed him extremely. Former investigators of Luther's diseases interpreted these attacks as manifestations of a psychiatric disorder and a chronic inflammatory disease of the middle ear. The present detailed study reveals that it was a typical case of Menière's disease of the left ear manifesting itself more than 330 years before Menière's classical observation.

  20. [Martin Luther's seizure disorder].

    PubMed

    Feldmann, H

    1989-01-01

    Martin Luther's diseases are well documented, because he used to discuss them freely in his letters. There is also a wealth of evidence through reports by his friends. Most of his diseases were common and well known to the contemporary physicians, who accordingly interpreted them correctly: bladder stones, chronic constipation, hemorrhoids. Luther's death obviously was due to a coronary thrombosis. During the last 19 years of his life, in addition to these "natural diseases", Luther also suffered from recurring attacks of a peculiar symptomatology. Luther himself and his friends considered these seizures to be no "natural disease", but Satan punching his flesh, and he compared them to St. Paul's disease (2. Cor. 12). The first of these attacks occurred on July 6, 1527, when Luther was 43 years of age. It began with a roaring tinnitus in his left ear, which increased dramatically and seemed to occupy the left half of his head. Then a state of sickness and collapse followed, however, consciousness was retained throughout the whole period. After a night's rest all the symptoms had subsided, except the tinnitus, which, from that day on, continued for all the following years in varying intensity. Similar attacks with increase of the tinnitus and vertigo as the leading symptoms, seized Luther at irregular intervals and distressed him extremely. Former investigators of Luther's diseases interpreted these attacks as manifestations of a psychiatric disorder and a chronic inflammatory disease of the middle ear. The present detailed study reveals that it was a typical case of Menière's disease of the left ear manifesting itself more than 330 years before Menière's classical observation. PMID:2529669

  1. Generalized versus partial reflex seizures: a review.

    PubMed

    Italiano, Domenico; Ferlazzo, Edoardo; Gasparini, Sara; Spina, Edoardo; Mondello, Stefania; Labate, Angelo; Gambardella, Antonio; Aguglia, Umberto

    2014-08-01

    In this review we assess our currently available knowledge about reflex seizures with special emphasis on the difference between "generalized" reflex seizures induced by visual stimuli, thinking, praxis and language tasks, and "focal" seizures induced by startle, eating, music, hot water, somatosensory stimuli and orgasm. We discuss in particular evidence from animal, clinical, neurophysiological and neuroimaging studies supporting the concept that "generalized" reflex seizures, usually occurring in the setting of IGE, should be considered as focal seizures with quick secondary generalization. We also review recent advances in genetic and therapeutic approach of reflex seizures.

  2. Automated seizure detection systems and their effectiveness for each type of seizure.

    PubMed

    Ulate-Campos, A; Coughlin, F; Gaínza-Lein, M; Fernández, I Sánchez; Pearl, P L; Loddenkemper, T

    2016-08-01

    Epilepsy affects almost 1% of the population and most of the approximately 20-30% of patients with refractory epilepsy have one or more seizures per month. Seizure detection devices allow an objective assessment of seizure frequency and a treatment tailored to the individual patient. A rapid recognition and treatment of seizures through closed-loop systems could potentially decrease morbidity and mortality in epilepsy. However, no single detection device can detect all seizure types. Therefore, the choice of a seizure detection device should consider the patient-specific seizure semiologies. This review of the literature evaluates seizure detection devices and their effectiveness for different seizure types. Our aim is to summarize current evidence, offer suggestions on how to select the most suitable seizure detection device for each patient and provide guidance to physicians, families and researchers when choosing or designing seizure detection devices. Further, this review will guide future prospective validation studies.

  3. Anticonvulsant Effect of the Aqueous Extract and Essential Oil of Carum Carvi L. Seeds in a Pentylenetetrazol Model of Seizure in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Showraki, Alireza; Emamghoreishi, Masoumeh; Oftadegan, Somayeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Carum carvi L. (caraway), known as black zeera in Iran, has been indicated for the treatment of epilepsy in Iranian folk medicine. This study evaluated whether the aqueous extract and essential oil of caraway seeds have anticonvulsant effects in mice. Methods: The anticonvulsant effects of the aqueous extract (200, 400, 800, 1600, and 3200 mg/kg, i.p.) and essential oil (25, 50, 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg, i.p.) of caraway were assessed using pentylenetetrazol (PTZ; 95 mg/kg i.p.) induced convulsions. Diazepam (3 mg/kg) was used as positive control. The latency time before the onset of myoclonic, clonic, and tonic convulsions and the percentage of mortality were recorded. In addition, the effect of caraway on neuromuscular coordination was evaluated using the rotarod performance test. Results: The extract and essential oil dose-dependently increased the latency time to the onset of myoclonic (ED50, 1257 and 62.2 mg/kg, respectively) and clonic (ED50, 929 and 42.3 mg/kg, respectively) seizures. The extract and essential oil of caraway prevented the animals from tonic seizure with ED50s of 2142.4 and 97.6 mg/kg, respectively. The extract and essential oil of caraway protected 28.6 and 71.4% of the animals from PTZ-induced death, respectively, and had no significant effect on neuromuscular coordination. Conclusion: This study showed that the aqueous extract and essential oil of caraway had anticonvulsant properties. However, the essential oil was more potent and effective than was the aqueous extract as an anticonvulsant. Additionally, the anticonvulsant effect of caraway was not due to a muscle relaxant activity. These findings support the acclaimed antiepileptic effect of caraway in folk medicine and propose its potential use in petit mal seizure in humans. PMID:27217604

  4. Seizure Suppression by High Temperature via cAMP Modulation in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Saras, Arunesh; Tanouye, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Bang-sensitive (BS) Drosophila mutants display characteristic seizure-like activity (SLA) and paralysis after mechanical shock . After high-frequency electrical stimulation (HFS) of the brain, they generate robust seizures at very low threshold voltage. Here we report an important phenomenon, which effectively suppresses SLA in BS mutants. High temperature causes seizure suppression in all BS mutants (parabss1, eas, sda) examined in this study. This effect is fully reversible and flies show complete recovery from BS paralysis once the temperature effect is nullified. High temperature induces an increase in seizure threshold after a brief pulse of heat shock (HS). By genetic screening, we identified the involvement of cAMP in the suppression of seizures by high temperature. We propose that HS induces adenylyl cyclase which in turn increases cAMP concentration which eventually suppresses seizures in mutant flies. In summary, we describe an unusual phenomenon, where high temperature can suppress SLA in flies by modulating cAMP concentration. PMID:27558668

  5. Febrile Seizures and Epilepsy: Possible Outcomes

    MedlinePlus

    ... whether they could increase the risk of developing epilepsy later. Febrile seizures are defined as seizures that ... brains of patients who underwent surgery for severe epilepsy. 3 The children with FSE were com- pared ...

  6. The serotonin axis: Shared mechanisms in seizures, depression, and SUDEP.

    PubMed

    Richerson, George B; Buchanan, Gordon F

    2011-01-01

    There is a growing appreciation that patients with seizures are also affected by a number of comorbid conditions, including an increase in prevalence of depression (Kanner, 2009), sleep apnea (Chihorek et al., 2007), and sudden death (Ryvlin et al., 2006; Tomson et al., 2008). The mechanisms responsible for these associations are unclear. Herein we discuss the possibility that underlying pathology in the serotonin (5-HT) system of patients with epilepsy lowers the threshold for seizures, while also increasing the risk of depression and sudden death. We propose that postictal dysfunction of 5-HT neurons causes depression of breathing and arousal in some epilepsy patients, and this can lead to sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP). We further draw parallels between SUDEP and sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), which may share pathophysiologic mechanisms, and which have both been linked to defects in the 5-HT system. PMID:21214537

  7. An Incredible Tool for Tracking Seizure Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollingsworth, Jan Carter

    2007-01-01

    Eric Schumacher knows all too well the trials and tribulations of tracking seizures and daily activities in the ongoing attempt to gain seizure control. Diagnosed with epilepsy in his teens, he is now bringing a new and innovative tool to the market that could help countless people with epilepsy gain better control over their seizures and thus…

  8. The effect of acute aripiprazole treatment on chemically and electrically induced seizures in mice: The role of nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Shafaroodi, Hamed; Oveisi, Simin; Hosseini, Mahsa; Niknahad, Hossein; Moezi, Leila

    2015-07-01

    Aripiprazole is an antipsychotic drug which acts through dopamine and serotonin receptors. Aripiprazole was noted to have antiseizure effects in a study on mice, while it induced seizures in a few human case reports. Dopaminergic and serotonergic systems relate to nitric oxide, and aripiprazole also has effects on dopamine and serotonin receptors. This study investigated the effects of aripiprazole on seizures and the potential role of nitric oxide in the process. The following three models were examined to explore the role of aripiprazole on seizures in mice: 1 - pentylenetetrazole administered intravenously, 2 - pentylenetetrazole administered intraperitoneally, and 3 - electroshock. Aripiprazole administration delayed clonic seizure in intravenous and intraperitoneal pentylenetetrazole models. In the electroshock-induced seizure model, tonic seizure and mortality protection percent were increased after aripiprazole administration. In intraperitoneal administration of pentylenetetrazole, aripiprazole effects on clonic seizure latency were significantly decreased when l-NAME - a nonselective nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor, 7-nitroindazole - a selective neuronal NOS (nNOS) inhibitor, or aminoguanidine - a selective inducible NOS (iNOS) inhibitor was injected before aripiprazole administration. In the intravenous pentylenetetrazole method, administration of l-NAME or aminoguanidine inhibited aripiprazole effects on clonic seizure threshold. Aminoguanidine or l-NAME administration decreased aripiprazole-induced protection against tonic seizures and death in the electroshock model. In both intravenous and intraperitoneal seizure models, aripiprazole and l-arginine coadministration delayed the onset of clonic seizures. Moreover, it increased protection against tonic seizures and death in intraperitoneal pentylenetetrazole and electroshock models. In conclusion, the release of nitric oxide via iNOS or nNOS may be involved in anticonvulsant properties of

  9. Nonlinear analysis of EEG for epileptic seizures

    SciTech Connect

    Hively, L.M.; Clapp, N.E.; Daw, C.S.; Lawkins, W.F.; Eisenstadt, M.L.

    1995-04-01

    We apply chaotic time series analysis (CTSA) to human electroencephalogram (EEG) data. Three epoches were examined: epileptic seizure, non-seizure, and transition from non-seizure to seizure. The CTSA tools were applied to four forms of these data: raw EEG data (e-data), artifact data (f-data) via application of a quadratic zero-phase filter of the raw data, artifact-filtered data (g- data) and that was the residual after subtracting f-data from e-data, and a low-pass-filtered version (h-data) of g-data. Two different seizures were analyzed for the same patient. Several nonlinear measures uniquely indicate an epileptic seizure in both cases, including an abrupt decrease in the time per wave cycle in f-data, an abrupt increase in the Kolmogorov entropy and in the correlation dimension for e-h data, and an abrupt increase in the correlation dimension for e-h data. The transition from normal to seizure state also is characterized by distinctly different trends in the nonlinear measures for each seizure and may be potential seizure predictors for this patient. Surrogate analysis of e-data shows that statistically significant nonlinear structure is present during the non-seizure, transition , and seizure epoches.

  10. Localizing epileptic seizure onsets with Granger causality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Bhim M.; Epstein, Charles M.; Dhamala, Mukesh

    2013-09-01

    Accurate localization of the epileptic seizure onset zones (SOZs) is crucial for successful surgery, which usually depends on the information obtained from intracranial electroencephalography (IEEG) recordings. The visual criteria and univariate methods of analyzing IEEG recordings have not always produced clarity on the SOZs for resection and ultimate seizure freedom for patients. Here, to contribute to improving the localization of the SOZs and to understanding the mechanism of seizure propagation over the brain, we applied spectral interdependency methods to IEEG time series recorded from patients during seizures. We found that the high-frequency (>80 Hz) Granger causality (GC) occurs before the onset of any visible ictal activity and causal relationships involve the recording electrodes where clinically identifiable seizures later develop. These results suggest that high-frequency oscillatory network activities precede and underlie epileptic seizures, and that GC spectral measures derived from IEEG can assist in precise delineation of seizure onset times and SOZs.

  11. Seizure-induced disinhibition of the HPA axis increases seizure susceptibility.

    PubMed

    O'Toole, Kate K; Hooper, Andrew; Wakefield, Seth; Maguire, Jamie

    2014-01-01

    Stress is the most commonly reported precipitating factor for seizures. The proconvulsant actions of stress hormones are thought to mediate the effects of stress on seizure susceptibility. Interestingly, epileptic patients have increased basal levels of stress hormones, including corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and corticosterone, which are further increased following seizures. Given the proconvulsant actions of stress hormones, we proposed that seizure-induced activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis may contribute to future seizure susceptibility. Consistent with this hypothesis, our data demonstrate that pharmacological induction of seizures in mice with kainic acid or pilocarpine increases circulating levels of the stress hormone, corticosterone, and exogenous corticosterone administration is sufficient to increase seizure susceptibility. However, the mechanism(s) whereby seizures activate the HPA axis remain unknown. Here we demonstrate that seizure-induced activation of the HPA axis involves compromised GABAergic control of CRH neurons, which govern HPA axis function. Following seizure activity, there is a collapse of the chloride gradient due to changes in NKCC1 and KCC2 expression, resulting in reduced amplitude of sIPSPs and even depolarizing effects of GABA on CRH neurons. Seizure-induced activation of the HPA axis results in future seizure susceptibility which can be blocked by treatment with an NKCC1 inhibitor, bumetanide, or blocking the CRH signaling with Antalarmin. These data suggest that compromised GABAergic control of CRH neurons following an initial seizure event may cause hyperexcitability of the HPA axis and increase future seizure susceptibility.

  12. Involvement of ATP-sensitive potassium channels and the opioid system in the anticonvulsive effect of zolpidem in mice.

    PubMed

    Sheikhi, Mehdi; Shirzadian, Armin; Dehdashtian, Amir; Amiri, Shayan; Ostadhadi, Sattar; Ghasemi, Mehdi; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza

    2016-09-01

    Zolpidem is a hypnotic medication that mainly exerts its function through activating γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptors. There is some evidence that zolpidem may have anticonvulsive effects. However, the mechanisms underlying this effect have not been elucidated yet. In the present study, we used the pentylentetrazole (PTZ)-induced generalized seizure model in mice to investigate whether zolpidem can affect seizure threshold. We also further evaluated the roles of ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels as well as μ-opioid receptors in the effects of zolpidem on seizure threshold. Our data showed that zolpidem in a dose-dependent manner increased the PTZ-induced seizure threshold. The noneffective (i.e., did not significantly alter the PTZ-induced seizure threshold by itself) doses of KATP channel blocker (glibenclamide) and nonselective opioid receptor antagonist (naloxone) were able to inhibit the anticonvulsive effect of zolpidem. Additionally, noneffective doses of either KATP channel opener (cromakalim) or nonselective μ-opioid receptor agonist (morphine) in combination with a noneffective dose of zolpidem exerted a significant anticonvulsive effect on PTZ-induced seizures in mice. A combination of noneffective doses of naloxone and glibenclamide, which separately did not affect zolpidem effect on seizure threshold, inhibited the anticonvulsive effects of zolpidem. These results suggest a role for KATP channels and the opioid system, alone or in combination, in the anticonvulsive effects of zolpidem. PMID:27521722

  13. Smartphone applications for seizure management.

    PubMed

    Pandher, Puneet Singh; Bhullar, Karamdeep Kaur

    2016-06-01

    Technological advancements continue to provide innovative ways of enhancing patient care in medicine. In particular, the growing popularity of smartphone technology has seen the recent emergence of a myriad of healthcare applications (or apps) that promise to help shape the way in which health information is delivered to people worldwide. While limited research already exists on a range of such apps, our study is the first to examine the salient features of smartphone applications as they apply to the area of seizure management. For the purposes of this review, we conducted a search of the official online application stores of the five major smartphone platforms: iPhone, Android, Blackberry, Windows Mobile and Nokia-Symbian. Apps were included if they reported to contain some information or tools relating to seizure management and excluded if they were aimed exclusively at health professionals. A total of 28 applications met these criteria. Overall, we found an increasing number of epilepsy apps available on the smartphone market, but with only a minority offering comprehensive educational information alongside tools such as seizure diaries, medication tracking and/or video recording.

  14. Occipital lobe seizures and epilepsies.

    PubMed

    Adcock, Jane E; Panayiotopoulos, Chrysostomos P

    2012-10-01

    Occipital lobe epilepsies (OLEs) manifest with occipital seizures from an epileptic focus within the occipital lobes. Ictal clinical symptoms are mainly visual and oculomotor. Elementary visual hallucinations are common and characteristic. Postictal headache occurs in more than half of patients (epilepsy-migraine sequence). Electroencephalography (EEG) is of significant diagnostic value, but certain limitations should be recognized. Occipital spikes and/or occipital paroxysms either spontaneous or photically induced are the main interictal EEG abnormalities in idiopathic OLE. However, occipital epileptiform abnormalities may also occur without clinical relationship to seizures particularly in children. In cryptogenic/symptomatic OLE, unilateral posterior EEG slowing is more common than occipital spikes. In neurosurgical series of symptomatic OLE, interictal EEG abnormalities are rarely strictly occipital. The most common localization is in the posterior temporal regions and less than one-fifth show occipital spikes. In photosensitive OLE, intermittent photic stimulation elicits (1) spikes/polyspikes confined in the occipital regions or (2) generalized spikes/polyspikes with posterior emphasis. In ictal EEG, a well-localized unifocal rhythmic ictal discharge during occipital seizures is infrequent. A bioccipital field spread to the temporal regions is common. Frequency, severity, and response to treatment vary considerably from good to intractable and progressive mainly depending on underlying causes.

  15. Temporal distribution of seizures in epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Taubøll, E; Lundervold, A; Gjerstad, L

    1991-03-01

    A major problem in epileptology is why a seizure occurs at a particular moment in time. An initial step in solving this problem is a detailed analysis of the temporal distribution of seizures. Using methods and theories of stochastic processes, seizure patterns in a group of epileptic outpatients were examined for stationarity, randomness, dependency and periodicity in a prospective study. Sixteen of the 21 seizure diaries included in the study showed stationarity; 2 were non-stationary and 3 inconclusive. Eleven of the 16 stationary diaries were non-Poisson (P less than 0.005), indicating that in the majority of patients seizures did not occur randomly. The most frequently encountered phenomenon was seizure clustering. Clustering was considered when the diaries fulfilled all three criteria: (1) a positive R-test (P less than 0.001); (2) deviation from the fitted Poisson distribution towards clustering; and (3) the feature of an autoregressive process in the autocorrelogram plot. Dependency between seizure events was demonstrated in 8 of the 16 stationary diaries, computing first order transition probabilities. A detailed analysis of seizure occurrence is a major step towards a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying seizure precipitation. This is exemplified by our finding of a relation between seizure frequency and the menstrual cycle.

  16. Role of the hippocampus in Nav1.6 (Scn8a) mediated seizure resistance

    PubMed Central

    Lamar, Tyra; Goldin, Alan L; Escayg, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    SCN1A mutations are the main cause of the epilepsy disorders Dravet syndrome (DS) and genetic epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+). Mutations that reduce the activity of the mouse Scn8a gene, in contrast, are found to confer seizure resistance and extend the lifespan of mouse models of DS and GEFS+. To investigate the mechanism by which reduced Scn8a expression confers seizure resistance, we induced interictal-like burst discharges in hippocampal slices of heterozygous Scn8a null mice (Scn8amed/+) with elevated extracellular potassium. Scn8amed/+ mutants exhibited reduced epileptiform burst discharge activity after P20, indicating an age-dependent increased threshold for induction of epileptiform discharges. Scn8a deficiency also reduced the occurrence of burst discharges in a GEFS+ mouse model (Scn1aR1648H/+). There was no detectable change in the expression levels of Scn1a (Nav1.1) or Scn2a (Nav1.2) in the hippocampus of adult Scn8amed/+ mutants. To determine whether the increased seizure resistance associated with reduced Scn8a expression was due to alterations that occurred during development, we examined the effect of deleting Scn8a in adult mice. Global Cre-mediated deletion of a heterozygous floxed Scn8a allele in adult mice was found to increase thresholds to chemically and electrically induced seizures. Finally, knockdown of Scn8a gene expression in the adult hippocampus via lentiviral Cre injection resulted in a reduction in the number of EEG-confirmed seizures following the administration of picrotoxin. Our results identify the hippocampus as an important structure in the mediation of Scn8a-dependent seizure protection and suggest that selective targeting of Scn8a activity might be efficacious in patients with epilepsy. PMID:24704313

  17. Activation of adenosine receptor potentiates the anticonvulsant effect of phenytoin against amygdala kindled seizures.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhen; Zhong, Xiao-Ling; Zong, Yu; Wu, Zhong-Chen; Zhang, Qun; Yu, Jin-Tai; Tan, Lan

    2015-01-01

    Drug resistance in epilepsy is considered as a complicated and multifactorial problem. Poor penetration of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) across blood-brain barrier (BBB) into the brain, which results in insufficient level of the drugs at the targeted brain region, has been discussed as one mechanism contributing to pharmacoresistance of epilepsies. Therefore, modulating permeability of BBB is the effective treatment strategy since it facilitates the entry of AEDs into the central nervous system (CNS). Recently, signaling through receptors for the adenosine has been identified as a potent modulator of BBB permeability. This paper aimed to investigate the effects of auxiliary application of adenosine receptor (AR) agonist on amygdala-kindled seizures in adult male Wistar rats. When fully kindled seizures were achieved by daily electrical stimulation of the amygdala, rats were randomly divided into three groups: control, phenytoin, and phenytoin (PHT)+5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA) groups. NECA (0.08 mg/kg, i.v.) was applied to the PHT+NECA group after the administration of PHT (75 mg/kg, i.p. on the first day; 50mg/kg, i.p. on the following 9 days). Intravenous infusion of NECA resulted in a significant increase in brain PHT levels as compared with the PHT treatment alone. On the other hand, the auxiliary application of NECA dramatically decreased the frequency of generalized seizures and seizure stage, shortened duration of afterdischarge and generalized seizures, as well as the elevated the afterdischarge threshold and generalized seizures threshold. Our study demonstrated that auxiliary application of AR agonist enhanced brain antiepileptic drug levels and strengthened the anticonvulsant properties of PHT against amygdala kindled seizures.

  18. Glutamatergic neuron-targeted loss of LGI1 epilepsy gene results in seizures

    PubMed Central

    Boillot, Morgane; Huneau, Clément; Marsan, Elise; Lehongre, Katia; Navarro, Vincent; Ishida, Saeko; Dufresnois, Béatrice; Ozkaynak, Ekim; Garrigue, Jérôme; Miles, Richard; Martin, Benoit; Leguern, Eric; Anderson, Matthew P.

    2014-01-01

    Leucin-rich, glioma inactivated 1 (LGI1) is a secreted protein linked to human seizures of both genetic and autoimmune aetiology. Mutations in the LGI1 gene are responsible for autosomal dominant temporal lobe epilepsy with auditory features, whereas LGI1 autoantibodies are involved in limbic encephalitis, an acquired epileptic disorder associated with cognitive impairment. We and others previously reported that Lgi1-deficient mice have early-onset spontaneous seizures leading to premature death at 2–3 weeks of age. Yet, where and when Lgi1 deficiency causes epilepsy remains unknown. To address these questions, we generated Lgi1 conditional knockout (cKO) mice using a set of universal Cre-driver mouse lines. Selective deletion of Lgi1 was achieved in glutamatergic pyramidal neurons during embryonic (Emx1-Lgi1cKO) or late postnatal (CaMKIIα-Lgi1cKO) developmental stages, or in gamma amino butyric acidergic (GABAergic) parvalbumin interneurons (PV-Lgi1cKO). Emx1-Lgi1cKO mice displayed early-onset and lethal seizures, whereas CaMKIIα-Lgi1cKO mice presented late-onset occasional seizures associated with variable reduced lifespan. In contrast, neither spontaneous seizures nor increased seizure susceptibility to convulsant were observed when Lgi1 was deleted in parvalbumin interneurons. Together, these data showed that LGI1 depletion restricted to pyramidal cells is sufficient to generate seizures, whereas seizure thresholds were unchanged after depletion in gamma amino butyric acidergic parvalbumin interneurons. We suggest that LGI1 secreted from excitatory neurons, but not parvalbumin inhibitory neurons, makes a major contribution to the pathogenesis of LGI1-related epilepsies. Our data further indicate that LGI1 is required from embryogenesis to adulthood to achieve proper circuit functioning. PMID:25234641

  19. Glutamatergic neuron-targeted loss of LGI1 epilepsy gene results in seizures.

    PubMed

    Boillot, Morgane; Huneau, Clément; Marsan, Elise; Lehongre, Katia; Navarro, Vincent; Ishida, Saeko; Dufresnois, Béatrice; Ozkaynak, Ekim; Garrigue, Jérôme; Miles, Richard; Martin, Benoit; Leguern, Eric; Anderson, Matthew P; Baulac, Stéphanie

    2014-11-01

    Leucin-rich, glioma inactivated 1 (LGI1) is a secreted protein linked to human seizures of both genetic and autoimmune aetiology. Mutations in the LGI1 gene are responsible for autosomal dominant temporal lobe epilepsy with auditory features, whereas LGI1 autoantibodies are involved in limbic encephalitis, an acquired epileptic disorder associated with cognitive impairment. We and others previously reported that Lgi1-deficient mice have early-onset spontaneous seizures leading to premature death at 2-3 weeks of age. Yet, where and when Lgi1 deficiency causes epilepsy remains unknown. To address these questions, we generated Lgi1 conditional knockout (cKO) mice using a set of universal Cre-driver mouse lines. Selective deletion of Lgi1 was achieved in glutamatergic pyramidal neurons during embryonic (Emx1-Lgi1cKO) or late postnatal (CaMKIIα-Lgi1cKO) developmental stages, or in gamma amino butyric acidergic (GABAergic) parvalbumin interneurons (PV-Lgi1cKO). Emx1-Lgi1cKO mice displayed early-onset and lethal seizures, whereas CaMKIIα-Lgi1cKO mice presented late-onset occasional seizures associated with variable reduced lifespan. In contrast, neither spontaneous seizures nor increased seizure susceptibility to convulsant were observed when Lgi1 was deleted in parvalbumin interneurons. Together, these data showed that LGI1 depletion restricted to pyramidal cells is sufficient to generate seizures, whereas seizure thresholds were unchanged after depletion in gamma amino butyric acidergic parvalbumin interneurons. We suggest that LGI1 secreted from excitatory neurons, but not parvalbumin inhibitory neurons, makes a major contribution to the pathogenesis of LGI1-related epilepsies. Our data further indicate that LGI1 is required from embryogenesis to adulthood to achieve proper circuit functioning.

  20. Role of GluK1 Kainate Receptors in Seizures, Epileptic Discharges, and Epileptogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Fritsch, Brita; Reis, Janine; Gasior, Maciej; Kaminski, Rafal M.

    2014-01-01

    Kainate receptors containing the GluK1 subunit have an impact on excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission in brain regions, such as the amygdala and hippocampus, which are relevant to seizures and epilepsy. Here we used 2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-tert-butylisoxazol-4-yl) propanoic acid (ATPA), a potent and selective agonist of kainate receptors that include the GluK1 subunit, in conjunction with mice deficient in GluK1 and GluK2 kainate receptor subunits to assess the role of GluK1 kainate receptors in provoking seizures and in kindling epileptogenesis. We found that systemic ATPA, acting specifically via GluK1 kainate receptors, causes locomotor arrest and forelimb extension (a unique behavioral characteristic of GluK1 activation) and induces myoclonic behavioral seizures and electrographic seizure discharges in the BLA and hippocampus. In contrast, the proconvulsant activity of systemic AMPA, kainate, and pentylenetetrazol is not mediated by GluK1 kainate receptors, and deletion of these receptors does not elevate the threshold for seizures in the 6 Hz model. ATPA also specifically activates epileptiform discharges in BLA slices in vitro via GluK1 kainate receptors. Olfactory bulb kindling developed similarly in wild-type, GluK1, and GluK2 knock-out mice, demonstrating that GluK1 kainate receptors are not required for epileptogenesis or seizure expression in this model. We conclude that selective activation of kainate receptors containing the GluK1 subunit can trigger seizures, but these receptors are not necessary for seizure generation in models commonly used to identify therapeutic agents for the treatment of epilepsy. PMID:24760837

  1. Des-acyl ghrelin attenuates pilocarpine-induced limbic seizures via the ghrelin receptor and not the orexin pathway.

    PubMed

    Portelli, Jeanelle; Coppens, Jessica; Demuyser, Thomas; Smolders, Ilse

    2015-06-01

    Des-acyl ghrelin, widely accepted to work independently of the ghrelin receptor, is increasingly being implicated in a number of biological functions. The involvement of des-acyl ghrelin in epilepsy has only been recently reported. In this study, apart from unravelling the effect of des-acyl ghrelin on seizure thresholds and seizure severity in two models of pilocarpine-induced seizures, we mainly attempted to unravel its anticonvulsant mechanism of action. Since it was found that des-acyl ghrelin administration affected food intake via the orexin pathway, we first determined whether this pathway was responsible for des-acyl ghrelin's seizure-attenuating properties using the dual orexin receptor antagonist almorexant. We noted that, while des-acyl ghrelin showed dose-dependent anticonvulsant effects against focal pilocarpine-evoked seizures in rats, almorexant did not affect seizure severity and did not reverse des-acyl ghrelin's anticonvulsant effect. Subsequently, to investigate whether the ghrelin receptor was implicated in des-acyl ghrelin's anticonvulsant properties, we tested this peptide in ghrelin receptor deficient mice and wild type mice, all infused with pilocarpine intravenously. Unexpectedly, we found that des-acyl ghrelin significantly elevated seizure thresholds in C57Bl/6 and wild type mice but not in ghrelin receptor knock-out mice. Taken together, our results indicate the involvement of the ghrelin receptor in the anticonvulsant effects of des-acyl ghrelin on pilocarpine-induced seizures. We also show for the first time that dual antagonism of hippocampal orexin receptors does not affect seizure severity.

  2. Seizure characteristics in Pallister-Killian syndrome.

    PubMed

    Candee, Meghan S; Carey, John C; Krantz, Ian D; Filloux, Francis M

    2012-12-01

    Pallister-Killian syndrome (PKS) is a congenital disorder attributed to supernumerary isochromosome 12p mosaicism. Craniofacial dysmorphism, learning impairment and seizures are considered cardinal features. However, little is known regarding the seizure and epilepsy patterns in PKS. To better define the prevalence and spectrum of seizures in PKS, we studied 51 patients (39 male, 12 female; median age 4 years and 9 months; age range 7 months to 31 years) with confirmed 12p tetrasomy. Using a parent-based structured questionnaire, we collected data regarding seizure onset, frequency, timing, semiology, and medication therapy. Patients were recruited through our practice, at PKS Kids family events, and via the PKS Kids website. Epilepsy occurred in 27 (53%) with 23 (85%) of those with seizures having seizure onset prior to 3.5 years of age. Mean age at seizure onset was 2 years and 4 months. The most common seizure types were myoclonic (15/27, 56%), generalized convulsions (13/27, 48%), and clustered tonic spasms (similar to infantile spasms; 8/27, 30%). Thirteen of 27 patients with seizures (48%) had more than one seizure type with 26 out of 27 (96%) ever having taken antiepileptic medications. Nineteen of 27 (70%) continued to have seizures and 17/27 (63%) remained on antiepileptic medication. The most commonly used medications were: levetiracetam (10/27, 37%), valproic acid (10/27, 37%), and topiramate (9/27, 33%) with levetiracetam felt to be "most helpful" by parents (6/27, 22%). Further exploration of seizure timing, in-depth analysis of EEG recordings, and collection of MRI data to rule out confounding factors is warranted. PMID:23169688

  3. Orgasm Induced Seizures: A Rare Phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Chaukimath, S P; Patil, P S

    2015-01-01

    A variety of stimuli can cause reflex seizures, Some triggers include light, music and cognitive phenomenon. There are case reports however where the phenomenon of sexual activity has been a trigger for epileptic seizures. Most of these cases reported are in women so far, and were found to be localized to right cerebral hemisphere. We report a case of a 36-year-old male with orgasm-induced seizures, with other atypical features compared to majority of previous reports. PMID:27057393

  4. Emergency Management of Seizures in the School Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Dell, Christine; O'Hara, Kathryn; Kiel, Sarah; McCullough, Kathleen

    2007-01-01

    Effective seizure management in the school setting is a critical issue for students with seizures, as well as their parents, classmates, and school personnel. The unpredictable nature of seizures and the potential outcomes of experiencing a seizure in school are sources of anxiety for students with seizures. The ability to respond appropriately to…

  5. Seizures and X-linked intellectual disability

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, Roger E.; Holden, Kenton R.; Rogers, R. Curtis; Schwartz, Charles E.

    2012-01-01

    Intellectual disability occurs as an isolated X-linked trait and as a component of recognizable X-linked syndromes in the company of somatic, metabolic, neuromuscular, or behavioral abnormalities. Seizures accompany intellectual disability in almost half of these X-linked disorders. The spectrum of seizures found in the X-linked intellectual disability syndromes is broad, varying in time of onset, type of seizure, and response to anticonvulsant therapy. The majority of the genes associated with XLID and seizures have now been identified. PMID:22377486

  6. Soy Infant Formula and Seizures in Children with Autism: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Westmark, Cara J.

    2014-01-01

    Seizures are a common phenotype in many neurodevelopmental disorders including fragile X syndrome, Down syndrome and autism. We hypothesized that phytoestrogens in soy-based infant formula were contributing to lower seizure threshold in these disorders. Herein, we evaluated the dependence of seizure incidence on infant formula in a population of autistic children. Medical record data were obtained on 1,949 autistic children from the SFARI Simplex Collection. An autism diagnosis was determined by scores on the ADI-R and ADOS exams. The database included data on infant formula use, seizure incidence, the specific type of seizure exhibited and IQ. Soy-based formula was utilized in 17.5% of the study population. Females comprised 13.4% of the subjects. There was a 2.6-fold higher rate of febrile seizures [4.2% versus 1.6%, OR = 2.6, 95% CI = 1.3–5.3], a 2.1-fold higher rate of epilepsy comorbidity [3.6% versus 1.7%, OR = 2.2, 95% CI = 1.1–4.7] and a 4-fold higher rate of simple partial seizures [1.2% versus 0.3%, OR = 4.8, 95% CI = 1.0–23] in the autistic children fed soy-based formula. No statistically significant associations were found with other outcomes including: IQ, age of seizure onset, infantile spasms and atonic, generalized tonic clonic, absence and complex partial seizures. Limitations of the study included: infant formula and seizure data were based on parental recall, there were significantly less female subjects, and there was lack of data regarding critical confounders such as the reasons the subjects used soy formula, age at which soy formula was initiated and the length of time on soy formula. Despite these limitations, our results suggest that the use of soy-based infant formula may be associated with febrile seizures in both genders and with a diagnosis of epilepsy in males in autistic children. Given the lack of data on critical confounders and the retrospective nature of the study, a prospective study is required to

  7. Seizures

    MedlinePlus

    ... brain defects) Brain tumor (rare) Drug abuse Electric shock Epilepsy Fever (particularly in young children ) Head injury Heart disease Heat illness ( heat intolerance ) High fever Phenylketonuria ( PKU ), which ...

  8. Basic concepts and clinical findings in the treatment of seizure disorders with EEG operant conditioning.

    PubMed

    Sterman, M B

    2000-01-01

    Two issues concerning sensorimotor EEG operant conditioning, or biofeedback, as a therapeutic modality for the treatment of seizure disorders are the focus of this review. The first relates to the question of whether relevant physiological changes are associated with this procedure. This question is addressed through review of an extensive neurophysiological literature that is likely unfamiliar to many clinicians but that documents both immediate and sustained functional changes that are consistent with elevation of seizure thresholds. The second focuses on the clinical efficacy of this method and whether it should carry the designation of "experimental". This designation is challenged through an assessment of over 25 years of peer-reviewed research demonstrating impressive EEG and clinical results achieved with the most difficult subset of seizure patients.

  9. Transient inhibitory seizures mimicking crescendo TIAs.

    PubMed

    Lee, H; Lerner, A

    1990-01-01

    Somatic inhibitory seizures are thought to occur rarely. We describe a patient with somatic inhibitory seizures who initially presented with a clinical picture of crescendo transient ischemic attacks. He did not improve with anticoagulation, but the episodes ceased promptly after the administration of an anticonvulsant.

  10. Search and Seizure in the Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staros, Kari; Williams, Charles F.

    2007-01-01

    The Fourth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution protects the people of the United States from unreasonable searches and seizures. On first reading, these protections seem clearly defined. The amendment was meant to protect Americans from the kinds of random searches and seizures that the colonists experienced under British colonial rule. Under…

  11. A Discriminative Approach to EEG Seizure Detection

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Ashley N.; Sow, Daby; Biem, Alain

    2011-01-01

    Seizures are abnormal sudden discharges in the brain with signatures represented in electroencephalograms (EEG). The efficacy of the application of speech processing techniques to discriminate between seizure and non-seizure states in EEGs is reported. The approach accounts for the challenges of unbalanced datasets (seizure and non-seizure), while also showing a system capable of real-time seizure detection. The Minimum Classification Error (MCE) algorithm, which is a discriminative learning algorithm with wide-use in speech processing, is applied and compared with conventional classification techniques that have already been applied to the discrimination between seizure and non-seizure states in the literature. The system is evaluated on 22 pediatric patients multi-channel EEG recordings. Experimental results show that the application of speech processing techniques and MCE compare favorably with conventional classification techniques in terms of classification performance, while requiring less computational overhead. The results strongly suggests the possibility of deploying the designed system at the bedside. PMID:22195192

  12. Conventional anticonvulsant drugs in the guinea-pig kindling model of partial seizures: effects of acute phenytoin.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, T H; Bharadia, V; Teskey, G C

    2001-10-01

    This study addressed some of the controversial issues surrounding the anticonvulsant effect of phenytoin, and the predictive validity of the guinea-pig kindling model for the screening of anticonvulsant drugs. Following an intraperitoneal injection of either 50 or 75 mg/kg phenytoin, we analysed plasma concentrations of phenytoin at various time intervals. Behavioural toxicity was assessed at 0.5 h postinjection using quantitative locomotor tests, as well as scores on a sedation/muscle relaxation rating index. The anticonvulsant efficacy of phenytoin was evaluated from measurements of afterdischarge threshold (ADT), afterdischarge duration (ADD) and behavioural seizure severity at three phases of kindling: non-kindled, kindling acquisition (early and late) and kindled (50+ ADs). ADD and seizure severity were also measured in response to both threshold and suprathreshold kindling stimulation. Plasma levels of phenytoin corresponded to the human therapeutic range at the time of behavioural testing and kindling. Phenytoin did not exert significant adverse effects in guinea-pigs on both the behavioural tests and rating index. Phenytoin increased ADT in non-kindled and kindled guinea-pigs and effectively reduced ADD and seizure severity, indicating that the guinea-pig model correctly predicted phenytoin's anticonvulsant effect. Phenytoin produced reliable anticonvulsant activity in the guinea-pig at threshold stimulation but a somewhat reduced efficacy on seizure severity at suprathreshold stimulation intensities. Kindling in the guinea-pig is a valid model of human partial seizures.

  13. A method for deciding about the possible safety of modafinil and armodafinil in patients with seizure disorder.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Chittaranjan

    2016-01-01

    Modafinil or armodafinil (ar/mod) may be considered for patients with approved or unapproved indications, including excessive daytime drowsiness, fatigue, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), or addictions. Ar/mod is classified as a psychostimulant, and psychostimulants have been associated with a small risk of seizures. There is no guidance about the use of ar/mod in patients who are at risk of seizures. This article suggests how a physician may explore the safety of ar/mod if indicated in a patient at such risk. In summary, reading the prescribing information, writing to the drug manufacturer, and searching research databases suggest the following: Ar/mod and its metabolites and derivatives have dose-dependent anticonvulsant action in animal models; ar/mod is not associated with seizures as an adverse event in populations at risk, such as those with ADHD, head injury, and brain tumors; it is not associated with worsening of seizure disorder in patients with current seizure disorder; and it is not associated with seizures in overdose. These findings are reassuring. However, not all the data are of high quality, and potential ar/mod interactions with antiepileptic drugs (and other concurrent medications that affect the seizure threshold) need to be considered because ar/mod can induce the metabolism of some drugs and inhibit the metabolism of others. Decisions should be individualized, and decision-making should be a shared effort between patient and physician.

  14. Epileptic seizure induced by fennel essential oil.

    PubMed

    Skalli, Souad; Soulaymani Bencheikh, Rachida

    2011-09-01

    An epileptic seizure is reported in a 38-year-old woman, known to be an epileptic patient. Although she was under antiepileptic treatment and had well-controlled epilepsy, she developed a typical generalised tonic-clonic seizure and remained unconscious for 45 minutes following ingestion of a number of cakes containing an unknown quantity of fennel essential oil. Involuntary diarrhoea accompanied her epileptic seizure. This reported case recalls the fact that fennel essential oil can induce seizures and that this oil should probably be avoided by patients with epilepsy. Labelling of products with fennel essential oil should refer to the risk of seizures, particularly for patients with epilepsy. An awareness programme should involve all stakeholders affected by this issue.

  15. Helicopter mishap attributed to single seizure.

    PubMed

    Simon, Esan; Watts, Darron; Bohnker, Bruce K

    2008-03-01

    A case report is presented of a 36-year-old U.S. Coast Guard aviator who had a single seizure while operating a helicopter on the ground. His seizure activity produced a loss of consciousness during which he pushed the cyclic to the left anterior quadrant that resulted in a ground mishap. No risk factors were identified in an extensive neurological workup. The current guidance for handling seizures in military aviation personnel is reviewed, along with considerations for treatment. Although the military aviation selection process carefully screens applicants for seizure history and potential, occasional seizures in the aviation population remain possible. Such events may result in military aircraft mishaps despite careful risk factor surveillance, as demonstrated by this case.

  16. Anticonvulsant activity of bone marrow cells in electroconvulsive seizures in mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Bone marrow is an accessible source of progenitor cells, which have been investigated as treatment for neurological diseases in a number of clinical trials. Here we evaluated the potential benefit of bone marrow cells in protecting against convulsive seizures induced by maximum electroconvulsive shock (MES), a widely used model for screening of anti-epileptic drugs. Behavioral and inflammatory responses were measured after MES induction in order to verify the effects promoted by transplantation of bone marrow cells. To assess the anticonvulsant effects of bone marrow cell transplantation, we measured the frequency and duration of tonic seizure, the mortality rate, the microglial expression and the blood levels of cytokine IL-1, IL-6, IL-10 and TNF-α after MES induction. We hypothesized that these behavioral and inflammatory responses to a strong stimulus such as a convulsive seizure could be modified by the transplantation of bone marrow cells. Results Bone marrow transplanted cells altered the convulsive threshold and showed anticonvulsant effect by protecting from tonic seizures. Bone marrow cells modified the microglial expression in the analyzed brain areas, increased the IL-10 and attenuate IL-6 levels. Conclusions Bone marrow cells exert protective effects by blocking the course of electroconvulsive seizures. Additionally, electroconvulsive seizures induced acute inflammatory responses by altering the pattern of microglia expression, as well as in IL-6 and IL-10 levels. Our findings also indicated that the anticonvulsant effects of these cells can be tested with the MES model following the same paradigm used for drug testing in pharmacological screening. Studies on the inflammatory reaction in response to acute seizures in the presence of transplanted bone marrow cells might open a wide range of discussions on the mechanisms relevant to the pathophysiology of epilepsies. PMID:24011127

  17. Quickest detection of drug-resistant seizures: An optimal control approach

    PubMed Central

    Santaniello, Sabato; Burns, Samuel P.; Golby, Alexandra J.; Singer, Jedediah M.; Anderson, William S.; Sarma, Sridevi V.

    2011-01-01

    Epilepsy affects 50 million people worldwide, and seizures in 30% of the cases remain drug resistant. This has increased interest in responsive neurostimulation, which is most effective when administered during seizure onset. We propose a novel framework for seizure onset detection that involves (i) constructing statistics from multichannel intracranial EEG (iEEG) to distinguish nonictal versus ictal states; (ii) modeling the dynamics of these statistics in each state and the state transitions; you can remove this word if there is no room. (iii) developing an optimal control-based “quickest detection” (QD) strategy to estimate the transition times from nonictal to ictal states from sequential iEEG measurements. The QD strategy minimizes a cost function of detection delay and false positive probability. The solution is a threshold that non-monotonically decreases over time and avoids responding to rare events that normally trigger false positives. We applied QD to four drug resistant epileptic patients (168 hour continuous recordings, 26–44 electrodes, 33 seizures) and achieved 100% sensitivity with low false positive rates (0.16 false positive/hour). This article is part of a Supplemental Special Issue entitled The Future of Automated Seizure Detection and Prediction. PMID:22078519

  18. The effects of coenzyme Q10 on seizures in mice: the involvement of nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Sattarinezhad, Elahe; Shafaroodi, Hamed; Sheikhnouri, Kiandokht; Mousavi, Zahra; Moezi, Leila

    2014-08-01

    Coenzyme Q10 is a potent antioxidant in both mitochondria and lipid membranes. It has also been recognized to have an effect on gene expression. This study was designed to investigate whether acute or subchronic treatment with coenzyme Q10 altered the seizures induced by pentylenetetrazole or electroshock in mice. We also evaluated the involvement of nitric oxide in the effects of coenzyme Q10 in pentylenetetrazole-induced seizure models. Acute oral treatment with different doses of coenzyme Q10 did not affect the seizure in intraperitoneal pentylenetetrazole, intravenous pentylenetetrazole, and electroshock models in mice. Subchronic oral administration of coenzyme Q10 (100 mg/kg or more) increased time latencies to the onset of myoclonic jerks and clonic seizures induced by intraperitoneal pentylenetetrazole and at the doses of 25 mg/kg or more increased the seizure threshold induced by intravenous infusion of pentylenetetrazole. Subchronic doses of coenzyme Q10 (50 mg/kg or more) also decreased the incidence of tonic seizures in the electroshock-induced seizure model. Moreover, acute treatment with the precursor of nitric oxide synthesis, L-arginine (60 mg/kg), led to a significant potentiation of the antiseizure effects of subchronic administration of coenzyme Q10 (400 mg/kg in intraperitoneal and 6.25 mg/kg in intravenous pentylenetetrazole tests). Acute treatment with l-NAME (5 mg/kg), a nonspecific nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, significantly attenuated the antiseizure effects of subchronic doses of coenzyme Q10 in both seizure models induced by pentylenetetrazole. On the other hand, acute administration of aminoguanidine (100 mg/kg), a specific inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, did not affect the seizures in mice treated with subchronic doses of coenzyme Q10 in both intraperitoneal and intravenous pentylenetetrazole tests. In conclusion, only subchronic and not acute administration of coenzyme Q10 attenuated seizures induced by pentylenetetrazole

  19. Nonepileptic seizures: an updated review.

    PubMed

    Perez, David L; LaFrance, W Curt

    2016-06-01

    Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) are a functional neurological disorder/conversion disorder subtype, which are neurobehavioral conditions at the interface of neurology and psychiatry. Significant advancements over the past decade have been made in the diagnosis, management, and neurobiological understanding of PNES. This article reviews published PNES research focusing on semiologic features that distinguish PNES from epileptic seizures, consensus diagnostic criteria, the intersection of PNES and other comorbidities, neurobiological studies, evidence-based treatment interventions, and outcome studies. Epidemiology and healthcare utilization studies highlight a continued unmet medical need in the comprehensive care of PNES. Consensus guidelines for diagnostic certainty are based on clinical history, semiology of witnessed typical event(s), and EEG findings. While certain semiologic features may aid in the diagnosis of PNES, the gold standard remains capturing a typical event on video electroencephalography (EEG) showing the absence of epileptiform activity with history and semiology consistent with PNES. Medical-neurologic and psychiatric comorbidities are prevalent in PNES; these should be assessed in diagnostic evaluations and integrated into treatment interventions and prognostic considerations. Several studies, including a pilot, multicenter, randomized clinical trial, have now demonstrated that a cognitive behavioral therapy-informed psychotherapy is an efficacious treatment for PNES, and additional efforts are necessary to evaluate the utility of pharmacologic and other psychotherapy treatments. Neuroimaging studies, while requiring replication, suggest that PNES may occur in the context of alterations within and across sensorimotor, emotion regulation/processing, cognitive control, and multimodal integration brain systems. Future research could investigate similarities and differences between PNES and other somatic symptom disorders.

  20. Nonepileptic seizures: an updated review.

    PubMed

    Perez, David L; LaFrance, W Curt

    2016-06-01

    Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) are a functional neurological disorder/conversion disorder subtype, which are neurobehavioral conditions at the interface of neurology and psychiatry. Significant advancements over the past decade have been made in the diagnosis, management, and neurobiological understanding of PNES. This article reviews published PNES research focusing on semiologic features that distinguish PNES from epileptic seizures, consensus diagnostic criteria, the intersection of PNES and other comorbidities, neurobiological studies, evidence-based treatment interventions, and outcome studies. Epidemiology and healthcare utilization studies highlight a continued unmet medical need in the comprehensive care of PNES. Consensus guidelines for diagnostic certainty are based on clinical history, semiology of witnessed typical event(s), and EEG findings. While certain semiologic features may aid in the diagnosis of PNES, the gold standard remains capturing a typical event on video electroencephalography (EEG) showing the absence of epileptiform activity with history and semiology consistent with PNES. Medical-neurologic and psychiatric comorbidities are prevalent in PNES; these should be assessed in diagnostic evaluations and integrated into treatment interventions and prognostic considerations. Several studies, including a pilot, multicenter, randomized clinical trial, have now demonstrated that a cognitive behavioral therapy-informed psychotherapy is an efficacious treatment for PNES, and additional efforts are necessary to evaluate the utility of pharmacologic and other psychotherapy treatments. Neuroimaging studies, while requiring replication, suggest that PNES may occur in the context of alterations within and across sensorimotor, emotion regulation/processing, cognitive control, and multimodal integration brain systems. Future research could investigate similarities and differences between PNES and other somatic symptom disorders. PMID:26996600

  1. CARA Risk Assessment Thresholds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hejduk, M. D.

    2016-01-01

    Warning remediation threshold (Red threshold): Pc level at which warnings are issued, and active remediation considered and usually executed. Analysis threshold (Green to Yellow threshold): Pc level at which analysis of event is indicated, including seeking additional information if warranted. Post-remediation threshold: Pc level to which remediation maneuvers are sized in order to achieve event remediation and obviate any need for immediate follow-up maneuvers. Maneuver screening threshold: Pc compliance level for routine maneuver screenings (more demanding than regular Red threshold due to additional maneuver uncertainty).

  2. Do reflex seizures and spontaneous seizures form a continuum? - triggering factors and possible common mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Irmen, Friederike; Wehner, Tim; Lemieux, Louis

    2015-02-01

    Recent changes in the understanding and classification of reflex seizures have fuelled a debate on triggering mechanisms of seizures and their conceptual organization. Previous studies and patient reports have listed extrinsic and intrinsic triggers, albeit their multifactorial and dynamic nature is poorly understood. This paper aims to review literature on extrinsic and intrinsic seizure triggers and to discuss common mechanisms among them. Among self-reported seizure triggers, emotional stress is most frequently named. Reflex seizures are typically associated with extrinsic sensory triggers; however, intrinsic cognitive or proprioceptive triggers have also been assessed. The identification of a trigger underlying a seizure may be more difficult if it is intrinsic and complex, and if triggering mechanisms are multifactorial. Therefore, since observability of triggers varies and triggers are also found in non-reflex seizures, the present concept of reflex seizures may be questioned. We suggest the possibility of a conceptual continuum between reflex and spontaneous seizures rather than a dichotomy and discuss evidence to the notion that to some extent most seizures might be triggered.

  3. Advances in management of neonatal seizures.

    PubMed

    Vesoulis, Zachary A; Mathur, Amit M

    2014-06-01

    Seizures are more common in the neonatal period than any other time in the human lifespan. A high index of suspicion for seizures should be maintained for infants who present with encephalopathy soon after birth, have had a stroke, central nervous system (CNS) infection or intracranial hemorrhage or have a genetic or metabolic condition associated with CNS malformations. Complicating the matter, most neonatal seizures lack a clinical correlate with only subtle autonomic changes and often no clinical indication at all. Over the last three decades, several tools have been developed to enhance the detection and treatment of neonatal seizures. The use of electroencephalography (EEG) and the later development of amplitude-integrated EEG (aEEG), allows for Neurologists and non-Neurologists alike, to significantly increase the sensitivity of seizure detection. When applied to the appropriate clinical setting, time to diagnosis and start of therapy is greatly reduced. Phenobarbital maintains the status of first-line therapy in worldwide use. However, newer anti-epileptic agents such as, levetiracetam, bumetanide, and topiramate are increasingly being applied to the neonatal population, offering the potential for seizure treatment with a significantly better side-effect profile. Seizures in premature infants, continue to confound clinicians and researchers alike. Though the apparent seizure burden is significant and there is an association between seizures and adverse outcomes, the two are not cleanly correlated. Compounding the issue, GABA-ergic anti-epileptic drugs are not only less effective in this age group due to reversed neuronal ion gradients but may cause harm. Selecting an appropriate treatment group remains a challenge. PMID:24796413

  4. Instantaneous frequency based newborn EEG seizure characterisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesbah, Mostefa; O'Toole, John M.; Colditz, Paul B.; Boashash, Boualem

    2012-12-01

    The electroencephalogram (EEG), used to noninvasively monitor brain activity, remains the most reliable tool in the diagnosis of neonatal seizures. Due to their nonstationary and multi-component nature, newborn EEG seizures are better represented in the joint time-frequency domain than in either the time domain or the frequency domain. Characterising newborn EEG seizure nonstationarities helps to better understand their time-varying nature and, therefore, allow developing efficient signal processing methods for both modelling and seizure detection and classification. In this article, we used the instantaneous frequency (IF) extracted from a time-frequency distribution to characterise newborn EEG seizures. We fitted four frequency modulated (FM) models to the extracted IFs, namely a linear FM, a piecewise-linear FM, a sinusoidal FM, and a hyperbolic FM. Using a database of 30-s EEG seizure epochs acquired from 35 newborns, we were able to show that, depending on EEG channel, the sinusoidal and piecewise-linear FM models best fitted 80-98% of seizure epochs. To further characterise the EEG seizures, we calculated the mean frequency and frequency span of the extracted IFs. We showed that in the majority of the cases (>95%), the mean frequency resides in the 0.6-3 Hz band with a frequency span of 0.2-1 Hz. In terms of the frequency of occurrence of the four seizure models, the statistical analysis showed that there is no significant difference( p = 0.332) between the two hemispheres. The results also indicate that there is no significant differences between the two hemispheres in terms of the mean frequency ( p = 0.186) and the frequency span ( p = 0.302).

  5. Biotelemetry system for Epilepsy Seizure Control

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, LaCurtise; Bohnert, George W.

    2009-07-02

    The Biotelemetry System for Epilepsy Seizure Control Project developed and tested an automated telemetry system for use in an epileptic seizure prevention device that precisely controls localized brain temperature. This project was a result of a Department of Energy (DOE) Global Initiatives for Proliferation Prevention (GIPP) grant to the Kansas City Plant (KCP), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to partner with Flint Hills Scientific, LLC, Lawrence, KS and Biophysical Laboratory Ltd (BIOFIL), Sarov, Russia to develop a method to help control epileptic seizures.

  6. Ambroxol-induced focal epileptic seizure.

    PubMed

    Lapenta, Leonardo; Morano, Alessandra; Fattouch, Jinane; Casciato, Sara; Fanella, Martina; Giallonardo, Anna Teresa; Di Bonaventura, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that in epileptic patients some compounds and different drugs used for the treatment of comorbidities can facilitate or provoke seizures, this evidence regarding a wide spectrum of pharmacological categories. The potential facilitating factors usually include direct toxic effects or pharmacological interactions of either active ingredients or excipients. We report the case of a patient with drug-resistant epilepsy who experienced focal epileptic seizures, easily and constantly reproducible, after each administration of a cough syrup. This is, to our knowledge, the first electroencephalogram-documented case of focal epileptic seizures induced by cough syrup containing ambroxol as active ingredient.

  7. Ambroxol-induced focal epileptic seizure.

    PubMed

    Lapenta, Leonardo; Morano, Alessandra; Fattouch, Jinane; Casciato, Sara; Fanella, Martina; Giallonardo, Anna Teresa; Di Bonaventura, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that in epileptic patients some compounds and different drugs used for the treatment of comorbidities can facilitate or provoke seizures, this evidence regarding a wide spectrum of pharmacological categories. The potential facilitating factors usually include direct toxic effects or pharmacological interactions of either active ingredients or excipients. We report the case of a patient with drug-resistant epilepsy who experienced focal epileptic seizures, easily and constantly reproducible, after each administration of a cough syrup. This is, to our knowledge, the first electroencephalogram-documented case of focal epileptic seizures induced by cough syrup containing ambroxol as active ingredient. PMID:24824664

  8. Hallervorden-Spatz Syndrome with Seizures.

    PubMed

    Gothwal, Sunil; Nayan, Swati

    2016-04-01

    Hallervorden-Spatz syndrome is a disorder characterized by dystonia, parkinsonism, and iron accumulation in the brain. The disease is caused by mutations in gene encoding pantothenate kinase 2 (PANK2) and patients have pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration. We present an 8-year-old boy with progressive muscle dystonia, neuroregression, frequent fall and multiple injury marks of different stages. Seizures are rare with PANK2. This child had seizure onset at 4 years of age and seizure free on valproate and levetricetam. The CT scan showed tiger eye appearance and mutations on PANK2 gene. PMID:27303611

  9. Alterations in Sociability and Functional Brain Connectivity Caused by Early-Life Seizures is Reversed by Bumetanide

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Gregory L.; Tian, Chengju; Hernan, Amanda E.; Flynn, Sean; Camp, Devon; Barry, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    There is a well-described association between infantile epilepsy and pervasive cognitive and behavioral deficits, including a high incidence of autism spectrum disorders. Despite the robustness of the relationship between early-life seizures and the development of autism, the pathophysiological mechanism by which this occurs has not been explored. As a result of increasing evidence that autism is a disorder of brain connectivity we hypothesized that early-life seizures would interrupt normal brain connectivity during brain maturation and result in an autistic phenotype. Normal rat pups underwent recurrent flurothyl-induced seizures from postnatal (P) day 5-14 and then tested, along with controls, for developmental alterations of development brain oscillatory activity from P18-25. Specifically we wished to understand how normal changes in rhythmicity in and between brain regions change as a function of age and if this rhythmicity is altered or interrupted by early life seizures. In rat pups with early-life seizures, field recordings from dorsal and ventral hippocampus and prefrontal cortex demonstrated marked increase in coherence as well as a decrease in voltage correlation at all bandwidths compared to controls while there were minimal differences in total power and relative power spectral densities. Rats with early-life seizures had resulting impairment in the sociability and social novelty tests but demonstrated no evidence of increased activity or generalized anxiety as measured in the open field. In addition, rats with early-life seizures had lower seizure thresholds than controls, indicating long-standing alterations in the excitatory/inhibition balance. Bumetanide, a pharmacological agent that blocks the activity of NKCC1 and induces a significant shift of ECl toward more hyperpolarized values, administration at the time of the seizures precluded the subsequent abnormalities in coherence and voltage correlation and resulted in normal sociability and seizure

  10. Alterations in sociability and functional brain connectivity caused by early-life seizures are prevented by bumetanide.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Gregory L; Tian, Chengju; Hernan, Amanda E; Flynn, Sean; Camp, Devon; Barry, Jeremy

    2015-05-01

    There is a well-described association between infantile epilepsy and pervasive cognitive and behavioral deficits, including a high incidence of autism spectrum disorders. Despite the robustness of the relationship between early-life seizures and the development of autism, the pathophysiological mechanism by which this occurs has not been explored. As a result of increasing evidence that autism is a disorder of brain connectivity we hypothesized that early-life seizures would interrupt normal brain connectivity during brain maturation and result in an autistic phenotype. Normal rat pups underwent recurrent flurothyl-induced seizures from postnatal (P)days 5-14 and then tested, along with controls, for developmental alterations of development brain oscillatory activity from P18-P25. Specifically we wished to understand how normal changes in rhythmicity in and between brain regions change as a function of age and if this rhythmicity is altered or interrupted by early life seizures. In rat pups with early-life seizures, field recordings from dorsal and ventral hippocampus and prefrontal cortex demonstrated marked increase in coherence as well as a decrease in voltage correlation at all bandwidths compared to controls while there were minimal differences in total power and relative power spectral densities. Rats with early-life seizures had resulting impairment in the sociability and social novelty tests but demonstrated no evidence of increased activity or generalized anxiety as measured in the open field. In addition, rats with early-life seizures had lower seizure thresholds than controls, indicating long-standing alterations in the excitatory/inhibition balance. Bumetanide, a pharmacological agent that blocks the activity of NKCC1 and induces a significant shift of ECl toward more hyperpolarized values, administration at the time of the seizures precluded the subsequent abnormalities in coherence and voltage correlation and resulted in normal sociability and seizure

  11. Alterations in sociability and functional brain connectivity caused by early-life seizures are prevented by bumetanide.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Gregory L; Tian, Chengju; Hernan, Amanda E; Flynn, Sean; Camp, Devon; Barry, Jeremy

    2015-05-01

    There is a well-described association between infantile epilepsy and pervasive cognitive and behavioral deficits, including a high incidence of autism spectrum disorders. Despite the robustness of the relationship between early-life seizures and the development of autism, the pathophysiological mechanism by which this occurs has not been explored. As a result of increasing evidence that autism is a disorder of brain connectivity we hypothesized that early-life seizures would interrupt normal brain connectivity during brain maturation and result in an autistic phenotype. Normal rat pups underwent recurrent flurothyl-induced seizures from postnatal (P)days 5-14 and then tested, along with controls, for developmental alterations of development brain oscillatory activity from P18-P25. Specifically we wished to understand how normal changes in rhythmicity in and between brain regions change as a function of age and if this rhythmicity is altered or interrupted by early life seizures. In rat pups with early-life seizures, field recordings from dorsal and ventral hippocampus and prefrontal cortex demonstrated marked increase in coherence as well as a decrease in voltage correlation at all bandwidths compared to controls while there were minimal differences in total power and relative power spectral densities. Rats with early-life seizures had resulting impairment in the sociability and social novelty tests but demonstrated no evidence of increased activity or generalized anxiety as measured in the open field. In addition, rats with early-life seizures had lower seizure thresholds than controls, indicating long-standing alterations in the excitatory/inhibition balance. Bumetanide, a pharmacological agent that blocks the activity of NKCC1 and induces a significant shift of ECl toward more hyperpolarized values, administration at the time of the seizures precluded the subsequent abnormalities in coherence and voltage correlation and resulted in normal sociability and seizure

  12. 19 CFR 162.22 - Seizure of conveyances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Seizure of conveyances. 162.22 Section 162.22 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INSPECTION, SEARCH, AND SEIZURE Seizures § 162.22 Seizure of conveyances. (a)...

  13. Initiation, Propagation, and Termination of Partial (Focal) Seizures

    PubMed Central

    de Curtis, Marco; Avoli, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    The neurophysiological patterns that correlate with partial (focal) seizures are well defined in humans by standard electroencephalogram (EEG) and presurgical depth electrode recordings. Seizure patterns with similar features are reproduced in animal models of partial seizures and epilepsy. However, the network determinants that support interictal spikes, as well as the initiation, progression, and termination of seizures, are still elusive. Recent findings show that inhibitory networks are prominently involved at the onset of these seizures, and that extracellular changes in potassium contribute to initiate and sustain seizure progression. The end of a partial seizure correlates with an increase in network synchronization, which possibly involves both excitatory and inhibitory mechanisms. PMID:26134843

  14. Threshold quantum cryptography

    SciTech Connect

    Tokunaga, Yuuki; Okamoto, Tatsuaki; Imoto, Nobuyuki

    2005-01-01

    We present the concept of threshold collaborative unitary transformation or threshold quantum cryptography, which is a kind of quantum version of threshold cryptography. Threshold quantum cryptography states that classical shared secrets are distributed to several parties and a subset of them, whose number is greater than a threshold, collaborates to compute a quantum cryptographic function, while keeping each share secretly inside each party. The shared secrets are reusable if no cheating is detected. As a concrete example of this concept, we show a distributed protocol (with threshold) of conjugate coding.

  15. Analysis of Epileptic Seizures with Complex Network

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Yan; Wang, Yinghua; Yu, Tao; Li, Xiaoli

    2014-01-01

    Epilepsy is a disease of abnormal neural activities involving large area of brain networks. Until now the nature of functional brain network associated with epilepsy is still unclear. Recent researches indicate that the small world or scale-free attributes and the occurrence of highly clustered connection patterns could represent a general organizational principle in the human brain functional network. In this paper, we seek to find whether the small world or scale-free property of brain network is correlated with epilepsy seizure formation. A mass neural model was adopted to generate multiple channel EEG recordings based on regular, small world, random, and scale-free network models. Whether the connection patterns of cortical networks are directly associated with the epileptic seizures was investigated. The results showed that small world and scale-free cortical networks are highly correlated with the occurrence of epileptic seizures. In particular, the property of small world network is more significant during the epileptic seizures. PMID:25147576

  16. Automatic Detection of Seizures with Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, Dale E.; Harris, John C.; Cutchis, Protagoras N.; Cristion, John A.; Lesser, Ronald P.; Webber, W. Robert S.

    1993-01-01

    There are an estimated two million people with epilepsy in the United States. Many of these people do not respond to anti-epileptic drug therapy. Two devices can be developed to assist in the treatment of epilepsy. The first is a microcomputer-based system designed to process massive amounts of electroencephalogram (EEG) data collected during long-term monitoring of patients for the purpose of diagnosing seizures, assessing the effectiveness of medical therapy, or selecting patients for epilepsy surgery. Such a device would select and display important EEG events. Currently many such events are missed. A second device could be implanted and would detect seizures and initiate therapy. Both of these devices require a reliable seizure detection algorithm. A new algorithm is described. It is believed to represent an improvement over existing seizure detection algorithms because better signal features were selected and better standardization methods were used.

  17. Decreased subcortical cholinergic arousal in focal seizures

    PubMed Central

    Motelow, Joshua E.; Li, Wei; Zhan, Qiong; Mishra, Asht M.; Sachdev, Robert N. S.; Liu, Geoffrey; Gummadavelli, Abhijeet; Zayyad, Zaina; Lee, Hyun Seung; Chu, Victoria; Andrews, John P.; Englot, Dario J.; Herman, Peter; Sanganahalli, Basavaraju G.; Hyder, Fahmeed; Blumenfeld, Hal

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Impaired consciousness in temporal lobe seizures has a major negative impact on quality of life. The prevailing view holds that this disorder impairs consciousness by seizure spread to the bilateral temporal lobes. We propose instead that seizures invade subcortical regions and depress arousal, causing impairment through decreases rather than through increases in activity. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging in a rodent model, we found increased activity in regions known to depress cortical function including lateral septum and anterior hypothalamus. Importantly, we found suppression of intralaminar thalamic and brainstem arousal systems and suppression of the cortex. At a cellular level, we found reduced firing of identified cholinergic neurons in the brainstem pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus and basal forebrain. Finally, we used enzyme-based amperometry to demonstrate reduced cholinergic neurotransmission in both cortex and thalamus. Decreased subcortical arousal is a novel mechanism for loss of consciousness in focal temporal lobe seizures. PMID:25654258

  18. Nonphotosensitive video game-induced partial seizures.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Y; Shigematsu, H; Kubota, H; Inoue, Y; Fujiwara, T; Yagi, K; Seino, M

    1995-08-01

    We report a 9-year-old boy with a ring 20 chromosome anomaly whose complex partial seizures (CPS), presumably of frontal lobe origin, were often induced by playing video games. Neither photosensitivity nor pattern sensitivity was observed. An intensive video-EEG investigation showed that video games as well as mental calculation elicited rhythmic runs of bilateral high-voltage slow waves, which eventually evolved into ictal discharges. This case suggests that higher brain functions can be involved in seizure induction.

  19. Genetic effects on sleep/wake variation of seizures

    PubMed Central

    Winawer, Melodie R.; Shih, Jerry; Beck, Erin S.; Hunter, Jessica E.; Epstein, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objective There is a complex bidirectional relationship between sleep and epilepsy. Sleep/wake timing of seizures has been investigated for several individual seizure types and syndromes, but few large-scale studies of the timing of seizures exist in people with varied epilepsy types. In addition, the genetic contributions to seizure timing have not been well studied. Methods Sleep/wake timing of seizures was determined for 1,395 subjects in 546 families enrolled in the Epilepsy Phenome/Genome Project (EPGP). We examined seizure timing among subjects with different epilepsy types, seizure types, epilepsy syndromes, and localization. We also examined the familial aggregation of sleep/wake occurrence of seizures. Results Seizures in nonacquired focal epilepsy (NAFE) were more likely to occur during sleep than seizures in generalized epilepsy (GE), for both convulsive (odds ratio [OR] 5.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.59–7.52) and nonconvulsive seizures (OR 4.2, 95% CI 2.48–7.21). Seizures occurring within 1 h of awakening were more likely to occur in patients with GE than with NAFE for both convulsive (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.54– 3.39) and nonconvulsive (OR 1.7, 95% CI 1.04–2.66) seizures. Frontal onset seizures were more likely than temporal onset seizures to occur during sleep. Sleep/wake timing of seizures in first-degree relatives predicted timing of seizures in the proband. Significance We found that sleep/wake timing of seizures is associated with both epilepsy syndrome and seizure type. In addition, we provide the first evidence for a genetic contribution to sleep/wake timing of seizures in a large group of individuals with common epilepsy syndromes. PMID:26948972

  20. Seizure or syncope: lessons over time.

    PubMed

    Sheen, Volney L

    2012-03-01

    A 25-year-old woman with recurrent syncopal episodes presented with a first time generalized tonic clonic (GTC) seizure. She had experienced two prior fainting spells lasting seconds and associated with diet pills and dehydration. She had another similar spell prior to falling, sustaining a laceration to the right posterior occiput, and having a witnessed GTC seizure. Her scalp electroencephalography (EEG) showed left temporal slowing with sharp features. T1-weighted and T2-weighted MRI revealed two moderately enhancing focal lesions within the left frontal and temporal regions. These findings raised the possibility of an underlying seizure focus. Repeat imaging studies of this patient 1 month later, however, demonstrated resolution of these findings and an area of encephalomalacia, consistent with a traumatic coup contrecoup injury. A repeat EEG was normal. Therefore, the cause of the loss of consciousness was due to syncope with the consequent head injury giving rise to an isolated seizure. Understanding the underlying cause of a seizure is important in dictating treatment. In this setting the patient was not initiated on seizure medication and has done well. PMID:22245277

  1. Acute Symptomatic Seizures Caused by Electrolyte Disturbances

    PubMed Central

    Nardone, Raffaele; Brigo, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    In this narrative review we focus on acute symptomatic seizures occurring in subjects with electrolyte disturbances. Quite surprisingly, despite its clinical relevance, this issue has received very little attention in the scientific literature. Electrolyte abnormalities are commonly encountered in clinical daily practice, and their diagnosis relies on routine laboratory findings. Acute and severe electrolyte imbalances can manifest with seizures, which may be the sole presenting symptom. Seizures are more frequently observed in patients with sodium disorders (especially hyponatremia), hypocalcemia, and hypomagnesemia. They do not entail a diagnosis of epilepsy, but are classified as acute symptomatic seizures. EEG has little specificity in differentiating between various electrolyte disturbances. The prominent EEG feature is slowing of the normal background activity, although other EEG findings, including various epileptiform abnormalities may occur. An accurate and prompt diagnosis should be established for a successful management of seizures, as rapid identification and correction of the underlying electrolyte disturbance (rather than an antiepileptic treatment) are of crucial importance in the control of seizures and prevention of permanent brain damage. PMID:26754778

  2. Acute Symptomatic Seizures Caused by Electrolyte Disturbances.

    PubMed

    Nardone, Raffaele; Brigo, Francesco; Trinka, Eugen

    2016-01-01

    In this narrative review we focus on acute symptomatic seizures occurring in subjects with electrolyte disturbances. Quite surprisingly, despite its clinical relevance, this issue has received very little attention in the scientific literature. Electrolyte abnormalities are commonly encountered in clinical daily practice, and their diagnosis relies on routine laboratory findings. Acute and severe electrolyte imbalances can manifest with seizures, which may be the sole presenting symptom. Seizures are more frequently observed in patients with sodium disorders (especially hyponatremia), hypocalcemia, and hypomagnesemia. They do not entail a diagnosis of epilepsy, but are classified as acute symptomatic seizures. EEG has little specificity in differentiating between various electrolyte disturbances. The prominent EEG feature is slowing of the normal background activity, although other EEG findings, including various epileptiform abnormalities may occur. An accurate and prompt diagnosis should be established for a successful management of seizures, as rapid identification and correction of the underlying electrolyte disturbance (rather than an antiepileptic treatment) are of crucial importance in the control of seizures and prevention of permanent brain damage. PMID:26754778

  3. Monitor for status epilepticus seizures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Mark; Simkins, Thomas

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the sensor technology and associated electronics of a monitor designed to detect the onset of a seizure disorder called status epilepticus. It is a condition that affects approximately 3-5 percent of those individuals suffering from epilepsy. This form of epilepsy does not follow the typical cycle of start-peak-end. The convulsions continue until medically interrupted and are life threatening. The mortality rate is high without prompt medical treatment at a suitable facility. The paper describes the details of a monitor design that provides an inexpensive solution to the needs of those responsible for the care of individuals afflicted with this disorder. The monitor has been designed as a cooperative research and development effort involving the United States Army Armament Research, Development, and Engineering Center's Benet Laboratories (Benet) and the Cerebral Palsy Center for the Disabled (Center), in association with the Department of Neurology at Albany Medical College (AMC). Benet has delivered a working prototype of the device for field testing, in collaboration with Albany Medical College. The Center has identified several children in need of special monitoring and has agreed to pursue commercialization of the device.

  4. Threshold Concepts in Biochemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loertscher, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Threshold concepts can be identified for any discipline and provide a framework for linking student learning to curricular design. Threshold concepts represent a transformed understanding of a discipline, without which the learner cannot progress and are therefore pivotal in learning in a discipline. Although threshold concepts have been…

  5. Ketogenic diet protects against epileptogenesis as well as neuronal loss in amygdaloid-kindling seizures.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yan; Yang, Yi; Wang, Shuang; Ding, Yao; Guo, Yi; Zhang, Man-Man; Wen, Shu-Qun; Ding, Mei-Ping

    2012-02-01

    Ketogenic diets (KD) have shown beneficial effects in terms of anticonvulsant and anti-epileptogenic properties in several experimental models. However, few studies have investigated the consequences of KD with regards to the anti-epileptogenic and neuroprotective effects in kindling-induced seizures. Here, postnatal day 28 male Sprague-Dawley rats received one of two experimental diets for 4 weeks: (a) a 'classic' 4:1 KD; and (b) a normal regular rodent chow diet (ND). Fully-kindled seizures were achieved by daily electrical stimulation in the amygdala. Seizure stage and after-discharge duration (ADD) were assessed daily. The after-discharge threshold (ADT) was measured every 5 days. The effects of the two diets on neuronal loss were observed before kindling and 20 days after stimulation by Nissl staining. We found that the progression of seizure stage and ADD was delayed by KD. KD prevented the ADT decrease on day 5. The incidence of generalized seizures was lower in the KD group compared to the ND group. The neuronal density was decreased in the ipsilateral hilus of the dentate gyrus (DG) and CA1 area, as well as the contralateral CA1 area before kindling in the KD group. However, KD prevented neuronal loss in the ipsilateral CA1 area 20 days after stimulation. Our data suggest that KD can protect against epileptogenesis by preventing both after-discharge generation and propagation in kindling seizures. In addition, KD also possesses a neuroprotective function during kindling although it changes hippocampal development in early life.

  6. Seizures and Teens: Surgery for Seizures--What's It All About?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duchowny, Michael S.; Dean, Patricia

    2006-01-01

    Nearly 1 out of 2 children and teens with seizures may need to take medications throughout their lives. At least 25% will develop a condition called refractory epilepsy--meaning that their seizures do not respond to medical therapy. For these children and teens, non-drug therapies such as brain surgery are available that may offer a chance to…

  7. Seizures and Teens: When Seizures Aren't the Only Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanner, Andres M.; Shafer, Patricia O.

    2006-01-01

    Some teenagers with epilepsy only have to deal with seizures, which can be tough enough, but for other teens, seizures are not the only problem. Parents and caregivers often report changes in their teens' abilities to think clearly, learn in school, or remain focused in class. Mood and other behavioral problems may also be seen. It is critical…

  8. Febrile seizures in Kaduna, north western Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Eseigbe, E. E.; Adama, S. J.; Eseigbe, P.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Febrile seizure is the most common seizure of childhood and has a good prognosis. However its presentation is fraught with poor management, with grave consequences, in our environment. Thus a review of its current status is important. Objective: To review the status of febrile seizures in Kaduna metropolis. Materials and Methods: A review of cases seen in the Department of Paediatrics, 44 Nigeria Army Reference Hospital, Kaduna between June 2008 and June 2010. Results: Out of the 635 cases admitted in the department 17 (2.7%) fulfilled the criteria for febrile seizures. There were 11 Males and 6 Females (M: F, 1.8:1). Age range was from 9 months to 5 years with a mean of 2.2 years ± 1.1 and peak age of 3 years. Twelve (70.6%) were in the upper social classes (I-III). Fever, convulsion, catarrh and cough were major presenting symptoms. Incidence of convulsion was least on the 1st day of complaint. Fourteen (82.4%) of the cases were simple febrile seizures while 3 were complex. There was a positive family history in 5 (29.4%) of the cases. Eleven (64.7%) had orthodox medication at home, before presentation, 5 (29.4%) consulted patient medicine sellers and 7 (41.7%) received traditional medication as part of home management. Malaria and acute respiratory infections were the identifiable causes. Standard anti-malaria and anti-biotic therapy were instituted, where indicated. All recovered and were discharged. Conclusion: There was a low prevalence of febrile seizures among the hospitalized children and a poor pre-hospitalization management of cases. It highlighted the need for improved community awareness on the prevention and management of febrile seizures. PMID:23293414

  9. Seizure detection, seizure prediction, and closed-loop warning systems in epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Ramgopal, Sriram; Thome-Souza, Sigride; Jackson, Michele; Kadish, Navah Ester; Sánchez Fernández, Iván; Klehm, Jacquelyn; Bosl, William; Reinsberger, Claus; Schachter, Steven; Loddenkemper, Tobias

    2014-08-01

    Nearly one-third of patients with epilepsy continue to have seizures despite optimal medication management. Systems employed to detect seizures may have the potential to improve outcomes in these patients by allowing more tailored therapies and might, additionally, have a role in accident and SUDEP prevention. Automated seizure detection and prediction require algorithms which employ feature computation and subsequent classification. Over the last few decades, methods have been developed to detect seizures utilizing scalp and intracranial EEG, electrocardiography, accelerometry and motion sensors, electrodermal activity, and audio/video captures. To date, it is unclear which combination of detection technologies yields the best results, and approaches may ultimately need to be individualized. This review presents an overview of seizure detection and related prediction methods and discusses their potential uses in closed-loop warning systems in epilepsy. PMID:25174001

  10. A practical approach to uncomplicated seizures in children.

    PubMed

    McAbee, G N; Wark, J E

    2000-09-01

    Uncomplicated seizures and epilepsy are common in infants and children. Family physicians should be aware of certain epilepsy syndromes that occur in children, such as febrile seizures, benign focal epilepsy of childhood, complex partial epilepsy, juvenile myoclonic epilepsy and video game-related epilepsy. Not all uncomplicated childhood seizures require neuroimaging or treatment. Febrile seizures, rolandic seizures and video game-related seizures are childhood epileptic syndromes that are typically not associated with brain structural lesions on computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging, and are often not treated with anticonvulsant drugs. Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy does not require neuroimaging but does require treatment because of a high rate of recurrent seizures. Complex partial epilepsy often requires both neuroimaging and treatment. Although seizures are diagnosed primarily on clinical grounds, all children with a possible seizure (except febrile seizures) should have an electroencephalogram. Interictal EEGs may be normal. Computed tomography has demonstrated abnormalities in 7 to 19 percent of children with new-onset seizures. The yield of magnetic resonance imaging for specific childhood seizure types is not known, but it is the preferred modality of neuroimaging for many clinical presentations. Most children's seizures treated with anticonvulsants are controlled by the first drug selected. The value of "therapeutic' serum drug levels is questionable in the management of uncomplicated childhood seizures.

  11. A New Model to Study Sleep Deprivation-Induced Seizure

    PubMed Central

    Lucey, Brendan P.; Leahy, Averi; Rosas, Regine; Shaw, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Study Objectives: A relationship between sleep and seizures is well-described in both humans and rodent animal models; however, the mechanism underlying this relationship is unknown. Using Drosophila melanogaster mutants with seizure phenotypes, we demonstrate that seizure activity can be modified by sleep deprivation. Design: Seizure activity was evaluated in an adult bang-sensitive seizure mutant, stress sensitive B (sesB9ed4), and in an adult temperature sensitive seizure mutant seizure (seits1) under baseline and following 12 h of sleep deprivation. The long-term effect of sleep deprivation on young, immature sesB9ed4 flies was also assessed. Setting: Laboratory. Participants: Drosophila melanogaster. Interventions: Sleep deprivation. Measurements and Results: Sleep deprivation increased seizure susceptibility in adult sesB9ed4/+ and seits1 mutant flies. Sleep deprivation also increased seizure susceptibility when sesB was disrupted using RNAi. The effect of sleep deprivation on seizure activity was reduced when sesB9ed4/+ flies were given the anti-seizure drug, valproic acid. In contrast to adult flies, sleep deprivation during early fly development resulted in chronic seizure susceptibility when sesB9ed4/+ became adults. Conclusions: These findings show that Drosophila is a model organism for investigating the relationship between sleep and seizure activity. Citation: Lucey BP, Leahy A, Rosas R, Shaw PJ. A new model to study sleep deprivation-induced seizure. SLEEP 2015;38(5):777–785. PMID:25515102

  12. Are seizures in the setting of sleep deprivation provoked?

    PubMed

    Lawn, Nicholas; Lieblich, Sam; Lee, Judy; Dunne, John

    2014-04-01

    It is generally accepted that sleep deprivation contributes to seizures. However, it is unclear whether a seizure occurring in the setting of sleep deprivation should be considered as provoked or not and whether this is influenced by seizure type and etiology. This information may have an important impact on epilepsy diagnosis and management. We prospectively analyzed the influence of sleep deprivation on the risk of seizure recurrence in patients with first-ever unprovoked seizures and compared the findings with patients with first-ever provoked seizures. Of 1026 patients with first-ever unprovoked seizures, 204 (20%) were associated with sleep deprivation. While the overall likelihood of seizure recurrence was slightly lower in sleep-deprived patients with first-ever seizures (log-rank p=0.03), sleep deprivation was not an independent predictor of seizure recurrence on multivariate analysis. Seizure recurrence following a first-ever unprovoked seizure associated with sleep deprivation was far more likely than for 174 patients with a provoked first-ever seizure (log-rank p<0.0001). Our findings support the International League Against Epilepsy recommendation that seizures occurring in the setting of sleep deprivation should not be regarded as provoked.

  13. Protective effects of TRH and its analogues in chemical and genetic models of seizures.

    PubMed

    Przewłocka, B; Labuz, D; Mika, J; Lipkowski, A; van Luijtelaar, G; Coenen, A; Lasoń, W

    1997-01-01

    TRH shows strong influence on neuronal excitability and may participate in the regulation of seizures. We investigated the effect of TRH and its stable analogues on seizures induced by intravenous (i.v.) infusion of pentetrazole in rats. The data showed that i.v. administration of TRH (10 and 20 mg/kg), RGH-2202 (0.1 mg/kg) and Z-p-Glu-His-Pro-NH2 (10 mg/kg) increased threshold for pentetrazole-induced clonic seizures, but did not affect the tonic ones. Another stable analogue of TRH, 1p-Glu-Tyr-Pro-NH2 (0.1-10 mg/kg), had no effect on pentetrazole-induced seizures. In further study, effects of TRH and RGH-2202 were examined in WAG/Rij rats, a genetic model of absence epilepsy. TRH (25 and 50 micrograms i.c.v.) decreased dose-dependently the number and mean duration of spike-wave discharges in cortical EEG of WAG/Rij rats at 90 and 120 min after the peptide administration. On the other hand, RGH-2202 (1 microgram i.c.v.) significantly decreased only the number of spike-wave discharges at 60 min post-injection. These results confirm that TRH and some of its analogues have moderate antiepileptic activity. PMID:9566039

  14. Accelerometry-based home monitoring for detection of nocturnal hypermotor seizures based on novelty detection.

    PubMed

    Cuppens, Kris; Karsmakers, Peter; Van de Vel, Anouk; Bonroy, Bert; Milosevic, Milica; Luca, Stijn; Croonenborghs, Tom; Ceulemans, Berten; Lagae, Lieven; Van Huffel, Sabine; Vanrumste, Bart

    2014-05-01

    Nocturnal home monitoring of epileptic children is often not feasible due to the cumbersome manner of seizure monitoring with the standard method of video/EEG-monitoring. We propose a method for hypermotor seizure detection based on accelerometers attached to the extremities. From the acceleration signals, multiple temporal, frequency, and wavelet-based features are extracted. After determining the features with the highest discriminative power, we classify movement events in epileptic and nonepileptic movements. This classification is only based on a nonparametric estimate of the probability density function of normal movements. Such approach allows us to build patient-specific models to classify movement data without the need for seizure data that are rarely available. If, in the test phase, the probability of a data point (event) is lower than a threshold, this event is considered to be an epileptic seizure; otherwise, it is considered as a normal nocturnal movement event. The mean performance over seven patients gives a sensitivity of 95.24% and a positive predictive value of 60.04%. However, there is a noticeable interpatient difference. PMID:24122607

  15. Positron emission tomography in generalized seizures

    SciTech Connect

    Theodore, W.H.; Brooks, R.; Margolin, R.; Patronas, N.; Sato, S.; Porter, R.J.; Mansi, L.; Bairamian, D.; DiChiro, G.

    1985-05-01

    The authors used /sup 18/F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) to study nine patients with clinical absence or generalized seizures. One patient had only absence seizures, two had only generalized tonic-clonic seizures, and six had both seizure types. Interictal scans in eight failed to reveal focal or lateralized hypometabolism. No apparent abnormalities were noted. Two patients had PET scans after isotope injection during hyperventilation-induced generalized spike-wave discharges. Diffusely increased metabolic rates were found in one compared with an interictal scan, and in another compared with control values. Another patient had FDG injected during absence status: EEG showed generalized spike-wave discharges (during which she was unresponsive) intermixed with slow activity accompanied by confusion. Metabolic rates were decreased, compared with the interictal scan, throughout both cortical and subcortical structures. Interictal PET did not detect specific anatomic regions responsible for absence seizure onset in any patient, but the results of the ictal scans did suggest that pathophysiologic differences exist between absence status and single absence attacks.

  16. Prenatal exposure to ionizing radiation and subsequent development of seizures

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, K.; Yoshimaru, H.; Otake, M.; Annegers, J.F.; Schull, W.J. )

    1990-01-01

    Seizures are a frequent sequela of impaired brain development and can be expected to affect more children with radiation-related brain damage than children without such damage. This report deals with the incidence and type of seizures among survivors prenatally exposed to the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and their association with specific stages of prenatal development at the time of irradiation. Fetal radiation dose was assumed to be equal to the dose to the maternal uterus. Seizures here include all references in the clinical record to seizure, epilepsy, or convulsion. Histories of seizures were obtained at biennial routine clinical examinations starting at about the age of 2 years. These clinical records were used to classify seizures as febrile or unprovoked (without precipitating cause). No seizures were ascertained among subjects exposed 0-7 weeks after fertilization at doses higher than 0.10 Gy. The incidence of seizures was highest with irradiation at the eighth through the 15th week after fertilization among subjects with doses exceeding 0.10 Gy and was linearly related to the level of fetal exposure. This obtains for all seizures without regard to the presence of fever or precipitating causes, and for unprovoked seizures. When the 22 cases of severe mental retardation were excluded, the increase in seizures was only suggestively significant and only for unprovoked seizures. After exposure at later stages of development, there was no increase in recorded seizures.

  17. Effects of an acute seizure on associative learning and memory.

    PubMed

    Holley, Andrew J; Lugo, Joaquin N

    2016-01-01

    Past studies have demonstrated that inducing several seizures or continuous seizures in neonatal or adult rats results in impairments in learning and memory. The impact of a single acute seizure on learning and memory has not been investigated in mice. In this study, we exposed adult 129SvEvTac mice to the inhalant flurothyl until a behavioral seizure was induced. Our study consisted of 4 experiments where we examined the effect of one seizure before or after delay fear conditioning. We also included a separate cohort of animals that was tested in the open field after a seizure to rule out changes in locomotor activity influencing the results of memory tests. Mice that had experienced a single seizure 1h, but not 6h, prior to training showed a significant impairment in associative conditioning to the conditioned stimulus when compared with controls 24h later. There were no differences in freezing one day later for animals that experienced a single seizure 1h after associative learning. We also found that an acute seizure reduced activity levels in an open-field test 2h but not 24h later. These findings suggest that an acute seizure occurring immediately before learning can have an effect on the recall of events occurring shortly after that seizure. In contrast, an acute seizure occurring shortly after learning appears to have little or no effect on long-term memory. These findings have implications for understanding the acute effects of seizures on the acquisition of new knowledge.

  18. Febrile Seizures and Febrile Seizure Syndromes: An Updated Overview of Old and Current Knowledge.

    PubMed

    Khair, Abdulhafeez M; Elmagrabi, Dalal

    2015-01-01

    Febrile seizures are the most common paroxysmal episode during childhood, affecting up to one in 10 children. They are a major cause of emergency facility visits and a source of family distress and anxiety. Their etiology and pathophysiological pathways are being understood better over time; however, there is still more to learn. Genetic predisposition is thought to be a major contributor. Febrile seizures have been historically classified as benign; however, many emerging febrile seizure syndromes behave differently. The way in which human knowledge has evolved over the years in regard to febrile seizures has not been dealt with in depth in the current literature, up to our current knowledge. This review serves as a documentary of how scientists have explored febrile seizures, elaborating on the journey of knowledge as far as etiology, clinical features, approach, and treatment strategies are concerned. Although this review cannot cover all clinical aspects related to febrile seizures at the textbook level, we believe it can function as a quick summary of the past and current sources of knowledge for all varieties of febrile seizure types and syndromes. PMID:26697219

  19. Comparable seizure characteristics in magnetic seizure therapy and electroconvulsive therapy for major depression.

    PubMed

    Kayser, Sarah; Bewernick, Bettina H; Hurlemann, René; Soehle, Martin; Schlaepfer, Thomas E

    2013-11-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is highly effective for treatment-resistant depression (TRD); however, its use for less severe forms of depression is somewhat limited by a lack of control over current spreading to medial temporal lobe memory structures, resulting in various cognitive side effects. In contrast, magnetic seizure therapy (MST), which uses high frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) for local seizure induction, has been associated with reduced cognitive side effects. To assess whether different characteristics of seizures induced by both methods are responsible for the differences in neuropsychological side-effect profile, we studied seven TRD-patients undergoing both MST and ECT in an open-label, within subject, controlled crossover pilot study. Comparison parameters included seizure-related ictal characteristics, including motor activity, electromyogram (EMG), electroencephalogram (EEG), and postictal recovery and reorientation times.Our results showed no differences in motor activity or EMG and EEG characteristics, thus implicating similar electrophysiological processes in seizure induction with MST and ECT. In line with previous studies, we observed shorter postictal recovery and reorientation times following MST.The ictal characteristics of induced seizures were found similar with ECT and MST suggesting that the more focal seizure induction associated with MST may account for the more beneficial neuropsychological side effect profile of MST.

  20. Vagus nerve stimulation: predictors of seizure freedom

    PubMed Central

    Janszky, J; Hoppe, M; Behne, F; Tuxhorn, I; Pannek, H; Ebner, A

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To identify predictive factors for the seizure-free outcome of vagus nerve stimulation (VNS). Methods: All 47 patients who had undergone VNS implantation at one centre and had at least one year of follow up were studied. They underwent complete presurgical evaluation including detailed clinical history, magnetic resonance imaging, and long term video-EEG with ictal and interictal recordings. After implantation, adjustment of stimulation parameters and concomitant antiepileptic drugs were at the discretion of the treating physician. Results: Mean (SD) age of the patients was 22.7 (11.6) years (range 7 to 53). Six patients (13%) became seizure-free after the VNS implantation. Only two variables showed a significant association with the seizure-free outcome: absence of bilateral interictal epileptiform discharges (IED) and presence of malformation of cortical development (MCD). Epilepsy duration showed a non-significant trend towards a negative association with outcome. By logistic regression analysis, only absence of bilateral IED correlated independently with successful VNS treatment (p<0.01, odds ratio = 29.2 (95% confidence interval, 2.4 to 353)). Bilateral IED (independent or bilateral synchronous) was found in one of six seizure-free patients and in 33 of 41 non-seizure-free patients. When bilateral IED were absent, the sensitivity for seizure-free outcome was 0.83 (0.44 to 0.97), and the specificity was 0.80 (0.66 to 0.90). Conclusions: Bilateral IED was independently associated with the outcome of VNS. These results are preliminary because they were based on a small patient population. They may facilitate prospective VNS studies enrolling larger numbers of patients to confirm the results. PMID:15716532

  1. Adjunctive pregabalin vs gabapentin for focal seizures

    PubMed Central

    Glue, Paul; Friedman, Daniel; Almas, Mary; Yardi, Nandan; Knapp, Lloyd; Pitman, Verne; Posner, Holly B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the comparative safety and adjunctive efficacy of pregabalin and gabapentin in reducing seizure frequency in patients with partial-onset seizures based on prestudy modeling showing superior efficacy for pregabalin. Methods: The design of this comparative efficacy and safety study of pregabalin and gabapentin as adjunctive treatment in adults with refractory partial-onset seizures was randomized, flexible dose, double blind, and parallel group. The study included a 6-week baseline and a 21-week treatment phase. The primary endpoint was the percentage change from baseline in 28-day seizure rate to the treatment phase. Results: A total of 484 patients were randomized to pregabalin (n = 242) or gabapentin (n = 242). Of these, 359 patients (187 pregabalin, 172 gabapentin) completed the treatment phase. The observed median and mean in percentage change from baseline was −58.65 and −47.7 (SD 48.3) for pregabalin and −57.43 and −45.28 (SD 60.6) for gabapentin. For the primary endpoint, there was no significant difference between treatments. The Hodges-Lehman estimated median difference was 0.0 (95% confidence interval −6.0 to 7.0). Safety profiles were comparable and consistent with prior trials. Conclusions: The absence of the anticipated efficacy difference based on modeling of prior, nearly identical trials and the larger-than-expected response rates of the 2 antiepileptic drugs were unexpected. These findings raise questions that are potentially important to consider in future comparative efficacy trials. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00537940. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class II evidence that for patients with partial seizures enrolled in this study, pregabalin is not superior to gabapentin in reducing seizure frequency. Because of the atypical response rates, the results of this study are poorly generalizable to other epilepsy populations. PMID:27521437

  2. What is a seizure network? Long-range network consequences of focal seizures.

    PubMed

    Blumenfeld, Hal

    2014-01-01

    What defines the spatial and temporal boundaries of seizure activity in brain networks? To fully answer this question a precise and quantitative definition of seizures is needed, which unfortunately remains elusive. Nevertheless, it is possible to ask under conditions where clearly divergent patterns of activity occur in large-scale brain networks whether certain activity patterns are part of the seizure while others are not. Here we examine brain network activity during focal limbic seizures, including diverse regions such as the hippocampus, subcortical arousal systems and fronto-parietal association cortex. Based on work from patients and from animal models we describe a characteristic pattern of intense increases in neuronal firing, cerebral blood flow, cerebral blood volume, blood oxygen level dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD fMRI) signals and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption in the hippocampus during focal limbic seizures. Similar increases are seen in certain closely linked subcortical structures such as the lateral septal nuclei and anterior hypothalamus, which contain inhibitory neurons. In marked contrast, decreases in all of these parameters are seen in the subcortical arousal systems of the upper brainstem and intralaminar thalamus, as well as in the fronto-parietal association cortex. We propose that the seizure proper can be defined as regions showing intense increases, while those areas showing opposite changes are inhibited by the seizure network and constitute long-range network consequences beyond the seizure itself. Importantly, the fronto-parietal cortex shows sleep-like slow wave activity and depressed metabolism under these conditions, associated with impaired consciousness. Understanding which brain networks are directly involved in seizures versus which sustain secondary consequences can provide new insights into the mechanisms of brain dysfunction in epilepsy, hopefully leading to innovative treatment

  3. Reducing premature KCC2 expression rescues seizure susceptibility and spine morphology in atypical febrile seizures.

    PubMed

    Awad, Patricia N; Sanon, Nathalie T; Chattopadhyaya, Bidisha; Carriço, Josianne Nunes; Ouardouz, Mohamed; Gagné, Jonathan; Duss, Sandra; Wolf, Daniele; Desgent, Sébastien; Cancedda, Laura; Carmant, Lionel; Di Cristo, Graziella

    2016-07-01

    Atypical febrile seizures are considered a risk factor for epilepsy onset and cognitive impairments later in life. Patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and a history of atypical febrile seizures often carry a cortical malformation. This association has led to the hypothesis that the presence of a cortical dysplasia exacerbates febrile seizures in infancy, in turn increasing the risk for neurological sequelae. The mechanisms linking these events are currently poorly understood. Potassium-chloride cotransporter KCC2 affects several aspects of neuronal circuit development and function, by modulating GABAergic transmission and excitatory synapse formation. Recent data suggest that KCC2 downregulation contributes to seizure generation in the epileptic adult brain, but its role in the developing brain is still controversial. In a rodent model of atypical febrile seizures, combining a cortical dysplasia and hyperthermia-induced seizures (LHS rats), we found a premature and sustained increase in KCC2 protein levels, accompanied by a negative shift of the reversal potential of GABA. In parallel, we observed a significant reduction in dendritic spine size and mEPSC amplitude in CA1 pyramidal neurons, accompanied by spatial memory deficits. To investigate whether KCC2 premature overexpression plays a role in seizure susceptibility and synaptic alterations, we reduced KCC2 expression selectively in hippocampal pyramidal neurons by in utero electroporation of shRNA. Remarkably, KCC2 shRNA-electroporated LHS rats show reduced hyperthermia-induced seizure susceptibility, while dendritic spine size deficits were rescued. Our findings demonstrate that KCC2 overexpression in a compromised developing brain increases febrile seizure susceptibility and contribute to dendritic spine alterations. PMID:26875662

  4. Psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES).

    PubMed

    Hingray, C; Biberon, J; El-Hage, W; de Toffol, B

    2016-01-01

    Psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) are defined as change in behavior or consciousness resembling epileptic seizures but which have a psychological origin. PNES are categorized as a manifestation of dissociative or somatoform (conversion) disorders. Video-EEG recording of an event is the gold standard for diagnosis. PNES represent a symptom, not the underlying disease and the mechanism of dissociation is pivotal in the pathophysiology. Predisposing, precipitating and perpetuating factors should be carefully assessed on a case-by-case basis. The process of communicating the diagnosis using a multidisciplinary approach is an important and effective therapeutic step. PMID:27117433

  5. Seizures due to high dose camphor ingestion.

    PubMed

    Tekin, Hande Gazeteci; Gökben, Sarenur; Serdaroğlu, Gül

    2015-12-01

    Camphor is a cyclic ketone of the hydro aromatic terpene group. Today it is frequently used as a prescription or non-prescription topical antitussive, analgesic, anesthetic and antipruritic agent. Camphor which is considered an innocent drug by parents and physicians is a common household item which can lead to severe poisoning in children even when taken in small amounts. Neurotoxicity in the form of seizures can ocur soon after ingestion. A two-year old female patient who presented with a complaint of generalized tonic-clonic seizures after oral ingestion of camphor is presented. PMID:26884696

  6. Emergence of semiology in epileptic seizures.

    PubMed

    Chauvel, Patrick; McGonigal, Aileen

    2014-09-01

    Semiology, the manifestation of epilepsy, is dependent upon electrical activity produced by epileptic seizures that are organized within existing neural pathways. Clinical signs evolve as the epileptic discharge spreads in both time and space. Studying the relation between these, of which the temporal component is at least as important as the spatial one, is possible using anatomo-electro-clinical correlations of stereoelectroencephalography (SEEG) data. The period of semiology production occurs with variable time lag after seizure onset and signs then emerge more or less rapidly depending on seizure type (temporal seizures generally propagating more slowly and frontal seizures more quickly). The subset of structures involved in semiological production, the "early spread network", is tightly linked to those constituting the epileptogenic zone. The level of complexity of semiological features varies according to the degree of involvement of the primary or associative cortex, with the former having a direct relation to peripheral sensory and motor systems with production of hallucinations (visual and auditory) or elementary sensorimotor signs. Depending on propagation pattern, these signs can occur in a "march" fashion as described by Jackson. On the other hand, seizures involving the associative cortex, having a less direct relation with the peripheral nervous system, and necessarily involving more widely distributed networks manifest with altered cognitive and/or behavioral signs whose neural substrate involves a network of cortical structures, as has been observed for normal cognitive processes. Other than the anatomical localization of these structures, the frequency of the discharge is a crucial determinant of semiological effect since a fast (gamma) discharge will tend to deactivate normal function, whereas a slower theta discharge can mimic physiological function. In terms of interaction between structures, the degree of synchronization plays a key role in

  7. Epileptiform seizures in captive African vultures.

    PubMed

    Mundy, P J; Foggin, C M

    1981-04-01

    African vultures are held in captivity at Salisbury, Johannesburg, and Durban, and in each place a number of birds showed epileptiform seizures. Of 17 griffon vultures (Gyps africanus and G. coprotheres) in Salisbury, three recovered and 11 died after one or more seizures. Of eight vultures of three other species, one Lappetfaced Vulture (Torgos tracheliotus) recovered and one Whiteheaded Vulture (Trigonoceps occipitalis) died. A variety of diagnostic tests, in particular levels of serum calcium and blood glucose, and histological examination of brains, has so far failed to reveal a cause. PMID:7241712

  8. Seizures due to high dose camphor ingestion

    PubMed Central

    Tekin, Hande Gazeteci; Gökben, Sarenur; Serdaroğlu, Gül

    2015-01-01

    Camphor is a cyclic ketone of the hydro aromatic terpene group. Today it is frequently used as a prescription or non-prescription topical antitussive, analgesic, anesthetic and antipruritic agent. Camphor which is considered an innocent drug by parents and physicians is a common household item which can lead to severe poisoning in children even when taken in small amounts. Neurotoxicity in the form of seizures can ocur soon after ingestion. A two-year old female patient who presented with a complaint of generalized tonic-clonic seizures after oral ingestion of camphor is presented. PMID:26884696

  9. [Adrenaline potentiates antiepileptic but not sedative action of diazepam in rats].

    PubMed

    Serdiuk, S E; Gmiro, V E

    2012-02-01

    Intramuscular (i.m.) administration ofdiazepam in a dose of 10 mg/kg and adrenaline in a dose of 0.2 mg/kg prevents generalized clonic-tonic pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) seizures in 75-80 % of rats, but only in 35-40 % of rats it prevents local clonic PTZ seizures. In the above mentioned dose, diazepam causes a strong sedation, but adrenaline does not cause a sedative effects. The combined administration of diazepam and adrenaline in threshold independently ineffective doses prevents both clonic-tonic and clonic PTZ seizures in 80 % of rats without a sedation development. The basis for mechanism of potentiation of anticonvulsant action of diazepam is the stimulation of gastric mucosa afferents by adrenaline. PMID:22650067

  10. Canine and feline epileptic seizures and the lunar cycle: 2,507 seizures (2000-2008).

    PubMed

    Browand-Stainback, Laura; Levesque, Donald; McBee, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    Epileptic seizures in 211 canine and feline patients diagnosed with idiopathic epilepsy were evaluated for temporal significance in relation to the lunar cycle. Seizure counts were compared among each of the eight individual lunar phases, among each of eight exact lunar phase dates, and by percent of lunar illumination using generalized estimating equations. No statistical significance was found in any of these comparisons excluding a relationship between the onset of epileptic seizures and the phases of the moon. Alteration in anticonvulsant treatment or monitoring of canine and feline patients with idiopathic epilepsy at large was not warranted based on the lunar cycle.

  11. Childhood Absence Epilepsy: Poor Attention Is More Than Seizures

    MedlinePlus

    ... Spencer, MD Steven Karceski, MD Childhood absence epilepsy Poor attention is more than seizures Liu Lin Thio, ... of this article is prohibited. Childhood absence epilepsy: Poor attention is more than seizures Liu Lin Thio ...

  12. The Effects of Sub-Chronic Treatment with Aripiprazole on Pentylenetetrazole- and Electroshock-Induced Seizures in Mice: The Role of Nitric Oxide.

    PubMed

    Moezi, Leila; Hosseini, Mahsa; Oveisi, Simin; Niknahad, Hossein; Shafaroodi, Hamed

    2015-01-01

    Almost all antipsychotics have been associated with a risk of epileptic seizure provocation. Aripiprazole is a novel atypical antipsychotic. The risk of seizures with aripiprazole is reported to be the lowest among atypical agents. In this study, we investigated the effect of aripiprazole on seizure of mice in sub-chronic treatments. We also examined the interaction of nitric oxide (NO) with aripiprazole in seizure experiments. Mice received aripiprazole for 6 days and then on the 7th day aripiprazole was injected 60 min before intraperitoneal pentylenetetrazole or electroshock. L-NAME (non-selective NO synthase (NOS) inhibitor), 7-nitroindazole (neuronal NOS selective inhibitor), aminoguanidine (inducible NOS selective inhibitors) or L-arginine (NO donor), all were injected 5 min before aripiprazole in separate groups. The results of both seizure models demonstrated anti-epileptic properties of aripiprazole in sub-chronic administrations. Co-administration of aripiprazole and selective and non-selective NOS inhibitors prevented the anticonvulsant effect of aripiprazole. While L-arginine and aripiprazole co-administration increased the clonic seizure threshold and protection against tonic seizure and death, these effects were not significant. The current results indicated that aripiprazole has anticonvulsant effects probably through the release of NO.

  13. A knock-in model of human epilepsy in Drosophila reveals a novel cellular mechanism associated with heat-induced seizure

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Lei; Gilligan, Jeff; Staber, Cynthia; Schutte, Ryan J.; Nguyen, Vivian; O'Dowd, Diane K.; Reenan, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Over 40 missense mutations in the human SCN1A sodium channel gene are linked to an epilepsy syndrome termed genetic epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+). Inheritance of GEFS+ is dominant but the underlying cellular mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here we report knock-in of a GEFS+ SCN1A mutation (K1270T) into the Drosophila sodium channel gene, para, causes a semi-dominant temperature-induced seizure phenotype. Electrophysiological studies of GABAergic interneurons in the brains of adult GEFS+ flies reveal a novel cellular mechanism underlying heat-induced seizures: the deactivation threshold for persistent sodium currents reversibly shifts to a more negative voltage when the temperature is elevated. This leads to sustained depolarizations in GABAergic neurons and reduced inhibitory activity in the central nervous system. Further, our data indicate a natural temperature-dependent shift in sodium current deactivation (exacerbated by mutation) may contribute to febrile seizures in GEFS+ and perhaps normal individuals. PMID:23055484

  14. Levetiracetam prophylaxis ameliorates seizure epileptogenesis after fluid percussion injury.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuan-Hao; Huang, Eagle Yi-Kung; Kuo, Tung-Tai; Hoffer, Barry J; Wu, Pei-Jie; Ma, Hsin-I; Tsai, Jing-Jr; Chou, Yu-Ching; Chiang, Yung-Hsiao

    2016-07-01

    To determine whether post-traumatic seizure severity would be affected by the interval between seizures and head injury, we measured seizures after various times with or without fluid percussion brain injury (2atm fluid percussion injury; FPI). To determine efficacy of anti-seizure medication, we also determined if levetiracetam (LEV) would alter the relationship between injury and subsequent seizures. Early post-traumatic seizures were induced by Kainic acid (KA) at one week after 2atm fluid percussion injury (FPI) in one group (FPI-ES). Seizures were induced at two weeks after FPI by KA in another group (FPI-LS). In addition, one group had induced seizures by KA without FPI, (sham-ES). Finally one group of animals received the antiepileptic agent (levetiracetam) infusion for one week after FPI and then had seizures induced by KA (FPI-LEV-ES). We measured seizure onset time, ictal duration and severity of seizures using a modified Racine's scale. Histopathological changes in the hippocampus CA1 region were also analyzed. Severity of seizures were increased in the FPI-ES group compared with sham-ES animals. Severity was also enhanced in early post-injury seizures induced by KA (FPI-ES vs. FPI-LS); this exacerbation of seizure severity could be ameliorated by levetiracetam infusion (FPI-ES vs. FPI-LEV-ES). Neuronal degeneration in CA1 was more severe in the FPI-ES group and this degeneration was also diminished by LEV. We conclude that early post injury seizures exacerbate susceptibility and severity of post traumatic seizures and increase neuronal degeneration in the CA1 layer of hippocampus. These changes are partially reversed by LEV infusion after FPI. PMID:27106270

  15. Lunar phases and seizure occurrence: just an ancient legend?

    PubMed

    Polychronopoulos, P; Argyriou, A A; Sirrou, V; Huliara, V; Aplada, M; Gourzis, P; Economou, A; Terzis, E; Chroni, E

    2006-05-01

    The authors retrospectively reviewed all neurologic records of an emergency unit from 1999 to 2003 to identify a potential association between lunar phases and seizure occurrence. Overall 859 patients admitted for seizure occurrence were divided into the four quarters of the synodic month according to moon phases. A significant clustering of seizures around the full moon period was observed, supporting the ancient belief of periodic increased seizure frequency during full-moon days.

  16. Quadriplegia Following Epileptic Seizure : Things to Keep in Mind

    PubMed Central

    Yeşilbudak, Zülal; Şişman, Lokman; Uca, Ali Ulvi

    2016-01-01

    People with epilepsy are believed to be at a higher risk of incurring accidental injury than people who do not have seizures. The incidence of injury, either due to seizure or accident as a consequent of seizure is also high and varies from 0.03% to 3%. The most common injuries are head contusions, lacerations, burns and fractures. In this article, we present a case of quadriplegia after a generalized epileptic seizure. PMID:27226869

  17. Quadriplegia Following Epileptic Seizure : Things to Keep in Mind.

    PubMed

    Kozak, Hasan Hüseyin; Yeşilbudak, Zülal; Şişman, Lokman; Uca, Ali Ulvi

    2016-05-01

    People with epilepsy are believed to be at a higher risk of incurring accidental injury than people who do not have seizures. The incidence of injury, either due to seizure or accident as a consequent of seizure is also high and varies from 0.03% to 3%. The most common injuries are head contusions, lacerations, burns and fractures. In this article, we present a case of quadriplegia after a generalized epileptic seizure. PMID:27226869

  18. Modification of seizure disorders: the interruption of behavioral chains.

    PubMed

    Zlutnick, S; Mayville, W J; Moffat, S

    1975-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of interruption and differential reinforcement on seizures in children. Seizures were conceptualized as the terminal link in a behavioral chain, resulting in a strategy aimed at identifying and modifying behaviors that reliably preceded the seizure climax. Seizure frequency was reduced in four of five subjects, whereas the frequency of preseizure behavior was reduced in only three subjects. Parents and school personnel were successfully used as change agents.

  19. Bayesian Threshold Estimation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gustafson, S. C.; Costello, C. S.; Like, E. C.; Pierce, S. J.; Shenoy, K. N.

    2009-01-01

    Bayesian estimation of a threshold time (hereafter simply threshold) for the receipt of impulse signals is accomplished given the following: 1) data, consisting of the number of impulses received in a time interval from zero to one and the time of the largest time impulse; 2) a model, consisting of a uniform probability density of impulse time…

  20. Pausing at the Threshold

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Patrick K.

    2015-01-01

    Since about 2003, the notion of threshold concepts--the central ideas in any field that change how learners think about other ideas--have become difficult to escape at library conferences and in general information literacy discourse. Their visibility will likely only increase because threshold concepts figure prominently in the Framework for…

  1. Threshold Concepts in Economics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shanahan, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine threshold concepts in the context of teaching and learning first-year university economics. It outlines some of the arguments for using threshold concepts and provides examples using opportunity cost as an exemplar in economics. Design/ Methodology/Approach: The paper provides an overview of the…

  2. Out-of-body experiences associated with seizures.

    PubMed

    Greyson, Bruce; Fountain, Nathan B; Derr, Lori L; Broshek, Donna K

    2014-01-01

    Alterations of consciousness are critical factors in the diagnosis of epileptic seizures. With these alterations in consciousness, some persons report sensations of separating from the physical body, experiences that may in rare cases resemble spontaneous out-of-body experiences. This study was designed to identify and characterize these out-of-body-like subjective experiences associated with seizure activity. Fifty-five percent of the patients in this study recalled some subjective experience in association with their seizures. Among our sample of 100 patients, 7 reported out-of-body experiences associated with their seizures. We found no differentiating traits that were associated with patients' reports of out-of-body experiences, in terms of either demographics; medical history, including age of onset and duration of seizure disorder, and seizure frequency; seizure characteristics, including localization, lateralization, etiology, and type of seizure, and epilepsy syndrome; or ability to recall any subjective experiences associated with their seizures. Reporting out-of-body experiences in association with seizures did not affect epilepsy-related quality of life. It should be noted that even in those patients who report out-of-body experiences, such sensations are extremely rare events that do not occur routinely with their seizures. Most patients who reported out-of-body experiences described one or two experiences that occurred an indeterminate number of years ago, which precludes the possibility of associating the experience with the particular characteristics of that one seizure or with medications taken or other conditions at the time.

  3. Reflex Myoclonic Epilepsy of Infancy: Seizures Induced by Tactile Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Turco, Emanuela Claudia; Pavlidis, Elena; Facini, Carlotta; Spagnoli, Carlotta; Andreolli, Anna; Geraci, Rosalia; Pisani, Francesco

    2016-06-01

    Myoclonic epilepsy with reflex seizures in infancy is an extremely rare condition, in which seizures are provoked mainly by auditory or auditory-tactile stimuli. To increase the awareness of pediatricians regarding this underrecognized condition, we describe a child with seizures provoked only by the tactile stimulation of specific areas of the head and face.

  4. 19 CFR 162.21 - Responsibility and authority for seizures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Responsibility and authority for seizures. 162.21 Section 162.21 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INSPECTION, SEARCH, AND SEIZURE Seizures § 162.21 Responsibility...

  5. Out-of-body experiences associated with seizures

    PubMed Central

    Greyson, Bruce; Fountain, Nathan B.; Derr, Lori L.; Broshek, Donna K.

    2014-01-01

    Alterations of consciousness are critical factors in the diagnosis of epileptic seizures. With these alterations in consciousness, some persons report sensations of separating from the physical body, experiences that may in rare cases resemble spontaneous out-of-body experiences. This study was designed to identify and characterize these out-of-body-like subjective experiences associated with seizure activity. Fifty-five percent of the patients in this study recalled some subjective experience in association with their seizures. Among our sample of 100 patients, 7 reported out-of-body experiences associated with their seizures. We found no differentiating traits that were associated with patients' reports of out-of-body experiences, in terms of either demographics; medical history, including age of onset and duration of seizure disorder, and seizure frequency; seizure characteristics, including localization, lateralization, etiology, and type of seizure, and epilepsy syndrome; or ability to recall any subjective experiences associated with their seizures. Reporting out-of-body experiences in association with seizures did not affect epilepsy-related quality of life. It should be noted that even in those patients who report out-of-body experiences, such sensations are extremely rare events that do not occur routinely with their seizures. Most patients who reported out-of-body experiences described one or two experiences that occurred an indeterminate number of years ago, which precludes the possibility of associating the experience with the particular characteristics of that one seizure or with medications taken or other conditions at the time. PMID:24592228

  6. 8 CFR 1280.21 - Seizure of aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Seizure of aircraft. 1280.21 Section 1280... REGULATIONS IMPOSITION AND COLLECTION OF FINES § 1280.21 Seizure of aircraft. Link to an amendment published at 76 FR 74630, December 1, 2011. Seizure of an aircraft under the authority of section 239 of...

  7. 8 CFR 1280.21 - Seizure of aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Seizure of aircraft. 1280.21 Section 1280... REGULATIONS IMPOSITION AND COLLECTION OF FINES § 1280.21 Seizure of aircraft. Seizure of an aircraft under the authority of section 239 of the Act and § 1280.2 will not be made if such aircraft is damaged to an...

  8. 8 CFR 1280.21 - Seizure of aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Seizure of aircraft. 1280.21 Section 1280... REGULATIONS IMPOSITION AND COLLECTION OF FINES § 1280.21 Seizure of aircraft. Seizure of an aircraft under the authority of section 239 of the Act and § 1280.2 will not be made if such aircraft is damaged to an...

  9. Levetiracetam for Pediatric Posttraumatic Seizure Prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Nita, Dragos A; Hahn, Cecil D

    2016-03-01

    Investigators from Nationwide Children's Hospital performed an observational cohort study of early post-traumatic seizures (EPTS) among 34 children with moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) who received levetiracetam (LEV) prophylaxis following admission to their pediatric intensive care unit. PMID:27396956

  10. Hemorrhagic Retinopathy Following Spondylosis Surgery and Seizure

    PubMed Central

    Valeshabad, Ali Kord; Francis, Andrew W.; Setlur, Vikram; Chang, Peter; Mieler, William F.; Shahidi, Mahnaz

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To report bilateral hemorrhagic retinopathy in an adult female following lumbar spinal surgery and seizure. Case Report A 38 year old female presented with bilateral blurry vision and spots in the visual field. The patient had lumbar spondylosis surgery which was complicated by a dural tear with persistent cerebrospinal fluid leak. Visual symptoms started immediately following witnessed seizure-like activity. At presentation, visual acuity was 20/100 and 20/25 in the right and left eye, respectively. Dilated fundus examination demonstrated bilateral hemorrhagic retinopathy with subhyaloid, intraretinal and subretinal involvement. At 4 month follow up, visual acuity improved to 20/60 and 20/20 in the right and left eye, respectively. Dilated fundus examination and fundus photography showed resolution of retinal hemorrhages in both eyes. Conclusions The first case of bilateral hemorrhagic retinopathy following lumbar spondylosis surgery and witnessed seizure in an adult was reported. Ophthalmic examination may be warranted following episodes of seizure in adults. PMID:26099062

  11. Neonatal seizures: soothing a burning topic.

    PubMed

    Thornton, Matthew D; Chen, Lei; Langhan, Melissa L

    2013-10-01

    Neonatal seizures are a potentially life-threatening pediatric problem with a variety of causes, such as birth trauma, asphyxia, congenital anomalies, metabolic disturbances, infections, and drug withdrawal or intoxication. Thorough and timely evaluations of such patients are necessary to identify and treat the underlying etiology, therefore reducing potential morbidity and mortality. We review neonatal seizures and hypocalcemia and present the case of a 6-day-old male infant who presented to a tertiary pediatric emergency department with seizure-like episodes. He was found to have markedly low serum calcium, magnesium, and parathyroid hormone concentrations, as well as a significantly elevated serum phosphate concentration. The etiology of these abnormalities was found to be maternal ingestion of extremely high doses of calcium carbonate during the third trimester of her pregnancy, an occurrence that has been reported only once in the literature. Education pertaining to the dangers of excessive calcium carbonate intake during pregnancy may be an important piece of anticipatory guidance for pregnant mothers with symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux, and questioning the mother of a neonate presenting with seizures about such over-the-counter medications may help to elucidate the diagnosis.

  12. [Classification of epileptic seizures and syndromes].

    PubMed

    Noachtar, S; Rémi, J

    2012-02-01

    Advances in diagnostic and therapeutic options require a revision of the current classification of seizures and epilepsies. Recently, a classification proposal was introduced which reflects the ambivalence of the Internationalen Liga gegen Epilepsie (ILAE). We suggest that epileptology should utilize the same established systematic approach used in clinical neurology.

  13. Cardiac arrhythmias during or after epileptic seizures

    PubMed Central

    van der Lende, Marije; Surges, Rainer; Sander, Josemir W; Thijs, Roland D

    2016-01-01

    Seizure-related cardiac arrhythmias are frequently reported and have been implicated as potential pathomechanisms of Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy (SUDEP). We attempted to identify clinical profiles associated with various (post)ictal cardiac arrhythmias. We conducted a systematic search from the first date available to July 2013 on the combination of two terms: ‘cardiac arrhythmias’ and ‘epilepsy’. The databases searched were PubMed, Embase (OVID version), Web of Science and COCHRANE Library. We attempted to identify all case reports and case series. We identified seven distinct patterns of (post)ictal cardiac arrhythmias: ictal asystole (103 cases), postictal asystole (13 cases), ictal bradycardia (25 cases), ictal atrioventricular (AV)-conduction block (11 cases), postictal AV-conduction block (2 cases), (post)ictal atrial flutter/atrial fibrillation (14 cases) and postictal ventricular fibrillation (3 cases). Ictal asystole had a mean prevalence of 0.318% (95% CI 0.316% to 0.320%) in people with refractory epilepsy who underwent video-EEG monitoring. Ictal asystole, bradycardia and AV-conduction block were self-limiting in all but one of the cases and seen during focal dyscognitive seizures. Seizure onset was mostly temporal (91%) without consistent lateralisation. Postictal arrhythmias were mostly found following convulsive seizures and often associated with (near) SUDEP. The contrasting clinical profiles of ictal and postictal arrhythmias suggest different pathomechanisms. Postictal rather than ictal arrhythmias seem of greater importance to the pathophysiology of SUDEP. PMID:26038597

  14. Cardiac arrhythmias during or after epileptic seizures.

    PubMed

    van der Lende, Marije; Surges, Rainer; Sander, Josemir W; Thijs, Roland D

    2016-01-01

    Seizure-related cardiac arrhythmias are frequently reported and have been implicated as potential pathomechanisms of Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy (SUDEP). We attempted to identify clinical profiles associated with various (post)ictal cardiac arrhythmias. We conducted a systematic search from the first date available to July 2013 on the combination of two terms: 'cardiac arrhythmias' and 'epilepsy'. The databases searched were PubMed, Embase (OVID version), Web of Science and COCHRANE Library. We attempted to identify all case reports and case series. We identified seven distinct patterns of (post)ictal cardiac arrhythmias: ictal asystole (103 cases), postictal asystole (13 cases), ictal bradycardia (25 cases), ictal atrioventricular (AV)-conduction block (11 cases), postictal AV-conduction block (2 cases), (post)ictal atrial flutter/atrial fibrillation (14 cases) and postictal ventricular fibrillation (3 cases). Ictal asystole had a mean prevalence of 0.318% (95% CI 0.316% to 0.320%) in people with refractory epilepsy who underwent video-EEG monitoring. Ictal asystole, bradycardia and AV-conduction block were self-limiting in all but one of the cases and seen during focal dyscognitive seizures. Seizure onset was mostly temporal (91%) without consistent lateralisation. Postictal arrhythmias were mostly found following convulsive seizures and often associated with (near) SUDEP. The contrasting clinical profiles of ictal and postictal arrhythmias suggest different pathomechanisms. Postictal rather than ictal arrhythmias seem of greater importance to the pathophysiology of SUDEP.

  15. Targeting Pannexin1 Improves Seizure Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Santiago, Marcelo F.; Veliskova, Jana; Patel, Naman K.; Lutz, Sarah E.; Caille, Dorothee; Charollais, Anne; Meda, Paolo; Scemes, Eliana

    2011-01-01

    Imbalance of the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate and of the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA is one of several causes of seizures. ATP has also been implicated in epilepsy. However, little is known about the mechanisms involved in the release of ATP from cells and the consequences of the altered ATP signaling during seizures. Pannexin1 (Panx1) is found in astrocytes and in neurons at high levels in the embryonic and young postnatal brain, declining in adulthood. Panx1 forms large-conductance voltage sensitive plasma membrane channels permeable to ATP that are also activated by elevated extracellular K+ and following P2 receptor stimulation. Based on these properties, we hypothesized that Panx1 channels may contribute to seizures by increasing the levels of extracellular ATP. Using pharmacological tools and two transgenic mice deficient for Panx1 we show here that interference with Panx1 ameliorates the outcome and shortens the duration of kainic acid-induced status epilepticus. These data thus indicate that the activation of Panx1 in juvenile mouse hippocampi contributes to neuronal hyperactivity in seizures. PMID:21949881

  16. Effect of sleep-wake reversal and sleep deprivation on the circadian rhythm of oxygen toxicity seizure susceptibility.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dexter, J. D.; Hof, D. G.; Mengel, C. E.

    1972-01-01

    Albino Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed in a previously O2 flushed, CO2 free chamber. The exposure began with attainment of 60 psi (gauge) and the end point was the first generalized oxygen toxicity seizure. Animals were exposed to reversal diurnal conditions since weanlings until their sleep-wake cycles had completely reversed, and then divided into four groups of 20 based on the time of day exposed. The time of exposure to oxygen at high pressure prior to seizure was now significantly longer in the group exposed from 1900 to 2000 hr and a reversal of the circadian rhythm of oxygen toxicity seizure susceptibility was noted. Animals maintained on normal diurnal conditions were deprived of sleep on the day of exposure for the 12 hours prior to exposure at 1900 hr, while controls were allowed to sleep. There was no significant differences in the time prior to seizure between the deprived animals and the controls with an n = 40. Thus the inherent threshold in susceptibility to high-pressure oxygen seizures seems not to be a function of sleep itself, but of some biochemical/physiologic event which manifests a circadian rhythm.

  17. Effects of chronic inhalation of volatile solvents, malnutrition and their interaction on seizures induced by pentylenetetrazole in rats.

    PubMed

    Palencia, G; Calvillo, M; Benita, A; Sotelo, J

    1998-10-01

    Chronic inhalation of volatile solvents induce severe brain damage. In humans, intense exposure to volatile solvents for recreational purposes is frequently associated with chronic malnutrition. We studied in rats the effects of chronic inhalation of volatile solvents and malnutrition, alone and combined, on the seizures induced by pentylenetetrazole. Animals were subjected to 14 months of either normal rodent diet or malnutrition induced by a diet based on corn derivatives; some animals were subjected for the last 4 months to daily inhalation of volatile solvents (paint thinner). Afterwards, a trial of pentylenetetrazole-induced seizures was conducted in all animals. When compared with controls, malnutrition, chronic inhalation of volatile solvents and their combination greatly reduced the threshold for both, the forebrain and the brain stem components of seizures. However, an expected lowering of the threshold when malnutrition and solvent inhalation were combined was not observed when compared with each condition alone. It is possible that malnutrition plus solvents exposure induce severe brain damage that interferes with the brain structures involved in the propagation of epileptic seizures. PMID:26735120

  18. Levetiracetam seizure prophylaxis in craniotomy patients at high risk for postoperative seizures

    PubMed Central

    Gokhale, Sankalp; Khan, Shariq Ali; Agrawal, Abhishek; Friedman, Allan H.; McDonagh, David L.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The risk of developing immediate postoperative seizures in patients undergoing supratentorial brain tumor surgery without anti-epileptic drug (AED) prophylaxis is 15-20%. Patients who present with pre-operative seizures and patients with supratentorial meningioma or supratentorial low grade gliomas are at significantly higher risk. There is little data on the efficacy of levetiracetam as a prophylactic AED in the immediate postoperative period (within 7 days of surgery) in these patients. Methods: We conducted a retrospective chart review of 165 adult patients classified as higher risk for postoperative seizures who underwent brain tumor resection at Duke University Hospital between time May 2010 and December 2011. All patients had received levetiracetam monotherapy in doses of 1000-3000 mg/day in the immediate postoperative period. Results: We identified 165 patients with following tumor locations: Frontal 83 (50.3%), Temporal 37 (22.4%), Parietal 30 (18.2%), Occipital 2 (1.2%) and 13 (7.8%) with single lesions involving more than one lobe. Histology revealed: Glioma 98 (59.4%), Meningioma 57 (34.5%) and Brain Metastases 6 (3.6%). Preoperatively, 88/165 (53.3%) patients had presented with seizures. 12/165 patients (7.3%) developed clinical seizures (generalized 10, partial 2) in the immediate post-operative period. Other than somnolence in 7 patients (4.2%), no major side-effects were noted. Conclusions: The incidence of seizures was significantly lower in patients treated with levetiracetam (7.3%) when compared with the expected (15-20%) rate without AED prophylaxis based on the previous literature. Levetiracetam appears effective and safe for seizure prevention in patients undergoing brain tumor resection and who are at significantly higher risk of developing post-operative seizures. These findings warrant confirmation in a prospective randomized trial. PMID:24550999

  19. Febrile seizures associated with influenza A.

    PubMed

    Hara, Keita; Tanabe, Takuya; Aomatsu, Tomoki; Inoue, Nao; Tamaki, Hirohumi; Okamoto, Nami; Okasora, Keisuke; Morimoto, Takahiro; Tamai, Hiroshi

    2007-01-01

    To clarify the clinical impact of influenza A on the development of febrile seizures (FS), consecutive FS patients brought to our hospital between October 2003 and September 2004 were prospectively surveyed. Patients infected with influenza A (influenza A patients) and those uninfected with influenza (non-influenza patients) were compared with regard to clinical characteristics of FS. Influenza infection was determined by rapid antigen test and/or serologically. Associations of influenza A with atypical findings of FS, including partial seizures, prolonged seizures, multiple seizures during the same illness, and 30-min or longer prolonged postictal impairment of consciousness (PPIC), were analyzed by multiple logistic regression. A total of 215 patients (47 influenza A and 168 non-influenza patients) were enrolled in the study. Age was significantly higher in the influenza A group (39.85+/-22.16 months vs. 27.51+/-17.14 months, P<0.001). Of 42 patients aged 48 months or older, which corresponded to the 80th percentile for age, 15 (35.7%) were influenza A patients, with a significantly higher incidence of such patients than in the subgroup of patients aged 47 months or younger (32/173, 18.5%) (P=0.015). On multiple logistic regression analysis, influenza A was independently associated with PPIC (odds ratio: 4.44, 95% confidence interval: 1.52-12.95, P=0.006), but not with other atypical findings. The positive association of influenza A with PPIC suggests that influenza may affect state of consciousness at the same time that it induces seizures with fever.

  20. Interictal spikes and epileptic seizures: their relationship and underlying rhythmicity.

    PubMed

    Karoly, Philippa J; Freestone, Dean R; Boston, Ray; Grayden, David B; Himes, David; Leyde, Kent; Seneviratne, Udaya; Berkovic, Samuel; O'Brien, Terence; Cook, Mark J

    2016-04-01

    We report on a quantitative analysis of electrocorticography data from a study that acquired continuous ambulatory recordings in humans over extended periods of time. The objectives were to examine patterns of seizures and spontaneous interictal spikes, their relationship to each other, and the nature of periodic variation. The recorded data were originally acquired for the purpose of seizure prediction, and were subsequently analysed in further detail. A detection algorithm identified potential seizure activity and a template matched filter was used to locate spikes. Seizure events were confirmed manually and classified as either clinically correlated, electroencephalographically identical but not clinically correlated, or subclinical. We found that spike rate was significantly altered prior to seizure in 9 out of 15 subjects. Increased pre-ictal spike rate was linked to improved predictability; however, spike rate was also shown to decrease before seizure (in 6 out of the 9 subjects). The probability distribution of spikes and seizures were notably similar, i.e. at times of high seizure likelihood the probability of epileptic spiking also increased. Both spikes and seizures showed clear evidence of circadian regulation and, for some subjects, there were also longer term patterns visible over weeks to months. Patterns of spike and seizure occurrence were highly subject-specific. The pre-ictal decrease in spike rate is not consistent with spikes promoting seizures. However, the fact that spikes and seizures demonstrate similar probability distributions suggests they are not wholly independent processes. It is possible spikes actively inhibit seizures, or that a decreased spike rate is a secondary symptom of the brain approaching seizure. If spike rate is modulated by common regulatory factors as seizures then spikes may be useful biomarkers of cortical excitability. PMID:26912639

  1. The perils of thresholding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Font-Clos, Francesc; Pruessner, Gunnar; Moloney, Nicholas R.; Deluca, Anna

    2015-04-01

    The thresholding of time series of activity or intensity is frequently used to define and differentiate events. This is either implicit, for example due to resolution limits, or explicit, in order to filter certain small scale physics from the supposed true asymptotic events. Thresholding the birth-death process, however, introduces a scaling region into the event size distribution, which is characterized by an exponent that is unrelated to the actual asymptote and is rather an artefact of thresholding. As a result, numerical fits of simulation data produce a range of exponents, with the true asymptote visible only in the tail of the distribution. This tail is increasingly difficult to sample as the threshold is increased. In the present case, the exponents and the spurious nature of the scaling region can be determined analytically, thus demonstrating the way in which thresholding conceals the true asymptote. The analysis also suggests a procedure for detecting the influence of the threshold by means of a data collapse involving the threshold-imposed scale.

  2. Reflex Seizures Triggered by Diaper Change in Dravet Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Subki, Ahmed H; Alasmari, Aishah S; Jan, Fadi M; Moria, Feras A; Jan, Mohammed M

    2016-07-01

    Dravet syndrome (DS) is a severe epilepsy syndrome characterized by early onset of multiple types of seizures. We report the first case of reflex seizures triggered by diaper change in a girl at 9 months old and 2 years old with a mutation in the SCN1A gene causing DS. Reflex seizures have been reported in patients with DS provoked by increased body temperature or visual stimulation. The case we report widens the spectrum of triggers causing reflex seizures in children with DS. Cortical hyperexcitability resulting from the genetic defect explains the tendency to experience such reflex seizures.

  3. How I treat a first single seizure in a child

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Sheffali; Kaushik, Jaya Shankar

    2016-01-01

    An epileptic seizure is defined as transient occurrence of signs and/or symptoms due to abnormal excessive or synchronous neuronal activity in brain. There are diverse etiologies for acute seizure in infants and children. The present review provides a broad approach to diagnosis and treatment plan for acute seizure in children. The approach to a child with acute seizure is discussed with special emphasis on clinical approach based on history and focused examination with judicious choice of investigation and further management plan. The review also emphasizes on recognizing common nonepileptic events that masquerade as true seizure among infants and children. PMID:27011625

  4. Double Photoionization Near Threshold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wehlitz, Ralf

    2007-01-01

    The threshold region of the double-photoionization cross section is of particular interest because both ejected electrons move slowly in the Coulomb field of the residual ion. Near threshold both electrons have time to interact with each other and with the residual ion. Also, different theoretical models compete to describe the double-photoionization cross section in the threshold region. We have investigated that cross section for lithium and beryllium and have analyzed our data with respect to the latest results in the Coulomb-dipole theory. We find that our data support the idea of a Coulomb-dipole interaction.

  5. Predictability of uncontrollable multifocal seizures – towards new treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Lehnertz, Klaus; Dickten, Henning; Porz, Stephan; Helmstaedter, Christoph; Elger, Christian E.

    2016-01-01

    Drug-resistant, multifocal, non-resectable epilepsies are among the most difficult epileptic disorders to manage. An approach to control previously uncontrollable seizures in epilepsy patients would consist of identifying seizure precursors in critical brain areas combined with delivering a counteracting influence to prevent seizure generation. Predictability of seizures with acceptable levels of sensitivity and specificity, even in an ambulatory setting, has been repeatedly shown, however, in patients with a single seizure focus only. We did a study to assess feasibility of state-of-the-art, electroencephalogram-based seizure-prediction techniques in patients with uncontrollable multifocal seizures. We obtained significant predictive information about upcoming seizures in more than two thirds of patients. Unexpectedly, the emergence of seizure precursors was confined to non-affected brain areas. Our findings clearly indicate that epileptic networks, spanning lobes and hemispheres, underlie generation of seizures. Our proof-of-concept study is an important milestone towards new therapeutic strategies based on seizure-prediction techniques for clinical practice. PMID:27091239

  6. [Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures: overview and implications for practice].

    PubMed

    Szita, Bernadett; Hidasi, Zoltán

    2016-05-15

    Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures are enigmatic disorders at the interface of neurology and psychiatry. Seizures resemble epileptic seizures but are not associated with electrical discharges in the brain. Symptoms typically start in early adulthood and women are far more affected than men. Video-EEG is widely considered to be the gold standard for diagnosis. Still psychogenic nonepileptic seizures are often misdiagnosed and treated as epilepsy for years that is burdensome to patients and costly to the healthcare system. Patients having psychogenic nonepileptic seizures show a high prevalence of traumatic life events, therefore, psychosocial factors are thought to play an important role in the etiology. Neurobiological factors may also contribute to the development of seizures as a subgroup of patients are characterized by cognitive impairment and subtle structural and functional brain abnormalities. Treatment includes psychotherapeutic procedures, particularly cognitive behavioral therapy and additional pharmacological interventions. This article presents an overview of the clinical context, diagnosis, etiology and treatment of psychogenic nonepileptic seizures. PMID:27156524

  7. [Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures: overview and implications for practice].

    PubMed

    Szita, Bernadett; Hidasi, Zoltán

    2016-05-15

    Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures are enigmatic disorders at the interface of neurology and psychiatry. Seizures resemble epileptic seizures but are not associated with electrical discharges in the brain. Symptoms typically start in early adulthood and women are far more affected than men. Video-EEG is widely considered to be the gold standard for diagnosis. Still psychogenic nonepileptic seizures are often misdiagnosed and treated as epilepsy for years that is burdensome to patients and costly to the healthcare system. Patients having psychogenic nonepileptic seizures show a high prevalence of traumatic life events, therefore, psychosocial factors are thought to play an important role in the etiology. Neurobiological factors may also contribute to the development of seizures as a subgroup of patients are characterized by cognitive impairment and subtle structural and functional brain abnormalities. Treatment includes psychotherapeutic procedures, particularly cognitive behavioral therapy and additional pharmacological interventions. This article presents an overview of the clinical context, diagnosis, etiology and treatment of psychogenic nonepileptic seizures.

  8. Metabolic Disruption in Drosophila Bang-Sensitive Seizure Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Fergestad, Tim; Bostwick, Bret; Ganetzky, Barry

    2006-01-01

    We examined a number of Drosophila mutants with increased susceptibility to seizures following mechanical or electrical stimulation to better understand the underlying factors that predispose neurons to aberrant activity. Several mutations in this class have been molecularly identified and suggest metabolic disruption as a possible source for increased seizure susceptibility. We mapped the bang-sensitive seizure mutation knockdown (kdn) to cytological position 5F3 and identified citrate synthase as the affected gene. These results further support a role for mitochondrial metabolism in controlling neuronal activity and seizure susceptibility. Biochemical analysis in bang-sensitive mutants revealed reductions in ATP levels consistent with disruption of mitochondrial energy production in these mutants. Electrophysiological analysis of mutants affecting mitochondrial proteins revealed an increased likelihood for a specific pattern of seizure activity. Our data implicate cellular metabolism in regulating seizure susceptibility and suggest that differential sensitivity of neuronal subtypes to metabolic changes underlies distinct types of seizure activity. PMID:16648587

  9. Effectiveness of ketogenic diet in pentylenetetrazol-induced and kindling rats as well as its potential mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shan; Ding, Yao; Ding, Xiao-Yan; Liu, Zhi-Rong; Shen, Chun-Hong; Jin, Bo; Guo, Yi; Wang, Shuang; Ding, Mei-Ping

    2016-02-12

    The effects and mechanisms of ketogenic diets (KD) are unclear. In this study, we aimed to reveal electrographic and behavioral thresholds in responses to the KD in pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)-induced seizures, as well as its antiepileptogenic effects on PTZ-kindling rats. Additionally, we investigated the potential link between KD and expression levels of two cation chloride co-transporters: K(+)-Cl(-) co-transporter 2 (KCC2) and Na(+)-K(+)-Cl(-) co-transporter 1 (NKCC1). The KD group had significantly higher electrographic thresholds than the control (ND) group for the first spike-and-wave, subcontinuous spike-and-wave, high amplitude spike-and-wave, and polyspikes both in the cortex and hippocampus. Compared to the ND group, the KD group had higher behavioral thresholds for behavioral absence, first jerk, first overt myoclonia, and generalized seizures. In the PTZ-kindling model, KD not only prolonged the latency of myoclonic and clonic convulsions, but shortened clonic and generalized duration. In addition, KD rats had higher KCC2 protein expression before kindling, during myoclonic jerks, and GTCS compared with ND rats. There were no significant differences in NKCC1 protein levels between both groups following the four-week dietary intervention without PTZ exposure (before kindling). Moreover, KD inhibited the upregulation of NKCC1 expression induced by kindling in myoclonic jerks and GTCS. Therefore, our findings demonstrated that KD had antiepileptic features in elevating thresholds to most electrographic and behavioral seizure patterns in PTZ-induced rats, as well as delaying the progression and alleviating the severity of seizure in PTZ-kindling model. The antiepileptogenic effects of KD may be attributed to its regulatory properties on KCC2 and NKCC1 protein expression.

  10. Effectiveness of ketogenic diet in pentylenetetrazol-induced and kindling rats as well as its potential mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shan; Ding, Yao; Ding, Xiao-Yan; Liu, Zhi-Rong; Shen, Chun-Hong; Jin, Bo; Guo, Yi; Wang, Shuang; Ding, Mei-Ping

    2016-02-12

    The effects and mechanisms of ketogenic diets (KD) are unclear. In this study, we aimed to reveal electrographic and behavioral thresholds in responses to the KD in pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)-induced seizures, as well as its antiepileptogenic effects on PTZ-kindling rats. Additionally, we investigated the potential link between KD and expression levels of two cation chloride co-transporters: K(+)-Cl(-) co-transporter 2 (KCC2) and Na(+)-K(+)-Cl(-) co-transporter 1 (NKCC1). The KD group had significantly higher electrographic thresholds than the control (ND) group for the first spike-and-wave, subcontinuous spike-and-wave, high amplitude spike-and-wave, and polyspikes both in the cortex and hippocampus. Compared to the ND group, the KD group had higher behavioral thresholds for behavioral absence, first jerk, first overt myoclonia, and generalized seizures. In the PTZ-kindling model, KD not only prolonged the latency of myoclonic and clonic convulsions, but shortened clonic and generalized duration. In addition, KD rats had higher KCC2 protein expression before kindling, during myoclonic jerks, and GTCS compared with ND rats. There were no significant differences in NKCC1 protein levels between both groups following the four-week dietary intervention without PTZ exposure (before kindling). Moreover, KD inhibited the upregulation of NKCC1 expression induced by kindling in myoclonic jerks and GTCS. Therefore, our findings demonstrated that KD had antiepileptic features in elevating thresholds to most electrographic and behavioral seizure patterns in PTZ-induced rats, as well as delaying the progression and alleviating the severity of seizure in PTZ-kindling model. The antiepileptogenic effects of KD may be attributed to its regulatory properties on KCC2 and NKCC1 protein expression. PMID:26751594

  11. Seizure Duration Determined by Subdural Electrode Recordings in Adult Patients with Intractable Focal Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Daeyoung; Cho, Jae-Wook; Lee, Jihyun; Joo, Eun Yeon; Hong, Seung Chyul; Hong, Seung Bong; Seo, Dae-Won

    2011-01-01

    Background and Purpose: To investigate the duration of seizures and its relationship to seizure type, epilepsy syndrome, and seizure clustering. Methods: We examined 1,251 seizures from 152 patients who underwent video-electrocorticographic monitoring with subdural electrodes. Their seizure duration, seizure types, epilepsy syndromes, and seizure clusters were analyzed. Results: The median seizure duration was 91.5s (4–1016s). There were 34 (2.7%) seizures lasting > 5 minutes in 20 (13.2%) patients. There was a significant difference in seizure duration according to seizure types (p < 0.0001), but not to epilepsy syndromes. There were 99 seizure clusters in 67 (44.1%) patients. The first seizure in a cluster of seizures tended to last longer than non-cluster seizures (median 98s versus 89s, p = 0.033). Seizure duration was significantly longer in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy than in neocortical lobe epilepsy (median 103s versus 87s, p = 0.041). Rate of seizure cluster was lower in mTLE (38.0%) than in NLE (47.1%), but this difference was not significant. Conclusions: Seizure durations were different among seizure types. Seizure clustering also differ between patients with mTLE and those with NLE, which suggests different seizure generation and propagation among different epileptogenic foci. This study has implications for the identification of abnormally prolonged seizures. PMID:24649447

  12. Local cerebral metabolism during partial seizures

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, J. Jr.; Kuhl, D.E.; Phelps, M.E.; Rausch, R.; Nuwer, M.

    1983-04-01

    Interictal and ictal fluorodeoxyglucose scans were obtained with positron CT from four patients with spontaneous recurrent partial seizures, one with epilepsia partialis continua, and one with a single partial seizure induced by electrical stimulation of the hippocampus. Ictal metabolic patterns were different for each patient studied. Focal and generalized increased and decreased metabolism were observed. Ictal hypermetabolism may exceed six times the interictal rate and could represent activation of excitatory or inhibitory synapses in the epileptogenic region and its projection fields. Hypometabolism seen on ictal scans most likely reflects postictal depression and may indicate projection fields of inhibited neurons. No quantitative relationship between alterations in metabolism and EEG or behavioral measurements of ictal events could be demonstrated.

  13. An unusual cause for hyponatremia with seizures

    PubMed Central

    Naha, Kushal; Vivek, G; Dasari, Sowjanya; Manthappa, M; Dias, Lorraine; Acharya, Raviraja

    2012-01-01

    A 50-year-old Asian Indian female with known hypertension presented with persistent vomiting but no other symptoms of meningism. Clinical examination and basic laboratory parameters were entirely normal except for significant hyponatremia. Further investigation was suggestive of the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (SIADH) secretion. Subsequently, despite steady correction of hyponatremia, the patient developed generalised seizures. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis performed was inconclusive. Screening for a chronic meningitis underlying SIADH, yielded positive blood and CSF titres for venereal disease research laboratory (VDRL), which were confirmed by Treponema pallidum haemagglutination (TPHA). The patient was treated for neurosyphilis and made a complete recovery. Hyponatremia resolved and she had no further episodes of seizures. She was tested for HIV infection which was negative. On follow-up, she remained TPHA positive but VDRL titres became negative. PMID:22605698

  14. Cerebral hemispherectomy for seizures with hemiplegia.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, T; Villemure, J G

    1989-01-01

    The risk-benefit ratio of this functionally complete but anatomically subtotal hemispherectomy is strongly in favor of its more widespread and early use for the small group of unfortunate seizure patients who have maximal or near maximal hemiplegia and a complete or high-grade hemianopsia, and whose seizures constitute a significant handicap in regard to schooling and psychosocial development despite an adequate trial of appropriate antiepileptic medication. The earlier the "good" hemisphere and the upper brain are spared the nociferous effect of continual bombardment by wide-spread high-amplitude epileptiform discharges, the more effectively motor, sensory, intellectual, and psychosocial development can take place in the remainder of the nervous system. PMID:2655991

  15. Signal subspace integration for improved seizure localization

    PubMed Central

    Stamoulis, Catherine; Fernández, Iván Sánchez; Chang, Bernard S.; Loddenkemper, Tobias

    2012-01-01

    A subspace signal processing approach is proposed for improved scalp EEG-based localization of broad-focus epileptic seizures, and estimation of the directions of source arrivals (DOA). Ictal scalp EEGs from adult and pediatric patients with broad-focus seizures were first decomposed into dominant signal modes, and signal and noise subspaces at each modal frequency, to improve the signal-to-noise ratio while preserving the original data correlation structure. Transformed (focused) modal signals were then resynthesized into wideband signals from which the number of sources and DOA were estimated. These were compared to denoised signals via principal components analysis (PCA). Coherent subspace processing performed better than PCA, significantly improved the localization of ictal EEGs and the estimation of distinct sources and corresponding DOAs. PMID:23366067

  16. Signal subspace integration for improved seizure localization.

    PubMed

    Stamoulis, Catherine; Fernández, Iván Sánchez; Chang, Bernard S; Loddenkemper, Tobias

    2012-01-01

    A subspace signal processing approach is proposed for improved scalp EEG-based localization of broad-focus epileptic seizures, and estimation of the directions of source arrivals (DOA). Ictal scalp EEGs from adult and pediatric patients with broad-focus seizures were first decomposed into dominant signal modes, and signal and noise subspaces at each modal frequency, to improve the signal-to-noise ratio while preserving the original data correlation structure. Transformed (focused) modal signals were then resynthesized into wideband signals from which the number of sources and DOA were estimated. These were compared to denoised signals via principal components analysis (PCA). Coherent subspace processing performed better than PCA, significantly improved the localization of ictal EEGs and the estimation of distinct sources and corresponding DOAs. PMID:23366067

  17. Animal Models of Posttraumatic Seizures and Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Glushakov, Alexander V; Glushakova, Olena Y; Doré, Sylvain; Carney, Paul R; Hayes, Ronald L

    2016-01-01

    Posttraumatic epilepsy (PTE) is one of the most common and devastating complications of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Currently, the etiopathology and mechanisms of PTE are poorly understood and as a result, there is no effective treatment or means to prevent it. Antiepileptic drugs remain common preventive strategies in the management of TBI to control acute posttraumatic seizures and to prevent the development of PTE, although their efficacy in the latter case is disputed. Different strategies of PTE prophylaxis have been showing promise in preclinical models, but their translation to the clinic still remains elusive due in part to the variability of these models and the fact they do not recapitulate all complex pathologies associated with human TBI. TBI is a multifaceted disorder reflected in several potentially epileptogenic alterations in the brain, including mechanical neuronal and vascular damage, parenchymal and subarachnoid hemorrhage, subsequent toxicity caused by iron-rich hemoglobin breakdown products, and energy disruption resulting in secondary injuries, including excitotoxicity, gliosis, and neuroinflammation, often coexisting to a different degree. Several in vivo models have been developed to reproduce the acute TBI cascade of events, to reflect its anatomical pathologies, and to replicate neurological deficits. Although acute and chronic recurrent posttraumatic seizures are well-recognized phenomena in these models, there is only a limited number of studies focused on PTE. The most used mechanical TBI models with documented electroencephalographic and behavioral seizures with remote epileptogenesis include fluid percussion, controlled cortical impact, and weight-drop. This chapter describes the most popular models of PTE-induced TBI models, focusing on the controlled cortical impact and the fluid percussion injury models, the methods of behavioral and electroencephalogram seizure assessments, and other approaches to detect epileptogenic properties

  18. Modern management of seizures and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Gschwind, Markus; Seeck, Margitta

    2016-01-01

    Complete seizure control is achieved in 40-50% of all epileptic patients with drug treatment, as reported in most epidemiological studies. Many effective antiepileptic drugs with a favourable profile are available in Switzerland, allowing treatment tailored to the patient's needs. Unfortunately, up to 40-50% of all patients will eventually relapse (pharmacoresistant epilepsy). These patients run a high risk of additional morbidity and mortality. Possible pharmacoresistant epilepsy should be considered early in the disease, when there is a lack of response to the first antiepileptic drug, since only 14% of those will respond to a second drug, and only 2% to a third drug if the second fails too. Epilepsy surgery is a viable option for these patients. It requires in-depth evaluation in specialized centres, and is related to complete seizure control in 50-90% of the patients, depending on the lesion type and site. Only for patients in whom surgery cannot be offered should neuromodulation treatments be considered. Today, two different approaches are approved, vagal nerve stimulation (VNS) and deep brain stimulation in the anterior thalamic nuclei (DBS-ANT). Although only a minority of patients become totally seizure-free. Both VNS and DBS-ANT represent an important adjunct in the therapeutic armamentarium. In the present review, we outline a practical approach for the different steps in therapeutic decisions and we summarise the profiles of modern antiepileptic drugs as well outcome of surgical and neuromodulatory therapies. The goal of any approach should be to obtain complete seizure control. In general, if two antiepileptic drugs are not successful, in-depth evaluation of the patient in a specialised center is strongly recommended. PMID:27322347

  19. Seizures after the age of sixty.

    PubMed

    Carney, L R

    1976-07-01

    Despite adequate diagnostic evaluation and prolonged follow-up, the causes of epilepsy in the elderly patient frequently remain unknown. Some of these may be of occult, degenerative or vascular central nervous system disease origin--entities which are often difficult to incriminate specifically. Unquestionably, in a few cases, seizures occur at the time of the initial cerebrovascular accident, although in some patients seizures may follow such an episode after a latent interval, particularly when cortical motor areas have been damaged by the initial vascular insult. It is important to differentiate this group from those with recurrent vascular episodes, in whom diagnostic studies and treatment may differ. Brain tumour is as prominent a cause of seizures in the seventh decade as it is in younger adults, but probably is of lower incidence thereafter. Focal, clinical and electroencephalographic findings and a progressive clinical course are particularly common in this group. A heterogeneous group of causes, a few of which are liable to affect the ageing patient, are responsible for some of the seizures in old age and should be searched for when the etiology is obscure. Diagnostic studies will vary with the individual problem and, whenever possible, should be restricted to non-invasive studies such as electroencephalography and computer-assisted tomography, after initial baseline clinical assessment and laboratory studies have been performed. Contrast procedures such as angiography are sometimes hazardous to patients with atherosclerosis and should be reserved for selected patients. Treatment follows conventional guidelines with some modifications due to the vulnerability of the ageing patient to degenerative disease and complications of immobilization. PMID:995828

  20. Hydrodynamics of sediment threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Sk Zeeshan; Dey, Subhasish

    2016-07-01

    A novel hydrodynamic model for the threshold of cohesionless sediment particle motion under a steady unidirectional streamflow is presented. The hydrodynamic forces (drag and lift) acting on a solitary sediment particle resting over a closely packed bed formed by the identical sediment particles are the primary motivating forces. The drag force comprises of the form drag and form induced drag. The lift force includes the Saffman lift, Magnus lift, centrifugal lift, and turbulent lift. The points of action of the force system are appropriately obtained, for the first time, from the basics of micro-mechanics. The sediment threshold is envisioned as the rolling mode, which is the plausible mode to initiate a particle motion on the bed. The moment balance of the force system on the solitary particle about the pivoting point of rolling yields the governing equation. The conditions of sediment threshold under the hydraulically smooth, transitional, and rough flow regimes are examined. The effects of velocity fluctuations are addressed by applying the statistical theory of turbulence. This study shows that for a hindrance coefficient of 0.3, the threshold curve (threshold Shields parameter versus shear Reynolds number) has an excellent agreement with the experimental data of uniform sediments. However, most of the experimental data are bounded by the upper and lower limiting threshold curves, corresponding to the hindrance coefficients of 0.2 and 0.4, respectively. The threshold curve of this study is compared with those of previous researchers. The present model also agrees satisfactorily with the experimental data of nonuniform sediments.

  1. Epileptic Seizure Detection and Warning Device

    SciTech Connect

    Elarton, J.K.; Koepsel, K.L.

    1999-06-21

    Flint Hills Scientific, L.L.C. (FHS) has invented what is believed to be the first real-time epileptic seizure detection and short-term prediction method in the world. They have demonstrated an IBM PC prototype with a multi-channel EEG monitoring configuration. This CRADA effort applied AlliedSignal FM and T hardware design, manufacturing miniaturization, and high quality manufacturing expertise in converting the prototype into a small, portable, self-contained, multi-channel EEG epileptic seizure detection and warning device. The purpose of this project was to design and build a proof-of-concept miniaturized prototype of the FHS-developed PC-based prototype. The resultant DSP prototype, measuring 4'' x 6'' x 2'', seizure detection performance compared favorably with the FHS PC prototype, thus validating the DSP design goals. The very successful completion of this project provided valuable engineering information for FHS for future prototype commercialization as well as providing AS/FM and T engineers DSP design experience.

  2. Pedigree analysis in families with febrile seizures

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, W.G.; Kugler, S.L.; Stenroos, E.S.; Meulener, M.C.

    1996-02-02

    Febrile seizures are the most common form of seizures, occurring in an estimated 2-5% of North American children. We carried out a systematic pedigree study of febrile seizure probands. Forty of 52 probands (77%) in a referral population selected for increased severity had more than one case per family: one family had 10 cases, one family had 7, 3 families had 6, 2 had 5, 3 had 4, 13 had 3, and 17 had 2 cases. Mode of inheritance in the multicase families best fit the hypothesis of autosomal dominance with reduced penetrance. Polygenic inheritance could not be excluded for some of the smaller families. There was no support for X-linked or mitochondrial inheritance. Penetrance was calculated to be 0.64. Because the cases were selected for increased severity, this represents a useful estimate of the upper limit of penetrance and is in agreement with twin studies. Simulated lod scores showed adequate power for a linkage study in the absence of heterogeneity. Individual families had simulated average lod scores as high as 2.1. However, with potential heterogeneity, assuming only 70% of families share the same disease locus, average lod scores were marginal, and a high density map of marker loci and additional families would be required to document linkage. 41 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Perspectives on seizure clusters: Gaps in lexicon, awareness, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Buelow, Janice M; Shafer, Patricia; Shinnar, Ruth; Austin, Joan; Dewar, Sandra; Long, Lucretia; O'Hara, Kathryn; Santilli, Nancy

    2016-04-01

    Seizure clusters in epilepsy can result in serious outcomes such as missed work or school, postictal psychosis, emergency room visits, or hospitalizations, and yet they are often not included in discussions between health-care professionals (HCPs) and their patients. The purpose of this paper was to describe and compare consumer (patient and caregivers) and professional understanding of seizure clusters and to describe how consumers and HCPs communicate regarding seizure clusters. We reviewed social media discussion sites to explore consumers' understanding of seizure clusters. We analyzed professional (medical) literature to explore the HCPs' understanding of seizure clusters. Major themes were revealed in one or both groups, including: communication about diagnosis; frequency, duration, and time frame; seizure type and pattern; severity; and self-management. When comparing discussions of professionals and consumers, both consumers and clinicians discussed the definition of seizure clusters. Discussions of HCPs were understandably clinically focused, and consumer discussions reflected the experience of seizure clusters; however, both groups struggled with a common lexicon. Seizure cluster events remain a problem associated with serious outcomes. Herein, we outline the lack of a common understanding and recommend the development of a common lexicon to improve communication regarding seizure clusters.

  4. Genetic comparison of seizure control by norepinephrine and neuropeptide Y.

    PubMed

    Weinshenker, D; Szot, P; Miller, N S; Rust, N C; Hohmann, J G; Pyati, U; White, S S; Palmiter, R D

    2001-10-01

    Epilepsy is a disease of neuronal hyperexcitability, and pharmacological and genetic studies have identified norepinephrine (NE) and neuropeptide Y (NPY) as important endogenous regulators of neuronal excitability. Both transmitters signal through G-protein-coupled receptors, are expressed either together or separately, and are abundant in brain regions implicated in seizure generation. NPY knock-out (NPY KO) and dopamine beta-hydroxylase knock-out (DBH KO) mice that lack NE are susceptible to seizures, and agonists of NE and NPY receptors protect against seizures. To examine the relative contributions of NE and NPY to neuronal excitability, we tested Dbh;Npy double knock-out (DKO) mice for seizure sensitivity. In general, DBH KO mice were much more seizure-sensitive than NPY KO mice and had normal NPY expression, demonstrating that an NPY deficiency did not contribute to the DBH KO seizure phenotype. DKO mice were only slightly more sensitive than DBH KO mice to seizures induced by kainic acid, pentylenetetrazole, or flurothyl, although DKO mice were uniquely prone to handling-induced seizures. NPY contributed to the seizure phenotype of DKO mice at high doses of convulsant agents and advanced stages of seizures. These data suggest that NE is a more potent endogenous anticonvulsant than NPY, and that NPY has the greatest contribution under conditions of extreme neuronal excitability.

  5. Inheritance of febrile seizures in sudden unexplained death in toddlers.

    PubMed

    Holm, Ingrid A; Poduri, Annapurna; Crandall, Laura; Haas, Elisabeth; Grafe, Marjorie R; Kinney, Hannah C; Krous, Henry F

    2012-04-01

    Sudden unexplained death in toddlers has been associated with febrile seizures, family history of febrile seizures, and hippocampal anomalies. We investigated the mode of inheritance for febrile seizures in these families. A three-generation pedigree was obtained from families enrolled in the San Diego Sudden Unexplained Death in Childhood Research Project, involving toddlers with sudden unexplained death, febrile seizures, and family history of febrile seizures. In our six cases, death was unwitnessed and related to sleep. The interval from last witnessed febrile seizure to death ranged from 3 weeks to 6 months. Hippocampal abnormalities were identified in one of three cases with available autopsy sections. Autosomal dominant inheritance of febrile seizures was observed in three families. A fourth demonstrated autosomal dominant inheritance with incomplete penetrance or variable expressivity. In two families, the maternal and paternal sides manifested febrile seizures. In this series, the major pattern of inheritance in toddlers with sudden unexplained death and febrile seizures was autosomal dominant. Future studies should develop markers (including genetic) to identify which patients with febrile seizures are at risk for sudden unexplained death in childhood, and to provide guidance for families and physicians.

  6. Seizures and Brain Arterovenous Malformation: A Surgical Series.

    PubMed

    Ferlisi, M; Zanoni, T; Moretto, G; Pasqualin, A

    2016-01-01

    Seizures are common symptoms of supratentorial arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). The potential risk factors for epilepsy in patients with AVMs are still controversial. The reported long-term outcome of seizures after surgical treatment of AVMs is variable and the data available are mainly from small retrospective case series.We identified all consecutive patients between 1990 and 2006 who underwent microsurgical resection of supratentorial AVMs at our institute. Pre-operative risk factors for seizures, intra-operative characteristics, long-term neurological disability, and seizure outcome (Engel's classification) were recorded and analyzed.During the study period, 110 patients underwent surgical resection of supratentorial AVM. Sixty of them (55 %) were symptomatic for seizures preoperatively. In our series, the absence of preoperative neurological deficits (p = 0.005), a large AVM size (p = 0.005), and no history of preoperative AVM hemorrhage (p < 0.001) were identified as risk factors for preoperative seizures. Following surgical resection, 77 % of patients with preoperative seizures had a modified Engel class I outcome. Among patients without a history of preoperative epilepsy, 56 % had new-onset seizures after surgical resection. None of the risk factors associated with preoperative seizures was associated with post-operative seizures. As there are no reliable factors predicting patients who may benefit from surgical treatment, epilepsy control should not be considered as the primary goal of AVMs surgery. PMID:27637642

  7. Identification of a neurovascular signaling pathway regulating seizures in mice

    PubMed Central

    Fredriksson, Linda; Stevenson, Tamara K; Su, Enming J; Ragsdale, Margaret; Moore, Shannon; Craciun, Stefan; Schielke, Gerald P; Murphy, Geoffrey G; Lawrence, Daniel A

    2015-01-01

    Objective A growing body of evidence suggests that increased blood–brain barrier (BBB) permeability can contribute to the development of seizures. The protease tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) has been shown to promote BBB permeability and susceptibility to seizures. In this study, we examined the pathway regulated by tPA in seizures. Methods An experimental model of kainate-induced seizures was used in genetically modified mice, including mice deficient in tPA (tPA−/−), its inhibitor neuroserpin (Nsp−/−), or both (Nsp:tPA−/−), and in mice conditionally deficient in the platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRα). Results Compared to wild-type (WT) mice, Nsp−/− mice have significantly reduced latency to seizure onset and generalization; whereas tPA−/− mice have the opposite phenotype, as do Nsp:tPA−/− mice. Furthermore, interventions that maintain BBB integrity delay seizure propagation, whereas osmotic disruption of the BBB in seizure-resistant tPA−/− mice dramatically reduces the time to seizure onset and accelerates seizure progression. The phenotypic differences in seizure progression between WT, tPA−/−, and Nsp−/− mice are also observed in electroencephalogram recordings in vivo, but absent in ex vivo electrophysiological recordings where regulation of the BBB is no longer necessary to maintain the extracellular environment. Finally, we demonstrate that these effects on seizure progression are mediated through signaling by PDGFRα on perivascular astrocytes. Interpretation Together, these data identify a specific molecular pathway involving tPA-mediated PDGFRα signaling in perivascular astrocytes that regulates seizure progression through control of the BBB. Inhibition of PDGFRα signaling and maintenance of BBB integrity might therefore offer a novel clinical approach for managing seizures. PMID:26273685

  8. A mouse model of Alzheimer's disease displays increased susceptibility to kindling and seizure-associated death.

    PubMed

    Chan, Jianxiong; Jones, Nigel C; Bush, Ashley I; O'Brien, Terence J; Kwan, Patrick

    2015-06-01

    People with Alzheimer's disease (AD) are up to 10 times more likely to develop epilepsy than the age-matched general population. However, given that only a proportion of patients with AD develop epilepsy, it is likely that additional factors may be required for the epilepsy to emerge. This study aimed to better understand the relationship between AD pathology and seizure susceptibility. It also aimed to investigate a "two-hit" hypothesis for seizure susceptibility through amygdala kindling of rodent AD models. Aged AD mice (Tg2576 model) and wild-type (WT) mice underwent electrical amygdala kindling. Compared with WT mice, Tg2576 mice had significantly lower afterdischarge threshold. Significantly fewer stimulations were required for the Tg2576 mice to reach the first class V seizure. Higher death rate was observed with Tg2576 mice in the kindling group. Both sham and kindled Tg2576 animals had increased levels of sprouting in the supragranular layer of the dentate gyrus compared with the WT counterparts. These findings support the "two-hit" hypothesis and represent a potentially novel research model to help better understand the relationship between AD pathology and epilepsy.

  9. A fuzzy logic system for seizure onset detection in intracranial EEG.

    PubMed

    Rabbi, Ahmed Fazle; Fazel-Rezai, Reza

    2012-01-01

    We present a multistage fuzzy rule-based algorithm for epileptic seizure onset detection. Amplitude, frequency, and entropy-based features were extracted from intracranial electroencephalogram (iEEG) recordings and considered as the inputs for a fuzzy system. These features extracted from multichannel iEEG signals were combined using fuzzy algorithms both in feature domain and in spatial domain. Fuzzy rules were derived based on experts' knowledge and reasoning. An adaptive fuzzy subsystem was used for combining characteristics features extracted from iEEG. For the spatial combination, three channels from epileptogenic zone and one from remote zone were considered into another fuzzy subsystem. Finally, a threshold procedure was applied to the fuzzy output derived from the final fuzzy subsystem. The method was evaluated on iEEG datasets selected from Freiburg Seizure Prediction EEG (FSPEEG) database. A total of 112.45 hours of intracranial EEG recordings was selected from 20 patients having 56 seizures was used for the system performance evaluation. The overall sensitivity of 95.8% with false detection rate of 0.26 per hour and average detection latency of 15.8 seconds was achieved.

  10. A Fuzzy Logic System for Seizure Onset Detection in Intracranial EEG

    PubMed Central

    Rabbi, Ahmed Fazle; Fazel-Rezai, Reza

    2012-01-01

    We present a multistage fuzzy rule-based algorithm for epileptic seizure onset detection. Amplitude, frequency, and entropy-based features were extracted from intracranial electroencephalogram (iEEG) recordings and considered as the inputs for a fuzzy system. These features extracted from multichannel iEEG signals were combined using fuzzy algorithms both in feature domain and in spatial domain. Fuzzy rules were derived based on experts' knowledge and reasoning. An adaptive fuzzy subsystem was used for combining characteristics features extracted from iEEG. For the spatial combination, three channels from epileptogenic zone and one from remote zone were considered into another fuzzy subsystem. Finally, a threshold procedure was applied to the fuzzy output derived from the final fuzzy subsystem. The method was evaluated on iEEG datasets selected from Freiburg Seizure Prediction EEG (FSPEEG) database. A total of 112.45 hours of intracranial EEG recordings was selected from 20 patients having 56 seizures was used for the system performance evaluation. The overall sensitivity of 95.8% with false detection rate of 0.26 per hour and average detection latency of 15.8 seconds was achieved. PMID:22577370

  11. Uric acid is released in the brain during seizure activity and increases severity of seizures in a mouse model for acute limbic seizures.

    PubMed

    Thyrion, Lisa; Raedt, Robrecht; Portelli, Jeanelle; Van Loo, Pieter; Wadman, Wytse J; Glorieux, Griet; Lambrecht, Bart N; Janssens, Sophie; Vonck, Kristl; Boon, Paul

    2016-03-01

    Recent evidence points at an important role of endogenous cell-damage induced pro-inflammatory molecules in the generation of epileptic seizures. Uric acid, under the form of monosodium urate crystals, has shown to have pro-inflammatory properties in the body, but less is known about its role in seizure generation. This study aimed to unravel the contribution of uric acid to seizure generation in a mouse model for acute limbic seizures. We measured extracellular levels of uric acid in the brain and modulated them using complementary pharmacological and genetic tools. Local extracellular uric acid levels increased three to four times during acute limbic seizures and peaked between 50 and 100 min after kainic acid infusion. Manipulating uric acid levels through administration of allopurinol or knock-out of urate oxidase significantly altered the number of generalized seizures, decreasing and increasing them by a twofold respectively. Taken together, our results consistently show that uric acid is released during limbic seizures and suggest that uric acid facilitates seizure generalization. PMID:26774005

  12. Administration of lithium and magnesium chloride inhibited tolerance to the anticonvulsant effect of morphine on pentylenetetrazole-induced seizures in mice.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi, Abbas; Saberi, Mohammad; Ghasemi, Mehdi; Shafaroodi, Hamed; Moezi, Leila; Bahremand, Arash; Montaser-Kouhsari, Laleh; Ziai, Pouya; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza

    2010-12-01

    Although morphine has an anticonvulsant effect in several animal models of seizures, its potential clinical application in epilepsy may be hindered by its adverse effects like opioid tolerance. The present study evaluated the development of tolerance to the anticonvulsant effect of morphine in a model of clonic seizures induced with pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) in male Swiss mice. We also examined whether administration of either lithium chloride (LiCl) or magnesium chloride (MgCl(2)) was able to prevent the probable tolerance. Our data demonstrated that the anticonvulsant effect of a potent dose of morphine (1mg/kg) was abolished in chronic morphine-treated mice (mice administered the same dose of morphine intraperitoneally twice daily for 4 days). Four days of pretreatment with low and noneffective doses of MgCl(2) (2 and 5mg/kg) and LiCl (5mg/kg) inhibited the development of tolerance to the anticonvulsant effect of morphine (1mg/kg, ip). Moreover, a single acute injection of the aforementioned agents at the same doses reversed the expression of tolerance to the anticonvulsant effects of morphine (1mg/kg, ip). Chronic 17-day treatment with LiCl (600 mg/L in drinking water) also inhibited the development of tolerance to the anticonvulsant effects of 1mg/kg morphine. These results demonstrate that the anticonvulsant effect of morphine is subject to tolerance after repeated administration. Both development and expression of tolerance are inhibited by either LiCl or MgCl(2). As both LiCl and MgCl(2) can modulate the function of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, we discuss how NMDA receptor functioning might be involved in the effects of LiCl and MgCl(2) on the development of tolerance to the anticonvulsant effect of morphine.

  13. γ-Hydroxybutyric Acid-Induced Electrographic Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Joseph; Lucey, Brendan P.; Duntley, Stephen P.; Darken, Rachel S.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a case of absence-like electrographic seizures during NREM sleep in a patient who was taking sodium oxybate, a sodium salt of γ-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB). An overnight full montage electroencephalography (EEG) study revealed numerous frontally predominant rhythmic 1.5-2 Hz sharp waves and spike-wave activity during stage N2 and N3 sleep at the peak dose time for sodium oxybate, resembling atypical absence-like electrographic seizures. The patient was later weaned off sodium oxybate, and a repeat study did not show any such electrographic seizures. Absence-like seizures induced by GHB had previously been described in experimental animal models. We present the first reported human case of absence-like electrographic seizure associated with sodium oxybate. Citation: Cheung J, Lucey BP, Duntley SP, Darken RS. γ-hydroxybutyric acid-induced electrographic seizures. J Clin Sleep Med 2014;10(7):811-812. PMID:25024661

  14. Effect of Seizures on the Developing Brain and Cognition.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Gregory L

    2016-05-01

    Epilepsy is a complex disorder, which involves much more than seizures, encompassing a range of associated comorbid health conditions that can have significant health and quality-of-life implications. Of these comorbidities, cognitive impairment is one of the most common and distressing aspects of epilepsy. Clinical studies have demonstrated that refractory seizures, resistant to antiepileptic drugs, and occurring early in life have significant adverse effects on cognitive function. Much of what has been learned about the neurobiological underpinnings of cognitive impairment following early-life seizures has come from animal models. Although early-life seizures in rodents do not result in cell loss, seizures cause in changes in neurogenesis and synaptogenesis and alteration of excitatory or inhibitory balance, network connectivity and temporal coding. These morphological and physiological changes are accompanied by parallel impairment in cognitive skills. This increased understanding of the pathophysiological basis of seizure-induced cognitive deficits should allow investigators to develop novel targets for therapeutic interventions.

  15. Intranasal midazolam for seizure cessation in the community setting

    PubMed Central

    Zelcer, Michal; Goldman, Ran D.

    2016-01-01

    Question There are times when parents arrive to my clinic after their child has had a seizure and a second seizure takes place in the clinic. While waiting for transport to the hospital, are there ways to stop the seizures without the need to obtain intravenous access in the clinic? Answer Intravenous diazepam has been a first-line therapy to stop seizures in children for many years. Other routes of drug administration such as intramuscular, rectal, and buccal are available but have several limitations. More evidence suggests that the intranasal route to administer drugs is quick and effective in children, and the use of midazolam has been continuing to show promise in seizure cessation. With its good safety profile, intranasal midazolam can be used in the clinic and prehospital setting for seizure cessation in children. PMID:27412207

  16. Effect of Seizures on the Developing Brain and Cognition.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Gregory L

    2016-05-01

    Epilepsy is a complex disorder, which involves much more than seizures, encompassing a range of associated comorbid health conditions that can have significant health and quality-of-life implications. Of these comorbidities, cognitive impairment is one of the most common and distressing aspects of epilepsy. Clinical studies have demonstrated that refractory seizures, resistant to antiepileptic drugs, and occurring early in life have significant adverse effects on cognitive function. Much of what has been learned about the neurobiological underpinnings of cognitive impairment following early-life seizures has come from animal models. Although early-life seizures in rodents do not result in cell loss, seizures cause in changes in neurogenesis and synaptogenesis and alteration of excitatory or inhibitory balance, network connectivity and temporal coding. These morphological and physiological changes are accompanied by parallel impairment in cognitive skills. This increased understanding of the pathophysiological basis of seizure-induced cognitive deficits should allow investigators to develop novel targets for therapeutic interventions. PMID:27544468

  17. Emergency department management of seizures in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Santillanes, Genevieve; Luc, Quyen

    2015-03-01

    Seizures account for 1% of all emergency department visits for children, and the etiologies range from benign to life-threatening. The challenge for emergency clinicians is to diagnose and treat the life-threatening causes of seizures while avoiding unnecessary radiation exposure and painful procedures in patients who are unlikely to have an emergent pathology. When treating patients in status epilepticus, emergency clinicians are also faced with the challenge of choosing anticonvulsant medications that will be efficacious while minimizing harmful side effects. Unfortunately, evidence to guide the evaluation and management of children presenting with new and breakthrough seizures and status epilepticus is limited. This review summarizes available evidence and guidelines on the diagnostic evaluation of first-time, breakthrough, and simple and complex febrile seizures. Management of seizures in neonates and seizures due to toxic ingestions is also reviewed.

  18. Ngram-Derived Pattern Recognition for the Detection and Prediction of Epileptic Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Eftekhar, Amir; Juffali, Walid; El-Imad, Jamil; Constandinou, Timothy G.; Toumazou, Christofer

    2014-01-01

    This work presents a new method that combines symbol dynamics methodologies with an Ngram algorithm for the detection and prediction of epileptic seizures. The presented approach specifically applies Ngram-based pattern recognition, after data pre-processing, with similarity metrics, including the Hamming distance and Needlman-Wunsch algorithm, for identifying unique patterns within epochs of time. Pattern counts within each epoch are used as measures to determine seizure detection and prediction markers. Using 623 hours of intracranial electrocorticogram recordings from 21 patients containing a total of 87 seizures, the sensitivity and false prediction/detection rates of this method are quantified. Results are quantified using individual seizures within each case for training of thresholds and prediction time windows. The statistical significance of the predictive power is further investigated. We show that the method presented herein, has significant predictive power in up to 100% of temporal lobe cases, with sensitivities of up to 70–100% and low false predictions (dependant on training procedure). The cases of highest false predictions are found in the frontal origin with 0.31–0.61 false predictions per hour and with significance in 18 out of 21 cases. On average, a prediction sensitivity of 93.81% and false prediction rate of approximately 0.06 false predictions per hour are achieved in the best case scenario. This compares to previous work utilising the same data set that has shown sensitivities of up to 40–50% for a false prediction rate of less than 0.15/hour. PMID:24886714

  19. Surface acoustic wave probe implant for predicting epileptic seizures

    DOEpatents

    Gopalsami, Nachappa; Kulikov, Stanislav; Osorio, Ivan; Raptis, Apostolos C.

    2012-04-24

    A system and method for predicting and avoiding a seizure in a patient. The system and method includes use of an implanted surface acoustic wave probe and coupled RF antenna to monitor temperature of the patient's brain, critical changes in the temperature characteristic of a precursor to the seizure. The system can activate an implanted cooling unit which can avoid or minimize a seizure in the patient.

  20. Epileptic seizure prediction by non-linear methods

    DOEpatents

    Hively, L.M.; Clapp, N.E.; Day, C.S.; Lawkins, W.F.

    1999-01-12

    This research discloses methods and apparatus for automatically predicting epileptic seizures monitor and analyze brain wave (EEG or MEG) signals. Steps include: acquiring the brain wave data from the patient; digitizing the data; obtaining nonlinear measures of the data via chaotic time series analysis tools; obtaining time serial trends in the nonlinear measures; comparison of the trend to known seizure predictors; and providing notification that a seizure is forthcoming. 76 figs.

  1. Epileptic seizure prediction by non-linear methods

    DOEpatents

    Hively, Lee M.; Clapp, Ned E.; Daw, C. Stuart; Lawkins, William F.

    1999-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for automatically predicting epileptic seizures monitor and analyze brain wave (EEG or MEG) signals. Steps include: acquiring the brain wave data from the patient; digitizing the data; obtaining nonlinear measures of the data via chaotic time series analysis tools; obtaining time serial trends in the nonlinear measures; comparison of the trend to known seizure predictors; and providing notification that a seizure is forthcoming.

  2. 8 CFR 280.21 - Seizure of aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Seizure of aircraft. 280.21 Section 280.21... OF FINES § 280.21 Seizure of aircraft. Seizure of an aircraft under the authority of section 239 of the Act and § 280.2 will not be made if such aircraft is damaged to an extent that its value is...

  3. 8 CFR 280.21 - Seizure of aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Seizure of aircraft. 280.21 Section 280.21... OF FINES § 280.21 Seizure of aircraft. Seizure of an aircraft under the authority of section 239 of the Act and § 280.2 will not be made if such aircraft is damaged to an extent that its value is...

  4. 8 CFR 280.21 - Seizure of aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Seizure of aircraft. 280.21 Section 280.21... OF FINES § 280.21 Seizure of aircraft. Seizure of an aircraft under the authority of section 239 of the Act and § 280.2 will not be made if such aircraft is damaged to an extent that its value is...

  5. 8 CFR 280.21 - Seizure of aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Seizure of aircraft. 280.21 Section 280.21... OF FINES § 280.21 Seizure of aircraft. Seizure of an aircraft under the authority of section 239 of the Act and § 280.2 will not be made if such aircraft is damaged to an extent that its value is...

  6. 8 CFR 280.21 - Seizure of aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Seizure of aircraft. 280.21 Section 280.21... OF FINES § 280.21 Seizure of aircraft. Seizure of an aircraft under the authority of section 239 of the Act and § 280.2 will not be made if such aircraft is damaged to an extent that its value is...

  7. Crossing the Writing Threshold.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Carol Lea

    What pushes a writer over the edge of thought into text production--over what may be called "the writing threshold?" This is the moment when the thoughts in a writer's mind, the writing situation, and personal motivations create a momentum that results in a pattern of written words. There is evidence that not everyone crosses the writing threshold…

  8. Elaborating on Threshold Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rountree, Janet; Robins, Anthony; Rountree, Nathan

    2013-01-01

    We propose an expanded definition of Threshold Concepts (TCs) that requires the successful acquisition and internalisation not only of knowledge, but also its practical elaboration in the domains of applied strategies and mental models. This richer definition allows us to clarify the relationship between TCs and Fundamental Ideas, and to account…

  9. Pharmacotherapy for Neonatal Seizures: Current Knowledge and Future Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Maria D; Griffin, Brendan T; Kharoshankaya, Liudmila; Cryan, John F; Boylan, Geraldine B

    2016-04-01

    Seizures are the most common neurological emergencies in the neonatal period and are associated with poor neurodevelopmental outcomes. Seizures affect up to five per 1000 term births and population-based studies suggest that they occur even more frequently in premature infants. Seizures are a sign of an underlying cerebral pathology, the most common of which is hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy in term infants. Due to a growing body of evidence that seizures exacerbate cerebral injury, effective diagnosis and treatment of neonatal seizures is of paramount importance to reduce long-term adverse outcomes. Electroencephalography is essential for the diagnosis of seizures in neonates due to their subtle clinical expression, non-specific neurological presentation and a high frequency of electro-clinical uncoupling in the neonatal period. Hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy may require neuroprotective therapeutic hypothermia, accompanying sedation with opioids, anticonvulsant drugs or a combination of all of these. The efficacy, safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of seven anticonvulsant drugs (phenobarbital, phenytoin, levetiracetam, lidocaine, midazolam, topiramate and bumetanide) are reviewed. This review is focused only on studies reporting electrographically confirmed seizures and highlights the knowledge gaps that exist in optimal treatment regimens for neonatal seizures. Randomised controlled trials are needed to establish a safe and effective treatment protocol for neonatal seizures. PMID:26943929

  10. Seizures and the Role of Anticonvulsants After Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Lara L; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; Vespa, Paul M

    2016-10-01

    Posttraumatic seizures are a common complication of traumatic brain injury. Posttraumatic epilepsy accounts for 20% of symptomatic epilepsy in the general population and 5% of all epilepsy. Early posttraumatic seizures occur in more than 20% of patients in the intensive care unit and are associated with secondary brain injury and worse patient outcomes. Most posttraumatic seizures are nonconvulsive and therefore continuous electroencephalography monitoring should be the standard of care for patients with moderate or severe brain injury. The literature shows that posttraumatic seizures result in secondary brain injury caused by increased intracranial pressure, cerebral edema and metabolic crisis. PMID:27637399

  11. Using a structured questionnaire improves seizure description by medical students

    PubMed Central

    Kapadia, Saher; Shah, Hemang; McNair, Nancy; Pruitt, J. Ned; Murro, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to evaluate a structured questionnaire for improving a medical students’ ability to identify, describe and interpret a witnessed seizure. Methods Ninety two 3rd year medical students, blinded to seizure diagnosis, viewed videos of a primary generalized seizure and a complex partial seizure.  Students next completed an unstructured questionnaire that asked the students to describe the seizure video recordings. The students then completed a structured questionnaire that asked the student to respond to 17 questions regarding specific features occurring during the seizures.  We determined the number and types of correct responses for each questionnaire. Results Overall, the structured questionnaire was more effective in eliciting an average of 9.25 correct responses compared to the unstructured questionnaire eliciting an average of 5.30 correct responses (p < 0.001). Additionally, 10 of the 17 seizure features were identified more effectively with the structured questionnaire. Potentially confounding factors, prior knowledge of someone with epilepsy or a prior experience of viewing a seizure, did not predict the student’s ability to correctly identify any of the 17 features. Conclusions A structured questionnaire significantly improves a medical student’s ability to provide an accurate clinical description of primary generalized and complex partial witnessed seizures. Our analysis identified the 10 specific features improved by using the structured questionnaire. PMID:26752118

  12. Self-induced photosensitive absence seizures with ictal pleasure.

    PubMed

    Faught, E; Falgout, J; Nidiffer, D; Dreifuss, F E

    1986-04-01

    A 32-year-old woman was treated for self-induced photosensitive seizures that included strong subjective feelings of pleasure and masturbatory behavior. Electroencephalograms demonstrated generalized polyphasic spike-wave discharges in response to stroboscopic stimulation. The behavioral sequences leading to seizures and the effects of treatment can be explained in terms of operant conditioning theory. Data from human and animal studies indicate a correlation between ictal pleasure or reinforcement and the subject's ability to induce seizures. Ictal pleasure is rare in spontaneous seizures that are not under the control of the patient.

  13. Evolving functional network properties and synchronizability during human epileptic seizures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindler, Kaspar A.; Bialonski, Stephan; Horstmann, Marie-Therese; Elger, Christian E.; Lehnertz, Klaus

    2008-09-01

    We assess electrical brain dynamics before, during, and after 100 human epileptic seizures with different anatomical onset locations by statistical and spectral properties of functionally defined networks. We observe a concave-like temporal evolution of characteristic path length and cluster coefficient indicative of a movement from a more random toward a more regular and then back toward a more random functional topology. Surprisingly, synchronizability was significantly decreased during the seizure state but increased already prior to seizure end. Our findings underline the high relevance of studying complex systems from the viewpoint of complex networks, which may help to gain deeper insights into the complicated dynamics underlying epileptic seizures.

  14. [Role of central histamine in amygdaloid kindled seizures].

    PubMed

    Kamei, C; Okuma, C

    2001-05-01

    The role of central histamine in amygdaloid kindled seizures in rats was studied. Histamine content in the amygdala was significantly decreased after development of amygdaloid kindling. Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of histamine resulted in inhibition of amygdaloid kindled seizures. The H1-agonists 2-methylhistamine and 2-thiazolylethylamine also inhibited amygdaloid kindled seizures. In addition, intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of histidine and metoprine inhibited amygdaloid kindled seizures at doses that caused increases in histamine contents of the brain. H1-antagonists (diphenhydramine and chlorpheniramine) attenuated histamine- or histidine-induced inhibition of amygdaloid kindled seizures. Both i.c.v. and i.p. injections of H3-antagonists (thioperamide, AQ0145 and clobenpropit) resulted in a dose-related inhibition of amygdaloid kindled seizures. The effects of thioperamide and AQ0145 were inhibited by an H3-agonist (R)-alpha-methylhistamine and H1-antagonists. On the other hand, H2-antagonists showed no antagonistic effect. GABAmimetic drugs, diazepam, sodium valproate and muscimol potentiated the effect of clobenpropit. Bicuculline caused significant antagonism of the inhibition of amygdaloid kindled seizures induced by clobenpropit. These findings suggested that a histaminergic mechanism plays an important role in suppressing amygdaloid kindled seizures through histamine H1-receptors. In addition, an inhibition of amygdaloid kindled seizures induced by histamine is closely related with the action of GABA.

  15. The Future of Seizure Prediction and Intervention: Closing the loop

    PubMed Central

    Nagaraj, Vivek; Lee, Steven; Krook-Magnuson, Esther; Soltesz, Ivan; Benquet, Pascal; Irazoqui, Pedro; Netoff, Theoden

    2014-01-01

    The ultimate goal of epilepsy therapies is to provide seizure control for all patients while eliminating side effects. Improved specificity of intervention through on-demand approaches may overcome many of the limitations of current intervention strategies. This article reviews progress in seizure prediction and detection, potential new therapies to provide improved specificity, and devices to achieve these ends. Specifically, we discuss 1) potential signal modalities and algorithms for seizure detection and prediction, 2) closed-loop intervention approaches, and 3) hardware for implementing these algorithms and interventions. Seizure prediction and therapies maximize efficacy while minimizing side-effects through improved specificity may represent the future of epilepsy treatments. PMID:26035672

  16. Urethane anesthesia blocks the development and expression of kindled seizures

    SciTech Connect

    Cain, D.P.; Raithby, A.; Corcoran, M.E.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of anesthetic and subanesthetic doses of urethane on the development of amygdala kindled seizures and on the expression of previously kindled seizures was studied in hooded rats. An anesthetic dose of urethane almost completely eliminated evoked after discharge and completely eliminated convulsive behavior in both groups. It also eliminated the seizure response to pentylenetetrazol. Subanesthetic doses of urethane strongly attenuated the expression of previously kindled seizures. These results suggest that urethane may not be an appropriate anesthetic for the study of epileptiform phenomena.

  17. Future of seizure prediction and intervention: closing the loop.

    PubMed

    Nagaraj, Vivek; Lee, Steven T; Krook-Magnuson, Esther; Soltesz, Ivan; Benquet, Pascal; Irazoqui, Pedro P; Netoff, Theoden I

    2015-06-01

    The ultimate goal of epilepsy therapies is to provide seizure control for all patients while eliminating side effects. Improved specificity of intervention through on-demand approaches may overcome many of the limitations of current intervention strategies. This article reviews the progress in seizure prediction and detection, potential new therapies to provide improved specificity, and devices to achieve these ends. Specifically, we discuss (1) potential signal modalities and algorithms for seizure detection and prediction, (2) closed-loop intervention approaches, and (3) hardware for implementing these algorithms and interventions. Seizure prediction and therapies maximize efficacy, whereas minimizing side effects through improved specificity may represent the future of epilepsy treatments. PMID:26035672

  18. Quantitative analysis of surface electromyography: Biomarkers for convulsive seizures.

    PubMed

    Beniczky, Sándor; Conradsen, Isa; Pressler, Ronit; Wolf, Peter

    2016-08-01

    Muscle activity during seizures is in electroencephalographical (EEG) praxis often considered an irritating artefact. This article discusses ways by surface electromyography (EMG) to turn it into a valuable tool of epileptology. Muscles are in direct synaptic contact with motor neurons. Therefore, EMG signals provide direct information about the electric activity in the motor cortex. Qualitative analysis of EMG has traditionally been a part of the long-term video-EEG recordings. Recent development in quantitative analysis of EMG signals yielded valuable information on the pathomechanisms of convulsive seizures, demonstrating that it was different from maximal voluntary contraction, and different from convulsive psychogenic non-epileptic seizures. Furthermore, the tonic phase of the generalised tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS) proved to have different quantitative features than tonic seizures. The high temporal resolution of EMG allowed detailed characterisation of temporal dynamics of the GTCS, suggesting that the same inhibitory mechanisms that try to prevent the build-up of the seizure activity, contribute to ending the seizure. These findings have clinical implications: the quantitative EMG features provided the pathophysiologic substrate for developing neurophysiologic biomarkers that accurately identify GTCS. This proved to be efficient both for seizure detection and for objective, automated distinction between convulsive and non-convulsive epileptic seizures.

  19. Neuropharmacologic characterization of strychnine seizure potentiation in the inferior olive lesioned rat

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, M.C.

    1988-01-01

    Cerebellar stimulation is associated with anticonvulsant activity in several animal models. There are two afferent inputs to cerebellar Purkinje cells: (1) parallel fibers, which relay mossy fiber input, from brainstem, spinal cord, cerebral cortex and cerebellum, and (2) climbing fibers, arising from the inferior olive. Both climbing and parallel fibers release excitatory amino acid neurotransmitters, which stimulate Purkinje cells and cause GABA release in the deep cerebellar nuclei. Climbing fibers also exert tonic inhibition over Purkinje cell activity by producing an absolute refractory period following stimulation, rendering Purkinje cells unresponsive to parallel fibers. Climbing fiber deafferentation by bilateral inferior olive lesions produced a specific decrease in threshold for strychnine-seizures in the rat. Inferior olive lesions produced no change in threshold to seizures induced by picrotoxin, bicuculline or pentylenetetrazole. Inferior olive lesions also produced abnormal motor behavior including, myoclonus, backward locomotion and hyperextension, which was significantly aggravated by strychnine, brucine, picrotoxin, bicuculline and pentylenetetrazole. Inferior olive lesions produced a significant increase in quisqualate sensitive ({sup 3}H)AMPA ((Rs)-alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazole-4-propionic acid) binding to cerebellar membranes. AMPA is a glutamate analog with high affinity for quisqualate sensitive receptors.

  20. Block term decomposition for modelling epileptic seizures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunyadi, Borbála; Camps, Daan; Sorber, Laurent; Paesschen, Wim Van; Vos, Maarten De; Huffel, Sabine Van; Lathauwer, Lieven De

    2014-12-01

    Recordings of neural activity, such as EEG, are an inherent mixture of different ongoing brain processes as well as artefacts and are typically characterised by low signal-to-noise ratio. Moreover, EEG datasets are often inherently multidimensional, comprising information in time, along different channels, subjects, trials, etc. Additional information may be conveyed by expanding the signal into even more dimensions, e.g. incorporating spectral features applying wavelet transform. The underlying sources might show differences in each of these modes. Therefore, tensor-based blind source separation techniques which can extract the sources of interest from such multiway arrays, simultaneously exploiting the signal characteristics in all dimensions, have gained increasing interest. Canonical polyadic decomposition (CPD) has been successfully used to extract epileptic seizure activity from wavelet-transformed EEG data (Bioinformatics 23(13):i10-i18, 2007; NeuroImage 37:844-854, 2007), where each source is described by a rank-1 tensor, i.e. by the combination of one particular temporal, spectral and spatial signature. However, in certain scenarios, where the seizure pattern is nonstationary, such a trilinear signal model is insufficient. Here, we present the application of a recently introduced technique, called block term decomposition (BTD) to separate EEG tensors into rank- ( L r , L r ,1) terms, allowing to model more variability in the data than what would be possible with CPD. In a simulation study, we investigate the robustness of BTD against noise and different choices of model parameters. Furthermore, we show various real EEG recordings where BTD outperforms CPD in capturing complex seizure characteristics.

  1. Seizures and Teens: The Impact of Seizures and Epilepsy on Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinstein, Sandra Cushner

    2007-01-01

    When a teenager or child of any age develops seizures, the impact on the family can be enormous. Worries and fears may affect everyone, and left untreated, crises can occur too easily. This article explores the way that epilepsy can affect family dynamics. Common factors that may contribute to family stress and patterns of coping will be…

  2. [Intracranial tumors and epileptic seizures: treatment principles].

    PubMed

    Rossetti, Andrea O; Vulliémoz, Serge

    2016-04-27

    Epileptic seizures represent a relatively frequent issue in patients with intracranial neoplasms, and very frequently imply the start of an antiepileptic treatment as secondary prophylaxis. Even if the current level of evidence is relatively low, compounds with a limited risk of pharmacokinetic interactions are clearly preferred. Levetiracetam is probably the most prescribed agent in this setting, while pregabalin, valproate, lacosamide and lamotrigine are valuable alternatives. The treatment choice has to consider the different profiles of side effects and should be tailored to each patient. In this setting, a multidisciplinary approach including general practicioner, oncologist and neurologist is strongly advocated. PMID:27281943

  3. Pediatric seizure disorders in dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Lavely, James A

    2014-03-01

    Seizure disorders in young animals pose different considerations as to cause and therapeutic decisions compared with adult animals. Infectious diseases of the nervous system are more likely in puppies and kittens compared with adults. The diagnosis of canine distemper is often based on clinical signs. Idiopathic epilepsy typically occurs in dogs between 1 and 5 years of age; however, inflammatory brain diseases such as necrotizing encephalitis and granulomatous meningoencephalomyelitis also commonly occur in young to middle-aged small-breed dogs. The choice of which anticonvulsant to administer for maintenance therapy is tailored to each individual patient.

  4. Pulmonary edema following generalized tonic clonic seizures is directly associated with seizure duration

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Jeffrey D.; Hardin, Kimberly A.; Parikh, Palak; Li, Chin-Shang; Seyal, Masud

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Postictal pulmonary edema (PPE) is almost invariably present in human and animal cases of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) coming to autopsy. PPE may be a contributing factor in SUDEP. The incidence of postictal PPE is unknown. We retrospectively investigated PPE following generalized tonic clonic seizures (GTCS) in the epilepsy monitoring unit. Methods Chest X-Rays (CXR) following each GTCS were obtained in 24 consecutive patients. Relationship of CXR abnormality to seizure duration, ictal/postictal oxygen desaturation (SpO2), apnea and presence of postictal generalized EEG suppression (PGES) was investigated using logistic regression. Results Eleven of 24 patients had CXR abnormalities following a GTCS. In these 11 patients, 22 CXR were obtained and abnormalities were present in 15 CXR. Abnormalities included PPE in 7 patients, of which 2 also had focal infiltrates. In 4 patients focal infiltrates were present without PPE. There was no significant difference in mean time to CXR (225 min) following GTCS in the abnormal CXR group versus the normal group of patients (196 min). Mean preceding seizure duration was longer (p=0.002) in GTCS with abnormal CXR (259.7 sec) versus GTCS with normal CXR (101.2 sec). Odds-ratio for CXR abnormality was 20.46 (p=0.006) with seizure duration greater than 100 sec versus less than 100 sec. On multivariable analysis, only the seizure duration was a significant predictor of CXR abnormality (p=0.015). Conclusions Radiographic abnormalities are not uncommon following GTCS. The presence of CXR abnormality is significantly associated with the duration of the preceding GTCS. Severe, untreated PPE may be relevant to the pathophysiology of SUDEP. PMID:25844030

  5. Electric field strength and focality in electroconvulsive therapy and magnetic seizure therapy: A finite element simulation study

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Zhi-De; Lisanby, Sarah H.; Peterchev, Angel V.

    2014-01-01

    We present the first computational study comparing the electric field induced by various electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and magnetic seizure therapy (MST) paradigms. Four ECT electrode configurations (bilateral, bifrontal, right unilateral, and focal electrically administered seizure therapy) and three MST coil configurations (circular, cap, and double cone) were modeled. The model incorporated a modality-specific neural activation threshold. ECT (0.3 ms pulse width) and MST induced maximum electric field in the brain of 2.1–2.5 V/cm and 1.1–2.2 V/cm, corresponding to 6.2–7.2 times and 1.2–2.3 times the neural activation threshold, respectively. The MST electric field is more confined to the superficial cortex compared to ECT. The brain volume stimulated was much higher with ECT (up to 100%) than MST (up to 8.2%). MST with the double cone coil was the most focal and bilateral ECT was the least focal. Our results suggest a possible biophysical explanation of the reduced side effects of MST compared to ECT. Our results also indicate that the conventional ECT pulse amplitude (800–900 mA) is much higher than necessary for seizure induction. Reducing the ECT pulse amplitude should be explored as a potential means of diminishing side effects. PMID:21248385

  6. Electric field strength and focality in electroconvulsive therapy and magnetic seizure therapy: a finite element simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Zhi-De; Lisanby, Sarah H.; Peterchev, Angel V.

    2011-02-01

    We present the first computational study comparing the electric field induced by various electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and magnetic seizure therapy (MST) paradigms. Four ECT electrode configurations (bilateral, bifrontal, right unilateral, and focal electrically administered seizure therapy) and three MST coil configurations (circular, cap, and double cone) were modeled. The model incorporated a modality-specific neural activation threshold. ECT (0.3 ms pulse width) and MST induced the maximum electric field of 2.1-2.5 V cm-1 and 1.1-2.2 V cm-1 in the brain, corresponding to 6.2-7.2 times and 1.2-2.3 times the neural activation threshold, respectively. The MST electric field is more confined to the superficial cortex compared to ECT. The brain volume stimulated was much larger with ECT (up to 100%) than with MST (up to 8.2%). MST with the double-cone coil was the most focal, and bilateral ECT was the least focal. Our results suggest a possible biophysical explanation of the reduced side effects of MST compared to ECT. Our results also indicate that the conventional ECT pulse amplitude (800-900 mA) is much higher than necessary for seizure induction. Reducing the ECT pulse amplitude should be explored as a potential means of diminishing side effects.

  7. Prospective Study of 2 Bed Alarms for Detection of Nocturnal Seizures.

    PubMed

    Fulton, Stephen; Poppel, Kate Van; McGregor, Amy; Ellis, Michelle; Patters, Andrea; Wheless, James

    2013-11-01

    For parents of children with epilepsy, seizures occurring in sleep are a major concern. Risk factors for sudden unexplained death in epilepsy patients include being in bed and generalized tonic-clonic seizures. A device for detecting nocturnal seizure activity would be valuable. Children with various seizure types undergoing evaluation had standard video electroencephalography (EEG), cardiopulmonary and nursing monitoring, and 1 of 2 models (ST-2 and MP5) of a Medpage bed alarm. The video EEG record was reviewed to detect any seizures missed by the bed alarms or caregivers. The ability of the bed alarms to detect motor seizures in general and specific seizure types was tested. In 15 patients, 69 seizures were recorded by video EEG. The ST-2 did not detect any nocturnal seizures. The MP5 alarm detected 1 of 15 in sleeping patients: a generalized tonic-clonic seizure. The Medpage seizure alarms do not appear to adequately detect nocturnal seizures. PMID:23076428

  8. Enhanced sensitivity of laforin- and malin-deficient mice to the convulsant agent pentylenetetrazole

    PubMed Central

    García-Cabrero, Ana M.; Sánchez-Elexpuru, Gentzane; Serratosa, José M.; Sánchez, Marina P.

    2014-01-01

    Lafora disease is a rare form of inherited progressive myoclonus epilepsy caused by mutations in the EPM2A gene encoding laforin, or in the EPM2B gene, which encodes malin. It is characterized by the presence of polyglucosan inclusion bodies (Lafora bodies) in brain and other tissues. Genetically engineered mice lacking expression of either the laforin (Epm2a−/−) or malin (Epm2b−/−) genes display a number of neurological and behavioral abnormalities that resemble those found in patients suffering from Lafora disease; of these, both Epm2a−/− and Epm2b−/− mice have shown altered motor activity, impaired motor coordination, episodic memory deficits, and different degrees of spontaneous epileptic activity. In this study, we analyze the sensitivity of Epm2a−/− and Epm2b−/− mice to the convulsant drug pentylenetetrazol (PTZ), an antagonist of the γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptor, commonly used to induce epileptic tonic-clonic seizures in laboratory animals. PTZ-induced epileptic activity, including myoclonic jerks and tonic-clonic seizures, was analyzed in 2 age groups of mice comprising representative samples of young adult and aged mice, after administration of PTZ at sub-convulsive and convulsive doses. Epm2a−/− and Epm2b−/− mice showed a lower convulsive threshold after PTZ injections at sub-convulsive doses. A lower convulsive threshold and shorter latencies to develop epileptic seizures were observed after PTZ injections at convulsive doses. Different patterns of generalized seizures and of discharges were observed in Epm2a−/− and Epm2b−/− mice. Epm2a−/− and Epm2b−/− mice present an increased sensitivity to the convulsant agent PTZ that may reflect different degrees of increased GABAA receptor-mediated hyperexcitability. PMID:25309313

  9. Network problem threshold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gejji, Raghvendra, R.

    1992-01-01

    Network transmission errors such as collisions, CRC errors, misalignment, etc. are statistical in nature. Although errors can vary randomly, a high level of errors does indicate specific network problems, e.g. equipment failure. In this project, we have studied the random nature of collisions theoretically as well as by gathering statistics, and established a numerical threshold above which a network problem is indicated with high probability.

  10. Photosensitivity, visually sensitive seizures and epilepsies.

    PubMed

    Trenité, Dorothée G A Kasteleijn-Nolst

    2006-08-01

    Although many observations in patients with this intriguing type of epilepsy have been described and detailed studies have been performed, only a few meet the current criteria of class 1 or 2 evidence-based studies. In general, the selection bias is due to studying a referral population instead of the general population, and to different age and sex distributions of the subjects under study. Comparing the various studies is often difficult, because of differences in the populations studied (single seizures, epilepsy centre population, etc.), but also because of different methods (photic stimulator, flash frequencies, eye conditions, etc.) and the terminology used. Finally, and most crucial, in many studies there is often no information on how the data were actually obtained (EEG or clinical data or both?). The popular term "photosensitive" is used widely and applied to patients with a history of visually induced seizures, with and without a photoparoxysmal response (PPR), and to those with only a PPR. An overview of the "hard" data is given with future needs for a better understanding of this type of epilepsy and for improving the endophenotype for genetic research. It is important to standardise the studies as much as possible and describe in detail the methodology of the study, taking at least the above variables into account. PMID:16814522

  11. Seizure prediction using polynomial SVM classification.

    PubMed

    Zisheng Zhang; Parhi, Keshab K

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a novel patient-specific algorithm for prediction of seizures in epileptic patients with low hardware complexity and low power consumption. In the proposed approach, we first compute the spectrogram of the input fragmented EEG signals from a few electrodes. Each fragmented data clip is ten minutes in duration. Band powers, relative spectral powers and ratios of spectral powers are extracted as features. The features are then subjected to electrode selection and feature selection using classification and regression tree. The baseline experiment uses all features from selected electrodes and these features are then subjected to a radial basis function kernel support vector machine (RBF-SVM) classifier. The proposed method further selects a small number features from the selected electrodes and train a polynomial support vector machine (SVM) classifier with degree of 2 on these features. Prediction performances are compared between the baseline experiment and the proposed method. The algorithm is tested using intra-cranial EEG (iEEG) from the American Epilepsy Society Seizure Prediction Challenge database. The baseline experiment using a large number of features and RBF-SVM achieves a 100% sensitivity and an average AUC of 0.9985, while the proposed algorithm using only a small number of features and polynomial SVM with degree of 2 can achieve a sensitivity of 100.0%, an average area under curve (AUC) of 0.9795. For both experiments, only 10% of the available training data are used for training. PMID:26737598

  12. Photosensitivity, visually sensitive seizures and epilepsies.

    PubMed

    Trenité, Dorothée G A Kasteleijn-Nolst

    2006-08-01

    Although many observations in patients with this intriguing type of epilepsy have been described and detailed studies have been performed, only a few meet the current criteria of class 1 or 2 evidence-based studies. In general, the selection bias is due to studying a referral population instead of the general population, and to different age and sex distributions of the subjects under study. Comparing the various studies is often difficult, because of differences in the populations studied (single seizures, epilepsy centre population, etc.), but also because of different methods (photic stimulator, flash frequencies, eye conditions, etc.) and the terminology used. Finally, and most crucial, in many studies there is often no information on how the data were actually obtained (EEG or clinical data or both?). The popular term "photosensitive" is used widely and applied to patients with a history of visually induced seizures, with and without a photoparoxysmal response (PPR), and to those with only a PPR. An overview of the "hard" data is given with future needs for a better understanding of this type of epilepsy and for improving the endophenotype for genetic research. It is important to standardise the studies as much as possible and describe in detail the methodology of the study, taking at least the above variables into account.

  13. Seizures and Epilepsy and Their Relationship to Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matson, Johnny L.; Neal, Daniene

    2009-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are serious neurodevelopmental disorders which often co-occur with intellectual disabilities. A disorder which is strongly correlated with both of these disabilities are seizures and epilepsy. The purpose of this review was to provide an overview of available research on seizures and epilepsy in the ASD population…

  14. Increasing Epilepsy Awareness in Schools: A Seizure Smart Schools Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brook, Heather A.; Hiltz, Cynthia M.; Kopplin, Vicki L.; Lindeke, Linda L.

    2015-01-01

    A high prevalence of epilepsy diagnoses and seizure events among students was identified at a large Midwestern school district. In partnership with the Epilepsy Foundation of Minnesota (EFMN), a quality improvement project was conducted to provide education and resources to staff caring for school children with seizures. School nurses (N = 26)…

  15. Neuropeptide FF receptors as novel targets for limbic seizure attenuation.

    PubMed

    Portelli, Jeanelle; Meurs, Alfred; Bihel, Frederic; Hammoud, Hassan; Schmitt, Martine; De Kock, Joery; Utard, Valerie; Humbert, Jean-Paul; Bertin, Isabelle; Buffel, Ine; Coppens, Jessica; Tourwe, Dirk; Maes, Veronique; De Prins, An; Vanhaecke, Tamara; Massie, Ann; Balasubramaniam, Ambikaipakan; Boon, Paul; Bourguignon, Jean-Jacques; Simonin, Frederic; Smolders, Ilse

    2015-08-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is a well established anticonvulsant and first-in-class antiepileptic neuropeptide. In this study, the controversial role of NPY1 receptors in epilepsy was reassessed by testing two highly selective NPY1 receptor ligands and a mixed NPY1/NPFF receptor antagonist BIBP3226 in a rat model for limbic seizures. While BIBP3226 significantly attenuated the pilocarpine-induced seizures, neither of the highly selective NPY1 receptor ligands altered the seizure severity. Administration of the NPFF1/NPFF2 receptor antagonist RF9 also significantly attenuated limbic seizure activity. To further prove the involvement of NPFF receptors in these seizure-modulating effects, low and high affinity antagonists for the NPFF receptors were tested. We observed that the low affinity ligand failed to exhibit anticonvulsant properties while the two high affinity ligands significantly attenuated the seizures. Continuous NPFF1 receptor agonist administration also inhibited limbic seizures whereas bolus administration of the NPFF1 receptor agonist was without effect. This suggests that continuous agonist perfusion could result in NPFF1 receptor desensitization and mimic NPFF1 receptor antagonist administration. Our data unveil for the first time the involvement of the NPFF system in the management of limbic seizures. PMID:25963417

  16. Recognition Memory Is Impaired in Children after Prolonged Febrile Seizures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinos, Marina M.; Yoong, Michael; Patil, Shekhar; Chin, Richard F. M.; Neville, Brian G.; Scott, Rod C.; de Haan, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    Children with a history of a prolonged febrile seizure show signs of acute hippocampal injury on magnetic resonance imaging. In addition, animal studies have shown that adult rats who suffered febrile seizures during development reveal memory impairments. Together, these lines of evidence suggest that memory impairments related to hippocampal…

  17. Effects of Early Seizures on Later Behavior and Epileptogenicity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Gregory L.

    2004-01-01

    Both clinical and laboratory studies demonstrate that seizures early in life can result in permanent behavioral abnormalities and enhance epileptogenicity. Understanding the critical periods of vulnerability of the developing nervous system to seizure-induced changes may provide insights into parallel or divergent processes in the development of…

  18. Search & Seizure in the Schools. A Model Policy and Rules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartlett, Larry; And Others

    The issue of search and seizure in the public schools is clouded by conflicting legal decisions. School policies and rules on the issue should be made only after considerable deliberation and community input. Because of the lack of clarity, this model of search and seizure policy and rules is intended only as a basis for consideration of the…

  19. 19 CFR 12.101 - Seizure of prohibited switchblade knives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Seizure of prohibited switchblade knives. 12.101...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SPECIAL CLASSES OF MERCHANDISE Switchblade Knives § 12.101 Seizure of prohibited switchblade knives. (a) Importations contrary to law. Inadmissible importations which are not exported...

  20. 19 CFR 12.101 - Seizure of prohibited switchblade knives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Seizure of prohibited switchblade knives. 12.101...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SPECIAL CLASSES OF MERCHANDISE Switchblade Knives § 12.101 Seizure of prohibited switchblade knives. (a) Importations contrary to law. Inadmissible importations which are not exported...

  1. 19 CFR 162.63 - Arrests and seizures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Arrests and seizures. 162.63 Section 162.63 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INSPECTION, SEARCH, AND SEIZURE Controlled Substances, Narcotics, and Marihuana §...

  2. 19 CFR 162.63 - Arrests and seizures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Arrests and seizures. 162.63 Section 162.63 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INSPECTION, SEARCH, AND SEIZURE Controlled Substances, Narcotics, and Marihuana §...

  3. 19 CFR 162.63 - Arrests and seizures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Arrests and seizures. 162.63 Section 162.63 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INSPECTION, SEARCH, AND SEIZURE Controlled Substances, Narcotics, and Marihuana §...

  4. 19 CFR 162.63 - Arrests and seizures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Arrests and seizures. 162.63 Section 162.63 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INSPECTION, SEARCH, AND SEIZURE Controlled Substances, Narcotics, and Marihuana §...

  5. Seizure Prediction and Detection via Phase and Amplitude Lock Values

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Mark H.; Padmanabha, Akshay; Hossain, Gahangir; de Jongh Curry, Amy L.; Blaha, Charles D.

    2016-01-01

    A robust seizure prediction methodology would enable a “closed-loop” system that would only activate as impending seizure activity is detected. Such a system would eliminate ongoing stimulation to the brain, thereby eliminating such side effects as coughing, hoarseness, voice alteration, and paresthesias (Murphy et al., 1998; Ben-Menachem, 2001), while preserving overall battery life of the system. The seizure prediction and detection algorithm uses Phase/Amplitude Lock Values (PLV/ALV) which calculate the difference of phase and amplitude between electroencephalogram (EEG) electrodes local and remote to the epileptic event. PLV is used as the seizure prediction marker and signifies the emergence of abnormal neuronal activations through local neuron populations. PLV/ALVs are used as seizure detection markers to demarcate the seizure event, or when the local seizure event has propagated throughout the brain turning into a grand-mal event. We verify the performance of this methodology against the “CHB-MIT Scalp EEG Database” which features seizure attributes for testing. Through this testing, we can demonstrate a high degree of sensivity and precision of our methodology between pre-ictal and ictal events. PMID:27014017

  6. 19 CFR 162.63 - Arrests and seizures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Arrests and seizures. 162.63 Section 162.63 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INSPECTION, SEARCH, AND SEIZURE Controlled Substances, Narcotics, and Marihuana §...

  7. Seizures and hyponatremia after excessive intake of diet coke.

    PubMed

    Mortelmans, Luc J M; Van Loo, Michel; De Cauwer, Harald G; Merlevede, Karen

    2008-02-01

    We describe a case of epileptic seizures after a massive intake of diet coke. Apart from the hyponatremia due to water intoxication the convulsions can be potentiated by the high dose of caffeine and aspartame from the diet coke. To our knowledge this is the first report of seizures due to excessive diet coke intake.

  8. Electrically Induced Limbic Seizures: Preliminary Findings in a Rodent Model

    PubMed Central

    Kowski, Alexander B; Holtkamp, Martin

    2015-01-01

    In epilepsy, novel pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatment approaches are commonly assessed in model systems of acute motor and often generalized seizures. We developed a rodent model with short-term electrical stimulation of the perforant path resulting in stereotyped limbic seizures. Limbic structures play a major role in human intractable epilepsy. In 10 rats, single electrical 5-second and 20-Hz stimuli to the perforant path reliably produced limbic seizures characterized by resting behavior and subtle motor signs. Electrophysiological recordings from the dentate gyrus demonstrated a seizure pattern with 4-Hz to 5-Hz discharges. Multiple inductions of seizures within 72 hours did not alter behavioral and electrophysiological seizure characteristics. Electrophysiological excitatory and inhibitory parameters assessed by evoked single and paired pulses did not change with increasing number of seizures. We present preliminary findings on a new model of electrically induced limbic seizures of mesiotemporal origin. This model may represent a reliable screening tool for new treatment approaches such as deep brain stimulation. PMID:25861223

  9. 14 CFR 13.17 - Seizure of aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Seizure of aircraft. 13.17 Section 13.17... INVESTIGATIVE AND ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Legal Enforcement Actions § 13.17 Seizure of aircraft. (a) Under... by the Regional Administrator of the region, or by the Chief Counsel, may summarily seize an...

  10. 14 CFR 13.17 - Seizure of aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Seizure of aircraft. 13.17 Section 13.17... INVESTIGATIVE AND ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Legal Enforcement Actions § 13.17 Seizure of aircraft. (a) Under... by the Regional Administrator of the region, or by the Chief Counsel, may summarily seize an...

  11. 14 CFR 13.17 - Seizure of aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Seizure of aircraft. 13.17 Section 13.17... INVESTIGATIVE AND ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Legal Enforcement Actions § 13.17 Seizure of aircraft. (a) Under... by the Regional Administrator of the region, or by the Chief Counsel, may summarily seize an...

  12. 14 CFR 13.17 - Seizure of aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Seizure of aircraft. 13.17 Section 13.17... INVESTIGATIVE AND ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Legal Enforcement Actions § 13.17 Seizure of aircraft. (a) Under... by the Regional Administrator of the region, or by the Chief Counsel, may summarily seize an...

  13. 14 CFR 13.17 - Seizure of aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Seizure of aircraft. 13.17 Section 13.17... INVESTIGATIVE AND ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Legal Enforcement Actions § 13.17 Seizure of aircraft. (a) Under... by the Regional Administrator of the region, or by the Chief Counsel, may summarily seize an...

  14. Detection of early seizures by diffuse optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tao; Hajihashemi, M. Reza; Zhou, Junli; Carney, Paul R.; Jiang, Huabei

    2015-03-01

    In epilepsy it has been challenging to detect early changes in brain activity that occurs prior to seizure onset and to map their origin and evolution for possible intervention. Besides, preclinical seizure experiments need to be conducted in awake animals with images reconstructed and displayed in real-time. We demonstrate using a rat model of generalized epilepsy that diffuse optical tomography (DOT) provides a unique functional neuroimaging modality for noninvasively and continuously tracking brain activities with high spatiotemporal resolution. We developed methods to conduct seizure experiments in fully awake rats using a subject-specific helmet and a restraining mechanism. For the first time, we detected early hemodynamic responses with heterogeneous patterns several minutes preceding the electroencephalographic seizure onset, supporting the presence of a "pre-seizure" state both in anesthetized and awake rats. Using a novel time-series analysis of scattering images, we show that the analysis of scattered diffuse light is a sensitive and reliable modality for detecting changes in neural activity associated with generalized seizure. We found widespread hemodynamic changes evolving from local regions of the bilateral cortex and thalamus to the entire brain, indicating that the onset of generalized seizures may originate locally rather than diffusely. Together, these findings suggest DOT represents a powerful tool for mapping early seizure onset and propagation pathways.

  15. Another Tool in the Fight against Epilepsy: Seizure Response Dogs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollingsworth, Jan Carter

    2007-01-01

    Epilepsy, a chronic neurological seizure disorder, affects 2.7 million Americans, half of them children, and worldwide, it is the most common brain disorder. While there is not a cure for epilepsy, the goal of treatment is to achieve the greatest freedom from seizures that can be attained with the minimal amount of side effects. These days…

  16. Neuropeptide FF receptors as novel targets for limbic seizure attenuation.

    PubMed

    Portelli, Jeanelle; Meurs, Alfred; Bihel, Frederic; Hammoud, Hassan; Schmitt, Martine; De Kock, Joery; Utard, Valerie; Humbert, Jean-Paul; Bertin, Isabelle; Buffel, Ine; Coppens, Jessica; Tourwe, Dirk; Maes, Veronique; De Prins, An; Vanhaecke, Tamara; Massie, Ann; Balasubramaniam, Ambikaipakan; Boon, Paul; Bourguignon, Jean-Jacques; Simonin, Frederic; Smolders, Ilse

    2015-08-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is a well established anticonvulsant and first-in-class antiepileptic neuropeptide. In this study, the controversial role of NPY1 receptors in epilepsy was reassessed by testing two highly selective NPY1 receptor ligands and a mixed NPY1/NPFF receptor antagonist BIBP3226 in a rat model for limbic seizures. While BIBP3226 significantly attenuated the pilocarpine-induced seizures, neither of the highly selective NPY1 receptor ligands altered the seizure severity. Administration of the NPFF1/NPFF2 receptor antagonist RF9 also significantly attenuated limbic seizure activity. To further prove the involvement of NPFF receptors in these seizure-modulating effects, low and high affinity antagonists for the NPFF receptors were tested. We observed that the low affinity ligand failed to exhibit anticonvulsant properties while the two high affinity ligands significantly attenuated the seizures. Continuous NPFF1 receptor agonist administration also inhibited limbic seizures whereas bolus administration of the NPFF1 receptor agonist was without effect. This suggests that continuous agonist perfusion could result in NPFF1 receptor desensitization and mimic NPFF1 receptor antagonist administration. Our data unveil for the first time the involvement of the NPFF system in the management of limbic seizures.

  17. Seizures in relation to shunt dysfunction in children with meningomyelocele.

    PubMed

    Hack, C H; Enrile, B G; Donat, J F; Kosnik, E

    1990-01-01

    To determine whether seizures are a reliable sign of increased intraventricular pressure in children with shunt-dependent hydrocephalus and meningomyelocele, we performed a retrospective chart review of 346 patients with meningomyelocele and shunt-dependent hydrocephalus. Fifty-one patients had seizures. Seizure episodes were investigated to determine whether they were temporally associated with shunt dysfunction. Episodes of actual or presumed shunt dysfunction were analyzed as to presenting symptoms, ventriculogram, computed tomography scan, and shunt film results. These 51 patients had 129 admissions for possible shunt dysfunction. One hundred one admissions were due to increased intraventricular pressure; nine (9%) of these, had a seizure as one of the presenting symptoms. All of the nine episodes had other common presenting symptoms of shunt dysfunction, such as headache, vomiting, lethargy, or respiratory compromise. We conclude that seizures alone are an inadequate predictor of shunt dysfunction in children with meningomyelocele, but can be seen as one of the presenting symptoms.

  18. Neonatal seizure detection using atomic decomposition with a novel dictionary.

    PubMed

    Nagaraj, Sunil Belur; Stevenson, Nathan J; Marnane, William P; Boylan, Geraldine B; Lightbody, Gordon

    2014-11-01

    Atomic decomposition (AD) can be used to efficiently decompose an arbitrary signal. In this paper, we present a method to detect neonatal electroencephalogram (EEG) seizure based on AD via orthogonal matching pursuit using a novel, application-specific, dictionary. The dictionary consists of pseudoperiodic Duffing oscillator atoms which are designed to be coherent with the seizure epochs. The relative structural complexity (a measure of the rate of convergence of AD) is used as the sole feature for seizure detection. The proposed feature was tested on a large clinical dataset of 826 h of EEG data from 18 full-term newborns with 1389 seizures. The seizure detection system using the proposed dictionary was able to achieve a median receiver operator characteristic area of 0.91 (IQR 0.87-0.95) across 18 neonates. PMID:25330152

  19. Clinically silent seizures in a neonate with tuberous sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ikeno, Mitsuru; Okumura, Akihisa; Abe, Shinpei; Igarashi, Ayuko; Hisata, Ken; Shoji, Hiromichi; Shimizu, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Although seizures during infancy in patients with tuberous sclerosis complex are common, seizures in neonates are infrequent. Here, we report the clinical course and electroencephalography (EEG) findings of a neonate with tuberous sclerosis complex associated with clinically silent seizures. The patient was a girl in whom cardiac tumors were detected on fetal ultrasonography. Brain magnetic resonance imaging during the neonatal period showed subependymal and cortical tubers. Routine EEG indicated unexpected ictal changes with no noticeable clinical symptoms. Ictal EEG was associated with a subtle increase in heart rate and a brief increase in chin electromyogram. These changes were difficult to identify clinically. The patient later developed focal seizures and epileptic spasms and had severe psychomotor delay. The present case suggests the occurrence of clinically silent seizures before the appearance of epileptic spasms in infants with tuberous sclerosis, and that EEG is an option for neonates with a prenatal diagnosis. PMID:26712128

  20. Sleep Related Hypermotor Seizures with a Right Parietal Onset.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Steve A; Figorilli, Michela; Casaceli, Giuseppe; Proserpio, Paola; Nobili, Lino

    2015-08-01

    Nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (NFLE) is a syndrome characterized by the occurrence of sleep related seizures of variable complexity and duration. Hypermotor seizures (HMS) represent a classic manifestation of this syndrome, associated with a perturbation of the ventromesial frontal cortex and anterior cingulate gyrus regions. Nevertheless, in recent years, reports have showed that the seizure onset zone (SOZ) need not be of frontal origin to generate HMS. Here we report an unusual case of a patient presenting with a seven-year history of drug-resistant sleep related HMS arising from the mesial parietal region. The presence of an infrequent feeling of levitation before the HMS was key to suspecting a subtle focal cortical dysplasia in the right precuneus region. A stereo-EEG investigation confirmed the extra-frontal seizure onset of the HMS and highlighted the interrelationship between unstable sleep and seizure precipitation. PMID:25902821

  1. The piriform, perirhinal, and entorhinal cortex in seizure generation

    PubMed Central

    Vismer, Marta S.; Forcelli, Patrick A.; Skopin, Mark D.; Gale, Karen; Koubeissi, Mohamad Z.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding neural network behavior is essential to shed light on epileptogenesis and seizure propagation. The interconnectivity and plasticity of mammalian limbic and neocortical brain regions provide the substrate for the hypersynchrony and hyperexcitability associated with seizure activity. Recurrent unprovoked seizures are the hallmark of epilepsy, and limbic epilepsy is the most common type of medically-intractable focal epilepsy in adolescents and adults that necessitates surgical evaluation. In this review, we describe the role and relationships among the piriform (PIRC), perirhinal (PRC), and entorhinal cortex (ERC) in seizure-generation and epilepsy. The inherent function, anatomy, and histological composition of these cortical regions are discussed. In addition, the neurotransmitters, intrinsic and extrinsic connections, and the interaction of these regions are described. Furthermore, we provide evidence based on clinical research and animal models that suggest that these cortical regions may act as key seizure-trigger zones and, even, epileptogenesis. PMID:26074779

  2. Prolactin and gonadotrophin changes following generalised and partial seizures.

    PubMed Central

    Dana-Haeri, J; Trimble, M r; Oxley, J

    1983-01-01

    Postictal values of prolactin, LH and FSH have been recorded in patients with both generalised tonic-clonic and partial seizures. Elevations of prolactin and LH were seen immediately and at 20 minutes in males and females with generalised attacks. At sixty minutes values for prolactin had fallen to baseline levels, but LH remained elevated. FSH values were increased in females only, at twenty and sixty minutes. Following partial seizures prolactin was elevated, especially with complex partial seizures, at twenty minutes. These results are discussed in the light of known electrophysiological mechanisms relating to partial seizures, and clinical guidelines for the use of neurohormonal tests in the evaluation of seizures are suggested. PMID:6405014

  3. Single photon emission computed tomography in seizure disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Denays, R; Rubinstein, M; Ham, H; Piepsz, A; Noël, P

    1988-01-01

    Fourteen children with various seizure disorders were studied using a cerebral blood flow tracer, 123I iodoamphetamine (0.05 mCi/kg), and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). In the five patients with radiological lesions, SPECT showed congruent or more extensive abnormalities. Five of the nine children with a normal scan on computed tomography had abnormal SPECT studies consisting of focal hypoperfusion, diffuse hemispheric hypoperfusion, multifocal and bilateral hypoperfusion, or focal hyperperfusion. A focal lesion seen on SPECT has been found in children with tonic-clonic seizures suggesting secondarily generalised seizures. Moreover the pattern seen on SPECT seemed to be related to the clinical status. An extensive impairment found on SPECT was associated with a poor evolution in terms of intellectual performance and seizure frequency. Conversely all children with a normal result on SPECT had less than two seizures per year and normal neurological and intellectual development. Images Figure PMID:3264135

  4. Pre-seizure state identified by diffuse optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tao; Zhou, Junli; Jiang, Ruixin; Yang, Hao; Carney, Paul R.; Jiang, Huabei

    2014-01-01

    In epilepsy it has been challenging to detect early changes in brain activity that occurs prior to seizure onset and to map their origin and evolution for possible intervention. Here we demonstrate using a rat model of generalized epilepsy that diffuse optical tomography (DOT) provides a unique functional neuroimaging modality for noninvasively and continuously tracking such brain activities with high spatiotemporal resolution. We detected early hemodynamic responses with heterogeneous patterns, along with intracranial electroencephalogram gamma power changes, several minutes preceding the electroencephalographic seizure onset, supporting the presence of a ``pre-seizure'' state. We also observed the decoupling between local hemodynamic and neural activities. We found widespread hemodynamic changes evolving from local regions of the bilateral cortex and thalamus to the entire brain, indicating that the onset of generalized seizures may originate locally rather than diffusely. Together, these findings suggest DOT represents a powerful tool for mapping early seizure onset and propagation pathways.

  5. MRI and Ultrasound Injury in Preterm Infants with Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Glass, Hannah C.; Bonifacio, Sonia L.; Sullivan, Joseph; Rogers, Elizabeth; Ferriero, Donna M.; Goldstein, Ruth; Barkovich, A. James

    2010-01-01

    The utility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a universal screening tool in preterm infants has been contested; however, MR is increasingly used in investigation of neonatal seizures. We evaluated 236 infants <34 weeks gestation at birth. Seizures were documented according to clinical standard of care. Infants were imaged using MRI and head ultrasound during the neonatal period. A neuroradiologist and ultrasonologist performed detailed reviews of the images. Nine infants (3.8%) had clinical suspicion of seizures during the hospital course. MRI was abnormal in each case (three with intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) and periventricular hemorrhagic infarct, two with findings of hypoxia-ischemia, three with white matter injury (WMI) and one each with schizencephaly and dysplasia –one infant had two lesions). Periventricular hemorrhagic infarct was more common in infants with seizures (33% vs 6% of those without seizures, OR 8.23, 95% CI 1.8-36.7). Infants with seizures were more likely to have WMI, though the difference was not significant (RR 2.4, 95% CI 0.54-11.1, P=0.3). Head ultrasound failed to detect the extent of brain abnormality in eight (89%) of the infants. In this large cohort, infants with clinical suspicion of seizures had a high rate of MRI abnormalities that were not as well characterized by head ultrasound. MRI may be the study of choice for evaluating preterm infants with seizures. Further studies using better seizure monitoring are necessary to evaluate electrographic seizures and their relationship to brain injury on MRI. PMID:19745086

  6. Ambulatory Seizure Monitoring: From Concept to Prototype Device

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Mark H.; Threatt, Madeline; Solies, Karsten M.; McFerrin, Brent M.; Hopf, Lindsey B.; Birdwell, J. Douglas; Sillay, Karl A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The brain, made up of billions of neurons and synapses, is the marvelous core of human thought, action and memory. However, if neuronal activity manifests into abnormal electrical activity across the brain, neural behavior may exhibit synchronous neural firings known as seizures. If unprovoked seizures occur repeatedly, a patient may be diagnosed with epilepsy. Purpose The scope of this project is to develop an ambulatory seizure monitoring system that can be used away from a hospital, making it possible for the user to stay at home, and primary care personnel to monitor a patient's seizure activity in order to provide deeper analysis of the patient's condition and apply personalized intervention techniques. Methods The ambulatory seizure monitoring device is a research device that has been developed with the objective of acquiring a portable, clean electroencephalography (EEG) signal and transmitting it wirelessly to a handheld device for processing and notification. Result This device is comprised of 4 phases: acquisition, transmission, processing and notification. During the acquisition stage, the EEG signal is detected using EEG electrodes; these signals are filtered and amplified before being transmitted in the second stage. The processing stage encompasses the signal processing and seizure prediction. A notification is sent to the patient and designated contacts, given an impending seizure. Each of these phases is comprised of various design components, hardware and software. The experimental findings illustrate that there may be a triggering mechanism through the phase lock value method that enables seizure prediction. Conclusion The device addresses the need for long-term monitoring of the patient's seizure condition in order to provide the clinician a better understanding of the seizure's duration and frequency and ultimately provide the best remedy for the patient.

  7. Lamotrigine monotherapy for newly diagnosed typical absence seizures in children☆

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Gregory L.; Frank, L. Matthew; Sheth, Raj D.; Philbrook, Bryan; Wooten, John D.; Vuong, Alain; Kerls, Susan; Hammer, Anne E.; Messenheimer, John

    2008-01-01

    Summary Purpose To evaluate the efficacy, tolerability, and effects on behavior and psychosocial functioning of lamotrigine monotherapy in children with newly diagnosed typical absence seizures. Patients and methods Children meeting enrollment criteria (n = 54) received a confirmatory 24-h ambulatory electroencephalogram (EEG) and then entered a Escalation Phase of up to 20-weeks during which lamotrigine was titrated until seizures were controlled or maximum dose (10.2 mg/kg) was reached. Seizure freedom was assessed by diary review and clinic hyperventilation (clinic HV) and then confirmed by EEG with hyperventilation (HV/EEG). Patients who maintained seizure freedom for two consecutive weekly visits were entered into the Maintenance Phase (n = 30). Diary, clinic HV, and HV/EEG data were supplemented with 24-h ambulatory EEG at baseline and the ends of the Escalation and Maintenance Phases. Health outcome assessments were completed at screening and at the end of the Maintenance Phase. Results By the end of the Escalation Phase, seizure-free rates (responders) were 59% by seizure diary (n = 51), 56% by HV/EEG (n = 54) (primary endpoint), and 49% by 24-h ambulatory EEG (n = 49). During the Maintenance Phase, 89% (week 24) and 86% (week 32) remained seizure free by diary (n = 28), 78% by clinic HV (n = 27), and 81% by 24-h ambulatory EEG (n = 26). Seizure freedom was first observed beginning at the fifth week of the Escalation Phase. The most frequent adverse events were headache and cough. Health outcome scores were either improved or unchanged at the end of the Maintenance Phase. Conclusions Lamotrigine monotherapy results in complete seizure freedom in a substantial number of children with typical absence seizures. Lamotrigine was well tolerated in this study. PMID:18778916

  8. Ambulatory Seizure Monitoring: From Concept to Prototype Device

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Mark H.; Threatt, Madeline; Solies, Karsten M.; McFerrin, Brent M.; Hopf, Lindsey B.; Birdwell, J. Douglas; Sillay, Karl A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The brain, made up of billions of neurons and synapses, is the marvelous core of human thought, action and memory. However, if neuronal activity manifests into abnormal electrical activity across the brain, neural behavior may exhibit synchronous neural firings known as seizures. If unprovoked seizures occur repeatedly, a patient may be diagnosed with epilepsy. Purpose The scope of this project is to develop an ambulatory seizure monitoring system that can be used away from a hospital, making it possible for the user to stay at home, and primary care personnel to monitor a patient's seizure activity in order to provide deeper analysis of the patient's condition and apply personalized intervention techniques. Methods The ambulatory seizure monitoring device is a research device that has been developed with the objective of acquiring a portable, clean electroencephalography (EEG) signal and transmitting it wirelessly to a handheld device for processing and notification. Result This device is comprised of 4 phases: acquisition, transmission, processing and notification. During the acquisition stage, the EEG signal is detected using EEG electrodes; these signals are filtered and amplified before being transmitted in the second stage. The processing stage encompasses the signal processing and seizure prediction. A notification is sent to the patient and designated contacts, given an impending seizure. Each of these phases is comprised of various design components, hardware and software. The experimental findings illustrate that there may be a triggering mechanism through the phase lock value method that enables seizure prediction. Conclusion The device addresses the need for long-term monitoring of the patient's seizure condition in order to provide the clinician a better understanding of the seizure's duration and frequency and ultimately provide the best remedy for the patient. PMID:27647960

  9. Seizure, Fit or Attack? The Use of Diagnostic Labels by Patients with Epileptic or Non-Epileptic Seizures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plug, Leendert; Sharrack, Basil; Reuber, Markus

    2010-01-01

    We present an analysis of the use of diagnostic labels such as "seizure", "attack", "fit", and "blackout" by patients who experience seizures. While previous research on patients' preferences for diagnostic terminology has relied on questionnaires, we assess patients' own preferences and their responses to a doctor's use of different labels…

  10. Seizure onset detection based on a Uni- or multi-modal intelligent seizure acquisition (UISA/MISA) system.

    PubMed

    Conradsen, Isa; Beniczky, Sandor; Wolf, Peter; Henriksen, Jonas; Sams, Thomas; Sorensen, Helge B D

    2010-01-01

    An automatic Uni- or Multi-modal Intelligent Seizure Acquisition (UISA/MISA) system is highly applicable for onset detection of epileptic seizures based on motion data. The modalities used are surface electromyography (sEMG), acceleration (ACC) and angular velocity (ANG). The new proposed automatic algorithm on motion data is extracting features as "log-sum" measures of discrete wavelet components. Classification into the two groups "seizure" versus "non-seizure" is made based on the support vector machine (SVM) algorithm. The algorithm performs with a sensitivity of 91-100%, a median latency of 1 second and a specificity of 100% on multi-modal data from five healthy subjects simulating seizures. The uni-modal algorithm based on sEMG data from the subjects and patients performs satisfactorily in some cases. As expected, our results clearly show superiority of the multi-modal approach, as compared with the uni-modal one. PMID:21096611

  11. Seizure Clustering during Drug Treatment Affects Seizure Outcome and Mortality of Childhood-Onset Epilepsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sillanpaa, Matti; Schmidt, Dieter

    2008-01-01

    To provide evidence of whether seizure clustering is associated with drug resistance and increased mortality in childhood-onset epilepsy, a prospective, long-term population-based study was performed. One hundred and twenty patients who had been followed since disease onset (average age 37.0 years, SD 7.1, median 40.0, range 11-42; incident cases)…

  12. Body packing: from seizures to laparotomy.

    PubMed

    Janczak, Joanna M; Beutner, Ulrich; Hasler, Karin

    2015-01-01

    Body packing is a common method for illegal drug trafficking. Complications associated with body packing can be severe and even lead to rapid death. Thus, a timely diagnosis is warranted. As most body packers initially do not show any symptoms, making a correct diagnosis can be rather challenging. We describe a case of a 41-year-old male, who was admitted with an epileptic seizure and who turned out to be a cocaine intoxicated body packer. Due to neurological and cardiovascular deterioration an emergency surgery was performed. Four bags of cocaine could be removed. We discuss the current management regimen in symptomatic and asymptomatic body packers and highlight pearls and pitfalls with diagnosis and treatment. PMID:25883813

  13. Successful psychotherapy for psychogenic seizures in men.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Maria Clare; Schofield, Margot J; Middleton, Warwick

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study examined factors contributing to the development and successful treatment of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES), in civilian men. In-depth interviews were conducted with therapist-client dyads comprising two male clients who had been successfully treated for PNES and their therapists. A theory-building case study approach provided evidence that those factors known to contribute to PNES and other somatoform symptoms in females and in males engaged in war also contributed to these symptoms in these two civilian males. In addition, PNES in these civilian males occurred in contexts where masculine identity was developmentally curtailed and socially constrained. Successful treatments occurred in long-term therapeutic relationships that sanctioned verbal expression of strong emotion and provided the attunement necessary for development of a robust masculine identity. These findings have implications for the funding of therapy, and training of therapists.

  14. Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures and movement disorders

    PubMed Central

    Erro, Roberto; Trinka, Eugen; Turri, Giulia; Edwards, Mark J.; Tinazzi, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Purpose of review: Neurologic symptoms due to a psychogenic cause are frequently seen in clinical practice. Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) and psychogenic movement disorders (PMD) are among the most common psychogenic neurologic disorders. PNES and PMD are usually investigated and managed separately by different neurology subspecialists. We review the main epidemiologic and clinical features of both PNES and PMD, aiming to highlight their similarities and differences and to see whether a common framework for these disorders exists. Recent findings: Data from the literature show that there is a profound overlap between PNES and PMD, which would argue for a larger unifying pathophysiology with variable phenotypic manifestations. Summary: Collaborative and integrated research among epileptologists, movement disorders experts, psychiatrists, psychologists, and physiotherapists may increase our collective knowledge about the pathophysiologic mechanisms of PNES and PMD and therefore improve outcomes for these patients. PMID:27104066

  15. A study of the dynamics of seizure propagation across micro domains in the vicinity of the seizure onset zone

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Ishita; Kudela, Pawel; Korzeniewska, Anna; Franaszczuk, Piotr J.; Anderson, William S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The use of micro-electrode arrays to measure electrical activity from the surface of the brain is increasingly being investigated as a means to improve seizure onset zone localization. In this work, we used a multivariate autoregressive model to determine the evolution of seizure dynamics in the 70 – 110 Hz high frequency band across micro-domains sampled by such micro-electrode arrays. Approach We used 7 complex partial seizures recorded from 4 patients undergoing intracranial monitoring for surgical evaluation to reconstruct the seizure propagation pattern over sliding windows using a directed transfer function measure. Main results We showed that a directed transfer function can be used to estimate the flow of seizure activity in a set of simulated micro-electrode data with known propagation pattern. In general, depending on the location of the micro-electrode grid with respect to the clinical seizure onset zone and the time from seizure onset, ictal propagation changed in directional characteristics over a 2 to 10 seconds time scale, with gross directionality limited to spatial dimensions of approximately 9mm2. It was also seen that the strongest seizure patterns in the high frequency band and their sources over such micro-domains are more stable over time and across seizures bordering the clinically determined seizure onset zone than inside. Significance This type of propagation analysis might in future provide an additional tool to epileptologists for characterizing epileptogenic tissue. This will potentially help narrowing down resection zones without compromising essential brain functions as well as provide important information about targeting anti-epileptic stimulation devices. PMID:26061006

  16. Coloring geographical threshold graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Bradonjic, Milan; Percus, Allon; Muller, Tobias

    2008-01-01

    We propose a coloring algorithm for sparse random graphs generated by the geographical threshold graph (GTG) model, a generalization of random geometric graphs (RGG). In a GTG, nodes are distributed in a Euclidean space, and edges are assigned according to a threshold function involving the distance between nodes as well as randomly chosen node weights. The motivation for analyzing this model is that many real networks (e.g., wireless networks, the Internet, etc.) need to be studied by using a 'richer' stochastic model (which in this case includes both a distance between nodes and weights on the nodes). Here, we analyze the GTG coloring algorithm together with the graph's clique number, showing formally that in spite of the differences in structure between GTG and RGG, the asymptotic behavior of the chromatic number is identical: {chi}1n 1n n / 1n n (1 + {omicron}(1)). Finally, we consider the leading corrections to this expression, again using the coloring algorithm and clique number to provide bounds on the chromatic number. We show that the gap between the lower and upper bound is within C 1n n / (1n 1n n){sup 2}, and specify the constant C.

  17. Laser threshold magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeske, Jan; Cole, Jared H.; Greentree, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new type of sensor, which uses diamond containing the optically active nitrogen-vacancy (NV-) centres as a laser medium. The magnetometer can be operated at room-temperature and generates light that can be readily fibre coupled, thereby permitting use in industrial applications and remote sensing. By combining laser pumping with a radio-frequency Rabi-drive field, an external magnetic field changes the fluorescence of the NV- centres. We use this change in fluorescence level to push the laser above threshold, turning it on with an intensity controlled by the external magnetic field, which provides a coherent amplification of the readout signal with very high contrast. This mechanism is qualitatively different from conventional NV--based magnetometers which use fluorescence measurements, based on incoherent photon emission. We term our approach laser threshold magnetometer (LTM). We predict that an NV--based LTM with a volume of 1 mm3 can achieve shot-noise limited dc sensitivity of 1.86 fT /\\sqrt{{{Hz}}} and ac sensitivity of 3.97 fT /\\sqrt{{{Hz}}}.

  18. Evidence for consolidation of neuronal assemblies after seizures in humans.

    PubMed

    Bower, Mark R; Stead, Matt; Bower, Regina S; Kucewicz, Michal T; Sulc, Vlastimil; Cimbalnik, Jan; Brinkmann, Benjamin H; Vasoli, Vincent M; St Louis, Erik K; Meyer, Fredric B; Marsh, W Richard; Worrell, Gregory A

    2015-01-21

    The establishment of memories involves reactivation of waking neuronal activity patterns and strengthening of associated neural circuits during slow-wave sleep (SWS), a process known as "cellular consolidation" (Dudai and Morris, 2013). Reactivation of neural activity patterns during waking behaviors that occurs on a timescale of seconds to minutes is thought to constitute memory recall (O'Keefe and Nadel, 1978), whereas consolidation of memory traces may be revealed and served by correlated firing (reactivation) that appears during sleep under conditions suitable for synaptic modification (Buhry et al., 2011). Although reactivation has been observed in human neuronal recordings (Gelbard-Sagiv et al., 2008; Miller et al., 2013), reactivation during sleep has not, likely because data are difficult to obtain and the effect is subtle. Seizures, however, provide intense and synchronous, yet sparse activation (Bower et al., 2012) that could produce a stronger consolidation effect if seizures activate learning-related mechanisms similar to those activated by learned tasks. Continuous wide-bandwidth recordings from patients undergoing intracranial monitoring for drug-resistant epilepsy revealed reactivation of seizure-related neuronal activity during subsequent SWS, but not wakefulness. Those neuronal assemblies that were most strongly activated during seizures showed the largest correlation changes, suggesting that consolidation selectively strengthened neuronal circuits activated by seizures. These results suggest that seizures "hijack" physiological learning mechanisms and also suggest a novel epilepsy therapy targeting neuronal dynamics during post-seizure sleep.

  19. Patient-Specific Early Seizure Detection from Scalp EEG

    PubMed Central

    Minasyan, Georgiy R.; Chatten, John B.; Chatten, Martha Jane; Harner, Richard N.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Develop a method for automatic detection of seizures prior to or immediately after clinical onset using features derived from scalp EEG. Methods This detection method is patient-specific. It uses recurrent neural networks and a variety of input features. For each patient we trained and optimized the detection algorithm for two cases: 1) during the period immediately preceding seizure onset, and 2) during the period immediately following seizure onset. Continuous scalp EEG recordings (duration 15 – 62 h, median 25 h) from 25 patients, including a total of 86 seizures, were used in this study. Results Pre-onset detection was successful in 14 of the 25 patients. For these 14 patients, all of the testing seizures were detected prior to seizure onset with a median pre-onset time of 51 sec and false positive rate was 0.06/h. Post-onset detection had 100% sensitivity, 0.023/hr false positive rate and median delay of 4 sec after onset. Conclusions The unique results of this study relate to pre-onset detection. Significance Our results suggest that reliable pre-onset seizure detection may be achievable for a significant subset of epilepsy patients without use of invasive electrodes. PMID:20461014

  20. Epidemiology of Acute Symptomatic Seizures among Adult Medical Admissions

    PubMed Central

    Nwani, Paul Osemeke; Nwosu, Maduaburochukwu Cosmas; Nwosu, Monica Nonyelum

    2016-01-01

    Acute symptomatic seizures are seizures occurring in close temporal relationship with an acute central nervous system (CNS) insult. The objective of the study was to determine the frequency of presentation and etiological risk factors of acute symptomatic seizures among adult medical admissions. It was a two-year retrospective study of the medical files of adults patients admitted with acute symptomatic seizures as the first presenting event. There were 94 cases of acute symptomatic seizures accounting for 5.2% (95% CI: 4.17–6.23) of the 1,802 medical admissions during the period under review. There were 49 (52.1%) males and 45 (47.9%) females aged between 18 years and 84 years. The etiological risk factors of acute symptomatic seizures were infections in 36.2% (n = 34) of cases, stroke in 29.8% (n = 28), metabolic in 12.8% (n = 12), toxic in 10.6% (n = 10), and other causes in 10.6% (n = 10). Infective causes were more among those below fifty years while stroke was more in those aged fifty years and above. CNS infections and stroke were the prominent causes of acute symptomatic seizures. This is an evidence of the “double tragedy” facing developing countries, the unresolved threat of infectious diseases on one hand and the increasing impact of noncommunicable diseases on the other one. PMID:26904280

  1. Familial Clustering of Seizure Types within the Idiopathic Generalized Epilepsies

    PubMed Central

    Winawer, Melodie R.; Marini, Carla; Grinton, Bronwyn E; Rabinowitz, Daniel; Berkovic, Samuel F.; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Ottman, Ruth

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To examine the genetic relationships among epilepsies with different seizure types --myoclonic, absence, and generalized tonic-clonic -- within the idiopathic generalized epilepsies (IGEs). Background: Careful phenotype definition in the epilepsies may allow division into groups that share susceptibility genes. Examination of seizure type, a phenotypic characteristic less complex than IGE syndrome, may help to define more homogeneous subgroups. Methods: Using the approach that found evidence for distinct genetic effects on myoclonic vs absence seizures in families from the Epilepsy Family Study of Columbia University, we examined an independent sample of families from Australia and Israel. We also examined the familial clustering of generalized tonic clonic seizures (GTCs) within the IGEs in our two combined datasets. Families were defined as concordant if all affected members had the same type of seizure or IGE syndrome, as appropriate for the analysis performed. Results: The proportion of families concordant for myoclonic vs absence seizures was greater than expected by chance in the Australian families. In addition, GTCs clustered in families with IGEs to a degree greater than expected by chance. Conclusions: These results provide additional evidence for distinct genetic effects on myoclonic vs absence seizures in an independent set of families. They also suggest that there is a genetic influence on the occurrence of GTCs within the IGEs. PMID:16116110

  2. Auditory and vestibular pathology of seizure-prone chicks.

    PubMed

    Beck, M M; Kuenzel, W J; Switzer, R C

    1983-01-31

    The mutant sex-linked lethal recessive px (paroxysmal) gene, expressed in White Leghorn chicks (Gallus domesticus) causes seizures beginning on approximately day 8 post-hatching. Seizures are spontaneous and inducible by auditory but not by photic stimulation. Prior to seizure onset px chicks are indistinguishable from non-px siblings. With seizure onset is a decrease in food intake which causes deterioration and death by 4-10 weeks of age. In a preliminary histological study conducted on 22-day-old seizure-prone chicks, brains were perfused and sections treated according to a modified cupric-silver staining technique. Nuclei and fiber tracts of px auditory and vestibular systems were extensively degenerated; control brains showed essentially no degeneration. A second experiment was conducted with preseizure chicks to determine whether and to what extent degeneration occurs prior to seizure onset. Deep nuclei of px cerebellum appeared to be the first seriously affected (5 days of age). Extent of degeneration progressed steadily over time through 20 days of age, by which time all components of the two sensory systems were maximally affected. Ambient noise did not affect onset or extent of degeneration, nor did it affect onset of seizures. PMID:6824948

  3. Seizures Related to Vitamin B6 Deficiency in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong-Gun; Lee, Yeonkyung; Shin, Hyeeun; Kang, Kyusik; Park, Jong-Moo; Kim, Byung-Kun; Kwon, Ohyun; Lee, Jung-Ju

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin B6 is closely associated with functions of the nervous, immune, and endocrine systems. Its deficiency may result in neurological disorders including convulsions and epileptic encephalopathy. Until today, this has only been reported in infants, children, and critically ill adult patients. We report a case of a 36year-old man with chronic alcoholism who presented with seizures after gastrointestinal disturbance. His seizures persisted even after treatment with antiepileptic drugs, but eventually disappeared after administration of pyridoxine. Hence, vitamin B6 deficiency may cause seizures in adult patients with chronic alcoholism. PMID:26157671

  4. Involuntary movements misdiagnosed as seizure during vitamin B12 treatment.

    PubMed

    Carman, Kursat Bora; Belgemen, Tugba; Yis, Uluc

    2013-11-01

    Seizures and epilepsy are a common problem in childhood. Nonepileptic paroxysmal events are conditions that can mimic seizure and frequent in early childhood. Nonepileptic paroxysmal events can be due to physiological or exaggerated physiological responses, parasomnias, movement disorders, behavioral or psychiatric disturbances, or to hemodynamic, respiratory, or gastrointestinal dysfunction. Vitamin B12 deficiency is a treatable cause of failure to thrive and developmental regression, involuntary movements, and anemia. Involuntary movements rarely may appear a few days after the initiation of vitamin B12 treatments and might be misdiagnosed as seizure. Here, we report 2 patients who presented with involuntary movements with his video image.

  5. Epileptic seizures evoked by card games, draughts, and similar games.

    PubMed

    Senanayake, N

    1987-01-01

    Three Asian patients, since adolescence, had myoclonic jerks and tonic-clonic seizures during card games, draughts, and a local game "punchi." Interictal EEG showed generalized bisynchronous atypical 3-Hz spike and wave discharges. Test procedures evoked EEG dysrhythmia and clinical seizures in two patients. These patients and previously reported cases have the seizure disorder juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (impulsive petit mal), which seems particularly sensitive to provocation by cognitive functions, especially decision making. Myoclonic epilepsy is considered resistant to antiepileptic drugs other than clonazepam and valproate, but two of our patients responded well to clobazam. PMID:3622411

  6. Musical hallucinations associated with seizures originating from an intracranial aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Roberts, D L; Tatini, U; Zimmerman, R S; Bortz, J J; Sirven, J I

    2001-04-01

    Hallucinations are defined as sensory phenomena in the absence of external sensory stimuli. Auditory hallucinations have been shown to arise from many different intracranial lesions, but seizures manifesting as musical hallucinations triggered by unruptured intracranial aneurysms are rare. We present a case of persistent, episodic musical hallucinations associated with seizures that led to the discovery of 2 small intracranial aneurysms. Typical electroencephalographic findings for seizure activity were observed but resolved after surgical clipping of the aneurysms. Concomitantly, the patient's hallucinations resolved. The literature on musical hallucinations is reviewed. PMID:11322359

  7. Seizure Localization using Three-Dimensional Surface Projections of Intracranial EEG Power

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyang Woon; Youngblood, Mark W.; Farooque, Pue; Han, Xiao; Jhun, Stephen; Chen, William; Goncharova, Irina; Vives, Kenneth; Spencer, Dennis D.; Zaveri, Hitten; Hirsch, Lawrence J.; Blumenfeld, Hal

    2013-01-01

    Intracranial EEG (icEEG) provides a critical road map for epilepsy surgery but has become increasingly difficult to interpret as technology has allowed the number of icEEG channels to grow. Borrowing methods from neuroimaging, we aimed to simplify data analysis and increase consistency between reviewers by using 3D Surface Projections of Intracranial EEG poweR (3D-SPIER). We analyzed 139 seizures from 48 intractable epilepsy patients (28 temporal and 20 extratemporal) who had icEEG recordings, epilepsy surgery, and at least one year of post-surgical follow-up. We coregistered and plotted icEEG β frequency band signal power over time onto MRI-based surface renderings for each patient, to create color 3D-SPIER movies. Two independent reviewers interpreted the icEEG data using visual analysis vs. 3D-SPIER, blinded to any clinical information. Overall agreement rates between 3D-SPIER and icEEG visual analysis or surgery were about 90% for side of seizure onset, 80% for lobe, and just under 80% for sublobar localization. These agreement rates were improved when flexible thresholds or frequency ranges were allowed for 3D SPIER, especially for sublobar localization. Interestingly, agreement was better for patients with good surgical outcome than for patients with poor outcome. Localization using 3D-SPIER was measurably faster and considered qualitatively easier to interpret than visual analysis. These findings suggest that 3D-SPIER could be an improved diagnostic method for presurgical seizure localization in patients with intractable epilepsy and may also be useful for mapping normal brain function. PMID:23850575

  8. Seizure Risk in Patients with Attention-Deficit-Hyperactivity Disorder Treated with Atomoxetine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wernicke, Joachim F.; Holdridge, Karen Chilcott; Jin, Ling; Edison, Timothy; Zhang, Shuyu; Bangs, Mark E.; Allen, Albert J.; Ball, Susan; Dunn, David

    2007-01-01

    The comorbidity of seizures, epilepsy, and attention-deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) prompted the examination of whether atomoxetine use for ADHD is associated with an increased risk of seizures. Seizures and seizure-related symptoms were reviewed from two independent Eli Lilly and Company databases: the atomoxetine clinical trials database…

  9. Effect of Immunotherapy on Seizure Outcome in Patients with Autoimmune Encephalitis: A Prospective Observational Registry Study

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Keun-Hwa; Sunwoo, Jun-Sang; Moon, Jangsup; Lim, Jung-Ah; Lee, Doo Young; Shin, Yong-Won; Kim, Tae-Joon; Lee, Keon-Joo; Lee, Woo-Jin; Lee, Han-Sang; Jun, Jinsun; Kim, Dong-Yub; Kim, Man-Young; Kim, Hyunjin; Kim, Hyeon Jin; Suh, Hong Il; Lee, Yoojin; Kim, Dong Wook; Jeong, Jin Ho; Choi, Woo Chan; Bae, Dae Woong; Shin, Jung-Won; Jeon, Daejong; Park, Kyung-Il; Jung, Ki-Young; Chu, Kon; Lee, Sang Kun

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the seizure characteristics and outcome after immunotherapy in adult patients with autoimmune encephalitis (AE) and new-onset seizure. Methods Adult (age ≥18 years) patients with AE and new-onset seizure who underwent immunotherapy and were followed-up for at least 6 months were included. Seizure frequency was evaluated at 2–4 weeks and 6 months after the onset of the initial immunotherapy and was categorized as “seizure remission”, “> 50% seizure reduction”, or “no change” based on the degree of its decrease. Results Forty-one AE patients who presented with new-onset seizure were analysed. At 2–4 weeks after the initial immunotherapy, 51.2% of the patients were seizure free, and 24.4% had significant seizure reduction. At 6 months, seizure remission was observed in 73.2% of the patients, although four patients died during hospitalization. Rituximab was used as a second-line immunotherapy in 12 patients who continued to have seizures despite the initial immunotherapy, and additional seizure remission was achieved in 66.6% of them. In particular, those who exhibited partial response to the initial immunotherapy had a better seizure outcome after rituximab, with low adverse events. Conclusion AE frequently presented as seizure, but only 18.9% of the living patients suffered from seizure at 6 months after immunotherapy. Aggressive immunotherapy can improve seizure outcome in patients with AE. PMID:26771547

  10. A study of the dynamics of seizure propagation across micro domains in the vicinity of the seizure onset zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Ishita; Kudela, Pawel; Korzeniewska, Anna; Franaszczuk, Piotr J.; Anderson, William S.

    2015-08-01

    Objective. The use of micro-electrode arrays to measure electrical activity from the surface of the brain is increasingly being investigated as a means to improve seizure onset zone (SOZ) localization. In this work, we used a multivariate autoregressive model to determine the evolution of seizure dynamics in the 70-110 Hz high frequency band across micro-domains sampled by such micro-electrode arrays. We showed that a directed transfer function (DTF) can be used to estimate the flow of seizure activity in a set of simulated micro-electrode data with known propagation pattern. Approach. We used seven complex partial seizures recorded from four patients undergoing intracranial monitoring for surgical evaluation to reconstruct the seizure propagation pattern over sliding windows using a DTF measure. Main results. We showed that a DTF can be used to estimate the flow of seizure activity in a set of simulated micro-electrode data with a known propagation pattern. In general, depending on the location of the micro-electrode grid with respect to the clinical SOZ and the time from seizure onset, ictal propagation changed in directional characteristics over a 2-10 s time scale, with gross directionality limited to spatial dimensions of approximately 9 m{{m}2}. It was also seen that the strongest seizure patterns in the high frequency band and their sources over such micro-domains are more stable over time and across seizures bordering the clinically determined SOZ than inside. Significance. This type of propagation analysis might in future provide an additional tool to epileptologists for characterizing epileptogenic tissue. This will potentially help narrowing down resection zones without compromising essential brain functions as well as provide important information about targeting anti-epileptic stimulation devices.

  11. Mozart K.448 listening decreased seizure recurrence and epileptiform discharges in children with first unprovoked seizures: a randomized controlled study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Increasing numbers of reports show the beneficial effects of listening to Mozart music in decreasing epileptiform discharges as well as seizure frequency in epileptic children. There has been no effective method to reduce seizure recurrence after the first unprovoked seizure until now. In this study, we investigated the effect of listening to Mozart K.448 in reducing the seizure recurrence rate in children with first unprovoked seizures. Methods Forty-eight children who experienced their first unprovoked seizure with epileptiform discharges were included in the study. They were randomly placed into treatment (n = 24) and control (n = 24) groups. Children in the treatment group listened to Mozart K.448 daily before bedtime for at least six months. Two patients in the treatment group were excluded from analysis due to discontinuation intervention. Finally, forty-six patients were analyzed. Most of these patients (89.1%) were idiopathic in etiology. Seizure recurrence rates and reduction of epileptiform discharges were compared. Results The average follow-up durations in the treatment and control groups were 18.6 ± 6.6 and 20.1 ± 5.1 months, respectively. The seizure recurrence rate was estimated to be significantly lower in the treatment group than the control group over 24 months (37.2% vs. 76.8%, p = 0.0109). Significant decreases in epileptiform discharges were also observed after 1, 2, and 6 months of listening to Mozart K.448 when compared with EEGs before listening to music. There were no significant differences in gender, mentality, seizure type, and etiology between the recurrence and non-recurrence groups. Conclusions Although the case number was limited and control music was not performed in this study, the study revealed that listening to Mozart K.448 reduced the seizure recurrence rate and epileptiform discharges in children with first unprovoked seizures, especially of idiopathic etiology. We believe that Mozart K.448

  12. The Effects of Amiloride on Seizure Activity, Cognitive Deficits and Seizure-Induced Neurogenesis in a Novel Rat Model of Febrile Seizures.

    PubMed

    Ou-Yang, Tang-Peng; Zhu, Ge-Min; Ding, Yin-Xiu; Yang, Feng; Sun, Xiao-Long; Jiang, Wen

    2016-04-01

    Accumulating data suggest that sodium-hydrogen exchangers (NHEs) play a key role in modulating seizure activity by regulating neuronal pH in the brain. Amiloride, an inhibitor of NHEs, has been demonstrated to be effective in many seizure models, although its efficacy for prolonged febrile seizures (FS) remains unclear. In this study, we investigated whether amiloride could produce neuroprotective effects in a prolonged FS model in which FS were induced in rat pups at postnatal day 10 using a heated air approach. Amiloride was administered by intraperitoneal injection at three different doses (0.65, 1.3 and 2.6 mg/kg). Pretreatment with amiloride significantly delayed the onset of the first episode of limbic seizures, whereas posttreatment with amiloride decreased escape latency in the Morris water maze test compared to post-FS treatment with saline. Amiloride also inhibited seizure-induced aberrant neurogenesis. In conclusion, this study demonstrated the antiseizure activity of amiloride. In particular, posttreatment with amiloride resulted in cognitive improvement; this finding provides crucial evidence of the neuroprotective function of amiloride and of the therapeutic potential of amiloride in FS.

  13. Anticonvulsant effects of a triheptanoin diet in two mouse chronic seizure models

    PubMed Central

    Willis, Sarah; Stoll, James; Sweetman, Lawrence; Borges, Karin

    2010-01-01

    We hypothesized that in epileptic brains citric acid cycle intermediate levels may be deficient leading to hyperexcitability. Anaplerosis is the metabolic refilling of deficient metabolites. Our goal was to determine the anticonvulsant effects of feeding triheptanoin, the triglyceride of anaplerotic heptanoate. CF1 mice were fed 0-35% calories from triheptanoin. Body weights and dietary intake were similar in mice fed triheptanoin vs. standard diet. Triheptanoin feeding increased blood propionyl-carnitine levels, signifying its metabolism. 35%, but not 20%, triheptanoin delayed development of corneal kindled seizures. After pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE), triheptanoin feeding increased the pentylenetetrazole tonic seizure threshold during the chronically epileptic stage. Mice in the chronically epileptic stage showed various changes in brain metabolite levels, including a reduction in malate. Triheptanoin feeding largely restored a reduction in propionyl-CoA levels and increased methylmalonyl-CoA levels in SE mice. In summary, triheptanoin was anticonvulsant in two chronic mouse models and increased levels of anaplerotic precursor metabolites in epileptic mouse brains. The mechanisms of triheptanoin's effects and its efficacy in humans suffering from epilepsy remain to be determined. PMID:20691264

  14. Seizures and hypothermia: importance of electroencephalographic monitoring and considerations for treatment.

    PubMed

    Boylan, Geraldine B; Kharoshankaya, Liudmila; Wusthoff, Courtney J

    2015-04-01

    Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy is a common cause of seizures in neonates. Despite the introduction of therapeutic hypothermia, seizure rates are similar to those reported in the pre-therapeutic hypothermia era. However, the seizure profile has been altered resulting in a lower overall seizure burden, shorter individual seizure durations, and seizures that are harder to detect. Electroencephalographic (EEG) monitoring is the gold standard for detecting all seizures in neonates and this is even more critical in neonates who are cooled, as they are often sedated, making seizures more difficult to detect. Several studies have shown that the majority of seizures in neonates undergoing therapeutic hypothermia remain subclinical, thus requiring EEG monitoring for diagnosis. Amplitude-integrated EEG monitoring is useful but shorter duration seizures are more likely to be missed. Evidence is emerging about the pharmacokinetic profile of routinely used antiepileptic drugs during therapeutic hypothermia and some modifications have been suggested, particularly for lidocaine use.

  15. Seizures and hypothermia: importance of electroencephalographic monitoring and considerations for treatment.

    PubMed

    Boylan, Geraldine B; Kharoshankaya, Liudmila; Wusthoff, Courtney J

    2015-04-01

    Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy is a common cause of seizures in neonates. Despite the introduction of therapeutic hypothermia, seizure rates are similar to those reported in the pre-therapeutic hypothermia era. However, the seizure profile has been altered resulting in a lower overall seizure burden, shorter individual seizure durations, and seizures that are harder to detect. Electroencephalographic (EEG) monitoring is the gold standard for detecting all seizures in neonates and this is even more critical in neonates who are cooled, as they are often sedated, making seizures more difficult to detect. Several studies have shown that the majority of seizures in neonates undergoing therapeutic hypothermia remain subclinical, thus requiring EEG monitoring for diagnosis. Amplitude-integrated EEG monitoring is useful but shorter duration seizures are more likely to be missed. Evidence is emerging about the pharmacokinetic profile of routinely used antiepileptic drugs during therapeutic hypothermia and some modifications have been suggested, particularly for lidocaine use. PMID:25683598

  16. Refractory Seizure in Childhood: Dyke-Davidoff-Masson Syndrome Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Abhijit; Bose, Sagar; Sen, Kaushik; Pandit, Narayan; Sharma, Samarth

    2016-01-01

    Dyke-Davidoff-Masson syndrome (DDMS) is a rare disorder characterized by recurrent seizures, facial asymmetry, contralateral hemiplegia, radiologic features of cerebral hemiatrophy, and ipsilateral compensatory hypertrophy of the skull bone and sinuses. We describe three cases of children with DDMS, who initially presented with refractory seizure to the pediatric department of North Bengal Medical College and Hospital, India. In each case, the clinical features noted along with computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging helped confirm the diagnosis of DDMS. DDMS should be considered as a differential diagnosis of refractory seizures in children. We seek to emphasize the importance of thorough clinical and neuroimaging workup of seizure disorder in children for the proper management of the condition. PMID:27403244

  17. Risk of Remote Seizures After Perinatal Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Ritacco, David G

    2016-08-01

    Investigators from the University of California San Francisco and Kaiser Permanente Medical Centers in Oakland report outcome of perinatal arterial ischemic stroke (PAIS) in a population-based cohort, with particular attention to the incidence of seizures. PMID:27649623

  18. Estimation of Eeg Signal Dispersion During Seizure Propagation

    PubMed Central

    Stamoulis, Catherine; Chang, Bernard S.; Madsen, Joseph R.

    2010-01-01

    Localization of the seizure focus in the brain is a challenging problem in the field of epilepsy. The complexity of the seizure-related EEG waveform, its non-stationarity and degradation with distance due to the dispersive nature of the brain as a propagation medium, make localization difficult. Yet, precise estimation of the focus is critical, particularly when surgical resection is the only therapeutic option. The first step to solving this inverse problem is to estimate and account for frequency- or mode-specific signal dispersion, which is present in both scalp and intracranial EEG recordings during seizures. We estimated dispersion curves in both types of signals using a spatial correlation method and mode-based semblance analysis. We showed that, despite the assumption of spatial stationarity and a simplified array geometry, there is measurable inter-modal and intra-modal dispersion during seizures in both types of EEG recordings, affecting the estimated arrival times and consequently focus localization. PMID:20436687

  19. Mapping preictal networks preceding childhood absence seizures using magnetoencephalography.

    PubMed

    Jacobs-Brichford, Eliza; Horn, Paul S; Tenney, Jeffrey R

    2014-10-01

    The electrographic hallmark of childhood absence seizures is 3 Hz generalized spike and wave discharges; however, there is likely a focal thalamic or cortical onset that cannot be detected using scalp electroencephalography (EEG). The purpose of this study was to study the earliest preictal changes in children with absence epilepsy. In this report, magnetoencephalography recordings of 44 absence seizures recorded from 12 children with drug-naïve childhood absence seizures were used to perform time frequency analysis and source localization prior to the onset of the seizures. Evidence of preictal magnetoencephalography frequency changes were detected a mean of 694 ms before the initial spike on the EEG. A consistent pattern of focal sources was present in the frontal cortex and thalamus during this preictal period, but source localization occurred synchronously so that independent activity between the 2 structures could not be distinguished.

  20. Occasional seizures, epilepsy, and inborn errors of metabolism.

    PubMed

    Dulac, Olivier; Plecko, Barbara; Gataullina, Svetlana; Wolf, Nicole I

    2014-07-01

    Seizures are a common paediatric problem, with inborn errors of metabolism being a rare underlying aetiology. The clinical presentation of inborn errors of metabolism is often associated with other neurological symptoms, such as hypotonia, movement disorders, and cognitive disturbances. However, the occurrence of epilepsy associated with inborn errors of metabolism represents a major challenge that needs to be identified quickly; for some cases, specific treatments are available, metabolic decompensation might be avoided, and accurate counselling can be given about recurrence risk. Some clinical presentations are more likely than others to point to an inborn error of metabolism as the cause of seizures. Knowledge of important findings at examination, and appropriate biochemical investigation of children with seizures of uncertain cause, can aid the diagnosis of an inborn error of metabolism and ascertain whether or not the seizures are amenable to specific metabolic treatment.

  1. Moonstruck? The effect of the lunar cycle on seizures.

    PubMed

    Baxendale, Sallie; Fisher, Jennifer

    2008-10-01

    Recent reports on the effects of the lunar cycle on seizure occurrence have yielded mixed results. If the moon phase is influential, we hypothesized that this would be due to the moon's contribution to nocturnal illumination, rather than its waxing or waning state, and that significant correlations would not be apparent if local cloud cover were controlled for. We found a significant negative correlation between the mean number of seizures and the fraction of the moon illuminated by the sun (rho=-0.09, P<0.05) in 1571 seizures recorded in a dedicated epilepsy inpatient unit over 341 days. This correlation disappeared when we controlled for the local clarity of the night sky, suggesting that it is the brightness of the night and the contribution the moon phase makes to nocturnal luminance, rather than the moon phase per se, that may influence the occurrence of epileptic seizures.

  2. Camphor: an herbal medicine causing grand mal seizures.

    PubMed

    MacKinney, Theodore G; Soti, Kamal Raj; Shrestha, Poojan; Basnyat, Buddha

    2015-01-01

    Camphor is usually used in the USA to repel insects, but it is widely used in other countries as an herb. We report the case of a 52-year-old previously healthy Nepali man who ingested approximately 10 g of pure camphor with therapeutic intention. He developed grand mal seizures, and was evaluated in an emergency room. He failed to recall the camphor ingestion initially, and was treated with phenytoin for new-onset idiopathic seizures. Examining physicians only later found out about his camphor ingestion. Finding the cause of new-onset seizures is often challenging for emergency room physicians, internists and neurologists. In addition to other well-reported causes of secondary seizures, herbal medications and supplements must also be explored. PMID:26065546

  3. Nitric Oxide Regulates Neurogenesis in the Hippocampus following Seizures.

    PubMed

    Carreira, Bruno P; Santos, Daniela F; Santos, Ana I; Carvalho, Caetana M; Araújo, Inês M

    2015-01-01

    Hippocampal neurogenesis is changed by brain injury. When neuroinflammation accompanies injury, activation of resident microglial cells promotes the release of inflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen/nitrogen species like nitric oxide (NO). In these conditions, NO promotes proliferation of neural stem cells (NSC) in the hippocampus. However, little is known about the role of NO in the survival and differentiation of newborn cells in the injured dentate gyrus. Here we investigated the role of NO following seizures in the regulation of proliferation, migration, differentiation, and survival of NSC in the hippocampus using the kainic acid (KA) induced seizure mouse model. We show that NO increased the proliferation of NSC and the number of neuroblasts following seizures but was detrimental to the survival of newborn neurons. NO was also required for the maintenance of long-term neuroinflammation. Taken together, our data show that NO positively contributes to the initial stages of neurogenesis following seizures but compromises survival of newborn neurons.

  4. The approach to patients with "non-epileptic seizures"

    PubMed Central

    Mellers, J

    2005-01-01

    Up to one fifth of patients who present to specialist clinics with seizures do not have epilepsy. The majority of such patients suffer from psychologically mediated episodes; dissociative seizures, often referred to as "non-epileptic seizures". This paper describes the diagnostic evaluation of seizure disorders, including clinical assessment and the role of special investigations. The organic and psychiatric imitators of epilepsy are outlined and findings on psychiatric assessment are reviewed. This group of patients often proves difficult to engage in appropriate treatment and an approach to explaining the diagnosis is described. As yet there are no controlled trials of treatment in this disorder but preliminary evidence suggests cognitive behavioural therapy is both a rational and promising way forward. PMID:16085740

  5. Refractory Seizure in Childhood: Dyke-Davidoff-Masson Syndrome Revisited.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Abhijit; Bose, Sagar; Sen, Kaushik; Pandit, Narayan; Sharma, Samarth

    2016-07-01

    Dyke-Davidoff-Masson syndrome (DDMS) is a rare disorder characterized by recurrent seizures, facial asymmetry, contralateral hemiplegia, radiologic features of cerebral hemiatrophy, and ipsilateral compensatory hypertrophy of the skull bone and sinuses. We describe three cases of children with DDMS, who initially presented with refractory seizure to the pediatric department of North Bengal Medical College and Hospital, India. In each case, the clinical features noted along with computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging helped confirm the diagnosis of DDMS. DDMS should be considered as a differential diagnosis of refractory seizures in children. We seek to emphasize the importance of thorough clinical and neuroimaging workup of seizure disorder in children for the proper management of the condition. PMID:27403244

  6. Impaired Serotonergic Brainstem Function during and after Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Qiong; Buchanan, Gordon F.; Motelow, Joshua E.; Andrews, John; Vitkovskiy, Petr; Chen, William C.; Serout, Florian; Gummadavelli, Abhijeet; Kundishora, Adam; Furman, Moran; Li, Wei; Bo, Xiao; Richerson, George B.

    2016-01-01

    Impaired breathing, cardiac function, and arousal during and after seizures are important causes of morbidity and mortality. Previous work suggests that these changes are associated with depressed brainstem function in the ictal and post-ictal periods. Lower brainstem serotonergic systems are postulated to play an important role in cardiorespiratory changes during and after seizures, whereas upper brainstem serotonergic and other systems regulate arousal. However, direct demonstration of seizure-associated neuronal activity changes in brainstem serotonergic regions has been lacking. Here, we performed multiunit and single-unit recordings from medullary raphe and midbrain dorsal raphe nuclei in an established rat seizure model while measuring changes in breathing rate and depth as well as heart rate. Serotonergic neurons were identified by immunohistochemistry. Respiratory rate, tidal volume, and minute ventilation were all significantly decreased during and after seizures in this model. We found that population firing of neurons in the medullary and midbrain raphe on multiunit recordings was significantly decreased during the ictal and post-ictal periods. Single-unit recordings from identified serotonergic neurons in the medullary raphe revealed highly consistently decreased firing during and after seizures. In contrast, firing of midbrain raphe serotonergic neurons was more variable, with a mixture of increases and decreases. The markedly suppressed firing of medullary serotonergic neurons supports their possible role in simultaneously impaired cardiorespiratory function in seizures. Decreased arousal likely arises from depressed population activity of several neuronal pools in the upper brainstem and forebrain. These findings have important implications for preventing morbidity and mortality in people living with epilepsy. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Seizures often cause impaired breathing, cardiac dysfunction, and loss of consciousness. The brainstem and

  7. Seizures and brain regulatory systems: Consciousness, sleep, and autonomic systems

    PubMed Central

    Sedigh-Sarvestani, Madineh; Blumenfeld, Hal; Loddenkemper, Tobias; Bateman, Lisa M

    2014-01-01

    Research into the physiological underpinnings of epilepsy has revealed reciprocal relationships between seizures and the activity of several regulatory systems in the brain, including those governing sleep, consciousness and autonomic functions. This review highlights recent progress in understanding and utilizing the relationships between seizures and the arousal or consciousness system, the sleep-wake and associated circadian system, and the central autonomic network. PMID:25233249

  8. Pediatric febrile seizures and childhood headaches in primary care.

    PubMed

    Reinhold, J; Bentti, A L

    2000-03-01

    Febrile seizures and migraine headaches in children are two of the most common neurological diagnoses seen by primary care practitioners. It is essential that a knowledge base be developed to better care for this population. This article reviews pediatric febrile seizures, including management and treatment recommendations and childhood headaches, with an emphasis on migraine headaches. Diagnosis, management, and referral criteria are also reviewed. PMID:10673570

  9. Startle provoked epileptic seizures:features in 19 patients.

    PubMed Central

    Manford, M R; Fish, D R; Shorvon, S D

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To define the clinical characteristics of a group of patients with startle provoked epileptic seizures (SPES). METHODS--Nineteen patients were identified during the course of a larger study of clinical seizure patterns. A witnessed seizure account was obtained in all patients; interictal EEG in 18, video-EEG-telemetry in eight, CT in 18, and high resolution MRI in eight. RESULTS--The onset of SPES was in childhood or adolescence in 14 of 19 patients. It was preceded by exclusively spontaneous seizures in nine patients and SPES had been replaced by exclusively spontaneous seizures in two patients. Sudden noise was the main triggering stimulus and somatosensory and visual stimuli were also effective in some patients. The clinical seizure pattern involved asymmetric tonic posturing in 16 of 19 patients. Focal neurological signs were present in nine patients, mental retardation in six, and 10 were clinically normal. Ictal scalp EEG showed a clear seizure discharge in only one patient with a tonic seizure pattern; over the lateral frontal electrodes contralateral to the posturing limbs. Brain CT showed a porencephalic cyst in three patients, focal frontal atrophy in one, and generalised atrophy in one. Brain MRI was undertaken in five normal subjects and three neurologically impaired patients, six with normal CT. It showed a porencephalic cyst in one patient. In six patients, there were dysplastic lesions. They affected the lateral premotor cortex in three patients and the perisylvian cortex in three patients, one with bilateral perisylvian abnormality. CONCLUSIONS--SPES are more frequent than is generally appreciated. They may be transient and occur relatively commonly without fixed deficit, by contrast with previous reports. The imaging abnormalities identified in those without diffuse cerebral damage suggest that SPES are often due to occult congenital lesions and that the lateral premotor and perisylvian cortices are important in this phenomenon. Images

  10. Developmental PCB Exposure Increases Susceptibility to Audiogenic Seizures in Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Poon, Emily; Bandara, Suren B.; Allen, Jont B.; Sadowski, Renee N.; Schantz, Susan L.

    2014-01-01

    Developmental exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) causes auditory deficits. Thus, we recently conducted a study to investigate if developmental PCB exposure would exacerbate noise-induced hearing loss in adulthood. Unexpectedly, some PCB-exposed rats exhibited seizure-like behaviors when exposed to loud noise. Therefore, we conducted the current experiment to determine if adult rats perinatally exposed to PCBs are more susceptible to audiogenic seizures when tested in a standard audiogenic seizure paradigm. Adult male and female rats exposed to PCBs during gestation and lactation (0, 1, 3 or 6 mg/kg/day) and previously tested in the noise-induced hearing loss study were presented with a 100dB noise stimulus. If they did not exhibit clonus in response to the 100dB noise, they were exposed to a 105dB stimulus 24-48 hours later. This was followed by an 110dB stimulus 24-48 hours later if they did not exhibit clonus at 105 dB. Female and male rats exposed to either 3 or 6 mg/kg PCBs exhibited a significantly higher incidence of audiogenic seizures, shorter latency to onset of seizures, and greater severity of seizures compared to controls. Thyroxine measured in littermates at weaning was significantly lower in all PCB groups compared to controls, suggesting a potential mechanism for the increased incidence of audiogenic seizures. This is the first study to show that developmental PCB exposure increases the susceptibility to audiogenic seizures in adulthood. PMID:25543072

  11. Somatic Overgrowth Predisposes to Seizures in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Brachini, Francesca; Apicella, Fabio; Cosenza, Angela; Ferrari, Anna Rita; Guerrini, Renzo; Muratori, Filippo; Romano, Maria Francesca; Santorelli, Filippo M.; Tancredi, Raffaella; Sicca, Federico

    2013-01-01

    Background Comorbidity of Autism Spectrum Disorders with seizures or abnormal EEG (Autism-Epilepsy Phenotype) suggests shared pathomechanisms, and might be a starting point to identify distinct populations within the clinical complexity of the autistic spectrum. In this study, we tried to assess whether distinct subgroups, having distinctive clinical hallmarks, emerge from this comorbid condition. Methods Two-hundred and six individuals with idiopathic Autism Spectrum Disorders were subgrouped into three experimental classes depending on the presence of seizures and EEG abnormalities. Neurobehavioral, electroclinical and auxological parameters were investigated to identify differences among groups and features which increase the risk of seizures. Our statistical analyses used ANOVA, post-hoc multiple comparisons, and the Chi-squared test to analyze continuous and categorical variables. A correspondence analysis was also used to decompose significant Chi-squared and reduce variables dimensions. Results The high percentage of children with seizures (28.2% of our whole cohort) and EEG abnormalities (64.1%) confirmed that the prevalence of epilepsy in Autism Spectrum Disorders exceeds that of the general population. Seizures were associated with severe intellectual disability, and not with autism severity. Interestingly, tall stature (without macrocephaly) was significantly associated with EEG abnormalities or later onset seizures. However, isolated macrocephaly was equally distributed among groups or associated with early onset seizures when accompanied by tall stature. Conclusions Tall stature seems to be a phenotypic “biomarker” of susceptibility to EEG abnormalities or late epilepsy in Autism Spectrum Disorders and, when concurring with macrocephaly, predisposes to early onset seizures. Growth pattern might act as an endophenotypic marker in Autism-Epilepsy comorbidity, delineating distinct pathophysiological subtypes and addressing personalized diagnostic work

  12. No association between ApoE polymorphism and febrile seizures.

    PubMed

    Lavenex, Pierre; Lavenex, Pamela Banta; Cachat, François; Gehri, Mario; Juvet, Typhaine

    2016-01-01

    Seizures associated with fever are a common pediatric problem, affecting about 2-7 % of children between 3 months and 5 years of age. Differentiation of febrile seizures from acute symptomatic seizures secondary to central nervous system infections or seizures associated with fever in children with epilepsy is essential to provide appropriate treatment and follow-up care. Here, we tested the hypothesis that children who exhibit simple febrile seizures during early childhood, but do not develop epileptic seizures later in life, might preferentially carry the ApoE2 allele of the gene coding for the apolipoprotein E. We did not find any differences in the distribution of ApoE alleles or genotypes between individuals who exhibited simple febrile seizures (n = 93) and age-matched, typically developing subjects (n = 80). We found that the observed allele and genotype frequencies did not deviate from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, which suggests that the frequencies of ApoE alleles and genotypes are stable in the Swiss population from which our samples were derived. Across both groups of subjects (n = 173), we found an ApoE2 allele frequency of 0.064, an ApoE3 frequency of 0.829 and an ApoE4 frequency of 0.107. Our findings are consistent with previous reports of the distribution of ApoE polymorphism for European subjects free of any neurological disorders, and show that the different alleles of the gene coding for the apolipoprotein E are not associated with the occurrence of simple febrile seizures. PMID:26233231

  13. Detection of Epileptic Seizure Using Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Borujeny, Golshan Taheri; Yazdi, Mehran; Keshavarz-Haddad, Alireza; Borujeny, Arash Rafie

    2013-01-01

    The monitoring of epileptic seizures is mainly done by means of electroencephalogram (EEG) monitoring. Although this method is accurate, it is not comfortable for the patient as the EEG-electrodes have to be attached to the scalp which hampers the patient's movement. This makes long-term home monitoring not feasible. In this paper, the aim is to propose a seizure detection system based on accelerometry for the detection of epileptic seizure. The used sensors are wireless, which can improve quality of life for the patients. In this system, three 2D accelerometer sensors are positioned on the right arm, left arm, and left thigh of an epileptic patient. Datasets from three patients suffering from severe epilepsy are used in this paper for the development of an automatic detection algorithm. This monitoring system is based on Wireless Sensor Networks and can determine the location of the patient when a seizure is detected and then send an alarm to hospital staff or the patient's relatives. Our wireless sensor nodes are MICAz Motes developed by Crossbow Technology. The proposed system can be used for patients living in a clinical environment or at their home, where they do only their daily routines. The analysis of the recorded data is done by an Artificial Neural Network and K Nearest-Neighbor to recognize seizure movements from normal movements. The results show that K Nearest Neighbor performs better than Artificial Neural Network for detecting these seizures. The results also show that if at least 50% of the signal consists of seizure samples, we can detect the seizure accurately. In addition, there is no need for training the algorithm for each new patient. PMID:24098859

  14. Fumonisin B1 facilitates seizures induced by pentylenetetrazol in mice.

    PubMed

    Poersch, Alice Bertotto; Trombetta, Francielle; Souto, Naiéli Schiefelbein; de Oliveira Lima, Camilla; Braga, Ana Cláudia Monteiro; Dobrachinski, Fernando; Ribeiro, Leandro Rodrigo; Soares, Félix Alexandre Antunes; Fighera, Michele Rechia; Royes, Luiz Fernando Freire; Oliveira, Mauro Schneider; Furian, Ana Flávia

    2015-01-01

    Fumonisin B1 (FB1) is a Fusarium spp. mycotoxin which constitutes a major public health issue because of its worldwide distribution and diversity of toxic effects.While the liver and kidney are considered the major target organs of FB1 toxicity in several species, evidence indicates that FB1 may be toxic to the brain. To further investigate the effects of FB1 on the central nervous system the present study aimed to test the hypothesis that acute FB1 exposure causes brain hyperexcitability and the potential underlying mechanisms. For these purposes, adult male C57BL/6 mice were injected with FB1 (8 mg/kg, i.p.) or its vehicle and 30 min thereafter received with a low dose of the classical convulsant pentylenetetrazol (PTZ, 30 mg/kg, i.p.) or its vehicle. After behavioral evaluation the cerebral cortex and the hippocampus were collected for analysis of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity, mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and mitochondrial complex I and II activities. We found that FB1 reduced the latency for PTZ-induced myoclonic jerks and increased the number of these events. After exposure to FB1 total and α1 Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activities increased in cerebral cortex, whereas the same enzyme activities decreased in the hippocampus. Although no changes in mitochondrial complex I and II activities were found, acute exposure to FB1 increased ΔΨm in the cerebral cortex. Altogether, present results indicate that FB1 causes brain hyperexcitability in vivo, and that mitochondrial dysfunction may represent a potential underlying mechanism. PMID:26342287

  15. Recognition and management of seizures in children in emergency departments.

    PubMed

    Caplan, Edward; Dey, Indranil; Scammell, Andrea; Burnage, Katy; Paul, Siba Prosad

    2016-09-01

    Seizure is defined as 'a sudden surge of electrical activity in the brain, which usually affects how a person appears or acts for a short time'. Children who have experienced seizures commonly present to emergency departments (EDs), and detailed history taking will usually help differentiate between epileptic and non-epileptic events. ED nurses are often the first health professionals to manage children with seizures, and this is best done by following the ABCDE approach. Treatment involves termination of seizures with anticonvulsants, and children may need other symptomatic management. Seizures in children can be an extremely distressing experience for parents, who should be supported and kept informed by experienced ED nurses. Nurses also play a vital role in educating parents on correct administration of anticonvulsants and safety advice. This article discusses the aetiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis and management of children with seizures, with particular emphasis on epilepsy. It includes two reflective case studies to highlight the challenges faced by healthcare professionals managing children who present with convulsions. PMID:27615348

  16. Seizure Prediction: Science Fiction or Soon to Become Reality?

    PubMed

    Freestone, Dean R; Karoly, Philippa J; Peterson, Andre D H; Kuhlmann, Levin; Lai, Alan; Goodarzy, Farhad; Cook, Mark J

    2015-11-01

    This review highlights recent developments in the field of epileptic seizure prediction. We argue that seizure prediction is possible; however, most previous attempts have used data with an insufficient amount of information to solve the problem. The review discusses four methods for gaining more information above standard clinical electrophysiological recordings. We first discuss developments in obtaining long-term data that enables better characterisation of signal features and trends. Then, we discuss the usage of electrical stimulation to probe neural circuits to obtain robust information regarding excitability. Following this, we present a review of developments in high-resolution micro-electrode technologies that enable neuroimaging across spatial scales. Finally, we present recent results from data-driven model-based analyses, which enable imaging of seizure generating mechanisms from clinical electrophysiological measurements. It is foreseeable that the field of seizure prediction will shift focus to a more probabilistic forecasting approach leading to improvements in the quality of life for the millions of people who suffer uncontrolled seizures. However, a missing piece of the puzzle is devices to acquire long-term high-quality data. When this void is filled, seizure prediction will become a reality.

  17. Effects of clobenpropit on pentylenetetrazole-kindled seizures in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lisan; Chen, Zhong; Ren, Keming; Leurs, Rob; Chen, Junchun; Zhang, Wenbin; Ye, Bo; Wei, Erqing; Timmerman, Henk

    2003-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether or not clobenpropit, a selective and potent histamine H(3) receptor antagonist, can protect from pentylenetetrazole (35 mg/kg)-kindled seizures in rats. I.c.v. injection with clobenpropit (10 and 20 microg) significantly delayed the seizure stage and prolonged the latency to the onset of myoclonic jerks and the latency to the clonic generalized seizure in a dose-dependent manner. The protection by clobenpropit (20 microg) was completely antagonized by both immepip (5 and 10 microg, i.c.v.), a selective potent histamine H(3) receptor agonist, and alpha-fluoromethylhistidine (alpha-FMH, 50 microg, i.c.v.), a selective histidine decarboxylase inhibitor. In addition, clobenpropit markedly potentiated the histidine (100 and 200 mg/kg)-induced inhibition of pentylenetetrazole-kindled seizures. Pyrilamine (2 and 5 microg, i.c.v.) reversed the inhibition of pentylenetetrazole-kindled seizures induced by clobenpropit, whereas cimetidine had no effect even at a high dose of 5 microg. These results indicate that clobenpropit protects against pentylenetetrazole-kindled seizures in rats, and that its action is mainly due to the activation of endogenous histamine by blocking autoinhibitory presynaptic histamine H(3) receptors.

  18. Sleep Related Hypermotor Seizures with a Right Parietal Onset

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, Steve A.; Figorilli, Michela; Casaceli, Giuseppe; Proserpio, Paola; Nobili, Lino

    2015-01-01

    Nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (NFLE) is a syndrome characterized by the occurrence of sleep related seizures of variable complexity and duration. Hypermotor seizures (HMS) represent a classic manifestation of this syndrome, associated with a perturbation of the ventromesial frontal cortex and anterior cingulate gyrus regions. Nevertheless, in recent years, reports have showed that the seizure onset zone (SOZ) need not be of frontal origin to generate HMS. Here we report an unusual case of a patient presenting with a seven-year history of drug-resistant sleep related HMS arising from the mesial parietal region. The presence of an infrequent feeling of levitation before the HMS was key to suspecting a subtle focal cortical dysplasia in the right precuneus region. A stereo-EEG investigation confirmed the extra-frontal seizure onset of the HMS and highlighted the interrelationship between unstable sleep and seizure precipitation. Citation: Gibbs SA, Figorilli M, Casaceli G, Proserpio P, Nobili L. Sleep related hypermotor seizures with a right parietal onset. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(8):953–955. PMID:25902821

  19. Efficacy of Retigabine on Acute Limbic Seizures in Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, LK; Slomko, AM; Wongvravit, JP; Naseer, Z; Hu, S; Wan, WY; Ali, SS

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose: The efficacy of retigabine (RGB), a positive allosteric modulator of K+ channels indicated for adjunct treatment of partial seizures, was studied in two adult models of kainic acid (KA)-induced status epilepticus to determine it’s toleratbility. Methods: Retigabine was administered systemiclly at high (5 mg/kg) and low (1–2 mg/kg) doses either 30 min prior to or 2 hr after KA-induced status epilepticus. High (1 µg/µL) and low (0.25 µg/µL) concentrations of RGB were also delivered by intrahippocampal microinjection in the presence of KA. Results: Dose-dependent effects of RGB were observed with both models. Lower doses increased seizure behavior latency and reduced the number of single spikes and synchronized burst events in the electroencephalogram (EEG). Higher doses worsened seizure behavior, produced severe ataxia, and increased spiking activity. Animals treated with RGB that were resistant to seizures did not exhibit significant injury or loss in GluR1 expression; however if stage 5–6 seizures were reached, typical hippocampal injury and depletion of GluR1 subunit protein in vulernable pyramidal fields occurred. Conclusions: RGB was neuroprotective only if seizures were significantly attenuated. GluR1 was simultaneously suppressed in the resistant granule cell layer in presence of RGB which may weaken excitatory transmission. Biphasic effects observed herein suggest that the human dosage must be carefully scrutinized to produce the optimal clinical response. PMID:26819936

  20. Susceptibility to febrile seizures: more than just a faulty thermostat!

    PubMed

    Prasad, Asuri N; Seshia, Shashi S

    2009-05-01

    Febrile seizures, always a hot topic, continue to fire up the interest of a wide spectrum of clinical and basic neuroscientists. Several clinical investigators, amongst them the Halifax group (spearheaded by the Camfields to whom we owe a great debt of gratitude for their contributions in this field), have provided us with a sound foundation for clinical management. We now need to explore febrile seizures in new ways to clarify factors and identify mechanisms that contribute to the intriguing age-dependent susceptibility. The complex processes involved in thermoregulation and the febrile response are important pieces of the puzzle. The contributory factors are likely different for isolated simple febrile, recurrent febrile and complex febrile seizures. A 'systems biology approach' is needed to investigate the intricate genome-proteome-metabolome interaction in determining susceptibility. Population studies that incorporate current clinical, experimental, infectious and molecular genetic knowledge in their concept and design will help to 'conquer' the final frontiers of febrile seizures. In 2006, Engel suggested that febrile seizures could 'encompass many different entities', an increasingly plausible opinion. A higher profile for febrile seizures and related syndromes in the ILAE classification scheme will further catalyze progress in the field. The resultant knowledge can only improve management. PMID:19534326

  1. Cannabidiol Rescues Acute Hepatic Toxicity and Seizure Induced by Cocaine

    PubMed Central

    Vilela, Luciano Rezende; Gomides, Lindisley Ferreira; David, Bruna Araújo; Antunes, Maísa Mota; Diniz, Ariane Barros; Moreira, Fabrício de Araújo; Menezes, Gustavo Batista

    2015-01-01

    Cocaine is a commonly abused illicit drug that causes significant morbidity and mortality. The most severe and common complications are seizures, ischemic strokes, myocardial infarction, and acute liver injury. Here, we demonstrated that acute cocaine intoxication promoted seizure along with acute liver damage in mice, with intense inflammatory infiltrate. Considering the protective role of the endocannabinoid system against cell toxicity, we hypothesized that treatment with an anandamide hydrolysis inhibitor, URB597, or with a phytocannabinoid, cannabidiol (CBD), protects against cocaine toxicity. URB597 (1.0 mg/kg) abolished cocaine-induced seizure, yet it did not protect against acute liver injury. Using confocal liver intravital microscopy, we observed that CBD (30 mg/kg) reduced acute liver inflammation and damage induced by cocaine and prevented associated seizure. Additionally, we showed that previous liver damage induced by another hepatotoxic drug (acetaminophen) increased seizure and lethality induced by cocaine intoxication, linking hepatotoxicity to seizure dynamics. These findings suggest that activation of cannabinoid system may have protective actions on both liver and brain induced by cocaine, minimizing inflammatory injury promoted by cocaine, supporting its further clinical application in the treatment of cocaine abuse. PMID:25999668

  2. Reflex seizures, traits, and epilepsies: from physiology to pathology.

    PubMed

    Koepp, Matthias J; Caciagli, Lorenzo; Pressler, Ronit M; Lehnertz, Klaus; Beniczky, Sándor

    2016-01-01

    Epileptic seizures are generally unpredictable and arise spontaneously. Patients often report non-specific triggers such as stress or sleep deprivation, but only rarely do seizures occur as a reflex event, in which they are objectively and consistently modulated, precipitated, or inhibited by external sensory stimuli or specific cognitive processes. The seizures triggered by such stimuli and processes in susceptible individuals can have different latencies. Once seizure-suppressing mechanisms fail and a critical mass (the so-called tipping point) of cortical activation is reached, reflex seizures stereotypically manifest with common motor features independent of the physiological network involved. The complexity of stimuli increases from simple sensory to complex cognitive-emotional with increasing age of onset. The topography of physiological networks involved follows the posterior-to-anterior trajectory of brain development, reflecting age-related changes in brain excitability. Reflex seizures and traits probably represent the extremes of a continuum, and understanding of their underlying mechanisms might help to elucidate the transition of normal physiological function to paroxysmal epileptic activity.

  3. Antisense Reduction of Tau in Adult Mice Protects against Seizures

    PubMed Central

    DeVos, Sarah L.; Goncharoff, Dustin K.; Chen, Guo; Kebodeaux, Carey S.; Yamada, Kaoru; Stewart, Floy R.; Schuler, Dorothy R.; Maloney, Susan E.; Wozniak, David F.; Rigo, Frank; Bennett, C. Frank; Cirrito, John R.; Holtzman, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Tau, a microtubule-associated protein, is implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's Disease (AD) in regard to both neurofibrillary tangle formation and neuronal network hyperexcitability. The genetic ablation of tau substantially reduces hyperexcitability in AD mouse lines, induced seizure models, and genetic in vivo models of epilepsy. These data demonstrate that tau is an important regulator of network excitability. However, developmental compensation in the genetic tau knock-out line may account for the protective effect against seizures. To test the efficacy of a tau reducing therapy for disorders with a detrimental hyperexcitability profile in adult animals, we identified antisense oligonucleotides that selectively decrease endogenous tau expression throughout the entire mouse CNS—brain and spinal cord tissue, interstitial fluid, and CSF—while having no effect on baseline motor or cognitive behavior. In two chemically induced seizure models, mice with reduced tau protein had less severe seizures than control mice. Total tau protein levels and seizure severity were highly correlated, such that those mice with the most severe seizures also had the highest levels of tau. Our results demonstrate that endogenous tau is integral for regulating neuronal hyperexcitability in adult animals and suggest that an antisense oligonucleotide reduction of tau could benefit those with epilepsy and perhaps other disorders associated with tau-mediated neuronal hyperexcitability. PMID:23904623

  4. Reflex seizures, traits, and epilepsies: from physiology to pathology.

    PubMed

    Koepp, Matthias J; Caciagli, Lorenzo; Pressler, Ronit M; Lehnertz, Klaus; Beniczky, Sándor

    2016-01-01

    Epileptic seizures are generally unpredictable and arise spontaneously. Patients often report non-specific triggers such as stress or sleep deprivation, but only rarely do seizures occur as a reflex event, in which they are objectively and consistently modulated, precipitated, or inhibited by external sensory stimuli or specific cognitive processes. The seizures triggered by such stimuli and processes in susceptible individuals can have different latencies. Once seizure-suppressing mechanisms fail and a critical mass (the so-called tipping point) of cortical activation is reached, reflex seizures stereotypically manifest with common motor features independent of the physiological network involved. The complexity of stimuli increases from simple sensory to complex cognitive-emotional with increasing age of onset. The topography of physiological networks involved follows the posterior-to-anterior trajectory of brain development, reflecting age-related changes in brain excitability. Reflex seizures and traits probably represent the extremes of a continuum, and understanding of their underlying mechanisms might help to elucidate the transition of normal physiological function to paroxysmal epileptic activity. PMID:26627365

  5. Risk factors for developing seizures after a stroke.

    PubMed

    Lancman, M E; Golimstok, A; Norscini, J; Granillo, R

    1993-01-01

    We evaluated development of seizures in 219 consecutive patients who had ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke. Subjects with transitory ischemic attacks, subarachnoid, subdural, and epidural hemorrhages or those with previous history of epilepsy were excluded. Mean follow-up time was 11.5 months (range 1-72 months). Twenty-two of 219 stroke patients (10.04%) had seizures. Twelve (54.55%) were of early onset (< 1 month after the stroke), and 10 (45.45%) were of late onset. No statistically significant differences were evident between the early- and late-onset seizure group in comparisons of type of stroke, localization, and size of the lesion. Six of 22 patients (27%) had seizure recurrence. Seizures developed in (a) 13 of 183 patients with ischemic stroke (7.1%) and 9 of 36 patients with hemorrhagic stroke (25%) (p = 0.01); (b) 16 of 93 patients with cortical lesions (17%) and 6 of 126 patients with subcortical lesions (4.7%) (p = 0.01); and (c) 14 of 66 patients with a lesion comprising more than one lobe (21.2%) and 8 of 153 patients with a lesion comprising less than one lobe (5.2%) (p < 0.01). We conclude that patients with hemorrhagic stroke, cortical lesions, and lesions involving more than one lobe are at higher risk of developing seizures.

  6. The quantitative measurement of consciousness during epileptic seizures.

    PubMed

    Nani, Andrea; Cavanna, Andrea E

    2014-01-01

    The assessment of consciousness is a fundamental element in the classification of epileptic seizures. It is, therefore, of great importance for clinical practice to develop instruments that enable an accurate and reliable measurement of the alteration of consciousness during seizures. Over the last few years, three psychometric scales have been specifically proposed to measure ictal consciousness: the Ictal Consciousness Inventory (ICI), the Consciousness Seizure Scale (CSS), and the Responsiveness in Epilepsy Scale--versions I and II (RES-I and RES-II). The ICI is a self-report psychometric instrument which retrospectively assesses ictal consciousness along the dimensions of the level/arousal and contents/awareness. The CSS has been used by clinicians to quantify the impairment of consciousness in order to establish correlations with the brain mechanisms underlying alterations of consciousness during temporal lobe seizures. The most recently developed observer-rated instrument is the RES-I, which has been used to assess responsiveness during epileptic seizures in patients undergoing video-EEG. The implementation of standardized psychometric tools for the assessment of ictal consciousness can complement clinical observations and contribute to improve accuracy in seizure classification.

  7. Characteristics of Veterans diagnosed with seizures within Veterans Health Administration.

    PubMed

    Rehman, Rizwana; Kelly, Pamela R; Husain, Aatif M; Tran, Tung T

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the demographics of Veterans diagnosed with seizures and taking antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) within the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) during fiscal year (FY) 2011 (October 1, 2010, to September 30, 2011), particularly with regard to comorbid traumatic brain injury (TBI) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Information collected included age; sex; Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation New Dawn (OIF/OEF/OND) status; and relevant encounter diagnosis codes for seizures, TBI, and PTSD. During FY11, 87,377 Veterans with seizures on AEDs were managed within the VHA. Prevalence was 15.5 per 1,000, and annual incidence was 148.2 per 100,000. The percentages of comorbid TBI and PTSD were 15.8% and 24.1%, respectively. For OIF/OEF/OND Veterans, these percentages increased to 52.6% and 70.4%, respectively. PTSD and TBI are risk factors for both epilepsy and psychogenic nonepileptic seizures. Within the VHA, many Veterans experiencing seizures cannot be successfully treated with AEDs. The VHA Epilepsy Centers of Excellence promotes a multidisciplinary approach to increase and improve access to both epilepsy and mental health specialists for the care of epileptic and nonepileptic seizures. PMID:26745205

  8. Versive seizures in occipital lobe epilepsy: lateralizing value and pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Usui, Naotaka; Mihara, Tadahiro; Baba, Koichi; Matsuda, Kazumi; Tottori, Takayasu; Umeoka, Shuichi; Kondo, Akihiko; Nakamura, Fumihiro; Terada, Kiyohito; Usui, Keiko; Inoue, Yushi

    2011-11-01

    To clarify the value of versive seizures in lateralizing and localizing the epileptogenic zone in patients with occipital lobe epilepsy, we studied 13 occipital lobe epilepsy patients with at least one versive seizure recorded during preoperative noninvasive video-EEG monitoring, who underwent occipital lobe resection, and were followed postoperatively for more than 2 years with Engel's class I outcome. The videotaped versive seizures were analyzed to compare the direction of version and the side of surgical resection in each patient. Moreover, we examined other motor symptoms (partial somatomotor manifestations such as tonic and/or clonic movements of face and/or limbs, automatisms, and eyelid blinking) associated with version. Forty-nine versive seizures were analyzed. The direction of version was always contralateral to the side of resection except in one patient. Among accompanying motor symptoms, partial somatomotor manifestations were observed in only five patients. In conclusion, versive seizure is a reliable lateralizing sign indicating contralateral epileptogenic zone in occipital lobe epilepsy. Since versive seizures were accompanied by partial somatomotor manifestations in less than half of the patients, it is suggested that the mechanism of version in occipital lobe epilepsy is different from that in frontal lobe epilepsy.

  9. Combination anticonvulsant treatment of soman-induced seizures.

    PubMed

    Koplovitz, I; Schulz, S; Shutz, M; Railer, R; Macalalag, R; Schons, M; McDonough, J

    2001-12-01

    These studies investigated the effectiveness of combination treatment with a benzodiazepine and an anticholinergic drug against soman-induced seizures. The anticholinergic drugs considered were biperiden, scopolamine, trihexaphenidyl, and procyclidine; the benzodiazepines were diazepam and midazolam. Male guinea pigs were implanted surgically with cortical screw electrodes. Electrocorticograms were displayed continually and recorded on a computerized electroencephalographic system. Pyridostigmine (0.026 mg x kg(-1), i.m.) was injected as a pretreatment to inhibit red blood cell acetylcholinesterase by 30-40%. Thirty minutes after pyridostigmine, 2 x LD50 (56 microg x kg(-1)) of soman was injected s.c., followed 1 min later by i.m. treatment with atropine (2 mg x kg(-1)) + 2-PAM (25 mg x kg(-1)). Electrographic seizures occurred in all animals. Anticonvulsant treatment combinations were administered i.m. at 5 or 40 min after seizure onset. Treatment consisted of diazepam or midazolam plus one of the above-mentioned anticholinergic drugs. All doses of the treatment compounds exhibited little or no antiseizure efficacy when given individually. The combination of a benzodiazepine and an anticholinergic drug was effective in terminating soman-induced seizure, whether given 5 or 40 min after seizure onset. The results suggest a strong synergistic effect of combining benzodiazepines with centrally active anticholinergic drugs and support the concept of using an adjunct to supplement diazepam for the treatment of nerve-agent-induced seizures.

  10. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis after unprovoked first seizure

    PubMed Central

    Zisimopoulou, Vaso; Mamali, Margarita; Katsavos, Serafeim; Siatouni, Anna; Tavernarakis, Antonios; Gatzonis, Stylianos

    2016-01-01

    Summary The aim of this study was to determine cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) characteristics after an unprovoked first seizure (UFS). We reviewed the medical records of 71 patients with UFS who underwent lumbar puncture, and examined the CSF parameters. Each CSF parameter was evaluated separately for potential correlations with the other study variables. We observed an overall frequency of CSF abnormalities of 35.2%. CSF protein was the most common abnormal parameter (31%) and showed significant positive correlations with male gender (p=0.037) and older age (p=0.007). Only seven patients (9.9%) had an abnormal cell count (5–40 cells/μl). Higher CSF cell counts were found to predict a longer hospitalization period (p=0.005). No relationship with abnormal EEG findings could be established (p=0.169). This study is one of the few to evaluate postictal CSF parameters in a clinical setting, and to our knowledge the first to investigate these parameters specifically in the emergency department. The development of a rapid, easy-to-use test that does not require extensive laboratory equipment to differentiate UFS from other conditions could be of great value in everyday clinical practice. PMID:27358223

  11. Effect of electroconvulsive seizures on cognitive flexibility.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Maria; Grahm, Matilda; Ekstrand, Joakim; Höglund, Peter; Johansson, Mikael; Tingström, Anders

    2016-07-01

    Electroconvulsive seizures (ECS), an animal model of electroconvulsive therapy, strongly stimulate hippocampal neurogenesis, but it is not known how this relates to the therapeutic effect or to the unwanted cognitive side effects. Recent findings suggest that neurogenesis might be important for flexible learning in changing environments. We hypothesize that animals receiving ECS treatment, which induces hippocampal neurogenesis, will show enhanced cognitive flexibility compared with controls. We have utilized a touch screen-based cognitive test (location discrimination (LD) task) to assess how five consecutive ECS treatments affect cognitive flexibility (measured as reversal of cognitive strategy) as well as spatial pattern separation ability. ECS-treated animals performed more reversals in the LD task earlier than controls over the 9 experimental weeks irrespective of spatial separation of visual stimuli, indicating an enhanced cognitive flexibility but unaffected pattern separation ability after ECS. We observed no correlation between hippocampal neurogenesis and the number of performed reversals during the last experimental week. This is the first study to elucidate the effect of ECS on cognitive flexibility. Our results indicate that ECS improves cognitive flexibility without affecting spatial pattern separation ability. Whether cognitive flexibility is enhanced via neurogenesis or other ECS-modulated processes, remains unknown. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Probabilistic Threshold Criterion

    SciTech Connect

    Gresshoff, M; Hrousis, C A

    2010-03-09

    The Probabilistic Shock Threshold Criterion (PSTC) Project at LLNL develops phenomenological criteria for estimating safety or performance margin on high explosive (HE) initiation in the shock initiation regime, creating tools for safety assessment and design of initiation systems and HE trains in general. Until recently, there has been little foundation for probabilistic assessment of HE initiation scenarios. This work attempts to use probabilistic information that is available from both historic and ongoing tests to develop a basis for such assessment. Current PSTC approaches start with the functional form of the James Initiation Criterion as a backbone, and generalize to include varying areas of initiation and provide a probabilistic response based on test data for 1.8 g/cc (Ultrafine) 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB) and LX-17 (92.5% TATB, 7.5% Kel-F 800 binder). Application of the PSTC methodology is presented investigating the safety and performance of a flying plate detonator and the margin of an Ultrafine TATB booster initiating LX-17.

  13. Threshold fatigue and information transfer

    PubMed Central

    Lindner, Benjamin; Longtin, André

    2016-01-01

    Neurons in vivo must process sensory information in the presence of significant noise. It is thus plausible to assume that neural systems have developed mechanisms to reduce this noise. Theoretical studies have shown that threshold fatigue (i.e. cumulative increases in the threshold during repetitive firing) could lead to noise reduction at certain frequencies bands and thus improved signal transmission as well as noise increases and decreased signal transmission at other frequencies: a phenomenon called noise shaping. There is, however, no experimental evidence that threshold fatigue actually occurs and, if so, that it will actually lead to noise shaping. We analyzed action potential threshold variability in intracellular recordings in vivo from pyramidal neurons in weakly electric fish and found experimental evidence for threshold fatigue: an increase in instantaneous firing rate was on average accompanied by an increase in action potential threshold. We show that, with a minor modification, the standard Hodgkin–Huxley model can reproduce this phenomenon. We next compared the performance of models with and without threshold fatigue. Our results show that threshold fatigue will lead to a more regular spike train as well as robustness to intrinsic noise via noise shaping. We finally show that the increased/reduced noise levels due to threshold fatigue correspond to decreased/increased information transmission at different frequencies. PMID:17436067

  14. Learning foraging thresholds for lizards

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, L.A.; Hart, W.E.; Wilson, D.B.

    1996-01-12

    This work gives a proof of convergence for a randomized learning algorithm that describes how anoles (lizards found in the Carribean) learn a foraging threshold distance. This model assumes that an anole will pursue a prey if and only if it is within this threshold of the anole`s perch. This learning algorithm was proposed by the biologist Roughgarden and his colleagues. They experimentally confirmed that this algorithm quickly converges to the foraging threshold that is predicted by optimal foraging theory our analysis provides an analytic confirmation that the learning algorithm converses to this optimal foraging threshold with high probability.

  15. Studies of stimulus parameters for seizure disruption using neural network simulations

    PubMed Central

    Kudela, Pawel; Cho, Ryan J.; Bergey, Gregory K.; Franaszczuk, Piotr

    2009-01-01

    A large scale neural network simulation with realistic cortical architecture has been undertaken to investigate the effects of external electrical stimulation on the propagation and evolution of ongoing seizure activity. This is an effort to explore the parameter space of stimulation variables to uncover promising avenues of research for this therapeutic modality. The model consists of an approximately 800 μm × 800 μm region of simulated cortex, and includes seven neuron classes organized by cortical layer, inhibitory or excitatory properties, and electrophysiological characteristics. The cell dynamics are governed by a modified version of the Hodgkin-Huxley equations in single compartment format. Axonal connections are patterned after histological data and published models of local cortical wiring. Stimulation induced action potentials take place at the axon initial segments, according to threshold requirements on the applied electric field distribution. Stimulation induced action potentials in horizontal axonal branches are also separately simulated. The calculations are performed on a 16 node distributed 32-bit processor system. Clear differences in seizure evolution are presented for stimulated versus the undisturbed rhythmic activity. Data is provided for frequency dependent stimulation effects demonstrating a plateau effect of stimulation efficacy as the applied frequency is increased from 60 Hz to 200 Hz. Timing of the stimulation with respect to the underlying rhythmic activity demonstrates a phase dependent sensitivity. Electrode height and position effects are also presented. Using a dipole stimulation electrode arrangement, clear orientation effects of the dipole with respect to the model connectivity is also demonstrated. A sensitivity analysis of these results as a function of the stimulation threshold is also provided. PMID:17619199

  16. Acute exposure to pulsed microwaves affects neither pentylenetetrazol seizures in the rat nor chlordiazepoxide protection against such seizures.

    PubMed

    Pappas, B A; Anisman, H; Ings, R; Hill, D A

    1983-12-01

    Three experiments failed to provide consistent evidence for an effect of 2.70 GHz pulsed microwave radiation up to 20 mW/cm2 on pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures or on the efficacy of chlordiazepoxide for counteracting such seizures. Microwave radiation counteracted the hypothermic effects of chlordiazepoxide without altering its antiseizure efficacy. This underscores the dissociation between thermal and pharmacological effects of microwaves. PMID:6228950

  17. Status epilepticus induction has prolonged effects on the efficacy of antiepileptic drugs in the 6-Hz seizure model.

    PubMed

    Leclercq, Karine; Kaminski, Rafal M

    2015-08-01

    Several factors may influence the efficacy of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in patients with epilepsy, and treatment resistance could be related to genetics, neuronal network alterations, and modification of drug transporters or targets. Consequently, preclinical models used for the identification of potential new, more efficacious AEDs should reflect at least a few of these factors. Previous studies indicate that induction of status epilepticus (SE) may alter drug efficacy and that this effect could be long-lasting. In this context, we wanted to assess the protective effects of mechanistically diverse AEDs in mice subjected to pilocarpine-induced SE in another seizure model. We first determined seizure thresholds in mice subjected to pilocarpine-induced SE in the 6-Hz model, 2 weeks and 8 weeks following SE. We then evaluated the protective effects of mechanistically diverse AEDs in post-SE and control animals. No major differences in 6-Hz seizure susceptibility were observed between control groups, while the seizure threshold of pilocarpine mice at 8 weeks after SE was higher than at 2 weeks and higher than in control groups. Treatment with AEDs revealed major differences in drug response depending on their mechanism of action. Diazepam produced a dose-dependent protection against 6-Hz seizures in control and pilocarpine mice, both at 2 weeks and 8 weeks after SE, but with a more pronounced increase in potency in post-SE animals at 2 weeks. Levetiracetam induced a potent and dose-dependent protection in pilocarpine mice, 2 weeks after SE, while its protective effects were observed only at much higher doses in control mice. Its potency decreased in post-SE mice at 8 weeks and was very limited (30% protection at the highest tested dose) in the control group. Carbamazepine induced a dose-dependent protection at 2 weeks in control mice but only limited effect (50% at the highest tested dose) in pilocarpine mice. Its efficacy deeply decreased in post-SE mice at 8 weeks

  18. RDX Binds to the GABAA Receptor–Convulsant Site and Blocks GABAA Receptor–Mediated Currents in the Amygdala: A Mechanism for RDX-Induced Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Larry R.; Aroniadou-Anderjaska, Vassiliki; Qashu, Felicia; Finne, Huckelberry; Pidoplichko, Volodymyr; Bannon, Desmond I.; Braga, Maria F. M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) is a high-energy, trinitrated cyclic compound that has been used worldwide since World War II as an explosive in both military and civilian applications. RDX can be released in the environment by way of waste streams generated during the manufacture, use, and disposal of RDX-containing munitions and can leach into groundwater from unexploded munitions found on training ranges. For > 60 years, it has been known that exposure to high doses of RDX causes generalized seizures, but the mechanism has remained unknown. Objective We investigated the mechanism by which RDX induces seizures. Methods and results By screening the affinity of RDX for a number of neurotransmitter receptors, we found that RDX binds exclusively to the picrotoxin convulsant site of the γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) ionophore. Whole-cell in vitro recordings in the rat basolateral amygdala (BLA) showed that RDX reduces the frequency and amplitude of spontaneous GABAA receptor–mediated inhibitory postsynaptic currents and the amplitude of GABA-evoked postsynaptic currents. In extracellular field recordings from the BLA, RDX induced prolonged, seizure-like neuronal discharges. Conclusions These results suggest that binding to the GABAA receptor convulsant site is the primary mechanism of seizure induction by RDX and that reduction of GABAergic inhibitory transmission in the amygdala is involved in the generation of RDX-induced seizures. Knowledge of the molecular site and the mechanism of RDX action with respect to seizure induction can guide therapeutic strategies, allow more accurate development of safe thresholds for exposures, and help prevent the development of new explosives or other munitions that could pose similar health risks. PMID:21362589

  19. Symptoms of hypoglycemia, thresholds for their occurrence, and hypoglycemia unawareness.

    PubMed

    Cryer, P E

    1999-09-01

    Ultimately traceable to neural glucose deprivation, symptoms of hypoglycemia include neurogenic (autonomic) and neuroglycopenic symptoms. Neurogenic symptoms (tremulousness, palpitations, anxiety, sweating, hunger, paresthesias) are the results of the perception of physiologic changes caused by the autonomic nervous system's response to hypoglycemia. Neuroglycopenic symptoms (confusion, sensation of warmth, weakness or fatigue, severe cognitive failure, seizure, coma) are the results of brain glucose deprivation itself. Glycemic thresholds for symptoms of hypoglycemia shift to lower plasma glucose concentrations following recent episodes of hypoglycemia, leading to the syndrome of hypoglycemia unawareness--loss of the warning symptoms of developing hypoglycemia. Thus, patients with recurrent hypoglycemia (e.g., those with tightly controlled diabetes or with an insulinoma) often tolerate abnormally low plasma glucose concentrations without symptoms. PMID:10500927

  20. Life below the threshold.

    PubMed

    Castro, C

    1991-01-01

    This article explains that malnutrition, poor health, and limited educational opportunities plague Philippine children -- especially female children -- from families living below the poverty threshold. Nearly 70% of households in the Philippines do not meet the required daily level of nutritional intake. Because it is often -- and incorrectly -- assumed that women's nutritional requirements are lower than men's, women suffer higher rates of malnutrition and poor health. A 1987 study revealed that 11.7% of all elementary students were underweight and 13.9% had stunted growths. Among elementary-school girls, 17% were malnourished and 40% suffered from anemia (among lactating mothers, more than 1/2 are anemic). A 1988 Program for Decentralized Educational Development study showed that grade VI students learn only about 1/2 of what they are supposed to learn. 30% of the children enrolled in grade school drop out before they reach their senior year. The Department of Education, Culture and Sports estimates that some 2.56 million students dropped out of school in l989. That same year, some 3.7 million children were counted as part of the labor force. In Manila alone, some 60,000 children work the streets, whether doing odd jobs or begging, or turning to crime or prostitution. the article tells the story of a 12 year-old girl named Ging, a 4th grader at a public school and the oldest child in a poor family of 6 children. The undernourished Ging dreams of a good future for her family and sees education as a way out of poverty; unfortunately, her time after school is spend working in the streets or looking after her family. She considers herself luckier than many of the other children working in the streets, since she at least has a family.

  1. The Nature of Psychological Thresholds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rouder, Jeffrey N.; Morey, Richard D.

    2009-01-01

    Following G. T. Fechner (1966), thresholds have been conceptualized as the amount of intensity needed to transition between mental states, such as between a states of unconsciousness and consciousness. With the advent of the theory of signal detection, however, discrete-state theory and the corresponding notion of threshold have been discounted.…

  2. Threshold Concepts and Information Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townsend, Lori; Brunetti, Korey; Hofer, Amy R.

    2011-01-01

    What do we teach when we teach information literacy in higher education? This paper describes a pedagogical approach to information literacy that helps instructors focus content around transformative learning thresholds. The threshold concept framework holds promise for librarians because it grounds the instructor in the big ideas and underlying…

  3. Threshold Hypothesis: Fact or Artifact?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karwowski, Maciej; Gralewski, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    The threshold hypothesis (TH) assumes the existence of complex relations between creative abilities and intelligence: linear associations below 120 points of IQ and weaker or lack of associations above the threshold. However, diverse results have been obtained over the last six decades--some confirmed the hypothesis and some rejected it. In this…

  4. Influences of hyperthermia-induced seizures on learning, memory and phosphorylative state of CaMKIIα in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Yufang; Zhou, Hui; Zhang, Lian

    2014-04-01

    Febrile seizure (FS) remains the most common childhood neurological emergency. Although many studies have been done, controversy exists as to whether these seizures are associated with a significant risk for cognitive impairment. The aim of our study is to check whether there is a spatial learning and memory deficit in the experimental FS rats using a heated-air FS paradigm and to determine the possible molecular mechanism of cognitive impairment. On days 10 to 12 postpartum, the male rat pups were subjected to one, three, or nine episodes of brief hyperthermia-induced seizures (HS). At adolescence and adulthood, the rats subjected to three, or nine episodes of HS had significant deficits in spatial learning and memory tested by Morris water maze. At adulthood, no apparent hippocampal neuronal loss was found in any HS group, but the seizure threshold to flurothyl was decreased significantly in the rats subjected to nine episodes of HS. In the rats subjected to three, or nine episodes of HS, the Western immunoblotting showed that there was a significant translocation of Ca(2+)-calmodulin stimulated protein kinase II (CaMKII) from the postsynaptic density to the cytosol. In the postsynaptic density the phosphorylation of CaMKIIα Thr(286) was reduced significantly, but the phosphorylation of CaMKIIα Thr(305) was increased significantly. Our study showed early-life brief but recurrent HS caused long-term cognitive impairment and CaMKIIα was involved in carrying forward the signal resulting from HS. The change of the phosphorylative level in Thr(286) and Thr(305) sites of CaMKIIα may underlie the molecular mechanism for the HS related cognitive impairment.

  5. A novel genetic programming approach for epileptic seizure detection.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Arpit; Tiwari, Aruna; Krishna, Ramesh; Varma, Vishaal

    2016-02-01

    The human brain is a delicate mix of neurons (brain cells), electrical impulses and chemicals, known as neurotransmitters. Any damage has the potential to disrupt the workings of the brain and cause seizures. These epileptic seizures are the manifestations of epilepsy. The electroencephalograph (EEG) signals register average neuronal activity from the cerebral cortex and label changes in activity over large areas. A detailed analysis of these electroencephalograph (EEG) signals provides valuable insights into the mechanisms instigating epileptic disorders. Moreover, the detection of interictal spikes and epileptic seizures in an EEG signal plays an important role in the diagnosis of epilepsy. Automatic seizure detection methods are required, as these epileptic seizures are volatile and unpredictable. This paper deals with an automated detection of epileptic seizures in EEG signals using empirical mode decomposition (EMD) for feature extraction and proposes a novel genetic programming (GP) approach for classifying the EEG signals. Improvements in the standard GP approach are made using a Constructive Genetic Programming (CGP) in which constructive crossover and constructive subtree mutation operators are introduced. A hill climbing search is integrated in crossover and mutation operators to remove the destructive nature of these operators. A new concept of selecting the Globally Prime offspring is also presented to select the best fitness offspring generated during crossover. To decrease the time complexity of GP, a new dynamic fitness value computation (DFVC) is employed to increase the computational speed. We conducted five different sets of experiments to evaluate the performance of the proposed model in the classification of different mixtures of normal, interictal and ictal signals, and the accuracies achieved are outstandingly high. The experimental results are compared with the existing methods on same datasets, and these results affirm the potential use of

  6. Zinc supplementation prolongs the latency of hyperthermia-induced febrile seizures in rats.

    PubMed

    Aydın, L; Erdem, S R; Yazıcı, C

    2016-03-01

    Some studies have shown a relationship between febrile seizures and zinc levels. The lowest dose zinc supplementation in pentylenetetrazole seizure model has a protective effect. But, zinc pretreatment has no effect in maximal electroshock model. However, it is unclear how zinc supplementation affects hyperthermia-induced febrile seizures. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of zinc supplementation on febrile seizures in male Sprague-Dawley rats. The rats were randomly assigned to four groups. Zinc supplementation was commenced 5 days prior to febrile seizure induction by placing the animals in a water bath at 45°C. We measured the rectal temperature and determined the febrile seizure latency, duration, and stage. In the zinc-supplemented group, both the seizure latency and the rectal temperature triggering seizure initiation were significantly higher than in the other groups. We suggest that zinc supplementation can positively modulate febrile seizure pathogenesis in rats.

  7. ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE IN CHILDREN WITH NEW-ONSET SEIZURES AND ASTHMA: A PROSPECTIVE STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, David W.; Johnson, Cynthia S.; Austin, Joan K.; Perkins, Susan M.

    2007-01-01

    The study purpose was to compare teacher ratings of academic performance (TRP) over 24 months between children with new-onset seizures (N = 121) and new-onset asthma (N = 54) ages 4 to 14 years. At each data collection point (baseline, 12 months, 24 months), children with seizures were placed into two groups according to their recurrent seizure status (yes/no) during that period. Longitudinal linear mixed models were used to explore differences between the asthma group and the two seizure groups and to identify if differences in TRP in children with seizures were associated with age, gender, or use of medication. In the seizure sample, scores for children in both groups (with and without recurrent seizures) initially declined at 12 months; however, at 24 months, children who did not have recurrent seizures improved while children who continued to have recurrent seizures declined. There was a trend for younger children to decline more than older children. PMID:17293164

  8. Modeling early-onset post-ischemic seizures in aging mice

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chiping; Wang, Justin; Peng, Jessie; Patel, Nisarg; Huang, Yayi; Gao, Xiaoxing; Aljarallah, Salman; Eubanks, James H; McDonald, Robert; Zhang, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of seizures and epilepsy in the aged population, with post-stroke seizures being a poor prognostic factor. The pathological processes underlying post-stroke seizures are not well understood and studies of these seizures in aging/aged animals remain scarce. Therefore, our primary objective was to model post-stroke seizures in aging mice (C57 black strain, 16–20 month-old), with a focus on early-onset, convulsive seizures that occur within 24-hours of brain ischemia. We utilized a middle cerebral artery occlusion model and examined seizure activity and brain injury using combined behavioral and electroencephalographic monitoring and histological assessments. Aging mice exhibited vigorous convulsive seizures within hours of the middle cerebral artery occlusion. These seizures manifested with jumping, rapid running, barrel-rolling and/or falling all in the absence of hippocampal-cortical electrographic discharges. Seizure development was closely associated with severe brain injury and acute mortality. Anticonvulsive treatments after seizure occurrence offered temporary seizure control but failed to improve animal survival. A separate cohort of adult mice (6–8 months-old) exhibited analogous early-onset convulsive seizures following the middle cerebral artery occlusion but had better survival outcomes following anticonvulsive treatment. Collectively, our data suggest that early-onset convulsive seizures are a result of severe brain ischemia in aging animals. PMID:25943585

  9. Modeling early-onset post-ischemic seizures in aging mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chiping; Wang, Justin; Peng, Jessie; Patel, Nisarg; Huang, Yayi; Gao, Xiaoxing; Aljarallah, Salman; Eubanks, James H; McDonald, Robert; Zhang, Liang

    2015-09-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of seizures and epilepsy in the aged population, with post-stroke seizures being a poor prognostic factor. The pathological processes underlying post-stroke seizures are not well understood and studies of these seizures in aging/aged animals remain scarce. Therefore, our primary objective was to model post-stroke seizures in aging mice (C57 black strain, 16-20 months-old), with a focus on early-onset, convulsive seizures that occur within 24-hours of brain ischemia. We utilized a middle cerebral artery occlusion model and examined seizure activity and brain injury using combined behavioral and electroencephalographic monitoring and histological assessments. Aging mice exhibited vigorous convulsive seizures within hours of the middle cerebral artery occlusion. These seizures manifested with jumping, rapid running, barrel-rolling and/or falling all in the absence of hippocampal-cortical electrographic discharges. Seizure development was closely associated with severe brain injury and acute mortality. Anticonvulsive treatments after seizure occurrence offered temporary seizure control but failed to improve animal survival. A separate cohort of adult mice (6-8 months-old) exhibited analogous early-onset convulsive seizures following the middle cerebral artery occlusion but had better survival outcomes following anticonvulsive treatment. Collectively, our data suggest that early-onset convulsive seizures are a result of severe brain ischemia in aging animals.

  10. A patient with atonic seizures mimicking transient ischemic attacks

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Min-Ju; Choi, Jun Young; An, Young-Sil; Park, Ki-Hyung; Park, Hyeon-Mi; Lee, Yeong-Bae; Shin, Dong-Jin; Sung, Young Hee; Shin, Dong Hoon

    2015-01-01

    A focal atonic seizure is a partial seizure in which the ictal manifestation consists of paresis of the extremities or muscles on one side of the body, and this phenomenon can easily be misdiagnosed as a transient ischemic attack. An 86-year-old woman visited our hospital complaining of transient right upper extremity weakness lasting for 10 min following an unusual sensation in her chest accompanied by palpitations. On the third hospital day, she again complained of right arm weakness, which progressed to jerky movements of her right extremity accompanied by facial twitching and then generalized into a tonic–clonic seizure. The EEG displayed several interictal spikes in the contralateral temporal area, and the ictal SPECT, analyzed using the SISCOM system, showed an increased signal in both the contralateral superior parietal area and the mesial frontal area. In this case, the patient was diagnosed with focal atonic seizures as the cause of the monolimb weakness, which had been initially misdiagnosed aas transient ischemic attacks. In cases in which a patient presents with monolimb paresis, physicians should consider the possibility of an atonic seizure as the cause. PMID:25870790

  11. Current and emerging treatments for absence seizures in young patients.

    PubMed

    Vrielynck, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    In this report, we review the pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments of the different absence seizure types as recently recognized by the International League Against Epilepsy: typical absences, atypical absences, myoclonic absences, and eyelid myoclonia with absences. Overall, valproate and ethosuximide remain the principal anti-absence drugs. Typical absence seizures exhibit a specific electroclinical semiology, pathophysiology, and pharmacological response profile. A large-scale comparative study has recently confirmed the key role of ethosuximide in the treatment of childhood absence epilepsy, more than 50 years after its introduction. No new antiepileptic drug has proven major efficacy against typical absences. Of the medications under development, brivaracetam might be an efficacious anti-absence drug. Some experimental drugs also show efficacy in animal models of typical absence seizures. The treatment of other absence seizure types is not supported with a high level of evidence. Rufinamide appears to be the most promising new antiepileptic drug for atypical absences and possibly for myoclonic absences. The efficacy of vagal nerve stimulation should be further evaluated for atypical absences. Levetiracetam appears to display a particular efficacy in eyelid myoclonia with absences. Finally, it is important to remember that the majority of antiepileptic drugs, whether they be old or new, may aggravate typical and atypical absence seizures. PMID:23885176

  12. Systemic and neurologic autoimmune disorders associated with seizures or epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Angela; Crino, Peter B

    2011-05-01

    In this article, we review the incidence and significance of seizures in well-established autoimmune disorders, including multiple sclerosis (MS), diabetes mellitus, celiac disease, thyroid disease, and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The five following presentations discuss the incidence and possible pathogenesis of epilepsies that are found in these well-known autoimmune conditions. There is a large body of evidence describing the clinical presentation of seizures with MS and SLE, and showing that refractory epilepsy can complicate these already challenging disorders. However, the mechanisms involved are complex and generally not well understood. Neurologic syndromes, including seizure disorders, can also be a feature of celiac disease (CD) or subclinical CD, sometimes associated with cerebral calcification. The association between type-1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and epilepsy is unclear and requires more definitive epidemiologic analysis, despite the fact that antibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase may provide a link between the two conditions. The association between thyroid disorders and encephalopathies, often termed Hashimoto's encephalopathy, is well known but the pathogenic significance of antithyroid antibodies in this condition is still debated. In general, the relationships between autoimmune mechanisms and seizures in these conditions are unclear; the seizures are likely to be caused by a variety of mechanisms, including ischemia, neuronal damage, and specific and nonspecific immunity. PMID:21542840

  13. NKCC1 transporter facilitates seizures in the developing brain.

    PubMed

    Dzhala, Volodymyr I; Talos, Delia M; Sdrulla, Dan A; Brumback, Audrey C; Mathews, Gregory C; Benke, Timothy A; Delpire, Eric; Jensen, Frances E; Staley, Kevin J

    2005-11-01

    During development, activation of Cl(-)-permeable GABA(A) receptors (GABA(A)-R) excites neurons as a result of elevated intracellular Cl(-) levels and a depolarized Cl(-) equilibrium potential (E(Cl)). GABA becomes inhibitory as net outward neuronal transport of Cl(-) develops in a caudal-rostral progression. In line with this caudal-rostral developmental pattern, GABAergic anticonvulsant compounds inhibit motor manifestations of neonatal seizures but not cortical seizure activity. The Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) cotransporter (NKCC1) facilitates the accumulation of Cl(-) in neurons. The NKCC1 blocker bumetanide shifted E(Cl) negative in immature neurons, suppressed epileptiform activity in hippocampal slices in vitro and attenuated electrographic seizures in neonatal rats in vivo. Bumetanide had no effect in the presence of the GABA(A)-R antagonist bicuculline, nor in brain slices from NKCC1-knockout mice. NKCC1 expression level versus expression of the Cl(-)-extruding transporter (KCC2) in human and rat cortex showed that Cl(-) transport in perinatal human cortex is as immature as in the rat. Our results provide evidence that NKCC1 facilitates seizures in the developing brain and indicate that bumetanide should be useful in the treatment of neonatal seizures.

  14. Cerebral glucose utilization after vasopressin barrel rotation or bicuculline seizures

    SciTech Connect

    Wurpel, J.; Dundore, R.; Bryan, R.; Keil, L.; Severs, W.B.

    1986-03-05

    Intraventricular (ivt) arginine vasopressin (AVP) causes a violent motor behavior termed barrel rotation (BR). AVP-BR is affected by visual/vestibular sensory input and may be related to other CNS motor disorders (seizures). Local cerebral glucose utilization (LCGU) was compared in SD rats during AVP-BR and bicuculline (BIC) seizures. Three groups were used: saline-ivt; AVP-ivt 0.5 ..mu..g; BIC-5.5 mg/kg,sc. /sup 14/C-glucose (40 ..mu..CI iv) was injected 15 sec. after ivt-saline or AVP or onset of BIC seizures. Rats were decapitated 10 min. after /sup 14/C-glucose. Brains were removed and dissected into 19 regions which were digested and glucose uptake quantified by liquid scintillation counting. LCGU was significantly increased in all CNS areas during BIC seizures vs controls (21-92%; p < 0.05 ANOVA). LCGU exhibits variable (upward arrow, downward arrow) changes in discrete areas during AVP-BR (p < .05). Glucose uptake increased in: cortex-olfactory (21%), sensory (9%), motor (8%) cerebellum-rt (13%) and 1t (17%) hemispheres, vermis (6%); pyramidal tract (6%); mesencephalon (5%); and pons (8%). Two areas decreased LCGU during AVP-BR: auditory cortex (-8%) and hippocampus (-11%). AVP-BR exhibits distinct changes in LCGU vs BIC seizures.

  15. EEG seizure detection and prediction algorithms: a survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alotaiby, Turkey N.; Alshebeili, Saleh A.; Alshawi, Tariq; Ahmad, Ishtiaq; Abd El-Samie, Fathi E.

    2014-12-01

    Epilepsy patients experience challenges in daily life due to precautions they have to take in order to cope with this condition. When a seizure occurs, it might cause injuries or endanger the life of the patients or others, especially when they are using heavy machinery, e.g., deriving cars. Studies of epilepsy often rely on electroencephalogram (EEG) signals in order to analyze the behavior of the brain during seizures. Locating the seizure period in EEG recordings manually is difficult and time consuming; one often needs to skim through tens or even hundreds of hours of EEG recordings. Therefore, automatic detection of such an activity is of great importance. Another potential usage of EEG signal analysis is in the prediction of epileptic activities before they occur, as this will enable the patients (and caregivers) to take appropriate precautions. In this paper, we first present an overview of seizure detection and prediction problem and provide insights on the challenges in this area. Second, we cover some of the state-of-the-art seizure detection and prediction algorithms and provide comparison between these algorithms. Finally, we conclude with future research directions and open problems in this topic.

  16. Detection of tonic epileptic seizures based on surface electromyography.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Sigge N; Conradsen, Isa; Beniczky, Sandor; Sorensen, Helge B D

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to design an algorithm for detection of tonic seizures based on surface electromyography signals from the deltoids. A successful algorithm has a future prospect of being implemented in a wearable device as part of an alarm system. This has already been done for generalized tonic-clonic seizures, and the hypothesis was that some of the same characteristics could be found for tonic seizures. The signals were pre-processed by a high-pass filter to remove low frequency noise such as movement artifacts. Several different features were investigated, including kurtosis, median frequency, zero crossing rate and approximate entropy. These features were used as input in the random forest classifier to decide if a data segment was from a seizure or not. The goal was to develop a generic algorithm for all tonic seizures, but better results were achieved when certain parameters were adapted specifically for each patient. With patient specific parameters the algorithm obtained a sensitivity of 100% for four of six patients with false detection rates between 0.08 and 7.90 per hour. PMID:25570115

  17. Bayesian estimation of dose thresholds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groer, P. G.; Carnes, B. A.

    2003-01-01

    An example is described of Bayesian estimation of radiation absorbed dose thresholds (subsequently simply referred to as dose thresholds) using a specific parametric model applied to a data set on mice exposed to 60Co gamma rays and fission neutrons. A Weibull based relative risk model with a dose threshold parameter was used to analyse, as an example, lung cancer mortality and determine the posterior density for the threshold dose after single exposures to 60Co gamma rays or fission neutrons from the JANUS reactor at Argonne National Laboratory. The data consisted of survival, censoring times and cause of death information for male B6CF1 unexposed and exposed mice. The 60Co gamma whole-body doses for the two exposed groups were 0.86 and 1.37 Gy. The neutron whole-body doses were 0.19 and 0.38 Gy. Marginal posterior densities for the dose thresholds for neutron and gamma radiation were calculated with numerical integration and found to have quite different shapes. The density of the threshold for 60Co is unimodal with a mode at about 0.50 Gy. The threshold density for fission neutrons declines monotonically from a maximum value at zero with increasing doses. The posterior densities for all other parameters were similar for the two radiation types.

  18. TRIGGER SELF-CONTROL AND SEIZURE ARREST IN THE ANDREWS/REITER BEHAVIORAL APPROACH TO EPILEPSY: A RETROSPECTIVE ANALYSIS OF SEIZURE FREQUENCY

    PubMed Central

    Michaelis, Rosa; Schonfeld, Warren; Elsas, Siegward-M.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study is to describe changes of seizure frequency in epilepsy patients who participated in the Andrews/Reiter behavioral intervention for epilepsy. For this uncontrolled retrospective study, data was extracted from patients’ medical journals. Intention-to-treat-analyses were restricted to patients with sufficient documentation supporting a diagnosis of probable or definite epilepsy. Main outcome variable was a comparison of mean seizure frequency at baseline and towards completion of the program. The seizure frequency of 30 (50%%) patients showed a clinically meaningful improvement (>50% reduction of seizures) towards the end of the intervention. Twenty-two (37%) patients became seizure-free at the end of the intervention. In summary, a clinically meaningful reduction in reported seizure frequency was observed in epilepsy patients who received the Andrews/Reiter intervention for epilepsy. Prospective trials are needed to further investigate the program’s efficacy and to study epileptic seizure triggers. PMID:22341960

  19. Hallucination in a seizure patient using levetiracetam: a case report.

    PubMed

    Shakya, D R; Dutta, A; Gautam, R

    2012-01-01

    Levetiracetam, a relatively new antiepileptic drug (AED), is used mainly as adjuvant and less as monotherapy of seizure. Though rare, Levetiracetam is reported to induce hallucination. To highlight the potential of this adverse drug event, we report a seizure-case that had auditory hallucination with Levetiracetam. A 32-year lady had 7-year history of unresponsive spells which increased in the last year, also occurred while asleep and were diagnosed as "generalized seizure" with video-EEG. With gradual optimization of Levetiracetam to 2250 mg, she continuously heard distressing sound of saw cutting wooden blocks. After 3-day continuous auditory hallucination, Levetiracetam had to be changed to sodium valproate. PMID:22851978

  20. [Faciobrachial dystonic seizures. Semiologic diagnosis in limbic encephalitis].

    PubMed

    González Otárula, Karina A; Ugarnes, Gabriela; Fernández Suárez, Marcos; D'Giano, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Limbic encephalitis (LE) associated with positive potassium channel complex antibodies often manifests with faciobrachial dystonic seizures (FBDS). We retrospectively analyze two cases, admitted to our video-EEG unit between 2006 and 2014. Both patients were males, aged 66 and 76 years respectively, presenting with brief, but very frequent uni/bilateral dystonic brachial movements, hand posturing and ipsilateral facial grimacing. Severe hyponatremia was found in both patients who went on to develop cognitive impairment. Immunosuppressive therapy improved both seizures and cognitive dysfunction. Serology testing confirmed anti VGKC antibody presence. FBDS are often the first manifestation of LE associated to positive anti VGKC antibodies, and are refractory to treatment with antiepileptic drugs. Early diagnosis and treatment of FBDS with immunosuppressive therapy is important, not only because of seizure suppression, but also because it may help limit the extent of the cognitive damage.