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Sample records for pudendal nerve stimulation

  1. Electrical stimulation of anal sphincter or pudendal nerve improves anal sphincter pressure.

    PubMed

    Damaser, Margot S; Salcedo, Levilester; Wang, Guangjian; Zaszczurynski, Paul; Cruz, Michelle A; Butler, Robert S; Jiang, Hai-Hong; Zutshi, Massarat

    2012-12-01

    Stimulation of the pudendal nerve or the anal sphincter could provide therapeutic options for fecal incontinence with little involvement of other organs. The goal of this project was to assess the effects of pudendal nerve and anal sphincter stimulation on bladder and anal pressures. Ten virgin female Sprague Dawley rats were randomly allocated to control (n = 2), perianal stimulation (n = 4), and pudendal nerve stimulation (n = 4) groups. A monopolar electrode was hooked to the pudendal nerve or placed on the anal sphincter. Aballoon catheter was inserted into the anus to measure anal pressure, and a catheter was inserted into the bladder via the urethra to measure bladder pressure. Bladder and anal pressures were measured with different electrical stimulation parameters and different timing of electrical stimulation relative to spontaneous anal sphincter contractions. Increasing stimulation current had the most dramatic effect on both anal and bladder pressures. An immediate increase in anal pressure was observed when stimulating either the anal sphincter or the pudendal nerve at stimulation values of 1 mA or 2 mA. No increase in anal pressure was observed for lower current values. Bladder pressure increased at high current during anal sphincter stimulation, but not as much as during pudendal nerve stimulation. Increased bladder pressure during anal sphincter stimulation was due to contraction of the abdominal muscles. Electrical stimulation caused an increase in anal pressures with bladder involvement only at high current. These initial results suggest that electrical stimulation can increase anal sphincter pressure, enhancing continence control.

  2. Pudendal nerve stimulation and block by a wireless-controlled implantable stimulator in cats.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guangning; Wang, Jicheng; Shen, Bing; Roppolo, James R; de Groat, William C; Tai, Changfeng

    2014-07-01

    The study aims to determine the functionality of a wireless-controlled implantable stimulator designed for stimulation and block of the pudendal nerve. In five cats under α-chloralose anesthesia, the stimulator was implanted underneath the skin on the left side in the lower back along the sacral spine. Two tripolar cuff electrodes were implanted bilaterally on the pudendal nerves in addition to one bipolar cuff electrode that was implanted on the left side central to the tripolar cuff electrode. The stimulator provided high-frequency (5-20 kHz) biphasic stimulation waveforms to the two tripolar electrodes and low-frequency (1-100 Hz) rectangular pulses to the bipolar electrode. Bladder and urethral pressures were measured to determine the effects of pudendal nerve stimulation (PNS) or block. The maximal (70-100 cmH2O) urethral pressure generated by 20-Hz PNS applied via the bipolar electrode was completely eliminated by the pudendal nerve block induced by the high-frequency stimulation (6-15 kHz, 6-10 V) applied via the two tripolar electrodes. In a partially filled bladder, 20-30 Hz PNS (2-8 V, 0.2 ms) but not 5 Hz stimulation applied via the bipolar electrode elicited a large sustained bladder contraction (45.9 ± 13.4 to 52.0 ± 22 cmH2O). During cystometry, the 5 Hz PNS significantly (p < 0.05) increased bladder capacity to 176.5 ± 27.1% of control capacity. The wireless-controlled implantable stimulator successfully generated the required waveforms for stimulation and block of pudendal nerve, which will be useful for restoring bladder functions after spinal cord injury. © 2013 International Neuromodulation Society.

  3. Reinnervation of Urethral and Anal Sphincters With Femoral Motor Nerve to Pudendal Nerve Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Ruggieri, Michael R.; Braverman, Alan S.; Bernal, Raymond M.; Lamarre, Neil S.; Brown, Justin M.; Barbe, Mary F.

    2012-01-01

    Aims Lower motor neuron damage to sacral roots or nerves can result in incontinence and a flaccid urinary bladder. We showed bladder reinnervation after transfer of coccygeal to sacral ventral roots, and genitofemoral nerves (L1, 2 origin) to pelvic nerves. This study assesses the feasibility of urethral and anal sphincter reinnervation using transfer of motor branches of the femoral nerve (L2–4 origin) to pudendal nerves (S1, 2 origin) that innervate the urethral and anal sphincters in a canine model. Methods Sacral ventral roots were selected by their ability to stimulate bladder, urethral sphincter, and anal sphincter contraction and transected. Bilaterally, branches of the femoral nerve, specifically, nervus saphenous pars muscularis [Evans HE. Miller’s anatomy of the dog. Philadelphia: W.B. Saunders; 1993], were transferred and end-to-end anastomosed to transected pudendal nerve branches in the perineum, then enclosed in unipolar nerve cuff electrodes with leads to implanted RF micro-stimulators. Results Nerve stimulation induced increased anal and urethral sphincter pressures in five of six transferred nerves. Retrograde neurotracing from the bladder, urethral sphincter, and anal sphincter using fluorogold, fast blue, and fluororuby, demonstrated urethral and anal sphincter labeled neurons in L2–4 cord segments (but not S1–3) in nerve transfer canines, consistent with rein-nervation by the transferred femoral nerve motor branches. Controls had labeled neurons only in S1–3 segments. Postmortem DiI and DiO labeling confirmed axonal regrowth across the nerve repair site. Conclusions These results show spinal cord reinnervation of urethral and anal sphincter targets after sacral ventral root transection and femoral nerve transfer (NT) to the denervated pudendal nerve. These surgical procedures may allow patients to regain continence. PMID:21953679

  4. Development of an Implantable Pudendal Nerve Stimulator To Restore Bladder Function in Humans After SCI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    new version of the stimulator will be manufactured and tested again. This design-build-test cycle will be repeated multiple times during the second...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-C-0066 TITLE: Development of an Implantable Pudendal Nerve Stimulator To Restore Bladder Function in Humans After SCI...response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and

  5. Anatomy of pudendal nerve at urogenital diaphragm--new critical site for nerve entrapment.

    PubMed

    Hruby, Stephan; Ebmer, Johannes; Dellon, A Lee; Aszmann, Oskar C

    2005-11-01

    To investigate the relations of the pudendal nerve in this complex anatomic region and determine possible entrapment sites that are accessible for surgical decompression. Entrapment neuropathies of the pudendal nerve are an uncommon and, therefore, often overlooked or misdiagnosed clinical entity. The detailed relations of this nerve as it exits the pelvis through the urogenital diaphragm and enters the mobile part of the penis have not yet been studied. Detailed anatomic dissections were performed in 10 formalin preserved hemipelves under 3.5x loupe magnification. The pudendal nerve was dissected from the entrance into the Alcock canal to the dorsum of the penis. The branching pattern of the nerve and its topographic relationship were recorded and photographs taken. The anatomic dissections revealed that the pudendal nerve passes through a tight osteofibrotic canal just distal to the urogenital diaphragm at the entrance to the base of the penis. This canal is, in part, formed by the inferior ramus of the pubic bone, the suspensory ligament of the penis, and the ischiocavernous body. In two specimens, a fusiform pseudoneuromatous thickening was found. The pudendal nerve is susceptible to compression at the passage from the Alcock canal to the dorsum of the penis. Individuals exposed to repetitive mechanical irritation in this region are especially endangered. Diabetic patients with peripheral neuropathy can have additional compression neuropathy with decreased penile sensibility and will benefit from decompression of the pudendal nerve.

  6. Pudendal nerve in pelvic bone fractures.

    PubMed

    Báča, Václav; Báčová, Tereza; Grill, Robert; Otčenášek, Michal; Kachlík, David; Bartoška, Radek; Džupa, Valér

    2013-07-01

    Pelvic ring injuries rank among the most serious skeletal injuries. According to published data, pelvic fractures constitute 3-8% of all fractures. There has been a threefold increase in the number of these fractures over the last 10 years. A significant factor determining the choice of the therapeutic procedure, timing and sequence of individual steps, and also the prognosis of the patient with a fractured pelvis, are associated injuries defined as injuries to the organs and anatomical structures found in the pelvic region. Published data describes the incidence of injury to neurogenic structures as ranging between 9 and 21%, to the urogenital tract between 5 and 11%, to the gastrointestinal tract in 3-17% and to the gynecologic organs up to 1%. The pathway of the pudendal nerve may be affected in types B and C fractures where the root fibers emerge from the foramina sacralia and plexus sacralis is formed, on the one hand, and in types A, B and C fractures during the nerve's course alongside the inferior pubic ramus. In order to determine the frequency of potential injury to the pudendal nerve, a set of 225 pelvic fractures treated between 2007 and 2009 was assessed; 38 fixed hemipelves were also used to study the length of the course of the pudendal nerve alongside the inferior pubic ramus, on the one hand, and the distances from the symphysis pubica at the crossing of the branches of the n. pudendus-n. dorsalis penis and the branches for the muscles of the diaphragma urogenitale on the other hand. The work elucidated the selected distances and discuss their possible clinical relevance for evaluation of the seriousness of pelvic fractures from the perspective of late sequelae in the region innervated by the pudendal nerve. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of pelvic, pudendal, or hypogastric nerve cuts on Fos induction in the rat brain following vaginocervical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Pfaus, James G; Manitt, Colleen; Coopersmith, Carol B

    2006-12-30

    In the female rat, genitosensory input is conveyed to the central nervous system predominantly through the pelvic, pudendal, and hypogastric nerves. The present study examined the relative contribution of those three nerves in the expression of Fos immunoreactivity within brain regions previously shown to be activated by vaginocervical stimulation (VCS). Bilateral transection of those nerves, or sham neurectomy, was conducted in separate groups of ovariectomized, sexually-experienced females. After recovery, females were primed with estrogen and progesterone and given either 50 manual VCSs with a lubricated glass rod over the course of 1 h. VCS increased the number of neurons expressing Fos immunoreactivity in the medial preoptic area, lateral septum, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, ventromedial hypothalamus, and medial amygdala of sham neurectomized females. Transection of the pelvic nerve reduced Fos immunoreactivity in the medial preoptic area, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, ventromedial hypothalamus, and medial amygdala, whereas transection of the pudendal nerve had no effect. In contrast, transection of the hypogastric nerve increased Fos immunoreactivity in the medial preoptic area and lateral septum, whereas transaction of the pelvic nerve increased Fos immunoreactivity in the lateral septum, following VCS. All females given VCS, except those with pelvic neurectomy, displayed a characteristic immobility during each application. These data confirm that the pelvic nerve is largely responsible for the neural and behavioral effects of VCS, and support a separate function for the hypogastric nerve.

  8. Robot-assisted pudendal neurolysis in the treatment of pudendal nerve entrapment syndrome.

    PubMed

    Moscatiello, P; Carracedo Calvo, D; Yupanqui Guerra, L; Rivera Martínez, M E; Mendiola de la Hoza, A; Sánchez Encinas, M

    2018-06-01

    Pudendal nerve entrapment syndrome (PNE) is characterised by the presence of neuropathic pain in the pudendal nerve (PN) territory, associated or not with urinary, defecatory and sexual disorders. Surgical PN decompression is an effective and safe alternative for cases when conservative treatment fails. The aim of this study is to describe the first robot-assisted pudendal neurolysis procedure performed in our country. We describe step by step the technique of robot-assisted laparoscopic neurolysis of the left PN performed with intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring on a 60-year-old patient diagnosed with left PNE. The procedure was performed satisfactorily without complications. After 24h, the patient was discharged from the hospital. We observed a 50% reduction in pain measured using the visual analogue scale 2 weeks after the procedure, which remained after 10 weeks of the neurolysis. Robot-assisted neurolysis of the PN constitutes a feasible and safe approach, enabling better visualisation and accuracy in the dissection of the PN. Intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring is useful for locating the PN and for detecting intraoperative changes after the release of the nerve. Copyright © 2018 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Pudendal Nerve and Internal Pudendal Artery Damage May Contribute to Radiation-Induced Erectile Dysfunction

    SciTech Connect

    Nolan, Michael W., E-mail: mwnolan@ncsu.edu; Department of Environmental and Radiologic Health Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado; Marolf, Angela J.

    Purpose/Objectives: Erectile dysfunction is common after radiation therapy for prostate cancer; yet, the etiopathology of radiation-induced erectile dysfunction (RI-ED) remains poorly understood. A novel animal model was developed to study RI-ED, wherein stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) was used to irradiate the prostate, neurovascular bundles (NVB), and penile bulb (PB) of dogs. The purpose was to describe vascular and neurogenic injuries after the irradiation of only the NVB or the PB, and after irradiation of all 3 sites (prostate, NVB, and PB) with varying doses of radiation. Methods and Materials: Dogs were treated with 50, 40, or 30 Gy to themore » prostate, NVB, and PB, or 50 Gy to either the NVB or the PB, by 5-fraction SBRT. Electrophysiologic studies of the pudendal nerve and bulbospongiosus muscles and ultrasound studies of pelvic perfusion were performed before and after SBRT. The results of these bioassays were correlated with histopathologic changes. Results: SBRT caused slowing of the systolic rise time, which corresponded to decreased arterial patency. Alterations in the response of the internal pudendal artery to vasoactive drugs were observed, wherein SBRT caused a paradoxical response to papaverine, slowing the systolic rise time after 40 and 50 Gy; these changes appeared to have some dose dependency. The neurofilament content of penile nerves was also decreased at high doses and was more profound when the PB was irradiated than when the NVB was irradiated. These findings are coincident with slowing of motor nerve conduction velocities in the pudendal nerve after SBRT. Conclusions: This is the first report in which prostatic irradiation was shown to cause morphologic arterial damage that was coincident with altered internal pudendal arterial tone, and in which decreased motor function in the pudendal nerve was attributed to axonal degeneration and loss. Further investigation of the role played by damage to these structures in RI

  10. Mechanisms of reflex bladder activation by pudendal afferents

    PubMed Central

    Woock, John P.; Yoo, Paul B.

    2011-01-01

    Activation of pudendal afferents can evoke bladder contraction or relaxation dependent on the frequency of stimulation, but the mechanisms of reflex bladder excitation evoked by pudendal afferent stimulation are unknown. The objective of this study was to determine the contributions of sympathetic and parasympathetic mechanisms to bladder contractions evoked by stimulation of the dorsal nerve of the penis (DNP) in α-chloralose anesthetized adult male cats. Bladder contractions were evoked by DNP stimulation only above a bladder volume threshold equal to 73 ± 12% of the distension-evoked reflex contraction volume threshold. Bilateral hypogastric nerve transection (to eliminate sympathetic innervation of the bladder) or administration of propranolol (a β-adrenergic antagonist) decreased the stimulation-evoked and distension-evoked volume thresholds by −25% to −39%. Neither hypogastric nerve transection nor propranolol affected contraction magnitude, and robust bladder contractions were still evoked by stimulation at volume thresholds below the distension-evoked volume threshold. As well, inhibition of distention-evoked reflex bladder contractions by 10 Hz stimulation of the DNP was preserved following bilateral hypogastric nerve transection. Administration of phentolamine (an α-adrenergic antagonist) increased stimulation-evoked and distension-evoked volume thresholds by 18%, but again, robust contractions were still evoked by stimulation at volumes below the distension-evoked threshold. These results indicate that sympathetic mechanisms contribute to establishing the volume dependence of reflex contractions but are not critical to the excitatory pudendal to bladder reflex. A strong correlation between the magnitude of stimulation-evoked bladder contractions and bladder volume supports that convergence of pelvic afferents and pudendal afferents is responsible for bladder excitation evoked by pudendal afferents. Further, abolition of stimulation-evoked bladder

  11. Efficacy of pudendal nerve block for alleviation of catheter-related bladder discomfort in male patients undergoing lower urinary tract surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Xiaoqiang, Li; Xuerong, Zhang; Juan, Liu; Mathew, Bechu Shelley; Xiaorong, Yin; Qin, Wan; Lili, Luo; Yingying, Zhu; Jun, Luo

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Catheter-related bladder discomfort (CRBD) to an indwelling urinary catheter is defined as a painful urethral discomfort, resistant to conventional opioid therapy, decreasing the quality of postoperative recovery. According to anatomy, the branches of sacral somatic nerves form the afferent nerves of the urethra and bladder triangle, which deriving from the ventral rami of the second to fourth sacral spinal nerves, innervating the urethral muscles and sphincter of the perineum and pelvic floor; as well as providing sensation to the penis and clitoris in males and females, which including the urethra and bladder triangle. Based on this theoretical knowledge, we formed a hypothesis that CRBD could be prevented by pudendal nerve block. Objective: To evaluate if bilateral nerve stimulator-guided pudendal nerve block could relieve CRBD through urethra discomfort alleviation. Design and Setting: Single-center randomized parallel controlled, double blind trial conducted at West China Hospital, Sichuan University, China. Participants: One hundred and eighty 2 male adult patients under general anesthesia undergoing elective trans-urethral resection of prostate (TURP) or trans-urethral resection of bladder tumor (TURBT). Around 4 out of 182 were excluded, 178 patients were randomly allocated into pudendal and control groups, using computer-generated randomized numbers in a sealed envelope method. A total of 175 patients completed the study. Intervention: Pudendal group received general anesthesia along with nerve-stimulator-guided bilateral pudendal nerve block and control group received general anesthesia only. Main outcome measures: Incidence and severity of CRBD; and postoperative VAS score of pain. Results: CRBD incidences were significantly lower in pudendal group at 30 minutes (63% vs 82%, P = .004), 2 hours (64% vs 90%, P < .000), 8 hours (58% vs 79%, P = .003) and 12 hours (52% vs 69%, P = .028) also significantly lower

  12. Development of an ultrasound-guided technique for pudendal nerve block in cat cadavers.

    PubMed

    Adami, Chiara; Angeli, Giovanni; Haenssgen, Kati; Stoffel, Michael H; Spadavecchia, Claudia

    2013-10-01

    The objective of this prospective experimental cadaveric study was to develop an ultrasound-guided technique to perform an anaesthetic pudendal nerve block in male cats. Fifteen fresh cadavers were used for this trial. A detailed anatomical dissection was performed on one cat in order to scrutinise the pudendal nerve and its ramifications. In a second step, the cadavers of six cats were used to test three different ultrasonographic approaches to the pudendal nerve: the deep dorso-lateral, the superficial dorso-lateral and the median transperineal. Although none of the approaches allowed direct ultrasonographical identification of the pudendal nerve branches, the deep dorso-lateral was found to be the most advantageous one in terms of practicability and ability to identify useful and reliable landmarks. Based on these findings, the deep dorso-lateral approach was selected as technique of choice for tracer injections (0.1 ml 1% methylene blue injected bilaterally) in six cat cadavers distinct from those used for the ultrasonographical study. Anatomical dissection revealed a homogeneous spread of the tracer around the pudendal nerve sensory branches in all six cadavers. Finally, computed tomography was performed in two additional cadavers after injection of 0.3 ml/kg (0.15 ml/kg per each injection sites, left and right) contrast medium through the deep dorso-lateral approach in order to obtain a model of volume distribution applicable to local anaesthetics. Our findings in cat cadavers indicate that ultrasound-guided pudendal nerve block is feasible and could be proposed to provide peri-operative analgesia in clinical patients undergoing perineal urethrostomy.

  13. Pudendal and median nerve sensory perception threshold: a comparison between normative studies.

    PubMed

    Quaghebeur, Jörgen; Wyndaele, Jean Jacques

    2014-12-01

    For the evaluation of sensory innervation, normative data are necessary as a comparison. To compare our current perception thresholds (CPTs) with normative data from other research. Healthy volunteers were assessed for 2000, 250, and 5 Hz CPTs of the median and pudendal nerve and data were compared with other studies. Normative data in the studied group n = 41 (male: 21; female: 20) for the median nerve, 2 kHz, 250 Hz, and 5 Hz were respectively: 241.85 ± 67.72 (140-444); 106.27 ± 39.12 (45-229); 82.05 ± 43.40 (13-271). Pudendal nerve CPTs 250 Hz were: 126.44 ± 69.46 (6-333). For men 2 kHz: 349.95 ± 125.76 (100-588); 5 Hz: 132.67 ± 51.81 (59-249) and women 2 kHz:226.20 ± 119.65 (64-528); 5 Hz: 92.45 ± 44.66 (35-215). For the median nerve no statistical differences for gender were shown. For the pudendal nerve, only 250 Hz showed no difference for gender (t-test: 0.516). Comparison of our data with CPTs of other normative data showed no agreement for the pudendal nerve. For the median nerve only 2 kHz showed agreement in three studies and for 5 Hz with one study. Comparing normative data of multiple studies shows a variety of results and poor agreement. Therefore, referring to normative data of other studies should be handled with caution.

  14. Pudendal nerve decompression in perineology : a case series

    PubMed Central

    Beco, Jacques; Climov, Daniela; Bex, Michèle

    2004-01-01

    Background Perineodynia (vulvodynia, perineal pain, proctalgia), anal and urinary incontinence are the main symptoms of the pudendal canal syndrome (PCS) or entrapment of the pudendal nerve. The first aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of bilateral pudendal nerve decompression (PND) on the symptoms of the PCS, on three clinical signs (abnormal sensibility, painful Alcock's canal, painful "skin rolling test") and on two neurophysiological tests: electromyography (EMG) and pudendal nerve terminal motor latencies (PNTML). The second aim was to study the clinical value of the aforementioned clinical signs in the diagnosis of PCS. Methods In this retrospective analysis, the studied sample comprised 74 female patients who underwent a bilateral PND between 1995 and 2002. To accomplish the first aim, the patients sample was compared before and at least one year after surgery by means of descriptive statistics and hypothesis testing. The second aim was achieved by means of a statistical comparison between the patient's group before the operation and a control group of 82 women without any of the following signs: prolapse, anal incontinence, perineodynia, dyschesia and history of pelvi-perineal surgery. Results When bilateral PND was the only procedure done to treat the symptoms, the cure rates of perineodynia, anal incontinence and urinary incontinence were 8/14, 4/5 and 3/5, respectively. The frequency of the three clinical signs was significantly reduced. There was a significant reduction of anal and perineal PNTML and a significant increase of anal richness on EMG. The Odd Ratio of the three clinical signs in the diagnosis of PCS was 16,97 (95% CI = 4,68 – 61,51). Conclusion This study suggests that bilateral PND can treat perineodynia, anal and urinary incontinence. The three clinical signs of PCS seem to be efficient to suspect this diagnosis. There is a need for further studies to confirm these preliminary results. PMID:15516268

  15. Anatomy of the Pudendal Nerve and Other Neural Structures Around the Proximal Hamstring Origin in Males.

    PubMed

    Cvetanovich, Gregory L; Saltzman, Bryan M; Ukwuani, Gift; Frank, Rachel M; Verma, Nikhil N; Bush-Joseph, Charles A; Nho, Shane J

    2018-03-29

    To define the anatomy of the pudendal nerve in relationship to the proximal hamstring and other nearby neurological structures during proximal hamstring repair. Six fresh-frozen human cadaveric hemi-pelvises from male patients ages 64.0 ± 4.1 years were dissected in prone position with hips in 10° flexion to identify the relationship of proximal hamstring origin to surrounding neurologic structures including the pudendal nerve, sciatic nerve, and posterior femoral cutaneous nerve. Two independent observers used digital calipers to measure distances. The pudendal nerve emerged at the inferior border of the piriformis muscle 6.3 ± 1.4 cm from the superior aspect of the proximal hamstring origin. It passed the superior border of the sacrotuberous ligament 3.0 ± 0.6 cm from the superior aspect and 3.9 ± 0.7 cm from the medial aspect of the hamstring origin. It crossed the inferior border of the sacrotuberous ligament 3.0 ± 0.4 cm from the superior aspect and 2.7 ± 0.7 cm from the medial aspect of the proximal hamstring origin. The shortest distance from the hamstring origin to the pudendal nerve was 2.6 ± 0.5 cm from the superior aspect and 2.3 ± 0.8 cm from the medial aspect. The shortest distance from the hamstring origin to the pudendal nerve was located deep to the sacrotuberous ligament in all cadavers. The sciatic nerve was an average of 1.1 ± 0.1 cm lateral to the lateral aspect of the proximal hamstring origin. The posterior femoral cutaneous nerve was located between the hamstring origin and the sciatic nerve, 0.7 ± 0.2 cm lateral to the lateral aspect of the proximal hamstring origin. The proximal hamstring origin lies in close proximity to surrounding nerves, including the pudendal, sciatic, and posterior femoral cutaneous nerves. Knowledge that the pudendal nerve lies 2 to 3 cm superior and medial to the proximal hamstring origin may help to prevent iatrogenic damage during surgical dissection and retraction when performing proximal

  16. Efficacy of pudendal nerve block for alleviation of catheter-related bladder discomfort in male patients undergoing lower urinary tract surgeries: A randomized, controlled, double-blind trial.

    PubMed

    Xiaoqiang, Li; Xuerong, Zhang; Juan, Liu; Mathew, Bechu Shelley; Xiaorong, Yin; Qin, Wan; Lili, Luo; Yingying, Zhu; Jun, Luo

    2017-12-01

    Catheter-related bladder discomfort (CRBD) to an indwelling urinary catheter is defined as a painful urethral discomfort, resistant to conventional opioid therapy, decreasing the quality of postoperative recovery. According to anatomy, the branches of sacral somatic nerves form the afferent nerves of the urethra and bladder triangle, which deriving from the ventral rami of the second to fourth sacral spinal nerves, innervating the urethral muscles and sphincter of the perineum and pelvic floor; as well as providing sensation to the penis and clitoris in males and females, which including the urethra and bladder triangle. Based on this theoretical knowledge, we formed a hypothesis that CRBD could be prevented by pudendal nerve block. To evaluate if bilateral nerve stimulator-guided pudendal nerve block could relieve CRBD through urethra discomfort alleviation. Single-center randomized parallel controlled, double blind trial conducted at West China Hospital, Sichuan University, China. One hundred and eighty 2 male adult patients under general anesthesia undergoing elective trans-urethral resection of prostate (TURP) or trans-urethral resection of bladder tumor (TURBT). Around 4 out of 182 were excluded, 178 patients were randomly allocated into pudendal and control groups, using computer-generated randomized numbers in a sealed envelope method. A total of 175 patients completed the study. Pudendal group received general anesthesia along with nerve-stimulator-guided bilateral pudendal nerve block and control group received general anesthesia only. Incidence and severity of CRBD; and postoperative VAS score of pain. CRBD incidences were significantly lower in pudendal group at 30 minutes (63% vs 82%, P = .004), 2 hours (64% vs 90%, P < .000), 8 hours (58% vs 79%, P = .003) and 12 hours (52% vs 69%, P = .028) also significantly lower incidence of moderate to severe CRBD in pudendal group at 30 minutes (29% vs 57%, P < .001), 2 hours (22

  17. New perineal injection technique for pudendal nerve infiltration in diagnostic and therapeutic procedures.

    PubMed

    Weinschenk, Stefan; Hollmann, Markus W; Strowitzki, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Pudendal nerve injection is used as a diagnostic procedure in the vulvar region and for therapeutic purposes, such as in vulvodynia. Here, we provide a new, easy-to-perform perineal injection technique. We analyzed 105 perineal injections into the pudendal nerve with a local anesthetic (LA), procaine in 20 patients. A 0.4 × 40 mm needle was handled using a stop-and-go technique while monitoring the patient's discomfort. The needle was placed 1-2 cm laterally to the dorsal introitus. After aspiration, a small amount of LA was applied. After subcutaneous anesthesia, the needle was further advanced step-by-step. Thus, 5 ml could be applied with little discomfort to the patient. Anesthesia in the pudendal target region was the primary endpoint of our analysis. In 93 of 105 injections (88.6 %), complete perineal anesthesia was achieved with a single injection. 12 injections were repeated. These injections were excluded from the analysis. Severity of injection pain, on visual analog scale (VAS) from 0 to 100, was 26.8 (95 % CI 7.2-46.4). Age (β = 0.33, p < 0.01) and the number of previous injections (β = 0.35, p < 0.01) inversely correlated with injection pain. Injection pain and anesthesia were not affected by BMI, the number and the side of previous injections, or order of injection. A reversible vasovagal reaction was common, but no serious adverse effects occurred. Perineal pudendal injection is an effective and safe technique for anesthesia in diagnostic (vulva biopsy) and therapeutic indications (pudendal neuralgia), and regional anesthesia in perinatal settings.

  18. Simultaneous perineal ultrasound and vaginal pressure measurement prove the action of electrical pudendal nerve stimulation in treating female stress incontinence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Siyou; Zhang, Shujing

    2012-11-01

    Study Type - Diagnostic (case series) Level of Evidence 4. What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? Pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) and transvaginal electrical stimulation (TES) are two commonly used forms of conservative treatment for stress urinary incontinence (SUI). PFMT may build up the structural support of the pelvis, but many SUI patients are unable to perform PFMT effectively and its primary disadvantage is lack of long-term patient compliance. TES is a passive treatment that produces PFM contraction and patient compliance with it is good; however, its effect is not as good as that of PFMT when performed correctly. Electrical pudendal nerve stimulation (EPNS) combines the advantages of PFMT and TES and incorporates the technique of deep insertion of long needles. In this study, simultaneous perineal ultrasound and vaginal pressure measurement prove that EPNS can contract the PFM and simulate PFMT. It is shown that EPNS is an alternative therapy for female SUI patients who fail PFMT and TES and the therapy can also be used for severe SUI. • To prove that electrical pudendal nerve stimulation (EPNS) can contract the pelvic floor muscles (PFM) and simulate pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT). • To show that EPNS is an alternative therapy for female stress urinary incontinence (SUI) that does not respond effectively to PFMT and transvaginal electrical stimulation (TES). • Thirty-five female patients with SUI who did not respond effectively to PFMT and TES (group I) were enrolled and 60 other female patients with SUI were allocated to group II (30 patients) and group III (30 patients). • Long needles were deeply inserted into four sacral points and electrified to stimulate the pudendal nerves. Group I and group II were treated by a doctor skilled in performing EPNS and group III, by a doctor unskilled in performing EPNS. • When EPNS was performed in group I, perineal ultrasonographic PFM movements, vaginal pressure (VP) and PFM

  19. Vascular Entrapment of Both the Sciatic and Pudendal Nerves Causing Persistent Sciatica and Pudendal Neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Kale, Ahmet; Basol, Gulfem; Usta, Taner; Cam, Isa

    2018-04-24

    To demonstrate the laparoscopic approach to malformed branches of the vessels entrapping the nerves of the sacral plexus. A step-by-step explanation of the surgery using video (educative video) (Canadian Task force classification II). The university's Ethics Committee ruled that approval was not required for this video. Kocaeli Derince Education and Research Hospital, Kocaeli, Turkey. A 26-year-old patient who had failed medical therapy and presented with complaints of numbness and burning pain on the right side of her vagina and pain radiating to her lower limbs for a period of approximately 36 months. The peritoneum was incised along the external iliac vessels, and these vessels were separated from the iliopsoas muscle on the right side of the pelvis. The laparoscopic decompression of intrapelvic vascular entrapment was performed at 3 sites: the lumbosacral trunk, sciatic nerve, and pudendal nerve. The aberrant dilated veins were gently dissected from nerves, and then coagulated and cut with the LigaSure sealing device (Medtronic, Minneapolis, Minn). The operation was completed successfully with no complications, and the patient was discharged from the hospital 24 hours after the operation. At a 6-month follow-up, she reported complete resolution of dyspareunia and sciatica (visual analog scale score 1 of 10). A less well-known cause of chronic pelvic pain is compression of the sacral plexus by dilated or malformed branches of the internal iliac vessels. Laparoscopic management of vascular entrapment of the sacral plexus has been described by Possover et al [1,2] and Lemos et al [3]. This procedure appears to be feasible and effective, but requires significant experience and familiarity with laparoscopy techniques and pelvic nerve anatomy. Copyright © 2018 American Association of Gynecologic Laparoscopists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Pudendal nerve neuromodulation with neurophysiology guidance: a potential treatment option for refractory chronic pelvi-perineal pain.

    PubMed

    Carmel, Maude; Lebel, Michel; Tu, Le Mai

    2010-05-01

    Refractory chronic pelvi-perineal pain (RCPPP) is a challenging entity that has devastating consequences for patient's quality of life. Many etiologies have been proposed including pudendal neuralgia. Multiple treatment options are used but the reported results are sub-optimal and temporary. In this article, we present the technique of pudendal nerve neuromodulation with neurophysiology guidance as a treatment option for RCPPP. This technique is a two-step procedure that includes electrode implantation under neurophysiology guidance followed by the implantation of a permanent generator after a successful trial period. We report the cases of three women who underwent this procedure as a last-resort treatment option. After 2 years of follow-up, their symptoms are still significantly improved. No major complication occurred.

  1. Proctalgia fugax: caused by pudendal neuropathy?

    PubMed

    Takano, Masahiro

    2005-01-01

    There is a strange disease called proctalgia fugax in which rather uncomfortable pain appears suddenly mostly at night without any particular warning and disappears completely without any objective traces. It also is categorized as a functional anorectal pain under the Rome II (diagnostic criteria for the functional gastrointestinal disorders). For the causes, many theories have been advocated but not decisive and therefore were not linked to the definite treatment. The author experienced 68 patients with proctalgia fugax, among which 55 patients had tenderness along the pudendal nerve. The location, character, and degree of pain caused by digital examination were confirmed by all of them to be similar to that which they experience at times of paroxysm. After administration of a nerve block, symptoms disappeared completely in 65 percent of the patients and decreased in 25 percent. These data suggest that the pathogenesis of proctalgia fugax is neuralgia of the pudendal nerves.

  2. Activation of somatosensory afferents elicit changes in vaginal blood flow and the urethrogenital reflex via autonomic efferents.

    PubMed

    Cai, R S; Alexander, M Sipski; Marson, L

    2008-09-01

    We examined the effects of pudendal sensory nerve stimulation and urethral distention on vaginal blood flow and the urethrogenital reflex, and the relationship between somatic and autonomic pathways regulating sexual responses. Distention of the urethra and stimulation of the pudendal sensory nerve were used to evoke changes in vaginal blood flow (laser Doppler perfusion monitoring) and pudendal motor nerve activity in anesthetized, spinally transected female rats. Bilateral cuts of either the pelvic or hypogastric nerve or both autonomic nerves were made, and blood flow and pudendal nerve responses were reexamined. Stimulation of the pudendal sensory nerve or urethral distention elicited consistent increases in vaginal blood flow and rhythmic firing of the pudendal motor nerve. Bilateral cuts of the pelvic plus hypogastric nerves significantly reduced vaginal blood flow responses without altering pudendal motor nerve responses. Pelvic nerve cuts also significantly reduced vaginal blood flow responses. In contrast, hypogastric nerve cuts did not significantly change vaginal blood flow. Bilateral cuts of the pudendal sensory nerve blocked pudendal motor nerve responses but stimulation of the central end evoked vaginal blood flow and pudendal motor nerve responses. Stimulation of the sensory branch of the pudendal nerve elicits vasodilatation of the vagina. The likely mechanism is via activation of spinal pathways that in turn activate pelvic nerve efferents to produced changes in vaginal blood flow. Climatic-like responses (firing of the pudendal motor nerve) occur in response to stimulation of the pudendal sensory nerve and do not require intact pelvic or hypogastric nerves.

  3. [Evidence of pudendal neuropathy in Proctalgia Fugax: perineal neurophysiological assessment in 55 patients].

    PubMed

    Damphousse, M; Jousse, M; Verollet, D; Guinet, A; Le Breton, F; Lacroix, P; Sheik Ismael, S; Amarenco, G

    2012-04-01

    Proctalgia fugax (PF) is a very common condition especially in women. Causes and pathophysiological mechanisms of PF are unknown. Recently, a pudendal neuropathy was clinically suspected in women with PF. The goal of our study was to demonstrate, or not, such abnormalities by means electrophysiological testing. Fifty-five patients with PF (45 female and 10 male, mean age 50.2 years) were evaluated. EMG testing with motor unit potential analysis of pelvic floor muscles (bulbocavernosus muscle and striated external anal sphincter), study of bulbocavernosus reflex and pudendal nerve terminal motor latencies (PNTML) were performed. EMG testing was altered in two males out of 10 (20%) and 29/45 females (64%). In women, denervation was found bilateral in 25/29 (86%). Sacral latency was delayed in eight out of 29 (bilateral in five cases, unilateral in three cases) and PNTML altered in 17 cases (13 bilateral alteration, four unilateral). A significant difference (P<0.002 Chi(2) test) was demonstrated between male and female concerning pelvic floor muscles denervation. Pelvic floor muscles denervation was a common feature in women suffering from PF, due to a stretch bilateral pudendal neuropathy. Distal lesions of the pudendal nerves, principally due to a stretch perineal neuropathy, can be imagined as a factor or co-factor of PF. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Stimulated pressure profile at rest: a noninvasive method for assessing urethral sphincter function.

    PubMed

    Meyer, S; Kuntzer, T; De Grandi, P; Bachelard, O; Schreyer, A

    1998-10-01

    To validate a method for assessing urethral sphincter muscle function by recording rises in intraurethral pressure during repetitive pudendal nerve stimulations. A supine urethral pressure profile at rest was performed on 12 stress-continent and 28 stress-incontinent patients during repetitive pudendal nerve stimulations applied near the ischial spine, and the intraurethral pressure increases were calculated for each third of the urethral functional length. No significant difference in intraurethral pressure increases was seen between continent and stress-incontinent women. On the various regression curves, the intraurethral pressure increases showed a significant correlation with maximal urethral closure pressure values at rest and at stress (r = 0.36 to 0.54) and with the patient's age (r = 0.46), but not with pudendal nerve conduction times to the urethral sphincter on either side (r = 0.14 and 0.19). This method (1) measures intraurethral pressure increases that correlate well with the anatomic location of the urethral sphincter muscle, (2) shows there is no significant difference between them in continent and stress-incontinent patients, except in patients with a low-pressure urethra, and (3) demonstrates that they correlate well with the maximal urethral closure pressure and the patient's age, but not with pudendal motor latencies to the urethral sphincter. This method gives us a mapping of the urethral sphincter activity, explaining why some patients with a low-pressure urethra have less urinary loss than others with the same urethral closure pressure.

  5. Electromechanical Nerve Stimulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tcheng, Ping; Supplee, Frank H., Jr.; Prass, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    Nerve stimulator applies and/or measures precisely controlled force and/or displacement to nerve so response of nerve measured. Consists of three major components connected in tandem: miniature probe with spherical tip; transducer; and actuator. Probe applies force to nerve, transducer measures force and sends feedback signal to control circuitry, and actuator positions force transducer and probe. Separate box houses control circuits and panel. Operator uses panel to select operating mode and parameters. Stimulator used in research to characterize behavior of nerve under various conditions of temperature, anesthesia, ventilation, and prior damage to nerve. Also used clinically to assess damage to nerve from disease or accident and to monitor response of nerve during surgery.

  6. Pudendal nerve entrapment leading to avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder (ARFID): A case report.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Karen; Singh, Deepan; Pinkhasov, Aaron

    2017-01-01

    Avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder (ARFID) is a diagnosis in diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders-5 (DSM-5) manifested by persistent failure to meet nutritional and/or energy needs. Pudendal nerve entrapment (PNE) often causes pelvic discomfort in addition to constipation and painful bowel movements. Current literature on ARFID is sparse and focuses on the pediatric and adolescent population. No association between PNE and ARFID has been described. We present a case of ARFID in an adult male with PNE resulting from subsequent scarring from testicular cancer surgery. The patient's gastrointestinal symptoms due to PNE caused significant food avoidance and restriction subsequently leading to severe malnourishment. Clinicians should be aware that distressing gastrointestinal symptoms arising from a secondary disease process such as PNE might lead to dietary restriction and food aversion. More research is needed for proper screening, detection, and treatment of ARFID. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. (Int J Eat Disord 2017; 50:84-87). © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. External laryngeal nerve in thyroid surgery: is the nerve stimulator necessary?

    PubMed

    Aina, E N; Hisham, A N

    2001-09-01

    To find out the incidence and type of external laryngeal nerves during operations on the thyroid, and to assess the role of a nerve stimulator in detecting them. Prospective, non-randomised study. Teaching hospital, Malaysia. 317 patients who had 447 dissections between early January 1998 and late November 1999. Number and type of nerves crossing the cricothyroid space, and the usefulness of the nerve stimulator in finding them. The nerve stimulator was used in 206/447 dissections (46%). 392 external laryngeal nerves were seen (88%), of which 196/206 (95%) were detected with the stimulator. However, without the stimulator 196 nerves were detected out of 241 dissections (81%). The stimulator detected 47 (23%) Type I nerves (nerve > 1 cm from the upper edge of superior pole); 86 (42%) Type IIa nerves (nerve < 1 cm from the upper edge of superior pole); and 63 (31%) Type IIb nerves (nerve below upper edge of superior pole). 10 nerves were not detected. When the stimulator was not used the corresponding figures were 32 (13%), 113 (47%), and 51 (21%), and 45 nerves were not seen. If the nerve cannot be found we recommend dissection of capsule close to the medial border of the upper pole of the thyroid to avoid injury to the nerve. Although the use of the nerve stimulator seems desirable, it confers no added advantage in finding the nerve. In the event of uncertainty about whether a structure is the nerve, the stimulator may help to confirm it. However, exposure of the cricothyroid space is most important for good exposure in searching for the external laryngeal nerve.

  8. VAGUS NERVE STIMULATION REGULATES HEMOSTASIS IN SWINE

    PubMed Central

    Czura, Christopher J.; Schultz, Arthur; Kaipel, Martin; Khadem, Anna; Huston, Jared M.; Pavlov, Valentin A.; Redl, Heinz; Tracey, Kevin J.

    2010-01-01

    The central nervous system regulates peripheral immune responses via the vagus nerve, the primary neural component of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway. Electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve suppresses pro-inflammatory cytokine release in response to endotoxin, I/R injury, and hypovolemic shock and protects against lethal hypotension. To determine the effect of vagus nerve stimulation on coagulation pathways, anesthetized pigs were subjected to partial ear resection before and after electrical vagus nerve stimulation. We observed that electrical vagus nerve stimulation significantly decreased bleeding time (pre–electrical vagus nerve stimulation = 1033 ± 210 s versus post–electrical vagus nerve stimulation = 585 ± 111 s; P < 0.05) and total blood loss (pre–electrical vagus nerve stimulation = 48.4 ± 6.8 mL versus post–electrical vagus nerve stimulation = 26.3 ± 6.7 mL; P < 0.05). Reduced bleeding time after vagus nerve stimulation was independent of changes in heart rate or blood pressure and correlated with increased thrombin/antithrombin III complex generation in shed blood. These data indicate that electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve attenuates peripheral hemorrhage in a porcine model of soft tissue injury and that this protective effect is associated with increased coagulation factor activity. PMID:19953009

  9. One-shot percutaneous electrical nerve stimulation vs. transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation for low back pain: comparison of therapeutic effects.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Ru-Lan; Lee, Wen-Chung

    2002-11-01

    To investigate the therapeutic effects of one shot of low-frequency percutaneous electrical nerve stimulation one shot of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation in patients with low back pain. In total, 133 low back pain patients were recruited for this randomized, control study. Group 1 patients received medication only. Group 2 patients received medication plus one shot of percutaneous electrical nerve stimulation. Group 3 patients received medication plus one shot of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation. Therapeutic effects were measured using a visual analog scale, body surface score, pain pressure threshold, and the Quebec Back Pain Disability Scale. Immediately after one-shot treatment, the visual analog scale improved 1.53 units and the body surface score improved 3.06 units in the percutaneous electrical nerve stimulation group. In the transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation group, the visual analog scale improved 1.50 units and the body surface score improved 3.98 units. The improvements did not differ between the two groups. There were no differences in improvement at 3 days or 1 wk after the treatment among the three groups. Simple one-shot treatment with percutaneous electrical nerve stimulation or transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation provided immediate pain relief for low back pain patients. One-shot transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation treatment is recommended due to the rarity of side effects and its convenient application.

  10. 21 CFR 870.3850 - Carotid sinus nerve stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Carotid sinus nerve stimulator. 870.3850 Section... nerve stimulator. (a) Identification. A carotid sinus nerve stimulator is an implantable device used to decrease arterial pressure by stimulating Hering's nerve at the carotid sinus. (b) Classification. Class...

  11. Chronic Pelvic Pain: Neurogenic or Non-Neurogenic? Warm Detection Threshold Testing Supports a Diagnosis of Pudendal Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Antolak, Stanley J; Antolak, Christopher M

    2018-03-01

    Chronic pelvic pain (CPP) in men is rarely considered to have a neurogenic (neuropathic) basis. Separation of neurogenic from non-neurogenic pain is possible using clinical examination and neurophysiologic tests. A definite diagnosis of neuropathic pain can be made. We aim to demonstrate that definite pudendal neuropathic abnormalities can be supported by a quantitative sensory test (QST) called the warm temperature threshold detection (WDT) test in men with CPP. This is a retrospective review of 25 consecutive, unrecruited men evaluated in a private clinical practice beginning on January 1, 2010. The techniques of examination and neurophysiological testing have been standard since 2003. A private practice that is a referral center because of its focus on CPP of a neuropathic basis. Pinprick sensation was evaluated at 6 sites in the pudendal nerve territory (3 branches on each side). A WDT was performed at each nerve branch using a Physitemp NTE-2C Thermoprobe and Controller. This used a stepping algorithm from a neutral baseline of 31.5°C. Quantitative and subjective "qualitative responses" were recorded. Our preferred symptom score to evaluate pain level at consultation is the National Institutes of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI). The results become the benchmark for comparison of responses following future treatments (not discussed). When possible, microscopy was used to evaluate prostate secretions for inflammatory prostatitis except in 2 men with CPP who had undergone previous radical prostatectomy for cancer. Observations were made of the skin in the pudendal territory. Our specific evaluation for neuropathy also sought evidence of multiple additional neuropathic pelvic pain generators. The WDT was abnormal in all men (88% quantitative), and pinprick sensation was abnormal in 92% of the men. The combination of tests provided a diagnosis of pudendal neuropathy in all patients, resulting in an accurate and timely explanation of the

  12. Ultrasound-guided, percutaneous peripheral nerve stimulation: technical note.

    PubMed

    Chan, Isaac; Brown, Anthony R; Park, Kenneth; Winfree, Christopher J

    2010-09-01

    Peripheral nerve stimulation is a form of neuromodulation that applies electric current to peripheral nerves to induce stimulation paresthesias within the painful areas. To report a method of ultrasound-guided, percutaneous peripheral nerve stimulation. This technique utilizes real-time imaging to avoid injury to adjacent vascular structures during minimally invasive placement of peripheral nerve stimulator electrodes. We describe a patient that presented with chronic, bilateral foot pain following multiple foot surgeries, for whom a comprehensive, pain management treatment strategy had failed. We utilized ultrasound-guided, percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation at a thigh level to provide durable pain relief on the right side, and open peripheral nerve stimulation on the left. The patient experienced appropriate stimulation paresthesias and excellent pain relief on the plantar aspect of the right foot with the percutaneous electrode. On the left side, we were unable to direct the stimulation paresthesias to the sole of the foot, despite multiple electrode repositionings. A subsequent, open placement of a left tibial nerve stimulator was performed. This revealed that the correct electrode position against the tibial nerve was immediately adjacent to the popliteal artery, and was thus not appropriate for percutaneous placement. We describe a method of ultrasound-guided peripheral nerve stimulation that avoids the invasiveness of electrode placement via an open procedure while providing excellent pain relief. We further describe limitations of the percutaneous approach when navigating close to large blood vessels, a situation more appropriately managed with open peripheral nerve stimulator placement. Ultrasound-guided placement may be considered for patients receiving peripheral nerve stimulators placed within the deep tissues, and not easily placed in a blind fashion.

  13. A precision mechanical nerve stimulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tcheng, Ping; Supplee, Frank H., Jr.; Prass, Richard L.

    1988-01-01

    An electromechanical device, used to apply and monitor stimulating pulses to a mammalian motor nerve, has been successfully developed at NASA Langley Research Center. Two existing force transducers, a flight skin friction balance and a miniature skin friction balance which were designed for making aerodynamic drag measurements, were modified and incorporated to form this precision instrument. The nerve stimulator is a type one servomechanism capable of applying and monitoring stimulating pulses of 0 to 10 grams with a precision of better than +/- 0.05 grams. Additionally, the device can be independently used to apply stimulating pulses by displacing the nerve from 0 to 0.25 mm with a precision of better than +/- 0.001 mm while measuring the level of the load applied.

  14. Preoperative transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation for localizing superficial nerve paths.

    PubMed

    Natori, Yuhei; Yoshizawa, Hidekazu; Mizuno, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Ayato

    2015-12-01

    During surgery, peripheral nerves are often seen to follow unpredictable paths because of previous surgeries and/or compression caused by a tumor. Iatrogenic nerve injury is a serious complication that must be avoided, and preoperative evaluation of nerve paths is important for preventing it. In this study, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) was used for an in-depth analysis of peripheral nerve paths. This study included 27 patients who underwent the TENS procedure to evaluate the peripheral nerve path (17 males and 10 females; mean age: 59.9 years, range: 18-83 years) of each patient preoperatively. An electrode pen coupled to an electrical nerve stimulator was used for superficial nerve mapping. The TENS procedure was performed on patients' major peripheral nerves that passed close to the surgical field of tumor resection or trauma surgery, and intraoperative damage to those nerves was apprehensive. The paths of the target nerve were detected in most patients preoperatively. The nerve paths of 26 patients were precisely under the markings drawn preoperatively. The nerve path of one patient substantially differed from the preoperative markings with numbness at the surgical region. During surgery, the nerve paths could be accurately mapped preoperatively using the TENS procedure as confirmed by direct visualization of the nerve. This stimulation device is easy to use and offers highly accurate mapping of nerves for surgical planning without major complications. The authors conclude that TENS is a useful tool for noninvasive nerve localization and makes tumor resection a safe and smooth procedure. Copyright © 2015 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. [Sacral nerve stimulation in fecal incontinence].

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Ole Ø; Christiansen, John

    2002-08-12

    Sacral nerve stimulation for the treatment of faecal incontinence has gained increasing use in Europe over the last two years. Experience with the first patients treated in Denmark is described here. Fourteen patients with severe faecal incontinence were given sacral nerve stimulation. The first treatment was temporary, and if this was successful they had a device for permanent stimulation implanted. The result of the test stimulation was good in ten of the 14 patients and a permanent system was implanted. After a median of 4.5 months' stimulation, nine of the ten patients continued to respond to respond well. Sacral nerve stimulation in the treatment of faecal incontinence shows promising results. Compared to other more advanced forms of treatment, this method is minimally invasive.

  16. Vagus Nerve Stimulation for Treating Epilepsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... and their FAMILIES VAGUS NERVE STIMULATION FOR TREATING EPILEPSY This information sheet is provided to help you ... how vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) may help treat epilepsy. The American Academy of Neurology (AAN) is the ...

  17. Extradural cold block for selective neurostimulation of the bladder: development of a new technique.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, S; Bross, S; Scheepe, J R; Seif, C; Jünemann, K P; Alken, P

    1999-03-01

    Cryotechnique for selective block of the urethral sphincter and simultaneous activation of the bladder was developed to achieve physiological micturition during sacral anterior root stimulation (SARS). In ten foxhounds SARS of S2 was carried out while extradurally both spinal nerves S2 were cooled down from positive 25C in a stepwise fashion until a sphincter block was observed. Subsequently, SARS of S2 was performed while the pudendal nerves were cooled down from + 15C. The effects of spinal and pudendal nerve cold block on the urethral sphincter and bladder during SARS and the recovery time were monitored by urodynamic investigation. A complete cold block of the urethral sphincter during spinal nerve cooling was achieved in all cases. During pudendal nerve cooling, the sphincter was completely blocked in two, and incompletely blocked in four dogs. Cold block temperature of the spinal nerves averaged +11.7C and of the pudendal nerves +6.2C. During SARS and spinal nerve cooling, an increase in intravesical pressure up to 13 cm. water was recognized, and recovery time was on average 6.6 minutes. Intravesical pressure remained unchanged during pudendal nerve cooling, with recovery time being less than 1 minute. The cold block was always reversible. Cryotechnique is an excellent method for selective and reversible block of the urethral sphincter during SARS to avoid detrusor-sphincter-dyssynergia. The application of cryotechnique in functional electrical stimulation leads to an improvement of quality of life in para- or tetraplegic patients because of selective nerve stimulation with optimization of micturition, standing, walking and grasping and does so without the necessity of surgical dorsal root rhizotomy.

  18. 21 CFR 868.2775 - Electrical peripheral nerve stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Electrical peripheral nerve stimulator. 868.2775... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2775 Electrical peripheral nerve stimulator. (a) Identification. An electrical peripheral nerve stimulator (neuromuscular blockade monitor) is...

  19. 21 CFR 868.2775 - Electrical peripheral nerve stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Electrical peripheral nerve stimulator. 868.2775... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2775 Electrical peripheral nerve stimulator. (a) Identification. An electrical peripheral nerve stimulator (neuromuscular blockade monitor) is...

  20. 21 CFR 868.2775 - Electrical peripheral nerve stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Electrical peripheral nerve stimulator. 868.2775... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2775 Electrical peripheral nerve stimulator. (a) Identification. An electrical peripheral nerve stimulator (neuromuscular blockade monitor) is...

  1. 21 CFR 874.1820 - Surgical nerve stimulator/locator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Surgical nerve stimulator/locator. 874.1820... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 874.1820 Surgical nerve stimulator/locator. (a) Identification. A surgical nerve stimulator/locator is a device that is intended to...

  2. Modern management of epilepsy: Vagus nerve stimulation.

    PubMed

    Ben-Menachem, E

    1996-12-01

    Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) was first tried as a treatment for seizure patients in 1988. The idea to stimulate the vagus nerve and disrupt or prevent seizures was proposed by Jacob Zabarra. He observed a consistent finding among several animal studies which indicated that stimulation of the vagus nerve could alter the brain wave patterns of the animals under study. His hypothesis formed the basis for the development of the vagus nerve stimulator, an implantable device similar to a pacemaker, which is implanted in the left chest and attached to the left vagus nerve via a stimulating lead. Once implanted, the stimulator is programmed by a physician to deliver regular stimulation 24 hours a day regardless of seizure activity. Patients can also activate extra 'on-demand' stimulation with a handheld magnet. Clinical studies have demonstrated VNS therapy to be a safe and effective mode of treatment when added to the existing regimen of severe, refractory patients with epilepsy. Efficacy ranges from seizure free to no response with the majority of patients (> 50%) reporting at least a 50% improvement in number of seizures after 1.5 years of treatment. The side-effect profile is unique and mostly includes stimulation-related sensations in the neck and throat. The mechanism of action for VNS is not clearly understood although two theories have emerged. First, the direct connection theory hypothesizes that the anticonvulsant action of VNS is caused by a threshold raising effect of the connections to the nucleus of the solitary tract and on to other structures. The second is the concept that chronic stimulation of the vagus nerve increases the amount of inhibitory neurotransmitters and decreases the amount of excitatory neurotransmitters. Additional research into the optimal use of VNS is ongoing. Animal and clinical research have produced some interesting new data suggesting there are numerous ways to improve the clinical performance of vagus nerve stimulation as a

  3. Right-sided vagus nerve stimulation inhibits induced spinal cord seizures.

    PubMed

    Tubbs, R Shane; Salter, E George; Killingsworth, Cheryl; Rollins, Dennis L; Smith, William M; Ideker, Raymond E; Wellons, John C; Blount, Jeffrey P; Oakes, W Jerry

    2007-01-01

    We have previously shown that left-sided vagus nerve stimulation results in cessation of induced spinal cord seizures. To test our hypothesis that right-sided vagus nerve stimulation will also abort seizure activity, we have initiated seizures in the spinal cord and then performed right-sided vagus nerve stimulation in an animal model. Four pigs were anesthetized and placed in the lateral position and a small laminectomy performed in the lumbar region. Topical penicillin, a known epileptogenic drug to the cerebral cortex and spinal cord, was next applied to the dorsal surface of the exposed cord. With the exception of the control animal, once seizure activity was discernible via motor convulsion or increased electrical activity, the right vagus nerve previously isolated in the neck was stimulated. Following multiple stimulations of the vagus nerve and with seizure activity confirmed, the cord was transected in the midthoracic region and vagus nerve stimulation performed. Right-sided vagus nerve stimulation resulted in cessation of spinal cord seizure activity in all animals. Transection of the spinal cord superior to the site of seizure induction resulted in the ineffectiveness of vagus nerve stimulation in causing cessation of seizure activity in all study animals. As with left-sided vagus nerve stimulation, right-sided vagus nerve stimulation results in cessation of induced spinal cord seizures. Additionally, the effects of right-sided vagus nerve stimulation on induced spinal cord seizures involve descending spinal pathways. These data may aid in the development of alternative mechanisms for electrical stimulation for patients with medically intractable seizures and add to our knowledge regarding the mechanism for seizure cessation following peripheral nerve stimulation.

  4. Continuous-wave infrared optical nerve stimulation for potential diagnostic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tozburun, Serhat; Cilip, Christopher M.; Lagoda, Gwen A.; Burnett, Arthur L.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2010-09-01

    Optical nerve stimulation using infrared laser radiation has recently been developed as a potential alternative to electrical nerve stimulation. However, recent studies have focused primarily on pulsed delivery of the laser radiation and at relatively low pulse rates. The objective of this study is to demonstrate faster optical stimulation of the prostate cavernous nerves using continuous-wave (cw) infrared laser radiation for potential diagnostic applications. A thulium fiber laser (λ=1870 nm) is used for noncontact optical stimulation of the rat prostate cavernous nerves in vivo. Optical nerve stimulation, as measured by an intracavernous pressure (ICP) response in the penis, is achieved with the laser operating in either cw mode, or with a 5-ms pulse duration at 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 100 Hz. Successful optical stimulation is observed to be primarily dependent on a threshold nerve temperature (42 to 45 °C), rather than an incident fluence, as previously reported. cw optical nerve stimulation provides a significantly faster ICP response time using a lower power (and also less expensive) laser than pulsed stimulation. cw optical nerve stimulation may therefore represent an alternative mode of stimulation for intraoperative diagnostic applications where a rapid response is critical, such as identification of the cavernous nerves during prostate cancer surgery.

  5. Pulsed laser versus electrical energy for peripheral nerve stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Jonathon; Konrad, Peter; Kao, Chris; Jansen, E. Duco; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita

    2010-01-01

    Transient optical neural stimulation has previously been shown to elicit highly controlled, artifact-free potentials within the nervous system in a non-contact fashion without resulting in damage to tissue. This paper presents the physiologic validity of elicited nerve and muscle potentials from pulsed laser induced stimulation of the peripheral nerve in a comparative study with the standard method of electrically evoked potentials. Herein, the fundamental physical properties underlying the two techniques are contrasted. Key laser parameters for efficient optical stimulation of the peripheral nerve are detailed. Strength response curves are shown to be linear for each stimulation modality, although fewer axons can be recruited with optically evoked potentials. Results compare the relative transient energy requirements for stimulation using each technique and demonstrate that optical methods can selectively excite functional nerve stimulation. Adjacent stimulation and recording of compound nerve potentials in their entirety from optical and electrical stimulation are presented, with optical responses shown to be free of any stimulation artifact. Thus, use of a pulsed laser exhibits some advantages when compared to standard electrical means for excitation of muscle potentials in the peripheral nerve in the research domain and possibly for clinical diagnostics in the future. PMID:17537515

  6. Vagal Nerve Stimulation Therapy: What Is Being Stimulated?

    PubMed Central

    Kember, Guy; Ardell, Jeffrey L.; Armour, John A.; Zamir, Mair

    2014-01-01

    Vagal nerve stimulation in cardiac therapy involves delivering electrical current to the vagal sympathetic complex in patients experiencing heart failure. The therapy has shown promise but the mechanisms by which any benefit accrues is not understood. In this paper we model the response to increased levels of stimulation of individual components of the vagal sympathetic complex as a differential activation of each component in the control of heart rate. The model provides insight beyond what is available in the animal experiment in as much as allowing the simultaneous assessment of neuronal activity throughout the cardiac neural axis. The results indicate that there is sensitivity of the neural network to low level subthreshold stimulation. This leads us to propose that the chronic effects of vagal nerve stimulation therapy lie within the indirect pathways that target intrinsic cardiac local circuit neurons because they have the capacity for plasticity. PMID:25479368

  7. Vagal nerve stimulation therapy: what is being stimulated?

    PubMed

    Kember, Guy; Ardell, Jeffrey L; Armour, John A; Zamir, Mair

    2014-01-01

    Vagal nerve stimulation in cardiac therapy involves delivering electrical current to the vagal sympathetic complex in patients experiencing heart failure. The therapy has shown promise but the mechanisms by which any benefit accrues is not understood. In this paper we model the response to increased levels of stimulation of individual components of the vagal sympathetic complex as a differential activation of each component in the control of heart rate. The model provides insight beyond what is available in the animal experiment in as much as allowing the simultaneous assessment of neuronal activity throughout the cardiac neural axis. The results indicate that there is sensitivity of the neural network to low level subthreshold stimulation. This leads us to propose that the chronic effects of vagal nerve stimulation therapy lie within the indirect pathways that target intrinsic cardiac local circuit neurons because they have the capacity for plasticity.

  8. The anatomy of the superficial external pudendal artery: a quantitative study.

    PubMed

    La Falce, Osvaldir Lanzoni; Ambrosio, João Dias; Souza, Romeu Rodrigues de

    2006-10-01

    The importance of the superficial external pudendal artery in cases of lower limb obstructive arteriopathies has been established, and a perfect knowledge of its anatomy is desirable for the creation of successful flaps involving it. However, little information is available on the morphometry of this artery. In this study, we conducted a quantitative investigation of the superficial external pudendal artery as the basis for skin grafts. Twenty-five right and left sides of the inguinal region of male cadavers were dissected. After retracting the skin at the inguinal region, the femoral vessels and the sapheno-femoral junction were exposed. The following aspects were then analyzed: 1) the presence of the superficial external pudendal artery, 2) the place of origin of the superficial external pudendal artery and the common trunk, 3) the duplication of the superficial external pudendal artery, 4) the distance from the superficial external pudendal artery or the common trunk to the inguinal ligament, and 5) the diameter of the superficial external pudendal artery. The results were the following: 1) superficial external pudendal arteries were found in 46 of 50 sides (92%); 2) they originated from the femoral artery in 45 cases and from the deep femoral artery in only 1 case; 3) the arteries were found duplicated in 21 cases (46%), as a common trunk in 11 cases (24%), and as a single artery in 14 cases (30%); 4) the distance from the superficial external pudendal artery to the inguinal ligament ranged from 0.8 cm to 8.5 cm; from the common trunk, it ranged from 3.5 cm to 6.7 cm; 5) the diameter of the superficial external pudendal artery ranged from 1.2 mm to 3.8 mm; and 6) the diameter of the common trunk ranged from 1.35 mm to 5.15 mm. The results show that the superficial external pudendal artery generally originates from the femoral artery. It was found as a common trunk, duplicated, or as a single artery. There was a great variability in both the diameter of the

  9. 21 CFR 882.5870 - Implanted peripheral nerve stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Implanted peripheral nerve stimulator for pain....5870 Implanted peripheral nerve stimulator for pain relief. (a) Identification. An implanted peripheral nerve stimulator for pain relief is a device that is used to stimulate electrically a peripheral nerve...

  10. Neuroprotection trek--the next generation: neuromodulation I. Techniques--deep brain stimulation, vagus nerve stimulation, and transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Russell J

    2003-05-01

    Neuromodulation denotes controlled electrical stimulation of the central or peripheral nervous system. The three forms of neuromodulation described in this paper-deep brain stimulation, vagus nerve stimulation, and transcranial magnetic stimulation-were chosen primarily for their demonstrated or potential clinical usefulness. Deep brain stimulation is a completely implanted technique for improving movement disorders, such as Parkinson's disease, by very focal electrical stimulation of the brain-a technique that employs well-established hardware (electrode and pulse generator/battery). Vagus nerve stimulation is similar to deep brain stimulation in being well-established (for the treatment of refractory epilepsy), completely implanted, and having hardware that can be considered standard at the present time. Vagus nerve stimulation differs from deep brain stimulation, however, in that afferent stimulation of the vagus nerve results in diffuse effects on many regions throughout the brain. Although use of deep brain stimulation for applications beyond movement disorders will no doubt involve placing the stimulating electrode(s) in regions other than the thalamus, subthalamus, or globus pallidus, the use of vagus nerve stimulation for applications beyond epilepsy-for example, depression and eating disorders-is unlikely to require altering the hardware significantly (although stimulation protocols may differ). Transcranial magnetic stimulation is an example of an external or non-implanted, intermittent (at least given the current state of the hardware) stimulation technique, the clinical value of which for neuromodulation and neuroprotection remains to be determined.

  11. Neuroprotection trek--the next generation: neuromodulation I. Techniques--deep brain stimulation, vagus nerve stimulation, and transcranial magnetic stimulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, Russell J.

    2003-01-01

    Neuromodulation denotes controlled electrical stimulation of the central or peripheral nervous system. The three forms of neuromodulation described in this paper-deep brain stimulation, vagus nerve stimulation, and transcranial magnetic stimulation-were chosen primarily for their demonstrated or potential clinical usefulness. Deep brain stimulation is a completely implanted technique for improving movement disorders, such as Parkinson's disease, by very focal electrical stimulation of the brain-a technique that employs well-established hardware (electrode and pulse generator/battery). Vagus nerve stimulation is similar to deep brain stimulation in being well-established (for the treatment of refractory epilepsy), completely implanted, and having hardware that can be considered standard at the present time. Vagus nerve stimulation differs from deep brain stimulation, however, in that afferent stimulation of the vagus nerve results in diffuse effects on many regions throughout the brain. Although use of deep brain stimulation for applications beyond movement disorders will no doubt involve placing the stimulating electrode(s) in regions other than the thalamus, subthalamus, or globus pallidus, the use of vagus nerve stimulation for applications beyond epilepsy-for example, depression and eating disorders-is unlikely to require altering the hardware significantly (although stimulation protocols may differ). Transcranial magnetic stimulation is an example of an external or non-implanted, intermittent (at least given the current state of the hardware) stimulation technique, the clinical value of which for neuromodulation and neuroprotection remains to be determined.

  12. Autistic spectrum disorder, epilepsy, and vagus nerve stimulation.

    PubMed

    Hull, Mariam Mettry; Madhavan, Deepak; Zaroff, Charles M

    2015-08-01

    In individuals with a comorbid autistic spectrum disorder and medically refractory epilepsy, vagus nerve stimulation may offer the potential of seizure control and a positive behavioral side effect profile. We aimed to examine the behavioral side effect profile using longitudinal and quantitative data and review the potential mechanisms behind behavioral changes. We present a case report of a 10-year-old boy with autistic spectrum disorder and epilepsy, who underwent vagus nerve stimulation subsequent to unsuccessful treatment with antiepileptic medication. Following vagus nerve stimulation implantation, initial, if temporary, improvement was observed in seizure control. Modest improvements were also observed in behavior and development, improvements which were observed independent of seizure control. Vagus nerve stimulation in autistic spectrum disorder is associated with modest behavioral improvement, with unidentified etiology, although several candidates for this improvement are evident.

  13. Intraoperative monitoring of the recurrent laryngeal nerve by vagal nerve stimulation in thyroid surgery.

    PubMed

    Farizon, Brigitte; Gavid, Marie; Karkas, Alexandre; Dumollard, Jean-Marc; Peoc'h, Michel; Prades, Jean-Michel

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the thyroarytenoid muscle response during bilateral thyroid surgery using vagal nerve stimulation. 195 patients (390 nerves at risk) underwent a total thyroidectomy. The recurrent laryngeal nerve's function was checked by analyzing the amplitude and the latency of the thyroarytenoid muscle's responses after a vagal nerve's stimulation (0.5 and 1 mA) using the NIM3 Medtronic system. All patients were submitted to preoperative and postoperative laryngoscopy. 20 patients get no thyroarytenoid muscle response to the vagal nerve stimulation, and 14 postoperative recurrent laryngeal nerve palsies were confirmed (3.8 %). Two palsies were present after 6 months (0.51 %). All the patients with muscle's response have normal mobility vocal fold. The test sensitivity was 100 % and the test specificity was 98 %. Physiologically, the mean latencies of the muscular potentials for the right RLN were, respectively, 3.89 and 3.83 ms (p > 0.05) for the stimulation at 0.5 and 1 mA. The mean latencies for the left RLN were, respectively, 6.25 and 6.22 ms for the stimulation at 0.5 and 1 mA (p > 0.05). The difference of the latencies between the right and the left nerve was 2.30 ms (1.75-3.25 ms) with a stimulation of 0.5 or 1 mA (p < 0.05). Thyroarytenoid muscle's response via a vagal nerve stimulation showed a functional asymmetry of the laryngeal adduction with a faster right response. Surgically, this method can predict accurately an immediate postoperative vocal folds function in patients undergoing a bilateral thyroid surgery.

  14. Anatomical organization and somatic axonal components of the lumbosacral nerves in female rabbits.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Yolanda; Hernández-Plata, Isela; Lucio, Rosa Angélica; Zempoalteca, René; Castelán, Francisco; Martínez-Gómez, Margarita

    2017-09-01

    To determine the anatomical organization and somatic axonal components of the lumbosacral nerves in female rabbits. Chinchilla adult anesthetized female rabbits were used. Anatomical, electrophysiological, and histological studies were performed. L7, S1, and some fibers from S2 and S3 form the lumbosacral trunk, which gives origin to the sciatic nerve and innervation to the gluteal region. From S2 to S3 originates the pudendal nerve, whose branches innervates the striated anal and urethra sphincters, as well as the bulbospongiosus, ischiocavernosus, and constrictor vulvae muscles. The sensory field of the pudendal nerve is ∼1800 mm 2 and is localized in the clitoral sheath and perineal and perigenital skin. The organization of the pudendal nerve varies between individuals, three patterns were identified, and one of them was present in 50% of the animals. From S3 emerge the pelvic nerve, which anastomoses to form a plexus localized between the vagina and the rectum. The innervation of the pelvic floor originates from S3 to S4 fibers. Most of the sacral spinal nerves of rabbit are mixed, carrying sensory, and motor information. Sacral nerves innervate the hind limbs, pelvic viscera, clitoris, perineal muscles, inguinal and anal glands and perineal, perigenital, and rump skin. The detailed description of the sacral nerves organization, topography, and axonal components further the knowledge of the innervation in pelvic and perinal structures of the female rabbit. This information will be useful in future studies about the physiology and physiopathology of urinary, fecal, reproductive, and sexual functions. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Nerve monitoring-guided selective hypoglossal nerve stimulation in obstructive sleep apnea patients.

    PubMed

    Heiser, Clemens; Hofauer, Benedikt; Lozier, Luke; Woodson, B Tucker; Stark, Thomas

    2016-12-01

    Selective stimulation of the upper airway is a new therapy for obstructive sleep apnea. The aim of the study was to determine if a selective nerve integrity monitoring (NIM) system could aid in precise placement of the cuff electrode in selective upper-airway stimulation. Single-center, prospective clinical trial. Twenty patients who received a selective upper-airway stimulation system (Inspire Medical Systems, Maple Grove, MN) were implanted by using a NIM system. The tongue motions were recorded during surgery and 2 months postoperatively from the transoral view and by transnasal endoscopy. All patients exhibited consistent protrusion at tongue front and tongue base. The nerve monitoring system helped to place the cuff electrode around the protrusion and stiffening branches, while excluding the retractor branches of the hypoglossal nerve. This report demonstrated a novel use of a NIM system to identify the functional separation between inclusion and exclusion branches of the hypoglossal nerve for implantation of a selective upper-airway stimulation system. 4. Laryngoscope, 126:2852-2858, 2016. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  16. Optical stimulation of the facial nerve: a surgical tool?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Claus-Peter; Teudt, Ingo Ulrik; Nevel, Adam E.; Izzo, Agnella D.; Walsh, Joseph T., Jr.

    2008-02-01

    One sequela of skull base surgery is the iatrogenic damage to cranial nerves. Devices that stimulate nerves with electric current can assist in the nerve identification. Contemporary devices have two main limitations: (1) the physical contact of the stimulating electrode and (2) the spread of the current through the tissue. In contrast to electrical stimulation, pulsed infrared optical radiation can be used to safely and selectively stimulate neural tissue. Stimulation and screening of the nerve is possible without making physical contact. The gerbil facial nerve was irradiated with 250-μs-long pulses of 2.12 μm radiation delivered via a 600-μm-diameter optical fiber at a repetition rate of 2 Hz. Muscle action potentials were recorded with intradermal electrodes. Nerve samples were examined for possible tissue damage. Eight facial nerves were stimulated with radiant exposures between 0.71-1.77 J/cm2, resulting in compound muscle action potentials (CmAPs) that were simultaneously measured at the m. orbicularis oculi, m. levator nasolabialis, and m. orbicularis oris. Resulting CmAP amplitudes were 0.3-0.4 mV, 0.15-1.4 mV and 0.3-2.3 mV, respectively, depending on the radial location of the optical fiber and the radiant exposure. Individual nerve branches were also stimulated, resulting in CmAP amplitudes between 0.2 and 1.6 mV. Histology revealed tissue damage at radiant exposures of 2.2 J/cm2, but no apparent damage at radiant exposures of 2.0 J/cm2.

  17. Use of Vagus Nerve Stimulator on Children With Primary Generalized Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Welch, William P; Sitwat, Bilal; Sogawa, Yoshimi

    2018-06-01

    To describe the response to vagus nerve stimulator (VNS) in otherwise neurotypical children with medically intractable primary generalized epilepsy. Retrospective chart review of patients who underwent vagus nerve stimulator surgery between January 2011 and December 2015. Eleven patients were identified. Median follow-up duration was 2.5 years (1.2-8.4 years). Prior to vagus nerve stimulator surgery, all patients had at least 1 seizure per week, and 7/11 (64%) had daily seizures. At 1-year follow-up after vagus nerve stimulator, 7/11 (64%) reported improved seizure frequency and 6/11 (55%) reported fewer than 1 seizure per month. Three patients (27%) reported complications related to vagus nerve stimulator surgery, and no patients required device removal. In children with medically intractable primary generalized epilepsy, vagus nerve stimulator is well tolerated and appears to lead to improvement in seizure frequency. Improvement was not attributable to epilepsy classification, age at vagus nerve stimulator implantation, output current, duty cycle, or follow-up duration.

  18. Stimulation of the human auditory nerve with optical radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fishman, Andrew; Winkler, Piotr; Mierzwinski, Jozef; Beuth, Wojciech; Izzo Matic, Agnella; Siedlecki, Zygmunt; Teudt, Ingo; Maier, Hannes; Richter, Claus-Peter

    2009-02-01

    A novel, spatially selective method to stimulate cranial nerves has been proposed: contact free stimulation with optical radiation. The radiation source is an infrared pulsed laser. The Case Report is the first report ever that shows that optical stimulation of the auditory nerve is possible in the human. The ethical approach to conduct any measurements or tests in humans requires efficacy and safety studies in animals, which have been conducted in gerbils. This report represents the first step in a translational research project to initiate a paradigm shift in neural interfaces. A patient was selected who required surgical removal of a large meningioma angiomatum WHO I by a planned transcochlear approach. Prior to cochlear ablation by drilling and subsequent tumor resection, the cochlear nerve was stimulated with a pulsed infrared laser at low radiation energies. Stimulation with optical radiation evoked compound action potentials from the human auditory nerve. Stimulation of the auditory nerve with infrared laser pulses is possible in the human inner ear. The finding is an important step for translating results from animal experiments to human and furthers the development of a novel interface that uses optical radiation to stimulate neurons. Additional measurements are required to optimize the stimulation parameters.

  19. Comparison of three types of stress urinary incontinence rat models: electrocauterization, pudendal denervation, and vaginal distension.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sung-Hoo; Piao, Shuyu; Kim, In Gul; Lee, Ji Young; Cho, Hyuk Jin; Kim, Sae Woong; Hwang, Tae-Kon; Lee, Ji Youl

    2013-02-01

    To investigate the differences in the histopathologic and functional characteristics of 3 rat models of stress urinary incontinence. A total of 24 female, 10-week-old, Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 4 groups: normal, electrocauterization, pudendal denervation, and vaginal distension. At 2 weeks after surgery, the leak point pressure was measured to detect urinary leakage. Urethral tissue samples were collected for histological examination. The smooth muscle content in the electrocauterization group was significantly decreased compared with that in all other groups, indicating that electrocauterization caused the most severe injury. A blood vessel marker, von Willebrand factor, was co-stained with α-smooth muscle actin to detect the blood vessel distribution. No significant differences were seen in von Willebrand factor expression among the 4 groups, other than in the electrocauterization group, in which we could hardly observe blood vessel expression. Protein gene product 9.5 staining was used to detect nerve fibers and cells. Protein gene product 9.5 expression was significantly lower in all the treatment groups compared with that in the normal group (P <.05), in particular, in the electrocauterization and pudendal denervation groups (P <.01). The leak point pressure was significantly lower in the electrocauterization (P <.01), pudendal denervation (P <.01), and vaginal distension (P <.05) groups than in the normal group. The vaginal distension model should mainly be used as the myogenic damage stress urinary incontinence animal model; the pudendal denervation model mainly as the neurogenic damage stress urinary incontinence animal model; and the electrocauterization model as the vasculogenic, neurogenic, and myogenic damage animal model. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Modeling cost of ultrasound versus nerve stimulator guidance for nerve blocks with sensitivity analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Spencer S; John, Raymond S

    2010-01-01

    Ultrasound guidance for regional anesthesia has increased in popularity. However, the cost of ultrasound versus nerve stimulator guidance is controversial, as multiple and varying cost inputs are involved. Sensitivity analysis allows modeling of different scenarios and determination of the relative importance of each cost input for a given scenario. We modeled cost per patient of ultrasound versus nerve stimulator using single-factor sensitivity analysis for 4 different clinical scenarios designed to span the expected financial impact of ultrasound guidance. The primary cost factors for ultrasound were revenue from billing for ultrasound (85% of variation in final cost), number of patients examined per ultrasound machine (10%), and block success rate (2.6%). In contrast, the most important input factors for nerve stimulator were the success rate of the nerve stimulator block (89%) and the amount of liability payout for failed airway due to rescue general anesthesia (9%). Depending on clinical scenario, ultrasound was either a profit or cost center. If revenue is generated, then ultrasound-guided blocks consistently become a profit center regardless of clinical scenario in our model. Without revenue, the clinical scenario dictates the cost of ultrasound. In an ambulatory setting, ultrasound is highly competitive with nerve stimulator and requires at least a 96% success rate with nerve stimulator before becoming more expensive. In a hospitalized scenario, ultrasound is consistently more expensive as the uniform use of general anesthesia and hospitalization negate any positive cost effects from greater efficiency with ultrasound.

  1. Peripheral Nerve Regeneration Strategies: Electrically Stimulating Polymer Based Nerve Growth Conduits

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Matthew; Shelke, Namdev B.; Manoukian, Ohan S.; Yu, Xiaojun; McCullough, Louise D.; Kumbar, Sangamesh G.

    2017-01-01

    Treatment of large peripheral nerve damages ranges from the use of an autologous nerve graft to a synthetic nerve growth conduit. Biological grafts, in spite of many merits, show several limitations in terms of availability and donor site morbidity, and outcomes are suboptimal due to fascicle mismatch, scarring, and fibrosis. Tissue engineered nerve graft substitutes utilize polymeric conduits in conjunction with cues both chemical and physical, cells alone and or in combination. The chemical and physical cues delivered through polymeric conduits play an important role and drive tissue regeneration. Electrical stimulation (ES) has been applied toward the repair and regeneration of various tissues such as muscle, tendon, nerve, and articular tissue both in laboratory and clinical settings. The underlying mechanisms that regulate cellular activities such as cell adhesion, proliferation, cell migration, protein production, and tissue regeneration following ES is not fully understood. Polymeric constructs that can carry the electrical stimulation along the length of the scaffold have been developed and characterized for possible nerve regeneration applications. We discuss the use of electrically conductive polymers and associated cell interaction, biocompatibility, tissue regeneration, and recent basic research for nerve regeneration. In conclusion, a multifunctional combinatorial device comprised of biomaterial, structural, functional, cellular, and molecular aspects may be the best way forward for effective peripheral nerve regeneration. PMID:27278739

  2. Endogenous angiotensin affects responses to stimulation of baroreceptor afferent nerves.

    PubMed

    DiBona, Gerald F; Jones, Susan Y

    2003-08-01

    To study effects of endogenous angiotensin II on responses to standardized stimulation of afferent neural input into the central portion of the arterial and cardiac baroreflexes. Different dietary sodium intakes were used to physiologically alter endogenous angiotensin II activity. Candesartan, an angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonist, was used to assess dependency of observed effects on angiotensin II stimulation of angiotensin II type 1 receptors. Electrical stimulation of arterial and cardiac baroreflex afferent nerves was used to provide a standardized input to the central portion of the arterial and cardiac baroreflexes. In anesthetized rats in balance on low, normal and high dietary sodium intake, arterial pressure, heart rate and renal sympathetic nerve activity responses to electrical stimulation of vagus and aortic depressor nerves were determined. Compared with plasma renin activity values in normal dietary sodium intake rats, those from low dietary sodium intake rats were higher and those from high dietary sodium intake rats were lower. During vagus nerve stimulation, the heart rate, arterial pressure and renal sympathetic nerve activity responses were similar in all three dietary sodium intake groups. During aortic depressor nerve stimulation, the heart rate and arterial pressure responses were similar in all three dietary sodium intake groups. However, the renal sympathetic nerve activity response was significantly greater in the low sodium group than in the normal and high sodium group at 4, 8 and 16 Hz. Candesartan administered to low dietary sodium intake rats had no effect on the heart rate and arterial pressure responses to either vagus or aortic depressor nerve stimulation but increased the magnitude of the renal sympathoinhibitory responses. Increased endogenous angiotensin II in rats on a low dietary sodium intake attenuates the renal sympathoinhibitory response to activation of the cardiac and sinoaortic baroreflexes by standardized vagus

  3. Use of early tactile stimulation in rehabilitation of digital nerve injuries.

    PubMed

    Cheng, A S

    2000-01-01

    Digital nerves are the most frequently injured peripheral nerve. To improve the recovery of functional sensibility of digital nerve injuries, a prospective randomized controlled study was conducted to see the effect of using early tactile stimulation in rehabilitation of digital nerve injuries. Two specific tactile stimulators were made and prescribed for patients with digital nerve-injury. Twenty-four participants with 32 digital nerve injuries received the prescribed tactile stimulators (experimental group), and another 25 participants with 33 digital nerve injuries received only routine conventional therapy (control group). A significant difference (p < .05) was seen in the experimental group, although there were some variations between the different classes of associated injuries, with least benefit observed in the combined nerve, tendon, and bone injury class. Use of early tactile stimulation as described in this study can be considered an effective way to improve both quality and quantity of recovery of functional sensibility in digital nerve injuries without combined nerve, tendon, and bone injuries.

  4. Effects of sciatic nerve stimulation on the propagation of cortical spreading depression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaoli; Yu, Zhidong; Zeng, Shaoqun; Luo, Qingming; Li, Pengcheng

    2008-02-01

    Cortical spreading depression (CSD) is an important pathological model of migraine and is related to other neural disorders, such as cerebral ischemia and epilepsy. It has been reported that brain stimulation is a quite effective way to treat neural diseases. However, direct stimulation could cause harm to brain. If peripheral nerve stimulation could have the same treatment, it would be essential to investigate the mechanisms of peripheral nerve and the study of sciatic nerve stimulation would have profound clinical meaning. In this paper, we used optical intrinsic signal imaging (OISI) and extracellular electrophysiologic recording techniques to study the effects of sciatic nerve stimulation on the propagation of CSD. We found that: (1) continuous sciatic nerve stimulation on rats caused a decrease in light intensity on the whole cortex, which meant an increase in cerebral blood volume(CBV); (2) the spreading velocity of CSD declined from 3.63+/- 0.272 mm/min to 3.06+/-0.260 mm/min during sciatic nerve stimulation, compared with that without sciatic nerve stimulation. In summary, data suggests that sciatic nerve stimulation elicits a response of cortex and causes a slowdown in the propagation of CSD.

  5. 21 CFR 882.5890 - Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator for... Devices § 882.5890 Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator for pain relief. (a) Identification. A transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator for pain relief is a device used to apply an electrical current to...

  6. 21 CFR 882.5890 - Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Devices § 882.5890 Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator for pain relief. (a) Identification. A transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator for pain relief is a device used to apply an electrical current to... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator for...

  7. 21 CFR 882.5890 - Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Devices § 882.5890 Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator for pain relief. (a) Identification. A transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator for pain relief is a device used to apply an electrical current to... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator for...

  8. 21 CFR 882.5890 - Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Devices § 882.5890 Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator for pain relief. (a) Identification. A transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator for pain relief is a device used to apply an electrical current to... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator for...

  9. 21 CFR 882.5890 - Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Devices § 882.5890 Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator for pain relief. (a) Identification. A transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator for pain relief is a device used to apply an electrical current to... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator for...

  10. Neuroprotective effects of vagus nerve stimulation on traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Long; Lin, Jinhuang; Lin, Junming; Kui, Guoju; Zhang, Jianhua; Yu, Yigang

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that vagus nerve stimulation can improve the prognosis of traumatic brain injury. The aim of this study was to elucidate the mechanism of the neuroprotective effects of vagus nerve stimulation in rabbits with brain explosive injury. Rabbits with brain explosive injury received continuous stimulation (10 V, 5 Hz, 5 ms, 20 minutes) of the right cervical vagus nerve. Tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β and interleukin-10 concentrations were detected in serum and brain tissues, and water content in brain tissues was measured. Results showed that vagus nerve stimulation could reduce the degree of brain edema, decrease tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β concentrations, and increase interleukin-10 concentration after brain explosive injury in rabbits. These data suggest that vagus nerve stimulation may exert neuroprotective effects against explosive injury via regulating the expression of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β and interleukin-10 in the serum and brain tissue. PMID:25368644

  11. Transcutaneous stimulation of the posterior tibial nerve for treating refractory urge incontinence of idiopathic and neurogenic origin.

    PubMed

    Valles-Antuña, C; Pérez-Haro, M L; González-Ruiz de L, C; Quintás-Blanco, A; Tamargo-Diaz, E M; García-Rodríguez, J; San Martín-Blanco, A; Fernandez-Gomez, J M

    2017-09-01

    To assess the efficacy of treatment with transcutaneous posterior tibial nerve stimulation (TPTNS) in patients with urge urinary incontinence, of neurogenic or nonneurogenic origin, refractory to first-line therapeutic options. We included 65 patients with urge urinary incontinence refractory to medical treatment. A case history review, a urodynamic study and a somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP) study were conducted before the TPTNS, studying the functional urological condition by means of a voiding diary. The treatment consisted of 10 weekly sessions of TPTNS lasting 30minutes. Some 57.7% of the patients showed abnormal tibial SEPs, and 42% showed abnormal pudendal SEPs. A statistically significant symptomatic improvement was observed in all clinical parameters after treatment with TPTNS, and 66% of the patients showed an overall improvement, regardless of sex, the presence of underlying neurological disorders, detrusor hyperactivity in the urodynamic study or SEP disorders. There were no adverse effects during the treatment. TPTNS is an effective and well tolerated treatment in patients with urge incontinence refractory to first-line therapies and should be offered early in the treatment strategy. New studies are needed to identify the optimal parameters of stimulation, the most effective treatment protocols and long-term efficacy, as well as its applicability to patients with a neurogenic substrate. Copyright © 2017 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Electrical stimulation vs. pulsed and continuous-wave optical stimulation of the rat prostate cavernous nerves, in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, William C.; Lagoda, Gwen A.; Burnett, Arthur; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2015-07-01

    Identification and preservation of the cavernous nerves (CNs) during prostate cancer surgery is critical for post-operative sexual function. Electrical nerve stimulation (ENS) mapping has previously been tested as an intraoperative tool for CN identification, but was found to be unreliable. ENS is limited by the need for electrode-tissue contact, poor spatial precision from electrical current spreading, and stimulation artifacts interfering with detection. Alternatively, optical nerve stimulation (ONS) provides noncontact stimulation, improved spatial selectivity, and elimination of stimulation artifacts. This study compares ENS to pulsed/CW ONS to explore the ONS mechanism. A total of eighty stimulations were performed in 5 rats, in vivo. ENS (4 V, 5 ms, 10 Hz) was compared to ONS using a pulsed diode laser nerve stimulator (1873 nm, 5 ms, 10 Hz) or CW diode laser nerve stimulator (1455 nm). Intracavernous pressure (ICP) response and nerve compound action potentials (nCAPs) were measured. All three stimulation modes (ENS, ONS-CW, ONS-P) produced comparable ICP magnitudes. However, ENS demonstrated more rapid ICP response times and well defined nCAPs compared to unmeasurable nCAPs for ONS. Further experiments measuring single action potentials during ENS and ONS are warranted to further understand differences in the ENS and ONS mechanisms.

  13. Continuous-wave vs. pulsed infrared laser stimulation of the rat prostate cavernous nerves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tozburun, Serhat; Cilip, Christopher M.; Lagoda, Gwen A.; Burnett, Arthur L.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2011-03-01

    Optical nerve stimulation has recently been developed as an alternative to electrical nerve stimulation. However, recent studies have focused primarily on pulsed delivery of the laser radiation and at relatively low pulse rates. The objective of this study is to demonstrate faster optical stimulation of the prostate cavernous nerves using continuouswave (CW) infrared laser radiation, for potential diagnostic applications. A Thulium fiber laser (λ = 1870 nm) was used for non-contact optical stimulation of the rat prostate cavernous nerves, in vivo. Optical nerve stimulation, as measured by an intracavernous pressure (ICP) response in the penis, was achieved with the laser operating in either CW mode, or with a 5-ms pulse duration at 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 100 Hz. Successful optical stimulation was observed to be primarily dependent on a threshold nerve temperature (42-45 °C), not an incident fluence, as previously reported. CW optical nerve stimulation provides a significantly faster ICP response time using a laser with lower power output than pulsed stimulation. CW optical nerve stimulation may therefore represent an alternative mode of stimulation for intra-operative diagnostic applications where a rapid response is critical, such as identification of the cavernous nerves during prostate cancer surgery.

  14. Posterior tibial nerve stimulation vs parasacral transcutaneous neuromodulation for overactive bladder in children.

    PubMed

    Barroso, Ubirajara; Viterbo, Walter; Bittencourt, Joana; Farias, Tiago; Lordêlo, Patrícia

    2013-08-01

    Parasacral transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and posterior tibial nerve stimulation have emerged as effective methods to treat overactive bladder in children. However, to our knowledge no study has compared the 2 methods. We evaluated the results of parasacral transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and posterior tibial nerve stimulation in children with overactive bladder. We prospectively studied children with overactive bladder without dysfunctional voiding. Success of treatment was evaluated by visual analogue scale and dysfunctional voiding symptom score, and by level of improvement of each specific symptom. Parasacral transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation was performed 3 times weekly and posterior tibial nerve stimulation was performed once weekly. A total of 22 consecutive patients were treated with posterior tibial nerve stimulation and 37 with parasacral transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation. There was no difference between the 2 groups regarding demographic characteristics or types of symptoms. Concerning the evaluation by visual analogue scale, complete resolution of symptoms was seen in 70% of the group undergoing parasacral transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and in 9% of the group undergoing posterior tibial nerve stimulation (p = 0.02). When the groups were compared, there was no statistically significant difference (p = 0.55). The frequency of persistence of urgency and diurnal urinary incontinence was nearly double in the group undergoing posterior tibial nerve stimulation. However, this difference was not statistically significant. We found that parasacral transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation is more effective in resolving overactive bladder symptoms, which matches parental perception. However, there were no statistically significant differences in the evaluation by dysfunctional voiding symptom score, or in complete resolution of urgency or diurnal incontinence. Copyright © 2013 American Urological

  15. Recruitment order of quadriceps motor units: femoral nerve vs. direct quadriceps stimulation.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Falces, Javier; Place, Nicolas

    2013-12-01

    To investigate potential differences in the recruitment order of motor units (MUs) in the quadriceps femoris when electrical stimulation is applied over the quadriceps belly versus the femoral nerve. M-waves and mechanical twitches were evoked using femoral nerve stimulation and direct quadriceps stimulation of gradually increasing intensity from 20 young, healthy subjects. Recruitment order was investigated by analysing the time-to-peak twitch and the time interval from the stimulus artefact to the M-wave positive peak (M-wave latency) for the vastus medialis (VM) and vastus lateralis (VL) muscles. During femoral nerve stimulation, time-to-peak twitch and M-wave latency decreased consistently (P < 0.05) with increasing stimulus intensity, whereas, during graded direct quadriceps stimulation, time-to-peak twitch and VL M-wave latency did not show a clear trend (P > 0.05). For the VM muscle, M-wave latency decreased with increasing stimulation level for both femoral nerve and direct quadriceps stimulation, whereas, for the VL muscle, the variation of M-wave latency with stimulus intensity was different for the two stimulation geometries (P < 0.05). Femoral nerve stimulation activated MUs according to the size principle, whereas the recruitment order during direct quadriceps stimulation was more complex, depending ultimately on the architecture of the peripheral nerve and its terminal branches below the stimulating electrodes for each muscle. For the VM, MUs were orderly recruited for both stimulation geometries, whereas, for the VL muscle, MUs were orderly recruited for femoral nerve stimulation, but followed no particular order for direct quadriceps stimulation.

  16. Nerve stimulator-guided sciatic-femoral nerve block in raptors undergoing surgical treatment of pododermatitis.

    PubMed

    d'Ovidio, Dario; Noviello, Emilio; Adami, Chiara

    2015-07-01

    To describe the nerve stimulator-guided sciatic-femoral nerve block in raptors undergoing surgical treatment of pododermatitis. Prospective clinical trial. Five captive raptors (Falco peregrinus) aged 6.7 ± 1.3 years. Anaesthesia was induced and maintained with isoflurane in oxygen. The sciatic-femoral nerve block was performed with 2% lidocaine (0.05 mL kg(-1) per nerve) as the sole intra-operative analgesic treatment. Intraoperative physiological variables were recorded every 10 minutes from endotracheal intubation until the end of anaesthesia. Assessment of intraoperative nociception was based on changes in physiological variables above baseline values, while evaluation of postoperative pain relied on species-specific behavioural indicators. The sciatic-femoral nerve block was feasible in raptors and the motor responses following electrical stimulation of both nerves were consistent with those reported in mammalian species. During surgery no rescue analgesia was required. The anaesthesia plane was stable and cardiorespiratory variables did not increase significantly in response to surgical stimulation. Iatrogenic complications, namely nerve damage and local anaesthetic toxicity, did not occur. Recovery was smooth and uneventful. The duration (mean ± SD) of the analgesic effect provided by the nerve block was 130 ± 20 minutes. The sciatic-femoral nerve block as described in dogs and rabbits can be performed in raptors as well. Further clinical trials with a control groups are required to better investigate the analgesic efficacy and the safety of this technique in raptors. © 2014 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia.

  17. Motor neuron activation in peripheral nerves using infrared neural stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, E. J.; Tyler, D. J.

    2014-02-01

    Objective. Localized activation of peripheral axons may improve selectivity of peripheral nerve interfaces. Infrared neural stimulation (INS) employs localized delivery to activate neural tissue. This study investigated INS to determine whether localized delivery limited functionality in larger mammalian nerves. Approach. The rabbit sciatic nerve was stimulated extraneurally with 1875 nm wavelength infrared light, electrical stimulation, or a combination of both. Infrared-sensitive regions (ISR) of the nerve surface and electromyogram (EMG) recruitment of the Medial Gastrocnemius, Lateral Gastrocnemius, Soleus, and Tibialis Anterior were the primary output measures. Stimulation applied included infrared-only, electrical-only, and combined infrared and electrical. Main results. 81% of nerves tested were sensitive to INS, with 1.7 ± 0.5 ISR detected per nerve. INS was selective to a single muscle within 81% of identified ISR. Activation energy threshold did not change significantly with stimulus power, but motor activation decreased significantly when radiant power was decreased. Maximum INS levels typically recruited up to 2-9% of any muscle. Combined infrared and electrical stimulation differed significantly from electrical recruitment in 7% of cases. Significance. The observed selectivity of INS indicates that it may be useful in augmenting rehabilitation, but significant challenges remain in increasing sensitivity and response magnitude to improve the functionality of INS.

  18. Motor Neuron Activation in Peripheral Nerves Using Infrared Neural Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, EJ; Tyler, DJ

    2014-01-01

    Objective Localized activation of peripheral axons may improve selectivity of peripheral nerve interfaces. Infrared neural stimulation (INS) employs localized delivery to activate neural tissue. This study investigated INS to determine whether localized delivery limited functionality in larger mammalian nerves. Approach The rabbit sciatic nerve was stimulated extraneurally with 1875 nm-wavelength infrared light, electrical stimulation, or a combination of both. Infrared-sensitive regions (ISR) of the nerve surface and electromyogram (EMG) recruitment of the Medial Gastrocnemius, Lateral Gastrocnemius, Soleus, and Tibialis Anterior were the primary output measures. Stimulation applied included infrared-only, electrical-only, and combined infrared and electrical. Main results 81% of nerves tested were sensitive to INS, with 1.7± 0.5 ISR detected per nerve. INS was selective to a single muscle within 81% of identified ISR. Activation energy threshold did not change significantly with stimulus power, but motor activation decreased significantly when radiant power was decreased. Maximum INS levels typically recruited up to 2–9% of any muscle. Combined infrared and electrical stimulation differed significantly from electrical recruitment in 7% of cases. Significance The observed selectivity of INS indicates it may be useful in augmenting rehabilitation, but significant challenges remain in increasing sensitivity and response magnitude to improve the functionality of INS. PMID:24310923

  19. High-Frequency Transcutaneous Peripheral Nerve Stimulation Induces a Higher Increase of Heat Pain Threshold in the Cutaneous Area of the Stimulated Nerve When Confronted to the Neighbouring Areas

    PubMed Central

    Buonocore, M.; Camuzzini, N.; Cecini, M.; Dalla Toffola, E.

    2013-01-01

    Background. TENS (transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation) is probably the most diffused physical therapy used for antalgic purposes. Although it continues to be used by trial and error, correct targeting of paresthesias evoked by the electrical stimulation on the painful area is diffusely considered very important for pain relief. Aim. To investigate if TENS antalgic effect is higher in the cutaneous area of the stimulated nerve when confronted to neighbouring areas. Methods. 10 volunteers (4 males, 6 females) underwent three different sessions: in two, heat pain thresholds (HPTs) were measured on the dorsal hand skin before, during and after electrical stimulation (100 Hz, 0.1 msec) of superficial radial nerve; in the third session HPTs, were measured without any stimulation. Results. Radial nerve stimulation induced an increase of HPT significantly higher in its cutaneous territory when confronted to the neighbouring ulnar nerve territory, and antalgic effect persisted beyond the stimulation time. Conclusions. The location of TENS electrodes is crucial for obtaining the strongest pain relief, and peripheral nerve trunk stimulation is advised whenever possible. Moreover, the present study indicates that continuous stimulation could be unnecessary, suggesting a strategy for avoiding the well-known tolerance-like effect of prolonged TENS application. PMID:24027756

  20. Functional MRI Detection of Hemodynamic Response of Repeated Median Nerve Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Leo; Oya, Hiroyuki; Howard, Matthew; Xiong, Jinhu

    2012-01-01

    Median nerve stimulation is a commonly used technique in the clinical setting to determine areas of neuronal function in the brain. Neuronal activity of repeated median nerve stimulation is well studied. The cerebral hemodynamic response of the stimulation, on the other hand, is not very clear. In this study, we investigate how cerebral hemodynamics behaves over time using the same repeated median nerve stimulation. Ten subjects received constant repeated electrical stimulation to the right median nerve. Each subject had fMRI scans while receiving said stimulations for seven runs. Our results show that the BOLD signal significantly decreases across each run. Significant BOLD signal decreases can also be seen within runs. These results are consistent with studies that have studied the hemodynamic habituation effect with other forms of stimulation. However, the results do not completely agree with the findings of studies where evoked potentials were examined. Thus, further inquiry of how evoked potentials and cerebral hemodynamics are coupled when using constant stimulations is needed. PMID:23228312

  1. Axotomy of tributaries of the pelvic and pudendal nerves induces changes in the neurochemistry of mouse dorsal root ganglion neurons and the spinal cord.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Carly J; Tomasella, Eugenia; Malet, Mariana; Seroogy, Kim B; Hökfelt, Tomas; Villar, Marcelo J; Gebhart, G F; Brumovsky, Pablo R

    2016-05-01

    Using immunohistochemical techniques, we characterized changes in the expression of several neurochemical markers in lumbar 4-sacral 2 (L4-S2) dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neuron profiles (NPs) and the spinal cord of BALB/c mice after axotomy of the L6 and S1 spinal nerves, major tributaries of the pelvic (targeting pelvic visceral organs) and pudendal (targeting perineum and genitalia) nerves. Sham animals were included. Expression of cyclic AMP-dependent transcription factor 3 (ATF3), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V, member 1 (TRPV1), tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUT) types 1 and -2 was analysed seven days after injury. L6-S1 axotomy induced dramatic de novo expression of ATF3 in many L6-S1 DRG NPs, and parallel significant downregulations in the percentage of CGRP-, TRPV1-, TH- and VGLUT2-immunoreactive (IR) DRG NPs, as compared to their expression in uninjured DRGs (contralateral L6-S1-AXO; sham mice); VGLUT1 expression remained unaltered. Sham L6-S1 DRGs only showed a small ipsilateral increase in ATF3-IR NPs (other markers were unchanged). L6-S1-AXO induced de novo expression of ATF3 in several lumbosacral spinal cord motoneurons and parasympathetic preganglionic neurons; in sham mice the effect was limited to a few motoneurons. Finally, a moderate decrease in CGRP- and TRPV1-like-immunoreactivities was observed in the ipsilateral superficial dorsal horn neuropil. In conclusion, injury of a mixed visceral/non-visceral nerve leads to considerable neurochemical alterations in DRGs matched, to some extent, in the spinal cord. Changes in these and potentially other nociception-related molecules could contribute to pain due to injury of nerves in the abdominopelvic cavity.

  2. Phrenic Nerve Stimulation: Technology and Clinical Applications.

    PubMed

    Abdunnur, Shane V; Kim, Daniel H

    2015-01-01

    Phrenic nerve stimulation is a technique used to reanimate the diaphragm of patients with central nervous system etiologies of respiratory insufficiency. Current clinical indications include congenital central hypoventilation syndrome, spinal cord injury above C4, brain stem injury, and idiopathic severe sleep apnea. Presurgical evaluation ensures proper patient selection by validating the intact circuit from the phrenic nerve through alveolar oxygenation. The procedure involves placing leads around the phrenic nerves bilaterally and attaching these leads to radio receivers in a subcutaneous pocket. The rate and amplitude of the current is adjusted via an external radio transmitter. After implantation, each patient progresses through a conditioning phase that strengthens the diaphragm and progressively provides independence from the mechanical ventilator. Studies indicate that patients and families experience an improved quality of life and are satisfied with the results. Phrenic nerve stimulation provides a safe and effective means for reanimating the diaphragm for certain patients with respiratory insufficiency, providing independence from mechanical ventilation. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Long pacing pulses reduce phrenic nerve stimulation in left ventricular pacing.

    PubMed

    Hjortshøj, Søren; Heath, Finn; Haugland, Morten; Eschen, Ole; Thøgersen, Anna Margrethe; Riahi, Sam; Toft, Egon; Struijk, Johannes Jan

    2014-05-01

    Phrenic nerve stimulation is a major obstacle in cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). Activation characteristics of the heart and phrenic nerve are different with higher chronaxie for the heart. Therefore, longer pulse durations could be beneficial in preventing phrenic nerve stimulation during CRT due to a decreased threshold for the heart compared with the phrenic nerve. We investigated if long pulse durations decreased left ventricular (LV) thresholds relatively to phrenic nerve thresholds in humans. Eleven patients, with indication for CRT and phrenic nerve stimulation at the intended pacing site, underwent determination of thresholds for the heart and phrenic nerve at different pulse durations (0.3-2.9 milliseconds). The resulting strength duration curves were analyzed by determining chronaxie and rheobase. Comparisons for those parameters were made between the heart and phrenic nerve, and between the models of Weiss and Lapicque as well. In 9 of 11 cases, the thresholds decreased faster for the LV than for the phrenic nerve with increasing pulse duration. In 3 cases, the thresholds changed from unfavorable for LV stimulation to more than a factor 2 in favor of the LV. The greatest change occurred for pulse durations up to 1.5 milliseconds. The chronaxie of the heart was significantly higher than the chronaxie of the phrenic nerve (0.47 milliseconds vs. 0.22 milliseconds [P = 0.029, Lapicque] and 0.79 milliseconds vs. 0.27 milliseconds [P = 0.033, Weiss]). Long pulse durations lead to a decreased threshold of the heart relatively to the phrenic nerve and may prevent stimulation of the phrenic nerve in a clinical setting. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation vs sacral nerve stimulation for faecal incontinence: a comparative case-matched study.

    PubMed

    Al Asari, S; Meurette, G; Mantoo, S; Kubis, C; Wyart, V; Lehur, P-A

    2014-11-01

    The study assessed the initial experience with posterior tibial nerve stimulation (PTNS) for faecal incontinence and compared it with sacral nerve stimulation (SNS) performed in a single centre during the same timespan. A retrospective review of a prospectively collected database was conducted at the colorectal unit, University Hospital, Nantes, France, from May 2009 to December 2010. Seventy-eight patients diagnosed with chronic severe faecal incontinence underwent neurostimulation including PTNS in 21 and SNS in 57. The main outcome measures were faecal incontinence (Wexner score) and quality of life (Fecal Incontinence Quality of Life, FIQL) scores in a short-term follow-up. No significant differences were observed in patients' characteristics. Of 57 patients having SNS, 18 (32%) failed peripheral nerve evaluation and 39 (68%) received a permanent implant. Two (5%) developed a wound infection. No adverse effects were recorded in the PTNS group. There was no significant difference in the mean Wexner and FIQL scores between patients having PTNS and SNS at 6 (P = 0.39 and 0.09) and 12 months (P = 0.79 and 0.37). A 50% or more improvement in Wexner score was seen at 6 and 12 months in 47% and 30% of PTNS patients and in 50% and 58% of SNS patients with no significant difference between the groups. Posterior tibial nerve stimulation is a valid method of treating faecal incontinence in the short term when conservative treatment has failed. It is easier, simpler, cheaper and less invasive than SNS with a similar short-term outcome. Colorectal Disease © 2014 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  5. The effects of general anaesthesia on nerve-motor response characteristics (rheobase and chronaxie) to peripheral nerve stimulation.

    PubMed

    Tsui, B C

    2014-04-01

    Using a simple surface nerve stimulation system, I examined the effects of general anaesthesia on rheobase (the minimum current required to stimulate nerve activity) and chronaxie (the minimum time for a stimulus twice the rheobase to elicit nerve activity). Nerve stimulation was used to elicit a motor response from the ulnar nerve at varying pulse widths before and after induction of general anaesthesia. Mean (SD) rheobase before and after general anaesthesia was 0.91 (0.37) mA (95% CI 0.77-1.04 mA) and 1.11 (0.53) mA (95% CI 0.92-1.30 mA), respectively. Mean (SD) chronaxie measured before and after general anaesthesia was 0.32 (0.17) ms (95% CI 0.26-0.38 ms) and 0.29 (0.13) ms (95% CI 0.24-0.33 ms), respectively. Under anaesthesia, rheobase values increased by an average of 20% (p = 0.05), but chronaxie values did not change significantly (p = 0.39). These results suggest that threshold currents used for motor response from nerve stimulation under general anaesthesia might be higher than those used in awake patients. © 2014 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  6. A systematic review investigating the relationship between efficacy and stimulation parameters when using transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation after knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Beckwée, David; Bautmans, Ivan; Swinnen, Eva; Vermet, Yorick; Lefeber, Nina; Lievens, Pierre; Vaes, Peter

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical efficacy of transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation in the treatment of postoperative knee arthroplasty pain and to relate these results to the stimulation parameters used. PubMed, Pedro and Web of Knowledge were systematically screened for studies investigating effects of transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation on postoperative knee arthroplasty pain. Studies were screened for their methodological and therapeutical quality. We appraised the influence of the stimulation settings used and indicated whether or not a neurophysiological and/or mechanistic rationale was given for these stimulation settings. A total of 5 articles met the inclusion criteria. In total, 347 patients were investigated. The number of patients who received some form of transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation was 117, and 54 patients received sham transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation. Pain was the primary outcome in all studies. The stimulation settings used in the studies (n = 2) that reported significant effects differed from the others as they implemented a submaximal stimulation intensity. Stimulation parameters were heterogeneous, and only one study provided a rationale for them. This review reveals that an effect of transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation might have been missed due to low methodological and therapeutical quality. Justifying the choice of transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation parameters may improve therapeutical quality.

  7. A systematic review investigating the relationship between efficacy and stimulation parameters when using transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation after knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Beckwée, David; Bautmans, Ivan; Swinnen, Eva; Vermet, Yorick; Lefeber, Nina; Lievens, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical efficacy of transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation in the treatment of postoperative knee arthroplasty pain and to relate these results to the stimulation parameters used. Data Sources: PubMed, Pedro and Web of Knowledge were systematically screened for studies investigating effects of transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation on postoperative knee arthroplasty pain. Review Methods: Studies were screened for their methodological and therapeutical quality. We appraised the influence of the stimulation settings used and indicated whether or not a neurophysiological and/or mechanistic rationale was given for these stimulation settings. Results: A total of 5 articles met the inclusion criteria. In total, 347 patients were investigated. The number of patients who received some form of transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation was 117, and 54 patients received sham transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation. Pain was the primary outcome in all studies. The stimulation settings used in the studies (n = 2) that reported significant effects differed from the others as they implemented a submaximal stimulation intensity. Stimulation parameters were heterogeneous, and only one study provided a rationale for them. Conclusion: This review reveals that an effect of transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation might have been missed due to low methodological and therapeutical quality. Justifying the choice of transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation parameters may improve therapeutical quality. PMID:26770730

  8. Laser Stimulation of Single Auditory Nerve Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Littlefield, Philip D.; Vujanovic, Irena; Mundi, Jagmeet; Matic, Agnella Izzo; Richter, Claus-Peter

    2011-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis One limitation with cochlear implants is the difficulty stimulating spatially discrete spiral ganglion cell groups because of electrode interactions. Multipolar electrodes have improved on this some, but also at the cost of much higher device power consumption. Recently, it has been shown that spatially selective stimulation of the auditory nerve is possible with a mid-infrared laser aimed at the spiral ganglion via the round window. However, these neurons must be driven at adequate rates for optical radiation to be useful in cochlear implants. We herein use single-fiber recordings to characterize the responses of auditory neurons to optical radiation. Study Design In vivo study using normal-hearing adult gerbils. Methods Two diode lasers were used for stimulation of the auditory nerve. They operated between 1.844 μm and 1.873 μm, with pulse durations of 35 μs to 1,000 μs, and at repetition rates up to 1,000 pulses per second (pps). The laser outputs were coupled to a 200-μm-diameter optical fiber placed against the round window membrane and oriented toward the spiral ganglion. The auditory nerve was exposed through a craniotomy, and recordings were taken from single fibers during acoustic and laser stimulation. Results Action potentials occurred 2.5 ms to 4.0 ms after the laser pulse. The latency jitter was up to 3 ms. Maximum rates of discharge averaged 97 ± 52.5 action potentials per second. The neurons did not strictly respond to the laser at stimulation rates over 100 pps. Conclusions Auditory neurons can be stimulated by a laser beam passing through the round window membrane and driven at rates sufficient for useful auditory information. Optical stimulation and electrical stimulation have different characteristics; which could be selectively exploited in future cochlear implants. Level of Evidence Not applicable. PMID:20830761

  9. A Nerve Clamp Electrode Design for Indirect Stimulation of Skeletal Muscle

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-01

    neurons. This device enables stimulation of muscle contraction indirectly as opposed to contraction from direct muscle stimulation. The electrode is able...to stimulate indirect muscle contraction when tested on ex vivo preparations from rodent phrenic nerve-hemidiaphragm muscle in similar fashion to...unsuccessful in stimulating indirect muscle contraction . Therefore, this novel electrode is useful for physiological assessment of nerve agents and

  10. Motor Cortex Stimulation Regenerative Effects in Peripheral Nerve Injury: An Experimental Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Nicolas, Nicolas; Kobaiter-Maarrawi, Sandra; Georges, Samuel; Abadjian, Gerard; Maarrawi, Joseph

    2018-06-01

    Immediate microsurgical nerve suture remains the gold standard after peripheral nerve injuries. However, functional recovery is delayed, and it is satisfactory in only 2/3 of cases. Peripheral electrical nerve stimulation proximal to the lesion enhances nerve regeneration and muscle reinnervation. This study aims to evaluate the effects of the motor cortex electrical stimulation on peripheral nerve regeneration after injury. Eighty rats underwent right sciatic nerve section, followed by immediate microsurgical epineural sutures. Rats were divided into 4 groups: Group 1 (control, n = 20): no electrical stimulation; group 2 (n = 20): immediate stimulation of the sciatic nerve just proximal to the lesion; Group 3 (n = 20): motor cortex stimulation (MCS) for 15 minutes after nerve section and suture (MCSa); group 4 (n = 20): MCS performed over the course of two weeks after nerve suture (MCSc). Assessment included electrophysiology and motor functional score at day 0 (baseline value before nerve section), and at weeks 4, 8, and 12. Rats were euthanized for histological study at week 12. Our results showed that MCS enhances functional recovery, nerve regeneration, and muscle reinnervation starting week 4 compared with the control group (P < 0.05). The MCS induces higher reinnervation rates even compared with peripheral stimulation, with better results in the MCSa group (P < 0.05), especially in terms of functional recovery. MCS seems to have a beneficial effect after peripheral nerve injury and repair in terms of nerve regeneration and muscle reinnervation, especially when acute mode is used. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Temperature-controlled optical stimulation of the rat prostate cavernous nerves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tozburun, Serhat; Hutchens, Thomas C.; McClain, Michael A.; Lagoda, Gwen A.; Burnett, Arthur L.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2013-06-01

    Optical nerve stimulation (ONS) may be useful as a diagnostic tool for intraoperative identification and preservation of the prostate cavernous nerves (CN), responsible for erectile function, during prostate cancer surgery. Successful ONS requires elevating the nerve temperature to within a narrow range (˜42 to 47°C) for nerve activation without thermal damage to the nerve. This preliminary study explores a prototype temperature-controlled optical nerve stimulation (TC-ONS) system for maintaining a constant (±1°C) nerve temperature during short-term ONS of the rat prostate CNs. A 150-mW, 1455-nm diode laser was operated in continuous-wave mode, with and without temperature control, during stimulation of the rat CNs for 15 to 30 s through a fiber optic probe with a 1-mm-diameter spot. A microcontroller opened and closed an in-line mechanical shutter in response to an infrared sensor, with a predetermined temperature set point. With TC-ONS, higher laser power settings were used to rapidly and safely elevate the CNs to a temperature necessary for a fast intracavernous pressure response, while also preventing excessive temperatures that would otherwise cause thermal damage to the nerve. With further development, TC-ONS may provide a rapid, stable, and safe method for intraoperative identification and preservation of the prostate CNs.

  12. Chronic stability and selectivity of four-contact spiral nerve-cuff electrodes in stimulating the human femoral nerve.

    PubMed

    Fisher, L E; Tyler, D J; Anderson, J S; Triolo, R J

    2009-08-01

    This study describes the stability and selectivity of four-contact spiral nerve-cuff electrodes implanted bilaterally on distal branches of the femoral nerves of a human volunteer with spinal cord injury as part of a neuroprosthesis for standing and transfers. Stimulation charge threshold, the minimum charge required to elicit a visible muscle contraction, was consistent and low (mean threshold charge at 63 weeks post-implantation: 23.3 +/- 8.5 nC) for all nerve-cuff electrode contacts over 63 weeks after implantation, indicating a stable interface with the peripheral nervous system. The ability of individual nerve-cuff electrode contacts to selectively stimulate separate components of the femoral nerve to activate individual heads of the quadriceps was assessed with fine-wire intramuscular electromyography while measuring isometric twitch knee extension moment. Six of eight electrode contacts could selectively activate one head of the quadriceps while selectively excluding others to produce maximum twitch responses of between 3.8 and 8.1 N m. The relationship between isometric twitch and tetanic knee extension moment was quantified, and selective twitch muscle responses scaled to between 15 and 35 N m in tetanic response to pulse trains with similar stimulation parameters. These results suggest that this nerve-cuff electrode can be an effective and chronically stable tool for selectively stimulating distal nerve branches in the lower extremities for neuroprosthetic applications.

  13. Chronic stability and selectivity of four-contact spiral nerve-cuff electrodes in stimulating the human femoral nerve

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, L E; Tyler, D J; Anderson, J S; Triolo, R J

    2010-01-01

    This study describes the stability and selectivity of four-contact spiral nerve-cuff electrodes implanted bilaterally on distal branches of the femoral nerves of a human volunteer with spinal cord injury as part of a neuroprosthesis for standing and transfers. Stimulation charge threshold, the minimum charge required to elicit a visible muscle contraction, was consistent and low (mean threshold charge at 63 weeks post-implantation: 23.3 ± 8.5 nC) for all nerve-cuff electrode contacts over 63 weeks after implantation, indicating a stable interface with the peripheral nervous system. The ability of individual nerve-cuff electrode contacts to selectively stimulate separate components of the femoral nerve to activate individual heads of the quadriceps was assessed with fine-wire intramuscular electromyography while measuring isometric twitch knee extension moment. Six of eight electrode contacts could selectively activate one head of the quadriceps while selectively excluding others to produce maximum twitch responses of between 3.8 and 8.1 Nm. The relationship between isometric twitch and tetanic knee extension moment was quantified, and selective twitch muscle responses scaled to between 15 and 35 Nm in tetanic response to pulse trains with similar stimulation parameters. These results suggest that this nerve-cuff electrode can be an effective and chronically stable tool for selectively stimulating distal nerve branches in the lower extremities for neuroprosthetic applications. PMID:19602729

  14. Electric stimulation and decimeter wave therapy improve the recovery of injured sciatic nerves

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Feng; He, Wei; Zhang, Yingze; Tian, Dehu; Zhao, Hongfang; Yu, Kunlun; Bai, Jiangbo

    2013-01-01

    Drug treatment, electric stimulation and decimeter wave therapy have been shown to promote the repair and regeneration of the peripheral nerves at the injured site. This study prepared a Mackinnon's model of rat sciatic nerve compression. Electric stimulation was given immediately after neurolysis, and decimeter wave radiation was performed at 1 and 12 weeks post-operation. Histological observation revealed that intraoperative electric stimulation and decimeter wave therapy could improve the local blood circulation of repaired sites, alleviate hypoxia of compressed nerves, and lessen adhesion of compressed nerves, thereby decreasing the formation of new entrapments and enhancing compressed nerve regeneration through an improved microenvironment for regeneration. Immunohistochemical staining results revealed that intraoperative electric stimulation and decimeter wave could promote the expression of S-100 protein. Motor nerve conduction velocity and amplitude, the number and diameter of myelinated nerve fibers, and sciatic functional index were significantly increased in the treated rats. These results verified that intraoperative electric stimulation and decimeter wave therapy contributed to the regeneration and the recovery of the functions in the compressed nerves. PMID:25206506

  15. Laryngeal and tracheal afferent nerve stimulation evokes swallowing in anaesthetized guinea pigs

    PubMed Central

    Tsujimura, Takanori; Udemgba, Chioma; Inoue, Makoto; Canning, Brendan J

    2013-01-01

    We describe swallowing reflexes evoked by laryngeal and tracheal vagal afferent nerve stimulation in anaesthetized guinea pigs. The swallowing reflexes evoked by laryngeal citric acid challenges were abolished by recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) transection and mimicked by electrical stimulation of the central cut ends of an RLN. By contrast, the number of swallows evoked by upper airway/pharyngeal distensions was not significantly reduced by RLN transection but they were virtually abolished by superior laryngeal nerve transection. Laryngeal citric acid-evoked swallowing was mimicked by laryngeal capsaicin challenges, implicating transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1)-expressing laryngeal afferent nerves arising from the jugular ganglia. The swallowing evoked by citric acid and capsaicin and evoked by electrical stimulation of either the tracheal or the laryngeal mucosa occurred at stimulation intensities that were typically subthreshold for evoking cough in these animals. Swallowing evoked by airway afferent nerve stimulation also desensitized at a much slower rate than cough. We speculate that swallowing is an essential component of airway protection from aspiration associated with laryngeal and tracheal afferent nerve activation. PMID:23858010

  16. Sandwich technique, peripheral nerve stimulation, peripheral field stimulation and hybrid stimulation for inguinal region and genital pain.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Andrew; Sharma, Mayur; Zibly, Zion; Ikeda, Daniel; Deogaonkar, Milind

    2016-12-01

    Ilioinguinal neuralgia (IG) and genitofemoral (GF) neuralgia following inguinal hernia repair is a chronic and debilitating neuropathic condition. Recently, peripheral nerve stimulation has become an effective and minimally invasive option for the treatment of refractory pain. Here we present a retrospective case series of six patients who underwent placement of peripheral nerve stimulation electrodes using various techniques for treatment of refractory post-intervention inguinal region pain. Six patients with post-intervention inguinal, femoral or GF neuropathic pain were evaluated for surgery. Either octopolar percutaneous electrodes or combination of paddle and percutaneous electrodes were implanted in the area of their pain. Pain visual analog scores (VAS), surgical complication rate, preoperative symptom duration, degree of pain relief, preoperative and postoperative work status, postoperative changes in medication usage, and overall degree of satisfaction with this therapy was assessed. All six patients had an average improvement of 62% in the immediate post-operative follow-up. Four patients underwent stimulation for IG, one for femoral neuralgia, and another for GF neuralgia. Peripheral nerve stimulation provided at least 50% pain relief in all the six patients with post-intervention inguinal region pain. 85% of patients indicated they were completely satisfied with the therapy overall. There was one treatment failure with an acceptable complication rate. Peripheral nerve or field stimulation for post-intervention inguinal region pain is a safe and effective treatment for this refractory and complex problem for patients who have exhausted other management options.

  17. Effect of renal nerve stimulation on responsiveness of the rat renal vasculature.

    PubMed

    DiBona, Gerald F; Sawin, Linda L

    2002-11-01

    When the renal nerves are stimulated with sinusoidal stimuli over the frequency range 0.04-0.8 Hz, low (< or =0.4 Hz)- but not high (> or =0.4 Hz)-frequency oscillations appear in renal blood flow (RBF) and are proposed to increase responsiveness of the renal vasculature to stimuli. This hypothesis was tested in anesthetized rats in which RBF responses to intrarenal injection of norepinephrine and angiotensin and to reductions in renal arterial pressure (RAP) were determined during conventional rectangular pulse and sinusoidal renal nerve stimulation. Conventional rectangular pulse renal nerve stimulation decreased RBF at 2 Hz but not at 0.2 or 1.0 Hz. Sinusoidal renal nerve stimulation elicited low-frequency oscillations (< or =0.4 Hz) in RBF only when the basal carrier signal frequency produced renal vasoconstriction, i.e., at 5 Hz but not at 1 Hz. Regardless of whether renal vasoconstriction occurred, neither conventional rectangular pulse nor sinusoidal renal nerve stimulation altered renal vasoconstrictor responses to norepinephrine and angiotensin. The RBF response to reduction in RAP was altered by both conventional rectangular pulse and sinusoidal renal nerve stimulation only when renal vasoconstriction occurred: the decrease in RBF during reduced RAP was greater. Sinusoidal renal nerve stimulation with a renal vasoconstrictor carrier frequency results in a decrease in RBF with superimposed low-frequency oscillations. However, these low-frequency RBF oscillations do not alter renal vascular responsiveness to vasoconstrictor stimuli.

  18. Peripheral nerve magnetic stimulation: influence of tissue non-homogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Krasteva, Vessela TZ; Papazov, Sava P; Daskalov, Ivan K

    2003-01-01

    Background Peripheral nerves are situated in a highly non-homogeneous environment, including muscles, bones, blood vessels, etc. Time-varying magnetic field stimulation of the median and ulnar nerves in the carpal region is studied, with special consideration of the influence of non-homogeneities. Methods A detailed three-dimensional finite element model (FEM) of the anatomy of the wrist region was built to assess the induced currents distribution by external magnetic stimulation. The electromagnetic field distribution in the non-homogeneous domain was defined as an internal Dirichlet problem using the finite element method. The boundary conditions were obtained by analysis of the vector potential field excited by external current-driven coils. Results The results include evaluation and graphical representation of the induced current field distribution at various stimulation coil positions. Comparative study for the real non-homogeneous structure with anisotropic conductivities of the tissues and a mock homogeneous media is also presented. The possibility of achieving selective stimulation of either of the two nerves is assessed. Conclusion The model developed could be useful in theoretical prediction of the current distribution in the nerves during diagnostic stimulation and therapeutic procedures involving electromagnetic excitation. The errors in applying homogeneous domain modeling rather than real non-homogeneous biological structures are demonstrated. The practical implications of the applied approach are valid for any arbitrary weakly conductive medium. PMID:14693034

  19. Non-invasive peripheral nerve stimulation via focused ultrasound in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downs, Matthew E.; Lee, Stephen A.; Yang, Georgiana; Kim, Seaok; Wang, Qi; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2018-02-01

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) has been employed on a wide range of clinical applications to safely and non-invasively achieve desired effects that have previously required invasive and lengthy procedures with conventional methods. Conventional electrical neuromodulation therapies that are applied to the peripheral nervous system (PNS) are invasive and/or non-specific. Recently, focused ultrasound has demonstrated the ability to modulate the central nervous system and ex vivo peripheral neurons. Here, for the first time, noninvasive stimulation of the sciatic nerve eliciting a physiological response in vivo is demonstrated with FUS. FUS was applied on the sciatic nerve in mice with simultaneous electromyography (EMG) on the tibialis anterior muscle. EMG signals were detected during or directly after ultrasound stimulation along with observable muscle contraction of the hind limb. Transecting the sciatic nerve downstream of FUS stimulation eliminated EMG activity during FUS stimulation. Peak-to-peak EMG response amplitudes and latency were found to be comparable to conventional electrical stimulation methods. Histology along with behavioral and thermal testing did not indicate damage to the nerve or surrounding regions. The findings presented herein demonstrate that FUS can serve as a targeted, safe and non-invasive alternative to conventional peripheral nervous system stimulation to treat peripheral neuropathic diseases in the clinic.

  20. Vagal nerve stimulator: Evolving trends

    PubMed Central

    Ogbonnaya, Sunny; Kaliaperumal, Chandrasekaran

    2013-01-01

    Over three decades ago, it was found that intermittent electrical stimulation from the vagus nerve produces inhibition of neural processes, which can alter brain activity and terminate seizures. This paved way for the concept of vagal nerve stimulator (VNS). We describe the evolution of the VNS and its use in different fields of medicine. We also review the literature focusing on the mechanism of action of VNS producing desired effects in different conditions. PUBMED and EMBASE search was performed for ‘VNS’ and its use in refractory seizure management, depression, obesity, memory, and neurogenesis. VNS has been in vogue over for the past three decades and has proven to reduce the intensity and frequency of seizure by 50% in the management of refractory seizures. Apart from this, VNS has been shown to promote neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus of rat hippocampus after 48 hours of stimulation of the vagus nerve. Improvement has also been observed in non-psychotic major depression from a randomized trial conducted 7 years ago. The same concept has been utilized to alter behavior and cognition in rodents, and good improvement has been observed. Recent studies have proven that VNS is effective in obesity management in patients with depression. Several hypotheses have been postulated for the mechanism of action of VNS contributing to its success. VNS has gained significant popularity with promising results in epilepsy surgery and treatment-resistant depression. The spectrum of its use has also extended to other fields of medicine including obesity, memory, and neurogenesis, and there is still a viable scope for its utility in the future. PMID:23633829

  1. Vagus nerve stimulation for the treatment of depression and other neuropsychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    George, Mark S; Nahas, Ziad; Borckardt, Jeffrey J; Anderson, Berry; Burns, Carol; Kose, Samet; Short, E Baron

    2007-01-01

    Vagus nerve stimulation is an interesting new approach to treating neuropsychiatric diseases within the class of brain-stimulation devices sometimes labeled 'neuromodulators'. With vagus nerve stimulation, a battery-powered generator implanted in the chest wall connects to a wire wrapped around the vagus nerve in the neck, and sends intermittent pulses of electricity along the nerve directly into the brain. This mechanism takes advantage of the natural role of the vagus nerve in conveying information into the brain concerning homeostatic information (e.g., hunger, chest pain and respirations). Vagus nerve stimulation therapy is US FDA approved for the adjunctive treatment of epilepsy and has recently been FDA approved for the treatment of medication-resistant depression. Owing to its novel route into the brain, it has no drug-drug interactions or systemic side effects. This treatment also appears to have high long-term tolerability in patients, with low rates of patients relapsing on vagus nerve stimulation or becoming tolerant. However, alongside the excitement and enthusiasm for this new treatment, a lack of Class I evidence of efficacy in treating depression is currently slowing down adoption by psychiatrists. Much more research is needed regarding exactly how to refine and deliver the electrical pulses and how this differentially affects brain function in health and disease.

  2. Transdermal optogenetic peripheral nerve stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maimon, Benjamin E.; Zorzos, Anthony N.; Bendell, Rhys; Harding, Alexander; Fahmi, Mina; Srinivasan, Shriya; Calvaresi, Peter; Herr, Hugh M.

    2017-06-01

    Objective: A fundamental limitation in both the scientific utility and clinical translation of peripheral nerve optogenetic technologies is the optical inaccessibility of the target nerve due to the significant scattering and absorption of light in biological tissues. To date, illuminating deep nerve targets has required implantable optical sources, including fiber-optic and LED-based systems, both of which have significant drawbacks. Approach: Here we report an alternative approach involving transdermal illumination. Utilizing an intramuscular injection of ultra-high concentration AAV6-hSyn-ChR2-EYFP in rats. Main results: We demonstrate transdermal stimulation of motor nerves at 4.4 mm and 1.9 mm depth with an incident laser power of 160 mW and 10 mW, respectively. Furthermore, we employ this technique to accurately control ankle position by modulating laser power or position on the skin surface. Significance: These results have the potential to enable future scientific optogenetic studies of pathologies implicated in the peripheral nervous system for awake, freely-moving animals, as well as a basis for future clinical studies.

  3. Flexible multichannel vagus nerve electrode for stimulation and recording for heart failure treatment.

    PubMed

    Xue, Ning; Martinez, Ignacio Delgado; Sun, Jianhai; Cheng, Yuhua; Liu, Chunxiu

    2018-07-30

    Vagus nerve stimulation is an emerging bioelectronic medicine to modulate cardiac function, as the nerve provides parasympathetic innervation to the heart. In this study, we developed a polyimide based 2D cuff electrode to wrap around on the vagus nerve. Thanks to the tiny size and bendable protruding structure of the contact tips of the device, the electrode sites are able to flexibly bend to touch the nerve, selectively record and stimulate the vagus nerve. Gold, platinum and platinum black materials were chosen to compose the electrodes for nerve stimulation and recording, respectively. Since the platinum black has ~30 times larger charge delivery capacity (CDC) than gold, Pt black electrode is used for nerve stimulation. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry measurement of the three materials were conducted in vitro, revealing the results of 405 kΩ, 41 kΩ, 10.5 kΩ, @1 kHz and 0.81 mC/cm 2 , 4.26 mC/cm 2 , 25.5 mC/cm 2 , respectively (n = 3). The cuff electrodes were implanted into the right-sided vagus nerve of rats for in vivo experiment. Biphasic current configuration was implemented for nerve stimulation with frequency of 10 Hz, pulse during of 300 μs and various currents stimulus. The result shows the heart beat frequency drops up to 36% during the stimulation and was able to return the regular frequency as stimulation was removed. Subsequently, the vagus nerve signals were recorded with the four channel cuff electrodes. The magnitude of the compound nerve action potentials (CNAPs) is ~10 μV and the signal to noise ratio (SNR) is ~20. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. 21 CFR 868.2775 - Electrical peripheral nerve stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... a device used to apply an electrical current to a patient to test the level of pharmacological... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Electrical peripheral nerve stimulator. 868.2775... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2775 Electrical peripheral nerve...

  5. 21 CFR 868.2775 - Electrical peripheral nerve stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... a device used to apply an electrical current to a patient to test the level of pharmacological... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Electrical peripheral nerve stimulator. 868.2775... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2775 Electrical peripheral nerve...

  6. Airway compromise secondary to vagus nerve stimulator: case report and implications for otolaryngologists.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Y M; Hans, P S; Belloso, A

    2010-05-01

    Vagus nerve stimulators are devices used in the management of patients with drug-refractory epilepsy unsuitable for resective or disconnective surgery. Implanted usually by neurosurgeons, these devices are infrequently encountered by otolaryngologists. Despite significant anti-seizure efficacy, side effects related to laryngopharyngeal stimulation are not uncommon. A 28-year-old man with a history of effective vagus nerve stimulator use presented with a cluster of seizures and respiratory distress associated with intermittent stridor. The duration of stridor corresponded to the period of vagus nerve stimulation. Endoscopy revealed forced adduction of the left vocal fold against a medialised right vocal fold. The device was switched off and the stridor immediately resolved. Airway compromise is an under-recognised side effect of vagus nerve stimulation. We describe the first known case of stridor and contralateral vocal fold palsy in a vagus nerve stimulator user. We highlight the need for better understanding amongst otolaryngologists of the laryngopharyngeal side effects of this technology.

  7. Evaluation of phrenic nerve and diaphragm function with peripheral nerve stimulation and M-mode ultrasonography in potential pediatric phrenic nerve or diaphragm pacing candidates.

    PubMed

    Skalsky, Andrew J; Lesser, Daniel J; McDonald, Craig M

    2015-02-01

    Assessing phrenic nerve function in the setting of diaphragmatic paralysis in diaphragm pacing candidates can be challenging. Traditional imaging modalities and electrodiagnostic evaluations are technically difficult. Either modality alone is not a direct measure of the function of the phrenic nerve and diaphragm unit. In this article, the authors present their method for evaluating phrenic nerve function and the resulting diaphragm function. Stimulating the phrenic nerve with transcutaneous stimulation and directly observing the resulting movement of the hemidiaphragm with M-mode ultrasonography provides quantitative data for predicting the success of advancing technologies such as phrenic nerve pacing and diaphragm pacing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Near-infrared signals associated with electrical stimulation of peripheral nerves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fantini, Sergio; Chen, Debbie K.; Martin, Jeffrey M.; Sassaroli, Angelo; Bergethon, Peter R.

    2009-02-01

    We report our studies on the optical signals measured non-invasively on electrically stimulated peripheral nerves. The stimulation consists of the delivery of 0.1 ms current pulses, below the threshold for triggering any visible motion, to a peripheral nerve in human subjects (we have studied the sural nerve and the median nerve). In response to electrical stimulation, we observe an optical signal that peaks at about 100 ms post-stimulus, on a much longer time scale than the few milliseconds duration of the electrical response, or sensory nerve action potential (SNAP). While the 100 ms optical signal we measured is not a direct optical signature of neural activation, it is nevertheless indicative of a mediated response to neural activation. We argue that this may provide information useful for understanding the origin of the fast optical signal (also on a 100 ms time scale) that has been measured non-invasively in the brain in response to cerebral activation. Furthermore, the optical response to peripheral nerve activation may be developed into a diagnostic tool for peripheral neuropathies, as suggested by the delayed optical signals (average peak time: 230 ms) measured in patients with diabetic neuropathy with respect to normal subjects (average peak time: 160 ms).

  9. Transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation (tVNS) enhances divergent thinking.

    PubMed

    Colzato, Lorenza S; Ritter, Simone M; Steenbergen, Laura

    2018-03-01

    Creativity is one of the most important cognitive skills in our complex and fast-changing world. Previous correlative evidence showed that gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is involved in divergent but not convergent thinking. In the current study, a placebo/sham-controlled, randomized between-group design was used to test a causal relation between vagus nerve and creativity. We employed transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation (tVNS), a novel non-invasive brain stimulation technique to stimulate afferent fibers of the vagus nerve and speculated to increase GABA levels, in 80 healthy young volunteers. Creative performance was assessed in terms of divergent thinking (Alternate Uses Task) and convergent thinking tasks (Remote Associates Test, Creative Problem Solving Task, Idea Selection Task). Results demonstrate active tVNS, compared to sham stimulation, enhanced divergent thinking. Bayesian analysis reported the data to be inconclusive regarding a possible effect of tVNS on convergent thinking. Therefore, our findings corroborate the idea that the vagus nerve is causally involved in creative performance. Even thought we did not directly measure GABA levels, our results suggest that GABA (likely to be increased in active tVNS condition) supports the ability to select among competing options in high selection demand (divergent thinking) but not in low selection demand (convergent thinking). Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. Patterning of sympathetic nerve activity in response to vestibular stimulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerman, I. A.; McAllen, R. M.; Yates, B. J.

    2000-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests a role for the vestibular system in regulation of autonomic outflow during postural adjustments. In the present paper we review evidence for the patterning of sympathetic nerve activity elicited by vestibular stimulation. In response to electrical activation of vestibular afferents, firing of sympathetic nerves located throughout the body is altered. However, activity of the renal nerve is most sensitive to vestibular inputs. In contrast, high-intensity simultaneous activation of cutaneous and muscle inputs elicits equivalent changes in firing of the renal, superior mesenteric and lumbar colonic nerves. Responses of muscle vasoconstrictor (MVC) efferents to vestibular stimulation are either inhibitory (Type I) or are comprised of a combination of excitation and inhibition (Type II). Interestingly, single MVC units located in the hindlimb exhibited predominantly Type I responses while those located in the forelimb and face exhibited Type II responses. Furthermore, brachial and femoral arterial blood flows were dissociated in response to vestibular stimulation, such that brachial vascular resistance increased while femoral resistance decreased. These studies demonstrate that vestibulosympathetic reflexes are patterned according to both the anatomical location and innervation target of a particular sympathetic nerve, and can lead to distinct changes in local blood flow.

  11. "Long-term stability of stimulating spiral nerve cuff electrodes on human peripheral nerves".

    PubMed

    Christie, Breanne P; Freeberg, Max; Memberg, William D; Pinault, Gilles J C; Hoyen, Harry A; Tyler, Dustin J; Triolo, Ronald J

    2017-07-11

    Electrical stimulation of the peripheral nerves has been shown to be effective in restoring sensory and motor functions in the lower and upper extremities. This neural stimulation can be applied via non-penetrating spiral nerve cuff electrodes, though minimal information has been published regarding their long-term performance for multiple years after implantation. Since 2005, 14 human volunteers with cervical or thoracic spinal cord injuries, or upper limb amputation, were chronically implanted with a total of 50 spiral nerve cuff electrodes on 10 different nerves (mean time post-implant 6.7 ± 3.1 years). The primary outcome measures utilized in this study were muscle recruitment curves, charge thresholds, and percent overlap of recruited motor unit populations. In the eight recipients still actively involved in research studies, 44/45 of the spiral contacts were still functional. In four participants regularly studied over the course of 1 month to 10.4 years, the charge thresholds of the majority of individual contacts remained stable over time. The four participants with spiral cuffs on their femoral nerves were all able to generate sufficient moment to keep the knees locked during standing after 2-4.5 years. The dorsiflexion moment produced by all four fibular nerve cuffs in the active participants exceeded the value required to prevent foot drop, but no tibial nerve cuffs were able to meet the plantarflexion moment that occurs during push-off at a normal walking speed. The selectivity of two multi-contact spiral cuffs was examined and both were still highly selective for different motor unit populations for up to 6.3 years after implantation. The spiral nerve cuffs examined remain functional in motor and sensory neuroprostheses for 2-11 years after implantation. They exhibit stable charge thresholds, clinically relevant recruitment properties, and functional muscle selectivity. Non-penetrating spiral nerve cuff electrodes appear to be a suitable option

  12. Dilation of the oropharynx via selective stimulation of the hypoglossal nerve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jingtao; Sahin, Mesut; Durand, Dominique M.

    2005-12-01

    The functional effects of selective hypoglossal nerve (HG) stimulation with a multi-contact peripheral nerve electrode were assessed using images of the upper airways and the tongue in anesthetized beagles. A biphasic pulse train of 50 Hz frequency and 2 s duration was applied through each one of the tripolar contact sets of the nerve electrode while the pharyngeal images were acquired into a computer. The stimulation current was limited to 20% above the activation threshold for maximum selectivity. The images showed that various contact sets could generate several different activation patterns of the tongue muscles resulting in medial and/or lateral dilation and closing of the airways at the tongue root. Some of these patterns translated into an increase in the oropharyngeal size while others did not have any effect. The pharyngeal sizes were not statistically different during stimulation either between the two different positions of the head (30° and 60°), or when the lateral contacts were compared with the medial ones. The contacts that had the least effect generated an average of 53 ± 15% pharyngeal dilation relative to the best contacts, indicating that the results are marginally sensitive to the contact position around the HG nerve trunk. These results suggest that selective HG nerve stimulation can be a useful technique to produce multiple tongue activation patterns that can dilate the pharynx. This may in turn increase the size of the patient population who can benefit from HG nerve stimulation as a treatment method for obstructive sleep apnea.

  13. Nerve Fiber Activation During Peripheral Nerve Field Stimulation: Importance of Electrode Orientation and Estimation of Area of Paresthesia.

    PubMed

    Frahm, Ken Steffen; Hennings, Kristian; Vera-Portocarrero, Louis; Wacnik, Paul W; Mørch, Carsten Dahl

    2016-04-01

    Low back pain is one of the indications for using peripheral nerve field stimulation (PNFS). However, the effect of PNFS varies between patients; several stimulation parameters have not been investigated in depth, such as orientation of the nerve fiber in relation to the electrode. While placing the electrode parallel to the nerve fiber may give lower activation thresholds, anodal blocking may occur when the propagating action potential passes an anode. A finite element model was used to simulate the extracellular potential during PNFS. This was combined with an active cable model of Aβ and Aδ nerve fibers. It was investigated how the angle between the nerve fiber and electrode affected the nerve activation and whether anodal blocking could occur. Finally, the area of paresthesia was estimated and compared with any concomitant Aδ fiber activation. The lowest threshold was found when nerve and electrode were in parallel, and that anodal blocking did not appear to occur during PNFS. The activation of Aβ fibers was within therapeutic range (<10V) of PNFS; however, within this range, Aδ fiber activation also may occur. The combined area of activated Aβ fibers (paresthesia) was at least two times larger than Aδ fibers for similar stimulation intensities. No evidence of anodal blocking was observed in this PNFS model. The thresholds were lowest when the nerves and electrodes were parallel; thus, it may be relevant to investigate the overall position of the target nerve fibers prior to electrode placement. © 2015 International Neuromodulation Society.

  14. Regenerated Sciatic Nerve Axons Stimulated through a Chronically Implanted Macro-Sieve Electrode.

    PubMed

    MacEwan, Matthew R; Zellmer, Erik R; Wheeler, Jesse J; Burton, Harold; Moran, Daniel W

    2016-01-01

    Sieve electrodes provide a chronic interface for stimulating peripheral nerve axons. Yet, successful utilization requires robust axonal regeneration through the implanted electrode. The present study determined the effect of large transit zones in enhancing axonal regeneration and revealed an intimate neural interface with an implanted sieve electrode. Fabrication of the polyimide sieve electrodes employed sacrificial photolithography. The manufactured macro-sieve electrode (MSE) contained nine large transit zones with areas of ~0.285 mm 2 surrounded by eight Pt-Ir metallized electrode sites. Prior to implantation, saline, or glial derived neurotropic factor (GDNF) was injected into nerve guidance silicone-conduits with or without a MSE. The MSE assembly or a nerve guidance conduit was implanted between transected ends of the sciatic nerve in adult male Lewis rats. At 3 months post-operation, fiber counts were similar through both implant types. Likewise, stimulation of nerves regenerated through a MSE or an open silicone conduit evoked comparable muscle forces. These results showed that nerve regeneration was comparable through MSE transit zones and an open conduit. GDNF had a minimal positive effect on the quality and morphology of fibers regenerating through the MSE; thus, the MSE may reduce reliance on GDNF to augment axonal regeneration. Selective stimulation of several individual muscles was achieved through monopolar stimulation of individual electrodes sites suggesting that the MSE might be an optimal platform for functional neuromuscular stimulation.

  15. Regenerated Sciatic Nerve Axons Stimulated through a Chronically Implanted Macro-Sieve Electrode

    PubMed Central

    MacEwan, Matthew R.; Zellmer, Erik R.; Wheeler, Jesse J.; Burton, Harold; Moran, Daniel W.

    2016-01-01

    Sieve electrodes provide a chronic interface for stimulating peripheral nerve axons. Yet, successful utilization requires robust axonal regeneration through the implanted electrode. The present study determined the effect of large transit zones in enhancing axonal regeneration and revealed an intimate neural interface with an implanted sieve electrode. Fabrication of the polyimide sieve electrodes employed sacrificial photolithography. The manufactured macro-sieve electrode (MSE) contained nine large transit zones with areas of ~0.285 mm2 surrounded by eight Pt-Ir metallized electrode sites. Prior to implantation, saline, or glial derived neurotropic factor (GDNF) was injected into nerve guidance silicone-conduits with or without a MSE. The MSE assembly or a nerve guidance conduit was implanted between transected ends of the sciatic nerve in adult male Lewis rats. At 3 months post-operation, fiber counts were similar through both implant types. Likewise, stimulation of nerves regenerated through a MSE or an open silicone conduit evoked comparable muscle forces. These results showed that nerve regeneration was comparable through MSE transit zones and an open conduit. GDNF had a minimal positive effect on the quality and morphology of fibers regenerating through the MSE; thus, the MSE may reduce reliance on GDNF to augment axonal regeneration. Selective stimulation of several individual muscles was achieved through monopolar stimulation of individual electrodes sites suggesting that the MSE might be an optimal platform for functional neuromuscular stimulation. PMID:28008303

  16. Changes in the frequency of swallowing during electrical stimulation of superior laryngeal nerve in rats.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Kojun; Tsujimura, Takanori; Magara, Jin; Sakai, Shogo; Nakamura, Yuki; Inoue, Makoto

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the adaptation of the swallowing reflex in terms of reduced swallowing reflex initiation following continuous superior laryngeal nerve stimulation. Forty-four male Sprague Dawley rats were anesthetized with urethane. To identify swallowing, electromyographic activity of the left mylohyoid and thyrohyoid muscles was recorded. To evoke the swallowing response, the superior laryngeal nerve (SLN), recurrent laryngeal nerve, or cortical swallowing area was electrically stimulated. Repetitive swallowing evoked by continuous SLN stimulation was gradually reduced, and this reduction was dependent on the resting time duration between stimulations. Prior SLN stimulation also suppressed subsequent swallowing initiation. The reduction in evoked swallows induced by recurrent laryngeal nerve or cortical swallowing area stimulation was less than that following superior laryngeal nerve stimulation. Decerebration had no effect on the reduction in evoked swallows. Prior subthreshold stimulation reduced subsequent initiation of swallowing, suggesting that there was no relationship between swallowing movement evoked by prior stimulation and the subsequent reduction in swallowing initiation. Overall, these data suggest that reduced sensory afferent nerve firing and/or trans-synaptic responses, as well as part of the brainstem central pattern generator, are involved in adaptation of the swallowing reflex following continuous stimulation of swallow-inducing peripheral nerves and cortical areas. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Preliminary results of sacral transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation for fecal incontinence.

    PubMed

    Leung, Edmund; Francombe, James

    2013-03-01

    Fecal incontinence is a common debilitating condition. The aim of this study is to investigate the feasibility of sacral transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation as an alternative treatment modality for fecal incontinence. All consecutive patients who presented with fecal incontinence to the senior author's clinic were prospectively recruited between June 2009 and September 2010. The severity of their fecal incontinence was assessed by the Wexner and Vaizey scores and anal physiology. Any improvement following a period of sacral transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation treatment was determined by repeating the scores. In addition, patient satisfaction with the procedure was assessed by using a patient impression score. Twenty female patients with a median age of 57.5 years (range, 30-86) were evaluated. The median follow-up was 10 months (range, 5-12 months). Two patients did not record a change in their Vaizey score. The overall mean Wexner score was 7.9 ± 4.2 before in comparison with 4.0 ± 3.1 after sacral transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation treatment (p < 0.0001, CI = 2.2-5.7, SE = 0.832). The overall mean Vaizey score was 12.7 ± 5.7 before in comparison with 5.8 ± 5.6 after sacral transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation treatment (p < 0.0001, CI = 4.5-9.4, SE = 1.162). The pretreatment patient impression score was set at a mean of 1 ± 0 in comparison with 2.8 ± 1.1 after sacral transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation treatment (p < 0.0001, CI = 1.2-2.3, SE = 0.25). The preliminary results suggest sacral transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation is a promising noninvasive alternative to existing modalities in the treatment of idiopathic fecal incontinence.

  18. Presacral abscess as a rare complication of sacral nerve stimulator implantation.

    PubMed

    Gumber, A; Ayyar, S; Varia, H; Pettit, S

    2017-03-01

    A 50-year-old man with intractable anal pain attributed to proctalgia fugax underwent insertion of a sacral nerve stimulator via the right S3 vertebral foramen for pain control with good symptomatic relief. Thirteen months later, he presented with signs of sepsis. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a large presacral abscess. MRI demonstrated increased enhancement along the pathway of the stimulator electrode, indicating that the abscess was caused by infection introduced at the time of sacral nerve stimulator placement. The patient was treated with broad spectrum antibiotics, and the sacral nerve stimulator and electrode were removed. Attempts were made to drain the abscess transrectally using minimally invasive techniques but these were unsuccessful and CT guided transperineal drainage was then performed. Despite this, the presacral abscess progressed, developing enlarging gas locules and extending to the pelvic brim to involve the aortic bifurcation, causing hydronephrosis and radiological signs of impending sacral osteomyelitis. MRI showed communication between the rectum and abscess resulting from transrectal drainage. In view of the progressive presacral sepsis, a laparotomy was performed with drainage of the abscess, closure of the upper rectum and formation of a defunctioning end sigmoid colostomy. Following this, the presacral infection resolved. Presacral abscess formation secondary to an infected sacral nerve stimulator electrode has not been reported previously. Our experience suggests that in a similar situation, the optimal management is to perform laparotomy with drainage of the presacral abscess together with simultaneous removal of the sacral nerve stimulator and electrode.

  19. Presacral abscess as a rare complication of sacral nerve stimulator implantation

    PubMed Central

    Gumber, A; Ayyar, S; Varia, H

    2017-01-01

    A 50-year-old man with intractable anal pain attributed to proctalgia fugax underwent insertion of a sacral nerve stimulator via the right S3 vertebral foramen for pain control with good symptomatic relief. Thirteen months later, he presented with signs of sepsis. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a large presacral abscess. MRI demonstrated increased enhancement along the pathway of the stimulator electrode, indicating that the abscess was caused by infection introduced at the time of sacral nerve stimulator placement. The patient was treated with broad spectrum antibiotics, and the sacral nerve stimulator and electrode were removed. Attempts were made to drain the abscess transrectally using minimally invasive techniques but these were unsuccessful and CT guided transperineal drainage was then performed. Despite this, the presacral abscess progressed, developing enlarging gas locules and extending to the pelvic brim to involve the aortic bifurcation, causing hydronephrosis and radiological signs of impending sacral osteomyelitis. MRI showed communication between the rectum and abscess resulting from transrectal drainage. In view of the progressive presacral sepsis, a laparotomy was performed with drainage of the abscess, closure of the upper rectum and formation of a defunctioning end sigmoid colostomy. Following this, the presacral infection resolved. Presacral abscess formation secondary to an infected sacral nerve stimulator electrode has not been reported previously. Our experience suggests that in a similar situation, the optimal management is to perform laparotomy with drainage of the presacral abscess together with simultaneous removal of the sacral nerve stimulator and electrode. PMID:28071947

  20. Patterned sensory nerve stimulation enhances the reactivity of spinal Ia inhibitory interneurons.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Shinji; Hirano, Masato; Morishita, Takuya; Uehara, Kazumasa; Funase, Kozo

    2015-03-25

    Patterned sensory nerve stimulation has been shown to induce plastic changes in the reciprocal Ia inhibitory circuit. However, the mechanisms underlying these changes have not yet been elucidated in detail. The aim of the present study was to determine whether the reactivity of Ia inhibitory interneurons could be altered by patterned sensory nerve stimulation. The degree of reciprocal Ia inhibition, the conditioning effects of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) on the soleus (SOL) muscle H-reflex, and the ratio of the maximum H-reflex amplitude versus maximum M-wave (H(max)/M(max)) were examined in 10 healthy individuals. Patterned electrical nerve stimulation was applied to the common peroneal nerve every 1 s (100 Hz-5 train) at the motor threshold intensity of tibialis anterior muscle to induce activity changes in the reciprocal Ia inhibitory circuit. Reciprocal Ia inhibition, the TMS-conditioned H-reflex amplitude, and H(max)/M(max) were recorded before, immediately after, and 15 min after the electrical stimulation. The patterned electrical nerve stimulation significantly increased the degree of reciprocal Ia inhibition and decreased the amplitude of the TMS-conditioned H-reflex in the short-latency inhibition phase, which was presumably mediated by Ia inhibitory interneurons. However, it had no effect on H(max)/M(max). Our results indicated that patterned sensory nerve stimulation could modulate the activity of Ia inhibitory interneurons, and this change may have been caused by the synaptic modification of Ia inhibitory interneuron terminals. These results may lead to a clearer understanding of the spinal cord synaptic plasticity produced by repetitive sensory inputs. Copyright © 2015 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Vagus Nerve Stimulation Delivered During Motor Rehabilitation Improves Recovery in a Rat Model of Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Khodaparast, Navid; Hays, Seth A.; Sloan, Andrew M.; Fayyaz, Tabbassum; Hulsey, Daniel R.; Rennaker, Robert L.; Kilgard, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    Neural plasticity is widely believed to support functional recovery following brain damage. Vagus nerve stimulation paired with different forelimb movements causes long-lasting map plasticity in rat primary motor cortex that is specific to the paired movement. We tested the hypothesis that repeatedly pairing vagus nerve stimulation with upper forelimb movements would improve recovery of motor function in a rat model of stroke. Rats were separated into three groups: vagus nerve stimulation during rehab, vagus nerve stimulation after rehab, and rehab alone. Animals underwent 4 training stages: shaping (motor skill learning), pre-lesion training, post-lesion training, and therapeutic training. Rats were given a unilateral ischemic lesion within motor cortex and implanted with a left vagus nerve cuff. Animals were allowed one week of recovery before post-lesion baseline training. During the therapeutic training stage, rats received vagus nerve stimulation paired with each successful trial. All seventeen trained rats demonstrated significant contralateral forelimb impairment when performing a bradykinesia assessment task. Forelimb function was recovered completely to pre-lesion levels when vagus nerve stimulation was delivered during rehab training. Alternatively, intensive rehab training alone (without stimulation) failed to restore function to pre-lesion levels. Delivering the same amount of stimulation after rehab training did not yield improvements compared to rehab alone. These results demonstrate that vagus nerve stimulation repeatedly paired with successful forelimb movements can improve recovery after motor cortex ischemia and may be a viable option for stroke rehabilitation. PMID:24553102

  2. Electrical stimulation accelerates motor functional recovery in autograft-repaired 10 mm femoral nerve gap in rats.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jinghui; Hu, Xueyu; Lu, Lei; Ye, Zhengxu; Wang, Yuqing; Luo, Zhuojing

    2009-10-01

    Electrical stimulation has been shown to enhance peripheral nerve regeneration after nerve injury. However, the impact of electrical stimulation on motor functional recovery after nerve injuries, especially over long nerve gap lesions, has not been investigated in a comprehensive manner. In the present study, we aimed to determine whether electrical stimulation (1 h, 20 Hz) is beneficial for motor functional recovery after a 10 mm femoral nerve gap lesion in rats. The proximal nerve stump was electrically stimulated for 1 h at 20 Hz frequency prior to nerve repair with an autologous graft. The rate of motor functional recovery was evaluated by single frame motion analysis and electrophysiological studies, and the nerve regeneration was investigated by double labeling and histological analysis. We found that brief electrical stimulation significantly accelerated motor functional recovery and nerve regeneration. Although the final outcome, both in functional terms and morphological terms, was not improved by electrical stimulation, the observed acceleration of functional recovery and axon regeneration may be of therapeutic importance in clinical setting.

  3. Sacral nerve stimulation can be an effective treatment for low anterior resection syndrome.

    PubMed

    Eftaiha, S M; Balachandran, B; Marecik, S J; Mellgren, A; Nordenstam, J; Melich, G; Prasad, L M; Park, J J

    2017-10-01

    Sacral nerve stimulation has become a preferred method for the treatment of faecal incontinence in patients who fail conservative (non-operative) therapy. In previous small studies, sacral nerve stimulation has demonstrated improvement of faecal incontinence and quality of life in a majority of patients with low anterior resection syndrome. We evaluated the efficacy of sacral nerve stimulation in the treatment of low anterior resection syndrome using a recently developed and validated low anterior resection syndrome instrument to quantify symptoms. A retrospective review of consecutive patients undergoing sacral nerve stimulation for the treatment of low anterior resection syndrome was performed. Procedures took place in the Division of Colon and Rectal Surgery at two academic tertiary medical centres. Pre- and post-treatment Cleveland Clinic Incontinence Scores and Low Anterior Resection Syndrome scores were assessed. Twelve patients (50% men) suffering from low anterior resection syndrome with a mean age of 67.8 (±10.8) years underwent sacral nerve test stimulation. Ten patients (83%) proceeded to permanent implantation. Median time from anterior resection to stimulator implant was 16 (range 5-108) months. At a median follow-up of 19.5 (range 4-42) months, there were significant improvements in Cleveland Clinic Incontinence Scores and Low Anterior Resection Syndrome scores (P < 0.001). Sacral nerve stimulation improved symptoms in patients suffering from low anterior resection syndrome and may therefore be a viable treatment option. Colorectal Disease © 2017 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  4. An Implantable Neuroprosthetic Device to Normalize Bladder Function after SCI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    Billington, K.S. Tweden, R.R. Wilson, F.G. Moody, “Selection of electrical algorithms to treat obesity with intermittent vagal block using an...C.J., Tweden, K.S., Wilson, R.R., Moody, F.G. (2009). Selection of electrical algorithms to treat obesity with intermittent vagal block using an...only one cuff electrode was implanted on the left pudendal nerve. Therefore, voiding induced by intermittent stimulation was tested but pudendal

  5. Electrical pelvic floor stimulation in the management of urinary incontinence due to neuropathic overactive bladder.

    PubMed

    Ishigooka, M; Hashimoto, T; Izumiya, K; Katoh, T; Yaguchi, H; Nakada, T; Handa, Y; Hoshimiya, N

    1993-01-01

    Electrical pelvic floor stimulation employing a portable functional electrical stimulation system with percutaneously indwelling electrodes was carried out to improve detrusor urinary incontinence. Cyclic stimulation using negative going pulse trains of 20 Hz was applied 3 to 6 times daily to the bilateral pudendal nerves distributing to the pelvic floor muscles for the purpose of strengthening these muscles, including the urethral sphincter, and simultaneously, suppressing detrusor overactivity and increasing cystometric capacity. Electrical training for 4-8 weeks resulted in an improvement of urinary incontinence in five of six patients. In two of six cases incontinence had subjectively disappeared. Urodynamic investigations demonstrated an increase in detrusor reflex threshold and less tendency for abortive detrusor contraction. No apparent complications were encountered during these periods. This procedure appears to be efficient for the management of patients with detrusor incontinence who respond poorly to conservative therapies.

  6. Infrared neural stimulation of human spinal nerve roots in vivo.

    PubMed

    Cayce, Jonathan M; Wells, Jonathon D; Malphrus, Jonathan D; Kao, Chris; Thomsen, Sharon; Tulipan, Noel B; Konrad, Peter E; Jansen, E Duco; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita

    2015-01-01

    Infrared neural stimulation (INS) is a neurostimulation modality that uses pulsed infrared light to evoke artifact-free, spatially precise neural activity with a noncontact interface; however, the technique has not been demonstrated in humans. The objective of this study is to demonstrate the safety and efficacy of INS in humans in vivo. The feasibility of INS in humans was assessed in patients ([Formula: see text]) undergoing selective dorsal root rhizotomy, where hyperactive dorsal roots, identified for transection, were stimulated in vivo with INS on two to three sites per nerve with electromyogram recordings acquired throughout the stimulation. The stimulated dorsal root was removed and histology was performed to determine thermal damage thresholds of INS. Threshold activation of human dorsal rootlets occurred in 63% of nerves for radiant exposures between 0.53 and [Formula: see text]. In all cases, only one or two monitored muscle groups were activated from INS stimulation of a hyperactive spinal root identified by electrical stimulation. Thermal damage was first noted at [Formula: see text] and a [Formula: see text] safety ratio was identified. These findings demonstrate the success of INS as a fresh approach for activating human nerves in vivo and providing the necessary safety data needed to pursue clinically driven therapeutic and diagnostic applications of INS in humans.

  7. Cutaneous electrical stimulation treatment in unresolved facial nerve paralysis: an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Hyvärinen, Antti; Tarkka, Ina M; Mervaala, Esa; Pääkkönen, Ari; Valtonen, Hannu; Nuutinen, Juhani

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess clinical and neurophysiological changes after 6 mos of transcutaneous electrical stimulation in patients with unresolved facial nerve paralysis. A pilot case series of 10 consecutive patients with chronic facial nerve paralysis either of idiopathic origin or because of herpes zoster oticus participated in this open study. All patients received below sensory threshold transcutaneous electrical stimulation for 6 mos for their facial nerve paralysis. The intervention consisted of gradually increasing the duration of electrical stimulation of three sites on the affected area for up to 6 hrs/day. Assessments of the facial nerve function were performed using the House-Brackmann clinical scale and neurophysiological measurements of compound motor action potential distal latencies on the affected and nonaffected sides. Patients were tested before and after the intervention. A significant improvement was observed in the facial nerve upper branch compound motor action potential distal latency on the affected side in all patients. An improvement of one grade in House-Brackmann scale was observed and some patients also reported subjective improvement. Transcutaneous electrical stimulation treatment may have a positive effect on unresolved facial nerve paralysis. This study illustrates a possibly effective treatment option for patients with the chronic facial paresis with no other expectations of recovery.

  8. Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation: Research Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johns, Florene Carnicelli

    Currently, research is being performed in the area of nonsurgical and nonchemical means for influencing the body's threshold for pain. Today, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is being widely used for this purpose. Application of this treatment can be confusing, however, because determining such things as selection of the proper…

  9. Vagus Nerve Stimulation for Electrographic Status Epilepticus in Slow-Wave Sleep.

    PubMed

    Carosella, Christopher M; Greiner, Hansel M; Byars, Anna W; Arthur, Todd M; Leach, James L; Turner, Michele; Holland, Katherine D; Mangano, Francesco T; Arya, Ravindra

    2016-07-01

    Electrographic status epilepticus in slow sleep or continuous spike and waves during slow-wave sleep is an epileptic encephalopathy characterized by seizures, neurocognitive regression, and significant activation of epileptiform discharges during nonrapid eye movement sleep. There is no consensus on the diagnostic criteria and evidence-based optimal treatment algorithm for children with electrographic status epilepticus in slow sleep. We describe a 12-year-old girl with drug-resistant electrographic status epilepticus in slow wave sleep that was successfully treated with vagus nerve stimulation. Her clinical presentation, presurgical evaluation, decision-making, and course after vagus nerve stimulator implantation are described in detail. After vagus nerve stimulator implantation, the girl remained seizure free for more than a year, resolved the electrographic status epilepticus in slow sleep pattern on electroencephalography, and exhibited significant cognitive improvement. Vagus nerve stimulation may be considered for electrographic status epilepticus in slow sleep. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Thoracoscopic patch insulation to correct phrenic nerve stimulation secondary to cardiac resynchronization therapy.

    PubMed

    Mediratta, Neeraj; Barker, Diane; McKevith, James; Davies, Peter; Belchambers, Sandra; Rao, Archana

    2012-07-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy is an established therapy for heart failure, improving quality of life and prognosis. Despite advances in technique, available leads and delivery systems, trans-venous left ventricular (LV) lead positioning remains dependent on the patient's underlying venous anatomy. The left phrenic nerve courses over the surface of the pericardium laterally and may be stimulated by the LV pacing lead, causing uncomfortable diaphragmatic twitch. This paper describes a video-assisted thoracoscopic (VATS) procedure to correct phrenic nerve stimulation secondary to cardiac resynchronization therapy. Most current ways of avoiding phrenic stimulation involve either electronic reprogramming to distance the phrenic nerve from the stimulation circuit or repositioning the lead. We describe a case where the phrenic nerve was surgically insulated from the stimulating current by insinuating a patch of bovine pericardium between the epicardium and native pericardium of the heart thus completely resolving previously intolerable and incessant diaphragmatic twitch. The procedure was performed under general anaesthesia with single-lung ventilation and minimal use of neuromuscular blocking agents. Surgical patch insulation of the phrenic nerve was performed using minimally invasive VATS surgery, as a short-stay procedure, with no complications. No diaphragmatic twitch occurred post-surgery and the patient continued to gain symptomatic benefit from cardiac synchronization therapy (New York Heart Association Class III to II), enabling return to work. In cases where the trans-venous position of a LV lead is limited by troublesome phrenic nerve stimulation, thoracoscopic surgical patch insulation of the phrenic nerve could be considered to allow beneficial cardiac resynchronization therapy.

  11. Late administration of high-frequency electrical stimulation increases nerve regeneration without aggravating neuropathic pain in a nerve crush injury.

    PubMed

    Su, Hong-Lin; Chiang, Chien-Yi; Lu, Zong-Han; Cheng, Fu-Chou; Chen, Chun-Jung; Sheu, Meei-Ling; Sheehan, Jason; Pan, Hung-Chuan

    2018-06-25

    High-frequency transcutaneous neuromuscular electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is currently used for the administration of electrical current in denervated muscle to alleviate muscle atrophy and enhance motor function; however, the time window (i.e. either immediate or delayed) for achieving benefit is still undetermined. In this study, we conducted an intervention of sciatic nerve crush injury using high-frequency TENS at different time points to assess the effect of motor and sensory functional recovery. Animals with left sciatic nerve crush injury received TENS treatment starting immediately after injury or 1 week later at a high frequency(100 Hz) or at a low frequency (2 Hz) as a control. In SFI gait analysis, either immediate or late admission of high-frequency electrical stimulation exerted significant improvement compared to either immediate or late administration of low-frequency electrical stimulation. In an assessment of allodynia, immediate high frequency electrical stimulation caused a significantly decreased pain threshold compared to late high-frequency or low-frequency stimulation at immediate or late time points. Immunohistochemistry staining and western blot analysis of S-100 and NF-200 demonstrated that both immediate and late high frequency electrical stimulation showed a similar effect; however the effect was superior to that achieved with low frequency stimulation. Immediate high frequency electrical stimulation resulted in significant expression of TNF-α and synaptophysin in the dorsal root ganglion, somatosensory cortex, and hippocampus compared to late electrical stimulation, and this trend paralleled the observed effect on somatosensory evoked potential. The CatWalk gait analysis also showed that immediate electrical stimulation led to a significantly high regularity index. In primary dorsal root ganglion cells culture, high-frequency electrical stimulation also exerted a significant increase in expression of TNF-α, synaptophysin, and

  12. Application of conductive polymers, scaffolds and electrical stimulation for nerve tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi-Mobarakeh, Laleh; Prabhakaran, Molamma P; Morshed, Mohammad; Nasr-Esfahani, Mohammad Hossein; Baharvand, Hossein; Kiani, Sahar; Al-Deyab, Salem S; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2011-04-01

    Among the numerous attempts to integrate tissue engineering concepts into strategies to repair nearly all parts of the body, neuronal repair stands out. This is partially due to the complexity of the nervous anatomical system, its functioning and the inefficiency of conventional repair approaches, which are based on single components of either biomaterials or cells alone. Electrical stimulation has been shown to enhance the nerve regeneration process and this consequently makes the use of electrically conductive polymers very attractive for the construction of scaffolds for nerve tissue engineering. In this review, by taking into consideration the electrical properties of nerve cells and the effect of electrical stimulation on nerve cells, we discuss the most commonly utilized conductive polymers, polypyrrole (PPy) and polyaniline (PANI), along with their design and modifications, thus making them suitable scaffolds for nerve tissue engineering. Other electrospun, composite, conductive scaffolds, such as PANI/gelatin and PPy/poly(ε-caprolactone), with or without electrical stimulation, are also discussed. Different procedures of electrical stimulation which have been used in tissue engineering, with examples on their specific applications in tissue engineering, are also discussed. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Long-term efficacy and safety of sacral nerve stimulation for fecal incontinence.

    PubMed

    Mellgren, Anders; Wexner, Steven D; Coller, John A; Devroede, Ghislain; Lerew, Darin R; Madoff, Robert D; Hull, Tracy

    2011-09-01

    Sacral nerve stimulation is effective in the treatment of urinary incontinence and is currently under Food and Drug Administration review in the United States for fecal incontinence. Previous reports have focused primarily on short-term results of sacral nerve stimulation for fecal incontinence. The present study reports the long-term effectiveness and safety of sacral nerve stimulation for fecal incontinence in a large prospective multicenter study. Patients with fecal incontinent episodes more than twice per week were offered participation in this multicentered prospective trial. Patients showing ≥ 50% improvement during test stimulation were offered chronic implantation of the InterStim Therapy system (Medtronic; Minneapolis, MN). The aims of the current report were to provide 3-year follow-up data on patients from that study who underwent sacral nerve stimulation and were monitored under the rigors of an Food and Drug Administration-approved investigational protocol. One hundred thirty-three patients underwent test stimulation with a 90% success rate, of whom 120 (110 females) with a mean age of 60.5 years and a mean duration of fecal incontinence of 7 years received chronic implantation. Mean length of follow-up was 3.1 (range, 0.2-6.1) years, with 83 patients completing all or part of the 3-year follow-up assessment. At 3 years follow-up, 86% of patients (P < .0001) reported ≥ 50% reduction in the number of incontinent episodes per week compared with baseline and the number of incontinent episodes per week decreased from a mean of 9.4 at baseline to 1.7. Perfect continence was achieved in 40% of subjects. The therapy also improved the fecal incontinence severity index. Sacral nerve stimulation had a positive impact on the quality of life, as evidenced by significant improvements in all 4 scales of the Fecal Incontinence Quality of Life instrument at 12, 24, and 36 months of follow-up. The most common device- or therapy-related adverse events through the

  14. High-reliability microcontroller nerve stimulator for assistance in regional anaesthesia procedures.

    PubMed

    Ferri, Carlos A; Quevedo, Antonio A F

    2017-07-01

    In the last decades, the use of nerve stimulators to aid in regional anaesthesia has been shown to benefit the patient since it allows a better location of the nerve plexus, leading to correct positioning of the needle through which the anaesthetic is applied. However, most of the nerve stimulators available in the market for this purpose do not have the minimum recommended features for a good stimulator, and this can lead to risks to the patient. Thus, this study aims to develop an equipment, using embedded electronics, which meets all the characteristics, for a successful blockade. The system is made of modules for generation and overall control of the current pulse and the patient and user interfaces. The results show that the designed system fits into required specifications for a good and reliable nerve stimulator. Linearity proved satisfactory, ensuring accuracy in electrical current amplitude for a wide range of body impedances. Field tests have proven very successful. The anaesthesiologist that used the system reported that, in all cases, plexus blocking was achieved with higher quality, faster anaesthetic diffusion and without needed of an additional dose when compared with same procedure without the use of the device.

  15. Artifacts produced during electrical stimulation of the vestibular nerve in cats. [autonomic nervous system components of motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, P. C.

    1973-01-01

    Evidence is presented to indicate that evoked potentials in the recurrent laryngeal, the cervical sympathetic, and the phrenic nerve, commonly reported as being elicited by vestibular nerve stimulation, may be due to stimulation of structures other than the vestibular nerve. Experiments carried out in decerebrated cats indicated that stimulation of the petrous bone and not that of the vestibular nerve is responsible for the genesis of evoked potentials in the recurrent laryngeal and the cervical sympathetic nerves. The phrenic response to electrical stimulation applied through bipolar straight electrodes appears to be the result of stimulation of the facial nerve in the facial canal by current spread along the petrous bone, since stimulation of the suspended facial nerve evoked potentials only in the phrenic nerve and not in the recurrent laryngeal nerve. These findings indicate that autonomic components of motion sickness represent the secondary reactions and not the primary responses to vestibular stimulation.

  16. Avoiding nerve stimulation in irreversible electroporation: a numerical modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercadal, Borja; Arena, Christopher B.; Davalos, Rafael V.; Ivorra, Antoni

    2017-10-01

    Electroporation based treatments consist in applying one or multiple high voltage pulses to the tissues to be treated. As an undesired side effect, these pulses cause electrical stimulation of excitable tissues such as nerves and muscles. This increases the complexity of the treatments and may pose a risk to the patient. To minimize electrical stimulation during electroporation based treatments, it has been proposed to replace the commonly used monopolar pulses by bursts of short bipolar pulses. In the present study, we have numerically analyzed the rationale for such approach. We have compared different pulsing protocols in terms of their electroporation efficacy and their capability of triggering action potentials in nerves. For that, we have developed a modeling framework that combines numerical models of nerve fibers and experimental data on irreversible electroporation. Our results indicate that, by replacing the conventional relatively long monopolar pulses by bursts of short bipolar pulses, it is possible to ablate a large tissue region without triggering action potentials in a nearby nerve. Our models indicate that this is possible because, as the pulse length of these bipolar pulses is reduced, the stimulation thresholds raise faster than the irreversible electroporation thresholds. We propose that this different dependence on the pulse length is due to the fact that transmembrane charging for nerve fibers is much slower than that of cells treated by electroporation because of their geometrical differences.

  17. Infrared neural stimulation of human spinal nerve roots in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Cayce, Jonathan M.; Wells, Jonathon D.; Malphrus, Jonathan D.; Kao, Chris; Thomsen, Sharon; Tulipan, Noel B.; Konrad, Peter E.; Jansen, E. Duco; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Infrared neural stimulation (INS) is a neurostimulation modality that uses pulsed infrared light to evoke artifact-free, spatially precise neural activity with a noncontact interface; however, the technique has not been demonstrated in humans. The objective of this study is to demonstrate the safety and efficacy of INS in humans in vivo. The feasibility of INS in humans was assessed in patients (n=7) undergoing selective dorsal root rhizotomy, where hyperactive dorsal roots, identified for transection, were stimulated in vivo with INS on two to three sites per nerve with electromyogram recordings acquired throughout the stimulation. The stimulated dorsal root was removed and histology was performed to determine thermal damage thresholds of INS. Threshold activation of human dorsal rootlets occurred in 63% of nerves for radiant exposures between 0.53 and 1.23  J/cm2. In all cases, only one or two monitored muscle groups were activated from INS stimulation of a hyperactive spinal root identified by electrical stimulation. Thermal damage was first noted at 1.09  J/cm2 and a 2∶1 safety ratio was identified. These findings demonstrate the success of INS as a fresh approach for activating human nerves in vivo and providing the necessary safety data needed to pursue clinically driven therapeutic and diagnostic applications of INS in humans. PMID:26157986

  18. WITHDRAWN: Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and acupuncture-like transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation for chronic low back pain.

    PubMed

    Gadsby, J G; Flowerdew, M W

    2007-07-18

    In view of the claims and counter-claims of the effectiveness of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, it would seem appropriate to systematically review the literature. To determine the effectiveness of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation in reducing pain and improving range of movement in patients with chronic low back pain. Electronic searches of EMBASE, MEDLINE, CISCOM, AMED for all studies of TENS in the English language, identifying those treating chronic low back pain and hand searching their references. The inclusion criterion for studies included in this review, 6 of 68 identified, was comparisons of TENS/ALTENS versus placebo in patients with chronic low back pain. Outcome data on pain reduction, range of movement, functional status and work was extracted by two independent reviewers together with trial design qualities to construct a Quality Index. The ratio of odds of improvement in pain for each comparison was calculated: TENS vs. placebo at 1.62 (95% CI 0.90, 2.68); ALTENS vs. placebo at 7.22 (95% CI 2.60, 20.01) and TENS/ALTENS vs. placebo at 2.11 (95% CI 1.32, 3.38) times that of placebo. An improvement in pain reduction was seen in 45.80% (CI 37.00%, 55.00%) of TENS; 86.70% (CI 80.00%, 93.00%) of ALTENS; 54.00% (CI 46.20%, 61.80%) of TENS/ ALTENS and 36.40% (95%CI 28.40%, 44.40%) of placebo subjects. The odds of improvement in range of movement on ALTENS vs. placebo was 6.61 times (95% CI 2.36, 18.55) that of placebo. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation appears to reduce pain and improve the range of movement in chronic low back pain subjects. A definitive randomised controlled study of ALTENS, TENS, placebo/no treatment controls, of sufficient power, is needed to confirm these findings.

  19. Effects of coil characteristics for femoral nerve magnetic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Tomazin, Katja; Verges, Samuel; Decorte, Nicolas; Oulerich, Alain; Millet, Guillaume Y

    2010-03-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficiency of two coils used for femoral nerve magnetic stimulation and to compare them with electrical stimulation in inducing maximal response of the quadriceps. The mechanical and electromyographic (EMG) responses were dependent on the coil used. The 45-mm double coil showed greater efficiency to elicit a maximal quadriceps response, which was similar to electrical stimulation.

  20. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and acupuncture-like transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation for chronic low back pain.

    PubMed

    Gadsby, J G; Flowerdew, M W

    2000-01-01

    Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS), originally based on the gate-control theory of pain, is widely used for the treatment of chronic low back pain. Despite its wide use and theoretical rationale, there appears at first glance little scientific evidence to support its use. This Cochrane review examines the available evidence on TENS for the treatment of chronic back pain through an exhaustive search of the literature. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) and acupuncture-like transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (ALTENS) for chronic low back pain management have experienced a tremendous growth over the past 25 years. The objective of this review was to assess the effects of TENS and ALTENS for reducing pain and improving function in patients with chronic back pain. We searched MEDLINE up to November 1997, EMBASE from 1985 to September 1995, Amed and Ciscom to January 1995, reference lists of the retrieved articles, proceedings of conferences and contacted investigators in the field. Randomised trials comparing TENS or ALTENS therapy to placebo in patients with chronic low back pain. Two reviewers independently assessed trial quality and extracted data on pain reduction, range of movement, functional and work status. Six trials were included. The trials included 288 participants with an average age range of 45 to 50 years and approximately equal numbers of women and men. The overall odds ratio for improvement in pain for each comparison was: TENS/ALTENS versus placebo 2.11 (95% confidence interval 1.32 to 3. 38), ALTENS versus placebo 7.22 (95% confidence interval 2.60 to 20.01) and TENS versus placebo 1.52 (95% confidence interval 0.90 to 2.58). The odds ration for improvement in range of motion on ALTENS versus placebo was 6.61 (95% confidence interval 2.36 to 18.55). There is evidence from the limited data available that TENS/ALTENS reduces pain and improves range of motion in chronic back pain patients, at least in the short

  1. 42 CFR 414.232 - Special payment rules for transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulators (TENS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... nerve stimulators (TENS). 414.232 Section 414.232 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... Special payment rules for transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulators (TENS). (a) General payment rule. Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, payment for TENS is made on a purchase basis with...

  2. Spinal cord stimulation suppresses bradycardias and atrial tachyarrhythmias induced by mediastinal nerve stimulation in dogs.

    PubMed

    Cardinal, René; Pagé, Pierre; Vermeulen, Michel; Bouchard, Caroline; Ardell, Jeffrey L; Foreman, Robert D; Armour, J Andrew

    2006-11-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) applied to the dorsal aspect of the cranial thoracic cord imparts cardioprotection under conditions of neuronally dependent cardiac stress. This study investigated whether neuronally induced atrial arrhythmias can be modulated by SCS. In 16 anesthetized dogs with intact stellate ganglia and in five with bilateral stellectomy, trains of five electrical stimuli were delivered during the atrial refractory period to right- or left-sided mediastinal nerves for up to 20 s before and after SCS (20 min). Recordings were obtained from 191 biatrial epicardial sites. Before SCS (11 animals), mediastinal nerve stimulation initiated bradycardia alone (12 nerve sites), bradycardia followed by tachyarrhythmia/fibrillation (50 sites), as well as tachyarrhythmia/fibrillation without a preceding bradycardia (21 sites). After SCS, the number of responsive sites inducing bradycardia was reduced by 25% (62 to 47 sites), and the cycle length prolongation in residual bradycardias was reduced. The number of responsive sites inducing tachyarrhythmia was reduced by 60% (71 to 29 sites). Once elicited, residual tachyarrhythmias arose from similar epicardial foci, displaying similar dynamics (cycle length) as in control states. In the absence of SCS, bradycardias and tachyarrhythmias induced by repeat nerve stimulation were reproducible (five additional animals). After bilateral stellectomy, SCS no longer influenced neuronal induction of bradycardia and atrial tachyarrhythmias. These data indicate that SCS obtunds the induction of atrial arrhythmias resulting from excessive activation of intrinsic cardiac neurons and that such protective effects depend on the integrity of nerves coursing via the subclavian ansae and stellate ganglia.

  3. Effects of noninvasive facial nerve stimulation in the dog middle cerebral artery occlusion model of ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Borsody, Mark K; Yamada, Chisa; Bielawski, Dawn; Heaton, Tamara; Castro Prado, Fernando; Garcia, Andrea; Azpiroz, Joaquín; Sacristan, Emilio

    2014-04-01

    Facial nerve stimulation has been proposed as a new treatment of ischemic stroke because autonomic components of the nerve dilate cerebral arteries and increase cerebral blood flow when activated. A noninvasive facial nerve stimulator device based on pulsed magnetic stimulation was tested in a dog middle cerebral artery occlusion model. We used an ischemic stroke dog model involving injection of autologous blood clot into the internal carotid artery that reliably embolizes to the middle cerebral artery. Thirty minutes after middle cerebral artery occlusion, the geniculate ganglion region of the facial nerve was stimulated for 5 minutes. Brain perfusion was measured using gadolinium-enhanced contrast MRI, and ATP and total phosphate levels were measured using 31P spectroscopy. Separately, a dog model of brain hemorrhage involving puncture of the intracranial internal carotid artery served as an initial examination of facial nerve stimulation safety. Facial nerve stimulation caused a significant improvement in perfusion in the hemisphere affected by ischemic stroke and a reduction in ischemic core volume in comparison to sham stimulation control. The ATP/total phosphate ratio showed a large decrease poststroke in the control group versus a normal level in the stimulation group. The same stimulation administered to dogs with brain hemorrhage did not cause hematoma enlargement. These results support the development and evaluation of a noninvasive facial nerve stimulator device as a treatment of ischemic stroke.

  4. Occipital Nerve Stimulation for the Treatment of Refractory Occipital Neuralgia: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Keifer, Orion P; Diaz, Ashley; Campbell, Melissa; Bezchlibnyk, Yarema B; Boulis, Nicholas M

    2017-09-01

    Occipital neuralgia is a chronic pain syndrome characterized by sharp, shooting pains in the distribution of the occipital nerves. Although relatively rare, it associated with extremely debilitating symptoms that drastically affect a patient's quality of life. Furthermore, it is extremely difficult to treat as the symptoms are refractory to traditional treatments, including pharmacologic and procedural interventions. A few previous case studies have established the use of a neurostimulation of the occipital nerves to treat occipital neuralgia. The following expands on that literature by retrospectively reviewing the results of occipital nerve stimulation in a relatively large patient cohort (29 patients). A retrospective review of 29 patients undergoing occipital nerve stimulation for occipital neuralgia from 2012 to 2017 at a single institution with a single neurosurgeon. Of those 29 patients, 5 were repair or replacement of previous systems, 4 did not have benefit from trial stimulation, and 20 saw benefit to their trial stage of stimulation and went on to full implantation. Of those 20 patients, even with a history of failed procedures and pharmacological therapies, there was an overall success rate of 85%. The average preoperative 10-point pain score dropped from 7.4 ± 1.7 to a postoperative score of 2.9 ± 1.7. However, as with any peripheral nerve stimulation procedure, there were complications (4 patients), including infection, hardware erosion, loss of effect, and lead migration, which required revision or system removal. Despite complications, the results suggest, overall, that occipital nerve stimulation is a safe and effective procedure for refractory occipital neuralgia and should be in the neurosurgical repertoire for occipital neuralgia treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Peripheral nerve recruitment curve using near-infrared stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dautrebande, Marie; Doguet, Pascal; Gorza, Simon-Pierre; Delbeke, Jean; Nonclercq, Antoine

    2018-02-01

    In the context of near-infrared neurostimulation, we report on an experimental hybrid electrode allowing for simultaneous photonic or electrical neurostimulation and for electrical recording of evoked action potentials. The electrode includes three contacts and one optrode. The optrode is an opening in the cuff through which the tip of an optical fibre is held close to the epineurium. Two contacts provide action potential recording. The remaining contact, together with a remote subcutaneous electrode, is used for electric stimulation which allows periodical assessment of the viability of the nerve during the experiment. A 1470 nm light source was used to stimulate a mouse sciatic nerve. Neural action potentials were not successfully recorded because of the electrical noise so muscular activity was used to reflect the motor fibres stimulation. A recruitment curve was obtained by stimulating with photonic pulses of same power and increasing duration and recording the evoked muscular action potentials. Motor fibres can be recruited with radiant exposures between 0.05 and 0.23 J/cm2 for pulses in the 100 to 500 μs range. Successful stimulation at short duration and at a commercial wavelength is encouraging in the prospect of miniaturisation and practical applications. Motor fibres recruitment curve is a first step in an ongoing research work. Neural action potential acquisition will be improved, with aim to shed light on the mechanism of action potential initiation under photonic stimulation.

  6. Effect of Fixed Versus Adjusted Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation Amplitude on Chronic Mechanical Low Back Pain.

    PubMed

    Elserty, Noha; Kattabei, Omaima; Elhafez, Hytham

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of adjusting pulse amplitude of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation versus fixed pulse amplitude in treatment of chronic mechanical low back pain. Randomized clinical trial. El-sahel Teaching Hospital, Egypt. Forty-five patients with chronic low back pain assigned to three equal groups. Their ages ranged from 20 to 50 years. The three groups received the same exercise program. Group A received transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation with fixed pulse amplitude for 40 minutes. Group B received transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation with adjusted pulse amplitude for 40 minutes, with the pulse amplitude adjusted every 5 minutes. Group C received exercises only. Treatment sessions were applied three times per week for 4 weeks for the three groups. A visual analogue scale was used to assess pain severity, the Oswestry Disability Index was used to assess functional level, and a dual inclinometer was used to measure lumbar range of motion. Evaluations were performed before and after treatment. Visual analogue scale, Oswestry Disability Index, and back range of motion significantly differed between the two groups that received transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and the control group and did not significantly differ between fixed and adjusted pulse amplitude of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation. Adjusting pulse amplitude of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation does not produce a difference in the effect of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation used to treat chronic low back pain.

  7. Optical stimulation of the prostate nerves: A potential diagnostic technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tozburun, Serhat

    There is wide variability in sexual potency rates (9--86%) after nerve-sparing prostate cancer surgery due to limited knowledge of the location of the cavernous nerves (CN's) on the prostate surface, which are responsible for erectile function. Thus, preservation of the CN's is critical in preserving a man's ability to have spontaneous erections following surgery. Nerve-mapping devices, utilizing conventional Electrical Nerve Stimulation (ENS) techniques, have been used as intra-operative diagnostic tools to assist in preservation of the CN. However, these technologies have proven inconsistent and unreliable in identifying the CN's due to the need for physical contact, the lack of spatial selectivity, and the presence of electrical artifacts in measurements. Optical Nerve Stimulation (ONS), using pulsed infrared laser radiation, is studied as an alternative to ENS. The objective of this study is sevenfold: (1) to develop a laparoscopic laser probe for ONS of the CN's in a rat model, in vivo; (2) to demonstrate faster ONS using continuous-wave infrared laser radiation; (3) to describe and characterize the mechanism of successful ONS using alternative laser wavelengths; (4) to test a compact, inexpensive all-single-mode fiber configuration for optical stimulation of the rat CN studies; (5) to implement fiber optic beam shaping methods for comparison of Gaussian and flat-top spatial beam profiles during ONS; (6) to demonstrate successful ONS of CN's through a thin layer of fascia placed over the nerve and prostate gland; and (7) to verify the experimentally determined therapeutic window for safe and reliable ONS without thermal damage to the CN's by comparison with a computational model for thermal damage. A 5.5-Watt Thulium fiber laser operated at 1870 nm and two pigtailed, single mode, near-IR diode lasers (150-mW, 1455-nm laser and 500-mW, 1550-nm laser) were used for non-contact stimulation of the rat CN's. Successful laser stimulation, as measured by an

  8. Electrical stimulation reveals relatively ineffective sural nerve projections to dorsal horn neurons in the cat.

    PubMed

    Pubols, L M; Foglesong, M E; Vahle-Hinz, C

    1986-04-16

    Electrical stimulation of the sural nerve (SN) revealed input from sural nerve afferents to L6 and L7 dorsal horn neurons that were not apparent using natural mechanical stimuli, especially in cells with variable latency responses to SN stimulation. Nearly all (31/32) cells that had reliable, fixed latency responses to SN stimulation also had an excitatory receptive field (RF) in the region of skin innervated by the sural nerve (SN region). About one-third (20/57) of the cells with variable latency responses to SN stimulation, however, had an RF outside the SN region. Most (130/146) cells with no response to SN stimulation had RFs outside the SN region. There were no obvious differences between variable latency cells with RFs in the SN region vs those with RFs outside it in latency of response to SN stimulation, recording depth, RF sizes or modality properties. In a subsample of 31 postsynaptic dorsal column neurons all cells responding to SN stimulation also had an RF in the SN region. Strengthening of relatively ineffective projections from the sural nerve by lesions might be expected to lead to an increase in the proportion of cells responding with impulses to natural stimulation of the skin innervated by the sural nerve, and, hence, to an increase in average RF size.

  9. Improving surgical results in complex nerve anatomy during implantation of selective upper airway stimulation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhaojun; Hofauer, Benedikt; Heiser, Clemens

    2018-06-01

    The following report presents a case of two late embedded hypoglossus branches during implantation of an upper airway stimulation device that caused a mixed activation of the tongue when included in the stimulation cuff. In the end, correct cuff placement could be achieved by careful examination of the hypoglossal nerve anatomy, precise nerve dissection, tongue motion analysis and intraoperative nerve monitoring. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Spatial distribution of motor units recruited during electrical stimulation of the quadriceps muscle versus the femoral nerve.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Falces, Javier; Maffiuletti, Nicola A; Place, Nicolas

    2013-11-01

    In this study we investigated differences in the spatial recruitment of motor units (MUs) in the quadriceps when electrical stimulation is applied over the quadriceps belly versus the femoral nerve. M-waves and mechanical twitches were evoked using over-the-quadriceps and femoral nerve stimulation of gradually increasing intensity from 22 young, healthy subjects. Spatial recruitment was investigated using recruitment curves of M-waves recorded from the vastus medialis (VM) and vastus lateralis (VL) and of twitches recorded from the quadriceps. At maximal stimulation intensity (Imax), no differences were found between nerve and over-the-quadriceps stimulation. At submaximal intensities, VL M-wave amplitude was higher for over-the-quadriceps stimulation at 40% Imax, and peak twitch force was greater for nerve stimulation at 60% and 80% Imax. For the VM, MU spatial recruitment during nerve and over-the-quadriceps stimulation of increasing intensity occurred in a similar manner, whereas significant differences were observed for the VL. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. The effect of dentinal stimulation on pulp nerve function and pulp morphology in the dog.

    PubMed

    Hirvonen, T J; Närhi, M V

    1986-11-01

    The effect of dentinal stimulation on pulpal nerve responses and pulp morphology has been studied in the dog. Canine tooth (n = 25) dentin was stimulated by drilling, probing, and air-blasting for from two to five hours. Acid-etching was used to open dentinal tubules. All test teeth showed disruption of the odontoblast layer and its separation from the predentin; also, dislocation of odontoblast nuclei into dentinal tubules was found in most cases. Single-fiber (n = 14, conduction velocity = 24.3 +/- 7.4 (SD) m/s) recordings of the responses of canine tooth pulpal nerves to dentinal stimulation were made in ten of the stimulated teeth. No changes in the sensitivity of the nerves to dentinal stimulation could be detected. It is concluded that pulpal nerve function and morphological changes of the pulp are not clearly correlated. The condition of the dentin surface seems to be the important factor.

  12. Fascicular nerve stimulation and recording using a novel double-aisle regenerative electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado-Martínez, I.; Righi, M.; Santos, D.; Cutrone, A.; Bossi, S.; D'Amico, S.; Del Valle, J.; Micera, S.; Navarro, X.

    2017-08-01

    Objective. As artificial prostheses become more refined, they are most often used as a therapeutic option for hand amputation. By contrast to extra- or intraneural interfaces, regenerative nerve electrodes are designed to enable electrical interfaces with regrowing axonal bundles of injured nerves, aiming to achieve high selectivity for recording and stimulation. However, most of the developed designs pose an obstacle to the regrowth mechanisms due to low transparency and cause impairment to the nerve regeneration. Approach. Here we present the double-aisle electrode, a new type of highly transparent, non-obstructive regenerative electrode. Using a double-side thin-film polyimide planar multi-contact electrode, two nerve fascicles can regenerate without physical impairment through two electrically isolated aisles. Main results. We show that this electrode can be used to selectively record and stimulate fascicles, acutely as well as chronically, and allow regeneration in nerve gaps of several millimeters without impairment. Significance. This multi-aisle regenerative electrode may be suitable for neuroprosthetic applications, such as prostheses, for the restoration of hand function after amputation or severe nerve injuries.

  13. Extracorporeal Stimulation of Sacral Nerve Roots for Observation of Pelvic Autonomic Nerve Integrity: Description of a Novel Methodological Setup.

    PubMed

    Moszkowski, Tomasz; Kauff, Daniel W; Wegner, Celine; Ruff, Roman; Somerlik-Fuchs, Karin H; Kruger, Thilo B; Augustyniak, Piotr; Hoffmann, Klaus-Peter; Kneist, Werner

    2018-03-01

    Neurophysiologic monitoring can improve autonomic nerve sparing during critical phases of rectal cancer surgery. To develop a system for extracorporeal stimulation of sacral nerve roots. Dedicated software controlled a ten-electrode stimulation array by switching between different electrode configurations and current levels. A built-in impedance and current level measurement assessed the effectiveness of current injection. Intra-anal surface electromyography (sEMG) informed on targeting the sacral nerve roots. All tests were performed on five pig specimens. During switching between electrode configurations, the system delivered 100% of the set current (25 mA, 30 Hz, 200 μs cathodic pulses) in 93% of 250 stimulation trains across all specimens. The impedance measured between single stimulation array contacts and corresponding anodes across all electrode configurations and specimens equaled 3.7 ± 2.5 kΩ. The intra-anal sEMG recorded a signal amplitude increase as previously observed in the literature. When the stimulation amplitude was tested in the range from 1 to 21 mA using the interconnected contacts of the stimulation array and the intra-anal anode, the impedance remained below 250 Ω and the system delivered 100% of the set current in all cases. Intra-anal sEMG showed an amplitude increase for current levels exceeding 6 mA. The system delivered stable electric current, which was proved by built-in impedance and current level measurements. Intra-anal sEMG confirmed the ability to target the branches of the autonomous nervous system originating from the sacral nerve roots. Stimulation outside of the operative field during rectal cancer surgery is feasible and may improve the practicality of pelvic intraoperative neuromonitoring.

  14. Long-term occipital nerve stimulation for drug-resistant chronic cluster headache.

    PubMed

    Leone, Massimo; Proietti Cecchini, Alberto; Messina, Giuseppe; Franzini, Angelo

    2017-07-01

    Introduction Chronic cluster headache is rare and some of these patients become drug-resistant. Occipital nerve stimulation has been successfully employed in open studies to treat chronic drug-resistant cluster headache. Data from large group of occipital nerve stimulation-treated chronic cluster headache patients with long duration follow-up are advantageous. Patients and methods Efficacy of occipital nerve stimulation has been evaluated in an experimental monocentric open-label study including 35 chronic drug-resistant cluster headache patients (mean age 42 years; 30 men; mean illness duration: 6.7 years). The primary end-point was a reduction in number of daily attacks. Results After a median follow-up of 6.1 years (range 1.6-10.7), 20 (66.7%) patients were responders (≥50% reduction in headache number per day): 12 (40%) responders showed a stable condition characterized by sporadic attacks, five responders had a 60-80% reduction in headache number per day and in the remaining three responders chronic cluster headache was transformed in episodic cluster headache. Ten (33.3%) patients were non-responders; half of these have been responders for a long period (mean 14.6 months; range 2-48 months). Battery depletion (21 patients 70%) and electrode migration (six patients - 20%) were the most frequent adverse events. Conclusions Occipital nerve stimulation efficacy is confirmed in chronic drug-resistant cluster headaches even after an exceptional long-term follow-up. Tolerance can occur years after improvement.

  15. Transverse tripolar stimulation of peripheral nerve: a modelling study of spatial selectivity.

    PubMed

    Deurloo, K E; Holsheimer, J; Boom, H B

    1998-01-01

    Various anode-cathode configurations in a nerve cuff are modelled to predict their spatial selectivity characteristics for functional nerve stimulation. A 3D volume conductor model of a monofascicular nerve is used for the computation of stimulation-induced field potentials, whereas a cable model of myelinated nerve fibre is used for the calculation of the excitation thresholds of fibres. As well as the usual configurations (monopole, bipole, longitudinal tripole, 'steering' anode), a transverse tripolar configuration (central cathode) is examined. It is found that the transverse tripole is the only configuration giving convex recruitment contours and therefore maximises activation selectivity for a small (cylindrical) bundle of fibres in the periphery of a monofascicular nerve trunk. As the electrode configuration is changed to achieve greater selectivity, the threshold current increases. Therefore threshold currents for fibre excitation with a transverse tripole are relatively high. Inverse recruitment is less extreme than for the other configurations. The influences of several geometrical parameters and model conductivities of the transverse tripole on selectivity and threshold current are analysed. In chronic implantation, when electrodes are encapsulated by a layer of fibrous tissue, threshold currents are low, whereas the shape of the recruitment contours in transverse tripolar stimulation does not change.

  16. Prevention of catheter-related bladder discomfort - pudendal nerve block with ropivacaine versus intravenous tramadol: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing-Yi; Liao, Ren

    2016-09-13

    Catheter-related bladder discomfort (CRBD) is a common distressing symptom complex during the postoperative period, especially after urologic procedures with a relatively greater size urinary catheter. In this study, we will enroll male patients undergoing elective prostate surgery with urinary catheterization under general anesthesia, and we will compare the efficacy of pudendal nerve block (PNB) and intravenous tramadol in CRBD prevention. This trial is a prospective, randomized controlled trial that will test the superiority of bilateral PNB with 0.33 % ropivacaine compared with intravenous tramadol 1.5 mg/kg for CRBD prevention. A total of 94 male patients undergoing elective prostate surgery with urinary catheterization after anesthesia induction will be randomized to receive either bilateral PNB with 0.33 % ropivacaine (the PNB group) or intravenous tramadol 1.5 mg/kg (the tramadol group) after the completion of surgery. The primary outcome is the incidence of CRBD. The most important secondary outcome is the severity of postoperative CRBD, and other secondary outcomes include Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) score for postoperative pain; incidence of postoperative side effects such as postoperative nausea/vomiting, sedation, dizziness, and dry mouth; postoperative requirement for tramadol as a rescue treatment for CRBD and sufentanil as a rescue analgesic for postoperative pain; and NRS score for acceptance of an indwelling urinary catheter. This trial is planned to test the superiority of PNB with 0.33 % ropivacaine compared with intravenous tramadol 1.5 mg/kg. It may provide a basis for a new clinical practice for the prevention of CRBD. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT02683070 . Registered on 11 February 2016.

  17. Literature Review and Meta-Analysis of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation in Treating Chronic Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lien-Chen; Weng, Pei-Wei; Chen, Chia-Hsien; Huang, Yi-You; Tsuang, Yang-Hwei; Chiang, Chang-Jung

    2018-01-01

    Background and Objectives This study is a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials comparing the efficacy of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) to a control and to other nerve stimulation therapies (NSTs) for the treatment of chronic back pain. Methods Citations were identified in MEDLINE, the Cochrane Library, Google Scholar, and ClinicalTrials.gov through June 2014 using the following keywords: nerve stimulation therapy, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, back pain, chronic pain. Control treatments included sham, placebo, or medication only. Other NSTs included electroacupuncture, percutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, and percutaneous neuromodulation therapy. Results Twelve randomized controlled trials including 700 patients were included in the analysis. The efficacy of TENS was similar to that of control treatment for providing pain relief (standardized difference in means [SDM] = −0.20; 95% confidence interval [CI], −0.58 to 0.18; P = 0.293). Other types of NSTs were more effective than TENS in providing pain relief (SDM = 0.86; 95% CI, 0.15–1.57; P = 0.017). Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation was more effective than control treatment in improving functional disability only in patients with follow-up of less than 6 weeks (SDM = −1.24; 95% CI, −1.83 to −0.65; P < 0.001). There was no difference in functional disability outcomes between TENS and other NSTs. Conclusions These results suggest that TENS does not improve symptoms of lower back pain, but may offer short-term improvement of functional disability. PMID:29394211

  18. The effect of intra-operative transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on posterior neck pain following thyroidectomy.

    PubMed

    Park, C; Choi, J B; Lee, Y-S; Chang, H-S; Shin, C S; Kim, S; Han, D W

    2015-04-01

    Posterior neck pain following thyroidectomy is common because full neck extension is required during the procedure. We evaluated the effect of intra-operative transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on postoperative neck pain in patients undergoing total thyroidectomy under general anaesthesia. One hundred patients were randomly assigned to one of two groups; 50 patients received transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation applied to the trapezius muscle and 50 patients acted as controls. Postoperative posterior neck pain and anterior wound pain were evaluated using an 11-point numerical rating scale at 30 min, 6 h, 24 h and 48 h following surgery. The numerical rating scale for posterior neck pain was significantly lower in the transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation group compared with the control group at all time points (p < 0.05). There were no significant differences in the numerical rating scale for anterior wound pain at any time point. No adverse effects related to transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation were observed. We conclude that intra-operative transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation applied to the trapezius muscle reduced posterior neck pain following thyroidectomy. © 2014 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  19. Blood pressure control with selective vagal nerve stimulation and minimal side effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plachta, Dennis T. T.; Gierthmuehlen, Mortimer; Cota, Oscar; Espinosa, Nayeli; Boeser, Fabian; Herrera, Taliana C.; Stieglitz, Thomas; Zentner, Joseph

    2014-06-01

    Objective. Hypertension is the largest threat to patient health and a burden to health care systems. Despite various options, 30% of patients do not respond sufficiently to medical treatment. Mechanoreceptors in the aortic arch relay blood pressure (BP) levels through vagal nerve (VN) fibers to the brainstem and trigger the baroreflex, lowering the BP. Selective electrical stimulation of these nerve fibers reduced BP in rats. However, there is no technique described to localize and stimulate these fibers inside the VN without inadvertent stimulation of non-baroreceptive fibers causing side effects like bradycardia and bradypnea. Approach. We present a novel method for selective VN stimulation to reduce BP without the aforementioned side effects. Baroreceptor compound activity of rat VN (n = 5) was localized using a multichannel cuff electrode, true tripolar recording and a coherent averaging algorithm triggered by BP or electrocardiogram. Main results. Tripolar stimulation over electrodes near the barofibers reduced the BP without triggering significant bradycardia and bradypnea. The BP drop was adjusted to 60% of the initial value by varying the stimulation pulse width and duration, and lasted up to five times longer than the stimulation. Significance. The presented method is robust to impedance changes, independent of the electrode's relative position, does not compromise the nerve and can run on implantable, ultra-low power signal processors.

  20. Increased electrical nerve stimulation threshold of the sciatic nerve in patients with diabetic foot gangrene: a prospective parallel cohort study.

    PubMed

    Keyl, Cornelius; Held, Tanja; Albiez, Georg; Schmack, Astrid; Wiesenack, Christoph

    2013-07-01

    Peripheral neuropathy may affect nerve conduction in patients with diabetes mellitus. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that the electrical stimulation threshold for a motor response of the sciatic nerve is increased in patients suffering from diabetic foot gangrene compared to non-diabetic patients. Prospective non-randomised trial with two parallel groups. Two university-affiliated hospitals. Patients scheduled for surgical treatment of diabetic foot gangrene (n = 30) and non-diabetic patients (n = 30) displaying no risk factors for neuropathy undergoing orthopaedic foot or ankle surgery. The minimum current intensity required to elicit a typical motor response (dorsiflexion or eversion of the foot) at a pulse width of 0.1 ms and a stimulation frequency of 1 Hz when the needle tip was positioned under ultrasound control directly adjacent to the peroneal component of the sciatic nerve. The non-diabetic patients were younger [64 (SD 12) vs. 74 (SD 7) years] and predominantly female (23 vs. 8). The geometric mean of the motor stimulation threshold was 0.26 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.24 to 0.28] mA in non-diabetic and 1.9 (95% CI 1.6 to 2.2) mA in diabetic patients. The geometric mean of the electrical stimulation threshold was significantly (P < 0.001) increased by a factor of 7.2 (95% CI 6.1 to 8.4) in diabetic compared to non-diabetic patients. The electrical stimulation threshold for a motor response of the sciatic nerve is increased by a factor of 7.2 in patients with diabetic foot gangrene, which might hamper nerve identification.

  1. Intraoperative identification of the facial nerve by needle electromyography stimulation with a burr

    PubMed Central

    KHAMGUSHKEEVA, N.N.; ANIKIN, I.A.; KORNEYENKOV, A.A.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to improve the safety of surgery for patients with a pathology of the middle and inner ear by preventing damage to the facial nerve by conducting intraoperative monitoring of the facial nerve by needle electromyography with continuous stimulation with a burr. Patients and Methods The clinical part of the prospective study was carried out on 48 patients that were diagnosed with suppurative otitis media. After the surgery with intraoperative monitoring, the facial nerve with an intact bone wall was stimulated electrically in the potentially dangerous places of damage. Minimum (threshold) stimulation (mA) of the facial nerve with a threshold event of 100 μV was used to register EMG events. The anatomical part of the study was carried out on 30 unformalinized cadaver temporal bones from adult bodies. The statistical analysis of obtained data was carried out with parametric methods (Student’s t-test), non-parametric correlation (Spearman’s method) and regression analysis. Results It was found that 1 mA of threshold amperage corresponded to 0.8 mm thickness of the bone wall of the facial canal. Values of transosseous threshold stimulation in potentially dangerous sections of the injury to the facial nerve were obtained. Conclusion These data lower the risk of paresis (paralysis) of the facial muscles during otologic surgery. PMID:27142821

  2. Peripheral nerve field stimulation in chronic abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Paicius, Richard M; Bernstein, Clifford A; Lempert-Cohen, Cheryl

    2006-07-01

    Spinal Cord Stimulation (SCS) has become an accepted therapeutic modality for the treatment of intractable pain syndromes, primarily used today in the settings of failed back surgery syndrome, neuropathic back and limb pain. The use of spinal cord stimulators for peripheral nerve field electrostimulation is becoming increasingly recognized as a safe, effective alternative for chronic pain conditions that are refractory to medical management and do not respond to traditional dorsal column stimulation. Advances in technology have allowed for minimally invasive percutaneous placement of multipolar leads with complex programmable systems to provide patient- controlled relief of pain in precisely targeted regions. With these improvements in hardware, the use of Peripheral Nerve Field Stimulation (PNFS) appears to have an untapped potential for providing patients with pain relief for a wider range of underlying conditions than was previously believed possible. We present three cases, each with a different etiology of chronic abdominal pain: one with inguinal neuralgia, one with chronic pancreatitis, and one with pain following liver transplant. Each patient was refractory to conventional medical approaches. For all three patients, PNFS provided significant relief from pain, enabling patients to decrease or discontinue their opioid medications and to enjoy significant improvement in their quality of life. We conclude that PNFS is a safe, effective and minimally invasive treatment that may be used successfully for a wide variety of indications including chronic abdominal pain.

  3. Secretion of Growth Hormone in Response to Muscle Sensory Nerve Stimulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grindeland, Richard E.; Roy, R. R.; Edgerton, V. R.; Gosselink, K. L.; Grossman, E. J.; Sawchenko, P. E.; Wade, Charles E. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) secretion is stimulated by aerobic and resistive exercise and inhibited by exposure to actual or simulated (bedrest, hindlimb suspension) microgravity. Moreover, hypothalamic growth hormone-releasing factor (GRF) and preproGRF mRNA are markedly decreased in spaceflight rats. These observations suggest that reduced sensory input from inactive muscles may contribute to the reduced secretion of GH seen in "0 G". Thus, the aim of this study was to determine the effect of muscle sensory nerve stimulation on secretion of GH. Fed male Wistar rats (304 +/- 23 g) were anesthetized (pentobarbital) and the right peroneal (Pe), tibial (T), and sural (S) nerves were cut. Electrical stimulation of the distal (D) or proximal (P) ends of the nerves was implemented for 15 min. to mimic the EMG activity patterns of ankle extensor muscles of a rat walking 1.5 mph. The rats were bled by cardiac puncture and their anterior pituitaries collected. Pituitary and plasma bioactive (BGH) and immunoactive (IGH) GH were measured by bioassay and RIA.

  4. Muscle Activation During Peripheral Nerve Field Stimulation Occurs Due to Recruitment of Efferent Nerve Fibers, Not Direct Muscle Activation.

    PubMed

    Frahm, Ken Steffen; Hennings, Kristian; Vera-Portocarrero, Louis; Wacnik, Paul W; Mørch, Carsten Dahl

    2016-08-01

    Peripheral nerve field stimulation (PNFS) is a potential treatment for chronic low-back pain. Pain relief using PNFS is dependent on activation of non-nociceptive Aβ-fibers. However, PNFS may also activate muscles, causing twitches and discomfort. In this study, we developed a mathematical model, to investigate the activation of sensory and motor nerves, as well as direct muscle fiber activation. The extracellular field was estimated using a finite element model based on the geometry of CT scanned lumbar vertebrae. The electrode was modeled as being implanted to a depth of 10-15 mm. Three implant directions were modeled; horizontally, vertically, and diagonally. Both single electrode and "between-lead" stimulation between contralateral electrodes were modeled. The extracellular field was combined with models of sensory Aβ-nerves, motor neurons and muscle fibers to estimate their activation thresholds. The model showed that sensory Aβ fibers could be activated with thresholds down to 0.563 V, and the lowest threshold for motor nerve activation was 7.19 V using between-lead stimulation with the cathode located closest to the nerves. All thresholds for direct muscle activation were above 500 V. The results suggest that direct muscle activation does not occur during PNFS, and concomitant motor and sensory nerve fiber activation are only likely to occur when using between-lead configuration. Thus, it may be relevant to investigate the location of the innervation zone of the low-back muscles prior to electrode implantation to avoid muscle activation. © 2016 International Neuromodulation Society.

  5. Interlimb Reflexes Induced by Electrical Stimulation of Cutaneous Nerves after Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Jane E.; Godfrey, Sharlene; Thomas, Christine K.

    2016-01-01

    Whether interlimb reflexes emerge only after a severe insult to the human spinal cord is controversial. Here the aim was to examine interlimb reflexes at rest in participants with chronic (>1 year) spinal cord injury (SCI, n = 17) and able-bodied control participants (n = 5). Cutaneous reflexes were evoked by delivering up to 30 trains of stimuli to either the superficial peroneal nerve on the dorsum of the foot or the radial nerve at the wrist (5 pulses, 300 Hz, approximately every 30 s). Participants were instructed to relax the test muscles prior to the delivery of the stimuli. Electromyographic activity was recorded bilaterally in proximal and distal arm and leg muscles. Superficial peroneal nerve stimulation evoked interlimb reflexes in ipsilateral and contralateral arm and contralateral leg muscles of SCI and control participants. Radial nerve stimulation evoked interlimb reflexes in the ipsilateral leg and contralateral arm muscles of control and SCI participants but only contralateral leg muscles of control participants. Interlimb reflexes evoked by superficial peroneal nerve stimulation were longer in latency and duration, and larger in magnitude in SCI participants. Interlimb reflex properties were similar for both SCI and control groups for radial nerve stimulation. Ascending interlimb reflexes tended to occur with a higher incidence in participants with SCI, while descending interlimb reflexes occurred with a higher incidence in able-bodied participants. However, the overall incidence of interlimb reflexes in SCI and neurologically intact participants was similar which suggests that the neural circuitry underlying these reflexes does not necessarily develop after central nervous system injury. PMID:27049521

  6. Peripheral nerve stimulation for occipital neuralgia: surgical leads.

    PubMed

    Kapural, Leonardo; Sable, James

    2011-01-01

    Peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) has been used for the treatment of various neuropathic pain disorders, including occipital neuralgia, for the patients who failed less-invasive therapeutic approaches. Several different mechanisms of pain relief were proposed when PNS is used to treat occipital neuralgia and clinical studies using various types of electrical leads suggested largely positive clinical responses in patients with mostly refractory, severe neuropathic pain. With advancements in cylindrical lead design for PNS and placement/implantation techniques, there are very few clear indications where 'paddle' (surgical) leads could be advantageous. Those include patients who experienced repeated migration of cylindrical lead as paddle lead may provide greater stability, who are experiencing unpleasant recruitment of surrounding muscle and/or motor nerve stimulation and for cases where skin erosions were caused by a cylindrical lead. However, disregarding the type of lead used, multiple clinical advantages of this minimally invasive, easily reversible approach include relatively low morbidity and a high treatment efficacy. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. The role of angiotensin II in the renal responses to somatic nerve stimulation in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Handa, R K; Johns, E J

    1987-01-01

    1. Electrical stimulation of the brachial nerves at 3 Hz (15 V, 0.2 ms), in sodium pentobarbitone-anaesthetized rats whose renal arterial pressure was held constant, elicited a 26% increase in systemic blood pressure, a 15% rise in heart rate, an 11% reduction in renal blood flow, did not alter glomerular filtration rate and significantly reduced absolute and fractional sodium excretions and urine flow by 44, 49 and 31%, respectively. 2. In a separate group of rats, brachial nerve stimulation at 3 Hz increased plasma renin activity approximately 2-fold, while in animals in which the brachial nerves were not stimulated plasma renin activity did not change. 3. Following inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system with captopril or sar-1-ile-8-angiotensin II, brachial nerve stimulation resulted in similar increases in systemic blood pressure and heart rate as in the animals with an intact renin-angiotensin system but, in captopril-infused rats, did not change renal haemodynamics or urine flow while absolute and fractional sodium excretions were reduced by 20 and 25%, respectively. In sar-1-ile-8-angiotensin II-infused animals, similar nerve stimulation decreased renal blood flow by 12%, glomerular filtration rate by 7% and absolute and fractional sodium excretions and urine flow by 25, 18 and 18%, respectively. These decreases in sodium and water output were significantly smaller than those observed in animals with an intact renin-angiotensin system. 4. Stimulation of the brachial nerves increased post-ganglionic efferent renal nerve activity by 20% and the magnitude of this response was unaffected following inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system. 5. The results show that low rates of brachial nerve stimulation in the rat can increase efferent renal nerve activity and result in an antinatriuresis and antidiuresis which is dependent on the presence of angiotensin II, and appears to be due to an action of angiotensin II at the level of the kidney. PMID:3328780

  8. Mesencephalic stimulation elicits inhibition of phrenic nerve activity in cat.

    PubMed Central

    Gallman, E A; Lawing, W L; Millhorn, D E

    1991-01-01

    1. Previous work from this laboratory has indicated that the mesencephalon is the anatomical substrate for a mechanism capable of inhibiting central respiratory drive in glomectomized cats for periods of up to 1 h or more following brief exposure to systemic hypoxia; phrenic nerve activity was used as an index of central respiratory drive. 2. The present study was undertaken to further localize the region responsible for the observed post-hypoxic inhibition of respiratory drive. We studied the phrenic nerve response to stimulations of the mesencephalon in anaesthetized, paralysed peripherally chemo-denervated cats with end-expired PCO2 and body temperature servo-controlled. 3. Stimulations of two types were employed. Electrical stimulation allowed rapid determination of sites from which phrenic inhibition could be elicited. Microinjections of excitatory amino acids were used subsequently in order to confine excitation to neuronal cell bodies and not axons of passage. 4. Stimulation of discrete regions of the ventromedial aspect of the mesencephalon in the vicinity of the red nucleus produced substantial inhibition of phrenic activity which lasted up to 45 min. Stimulation of other areas of the mesencephalon either produced no phrenic inhibition or resulted in a slight stimulation of phrenic activity. 5. The results are discussed in the context of the central respiratory response to hypoxia. PMID:1676420

  9. A nerve stimulation method to selectively recruit smaller motor-units in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    van Bolhuis, A I; Holsheimer, J; Savelberg, H H

    2001-05-30

    Electrical stimulation of peripheral nerve results in a motor-unit recruitment order opposite to that attained by natural neural control, i.e. from large, fast-fatiguing to progressively smaller, fatigue-resistant motor-units. Yet animal studies involving physiological exercise protocols of low intensity and long duration require minimal fatigue. The present study sought to apply a nerve stimulation method to selectively recruit smaller motor-units in rat skeletal muscle. Two pulse generators were used, independently supplying short supramaximal cathodal stimulating pulses (0.5 ms) and long subthreshold cathodal inactivating pulses (1.5 s) to the sciatic nerve. Propagation of action potentials was selectively blocked in nerve fibres of different diameter by adjusting the strength of the inactivating current. A tensile-testing machine was used to gauge isometric muscle force of the plantaris and both heads of the gastrocnemius muscle. The order of motor-unit recruitment was estimated from twitch characteristics, i.e. peak force and relaxation time. The results showed prolonged relaxation at lower twitch peak forces as the intensity of the inactivating current increased, indicating a reduction of the number of large motor-units to force production. It is shown that the nerve stimulation method described is effective in mimicking physiological muscle control.

  10. Exploration of Hand Grasp Patterns Elicitable Through Non-Invasive Proximal Nerve Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Shin, Henry; Watkins, Zach; Hu, Xiaogang

    2017-11-29

    Various neurological conditions, such as stroke or spinal cord injury, result in an impaired control of the hand. One method of restoring this impairment is through functional electrical stimulation (FES). However, traditional FES techniques often lead to quick fatigue and unnatural ballistic movements. In this study, we sought to explore the capabilities of a non-invasive proximal nerve stimulation technique in eliciting various hand grasp patterns. The ulnar and median nerves proximal to the elbow joint were activated transcutanously using a programmable stimulator, and the resultant finger flexion joint angles were recorded using a motion capture system. The individual finger motions averaged across the three joints were analyzed using a cluster analysis, in order to classify the different hand grasp patterns. With low current intensity (<5 mA and 100 µs pulse width) stimulation, our results show that all of our subjects demonstrated a variety of consistent hand grasp patterns including single finger movement and coordinated multi-finger movements. This study provides initial evidence on the feasibility of a proximal nerve stimulation technique in controlling a variety of finger movements and grasp patterns. Our approach could also be developed into a rehabilitative/assistive tool that can result in flexible movements of the fingers.

  11. Tibial nerve stimulation for overactive bladder syndrome unresponsive to medical therapy.

    PubMed

    Ridout, A E; Yoong, W

    2010-02-01

    Overactive bladder syndrome is defined as a symptom syndrome which includes urinary urgency, with or without urge incontinence, usually accompanied by frequency (>8 micturitions/24 h) and nocturia. Conservative treatment usually comprises behavioural techniques, bladder retraining, pelvic floor re-education and pharmacotherapy but up to 30% of patients will remain refractory to treatment. Although second-line treatment options such as sacral nerve stimulation and intravesical botulinum A injections are valuable additions to the therapeutic arsenal, they are relatively invasive and can have serious side-effects. Inhibition of detrusor activity by peripheral neuromodulation of the posterior tibial nerve was first described in 1983, with recent authors further confirming a 60-80% positive response rate. This review was undertaken to examine published literature on percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation and to discuss outcome measures, maintenance therapy and prognostic factors of this technique.

  12. NERVE ENTRAPMENT IN THE HIP REGION: CURRENT CONCEPTS REVIEW.

    PubMed

    Martin, RobRoy; Martin, Hal David; Kivlan, Benjamin R

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this clinical commentary is to review the anatomy, etiology, evaluation, and treatment techniques for nerve entrapments of the hip region. Nerve entrapment can occur around musculotendinous, osseous, and ligamentous structures because of the potential for increased strain and compression on the peripheral nerve at those sites. The sequela of localized trauma may also result in nerve entrapment if normal nerve gliding is prevented. Nerve entrapment can be difficult to diagnose because patient complaints may be similar to and coexist with other musculoskeletal conditions in the hip and pelvic region. However, a detailed description of symptom location and findings from a comprehensive physical examination can be used to determine if an entrapment has occurred, and if so where. The sciatic, pudendal, obturator, femoral, and lateral femoral cutaneous are nerves that can be entrapped and serve a source of hip pain in the athletic population. Manual therapy, stretching and strengthening exercises, aerobic conditioning, and cognitive-behavioral education are potential interventions. When conservative treatment is ineffective at relieving symptoms surgical treatment with neurolysis or neurectomy may be considered. 5.

  13. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation effect on postoperative complications.

    PubMed

    Sezen, Celal Bugra; Akboga, Suleyman Anil; Celik, Ali; Kalafat, Cem Emrah; Tastepe, Abdullah Irfan

    2017-05-01

    Objectives Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation has been used to control post-thoracotomy pain, with conflicting results. We aimed to assess its efficacy on post-thoracotomy pain and early complications. Methods Between January 2012 and December 2014, 87 patients underwent a standard posterolateral thoracotomy and were randomized in 2 groups: group T was 43 patients who had transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and group C was 44 patients who had placebo stimulation with an inoperative device. Pain score was measured using a visual analogue scale ranging from 0 to 10. The frequency of the device was set at 100 Hz and pulse width at 100 ms. Results There were no statistically significant differences in the demographic characteristics of the 2 groups, and there was no difference in the duration of hospitalization (4.74 ± 1.6 vs. 5.23 ± 1.5 days; p = 0.06). Postoperative pain scores of the two groups showed that on postoperative day 0, 1, and 2, the mean pain scores of group T were significantly lower ( p = 0.001, p < 0.001, and p = 0.003). There were no significant differences in early complications or surgical technique. Conclusion We concluded that electrical stimulation is a safe and effective adjunctive therapy for acute post-thoracotomy pain control. However, it does not affect the duration of hospitalization or early pulmonary complications.

  14. Colonic motor and vascular responses to pelvic nerve stimulation and their relation to local peptide release in the cat.

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, P O; Bloom, S R; Järhult, J

    1983-01-01

    1. The effects of stimulation of the pelvic nerves in atropinized cats at continuous, low frequencies from 1 to 16 Hz (continuous stimulation) were compared with those of stimulation at higher frequencies (10-160 Hz) delivered in 1 s bursts at 10 s intervals (stimulation in bursts), the latter simulating a commonly observed discharge pattern in vivo. Both types of stimulation evoked a transient vasodilatation. Stimulation in bursts at 20 and 40 Hz evoked more pronounced vasodilatations than continuous stimulation delivering exactly the same number of impulses over the whole period of excitation. 2. Stimulation of the pelvic nerves in bursts failed to elicit an effective contraction of the colon at any frequency tested, whereas continuous stimulation invariably evoked a contraction. 3. There was a clear-cut increase in the output of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide during both continuous and intermittent stimulation of the pelvic nerves. Stimulation in bursts caused a small but significant increase in the output of somatostatin but there was no change in the output of substance P in response to either type of pelvic nerve stimulation. 4. The colonic muscular contraction in response to continuous stimulation of the pelvic nerves was not affected by somatostatin when infused intra-arterially at the large dose of 1.0 microgram/min. 5. It is concluded that the colonic responses of atropinized cats to pelvic nerve stimulation can be substantially altered merely by changing the pattern of stimulation. Thus, whereas continuous stimulation produces both muscular contraction and vasodilatation, stimulation in bursts favours vasodilatation but is ineffective in eliciting colonic contraction. PMID:6191025

  15. Relationship of vocal cord paralysis to the coil diameter of vagus nerve stimulator leads.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Leslie C; Winston, Ken R

    2015-03-01

    This investigation was done to examine, following implantation of vagus nerve stimulators, the relationship of vocal cord paralysis to the inner diameter of the coils used to attach the stimulator lead to the nerve. All data in this investigation were collected, as mandated by the FDA, by the manufacturer of vagus nerve stimulators and were made available without restrictions for analysis by the authors. The data reflect all initial device implantations in the United States for the period from 1997 through 2012. Vocal cord paralysis was reported in 193 of 51,882 implantations. In patients aged 18 years and older, the incidence of paralysis was 0.26% when the stimulator leads had coil diameters of 3 mm and 0.51% when the leads had 2-mm-diameter coils (p < 0.05). Across all age groups, the incidence of vocal cord paralysis increased with age at implantation for leads having 2-mm-diameter coils. In patients aged 18 years and older, vocal cord paralysis occurred at almost twice the rate with the implantation of vagus nerve stimulator leads having 2-mm-diameter coils than with leads having 3-mm-diameter coils. The incidence of vocal cord paralysis increases with patient age at implantation.

  16. A micro-scale printable nanoclip for electrical stimulation and recording in small nerves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lissandrello, Charles A.; Gillis, Winthrop F.; Shen, Jun; Pearre, Ben W.; Vitale, Flavia; Pasquali, Matteo; Holinski, Bradley J.; Chew, Daniel J.; White, Alice E.; Gardner, Timothy J.

    2017-06-01

    Objective. The vision of bioelectronic medicine is to treat disease by modulating the signaling of visceral nerves near various end organs. In small animal models, the nerves of interest can have small diameters and limited surgical access. New high-resolution methods for building nerve interfaces are desirable. In this study, we present a novel nerve interface and demonstrate its use for stimulation and recording in small nerves. Approach. We design and fabricate micro-scale electrode-laden nanoclips capable of interfacing with nerves as small as 50 µm in diameter. The nanoclips are fabricated using a direct laser writing technique with a resolution of 200 nm. The resolution of the printing process allows for incorporation of a number of innovations such as trapdoors to secure the device to the nerve, and quick-release mounts that facilitate keyhole surgery, obviating the need for forceps. The nanoclip can be built around various electrode materials; here we use carbon nanotube fibers for minimally invasive tethering. Main results. We present data from stimulation-evoked responses of the tracheal syringeal (hypoglossal) nerve of the zebra finch, as well as quantification of nerve functionality at various time points post implant, demonstrating that the nanoclip is compatible with healthy nerve activity over sub-chronic timescales. Significance. Our nerve interface addresses key challenges in interfacing with small nerves in the peripheral nervous system. Its small size, ability to remain on the nerve over sub-chronic timescales, and ease of implantation, make it a promising tool for future use in the treatment of disease.

  17. A micro-scale printable nanoclip for electrical stimulation and recording in small nerves.

    PubMed

    Lissandrello, Charles A; Gillis, Winthrop F; Shen, Jun; Pearre, Ben W; Vitale, Flavia; Pasquali, Matteo; Holinski, Bradley J; Chew, Daniel J; White, Alice E; Gardner, Timothy J

    2017-06-01

    The vision of bioelectronic medicine is to treat disease by modulating the signaling of visceral nerves near various end organs. In small animal models, the nerves of interest can have small diameters and limited surgical access. New high-resolution methods for building nerve interfaces are desirable. In this study, we present a novel nerve interface and demonstrate its use for stimulation and recording in small nerves. We design and fabricate micro-scale electrode-laden nanoclips capable of interfacing with nerves as small as 50 µm in diameter. The nanoclips are fabricated using a direct laser writing technique with a resolution of 200 nm. The resolution of the printing process allows for incorporation of a number of innovations such as trapdoors to secure the device to the nerve, and quick-release mounts that facilitate keyhole surgery, obviating the need for forceps. The nanoclip can be built around various electrode materials; here we use carbon nanotube fibers for minimally invasive tethering. We present data from stimulation-evoked responses of the tracheal syringeal (hypoglossal) nerve of the zebra finch, as well as quantification of nerve functionality at various time points post implant, demonstrating that the nanoclip is compatible with healthy nerve activity over sub-chronic timescales. Our nerve interface addresses key challenges in interfacing with small nerves in the peripheral nervous system. Its small size, ability to remain on the nerve over sub-chronic timescales, and ease of implantation, make it a promising tool for future use in the treatment of disease.

  18. Effects of Asymmetric Superior Laryngeal Nerve Stimulation on Glottic Posture, Acoustics, Vibration

    PubMed Central

    Chhetri, Dinesh K.; Neubauer, Juergen; Bergeron, Jennifer L.; Sofer, Elazar; Peng, Kevin A.; Jamal, Nausheen

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Evaluate the effects of asymmetric superior laryngeal nerve stimulation on the vibratory phase, laryngeal posture, and acoustics. Study Design Basic science study using an in vivo canine model. Methods The superior laryngeal nerves were symmetrically and asymmetrically stimulated over eight activation levels to mimic laryngeal asymmetries representing various levels of superior laryngeal nerve paresis and paralysis conditions. Glottal posture change, vocal fold speed, and vibration of these 64 distinct laryngeal activation conditions were evaluated by high speed video and concurrent acoustic and aerodynamic recordings. Assessments were made at phonation onset. Results Vibratory phase was symmetric in all symmetric activation conditions but consistent phase asymmetry towards the vocal fold with higher superior laryngeal nerve activation was observed. Superior laryngeal nerve paresis and paralysis conditions had reduced vocal fold strain and fundamental frequency. Superior laryngeal nerve activation increased vocal fold closure speed, but this effect was more pronounced for the ipsilateral vocal fold. Increasing asymmetry led to aperiodic and chaotic vibration. Conclusions This study directly links vocal fold tension asymmetry with vibratory phase asymmetry; in particular the side with greater tension leads in the opening phase. The clinical observations of vocal fold lag, reduced vocal range, and aperiodic voice in superior laryngeal paresis and paralysis is also supported. PMID:23712542

  19. The role of laryngeal electromyography in vagus nerve stimulation-related vocal fold dysmotility.

    PubMed

    Saibene, Alberto M; Zambrelli, Elena; Pipolo, Carlotta; Maccari, Alberto; Felisati, Giovanni; Felisati, Elena; Furia, Francesca; Vignoli, Aglaia; Canevini, Maria Paola; Alfonsi, Enrico

    2017-03-01

    Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is a useful tool for drug-resistant epilepsy, but it induces known laryngeal side effects, with a significant role on patients' quality of life. VNS patients may show persistent left vocal fold (LVF) palsy at rest and/or recurrent LVF adduction during stimulation. This study aims at electromyographically evaluating laryngeal muscles abnormalities in VNS patients. We compared endoscopic laryngeal evaluation data in six VNS patients with laryngeal muscle electromyography (LMEMG) carried out on the thyroarytenoid, cricothyroid, posterior cricoarytenoid, and cricopharyngeal muscles. Endoscopy showed LVF palsy at rest in 3/6 patients in whom LMEMG documented a tonic spastic activity with reduced phasic modulation. In four out of six patients with recurrent LVF adduction during VNS activation, LMEMG showed a compound muscle action potential persisting for the whole stimulation. This is the first LMEMG report of VNS-induced motor unit activation via recurrent laryngeal nerve and upper laryngeal nerve stimulation. LMEMG data were could, therefore, be considered consistent with the endoscopic laryngeal examination in all patient.

  20. [Electrical stimulation of the facial nerve with a prognostic function in parotid surgery].

    PubMed

    García-Losarcos, N; González-Hidalgo, M; Franco-Carcedo, C; Poch-Broto, J

    Continuous electromyography during parotidectomies and direct stimulation of the facial nerve as an intraoperative identification technique significantly lower the rate of post-operative morbidity. To determine the usefulness of intra-operative neurophysiological parameters registered by means of electrical stimulation of the facial nerve as values capable of predicting the type of lesion and the functional prognosis. Our sample consisted of a correlative series of 20 cases of monitored parotidectomies. Post-operative facial functioning, type of lesion and its prognosis were compared with the variations in latency/amplitude of the muscle response between two stimulations of the facial nerve before and after resection, as well as in the absence or presence of muscle response to stimulation after resection. All the patients except one presented motor evoked potentials (MEP) to stimulation after resection. There was no facial damage following the operation in 55% of patients and 45% presented some kind of paresis. The 21% drop in the amplitude of the intra-operative MEP and the mean increase in latency of 13.5% correspond to axonal and demyelinating insult, respectively, with a mean recovery time of three and six months. The only case of absence of response to the post-resection stimulation presented permanent paresis. The presence of MEP following resection does not ensure that functioning of the nerve remains undamaged. Nevertheless, it can be considered a piece of data that suggests a lower degree of compromise, if it is present, and a better prognosis. The variations in latency and amplitude of the MEP tend to be intra-operative parameters that indicate the degree of compromise and functional prognosis.

  1. Brief electrical stimulation after facial nerve transection and neurorrhaphy: a randomized prospective animal study.

    PubMed

    Mendez, Adrian; Seikaly, Hadi; Biron, Vincent L; Zhu, Lin Fu; Côté, David W J

    2016-02-01

    Recent studies have examined the effects of brief electrical stimulation (BES) on nerve regeneration, with some suggesting that BES accelerates facial nerve recovery. However, the facial nerve outcome measurement in these studies has not been precise or accurate. The objective of this study is to assess the effect of BES on accelerating facial nerve functional recovery from a transection injury in the rat model. A prospective randomized animal study using a rat model was performed. Two groups of 9 rats underwent facial nerve surgery. Both group 1 and 2 underwent facial nerve transection and repair at the main trunk of the nerve, with group 2 additionally receiving BES on post-operative day 0 for 1 h using an implantable stimulation device. Primary outcome was measured using a laser curtain model, which measured amplitude of whisking at 2, 4, and 6 weeks post-operatively. At week 2, the average amplitude observed for group 1 was 4.4°. Showing a statistically significant improvement over group 1, the group 2 mean was 14.0° at 2 weeks post-operatively (p = 0.0004). At week 4, group 1 showed improvement having an average of 9.7°, while group 2 remained relatively unchanged with an average of 12.8°. Group 1 had an average amplitude of 13.63° at 6-weeks from surgery. Group 2 had a similar increase in amplitude with an average of 15.8°. There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups at 4 and 6 weeks after facial nerve surgery. This is the first study to use an implantable stimulator for serial BES following neurorrhaphy in a validated animal model. Results suggest performing BES after facial nerve transection and neurorrhaphy at the main trunk of the facial nerve is associated with accelerated whisker movement in a rat model compared with a control group.

  2. Sciatic Nerve Stimulation and its Effects on Upper Airway Resistance in the Anesthetized Rabbit Model Relevant to Sleep Apnea.

    PubMed

    Schiefer, Matthew; Gamble, Jenniffer; Strohl, Kingman Perkins

    2018-06-07

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a disorder characterized by collapse of the velopharynx and/or oropharynx during sleep when drive to the upper airway is reduced. Here, we explore an indirect approach for activation of upper airway muscles which might affect airway dynamics- unilateral electrical stimulation of the afferent fibers of the sciatic nerve- in an anesthetized rabbit model. A nerve cuff electrode was placed around the sciatic and hypoglossal nerves to deliver stimulus while air flow, air pressure, and alae nasi electromyogram (EMG) were monitored both prior to and after sciatic transection. Sciatic nerve stimulation increased respiratory effort, rate, and alae nasi EMG, which persisted for seconds after stimulation; however, upper airway resistance was unchanged. Hypoglossal stimulation reduced resistance without altering drive. While sciatic nerve stimulation is not ideal for treating obstructive sleep apnea, it remains a target for altering respiratory drive.

  3. The effect of vagus nerve stimulation on response inhibition.

    PubMed

    Schevernels, Hanne; van Bochove, Marlies E; De Taeye, Leen; Bombeke, Klaas; Vonck, Kristl; Van Roost, Dirk; De Herdt, Veerle; Santens, Patrick; Raedt, Robrecht; Boehler, C Nico

    2016-11-01

    In the current study, we explored whether vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) in patients with epilepsy, which is believed to increase norepinephrine (NE) levels via activation of the locus coeruleus, would positively affect response inhibition. Moreover, we tried to identify the dynamics of the underlying neural processes by investigating event-related potentials (ERPs) and pupil size. Patients performed a stop-signal task once when stimulation was switched on and once when it was switched off. We found a correlational pattern suggesting that patients who clinically benefit more from VNS treatment also show a larger behavioral advantage, in terms of faster response inhibition, when the vagus nerve is being stimulated. Event-related potential (ERP) results suggested more pronounced reactive inhibition when stimulation was switched on, independent of the individual amount of seizure reduction. Transient go-locked pupil size was increased from go trials to successful stop trials to unsuccessful stop trials but without displaying a clear VNS effect, which however, might relate to limited sensitivity. We conclude that VNS likely has a positive effect on response inhibition, at least in patients with epilepsy that benefit clinically from the treatment, presumably relating to enhancements of response-inhibition mechanisms and, therefore, identify enhanced response inhibition as a possible cognitive benefit of VNS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. [Hypoglossal nerve stimulation in patients with CPAP failure : Evolution of an alternative treatment for patients with obstructive sleep apnea].

    PubMed

    Heiser, C; Hofauer, B

    2017-02-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common disease in western industrialized countries with increasing prevalence. Gold standard of therapy is nocturnal positive pressure ventilation by continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). Due to complications and side effects of ventilation, therapy adherence is limited. Recently an alternative surgical treatment has become available for these patients, which uses established techniques to stimulate the hypoglossus nerve to open the upper airway during sleep. The aim of this work is to provide an overview of the history and current state of scientific knowledge of this therapy in the treatment of OSA. Currently, two systems are available on the market: respiratory-driven hypoglossal nerve stimulation (Inspire Medical Systems) and continuous hypoglossal nerve stimulation (ImThera Medical). For respiratory-driven hypoglossal nerve stimulation, a solid body of evidence is available and the therapy has been investigated in numerous multicenter clinical studies with regard to safety and efficacy. Only a small number of publications is available for continuous hypoglossal nerve stimulation. At the end of the last century, promising clinical results were shown in the first patients treated with hypoglossal nerve stimulation. Consequent technological and scientific development of respiratory-driven hypoglossal nerve stimulation in recent years led to its implementation in today's clinical routine. This therapy significantly broadens the spectrum of therapies in the treatment of OSA, especially for patients with CPAP intolerance.

  5. Detection of a diabetic sural nerve from the magnetic field after electric stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayami, Takehito; Iramina, Keiji; Hyodo, Akira; Chen, Xian; Sunagawa, Kenji

    2009-04-01

    In this study, we proposed a new diagnostic technique for diabetic neuropathy using biomagnetic measurement. Peripheral neuropathy is one of the most common complications of diabetes. To examine the injury, the skin potential around the nerve is often measured after electric stimulation. However, measuring the magnetic field may reveal precise condition of the injury. To evaluate the effect of measuring the magnetic field, a simulation study was performed. A diabetic sural nerve was simulated as a bundle of myelinated nerve fibers. Each fiber was modeled as an electric cable of Ranvier's nodes. Anatomical data were used to determine the number of nerve fibers and distribution of nerve fiber diameters. The electric potential and the magnetic field on the skin after electric stimulation were computed to the boundary element method. Biphasic time courses were obtained as the electric potential and the magnetic flux density at measurement points. In diabetic nerves, the longer interpeak latency of the electric potential wave and the shorter interpeak latency of the magnetic flux wave were obtained. Measuring both the electric potential and the magnetic flux density seemed to provide a noninvasive and objective marker for diabetic neuropathy.

  6. 21 CFR 882.5830 - Implanted diaphragmatic/phrenic nerve stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Implanted diaphragmatic/phrenic nerve stimulator. 882.5830 Section 882.5830 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5830...

  7. 21 CFR 882.5830 - Implanted diaphragmatic/phrenic nerve stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Implanted diaphragmatic/phrenic nerve stimulator. 882.5830 Section 882.5830 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5830...

  8. Transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation (tVNS) enhances recognition of emotions in faces but not bodies.

    PubMed

    Sellaro, Roberta; de Gelder, Beatrice; Finisguerra, Alessandra; Colzato, Lorenza S

    2018-02-01

    The polyvagal theory suggests that the vagus nerve is the key phylogenetic substrate enabling optimal social interactions, a crucial aspect of which is emotion recognition. A previous study showed that the vagus nerve plays a causal role in mediating people's ability to recognize emotions based on images of the eye region. The aim of this study is to verify whether the previously reported causal link between vagal activity and emotion recognition can be generalized to situations in which emotions must be inferred from images of whole faces and bodies. To this end, we employed transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation (tVNS), a novel non-invasive brain stimulation technique that causes the vagus nerve to fire by the application of a mild electrical stimulation to the auricular branch of the vagus nerve, located in the anterior protuberance of the outer ear. In two separate sessions, participants received active or sham tVNS before and while performing two emotion recognition tasks, aimed at indexing their ability to recognize emotions from facial and bodily expressions. Active tVNS, compared to sham stimulation, enhanced emotion recognition for whole faces but not for bodies. Our results confirm and further extend recent observations supporting a causal relationship between vagus nerve activity and the ability to infer others' emotional state, but restrict this association to situations in which the emotional state is conveyed by the whole face and/or by salient facial cues, such as eyes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation in Children with Monosymptomatic Nocturnal Enuresis: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo Controlled Study.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Cecilie Siggaard; Kamperis, Konstantinos; Borch, Luise; Borg, Britt; Rittig, Søren

    2017-09-01

    In a third of all children with monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis their condition is refractory to first line treatments. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation has been documented to be efficacious in children with daytime incontinence. We investigated the effect of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation in children with monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis without nocturnal polyuria. Children with monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis (3 or more wet nights per week) and no nocturnal polyuria were randomized to treatment with active or sham transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation involving 1-hour sessions twice daily for 10 weeks in a double-blind design. Of the 52 children with monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis included in the study 47 completed treatment (mean age 9.5 ± 2.1 years, 38 males). None of the children experienced a full response with complete remission of enuresis. Treatment with transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation did not lead to significant changes in number of wet nights, nocturnal urine production on wet or dry nights, maximum voided volume with and without first morning voided volume, or voiding frequency when comparing parameters before and after treatment. The present study demonstrates no anti-enuretic effect of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation in children with monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis without nocturnal polyuria. Nocturnal urine production and bladder capacity remained unchanged during and after treatment with transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation. Copyright © 2017 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Normal and sonographic anatomy of selected peripheral nerves. Part III: Peripheral nerves of the lower limb.

    PubMed

    Kowalska, Berta; Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona

    2012-06-01

    The ultrasonographic examination is currently increasingly used in imaging peripheral nerves, serving to supplement the physical examination, electromyography and magnetic resonance imaging. As in the case of other USG imaging studies, the examination of peripheral nerves is non-invasive and well-tolerated by patients. The typical ultrasonographic picture of peripheral nerves as well as the examination technique have been discussed in part I of this article series, following the example of the median nerve. Part II of the series presented the normal anatomy and the technique for examining the peripheral nerves of the upper limb. This part of the article series focuses on the anatomy and technique for examining twelve normal peripheral nerves of the lower extremity: the iliohypogastric and ilioinguinal nerves, the lateral cutaneous nerve of the thigh, the pudendal, sciatic, tibial, sural, medial plantar, lateral plantar, common peroneal, deep peroneal and superficial peroneal nerves. It includes diagrams showing the proper positioning of the sonographic probe, plus USG images of the successively discussed nerves and their surrounding structures. The ultrasonographic appearance of the peripheral nerves in the lower limb is identical to the nerves in the upper limb. However, when imaging the lower extremity, convex probes are more often utilized, to capture deeply-seated nerves. The examination technique, similarly to that used in visualizing the nerves of upper extremity, consists of locating the nerve at a characteristic anatomic reference point and tracking it using the "elevator technique". All 3 parts of the article series should serve as an introduction to a discussion of peripheral nerve pathologies, which will be presented in subsequent issues of the "Journal of Ultrasonography".

  11. Normal and sonographic anatomy of selected peripheral nerves. Part III: Peripheral nerves of the lower limb

    PubMed Central

    Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona

    2012-01-01

    The ultrasonographic examination is currently increasingly used in imaging peripheral nerves, serving to supplement the physical examination, electromyography and magnetic resonance imaging. As in the case of other USG imaging studies, the examination of peripheral nerves is non-invasive and well-tolerated by patients. The typical ultrasonographic picture of peripheral nerves as well as the examination technique have been discussed in part I of this article series, following the example of the median nerve. Part II of the series presented the normal anatomy and the technique for examining the peripheral nerves of the upper limb. This part of the article series focuses on the anatomy and technique for examining twelve normal peripheral nerves of the lower extremity: the iliohypogastric and ilioinguinal nerves, the lateral cutaneous nerve of the thigh, the pudendal, sciatic, tibial, sural, medial plantar, lateral plantar, common peroneal, deep peroneal and superficial peroneal nerves. It includes diagrams showing the proper positioning of the sonographic probe, plus USG images of the successively discussed nerves and their surrounding structures. The ultrasonographic appearance of the peripheral nerves in the lower limb is identical to the nerves in the upper limb. However, when imaging the lower extremity, convex probes are more often utilized, to capture deeply-seated nerves. The examination technique, similarly to that used in visualizing the nerves of upper extremity, consists of locating the nerve at a characteristic anatomic reference point and tracking it using the “elevator technique”. All 3 parts of the article series should serve as an introduction to a discussion of peripheral nerve pathologies, which will be presented in subsequent issues of the “Journal of Ultrasonography”. PMID:26674560

  12. The electrophysiology of thyroid surgery: electrophysiologic and muscular responses with stimulation of the vagus nerve, recurrent laryngeal nerve, and external branch of the superior laryngeal nerve.

    PubMed

    Liddy, Whitney; Barber, Samuel R; Cinquepalmi, Matteo; Lin, Brian M; Patricio, Stephanie; Kyriazidis, Natalia; Bellotti, Carlo; Kamani, Dipti; Mahamad, Sadhana; Dralle, Henning; Schneider, Rick; Dionigi, Gianlorenzo; Barczynski, Marcin; Wu, Che-Wei; Chiang, Feng Yu; Randolph, Gregory

    2017-03-01

    Correlation of physiologically important electromyographic (EMG) waveforms with demonstrable muscle activation is important for the reliable interpretation of evoked waveforms during intraoperative neural monitoring (IONM) of the vagus nerve, recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN), and external branch of the superior laryngeal nerve (EBSLN) in thyroid surgery. Retrospective chart review. Data were reviewed retrospectively for thyroid surgery patients with laryngeal nerve IONM from January to December, 2015. EMG responses to monopolar stimulation of the vagus/RLN and EBSLN were recorded in bilateral vocalis, cricothyroid (CTM), and strap muscles using endotracheal tube-based surface and intramuscular hook electrodes, respectively. Target muscles for vagal/RLN and EBSLN stimulation were the ipsilateral vocalis and CTM, respectively. All other recording channels were nontarget muscles. Fifty surgical sides were identified in 37 subjects. All target muscle mean amplitudes were significantly higher than in nontarget muscles. With vagal/RLN stimulation, target ipsilateral vocalis mean amplitude was 1,095.7 μV (mean difference range = -814.1 to -1,078 μV, P < .0001). For EBSLN stimulation, target ipsilateral CTM mean amplitude was 6,379.3 μV (mean difference range = -6,222.6 to -6,362.3 μV, P < .0001). Target muscle large-amplitude EMG responses correlated with meaningful visual or palpable muscular responses, whereas nontarget EMG responses showed no meaningful muscle activation. Target and nontarget laryngeal muscles are differentiated based on divergence of EMG response directly correlating with presence or absence of visual and palpable muscle activation. Low-amplitude EMG waveforms in nontarget muscles with neural stimulation can be explained by the concept of far-field artifactual waveforms and do not correspond to a true muscular response. The surgeon should be aware of these nonphysiologic waveforms when interpreting and applying IONM during thyroid surgery. 4

  13. Novel use of narrow paddle electrodes for occipital nerve stimulation--technical note.

    PubMed

    Abhinav, Kumar; Park, Nicholas D; Prakash, Savithru K; Love-Jones, Sarah; Patel, Nikunj K

    2013-01-01

    Occipital nerve stimulation (ONS), an established treatment for medically intractable headache syndromes, has lead migration rates quoted up to 24%. In a series of patients with ideal characteristics for this treatment modality, we describe an operative technique for ONS involving the novel use of narrow paddle electrodes: "S8 Lamitrode" (St. Jude Medical [SJM], St. Paul, MN, USA). Five patients (occipital neuralgia [ON] = 4; chronic migraine [CM] = 1) were treated with ONS between 2010 and 2011. All patients had a successful trial of peripheral neurostimulation (Algotec Ltd, Crawley, UK) therapy. Operative technique involved the use of a park-bench position, allowing simultaneous exposure of the occipital and infraclavicular regions. Through a retromastoid/occipital incision just beneath the external occipital protruberance, exposing the extrafascial plane, the S8 Lamitrode is implanted to intersect both greater occipital nerves for bilateral pain or unilateral greater and lesser occipital nerves for unilateral ON or with significant component of the pain relating to the lesser occipital nerve. Over the median follow-up of 12 months, there were no episodes of lead migration or revision. There also was significant improvement in symptoms in all patients. This is the first reported use of S8 Lamitrode electrode for ONS. This narrow electrode is suited for this role leading to minimal trauma during surgical placement, facilitates resolution of problems with lead migration, and optimizes effect with stimulation focused more in direction of the occipital nerves without skin involvement. To date, the SJM Genesis neurostimulation system, with percutaneous electrodes only, is CE mark approved in Europe for peripheral nerve stimulation of the occipital nerves for the management of pain and disability for patients diagnosed with intractable CM. Further developments and studies are required for better devices to suit ONS, thereby avoiding frequently encountered

  14. Diadenosine Polyphosphates Suppress the Effects of Sympathetic Nerve Stimulation in Rabbit Heart Pacemaker.

    PubMed

    Abramochkin, D V; Pustovit, K B; Kuz'min, V S

    2017-09-01

    The modulatory influence of diadenosine tetraphosphate (Ap4A) and diadenosine pentaphosphate (Ap5A) on the effect of intramural autonomic nerve stimulation in isolated rabbit sinoatrial node were examined. Electrical activity of the sinoatrial node was recorded intracellularly. Against the background of blockade of adrenergic effects with propranolol (3×10 -6 M) or in preparations isolated 2 h after injection of reserpine (2 mg/kg), nerve stimulation induced short-term membrane hyperpolarization and diminished the sinus node firing rate. These phenomena were not affected by Ap4A or Ap5A (10 -5 M). Under the action of atropine (3×10 -6 M) that completely eliminated the cholinergic influences, nerve stimulation enhanced the sinus node firing rate by 17.30±3.45% from the initial rate. Both Ap4A and Ap5A moderated the stimulation-induced elevation of firing rate to 9.9±2.8 and 10.5±2.9%, respectively. The data suggest that diadenosine polyphosphates significantly modulate the sympathetic influences on the heart rhythm, but have no effect on the parasympathetic control over activity of sinoatrial node.

  15. Technical Note: Treatment of Sacroiliac Joint Pain with Peripheral Nerve Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Guentchev, Marin; Preuss, Christian; Rink, Rainer; Peter, Levente; Wocker, Ernst-Ludwig; Tuettenberg, Jochen

    2015-07-01

    Sacroiliac joint (SIJ) pain affects older adults with a prevalence of up to 20% among patients with chronic low back pain. While pain medication, joint blocks and denervation procedures achieve pain relief in most patients, some cases fail to improve. Our goal was to determine the effectiveness of SIJ peripheral nerve stimulation in patients with severe conservative therapy-refractory SIJ pain. Here we present 12 patients with severe conservative therapy-refractory pain receiving an SIJ peripheral nerve stimulation. Patient satisfaction, pain, and quality of life were evaluated by means of the International Patient Satisfaction Index (IPSI), visual analog scale (VAS), and Oswestry Disability Index 2.0 (ODI) using standard questionnaires. For stimulation we placed an eight-pole peripheral nerve electrode parallel to the SIJ. Two weeks postoperatively, our patients reported an average ODI reduction from 57% to 32% and VAS from 9 to 2.1. IPSI was 1.1. After six months, the therapy was rated as effective in seven out of eight patients reporting at that period. The average ODI was low at 34% (p = 0.0006), while the VAS index rose to 3.8 (p < 0.0001) and IPSI to 1.9. Twelve months after stimulation, six out of seven patients considered their treatment a success with an average ODI of 21% (p < 0.0005), VAS 1.7 (p < 0.0001), and IPSI 1.3. We conclude that SIJ stimulation is a promising therapeutic strategy in the treatment of intractable SIJ pain. Further studies are required to determine the precise target group and long-term effect of this novel treatment method. © 2014 International Neuromodulation Society.

  16. Mechanisms underlying electrical and mechanical responses of the bovine retractor penis to inhibitory nerve stimulation and to an inhibitory extract.

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, N. G.; Muir, T. C.

    1985-01-01

    The response of the bovine retractor penis (BRP) to stimulation of non-adrenergic, non-cholinergic (NANC) inhibitory nerves and to an inhibitory extract prepared from this muscle have been studied using intracellular microelectrode, sucrose gap and conventional mechanical recording techniques. Both inhibitory nerve stimulation and inhibitory extract hyperpolarized the membrane potential and relaxed spontaneous or guanethidine (3 X 10(-5) M)-induced tone. These effects were accompanied by an increase in membrane resistance. Following membrane potential displacement from an average value of -53 +/- 7 mV (n = 184; Byrne & Muir, 1984) inhibitory potentials to nerve stimulation were abolished at approximately -30 mV; there was no evidence of reversal. Displacement by inward hyperpolarizing current over the range -45 to -60 mV increased the inhibitory response to nerve stimulation and to inhibitory extract; at more negative potential values (above approximately -60 mV) the inhibitory potential decreased and was abolished (approximately -103 mV). There was no evidence of reversal. Removal of [K+]o reversibly reduced hyperpolarization to nerve stimulation and inhibitory extract. No enhancement was observed. Increasing the [K+]o to 20 mM reduced the inhibitory potential to nerve stimulation but this was restored by passive membrane hyperpolarization. Inhibitory potentials were obtained at membrane potential values exceeding that of the estimated EK (-49 mV). [Cl-]o-free or [Cl-]o-deficient solutions reduced and abolished (after some 20-25 min) the hyperpolarization produced by inhibitory nerve stimulation or inhibitory extract. The inhibitory potential amplitude following nerve stimulation was not restored by passive displacement of the membrane potential from -26 to -104 mV approximately. Ouabain (1-5 X 10(-5) M) reduced then (45-60 min later) abolished the inhibitory potential to nerve stimulation. The effects of this drug on the extract were not investigated. It is

  17. Mechanisms underpinning sympathetic nervous activity and its modulation using transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation.

    PubMed

    Deuchars, Susan A; Lall, Varinder K; Clancy, Jennifer; Mahadi, Mohd; Murray, Aaron; Peers, Lucy; Deuchars, Jim

    2018-03-01

    What is the topic of this review? This review briefly considers what modulates sympathetic nerve activity and how it may change as we age or in pathological conditions. It then focuses on transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation, a method of neuromodulation in autonomic cardiovascular control. What advances does it highlight? The review considers the pathways involved in eliciting the changes in autonomic balance seen with transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation in relationship to other neuromodulatory techniques. The autonomic nervous system, consisting of the sympathetic and parasympathetic branches, is a major contributor to the maintenance of cardiovascular variables within homeostatic limits. As we age or in certain pathological conditions, the balance between the two branches changes such that sympathetic activity is more dominant, and this change in dominance is negatively correlated with prognosis in conditions such as heart failure. We have shown that non-invasive stimulation of the tragus of the ear increases parasympathetic activity and reduces sympathetic activity and that the extent of this effect is correlated with the baseline cardiovascular parameters of different subjects. The effects could be attributable to activation of the afferent branch of the vagus and, potentially, other sensory nerves in that region. This indicates that tragus stimulation may be a viable treatment in disorders where autonomic activity to the heart is compromised. © 2017 The Authors. Experimental Physiology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of The Physiological Society.

  18. Effects of patterned peripheral nerve stimulation on soleus spinal motor neuron excitability

    PubMed Central

    Dileone, Michele; Campolo, Michela; Carrasco-Lopez, Carmen; Moitinho-Ferreira, Fabricia; Gallego-Izquierdo, Tomas; Siebner, Hartwig R.; Valls-Solé, Josep; Aguilar, Juan

    2018-01-01

    Spinal plasticity is thought to contribute to sensorimotor recovery of limb function in several neurological disorders and can be experimentally induced in animals and humans using different stimulation protocols. In healthy individuals, electrical continuous Theta Burst Stimulation (TBS) of the median nerve has been shown to change spinal motoneuron excitability in the cervical spinal cord as indexed by a change in mean H-reflex amplitude in the flexor carpi radialis muscle. It is unknown whether continuous TBS of a peripheral nerve can also shift motoneuron excitability in the lower limb. In 26 healthy subjects, we examined the effects of electrical TBS given to the tibial nerve in the popliteal fossa on the excitability of lumbar spinal motoneurons as measured by H-reflex amplitude of the soleus muscle evoked by tibial nerve stimulation. Continuous TBS was given at 110% of H-reflex threshold intensity and compared to non-patterned regular electrical stimulation at 15 Hz. To disclose any pain-induced effects, we also tested the effects of TBS at individual sensory threshold. Moreover, in a subgroup of subjects we evaluated paired-pulse inhibition of H-reflex. Continuous TBS at 110% of H-reflex threshold intensity induced a short-term reduction of H-reflex amplitude. The other stimulation conditions produced no after effects. Paired-pulse H-reflex inhibition was not modulated by continuous TBS or non-patterned repetitive stimulation at 15 Hz. An effect of pain on the results obtained was discarded, since non-patterned 15 Hz stimulation at 110% HT led to pain scores similar to those induced by EcTBS at 110% HT, but was not able to induce any modulation of the H reflex amplitude. Together, the results provide first time evidence that peripheral continuous TBS induces a short-lasting change in the excitability of spinal motoneurons in lower limb circuitries. Future studies need to investigate how the TBS protocol can be optimized to produce a larger and longer effect

  19. NERVE ENTRAPMENT IN THE HIP REGION: CURRENT CONCEPTS REVIEW

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Hal David; Kivlan, Benjamin R.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this clinical commentary is to review the anatomy, etiology, evaluation, and treatment techniques for nerve entrapments of the hip region. Nerve entrapment can occur around musculotendinous, osseous, and ligamentous structures because of the potential for increased strain and compression on the peripheral nerve at those sites. The sequela of localized trauma may also result in nerve entrapment if normal nerve gliding is prevented. Nerve entrapment can be difficult to diagnose because patient complaints may be similar to and coexist with other musculoskeletal conditions in the hip and pelvic region. However, a detailed description of symptom location and findings from a comprehensive physical examination can be used to determine if an entrapment has occurred, and if so where. The sciatic, pudendal, obturator, femoral, and lateral femoral cutaneous are nerves that can be entrapped and serve a source of hip pain in the athletic population. Manual therapy, stretching and strengthening exercises, aerobic conditioning, and cognitive-behavioral education are potential interventions. When conservative treatment is ineffective at relieving symptoms surgical treatment with neurolysis or neurectomy may be considered. Level of Evidence 5 PMID:29234567

  20. Left phrenic nerve anatomy relative to the coronary venous system: Implications for phrenic nerve stimulation during cardiac resynchronization therapy.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Julianne H; Goff, Ryan P; Iaizzo, Paul A

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this study was to quantitatively characterize anatomy of the human phrenic nerve in relation to the coronary venous system, to reduce undesired phrenic nerve stimulation during left-sided lead implantations. We obtained CT scans while injecting contrast into coronary veins of 15 perfusion-fixed human heart-lung blocs. A radiopaque wire was glued to the phrenic nerve under CT, then we created three-dimensional models of anatomy and measured anatomical parameters. The left phrenic nerve typically coursed over the basal region of the anterior interventricular vein, mid region of left marginal veins, and apical region of inferior and middle cardiac veins. There was large variation associated with the average angle between nerve and veins. Average angle across all coronary sinus tributaries was fairly consistent (101.3°-111.1°). The phrenic nerve coursed closest to the middle cardiac vein and left marginal veins. The phrenic nerve overlapped a left marginal vein in >50% of specimens. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Brain plasticity after implanted peroneal nerve electrical stimulation to improve gait in chronic stroke patients: Two case reports.

    PubMed

    Thibaut, Aurore; Moissenet, Florent; Di Perri, Carol; Schreiber, Céline; Remacle, Angélique; Kolanowski, Elisabeth; Chantraine, Frédéric; Bernard, Claire; Hustinx, Roland; Tshibanda, Jean-Flory; Filipetti, Paul; Laureys, Steven; Gosseries, Olivia

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that stimulation of the peroneal nerve using an implantable 4-channel peroneal nerve stimulator could improve gait in stroke patients. To assess structural cortical and regional cerebral metabolism changes associated with an implanted peroneal nerve electrical stimulator to correct foot drop related to a central nervous system lesion. Two stroke patients presenting a foot drop related to a central nervous system lesion were implanted with an implanted peroneal nerve electrical stimulator. Both patients underwent clinical evaluations before implantation and one year after the activation of the stimulator. Structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) were acquired before and one year after the activation of the stimulator. Foot drop was corrected for both patients after the implantation of the stimulator. After one year of treatment, patient 1 improved in three major clinical tests, while patient 2 only improved in one test. Prior to treatment, FDG-PET showed a significant hypometabolism in premotor, primary and supplementary motor areas in both patients as compared to controls, with patient 2 presenting more widespread hypometabolism. One year after the activation of the stimulator, both patients showed significantly less hypometabolism in the damaged motor cortex. No difference was observed on the structural MRI. Clinical improvement of gait under peroneal nerve electrical stimulation in chronic stroke patients presenting foot drop was paralleled to metabolic changes in the damaged motor cortex.

  2. Evoked pain analgesia in chronic pelvic pain patients using respiratory-gated auricular vagal afferent nerve stimulation.

    PubMed

    Napadow, Vitaly; Edwards, Robert R; Cahalan, Christine M; Mensing, George; Greenbaum, Seth; Valovska, Assia; Li, Ang; Kim, Jieun; Maeda, Yumi; Park, Kyungmo; Wasan, Ajay D

    2012-06-01

    Previous vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) studies have demonstrated antinociceptive effects, and recent noninvasive approaches, termed transcutaneous-vagus nerve stimulation (t-VNS), have utilized stimulation of the auricular branch of the vagus nerve in the ear. The dorsal medullary vagal system operates in tune with respiration, and we propose that supplying vagal afferent stimulation gated to the exhalation phase of respiration can optimize t-VNS. Counterbalanced, crossover study. Patients with chronic pelvic pain (CPP) due to endometriosis in a specialty pain clinic. INTERVENTIONS/OUTCOMES: We evaluated evoked pain analgesia for respiratory-gated auricular vagal afferent nerve stimulation (RAVANS) compared with nonvagal auricular stimulation (NVAS). RAVANS and NVAS were evaluated in separate sessions spaced at least 1 week apart. Outcome measures included deep-tissue pain intensity, temporal summation of pain, and anxiety ratings, which were assessed at baseline, during active stimulation, immediately following stimulation, and 15 minutes after stimulus cessation. RAVANS demonstrated a trend for reduced evoked pain intensity and temporal summation of mechanical pain, and significantly reduced anxiety in N = 15 CPP patients, compared with NVAS, with moderate to large effect sizes (η(2) > 0.2). Chronic pain disorders such as CPP are in great need of effective, nonpharmacological options for treatment. RAVANS produced promising antinociceptive effects for quantitative sensory testing (QST) outcomes reflective of the noted hyperalgesia and central sensitization in this patient population. Future studies should evaluate longer-term application of RAVANS to examine its effects on both QST outcomes and clinical pain. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Electrophysiological Basis of Fecal Incontinence and Its Implications for Treatment

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The majority of patients with neuropathic incontinence and other pelvic floor conditions associated with straining at stool have damage to the pudendal nerves distal to the ischial spine. Sacral nerve stimulation appears to be a promising innovation and has been widely adopted and currently considered the standard of care for adults with moderate to severe fecal incontinence and following failed sphincter repair. From a decision-to-treat perspective, the short-term efficacy is good (70%–80%), but the long-term efficacy of sacral nerve stimulation is around 50%. Newer electrophysiological tests and improved anal endosonography would more effectively guide clinical decision making. PMID:29159162

  4. Supraspinal control of external anal sphincter motility: effects of vesical distension in humans and cats.

    PubMed

    Vitton, V; Grimaud, J-C; Bouvier, M; Abysique, A

    2006-11-01

    A pontine centre located near the micturition centre controlling external anal sphincter (EAS) motility via noradrenergic neurones has been described in cats. The aim of this study was to determine (i) whether a similar centre controls EAS motility in humans and (ii) whether this centre is involved in vesico-sphincteric reflexes in cats and humans. The effects of an alpha-1-adrenoceptor antagonist (nicergoline) and those of vesical distension on the electrical activity of the EAS were studied in paraplegic and non-paraplegic volunteers. The effects of vesical distension by injecting saline at physiological levels on the responses of the EAS to pudendal nerve stimulation were investigated in intact cats and cats with nerve sections. In non-paraplegic subjects, nicergoline and vesical distension abolished the activity of the EAS. These effects were no longer observed in paraplegic patients. In cats, vesical distension inhibited the reflex response of the EAS to pudendal nerve stimulation. This vesico-sphincteric reflex, which was no longer observed in spinal animals, persisted after nicergoline injection. These findings indicate that in humans, there exists a supra-spinal centre facilitating the tonic activity of the EAS via noradrenergic neurones not involved in the inhibitory vesico-sphincteric reflex.

  5. The combined effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) and stretching on muscle hardness and pressure pain threshold.

    PubMed

    Karasuno, Hiroshi; Ogihara, Hisayoshi; Morishita, Katsuyuki; Yokoi, Yuka; Fujiwara, Takayuki; Ogoma, Yoshiro; Abe, Koji

    2016-04-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to clarify the immediate effects of a combined transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and stretching protocol. [Subjects] Fifteen healthy young males volunteered to participate in this study. The inclusion criterion was a straight leg raising range of motion of less than 70 degrees. [Methods] Subjects performed two protocols: 1) stretching (S group) of the medial hamstrings, and 2) tanscutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (100 Hz) with stretching (TS group). The TS group included a 20-minute electrical stimulation period followed by 10 minutes of stretching. The S group performed 10 minutes of stretching. Muscle hardness, pressure pain threshold, and straight leg raising range of motion were analyzed to evaluate the effects. The data were collected before transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (T1), before stretching (T2), immediately after stretching (T3), and 10 minutes after stretching (T4). [Results] Combined transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and stretching had significantly beneficial effects on muscle hardness, pressure pain threshold, and straight leg raising range of motion at T2, T3, and T4 compared with T1. [Conclusion] These results support the belief that transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation combined with stretching is effective in reducing pain and decreasing muscle hardness, thus increasing range of motion.

  6. Ultrasound-guided placement of a permanent percutaneous femoral nerve stimulator leads for the treatment of intractable femoral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Narouze, Samer N; Zakari, Adel; Vydyanathan, Amaresh

    2009-01-01

    Femoral nerve injury is a rare complication of cardiac catheterization and is usually caused by direct trauma during femoral artery access, compression from a hematoma, or prolonged digital pressure for post-procedural hemostasis. Peripheral nerve stimulation has been used to treat different pain syndromes in the upper and lower extremities with variable success and it typically requires direct vision with open surgical approach. Since the femoral nerve can be readily seen with ultrasonography, an ultrasound-guided lead placement seemed practical. A 61-year-old morbidly obese male who sustained femoral nerve injury during cardiac catheterization continued to complain of intractable femoral neuropathy 18 months afterwords. He failed multiple treatment modalities and continued to complain of severe neuropathic pains that markedly interfere with his daily activities. Two percutaneous leads were placed under real-time ultrasonography and the placement was confirmed with fluoroscopy. One lead was placed along the longitudinal axis of the nerve and the patient had good coverage over the anterior thigh but not below the knee. So another lead was placed horizontally across the femoral nerve in order to stimulate all the branches and the patient reported good coverage along the saphenous nerve distribution down to the foot. The patient continues to be pain free 20 months after the implant. Here we described a novel non-invasive percutaneous approach for femoral nerve stimulation with ultrasound guidance which allowed precise placement of the stimulating lead very close to the femoral nerve without the need for surgical exploration.

  7. Daily Electrical Muscle Stimulation Enhances Functional Recovery Following Nerve Transection and Repair in Rats.

    PubMed

    Willand, Michael P; Chiang, Cameron D; Zhang, Jennifer J; Kemp, Stephen W P; Borschel, Gregory H; Gordon, Tessa

    2015-08-01

    Incomplete recovery following surgical reconstruction of damaged peripheral nerves is common. Electrical muscle stimulation (EMS) to improve functional outcomes has not been effective in previous studies. To evaluate the efficacy of a new, clinically translatable EMS paradigm over a 3-month period following nerve transection and immediate repair. Rats were divided into 6 groups based on treatment (EMS or no treatment) and duration (1, 2, or 3 months). A tibial nerve transection injury was immediately repaired with 2 epineurial sutures. The right gastrocnemius muscle in all rats was implanted with intramuscular electrodes. In the EMS group, the muscle was electrically stimulated with 600 contractions per day, 5 days a week. Terminal measurements were made after 1, 2, or 3 months. Rats in the 3-month group were assessed weekly using skilled and overground locomotion tests. Neuromuscular junction reinnervation patterns were also examined. Muscles that received daily EMS had significantly greater numbers of reinnervated motor units with smaller average motor unit sizes. The majority of muscle endplates were reinnervated by a single axon arising from a nerve trunk with significantly fewer numbers of terminal sprouts in the EMS group, the numbers being small. Muscle mass and force were unchanged but EMS improved behavioral outcomes. Our results demonstrated that EMS using a moderate stimulation paradigm immediately following nerve transection and repair enhances electrophysiological and behavioral recovery. © The Author(s) 2014.

  8. Selective recurrent laryngeal nerve stimulation using a penetrating electrode array in the feline model.

    PubMed

    Haidar, Yarah M; Sahyouni, Ronald; Moshtaghi, Omid; Wang, Beverly Y; Djalilian, Hamid R; Middlebrooks, John C; Verma, Sunil P; Lin, Harrison W

    2017-10-31

    Laryngeal muscles (LMs) are controlled by the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN), injury of which can result in vocal fold (VF) paralysis (VFP). We aimed to introduce a bioelectric approach to selective stimulation of LMs and graded muscle contraction responses. Acute experiments in cats. The study included six anesthetized cats. In four cats, a multichannel penetrating microelectrode array (MEA) was placed into an uninjured RLN. For RLN injury experiments, one cat received a standardized hemostat-crush injury, and one cat received a transection-reapproximation injury 4 months prior to testing. In each experiment, three LMs (thyroarytenoid, posterior cricoarytenoid, and cricothyroid muscles) were monitored with an electromyographic (EMG) nerve integrity monitoring system. Electrical current pulses were delivered to each stimulating channel individually. Elicited EMG voltage outputs were recorded for each muscle. Direct videolaryngoscopy was performed for visualization of VF movement. Stimulation through individual channels led to selective activation of restricted nerve populations, resulting in selective contraction of individual LMs. Increasing current levels resulted in rising EMG voltage responses. Typically, activation of individual muscles was successfully achieved via single placement of the MEA by selection of appropriate stimulation channels. VF abduction was predominantly observed on videolaryngoscopy. Nerve histology confirmed injury in cases of RLN crush and transection experiments. We demonstrated the ability of a penetrating MEA to selectively stimulate restricted fiber populations within the feline RLN and selectively elicit contractions of discrete LMs in both acute and injury-model experiments, suggesting a potential role for intraneural MEA implantation in VFP management. NA Laryngoscope, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  9. Long-term durability of sacral nerve stimulation therapy for chronic fecal incontinence.

    PubMed

    Hull, Tracy; Giese, Chad; Wexner, Steven D; Mellgren, Anders; Devroede, Ghislain; Madoff, Robert D; Stromberg, Katherine; Coller, John A

    2013-02-01

    Limited data have been published regarding the long-term results of sacral nerve stimulation, or sacral neuromodulation, for severe fecal incontinence. The aim was to assess the outcome of sacral nerve stimulation with the use of precise tools and data collection, focusing on the long-term durability of the therapy. Five-year data were analyzed. Patients entered in a multicenter, prospective study for fecal incontinence were followed at 3, 6, and 12 months and annually after device implantation. Patients with chronic fecal incontinence in whom conservative treatments had failed or who were not candidates for more conservative treatments were selected. Patients with ≥ 50% improvement over baseline in fecal incontinence episodes per week during a 14-day test stimulation period received sacral nerve stimulation therapy. Patients were assessed with a 14-day bowel diary and Fecal Incontinence Quality of Life and Fecal Incontinence Severity Index questionnaires. Therapeutic success was defined as ≥ 50% improvement over baseline in fecal incontinence episodes per week. All adverse events were collected. A total of 120 patients (110 women; mean age, 60.5 years) underwent implantation. Seventy-six of these patients (63%) were followed a minimum of 5 years (maximum, longer than 8 years) and are the basis for this report. Fecal incontinence episodes per week decreased from a mean of 9.1 at baseline to 1.7 at 5 years, with 89% (n = 64/72) having ≥ 50% improvement (p < 0.0001) and 36% (n = 26/72) having complete continence. Fecal Incontinence Quality of Life scores also significantly improved for all 4 scales between baseline and 5 years (n = 70; p < 0.0001). Twenty-seven of the 76 (35.5%) patients required a device revision, replacement, or explant. The therapeutic effect and improved quality of life for fecal incontinence is maintained 5 years after sacral nerve stimulation implantation and beyond. Device revision, replacement, or explant rate was acceptable, but future

  10. Comparison of percutaneous electrical nerve stimulation with transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation for long-term pain relief in patients with chronic low back pain.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Masataka; Sun, Xiaohui; Oku, Satoru; Taga, Naoyuki; Sato, Kenji; Mizobuchi, Satoshi; Takahashi, Toru; Morita, Kiyoshi

    2004-06-01

    The long-term effect of percutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (PENS) on chronic low back pain (LBP) is unclear. We evaluated the number of sessions for which PENS should be performed to alleviate chronic LBP and how long analgesia is sustained. Patients underwent treatment on a twice-weekly schedule for 8 wk. Group A (n = 18) received PENS for 8 wk, group B (n = 17) received PENS for the first 4 wk and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) for the second 4 wk, and group C (n = 18) received TENS for 8 wk. Pain level, degree of physical impairment, and the daily intake of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) were assessed before the first treatment, 3 days after Week 2, Week 4, and Week 8 treatments, and at 1 and 2 mo after the sessions. During PENS therapy, the pain level decreased significantly from Week 2 in Groups A and B (P < 0.05 or 0.01), and physical impairment and required NSAIDs decreased significantly from Week 4 (P < 0.05 or 0.01) in Group A but only at Week 4 in Group B (P < 0.05 or 0.01). These effects were sustained until 1-mo follow-up (P < 0.01) in Group A but not in Group B; these effects were not observed at 2-mo follow-up even in Group A. In Group C, pain level decreased significantly only at Week 8 (P < 0.05). Our results indicate that repeated PENS is more effective than TENS for chronic LBP but must be continued to sustain the analgesic effect. A cumulative analgesic effect was observed in patients with chronic low back pain (LBP) after repeated percutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (PENS), but this effect gradually faded after the treatment was terminated. Results indicate that although PENS is effective for chronic LBP, treatments need to be continued to sustain analgesia.

  11. Management of pain secondary to temporomandibular joint syndrome with peripheral nerve stimulation.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Lopez, Manuel J; Fernandez-Baena, Mariano; Aldaya-Valverde, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint syndrome, or Costen syndrome, is a clinically diagnosed disorder whose most common symptoms include joint pain and clicking, difficulty opening the mouth, and temporomandibular joint discomfort. The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is supplied by the auriculotemporal nerve, a collateral branch of the mandibular nerve (the V3 branch of the trigeminal nerve). The aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness and safety of permanent peripheral nerve stimulation to relieve TMJ pain. This case series is a prospective study. Pain Unit of a regional universitary hospital. The study included 6 female patients with temporomandibular pain lasting from 2 to 8 years that did not respond to intraarticular local anesthetic and corticoid injections. After a positive diagnostic block test, the patients were implanted with quadripolar or octapolar leads in the affected preauricular region for a 2-week stimulation test phase, after which the leads were connected to a permanent implanted pulse generator. Results of the visual analog scale, SF-12 Health Survey, Brief Pain Inventory, and drug intake were recorded at baseline and at 4, 12, and 24 weeks after the permanent implant. Five out of 6 patients experienced pain relief exceeding 80% (average 72%) and received a permanent implant. The SF-12 Health Survey results were very positive for all specific questions, especially items concerning the physical component. Patients reported returning to normal physical activity and rest at night. Four patients discontinued their analgesic medication and 1 patient reduced their gabapentin dose by 50%. Sample size; impossibility of placebo control. Patients affected with TMJ syndrome who do not respond to conservative treatments may find a solution in peripheral nerve stimulation, a simple technique with a relatively low level of complications.

  12. [Mechanisms and applications of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation in analgesia].

    PubMed

    Tang, Zheng-Yu; Wang, Hui-Quan; Xia, Xiao-Lei; Tang, Yi; Peng, Wei-Wei; Hu, Li

    2017-06-25

    Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS), as a non-pharmacological and non-invasive analgesic therapy with low-cost, has been widely used to relieve pain in various clinical applications, by delivering current pulses to the skin area to activate the peripheral nerve fibers. Nevertheless, analgesia induced by TENS varied in the clinical practice, which could be caused by the fact that TENS with different stimulus parameters has different biological mechanisms in relieving pain. Therefore, to advance our understanding of TENS in various basic and clinical studies, we discussed (1) neurophysiological and biochemical mechanisms of TENS-induced analgesia; (2) relevant factors that may influence analgesic effects of TENS from the perspectives of stimulus parameters, including stimulated position, pulse parameters (current intensity, frequency, and pulse width), stimulus duration and used times in each day; and (3) applications of TENS in relieving clinical pain, including post-operative pain, chronic low back pain and labor pain. Finally, we propose that TENS may involve multiple and complex psychological neurophysiological mechanisms, and suggest that different analgesic effects of TENS with different stimulus parameters should be taken into consideration in clinical applications. In addition, to optimize analgesic effect, we recommend that individual-based TENS stimulation parameters should be designed by considering individual differences among patients, e.g., adaptively adjusting the stimulation parameters based on the dynamic ratings of patients' pain.

  13. The pig as preclinical model for laparoscopic vagus nerve stimulation.

    PubMed

    Wolthuis, A M; Stakenborg, N; D'Hoore, A; Boeckxstaens, G E

    2016-02-01

    Cervical vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) prevents manipulation-induced intestinal inflammation and improves intestinal transit in a mouse model of postoperative ileus (POI). Cervical VNS, however, is accompanied by cardiovascular and respiratory side effects. In view of potential clinical application, we therefore evaluated the safety and feasibility of abdominal VNS via laparoscopic approach in a porcine model. Six pigs were used in a non-survival study for both cervical and abdominal VNS. Two cardiac pacing electrodes were positioned around the right cervical and posterior abdominal vagus nerve and connected to an external stimulator. VNS was performed using four different settings (5 and 20 Hz, 0.5 and 1 ms pulse width) during 2 min with ECG recording. Laparoscopic VNS was timed and videotaped, and technical difficulties were noted. A validated National Aeronautics and Space Administration Task Load Index (NASA-TLX) questionnaire was used to evaluate the task and workload. The procedure was completed in all pigs with 4-port laparoscopic technique. Cervical and abdominal VNS were performed after correct identification and isolation of the nerve, and positioning of the electrodes around the nerve. Median laparoscopic operating time was 16 min (range 8-33 min), and median NASA-TLX was 31 (range 11-74). No major complications were encountered. Reduction of heart rate was between 5.5 and 14% for cervical VNS and undetectable for abdominal VNS. In a porcine model, laparoscopic VNS is feasible and safe with cardiac pacing electrodes and may lead to a similar novel approach in humans in the near future.

  14. Noninvasive transcranial stimulation of rat abducens nerve by focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyungmin; Taghados, Seyed Javid; Fischer, Krisztina; Maeng, Lee-So; Park, Shinsuk; Yoo, Seung-Schik

    2012-09-01

    Nonpharmacologic and nonsurgical transcranial modulation of the nerve function may provide new opportunities in evaluation and treatment of cranial nerve diseases. This study investigates the possibility of using low-intensity transcranial focused ultrasound (FUS) to selectively stimulate the rat abducens nerve located above the base of the skull. FUS (frequencies of 350 kHz and 650 kHz) operating in a pulsed mode was applied to the abducens nerve of Sprague-Dawley rats under stereotactic guidance. The abductive eyeball movement ipsilateral to the side of sonication was observed at 350 kHz, using the 0.36-msec tone burst duration (TBD), 1.5-kHz pulse repetition frequency (PRF), and the overall sonication duration of 200 msec. Histologic and behavioral monitoring showed no signs of disruption in the blood brain barrier (BBB), as well as no damage to the nerves and adjacent brain tissue resulting from the sonication. As a novel functional neuro-modulatory modality, the pulsed application of FUS has potential for diagnostic and therapeutic applications in diseases of the peripheral nervous system. Copyright © 2012 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Noninvasive techniques for probing neurocircuitry and treating illness: vagus nerve stimulation (VNS), transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS)

    PubMed Central

    George, Mark S; Aston-Jones, Gary

    2010-01-01

    Although the preceding chapters discuss much of the new knowledge of neurocircuitry of neuropsychiatric diseases, and an invasive approach to treatment, this chapter describes and reviews the noninvasive methods of testing circuit-based theories and treating neuropsychiatric diseases that do not involve implanting electrodes into the brain or on its surface. These techniques are transcranial magnetic stimulation, vagus nerve stimulation, and transcranial direct current stimulation. Two of these approaches have FDA approval as therapies. PMID:19693003

  16. Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation Combined with Oxybutynin is Superior to Monotherapy in Children with Urge Incontinence: A Randomized, Placebo Controlled Study.

    PubMed

    Borch, Luise; Hagstroem, Soeren; Kamperis, Konstantinos; Siggaard, C V; Rittig, Soeren

    2017-08-01

    We evaluated whether combination therapy with transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and oxybutynin results in a superior treatment response compared to either therapy alone in children with urge incontinence. In this placebo controlled study 66 children with a mean ± SD age of 7.3 ± 1.6 years who were diagnosed with urge incontinence were randomized to 3 treatment groups. Group 1 consisted of 22 children undergoing transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation plus active oxybutynin administration. Group 2 included 21 children undergoing active transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation plus placebo oxybutynin administration. Group 3 consisted of 23 children undergoing active oxybutynin administration plus placebo transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation. The children received active or placebo transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation over the sacral S2 to S3 outflow for 2 hours daily in combination with 5 mg active or placebo oxybutynin twice daily. The intervention period was 10 weeks. Primary outcome was number of wet days weekly. Secondary outcomes were severity of incontinence, frequency, maximum voided volume over expected bladder capacity for age, average voided volume over expected bladder capacity for age and visual analogue scale score. Combination therapy was superior to oxybutynin monotherapy, with an 83% greater chance of treatment response (p = 0.05). Combination therapy was also significantly more effective than transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation monotherapy regarding reduced number of wet days weekly (mean difference -2.28, CI -4.06 to -0.49), severity of incontinence (-3.11, CI -5.98 to -0.23) and daily voiding frequency (-2.82, CI -4.48 to -1.17). Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation in combination with oxybutynin for childhood urge incontinence was superior to monotherapy consisting of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation or oxybutynin, although the latter only reached borderline statistical significance

  17. Artificial voice modulation in dogs by recurrent laryngeal nerve stimulation: electrophysiological confirmation of anatomic data.

    PubMed

    Broniatowski, Michael; Grundfest-Broniatowski, Sharon; Tucker, Harvey M; Tyler, Dustin J

    2007-02-01

    We hypothesized that voice may be artificially manipulated to ameliorate dystonias considered to be a failure in dynamic integration between competing neuromuscular systems. Orderly intrinsic laryngeal muscle recruitment by anodal block via the recurrent laryngeal and vagus nerves has allowed us to define specific values based on differential excitabilities, but has precluded voice fluency because of focused breaks during stimulation and the need to treat several neural conduits. Such problems may be obviated by a circuit capable of stimulating some axons while simultaneously blocking others in the recurrent laryngeal nerve, which carries innervation to all intrinsic laryngeal muscles, including the arguably intrinsic cricothyroideus. In 5 dogs, both recurrent laryngeal nerves received 40-Hz quasi-trapezoidal pulses (0 to 2000 microA, 0 to 2000 micros, 0 to 500 micros decay) via tripolar electrodes. Electromyograms were matched with audio intensities and fundamental frequencies recorded under a constant flow of humidified air. Data were digitized and evaluated for potential correlations. Orderly recruitment of the thyroarytenoideus, posterior cricoarytenoideus, and cricothyroideus was correlated with stimulating intensities (p < .001), and posterior cricoarytenoideus opposition to the thyroarytenoideus and cricothyroideus was instrumental in manipulating audio intensities and fundamental frequencies. Manipulation of canine voice parameters appears feasible via the sole recurrent laryngeal nerve within appropriate stimulation envelopes, and offers promise in human laryngeal dystonias.

  18. Strategies to promote peripheral nerve regeneration: electrical stimulation and/or exercise

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Tessa; English, Arthur W.

    2015-01-01

    Enhancing the regeneration of axons is often considered a therapeutic target for improving functional recovery after peripheral nerve injury. In this review, the evidence for the efficacy of electrical stimulation (ES), daily exercise, and their combination in promoting nerve regeneration after peripheral nerve injuries in both animal models and in human patients, is explored. The rationale, effectiveness, and molecular basis of ES and exercise in accelerating axon outgrowth are reviewed. In comparing the effects of ES and exercise in enhancing axon regeneration, increased neural activity, neurotrophins, and androgens are considered common requirements. Similar, gender-specific requirements are found for exercise to enhance axon regeneration in the periphery and for sustaining synaptic inputs onto injured motoneurons. ES promotes nerve regeneration after delayed nerve repair in humans and rats. The effectiveness of exercise is less clear. Although ES, but not exercise, results in a significant misdirection of regenerating motor axons to reinnervate different muscle targets, the loss of neuromuscular specificity encountered has only a very small impact on resulting functional recovery. Both ES and exercise are promising experimental treatments for peripheral nerve injury that seem ready to be translated to clinical use. PMID:26121368

  19. Influence of Different Geometric Representations of the Volume Conductor on Nerve Activation during Electrical Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Tames, José; González, José; Yu, Wenwei

    2014-01-01

    Volume conductor models with different geometric representations, such as the parallel layer model (PM), the cylindrical layer model (CM), or the anatomically based model (AM), have been employed during the implementation of bioelectrical models for electrical stimulation (FES). Evaluating their strengths and limitations to predict nerve activation is fundamental to achieve a good trade-off between accuracy and computation time. However, there are no studies aimed at clarifying the following questions. (1) Does the nerve activation differ between CM and PM? (2) How well do CM and PM approximate an AM? (3) What is the effect of the presence of blood vessels and nerve trunk on nerve activation prediction? Therefore, in this study, we addressed these questions by comparing nerve activation between CM, PM, and AM models by FES. The activation threshold was used to evaluate the models under different configurations of superficial electrodes (size and distance), nerve depths, and stimulation sites. Additionally, the influences of the sciatic nerve, femoral artery, and femoral vein were inspected for a human thigh. The results showed that the CM and PM had a high error rate, but the variation of the activation threshold followed the same tendency for electrode size and interelectrode distance variation as AM. PMID:25276222

  20. Hypothalamic stimulation and baroceptor reflex interaction on renal nerve activity.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, M. F.; Ninomiya, I.; Franz, G. N.; Judy, W. V.

    1971-01-01

    The basal level of mean renal nerve activity (MRNA-0) measured in anesthetized cats was found to be modified by the additive interaction of hypothalamic and baroceptor reflex influences. Data were collected with the four major baroceptor nerves either intact or cut, and with mean aortic pressure (MAP) either clamped with a reservoir or raised with l-epinephrine. With intact baroceptor nerves, MRNA stayed essentially constant at level MRNA-0 for MAP below an initial pressure P1, and fell approximately linearly to zero as MAP was raised to P2. Cutting the baroceptor nerves kept MRNA at MRNA-0 (assumed to represent basal central neural output) independent of MAP. The addition of hypothalamic stimulation produced nearly constant increments in MRNA for all pressure levels up to P2, with complete inhibition at some level above P2. The increments in MRNA depended on frequency and location of the stimulus. A piecewise linear model describes MRNA as a linear combination of hypothalamic, basal central neural, and baroceptor reflex activity.

  1. Placebo-controlled vagus nerve stimulation paired with tones in a patient with refractory tinnitus: a case report.

    PubMed

    De Ridder, Dirk; Kilgard, Michael; Engineer, Navzer; Vanneste, Sven

    2015-04-01

    Classical neuromodulation consists of applying electrical or magnetic stimuli to the nervous system to modulate ongoing activity and connectivity. However, recently, an exciting novel neuromodulation technique was developed in which stimulation of the vagal nerve was paired with simultaneous presentation of tones, demonstrating that it reverses a tinnitus percept in noise-exposed rats. To determine whether this therapy could also be effective in humans, we delivered a similar therapy in a patient with chronic tinnitus unresponsive to previous therapies. In this report, we describe the case of a 59-year-old man who suffered from bilateral tinnitus for 14 years that arose after a cervical fusion operation. Pharmacotherapy, transcranial magnetic stimulation, transcranial direct current stimulation, neurofeedback, and bilateral auditory cortex stimulation via implanted electrodes did not improve the tinnitus. After implanting the vagal nerve stimulator, the patient received daily vagus nerve stimulation tone pairings for 4 weeks in a non-placebo-controlled way. At the end of therapy, the patient experienced a significant reduction in tinnitus symptoms that lasted for 2 months after treatment. Tinnitus Handicap Inventory and Tinnitus Reaction Questionnaire were reduced by 48% and 68%, respectively. Symptoms of depression were also improved by 40%, as quantified by the Beck Depression Inventory. Three months after ending therapy, placebo stimulation was performed consisting of only tone presentation without the simultaneous electrical stimuli. This resulted in further continuation of the gradual relapse to the baseline state, without renewed improvement. Our results suggest that vagus nerve stimulation paired with tones could become an effective therapy for the treatment of tinnitus.

  2. Non-invasive transcranial stimulation of rat abducens nerve by focused ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyungmin; Taghados, Seyed Javid; Fischer, Krisztina; Maeng, Lee-So; Park, Shinsuk; Yoo, Seung-Schik

    2012-01-01

    Non-pharmacological and non-surgical transcranial modulation of the nerve function may provide new opportunities in evaluation and treatment of cranial nerve diseases. This study investigates the possibility of using low-intensity transcranial focused ultrasound (FUS) to selectively stimulate the rat abducens nerve located above the base of the skull. FUS (frequencies of 350 kHz and 650 kHz) operating in a pulsed mode was applied to the abducens nerve of Sprague-Dawley rats under stereotactic guidance. The abductive eyeball movement ipsilateral to the side of sonication was observed at 350 kHz, using the 0.36 msec tone burst duration (TBD), 1.5 kHz pulse repetition frequency (PRF), and the overall sonication duration of 200 msec. Histological and behavioral monitoring showed no signs of disruption in the blood brain barrier (BBB) as well as no damage to the nerves and adjacent brain tissue resulting from the sonication. As a novel functional neuro-modulatory modality, the pulsed application of FUS has potential in diagnostic and therapeutic applications in diseases of the peripheral nervous system. PMID:22763009

  3. Vagus nerve stimulation therapy in partial epilepsy: a review.

    PubMed

    Panebianco, Mariangela; Zavanone, Chiara; Dupont, Sophie; Restivo, Domenico A; Pavone, Antonino

    2016-09-01

    Epilepsy is a chronic neurological disorder characterized by recurrent, unprovoked epileptic seizures. The majority of people given a diagnosis of epilepsy have a good prognosis, but 20-30 % will develop drug-resistant epilepsy. Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is a neuromodulatory treatment that is used as an adjunctive therapy for treating people with medically refractory epilepsy. It consists of chronic intermittent electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve, delivered by a programmable pulse generator (Neuro-Cybernetic Prosthesis). In 1997, the Food and Drug Administration approved VNS as adjunctive treatment for medically refractory partial-onset seizures in adults and adolescents. This article reviews the literature from 1988 to nowadays. We discuss thoroughly the anatomy and physiology of vagus nerve and the potential mechanisms of actions and clinical applications involved in VNS therapy, as well as the management, safety, tolerability and effectiveness of VNS therapy. VNS for partial seizures appears to be an effective and well tolerated treatment in adult and pediatric patients. People noted improvements in feelings of well-being, alertness, memory and thinking skills, as well as mood. The adverse effect profile is substantially different from the adverse effect profile associated with antiepileptic drugs, making VNS a potential alternative for patients with difficulty tolerating antiepileptic drug adverse effects. Despite the passing years and the advent of promising neuromodulation technologies, VNS remains an efficacy treatment for people with medically refractory epilepsy. Past and ongoing investigations in other indications have provided signals of the therapeutic potential in a wide variety of conditions.

  4. Selective pelvic autonomic nerve stimulation with simultaneous intraoperative monitoring of internal anal sphincter and bladder innervation.

    PubMed

    Kneist, W; Kauff, D W; Koch, K P; Schmidtmann, I; Heimann, A; Hoffmann, K P; Lang, H

    2011-01-01

    Pelvic autonomic nerve preservation avoids postoperative functional disturbances. The aim of this feasibility study was to develop a neuromonitoring system with simultaneous intraoperative verification of internal anal sphincter (IAS) activity and intravesical pressure. 14 pigs underwent low anterior rectal resection. During intermittent bipolar electric stimulation of the inferior hypogastric plexus (IHP) and the pelvic splanchnic nerves (PSN), electromyographic signals of the IAS and manometry of the urinary bladder were observed simultaneously. Stimulation of IHP and PSN as well as simultaneous intraoperative monitoring could be realized with an adapted neuromonitoring device. Neurostimulation resulted in either bladder or IAS activation or concerted activation of both. Intravesical pressure increase as well as amplitude increase of the IAS neuromonitoring signal did not differ significantly between stimulation of IHP and PSN [6.0 cm H(2)O (interquartile range [IQR] 3.5-9.0) vs. 6.0 cm H(2)O (IQR 3.0-10.0) and 12.1 μV (IQR 3.0-36.7) vs. 40.1 μV (IQR 9.0-64.3)] (p > 0.05). Pelvic autonomic nerve stimulation with simultaneous intraoperative monitoring of IAS and bladder innervation is feasible. The method may enable neuromonitoring with increasing selectivity for pelvic autonomic nerve preservation. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Challenges associated with nerve conduction block using kilohertz electrical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Yogi A.; Butera, Robert J.

    2018-06-01

    Neuromodulation therapies, which electrically stimulate parts of the nervous system, have traditionally attempted to activate neurons or axons to restore function or alleviate disease symptoms. In stark contrast to this approach is inhibiting neural activity to relieve disease symptoms and/or restore homeostasis. One potential approach is kilohertz electrical stimulation (KES) of peripheral nerves—which enables a rapid, reversible, and localized block of conduction. This review highlights the existing scientific and clinical utility of KES and discusses the technical and physiological challenges that must be addressed for successful translation of KES nerve conduction block therapies.

  6. Comparative analysis of transverse intrafascicular multichannel, longitudinal intrafascicular and multipolar cuff electrodes for the selective stimulation of nerve fascicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badia, Jordi; Boretius, Tim; Andreu, David; Azevedo-Coste, Christine; Stieglitz, Thomas; Navarro, Xavier

    2011-06-01

    The selection of a suitable nerve electrode for neuroprosthetic applications implies a trade-off between invasiveness and selectivity, wherein the ultimate goal is achieving the highest selectivity for a high number of nerve fascicles by the least invasiveness and potential damage to the nerve. The transverse intrafascicular multichannel electrode (TIME) is intended to be transversally inserted into the peripheral nerve and to be useful to selectively activate subsets of axons in different fascicles within the same nerve. We present a comparative study of TIME, LIFE and multipolar cuff electrodes for the selective stimulation of small nerves. The electrodes were implanted on the rat sciatic nerve, and the activation of gastrocnemius, plantar and tibialis anterior muscles was recorded by EMG signals. Thus, the study allowed us to ascertain the selectivity of stimulation at the interfascicular and also at the intrafascicular level. The results of this study indicate that (1) intrafascicular electrodes (LIFE and TIME) provide excitation circumscribed to the implanted fascicle, whereas extraneural electrodes (cuffs) predominantly excite nerve fascicles located superficially; (2) the minimum threshold for muscle activation with TIME and LIFE was significantly lower than with cuff electrodes; (3) TIME allowed us to selectively activate the three tested muscles when stimulating through different active sites of one device, both at inter- and intrafascicular levels, whereas selective activation using multipolar cuff (with a longitudinal tripolar stimulation configuration) was only possible for two muscles, at the interfascicular level, and LIFE did not activate selectively more than one muscle in the implanted nerve fascicle.

  7. Transcutaneous Vagus Nerve Stimulation: A Promising Method for Treatment of Autism Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yu; Kong, Jian

    2017-01-01

    Transcutaneous Vagus Nerve Stimulation (tVNS) on the auricular branch of the vagus nerve has been receiving attention due to its therapeutic potential for neuropsychiatric disorders. Although the mechanism of tVNS is not yet completely understood, studies have demonstrated the potential role of vagal afferent nerve stimulation in the regulation of mood and visceral state associated with social communication. In addition, a growing body of evidence shows that tVNS can activate the brain regions associated with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), trigger neuroimmune modulation and produce treatment effects for comorbid disorders of ASD such as epilepsy and depression. We thus hypothesize that tVNS may be a promising treatment for ASD, not only for comorbid epilepsy and depression, but also for the core symptoms of ASD. The goal of this manuscript is to summarize the findings and rationales for applying tVNS to treat ASD and propose potential parameters for tVNS treatment of ASD. PMID:28163670

  8. Flight behavior of the rhinoceros beetle Trypoxylus dichotomus during electrical nerve stimulation.

    PubMed

    Van Truong, Tien; Byun, Doyoung; Lavine, Laura Corley; Emlen, Douglas J; Park, Hoon Cheol; Kim, Min Jun

    2012-09-01

    Neuronal stimulation is an intricate part of understanding insect flight behavior and control insect itself. In this study, we investigated the effects of electrical pulses applied to the brain and basalar muscle of the rhinoceros beetle (Trypoxylus dichotomus). To understand specific neuronal stimulation mechanisms, responses and flight behavior of the beetle, four electrodes were implanted into the two optic lobes, the brain's central complex and the ventral nerve cord in the posterior pronotum. We demonstrated flight initiation, turning and cessation by stimulating the brain. The change undergone by the wing flapping in response to the electrical signal was analyzed from a sequence of images captured by a high-speed camera. Here, we provide evidence to distinguish the important differences between neuronal and muscular flight stimulations in beetles. We found that in the neural potential stimulation, both the hind wing and the elytron were suppressed. Interestingly, the beetle stopped flying whenever a stimulus potential was applied between the pronotum and one side of the optic lobe, or between the ventral nerve cord in the posterior pronotum and the central complex. In-depth experimentation demonstrated the effective of neural stimulation over muscle stimulation for flight control. During electrical stimulation of the optic lobes, the beetle performed unstable flight, resulting in alternating left and right turns. By applying the electrical signal into both the optic lobes and the central complex of the brain, we could precisely control the direction of the beetle flight. This work provides an insight into insect flight behavior for future development of insect-micro air vehicle.

  9. Mapping for Acute Transvenous Phrenic Nerve Stimulation Study (MAPS Study).

    PubMed

    Dekker, Lukas R C; Gerritse, Bart; Scheiner, Avram; Kornet, Lilian

    2017-03-01

    Central sleep apnea syndrome, correlated with the occurrence of heart failure, is characterized by periods of insufficient ventilation during sleep. This acute study in 15 patients aims to map the venous system and determine if diaphragmatic movement can be achieved by phrenic nerve stimulation at various locations within the venous system. Subjects underwent a scheduled catheter ablation procedure. During the procedural waiting time, one multielectrode electrophysiology catheter was subsequently placed at the superior and inferior vena cava and the junctions of the left jugular and left brachiocephalic vein and right jugular and right brachiocephalic vein, for phrenic nerve stimulation (1-2 seconds ON/2-3 seconds OFF, 40 Hz, pulse width 210 μs). Diaphragmatic movement was assessed manually and by a breathing mask. During a follow-up assessment between 2 and 4 weeks postprocedure, occurrence of adverse events was assessed. In all patients diaphragmatic movement was induced at one or more locations using a median threshold of at least 2 V and maximally 7.5 V (i.e., e 3.3 mA, 14.2 mA). The lowest median current to obtain diaphragmatic stimulation without discomfort was found for the right brachiocephalic vein (4.7 mA). In 12/15 patients diaphragmatic movement could be induced without any discomfort, but in three patients hiccups occurred. Diaphragmatic stimulation from the brachiocephalic and caval veins is feasible. Potential side effects should be eliminated by adapting the stimulation pattern. This information could be used to design a catheter, combining cardiac pacing with enhancing diaphragm movement during a sleep apnea episode. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Diagnostic relevance of transcranial magnetic and electric stimulation of the facial nerve in the management of facial palsy.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Dennis A; Linder, Stefan; Topka, Helge

    2005-09-01

    Earlier investigations have suggested that isolated conduction block of the facial nerve to transcranial magnetic stimulation early in the disorder represents a very sensitive and potentially specific finding in Bell's palsy differentiating the disease from other etiologies. Stimulation of the facial nerve was performed electrically at the stylomastoid foramen and magnetically at the labyrinthine segment of the Fallopian channel within 3 days from symptom onset in 65 patients with Bell's palsy, five patients with Zoster oticus, one patient with neuroborreliosis and one patient with nuclear facial nerve palsy due to multiple sclerosis. Absence or decreased amplitudes of muscle responses to early transcranial magnetic stimulation was not specific for Bell's palsy, but also evident in all cases of Zoster oticus and in the case of neuroborreliosis. Amplitudes of electrically evoked muscle responses were more markedly reduced in Zoster oticus as compared to Bell's palsy, most likely due to a more severe degree of axonal degeneration. The degree of amplitude reduction of the muscle response to electrical stimulation reliably correlated with the severity of facial palsy. Transcranial magnetic stimulation in the early diagnosis of Bell's palsy is less specific than previously thought. While not specific with respect to the etiology of facial palsy, transcranial magnetic stimulation seems capable of localizing the site of lesion within the Fallopian channel. Combined with transcranial magnetic stimulation, early electrical stimulation of the facial nerve at the stylomastoid foramen may help to establish correct diagnosis and prognosis.

  11. Vagus nerve stimulation ameliorated deficits in one-way active avoidance learning and stimulated hippocampal neurogenesis in bulbectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Gebhardt, Nils; Bär, Karl-Jürgen; Boettger, Michael K; Grecksch, Gisela; Keilhoff, Gerburg; Reichart, Rupert; Becker, Axel

    2013-01-01

    Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) has been introduced as a therapeutic option for treatment-resistant depression. The neural and chemical mechanisms responsible for the effects of VNS are largely unclear. Bilateral removal of the olfactory bulbs (OBX) is a validated animal model in depression research. We studied the effects of vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) on disturbed one-way active avoidance learning and neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus of rats. After a stimulation period of 3 weeks, OBX rats acquired the learning task as controls. In addition, the OBX-related decrease of neuronal differentiated BrdU positive cells in the dentate gyrus was prevented by VNS. This suggests that chronic VNS and changes in hippocampal neurogenesis induced by VNS may also account for the amelioration of behavioral deficits in OBX rats. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the restorative effects of VNS on behavioral function in an animal model of depression that can be compared with the effects of antidepressants. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of an implantable two-channel peroneal nerve stimulator versus conventional walking device on spatiotemporal parameters and kinematics of hemiparetic gait.

    PubMed

    Kottink, Anke I R; Tenniglo, Martin J B; de Vries, Wiebe H K; Hermens, Hermie J; Buurke, Jaap H

    2012-01-01

    The aims of this study were: (i) to compare the neuro-prosthetic effect of implantable peroneal nerve stimulation to the orthotic effect of a standard of care intervention (no device, shoe or ankle foot orthosis) on walking, as assessed by spatiotemporal parameters; and (ii) to examine whether there is evidence of an enhanced lower-limb flexion reflex with peroneal nerve stimulation and compare the kinematic effect of an implantable peroneal nerve stimulation device vs standard of care intervention on initial loading response of the paretic limb, as assessed by hip, knee and ankle kinematics. Randomized controlled trial. A total of 23 chronic stroke survivors with drop foot. The intervention group received an implantable 2-channel peroneal nerve stimulator for correction of drop foot. The control group continued using a conventional walking device. Spatiotemporal parameters and hip, knee and ankle kinematics were measured while subjects walked with the device on using a 3-dimensional video camera system during baseline and after a follow-up period of 26 weeks. Peroneal nerve stimulation normalized stance and double support of the paretic limb and single support of the non-paretic limb, in comparison with using a conventional walking device. In addition, peroneal nerve stimulation is more effective to provide ankle dorsiflexion during swing and resulted in a normalized initial loading response. Although peroneal nerve stimulation and ankle foot orthosis are both prescribed to correct a drop foot in the same patient population, spatiotemporal parameters, dorsiflexion during swing and loading response are influenced in a functionally different way.

  13. A System for Delivering Mechanical Stimulation and Robot-Assisted Therapy to the Rat Whisker Pad during Facial Nerve Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Heaton, James T.; Knox, Christopher; Malo, Juan; Kobler, James B.; Hadlock, Tessa A.

    2013-01-01

    Functional recovery is typically poor after facial nerve transection and surgical repair. In rats, whisking amplitude remains greatly diminished after facial nerve regeneration, but can recover more completely if the whiskers are periodically mechanically stimulated during recovery. Here we present a robotic “whisk assist” system for mechanically driving whisker movement after facial nerve injury. Movement patterns were either pre-programmed to reflect natural amplitudes and frequencies, or movements of the contralateral (healthy) side of the face were detected and used to control real-time mirror-like motion on the denervated side. In a pilot study, twenty rats were divided into nine groups and administered one of eight different whisk assist driving patterns (or control) for 5–20 minutes, five days per week, across eight weeks of recovery after unilateral facial nerve cut and suture repair. All rats tolerated the mechanical stimulation well. Seven of the eight treatment groups recovered average whisking amplitudes that exceeded controls, although small group sizes precluded statistical confirmation of group differences. The potential to substantially improve facial nerve recovery through mechanical stimulation has important clinical implications, and we have developed a system to control the pattern and dose of stimulation in the rat facial nerve model. PMID:23475376

  14. Rapid Remission of Conditioned Fear Expression with Extinction Training Paired with Vagus Nerve Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Peña, David F.; Engineer, Navzer D.; McIntyre, Christa K.

    2012-01-01

    Background Fearful experiences can produce long-lasting and debilitating memories. Extinction of conditioned fear requires consolidation of new memories that compete with fearful associations. In human subjects, as well as rats, posttraining stimulation of the vagus nerve enhances memory consolidation. Subjects with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) show impaired extinction of conditioned fear. The objective of this study was to determine whether vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) can enhance the consolidation of extinction of conditioned fear. Methods Male Sprague-Dawley rats were trained on an auditory fear conditioning task followed by 1–10 days of extinction training. Treatment with vagus nerve or sham stimulation was administered concurrently with exposure to the fear conditioned stimulus. Another group was given VNS and extinction training but the VNS was not paired with exposure to conditioned cues. Retention of fear conditioning was tested 24 hours after each treatment. Results VNS paired with exposure to conditioned cues enhanced the extinction of conditioned fear. After a single extinction trial, rats given VNS stimulation demonstrated a significantly lower level of freezing, compared to that of sham controls. When extinction trials were extended to 10 days, paired VNS accelerated extinction of the conditioned response. Conclusions Extinction paired with VNS is more rapid than extinction paired with sham stimulation. As it is currently approved by the Federal Food and Drug Administration for depression and seizure prevention, VNS is a readily-available and promising adjunct to exposure therapy for the treatment of severe anxiety disorders. PMID:23245749

  15. The effect of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation in patients with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Öncü, Emine; Zincir, Handan

    2017-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the efficacy of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation in patients with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation has been known to attain improvement in forced expiratory volume in 1 seconds, physical activity, and quality of life. However, information about the effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is quite limited. A single-blind, randomised controlled trial. Data were collected between August 2013-May 2014. Eighty-two patients who were hospitalised with a diagnosis of acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were randomly assigned to a transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation group receiving transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation treatment for 20 seance over the acupuncture points with pharmacotherapy or placebo group receiving the same treatment without electrical current output from the transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation device. Pulmonary functional test, six-minute walking distance, dyspnoea and fatigue scale, and St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire scores were assessed pre- and postprogram. The program started at the hospital by the researcher was sustained in the patient's home by the caregiver. All patients were able to complete the program, despite the exacerbation. The 20 seance transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation program provided clinically significant improvement in forced expiratory volume in 1 seconds 21 ml, 19·51% but when compared with the placebo group, the difference was insignificant (p > 0·05). The six-minute walking distance increased by 48·10 m more in the placebo group (p < 0·05). There were no significant differences between the two groups' St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire, dyspnoea and fatigue score (p > 0·05). Adding

  16. Sacral nerve stimulation enhances epithelial barrier of the rectum: results from a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Meurette, G; Blanchard, C; Duchalais-Dassonneville, E; Coquenlorge, S; Aubert, P; Wong, M; Lehur, P-A; Neunlist, M

    2012-03-01

    The mechanism of action of sacral nerve stimulation (SNS) remains largely elusive. The aims of this study were to develop a clinically relevant animal model for percutaneous SNS and to describe its effect on the epithelial barrier of the rectum. Under general anesthesia and after percutaneous electrode placement for S3 nerve root stimulation, six pigs underwent unilateral stimulation and six bilateral stimulation. Animals were stimulated for 3 h using an external pulse generator (1-2.5 V; 14 Hz; 210 μs). Six animals underwent electrode implantation without stimulation and served as controls. Full-thickness rectal biopsies were performed prior to and after stimulation. Paracellular permeability was evaluated by measuring sulfonic acid flux across the rectal mucosa in Ussing chambers. Histological assessment of mucosal thickness, epithelial desquamation, and mucus expression were performed. Percutaneous stimulation resulted in successful anal contractions whose amplitude and uniformity was enhanced following bilateral compared with unilateral stimulation. In controls, paracellular permeability significantly increased during the stimulation period whereas it remained unchanged following unilateral stimulation. In contrast, permeability was significantly reduced by bilateral stimulation. This effect was associated with a concomitant reduction in mucosal thickness and a trend toward increased amount of mucus on surface epithelium compared with controls. The development of a porcine model of percutaneous SNS revealed the ability of neuromodulation to reinforce rectal epithelial barrier. Furthermore, our results suggest that SNS could be used for treatment of gastrointestinal pathologies with reduced rectal mucosal barrier functions. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Peripheral Nerve Stimulation in the Treatment of Chronic Pain Syndromes From Nerve Injury: A Multicenter Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Colini Baldeschi, Gianni; Dario, Alessandro; De Carolis, Giuliano; Luxardo, Nicola; Natale, Massimo; Nosella, Paola; Papa, Alfonso; Raggi, Massimiliano; Reverberi, Claudio

    2017-06-01

    Assessing the feasibility, technical implications, and clinical benefits of peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) performed by an implantable pulse generator (IPG) located close to the stimulation site. Selected patients were affected by neuropathic pain associated with a documented peripheral nerve lesion, refractory to conventional surgical or pharmacological treatment. A PNS system specifically designed for peripheral placement (Neurimpulse, Padova, Italy) was implanted and followed for six months, recording the degree of patient's satisfaction (PGI-I questionnaire), the pain numerical rating scale (NRS) and the quality of life (SF36 questionnaire), as well as any change in drug regimen and work capability. The statistical significance of differences was determined by the paired Student's t-test. A total of 58 patients were referred to permanent IPG implantation. Stimulation failure due to lead damage or dislocation was noticed in two cases (3.4%) in six months. At the follow-up end, the relative NRS reduction averaged -58 ± 30% (p < 10 -6 ) and was greater than 50% in 69% of the cases. Quality-of-life physical and mental indices were increased by 18% (p < 0.005) and 29% (p < 0.0005), respectively. The administration of antalgic drugs was stopped in 55% and reduced in 16% of the patients. Low-energy stimulation was possible in most cases, resulting in an IPG estimated life of 80 ± 35 months. Successful PNS was achieved with a stimulation system designed for peripheral location. This new technology reduced the incidence of lead-related adverse events and the energy cost of the treatment. © 2016 International Neuromodulation Society.

  18. A Study on Duration of Effect of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation Therapy on Whole Saliva Flow.

    PubMed

    Bhasin, Neha; Reddy, Sreedevi; Nagarajappa, Anil Kumar; Kakkad, Ankur

    2015-06-01

    Saliva is a complex fluid, whose important role is to maintain the well being of oral cavity. Salivary gland hypofunction or hyposalivation is the condition of having reduced saliva production which leads to the subjective complaint of oral dryness termed xerostomia.(7) Management of xerostomia includes palliative therapy using topical agents or systemic therapy. Electrostimulation to produce saliva was studied in the past and showed moderate promise but never became part of mainstream therapy. Hence, this study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) on whole salivary flow rate in healthy adults and to evaluate how long this effect of TENS lasts on salivary flow. One hundred healthy adult subjects were divided into five age groups with each group containing 20 subjects equally divided into males and females in each group. Unstimulated saliva was collected using a graduated test tube fitted with funnel and quantity was measured. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation unit was activated and stimulated saliva was collected. Saliva was again collected 30 minutes and 24 hours post stimulation. The mean unstimulated whole saliva flow rate for all subjects (n = 100) was 2.60 ml/5 min. During stimulation, it increased to 3.60 ± 0.39 ml/5 min. There was 38.46% increase in salivary flow. Ninety six out of 100 responded positively to TENS therapy. Salivary flow remained increased 30 minutes and 24 hours post stimulation with the values being 3.23 ± 0.41 ml/5 min and 2.69 ± 0.39 ml/5 min respectively. Repeated measures One way analysis of variance (ANOVA) test showed that the difference between these values were statistically significant. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation therapy was effective for stimulation of whole saliva in normal, healthy subjects and its effect retained till 30 minutes and a little up to 24 hours. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation may work best synergistically with other

  19. Effect of nitric oxide synthase inhibitor on increase in nasal mucosal blood flow induced by sensory and parasympathetic nerve stimulation in rats.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Fumio; Hanamitsu, Masakazu; Ayajiki, Kazuhide; Aimi, Yoshinari; Okamura, Tomio; Shimizu, Takeshi

    2010-06-01

    Neural control of nasal blood flow (NBF) has not been systematically investigated. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of electrical stimulation of both sensory and parasympathetic nerves innervating the nasal mucosal arteries on NBF in rats. In anesthetized rats, nasociliary (sensory) nerves and postganglionic (parasympathetic) nerves derived from the right sphenopalatine ganglion were electrically stimulated. We measured NBF with a laser-Doppler flowmeter. The nerve stimulation increased NBF on both sides and increased the mean arterial blood pressure. The increase in NBF was larger on the ipsilateral side than on the contralateral side. Hexamethonium bromide, a ganglion blocker, abolished the stimulation-induced pressure effect and the increase in NBF on the contralateral side, but did not abolish the increase in NBF on the ipsilateral side. The remaining increase in NBF was abolished by N(G)-nitro-L-arginine, a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor. Histochemical analysis with nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-diaphorase showed neuronal nitric oxide synthase-containing nerves that innervate nasal mucosal arteries. Nitric oxide released from parasympathetic nitrergic nerves may contribute to an increase in NBF in rats. The afferent impulses induced by sensory nerve stimulation may lead to an increase in mean arterial blood pressure that is partly responsible for the increase in NBF.

  20. Influence of Asymmetric Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve Stimulation on Vibration, Acoustics, and Aerodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Chhetri, Dinesh K.; Neubauer, Juergen; Sofer, Elazar

    2015-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis Evaluate the influence of asymmetric recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) stimulation on the vibratory phase, acoustics and aerodynamics of phonation. Study Design Basic science study using an in vivo canine model. Methods The RLNs were symmetrically and asymmetrically stimulated over eight graded levels to test a range of vocal fold activation conditions from subtle paresis to paralysis. Vibratory phase, fundamental frequency (F0), subglottal pressure, and airflow were noted at phonation onset. The evaluations were repeated for three levels of symmetric superior laryngeal nerve (SLN) stimulation. Results Asymmetric laryngeal adductor activation from asymmetric left-right RLN stimulation led to a consistent pattern of vibratory phase asymmetry, with the more activated vocal fold leading in the opening phase of the glottal cycle and in mucosal wave amplitude. Vibratory amplitude asymmetry was also observed, with more lateral excursion of the glottis of the less activated side. Onset fundamental frequency was higher with asymmetric activation because the two RLNs were synergistic in decreasing F0, glottal width, and strain. Phonation onset pressure increased and airflow decreased with symmetric RLN activation. Conclusion Asymmetric laryngeal activation from RLN paresis and paralysis has consistent effects on vocal fold vibration, acoustics, and aerodynamics. This information may be useful in diagnosis and management of vocal fold paresis. PMID:24913182

  1. Influence of asymmetric recurrent laryngeal nerve stimulation on vibration, acoustics, and aerodynamics.

    PubMed

    Chhetri, Dinesh K; Neubauer, Juergen; Sofer, Elazar

    2014-11-01

    Evaluate the influence of asymmetric recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) stimulation on the vibratory phase, acoustics and aerodynamics of phonation. Basic science study using an in vivo canine model. The RLNs were symmetrically and asymmetrically stimulated over eight graded levels to test a range of vocal fold activation conditions from subtle paresis to paralysis. Vibratory phase, fundamental frequency (F0 ), subglottal pressure, and airflow were noted at phonation onset. The evaluations were repeated for three levels of symmetric superior laryngeal nerve (SLN) stimulation. Asymmetric laryngeal adductor activation from asymmetric left-right RLN stimulation led to a consistent pattern of vibratory phase asymmetry, with the more activated vocal fold leading in the opening phase of the glottal cycle and in mucosal wave amplitude. Vibratory amplitude asymmetry was also observed, with more lateral excursion of the glottis of the less activated side. Onset fundamental frequency was higher with asymmetric activation because the two RLNs were synergistic in decreasing F0 , glottal width, and strain. Phonation onset pressure increased and airflow decreased with symmetric RLN activation. Asymmetric laryngeal activation from RLN paresis and paralysis has consistent effects on vocal fold vibration, acoustics, and aerodynamics. This information may be useful in diagnosis and management of vocal fold paresis. N/A. © 2014 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  2. A good preoperative response to transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation predicts a better therapeutic effect of implanted occipital nerve stimulation in pharmacologically intractable headaches.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Jean-Paul; Nizard, Julien; Kuhn, Emmanuelle; Carduner, Florence; Penverne, Frédérique; Verleysen-Robin, Marie-Christine; Terreaux, Luc; de Gaalon, Solène; Raoul, Sylvie; Lefaucheur, Jean-Pascal

    2016-02-01

    Occipital nerve stimulation (ONS) is a surgical approach to treat patients with medically intractable chronic headache disorders. However, no preoperative test has been yet validated to allow candidates to be selected for implantation. In this study, the analgesic efficacy of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) was tested for 1 to 3 months in 41 patients with pharmacologically intractable headache disorders of various origins, using a new technique of electrode placement over the occipital nerve. ONS electrodes were subsequently implanted in 33 patients (occipital neuralgia [n=15], cervicogenic headache [n=7], cluster headache [n=6], chronic migraine [n=5]) who had responded at least moderately to TENS. Assessment was performed up to five years after implantation (three years on average), based on the mean and maximum daily pain intensity scored on a 0-10 visual analogue scale and the number of headache days per month. Both TENS and chronic ONS therapy were found to be efficacious (57-76% improvement compared to baseline on the various clinical variables). The efficacy of ONS was better in cases of good or very good preoperative response to TENS than in cases of moderate response to TENS. Implanted ONS may be a valuable therapeutic option in the long term for patients with pharmacologically intractable chronic headache. Although we cannot conclude in patients with poor or no response to TENS, a good or very good response to TENS can support the indication of ONS therapy. This preoperative test could particularly be useful in patients with chronic migraine, in whom it may be difficult to indicate an invasive technique of cranial neurostimulation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Persistent Increase in Blood Pressure After Renal Nerve Stimulation in Accessory Renal Arteries After Sympathetic Renal Denervation.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Mark R; Hoogerwaard, Annemiek F; Gal, Pim; Adiyaman, Ahmet; Smit, Jaap Jan J; Delnoy, Peter Paul H M; Ramdat Misier, Anand R; van Hasselt, Boudewijn A A M; Heeg, Jan-Evert; le Polain de Waroux, Jean-Benoit; Lau, Elizabeth O Y; Staessen, Jan A; Persu, Alexandre; Elvan, Arif

    2016-06-01

    Blood pressure response to renal denervation is highly variable, and the proportion of responders is disappointing. This may be partly because of accessory renal arteries too small for denervation, causing incomplete ablation. Renal nerve stimulation before and after renal denervation is a promising approach to assess completeness of renal denervation and may predict blood pressure response to renal denervation. The objective of the current study was to assess renal nerve stimulation-induced blood pressure increase before and after renal sympathetic denervation in main and accessory renal arteries of anaesthetized patients with drug-resistant hypertension. The study included 21 patients. Nine patients had at least 1 accessory renal artery in which renal denervation was not feasible. Renal nerve stimulation was performed in the main arteries of all patients and in accessory renal arteries of 6 of 9 patients with accessory arteries, both before and after renal sympathetic denervation. Renal nerve stimulation before renal denervation elicited a substantial increase in systolic blood pressure, both in main (25.6±2.9 mm Hg; P<0.001) and accessory (24.3±7.4 mm Hg; P=0.047) renal arteries. After renal denervation, renal nerve stimulation-induced systolic blood pressure increase was blunted in the main renal arteries (Δ systolic blood pressure, 8.6±3.7 mm Hg; P=0.020), but not in the nondenervated renal accessory renal arteries (Δ systolic blood pressure, 27.1±7.6 mm Hg; P=0.917). This residual source of renal sympathetic tone may result in persistent hypertension after ablation and partly account for the large response variability. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Transcranial magnetic stimulation of the human brain: responses in muscles supplied by cranial nerves.

    PubMed

    Benecke, R; Meyer, B U; Schönle, P; Conrad, B

    1988-01-01

    The present investigation demonstrates that time-varying magnetic fields induced over the skull elicit distinct types of responses in muscles supplied by the cranial nerves both on the ipsilateral and the contralateral side. When the center of the copper coil was positioned 4 cm lateral to the vertex on a line from the vertex to the external auditory meatus, bilateral responses in the masseter, orbicularis oculi, mentalis, and sternocleidomastoideus muscles with a delay of about 10 to 14 ms after the stimulus occurred. Similar to the transcranially evoked muscle responses in hand muscles, the responses in the cranial muscles can be influenced in latency and amplitude by background excitation. It is concluded that these responses are induced by excitation of the face-associated motor cortex followed by multiple I-waves in the corticonuclear tract with both ipsilateral and contralateral projections to the corresponding motoneurones. Additionally, at higher stimulation strengths "short-latency" ipsilateral responses in muscles supplied by the trigeminal, facial, and accessory nerves occurred which we suggest are induced by direct stimulation of the peripheral cranial nerves in their intracisternal course. The present study confirms the bilateral projection of corticonuclear tracts in awake unanesthetised human subjects which has been observed by electrical stimulation on the exposed cortex during surgical procedures already decades ago. The present investigation will serve as a basis for the assessment of pathophysiological mechanisms involving the corticonuclear system or the peripheral cranial nerves in their proximal parts in awake humans.

  5. Randomized clinical trial of transcutaneous electrical posterior tibial nerve stimulation versus lateral internal sphincterotomy for treatment of chronic anal fissure.

    PubMed

    Youssef, Tamer; Youssef, Mohamed; Thabet, Waleed; Lotfy, Ahmed; Shaat, Reham; Abd-Elrazek, Eman; Farid, Mohamed

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of transcutaneous electrical posterior tibial nerve stimulation in treatment of patients with chronic anal fissure and to compare it with the conventional lateral internal sphincterotomy. Consecutive patients with chronic anal fissure were randomly allocated into two treatment groups: transcutaneous electrical posterior tibial nerve stimulation group and lateral internal sphincterotomy group. The primary outcome measures were number of patients with clinical improvement and healed fissure. Secondary outcome measures were complications, VAS pain scores, Wexner's constipation and Peascatori anal incontinence scores, anorectal manometry, and quality of life index. Seventy-three patients were randomized into two groups of 36 patients who were subjected to transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and 37 patients who underwent lateral internal sphincterotomy. All (100%) patients in lateral internal sphincterotomy group had clinical improvement at one month following the procedure in contrast to 27 (75%) patients in transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation group. Recurrence of anal fissure after one year was reported in one (2.7%) and 11 (40.7%) patients in lateral internal sphincterotomy and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation groups respectively. Resting anal pressure and functional anal canal length were significantly reduced after lateral internal sphincterotomy. Transcutaneous electrical posterior tibial nerve stimulation for treatment of chronic anal fissure is a novel, non-invasive procedure and has no complications. However, given the higher rate of clinical improvement and fissure healing and the lower rate of fissure recurrence, lateral internal sphincterotomy remains the gold standard for treating chronic anal fissure. Copyright © 2015 IJS Publishing Group Limited. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Conduction block of mammalian myelinated nerve by local cooling to 15–30°C after a brief heating

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhaocun; Lyon, Timothy D.; Kadow, Brian T.; Shen, Bing; Wang, Jicheng; Lee, Andy; Kang, Audry; Roppolo, James R.; de Groat, William C.

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed at understanding thermal effects on nerve conduction and developing new methods to produce a reversible thermal block of axonal conduction in mammalian myelinated nerves. In 13 cats under α-chloralose anesthesia, conduction block of pudendal nerves (n = 20) by cooling (5–30°C) or heating (42–54°C) a small segment (9 mm) of the nerve was monitored by the urethral striated muscle contractions and increases in intraurethral pressure induced by intermittent (5 s on and 20 s off) electrical stimulation (50 Hz, 0.2 ms) of the nerve. Cold block was observed at 5–15°C while heat block occurred at 50–54°C. A complete cold block up to 10 min was fully reversible, but a complete heat block was only reversible when the heating duration was less than 1.3 ± 0.1 min. A brief (<1 min) reversible complete heat block at 50–54°C or 15 min of nonblock mild heating at 46–48°C significantly increased the cold block temperature to 15–30°C. The effect of heating on cold block fully reversed within ∼40 min. This study discovered a novel method to block mammalian myelinated nerves at 15–30°C, providing the possibility to develop an implantable device to block axonal conduction and treat many chronic disorders. The effect of heating on cold block is of considerable interest because it raises many basic scientific questions that may help reveal the mechanisms underlying cold or heat block of axonal conduction. PMID:26740534

  7. Influence of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on spasticity, balance, and walking speed in stroke patients: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shuqin; Sun, Qi; Wang, Haifeng; Xie, Guomin

    2018-01-10

    To evaluate the influence of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation in patients with stroke through a systematic review and meta-analysis. PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, EBSCO, and Cochrane Library databases were searched systematically. Randomized controlled trials assessing the effect of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation vs placebo transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on stroke were included. Two investigators independently searched articles, extracted data, and assessed the quality of included studies. The primary outcome was modified Ashworth scale (MAS). Meta-analysis was performed using the random-effect model. Seven randomized controlled trials were included in the meta-analysis. Compared with placebo transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation supplementation significantly reduced MAS (standard mean difference (SMD) = -0.71; 95% confidence interval (95% CI) = -1.11 to -0.30; p = 0.0006), improved static balance with open eyes (SMD = -1.26; 95% CI = -1.83 to -0.69; p<0.0001) and closed eyes (SMD = -1.74; 95% CI = -2.36 to -1.12; p < 0.00001), and increased walking speed (SMD = 0.44; 95% CI = 0.05 to 0.84; p = 0.03), but did not improve results on the Timed Up and Go Test (SMD = -0.60; 95% CI=-1.22 to 0.03; p = 0.06). Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation is associated with significantly reduced spasticity, increased static balance and walking speed, but has no influence on dynamic balance.

  8. Gaussian versus flat-top spatial beam profiles for optical stimulation of the prostate nerves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tozburun, Serhat; Lagoda, Gwen A.; Burnett, Arthur L.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2010-02-01

    The cavernous nerves (CN) course along the prostate surface and are responsible for erectile function. Improved identification and preservation of the CN's is critical to maintaining sexual potency after prostate cancer surgery. Noncontact optical nerve stimulation (ONS) of the CN's was recently demonstrated in a rat model, in vivo, as a potential alternative to electrical nerve stimulation (ENS) for identification of the CN's during prostate surgery. However, the therapeutic window for ONS is narrow, so optimal design of the fiber optic delivery system is critical for safe, reproducible stimulation. This study describes modeling, assembly, and testing of an ONS probe for delivering a small, collimated, flat-top laser beam for uniform CN stimulation. A direct comparison of the magnitude and response time of the intracavernosal pressure (ICP) for both Gaussian and flat-top spatial beam profiles was performed. Thulium fiber laser radiation (λ=1870 nm) was delivered through a 200-μm fiber, with distal fiber tip chemically etched to convert a Gaussian to flat-top beam profile. The laser beam was collimated to a 1-mm-diameter spot using an aspheric lens. Computer simulations of light propagation were used to optimize the probe design. The 10-Fr (3.4-mm-OD) laparoscopic probe provided a constant radiant exposure at the CN surface. The probe was tested in four rats, in vivo. ONS of the CN's was performed with a 1-mm-diameter spot, 5-ms pulse duration, and pulse rate of 20 Hz for a duration of 15-30 s. The flat-top laser beam profile consistently produced a faster and higher ICP response at a lower radiant exposure than the Gaussian beam profile due, in part, to easier alignment of the more uniform beam with nerve. The threshold for ONS was approximately 0.14 J/cm2, corresponding to a temperature increase of 6-8°C at the CN surface after a stimulation time of 15 s. With further development, ONS may be used as a diagnostic tool for identification of CN's during prostate

  9. Inhibition of Parkinsonian tremor with cutaneous afferent evoked by transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation.

    PubMed

    Hao, Man-Zhao; Xu, Shao-Qin; Hu, Zi-Xiang; Xu, Fu-Liang; Niu, Chuan-Xin M; Xiao, Qin; Lan, Ning

    2017-07-14

    Recent study suggests that tremor signals are transmitted by way of multi-synaptic corticospinal pathway. Neurophysiological studies have also demonstrated that cutaneous afferents exert potent inhibition to descending motor commands by way of spinal interneurons. We hypothesize in this study that cutaneous afferents could also affect the transmission of tremor signals, thus, inhibit tremor in patients with PD. We tested this hypothesis by activating cutaneous afferents in the dorsal hand skin innervated by superficial radial nerve using transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS). Eight patients with PD having tremor dominant symptom were recruited to participate in this study using a consistent experimental protocol for tremor inhibition. Resting tremor and electromyogram (EMG) of muscles in the upper extremity of these subjects with PD were recorded, while surface stimulation was applied to the dorsal skin of the hand. Fifteen seconds of data were recorded for 5 s prior to, during and post stimulation. Power spectrum densities (PSDs) of tremor and EMG signals were computed for each data segment. The peak values of PSDs in three data segments were compared to detect evidence of tremor inhibition. At stimulation intensity from 1.5 to 1.75 times of radiating sensation threshold, apparent suppressions of tremor at wrist, forearm and upper arm and in the EMGs were observed immediately at the onset of stimulation. After termination of stimulation, tremor and rhythmic EMG bursts reemerged gradually. Statistical analysis of peak spectral amplitudes showed a significant difference in joint tremors and EMGs during and prior to stimulation in all 8 subjects with PD. The average percentage of suppression was 61.56% in tremor across all joints of all subjects, and 47.97% in EMG of all muscles. The suppression appeared to occur mainly in distal joints and muscles. There was a slight, but inconsistent effect on tremor frequency in the 8 patients with PD tested. Our

  10. The effect of routine reversal of neuromuscular blockade on adequacy of recurrent laryngeal nerve stimulation during thyroid surgery.

    PubMed

    Marshall, S D; Boden, E; Serpell, J

    2015-07-01

    Testing of the integrity of the recurrent laryngeal nerve during thyroid surgery has become routine practice for many surgeons to aid dissection and minimise the chance of inadvertent nerve injury. We hypothesised that routine reversal of an intermediate-acting, non-depolarising neuromuscular blocking agent would improve conditions for stimulation of the recurrent laryngeal nerve. We conducted a single-centre, randomised, double-blind placebo-controlled trial of patients undergoing thyroid surgery by the same surgeon. After randomisation, the participants received either neostigmine 2.5 mg with glycopyrrolate 0.4 mg or placebo, at 30 minutes after induction of anaesthesia and administration of 0.4 mg/kg of atracurium. The primary outcome was the subjective assessment by the surgeon as to whether the neuromuscular function was adequate for stimulation of the recurrent laryngeal nerve using a neuromuscular integrity monitor (NIM). Time to NIM stimulation was 44.6 minutes in the placebo group and 41.4 minutes in the intervention group (P=0.268). Of the 21 patients who received the neuromuscular blockade reversal, 20 (95.2%) had adequate surgical conditions for NIM stimulation, compared to 9 out of 18 patients (50%) in the placebo group (P=0.002). Three of the ten patients (30%) with inadequate reversal showed no evidence of residual blockade assessed peripherally. The routine reversal of neuromuscular blockade at 30 minutes post induction appears to result in adequate surgical conditions for safe stimulation of the recurrent laryngeal nerve. Return of neuromuscular function at a peripheral site does not guarantee adequate laryngeal muscle function for use of the NIM.

  11. Does transcutaneous nerve stimulation have effect on sympathetic skin response?

    PubMed

    Okuyucu, E Esra; Turhanoğlu, Ayşe Dicle; Guntel, Murat; Yılmazer, Serkan; Savaş, Nazan; Mansuroğlu, Ayhan

    2018-01-01

    This study examined the effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) on the sympathetic nerve system by sympathetic skin response test. Fifty-five healthy volunteers received either: (i) 30minutes TENS (25 participants) (ii) 30minutes sham TENS (30 participants) and SSR test was performed pre- and post-TENS. The mean values of latency and peak-to-peak amplitude of five consecutive SSRs were calculated. A significant amplitude difference was found between TENS and sham TENS group both in right and left hand (p=0.04, p=0.01, respectively). However there was no significant latancy difference between two groups (p>0.05 ). TENS has an inhibitory effect on elicited SNS responses when compared with sham TENS control group. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of long-term electroacupuncture stimulation on recovery of sensorimotor function after peripheral nerve anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingxing; Zhang, Ye; Bian, Yuhong; Fu, Hui; Xu, Ying; Guo, Yi

    2018-06-01

    Recently, application of electroacupuncture (EA) to stimulate nerve regeneration has become a mainstream treatment in clinical rehabilitation and related basic research, but the efficacy of long-term stimulation has not been confirmed. To evaluate the influence of long term EA on peripheral nerve injury (PNI) from multiple angles. Twenty-four rats were divided into three groups: control, PNI and PNI+EA. In the latter two groups, PNI was modelled by transection followed by re-anastomosis of thesciatic nerve. In the PNI+EA group only,EA was delivered using a discontinuous wave with frequency 5 Hz, pulse width 2 ms, and intensity approximately 2 mA, until the affected limb was observed to twitch slightly. The treatment was given for 15 min each time, six times a week (continuously for 6 days followed by a 1-day break) for a total of 8 weeks. The effects of EA on anastomotic sciatic nerve regeneration were evaluated using the sciatic function index (SFI), mechanical withdrawal thresholds, thermo-nociceptive thresholds, conduction velocity of the sciatic nerve and bilateral gastrocnemius wet weight. From weeks 2 to 4 after modelling, the SFI recovery rate in the PNI+EA group was faster than that in the PNI group. In week 4, the SFI of the PNI+EA group was significantly higher than that of the PNI group (p<0.05). However, a significant effect of EA was no longer evident from weeks 5 to 8. There was no effect of acupuncture on anti-amyotrophy and conduction velocity of the sciatic nerve at 8 weeks after modelling. EA did not shorten the paw withdrawal threshold time, but appeared to alleviate thermo-nociceptive sensitivity. Long term repeated stimulation of the same site with EA does not appear to be conducive to the functional recovery of an injured sciatic nerve in rats. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly

  13. Effectiveness of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and interferential current in primary dysmenorrhea.

    PubMed

    Tugay, Nazan; Akbayrak, Türkan; Demirtürk, Funda; Karakaya, Ilkim Citak; Kocaacar, Ozge; Tugay, Umut; Karakaya, Mehmet Gürhan; Demirtürk, Fazli

    2007-01-01

    To compare the effectiveness of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and interferential current in primary dysmenorrhea. A prospective, randomized, and controlled study. Hacettepe University School of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation. Thirty-four volunteer subjects with primary dysmenorrhea (mean age: 21.35 +/- 1.70 years) were included. Statistical analyses were performed in 32 subjects who completed all measures. Fifteen subjects received interferential current application for 20 minutes and 17 subjects received transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation for 20 minutes when they were experiencing dysmenorrhea. Physical characteristics, years since menarche, length of menstrual cycle (days), and duration of menstruation (days) were recorded. Visual analog scale ( VAS) intensities of menstrual pain, referred lower limb pain, and low back pain were recorded before treatment, and immediately, 8 hours, and 24 hours after treatment. Intensities of the evaluated parameters decreased beginning from just after the applications in both groups (P<0.05). Intensity of referring low back pain in first three measurement times was different between the groups (P<0.05), but this difference is thought to be due to the baseline values of the groups. So, it can be said that no superiority existed between the methods (P>0.05). Both transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and interferential current appear to be effective in primary dysmenorrhea. As they are free from the potentially adverse effects of analgesics, and no adverse effects are reported in the literature nor observed in this study, a clinical trial of their effectiveness in comparison with untreated and placebo-treated control groups is warranted.

  14. Use of Sacral Nerve Stimulation for the Treatment of Overlapping Constipation and Fecal Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Sreepati, Gouri; James-Stevenson, Toyia

    2017-01-01

    Patient: Female, 51 Final Diagnosis: Fecal incontinence Symptoms: Constipation • fecal incontinence Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Sacral nerve stimulator Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Rare co-existance of disease or pathology Background: Fecal incontinence and constipation are common gastrointestinal complaints, but rarely occur concurrently. Management of these seemingly paradoxical processes is challenging, as treatment of one symptom may exacerbate the other. Case Report: A 51-year-old female with lifelong neurogenic bladder secondary to spina bifida occulta presented with progressive symptoms of daily urge fecal incontinence as well as hard bowel movements associated with straining and a sensation of incomplete evacuation requiring manual disimpaction. Pelvic floor testing showed poor ability to squeeze the anal sphincter, which indicated sphincter weakness as a major contributor to her fecal incontinence symptoms. Additionally, on defecography she was unable to widen her posterior anorectal angle or relax the anal sphincter during defecation consistent with dyssynergic defecation. A sacral nerve stimulator was placed for management of her fecal incontinence. Interestingly, her constipation also dramatically improved with sacral neuromodulation. Conclusions: This unique case highlights the emerging role of sacral nerve stimulation in the treatment of complex pelvic floor dysfunction with improvement in symptoms beyond fecal incontinence in a patient with dyssynergic-type constipation. PMID:28265107

  15. Phrenic nerve stimulation for the treatment of central sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Abraham, William T; Jagielski, Dariusz; Oldenburg, Olaf; Augostini, Ralph; Krueger, Steven; Kolodziej, Adam; Gutleben, Klaus-Jürgen; Khayat, Rami; Merliss, Andrew; Harsch, Manya R; Holcomb, Richard G; Javaheri, Shahrokh; Ponikowski, Piotr

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate chronic, transvenous, unilateral phrenic nerve stimulation to treat central sleep apnea (CSA) in a prospective, multicenter, nonrandomized study. CSA occurs predominantly in patients with heart failure and increases the risk for morbidity and mortality. Established therapies for CSA are lacking, and those available are limited by poor patient adherence. Fifty-seven patients with CSA underwent baseline polysomnography followed by transvenous phrenic nerve stimulation system implantation and follow-up. Feasibility was assessed by implantation success rate and therapy delivery. Safety was evaluated by monitoring of device- and procedure-related adverse events. Efficacy was evaluated by changes in the apnea-hypopnea index at 3 months. Quality of life at 6 months was evaluated using a sleepiness questionnaire, patient global assessment, and, in patients with heart failure at baseline, the Minnesota Living With Heart Failure Questionnaire. The study met its primary end point, demonstrating a 55% reduction in apnea-hypopnea index from baseline to 3 months (49.5 ± 14.6 episodes/h vs. 22.4 ± 13.6 episodes/h of sleep; p < 0.0001; 95% confidence interval for change: -32.3 to -21.9). Central apnea index, oxygenation, and arousals significantly improved. Favorable effects on quality of life and sleepiness were noted. In patients with heart failure, the Minnesota Living With Heart Failure Questionnaire score significantly improved. Device- or procedure-related serious adverse events occurred in 26% of patients through 6 months post therapy initiation, predominantly due to lead repositioning early in the study. Therapy was well tolerated. Efficacy was maintained at 6 months. Transvenous, unilateral phrenic nerve stimulation appears safe and effective for treating CSA. These findings should be confirmed in a prospective, randomized, controlled trial. (Chronic Evaluation of Respicardia Therapy; NCT01124370). Copyright © 2015 American

  16. Evoked Pain Analgesia in Chronic Pelvic Pain Patients using Respiratory-gated Auricular Vagal Afferent Nerve Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Napadow, Vitaly; Edwards, Robert R; Cahalan, Christine M; Mensing, George; Greenbaum, Seth; Valovska, Assia; Li, Ang; Kim, Jieun; Maeda, Yumi; Park, Kyungmo; Wasan, Ajay D.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Previous Vagus Nerve Stimulation (VNS) studies have demonstrated anti-nociceptive effects, and recent non-invasive approaches; termed transcutaneous-VNS, or t-VNS, have utilized stimulation of the auricular branch of the vagus nerve in the ear. The dorsal medullary vagal system operates in tune with respiration, and we propose that supplying vagal afferent stimulation gated to the exhalation phase of respiration can optimize t-VNS. Design counterbalanced, crossover study. Patients patients with chronic pelvic pain (CPP) due to endometriosis in a specialty pain clinic. Interventions/Outcomes We evaluated evoked pain analgesia for Respiratory-gated Auricular Vagal Afferent Nerve Stimulation (RAVANS) compared with Non-Vagal Auricular Stimulation (NVAS). RAVANS and NVAS were evaluated in separate sessions spaced at least one week apart. Outcome measures included deep tissue pain intensity, temporal summation of pain, and anxiety ratings, which were assessed at baseline, during active stimulation, immediately following stimulation, and 15 minutes after stimulus cessation. Results RAVANS demonstrated a trend for reduced evoked pain intensity and temporal summation of mechanical pain, and significantly reduced anxiety in N=15 CPP patients, compared to NVAS, with moderate to large effect sizes (eta2>0.2). Conclusion Chronic pain disorders such as CPP are in great need of effective, non-pharmacological options for treatment. RAVANS produced promising anti-nociceptive effects for QST outcomes reflective of the noted hyperalgesia and central sensitization in this patient population. Future studies should evaluate longer-term application of RAVANS to examine its effects on both QST outcomes and clinical pain. PMID:22568773

  17. Efficient Healing Takes Some Nerve: Electrical Stimulation Enhances Innervation in Cutaneous Human Wounds.

    PubMed

    Emmerson, Elaine

    2017-03-01

    Cutaneous nerves extend throughout the dermis and epidermis and control both the functional and reparative capacity of the skin. Denervation of the skin impairs cutaneous healing, presenting evidence that nerves provide cues essential for timely wound repair. Sebastian et al. demonstrate that electrical stimulation promotes reinnervation and neural differentiation in human acute wounds, thus accelerating wound repair. Copyright © 2016 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Treatment of intractable chronic cluster headache by occipital nerve stimulation: a cohort of 51 patients.

    PubMed

    Miller, S; Watkins, L; Matharu, M

    2017-02-01

    Chronic cluster headache is a rare, highly disabling primary headache condition. When medically intractable, occipital nerve stimulation can offer effective treatment. Open-label series have provided data on small cohorts only. We analyzed 51 subjects to evaluate the long-term outcomes of highly intractable chronic cluster headache with occipital nerve stimulation. Patients with intractable chronic cluster headache were implanted with occipital nerve stimulators during the period 2007-2014. The primary endpoint was improvement in daily attack frequency. Secondary endpoints included attack severity, attack duration, quality-of-life measures, headache disability scores and adverse events. We studied 51 patients [35 males; mean age at implant 47.78 (range 31-70) years; mean follow-up 39.17 (range 2-81) months]. Nineteen patients had other chronic headache types in addition in chronic cluster headache. At final follow-up, there was a 46.1% improvement in attack frequency (P < 0001) across all patients, 49.5% (P < 0.001) in those with cluster headache alone and 40.3% (P = 0.036) in those with multiple phenotypes. There were no significant differences in response in those with or without multiple headache types. The overall response rate (defined as at least a 50% improvement in attack frequency) was 52.9%. Significant reductions were also seen in attack duration and severity. Improvements were noted in headache disability scores and quality-of-life measures. Triptan use of responders dropped by 62.56%, resulting in significant cost savings. Adverse event rates were highly favorable. Occipital nerve stimulation appears to be a safe and efficacious treatment for highly intractable chronic cluster headache even after a mean follow-up of over 3 years. © 2016 EAN.

  19. Successful peripheral nerve field stimulation for thoracic radiculitis following Brown-Sequard syndrome.

    PubMed

    Desai, Mehul J; Desai, Mehul; Jacob, Lisa; Leiphart, James

    2011-01-01

      The objective of this study is to present a novel approach to the treatment of thoracic radiculitis following Brown-Sequard syndrome with peripheral nerve field stimulation (PNFS). Furthermore, we endeavor to discuss the role of PNFS in the management of refractory neuropathic pain conditions including post-traumatic and post-surgical neuropathy particularly with regards to the post-surgical spine.   Presented is a 57-year-old man with history of thoracic microdiscectomy resulting in Brown-Sequard syndrome presented with chronic post-operative thoracic radicular pain radiating to the abdomen, refractory to conservative management. The patient underwent three intercostal nerve blocks from T7 to T9 with transient symptomatic relief. The patient's options were limited to chemomodulation, neuromodulation, or selective intercostal nerve surgical neurectomy. He subsequently underwent a PNFS trial and reported >75% pain reduction. Permanent percutaneous PNFS electrodes were implanted subcutaneously over the right T7 and T9 intercostal nerves and replicated the trial results.   Neuromodulation produced pain relief with >90% improvement in pain compared with baseline both during the trial and following permanent implantation of the PNFS system.   Chronic radicular pain may be difficult to manage in the post-surgical patient and often requires the use of multiple therapeutic modalities. In this case, we successfully utilized PNFS as it demonstrated greater technical feasibility when compared with dorsal column stimulation and repeat surgery; therefore, it may be considered for the management of post-surgical neuropathy. Further controlled studies are needed to evaluate the efficacy of PNFS as a treatment option. © 2011 International Neuromodulation Society.

  20. Different effects of transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation and electroacupuncture at ST36-ST37 on the cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yu-Tien; Liao, Yi-Sheng; Hsieh, Ching-Liang

    2015-02-01

    The effects of transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS) and electroacupuncture (EA) on the cerebral cortex are largely unclear. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of TENS and EA on the cerebral cortex by examining their effect on the median nerve-somatosensory evoked potentials (MN-SEPs). Twenty volunteers were studied. The cortical and cervical spinal potentials were recorded by median nerve stimulation at the left wrist. Sham TENS, 2 Hz TENS and 2 Hz EA were applied to both ST36 and ST37. MN-SEPs were recorded during sham TENS, 2 Hz TENS and 2 Hz EA, with at least 1 week interval for each subject. One-way analysis of variance was used to determine the differences in latency and amplitude of the MN-SEPs observed in the stimulation and post-stimulation periods compared with baseline. Scheffe's post hoc correction was employed to identify pairwise differences. No differences in mean latency were found between the stimulation procedures during the stimulation and post-stimulation periods. 2 Hz EA but not sham TENS or 2 Hz TENS caused higher mean amplitudes in N20 and N30 during the stimulation and post-stimulation periods. EA, but not TENS, induces changes in certain components of the signal. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  1. Occurrence of phrenic nerve stimulation in cardiac resynchronization therapy patients: the role of left ventricular lead type and placement site.

    PubMed

    Biffi, Mauro; Exner, Derek V; Crossley, George H; Ramza, Brian; Coutu, Benoit; Tomassoni, Gery; Kranig, Wolfgang; Li, Shelby; Kristiansen, Nina; Voss, Frederik

    2013-01-01

    Unwanted phrenic nerve stimulation (PNS) has been reported in ∼1 in 4 patients undergoing left ventricular (LV) pacing. The occurrence of PNS over mid-term follow-up and the significance of PNS are less certain. Data from 1307 patients enrolled in pre-market studies of LV leads manufactured by Medtronic (models 4193 and 4195 unipolar, 4194, 4196, 4296, and 4396 bipolar) were pooled. Left ventricular lead location was recorded at implant using a common classification scheme. Phrenic nerve stimulation symptoms were either spontaneously reported or identified at scheduled follow-up visits. A PNS-related complication was defined as PNS resulting in invasive intervention or the termination of LV pacing. Average follow-up was 14.9 months (range 0.0-46.6). Phrenic nerve stimulation symptoms occurred in 169 patients (12.9%). Phrenic nerve stimulation-related complications occurred in 21 of 1307 patients (1.6%); 16 of 738 (2.2%) in the unipolar lead studies, and 5 of 569 (0.9%) in the bipolar lead studies (P = 0.08). Phrenic nerve stimulation was more frequent at middle-lateral/posterior, and apical LV sites (139/1010) vs. basal-posterior/lateral/anterior, and middle-anterior sites (20/297; P= 0.01). As compared with an anterior LV lead position, a lateral LV pacing site was associated with over a four-fold higher risk of PNS (P= 0.005) and an apical LV pacing site was associated with over six-fold higher risk of PNS (P= 0.001). Phrenic nerve stimulation occurred in 13% of patients undergoing LV lead placement and was more common at mid-lateral/posterior, and LV apical sites. Most cases (123/139; 88%) of PNS were mitigated via electrical reprogramming, without the need for invasive intervention.

  2. Intracranial stimulation of the trigeminal nerve in man. III. Sensory potentials.

    PubMed Central

    Cruccu, G; Inghilleri, M; Manfredi, M; Meglio, M

    1987-01-01

    Percutaneous electrical stimulation of the trigeminal root was performed in 18 subjects undergoing surgery for idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia or implantation of electrodes into Meckel's cave for recording of limbic epileptic activity. All subjects had normal trigeminal reflexes and evoked potentials. Sensory action potentials were recorded antidromically from the supraorbital (V1), infraorbital (V2) and mental (V3) nerves. In the awake subject, sensory potentials were usually followed by myogenic artifacts due to direct activation of masticatory muscles or reflex activation of facial muscles. In the anaesthetised and curarised subject, sensory potentials from the three nerves showed 1.4-2.2 ms onset latency, 1.9-2.7 ms peak latency and 17-29 microV amplitude. Sensory conduction velocity was computed at the onset latency (maximum CV) and at the peak latency (peak CV). On average, maximum and peak CV were 52 and 39 m/s for V1, 54 and 42 m/s for V2 and 54 and 44 m/s for V3. There was no apparent difference in CV between subjects with trigeminal neuralgia and those with epilepsy. A significant inverse correlation was found between CV and age, the overall maximum CV declining from 59 m/s (16 years) to 49 m/s (73 years). This range of CV is compatible both with histometric data and previous electrophysiological findings on trigeminal nerve conduction. Intraoperative intracranial stimulation is also proposed as a method of monitoring trigeminal function under general anaesthesia. Images PMID:3681311

  3. Brain evoked potentials to noxious sural nerve stimulation in sciatalgic patients.

    PubMed

    Willer, J C; De Broucker, T; Barranquero, A; Kahn, M F

    1987-07-01

    In sciatalgic patients and before any treatment, the goal of this work was to compare the amplitude of the late component (N150-P220) of the brain evoked potential (BEP) between resting pain-free conditions and a neurological induced pain produced by the Lasègue manoeuvre. The study was carried out with 8 inpatients affected with a unilateral sciatica resulting from an X-ray identified dorsal root compression from discal origin. The sural nerve was electrically stimulated at the ankle level while BEPs were recorded monopolarly from the vertex. The stimulus intensity eliciting a liminal nociceptive reflex response in a knee-flexor muscle associated with a liminal pain was selected for this study. Both normal and affected side were alternatively stimulated during several conditions of controls and of Lasègue's manoeuvres performed on the normal and on the affected side. Results show that the Lasègue manoeuvre performed on the affected side induced a significant increase in the amplitude of N150-P220; performed on the normal side, this same manoeuvre resulted in a significant decrease of the N150-P220 amplitude. These variations were observed whatever was the side (normal or affected) under sural nerve stimulation. The possible neural mechanisms of these changes and clinical implications of these data are then discussed.

  4. Multichannel electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve in man. I. Basic psychophysics.

    PubMed

    Shannon, R V

    1983-08-01

    Basic psychophysical measurements were obtained from three patients implanted with multichannel cochlear implants. This paper presents measurements from stimulation of a single channel at a time (either monopolar or bipolar). The shape of the threshold vs. frequency curve can be partially related to the membrane biophysics of the remaining spiral ganglion and/or dendrites. Nerve survival in the region of the electrode may produce some increase in the dynamic range on that electrode. Loudness was related to the stimulus amplitude by a power law with exponents between 1.6 and 3.4, depending on frequency. Intensity discrimination was better than for normal auditory stimulation, but not enough to offset the small dynamic range for electrical stimulation. Measures of temporal integration were comparable to normals, indicating a central mechanism that is still intact in implant patients. No frequency analysis of the electrical signal was observed. Each electrode produced a unique pitch sensation, but they were not simply related to the tonotopic position of the stimulated electrode. Pitch increased over more than 4 octaves (for one patient) as the frequency was increased from 100 to 300 Hz, but above 300 Hz no pitch change was observed. Possibly the major limitation of single channel cochlear implants is the 1-2 ms integration time (probably due to the capacitative properties of the nerve membrane which acts as a low-pass filter at 100 Hz). Another limitation of electrical stimulation is that there is no spectral analysis of the electrical waveform so that temporal waveform alone determines the effective stimulus.

  5. Effect of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation for pain control after total knee arthroplasty: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yongjun; Feng, Yuxing; Peng, Lihua

    2017-11-21

    Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation is a possible adjunctive therapy to pharmacological treatment for controlling pain after total knee arthroplasty. However, the results are controversial. A systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted to explore the effect of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on patients with total knee arthroplasty. PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, EBSCO, and Cochrane Library databases were searched systematically. Randomized controlled trials assessing the effect of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on patients with total knee arthroplasty were included. Two investigators independently searched articles, extracted data, and assessed the quality of included studies. Primary outcome was visual analogue scale (VAS) score over a period of 24 h. Meta-analysis was performed using a random-effect model. Six randomized controlled trials involving 529 patients were included in the meta-analysis. Overall, compared with control intervention, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation supplementation intervention was found to significantly reduce VAS scores and total postoperative morphine dose over a period of 24 h, and to improve active range of knee motion (standard mean difference (SMD) = 0.37; 95% confidence interval (95% CI) = 0.06-0.68; p = 0.02), but had no effect on VAS scores at 2 weeks (SMD = 0.20; 95% CI = -0.07 to 0.48; p = 0.15). Compared with control intervention, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation supplementation intervention was found to significantly reduce pain and morphine requirement over a period of 24 h and to promote functional recovery in patients who have undergone total knee arthroplasty.

  6. Vagus nerve stimulation: state of the art of stimulation and recording strategies to address autonomic function neuromodulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guiraud, David; Andreu, David; Bonnet, Stéphane; Carrault, Guy; Couderc, Pascal; Hagège, Albert; Henry, Christine; Hernandez, Alfredo; Karam, Nicole; Le Rolle, Virginie; Mabo, Philippe; Maciejasz, Paweł; Malbert, Charles-Henri; Marijon, Eloi; Maubert, Sandrine; Picq, Chloé; Rossel, Olivier; Bonnet, Jean-Luc

    2016-08-01

    Objective. Neural signals along the vagus nerve (VN) drive many somatic and autonomic functions. The clinical interest of VN stimulation (VNS) is thus potentially huge and has already been demonstrated in epilepsy. However, side effects are often elicited, in addition to the targeted neuromodulation. Approach. This review examines the state of the art of VNS applied to two emerging modulations of autonomic function: heart failure and obesity, especially morbid obesity. Main results. We report that VNS may benefit from improved stimulation delivery using very advanced technologies. However, most of the results from fundamental animal studies still need to be demonstrated in humans.

  7. Synaptic Plasticity after Chemical Deafening and Electrical Stimulation of the Auditory Nerve in Cats

    PubMed Central

    Ryugo, D.K.; Baker, C.A.; Montey, K.L.; Chang, L.Y.; Coco, A.; Fallon, J.B.; Shepherd, R.K.

    2010-01-01

    The effects of deafness on brain structure and function have been studied using animal models of congenital deafness that include surgical ablation of the organ of Corti, acoustic trauma, ototoxic drugs, and hereditary deafness. This report describes the morphologic plasticity of auditory nerve synapses in response to ototoxic deafening and chronic electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve. Normal kittens were deafened by neonatal administration of neomycin that eliminated auditory receptor cells. Some of these cats were raised deaf, whereas others were chronically implanted with cochlear electrodes at two months of age and electrically stimulated for up to 12 months. The large endings of the auditory nerve, endbulbs of Held, were studied because they hold a key position in the timing pathway for sound localization, are readily identifiable, and exhibit deafness-associated abnormalities. Compared to normal hearing cats, synapses of ototoxically deafened cats displayed expanded postsynaptic densities, a decrease in synaptic vesicle (SV) density, and a reduction in the somatic size of spherical bushy cells (SBCs). When compared to normal hearing cats, endbulbs of ototoxically deafened cats that received cochlear stimulation expressed postsynaptic densities (PSDs) that were statistically identical in size, showed a 32.8% reduction in SV density, and whose target SBCs had a 25.5% reduction in soma area. These results demonstrate that electrical stimulation via a cochlear implant in chemically-deafened cats preserves PSD size but not other aspects of synapse morphology. The results further suggest that the effects of ototoxic deafness are not identical to those of hereditary deafness. PMID:20127807

  8. Different effects of transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation and electroacupuncture at ST36–ST37 on the cerebral cortex

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Yu-Tien; Liao, Yi-Sheng; Hsieh, Ching-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Background The effects of transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS) and electroacupuncture (EA) on the cerebral cortex are largely unclear. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of TENS and EA on the cerebral cortex by examining their effect on the median nerve-somatosensory evoked potentials (MN-SEPs). Methods Twenty volunteers were studied. The cortical and cervical spinal potentials were recorded by median nerve stimulation at the left wrist. Sham TENS, 2 Hz TENS and 2 Hz EA were applied to both ST36 and ST37. MN-SEPs were recorded during sham TENS, 2 Hz TENS and 2 Hz EA, with at least 1 week interval for each subject. One-way analysis of variance was used to determine the differences in latency and amplitude of the MN-SEPs observed in the stimulation and post-stimulation periods compared with baseline. Scheffe's post hoc correction was employed to identify pairwise differences. Results No differences in mean latency were found between the stimulation procedures during the stimulation and post-stimulation periods. 2 Hz EA but not sham TENS or 2 Hz TENS caused higher mean amplitudes in N20 and N30 during the stimulation and post-stimulation periods. Conclusions EA, but not TENS, induces changes in certain components of the signal. PMID:25432425

  9. Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation Improves Walking Performance in Patients With Intermittent Claudication.

    PubMed

    Seenan, Chris; McSwiggan, Steve; Roche, Patricia A; Tan, Chee-Wee; Mercer, Tom; Belch, Jill J F

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of 2 types of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) on walking distance and measures of pain in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and intermittent claudication (IC). In a phase 2a study, 40 participants with PAD and IC completed a graded treadmill test on 2 separate testing occasions. Active TENS was applied to the lower limb on the first occasion; and placebo TENS, on the second. The participants were divided into 2 experimental groups. One group received high-frequency TENS; and the other, low-frequency TENS. Measures taken were initial claudication distance, functional claudication distance, and absolute claudication distance. The McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ) vocabulary was completed at the end of the intervention, and the MPQ-Pain Rating Index score was calculated. Four participants were excluded from the final analysis because of noncompletion of the experimental procedure. Median walking distance increased with high-frequency TENS for all measures (P < .05, Wilcoxon signed rank test, all measures). Only absolute claudication distance increased significantly with low-frequency TENS compared with placebo (median, 179-228; Ws = 39; z = 2.025; P = .043; r = 0.48). No difference was observed between reported median MPQ-Pain Rating Index scores: 21.5 with placebo TENS and 21.5 with active TENS (P = .41). Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation applied to the lower limb of the patients with PAD and IC was associated with increased walking distance on a treadmill but not with any reduction in pain. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation may be a useful adjunctive intervention to help increase walking performance in patients with IC.

  10. Sustained 12 Month Benefit of Phrenic Nerve Stimulation for Central Sleep Apnea.

    PubMed

    Costanzo, Maria Rosa; Ponikowski, Piotr; Javaheri, Shahrokh; Augostini, Ralph; Goldberg, Lee R; Holcomb, Richard; Kao, Andrew; Khayat, Rami N; Oldenburg, Olaf; Stellbrink, Christoph; Abraham, William T

    2018-06-01

    Transvenous phrenic nerve stimulation improved sleep metrics and quality of life after 6 months versus control in the remedē System Pivotal Trial. This analysis explored the effectiveness of phrenic nerve stimulation in patients with central sleep apnea after 12 months of therapy. Reproducibility of treatment effect was assessed in the former control group in whom the implanted device was initially inactive for the sixth month and subsequently activated when the randomized control assessments were complete. Patients with moderate-to-severe central sleep apnea implanted with the remedē System were randomized to therapy activation at 1 month (treatment) or after 6 months (control). Sleep indices were assessed from baseline to 12 months in the treatment group and from 6 to 12 months in former controls. In the treatment group, a ≥50% reduction in apnea-hypopnea index occurred in 60% of patients at 6 months (95% confidence interval [CI] 47% to 64%) and 67% (95% CI 53% to 78%) at 12 months. After 6 months of therapy, 55% of former controls (95% CI 43% to 67%) achieved ≥50%reduction in apnea-hypopnea index. Patient Global Assessment was markedly ormoderately improved at 6 and 12 months in 60% of treatment patients.Improvements persisted at 12 months. A serious adverse event within 12 months occurred in 13 patients (9%). Phrenic nerve stimulation produced sustained improvements in sleep indices and quality of life to at least 12 months in patients with central sleep apnea. The similar improvement of former controls after 6 months of active therapy confirms benefits are reproducible and reliable. Copyright © 2018 Respicardia, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Nerve cuff electrode using embedded magnets and its application to hypoglossal nerve stimulation.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jungmin; Wee, Jee Hye; Park, Jeong Hoan; Park, Pona; Kim, Jeong-Whun; Kim, Sung June

    2016-12-01

    A novel nerve cuff electrode with embedded magnets was fabricated and developed. In this study, a pair of magnets was fully embedded and encapsulated in a liquid crystal polymer (LCP) substrate to utilize magnetic force in order to replace the conventional installing techniques of cuff electrodes. In vitro and in vivo experiments were conducted to evaluate the feasibility of the magnet-embedded nerve cuff electrode (MENCE). Lastly, several issues pertaining to the MENCE such as the cuff-to-nerve diameter ratio, the force of the magnets, and possible concerns were discussed in the discussion section. Electrochemical impedance spectrum and cyclic voltammetry assessments were conducted to measure the impedance and charge storage capacity of the cathodal phase (CSC c ). The MENCE was installed onto the hypoglossal nerve (HN) of a rabbit and the movement of the genioglossus was recorded through C-arm fluoroscopy while the HN was stimulated by a pulsed current. The measured impedance was 0.638 ∠ -67.8° kΩ at 1 kHz and 5.27 ∠ -82.1° kΩ at 100 Hz. The average values of access resistance and cut-off frequency were 0.145 kΩ and 3.98 kHz, respectively. The CSC c of the electrode was measured as 1.69 mC cm -2 at the scan rate of 1 mV s -1 . The movement of the genioglossus contraction was observed under a pulsed current with an amplitude level of 0.106 mA, a rate of 0.635 kHz, and a duration of 0.375 ms applied through the MENCE. A few methods to close and secure cuff electrodes have been researched, but they are associated with several drawbacks. To overcome these, we used magnetic force as a closing method of the cuff electrode. The MENCE can be precisely installed on a target nerve without any surgical techniques such as suturing or molding. Furthermore, it is convenient to remove the installed MENCE because it requires little force to detach one magnet from the other, enabling repeatable installation and removal. We anticipate that the MENCE will become a very

  12. Occipital peripheral nerve stimulation in the management of chronic intractable occipital neuralgia in a patient with neurofibromatosis type 1: a case report.

    PubMed

    Skaribas, Ioannis; Calvillo, Octavio; Delikanaki-Skaribas, Evangelia

    2011-05-10

    Occipital peripheral nerve stimulation is an interventional pain management therapy that provides beneficial results in the treatment of refractory chronic occipital neuralgia. Herein we present a first-of-its-kind case study of a patient with neurofibromatosis type 1 and bilateral occipital neuralgia treated with occipital peripheral nerve stimulation. A 42-year-old Caucasian woman presented with bilateral occipital neuralgia refractory to various conventional treatments, and she was referred for possible treatment with occipital peripheral nerve stimulation. She was found to be a suitable candidate for the procedure, and she underwent implantation of two octapolar stimulating leads and a rechargeable, programmable, implantable generator. The intensity, severity, and frequency of her symptoms resolved by more than 80%, but an infection developed at the implantation site two months after the procedure that required explantation and reimplantation of new stimulating leads three months later. To date she continues to experience symptom resolution of more than 60%. These results demonstrate the significance of peripheral nerve stimulation in the management of refractory occipital neuralgias in patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 and the possible role of neurofibromata in the development of occipital neuralgia in these patients.

  13. Occipital peripheral nerve stimulation in the management of chronic intractable occipital neuralgia in a patient with neurofibromatosis type 1: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Occipital peripheral nerve stimulation is an interventional pain management therapy that provides beneficial results in the treatment of refractory chronic occipital neuralgia. Herein we present a first-of-its-kind case study of a patient with neurofibromatosis type 1 and bilateral occipital neuralgia treated with occipital peripheral nerve stimulation. Case presentation A 42-year-old Caucasian woman presented with bilateral occipital neuralgia refractory to various conventional treatments, and she was referred for possible treatment with occipital peripheral nerve stimulation. She was found to be a suitable candidate for the procedure, and she underwent implantation of two octapolar stimulating leads and a rechargeable, programmable, implantable generator. The intensity, severity, and frequency of her symptoms resolved by more than 80%, but an infection developed at the implantation site two months after the procedure that required explantation and reimplantation of new stimulating leads three months later. To date she continues to experience symptom resolution of more than 60%. Conclusion These results demonstrate the significance of peripheral nerve stimulation in the management of refractory occipital neuralgias in patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 and the possible role of neurofibromata in the development of occipital neuralgia in these patients. PMID:21569290

  14. Incorporation of fiber optic beam shaping into a laparoscopic probe for laser stimulation of the cavernous nerves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tozburun, Serhat; Lagoda, Gwen A.; Mayeh, Mona; Burnett, Arthur L.; Farahi, Faramarz; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2010-02-01

    The cavernous nerves (CN) course along the prostate surface and are responsible for erectile function. Improved identification and preservation of the CN's is critical to maintaining sexual potency after prostate cancer surgery. Noncontact optical nerve stimulation (ONS) of the CN's was recently demonstrated in a rat model, in vivo, as a potential alternative to electrical nerve stimulation (ENS) for identification of the CN's during prostate surgery. However, the therapeutic window for ONS is narrow, so optimal design of the fiber optic delivery system is critical for safe, reproducible stimulation. This study describes modeling, assembly, and testing of an ONS probe for delivering a small, collimated, flat-top laser beam for uniform CN stimulation. A direct comparison of the magnitude and response time of the intracavernosal pressure (ICP) for both Gaussian and flat-top spatial beam profiles was performed. Thulium fiber laser radiation (λ=1870 nm) was delivered through a 200-μm fiber, with distal fiber tip chemically etched to convert a Gaussian to flat-top beam profile. The laser beam was collimated to a 1-mm-diameter spot using an aspheric lens. Computer simulations of light propagation were used to optimize the probe design. The 10-Fr (3.4-mm-OD) laparoscopic probe provided a constant radiant exposure at the nerve surface. The probe was tested in four rats, in vivo. ONS of the CN's was performed with a 1-mm-diameter spot, 5- ms pulse duration, and pulse rate of 20 Hz for a duration of 15-30 s. The flat-top laser beam profile consistently produced a faster and higher ICP response at a lower radiant exposure than the Gaussian beam profile due, in part, to easier alignment of the more uniform beam with nerve. With further development, ONS may be used as a diagnostic tool for identification of the CN's during laparoscopic and robotic nerve-sparing prostate cancer surgery.

  15. Electrical and transcranial magnetic stimulation of the facial nerve: diagnostic relevance in acute isolated facial nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Happe, Svenja; Bunten, Sabine

    2012-01-01

    Unilateral facial weakness is common. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) allows identification of a conduction failure at the level of the canalicular portion of the facial nerve and may help to confirm the diagnosis. We retrospectively analyzed 216 patients with the diagnosis of peripheral facial palsy. The electrophysiological investigations included the blink reflex, preauricular electrical stimulation and the response to TMS at the labyrinthine part of the canalicular proportion of the facial nerve within 3 days after symptom onset. A similar reduction or loss of the TMS amplitude (p < 0.005) of the affected side was seen in each patient group. Of the 216 patients (107 female, mean age 49.7 ± 18.0 years), 193 were diagnosed with Bell's palsy. Test results of the remaining patients led to the diagnosis of infectious [including herpes simplex, varicella zoster infection and borreliosis (n = 13)] and noninfectious [including diabetes and neoplasma (n = 10)] etiology. A conduction block in TMS supports the diagnosis of peripheral facial palsy without being specific for Bell's palsy. These data shed light on the TMS-based diagnosis of peripheral facial palsy, an ability to localize the site of lesion within the Fallopian channel regardless of the underlying pathology. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. A Rare Case: Rupture of Internal Pudendal and Uterine Artery in a Vaginal Delivery.

    PubMed

    Chughtai, Novera G; Rizvi, Raheela Mohsin

    2018-03-01

    The management of puerperal hematomas after normal delivery has always been challenging for obstetricians. Vulvar, vulvovaginal, or paravaginal hematomas are common. On the other hand, retroperitoneal hematomas are uncommon and can be life-threatening. The diagnosis of vascular injury is rarely made preoperatively as atonic or traumatic postpartum hemorrhage (PPH), uterine rupture and amniotic fluid embolism are more common differential diagnoses. Injury to internal pudendal and uterine vessels is extremely rare in cases of vaginal delivery and, therefore, the literature on this topic is very scarce. We present a rare case of both internal pudendal and uterine artery rupture in a normal vaginal delivery, which led to massive postpartum hemorrhage. The diagnosis was made on Magnetic Resonance imaging (MRI) and arterial embolization was performed. This case stresses on the need for careful post-delivery monitoring for revealed postpartum hemorrhage. Vascular injury is a rare life-threatening cause of obstetric shock, and active; and timely operative intervention can prevent morbidity and mortality.

  17. Ablation of the sphenopalatine ganglion does not attenuate the infarct reducing effect of vagus nerve stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Ay, Ilknur; Ay, Hakan

    2013-01-01

    Electrical stimulation of the cervical vagus nerve reduces infarct size by approximately 50% after cerebral ischemia in rats. The mechanism of ischemic protection by vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is not known. In this study, we investigated whether the infarct reducing effect of VNS was mediated by activation of the parasympathetic vasodilator fibers that originate from the sphenopalatine ganglion (SPG) and innervate the anterior cerebral circulation. We examined the effects of electrical stimulation of the cervical vagus nerve in two groups of rats: one with and one without SPG ablation. Electrical stimulation was initiated 30 min after induction of ischemia, and lasted for 1h. Measurement of infarct size 24h later revealed that the volume of ischemic damage was smaller in those animals that received VNS treatment (41.32 ± 2.07% vs. 24.19 ± 2.62% of the contralateral hemispheric volume, n=6 in both; p<0.05). SPG ablation did not abolish this effect; the reduction in infarct volume following VNS was 58% in SPG-damaged animals, 41% in SPG-intact animals (p>0.05). In both SPG-intact and SPG-damaged animals VNS treatment resulted in better motor outcome (p<0.05 vs. corresponding controls for both). Our findings show that VNS can protect the brain against acute ischemic injury, and that this effect is not mediated by SPG projections. PMID:23273773

  18. Continuous-wave optical stimulation of the rat prostate nerves using an all-single-mode 1455 nm diode laser and fiber system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tozburun, Serhat; Lagoda, Gwen A.; Burnett, Arthur L.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2011-03-01

    Optical nerve stimulation (ONS) has recently been reported as a potential alternative to electrical nerve stimulation. Continuous-wave (CW) laser stimulation of the prostate cavernous nerves (CN) in a rat model, in vivo, has also been demonstrated in our previous studies. The objective of this study is to present a new all-single-mode-fiber configuration for ONS with the laser operating in CW mode for potential diagnostic applications. An infrared pigtailed single-mode diode laser (λ = 1455 nm) was used in this study for noncontact ONS. This new all-fiber approach introduces several advantages including: (1) a less expensive and more compact ONS system, (2) elimination of alignment of optical components, and (3) an improved spatial beam profile. Successful optical stimulation of the rat CN using this new design was observed after the CN reached a threshold temperature of ~ 41 °C with response times as short as 3 s. Upon further study, this configuration may be useful for identification and preservation of the cavernous nerves during prostate cancer surgery.

  19. Is Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation an Effective Predictor for Invasive Occipital Nerve Stimulation Treatment Success in Fibromyalgia Patients?

    PubMed

    Plazier, Mark; Tchen, Stephanie; Ost, Jan; Joos, Kathleen; De Ridder, Dirk; Vanneste, Sven

    2015-10-01

    Fibromyalgia is a disorder distinguished by pervasive musculoskeletal pain that has pervasive effects on affected individuals magnifying the importance of finding a safe and viable treatment option. The goal of this study is to investigate if transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) treatment can predict the outcome of occipital nerve field stimulation (ONFS) via a subcutaneous electrode. Nine patients with fibromyalgia were selected fulfilling the American College of Rheumatology-90 criteria. The patients were implanted with a subcutaneous trial-lead in the C2 dermatome innervated by the occipital nerve. After the treatment phase of ONFS using a C2 implant, each patient participated in three sessions of tDCS. Stimulation outcomes for pain suppression were examined between the two methods to determine possible correlations. Positive correlation of stimulation effect was noted between the numeric rating scale changes for pain obtained by tDCS treatments and short-term measures of ONFS, but no correlation was noted between tDCS and long-term ONFS outcomes. A correlation also was noted between short-term ONS C2 implant pain suppression and long-term ONS C2 implant treatment success. This pilot study suggests that tDCS is a predictive measure for success of OFNS in short-term but cannot be used as a predictive measure for success of long-term OFNS. Our data confirm previous findings that ONFS via an implanted electrode can improve fibromyalgia pain in a placebo-controlled way and exert a long-term pain suppression effect for ONFS via an implanted electrode. © 2015 International Neuromodulation Society.

  20. Electrically stimulated signals from a long-term Regenerative Peripheral Nerve Interface.

    PubMed

    Langhals, Nicholas B; Woo, Shoshana L; Moon, Jana D; Larson, John V; Leach, Michelle K; Cederna, Paul S; Urbanchek, Melanie G

    2014-01-01

    Despite modern technological advances, the most widely available prostheses provide little functional recovery beyond basic grasping. Although sophisticated upper extremity prostheses are available, optimal prosthetic interfaces which give patients high-fidelity control of these artificial limbs are limited. We have developed a novel Regenerative Peripheral Nerve Interface (RPNI), which consists of a unit of free muscle that has been neurotized by a transected peripheral nerve. In conjunction with a biocompatible electrode on the muscle surface, the RPNI facilitates signal transduction from a residual peripheral nerve to a neuroprosthetic limb. The purpose of this study was to explore signal quality and reliability in an RPNI following an extended period of implantation. Following a 14-month maturation period, electromyographic signal generation was evaluated via electrical stimulation of the innervating nerve. The long-term RPNI was viable and healthy, as demonstrated by evoked compound muscle action potentials as well as histological tissue analysis. Signals exceeding 4 mV were successfully acquired and amplitudes were consistent across multiple repetitions of applied stimuli. There were no evident signs of muscle denervation, significant scar tissue, or muscle necrosis. This study provides further evidence that after a maturation period exceeding 1 year, reliable and consistent signals can still be acquired from an RPNI.

  1. Vagal Nerve Stimulator Malfunction with Change in Neck Position: Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    D'Agostino, Erin; Makler, Vyacheslav; Bauer, David F

    2018-06-01

    Vagal nerve stimulation is a safe and well-tolerated treatment for drug-resistant epilepsy. Complications and failure of the device can result from lead fracture, device malfunction, disconnection, or battery displacement and can result in a variety of symptoms. We present an interesting case of stimulator malfunction with increased impedance change seen only with a change in head position. The patient is a 25-year-old male with a vagal nerve stimulator (VNs) placed for medically refractory epilepsy who presented with neck pain and an electrical pulling sensation in his neck whenever he turned his head to the right. Initial interrogation of the VNs showed normal impedance. Subsequent interrogation with the patient's head turned found increased impedance only when the head was turned to the right. The patient had successful removal and replacement of the device with resolution of his preoperative complaints. Partial lead fracture was seen at explant. VNs malfunction can present in atypical ways. Positional maneuvers may help with its timely diagnosis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Maintenance percutaneous posterior nerve stimulation for refractory lower urinary tract symptoms in patients with multiple sclerosis: an open label, multicenter, prospective study.

    PubMed

    Zecca, C; Digesu, G A; Robshaw, P; Singh, A; Elneil, S; Gobbi, C

    2014-03-01

    Percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation is an effective second line therapy for lower urinary tract symptoms. Data on percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation maintenance treatment are scarce. In this study we evaluate its effectiveness and propose an algorithm of percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation maintenance treatment in patients with multiple sclerosis. In this prospective, multicenter, open label trial consecutive patients with multiple sclerosis and lower urinary tract symptoms unresponsive to medical therapy were treated with 12 weekly sessions of percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation. Responder patients (50% or greater improvement of lower urinary tract symptoms as measured by the patient perception of bladder condition questionnaire) entered a maintenance phase with individualized treatment frequency based on patient response. Lower urinary tract symptoms were assessed using a 3-day frequency volume chart, urodynamics and patient perception of bladder condition questionnaire. Treatment satisfaction was evaluated using a global response assessment scale and a treatment satisfaction visual analog scale. A total of 83 patients were included in the study and 74 (89%) responded to initial treatment. Persistent efficacy occurred in all initial responders after a mean treatment of 24 months. The greatest frequency of maintenance percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation was every 2 weeks. Lower urinary tract symptoms and patient treatment satisfaction improved with time compared to initial treatment (p <0.05). Bladder diary parameters and voiding parameters improved compared to baseline (p <0.05). Prolonged percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation treatment leads to a persistent improvement of lower urinary tract symptoms in patients with multiple sclerosis. Copyright © 2014 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Right median nerve electrical stimulation for acute traumatic coma (the Asia Coma Electrical Stimulation trial): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiang; Zhang, Chao; Feng, Junfeng; Mao, Qing; Gao, Guoyi; Jiang, Jiyao

    2017-07-10

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has become the most common cause of death and disability in persons between 15 and 30 years of age, and about 10-15% of patients affected by TBI will end up in a coma. Coma caused by TBI presents a significant challenge to neuroscientists. Right median nerve electrical stimulation has been reported as a simple, inexpensive, non-invasive technique to speed recovery and improve outcomes for traumatic comatose patients. This multicentre, prospective, randomised (1:1) controlled trial aims to demonstrate the efficacy and safety of electrical right median nerve stimulation (RMNS) in both accelerating emergence from coma and promoting long-term outcomes. This trial aims to enrol 380 TBI comatose patients to partake in either an electrical stimulation group or a non-stimulation group. Patients assigned to the stimulation group will receive RMNS in addition to standard treatment at an amplitude of 15-20 mA with a pulse width of 300 μs at 40 Hz ON for 20 s and OFF for 40 s. The electrical treatment will last for 8 h per day for 2 weeks. The primary endpoint will be the percentage of patients regaining consciousness 6 months after injury. The secondary endpoints will be Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale, Coma Recovery Scale-Revised and Disability Rating Scale scores at 28 days, 3 months and 6 months after injury; Glasgow Coma Scale, Glasgow Coma Scale Motor Part and Full Outline of Unresponsiveness scale scores on day 1 and day 7 after enrolment and 28 days, 3 months and 6 months after injury; duration of unconsciousness and mechanical ventilation; length of intensive care unit and hospital stays; and incidence of adverse events. Right median nerve electrical stimulation has been used as a safe, inexpensive, non-invasive therapy for neuroresuscitation of coma patients for more than two decades, yet no trial has robustly proven the efficacy and safety of this treatment. The Asia Coma Electrical Stimulation (ACES) trial has the

  4. Auditory-nerve single-neuron thresholds to electrical stimulation from scala tympani electrodes.

    PubMed

    Parkins, C W; Colombo, J

    1987-12-31

    Single auditory-nerve neuron thresholds were studied in sensory-deafened squirrel monkeys to determine the effects of electrical stimulus shape and frequency on single-neuron thresholds. Frequency was separated into its components, pulse width and pulse rate, which were analyzed separately. Square and sinusoidal pulse shapes were compared. There were no or questionably significant threshold differences in charge per phase between sinusoidal and square pulses of the same pulse width. There was a small (less than 0.5 dB) but significant threshold advantage for 200 microseconds/phase pulses delivered at low pulse rates (156 pps) compared to higher pulse rates (625 pps and 2500 pps). Pulse width was demonstrated to be the prime determinant of single-neuron threshold, resulting in strength-duration curves similar to other mammalian myelinated neurons, but with longer chronaxies. The most efficient electrical stimulus pulse width to use for cochlear implant stimulation was determined to be 100 microseconds/phase. This pulse width delivers the lowest charge/phase at threshold. The single-neuron strength-duration curves were compared to strength-duration curves of a computer model based on the specific anatomy of auditory-nerve neurons. The membrane capacitance and resulting chronaxie of the model can be varied by altering the length of the unmyelinated termination of the neuron, representing the unmyelinated portion of the neuron between the habenula perforata and the hair cell. This unmyelinated segment of the auditory-nerve neuron may be subject to aminoglycoside damage. Simulating a 10 micron unmyelinated termination for this model neuron produces a strength-duration curve that closely fits the single-neuron data obtained from aminoglycoside deafened animals. Both the model and the single-neuron strength-duration curves differ significantly from behavioral threshold data obtained from monkeys and humans with cochlear implants. This discrepancy can best be explained by

  5. Physiology of male sexual function.

    PubMed

    deGroat, W C; Booth, A M

    1980-02-01

    The male sexual response cycle consists of excitement, plateau, orgasm, and resolution. The initial event, penile erection, is produced by arteriolar dilatation and increased blood flow to the erectile tissue of the penis. Erection is a reflex response initiated by visual, olfactory, or imaginative stimuli impinging upon supraspinal centers or by genital stimulation that in turn activates spinal reflex mechanisms. Sacral parasympathetic and thoracolumbar sympathetic nerves provide the efferent vasodilator input to the penis. Parasympathetic nerves also stimulate secretion from the seminal vesicles and prostate and Cowper's glands during the plateau phase. The orgasmic phase is characterized by seminal emission and ejaculation and the accompanying sensations. Emission of semen into the urethra depends on sympathetic nerves that elicit contractions of smooth muscles in the vas deferens, seminal vesicles, and prostate. Rhythmic contractions of striated muscle (bulbocavernosus and ischiocavernosus) generated by efferent pathways in the pudendal nerve eject semen from the urethra.

  6. Application of Rubber Band with Hooks on Both Ends for Vagus Nerve Stimulator Implantation.

    PubMed

    Hosoyama, Hiroshi; Hanaya, Ryosuke; Otsubo, Toshiaki; Sato, Masanori; Kashida, Yumi; Sugata, Sei; Katagiri, Masaya; Iida, Koji; Arita, Kazunori

    2018-03-01

    Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is a valuable therapeutic option for many types of drug-resistant epilepsy. Muscle hooks and carotid endarterectomy rings have been used for cervical delamination preceding the implantation of stimulation electrodes. The attachment on both sides of a rubber band of Kamiyama-style hanging needles, as are used for scalp and dural retraction during craniotomy, yields a useful tool for VNS implantation. Here we report our experience with this method. We present our method using a rubber band plus hooks and a review of 21 consecutive patients who underwent VNS implantation using our rubber band-plus-hooks method. None of the 21 patients experienced intraoperative or perioperative complications. Hooks placed in connective tissue around the common carotid artery and jugular vein raised the vagus nerve by elevating the carotid sheath. A single surgeon was able to perform all cervical manipulations under a surgical microscope. The average operation time in this series of 21 patients was 137 minutes. The use of hooks attached to both sides of a rubber band rendered VNS implantation safer by lifting the vagus nerve and standardizing the procedure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. In Vivo Magnetic Stimulation of Rat Sciatic Nerve With Centimeter- and Millimeter-Scale Solenoid Coils.

    PubMed

    Kagan, Zachary B; RamRakhyani, Anil Kumar; Lazzi, Gianluca; Normann, Richard A; Warren, David J

    2016-11-01

    Previous reports of magnetic stimulation of the peripheral nervous system (PNS) used various coil geometries, all with outer diameters larger than 35 mm, and stimulation energies in the 50 J range to evoke neural excitation. Recent reports of central nervous system (CNS) activation used sub-mm-scale solenoid coils with mJ energy levels. The goal of this study was to translate the lower energy levels from the CNS to the PNS via using smaller coils placed in closer proximity to the neural tissue. Such a performance improvement would advance the state of the art of magnetic stimulation and provide a path towards new neuroprosthetic devices. Primarily, we investigated the range of coil outer diameters from 25 mm down to 5 mm to better understand the dependence of coil diameter on energy required for PNS activation. Nine cm- and mm-scale copper solenoid coils, with various resistances, inductances, inner and outer diameters, and heights were compared by quantizing neuromuscular responses to magnetic stimulation via capacitive discharge excitation of rat sciatic nerves in vivo. Additionally, the effects of stimulus duration and coil position were investigated. As opposed to prior work, this study compares a subset of stimulation parameters in an intact nerve preparation, and shows that magnetic stimulation with coils that abut the nerve is a reliable, effective method of neuromuscular stimulation. Although we observed different energies required for neuromuscular activation depending on the coil and excitation parameters used, for the experimental configuration, devices, and stimulus waveform shapes presented in this manuscript, no systematic dependence of PNS activation on coil diameter was found, even for the mm-scale coils investigated herein. However, there was a clear relationship between discharge circuit capacitance and energy required to evoke a neuromuscular response. Coils approximately 12 mm in outer diameter and larger consistently evoked responses, whereas

  8. Super-response to cardiac resynchronization therapy may predict late phrenic nerve stimulation.

    PubMed

    Juliá, Justo; López-Gil, María; Fontenla, Adolfo; Lozano, Álvaro; Villagraz, Lola; Salguero, Rafael; Arribas, Fernando

    2017-11-22

    Changes in the anatomical relationship between left phrenic nerve and coronary veins may occur due to the reverse remodelling observed in super-responders to cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) and might be the underlying mechanism in patients developing late-onset phrenic nerve stimulation (PNS) without evidence of lead dislodgement (LD). In this study, we sought to evaluate the role of super-response (SR) to CRT as a potential predictor of late-onset PNS. Consecutive patients implanted with a left ventricular (LV) lead in a single centre were retrospectively analysed. Phrenic nerve stimulation was classified as 'early' when it occurred within 3 months of implantation and 'late' for occurrences thereafter. 'Late' PNS was considered related to LD (LD-PNS) when LV threshold differed by > 1 V or impedance >250 Ω from baseline values or in case of radiological displacement. Cases not meeting the former criteria were classified as 'non-LD-PNS'. Super-response was defined as a decrease ≥30% of the left ventricluar end-systolic volume at 1-year echocardiography. At 32 ± 7 months follow-up, PNS occurred in 20 of 139 patients. Late non-LD-PNS incidence was significantly higher in the SR group (8/61; 13.1%) when compared with the non-SR (1/78; 1.3%) (P = 0.010). Super-response remained the only predictor of non-LD-PNS at multivariate analysis (odds ratio: 11.62, 95% confidence interval 1.41-95.68, P = 0.023). Incidence of late non-LD-PNS is higher among SR to CRT, suggesting a potential role of the changes in the anatomical relationship between left phrenic nerve and coronary veins. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2017. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Influence of local noxious heat stimulation on sensory nerve activity in the feline dental pulp.

    PubMed

    Ahlberg, K F

    1978-05-01

    The present investigation was undertaken to develop an experimental model in which noxious heat stimulation was used to produce increased intradental sensory nerve activity in canine teeth of anesthetized cats. Two techniques were evaluated in which both the method of recording and the nature of the stimulus varied. Slow heating (approx 1 degree C/s) to 47 degree C of the tooth surface (combined with recording from electrodes in open dentinal cavities) did not produce any persistent nerve activity. Repeated periods of brief intense heating (approx 60 degrees C/s) (combined with recording from amalgam electrodes placed on cavity floors) resulted in an immediate response and an afterdischarge (phase 3) generally persisting for 20--60 min. Maximum phase 3 activity was characteristic for the individual cat and ranged from 0.2 to 50.2 imp/s. mean value 10.6 imp/s (S.D. +/- 9.2). A systematically higher phase 3 activity was recorded in lower compared to upper canine teeth (p less than 0.05). The maximum phase 3 response generally occurred after 3-8 stimulations; the median number of required stimuli was 3. Repeated brief heat stimulations combined with the closed cavity recording technique may be used as an experimental model by which the mechanisms behind increases in intradental sensory nerve activity associated with tissue damage can be studied.

  10. Comparison of three pulsed infrared lasers for optical stimulation of the rat prostate cavernous nerves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stahl, Charlotte S. D.; Tozburun, Serhat; Hutchens, Thomas C.; Lagoda, Gwen A.; Burnett, Arthur L.; Keller, Matthew D.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2013-03-01

    Optical nerve stimulation (ONS) is being explored for identification and preservation of the cavernous nerves (CN), responsible for erectile function, during prostate cancer surgery. This study compares three pulsed infrared lasers to determine whether differences in spectral linewidth and/or temporal pulse profile influence successful ONS of CN. Infrared laser radiation from the Capella diode laser (1873 nm, 5 ms, 10 Hz), Thulium fiber laser (TFL) (1873 nm, 5 ms, 10 Hz), and solid-state Holmium:YAG laser (2120 nm, 200 μs, 5 Hz) were transmitted through 400-μm-corediameter optical fibers, producing a 1-mm-diameter-spot on the nerve surface. Successful ONS was judged by an intracavernous pressure (ICP) response in the penis (n =10 rats) during a total stimulation time of 30 s. The narrow linewidth TFL (Δλ 0.5 nm) and broad linewidth Capella laser (Δλ 12 nm) performed similarly, producing ICP responses with a threshold radiant exposure of 0.45 J/cm2, and ICP response times of 12-17 s, while the Holmium laser stimulated at 0.59 J/cm2, and ICP response times of about 14-28 s. All three lasers demonstrated successful ONS of CN. ICP response time was dependent on the rate of energy deposition into the CN, rather than linewidth or temporal pulse profile.

  11. Recovery of supraspinal control of leg movement in a chronic complete flaccid paraplegic man after continuous low-frequency pelvic nerve stimulation and FES-assisted training

    PubMed Central

    Possover, Marc; Forman, Axel

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: More than 30 years ago, functional electrical stimulation (FES) was developed as an orthotic system to be used for rehabilitation for SCI patients. In the present case report, FES-assisted training was combined with continuous low-frequency stimulation of the pelvic somatic nerves in a SCI patient. Case Presentation: We report on unexpected findings in a 41-year-old man with chronic complete flaccid paraplegia, since he was 18 years old, who underwent spinal stem cell therapy and a laparoscopic implantation of neuroprosthesis (LION procedure) in the pelvic lumbosacral nerves. The patient had complete flaccid sensomotoric paraplegia T12 as a result of a motor vehicle accident in 1998. In June 2011, he underwent a laparoscopic implantation of stimulation electrodes to the sciatic and femoral nerves for continuous low-frequency electrical stimulation and functional electrical stimulation of the pelvic nerves. Neither intraoperative direct stimulation of the pelvic nerves nor postoperative stimulation induced any sensation or muscle reactions. After 2 years of passive continuous low-frequency stimulation, the patient developed progressive recovery of electrically assisted voluntary motor functions below the lesions: he was first able to extend the right knee and 6 months later, the left. He is currently capable of voluntary weight-bearing standing and walking (with voluntary knee movements) about 50 m with open cuff crutches and drop foot braces. Discussion: Our findings suggest that continuous low-frequency pelvic nerve stimulation in combination with FES-assisted training might induce changes that affect both the upper and the lower motor neuron and allow supra- and infra-spinal inputs to engage residual spinal and peripheral pathways. PMID:28503316

  12. Vagus Nerve Stimulation Reduces Cocaine Seeking and Alters Plasticity in the Extinction Network

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Childs, Jessica E.; DeLeon, Jaime; Nickel, Emily; Kroener, Sven

    2017-01-01

    Drugs of abuse cause changes in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and associated regions that impair inhibitory control over drug-seeking. Breaking the contingencies between drug-associated cues and the delivery of the reward during extinction learning reduces rates of relapse. Here we used vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) to induce targeted synaptic…

  13. Differential effects of progesterone and genital stimulation on sequential inhibition of estrous behavior and progesterone receptor expression in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Camarillo, Madaí A; Beyer, Carlos; Lucio, Rosa Angélica; García-Juárez, Marcos; González-Arenas, Aliesha; Camacho-Arroyo, Ignacio; Komisaruk, Barry R; González-Flores, Oscar

    2011-05-30

    The effect of genital stimulation, either by vaginocervical stimulation (VCS) using a calibrated vaginal probe combined with manual flank stimulation (FS), or by mounts performed by the male, on the hypothalamus and preoptic area concentration of the progesterone receptors A (PR-A) and B (PR-B) was assessed in ovariectomized (ovx) estrogen-primed rats. VCS/FS or stimulation provided by male mounts, even without intromission, significantly decreased PR-B concentration in the hypoythalamus. Down regulation of PR produced by genital stimulation was quantitatively similar to that elicited by progesterone (P) administration. Bilateral or unilateral transection of the pelvic or the pudendal nerves prevented down regulation elicited by VCS/FS. Repeated VCS/FS elicited lordosis behavior in most ovx estrogen primed rats, but the lordosis intensity was lower than that observed in response to P. P administered to ovx estrogen primed rats, induced sequential inhibition, i.e., failure to display estrous behavior in response to a second P injection (24h after the initial P injection). VCS/FS failed to elicit sequential inhibition, since rats responded with normal estrous behavior to the second injection of P. This suggests that down regulation by VCS, by contrast with P, failed to inhibit the subpopulation of PR involved in the facilitation of estrous behavior by P. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Release of [3H-noradrenaline from the motor adrenergic nerves of the anococcygeus muscle by lysergic acid diethylamide, tyramine or nerve stimulation.

    PubMed Central

    McGrath, J C; Olverman, H J

    1978-01-01

    1 A method is described for labelling the neuronal noradrenaline (NA) stores of rat anococcygeus with [3H]-NA and detecting subsequent release of 3H from the superfused tissue by nerve stimulation or drugs. 2 Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) or tyramine but not barium chloride or carbachol increased the efflux of 3H although each drug produced an equivalent contractile response. This confirms that LDS has an indirect sympathomimetic action. 3 LSD was found to produce a proportionately smaller reduction of the nerve-induced efflux of 3H than of the accompanying contractile response. 4 The inhibition of nerve-induced contractile responses by LSD was shown to be independent of the neuronal uptake of noradrenaline and any post-junctional inhibition demonstrated to be non-specific. PMID:728688

  15. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and interferential current demonstrate similar effects in relieving acute and chronic pain: a systematic review with meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Camila Cadena de; Silva, Vinicius Z Maldaner da; Júnior, Gerson Cipriano; Liebano, Richard Eloin; Durigan, Joao Luiz Quagliotti

    2018-02-02

    Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and interferential current have been widely used in clinical practice. However, a systematic review comparing their effects on pain relief has not yet been performed. To investigate the effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and interferential current on acute and chronic pain. We use Pubmed, Embase, LILACS, PEDro and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials as data sources. Two independent reviewers that selected studies according to inclusion criteria, extracted information of interest and verified the methodological quality of the studies made study selection. The studies were selected if transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and interferential current were used as treatment and they had pain as the main outcome, as evaluated by a visual analog scale. Secondary outcomes were the Western Ontario Macmaster and Rolland Morris Disability questionnaires, which were added after data extraction. Eight studies with a pooled sample of 825 patients were included. The methodological quality of the selected studies was moderate, with an average of six on a 0-10 scale (PEDro). In general, both transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and interferential current improved pain and functional outcomes without a statistical difference between them. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and interferential current have similar effects on pain outcome The low number of studies included in this meta-analysis indicates that new clinical trials are needed. Copyright © 2018 Associação Brasileira de Pesquisa e Pós-Graduação em Fisioterapia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  16. Facial nerve stimulation in normal pigs and healthy human volunteers: transitional development of a medical device for the emergency treatment of ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Olivia; García, Andrea; Castro-Prado, Fernando; Perez, Miriam; Lara-Estrada, Rafael; Ramirez-Meza, Martin; Godinez, Montserrat; Coco, Michael L; Azpiroz, Joaquín; Borsody, Mark K; Sacristán, Emilio

    2018-02-15

    Magnetic stimulation of the facial nerve has been tested in preclinical studies as a new, non-invasive emergency treatment of ischemic stroke that acts by increasing cerebral blood flow (CBF). The objective of the studies reported herein was to identify minimal stimulation parameters that increase CBF in large animals and then test those stimulation parameters in healthy volunteers for safety, tolerability, and effectiveness at increasing CBF. This translational research is necessary preparation for clinical studies in ischemic stroke patients. Initial experiments in anesthetized Yorkshire pigs were undertaken in order to identify the lowest stimulus power and duration that increase CBF. A full 3 × 3 factorial design was used to evaluate magnetic stimulation of the facial nerve at various stimulation powers (1.3, 1.6, and 1.9 Tesla field strength at coil surface) and for various durations (2, 3.5, and 5 min). CBF was measured with contrast MRI perfusion imaging and the internal carotid arteries were assessed with MR angiography. Magnetic facial nerve stimulation with parameters identified in the pig study was then applied to 35 healthy volunteers. Safety was assessed with adverse event reports and by medical examination. Tolerability was defined as each volunteer's ability to withstand at least 2 min of stimulation. Volunteers could determine the maximum power of stimulation they received during a ramp-up period. In pigs, unilateral facial nerve stimulation increased CBF by as much as 77% over pre-stimulation baseline when administered across a range of 1.3-1.9 Tesla power and for 2- to 5-min duration. No clear dose-response relationship could be observed across this range, but lower powers and durations than these were markedly less effective. The effect of a single stimulation lasted 90 min. A second stimulation delivered 100 min after the first stimulation sustained the increased CBF without evidence of tachyphylaxis. In human, bilateral facial nerve

  17. Electrical stimulation promotes nerve cell differentiation on polypyrrole/poly (2-methoxy-5 aniline sulfonic acid) composites.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao; Gilmore, Kerry J; Moulton, Simon E; Wallace, Gordon G

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate for the first time the potential biomedical applications of novel polypyrrole (PPy) composites incorporating a large polyelectrolyte dopant, poly (2-methoxy-5 aniline sulfonic acid) (PMAS). The physical and electrochemical properties were characterized. The PPy/PMAS composites were found to be smooth and hydrophilic and have low electrical impedance. We demonstrate that PPy/PMAS supports nerve cell (PC12) differentiation, and that clinically relevant 250 Hz biphasic current pulses delivered via PPy/PMAS films significantly promote nerve cell differentiation in the presence of nerve growth factor (NGF). The capacity of PPy/PMAS composites to support and enhance nerve cell differentiation via electrical stimulation renders them valuable for medical implants for neurological applications.

  18. Efficacy of electroacupuncture compared with transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation for functional constipation

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Yuxiao; Zhang, Xuecheng; Zhou, Jing; Wang, Xinwei; Jiao, Ruimin; Liu, Zhishun

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Background: To treat functional constipation, both electroacupuncture (EA) therapy and transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS) are safe and effective. However, no head-to-head comparison trial has been conducted. This trial compares the efficacy of electroacupuncture relative to transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation for functional constipation. Methods: Individuals with functional constipation will be randomly allocated to receive either EA or TENS (n = 51, each), 3 times per week for 8 weeks. The primary outcome is the percentage of participants with an average increase from baseline of 1 or more complete spontaneous bowel movements at week 8. The secondary outcome measures are the following: at the time of visits, changes in the number of complete spontaneous bowel movements, number of spontaneous bowel movements, stool character, difficulty in defecation, patients’ assessment of quality of life regarding constipation (self-report questionnaire), and use of auxiliary defecation methods. Discussion: The results of this trial should verify whether EA is more efficacious than TENS for relieving symptoms of functional constipation. The major limitation of the study is the lack of blinding of the participants and acupuncturist. PMID:29742718

  19. Sympathetic nerve stimulation induces local endothelial Ca2+ signals to oppose vasoconstriction of mouse mesenteric arteries

    PubMed Central

    Nausch, Lydia W. M.; Bonev, Adrian D.; Heppner, Thomas J.; Tallini, Yvonne; Kotlikoff, Michael I.

    2012-01-01

    It is generally accepted that the endothelium regulates vascular tone independent of the activity of the sympathetic nervous system. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the activation of sympathetic nerves engages the endothelium to oppose vasoconstriction. Local inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3)-mediated Ca2+ signals (“pulsars”) in or near endothelial projections to vascular smooth muscle (VSM) were measured in an en face mouse mesenteric artery preparation. Electrical field stimulation of sympathetic nerves induced an increase in endothelial cell (EC) Ca2+ pulsars, recruiting new pulsar sites without affecting activity at existing sites. This increase in Ca2+ pulsars was blocked by bath application of the α-adrenergic receptor antagonist prazosin or by TTX but was unaffected by directly picospritzing the α-adrenergic receptor agonist phenylephrine onto the vascular endothelium, indicating that nerve-derived norepinephrine acted through α-adrenergic receptors on smooth muscle cells. Moreover, EC Ca2+ signaling was not blocked by inhibitors of purinergic receptors, ryanodine receptors, or voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels, suggesting a role for IP3, rather than Ca2+, in VSM-to-endothelium communication. Block of intermediate-conductance Ca2+-sensitive K+ channels, which have been shown to colocalize with IP3 receptors in endothelial projections to VSM, enhanced nerve-evoked constriction. Collectively, our results support the concept of a transcellular negative feedback module whereby sympathetic nerve stimulation elevates EC Ca2+ signals to oppose vasoconstriction. PMID:22140050

  20. Comparison of Nerve Stimulation-guided Axillary Brachial Plexus Block, Single Injection versus Four Injections: A Prospective Randomized Double-blind Study.

    PubMed

    Badiger, Santoshi V; Desai, Sameer N

    2017-01-01

    A variety of techniques have been described for the axillary block using nerve stimulator, either with single injection, two, three, or four separate injections. Identification of all the four nerves is more difficult and time-consuming than other methods. Aim of the present study is to compare success rate, onset, and duration of sensory and motor anesthesia of axillary block using nerve stimulator, either with single injection after identification of any one of the four nerves or four separate injections following identification of each of nerve. Prospective, randomized, double-blind study. Patients undergoing forearm and hand surgeries under axillary block. One hundred patients, aged 18-75 years, were randomly allocated into two groups of 50 each. Axillary block was performed under the guidance of nerve stimulator with a mixture of 18 ml of 1.5% lignocaine and 18 ml of 0.5% bupivacaine. In the first group ( n = 50), all 36 ml of local anesthetic was injected after the identification of motor response to any one of the nerves and in Group 2, all the four nerves were identified by the motor response, and 9 ml of local anesthetic was injected at each of the nerves. The success rate of the block, onset, and duration of sensory and motor block was assessed. Categorical variables were compared using the Chi-square test, and continuous variables were compared using independent t -test. The success rate of the block with four injection technique was higher compared to single-injection technique (84% vs. 56%, P = 0.02). Four injection groups had a faster onset of sensory and motor block and prolonged duration of analgesia compared to single-injection group ( P < 0.001). There were no significant differences in the incidence of accidental arterial puncture and hemodynamic parameter between the groups. Identification of all the four nerves produced higher success rate and better quality of the block when compared to single-injection technique.

  1. Non-invasive stimulation of the vibrissal pad improves recovery of whisking function after simultaneous lesion of the facial and infraorbital nerves in rats.

    PubMed

    Bendella, H; Pavlov, S P; Grosheva, M; Irintchev, A; Angelova, S K; Merkel, D; Sinis, N; Kaidoglou, K; Skouras, E; Dunlop, S A; Angelov, Doychin N

    2011-07-01

    We have recently shown that manual stimulation of target muscles promotes functional recovery after transection and surgical repair to pure motor nerves (facial: whisking and blink reflex; hypoglossal: tongue position). However, following facial nerve repair, manual stimulation is detrimental if sensory afferent input is eliminated by, e.g., infraorbital nerve extirpation. To further understand the interplay between sensory input and motor recovery, we performed simultaneous cut-and-suture lesions on both the facial and the infraorbital nerves and examined whether stimulation of the sensory afferents from the vibrissae by a forced use would improve motor recovery. The efficacy of 3 treatment paradigms was assessed: removal of the contralateral vibrissae to ensure a maximal use of the ipsilateral ones (vibrissal stimulation; Group 2), manual stimulation of the ipsilateral vibrissal muscles (Group 3), and vibrissal stimulation followed by manual stimulation (Group 4). Data were compared to controls which underwent surgery but did not receive any treatment (Group 1). Four months after surgery, all three treatments significantly improved the amplitude of vibrissal whisking to 30° versus 11° in the controls of Group 1. The three treatments also reduced the degree of polyneuronal innervation of target muscle fibers to 37% versus 58% in Group 1. These findings indicate that forced vibrissal use and manual stimulation, either alone or sequentially, reduce target muscle polyinnervation and improve recovery of whisking function when both the sensory and the motor components of the trigemino-facial system regenerate.

  2. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor off-target effect on nerve outgrowth promotes prostate cancer development.

    PubMed

    Dobrenis, Kostantin; Gauthier, Laurent R; Barroca, Vilma; Magnon, Claire

    2015-02-15

    The hematopoietic growth factor granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) has a role in proliferation, differentiation and migration of the myeloid lineage and in mobilizing hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells into the bloodstream. However, G-CSF has been newly characterized as a neurotrophic factor in the brain. We recently uncovered that autonomic nerve development in the tumor microenvironment participates actively in prostate tumorigenesis and metastasis. Here, we found that G-CSF constrains cancer to grow and progress by, respectively, supporting the survival of sympathetic nerve fibers in 6-hydroxydopamine-sympathectomized mice and also, promoting the aberrant outgrowth of parasympathetic nerves in transgenic or xenogeneic prostate tumor models. This provides insight into how neurotrophic growth factors may control tumor neurogenesis and may lead to new antineurogenic therapies for prostate cancer. © 2014 UICC.

  3. Extracellular pH monitoring for use in closed-loop vagus nerve stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cork, Simon C.; Eftekhar, Amir; Mirza, Khalid B.; Zuliani, Claudio; Nikolic, Konstantin; Gardiner, James V.; Bloom, Stephen R.; Toumazou, Christofer

    2018-02-01

    Objective. Vagal nerve stimulation (VNS) has shown potential benefits for obesity treatment; however, current devices lack physiological feedback, which limit their efficacy. Changes in extracellular pH (pHe) have shown to be correlated with neural activity, but have traditionally been measured with glass microelectrodes, which limit their in vivo applicability. Approach. Iridium oxide has previously been shown to be sensitive to fluctuations in pH and is biocompatible. Iridium oxide microelectrodes were inserted into the subdiaphragmatic vagus nerve of anaesthetised rats. Introduction of the gut hormone cholecystokinin (CCK) or distension of the stomach was used to elicit vagal nerve activity. Main results. Iridium oxide microelectrodes have sufficient pH sensitivity to readily detect changes in pHe associated with both CCK and gastric distension. Furthermore, a custom-made Matlab script was able to use these changes in pHe to automatically trigger an implanted VNS device. Significance. This is the first study to show pHe changes in peripheral nerves in vivo. In addition, the demonstration that iridium oxide microelectrodes are sufficiently pH sensitive as to measure changes in pHe associated with physiological stimuli means they have the potential to be integrated into closed-loop neurostimulating devices.

  4. Evaluation of electrical nerve stimulation for epidural catheter positioning in the dog.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Pereira, Fernando L; Sanders, Robert; Shih, Andre C; Sonea, Ioana M; Hauptman, Joseph G

    2013-09-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of epidural catheter placement at different levels of the spinal cord guided solely by electrical nerve stimulation and resultant segmental muscle contraction. Prospective, experiment. Six male and two female Beagles, age (1 ± 0.17 years) and weight (12.9 ± 1.1 kg). Animals were anesthetized with propofol and maintained with isoflurane. An insulated epidural needle was used to reach the lumbosacral epidural space. A Tsui epidural catheter was inserted and connected to a nerve stimulator (1.0 mA, 0.1 ms, 2 Hz) to assess positioning of the tip at specific spinal cord segments. The catheter was advanced to three different levels of the spinal cord: lumbar (L2-L5), thoracic (T5-T10) and cervical (C4-C6). Subcutaneous needles were previously placed at these spinal levels and the catheter was advanced to match the needle location, guided only by corresponding muscle contractions. Catheter position was verified by fluoroscopy. If catheter tip and needle were at the same vertebral body a score of zero was assigned. When catheter tip was cranial or caudal to the needle, positive or negative numbers, respectively, corresponding to the number of vertebrae between them, were assigned. The mean and standard deviation of the number of vertebrae between catheter tip and needle were calculated to assess accuracy. Results are given as mean ± SD. The catheter position in relation to the needle was within 0.3 ± 2.0 vertebral bodies. Positive predictive values (PPV) were 57%, 83% and 71% for lumbar, thoracic and cervical regions respectively. Overall PPV was 70%. No significant difference in PPV among regions was found. Placement of an epidural catheter at specific spinal levels using electrical nerve stimulation was feasible without radiographic assistance in dogs. Two vertebral bodies difference from the target site may be clinically acceptable when performing segmental epidural regional anesthesia. © 2013 Association of Veterinary

  5. Creating a meaningful visual perception in blind volunteers by optic nerve stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brelén, M. E.; Duret, F.; Gérard, B.; Delbeke, J.; Veraart, C.

    2005-03-01

    A blind volunteer, suffering from retinitis pigmentosa, has been chronically implanted with an optic nerve visual prosthesis. Vision rehabilitation with this volunteer has concentrated on the development of a stimulation strategy according to which video camera images are converted into stimulation pulses. The aim is to convey as much information as possible about the visual scene within the limits of the device's capabilities. Pattern recognition tasks were used to assess the effectiveness of the stimulation strategy. The results demonstrate how even a relatively basic algorithm can efficiently convey useful information regarding the visual scene. By increasing the number of phosphenes used in the algorithm, better performance is observed but a longer training period is required. After a learning period, the volunteer achieved a pattern recognition score of 85% at 54 s on average per pattern. After nine evaluation sessions, when using a stimulation strategy exploiting all available phosphenes, no saturation effect has yet been observed.

  6. Effects of short and prolonged transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation on heart rate variability in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    De Couck, M; Cserjesi, R; Caers, R; Zijlstra, W P; Widjaja, D; Wolf, N; Luminet, O; Ellrich, J; Gidron, Y

    2017-03-01

    The vagus nerve is strategically located in the body, and has multiple homeostatic and health-promoting effects. Low vagal activity predicts onset and progression of diseases. These are the reasons to activate this nerve. This study examined the effects of transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation (t-VNS) on a main index of vagal activity, namely heart rate variability (HRV). In Study 1, we compared short (10min) left versus right ear t-VNS versus sham (no stimulation) in a within-subjects experimental design. Results revealed significant increases in only one HRV parameter (standard deviation of the RR intervals (SDNN)) following right-ear t-VNS. Study 2 examined the prolonged effects of t-VNS (1h) in the right ear. Compared to baseline, right-t-VNS significantly increased the LF and LF/HF components of HRV, and SDNN in women, but not in men. These results show limited effects of t-VNS on HRV, and are discussed in light of neuroanatomical and statistical considerations and future directions are proposed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Efficacy of ultrasound and nerve stimulation guidance in peripheral nerve block: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi-Xue; Zhang, De-Li; Liu, Xin-Wei; Li, Yan; Zhang, Xiao-Xia; Li, Ru-Hong

    2017-09-01

    Evidence was controversial about whether nerve stimulation (NS) can optimize ultrasound guidance (US)-guided nerve blockade for peripheral nerve block. This review aims to explore the effects of the two combined techniques. We searched EMBASE (from 1974 to March 2015), PubMed (from 1966 to Mar 2015), Medline (from 1966 to Mar 2015), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and clinicaltrials.gov. Finally, 15 randomized trials were included into analysis involving 1,019 lower limb and 696 upper limb surgery cases. Meta-analysis indicated that, compared with US alone, USNS combination had favorable effects on overall block success rate (risk ratio [RR] 1.17; confidence interval [CI] 1.05 to 1.30, P = 0.004), sensory block success rate (RR 1.56; CI 1.29 to 1.89, P < 0.00001), and block onset time (mean difference [MD] -3.84; CI -5.59 to -2.08, P < 0.0001). USNS guidance had a longer procedure time in both upper and lower limb nerve block (MD 1.67; CI 1.32 to 2.02, P < 0.00001; MD 1.17; CI 0.95 to 1.39, P < 0.00001) and more patients with anesthesia supplementation (RR 2.5; CI 1.02 to 6.13, P = 0.05). USNS guidance trends to result in a shorter block onset time than US alone as well as higher block success rate, but no statistical difference was demonstrated, as more data are required. © 2017 IUBMB Life, 69(9):720-734, 2017. © 2017 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  8. A compact, inexpensive infrared laser system for continuous-wave optical stimulation of the rat prostate cavernous nerves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, William C.; Lagoda, Gwen A.; Burnett, Arthur L.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2014-03-01

    Optical nerve stimulation (ONS) has been commonly performed in the laboratory using high-power, pulsed, infrared (IR) lasers including Holmium:YAG, diode, and Thulium fiber lasers. However, the relatively high cost of these lasers in comparison with conventional electrical nerve stimulation (ENS) equipment may represent a significant barrier to widespread adoption of ONS. Optical stimulation of the prostate cavernous nerves (CN's) has recently been reported using lower cost, continuous-wave (CW), all-fiber-based diode lasers. This preliminary study describes further miniaturization and cost reduction of the ONS system in the form of a compact, lightweight, cordless, and inexpensive IR laser. A 140-mW, 1560-nm diode laser was integrated with a green aiming beam and delivery optics into a compact ONS system. Surface and subsurface ONS was performed in a total of 5 rats, in vivo, with measurement of an intracavernous pressure (ICP) response during CW laser irradiation for 30 s with a spot diameter of 0.7 mm. Short-term, CW ONS of the prostate CN's is feasible using a compact, inexpensive, batterypowered IR laser diode system. This ONS system may represent an alternative to ENS for laboratory studies, and with further development, a handheld option for ONS in the clinic to identify and preserve the CN's during prostate cancer surgery.

  9. Sacral Nerve Stimulation for Pediatric Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunction: Development of a Standardized Pathway with Objective Urodynamic Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Schober, Megan S; Sulkowski, Jason P; Lu, Peter L; Minneci, Peter C; Deans, Katherine J; Teich, Steven; Alpert, Seth A

    2015-12-01

    We propose that sacral nerve stimulation is a valid adjunctive therapy for refractory pediatric lower urinary tract dysfunction, and that prospective collection of preoperative and postoperative validated questionnaires and urodynamic data in a standardized fashion is beneficial in characterizing patient response. Patients were candidates for sacral nerve stimulation if they had refractory voiding dysfunction and standard treatments had failed. Preoperative evaluation included urodynamic studies, spinal magnetic resonance imaging, and validated bladder and bowel related questionnaires. Children were stratified into 2 groups, ie overactive bladder with or without incontinence (group 1) and detrusor underactivity/urinary retention requiring clean intermittent catheterization (group 2). A staged procedure was used with initial test lead placement, followed by permanent device insertion 2 weeks later if patients demonstrated symptom improvement with test lead. Postoperatively children were followed with questionnaires and at least 1 urodynamic study. A total of 26 children underwent sacral nerve stimulation. Mean patient age was 10.8 years and median followup was 1.2 years. There were 23 patients in group 1 and 4 in group 2 (1 patient was included in both groups). In group 1 voiding dysfunction scores improved significantly, and urodynamic studies revealed a significant decrease in mean number of uninhibited contractions and maximum detrusor pressure during the filling phase. In group 2 there was significant improvement in mean post-void residual. Sacral nerve stimulation is a treatment option that may produce significant improvement in objective and subjective measures of bladder function in children with refractory lower urinary tract dysfunction. Copyright © 2015 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Neuromodulation for the Treatment of Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Yamanishi, Tomonori; Kaga, Kanya; Fuse, Miki; Shibata, Chiharu; Uchiyama, Tomoyuki

    2015-09-01

    Neuromodulation therapy incorporates electrical stimulation to target specific nerves that control lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). The objectives of this article are to review the mechanism of action, the type of neuromodulation, and the efficacy of neuromodulation mainly according to the results of randomized controlled trials. Neuromodulation includes pelvic floor electrical stimulation (ES) using vaginal, anal and surface electrodes, interferential therapy (IF), magnetic stimulation (MS), percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation, and sacral nerve stimulation (SNS). The former four stimulations are used for external periodic (short-term) stimulation, and SNS are used for internal, chronic (long-term) stimulation. All of these therapies have been reported to be effective for overactive bladder or urgency urinary incontinence. Pelvic floor ES, IF, and MS have also been reported to be effective for stress urinary incontinence. The mechanism of neuromodulation for overactive bladder has been reported to be the reflex inhibition of detrusor contraction by the activation of afferent fibers by three actions, i.e., the activation of hypogastric nerve, the direct inhibition of the pelvic nerve within the sacral cord and the supraspinal inhibition of the detrusor reflex. The mechanism of neuromodulation for stress incontinence is contraction of the pelvic floor muscles through an effect on the muscle fibers as well as through the stimulation of pudendal nerves. Overall, cure and improvement rates of these therapies for urinary incontinence are 30-50, and 60-90% respectively. MS has been considered to be a technique for stimulating nervous system noninvasively. SNS is indicated for patients with refractory overactive bladder and urinary retention. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  11. Improved Walking Claudication Distance with Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation: An Old Treatment with a New Indication in Patients with Peripheral Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Labrunée, Marc; Boned, Anne; Granger, Richard; Bousquet, Marc; Jordan, Christian; Richard, Lisa; Garrigues, Damien; Gremeaux, Vincent; Sénard, Jean-Michel; Pathak, Atul; Guiraud, Thibaut

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether 45 mins of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation before exercise could delay pain onset and increase walking distance in peripheral artery disease patients. After a baseline assessment of the walking velocity that led to pain after 300 m, 15 peripheral artery disease patients underwent four exercise sessions in a random order. The patients had a 45-min transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation session with different experimental conditions: 80 Hz, 10 Hz, sham (presence of electrodes without stimulation), or control with no electrodes, immediately followed by five walking bouts on a treadmill until pain occurred. The patients were allowed to rest for 10 mins between each bout and had no feedback concerning the walking distance achieved. Total walking distance was significantly different between T10, T80, sham, and control (P < 0.0003). No difference was observed between T10 and T80, but T10 was different from sham and control. Sham, T10, and T80 were all different from control (P < 0.001). There was no difference between each condition for heart rate and blood pressure. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation immediately before walking can delay pain onset and increase walking distance in patients with class II peripheral artery disease, with transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation of 10 Hz being the most effective.

  12. Surgical anatomy of the hypoglossal nerve: A new classification system for selective upper airway stimulation.

    PubMed

    Heiser, Clemens; Knopf, Andreas; Hofauer, Benedikt

    2017-12-01

    Selective upper airway stimulation (UAS) has shown effectiveness in treating patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). The terminating branches of the hypoglossal nerve show a wide complexity, requiring careful discernment of a functional breakpoint between branches for inclusion and exclusion from the stimulation cuff electrode. The purpose of this study was to describe and categorize the topographic phenotypes of these branches. Thirty patients who received an implant with selective UAS from July 2015 to June 2016 were included. All implantations were recorded using a microscope and resultant tongue motions were captured perioperatively for comparison. Eight different variations of the branches were encountered and described, both in a tabular numeric fashion and in pictorial schema. The examinations showed the complex phenotypic surgical anatomy of the hypoglossal nerve. A schematic classification system has been developed to help surgeons identify the optimal location for cuff placement in UAS. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Effects of pyrogallol, hydroquinone and duroquinone on responses to nitrergic nerve stimulation and NO in the rat anococcygeus muscle

    PubMed Central

    La, Mylinh; Rand, Michael J

    1999-01-01

    The hypothesis that endogenous superoxide dismutase (SOD) protects the nitrergic transmitter from inactivation by superoxide and that this explains the lack of sensitivity of the transmitter to superoxide generators was tested in the rat isolated anococcygeus muscle.Responses to nitrergic nerve stimulation or to NO were not significantly affected by exogenous SOD or by the Cu/Zn SOD inhibitor diethyldithiocarbamic acid (DETCA).Hydroquinone produced a concentration-dependent reduction of responses to NO with an IC50 of 27 μM, and higher concentrations reduced relaxant responses to nitrergic nerve stimulation with an IC50 of 612 μM. The effects of hydroquinone were only slightly reversed by SOD, so it does not appear to be acting as a superoxide generator.Pyrogallol produced a concentration-dependent reduction in responses to NO with an IC50 value of 39 μM and this effect was reversed by SOD (100–1000 u ml−1). Pyrogallol did not affect responses to nitrergic nerve stimulation. Treatment with DETCA did not alter the differentiating action of pyrogallol.Duroquinone produced a concentration-dependent reduction of relaxations to NO with an IC50 value of 240 μM and 100 μM slightly decreased nitrergic relaxations. After treatment with DETCA, duroquinone produced greater reductions of relaxant responses to NO and to nitrergic stimulation, the IC50 values being 8.5 μM for NO and 40 μM for nitrergic nerve stimulation: these reductions were reversed by SOD.The findings do not support the hypothesis that the presence of Cu/Zn SOD explains the greater susceptibility of NO than the nitrergic transmitter to the superoxide generator pyrogallol, but suggest that it may play a role in the effects of duroquinone. PMID:10051154

  14. Reproducibility of current perception threshold with the Neurometer(®) vs the Stimpod NMS450 peripheral nerve stimulator in healthy volunteers: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Tsui, Ban C H; Shakespeare, Timothy J; Leung, Danika H; Tsui, Jeremy H; Corry, Gareth N

    2013-08-01

    Current methods of assessing nerve blocks, such as loss of perception to cold sensation, are subjective at best. Transcutaneous nerve stimulation is an alternative method that has previously been used to measure the current perception threshold (CPT) in individuals with neuropathic conditions, and various devices to measure CPT are commercially available. Nevertheless, the device must provide reproducible results to be used as an objective tool for assessing nerve blocks. We recruited ten healthy volunteers to examine CPT reproducibility using the Neurometer(®) and the Stimpod NMS450 peripheral nerve stimulator. Each subject's CPT was determined for the median (second digit) and ulnar (fifth digit) nerve sensory distributions on both hands - with the Neurometer at 5 Hz, 250 Hz, and 2000 Hz and with the Stimpod at pulse widths of 0.1 msec, 0.3 msec, 0.5 msec, and 1.0 msec, both at 5 Hz and 2 Hz. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) were also calculated to assess reproducibility; acceptable ICCs were defined as ≥ 0.4. The ICC values for the Stimpod ranged from 0.425-0.79, depending on pulse width, digit, and stimulation; ICCs for the Neurometer were 0.615 and 0.735 at 250 and 2,000 Hz, respectively. These values were considered acceptable; however, the Neurometer performed less efficiently at 5 Hz (ICCs for the second and fifth digits were 0.292 and 0.318, respectively). Overall, the Stimpod device displayed good to excellent reproducibility in measuring CPT in healthy volunteers. The Neurometer displayed poor reproducibility at low frequency (5 Hz). These results suggest that peripheral nerve stimulators may be potential devices for measuring CPT to assess nerve blocks.

  15. Interaction of paired cortical and peripheral nerve stimulation on human motor neurons.

    PubMed

    Poon, David E; Roy, Francois D; Gorassini, Monica A; Stein, Richard B

    2008-06-01

    This paper contrasts responses in the soleus muscle of normal human subjects to two major inputs: the tibial nerve (TN) and the corticospinal tract. Paired transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the motor cortex at intervals of 10-25 ms strongly facilitated the motor evoked potential (MEP) produced by the second stimulus. In contrast, paired TN stimulation produced a depression of the reflex response to the second stimulus. Direct activation of the pyramidal tract did not facilitate a second response, suggesting that the MEP facilitation observed using paired TMS occurred in the cortex. A TN stimulus also depressed a subsequent MEP. Since the TN stimulus depressed both inputs, the mechanism is probably post-synaptic, such as afterhyperpolarization of motor neurons. Presynaptic mechanisms, such as homosynaptic depression, would only affect the pathway used as a conditioning stimulus. When TN and TMS pulses were paired, the largest facilitation occurred when TMS preceded TN by about 5 ms, which is optimal for summation of the two pathways at the level of the spinal motor neurons. A later, smaller facilitation occurred when a single TN stimulus preceded TMS by 50-60 ms, an interval that allows enough time for the sensory afferent input to reach the sensory cortex and be relayed to the motor cortex. Other work indicates that repetitively pairing nerve stimuli and TMS at these intervals, known as paired associative stimulation, produces long-term increases in the MEP and may be useful in strengthening residual pathways after damage to the central nervous system.

  16. An alternative therapy for drug-resistant epilepsy: transcutaneous auricular vagus nerve stimulation.

    PubMed

    Rong, Peijing; Liu, Aihua; Zhang, Jianguo; Wang, Yuping; Yang, Anchao; Li, Liang; Ben, Hui; Li, Liping; Liu, Rupeng; He, Wei; Liu, Huanguang; Huang, Feng; Li, Xia; Wu, Peng; Zhu, Bing

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is an effective therapy for drug-resistant epilepsy. Acupuncture is also used to treat epilepsy. This study was designed to examine the safety and effectiveness of transcutaneous auricular vagus nerve stimulation (ta-VNS) for patients with drug-resistant epilepsy. A total of 50 volunteer patients with drug-resistant epilepsy were selected for a random clinical trial to observe the therapeutic effect of ta-VNS. The seizure frequency, quality of life, and severity were assessed in weeks 8, 16, and 24 of the treatment according to the percentage of seizure frequency reduction. In the pilot study, 47 of the 50 epilepsy patients completed the 24-week treatment; three dropped off. After 8-week treatment, six of the 47 patients (12%) were seizure free and 12 (24%) had a reduction in seizure frequency. In week 16 of the continuous treatment, six of the 47 patients (12%) were seizure free; 17 (34%) had a reduction in seizure frequency. After 24 weeks' treatment, eight patients (16%) were seizure free; 19 (38%) had reduced seizure frequency. Similar to the therapeutic effect of VNS, ta-VNS can suppress epileptic seizures and is a safe, effective, economical, and widely applicable treatment option for drug-resistant epilepsy. (ChiCTR-TRC-10001023).

  17. Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS) A Possible Aid for Pain Relief in Developing Countries?

    PubMed Central

    Tashani, O; Johnson, MI

    2009-01-01

    Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) refers to the delivery of electrical currents through the skin to activate peripheral nerves. The technique is widely used in developed countries to relieve a wide range of acute and chronic pain conditions, including pain resulting from cancer and its treatment. There are many systematic reviews on TENS although evidence is often inconclusive because of shortcomings in randomised control trials methodology. In this overview the basic science behind TENS will be discussed, the evidence of its effectiveness in specific clinical conditions analysed and a case for its use in pain management in developing countries will be made. PMID:21483510

  18. TRANSCUTANEOUS CERVICAL VAGUS NERVE STIMULATION AMELIORATES ACUTE ISCHEMIC INJURY IN RATS

    PubMed Central

    Ay, Ilknur; Nasser, Rena; Simon, Bruce; Ay, Hakan

    2016-01-01

    Background Direct stimulation of the vagus nerve in the neck via surgically implanted electrodes is protective in animal models of stroke. We sought to determine the safety and efficacy of a non-invasive cervical VNS (nVNS) method using surface electrodes applied to the skin overlying the vagus nerve in the neck in a model of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Methods nVNS was initiated variable times after MCAO hour in rats (n=33). Control animals received sham stimulation (n=33). Infarct volume and functional outcome were assessed on day 7. Brains were processed by immunohistochemistry for microglial activation and cytokine levels. The ability of nVNS to activate the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) was assessed using c-Fos immunohistochemistry. Results Infarct volume was 43.15±3.36 percent of the contralateral hemisphere (PCH) in control and 28.75±4.22 PCH in nVNS-treated animals (p<0.05). The effect of nVNS on infarct size was consistent when stimulation was initiated up to 4 hours after MCAO. There was no difference in heart rate and blood pressure between control and nVNS-treated animals. The number of c-Fos positive cells was 32.4±10.6 and 6.2±6.3 in the ipsilateral NTS (p<0.05) and 30.4±11.2 and 5.8±4.3 in the contralateral NTS (p<0.05) in nVNS-treated and control animals, respectively. nVNS reduced the number of Iba-1, CD68, and TNF-α positive cells and increased the number of HMGB1 positive cells. Conclusions nVNS inhibits ischemia-induced immune activation and reduces the extent of tissue injury and functional deficit in rats without causing cardiac or hemodynamic adverse effects when initiated up to 4 hours after MCAO. PMID:26723020

  19. [A Case of Left Vertebral Artery Aneurysm Showing Evoked Potentials on Bilateral Electrode by the Left Vagus Nerve Stimulation to Electromyographic Tracheal Tube].

    PubMed

    Kadoya, Tatsuo; Uehara, Hirofumi; Yamamoto, Toshinori; Shiraishi, Munehiro; Kinoshita, Yuki; Joyashiki, Takeshi; Enokida, Kengo

    2016-02-01

    Previously, we reported a case of brainstem cavernous hemangioma showing false positive responses to electromyographic tracheal tube (EMG tube). We concluded that the cause was spontaneous respiration accompanied by vocal cord movement. We report a case of left vertebral artery aneurysm showing evoked potentials on bilateral electrodes by the left vagus nerve stimulation to EMG tube. An 82-year-old woman underwent clipping of a left unruptured vertebral artery-posterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysm. General anesthesia was induced with remifentanil, propofol and suxamethonium, and was maintained with oxygen, air, remifentanil and propofol. We monitored somatosensory evoked potentials, motor evoked potentials, and electromyogram of the vocal cord. When the manipulation reached brainstem and the instrument touched the left vagus nerve, evoked potentials appeared on bilateral electrodes. EMG tube is equipped with two electrodes on both sides. We concluded that the left vagus nerve stimulation generated evoked potentials of the left laryngeal muscles, and they were simultaneously detected as potential difference between two electrodes on both sides. EMG tube is used to identify the vagus nerve. However, it is necessary to bear in mind that each vagus nerve stimulation inevitably generates evoked potentials on bilateral electrodes.

  20. Coordinated, multi-joint, fatigue-resistant feline stance produced with intrafascicular hind limb nerve stimulation.

    PubMed

    Normann, R A; Dowden, B R; Frankel, M A; Wilder, A M; Hiatt, S D; Ledbetter, N M; Warren, D A; Clark, G A

    2012-04-01

    The production of graceful skeletal movements requires coordinated activation of multiple muscles that produce torques around multiple joints. The work described herein is focused on one such movement, stance, that requires coordinated activation of extensor muscles acting around the hip, knee and ankle joints. The forces evoked in these muscles by external stimulation all have a complex dependence on muscle length and shortening velocities, and some of these muscles are biarticular. In order to recreate sit-to-stand maneuvers in the anesthetized feline, we excited the hind limb musculature using intrafascicular multielectrode stimulation (IFMS) of the muscular branch of the sciatic nerve, the femoral nerve and the main branch of the sciatic nerve. Stimulation was achieved with either acutely or chronically implanted Utah Slanted Electrode Arrays (USEAs) via subsets of electrodes (1) that activated motor units in the extensor muscles of the hip, knee and ankle joints, (2) that were able to evoke large extension forces and (3) that manifested minimal coactivation of the targeted motor units. Three hind limb force-generation strategies were investigated, including sequential activation of independent motor units to increase force, and interleaved or simultaneous IFMS of three sets of six or more USEA electrodes that excited the hip, knee and ankle extensors. All force-generation strategies evoked stance, but the interleaved IFMS strategy also reduced muscle fatigue produced by repeated sit-to-stand maneuvers compared with fatigue produced by simultaneous activation of different motor neuron pools. These results demonstrate the use of interleaved IFMS as a means to recreate coordinated, fatigue-resistant multi-joint muscle forces in the unilateral hind limb. This muscle activation paradigm could provide a promising neuroprosthetic approach for the restoration of sit-to-stand transitions in individuals who are paralyzed by spinal cord injury, stroke or disease.

  1. Coordinated, multi-joint, fatigue-resistant feline stance produced with intrafascicular hind limb nerve stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Normann, R. A.; Dowden, B. R.; Frankel, M. A.; Wilder, A. M.; Hiatt, S. D.; Ledbetter, N. M.; Warren, D. A.; Clark, G. A.

    2012-04-01

    The production of graceful skeletal movements requires coordinated activation of multiple muscles that produce torques around multiple joints. The work described herein is focused on one such movement, stance, that requires coordinated activation of extensor muscles acting around the hip, knee and ankle joints. The forces evoked in these muscles by external stimulation all have a complex dependence on muscle length and shortening velocities, and some of these muscles are biarticular. In order to recreate sit-to-stand maneuvers in the anesthetized feline, we excited the hind limb musculature using intrafascicular multielectrode stimulation (IFMS) of the muscular branch of the sciatic nerve, the femoral nerve and the main branch of the sciatic nerve. Stimulation was achieved with either acutely or chronically implanted Utah Slanted Electrode Arrays (USEAs) via subsets of electrodes (1) that activated motor units in the extensor muscles of the hip, knee and ankle joints, (2) that were able to evoke large extension forces and (3) that manifested minimal coactivation of the targeted motor units. Three hind limb force-generation strategies were investigated, including sequential activation of independent motor units to increase force, and interleaved or simultaneous IFMS of three sets of six or more USEA electrodes that excited the hip, knee and ankle extensors. All force-generation strategies evoked stance, but the interleaved IFMS strategy also reduced muscle fatigue produced by repeated sit-to-stand maneuvers compared with fatigue produced by simultaneous activation of different motor neuron pools. These results demonstrate the use of interleaved IFMS as a means to recreate coordinated, fatigue-resistant multi-joint muscle forces in the unilateral hind limb. This muscle activation paradigm could provide a promising neuroprosthetic approach for the restoration of sit-to-stand transitions in individuals who are paralyzed by spinal cord injury, stroke or disease.

  2. Tongue muscle plasticity following hypoglossal nerve stimulation in aged rats

    PubMed Central

    Connor, Nadine P.; Russell, John A.; Jackson, Michelle A.; Kletzien, Heidi; Wang, Hao; Schaser, Allison J.; Leverson, Glen E.; Zealear, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Age-related decreases in tongue muscle mass and strength have been reported. It may be possible to prevent age-related tongue muscle changes using neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES). Our hypothesis was that alterations in muscle contractile properties and myosin heavy chain composition would be found following NMES. Methods Fifty-four young, middle-aged and old Fischer 344/Brown Norway rats were included. Twenty-four rats underwent bilateral electrical stimulation of the hypoglossal nerves for 8 weeks and were compared with control or sham rats. Muscle contractile properties and myosin heavy chain (MHC) in the genioglossus (GG), styloglossus (SG) and hyoglossus (HG) muscles were examined. Results In comparison with unstimulated control rats, we found reduced muscle fatigue, increased contraction and half decay times and increased twitch and tetanic tension. Increased Type I MHC was found, except for GG in old and middle-aged rats. Discussion Transitions in tongue muscle contractile properties and phenotype were found following NMES. PMID:23169566

  3. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation for spasticity: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Tenorio, E; Serrano-Muñoz, D; Avendaño-Coy, J; Gómez-Soriano, J

    2016-07-26

    Although transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) has traditionally been used to treat pain, some studies have observed decreased spasticity after use of this technique. However, its use in clinical practice is still limited. Our purpose was twofold: to determine whether TENS is effective for treating spasticity or associated symptoms in patients with neurological involvement, and to determine which stimulation parameters exert the greatest effect on variables associated with spasticity. Two independent reviewers used PubMed, PEDro, and Cochrane databases to search for randomised clinical trials addressing TENS and spasticity published before 12 May 2015, and selected the articles that met the inclusion criteria. Of the initial 96 articles, 86 were excluded. The remaining 10 articles present results from 207 patients with a cerebrovascular accident, 84 with multiple sclerosis, and 39 with spinal cord lesions. In light of our results, we recommend TENS as a treatment for spasticity due to its low cost, ease of use, and absence of adverse reactions. However, the great variability in the types of stimulation used in the studies, and the differences in parameters and variables, make it difficult to assess and compare any results that might objectively determine the effectiveness of this technique and show how to optimise parameters. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Vagus nerve stimulation mediates protection from kidney ischemia-reperfusion injury through α7nAChR+ splenocytes.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Abe, Chikara; Sung, Sun-Sang J; Moscalu, Stefan; Jankowski, Jakub; Huang, Liping; Ye, Hong; Rosin, Diane L; Guyenet, Patrice G; Okusa, Mark D

    2016-05-02

    The nervous and immune systems interact in complex ways to maintain homeostasis and respond to stress or injury, and rapid nerve conduction can provide instantaneous input for modulating inflammation. The inflammatory reflex referred to as the cholinergic antiinflammatory pathway regulates innate and adaptive immunity, and modulation of this reflex by vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is effective in various inflammatory disease models, such as rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease. Effectiveness of VNS in these models necessitates the integration of neural signals and α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α7nAChRs) on splenic macrophages. Here, we sought to determine whether electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve attenuates kidney ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI), which promotes the release of proinflammatory molecules. Stimulation of vagal afferents or efferents in mice 24 hours before IRI markedly attenuated acute kidney injury (AKI) and decreased plasma TNF. Furthermore, this protection was abolished in animals in which splenectomy was performed 7 days before VNS and IRI. In mice lacking α7nAChR, prior VNS did not prevent IRI. Conversely, adoptive transfer of VNS-conditioned α7nAChR splenocytes conferred protection to recipient mice subjected to IRI. Together, these results demonstrate that VNS-mediated attenuation of AKI and systemic inflammation depends on α7nAChR-positive splenocytes.

  5. Optogenetic probing of nerve and muscle function after facial nerve lesion in the mouse whisker system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandi, Akhil; Vajtay, Thomas J.; Upadhyay, Aman; Yiantsos, S. Olga; Lee, Christian R.; Margolis, David J.

    2018-02-01

    Optogenetic modulation of neural circuits has opened new avenues into neuroscience research, allowing the control of cellular activity of genetically specified cell types. Optogenetics is still underdeveloped in the peripheral nervous system, yet there are many applications related to sensorimotor function, pain and nerve injury that would be of great benefit. We recently established a method for non-invasive, transdermal optogenetic stimulation of the facial muscles that control whisker movements in mice (Park et al., 2016, eLife, e14140)1. Here we present results comparing the effects of optogenetic stimulation of whisker movements in mice that express channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) selectively in either the facial motor nerve (ChAT-ChR2 mice) or muscle (Emx1-ChR2 or ACTA1-ChR2 mice). We tracked changes in nerve and muscle function before and up to 14 days after nerve transection. Optogenetic 460 nm transdermal stimulation of the distal cut nerve showed that nerve degeneration progresses rapidly over 24 hours. In contrast, the whisker movements evoked by optogenetic muscle stimulation were up-regulated after denervation, including increased maximum protraction amplitude, increased sensitivity to low-intensity stimuli, and more sustained muscle contractions (reduced adaptation). Our results indicate that peripheral optogenetic stimulation is a promising technique for probing the timecourse of functional changes of both nerve and muscle, and holds potential for restoring movement after paralysis induced by nerve damage or motoneuron degeneration.

  6. Subsurface optical stimulation of rat prostate cavernous nerves using a continuous wave, single mode, 1490 nm diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tozburun, Serhat; Stahl, Charlotte S. D.; Hutchens, Thomas C.; Lagoda, Gwen A.; Burnett, Arthur L.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2013-03-01

    Successful identification of the cavernous nerves (CN's) during radical prostatectomy requires detection of the CN's through a thin layer of overlying fascia. This study explores the 1490 nm infrared (IR) diode laser wavelength for rapid and deep subsurface CN stimulation in a rat model, in vivo. A 150-mW, 1490-nm diode laser providing an optical penetration depth of 520 μm was used to stimulate the CN's in 8 rats through a single mode fiber optic probe with 1-mm-diameter spot and 15 s irradiation time. Successful ONS was judged by an intracavernous pressure response (ICP) in the rat penis. Subsurface ONS at 1490 nm was also compared with previous studies using 1455 and 1550 nm IR diode laser wavelengths. ONS was observed through fascia layers up to 380 μm thick using an incident laser power of 50 mW. ICP response times as short as 4.6 +/- 0.2 s were recorded using higher laser powers bust still below the nerve damage threshold. The 1490-nm diode laser represents a compact, low cost, high power, and high quality infrared light source for use in ONS. This wavelength provides deeper optical penetration than 1455 nm and more rapid and efficient nerve stimulation than 1550 nm.

  7. Epicardial distribution of ST segment and T wave changes produced by stimulation of intrathoracic ganglia or cardiopulmonary nerves in dogs.

    PubMed

    Savard, P; Cardinal, R; Nadeau, R A; Armour, J A

    1991-06-01

    Sixty-three ventricular epicardial electrograms were recorded simultaneously in 8 atropinized dogs during stimulation of acutely decentralized intrathoracic autonomic ganglia or cardiopulmonary nerves. Three variables were measured: (1) isochronal maps representing the epicardial activation sequence, (2) maps depicting changes in areas under the QRS complex and T wave (regional inhomogeneity of repolarization), and (3) local and total QT intervals. Neural stimulations did not alter the activation sequence but induced changes in the magnitude and polarity of the ST segments and T waves as well as in QRST areas. Stimulation of the same neural structure in different dogs induced electrical changes with different amplitudes and in different regions of the ventricles, except for the ventral lateral cardiopulmonary nerve which usually affected the dorsal wall of the left ventricle. Greatest changes occurred when the right recurrent, left intermediate medial, left caudal pole, left ventral lateral cardiopulmonary nerves and stellate ganglia were stimulated. Local QT durations either decreased or did not change, whereas total QT duration as measured using a root-mean-square signal did not change, indicating the regional nature of repolarization changes. Taken together, these data indicate that intrathoracic efferent sympathetic neurons can induce regional inhomogeneity of repolarization without prolonging the total QT interval.

  8. Peripheral nerve field stimulation (PNFS) in chronic low back pain: a prospective multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Kloimstein, Herwig; Likar, Rudolf; Kern, Michael; Neuhold, Josef; Cada, Miroslav; Loinig, Nadja; Ilias, Wilfried; Freundl, Brigitta; Binder, Heinrich; Wolf, Andreas; Dorn, Christian; Mozes-Balla, Eva Maria; Stein, Rolf; Lappe, Ivo; Sator-Katzenschlager, Sabine

    2014-02-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the long-term efficacy and safety of peripheral nerve field stimulation (PNFS) for chronic low back pain (cLBP). In this prospective, multicenter observational study, 118 patients were admitted to 11 centers throughout Austria and Switzerland. After a screening visit, all patients underwent a trial stimulation period of at least seven days before implantation of the permanent system. Leads were placed in the subcutaneous tissues of the lower back directly in the region of greatest pain. One hundred five patients were implanted with a permanent stimulating system. Patients' evaluation of pain and functional levels were completed before implantation and one, three, and six months after implantation. Adverse events, medication usage, and coverage of the painful area and predictive value of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) were monitored. All pain and quality-of-life measures showed statistically significant improvement during the treatment period. These included the average pain visual analog scale, the Oswestry Disability Questionnaire, the Becks Depression Inventory, and the Short Form-12 item Health survey. Additionally, medication usage with opioids, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and anti-convulsants showed a highly significant reduction. Complications requiring surgical intervention were reported in 9.6% of the patients. The degree of coverage of painful areas seems to be an important criterion for efficacy of PNFS, whereas TENS is presumably no predictor. This prospective, multicenter study confirms that PNFS is an effective therapy for the management of cLBP. Significant improvements in many aspects of the pain condition were measured, and complications were minimal. © 2013 International Neuromodulation Society.

  9. The role of nerve monitoring to predict postoperative recurrent laryngeal nerve function in thyroid and parathyroid surgery.

    PubMed

    Eid, Issam; Miller, Frank R; Rowan, Stephanie; Otto, Randal A

    2013-10-01

    To determine the role and efficacy of intraoperative recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) stimulation in the prediction of early and permanent postoperative nerve function in thyroid and parathyroid surgery. A retrospective review of thyroid and parathyroid surgeries was performed with calculation of sensitivity and specificity of the response of intraoperative stimulation for different pathological groups. Normal electromyography (EMG) response with 0.5 mAmp stimulation was considered a positive stimulation response with postoperative function determined by laryngoscopy. No EMG response at >1-2 mAmps was considered a negative response. The rates of early and permanent paralysis, as well as sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values for postoperative nerve function were calculated for separate pathological groups. The number of nerves at risk analyzed was 909. The overall early and permanent paralysis rates were 3.1% and 1.2%, respectively, with the highest rate being for Grave's disease cases. The overall sensitivity was 98.4%. The specificity was lower at 62.5% but acceptable in thyroid carcinoma and Grave's disease patients. The majority of nerves with a positive stimulation result and postoperative paralysis on laryngoscopy recovered function in 3 to 12 weeks, showing positive stimulation to be a good predictor of eventual recovery. Stimulation of the RLN during thyroid and parathyroid surgery is a useful tool in predicting postoperative RLN function. The sensitivity of stimulation is high, showing positive stimulation to be an excellent predictor of normal nerve function. Negative stimulation is more predictive of paralysis in cases of thyroid carcinoma and Grave's disease. 2b. Copyright © 2013 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  10. Neuroanatomy and neurophysiology related to sexual dysfunction in male neurogenic patients with lesions to the spinal cord or peripheral nerves.

    PubMed

    Everaert, K; de Waard, W I Q; Van Hoof, T; Kiekens, C; Mulliez, T; D'herde, C

    2010-03-01

    Review article. The neuroanatomy and physiology of psychogenic erection, cholinergic versus adrenergic innervation of emission and the predictability of outcome of vibration and electroejaculation require a review and synthesis. University Hospital Belgium. We reviewed the literature with PubMed 1973-2008. Erection, emission and ejaculation are separate phenomena and have different innervations. It is important to realize, which are the afferents and efferents and where the motor neuron of the end organ is located. When interpreting a specific lesion it is important to understand if postsynaptic fibres are intact or not. Afferents of erection, emission and ejaculation are the pudendal nerve and descending pathways from the brain. Erection is cholinergic and NO-mediated. Emission starts cholinergically (as a secretion) and ends sympathetically (as a contraction). Ejaculation is mainly adrenergic and somatic. For vibratory-evoked ejaculation, the reflex arch must be complete; for electroejaculation, the postsynaptic neurons (paravertebral ganglia) must be intact. Afferents of erection, emission and ejaculation are the pudendal nerve and descending pathways from the brain. Erection is cholinergic and NO-mediated. Emission starts cholinergically (as a secretion) and ends sympathetically (as a contraction). Ejaculation is mainly adrenergic and somatic. In neurogenic disease, a good knowledge of neuroanatomy and physiology makes understanding of sexual dysfunction possible and predictable. The minimal requirement for the success of penile vibration is a preserved reflex arch and the minimal requirement for the success of electroejaculation is the existence of intact post-ganglionic fibres.

  11. Role of transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation in the management of trigeminal neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Singla, Sanju; Prabhakar, Vikram; Singla, Rajan Kumar

    2011-07-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia typically involves nerves supplying teeth, jaws and face of older females. Though the etiology is usually obscure, different treatment modalities have been tried for it viz. medicinal treatment, injection alcohol, peripheral neurectomy, rhizotomy, and microvascular decompression etc. Transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS) is an emerging and promising option for management of such patients. The present study was designed with an aim to study the efficacy of TENS in management of trigeminal neuralgia. The study was conducted on 30 patients of trigeminal neuralgia confirmed by diagnostic nerve block. They were given bursts of TENS for 20-40 days over the path of the affected nerve and subsequently evaluated at 1 month and 3 month intervals by visual analogue scale (VAS), verbal pain scale (VPS), a functional outcome scales for main daily activities like sleep, chewing, talking, or washing face. The results showed that, on VAS, the score decreased from 8.9 (Pre TENS) to 3.1 at 1 month and 1.3 at 3 months, and on VPS, the score decreased from 3.5 (Pre TENS) to 1.2 at 1 month and 0.3 at 3 months. Similarly, a considerable decrease in scores was seen on functional outcome scale for different activities. No side effects like irritation or redness of skin were seen in any of the patients. Thus, TENS was found to be a safe, easily acceptable, and non-invasive outdoor patient department procedure for management of trigeminal neuralgia.

  12. Neuroendocrine responses to stimulation of the vagus nerves in bursts in conscious calves.

    PubMed

    Adrian, T E; Bloom, S R; Edwards, A V

    1983-11-01

    Effects of stimulation of the peripheral ends of the vagus nerves below the heart at 4 Hz continuously, and at 40 Hz for 1 s at 10 s intervals, have been compared in conscious calves below behavioural threshold. Neither pattern of stimulation caused any significant change in mean aortic blood pressure or heart rate but both invariably produced a substantial increase in the flow of intestinal lymph. Each form of stimulation provoked release of glucagon, insulin and pancreatic polypeptide from the pancreas and produced a small but significant rise in mean arterial plasma glucose concentration. The release of gastric inhibitory peptide- and bombesin-like molecules from the gastrointestinal tract was not affected by vagal stimulation whereas release of vasoactive intestinal peptide was observed in response to both patterns of vagal stimulation. Evidence was obtained to suggest that gastrin-like peptides are preferentially released into the bloodstream whereas cholecystokinin-like peptides are not. Vagal stimulation releases somatostatin from the gastrointestinal tract but discontinuous stimulation seems to inhibit the release of somatostatin into the general circulation. The results that have been obtained, employing this particular protocol, suggest that the pattern of the stimulus that is applied to the vagal splanchnic innervation has relatively little effect on neuroendocrine response in this species.

  13. Neuroendocrine responses to stimulation of the vagus nerves in bursts in conscious calves.

    PubMed Central

    Adrian, T E; Bloom, S R; Edwards, A V

    1983-01-01

    Effects of stimulation of the peripheral ends of the vagus nerves below the heart at 4 Hz continuously, and at 40 Hz for 1 s at 10 s intervals, have been compared in conscious calves below behavioural threshold. Neither pattern of stimulation caused any significant change in mean aortic blood pressure or heart rate but both invariably produced a substantial increase in the flow of intestinal lymph. Each form of stimulation provoked release of glucagon, insulin and pancreatic polypeptide from the pancreas and produced a small but significant rise in mean arterial plasma glucose concentration. The release of gastric inhibitory peptide- and bombesin-like molecules from the gastrointestinal tract was not affected by vagal stimulation whereas release of vasoactive intestinal peptide was observed in response to both patterns of vagal stimulation. Evidence was obtained to suggest that gastrin-like peptides are preferentially released into the bloodstream whereas cholecystokinin-like peptides are not. Vagal stimulation releases somatostatin from the gastrointestinal tract but discontinuous stimulation seems to inhibit the release of somatostatin into the general circulation. The results that have been obtained, employing this particular protocol, suggest that the pattern of the stimulus that is applied to the vagal splanchnic innervation has relatively little effect on neuroendocrine response in this species. PMID:6361233

  14. Electrical stimulation and testosterone enhance recovery from recurrent laryngeal nerve crush.

    PubMed

    Monaco, Gina N; Brown, Todd J; Burgette, Ryan C; Fargo, Keith N; Akst, Lee M; Jones, Kathryn J; Foecking, Eileen M

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of a combinatorial treatment, consisting of a brief period of nerve electrical stimulation (ES) and systemic supraphysiologic testosterone, on functional recovery following a crush of the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN). Prospective, controlled animal study. After a crush of the left RLN, adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four treatment groups: 1) no treatment, 2) ES, 3) testosterone propionate (TP), and 4) ES + TP. Each group was subdivided into 1, 2, 3, or 4 weeks post-operative survival time points. Groups had an n of 4- 9. Recovery of vocal fold mobility (VFM) was assessed. Brief ES of the proximal nerve alone or in combination with TP accelerated the initiation of functional recovery. TP administration by itself also produced increased VFM scores compared to controls, but there were no statistical differences between the ES-treated and TP-treated animals. Treatment with brief ES alone was sufficient to decrease the time required to recover complete VFM. Animals with complete VFM were seen in treatment groups as early as 1 week following injury; in the untreated group, this was not observed until at least 3 weeks post-injury, translating into a 66% decrease in time to complete recovery. Brief ES, alone or in combination with TP, promise to be effective therapeutic interventions for promoting regeneration following RLN injury.

  15. Effect of selective vagal nerve stimulation on blood pressure, heart rate and respiratory rate in rats under metoprolol medication.

    PubMed

    Gierthmuehlen, Mortimer; Plachta, Dennis T T

    2016-02-01

    Selective vagal nerve stimulation (sVNS) has been shown to reduce blood pressure without major side effects in rats. This technology might be the key to non-medical antihypertensive treatment in patients with therapy-resistant hypertension. β-blockers are the first-line therapy of hypertension and have in general a bradycardic effect. As VNS itself can also promote bradycardia, it was the aim of this study to investigate the influence of the β1-selective blocker Metoprolol on the effect of sVNS especially with respect to the heart rate. In 10 male Wistar rats, a polyimide multichannel-cuff electrode was placed around the vagal nerve bundle to selectively stimulate the aortic depressor nerve fibers. The stimulation parameters were adapted to the thresholds of individual animals and were in the following ranges: frequency 30-50 Hz, amplitude 0.3-1.8 mA and pulse width 0.3-1.3 ms. Blood pressure responses were detected with a microtip transducer in the carotid artery, and electrocardiography was recorded with s.c. chest electrodes. After IV administration of Metoprolol (2 mg kg(-1) body weight), the animals' mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) decreased significantly. Although the selective electrical stimulation of the baroreceptive fibers reduced MAP and HR, both effects were significantly alleviated by Metoprolol. As a side effect, the rate of stimulation-induced apnea significantly increased after Metoprolol administration. sVNS can lower the MAP under Metoprolol without causing severe bradycardia.

  16. The optimal distance between two electrode tips during recording of compound nerve action potentials in the rat median nerve

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yongping; Lao, Jie; Zhao, Xin; Tian, Dong; Zhu, Yi; Wei, Xiaochun

    2014-01-01

    The distance between the two electrode tips can greatly influence the parameters used for recording compound nerve action potentials. To investigate the optimal parameters for these recordings in the rat median nerve, we dissociated the nerve using different methods and compound nerve action potentials were orthodromically or antidromically recorded with different electrode spacings. Compound nerve action potentials could be consistently recorded using a method in which the middle part of the median nerve was intact, with both ends dissociated from the surrounding fascia and a ground wire inserted into the muscle close to the intact part. When the distance between two stimulating electrode tips was increased, the threshold and supramaximal stimulating intensity of compound nerve action potentials were gradually decreased, but the amplitude was not changed significantly. When the distance between two recording electrode tips was increased, the amplitude was gradually increased, but the threshold and supramaximal stimulating intensity exhibited no significant change. Different distances between recording and stimulating sites did not produce significant effects on the aforementioned parameters. A distance of 5 mm between recording and stimulating electrodes and a distance of 10 mm between recording and stimulating sites were found to be optimal for compound nerve action potential recording in the rat median nerve. In addition, the orthodromic compound action potential, with a biphasic waveform that was more stable and displayed less interference (however also required a higher threshold and higher supramaximal stimulus), was found to be superior to the antidromic compound action potential. PMID:25206798

  17. Cardiac effects produced by long-term stimulation of thoracic autonomic ganglia or nerves: implications for interneuronal interactions within the thoracic autonomic nervous system.

    PubMed

    Butler, C; Watson-Wright, W M; Wilkinson, M; Johnstone, D E; Armour, J A

    1988-03-01

    Electrical stimulation of an acutely decentralized stellate or middle cervical ganglion or cardiopulmonary nerve augments cardiac chronotropism or inotropism; as the stimulation continues there is a gradual reduction of this augmentation following the peak response, i.e., an inhibition of augmentation. The amount of this inhibition was found to be dependent upon the region of the heart investigated and the neural structure stimulated. The cardiac parameters which were augmented the most displayed the greatest inhibition. Maximum augmentation or inhibition occurred, in most instances, when 5-20 Hz stimuli were used. Inhibition of augmentation was overcome when the stimulation frequency was subsequently increased or following the administration of nicotine or tyramine, indicating that the inhibition was not primarily due to the lack of availability of noradrenaline in the nerve terminals of the efferent postganglionic sympathetic neurons. Furthermore, as infusions of isoproterenol or noradrenaline during the period of inhibition could still augment cardiac responses, whereas during the early peak responses they did not, the inhibition of augmentation does not appear to be due primarily to down regulation of cardiac myocyte beta-adrenergic receptors. The inhibition was modified by hexamethonium but not by phentolamine or atropine. Inhibition occurred when all ipsilateral cardiopulmonary nerves connected with acutely decentralized middle cervical and stellate ganglia were stimulated, whereas significant inhibition did not occur when these nerves were stimulated after they had been disconnected from the ipsilateral decentralized ganglia. Taken together these data indicate that the inhibition of cardiac augmentation which occurs during relatively long-term stimulation of intrathoracic sympathetic neural elements is due in large part to nicotinic cholinergic synaptic mechanisms that lie primarily in the major thoracic autonomic ganglia. They also indicate that long

  18. The Parameters of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation Are Critical to Its Regenerative Effects When Applied Just after a Sciatic Crush Lesion in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Martins Lima, Êmyle; Teixeira Goes, Bruno; Zugaib Cavalcanti, João; Vannier-Santos, Marcos André; Martinez, Ana Maria Blanco; Baptista, Abrahão Fontes

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effect of two frequencies of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) applied immediately after lesion on peripheral nerve regeneration after a mouse sciatic crush injury. The animals were anesthetized and subjected to crushing of the right sciatic nerve and then separated into three groups: nontreated, Low-TENS (4 Hz), and High-TENS (100 Hz). The animals of Low- and High-TENS groups were stimulated for 2 h immediately after the surgical procedure, while the nontreated group was only positioned for the same period. After five weeks the animals were euthanized, and the nerves dissected bilaterally for histological and histomorphometric analysis. Histological assessment by light and electron microscopy showed that High-TENS and nontreated nerves had a similar profile, with extensive signs of degeneration. Conversely, Low-TENS led to increased regeneration, displaying histological aspects similar to control nerves. High-TENS also led to decreased density of fibers in the range of 6–12 μm diameter and decreased fiber diameter and myelin area in the range of 0–2 μm diameter. These findings suggest that High-TENS applied just after a peripheral nerve crush may be deleterious for regeneration, whereas Low-TENS may increase nerve regeneration capacity. PMID:25147807

  19. Presence and Absence of Muscle Contraction Elicited by Peripheral Nerve Electrical Stimulation Differentially Modulate Primary Motor Cortex Excitability.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Ryoki; Kotan, Shinichi; Nakagawa, Masaki; Miyaguchi, Shota; Kojima, Sho; Saito, Kei; Inukai, Yasuto; Onishi, Hideaki

    2017-01-01

    Modulation of cortical excitability by sensory inputs is a critical component of sensorimotor integration. Sensory afferents, including muscle and joint afferents, to somatosensory cortex (S1) modulate primary motor cortex (M1) excitability, but the effects of muscle and joint afferents specifically activated by muscle contraction are unknown. We compared motor evoked potentials (MEPs) following median nerve stimulation (MNS) above and below the contraction threshold based on the persistence of M-waves. Peripheral nerve electrical stimulation (PES) conditions, including right MNS at the wrist at 110% motor threshold (MT; 110% MNS condition), right MNS at the index finger (sensory digit nerve stimulation [DNS]) with stimulus intensity approximately 110% MNS (DNS condition), and right MNS at the wrist at 90% MT (90% MNS condition) were applied. PES was administered in a 4 s ON and 6 s OFF cycle for 20 min at 30 Hz. In Experiment 1 ( n = 15), MEPs were recorded from the right abductor pollicis brevis (APB) before (baseline) and after PES. In Experiment 2 ( n = 15), M- and F-waves were recorded from the right APB. Stimulation at 110% MNS at the wrist evoking muscle contraction increased MEP amplitudes after PES compared with those at baseline, whereas DNS at the index finger and 90% MNS at the wrist not evoking muscle contraction decreased MEP amplitudes after PES. M- and F-waves, which reflect spinal cord or muscular and neuromuscular junctions, did not change following PES. These results suggest that muscle contraction and concomitant muscle/joint afferent inputs specifically enhance M1 excitability.

  20. Presence and Absence of Muscle Contraction Elicited by Peripheral Nerve Electrical Stimulation Differentially Modulate Primary Motor Cortex Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Ryoki; Kotan, Shinichi; Nakagawa, Masaki; Miyaguchi, Shota; Kojima, Sho; Saito, Kei; Inukai, Yasuto; Onishi, Hideaki

    2017-01-01

    Modulation of cortical excitability by sensory inputs is a critical component of sensorimotor integration. Sensory afferents, including muscle and joint afferents, to somatosensory cortex (S1) modulate primary motor cortex (M1) excitability, but the effects of muscle and joint afferents specifically activated by muscle contraction are unknown. We compared motor evoked potentials (MEPs) following median nerve stimulation (MNS) above and below the contraction threshold based on the persistence of M-waves. Peripheral nerve electrical stimulation (PES) conditions, including right MNS at the wrist at 110% motor threshold (MT; 110% MNS condition), right MNS at the index finger (sensory digit nerve stimulation [DNS]) with stimulus intensity approximately 110% MNS (DNS condition), and right MNS at the wrist at 90% MT (90% MNS condition) were applied. PES was administered in a 4 s ON and 6 s OFF cycle for 20 min at 30 Hz. In Experiment 1 (n = 15), MEPs were recorded from the right abductor pollicis brevis (APB) before (baseline) and after PES. In Experiment 2 (n = 15), M- and F-waves were recorded from the right APB. Stimulation at 110% MNS at the wrist evoking muscle contraction increased MEP amplitudes after PES compared with those at baseline, whereas DNS at the index finger and 90% MNS at the wrist not evoking muscle contraction decreased MEP amplitudes after PES. M- and F-waves, which reflect spinal cord or muscular and neuromuscular junctions, did not change following PES. These results suggest that muscle contraction and concomitant muscle/joint afferent inputs specifically enhance M1 excitability. PMID:28392766

  1. The lack of effect of oxytetracycline on responses to sympathetic nerve stimulation and catecholamines in vascular tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Kalsner, S

    1976-01-01

    The effects of oxytetracycline, an inhibitor of amine binding in connective tissue, on the responses of perfused rabbit ear arteries to sympathetic nerve stimulation and to intraluminally administered noradrenaline were examined. The contractions of aortic strips to catecholamines in the presence of oxytetracycline were also examined. Oxytetracycline (0.1 mM) had no discernable effect on the magnitude of constrictions, measured as reductions in flow, produced by either nerve stimulation (0.5-10 Hz) or noradrenaline (0.5-50 ng) in the ear artery. In addition, the time taken for vessels to recover towards control flow values after endogenously released or exogenously applied noradrenaline had acted was not increased by oxytetracycline. Oxytetracycline (0.1 mM) did not alter the position or shape of the concentration-response curve to noradrenaline nor did it enhance the amplitude of individual responses to catecholamines in aortic strips. It is concluded, contrary to the observations of Powis (1973), that oxytetracycline does not increase the magnitude or duration of responses to sympathetic nerve activation or to catecholamines and that binding to connective tissue is of no material consequence in terminating their action in vascular tissue. PMID:974389

  2. Influence of different frequencies of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on the threshold and pain intensity in young subjects

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Adriana de Oliveira; Silvestre, Ana Caroline; da Silva, Cristina Ferreira; Gomes, Mariany Ribeiro; Bonfleur, Maria Lúcia; Bertolini, Gladson Ricardo Flor

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of different transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation frequencies in nociception front of a pressure pain threshold and cold in healthy individuals. Methods Twenty healthy subjects were divided into four groups, all of which have gone through all forms of electrical stimulation at different weeks. Assessments were pre and post-therapy, 20 and 60 minutes after stimulation. To evaluate the pressure pain threshold, an algometer was used with one tapered tip, pressing the hypothenar region until voluntary report the word “pain”. Cold pain intensity was assessed by immersion in water at 5°C for 30 seconds; at the end, the subject was asked to quantify the pain intensity on a Visual Analog Scale for Pain. For electrical stimulation, two electrodes were used near the elbow, for 20 minutes, with an intensity strong, but not painful. The frequency was in accordance with the group: 0Hz (placebo); 7Hz; 100Hz; and 255Hz. Results Both for the assessment of pressure pain threshold as the cold pain intensity, there was no significant difference (p>0.05). Conclusion We conclude that the use of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on dermatomes C6 to C8 produced no significant change in pressure pain threshold or cold discomfort. PMID:25295453

  3. Gross Anatomical Study of the Nerve Supply of Genitourinary Structures in Female Mongrel Hound Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Amaya, S. M.; Ruggieri, M. R.; Arias Serrato, S. A.; Massicotte, V. S.; Barbe, M. F.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Anatomical variations in lumbosacral plexus or nerves to genitourinary structures in dogs are under described, despite their importance during surgery and potential contributions to neuromuscular syndromes. Gross dissection of 16 female mongrel hound dogs showed frequent variations in lumbosacral plexus classification, sympathetic ganglia, ventral rami input to nerves innervating genitourinary structures and pudendal nerve (PdN) branching. Lumbosacral plexus classification types were mixed, rather than pure, in 13 (82%) of dogs. The genitofemoral nerve (GFN) originated from ventral ramus of L4 in 67% of nerves, differing from the expected L3. Considerable variability was seen in ventral rami origins of pelvic (PN) and Pd nerves, with new findings of L7 contributions to PN, joining S1 and S2 input (23% of sides in 11 dogs) or S1–S3 input (5%), and to PdN, joining S1–S2, unilaterally, in one dog. L7 input was confirmed using retrograde dye tracing methods. The PN also received CG1 contributions, bilaterally, in one dog. The PdN branched unusually in two dogs. Lumbosacral sympathetic ganglia had variant intra-, inter- and multisegmental connectivity in 6 (38%). Thus, the anatomy of mongrel dogs had higher variability than previously described for purebred dogs. Knowledge of this variant innervation during surgery could aid in the preservation of nerves and reduce risk of urinary and sexual dysfunctions. PMID:24730986

  4. Variability and Reliability of Paired-Pulse Depression and Cortical Oscillation Induced by Median Nerve Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Onishi, Hideaki; Otsuru, Naofumi; Kojima, Sho; Miyaguchi, Shota; Saito, Kei; Inukai, Yasuto; Yamashiro, Koya; Sato, Daisuke; Tamaki, Hiroyuki; Shirozu, Hiroshi; Kameyama, Shigeki

    2018-05-08

    Paired-pulse depression (PPD) has been widely used to investigate the functional profiles of somatosensory cortical inhibition. However, PPD induced by somatosensory stimulation is variable, and the reasons for between- and within-subject PPD variability remains unclear. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to clarify the factors influencing PPD variability induced by somatosensory stimulation. The study participants were 19 healthy volunteers. First, we investigated the relationship between the PPD ratio of each component (N20m, P35m, and P60m) of the somatosensory magnetic field, and the alpha, beta, and gamma band changes in power [event-related desynchronization (ERD) and event-related synchronization (ERS)] induced by median nerve stimulation. Second, because brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene polymorphisms reportedly influence the PPD ratio, we assessed whether BDNF genotype influences PPD ratio variability. Finally, we evaluated the test-retest reliability of PPD and the alpha, beta, and gamma ERD/ERS induced by somatosensory stimulation. Significant positive correlations were observed between the P60m_PPD ratio and beta power change, and the P60m_PPD ratio was significantly smaller for the beta ERD group than for the beta ERS group. P35m_PPD was found to be robust and highly reproducible; however, P60m_PPD reproducibility was poor. In addition, the ICC values for alpha, beta, and gamma ERD/ERS were 0.680, 0.760, and 0.552 respectively. These results suggest that the variability of PPD for the P60m deflection may be influenced by the ERD/ERS magnitude, which is induced by median nerve stimulation.

  5. Functions of the Renal Nerves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koepke, John P.; DiBona, Gerald F.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses renal neuroanatomy, renal vasculature, renal tubules, renin secretion, renorenal reflexes, and hypertension as related to renal nerve functions. Indicates that high intensitites of renal nerve stimulation have produced alterations in several renal functions. (A chart with various stimulations and resultant renal functions and 10-item,…

  6. Spinal Cord Stimulation Modulates Gene Expression in the Spinal Cord of an Animal Model of Peripheral Nerve Injury.

    PubMed

    Tilley, Dana M; Cedeño, David L; Kelley, Courtney A; Benyamin, Ramsin; Vallejo, Ricardo

    Previously, we found that application of pulsed radiofrequency to a peripheral nerve injury induces changes in key genes regulating nociception concurrent with alleviation of paw sensitivity in an animal model. In the current study, we evaluated such genes after applying spinal cord stimulation (SCS) therapy. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 6 per group) were randomized into test and control groups. The spared nerve injury model was used to simulate a neuropathic pain state. A 4-contact microelectrode was implanted at the L1 vertebral level and SCS was applied continuously for 72 hours. Mechanical hyperalgesia was tested. Spinal cord tissues were collected and analyzed using real-time polymerase chain reaction to quantify levels of IL1β, GABAbr1, subP, Na/K ATPase, cFos, 5HT3ra, TNFα, Gal, VIP, NpY, IL6, GFAP, ITGAM, and BDNF. Paw withdrawal thresholds significantly decreased in spared nerve injury animals and stimulation attenuated sensitivity within 24 hours (P = 0.049), remaining significant through 72 hours (P = 0.003). Nerve injury caused up-regulation of TNFα, GFAP, ITGAM, and cFOS as well as down-regulation of Na/K ATPase. Spinal cord stimulation therapy modulated the expression of 5HT3ra, cFOS, and GABAbr1. Strong inverse relationships in gene expression relative to the amount of applied current were observed for GABAbr1 (R = -0.65) and Na/K ATPase (R = -0.58), and a positive linear correlations between 5HT3r (R = 0.80) and VIP (R = 0.50) were observed. Continuously applied SCS modulates expression of key genes involved in the regulation of neuronal membrane potential.

  7. ["Dual Guidance"? - parallel combination of ultrasound-guidance and nerve stimulation - Contra].

    PubMed

    Maecken, Tim

    2015-07-01

    Sonography is a highly user-dependent technology. It presupposes a considerable degree of sonoanatomic and sonographic knowledge and requires good practical skills of the examiner. Sonography allows the identification of the puncture target, observes the needle feed and assesses the spread pattern of the local anesthetic in real time. Peripheral electrical nerve stimulation (PNS) cannot offer these advantages to the same degree, but may allow nerve localization under difficult sonographic conditions. The combination of the two locating techniques is complex in its practical implementation. Partially, the use of one location technique is made even more difficult by the combination with the second. PNS in parallel to sonography serves primarily as a warning technology in the case of an invisible cannula tip. It should not be construed as a compensation technique for the lack of sonographic skills or knowledge. However, PNS may be helpful in the sense of a bridging technology as long as the user is aware of its limitations. © Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Motor evoked responses from the thigh muscles to the stimulation of the upper limb nerves in patients with late poliomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Ertekin, Cumhur; On, Arzu Yagiz; Kirazli, Yeşim; Kurt, Tülay; Gürgör, Nevin

    2002-04-01

    To demonstrate a clear-cut M response recorded from the severely affected thigh muscles to the stimulation of the upper limb nerves in a serial of patients with late poliomyelitis. Fifteen patients with late poliomyelitis, 7 patients with spinal cord disorders and 11 control subjects were included. Evoked muscle responses were investigated in quadriceps femoris and/or thigh adductor muscles to the stimulation of the brachial plexus, median and ulnar nerves. Evoked muscle responses were obtained from the thigh muscles in all 12 late polio patients with proximal lower extremity involvement. The response could not be recorded from the thigh muscles neither in the 3 polio patients with upper extremity involvement nor in the healthy control subjects and in patients with other spinal cord disorders of anterior horn cell. It is proposed that the electrical stimulation of the arm nerves produce interlimb descending muscle responses in the severely affected atrophic thigh muscles of the patients with late polio. This finding suggests that there might be a focal and/or specific loss of inhibitory interneurons between injured and normal motor neurons and increased facilitatory synaptic action at the end of long propriospinal descending fibers in the case of late poliomyelitis.

  9. Failure of a vagus nerve stimulator following a nearby lightning strike.

    PubMed

    Terry, Garth E; Conry, Joan A; Taranto, Eleanor; Yaun, Amanda

    2011-01-01

    We recently reported our experience with implanted vagus nerve stimulators (VNS) in 62 children over a 7-year period. Here, we present a case of a VNS that successfully reduced the number and severity of seizures in a patient with an unusual seizure pattern, and failed to function shortly after a lightning storm. To our knowledge, the failure of VNS or any implantable electrical devices by lightning has not been reported in the literature. This mechanism of electrical interference, while unusual, may require more attention as these devices are expected to be used more frequently. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Trigeminal Nerve Stimulation for Comorbid Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Major Depressive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Cook, Ian A; Abrams, Michelle; Leuchter, Andrew F

    2016-04-01

    External stimulation of the trigeminal nerve (eTNS) is an emerging neuromodulation therapy for epilepsy and depression. Preliminary studies suggest it has an excellent safety profile and is associated with significant improvements in seizures and mood. Neuroanatomical projections of the trigeminal system suggest eTNS may alter activity in structures regulating mood, anxiety, and sleep. In this proof-of-concept trial, the effects of eTNS were evaluated in adults with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and comorbid unipolar major depressive disorder (MDD) as an adjunct to pharmacotherapy for these commonly co-occurring conditions. Twelve adults with PTSD and MDD were studied in an eight-week open outpatient trial (age 52.8 [13.7 sd], 8F:4M). Stimulation was applied to the supraorbital and supratrochlear nerves for eight hours each night as an adjunct to pharmacotherapy. Changes in symptoms were monitored using the PTSD Patient Checklist (PCL), Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS-17), Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (QIDS-C), and the Quality of Life Enjoyment and Satisfaction Questionnaire (Q-LES-Q). Over the eight weeks, eTNS treatment was associated with significant decreases in PCL (p = 0.003; median decrease of 15 points; effect size d 1.5), HDRS-17 (p < 0.001; 42% response rate, 25% remission; d 2.1), and QIDS-C scores (p < 0.001; d 1.8), as well as an improvement in quality of life (Q-LES-Q, p < 0.01). eTNS was well tolerated with few treatment emergent adverse events. Significant improvements in PTSD and depression severity were achieved in the eight weeks of acute eTNS treatment. This novel approach to wearable brain stimulation may have use as an adjunct to pharmacotherapy in these disorders if efficacy and tolerability are confirmed with additional studies. © 2016 International Neuromodulation Society.

  11. Exhausted implanted pulse generator in sacral nerve stimulation for faecal incontinence: What next in daily practice for patients?

    PubMed

    Duchalais, Emilie; Meurette, Guillaume; Perrot, Bastien; Wyart, Vincent; Kubis, Caroline; Lehur, Paul-Antoine

    2016-02-01

    The efficacy of sacral nerve stimulation in faecal incontinence relies on an implanted pulse generator known to have a limited lifespan. The long-term use of sacral nerve stimulation raises concerns about the true lifespan of generators. The aim of the study was to assess the lifespan of sacral nerve stimulation implanted pulse generators in daily practice, and the outcome of exhausted generator replacement, in faecal incontinent patients. Faecal incontinent patients with pulse generators (Medtronic Interstim™ or InterstimII™) implanted in a single centre from 2001 to 2014 were prospectively followed up. Generator lifespan was measured according to the Kaplan-Meier method. Patients with a generator explanted/turned off before exhaustion were excluded. Morbidity of exhausted generator replacement and the outcome (Cleveland Clinic Florida Faecal Incontinence (CCF-FI) and Faecal Incontinence Quality of Life (FIQL) scores) were recorded. Of 135 patients with an implanted pulse generator, 112 (InterstimII 66) were included. Mean follow-up was 4.9 ± 2.8 years. The generator reached exhaustion in 29 (26%) cases. Overall median lifespan of an implanted pulse generator was approximately 9 years (95% CI 8-9.2). Interstim and InterstimII 25th percentile lifespan was 7.2 (CI 6.4-8.3) and 5 (CI 4-not reached) years, respectively. After exhaustion, generators were replaced, left in place or explanted in 23, 2 and 4 patients, respectively. Generator replacement was virtually uneventful. CCF-FI/FIQL scores remained unchanged after generator replacement (CCF-FI 8 ± 2 vs 7 ± 3; FIQL 3 ± 0.6 vs 3 ± 0.5; p = ns). In this study, the implanted pulse generator observed median lifespan was 9 years. After exhaustion, generators were safely and efficiently replaced. The study also gives insight into long-term needs and costs of sacral nerve stimulation (SNS) therapy.

  12. Wireless peripheral nerve stimulation for complex regional pain syndrome type I of the upper extremity: a case illustration introducing a novel technology.

    PubMed

    Herschkowitz, Daniel; Kubias, Jana

    2018-04-13

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a debilitating painful disorder, cryptic in its pathophysiology and refractory condition with limited therapeutic options. Type I CRPS with its variable relationship to trauma has often no discernible fractures or nerve injuries and remains enigmatic in its response to conservative treatment as well as the other limited interventional therapies. Neuromodulation in the form of spinal cord and dorsal root ganglion stimulation (SCS, DRGS) has shown encouraging results, especially of causalgia or CRPS I of lower extremities. Upper extremity CRPS I is far more difficult. To report a case of upper extremity CRPS I treated by wireless peripheral nerve stimulation (WPNS) for its unique features and minimally invasive technique. The system does not involve implantation of battery or its connections. A 47 year old female patient presented with refractory CRPS I following a blunt trauma to her right forearm. As interventional treatment in the form of local anesthetics (Anesthesia of peripheral branches of radial nerve) and combined infusions of ketamine/lidocaine failed to provide any significant relief she opted for WPNS treatment. Based on the topographic distribution, two electrodes (Stimwave Leads: FR4A-RCV-A0 with tines, Generation 1 and FR4A-RCV-B0 with tines, Generation 1), were placed along the course of radial and median nerves under ultrasonography monitoring and guided by intraoperative stimulation. This procedure did not involve implantation of extension cables or the power source. At a frequency of 60 Hz and 300 μs the stimulation induced paresthesia along the distribution of the nerves. Therapeutic relief was observed with high frequency (HF) stimulation (HF 10 kHz/32 μs, 2.0 mA) reducing her pain from a visual analogue scale (VAS) score of 7-4 postoperatively. Three HF stimulations programs were provided at the time of discharge, as she improved in her sensory impairment to touch, pressure and temperature at her first

  13. Role of transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation in the management of trigeminal neuralgia

    PubMed Central

    Singla, Sanju; Prabhakar, Vikram; Singla, Rajan Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Background: Trigeminal neuralgia typically involves nerves supplying teeth, jaws and face of older females. Though the etiology is usually obscure, different treatment modalities have been tried for it viz. medicinal treatment, injection alcohol, peripheral neurectomy, rhizotomy, and microvascular decompression etc. Transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS) is an emerging and promising option for management of such patients. Aims and Design: The present study was designed with an aim to study the efficacy of TENS in management of trigeminal neuralgia. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on 30 patients of trigeminal neuralgia confirmed by diagnostic nerve block. They were given bursts of TENS for 20-40 days over the path of the affected nerve and subsequently evaluated at 1 month and 3 month intervals by visual analogue scale (VAS), verbal pain scale (VPS), a functional outcome scales for main daily activities like sleep, chewing, talking, or washing face. Results: The results showed that, on VAS, the score decreased from 8.9 (Pre TENS) to 3.1 at 1 month and 1.3 at 3 months, and on VPS, the score decreased from 3.5 (Pre TENS) to 1.2 at 1 month and 0.3 at 3 months. Similarly, a considerable decrease in scores was seen on functional outcome scale for different activities. No side effects like irritation or redness of skin were seen in any of the patients. Conclusions: Thus, TENS was found to be a safe, easily acceptable, and non-invasive outdoor patient department procedure for management of trigeminal neuralgia. PMID:21897677

  14. Galanin inhibits caerulein-stimulated pancreatic amylase secretion via cholinergic nerves and insulin.

    PubMed

    Barreto, Savio G; Woods, Charmaine M; Carati, Colin J; Schloithe, Ann C; Jaya, Surendra R; Toouli, James; Saccone, Gino T P

    2009-08-01

    Pancreatic exocrine secretion is affected by galanin, but the mechanisms involved are unclear. We aimed to determine the effect and elucidate the mechanism of action of exogenous galanin on basal and stimulated pancreatic amylase secretion in vitro. The effect of galanin on basal-, carbachol-, and caerulein-stimulated amylase secretion from isolated murine pancreatic lobules was measured. Carbachol and caerulein concentration-response relationships were established. Lobules were coincubated with galanin (10(-12) M to 10(-7) M), carbachol (10(-6) M), or caerulein (10(-10) M). Lobules were preincubated with atropine (10(-5) M), tetrodotoxin (10(-5) M), hexamethonium (10(-5) M), or diazoxide (10(-7) M and 10(-4) M) for 30 min followed by incubation with caerulein (10(-10) M) alone or combined with galanin (10(-12) M). Amylase secretion was expressed as percent of total lobular amylase. Immunohistochemical studies used the antigen retrieval technique and antisera for galanin receptor (GALR) 1, 2, and 3. Carbachol and caerulein stimulated amylase secretion in a concentration-dependent manner with maximal responses of two- and 1.7-fold over control evoked at 10(-6) M and 10(-10) M, respectively. Galanin (10(-12) M) completely inhibited caerulein-stimulated amylase secretion but had no effect on carbachol-stimulated or basal secretion. Atropine and tetrodotoxin pretreatment abolished the caerulein-stimulated amylase secretion, whereas hexamethonium had no significant effect. Diazoxide significantly reduced caerulein-stimulated amylase secretion by approximately 80%. Galanin did not affect caerulein-stimulated amylase secretion in the presence of hexamethonium or diazoxide. Glucose-stimulated amylase secretion was also inhibited by galanin. Immunohistochemistry revealed islet cells labeled for GALR2. These data suggest that galanin may modulate caerulein-stimulated amylase secretion by acting on cholinergic nerves and/or islet cells possibly via GALR2 to regulate insulin

  15. On-off closed-loop control of vagus nerve stimulation for the adaptation of heart rate.

    PubMed

    Ugalde, Hector Romero; Le Rolle, Virginie; Bel, Alain; Bonnet, Jean-Luc; Andreu, David; Mabo, Philippe; Carrault, Guy; Hernández, Alfredo I

    2014-01-01

    Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is a potential therapeutic approach in a number of clinical applications. Although VNS is commonly delivered in an open-loop approach, it is now recognized that closed-loop approaches may be necessary to optimize the therapy and minimize side effects of neuro-stimulation devices. In this paper, we describe a prototype system for real-time control of the instantaneous heart rate, working synchronously with the heart period. As a first step, an on-off control method has been integrated. The system is evaluated on one sheep with induced heart failure, showing the interest of the proposed approach.

  16. Non-invasive vagus nerve stimulation acutely improves spontaneous cardiac baroreflex sensitivity in healthy young men: A randomized placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Antonino, Diego; Teixeira, André L; Maia-Lopes, Paulo M; Souza, Mayara C; Sabino-Carvalho, Jeann L; Murray, Aaron R; Deuchars, Jim; Vianna, Lauro C

    Despite positive outcomes of transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation (tVNS) via the auricular branch of the vagus nerve (ABVN), the mechanisms underlying these outcomes remain unclear. Additionally, previous studies have not been controlled the possible placebo effects of tVNS. To test the hypothesis that tVNS acutely improves spontaneous cardiac baroreflex sensitivity (cBRS) and autonomic modulation, and that these effects are specific to stimulation of ABVN. Thirteen healthy men (23±1yrs) were randomized across three experimental visits. In active tVNS, electrodes were placed on the tragus of the ear and electrical current was applied by using a Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation device. A time-control visit was performed with the electrodes placed on tragus, but no current was applied (sham-T). Additionally, to avoid a placebo effect, another sham protocol was performed with same electrical current of the active visit, but the electrodes were placed on the ear lobe (an area without cutaneous nerve endings from the vagus - tLS). Beat-to-beat heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP) were monitored at rest, during stimulation (active, sham-T and tLS) and recovery. cBRS was measured via sequence technique. Both HR (HRV) and BP variability (BPV) were also measured. Arterial BP and BPV were not affected by any active or sham protocols (P > 0.05). Resting HR and LF/HF ratio of HRV decreased (Δ-3.4 ± 1% and Δ-15 ± 12%, P < 0.05, respectively) and cBRS increased (Δ24 ± 8%, P < 0.05) during active tVNS, but were unchanged during both sham protocols. tVNS acutely improves cBRS and autonomic modulation in healthy young men. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Innervation of the human cricopharyngeal muscle by the recurrent laryngeal nerve and external branch of the superior laryngeal nerve.

    PubMed

    Uludag, Mehmet; Aygun, Nurcihan; Isgor, Adnan

    2017-06-01

    The major component of the upper esophageal sphincter is the cricopharyngeal muscle (CPM). We assessed the contribution of the laryngeal nerves to motor innervation of the CPM. We performed an intraoperative electromyographic study of 27 patients. The recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN), vagus nerve, external branch of the superior laryngeal nerve (EBSLN), and pharyngeal plexus (PP) were stimulated. Responses were evaluated by visual observation of CPM contractions and electromyographic examination via insertion of needle electrodes into the CPM. In total, 46 CPMs (24 right, 22 left) were evaluated. PP stimulation produced both positive visual contractions and electromyographic (EMG) responses in 42 CPMs (2080 ± 1583 μV). EBSLN stimulation produced visual contractions of 28 CPMs and positive EMG responses in 35 CPMs (686 ± 630 μV). Stimulation of 45 RLNs produced visible contractions of 37 CPMs and positive EMG activity in 41 CPMs (337 ± 280 μV). Stimulation of 42 vagal nerves resulted in visible contractions of 36 CPMs and positive EMG responses in 37 CPMs (292 ± 229 μV). Motor activity was noted in 32 CPMs by both RLN and EBSLN stimulation, 9 CPMs by RLN stimulation, and 3 CPMs by EBSLN stimulation; 2 CPMs exhibited no response. This is the first study to show that the EBSLN contributes to motor innervation of the human CPM. The RLN, EBSLN, or both of the nerves innervate the 90, 75, and 70 % of the CPMs ipsilaterally, respectively.

  18. Safety and efficacy of vagus nerve stimulation paired with tones for the treatment of tinnitus: a case series.

    PubMed

    De Ridder, Dirk; Vanneste, Sven; Engineer, Navzer D; Kilgard, Michael P

    2014-02-01

    Classical neuromodulation applies current to the nervous system in an attempt to alter ongoing activity. However, classical neuromodulation interferes with activity but does not drive it in a controlled way. Recently, an animal study demonstrated it is possible to drive plasticity in a controlled way by using stimulation of the vagus nerve paired with tones. This reversed the tinnitus percept and pathological neural plasticity in noise-exposed rats with behavioral characteristics of tinnitus. The aim of the current study was to translate this innovative neuromodulation method to humans suffering from tinnitus. Ten patients with severe chronic tinnitus were implanted with electrodes on their left vagus nerve. Two and a half hours each day for 20 days, the patients heard tones, excluding the tinnitus-matched frequency, paired with brief electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve. The therapy was well tolerated, and no patient withdrew from the study due to complications or side-effects. Four of the ten patients exhibited clinically meaningful improvements in their tinnitus, both for the affective component, as quantified by the Tinnitus Handicap Inventory, and for the sound percept, as quantified by the minimum masking level. These improvements were stable for more than two months after the end of therapy. Of the ten patients, five were on medications that included muscarinic antagonists, norepinephrine agonists, and γ-amino butyric acid agonists, thereby possibly interfering with acetylcholine and norepinephrine release induced by vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) and essential for inducing plasticity. These patients had no improvement in contrast to medication-free patients. VNS paired with tones excluding the tinnitus-matched frequency is safe and feasible. It seems to exert a beneficial effect in nonmedication-taking patients, both with regard to the perceived sound and the distress. Further studies are therefore mandated. © 2013 International Neuromodulation

  19. Application of a rat hindlimb model: a prediction of force spaces reachable through stimulation of nerve fascicles.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Will L; Jindrich, Devin L; Zhong, Hui; Roy, Roland R; Edgerton, V Reggie

    2011-12-01

    A device to generate standing or locomotion through chronically placed electrodes has not been fully developed due in part to limitations of clinical experimentation and the high number of muscle activation inputs of the leg. We investigated the feasibility of functional electrical stimulation paradigms that minimize the input dimensions for controlling the limbs by stimulating at nerve fascicles, utilizing a model of the rat hindlimb, which combined previously collected morphological data with muscle physiological parameters presented herein. As validation of the model, we investigated the suitability of a lumped-parameter model for the prediction of muscle activation during dynamic tasks. Using the validated model, we found that the space of forces producible through activation of muscle groups sharing common nerve fascicles was nonlinearly dependent on the number of discrete muscle groups that could be individually activated (equivalently, the neuroanatomical level of activation). Seven commonly innervated muscle groups were sufficient to produce 78% of the force space producible through individual activation of the 42 modeled hindlimb muscles. This novel, neuroanatomically derived reduction in input dimension emphasizes the potential to simplify controllers for functional electrical stimulation to improve functional recovery after a neuromuscular injury.

  20. Application of a Rat Hindlimb Model: A Prediction of Force Spaces Reachable Through Stimulation of Nerve Fascicles

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Will L.; Jindrich, Devin L.; Zhong, Hui; Roy, Roland R.

    2011-01-01

    A device to generate standing or locomotion through chronically placed electrodes has not been fully developed due in part to limitations of clinical experimentation and the high number of muscle activation inputs of the leg. We investigated the feasibility of functional electrical stimulation paradigms that minimize the input dimensions for controlling the limbs by stimulating at nerve fascicles, utilizing a model of the rat hindlimb which combined previously collected morphological data with muscle physiological parameters presented herein. As validation of the model we investigated the suitability of a lumped-parameter model for prediction of muscle activation during dynamic tasks. Using the validated model we found that the space of forces producible through activation of muscle groups sharing common nerve fascicles was nonlinearly dependent on the number of discrete muscle groups that could be individually activated (equivalently, the neuroanatomical level of activation). Seven commonly innervated muscle groups were sufficient to produce 78% of the force space producible through individual activation of the 42 modeled hindlimb muscles. This novel, neuroanatomically derived reduction in input dimension emphasizes the potential to simplify controllers for functional electrical stimulation to improve functional recovery after a neuromuscular injury. PMID:21244999

  1. The effectiveness of Hering's nerve stimulation in controlling penicillin-induced seizures in the rat is dependent on the amygdala.

    PubMed

    Tubbs, R Shane; Wellons, John C; Patwardhan, Ravish V; Oakes, W Jerry; Wyss, J Michael

    2002-11-01

    This study tests the hypothesis that the ability of Hering's nerve stimulation (HNS) to blunt seizure activity is dependent on the availability of dopamine in the amygdala. In 10 rats, Hering's nerve (HN) on the right side was isolated and placed on an electrode and penicillin was locally placed on each rat's left frontoparietal region to induce seizures. After the initiation of seizures, HN was stimulated. After the recurrence of seizure activity, the left basolateral amygdala was injected with 1.0 microl of normal saline, dopamine, haloperidol or 1% lidocaine in sequential tests. HN was stimulated after each injection and the latency and amplitude of the seizure activity were assessed. Focal cortical penicillin induced seizures that resulted in tonic-clonic movement of the limbs and face that lasted 35-45 min. Tonic-clonic movements of the limbs and face of similar latency and amplitude were induced by repeated reapplication of penicillin in untreated rats. HNS decreased seizure activity, but infusion of haloperidol or lidocaine into the basolateral amygdala blocked this antiseizure effect of HNS. In contrast, infusion of saline or dopamine had no effect on the ability of HNS to blunt seizure activity. None of the amygdala injections altered the latency or amplitude of seizure activity. These results demonstrate that the ability of HNS to blunt seizure activity in the rat is dependent on an intact dopamine system in the basolateral amygdala. These data will hopefully be useful in furthering our understanding of the circuitry that allows peripheral nerve stimulation to alter seizure activity. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

  2. [Phrenic nerve stimulation protects against mechanical ventilation-induced diaphragmatic dysfunction through myogenic regulatory factors].

    PubMed

    An, G H; Chen, M; Zhan, W F; Hu, B; Zhang, H X

    2018-02-12

    Objective: To explore the protective effect of electrical stimulation of phrenic nerve on diaphragmatic function during mechanical ventilation. Methods: Forty healthy adult SD rats were randomly divided into 5 groups: blank control group (BC), spontaneous breathing group (SB), electrical stimulation group (ES), mechanical ventilation group (MV), and electrical stimulation and mechanical ventilation group (MS). The rats in each group were treated for 18 h except for the BC group. After treatment, the diaphragm muscle tissue was obtained and the diaphragm contractility including peak-to-peak value(Vpp) and maximum rate of contraction(+ dT/dt max) were measured. Expression of MyoD and myogenin were detected. Results: Except for the ES and the MS groups, there was a significant difference for peak-to-peak value (Vpp) between each 2 groups ( P <0.05). Expression levels of MyoD in treatment groups were also significantly different ( P <0.05). Expressions of MS(Q-PCR 2(-ΔΔCt) value: 11.66±2.80) and MV(Q-PCR 2(-ΔΔCt) value: 40.89±24.71) in the treatment group were significantly different ( P <0.05). The expression of myogenin in the MS and the MV groups were significantly different from those of the BC group( P <0.05), however there was no significant difference between the MS(Q-PCR 2(-ΔΔCt) value: 2.58±2.75) and the MV group(Q-PCR 2(-ΔΔCt) value: 1.63±0.71). Conclusions: Electrical stimulation of the phrenic nerve can change the expression level of MyoD and myogenin to offset mechanical ventilation induced diaphragmatic function damage, and therefore plays a protective effect on the diaphragm.

  3. Stimulating effect of thyroid hormones in peripheral nerve regeneration: research history and future direction toward clinical therapy

    PubMed Central

    Barakat-Walter, I.; Kraftsik, R.

    2018-01-01

    Injury to peripheral nerves is often observed in the clinic and severe injuries may cause loss of motor and sensory functions. Despite extensive investigation, testing various surgical repair techniques and neurotrophic molecules, at present, a satisfactory method to ensuring successful recovery does not exist. For successful molecular therapy in nerve regeneration, it is essential to improve the intrinsic ability of neurons to survive and to increase the speed of axonal outgrowth. Also to induce Schwann cell phenotypical changes to prepare the local environment favorable for axonal regeneration and myelination. Therefore, any molecule that regulates gene expression of both neurons and Schwann cells could play a crucial role in peripheral nerve regeneration. Clinical and experimental studies have reported that thyroid hormones are essential for the normal development and function of the nervous system, so they could be candidates for nervous system regeneration. This review provides an overview of studies devoted to testing the effect of thyroid hormones on peripheral nerve regeneration. Also it emphasizes the importance of combining biodegradable tubes with local administration of triiodothyronine for future clinical therapy of human severe injured nerves. We highlight that the local and single administration of triiodothyronine within biodegradable nerve guide improves significantly the regeneration of severed peripheral nerves, and accelerates functional recovering. This technique provides a serious step towards future clinical application of triiodothyronine in human severe injured nerves. The possible regulatory mechanism by which triiodothyronine stimulates peripheral nerve regeneration is a rapid action on both axotomized neurons and Schwann cells. PMID:29722302

  4. Transmission failure in sympathetic nerves produced by hemicholinium

    PubMed Central

    Chang, V.; Rand, M. J.

    1960-01-01

    It has been shown by others that hemicholinium (α,α'-dimethylethanolamino-4,4'-biacetophenone) inhibits the synthesis of acetylcholine, an effect which is reversed by choline. Hemicholinium produces a failure of response to nerve stimulation in the following sympathetically innervated preparations: guinea-pig isolated vas deferens, rabbit isolated uterus, rabbit isolated colon, perfused rabbit ear, cat isolated atria and the piloerector muscles in the cat's tail. The blocking action of hemicholinium on the responses to postganglionic sympathetic stimulation resembles its blocking action against cholinergic nerve stimulation observed on rabbit isolated atria with vagus nerves, rabbit isolated vagina with pelvic nerves, and guinea-pig isolated diaphragm with phrenic nerve. The failure of transmission produced by hemicholinium in sympathetic nerves and in cholinergic nerves can be reversed by choline. It is suggested that if there were a cholinergic junction at sympathetic nerve endings the mechanism of the blocking action of hemicholinium at these endings could be explained by inhibition of acetylcholine synthesis. ImagesFIG. 13FIG. 14 PMID:13692344

  5. Tibial nerve stimulation to inhibit the micturition reflex by an implantable wireless driver microstimulator in cats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xing; Liao, Li-Min; Chen, Guo-Qing; Wang, Zhao-Xia; Lu, Tian-Ji; Deng, Han; Loeb, Gerald-E

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Traditional tibial nerve stimulation (TNS) has been used to treat overactive bladder syndrome (OAB), but there are some shortcomings. Thus, a novel alternative is needed for the treatment of OAB. The study investigated the effects of a new type of tibial nerve microstimulator on the micturition reflex in cats. Methods: An implantable wireless driver microstimulator was implanted around the tibial nerve in 9 α-chloralose anesthetized cats. Cystometry was performed by infusing 0.9% normal saline (NS) or 0.25% acetic acid (AA) through a urethral catheter. Multiple cystometrograms were performed before, during, and after TNS to determine the inhibitory effect of the microstimulator on the micturition reflex. Results: TNS at 2 threshold (T) intensity significantly increased the bladder capacity (BC) during NS infusion. Bladder overactivity was irritated by the intravesical infusion of 0.25% AA, which significantly reduced the BC compared with the NS infusion. TNS at 2 T intensity suppressed AA-induced bladder overactivity and significantly increased the BC compared with the AA control. Conclusion: The implantable wireless driver tibial nerve microstimulator appears to be effective in inhibiting the micturition reflex during physiologic and pathologic conditions. The implantable wireless driver tibial nerve microstimulator could be used to treat OAB. PMID:27537576

  6. The Role of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation in the Management of Temporomandibular Joint Disorder.

    PubMed

    Awan, Kamran Habib; Patil, Shankargouda

    2015-12-01

    Temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD) constitutes of a group of diseases that functionally affect the masticatory system, including the muscles of mastication and temporomandibular joint (TMJ). A number of etiologies with specific treatment have been identified, including the transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS). The current paper presents a literature review on the use of TENS in the management of TMD patients. Temporomandibular joint disorder is very common disorder with approximately 75% of people showing some signs, while more than quarter (33%) having at least one symptom. An attempt to treat the pain should be made whenever possible. However, in cases with no defined etiology, starting with less intrusive and reversible techniques is prescribed. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation is one such treatment modality, i.e. useful in the management of TMD. It comprises of controlled exposure of electrical current to the surface of skin, causing hyperactive muscles relaxation and decrease pain. Although the value of TENS to manage chronic pain in TMD patients is still controversial, its role in utilization for masticatory muscle pain is significant. However, an accurate diagnosis is essential to minimize its insufficient use. Well-controlled randomized trials are needed to determine the utilization of TENS in the management of TMD patients.

  7. Aging changes and gender differences in response to median nerve stimulation measured with MEG.

    PubMed

    Stephen, Julia M; Ranken, Doug; Best, Elaine; Adair, John; Knoefel, Janice; Kovacevic, Sanja; Padilla, Denise; Hart, Blaine; Aine, Cheryl J

    2006-01-01

    The current study uses magnetoencephalography (MEG) to characterize age-related changes and gender differences in the amplitudes and timing of cortical sources evoked by median nerve stimulation. Thirty-four healthy subjects from two age groups: 20-29 and >64 years of age were examined. After measuring the MEG responses, we modeled the data using a spatio-temporal multi-dipole modeling approach to determine the source locations and their associated timecourses. We found early, large amplitude responses in the elderly in primary somatosensory (approximately 20 ms) and pre-central sulcus timecourses (approximately 22 ms) and lower amplitude responses in the elderly later in primary somatosensory (approximately 32 ms) and contralateral secondary somatosensory timecourses (approximately 90 ms). In addition, females had larger peak amplitude responses than males in the contralateral secondary somatosensory timecourse (approximately 28 and 51 ms). These results show that the median nerve stimulation paradigm provides considerable sensitivity to age- and gender-related differences. The results are consistent with the theory that increased amplitudes identified in the elderly may be associated with decreased inhibition. The results emphasize that an examination of two discrete age groups, collapsed across gender, cannot provide a complete understanding of the fundamental changes that occur in the brain across the lifetime.

  8. Pupil constriction evoked in vitro by stimulation of the oculomotor nerve in the turtle (Trachemys scripta elegans).

    PubMed

    Dearworth, James R; Brenner, J E; Blaum, J F; Littlefield, T E; Fink, D A; Romano, J M; Jones, M S

    2009-01-01

    The pond turtle (Trachemys scripta elegans) exhibits a notably sluggish pupillary light reflex (PLR), with pupil constriction developing over several minutes following light onset. In the present study, we examined the dynamics of the efferent branch of the reflex in vitro using preparations consisting of either the isolated head or the enucleated eye. Stimulation of the oculomotor nerve (nIII) using 100-Hz current trains resulted in a maximal pupil constriction of 17.4% compared to 27.1% observed in the intact animal in response to light. When current amplitude was systematically increased from 1 to 400 microA, mean response latency decreased from 64 to 45 ms, but this change was not statistically significant. Hill equations fitted to these responses indicated a current threshold of 3.8 microA. Stimulation using single pulses evoked a smaller constriction (3.8%) with response latencies and threshold similar to that obtained using train stimulation. The response evoked by postganglionic stimulation of the ciliary nerve using 100-Hz trains was largely indistinguishable from that of train stimulation of nIII. However, application of single-pulse stimulation postganglionically resulted in smaller pupil constriction at all current levels relative to that of nIII stimulation, suggesting that there is amplification of efferent drive at the ganglion. Time constants for constrictions ranged from 88 to 154 ms with relaxations occurring more slowly at 174-361 ms. These values for timing from in vitro are much faster than the time constant 1.66 min obtained for the light response in the intact animal. The rapid dynamics of pupil constriction observed here suggest that the slow PLR of the turtle observed in vivo is not due to limitations of the efferent pathway. Rather, the sluggish response probably results from photoreceptive mechanisms or central processing.

  9. Fabrication of High Contact-Density, Flat-Interface Nerve Electrodes for Recording and Stimulation Applications.

    PubMed

    Dweiri, Yazan M; Stone, Matthew A; Tyler, Dustin J; McCallum, Grant A; Durand, Dominique M

    2016-10-04

    Many attempts have been made to manufacture multi-contact nerve cuff electrodes that are safe, robust and reliable for long term neuroprosthetic applications. This protocol describes a fabrication technique of a modified cylindrical nerve cuff electrode to meet these criteria. Minimum computer-aided design and manufacturing (CAD and CAM) skills are necessary to consistently produce cuffs with high precision (contact placement 0.51 ± 0.04 mm) and various cuff sizes. The precision in spatially distributing the contacts and the ability to retain a predefined geometry accomplished with this design are two criteria essential to optimize the cuff's interface for selective recording and stimulation. The presented design also maximizes the flexibility in the longitudinal direction while maintaining sufficient rigidity in the transverse direction to reshape the nerve by using materials with different elasticities. The expansion of the cuff's cross sectional area as a result of increasing the pressure inside the cuff was observed to be 25% at 67 mm Hg. This test demonstrates the flexibility of the cuff and its response to nerve swelling post-implant. The stability of the contacts' interface and recording quality were also examined with contacts' impedance and signal-to-noise ratio metrics from a chronically implanted cuff (7.5 months), and observed to be 2.55 ± 0.25 kΩ and 5.10 ± 0.81 dB respectively.

  10. Restoration of quinine-stimulated Fos-immunoreactive neurons in the central nucleus of the amygdala and gustatory cortex following reinnervation or cross-reinnervation of the lingual taste nerves in rats.

    PubMed

    King, Camille Tessitore; Garcea, Mircea; Spector, Alan C

    2014-08-01

    Remarkably, when lingual gustatory nerves are surgically rerouted to inappropriate taste fields in the tongue, some taste functions recover. We previously demonstrated that quinine-stimulated oromotor rejection reflexes and neural activity (assessed by Fos immunoreactivity) in subregions of hindbrain gustatory nuclei were restored if the posterior tongue, which contains receptor cells that respond strongly to bitter compounds, was cross-reinnervated by the chorda tympani nerve. Such functional recovery was not seen if instead, the anterior tongue, where receptor cells are less responsive to bitter compounds, was cross-reinnervated by the glossopharyngeal nerve, even though this nerve typically responds robustly to bitter substances. Thus, recovery depended more on the taste field being reinnervated than on the nerve itself. Here, the distribution of quinine-stimulated Fos-immunoreactive neurons in two taste-associated forebrain areas was examined in these same rats. In the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA), a rostrocaudal gradient characterized the normal quinine-stimulated Fos response, with the greatest number of labeled cells situated rostrally. Quinine-stimulated neurons were found throughout the gustatory cortex, but a "hot spot" was observed in its anterior-posterior center in subregions approximating the dysgranular/agranular layers. Fos neurons here and in the rostral CeA were highly correlated with quinine-elicited gapes. Denervation of the posterior tongue eliminated, and its reinnervation by either nerve restored, numbers of quinine-stimulated labeled cells in the rostralmost CeA and in the subregion approximating the dysgranular gustatory cortex. These results underscore the remarkable plasticity of the gustatory system and also help clarify the functional anatomy of neural circuits activated by bitter taste stimulation. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Medtronic, Inc.; premarket approval of the Interstim Sacral Nerve Stimulation (SNS) System--FDA. Notice.

    PubMed

    1998-01-29

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing its approval of the application by Medtronic, Inc., Minneapolis, MN, for premarket approval, under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act), of the Interstim Sacral Nerve Stimulation (SNS) System. After reviewing the recommendation of the Gastroenterology and Urology Devices Panel, FDA's Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) notified the applicant, by letter of September 29, 1997, of the approval of the application.

  12. Chronic monitoring of lower urinary tract activity via a sacral dorsal root ganglia interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khurram, Abeer; Ross, Shani E.; Sperry, Zachariah J.; Ouyang, Aileen; Stephan, Christopher; Jiman, Ahmad A.; Bruns, Tim M.

    2017-06-01

    Objective. Our goal is to develop an interface that integrates chronic monitoring of lower urinary tract (LUT) activity with stimulation of peripheral pathways. Approach. Penetrating microelectrodes were implanted in sacral dorsal root ganglia (DRG) of adult male felines. Peripheral electrodes were placed on or in the pudendal nerve, bladder neck and near the external urethral sphincter. Supra-pubic bladder catheters were implanted for saline infusion and pressure monitoring. Electrode and catheter leads were enclosed in an external housing on the back. Neural signals from microelectrodes and bladder pressure of sedated or awake-behaving felines were recorded under various test conditions in weekly sessions. Electrodes were also stimulated to drive activity. Main results. LUT single- and multi-unit activity was recorded for 4-11 weeks in four felines. As many as 18 unique bladder pressure single-units were identified in each experiment. Some channels consistently recorded bladder afferent activity for up to 41 d, and we tracked individual single-units for up to 23 d continuously. Distension-evoked and stimulation-driven (DRG and pudendal) bladder emptying was observed, during which LUT sensory activity was recorded. Significance. This chronic implant animal model allows for behavioral studies of LUT neurophysiology and will allow for continued development of a closed-loop neuroprosthesis for bladder control.

  13. Optimization of epilepsy treatment with vagus nerve stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uthman, Basim; Bewernitz, Michael; Liu, Chang-Chia; Ghacibeh, Georges

    2007-11-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common chronic neurological disorders that affects close to 50 million people worldwide. Antiepilepsy drugs (AEDs), the main stay of epilepsy treatment, control seizures in two thirds of patients only. Other therapies include the ketogenic diet, ablative surgery, hormonal treatments and neurostimulation. While other approaches to stimulation of the brain are currently in the experimental phase vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) has been approved by the FDA since July 1997 for the adjunctive treatment of intractable partial onset epilepsy with and without secondary generalization in patients twelve years of age or older. The safety and efficacy of VNS have been proven and duplicated in two subsequent double-blinded controlled studies after two pilot studies demonstrated the feasibility of VNS in man. Long term observational studies confirmed the safety of VNS and that its effectiveness is sustained over time. While AEDs influence seizure thresholds via blockade or modulation of ionic channels, inhibit excitatory neurotransmitters or enhance inhibitory neurotransmitters the exact mechanism of action of VNS is not known. Neuroimaging studies revealed that VNS increases blood flow in certain regions of the brain such as the thalamus. Chemical lesions in the rat brains showed that norepinephrine is an important link in the anticonvulsant effect of VNS. Analysis of cerebrospinal fluid obtained from patients before and after treatment with VNS showed modest decreases in excitatory neurotransmitters. Although Hammond et al. reported no effect of VNS on scalp EEG by visual analysis and Salinsky et al. found no effect of VNS on scalp EEG by spectral analysis, Kuba et al. suggested that VNS reduces interictal epileptiform activity. Further, nonlinear dynamical analysis of the electroencephalogram in the rat and man have reportedly shown predictable changes (decrease in the short term Lyapunov exponent STLmax and T-index) more than an hour prior to the

  14. Caloric stimulation

    MedlinePlus

    ... differences in temperature to diagnose damage to the acoustic nerve. This is the nerve that is involved ... This test stimulates your acoustic nerve by delivering cold or warm water or air into your ear canal. When cold water or air enters your ...

  15. The renal response to electrical stimulation of renal efferent sympathetic nerves in the anaesthetized greyhound.

    PubMed Central

    Poucher, S M; Karim, F

    1991-01-01

    1. The effect of direct electrical stimulation of the renal efferent nerves upon renal haemodynamics and function was studied in greyhounds anaesthetized with chloralose and artificially ventilated. The left kidney was neurally and vascularly isolated, and perfused with blood from one of the femoral arteries at a constant pressure of 99 +/- 1 mmHg. Renal blood flow was measured with a cannulating electromagnetic flow probe placed in the perfusion circuit, glomerular filtration rate by creatinine clearance, urinary sodium excretion by flame photometry and solute excretion by osmometry. Beta-Adrenergic receptor activation was blocked by the infusion of dl-propranolol (17 micrograms kg-1 min-1). The peripheral ends of the ligated renal nerves were stimulated at 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 Hz. 2. At 0.5 Hz frequency only osmolar excretion was significantly reduced (10.3 +/- 3.2%, P less than 0.05, n = 6). Reductions in sodium excretion (53.6 +/- 8.5%, P less than 0.01, n = 6) and water excretion (26.9 +/- 8.0%, P less than 0.05, n = 6) and further reductions of osmolar excretion (20.7 +/- 3.7%, P less than 0.01, n = 6) were observed at 1.0 Hz; however, these were observed in the absence of significant changes in renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate. Significant reductions were observed in glomerular filtration rate at 1.5 Hz (16.3 +/- 4.1%, P less than 0.02, n = 5) and in renal blood flow at 2.0 Hz (13.1 +/- 4.0%, P less than 0.05, n = 5). Further reductions in urine flow and sodium excretion were also observed at these higher frequencies. 3. These results clearly show that significant changes in renal tubular function can occur in the absence of changes in renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate when the renal nerves are stimulated electrically from a zero baseline activity up to a frequency of 1.5 Hz. Higher frequencies caused significant changes in both renal haemodynamics and function. PMID:2023113

  16. Monitoring peripheral nerve degeneration in ALS by label-free stimulated Raman scattering imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Feng; Yang, Wenlong; Mordes, Daniel A.; Wang, Jin-Yuan; Salameh, Johnny S.; Mok, Joanie; Chew, Jeannie; Sharma, Aarti; Leno-Duran, Ester; Suzuki-Uematsu, Satomi; Suzuki, Naoki; Han, Steve S.; Lu, Fa-Ke; Ji, Minbiao; Zhang, Rosanna; Liu, Yue; Strominger, Jack; Shneider, Neil A.; Petrucelli, Leonard; Xie, X. Sunney; Eggan, Kevin

    2016-10-01

    The study of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and potential interventions would be facilitated if motor axon degeneration could be more readily visualized. Here we demonstrate that stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy could be used to sensitively monitor peripheral nerve degeneration in ALS mouse models and ALS autopsy materials. Three-dimensional imaging of pre-symptomatic SOD1 mouse models and data processing by a correlation-based algorithm revealed that significant degeneration of peripheral nerves could be detected coincidentally with the earliest detectable signs of muscle denervation and preceded physiologically measurable motor function decline. We also found that peripheral degeneration was an early event in FUS as well as C9ORF72 repeat expansion models of ALS, and that serial imaging allowed long-term observation of disease progression and drug effects in living animals. Our study demonstrates that SRS imaging is a sensitive and quantitative means of measuring disease progression, greatly facilitating future studies of disease mechanisms and candidate therapeutics.

  17. C2 Nerve Field Stimulation for the Treatment of Fibromyalgia: A Prospective, Double-blind, Randomized, Controlled Cross-over Study.

    PubMed

    Plazier, Mark; Ost, Jan; Stassijns, Gaëtane; De Ridder, Dirk; Vanneste, Sven

    2015-01-01

    Fibromyalgia is a condition characterized by widespread chronic pain. Due to the high prevalence and high costs, it has a substantial burden on society. Treatment results are diverse and only help a small subset of patients. C2 nerve field stimulation, aka occipital nerve stimulation, is helpful and a minimally invasive treatment for primary headache syndromes. Small C2 pilot studies seem to be beneficial in fibromyalgia. Forty patients were implanted with a subcutaneous electrode in the C2 dermatoma as part of a prospective, double-blind, randomized, controlled cross-over study followed by an open label follow up period of 6 months. The patients underwent 2 week periods of different doses of stimulation consisting of minimal (.1 mA), subthreshold, and suprathreshold (for paresthesias) in a randomized order. Twenty seven patients received a permanent implant and 25 completed the 6 month open label follow up period. During the 6 week trial phase of the study, patients had an overall decrease of 36% on the fibromyalgia impact questionnaire (FIQ), a decrease of 33% fibromyalgia pain and improvement of 42% on the impact on daily life activities and quality. These results imply an overall improvement in the disease burden, maintained at 6 months follow up, as well as an improvement in life quality of 50%. Seventy six percent of patients were satisfied or very satisfied with their treatment. There seems to be a dose-response curve, with increasing amplitudes leading to better clinical outcomes. Subcutaneous C2 nerve field stimulation seems to offer a safe and effective treatment option for selected medically intractable patients with fibromyalgia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Evaluating the evidence: is phrenic nerve stimulation a safe and effective tool for decreasing ventilator dependence in patients with high cervical spinal cord injuries and central hypoventilation?

    PubMed

    Sieg, Emily P; Payne, Russell A; Hazard, Sprague; Rizk, Elias

    2016-06-01

    Case reports, case series and case control studies have looked at the use of phrenic nerve stimulators in the setting of high spinal cord injuries and central hypoventilation syndromes dating back to the 1980s. We evaluated the evidence related to this topic by performing a systematic review of the published literature. Search terms "phrenic nerve stimulation," "phrenic nerve and spinal cord injury," and "phrenic nerve and central hypoventilation" were entered into standard search engines in a systematic fashion. Articles were reviewed by two study authors and graded independently for class of evidence according to published guidelines. The published evidence was reviewed, and the overall body of evidence was evaluated using the grading of recommendations, assesment, development and evaluations (GRADE) criteria Balshem et al. (J Clin Epidemiol 64:401-406, 2011). Our initial search yielded 420 articles. There were no class I, II, or III studies. There were 18 relevant class IV articles. There were no discrepancies among article ratings (i.e., kappa = 1). A meta-analysis could not be performed due to the low quality of the available evidence. The overall quality of the body of evidence was evaluated using GRADE criteria and fell within the "very poor" category. The quality of the published literature for phrenic nerve stimulation is poor. Our review of the literature suggests that phrenic nerve stimulation is a safe and effective option for decreasing ventilator dependence in high spinal cord injuries and central hypoventilation; however, we are left with critical questions that provide crucial directions for future studies.

  19. Transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS) in dentistry- A review.

    PubMed

    Kasat, Vikrant; Gupta, Aditi; Ladda, Ruchi; Kathariya, Mitesh; Saluja, Harish; Farooqui, Anjum-Ara

    2014-12-01

    Transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS) is a non-pharmacological method which is widely used by medical and paramedical professionals for the management of acute and chronic pain in a variety of conditions. Similarly, it can be utilized for the management of pain during various dental procedures as well as pain due to various conditions affecting maxillofacial region. This review aims to provide an insight into clinical research evidence available for the analgesic and non analgesic uses of TENS in pediatric as well as adult patients related to the field of dentistry. Also, an attempt is made to briefly discuss history of therapeutic electricity, mechanism of action of TENS, components of TENs equipment, types, techniques of administration, advantages and contradictions of TENS. With this we hope to raise awareness among dental fraternity regarding its dental applications thereby increasing its use in dentistry. Key words:Dentistry, pain, TENS.

  20. Transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS) in dentistry- A review

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Aditi; Ladda, Ruchi; Kathariya, Mitesh; Saluja, Harish; Farooqui, Anjum-Ara

    2014-01-01

    Transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS) is a non-pharmacological method which is widely used by medical and paramedical professionals for the management of acute and chronic pain in a variety of conditions. Similarly, it can be utilized for the management of pain during various dental procedures as well as pain due to various conditions affecting maxillofacial region. This review aims to provide an insight into clinical research evidence available for the analgesic and non analgesic uses of TENS in pediatric as well as adult patients related to the field of dentistry. Also, an attempt is made to briefly discuss history of therapeutic electricity, mechanism of action of TENS, components of TENs equipment, types, techniques of administration, advantages and contradictions of TENS. With this we hope to raise awareness among dental fraternity regarding its dental applications thereby increasing its use in dentistry. Key words:Dentistry, pain, TENS. PMID:25674327

  1. Effect of Unmodulated 5-kHz Alternating Currents Versus Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation on Mechanical and Thermal Pain, Tactile Threshold, and Peripheral Nerve Conduction: A Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Crossover Trial.

    PubMed

    Avendaño-Coy, Juan; Gómez-Soriano, Julio; Goicoechea-García, Carlos; Basco-López, Julian Angel; Taylor, Julian

    2017-05-01

    To investigate the effect of unmodulated 5-kHz alternating current on mechanical pain threshold (MPT), heat pain threshold (HPT), tactile threshold (TT), and peripheral nerve conduction (PNC) compared with transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) and sham stimulation. National referral center. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover trial. Healthy volunteers (N=38). No dropouts or adverse events were reported. TENS, unmodulated 5-kHz currents, and sham stimulation were applied on the radial nerve for 20 minutes with a 24-hour washout period between them and concealed intervention allocation. Four measures were taken: before, during, and 2 after the interventions. Algometry was used to assess MPT, a Peltier thermode for HPT using the method of limits, Von Frey filaments for TT, and radial nerve compound action potential. No differences were observed on MPT, HPT, and PNC when 5-kHz current and TENS were compared. However, TT increased 56.2mN (95% confidence interval [CI], 28.8-83.6) in the TENS group compared with the 5-kHz current group during intervention. Compared with sham stimulation during intervention, MPT increased 4.7N (95% CI, 0.3-9.2) using 5-kHz current and 10.4N (95% CI, 3.5-17.3) with TENS. TT increased 17.2mN (95% CI, 4.7-29.7) with 5-kHz current and 73.4mN (95% CI, 47.5-99.2) with TENS. However, HPT increased 1.0°C (95% CI, 0.2-2.0) only with TENS. For the PNC, no differences were found among the 3 groups. Unmodulated 5-kHz current produced an increase in somatosensory thresholds that was greater than placebo but not when compared with TENS; however, participants perceived 5-kHz currents to be more comfortable and showed more habituation to them. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. [Changes in the electrical activity of the rabbit proximal colon in vivo by stimulation of the vagus and splanchnic nerves].

    PubMed

    Julé, Y

    1975-05-01

    1. Using extracellular electrodes placed on the serosa, we recorded the modifications of the electrical activity of the colonic muslce fibers caused by the stimulation of vagal and splanchnic nerve fibers. 2. Vagal stimulation produces two types of junction potentials: excitatory junction potentials (EJPs) and inhibitory junction potentials (IJPs). The IJPs are elicited by stimulation of vagal fibers which innervate intramural non-adrenergic inhibitory neurons. 3. The conduction velocity of the nerve impulse along the vagal pre-ganglionic fibers is 1.01 m/sec for excitatory fibers and 0.5. m/sec for inhibitory fibers. 4. Splanchnic fiber stimulation causes EJP disappearance, blocking transmission between preganglionic fibers and intramural excitatory neurons, and a decrease in IJP amplitude that most likely indicates a previous hyperpolarization of the smooth muscle. 5. IJP persistence during splanchnic stimulation proves that sympathetic inhibition does not modify the transmission of the vagal influx onto the non-adrenergic inhibitory neurons of the intramural plexuses. 6. Through a comparative study of proximal and distal colonic innervation, we are able to show that there is a similar organization of both regions, that is a double inhibitory innervation: an adrenergic one of a sympathetic origin, and a non adrenergic one of a parasympathetic origin.

  3. Comparison of the Effectiveness of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation and Interferential Therapy on the Upper Trapezius in Myofascial Pain Syndrome: A Randomized Controlled Study.

    PubMed

    Dissanayaka, Thusharika Dilrukshi; Pallegama, Ranjith Wasantha; Suraweera, Hilari Justus; Johnson, Mark I; Kariyawasam, Anula Padma

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and interferential therapy (IFT) both in combination with hot pack, myofascial release, active range of motion exercise, and a home exercise program on myofascial pain syndrome patients with upper trapezius myofascial trigger point. A total of 105 patients with an upper trapezius myofascial trigger point were recruited to this single-blind randomized controlled trial. Following random allocation of patients to three groups, three therapeutic regimens-control-standard care (hot pack, active range of motion exercises, myofascial release, and a home exercise program with postural advice), transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation-standard care and IFT-standard care-were administered eight times during 4 wks at regular intervals. Pain intensity and cervical range of motions (cervical extension, lateral flexion to the contralateral side, and rotation to the ipsilateral side) were measured at baseline, immediately after the first treatment, before the eighth treatment, and 1 wk after the eighth treatment. Immediate and short-term improvements were marked in the transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation group (n = 35) compared with the IFT group (n = 35) and the control group (n = 35) with respect to pain intensity and cervical range of motions (P < 0.05). The IFT group showed significant improvement on these outcome measurements than the control group did (P < 0.05). Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation with standard care facilitates recovery better than IFT does in the same combination.

  4. Adjusting Pulse Amplitude During Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation Does Not Provide Greater Hypoalgesia.

    PubMed

    Bergeron-Vézina, Kayla; Filion, Camille; Couture, Chantal; Vallée, Élisabeth; Laroche, Sarah; Léonard, Guillaume

    2018-03-01

    Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is an electrotherapeutic modality commonly used in rehabilitation to relieve pain. Adjusting pulse amplitude (intensity) during TENS treatment has been suggested to overcome nerve habituation. However, it is still unclear if this procedure leads to greater hypoalgesia. The aim of this study was to determine if the hypoalgesic effect of TENS is greater when pulse amplitude is adjusted throughout the TENS treatment session in chronic low-back pain patients. Randomized double-blind crossover study. Recruitment and assessment were conducted at the Clinique universitaire de réadaptation de l'Estrie (CURE) of the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences of the Université de Sherbrooke. Twenty-one volunteers with chronic low-back pain were enrolled and completed this investigation. Each patient received two high-frequency TENS treatments on two separate sessions: (1) with adjustment of pulse amplitude and (2) without pulse amplitude adjustment. Pain intensity and unpleasantness were assessed before, during, and after TENS application with a 10 cm visual analog scale. Both TENS conditions (with and without adjustment of intensity) decreased pain intensity and unpleasantness when compared with baseline. No difference was observed between the two stimulation conditions for both pain intensity and unpleasantness. The current results suggest that adjustment of pulse amplitude during TENS application does not provide greater hypoalgesia in individuals with chronic low-back pain. Future studies are needed to confirm these findings in other pain populations.

  5. Short-duration transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation in the postoperative period of cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Gregorini, Cristie; Cipriano Junior, Gerson; Aquino, Leticia Moraes de; Branco, João Nelson Rodrigues; Bernardelli, Graziella França

    2010-03-01

    Respiratory muscle strength has been related to the postoperative outcome of cardiac surgeries. The main documented therapeutic purpose of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is the reduction of pain, which could bring secondary benefits to the respiratory muscles and, consequently, to lung capacities and volumes. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of short-duration transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) in the reduction of pain and its possible influence on respiratory muscle strength and lung capacity and volumes of patients in the postoperative period of cardiac surgery. Twenty five patients with mean age of 59.9 +/- 10.3 years, of whom 72% were men, and homogeneous as regards weight and height, were randomly assigned to two groups. One group received therapeutic TENS (n = 13) and the other, placebo TENS (n = 12), for four hours on the third postoperative day of cardiac surgery. Pain was analyzed by means of a visual analogue scale, and of respiratory muscle strength as measured by maximum respiratory pressures and lung capacity and volumes before and after application of TENS. Short-duration TENS significantly reduced pain of patients in the postoperative period (p < 0.001). Respiratory muscle strength (p < 0.001), tidal volume (p < 0.001) and vital capacity (p < 0.05) significantly improved after therapeutic TENS, unlike in the placebo group. Short-duration TENS proved effective for the reduction of pain and improvement of respiratory muscle strength, as well as of lung volumes and capacity.

  6. Energy-optimal electrical excitation of nerve fibers.

    PubMed

    Jezernik, Saso; Morari, Manfred

    2005-04-01

    We derive, based on an analytical nerve membrane model and optimal control theory of dynamical systems, an energy-optimal stimulation current waveform for electrical excitation of nerve fibers. Optimal stimulation waveforms for nonleaky and leaky membranes are calculated. The case with a leaky membrane is a realistic case. Finally, we compare the waveforms and energies necessary for excitation of a leaky membrane in the case where the stimulation waveform is a square-wave current pulse, and in the case of energy-optimal stimulation. The optimal stimulation waveform is an exponentially rising waveform and necessitates considerably less energy to excite the nerve than a square-wave pulse (especially true for larger pulse durations). The described theoretical results can lead to drastically increased battery lifetime and/or decreased energy transmission requirements for implanted biomedical systems.

  7. Feasibility study of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS) for cancer bone pain.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Michael I; Johnson, Mark I; Brown, Sarah R; Radford, Helen; Brown, Julia M; Searle, Robert D

    2010-04-01

    This multicenter study assessed the feasibility of conducting a phase III trial of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) in patients with cancer bone pain recruited from palliative care services. Eligible patients received active and placebo TENS for 1 hour at site of pain in a randomized crossover design; median interval between applications 3 days. Responses assessed at 30 and 60 minutes included numerical and verbal ratings of pain at rest and on movement, and pain relief. Recruitment, tolerability, adverse events, and effectiveness of blinding were also evaluated. Twenty-four patients were randomised and 19 completed both applications. The intervention was well tolerated. Five patients withdrew: 3 due to deteriorating performance status, and 2 due to increased pain (1 each following active and placebo TENS). Confidence interval estimation around the differences in outcomes between active and placebo TENS suggests that TENS has the potential to decrease pain on movement more than pain on rest. Nine patients did not consider that a placebo was used; the remaining 10 correctly identified placebo TENS. Feasibility studies are important in palliative care prior to undertaking clinical trials. Our findings suggest that further work is required on recruitment strategies and refining the control arm before evaluating TENS in cancer bone pain. Cancer bone pain is common and severe, and partly mediated by hyperexcitability. Animal studies suggest that Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation can reduce hyperalgesia. This study examined the feasibility of evaluating TENS in patients with cancer bone pain in order to optimize methods before a phase III trial. Copyright 2010 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Subsurface optical stimulation of the rat prostate nerves using continuous-wave near-infrared laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tozburun, Serhat; Lagoda, Gwen A.; Burnett, Arthur L.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2012-02-01

    Successful identification and preservation of the cavernous nerves (CN), which are responsible for sexual function, during prostate cancer surgery, will require subsurface detection of the CN beneath a thin fascia layer. This study explores optical nerve stimulation (ONS) in the rat with a fascia layer placed over the CN. Two near-IR diode lasers (1455 nm and 1550 nm lasers) were used to stimulate the CN in CW mode with a 1-mm-diameter spot in 8 rats. The 1455 nm wavelength provides an optical penetration depth (OPD) of ~350 μm, while 1550 nm provides an OPD of ~1000 μm (~3 times deeper than 1455 nm and 1870 nm wavelengths previously tested). Fascia layers with thicknesses of 85 - 600 μm were placed over the CN. Successful ONS was confirmed by an intracavernous pressure (ICP) response in the rat penis at 1455 nm through fascia 110 μm thick and at 1550 nm through fascia 450 μm thick. Higher incident laser power was necessary and weaker and slower ICP responses were observed as fascia thickness was increased. Subsurface ONS of the rat CN at a depth of 450 μm using a 1550 nm laser is feasible.

  9. Sensation, mechanoreceptor, and nerve fiber function after nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Krarup, Christian; Rosén, Birgitta; Boeckstyns, Michel; Ibsen Sørensen, Allan; Lundborg, Göran; Moldovan, Mihai; Archibald, Simon J

    2017-12-01

    Sensation is essential for recovery after peripheral nerve injury. However, the relationship between sensory modalities and function of regenerated fibers is uncertain. We have investigated the relationships between touch threshold, tactile gnosis, and mechanoreceptor and sensory fiber function after nerve regeneration. Twenty-one median or ulnar nerve lesions were repaired by a collagen nerve conduit or direct suture. Quantitative sensory hand function and sensory conduction studies by near-nerve technique, including tactile stimulation of mechanoreceptors, were followed for 2 years, and results were compared to noninjured hands. At both repair methods, touch thresholds at the finger tips recovered to 81 ± 3% and tactile gnosis only to 20 ± 4% (p < 0.001) of control. The sensory nerve action potentials (SNAPs) remained dispersed and areas recovered to 23 ± 2% and the amplitudes only to 7 ± 1% (P < 0.001). The areas of SNAPs after tactile stimulation recovered to 61 ± 11% and remained slowed. Touch sensation correlated with SNAP areas (p < 0.005) and was negatively related to the prolongation of tactile latencies (p < 0.01); tactile gnosis was not related to electrophysiological parameters. The recovered function of regenerated peripheral nerve fibers and reinnervated mechanoreceptors may differentially influence recovery of sensory modalities. Touch was affected by the number and function of regenerated fibers and mechanoreceptors. In contrast, tactile gnosis depends on the input and plasticity of the central nervous system (CNS), which may explain the absence of a direct relation between electrophysiological parameters and poor recovery. Dispersed maturation of sensory nerve fibers with desynchronized inputs to the CNS also contributes to the poor recovery of tactile gnosis. Ann Neurol 2017. Ann Neurol 2017;82:940-950. © 2017 American Neurological Association.

  10. Useful Method for Intraoperative Monitoring of Facial Nerve in a Scarred Bed.

    PubMed

    Aysal, Bilge Kagan; Yapici, Abdulkerim; Bayram, Yalcin; Zor, Fatih

    2016-10-01

    Facial nerve is the main cranial nerve for the innervation of facial expression muscles. Main trunk of facial nerve passes approximately 1 to 2 cm deep to tragal pointer. In some patients, where a patient has multiple operations, fibrosis due to previous operations may change the natural anatomy and direction of the branches of facial nerve. A 22-year-old male patient had 2 operations for mandibular reconstruction after gunshot wound. During the second operation, there was a possible injury to the marginal mandibular nerve and a nerve stimulator was used intraoperatively to monitor the nerve at the tragal pointer because the excitability of the distal segments remains intact for 24 to 48 hours after nerve injuries. Thus, using a nerve stimulator at the operational site may lead to false-positive muscle movements in case of injuries. Using the nerve stimulator to stimulate the main trunk at the tragal point may help to distinguish the presence of possible injuries. A reliable method for intraoperative facial nerve monitoring in a scarred operational site was introduced in this letter.

  11. Novel Neurostimulation of Autonomic Pelvic Nerves Overcomes Bladder-Sphincter Dyssynergia

    PubMed Central

    Peh, Wendy Yen Xian; Mogan, Roshini; Thow, Xin Yuan; Chua, Soo Min; Rusly, Astrid; Thakor, Nitish V.; Yen, Shih-Cheng

    2018-01-01

    The disruption of coordination between smooth muscle contraction in the bladder and the relaxation of the external urethral sphincter (EUS) striated muscle is a common issue in dysfunctional bladders. It is a significant challenge to overcome for neuromodulation approaches to restore bladder control. Bladder-sphincter dyssynergia leads to undesirably high bladder pressures, and poor voiding outcomes, which can pose life-threatening secondary complications. Mixed pelvic nerves are potential peripheral targets for stimulation to treat dysfunctional bladders, but typical electrical stimulation of pelvic nerves activates both the parasympathetic efferent pathway to excite the bladder, as well as the sensory afferent pathway that causes unwanted sphincter contractions. Thus, a novel pelvic nerve stimulation paradigm is required. In anesthetized female rats, we combined a low frequency (10 Hz) stimulation to evoke bladder contraction, and a more proximal 20 kHz stimulation of the pelvic nerve to block afferent activation, in order to produce micturition with reduced bladder-sphincter dyssynergia. Increasing the phase width of low frequency stimulation from 150 to 300 μs alone was able to improve voiding outcome significantly. However, low frequency stimulation of pelvic nerves alone evoked short latency (19.9–20.5 ms) dyssynergic EUS responses, which were abolished with a non-reversible proximal central pelvic nerve cut. We demonstrated that a proximal 20 kHz stimulation of pelvic nerves generated brief onset effects at lower current amplitudes, and was able to either partially or fully block the short latency EUS responses depending on the ratio of the blocking to stimulation current. Our results indicate that ratios >10 increased the efficacy of blocking EUS contractions. Importantly, we also demonstrated for the first time that this combined low and high frequency stimulation approach produced graded control of the bladder, while reversibly blocking afferent

  12. Pharyngeal dysesthesia in refractory complex partial epilepsy: new seizure or adverse effect of vagal nerve stimulation?

    PubMed

    Akman, Cigdem; Riviello, James J; Madsen, Joseph R; Bergin, Ann M

    2003-06-01

    Sensory symptoms are commonly seen in association with focal epilepsy, but viscerosensory auras, such as pharyngeal dysesthesias, are rarely the main clinical manifestation. With the introduction of vagal nerve stimulation (VNS) for medically refractory epilepsy, viscerosensory symptoms commonly occur as an adverse effect of VNS. Voice alterations (hoarseness or tremulousness), local neck or throat pain, and cough are the most common adverse effects seen during active stimulation (on-time). Numbness of the throat, neck, or chin, as well as a tingling sensation of the neck and throat is directly related to stimulation intensity. We present a case in which recurrent pharyngeal sensations caused a diagnostic dilemma and in which monitoring the VNS artifact during video/EEG and correlating this with clinical symptoms helped determine the etiology of the recurrent sensory symptoms.

  13. Occipital Nerve Field Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Normalizes Imbalance Between Pain Detecting and Pain Inhibitory Pathways in Fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    De Ridder, Dirk; Vanneste, Sven

    2017-04-01

    Occipital nerve field (OCF) stimulation with subcutaneously implanted electrodes is used to treat headaches, more generalized pain, and even failed back surgery syndrome via unknown mechanisms. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) can predict the efficacy of implanted electrodes. The purpose of this study is to unravel the neural mechanisms involved in global pain suppression, mediated by occipital nerve field stimulation, within the realm of fibromyalgia. Nineteen patients with fibromyalgia underwent a placebo-controlled OCF tDCS. Electroencephalograms were recorded at baseline after active and sham stimulation. In comparison with healthy controls, patients with fibromyalgia demonstrate increased dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, increased premotor/dorsolateral prefrontal cortex activity, and an imbalance between pain-detecting dorsal anterior cingulate cortex and pain-suppressing pregenual anterior cingulate cortex activity, which is normalized after active tDCS but not sham stimulation associated with increased pregenual anterior cingulate cortex activation. The imbalance improvement between the pregenual anterior cingulate cortex and the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex is related to clinical changes. An imbalance assumes these areas communicate and, indeed, abnormal functional connectivity between the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex and pregenual anterior cingulate cortex is noted to be caused by a dysfunctional effective connectivity from the pregenual anterior cingulate cortex to the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, which improves and normalizes after real tDCS but not sham tDCS. In conclusion, OCF tDCS exerts its effect via activation of the descending pain inhibitory pathway and de-activation of the salience network, both of which are abnormal in fibromyalgia.

  14. Effect of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation on Sensation Thresholds in Patients with Painful Diabetic Neuropathy: An Observational Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moharic, Metka

    2010-01-01

    Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is one of the therapies for painful neuropathy. Its analgesic mechanisms probably involve the gate control theory, the physiological block and the endogenous pain inhibitory system. The aim of the study was to determine whether TENS improves small fibre function diminished because of painful…

  15. Dynamic impact of brief electrical nerve stimulation on the neural immune axis-polarization of macrophages toward a pro-repair phenotype in demyelinated peripheral nerve.

    PubMed

    McLean, Nikki A; Verge, Valerie M K

    2016-09-01

    Demyelinating peripheral nerves are infiltrated by cells of the monocyte lineage, including macrophages, which are highly plastic, existing on a continuum from pro-inflammatory M1 to pro-repair M2 phenotypic states. Whether one can therapeutically manipulate demyelinated peripheral nerves to promote a pro-repair M2 phenotype remains to be elucidated. We previously identified brief electrical nerve stimulation (ES) as therapeutically beneficial for remyelination, benefits which include accelerated clearance of macrophages, making us theorize that ES alters the local immune response. Thus, the impact of ES on the immune microenvironment in the zone of demyelination was examined. Adult male rat tibial nerves were focally demyelinated via 1% lysophosphatidyl choline (LPC) injection. Five days later, half underwent 1 hour 20 Hz sciatic nerve ES proximal to the LPC injection site. ES had a remarkable and significant impact, shifting the macrophage phenotype from predominantly pro-inflammatory/M1 toward a predominantly pro-repair/M2 one, as evidenced by an increased incidence of expression of M2-associated phenotypic markers in identified macrophages and a decrease in M1-associated marker expression. This was discernible at 3 days post-ES (8 days post-LPC) and continued at the 5 day post-ES (10 days post-LPC) time point examined. ES also affected chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2; aka MCP-1) expression in a manner that correlated with increases and decreases in macrophage numbers observed in the demyelination zone. The data establish that briefly increasing neuronal activity favorably alters the immune microenvironment in demyelinated nerve, rapidly polarizing macrophages toward a pro-repair phenotype, a beneficial therapeutic concept that may extend to other pathologies. GLIA 2016;64:1546-1561. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Automatic Vagus Nerve Stimulation Triggered by Ictal Tachycardia: Clinical Outcomes and Device Performance--The U.S. E-37 Trial.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Robert S; Afra, Pegah; Macken, Micheal; Minecan, Daniela N; Bagić, Anto; Benbadis, Selim R; Helmers, Sandra L; Sinha, Saurabh R; Slater, Jeremy; Treiman, David; Begnaud, Jason; Raman, Pradheep; Najimipour, Bita

    2016-02-01

    The Automatic Stimulation Mode (AutoStim) feature of the Model 106 Vagus Nerve Stimulation (VNS) Therapy System stimulates the left vagus nerve on detecting tachycardia. This study evaluates performance, safety of the AutoStim feature during a 3-5-day Epilepsy Monitoring Unit (EMU) stay and long- term clinical outcomes of the device stimulating in all modes. The E-37 protocol (NCT01846741) was a prospective, unblinded, U.S. multisite study of the AspireSR(®) in subjects with drug-resistant partial onset seizures and history of ictal tachycardia. VNS Normal and Magnet Modes stimulation were present at all times except during the EMU stay. Outpatient visits at 3, 6, and 12 months tracked seizure frequency, severity, quality of life, and adverse events. Twenty implanted subjects (ages 21-69) experienced 89 seizures in the EMU. 28/38 (73.7%) of complex partial and secondarily generalized seizures exhibited ≥20% increase in heart rate change. 31/89 (34.8%) of seizures were treated by Automatic Stimulation on detection; 19/31 (61.3%) seizures ended during the stimulation with a median time from stimulation onset to seizure end of 35 sec. Mean duty cycle at six-months increased from 11% to 16%. At 12 months, quality of life and seizure severity scores improved, and responder rate was 50%. Common adverse events were dysphonia (n = 7), convulsion (n = 6), and oropharyngeal pain (n = 3). The Model 106 performed as intended in the study population, was well tolerated and associated with clinical improvement from baseline. The study design did not allow determination of which factors were responsible for improvements. © 2015 The Authors. Neuromodulation: Technology at the Neural Interface published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Neuromodulation Society.

  17. Effects of peripheral sensory nerve stimulation plus task-oriented training on upper extremity function in patients with subacute stroke: a pilot randomized crossover trial.

    PubMed

    Ikuno, Koki; Kawaguchi, Saori; Kitabeppu, Shinsuke; Kitaura, Masaki; Tokuhisa, Kentaro; Morimoto, Shigeru; Matsuo, Atsushi; Shomoto, Koji

    2012-11-01

    To investigate the feasibility of peripheral sensory nerve stimulation combined with task-oriented training in patients with stroke during inpatient rehabilitation. A pilot randomized crossover trial. Two rehabilitation hospitals. Twenty-two patients with subacute stroke. Participants were randomly assigned to two groups and underwent two weeks of training in addition to conventional inpatient rehabilitation. The immediate group underwent peripheral sensory nerve stimulation combined with task-oriented training in the first week, followed by another week with task-oriented training alone. The delayed group underwent the same training in reverse order. Outcome measures were the level of fatigue and Wolf Motor Function Test. Patients were assessed at baseline, one and two weeks. All participants completed the study with no adverse events. There was no significant difference in level of fatigue between each treatment. From baseline to one week, the immediate group showed larger improvements than the delayed groups in the Wolf Motor Function Test (decrease in mean time (± SD) from 41.9 ± 16.2 seconds to 30.6 ± 11.4 seconds versus from 46.8 ± 19.4 seconds to 42.9 ± 14.7 seconds, respectively) but the difference did not reach significance after Bonferroni correction (P = 0.041). Within-group comparison showed significant improvements in the Wolf Motor Function Test mean time after the peripheral sensory nerve stimulation combined with task-oriented training periods in each group (P < 0.01). Peripheral sensory nerve stimulation is feasible in clinical settings and may enhance the effects of task-oriented training in patients with subacute stroke.

  18. Double peak sensory nerve action potentials to single stimuli in nerve conduction studies.

    PubMed

    Leote, Joao; Pereira, Pedro; Valls-Sole, Josep

    2017-05-01

    In humans, sensory nerve action potentials (SNAPs) can show 2 separate deflections, i.e., double peak potentials (DPp), which necessarily means that 1 peak is delayed with respect to the other. DPps may have various origins and be due to either physical or physiological properties. We review the nature of commonly encountered DPps in clinical practice, provide the most likely interpretations for their physiological origin, and assess their reproducibility and clinical utility. We classified the DPps into 3 categories: (1) simultaneous anodal and cathodal stimulation. (2) simultaneous recording from 2 different nerves at the same site, and (3) SNAP desynchronization. Although the recording of DPps is not a standardized neurophysiological method, their study brings interesting cues about the physiology of nerve stimulation and paves the way for clinical application of such an observation. Muscle Nerve 55: 619-625, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation Effects on Neglect: A Visual-Evoked Potential Study

    PubMed Central

    Pitzalis, Sabrina; Spinelli, Donatella; Vallar, Giuseppe; Di Russo, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    We studied the effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) in six right-brain-damaged patients with left unilateral spatial neglect (USN), using both standard clinical tests (reading, line, and letter cancelation, and line bisection), and electrophysiological measures (steady-state visual-evoked potentials, SSVEP). TENS was applied on left neck muscles for 15′, and measures were recorded before, immediately after, and 60′ after stimulation. Behavioral results showed that the stimulation temporarily improved the deficit in all patients. In cancelation tasks, omissions and performance asymmetries between the two hand-sides were reduced, as well as the rightward deviation in line bisection. Before TENS, SSVEP average latency to stimuli displayed in the left visual half-field [LVF (160 ms)] was remarkably longer than to stimuli shown in the right visual half-field [RVF (120 ms)]. Immediately after TENS, latency to LVF stimuli was 130 ms; 1 h after stimulation the effect of TENS faded, with latency returning to baseline. TENS similarly affected also the latency SSVEP of 12 healthy participants, and their line bisection performance, with effects smaller in size. The present study, first, replicates evidence concerning the positive behavioral effects of TENS on the manifestations of left USN in right-brain-damaged patients; second, it shows putatively related electrophysiological effects on the SSVEP latency. These behavioral and novel electrophysiological results are discussed in terms of specific directional effects of left somatosensory stimulation on egocentric coordinates, which in USN patients are displaced toward the side of the cerebral lesion. Showing that visual-evoked potentials latency is modulated by proprioceptive stimulation, we provide electrophysiological evidence to the effect that TENS may improve some manifestations of USN, with implications for its rehabilitation. PMID:23966919

  20. Analysis of compound action potentials elicited with specific current stimulating pulses in an isolated rat sciatic nerve.

    PubMed

    Žužek, Monika C; Rozman, Janez; Pečlin, Polona; Vrecl, Milka; Frangež, Robert

    2017-02-01

    The ability to selectively stimulate Aα, Aβ-fibers and Aδ-fibers in an isolated rat sciatic nerve (SNR) was assessed. The stimulus used was a current, biphasic pulse with a quasitrapezoidal cathodic phase and rectangular anodic phase where parameters were systematically varied: intensity of the cathodic phase (ic); width of the cathodic phase (tc); width of the cathodic exponential decay (texp) and time constant of the exponential decay (τexp). A SNR was stimulated using a pair of hook electrodes while conduction velocity (CV) and compound action potentials (CAP) were measured at two sites along the SNR using another two pairs of electrodes. Results showed that the highest CAP1 (8.5-9 mV), shall be expected when parameters of the stimulus were within the following range: ic=3.8-4 mA, tc=350-400 μs and texp=330-440 μs. Results also showed that with ascending tc and texp, CV of the corresponding superficial region of the SNR was reduced in both, conduction velocity of CAP1 and conduction velocity of CAP2. It was concluded that action potentials (APs) were activated in the Aβ-fibers and Aδ-fibers along with a slight AP inhibition in the Aβ-fibers. The obtained results, could serve as a tool for developing multi-electrode systems that potentially enable fiber-type selective stimulation of nerve fibers.

  1. Facial nerve stimulation associated with cochlear implant use following temporal bone fractures.

    PubMed

    Espahbodi, Mana; Sweeney, Alex D; Lennon, Kristen J; Wanna, George B

    2015-01-01

    To describe the incidence and management of patients with facial nerve stimulation (FNS) associated with cochlear implant (CI) use in the setting of a prior temporal bone fracture. One adult CI recipient is reported who experienced implant associated FNS with a history of a temporal bone fracture. Additionally, a literature search was performed to identify similar patients from previous descriptions of CI related FNS. Presence of FNS after implantation and ability to modify implant programming to avoid FNS. The patient in the present report experienced FNS for middle and basal electrodes during intraoperative neural response telemetry (NRT) in the absence of any surgical exposure or manipulation of the facial nerve. FNS was absent during device activation, but it recurred during follow-up programming sessions. However, additional programming has prevented further FNS during regular implant use. Four other patients with FNS after temporal bone fracture were identified from the literature, and the present case represents the one of two cases in which reprogramming allowed for implant use without FNS. CI associated FNS is uncommon in patients with a history of a temporal bone fracture, but it is likely that fracture lines provide a lower impedance pathway to the adjacent facial nerve and thus reduce the threshold for FNS. The present report suggests that, in the setting of a prior temporal bone fracture, NRT is not always a reliable predictor of FNS during implant use, and programming changes can help to mitigate FNS when it occurs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. [Neurobiology of ejaculation and orgasm disorders].

    PubMed

    Salinas Casado, J; Vírseda Chamorro, M; Samblás García, R; Esteban Fuertes, M; Aristizábal Agudelo, J M; Delgado Martín, J A; Blázquez Izquierdo, J; Resel Estévez, L

    1998-04-01

    To determine the neurologic alterations of patients with ejaculatory and orgasmic disorders. A study of the neuroandrologic profile was performed in eight patients; 6 presented an ejaculation, one premature ejaculation and one presented an orgasm. The neuroandrologic profile consisted in performing selective electromyography of the bulbocavernosus muscle, recording of the S2-S4 evoked potentials, evoked somatosensory potentials of the pudendal nerve, electromyography of the smooth cavernous muscle (SPACE), sympathetic skin response and cystometry. The sympathetic lesion was more frequent in the cases with an ejaculation (four cases; 66%); a pudendal efferent lesion was demonstrated in one case (17%) and a suprasacral lesion in one case (16%). A pudendal afferent lesion was observed in the two cases with premature ejaculation (100%). Both cases with an orgasm had a pudendal afferent lesion (100%) and one of them also presented a sympathetic lesion (50%). An ejaculation appears to be caused by sympathetic, motor pudendal or suprasacral lesion. An altered perception of genital sensations due to lesion of the afferent pudendal pathway appears to be present in premature ejaculation. An orgasm could be ascribed to an alteration of the pudendal sensibility or to the absence of ejaculation.

  3. Electrical stimulation-based renal nerve mapping exacerbates ventricular arrhythmias during acute myocardial ischaemia.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bing; Zhou, Xiaoya; Wang, Menglong; Li, Xuefei; Zhou, Liping; Meng, Guannan; Wang, Yuhong; Wang, Zhuo; Wang, Songyun; Yu, Lilei; Jiang, Hong

    2018-06-01

    Blood pressure elevation in response to transient renal nerve stimulation (RNS) has been used to determine the ablation target and endpoint of renal denervation. This study aimed to evaluate the safety of transient RNS in canines with normal or ischaemic hearts. In ten normal (Group 1) and six healed myocardial infarction (HMI) (Group 2) canines, a large-tip catheter was inserted into the left or right renal artery to perform transient RNS. The left stellate ganglion neural activity (LSGNA) and ventricular electrophysiological parameters were measured at baseline and during transient RNS. In another 20 acute myocardial infarction (AMI) canines, RNS (Group 3, n = 10) or sham RNS (Group 4, n = 10) was intermittently (1 min ON and 4 min OFF) performed for 1 h following AMI induction. The LSGNA and AMI-induced ventricular arrhythmias were analysed. In normal and HMI canines, although transient RNS significantly increased the LSGNA and facilitated the action potential duration (APD) alternans, it did not induce any ventricular arrhythmias and did not change the ventricular effective refractory period, APD or maximum slope of the APD restitution curve. In AMI canines, transient RNS significantly exacerbated LSG activation and promoted the incidence of ventricular arrhythmias. Transient RNS did not increase the risk of ventricular arrhythmias in normal or HMI hearts, but it significantly promoted the occurrence of ventricular arrhythmias in AMI hearts. Therefore, electrical stimulation-based renal nerve mapping may be unsafe in AMI patients and in patients with a high risk for malignant ventricular arrhythmias.

  4. Electrical stimulation of paralyzed vibrissal muscles reduces endplate reinnervation and does not promote motor recovery after facial nerve repair in rats.

    PubMed

    Sinis, Nektarios; Horn, Frauke; Genchev, Borislav; Skouras, Emmanouil; Merkel, Daniel; Angelova, Srebrina K; Kaidoglou, Katerina; Michael, Joern; Pavlov, Stoyan; Igelmund, Peter; Schaller, Hans-Eberhard; Irintchev, Andrey; Dunlop, Sarah A; Angelov, Doychin N

    2009-10-01

    The outcome of peripheral nerve injuries requiring surgical repair is poor. Recent work has suggested that electrical stimulation (ES) of denervated muscles could be beneficial. Here we tested whether ES has a positive influence on functional recovery after injury and surgical repair of the facial nerve. Outcomes at 2 months were compared to animals receiving sham stimulation (SS). Starting on the first day after end-to-end suture (facial-facial anastomosis), electrical stimulation (square 0.1 ms pulses at 5 Hz at an ex tempore established threshold amplitude of between 3.0 and 5.0V) was delivered to the vibrissal muscles for 5 min a day, 3 times a week. Restoration of vibrissal motor performance following ES or SS was evaluated using the video-based motion analysis and correlated with the degree of collateral axonal branching at the lesion site, the number of motor endplates in the target musculature and the quality of their reinnervation, i.e. the degree of mono- versus poly-innervation. Neither protocol reduced collateral branching. ES did not improve functional outcome, but rather reduced the number of innervated motor endplates to approximately one-fifth of normal values and failed to reduce the proportion of poly-innervated motor endplates. We conclude that ES is not beneficial for recovery of whisker function after facial nerve repair in rats.

  5. Fixed-site high-frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation for treatment of chronic low back and lower extremity pain.

    PubMed

    Gozani, Shai N

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if fixed-site high-frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (FS-TENS) is effective in treating chronic low back and lower extremity pain. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation is widely used for treatment of chronic pain. General-purpose transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation devices are designed for stimulation anywhere on the body and often cannot be used while the user is active or sleeping. FS-TENS devices are designed for placement at a pre-determined location, which enables development of a wearable device for use over extended time periods. Study participants with chronic low back and/or lower extremity pain self-administered an FS-TENS device for 60 days. Baseline, 30-, and 60-day follow-up data were obtained through an online questionnaire. The primary outcome measure was the patient global impression of change. Pain intensity and interference were assessed using the Brief Pain Inventory. Changes in use of concomitant pain medications were evaluated with a single-item global self-rating. One hundred and thirty participants were enrolled, with 88 completing the 60-day follow-up questionnaire. Most participants (73.9%) were 50 years of age or older. At baseline, low back pain was identified by 85.3%, lower extremity pain by 71.6%, and upper extremity pain by 62.5%. Participants reported widespread pain, at baseline, with a mean of 3.4 (standard deviation 1.1) pain sites. At the 60-day follow-up, 80.7% of participants reported that their chronic pain had improved and they were classified as responders. Baseline characteristics did not differentiate non-responders from responders. There were numerical trends toward reduced pain interference with walking ability and sleep, and greater pain relief in responders. There was a large difference in use of concomitant pain medications, with 80.3% of responders reporting a reduction compared to 11.8% of non-responders. FS-TENS is a safe and effective

  6. Real time imaging of peripheral nerve vasculature using optical coherence angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasudevan, Srikanth; Kumsa, Doe; Takmakov, Pavel; Welle, Cristin G.; Hammer, Daniel X.

    2016-03-01

    The peripheral nervous system (PNS) carries bidirectional information between the central nervous system and distal organs. PNS stimulation has been widely used in medical devices for therapeutic indications, such as bladder control and seizure cessation. Investigational uses of PNS stimulation include providing sensory feedback for improved control of prosthetic limbs. While nerve safety has been well documented for stimulation parameters used in marketed devices, novel PNS stimulation devices may require alternative stimulation paradigms to achieve maximum therapeutic benefit. Improved testing paradigms to assess the safety of stimulation will expedite the development process for novel PNS stimulation devices. The objective of this research is to assess peripheral nerve vascular changes in real-time with optical coherence angiography (OCA). A 1300-nm OCA system was used to image vasculature changes in the rat sciatic nerve in the region around a surface contacting single electrode. Nerves and vasculature were imaged without stimulation for 180 minutes to quantify resting blood vessel diameter. Walking track analysis was used to assess motor function before and 6 days following experiments. There was no significant change in vessel diameter between baseline and other time points in all animals. Motor function tests indicated the experiments did not impair functionality. We also evaluated the capabilities to image the nerve during electrical stimulation in a pilot study. Combining OCA with established nerve assessment methods can be used to study the effects of electrical stimulation safety on neural and vascular tissue in the periphery.

  7. The Effect of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation of Sympathetic Ganglions and Acupuncture Points on Distal Blood Flow.

    PubMed

    Kamali, Fahimeh; Mirkhani, Hossein; Nematollahi, Ahmadreza; Heidari, Saeed; Moosavi, Elahesadat; Mohamadi, Marzieh

    2017-04-01

    Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is a widely-practiced method to increase blood flow in clinical practice. The best location for stimulation to achieve optimal blood flow has not yet been determined. We compared the effect of TENS application at sympathetic ganglions and acupuncture points on blood flow in the foot of healthy individuals. Seventy-five healthy individuals were randomly assigned to three groups. The first group received cutaneous electrical stimulation at the thoracolumbar sympathetic ganglions. The second group received stimulation at acupuncture points. The third group received stimulation in the mid-calf area as a control group. Blood flow was recorded at time zero as baseline and every 3 minutes after baseline during stimulation, with a laser Doppler flow-meter. Individuals who received sympathetic ganglion stimulation showed significantly greater blood flow than those receiving acupuncture point stimulation or those in the control group (p<0.001). Data analysis revealed that blood flow at different times during stimulation increased significantly from time zero in each group. Therefore, the application of low-frequency TENS at the thoracolumbar sympathetic ganglions was more effective in increasing peripheral blood circulation than stimulation at acupuncture points. Copyright © 2017 Medical Association of Pharmacopuncture Institute. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of long-term electrical stimulation on motor recovery and improvement of clinical residuals in patients with unresolved facial nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Targan, R S; Alon, G; Kay, S L

    2000-02-01

    This study investigated the efficacy of a pulsatile electrical current to shorten neuromuscular conduction latencies and minimize clinical residuals in patients with chronic facial nerve damage caused by Bell's palsy or acoustic neuroma excision. The study group included 12 patients (mean age 50.4 +/- 12. 3 years) with idiopathic Bell's palsy and 5 patients (mean age 45.6 +/- 10.7 years) whose facial nerves were surgically sacrificed. The mean time since the onset of paresis/paralysis was 3.7 years (range 1-7 years) and 7.2 years (range 6-9 years) for the Bell's and neuroma excision groups, respectively. Motor nerve conduction latencies, House-Brackmann facial recovery scores, and a 12-item clinical assessment of residuals were obtained 3 months before the onset of treatment, at the beginning of treatment, and after 6 months of stimulation. Patients were treated at home for periods of up to 6 hours daily for 6 months with a battery-powered stimulator. Stimulation intensity was kept at a submotor level throughout the study. Surface electrodes were secured over the most affected muscles. Groups and time factors were used in the analyses of the 3 outcome measures. No statistical differences were found between the two diagnostic groups with respect to any of the 3 outcome measures. Mean motor nerve latencies decreased by 1.13 ms (analysis of variance test, significant P = 0.0001). House-Brackmann scores were also significantly lower (Wilcoxon signed rank test, P = 0.0003) after treatment. Collective scores on the 12 clinical impairment measures decreased 28.7 +/- 8.1 points after 6 months [analysis of variance test, significant P = 0.0005). Eight patients showed more than 40% improvement, 4 better than 30%, and 5 less than 10% improvement in residuals score. These data are consistent with the notion that long-term electrical stimulation may facilitate partial reinnervation in patients with chronic facial paresis/paralysis. Additionally, residual clinical impairments

  9. Transcutaneous Nerve Stimulation for Pain Relief During Office Hysteroscopy: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Lisón, Juan F; Amer-Cuenca, Juan J; Piquer-Martí, Silvia; Benavent-Caballer, Vicente; Biviá-Roig, Gemma; Marín-Buck, Alejandro

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate the pain-relieving effect of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) during office-based hysteroscopy without sedation. We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Participants were randomly assigned to the active TENS, placebo TENS, or control group. The active TENS intervention consisted of a varying high-frequency (80-100 Hz), 400-microseconds, individually adjusted, high-intensity TENS application with two self-adhesive electrodes placed parallel to the spinal cord at the T10-L1 and S2-S4 levels. In the placebo group, participants were connected to the TENS unit but delivering no electrical stimulation. The primary outcome was self-reported pain intensity (0-100 mm) measured on a visual analog scale at several stages (entry, contact, biopsy, and residual). The minimum clinically relevant difference for the visual analog scale has been previously reported as 10 mm. Sample size was calculated to provide 80% power to show a 10-mm difference (α=0.0125) in the primary outcome. Secondary outcomes included duration of the procedure, vital parameters, vasovagal symptoms, and participant satisfaction index (0-10 rating scale). A total of 138 women (46 per group) participated in the study between January 2016 and April 2016. No differences were found between groups regarding age, weight, body mass index, parity status, menopausal status, or previous hysteroscopy status. Visual analog scale scores highlighted a decrease in pain in the active TENS group compared with the placebo group (entry: -11 mm, 95% confidence interval [CI] -17 to -5; contact: -21.9 mm, 95% CI -30 to -13.9; biopsy: -30.5 mm, 95% CI -47.1 to -13.8, P<.001). Moreover, the reduction in pain reached the minimum clinically relevant difference. Regarding satisfaction, results also revealed differences between active TENS and placebo groups (1.3, 95% CI 0.5-2.2, P=.001). Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation reduces pain and increases patient satisfaction

  10. Impact of Anesthetics on Immune Functions in a Rat Model of Vagus Nerve Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Picq, Chloé A.; Clarençon, Didier; Sinniger, Valérie E.; Bonaz, Bruno L.; Mayol, Jean-François S.

    2013-01-01

    Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) has been successfully performed in animals for the treatment of different experimental models of inflammation. The anti-inflammatory effect of VNS involves the release of acetylcholine by vagus nerve efferent fibers inhibiting pro-inflammatory cytokines (e.g. TNF-α) produced by macrophages. Moreover, it has recently been demonstrated that splenic lymphocytic populations may also be involved. As anesthetics can modulate the inflammatory response, the current study evaluated the effect of two different anesthetics, isoflurane and pentobarbital, on splenic cellular and molecular parameters in a VNS rat model. Spleens were collected for the characterization of lymphocytes sub-populations by flow cytometry and quantification of cytokines secretion after in vitro activation. Different results were observed depending on the anesthetic used. The use of isoflurane displayed a non-specific effect of VNS characterized by a decrease of most splenic lymphocytes sub-populations studied, and also led to a significantly lower TNF-α secretion by splenocytes. However, the use of pentobarbital brought to light immune modifications in non-stimulated animals that were not observed with isoflurane, and also revealed a specific effect of VNS, notably at the level of T lymphocytes’ activation. These differences between the two anesthetics could be related to the anti-inflammatory properties of isoflurane. In conclusion, pentobarbital is more adapted than isoflurane in the study of the anti-inflammatory effect of VNS on an anesthetized rat model in that it allows more accurate monitoring of subtle immunomodulatory processes. PMID:23840592

  11. Unilateral occipital nerve stimulation for bilateral occipital neuralgia: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Liu, Aijun; Jiao, Yongcheng; Ji, Huijun; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to present a case of successful relief of bilateral occipital neuralgia (ON) using unilateral occipital nerve stimulation (ONS) and to discuss the possible underlying mechanisms. We present the case of a 59-year-old female patient with severe bilateral ON treated with unilateral ONS. We systematically reviewed previous studies of ONS for ON, discussing the possible mechanisms of ONS in the relief of ON. The patient reported complete pain relief after consistent unilateral ONS during the follow-up period. The underlying mechanisms may be linked to the relationship between pain and several brain regions, including the pons, midbrain, and periaqueductal gray. ONS is an effective and safe option for treating ON. Future studies will be required to clarify the mechanisms by which unilateral occipital stimulation provided relief for bilateral neuralgia in this case.

  12. Electrophysiological Assessment of a Peptide Amphiphile Nanofiber Nerve Graft for Facial Nerve Repair.

    PubMed

    Greene, Jacqueline J; McClendon, Mark T; Stephanopoulos, Nicholas; Álvarez, Zaida; Stupp, Samuel I; Richter, Claus-Peter

    2018-04-27

    Facial nerve injury can cause severe long-term physical and psychological morbidity. There are limited repair options for an acutely transected facial nerve not amenable to primary neurorrhaphy. We hypothesize that a peptide amphiphile nanofiber neurograft may provide the nanostructure necessary to guide organized neural regeneration. Five experimental groups were compared, animals with 1) an intact nerve, 2) following resection of a nerve segment, and following resection and immediate repair with either a 3) autograft (using the resected nerve segment), 4) neurograft, or 5) empty conduit. The buccal branch of the rat facial nerve was directly stimulated with charge balanced biphasic electrical current pulses at different current amplitudes while nerve compound action potentials (nCAPs) and electromygraphic (EMG) responses were recorded. After 8 weeks, the proximal buccal branch was surgically re-exposed and electrically evoked nCAPs were recorded for groups 1-5. As expected, the intact nerves required significantly lower current amplitudes to evoke an nCAP than those repaired with the neurograft and autograft nerves. For other electrophysiologic parameters such as latency and maximum nCAP, there was no significant difference between the intact, autograft and neurograft groups. The resected group had variable responses to electrical stimulation, and the empty tube group was electrically silent. Immunohistochemical analysis and TEM confirmed myelinated neural regeneration. This study demonstrates that the neuroregenerative capability of peptide amphiphile nanofiber neurografts is similar to the current clinical gold standard method of repair and holds potential as an off-the-shelf solution for facial reanimation and potentially peripheral nerve repair. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. Long-term effect of sphincteric fatigue during bladder neurostimulation.

    PubMed

    Li, J S; Hassouna, M; Sawan, M; Duval, F; Elhilali, M M

    1995-01-01

    Commercially available stimulators lack several features, including multiple channel capability and flexible stimulation parameters. These factors limit clinical application. A new computerized electrical stimulator system was developed by our team and evaluated for its efficacy in bladder evacuation in an animal model after spinal cord transection. The system can generate a wide range of stimulation characteristics and has the feature of being a programmable multichannel pacemaker. It has enabled us to induce a reversible fatigue to the external sphincter that results in proper bladder emptying on stimulation. Using this new bladder pacemaker, 8 dogs were studied. We applied the concept of fatiguing of the external sphincter via the pudendal nerve to avoid rhizotomy. We determined the optimal stimulation parameters that can reliably empty the dog's bladder for the duration of the experiment, which lasted for 8 months. The new computerized electrical stimulation system achieved the objective of reducing bladder outlet resistance without the need for sacral rhizotomy.

  14. Use of tripolar electrodes for minimization of current spread in uncut peripheral nerve stimulation.

    PubMed

    Ohsawa, Ichiro; Inui, Koji

    2009-05-01

    The electrical stimulation of an uncut peripheral nerve requires a countermeasure to avoid the spread of current through a loop pathway formed outside the electrode array. Here the use of tripolar electrodes (TE) is proposed. By binding the two end poles, current spread through the loop pathway can theoretically be eliminated since both end poles are held equipotential. Experimentally, we tested the validity of this approach. In chloralose-urethane anesthetized rats, the left cervical vagus (LCV) was placed on TE which could function as such or as bipolar electrodes (BE) by the use of a selector switch. The spread of current to the adjacent tissues (rectus capitis muscle underlying the LCV, and the right cervical vagus (RCV) incised and translocated beside the target, LCV) was compared between TE and BE. When the stimulus intensity was increased, contraction occurred in the capitis muscle with BE, but not TE. Compound spike potentials of A fiber origin were evoked in the non-target RCV on high-intensity stimulation with BE, but not TE. Constant voltage stimulation of the LCV with TE produced bradycardia of the same magnitude as that with BE. In conclusion, constant voltage stimulation using TE can minimize current spread without changing the stimulus's effects.