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Sample records for puf9 regulates mrnas

  1. Yeast glycolytic mRNAs are differentially regulated.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, P A; Sagliocco, F A; Wood, R M; Brown, A J

    1991-01-01

    The regulation of glycolytic genes in response to carbon source in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been studied. When the relative levels of each glycolytic mRNA were compared during exponential growth on glucose or lactate, the various glycolytic mRNAs were found to be induced to differing extents by glucose. No significant differences in the stabilities of the PFK2, PGK1, PYK1, or PDC1 mRNAs during growth on glucose or lactate were observed. PYK::lacZ and PGK::lacZ fusions were integrated independently into the yeast genome at the ura3 locus. The manner in which these fusions were differentially regulated in response to carbon source was similar to that of their respective wild-type loci. Therefore, the regulation of glycolytic mRNA levels is mediated at the transcriptional level. When the mRNAs are ordered with respect to the glycolytic pathway, two peaks of maximal induction are observed at phosphofructokinase and pyruvate kinase. These enzymes (i) catalyze the two essentially irreversible steps on the pathway, (ii) are the two glycolytic enzymes that are circumvented during gluconeogenesis and hence are specific to glycolysis, and (iii) are encoded by mRNAs that we have shown previously to be coregulated at the translational level in S. cerevisiae (P. A. Moore, A. J. Bettany, and A. J. P. Brown, NATO ASI Ser. Ser. H Cell Biol. 49:421-432, 1990). This differential regulation of glycolytic mRNA levels might therefore have a significant influence upon glycolytic flux in S. cerevisiae. Images PMID:1922048

  2. Cyclic AMP stabilizes a class of developmentally regulated Dictyostelium discoideum mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Mangiarotti, G; Ceccarelli, A; Lodish, H F

    The stability of mRNA is an important facet of the regulation of protein synthesis. In mammalian cells most mRNAs have long half-lives (5-15 hours) but a substantial fraction are much less stable. There are few examples where the stability of a particular mRNA or class of mRNAs is specifically affected by environmental or developmental stimuli. Certain hormones cause specific stabilization of mRNAs species and preferential mRNA stability is important in the accumulation of globin and myosin mRNAs during the terminal stages of erythropoesis or myogenesis, respectively. Disaggregation of Dictyostelium discoideum aggregates induces the specific destabilization of a large class of developmentally regulated mRNAs; thus, this system is an excellent one in which to determine how such controls are effected. Here we show that addition of cyclic AMP to disaggregated cells specifically prevents the destabilization of these mRNAs.

  3. Growth Hormone-Regulated mRNAs and miRNAs in Chicken Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huijuan; Shao, Fang; Yu, JianFeng; Jiang, Honglin; Han, Yaoping; Gong, Daoqing; Gu, Zhiliang

    2014-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) is a key regulatory factor in animal growth, development and metabolism. Based on the expression level of the GH receptor, the chicken liver is a major target organ of GH, but the biological effects of GH on the chicken liver are not fully understood. In this work we identified mRNAs and miRNAs that are regulated by GH in primary hepatocytes from female chickens through RNA-seq, and analyzed the functional relevance of these mRNAs and miRNAs through GO enrichment analysis and miRNA target prediction. A total of 164 mRNAs were found to be differentially expressed between GH-treated and control chicken hepatocytes, of which 112 were up-regulated and 52 were down-regulated by GH. A total of 225 chicken miRNAs were identified by the RNA-Seq analysis. Among these miRNAs 16 were up-regulated and 1 miRNA was down-regulated by GH. The GH-regulated mRNAs were mainly involved in growth and metabolism. Most of the GH-upregulated or GH-downregulated miRNAs were predicted to target the GH-downregulated or GH-upregulated mRNAs, respectively, involved in lipid metabolism. This study reveals that GH regulates the expression of many mRNAs involved in metabolism in female chicken hepatocytes, which suggests that GH plays an important role in regulating liver metabolism in female chickens. The results of this study also support the hypothesis that GH regulates lipid metabolism in chicken liver in part by regulating the expression of miRNAs that target the mRNAs involved in lipid metabolism. PMID:25386791

  4. Synaptic microRNAs Coordinately Regulate Synaptic mRNAs: Perturbation by Chronic Alcohol Consumption

    PubMed Central

    Most, Dana; Leiter, Courtney; Blednov, Yuri A; Harris, R Adron; Mayfield, R Dayne

    2016-01-01

    Local translation of mRNAs in the synapse has a major role in synaptic structure and function. Chronic alcohol use causes persistent changes in synaptic mRNA expression, possibly mediated by microRNAs localized in the synapse. We profiled the transcriptome of synaptoneurosomes (SN) obtained from the amygdala of mice that consumed 20% ethanol (alcohol) in a 30-day continuous two-bottle choice test to identify the microRNAs that target alcohol-induced mRNAs. SN are membrane vesicles containing pre- and post-synaptic compartments of neurons and astroglia and are a unique model for studying the synaptic transcriptome. We previously showed that chronic alcohol regulates mRNA expression in a coordinated manner. Here, we examine microRNAs and mRNAs from the same samples to define alcohol-responsive synaptic microRNAs and their predicted interactions with targeted mRNAs. The aim of the study was to identify the microRNA–mRNA synaptic interactions that are altered by alcohol. This was accomplished by comparing the effect of alcohol in SN and total homogenate preparations from the same samples. We used a combination of unbiased bioinformatic methods (differential expression, correlation, co-expression, microRNA-mRNA target prediction, co-targeting, and cell type-specific analyses) to identify key alcohol-sensitive microRNAs. Prediction analysis showed that a subset of alcohol-responsive microRNAs was predicted to target many alcohol-responsive mRNAs, providing a bidirectional analysis for identifying microRNA–mRNA interactions. We found microRNAs and mRNAs with overlapping patterns of expression that correlated with alcohol consumption. Cell type-specific analysis revealed that a significant number of alcohol-responsive mRNAs and microRNAs were unique to glutamate neurons and were predicted to target each other. Chronic alcohol consumption appears to perturb the coordinated microRNA regulation of mRNAs in SN, a mechanism that may explain the aberrations in synaptic

  5. Synaptic microRNAs Coordinately Regulate Synaptic mRNAs: Perturbation by Chronic Alcohol Consumption.

    PubMed

    Most, Dana; Leiter, Courtney; Blednov, Yuri A; Harris, R Adron; Mayfield, R Dayne

    2016-01-01

    Local translation of mRNAs in the synapse has a major role in synaptic structure and function. Chronic alcohol use causes persistent changes in synaptic mRNA expression, possibly mediated by microRNAs localized in the synapse. We profiled the transcriptome of synaptoneurosomes (SN) obtained from the amygdala of mice that consumed 20% ethanol (alcohol) in a 30-day continuous two-bottle choice test to identify the microRNAs that target alcohol-induced mRNAs. SN are membrane vesicles containing pre- and post-synaptic compartments of neurons and astroglia and are a unique model for studying the synaptic transcriptome. We previously showed that chronic alcohol regulates mRNA expression in a coordinated manner. Here, we examine microRNAs and mRNAs from the same samples to define alcohol-responsive synaptic microRNAs and their predicted interactions with targeted mRNAs. The aim of the study was to identify the microRNA-mRNA synaptic interactions that are altered by alcohol. This was accomplished by comparing the effect of alcohol in SN and total homogenate preparations from the same samples. We used a combination of unbiased bioinformatic methods (differential expression, correlation, co-expression, microRNA-mRNA target prediction, co-targeting, and cell type-specific analyses) to identify key alcohol-sensitive microRNAs. Prediction analysis showed that a subset of alcohol-responsive microRNAs was predicted to target many alcohol-responsive mRNAs, providing a bidirectional analysis for identifying microRNA-mRNA interactions. We found microRNAs and mRNAs with overlapping patterns of expression that correlated with alcohol consumption. Cell type-specific analysis revealed that a significant number of alcohol-responsive mRNAs and microRNAs were unique to glutamate neurons and were predicted to target each other. Chronic alcohol consumption appears to perturb the coordinated microRNA regulation of mRNAs in SN, a mechanism that may explain the aberrations in synaptic

  6. Chromatin environment, transcriptional regulation, and splicing distinguish lincRNAs and mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Melé, Marta; Mattioli, Kaia; Mallard, William; Shechner, David M.; Gerhardinger, Chiara; Rinn, John L.

    2017-01-01

    While long intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs) and mRNAs share similar biogenesis pathways, these transcript classes differ in many regards. LincRNAs are less evolutionarily conserved, less abundant, and more tissue-specific, suggesting that their pre- and post-transcriptional regulation is different from that of mRNAs. Here, we perform an in-depth characterization of the features that contribute to lincRNA regulation in multiple human cell lines. We find that lincRNA promoters are depleted of transcription factor (TF) binding sites, yet enriched for some specific factors such as GATA and FOS relative to mRNA promoters. Surprisingly, we find that H3K9me3—a histone modification typically associated with transcriptional repression—is more enriched at the promoters of active lincRNA loci than at those of active mRNAs. Moreover, H3K9me3-marked lincRNA genes are more tissue-specific. The most discriminant differences between lincRNAs and mRNAs involve splicing. LincRNAs are less efficiently spliced, which cannot be explained by differences in U1 binding or the density of exonic splicing enhancers but may be partially attributed to lower U2AF65 binding and weaker splicing-related motifs. Conversely, the stability of lincRNAs and mRNAs is similar, differing only with regard to the location of stabilizing protein binding sites. Finally, we find that certain transcriptional properties are correlated with higher evolutionary conservation in both DNA and RNA motifs and are enriched in lincRNAs that have been functionally characterized. PMID:27927715

  7. Controlling the Messenger: Regulated Translation of Maternal mRNAs in Xenopus laevis Development.

    PubMed

    Sheets, Michael D; Fox, Catherine A; Dowdle, Megan E; Blaser, Susanne Imboden; Chung, Andy; Park, Sookhee

    2017-01-01

    The selective translation of maternal mRNAs encoding cell-fate determinants drives the earliest decisions of embryogenesis that establish the vertebrate body plan. This chapter will discuss studies in Xenopus laevis that provide insights into mechanisms underlying this translational control. Xenopus has been a powerful model organism for many discoveries relevant to the translational control of maternal mRNAs because of the large size of its oocytes and eggs that allow for microinjection of molecules and the relative ease of manipulating the oocyte to egg transition (maturation) and fertilization in culture. Consequently, many key studies have focused on the expression of maternal mRNAs during the oocyte to egg transition (the meiotic cell cycle) and the rapid cell divisions immediately following fertilization. This research has made seminal contributions to our understanding of translational regulatory mechanisms, but while some of the mRNAs under consideration at these stages encode cell-fate determinants, many encode cell cycle regulatory proteins that drive these early cell cycles. In contrast, while maternal mRNAs encoding key developmental (i.e., cell-fate) regulators that function after the first cleavage stages may exploit aspects of these foundational mechanisms, studies reveal that these mRNAs must also rely on distinct and, as of yet, incompletely understood mechanisms. These findings are logical because the functions of such developmental regulatory proteins have requirements distinct from cell cycle regulators, including becoming relevant only after fertilization and then only in specific cells of the embryo. Indeed, key maternal cell-fate determinants must be made available in exquisitely precise amounts (usually low), only at specific times and in specific cells during embryogenesis. To provide an appreciation for the regulation of maternal cell-fate determinant expression, an overview of the maternal phase of Xenopus embryogenesis will be presented

  8. Differential regulation of the levels of three gap junction mRNAs in Xenopus embryos

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Xenopus mRNAs that potentially encode gap junction proteins in the oocyte and early embryo have been identified by low-stringency screening of cDNA libraries with cloned mammalian gap junction cDNAs. The levels of these mRNAs show strikingly different temporal regulation and tissue distribution. Using a nomenclature designed to stress important structural similarities of distinct gap junction gene products, the deduced polypeptides have been designated the Xenopus alpha 1 and alpha 2 gap junction proteins. The alpha 2 gap junction mRNA is a maternal transcript that disappears by the late gastrula stage. It is not detected in any organ of the adult except the ovary, and resides primarily, if not exclusively, in the oocytes and early embryos. The alpha 1 gap junction mRNA appears during organogenesis, and is detected in RNA from a wide variety of organs. It is also found in full-grown oocytes, but is rapidly degraded upon oocyte maturation, both in vivo and in vitro. The alpha 1 and alpha 2 mRNAs encode proteins with different degrees of amino acid sequence similarity to the predominant gap junction subunit of the mammalian heart (connexin 43). Together with our earlier report of a mid-embryonic (beta 1) gap junction mRNA, the results suggest that intercellular communication during oocyte growth and postfertilization development is a complex phenomenon involving the coordinated regulation of several genes. PMID:2155241

  9. Translational Regulation of Specific mRNAs Controls Feedback Inhibition and Survival during Macrophage Activation

    PubMed Central

    Schott, Johanna; Reitter, Sonja; Philipp, Janine; Haneke, Katharina; Schäfer, Heiner; Stoecklin, Georg

    2014-01-01

    For a rapid induction and efficient resolution of the inflammatory response, gene expression in cells of the immune system is tightly regulated at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level. The control of mRNA translation has emerged as an important determinant of protein levels, yet its role in macrophage activation is not well understood. We systematically analyzed the contribution of translational regulation to the early phase of the macrophage response by polysome fractionation from mouse macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Individual mRNAs whose translation is specifically regulated during macrophage activation were identified by microarray analysis. Stimulation with LPS for 1 h caused translational activation of many feedback inhibitors of the inflammatory response including NF-κB inhibitors (Nfkbid, Nfkbiz, Nr4a1, Ier3), a p38 MAPK antagonist (Dusp1) and post-transcriptional suppressors of cytokine expression (Zfp36 and Zc3h12a). Our analysis showed that their translation is repressed in resting and de-repressed in activated macrophages. Quantification of mRNA levels at a high temporal resolution by RNASeq allowed us to define groups with different expression patterns. Thereby, we were able to distinguish mRNAs whose translation is actively regulated from mRNAs whose polysomal shifts are due to changes in mRNA levels. Active up-regulation of translation was associated with a higher content in AU-rich elements (AREs). For one example, Ier3 mRNA, we show that repression in resting cells as well as de-repression after stimulation depends on the ARE. Bone-marrow derived macrophages from Ier3 knockout mice showed reduced survival upon activation, indicating that IER3 induction protects macrophages from LPS-induced cell death. Taken together, our analysis reveals that translational control during macrophage activation is important for cellular survival as well as the expression of anti-inflammatory feedback inhibitors that promote the

  10. mRNAs involved in copper homeostasis are regulated by the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay pathway depending on environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Peccarelli, Megan; Scott, Taylor D; Steele, Megan; Kebaara, Bessie W

    2016-01-01

    The nonsense-mediated mRNA decay pathway (NMD) is an mRNA degradation pathway that degrades mRNAs that prematurely terminate translation. These mRNAs include mRNAs with premature termination codons as well as many natural mRNAs. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae a number of features have been shown to target natural mRNAs to NMD. However, the extent to which natural mRNAs from the same functional group are regulated by NMD and how environmental conditions influence this regulation is not known. Here, we examined mRNAs involved in copper homeostasis and are predicted to be sensitive to NMD. We found that the majority of these mRNAs have long 3'-UTRs that could target them for degradation by NMD. Analysis of one of these mRNAs, COX19, found that the long 3'-UTR contributes to regulation of this mRNA by NMD. Furthermore, we examined an additional mRNA, MAC1 under low copper conditions. We found that low copper growth conditions affect NMD sensitivity of the MAC1 mRNA demonstrating that sensitivity to NMD can be altered by environmental conditions. MAC1 is a copper sensitive transcription factor that regulates genes involved with high affinity copper transport. Our results expand our understanding of how NMD regulates mRNAs from the same functional group and how the environment influences this regulation.

  11. Genomic Analyses of Sperm Fate Regulator Targets Reveal a Common Set of Oogenic mRNAs in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Noble, Daniel C.; Aoki, Scott T.; Ortiz, Marco A.; Kim, Kyung Won; Verheyden, Jamie M.; Kimble, Judith

    2016-01-01

    Germ cell specification as sperm or oocyte is an ancient cell fate decision, but its molecular regulation is poorly understood. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the FOG-1 and FOG-3 proteins behave genetically as terminal regulators of sperm fate specification. Both are homologous to well-established RNA regulators, suggesting that FOG-1 and FOG-3 specify the sperm fate post-transcriptionally. We predicted that FOG-1 and FOG-3, as terminal regulators of the sperm fate, might regulate a battery of gamete-specific differentiation genes. Here we test that prediction by exploring on a genomic scale the messenger RNAs (mRNAs) associated with FOG-1 and FOG-3. Immunoprecipitation of the proteins and their associated mRNAs from spermatogenic germlines identifies 81 FOG-1 and 722 FOG-3 putative targets. Importantly, almost all FOG-1 targets are also FOG-3 targets, and these common targets are strongly biased for oogenic mRNAs. The discovery of common target mRNAs suggested that FOG-1 and FOG-3 work together. Consistent with that idea, we find that FOG-1 and FOG-3 proteins co-immunoprecipitate from both intact nematodes and mammalian tissue culture cells and that they colocalize in germ cells. Taking our results together, we propose a model in which FOG-1 and FOG-3 work in a complex to repress oogenic transcripts and thereby promote the sperm fate. PMID:26564160

  12. Testosterone regulation of sex steroid-related mRNAs and dopamine-related mRNAs in adolescent male rat substantia nigra

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Increased risk of schizophrenia in adolescent males indicates that a link between the development of dopamine-related psychopathology and testosterone-driven brain changes may exist. However, contradictions as to whether testosterone increases or decreases dopamine neurotransmission are found and most studies address this in adult animals. Testosterone-dependent actions in neurons are direct via activation of androgen receptors (AR) or indirect by conversion to 17β-estradiol and activation of estrogen receptors (ER). How midbrain dopamine neurons respond to sex steroids depends on the presence of sex steroid receptor(s) and the level of steroid conversion enzymes (aromatase and 5α-reductase). We investigated whether gonadectomy and sex steroid replacement could influence dopamine levels by changing tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) protein and mRNA and/or dopamine breakdown enzyme mRNA levels [catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT) and monoamine oxygenase (MAO) A and B] in the adolescent male rat substantia nigra. We hypothesized that adolescent testosterone would regulate sex steroid signaling through regulation of ER and AR mRNAs and through modulation of aromatase and 5α-reductase mRNA levels. Results We find ERα and AR in midbrain dopamine neurons in adolescent male rats, indicating that dopamine neurons are poised to respond to circulating sex steroids. We report that androgens (T and DHT) increase TH protein and increase COMT, MAOA and MAOB mRNAs in the adolescent male rat substantia nigra. We report that all three sex steroids increase AR mRNA. Differential action on ER pathways, with ERα mRNA down-regulation and ERβ mRNA up-regulation by testosterone was found. 5α reductase-1 mRNA was increased by AR activation, and aromatase mRNA was decreased by gonadectomy. Conclusions We conclude that increased testosterone at adolescence can shift the balance of sex steroid signaling to favor androgenic responses through promoting conversion of T to DHT and

  13. shot regulates the microtubule reorganization required for localization of axis-determining mRNAs during oogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jiyeon; Lee, Sujung; Chen, Cheng; Shim, Hyeran; Kim-Ha, Jeongsil

    2016-02-01

    The Drosophila mid-oogenesis stages are notable as the time when most maternal mRNAs become localized at discrete regions of the oocyte. Microtubule rearrangement occurs during this period and is critical for the localization of axis-determining maternal mRNAs. We have identified shot as a key player in establishing the cytoskeletal arrangement required for the spatial localization of axis-determining maternal mRNAs. We also found that the spatial distribution of the Shot protein is regulated by its mRNA localization. Our results suggest that the RNA localization mechanism is used not only for restricted accumulation of patterning molecules but also for the microtubule organization that leads to the initial development of oocyte polarity.

  14. M-phase regulation of the recruitment of mRNAs onto polysomes using the CDK1/cyclin B inhibitor aminopurvalanol.

    PubMed

    Le Breton, Magali; Bellé, Robert; Cormier, Patrick; Mulner-Lorillon, Odile; Morales, Julia

    2003-07-11

    Translation under the control of the universal cell cycle regulator CDK1/cyclin B was investigated during the first cell cycle in sea urchin embryos. The CDK1/cyclin B inhibitor aminopurvalanol arrested embryos at the G2/M transition. Polysomal mRNAs were purified from control and arrested embryos, and screened for specific mRNA recruitment or release at M-phase by subtractive hybridization. The polysomal repartition of clones issued from this screen was analyzed. Three specific mRNAs were selectively recruited onto polysomes at M-phase. Conversely, two other specific mRNAs were released from polysomes. The isolation of these translationally regulated mRNAs gives now important tools for insights into the regulation of protein synthesis by the cell cycle regulator CDK1-cyclin B.

  15. CRM 1-mediated degradation and agonist-induced down-regulation of beta-adrenergic receptor mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Bai, Ying; Lu, Huafei; Machida, Curtis A

    2006-10-01

    The beta1-adrenergic receptor (beta1-AR) mRNAs are post-transcriptionally regulated at the level of mRNA stability and undergo accelerated agonist-mediated degradation via interaction of its 3' untranslated region (UTR) with RNA binding proteins, including the HuR nuclear protein. In a previous report [Kirigiti et al. (2001). Mol. Pharmacol. 60:1308-1324], we examined the agonist-mediated down-regulation of the rat beta1-AR mRNAs, endogenously expressed in the rat C6 cell line and ectopically expressed in transfectant hamster DDT1MF2 and rat L6 cells. In this report, we determined that isoproterenol treatment of neonatal rat cortical neurons, an important cell type expressing beta1-ARs in the brain, results in significant decreases in beta1-AR mRNA stability, while treatment with leptomycin B, an inhibitor of the nuclear export receptor CRM 1, results in significant increases in beta1-AR mRNA stability and nuclear retention. UV-crosslinking/immunoprecipitation and glycerol gradient fractionation analyses indicate that the beta1-AR 3' UTR recognize complexes composed of HuR and multiple proteins, including CRM 1. Cell-permeable peptides containing the leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES) were used as inhibitors of CRM 1-mediated nuclear export. When DDT1MF2 transfectants were treated with isoproterenol and peptide inhibitors, only the co-addition of the NES inhibitor reversed the isoproterenol-induced reduction of beta1-AR mRNA levels. Our results suggest that CRM 1-dependent NES-mediated mechanisms influence the degradation and agonist-mediated down-regulation of the beta1-AR mRNAs.

  16. Endogenous microRNAs in human microvascular endothelial cells regulate mRNAs encoded by hypertension-related genes.

    PubMed

    Kriegel, Alison J; Baker, Maria Angeles; Liu, Yong; Liu, Pengyuan; Cowley, Allen W; Liang, Mingyu

    2015-10-01

    The goal of this study was to systematically identify endogenous microRNAs (miRNAs) in endothelial cells that regulate mRNAs encoded by genes relevant to hypertension. Small RNA deep sequencing was performed in cultured human microvascular endothelial cells. Of the 50 most abundant miRNAs identified, 30 had predicted target mRNAs encoded by genes with known involvement in hypertension or blood pressure regulation. The cells were transfected with anti-miR oligonucleotides to inhibit each of the 30 miRNAs and the mRNA abundance of predicted targets was examined. Of 95 miRNA-target pairs examined, the target mRNAs were significantly upregulated in 35 pairs and paradoxically downregulated in 8 pairs. The result indicated significant suppression of the abundance of mRNA encoded by ADM by endogenous miR-181a-5p, ATP2B1 by the miR-27 family, FURIN by miR-125a-5p, FGF5 by the let-7 family, GOSR2 by miR-27a-3p, JAG1 by miR-21-5p, SH2B3 by miR-30a-5p, miR-98, miR-181a-5p, and the miR-125 family, TBX3 by the miR-92 family, ADRA1B by miR-22-3p, ADRA2A by miR-30a-5p and miR-30e-5p, ADRA2B by miR-30e-5p, ADRB1 by the let-7 family and miR-98, EDNRB by the miR-92 family, and NOX4 by the miR-92 family, miR-100-5p, and miR-99b-5p (n=3-9; P<0.05 versus scrambled anti-miR). Treatment with anti-miR-21 decreased blood pressure in mice fed a 4% NaCl diet. Inhibition of the miRNAs targeting NOX4 mRNA increased H2O2 release from endothelial cells. The findings indicate widespread, tonic control of mRNAs encoded by genes relevant to blood pressure regulation by endothelial miRNAs and provide a novel and uniquely informative basis for studying the role of miRNAs in hypertension.

  17. A 5′ cytosine binding pocket in Puf3p specifies regulation of mitochondrial mRNAs

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Deyu; Stumpf, Craig R.; Krahn, Joseph M.; Wickens, Marvin; Tanaka Hall, Traci M.

    2010-11-03

    A single regulatory protein can control the fate of many mRNAs with related functions. The Puf3 protein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is exemplary, as it binds and regulates more than 100 mRNAs that encode proteins with mitochondrial function. Here we elucidate the structural basis of that specificity. To do so, we explore the crystal structures of Puf3p complexes with 2 cognate RNAs. The key determinant of Puf3p specificity is an unusual interaction between a distinctive pocket of the protein with an RNA base outside the 'core' PUF-binding site. That interaction dramatically affects binding affinity in vitro and is required for regulation in vivo. The Puf3p structures, combined with those of Puf4p in the same organism, illuminate the structural basis of natural PUF-RNA networks. Yeast Puf3p binds its own RNAs because they possess a -2C and is excluded from those of Puf4p which contain an additional nucleotide in the core-binding site.

  18. Differential Accumulation of Sunflower Tetraubiquitin mRNAs during Zygotic Embryogenesis and Developmental Regulation of Their Heat-Shock Response.

    PubMed Central

    Almoguera, C.; Coca, M. A.; Jordano, J.

    1995-01-01

    We have isolated and sequenced Ha UbiS, a cDNA for a dry-seed-stored mRNA that encodes tetraubiquitin. We have observed differential accumulation of tetraubiquitin mRNAs during sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) zygotic embryogenesis. These mRNAs were up-regulated during late embryogenesis and reached higher prevalence in the dry seed, where they were found to be associated mainly with provascular tissue. UbiS mRNA, as confirmed by Rnase A protection experiments, accumulated also in response to heat shock, but only in leaves and later during postgerminative development. These novel observations demonstrate expression during seed maturation of specific plant polyubiquitin transcripts and developmental regulation of their heat-shock response. Using ubiquitin antibodies we also detected discrete, seed-specific proteins with distinct temporal expression patterns during zygotic embryogenesis. Some of these patterns were concurrent with UbiS mRNA accumulation in seeds. The most abundant ubiquitin-reacting proteins found in mature seeds were small (16-22 kD) and acidic (isoelectric points of 6.1-7.4). Possible functional implications for UbiS expression elicited from these observations are discussed. PMID:12228401

  19. Registered report: A coding-independent function of gene and pseudogene mRNAs regulates tumour biology.

    PubMed

    Cowley, Dale; Pandya, Kumar; Khan, Israr; Kerwin, John; Owen, Kate; Griner, Erin

    2015-09-03

    The Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology seeks to address growing concerns about reproducibility in scientific research by conducting replications of selected experiments from a number of high-profile papers in the field of cancer biology. The papers, which were published between 2010 and 2012, were selected on the basis of citations and Altmetric scores (Errington et al., 2014). This Registered report describes the proposed replication plan of key experiments from 'A coding-independent function of gene and pseudogene mRNAs regulates tumour biology' by Poliseno et al. (2010), published in Nature in 2010. The key experiments to be replicated are reported in Figures 1D, 2F-H, and 4A. In these experiments, Poliseno and colleagues report microRNAs miR-19b and miR-20a transcriptionally suppress both PTEN and PTENP1 in prostate cancer cells (Figure 1D; Poliseno et al., 2010). Decreased expression of PTEN and/or PTENP1 resulted in downregulated PTEN protein levels (Figure 2H), downregulation of both mRNAs (Figure 2G), and increased tumor cell proliferation (Figure 2F; Poliseno et al., 2010). Furthermore, overexpression of the PTEN 3' UTR enhanced PTENP1 mRNA abundance limiting tumor cell proliferation, providing additional evidence for the co-regulation of PTEN and PTENP1 (Figure 4A; Poliseno et al., 2010). The Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology is collaboration between the Center for Open Science and Science Exchange, and the results of the replications will be published in eLife.

  20. Transcriptional regulation of coordinate changes in flagellar mRNAs during differentiation of Naegleria gruberi amoebae into flagellates

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.H.; Walsh, C.J.

    1988-06-01

    The nuclear run-on technique was used to measure the rate of transcription of flagellar genes during the differentiation of Naegleria gruberi amebae into flagellates. Synthesis of mRNAs for the axonemal proteins ..cap alpha..- and BETA-tubulin and flagellar calmodulin, as well as a coordinately regulated poly(A)/sup +/ RNA that codes for an unidentified protein, showed transient increases averaging 22-fold. The rate of synthesis of two poly(A)/sup +/ RNAs common to ameobae and flagellates was low until the transcription of the flagellar genes began to decline, at which time synthesis of the RNAs found in ameobae increased 3- to 10-fold. The observed changes in the rate of transcription can account quantitatively for the 20-fold increase in flagellar mRNA concentration during the differentiation. The data for the flagellar calmodulin gene demonstrate transcriptional regulation for a nontubulin axonemal protein. The data also demonstrate at least two programs of transcriptional regulation during the differentiation and raise the intriguing possibility that some significant fraction of the nearly 200 different proteins of the flagellar axoneme is transcriptionally regulated during the 1 h it takes N. gruberi amebae to form visible flagella.

  1. Regulation of RNA-binding proteins affinity to export receptors enables the nuclear basket proteins to distinguish and retain aberrant mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Soheilypour, M.; Mofrad, M. R. K.

    2016-01-01

    Export of messenger ribonucleic acids (mRNAs) into the cytoplasm is a fundamental step in gene regulation processes, which is meticulously quality controlled by highly efficient mechanisms in eukaryotic cells. Yet, it remains unclear how the aberrant mRNAs are recognized and retained inside the nucleus. Using a new modelling approach for complex systems, namely the agent-based modelling (ABM) approach, we develop a minimal model of the mRNA quality control (QC) mechanism. Our results demonstrate that regulation of the affinity of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) to export receptors along with the weak interaction between the nuclear basket protein (Mlp1 or Tpr) and RBPs are the minimum requirements to distinguish and retain aberrant mRNAs. Our results show that the affinity between Tpr and RBPs is optimized to maximize the retention of aberrant mRNAs. In addition, we demonstrate how the length of mRNA affects the QC process. Since longer mRNAs spend more time in the nuclear basket to form a compact conformation and initiate their export, nuclear basket proteins could more easily capture and retain them inside the nucleus. PMID:27805000

  2. The STAR protein QKI-7 recruits PAPD4 to regulate post-transcriptional polyadenylation of target mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Yamagishi, Ryota; Tsusaka, Takeshi; Mitsunaga, Hiroko; Maehata, Takaharu; Hoshino, Shin-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence has demonstrated that regulating the length of the poly(A) tail on an mRNA is an efficient means of controlling gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. In early development, transcription is silenced and gene expression is primarily regulated by cytoplasmic polyadenylation. In somatic cells, considerable progress has been made toward understanding the mechanisms of negative regulation by deadenylation. However, positive regulation through elongation of the poly(A) tail has not been widely studied due to the difficulty in distinguishing whether any observed increase in length is due to the synthesis of new mRNA, reduced deadenylation or cytoplasmic polyadenylation. Here, we overcame this barrier by developing a method for transcriptional pulse-chase analysis under conditions where deadenylases are suppressed. This strategy was used to show that a member of the Star family of RNA binding proteins, QKI, promotes polyadenylation when tethered to a reporter mRNA. Although multiple RNA binding proteins have been implicated in cytoplasmic polyadenylation during early development, previously only CPEB was known to function in this capacity in somatic cells. Importantly, we show that only the cytoplasmic isoform QKI-7 promotes poly(A) tail extension, and that it does so by recruiting the non-canonical poly(A) polymerase PAPD4 through its unique carboxyl-terminal region. We further show that QKI-7 specifically promotes polyadenylation and translation of three natural target mRNAs (hnRNPA1, p27kip1 and β-catenin) in a manner that is dependent on the QKI response element. An anti-mitogenic signal that induces cell cycle arrest at G1 phase elicits polyadenylation and translation of p27kip1 mRNA via QKI and PAPD4. Taken together, our findings provide significant new insight into a general mechanism for positive regulation of gene expression by post-transcriptional polyadenylation in somatic cells. PMID:26926106

  3. Regulation of mRNAs encoding the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein and cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme in the elasmobranch interrenal gland.

    PubMed

    Evans, Andrew N; Nunez, B Scott

    2010-08-01

    The rate-limiting and regulated step in steroidogenesis, the conversion of cholesterol to pregnenolone, is facilitated by the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) and cytochrome P450 cholesterol side-chain cleavage (P450scc). We have isolated cDNAs encoding StAR and P450scc from the Atlantic stingray, Dasyatis sabina, and characterized the steroidogenic activity of the encoded proteins using a heterologous expression system. Green monkey kidney (COS-1) cells cotransfected with D. sabina StAR and human P450scc/adrenodoxin reductase/adrenodoxin fusion (F2) constructs produced significantly more pregnenolone than cells transfected with the F2 construct alone. COS-1 cells transfected with a modified F2 construct (F2DS) in which human P450scc is replaced by D. sabina P450scc had higher rates than cells transfected with D. sabina P450scc alone. In other vertebrates, the stress peptide adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) elicits its effects on corticosteroidogenesis in part through regulation of StAR and P450scc mRNAs. In vitro incubation of D. sabina interrenal tissue with porcine ACTH significantly increased intracellular cAMP and corticosteroid production. As demonstrated by quantitative PCR, ACTH also induced significant increases in mRNA abundance of both StAR and P450scc. Our results suggest that, as in higher vertebrates, chronic ACTH-induced glucocorticoid synthesis in elasmobranchs is mediated by regulation of primary steroidogenic mRNAs. This study is the first to demonstrate steroidogenic activity of an elasmobranch P450scc protein and express a composite elasmobranch steroidogenic pathway in a heterologous cell line. Also, the regulation of StAR and P450scc mRNAs has not previously been demonstrated in elasmobranch fishes.

  4. CELF4 Regulates Translation and Local Abundance of a Vast Set of mRNAs, Including Genes Associated with Regulation of Synaptic Function

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wenzhi; Mahaffey, Connie L.; Curk, Tomaž; Rot, Gregor; Ule, Jernej; Frankel, Wayne N.

    2012-01-01

    RNA–binding proteins have emerged as causal agents of complex neurological diseases. Mice deficient for neuronal RNA–binding protein CELF4 have a complex neurological disorder with epilepsy as a prominent feature. Human CELF4 has recently been associated with clinical features similar to those seen in mutant mice. CELF4 is expressed primarily in excitatory neurons, including large pyramidal cells of the cerebral cortex and hippocampus, and it regulates excitatory but not inhibitory neurotransmission. We examined mechanisms underlying neuronal hyperexcitability in Celf4 mutants by identifying CELF4 target mRNAs and assessing their fate in the absence of CELF4 in view of their known functions. CELF4 binds to at least 15%–20% of the transcriptome, with striking specificity for the mRNA 3′ untranslated region. CELF4 mRNA targets encode a variety of proteins, many of which are well established in neuron development and function. While the overall abundance of these mRNA targets is often dysregulated in Celf4 deficient mice, the actual expression changes are modest at the steady-state level. In contrast, by examining the transcriptome of polysome fractions and the mRNA distribution along the neuronal cell body-neuropil axis, we found that CELF4 is critical for maintaining mRNA stability and availability for translation. Among biological processes associated with CELF4 targets that accumulate in neuropil of mutants, regulation of synaptic plasticity and transmission are the most prominent. Together with a related study of the impact of CELF4 loss on sodium channel Nav1.6 function, we suggest that CELF4 deficiency leads to abnormal neuronal function by combining a specific effect on neuronal excitation with a general impairment of synaptic transmission. These results also expand our understanding of the vital roles RNA–binding proteins play in regulating and shaping the activity of neural circuits. PMID:23209433

  5. Post-transcriptional regulation of cytokine genes in fish: A role for conserved AU-rich elements located in the 3'-untranslated region of their mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Roca, Francisco J; Cayuela, María L; Secombes, Chris J; Meseguer, José; Mulero, Victoriano

    2007-01-01

    The overproduction of cytokines, such us interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha), contributes to the pathological complications observed in many inflammatory diseases caused by bacterial endotoxins. The synthesis of these cytokines is tightly regulated at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression depends on specific cis-acting sequences and trans-acting factors. Thus, the presence of adenylate- and uridylate-rich (AU-rich) elements (AREs) has been described in the 3'-untranslated regions (UTRs) of many unstable mammalian mRNAs. Although, it represents the most widespread, phylogenetically conserved and efficient determinant of mRNA stability among those so far characterized in mammalian cells, no studies are available on the functional relevance of this sequence in non-mammalian vertebrates. In this contribution, we study the enzymatic activity of various luciferase reporter constructs, containing or lacking the 3'UTR of IL-1beta and TNFalpha from different fish species, and report the finding that bony fish AREs are able to decrease luciferase activity but are less potent than their mammalian counterparts. Surprisingly, the 3'UTR of the IL-1beta from the cartilaginous fish small spotted catshark had the greatest ability to decrease luciferase activity. Lastly, the functional significance of the above was confirmed by measuring the half-life of IL-1beta and TNFalpha mRNAs in gilthead seabream leukocytes by blocking transcription with actinomycin D. Both cytokine mRNAs were unstable with an estimated half-life of about 45 min in control and activated cells.

  6. Repeated Exposure to D-Amphetamine Decreases Global Protein Synthesis and Regulates the Translation of a Subset of mRNAs in the Striatum

    PubMed Central

    Biever, Anne; Boubaker-Vitre, Jihane; Cutando, Laura; Gracia-Rubio, Irene; Costa-Mattioli, Mauro; Puighermanal, Emma; Valjent, Emmanuel

    2017-01-01

    Repeated psychostimulant exposure induces persistent gene expression modifications that contribute to enduring changes in striatal GABAergic spiny projecting neurons (SPNs). However, it remains unclear whether changes in the control of mRNA translation are required for the establishment of these durable modifications. Here we report that repeated exposure to D-amphetamine decreases global striatal mRNA translation. This effect is paralleled by an enhanced phosphorylation of the translation factors, eIF2α and eEF2, and by the concomitant increased translation of a subset of mRNAs, among which the mRNA encoding for the activity regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein, also known as activity regulated gene 3.1 (Arc/Arg3.1). The enrichment of Arc/Arg3.1 mRNA in the polysomal fraction is accompanied by a robust increase of Arc/Arg3.1 protein levels within the striatum. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed that this increase occurred preferentially in D1R-expressing SPNs localized in striosome compartments. Our results suggest that the decreased global protein synthesis following repeated exposure to D-amphetamine favors the translation of a specific subset of mRNAs in the striatum. PMID:28119566

  7. The expression of insulin and insulin receptor mRNAs is regulated by nutritional state and glucose in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Caruso, Michael A; Sheridan, Mark A

    2012-01-15

    Many species of fish, including rainbow trout, possess multiple INS- and IR-encoding mRNAs. In this study, rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were used as a model to study the regulation of INS (INS1, INS2) and IR (IR1, IR2, IR3, and IR4) mRNA expression by nutritional state and glucose. In the nutritional state study, fish were either fed continuously, fasted (4 or 6 weeks), or fasted 4 weeks, then refed for 2 weeks. Nutritional state regulated INS and IR mRNA expression in a subtype- and tissue-specific manner. A 4-week fast reduced INS1 expression in endocrine pancreas (Brockmann body) and of INS1 and INS2 in brain, whereas a 6-week fast reduced the expression of both INS1 and INS2 in pancreas but only of INS1 in brain. Refeeding only restored INS2 levels in pancreas. In adipose tissue, by contrast, a 4-week fast increased INS1 expression, and a 6-week fast increased the expression of both INS1 and INS2. Nutritional state also modulated the pattern of IR mRNA expression. Fasting for 4 weeks resulted in no significant change in IR expression. Prolonged fasting (6 weeks) increased the expression of IR4 mRNA in the pancreas, adipose tissue, cardiac muscle, and gill; however, fasting decreased expression of IR3 mRNA in liver. Refeeding restored fasting-associated increases in IR4 expression in pancreas, adipose tissue, cardiac muscle, and gill, but had no effect on the fasting-associated decrease in IR3 expression in liver. Glucose differentially regulated the expression of INS and IR mRNAs in Brockmann bodies and liver pieces incubated in vitro, respectively. Low glucose (1 mM) reduced pancreatic expression of both INS1 and INS2 mRNAs compared to levels observed at 4 or 10 mM glucose. In the liver, IR1 and IR2 mRNA expression was insensitive to glucose concentration, whereas expression of IR3 and IR4 was attenuated at 1 and 10 mM compared to 4 mM glucose. These findings indicate that the pattern of INS and IR expression in selected tissues is regulated by

  8. The novel poly(A) polymerase Star-PAP is a signal-regulated switch at the 3'-end of mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Li, Weimin; Laishram, Rakesh S; Anderson, Richard A

    2013-01-01

    The mRNA 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) modulates message stability, transport, intracellular location and translation. We have discovered a novel nuclear poly(A) polymerase termed Star-PAP (nuclear speckle targeted PIPKIα regulated-poly(A) polymerase) that couples with the transcriptional machinery and is regulated by the phosphoinositide lipid messenger phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PI4,5P(2)), the central lipid in phosphoinositide signaling. PI4,5P(2) is generated primarily by type I phosphatidylinositol phosphate kinases (PIPKI). Phosphoinositides are present in the nucleus including at nuclear speckles compartments separate from known membrane structures. PIPKs regulate cellular functions by interacting with PI4,5P(2) effectors where PIPKs generate PI4,5P(2) that then modulates the activity of the associated effectors. Nuclear PIPKIα interacts with and regulates Star-PAP, and PI4,5P(2) specifically activates Star-PAP in a gene- and signaling-dependent manner. Importantly, other select signaling molecules integrated into the Star-PAP complex seem to regulate Star-PAP activities and processivities toward RNA substrates, and unique sequence elements around the Star-PAP binding sites within the 3'-UTR of target genes contribute to Star-PAP specificity for processing. Therefore, Star-PAP and its regulatory molecules form a signaling nexus at the 3'-end of target mRNAs to control the expression of select group of genes including the ones involved in stress responses.

  9. Regulation of Hypoxia-Inducible mRNAs by the von Hippel-Lindau Tumor Suppressor Protein Requires Binding to Complexes Containing Elongins B/C and Cul2

    PubMed Central

    Lonergan, Kim M.; Iliopoulos, Othon; Ohh, Michael; Kamura, Takumi; Conaway, Ronald C.; Conaway, Joan Weliky; Kaelin, William G.

    1998-01-01

    The von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor protein (pVHL) binds to elongins B and C and posttranscriptionally regulates the accumulation of hypoxia-inducible mRNAs under normoxic (21% O2) conditions. Here we report that pVHL binds, via elongin C, to the human homolog of the Caenorhabditis elegans Cul2 protein. Coimmunoprecipitation and chromatographic copurification data suggest that pVHL-Cul2 complexes exist in native cells. pVHL mutants that were unable to bind to complexes containing elongin C and Cul2 were likewise unable to inhibit the accumulation of hypoxia-inducible mRNAs. A model for the regulation of hypoxia-inducible mRNAs by pVHL is presented based on the apparent similarity of elongin C and Cul2 to Skp1 and Cdc53, respectively. These latter proteins form complexes that target specific proteins for ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis. PMID:9447969

  10. Endogenous short RNAs generated by Dicer 2 and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 1 regulate mRNAs in the basal fungus Mucor circinelloides

    SciTech Connect

    Grigoriev, Igor; Nicolas, Francisco; Moxon, Simon; Haro, Juan de; Calo, Silvia; Torres-Martinez, Santiago; Moulton, Vincent; Ruiz-Vazquez, Rosa; Dalmay, Tamas

    2011-09-01

    Endogenous short RNAs (esRNAs) play diverse roles in eukaryotes and usually are produced from double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) by Dicer. esRNAs are grouped into different classes based on biogenesis and function but not all classes are present in all three eukaryotic kingdoms. The esRNA register of fungi is poorly described compared to other eukaryotes and it is not clear what esRNA classes are present in this kingdom and whether they regulate the expression of protein coding genes. However, evidence that some dicer mutant fungi display altered phenotypes suggests that esRNAs play an important role in fungi. Here, we show that the basal fungus Mucor circinelloides produces new classes of esRNAs that map to exons and regulate the expression of many protein coding genes. The largest class of these exonic-siRNAs (ex-siRNAs) are generated by RNA-dependent RNA Polymerase 1 (RdRP1) and dicer-like 2 (DCL2) and target the mRNAs of protein coding genes from which they were produced. Our results expand the range of esRNAs in eukaryotes and reveal a new role for esRNAs in fungi

  11. The Shine-Dalgarno sequence of riboswitch-regulated single mRNAs shows ligand-dependent accessibility bursts

    PubMed Central

    Rinaldi, Arlie J.; Lund, Paul E.; Blanco, Mario R.; Walter, Nils G.

    2016-01-01

    In response to intracellular signals in Gram-negative bacteria, translational riboswitches—commonly embedded in messenger RNAs (mRNAs)—regulate gene expression through inhibition of translation initiation. It is generally thought that this regulation originates from occlusion of the Shine-Dalgarno (SD) sequence upon ligand binding; however, little direct evidence exists. Here we develop Single Molecule Kinetic Analysis of RNA Transient Structure (SiM-KARTS) to investigate the ligand-dependent accessibility of the SD sequence of an mRNA hosting the 7-aminomethyl-7-deazaguanine (preQ1)-sensing riboswitch. Spike train analysis reveals that individual mRNA molecules alternate between two conformational states, distinguished by ‘bursts' of probe binding associated with increased SD sequence accessibility. Addition of preQ1 decreases the lifetime of the SD's high-accessibility (bursting) state and prolongs the time between bursts. In addition, ligand-jump experiments reveal imperfect riboswitching of single mRNA molecules. Such complex ligand sensing by individual mRNA molecules rationalizes the nuanced ligand response observed during bulk mRNA translation. PMID:26781350

  12. The kinesin KIF17b and RNA-binding protein TB-RBP transport specific cAMP-responsive element modulator-regulated mRNAs in male germ cells.

    PubMed

    Chennathukuzhi, Vargheese; Morales, Carlos R; El-Alfy, Mohamed; Hecht, Norman B

    2003-12-23

    Testis brain RNA-binding protein (TB-RBP), the mouse orthologue of the human protein Translin, is a widely expressed and highly conserved protein with proposed functions in chromosomal translocations, mitotic cell division, and mRNA transport, stabilization, and storage. Targeted inactivation of TB-RBP leads to abnormalities in fertility and behavior. A testis-enriched kinesin KIF17b coimmunoprecipitates with TB-RBP in a RNA-protein complex containing specific cAMP-responsive element modulator (CREM)-regulated mRNAs. The specificity of this interaction is confirmed by in vivo RNA-protein crosslinking and transfections of hippocampal neurons. Combining in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry at the electron microscope level, a temporally sequential dissociation of KIF17b and TB-RBP from specific mRNAs is detected with TB-RBP release coincident with the time of mRNA translation, indicating a separation of the processes of transport and translation. We conclude that KIF17b serves as a molecular motor component of a TB-RBP-mouse ribonucleoprotein complex transporting a group of specific CREM-regulated mRNAs in mammalian male postmeiotic germ cells. Because KIF17b has been reported to control CREM-dependent transcription in male germ cells by regulating the intracellular location of the transcriptional coactivator activator of CREM in testis, this indicates that one kinesin links the processes of transcription and transport of specific mRNAs in mammalian male germ cells.

  13. Joint Profiling of miRNAs and mRNAs Reveals miRNA Mediated Gene Regulation in the Göttingen Minipig Obesity Model

    PubMed Central

    Alkan, Ferhat; Keinicke, Helle; Jacobsen, Mette J.; Gorodkin, Jan; Fredholm, Merete; Cirera, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Obesity and its comorbidities are an increasing challenge for both affected individuals and health care systems, worldwide. In obese individuals, perturbation of expression of both protein-coding genes and microRNAs (miRNA) are seen in obesity-relevant tissues (i.e. adipose tissue, liver and skeletal muscle). miRNAs are small non-coding RNA molecules which have important regulatory roles in a wide range of biological processes, including obesity. Rodents are widely used animal models for human diseases including obesity. However, not all research is applicable for human health or diseases. In contrast, pigs are emerging as an excellent animal model for obesity studies, due to their similarities in their metabolism, their digestive tract and their genetics, when compared to humans. The Göttingen minipig is a small sized easy-to-handle pig breed which has been extensively used for modeling human obesity, due to its capacity to develop severe obesity when fed ad libitum. The aim of this study was to identify differentially expressed of protein-coding genes and miRNAs in a Göttingen minipig obesity model. Liver, skeletal muscle and abdominal adipose tissue were sampled from 7 lean and 7 obese minipigs. Differential gene expression was investigated using high-throughput quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) on 90 mRNAs and 72 miRNAs. The results revealed de-regulation of several obesity and inflammation-relevant protein-coding genes and miRNAs in all tissues examined. Many genes that are known to be de-regulated in obese humans were confirmed in the obese minipigs and several of these genes have target sites for miRNAs expressed in the opposing direction of the gene, confirming miRNA-mediated regulation in obesity. These results confirm the translational value of the pig for human obesity studies. PMID:27902747

  14. Isolation of cucumber CsARF cDNAs and expression of the corresponding mRNAs during gravity-regulated morphogenesis of cucumber seedlings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Y.; Yamasaki, S.; Fujii, N.; Hagen, G.; Guilfoyle, T.; Takahashi, H.

    Cucumber seedlings grown in a horizontal position develop a protuberance called peg on the lower side of the transition zone between the hypocotyl and the root. We have suggested that peg formation on the upper side of the gravistimulated transition zone is suppressed because cucumber seedlings grown in a vertical position or microgravity symmetrically develop two pegs on the transition zone. Plant hormone, auxin, is considered to play a crucial role in the gravity-regulated formation of peg. We have shown that the mRNAs of auxin-inducible genes (CsIAAs) isolated from cucumber accumulate more abundantly in the lower side of the transition zone than in the upper side when peg formation initiates. To reveal the mechanism of transcriptional regulation by auxin for peg formation, we isolated five cDNAs of Auxin Response Factors (ARFs) from cucumber and compared their mRNA accumulation with those of CsIAA1 and CsIAA2. The tissue specificity of mRNA accumulation of CsARF2 was similar to those of CsIAA1 and CsIAA2. The structural character of CsARF2 predicts it is transcriptional activator. These results suggest that CsARF2 may be involved in activation of the transcription of auxin-inducible genes including CsIAA1 for peg formation. Because mRNA accumulation of five CsARFs, including CsARF2, were affected by neither gravity nor auxin, transcriptional activity of CsARF2 may be regulated at post-transcriptional level to induce asymmetric mRNA accumulation of auxin-inducible genes in the transition zone.

  15. Specific Soybean Lipoxygenases Localize to Discrete Subcellular Compartments and Their mRNAs Are Differentially Regulated by Source-Sink Status1

    PubMed Central

    Stephenson, Lowry C.; Bunker, Thomas W.; Dubbs, Wesley E.; Grimes, Howard D.

    1998-01-01

    Members of the lipoxygenase multigene family, found widely in eukaryotes, have been proposed to function in nitrogen partitioning and storage in plants. Lipoxygenase gene responses to source-sink manipulations in mature soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) leaves were examined using gene-specific riboprobes to the five vegetative lipoxygenases (vlxA–vlxE). Steady-state levels of all vlx mRNAs responded strongly to sink limitation, but specific transcripts exhibited differential patterns of response as well. During reproductive sink limitation, vlxA and vlxB messages accumulated to high levels, whereas vlxC and vlxD transcript levels were modest. Immunolocalization using peptide-specific antibodies demonstrated that under control conditions, VLXB was present in the cytosol of the paraveinal mesophyll and with pod removal accumulated additionally in the bundle-sheath and adjacent cells. With sink limitation VLXD accumulated to apparent high levels in the vacuoles of the same cells. Segregation of gene products at the cellular and subcellular levels may thus permit complex patterns of differential regulation within the same cell type. Specific lipoxygenase isoforms may have a role in short-term nitrogen storage (VLXC/D), whereas others may simultaneously function in assimilate partitioning as active enzymes (VLXA/B). PMID:9501125

  16. Translation Regulation and RNA Granule Formation after Heat Shock of Procyclic Form Trypanosoma brucei: Many Heat-Induced mRNAs Are also Increased during Differentiation to Mammalian-Infective Forms

    PubMed Central

    Minia, Igor; Merce, Clementine; Terrao, Monica

    2016-01-01

    African trypanosome procyclic forms multiply in the midgut of tsetse flies, and are routinely cultured at 27°C. Heat shocks of 37°C and above result in general inhibition of translation, and severe heat shock (41°C) results in sequestration of mRNA in granules. The mRNAs that are bound by the zinc-finger protein ZC3H11, including those encoding refolding chaperones, escape heat-induced translation inhibition. At 27°C, ZC3H11 mRNA is predominantly present as an untranslated cytosolic messenger ribonucleoprotein particle, but after heat shocks of 37°C—41°C, the ZC3H11 mRNA moves into the polysomal fraction. To investigate the scope and specificities of heat-shock translational regulation and granule formation, we analysed the distributions of mRNAs on polysomes at 27°C and after 1 hour at 39°C, and the mRNA content of 41°C heat shock granules. We found that mRNAs that bind to ZC3H11 remained in polysomes at 39°C and were protected from sequestration in granules at 41°C. As previously seen for starvation stress granules, the mRNAs that encode ribosomal proteins were excluded from heat-shock granules. 70 mRNAs moved towards the polysomal fraction after the 39°C heat shock, and 260 increased in relative abundance. Surprisingly, many of these mRNAs are also increased when trypanosomes migrate to the tsetse salivary glands. It therefore seems possible that in the wild, temperature changes due to diurnal variations and periodic intake of warm blood might influence the efficiency with which procyclic forms develop into mammalian-infective forms. PMID:27606618

  17. The CELF1 RNA-Binding Protein Regulates Decay of Signal Recognition Particle mRNAs and Limits Secretion in Mouse Myoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Joseph; Lee, Jerome E.; López, Carolina M.; Anderson, John; Nguyen, Thuy-mi P.; Heck, Adam M.; Wilusz, Jeffrey

    2017-01-01

    We previously identified several mRNAs encoding components of the secretory pathway, including signal recognition particle (SRP) subunit mRNAs, among transcripts associated with the RNA-binding protein CELF1. Through immunoprecipitation of RNAs crosslinked to CELF1 in myoblasts and in vitro binding assays using recombinant CELF1, we now provide evidence that CELF1 directly binds the mRNAs encoding each of the subunits of the SRP. Furthermore, we determined the half-lives of the Srp transcripts in control and CELF1 knockdown myoblasts. Our results indicate CELF1 is a destabilizer of at least five of the six Srp transcripts and that the relative abundance of the SRP proteins is out of balance when CELF1 is depleted. CELF1 knockdown myoblasts exhibit altered secretion of a luciferase reporter protein and are impaired in their ability to migrate and close a wound, consistent with a defect in the secreted extracellular matrix. Importantly, similar defects in wound healing are observed when SRP subunit imbalance is induced by over-expression of SRP68. Our studies support the existence of an RNA regulon containing Srp mRNAs that is controlled by CELF1. One implication is that altered function of CELF1 in myotonic dystrophy may contribute to changes in the extracellular matrix of affected muscle through defects in secretion. PMID:28129347

  18. Regulation of miR-29b-1/a transcription and identification of target mRNAs in CHO-K1 cells.

    PubMed

    Muluhngwi, Penn; Richardson, Kirsten; Napier, Joshua; Rouchka, Eric C; Mott, Justin L; Klinge, Carolyn M

    2017-03-15

    miR-29b and miR-29a transcript levels were reported to increase in exponentially growing CHO-K1 cells. Here, we examine the regulation of miR-29b-1/a in CHO-K1 cells. We observed that 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4-OHT) increased pri-miR-29b-1 and pri-miR-29a transcription in CHO-K1 cells by activating endogenous estrogen receptor α (ERα). DICER, an established, bona fide target of miR-29b-1/a, was shown to be regulated by 4-OHT in CHO-K1 cells. We showed that miR-29b-1 and miR-29a serve a repressive role in cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and colony formation in CHO-K1 cells. To identify other targets of miR-29b-1 and miR-29a, RNA sequencing was performed by transfecting cells with anti-miR-29a, which inhibits both miR-29a and miR-29b-1, pre-miR-29b-1, and/or pre-miR-29a. In silico network analysis in MetaCore™ identified common and unique putative gene targets of miR-29b-1 and miR-29a. Pathway analysis of identified putative miR-29 targets were related to cell adhesion, cytoskeletal remodeling, and development. Further inquiry revealed regulation of pathways mediating responses to growth factor stimulus and cell cycle regulation.

  19. Drosha, DGCR8, and Dicer mRNAs are down-regulated in human cells infected with dengue virus 4, and play a role in viral pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Casseb, S M M; Simith, D B; Melo, K F L; Mendonça, M H; Santos, A C M; Carvalho, V L; Cruz, A C R; Vasconcelos, P F C

    2016-05-09

    Dengue virus (DENV) and its four serotypes (DENV1-4) belong to the Flavivirus genus of the Flaviviridae family. DENV infection is a life-threatening disease, which results in up to 20,000 deaths each year. Viruses have been shown to encode trans-regulatory small RNAs, or microRNAs (miRNAs), which bind to messenger RNA and negatively regulate host or viral gene expression. During DENV infections, miRNAs interact with proteins in the RNAi pathway, and are processed by ribonucleases such as Dicer and Drosha. This study aims to investigate Drosha, DGCR8, and Dicer expression levels in human A-549 cells following DENV4 infection. DENV4 infected A-549 cells were collected daily for 5 days, and RNA was extracted to quantify viral load. Gene expression of Drosha, Dicer, and DGCR8 was determined using quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). We found that DENV4 infection exhibited the highest viral load 3 days post-infection. Dicer, Drosha, and DGCR8 showed reduced expression following DENV4 infection as compared with negative controls. In addition, we hypothesize that reduced expression of DGCR8 may not only be related to miRNA biogenesis, but also other small RNAs. This study may change our understanding regarding the relationship between host cells and the dengue virus.

  20. Temporal regulation of mRNAs for select bone morphogenetic proteins (BMP), BMP receptors and their associated SMAD proteins during bovine early embryonic development: effects of exogenous BMP2 on embryo developmental progression

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    blastocyst mRNA for CDX2 and NANOG. Conclusions Abundance of maternally derived mRNAs for above BMP system components are dynamically regulated during oocyte maturation and early embryogenesis. Exogenous BMP2 treatment does not influence progression to various developmental endpoints, but impacts characteristics of resulting blastocysts. Results support a potential role for BMPs in bovine early embryogenesis. PMID:25027287

  1. An integrated approach identifies IFN-regulated microRNAs and targeted mRNAs modulated by different HCV replicon clones

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Infections with hepatitis C virus (HCV) progress to chronic phase in 80% of patients. To date, the effect produced by HCV on the expression of microRNAs (miRs) involved in the interferon-β (IFN-β) antiviral pathway has not been explored in details. Thus, we compared the expression profile of 24 selected miRs in IFN-β-treated Huh-7 cells and in three different clones of Huh-7 cells carrying a self-replicating HCV RNA which express all viral proteins (HCV replicon system). Methods The expression profile of 24 selected miRs in IFN-β-treated Huh-7 cells and in HCV replicon 21-5 clone with respect to Huh-7 parental cells was analysed by real-time PCR. To exclude clone specific variations, the level of 16 out of 24 miRs, found to be modulated in 21-5 clone, was evaluated in two other HCV replicon clones, 22-6 and 21-7. Prediction of target genes of 3 miRs, confirmed in all HCV clones, was performed by means of miRGator program. The gene dataset obtained from microarray analysis of HCV clones was farther used to validate target prediction. Results The expression profile revealed that 16 out of 24 miRs were modulated in HCV replicon clone 21-5. Analysis in HCV replicon clones 22-6 and 21-7 indicated that 3 out of 16 miRs, (miR-128a, miR-196a and miR-142-3p) were modulated in a concerted fashion in all three HCV clones. Microarray analysis revealed that 37 out of 1981 genes, predicted targets of the 3 miRs, showed an inverse expression relationship with the corresponding miR in HCV clones, as expected for true targets. Classification of the 37 genes by Panther System indicated that the dataset contains genes involved in biological processes that sustain HCV replication and/or in pathways potentially implicated in the control of antiviral response by HCV infection. Conclusions The present findings reveal that 3 IFN-β-regulated miRs and 37 genes, which are likely their functional targets, were commonly modulated by HCV in three replicon clones. The future use

  2. Translation initiation of viral mRNAs.

    PubMed

    López-Lastra, Marcelo; Ramdohr, Pablo; Letelier, Alejandro; Vallejos, Maricarmen; Vera-Otarola, Jorge; Valiente-Echeverría, Fernando

    2010-05-01

    Viruses depend on cells for their replication but have evolved mechanisms to achieve this in an efficient and, in some instances, a cell-type-specific manner. The expression of viral proteins is frequently subject to translational control. The dominant target of such control is the initiation step of protein synthesis. Indeed, during the early stages of infection, viral mRNAs must compete with their host counterparts for the protein synthetic machinery, especially for the limited pool of eukaryotic translation initiation factors (eIFs) that mediate the recruitment of ribosomes to both viral and cellular mRNAs. To circumvent this competition viruses use diverse strategies so that ribosomes can be recruited selectively to viral mRNAs. In this review we focus on the initiation of protein synthesis and outline some of the strategies used by viruses to ensure efficient translation initiation of their mRNAs.

  3. Zebrafish MiR-430 promotes deadenylation and clearance of maternal mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Giraldez, Antonio J; Mishima, Yuichiro; Rihel, Jason; Grocock, Russell J; Van Dongen, Stijn; Inoue, Kunio; Enright, Anton J; Schier, Alexander F

    2006-04-07

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) comprise 1 to 3% of all vertebrate genes, but their in vivo functions and mechanisms of action remain largely unknown. Zebrafish miR-430 is expressed at the onset of zygotic transcription and regulates morphogenesis during early development. By using a microarray approach and in vivo target validation, we find that miR-430 directly regulates several hundred target messenger RNA molecules (mRNAs). Most targets are maternally expressed mRNAs that accumulate in the absence of miR-430. We also show that miR-430 accelerates the deadenylation of target mRNAs. These results suggest that miR-430 facilitates the deadenylation and clearance of maternal mRNAs during early embryogenesis.

  4. Different mRNAs have different nuclear transit times in Dictyostelium discoideum aggregates.

    PubMed Central

    Mangiarotti, G; Zuker, C; Chisholm, R L; Lodish, H F

    1983-01-01

    Nuclear processing of mRNA precursors in differentiating multicellular Dictyostelium discoideum aggregates is markedly slower than in growing amoebae. Thus, we have been able to determine the time of nuclear processing of individual mRNA species in postaggregating cells by following the incorporation of 32PO4 into nuclear and cytoplasmic RNA complementary to cloned cDNAs. Precursors of mRNAs synthesized during both growth and differentiation remain in the nucleus for about 25 to 60 min. By contrast, typical mRNAs which are synthesized only by postaggregative cells have nuclear processing times between 50 and 100 min. Depending on the particular mRNA, between 20 and 60% of nuclear transcripts are converted into cytoplasmic mRNA. A third class of mRNAs are transcribed from a set of repetitive DNA segments and are expressed predominantly during differentiation. Nuclear precursors of these mRNAs are extensively degraded within the nucleus or very rapidly after transport to the cytoplasm. Those sequences that are stable in the cytoplasm exit from the nucleus only after a lag of over 2 h. Thus, mRNAs encoded by different genes that are subject to different types of developmental controls display different times of transit to the cytoplasm and different efficiencies of nuclear processing. Differential nuclear processing may contribute to the regulation of the level of individual cytoplasmic mRNAs. Images PMID:6621537

  5. Translational coregulation of 5'TOP mRNAs by TIA-1 and TIAR.

    PubMed

    Damgaard, Christian Kroun; Lykke-Andersen, Jens

    2011-10-01

    The response of cells to changes in their environment often requires coregulation of gene networks, but little is known about how this can occur at the post-transcriptional level. An important example of post-transcriptional coregulation is the selective translational regulation in response to growth conditions of mammalian mRNAs that encode protein biosynthesis factors and contain hallmark 5'-terminal oligopyrimidine tracts (5'TOP). However, the responsible trans-factors and the mechanism by which they coregulate 5'TOP mRNAs have remained elusive. Here we identify stress granule-associated TIA-1 and TIAR proteins as key factors in human 5'TOP mRNA regulation, which upon amino acid starvation assemble onto the 5' end of 5'TOP mRNAs and arrest translation at the initiation step, as evidenced by TIA-1/TIAR-dependent 5'TOP mRNA translation repression, polysome release, and accumulation in stress granules. This requires starvation-mediated activation of the GCN2 (general control nonderepressible 2) kinase and inactivation of the mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) signaling pathway. Our findings provide a mechanistic explanation to the long-standing question of how the network of 5'TOP mRNAs are coregulated according to amino acid availability, thereby allowing redirection of limited resources to mount a nutrient deprivation response. This presents a fundamental example of how a group of mRNAs can be translationally coregulated in response to changes in the cellular environment.

  6. Evaluating the Stability of mRNAs and Noncoding RNAs.

    PubMed

    Ayupe, Ana Carolina; Reis, Eduardo M

    2017-01-01

    Changes in RNA stability have an important impact in the gene expression regulation. Different methods based on the transcription blockage with RNA polymerase inhibitors or metabolic labeling of newly synthesized RNAs have been developed to evaluate RNA decay rates in cultured cell. Combined with techniques to measure transcript abundance genome-wide, these methods have been used to reveal novel features of the eukaryotic transcriptome. The stability of protein-coding mRNAs is in general closely associated to the physiological function of their encoded proteins, with short-lived mRNAs being significantly enriched among regulatory genes whereas genes associated with housekeeping functions are predominantly stable. Likewise, the stability of noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) seems to reflect their functional role in the cell. Thus, investigating RNA stability can provide insights regarding the function of yet uncharacterized regulatory ncRNAs. In this chapter, we discuss the methodologies currently used to estimate RNA decay and outline an experimental protocol for genome-wide estimation of RNA stability of protein-coding and lncRNAs. This protocol details the transcriptional blockage of cultured cells with actinomycin D, followed by RNA isolation at different time points, the determination of transcript abundance by qPCR/DNA oligoarray hybridization, and the calculation of individual transcript half-lives.

  7. Systematic imaging reveals features and changing localization of mRNAs in Drosophila development.

    PubMed

    Jambor, Helena; Surendranath, Vineeth; Kalinka, Alex T; Mejstrik, Pavel; Saalfeld, Stephan; Tomancak, Pavel

    2015-04-02

    mRNA localization is critical for eukaryotic cells and affects numerous transcripts, yet how cells regulate distribution of many mRNAs to their subcellular destinations is still unknown. We combined transcriptomics and systematic imaging to determine the tissue-specific expression and subcellular distribution of 5862 mRNAs during Drosophila oogenesis. mRNA localization is widespread in the ovary and detectable in all of its cell types-the somatic epithelial, the nurse cells, and the oocyte. Genes defined by a common RNA localization share distinct gene features and differ in expression level, 3'UTR length and sequence conservation from unlocalized mRNAs. Comparison of mRNA localizations in different contexts revealed that localization of individual mRNAs changes over time in the oocyte and between ovarian and embryonic cell types. This genome scale image-based resource (Dresden Ovary Table, DOT, http://tomancak-srv1.mpi-cbg.de/DOT/main.html) enables the transition from mechanistic dissection of singular mRNA localization events towards global understanding of how mRNAs transcribed in the nucleus distribute in cells.

  8. Systematic imaging reveals features and changing localization of mRNAs in Drosophila development

    PubMed Central

    Jambor, Helena; Surendranath, Vineeth; Kalinka, Alex T; Mejstrik, Pavel; Saalfeld, Stephan; Tomancak, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    mRNA localization is critical for eukaryotic cells and affects numerous transcripts, yet how cells regulate distribution of many mRNAs to their subcellular destinations is still unknown. We combined transcriptomics and systematic imaging to determine the tissue-specific expression and subcellular distribution of 5862 mRNAs during Drosophila oogenesis. mRNA localization is widespread in the ovary and detectable in all of its cell types—the somatic epithelial, the nurse cells, and the oocyte. Genes defined by a common RNA localization share distinct gene features and differ in expression level, 3′UTR length and sequence conservation from unlocalized mRNAs. Comparison of mRNA localizations in different contexts revealed that localization of individual mRNAs changes over time in the oocyte and between ovarian and embryonic cell types. This genome scale image-based resource (Dresden Ovary Table, DOT, http://tomancak-srv1.mpi-cbg.de/DOT/main.html) enables the transition from mechanistic dissection of singular mRNA localization events towards global understanding of how mRNAs transcribed in the nucleus distribute in cells. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05003.001 PMID:25838129

  9. Cold shock protein 1 chaperones mRNAs during translation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Juntawong, Piyada; Sorenson, Reed; Bailey-Serres, Julia

    2013-06-01

    RNA binding proteins (RBPs) function post-transcriptionally to fine-tune gene regulation. Arabidopsis thaliana has four Gly-rich, zinc finger-containing RBPs called cold shock proteins 1-4 (CSP1-CSP4), that possess an evolutionary conserved cold shock domain. Here, we determined that CSP1 associates with polyribosomes (polysomes) via an RNA-mediated interaction. Both the abundance and polysomal co-fractionation of CSP1 was enhanced in the cold (4°C), but did not influence global levels of polysomes, which were minimally perturbed by above freezing cold temperatures. Using a polyclonal antiserum, CSP1 was co-immunopurified with several hundred transcripts from rosettes of plants cultivated at 23°C or transferred to 4°C for 12 h. CSP1-associated mRNAs were characterized by G+C-rich 5' untranslated regions and gene ontologies related to cellular respiration, mRNA binding and translation. The majority of the CSP1-associated mRNAs were constitutively expressed and stable in the cold. CSP1 abundance was correlated with improved translation of ribosomal protein mRNAs during cold stress and improved maintenance of homeostasis and translation of mRNAs under water-deficit stress. In summary, CSP1 selectively chaperones mRNAs, providing translational enhancement during stress.

  10. Regulation of synaptic Pumilio function by an aggregation-prone domain

    PubMed Central

    Salazar, Anna M.; Silverman, Edward J.; Menon, Kaushiki P.; Zinn, Kai

    2010-01-01

    We identified Pumilio (Pum), a Drosophila translational repressor, in a computational search for metazoan proteins whose activities might be regulated by assembly into ordered aggregates. The search algorithm was based on evolutionary sequence conservation patterns observed for yeast prion proteins, which contain aggregation-prone glutamine/asparagine (Q/N)-rich domains attached to functional domains of normal amino acid composition. We examined aggregation of Pum and its nematode ortholog PUF-9 by expression in yeast. A domain of Pum containing the Q/N-rich sequence, denoted as NQ1, the entire Pum N-terminus, and the complete PUF-9 protein localize to macroscopic aggregates (foci) in yeast. NQ1 and PUF-9 can generate the yeast Pin+ trait, which is transmitted by a heritable aggregate. NQ1 also assembles into amyloid fibrils in vitro. In Drosophila, Pum regulates postsynaptic translation at neuromuscular junctions (NMJs). To assess whether NQ1 affects synaptic Pum activity in vivo, we expressed it in muscles. We found that it negatively regulates endogenous Pum, producing gene dosage-dependent pum loss-of-function NMJ phenotypes. NQ1 coexpression also suppresses lethality and NMJ phenotypes caused by overexpression of Pum in muscles. The Q/N block of NQ1 is required for these phenotypic effects. Negative regulation of Pum by NQ1 might be explained by formation of inactive aggregates, but we have been unable to demonstrate that NQ1 aggregates in Drosophila. NQ1 could also regulate Pum by a “dominant-negative” effect, in which it would block Q/N-mediated interactions of Pum with itself or with cofactors required for translational repression. PMID:20071514

  11. Vertebrate mRNAs with a 5'-terminal pyrimidine tract are candidates for translational repression in quiescent cells: characterization of the translational cis-regulatory element.

    PubMed Central

    Avni, D; Shama, S; Loreni, F; Meyuhas, O

    1994-01-01

    The translation of mammalian ribosomal protein (rp) mRNAs is selectively repressed in nongrowing cells. This response is mediated through a regulatory element residing in the 5' untranslated region of these mRNAs and includes a 5' terminal oligopyrimidine tract (5' TOP). To further characterize the translational cis-regulatory element, we monitored the translational behavior of various endogenous and heterologous mRNAs or hybrid transcripts derived from transfected chimeric genes. The translational efficiency of these mRNAs was assessed in cells that either were growing normally or were growth arrested under various physiological conditions. Our experiments have yielded the following results: (i) the translation of mammalian rp mRNAs is properly regulated in amphibian cells, and likewise, amphibian rp mRNA is regulated in mammalian cells, indicating that all of the elements required for translation control of rp mRNAs are conserved among vertebrate classes; (ii) selective translational control is not confined to rp mRNAs, as mRNAs encoding the naturally occurring ubiquitin-rp fusion protein and elongation factor 1 alpha, which contain a 5' TOP, also conform this mode of regulation; (iii) rat rpP2 mRNA contains only five pyrimidines in its 5' TOP, yet this mRNA is translationally controlled in the same fashion as other rp mRNAs with a 5' TOP of eight or more pyrimidines; (iv) full manifestation of this mode of regulation seems to require both the 5' TOP and sequences immediately downstream; and (v) an intact translational regulatory element from rpL32 mRNA fails to exert its regulatory properties even when preceded by a single A residue. Images PMID:8196625

  12. nanoCAGE reveals 5′ UTR features that define specific modes of translation of functionally related MTOR-sensitive mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Gandin, Valentina; Masvidal, Laia; Hulea, Laura; Gravel, Simon-Pierre; Cargnello, Marie; McLaughlan, Shannon; Cai, Yutian; Balanathan, Preetika; Morita, Masahiro; Rajakumar, Arjuna; Furic, Luc; Pollak, Michael; Porco, John A.; St-Pierre, Julie; Pelletier, Jerry; Larsson, Ola; Topisirovic, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    The diversity of MTOR-regulated mRNA translation remains unresolved. Whereas ribosome-profiling suggested that MTOR almost exclusively stimulates translation of the TOP (terminal oligopyrimidine motif) and TOP-like mRNAs, polysome-profiling indicated that MTOR also modulates translation of mRNAs without the 5′ TOP motif (non-TOP mRNAs). We demonstrate that in ribosome-profiling studies, detection of MTOR-dependent changes in non-TOP mRNA translation was obscured by low sensitivity and methodology biases. Transcription start site profiling using nano-cap analysis of gene expression (nanoCAGE) revealed that not only do many MTOR-sensitive mRNAs lack the 5′ TOP motif but that 5′ UTR features distinguish two functionally and translationally distinct subsets of MTOR-sensitive mRNAs: (1) mRNAs with short 5′ UTRs enriched for mitochondrial functions, which require EIF4E but are less EIF4A1-sensitive; and (2) long 5′ UTR mRNAs encoding proliferation- and survival-promoting proteins, which are both EIF4E- and EIF4A1-sensitive. Selective inhibition of translation of mRNAs harboring long 5′ UTRs via EIF4A1 suppression leads to sustained expression of proteins involved in respiration but concomitant loss of those protecting mitochondrial structural integrity, resulting in apoptosis. Conversely, simultaneous suppression of translation of both long and short 5′ UTR mRNAs by MTOR inhibitors results in metabolic dormancy and a predominantly cytostatic effect. Thus, 5′ UTR features define different modes of MTOR-sensitive translation of functionally distinct subsets of mRNAs, which may explain the diverse impact of MTOR and EIF4A inhibitors on neoplastic cells. PMID:26984228

  13. Accumulation of long-lived mRNAs associated with germination in embryos during seed development of rice

    PubMed Central

    Sano, Naoto; Ono, Hanako; Murata, Kazumasa; Yamada, Tetsuya; Hirasawa, Tadashi; Kanekatsu, Motoki

    2015-01-01

    Mature dry seeds contain translatable mRNAs called long-lived mRNAs. Early studies have shown that protein synthesis during the initial phase of seed germination occurs from long-lived mRNAs, without de novo transcription. However, the gene expression systems that generate long-lived mRNAs in seeds are not well understood. To examine the accumulation of long-lived mRNAs in developing rice embryos, germination tests using the transcriptional inhibitor actinomycin D (Act D) were performed with the Japonica rice cultivar Nipponbare. Although over 70% of embryos at 10 days after flowering (DAF) germinated in the absence of the inhibitor, germination was remarkably impaired in embryos treated with Act D. In contrast, more than 70% of embryos at 20, 25, 30 and 40 DAF germinated in the presence of Act D. The same results were obtained when another cultivar, Koshihikari, was used, indicating that the long-lived mRNAs required for germination predominantly accumulate in embryos between 10 and 20 DAF during seed development. RNA-Seq identified 529 long-lived mRNA candidates, encoding proteins such as ABA, calcium ion and phospholipid signalling-related proteins, and HSP DNA J, increased from 10 to 20 DAF and were highly abundant in 40 DAF embryos of Nipponbare and Koshihikari. We also revealed that these long-lived mRNA candidates are clearly up-regulated in 10 DAF germinating embryos after imbibition, suggesting that the accumulation of these mRNAs in embryos is indispensable for the induction of germination. The findings presented here may facilitate in overcoming irregular seed germination or producing more vigorous seedlings. PMID:25941326

  14. Accumulation of long-lived mRNAs associated with germination in embryos during seed development of rice.

    PubMed

    Sano, Naoto; Ono, Hanako; Murata, Kazumasa; Yamada, Tetsuya; Hirasawa, Tadashi; Kanekatsu, Motoki

    2015-07-01

    Mature dry seeds contain translatable mRNAs called long-lived mRNAs. Early studies have shown that protein synthesis during the initial phase of seed germination occurs from long-lived mRNAs, without de novo transcription. However, the gene expression systems that generate long-lived mRNAs in seeds are not well understood. To examine the accumulation of long-lived mRNAs in developing rice embryos, germination tests using the transcriptional inhibitor actinomycin D (Act D) were performed with the Japonica rice cultivar Nipponbare. Although over 70% of embryos at 10 days after flowering (DAF) germinated in the absence of the inhibitor, germination was remarkably impaired in embryos treated with Act D. In contrast, more than 70% of embryos at 20, 25, 30 and 40 DAF germinated in the presence of Act D. The same results were obtained when another cultivar, Koshihikari, was used, indicating that the long-lived mRNAs required for germination predominantly accumulate in embryos between 10 and 20 DAF during seed development. RNA-Seq identified 529 long-lived mRNA candidates, encoding proteins such as ABA, calcium ion and phospholipid signalling-related proteins, and HSP DNA J, increased from 10 to 20 DAF and were highly abundant in 40 DAF embryos of Nipponbare and Koshihikari. We also revealed that these long-lived mRNA candidates are clearly up-regulated in 10 DAF germinating embryos after imbibition, suggesting that the accumulation of these mRNAs in embryos is indispensable for the induction of germination. The findings presented here may facilitate in overcoming irregular seed germination or producing more vigorous seedlings.

  15. High throughput sequencing analysis of Trypanosoma brucei DRBD3/PTB1-bound mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Das, Anish; Bellofatto, Vivian; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey; Carrington, Mark; Romero-Zaliz, Rocío; del Val, Coral; Estévez, Antonio M

    2015-01-01

    Trypanosomes are early-branched eukaryotes that show an unusual dependence on post-transcriptional mechanisms to regulate gene expression. RNA-binding proteins are crucial in controlling mRNA fate in these organisms, but their RNA substrates remain largely unknown. Here we have analyzed on a global scale the mRNAs associated with the Trypanosoma brucei RNA-binding protein DRBD3/PTB1, by capturing ribonucleoprotein complexes using UV cross-linking and subsequent immunoprecipitation. DRBD3/PTB1 associates with many transcripts encoding ribosomal proteins and translation factors. Consequently, silencing of DRBD3/PTB1 expression altered the protein synthesis rate. DRBD3/PTB1 also binds to mRNAs encoding the enzymes required to obtain energy through the oxidation of proline to succinate. We hypothesize that DRBD3/PTB1 is a key player in RNA regulon-based gene control influencing protein synthesis in trypanosomes.

  16. Spatial and temporal translational control of germ cell mRNAs mediated by the eIF4E isoform IFE-1.

    PubMed

    Friday, Andrew J; Henderson, Melissa A; Morrison, J Kaitlin; Hoffman, Jenna L; Keiper, Brett D

    2015-12-15

    Regulated mRNA translation is vital for germ cells to produce new proteins in the spatial and temporal patterns that drive gamete development. Translational control involves the de-repression of stored mRNAs and their recruitment by eukaryotic initiation factors (eIFs) to ribosomes. C. elegans expresses five eIF4Es (IFE-1-IFE-5); several have been shown to selectively recruit unique pools of mRNA. Individual IFE knockouts yield unique phenotypes due to inefficient translation of certain mRNAs. Here, we identified mRNAs preferentially translated through the germline-specific eIF4E isoform IFE-1. Differential polysome microarray analysis identified 77 mRNAs recruited by IFE-1. Among the IFE-1-dependent mRNAs are several required for late germ cell differentiation and maturation. Polysome association of gld-1, vab-1, vpr-1, rab-7 and rnp-3 mRNAs relies on IFE-1. Live animal imaging showed IFE-1-dependent selectivity in spatial and temporal translation of germline mRNAs. Altered MAPK activation in oocytes suggests dual roles for IFE-1, both promoting and suppressing oocyte maturation at different stages. This single eIF4E isoform exerts positive, selective translational control during germ cell differentiation.

  17. Selective recruitment of mRNAs and miRNAs to polyribosomes in response to rhizobia infection in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Reynoso, Mauricio Alberto; Blanco, Flavio Antonio; Bailey-Serres, Julia; Crespi, Martín; Zanetti, María Eugenia

    2013-01-01

    Translation of mRNAs is a key regulatory step that contributes to the coordination and modulation of eukaryotic gene expression during development or adaptation to the environment. mRNA stability or translatability can be regulated by the action of small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs), which control diverse biological processes. Under low nitrogen conditions, leguminous plants associate with soil bacteria and develop a new organ specialized in nitrogen fixation: the nodule. To gain insight into the translational regulation of mRNAs during nodule formation, the association of mRNAs and sRNAs to polysomes was characterized in roots of the model legume Medicago truncatula during the symbiotic interaction with Sinorhizobium meliloti. Quantitative comparison of steady-state and polysomal mRNAs for 15 genes involved in nodulation identified a group of transcripts with slight or no change in total cellular abundance that were significantly upregulated at the level of association with polysomes in response to rhizobia. This group included mRNAs encoding receptors like kinases required either for nodule organogenesis, bacterial infection or both, and transcripts encoding GRAS and NF-Y transcription factors (TFs). Quantitative analysis of sRNAs in total and polysomal RNA samples revealed that mature microRNAs (miRNAs) were associated with the translational machinery, notably, miR169 and miR172, which target the NF-YA/HAP2 and AP2 TFs, respectively. Upon inoculation, levels of miR169 pronouncedly decreased in polysomal complexes, concomitant with the increased accumulation of the NF-YA/HAP2 protein. These results indicate that both mRNAs and miRNAs are subject to differential recruitment to polysomes, and expose the importance of selective mRNA translation during root nodule symbiosis.

  18. Expression changes in mRNAs and mitochondrial damage in lens epithelial cells with selenite.

    PubMed

    Belusko, P B; Nakajima, T; Azuma, M; Shearer, T R

    2003-10-13

    An overdose of sodium selenite induces cataracts in young rats. The mid-stage events producing the cataract include calpain-induced hydrolysis and precipitation of lens proteins. Apoptosis in lens epithelial cells has been suggested as an initial event in selenite cataracts. Expression levels of two genes associated with apoptosis were altered in lens epithelial cells from selenite-injected rats. The purpose of the present experiment was to perform a more comprehensive search for changes in expression of mRNAs in lens epithelial cells in order to more fully delineate the early events in selenite-induced cataracts. Lens epithelial cells were harvested at 1 and 2 days after a single subcutaneous injection of sodium selenite (30 mumol/kg body weight) into 12-day-old rats. Gene expression was analyzed using a commercial DNA array (Rat Genome U34A GeneChip array, Affymetrix). Of approximately 8000 genes assayed by hybridization, 13 genes were decreased and 27 genes were increased in the rat lens epithelial cells after injection of selenite. Some of the up-regulated genes included apoptosis-related genes, and a majority of the down-regulated genes were mitochondrial genes. Previously observed changes in expression of EGR-1 mRNA were also confirmed. Changes in the expression patterns of mRNAs were also confirmed by RT-PCR. To determine the mechanism for damage of lens epithelial cells (alpha TN4 cell) by culture in selenite, leakage of cytochrome c from mitochondria was measured. Selenite caused significant leakage of cytochrome c into the cytosol of alpha TN4 cells. Our data suggested that the loss of integrity of lens epithelial cells by selenite might be caused by preferential down-regulation of mitochondrial RNAs, release of cytochrome c, and impaired mitochondrial function. Up-regulation of mRNAs involved in maintenance of DNA, regulation of metabolism, and induction of apoptosis may also play roles.

  19. Differential dendritic targeting of AMPA receptor subunit mRNAs in adult rat hippocampal principal neurons and interneurons.

    PubMed

    Cox, David J; Racca, Claudia

    2013-06-15

    In hippocampal neurons, AMPA receptors (AMPARs) mediate fast excitatory postsynaptic responses at glutamatergic synapses, and are involved in various forms of synaptic plasticity. Dendritic local protein synthesis of selected AMPAR subunit mRNAs is considered an additional mechanism to independently and rapidly control the strength of individual synapses. We have used fluorescent in situ hybridization and immunocytochemistry to analyze the localization of AMPAR subunit (GluA1-4) mRNAs and their relationship with the translation machinery in principal cells and interneurons of the adult rat hippocampus. The mRNAs encoding all four AMPAR subunits were detected in the somata and dendrites of CA3 and CA1 pyramidal cells and those of six classes of CA1 γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic interneurons. GluA1-4 subunit mRNAs were highly localized to the apical dendrites of pyramidal cells, whereas in interneurons they were present in multiple dendrites. In contrast, in the dentate gyrus, GluA1-4 subunit mRNAs were virtually restricted to the somata and were absent from the dendrites of granule cells. These different regional and cell type-specific labeling patterns also correlated with the localization of markers for components of the protein synthesis machinery. Our results support the local translation of GluA1-4 mRNAs in dendrites of hippocampal pyramidal cells and CA1 interneurons but not in granule cells of the dentate gyrus. Furthermore, the regional and cell type-specific differences we observed suggest that each cell type uses distinct ways of regulating the local translation of AMPAR subunits.

  20. Obesity resistance and increased hepatic expression of catabolism-related mRNAs in Cnot3+/− mice

    PubMed Central

    Morita, Masahiro; Oike, Yuichi; Nagashima, Takeshi; Kadomatsu, Tsuyoshi; Tabata, Mitsuhisa; Suzuki, Toru; Nakamura, Takahisa; Yoshida, Nobuaki; Okada, Mariko; Yamamoto, Tadashi

    2011-01-01

    Obesity is a life-threatening factor and is often associated with dysregulation of gene expression. Here, we show that the CNOT3 subunit of the CCR4–NOT deadenylase complex is critical to metabolic regulation. Cnot3+/− mice are lean with hepatic and adipose tissues containing reduced levels of lipids, and show increased metabolic rates and enhanced glucose tolerance. Cnot3+/− mice remain lean and sensitive to insulin even on a high-fat diet. Furthermore, introduction of Cnot3 haplodeficiency in ob/ob mice ameliorated the obese phenotype. Hepatic expression of most mRNAs is not altered in Cnot3+/− vis-à-vis wild-type mice. However, the levels of specific mRNAs, such as those coding for energy metabolism-related PDK4 and IGFBP1, are increased in Cnot3+/− hepatocytes, having poly(A) tails that are longer than those seen in control cells. We provide evidence that CNOT3 is involved in recruitment of the CCR4–NOT deadenylase to the 3′ end of specific mRNAs. Finally, as CNOT3 levels in the liver and white adipose tissues decrease upon fasting, we propose that CNOT3 responds to feeding conditions to regulate deadenylation-specific mRNAs and energy metabolism. PMID:21897366

  1. FRET-Based Identification of mRNAs Undergoing Translation

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, Ian; Zhang, Haibo; Kaur, Jaskiran; Broitman, Steven L.; Smilansky, Zeev; Cooperman, Barry S.; Goldman, Yale E.

    2012-01-01

    We present proof-of-concept in vitro results demonstrating the feasibility of using single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) measurements to distinguish, in real time, between individual ribosomes programmed with several different, short mRNAs. For these measurements we use either the FRET signal generated between two tRNAs labeled with different fluorophores bound simultaneously in adjacent sites to the ribosome (tRNA-tRNA FRET) or the FRET signal generated between a labeled tRNA bound to the ribosome and a fluorescent derivative of ribosomal protein L1 (L1-tRNA FRET). With either technique, criteria were developed to identify the mRNAs, taking into account the relative activity of the mRNAs. These criteria enabled identification of the mRNA being translated by a given ribosome to within 95% confidence intervals based on the number of identified FRET traces. To upgrade the approach for natural mRNAs or more complex mixtures, the stoichiometry of labeling should be enhanced and photobleaching reduced. The potential for porting these methods into living cells is discussed. PMID:22693619

  2. FRET-based identification of mRNAs undergoing translation.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Benjamin; Chen, Chunlai; Farrell, Ian; Zhang, Haibo; Kaur, Jaskiran; Broitman, Steven L; Smilansky, Zeev; Cooperman, Barry S; Goldman, Yale E

    2012-01-01

    We present proof-of-concept in vitro results demonstrating the feasibility of using single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) measurements to distinguish, in real time, between individual ribosomes programmed with several different, short mRNAs. For these measurements we use either the FRET signal generated between two tRNAs labeled with different fluorophores bound simultaneously in adjacent sites to the ribosome (tRNA-tRNA FRET) or the FRET signal generated between a labeled tRNA bound to the ribosome and a fluorescent derivative of ribosomal protein L1 (L1-tRNA FRET). With either technique, criteria were developed to identify the mRNAs, taking into account the relative activity of the mRNAs. These criteria enabled identification of the mRNA being translated by a given ribosome to within 95% confidence intervals based on the number of identified FRET traces. To upgrade the approach for natural mRNAs or more complex mixtures, the stoichiometry of labeling should be enhanced and photobleaching reduced. The potential for porting these methods into living cells is discussed.

  3. LRPPRC is necessary for polyadenylation and coordination of translation of mitochondrial mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Ruzzenente, Benedetta; Metodiev, Metodi D; Wredenberg, Anna; Bratic, Ana; Park, Chan Bae; Cámara, Yolanda; Milenkovic, Dusanka; Zickermann, Volker; Wibom, Rolf; Hultenby, Kjell; Erdjument-Bromage, Hediye; Tempst, Paul; Brandt, Ulrich; Stewart, James B; Gustafsson, Claes M; Larsson, Nils-Göran

    2012-01-01

    Regulation of mtDNA expression is critical for maintaining cellular energy homeostasis and may, in principle, occur at many different levels. The leucine-rich pentatricopeptide repeat containing (LRPPRC) protein regulates mitochondrial mRNA stability and an amino-acid substitution of this protein causes the French-Canadian type of Leigh syndrome (LSFC), a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by complex IV deficiency. We have generated conditional Lrpprc knockout mice and show here that the gene is essential for embryonic development. Tissue-specific disruption of Lrpprc in heart causes mitochondrial cardiomyopathy with drastic reduction in steady-state levels of most mitochondrial mRNAs. LRPPRC forms an RNA-dependent protein complex that is necessary for maintaining a pool of non-translated mRNAs in mammalian mitochondria. Loss of LRPPRC does not only decrease mRNA stability, but also leads to loss of mRNA polyadenylation and the appearance of aberrant mitochondrial translation. The translation pattern without the presence of LRPPRC is misregulated with excessive translation of some transcripts and no translation of others. Our findings point to the existence of an elaborate machinery that regulates mammalian mtDNA expression at the post-transcriptional level. PMID:22045337

  4. Differential compartmentalization of mRNAs in squid giant axon.

    PubMed

    Chun, J T; Gioio, A E; Crispino, M; Giuditta, A; Kaplan, B B

    1996-11-01

    Previously, we reported that the squid giant axon contains a heterogeneous population of mRNAs that includes beta-actin, beta-tubulin, kinesin, neurofilament proteins, and enolase. To define the absolute levels and relative distribution of these mRNAs, we have used competitive reverse transcription-PCR to quantify the levels of five mRNAs present in the giant axon and giant fiber lobe (GFL), the location of the parental cell soma. In the GFL, the number of transcripts for these mRNAs varied over a fourfold range, with beta-tubulin being the most abundant mRNA species (1.25 x 10(9) molecules per GFL). Based on transcript number, the rank order of mRNA levels in the GFL was beta-tubulin > beta-actin > kinesin > enolase > microtubule-associated protein (MAP) H1. In contrast, kinesin mRNA was most abundant in the axon (4.1 x 10(7) molecules per axon) with individual mRNA levels varying 15-fold. The rank order of mRNA levels in the axon was kinesin > beta-tubulin > MAP H1 > beta-actin > enolase. The relative abundance of the mRNA species in the axon did not correlate with the size of the transcript, nor was it directly related to their corresponding levels in the GFL. Taken together, these findings confirm that significant amounts of mRNA are present in the giant axon and suggest that specific mRNAs are differentially transported into the axonal domain.

  5. Distinct expression of Cbln family mRNAs in developing and adult mouse brains.

    PubMed

    Miura, Eriko; Iijima, Takatoshi; Yuzaki, Michisuke; Watanabe, Masahiko

    2006-08-01

    Cbln1 belongs to the C1q and tumour necrosis factor superfamily, and plays crucial roles as a cerebellar granule cell-derived transneuronal regulator for synapse integrity and plasticity in Purkinje cells. Although Cbln2-Cbln4 are also expressed in the brain and could form heteromeric complexes with Cbln1, their precise expressions remain unclear. Here, we investigated gene expression of the Cbln family in developing and adult C57BL mouse brains by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), Northern blot, and high-resolution in situ hybridization (ISH) analyses. In the adult brain, spatial patterns of mRNA expression were highly differential depending on Cbln subtypes. Notably, particularly high levels of Cbln mRNAs were expressed in some nuclei and neurons, whereas their postsynaptic targets often lacked or were low for any Cbln mRNAs, as seen for cerebellar granule cells/Purkinje cells, entorhinal cortex/hippocampus, intralaminar group of thalamic nuclei/caudate-putamen, and dorsal nucleus of the lateral lemniscus/central nucleus of the inferior colliculus. In the developing brain, Cbln1, 2, and 4 mRNAs appeared as early as embryonic day 10-13, and exhibited transient up-regulation during the late embryonic and neonatal periods. For example, Cbln2 mRNA was expressed in the cortical plate of the developing neocortex, displaying a high rostromedial to low caudolateral gradient. In contrast, Cbln3 mRNA was selective to cerebellar granule cells throughout development, and its onset was as late as postnatal day 7-10. These results will provide a molecular-anatomical basis for future studies that characterize roles played by the Cbln family.

  6. Gene-expression reversal of lncRNAs and associated mRNAs expression in active vs latent HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Madhavan; Sagar, Vidya; Pilakka-Kanthikeel, Sudheesh

    2016-01-01

    Interplay between lncRNAs and mRNAs is rapidly emerging as a key epigenetic mechanism in controlling various cell functions. HIV can actively infect and/or can persist latently for years by manipulating host epigenetics; however, its molecular essence remains undiscovered in entirety. Here for the first time, we delineate the influence of HIV on global lncRNAs expression in monocytic cells lines. Our analysis revealed the expression modulation of nearly 1060 such lncRNAs which are associated with differentially expressed mRNAs in active and latent infection. This suggests a greater role of lncRNAs in regulating transcriptional and post-transcriptional gene expression during HIV infection. The differentially expressed mRNAs were involved in several different biological pathways where immunological networks were most enriched. Importantly, we discovered that HIV induces expression reversal of more than 150 lncRNAs between its active and latent infection. Also, hundreds of unique lncRNAs were identified in both infection conditions. The pathology specific “gene-expression reversal” and “on-and-off” switching of lncRNAs and associated mRNAs may lead to establish the relationship between active and HIV infection. PMID:27756902

  7. Transcriptome-Wide Mapping of RNA 5-Methylcytosine in Arabidopsis mRNAs and Noncoding RNAs.

    PubMed

    David, Rakesh; Burgess, Alice; Parker, Brian; Li, Jun; Pulsford, Kalinya; Sibbritt, Tennille; Preiss, Thomas; Searle, Iain Robert

    2017-03-01

    Posttranscriptional methylation of RNA cytosine residues to 5-methylcytosine (m(5)C) is an important modification with diverse roles, such as regulating stress responses, stem cell proliferation, and RNA metabolism. Here, we used RNA bisulfite sequencing for transcriptome-wide quantitative mapping of m(5)C in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana We discovered more than a thousand m(5)C sites in Arabidopsis mRNAs, long noncoding RNAs, and other noncoding RNAs across three tissue types (siliques, seedling shoots, and roots) and validated a number of these sites. Quantitative differences in methylated sites between these three tissues suggest tissue-specific regulation of m(5)C. Perturbing the RNA m(5)C methyltransferase TRM4B resulted in the loss of m(5)C sites on mRNAs and noncoding RNAs and reduced the stability of tRNA(Asp(GTC)) We also demonstrate the importance of m(5)C in plant development, as trm4b mutants have shorter primary roots than the wild type due to reduced cell division in the root apical meristem. In addition, trm4b mutants show increased sensitivity to oxidative stress. Finally, we provide insights into the targeting mechanism of TRM4B by demonstrating that a 50-nucleotide sequence flanking m(5)C C3349 in MAIGO5 mRNA is sufficient to confer methylation of a transgene reporter in Nicotiana benthamiana.

  8. Identification of NAD+ capped mRNAs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Robert W.; Matheny, Tyler; Mizoue, Laura S.; Rao, Bhalchandra S.; Muhlrad, Denise; Parker, Roy

    2017-01-01

    RNAs besides tRNA and rRNA contain chemical modifications, including the recently described 5′ nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) RNA in bacteria. Whether 5′ NAD-RNA exists in eukaryotes remains unknown. We demonstrate that 5′ NAD-RNA is found on subsets of nuclear and mitochondrial encoded mRNAs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. NAD-mRNA appears to be produced cotranscriptionally because NAD-RNA is also found on pre-mRNAs, and only on mitochondrial transcripts that are not 5′ end processed. These results define an additional 5′ RNA cap structure in eukaryotes and raise the possibility that this 5′ NAD+ cap could modulate RNA stability and translation on specific subclasses of mRNAs. PMID:28031484

  9. Widespread mRNA Association with Cytoskeletal Motor Proteins and Identification and Dynamics of Myosin-Associated mRNAs in S. cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Casolari, Jason M.; Thompson, Michael A.; Salzman, Julia; Champion, Lowry M.; Moerner, W. E.; Brown, Patrick O.

    2012-01-01

    Programmed mRNA localization to specific subcellular compartments for localized translation is a fundamental mechanism of post-transcriptional regulation that affects many, and possibly all, mRNAs in eukaryotes. We describe her e a systematic approach to identify the RNA cargoes associated with the cytoskeletal motor proteins of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in combination with live-cell 3D super-localization microscopy of endogenously tagged mRNAs. Our analysis identified widespread association of mRNAs with cytoskeletal motor proteins, including association of Myo3 with mRNAs encoding key regulators of actin branching and endocytosis such as WASP and WIP. Using conventional fluorescence microscopy and expression of MS2-tagged mRNAs from endogenous loci, we observed a strong bias for actin patch nucleator mRNAs to localize to the cell cortex and the actin patch in a Myo3- and F-actin dependent manner. Use of a double-helix point spread function (DH-PSF) microscope allowed super-localization measurements of single mRNPs at a spatial precision of 25 nm in x and y and 50 nm in z in live cells with 50 ms exposure times, allowing quantitative profiling of mRNP dynamics. The actin patch mRNA exhibited distinct and characteristic diffusion coefficients when compared to a control mRNA. In addition, disruption of F-actin significantly expanded the 3D confinement radius of an actin patch nucleator mRNA, providing a quantitative assessment of the contribution of the actin cytoskeleton to mRNP dynamic localization. Our results provide evidence for specific association of mRNAs with cytoskeletal motor proteins in yeast, suggest that different mRNPs have distinct and characteristic dynamics, and lend insight into the mechanism of actin patch nucleator mRNA localization to actin patches. PMID:22359641

  10. A four-nucleotide translation enhancer in the 3'-terminal consensus sequence of the nonpolyadenylated mRNAs of rotavirus.

    PubMed Central

    Chizhikov, V; Patton, J T

    2000-01-01

    The 5' cap and poly(A) tail of eukaryotic mRNAs work synergistically to enhance translation through a process that requires interaction of the cap-associated eukaryotic initiation factor, eIF-4G, and the poly(A)-binding protein, PABP. Because the mRNAs of rotavirus, and other members of the Reoviridae, contain caps but lack poly(A) tails, their translation may be enhanced through a unique mechanism. To identify translation-enhancement elements in the viral mRNAs that stimulate translation in vivo, chimeric RNAs were prepared that contained an open reading frame for luciferase and the 5' and 3' untranslated regions (UTRs) of a rotavirus mRNA or of a nonviral mRNA. Transfection of the chimeric RNAs into rotavirus-infected cells showed that the viral 3' UTR contained a translation-enhancement element that promoted gene expression. The element did not enhance gene expression in uninfected cells and did not affect the stability of the RNAs. Mutagenesis showed that the conserved sequence GACC located at the 3' end of rotavirus mRNAs operated as an enhancement element. The 3'-GACC element stimulated protein expression independently of the sequence of the 5' UTR, although efficient expression required the RNA to contain a cap. The results indicate that the expression of viral proteins in rotavirus-infected cells is specifically up-regulated by the activity of a novel 4-nt 3' translation enhancer (TE) common to the 11 nonpolyadenylated mRNAs of the virus. The 4-nt sequence of the rotavirus 3' TE represents by far the shortest of any of the sequence enhancers known to stimulate translation. PMID:10864041

  11. Patterns of gene expression in the murine brain revealed by in situ hybridization of brain-specific mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Branks, P L; Wilson, M C

    1986-07-01

    Biochemical differences between neuronal cell populations of the mammalian brain, including selection of neurotransmitters and distinct neural antigens, suggest that the regulation of gene expression plays an important role in defining brain function. Here we describe the use of in situ hybridization to identify cDNA clones of highly regulated mRNA species and to define directly their pattern of gene expression in brain at both gross morphological and cellular levels. One of the selected cDNA clones, pMuBr2, detected a single 3.0 kb mRNA species, which from in situ hybridization appears specific to oligodendroglia cells. Three other cDNA clones, pMuBr3, 8 and 85, identified polyadenylated mRNA transcripts expressed by neuronal cells of the murine brain. Viewed at the gross morphological level, the mRNAs hybridizing to these cDNA sequences exhibit different patterns of abundance distinguishing such brain structures as pons, anterior thalamus, hippocampus, basal ganglia and anterior lobe of the neuroendocrine pituitary gland. At the cellular level, in situ hybridization revealed that these mRNAs are differentially expressed by morphologically and functionally distinct neurons of the cerebellum and hippocampal formation. When examined in the context of known brain function, however, the regulated expression of the neuron-specific mRNAs does not correlate simply with known cellular morphology or previously demonstrated neuronal relationships suggesting novel patterns of gene expression which may contribute to brain function.

  12. Quail Pax-6 (Pax-QNR) mRNAs are expressed from two promoters used differentially during retina development and neuronal differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Plaza, S; Dozier, C; Turque, N; Saule, S

    1995-01-01

    During investigations on the regulation of the Pax-6 gene, we characterized a cDNA from quail neuroretina showing a 5' untranslated region distinct from that previously described and initiated from an internal promoter. Using RNase protection and primer extension mapping, we localized this second quail Pax-6 promoter, termed P1. As reported for the already described P0 promoter, P1 was also transactivated in vitro by the p46Pax-QNR protein. RNase protection assays performed with quail neuroretina RNA showed that P1-initiated mRNAs were detected before the P0-initiated mRNAs, remained constant up to embryonic day 8, and decreased slowly thereafter whereas, P0-initiated mRNAs accumulated up to embryonic day 8. In contrast, quail retinal pigmented epithelium expressed only the P1-initiated mRNAs. Transformation of these cells by the v-myc oncogene induced neuronal traits in the culture, which thereafter, in addition to the P1-initiated mRNAs, expressed Pax-QNR from the P0 promoter. These results suggest that expression of the quail Pax-6 gene is under the control of different regulators through alternate promoters, P0 being activated at the onset of neuronal differentiation. PMID:7760830

  13. Splicing and Polyadenylation of Human Papillomavirus Type 16 mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chengjun; Kajitani, Naoko; Schwartz, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    The human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) life cycle can be divided into an early stage in which the HPV16 genomic DNA is replicated, and a late stage in which the HPV16 structural proteins are synthesized and virions are produced. A strong coupling between the viral life cycle and the differentiation state of the infected cell is highly characteristic of all HPVs. The switch from the HPV16 early gene expression program to the late requires a promoter switch, a polyadenylation signal switch and a shift in alternative splicing. A number of cis-acting RNA elements on the HPV16 mRNAs and cellular and viral factors interacting with these elements are involved in the control of HPV16 gene expression. This review summarizes our knowledge of HPV16 cis-acting RNA elements and cellular and viral trans-acting factors that regulate HPV16 gene expression at the level of splicing and polyadenylation. PMID:28208770

  14. Glucocorticoids and the expression of mRNAs for neurotrophins, their receptors and GAP-43 in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Chao, H M; McEwen, B S

    1994-10-01

    The genes encoding brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) are all expressed in the adult rat hippocampus. The colocalization of the these factors with the receptors to which they bind, namely trkB, trkC and the bFGF receptor, respectively, suggests that in the hippocampus they may exert their putative protective and trophic effects through an autocrine mechanism. The morphology and survival of hippocampal neurons are also affected by glucocorticoids, which can act as transcriptional activators of gene expression. In this study we have used in situ hybridization to investigate the adrenal steroid regulation of the mRNAs encoding the neurotrophic factors BDNF, NT-3, and bFGF, their respective receptors, and the growth-associated protein GAP-43. After 7 days of adrenalectomy (ADX), there was an increase in the level of GAP-43 mRNA expression in the CA1 and CA3 pyramidal cell layers of the hippocampus, that was prevented by corticosterone replacement to the ADX animals. In the CA2 subregion, adrenalectomy resulted in a decrease in bFGF mRNA expression, that was reversed by steroid treatment. There was evidence for glucocorticoid modulation of the BDNF and NT-3 mRNAs in pyramidal cell layers and in the dentate gyrus, but not of the mRNAs encoding the trkB, trk C or bFGF receptors.

  15. Discovery of shear- and side-specific mRNAs and miRNAs in human aortic valvular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Holliday, Casey J.; Ankeny, Randall F.; Nerem, Robert M.

    2011-01-01

    The role of endothelial cells (ECs) in aortic valve (AV) disease remains relatively unknown; however, disease preferentially occurs in the fibrosa. We hypothesized oscillatory shear (OS) present on the fibrosa stimulates ECs to modify mRNAs and microRNAs (miRNAs) inducing disease. Our goal was to identify mRNAs and miRNAs differentially regulated by OS and laminar shear (LS) in human AVECs (HAVECs) from the fibrosa (fHAVECs) and ventricularis (vHAVECs). HAVECs expressed EC markers as well as some smooth muscle cell markers and functionally aligned with the flow. HAVECs were exposed to OS and LS for 24 h, and total RNA was analyzed by mRNA and miRNA microarrays. We found over 700 and 300 mRNAs down- and upregulated, respectively, by OS; however, there was no side dependency. mRNA microarray results were validated for 26 of 28 tested genes. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis revealed thrombospondin 1 (Thbs1) and NF-κB inhibitor-α (Nfkbia) as highly connected, shear-sensitive genes. miRNA array analysis yielded 30 shear-sensitive miRNAs and 3 side-specific miRNAs. miRNA validation confirmed 4 of 17 shear-sensitive miRNAs and 1 of 3 side-dependent miRNAs. Using miRWalk and several filtering steps, we identified shear-sensitive mRNAs potentially targeted by shear-sensitive miRNAs. These genes and signaling pathways could act as therapeutic targets of AV disease. PMID:21705672

  16. Two Dictyostelium ribosomal proteins act as RNases for specific classes of mRNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Mangiarotti, Giorgio

    2003-01-01

    Phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 leads to the stabilization of pre-spore specific mRNAs during development of Dictyostelium discoideum. The purification of S6 kinase has allowed the identification of protein S11 as the mRNase specific for pre-spore mRNAs. Methylation of ribosomal protein S31 leads to the destabilization of ribosomal protein mRNAs. The purification of S31 methyltransferase has allowed the identification of protein S29 as the mRNAse specific for ribosomal protein mRNAs. PMID:12392449

  17. Two Dictyostelium ribosomal proteins act as RNases for specific classes of mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Mangiarotti, Giorgio

    2003-03-01

    Phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 leads to the stabilization of pre-spore specific mRNAs during development of Dictyostelium discoideum. The purification of S6 kinase has allowed the identification of protein S11 as the mRNase specific for pre-spore mRNAs. Methylation of ribosomal protein S31 leads to the destabilization of ribosomal protein mRNAs. The purification of S31 methyltransferase has allowed the identification of protein S29 as the mRNAse specific for ribosomal protein mRNAs.

  18. Expression of neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit mRNAs in rat hippocampal GABAergic interneurons.

    PubMed

    Son, Jong-Hyun; Winzer-Serhan, Ursula H

    2008-11-10

    Hippocampal inhibitory interneurons are a diverse population of cells widely scattered in the hippocampus, where they regulate hippocampal circuit activity. The hippocampus receives cholinergic projections from the basal forebrain, and functional studies have suggested the presence of different subtypes of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) on gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic interneurons. Single-cell polymerase chain reaction analysis had confirmed that several nAChR subunit mRNAs are co-expressed with glutamate decarboxylase 67 (GAD67), the marker for GABAergic interneurons. In this anatomical study, we systematically investigated the co-expression of GAD67 with different nAChR subunits by using double in situ hybridization with a digoxigenin-labeled GAD67 probe and (35)S-labeled probes for nAChR subunits (alpha2, alpha3, alpha4, alpha5, alpha6, alpha7, beta2, beta3, and beta4). The results revealed that most GAD67-positive interneurons expressed beta2, and 67 % also expressed alpha7 mRNA. In contrast, mRNA expression of other subunits was limited; only 13 % of GAD67-positive neurons co-expressed alpha4, and less than 10% expressed transcripts for alpha2, alpha3, alpha5, or beta4. Most GAD67/alpha2 co-expression was located in CA1/CA3 stratum oriens, and GAD67/alpha5 co-expression was predominantly detected in CA1/CA3 stratum radiatum/lacunosum moleculare and the dentate gyrus. Expression of alpha6 and beta3 mRNAs was rarely detected in the hippocampus, and mRNAs were not co-expressed with GAD67. These findings suggest that the majority of nicotinic responses in GABAergic interneurons should be mediated by a homomeric alpha7 or heteromeric alpha7*-containing nAChRs. Other possible combinations such as alpha2beta2*, alpha4beta2*, or alpha5beta2* heteromeric nAChRs could contribute to functional nicotinic response in subsets of GABAergic interneurons but overall would have a minor role.

  19. 5’-Terminal AUGs in Escherichia coli mRNAs with Shine-Dalgarno Sequences: Identification and Analysis of Their Roles in Non-Canonical Translation Initiation

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Heather J.; Fleming, Ian M. C.

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of the Escherichia coli transcriptome identified a unique subset of messenger RNAs (mRNAs) that contain a conventional untranslated leader and Shine-Dalgarno (SD) sequence upstream of the gene’s start codon while also containing an AUG triplet at the mRNA’s 5’- terminus (5’-uAUG). Fusion of the coding sequence specified by the 5’-terminal putative AUG start codon to a lacZ reporter gene, as well as primer extension inhibition assays, reveal that the majority of the 5’-terminal upstream open reading frames (5’-uORFs) tested support some level of lacZ translation, indicating that these mRNAs can function both as leaderless and canonical SD-leadered mRNAs. Although some of the uORFs were expressed at low levels, others were expressed at levels close to that of the respective downstream genes and as high as the naturally leaderless cI mRNA of bacteriophage λ. These 5’-terminal uORFs potentially encode peptides of varying lengths, but their functions, if any, are unknown. In an effort to determine whether expression from the 5’-terminal uORFs impact expression of the immediately downstream cistron, we examined expression from the downstream coding sequence after mutations were introduced that inhibit efficient 5’-uORF translation. These mutations were found to affect expression from the downstream cistrons to varying degrees, suggesting that some 5’-uORFs may play roles in downstream regulation. Since the 5’-uAUGs found on these conventionally leadered mRNAs can function to bind ribosomes and initiate translation, this indicates that canonical mRNAs containing 5’-uAUGs should be examined for their potential to function also as leaderless mRNAs. PMID:27467758

  20. Inhibition of Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase (MAPK)-interacting Kinase (MNK) Preferentially Affects Translation of mRNAs Containing Both a 5'-Terminal Cap and Hairpin.

    PubMed

    Korneeva, Nadejda L; Song, Anren; Gram, Hermann; Edens, Mary Ann; Rhoads, Robert E

    2016-02-12

    The MAPK-interacting kinases 1 and 2 (MNK1 and MNK2) are activated by extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) or p38 in response to cellular stress and extracellular stimuli that include growth factors, cytokines, and hormones. Modulation of MNK activity affects translation of mRNAs involved in the cell cycle, cancer progression, and cell survival. However, the mechanism by which MNK selectively affects translation of these mRNAs is not understood. MNK binds eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4G (eIF4G) and phosphorylates the cap-binding protein eIF4E. Using a cell-free translation system from rabbit reticulocytes programmed with mRNAs containing different 5'-ends, we show that an MNK inhibitor, CGP57380, affects translation of only those mRNAs that contain both a cap and a hairpin in the 5'-UTR. Similarly, a C-terminal fragment of human eIF4G-1, eIF4G(1357-1600), which prevents binding of MNK to intact eIF4G, reduces eIF4E phosphorylation and inhibits translation of only capped and hairpin-containing mRNAs. Analysis of proteins bound to m(7)GTP-Sepharose reveals that both CGP and eIF4G(1357-1600) decrease binding of eIF4E to eIF4G. These data suggest that MNK stimulates translation only of mRNAs containing both a cap and 5'-terminal RNA duplex via eIF4E phosphorylation, thereby enhancing the coupled cap-binding and RNA-unwinding activities of eIF4F.

  1. Dynamic co-expression network analysis of lncRNAs and mRNAs associated with venous congestion

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jinshun; Xu, Yuqin; Xu, Jia; Wang, Jinhua; Wu, Liying

    2016-01-01

    Venous congestion and volume overload are important in cardiorenal syndromes, in which multiple regulated factors are involved, including long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs). To investigate the underlying role of lncRNAs in regulating the development of venous congestion, an Affymetrix microarray associated with peripheral venous congestion was annotated, then a bipartite dynamic lncRNA-mRNA co-expression network was constructed in which nodes indicated lncRNAs or mRNAs. The nodes were connected when the lncRNAs or mRNAs were dynamically co-expressed. Following functional analysis of this network, several dynamic alternative pathways were identified, including the calcium signaling pathway during venous congestion development. Additionally, certain lncRNAs (LINC00523, LINC01210 and RP11-435O5.5) were identified that may potentially dynamically regulate certain proteins, including plasma membrane calcium ATPase (PMCA) and G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), in the calcium signaling pathway. Particularly, the dynamically regulated switch of LINC00523 from co-expression with PMCA to GPCR may be involved in damage to steady state intracellular calcium. In brief, the current study demonstrated a potential novel mechanism of lncRNA function during venous congestion. PMID:27431002

  2. Identifying eIF4E-binding protein translationally-controlled transcripts reveals links to mRNAs bound by specific PUF proteins

    PubMed Central

    Cridge, Andrew G.; Castelli, Lydia M.; Smirnova, Julia B.; Selley, Julian N.; Rowe, William; Hubbard, Simon J.; McCarthy, John E.G.; Ashe, Mark P.; Grant, Christopher M.; Pavitt, Graham D.

    2010-01-01

    eIF4E-binding proteins (4E-BPs) regulate translation of mRNAs in eukaryotes. However the extent to which specific mRNA targets are regulated by 4E-BPs remains unknown. We performed translational profiling by microarray analysis of polysome and monosome associated mRNAs in wild-type and mutant cells to identify mRNAs in yeast regulated by the 4E-BPs Caf20p and Eap1p; the first-global comparison of 4E-BP target mRNAs. We find that yeast 4E-BPs modulate the translation of >1000 genes. Most target mRNAs differ between the 4E-BPs revealing mRNA specificity for translational control by each 4E-BP. This is supported by observations that eap1Δ and caf20Δ cells have different nitrogen source utilization defects, implying different mRNA targets. To account for the mRNA specificity shown by each 4E-BP, we found correlations between our data sets and previously determined targets of yeast mRNA-binding proteins. We used affinity chromatography experiments to uncover specific RNA-stabilized complexes formed between Caf20p and Puf4p/Puf5p and between Eap1p and Puf1p/Puf2p. Thus the combined action of each 4E-BP with specific 3′-UTR-binding proteins mediates mRNA-specific translational control in yeast, showing that this form of translational control is more widely employed than previously thought. PMID:20705650

  3. Analysis of Argonaute Complex Bound mRNAs in DU145 Prostate Carcinoma Cells Reveals New miRNA Target Genes

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Volker; Beitzinger, Michaela; Nolte, Elke; Wach, Sven; Hart, Martin; Sapich, Sandra; Wiesehöfer, Marc; Wennemuth, Gunther; Eichner, Norbert; Stempfl, Thomas; Wullich, Bernd; Meister, Gunter

    2017-01-01

    Posttranscriptional gene regulation by microRNAs (miRNAs) contributes to the induction and maintenance of prostate carcinoma (PCa). To identify mRNAs enriched or removed from Ago2-containing RISC complexes, these complexes were immunoprecipitated from normal prostate fibroblasts (PNFs) and the PCa line DU145 and the bound mRNAs were quantified by microarray. The analysis of Ago complexes derived from PNFs or DU145 confirmed the enrichment or depletion of a variety of mRNAs already known from the literature to be deregulated. Novel potential targets were analyzed by luciferase assays with miRNAs known to be deregulated in PCa. We demonstrate that the mRNAs of the death effector domain-containing protein (DEDD), the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily, member 10b protein (TNFRSF10B), the tumor protein p53 inducible nuclear protein 1 (TP53INP1), and the secreted protein, acidic, cysteine-rich (SPARC; osteonectin) are regulated by miRNAs miR-148a, miR-20a, miR-24, and miR-29a/b, respectively. Therefore, these miRNAs represent potential targets for therapy. Surprisingly, overexpression of miR-24 induced focus formation and proliferation of DU145 cells, while miR-29b reduced proliferation. The study confirms genes deregulated in PCa by virtue of their presence/absence in the Ago2-complex. In conjunction with the already published miRNA profiles of PCa, the data can be used to identify miRNA-regulated mRNAs. PMID:28163933

  4. The CCR4-NOT complex mediates deadenylation and degradation of stem cell mRNAs and promotes planarian stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Solana, Jordi; Gamberi, Chiara; Mihaylova, Yuliana; Grosswendt, Stefanie; Chen, Chen; Lasko, Paul; Rajewsky, Nikolaus; Aboobaker, A Aziz

    2013-01-01

    Post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms are of fundamental importance to form robust genetic networks, but their roles in stem cell pluripotency remain poorly understood. Here, we use freshwater planarians as a model system to investigate this and uncover a role for CCR4-NOT mediated deadenylation of mRNAs in stem cell differentiation. Planarian adult stem cells, the so-called neoblasts, drive the almost unlimited regenerative capabilities of planarians and allow their ongoing homeostatic tissue turnover. While many genes have been demonstrated to be required for these processes, currently almost no mechanistic insight is available into their regulation. We show that knockdown of planarian Not1, the CCR4-NOT deadenylating complex scaffolding subunit, abrogates regeneration and normal homeostasis. This abrogation is primarily due to severe impairment of their differentiation potential. We describe a stem cell specific increase in the mRNA levels of key neoblast genes after Smed-not1 knock down, consistent with a role of the CCR4-NOT complex in degradation of neoblast mRNAs upon the onset of differentiation. We also observe a stem cell specific increase in the frequency of longer poly(A) tails in these same mRNAs, showing that stem cells after Smed-not1 knock down fail to differentiate as they accumulate populations of transcripts with longer poly(A) tails. As other transcripts are unaffected our data hint at a targeted regulation of these key stem cell mRNAs by post-transcriptional regulators such as RNA-binding proteins or microRNAs. Together, our results show that the CCR4-NOT complex is crucial for stem cell differentiation and controls stem cell-specific degradation of mRNAs, thus providing clear mechanistic insight into this aspect of neoblast biology.

  5. The CCR4-NOT Complex Mediates Deadenylation and Degradation of Stem Cell mRNAs and Promotes Planarian Stem Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Solana, Jordi; Gamberi, Chiara; Mihaylova, Yuliana; Grosswendt, Stefanie; Chen, Chen; Lasko, Paul; Rajewsky, Nikolaus; Aboobaker, A. Aziz

    2013-01-01

    Post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms are of fundamental importance to form robust genetic networks, but their roles in stem cell pluripotency remain poorly understood. Here, we use freshwater planarians as a model system to investigate this and uncover a role for CCR4-NOT mediated deadenylation of mRNAs in stem cell differentiation. Planarian adult stem cells, the so-called neoblasts, drive the almost unlimited regenerative capabilities of planarians and allow their ongoing homeostatic tissue turnover. While many genes have been demonstrated to be required for these processes, currently almost no mechanistic insight is available into their regulation. We show that knockdown of planarian Not1, the CCR4-NOT deadenylating complex scaffolding subunit, abrogates regeneration and normal homeostasis. This abrogation is primarily due to severe impairment of their differentiation potential. We describe a stem cell specific increase in the mRNA levels of key neoblast genes after Smed-not1 knock down, consistent with a role of the CCR4-NOT complex in degradation of neoblast mRNAs upon the onset of differentiation. We also observe a stem cell specific increase in the frequency of longer poly(A) tails in these same mRNAs, showing that stem cells after Smed-not1 knock down fail to differentiate as they accumulate populations of transcripts with longer poly(A) tails. As other transcripts are unaffected our data hint at a targeted regulation of these key stem cell mRNAs by post-transcriptional regulators such as RNA-binding proteins or microRNAs. Together, our results show that the CCR4-NOT complex is crucial for stem cell differentiation and controls stem cell-specific degradation of mRNAs, thus providing clear mechanistic insight into this aspect of neoblast biology. PMID:24367277

  6. Qualitative effect on mRNAs of injury-associated proteins by cell phone like radiation in rat facial nerves.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ji-Geng; Agresti, Michael; Zhang, Lin-Ling; Yan, Yuhui; Matloub, Hani S

    2009-01-01

    Rats were exposed to cell phone radiation for 6 hours per day for 18 weeks. The buccal and mandibular branches of the facial nerve were evaluated for this study. The mRNA levels of four proteins that are usually up regulated when an injury has occurred were investigated; included were Calcium ATP-ase, Endothelin, Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule, and Neural Growth Factor. These isolated mRNAs were subjected to RT-PCR and all four were up regulated. The mandibular nerve showed a higher and broader level of up regulation than the buccal nerve. All four mRNA up regulations for the mandibular nerve and two for the buccal nerve were also statistically significant. These specific injury-related findings were mild. As the use of these cell phones continues, there most likely will be permanent damage to these tissues over the years and the likelihood of tumors, cancers, and system failures will potentially increase.

  7. MicroRNAs Align With Accessible Sites in Target mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Weihua; Xin, Ping; Clawson, Gary A.

    2015-01-01

    The importance of microRNAs (miRs) in control of gene expression is now clearly recognized. While individual microRNAs are thought to target hundreds of disparate mRNAs via imperfect base pairing, little is known about the characteristics of miR target sites. Here we show that the miRs can be aligned with empirically identified accessible sites in a target RNA (Cytokeratin 19, KRT), and that some of the aligned miRs functionally down-regulate KRT expression post-transcriptionally. We employed an RNase-H-based random library selection protocol to identify accessible sites in KRT RNA. We then aligned the Sanger Institute database collection of human miRs to KRT mRNA, and also aligned them using the web-based MicroInspector program. Most miRs aligned with the accessible sites identified empirically; those not aligned with the empirically identified sites also functioned effectively in RNase-H-based assays. Similar results were obtained with a second target RNA (Mammoglobin). Transient transfection assays established that some of the miRs which aligned with KRT significantly down-regulated it at the protein level, with no effect on RNA level. The functionally effective miRs aligned within the coding region of KRT, whereas a number of miRs which aligned with the 3′-untranslated region did not produce down-regulation. PMID:19998415

  8. Drosophila Syncrip modulates the expression of mRNAs encoding key synaptic proteins required for morphology at the neuromuscular junction.

    PubMed

    McDermott, Suzanne M; Yang, Lu; Halstead, James M; Hamilton, Russell S; Meignin, Carine; Davis, Ilan

    2014-10-01

    Localized mRNA translation is thought to play a key role in synaptic plasticity, but the identity of the transcripts and the molecular mechanism underlying their function are still poorly understood. Here, we show that Syncrip, a regulator of localized translation in the Drosophila oocyte and a component of mammalian neuronal mRNA granules, is also expressed in the Drosophila larval neuromuscular junction, where it regulates synaptic growth. We use RNA-immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing and qRT-PCR to show that Syncrip associates with a number of mRNAs encoding proteins with key synaptic functions, including msp-300, syd-1, neurexin-1, futsch, highwire, discs large, and α-spectrin. The protein levels of MSP-300, Discs large, and a number of others are significantly affected in syncrip null mutants. Furthermore, syncrip mutants show a reduction in MSP-300 protein levels and defects in muscle nuclear distribution characteristic of msp-300 mutants. Our results highlight a number of potential new players in localized translation during synaptic plasticity in the neuromuscular junction. We propose that Syncrip acts as a modulator of synaptic plasticity by regulating the translation of these key mRNAs encoding synaptic scaffolding proteins and other important components involved in synaptic growth and function.

  9. [Similar features in mechanisms of translation initiation of mRNAs in eukaryotic and prokaryotic systems].

    PubMed

    Andreev, D E; Terenin, I M; Dmitriev, S E; Shatskiĭ, I N

    2006-01-01

    Using as examples non-canonical features of translation initiation for some bacterial and mammalian mRNAs with unusual 5'- untranslated regions (5'-UTR) or lacking these regions (leaderless mRNAs), the authors of this review discuss similarities in mechanisms of translation initiation on prokaryotic and eukaryotic ribosomes.

  10. The essential polysome-associated RNA-binding protein RBP42 targets mRNAs involved in Trypanosoma brucei energy metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Das, Anish; Morales, Rachel; Banday, Mahrukh; Garcia, Stacey; Hao, Li; Cross, George A.M.; Estevez, Antonio M.; Bellofatto, Vivian

    2012-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins that target mRNA coding regions are emerging as regulators of post-transcriptional processes in eukaryotes. Here we describe a newly identified RNA-binding protein, RBP42, which targets the coding region of mRNAs in the insect form of the African trypanosome, Trypanosoma brucei. RBP42 is an essential protein and associates with polysome-bound mRNAs in the cytoplasm. A global survey of RBP42-bound mRNAs was performed by applying HITS-CLIP technology, which captures protein–RNA interactions in vivo using UV light. Specific RBP42–mRNA interactions, as well as mRNA interactions with a known RNA-binding protein, were purified using specific antibodies. Target RNA sequences were identified and quantified using high-throughput RNA sequencing. Analysis revealed that RBP42 bound mainly within the coding region of mRNAs that encode proteins involved in cellular energy metabolism. Although the mechanism of RBP42's function is unclear at present, we speculate that RBP42 plays a critical role in modulating T. brucei energy metabolism. PMID:22966087

  11. Enhanced translation by Nucleolin via G-rich elements in coding and non-coding regions of target mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Abdelmohsen, Kotb; Tominaga, Kumiko; Lee, Eun Kyung; Srikantan, Subramanya; Kang, Min-Ju; Kim, Mihee M; Selimyan, Roza; Martindale, Jennifer L; Yang, Xiaoling; Carrier, France; Zhan, Ming; Becker, Kevin G; Gorospe, Myriam

    2011-10-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) regulate gene expression at many post-transcriptional levels, including mRNA stability and translation. The RBP nucleolin, with four RNA-recognition motifs, has been implicated in cell proliferation, carcinogenesis and viral infection. However, the subset of nucleolin target mRNAs and the influence of nucleolin on their expression had not been studied at a transcriptome-wide level. Here, we globally identified nucleolin target transcripts, many of which encoded cell growth- and cancer-related proteins, and used them to find a signature motif on nucleolin target mRNAs. Surprisingly, this motif was very rich in G residues and was not only found in the 3'-untranslated region (UTR), but also in the coding region (CR) and 5'-UTR. Nucleolin enhanced the translation of mRNAs bearing the G-rich motif, since silencing nucleolin did not change target mRNA stability, but decreased the size of polysomes forming on target transcripts and lowered the abundance of the encoded proteins. In summary, nucleolin binds G-rich sequences in the CR and UTRs of target mRNAs, many of which encode cancer proteins, and enhances their translation.

  12. Interplay of viral miRNAs and host mRNAs and proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P.

    2011-10-01

    Recent experiments indicate that several viruses may encode microRNAs (miRNAs) in cells. Such RNAs may interfere with the host mRNAs and proteins. We present a kinetic analysis of this interplay. In our treatment, the viral miRNA is considered to be able to associate with the host mRNA with subsequent degradation. This process may result in a decline of the mRNA population and also in a decline of the population of the protein encoded by this mRNA. With these ingredients, we first show the types of the corresponding steady-state kinetics in the cases of positive and negative regulation of the miRNA synthesis by the protein. In addition, we scrutinize the situation when the protein regulates the virion replication or, in other words, provides a feedback for the replication. For the negative feedback, the replication rate is found to increase with increasing the intracellular virion population. For the positive feedback, the replication rate first increases and then drops. These features may determine the stability of steady states.

  13. Sequestration of mRNAs Modulates the Timing of Translation during Meiosis in Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Liang; Zhang, Kai; Xu, Yifeng; Sternglanz, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    Starvation of diploid cells of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae induces them to enter meiosis and differentiate into haploid spores. During meiosis, the precise timing of gene expression is controlled at the level of transcription, and also translation. If cells are returned to rich medium after they have committed to meiosis, the transcript levels of most meiotically upregulated genes decrease rapidly. However, for a subset of transcripts whose translation is delayed until the end of meiosis II, termed protected transcripts, the transcript levels remain stable even after nutrients are reintroduced. The Ime2-Rim4 regulatory circuit controls both the delayed translation and the stability of protected transcripts. These protected mRNAs localize in discrete foci, which are not seen for transcripts of genes with different translational timing and are regulated by Ime2. These results suggest that Ime2 and Rim4 broadly regulate translational delay but that additional factors, such as mRNA localization, modulate this delay to tune the timing of gene expression to developmental transitions during sporulation. PMID:26217015

  14. Sequestration of mRNAs Modulates the Timing of Translation during Meiosis in Budding Yeast.

    PubMed

    Jin, Liang; Zhang, Kai; Xu, Yifeng; Sternglanz, Rolf; Neiman, Aaron M

    2015-10-01

    Starvation of diploid cells of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae induces them to enter meiosis and differentiate into haploid spores. During meiosis, the precise timing of gene expression is controlled at the level of transcription, and also translation. If cells are returned to rich medium after they have committed to meiosis, the transcript levels of most meiotically upregulated genes decrease rapidly. However, for a subset of transcripts whose translation is delayed until the end of meiosis II, termed protected transcripts, the transcript levels remain stable even after nutrients are reintroduced. The Ime2-Rim4 regulatory circuit controls both the delayed translation and the stability of protected transcripts. These protected mRNAs localize in discrete foci, which are not seen for transcripts of genes with different translational timing and are regulated by Ime2. These results suggest that Ime2 and Rim4 broadly regulate translational delay but that additional factors, such as mRNA localization, modulate this delay to tune the timing of gene expression to developmental transitions during sporulation.

  15. Mitochondrial toxins in models of neurodegenerative diseases. II: Elevated zif268 transcription and independent temporal regulation of striatal D1 and D2 receptor mRNAs and D1 and D2 receptor-binding sites in C57BL/6 mice during MPTP treatment.

    PubMed

    Smith, T S; Trimmer, P A; Khan, S M; Tinklepaugh, D L; Bennett, J P

    1997-08-15

    Sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD) may arise from a defect in complex I of the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC), transmitted through mitochondrial DNA mutations. The N-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) model of experimental PD is believed to arise from loss of complex I activity in dopamine (DA) neurons after accumulation of MPP+, a potent complex I inhibitor and the two electron monoamine oxidase B oxidation product of MPTP. Acute MPP+ infusion into striatum, possibly mimicking the in vivo situation after MPTP treatment, increases release of DA and production of hydroxyl radical (-OH). We treated C57BL/6 mice with MPTP and followed the expression of the immediate-early gene zif268 in striatum as a marker of DA synaptic activity, determined the pharmacology of its activation during MPTP toxicity, and assayed the time course of MPTP effects on striatal DA transporter (DAT), and D1 and D2 DA receptor-binding sites and their mRNAs. MPTP (24 mg/kg b.i.d. for 4 doses) increased striatal zif268 expression, with peak effects observed 24 h after starting MPTP. Increased striatal zif268 was dependent mainly on DA D1 and to a lesser extent on non-NMDA glutamate receptors and was not altered by inhibition of nitric oxide synthase (NOS). Our MPTP schedule resulted in a loss of about one-third of nigral DA neurons. We observed with [3H]mazindol autoradiography that loss of striatal DAT sites after starting MPTP was heterogenous and greatest in centromedial striatum, reached a maximum at 48 h and showed a slight recovery at 2 weeks. Striatal D1 and D2 receptor-binding sites (measured with [3H]SCH23390 and [3H]spiperone binding, respectively) and mRNA levels for D1 and D2 receptors (determined with quantitative in situ hybridization) were altered after MPTP treatment in temporally independent manners. MPTP toxicity to the nigrostriatal system likely induces substantial striatal DA release in vivo and stimulates transcription of at least one major IEG

  16. A cross-talk between Hepatitis B virus and host mRNAs confers viral adaptation to liver

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jun; Xu, Yaxing; Li, Changfei; Hao, Junli; Peng, Shanxin; Chu, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Dake; Xu, Dongping; Meng, Songdong

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) chronically infects approximately 350 million people worldwide. The replication of HBV which genome is only 3.2 kb long relies heavily on host factors. Previous studies demonstrated that a highly expressed liver-specific microRNA (miRNA) miR-122 suppresses HBV expression and replication in multiple ways. In this study, we found that the miR-122 response elements in viral genome facilitate HBV expression and replication in miR-122 highly-expressed hepatocytes. Moreover, mutations in miR-122 response elements are correlated with viral loads and disease progression in HBV-infected patients. We next found that HBV mRNA with miR-122 response elements alone could lead to altered expression of multiple host genes by whole genome expression analysis. HBV mRNA-mediated miR-122 down-regulation plays a major role in HBV mRNA-induced differential gene expression. HBV mRNA could enhance viral replication via miR-122 degradation and the up-regulation of its target cyclin G1. Our study thereby reveals that under the unique condition of high abundance of miR-122 and viral mRNAs and much lower level of miR-122 target in HBV infection, HBV may have evolved to employ the miRNA-mediated virus and host mRNAs network for optimal fitness within hepatocytes. PMID:26184825

  17. Transduction of Growth or Mitogenic Signals into Translational Activation of TOP mRNAs Is Fully Reliant on the Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase-Mediated Pathway but Requires neither S6K1 nor rpS6 Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Stolovich, Miri; Tang, Hua; Hornstein, Eran; Levy, Galit; Cohen, Ruth; Bae, Sun Sik; Birnbaum, Morris J.; Meyuhas, Oded

    2002-01-01

    Translation of terminal oligopyrimidine tract (TOP) mRNAs, which encode multiple components of the protein synthesis machinery, is known to be controlled by mitogenic stimuli. We now show that the ability of cells to progress through the cell cycle is not a prerequisite for this mode of regulation. TOP mRNAs can be translationally activated when PC12 or embryonic stem (ES) cells are induced to grow (increase their size) by nerve growth factor and retinoic acid, respectively, while remaining mitotically arrested. However, both growth and mitogenic signals converge via the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-kinase)-mediated pathway and are transduced to efficiently translate TOP mRNAs. Translational activation of TOP mRNAs can be abolished by LY294002, a PI3-kinase inhibitor, or by overexpression of PTEN as well as by dominant-negative mutants of PI3-kinase or its effectors, PDK1 and protein kinase Bα (PKBα). Likewise, overexpression of constitutively active PI3-kinase or PKBα can relieve the translational repression of TOP mRNAs in quiescent cells. Both mitogenic and growth signals lead to phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 (rpS6), which precedes the translational activation of TOP mRNAs. Nevertheless, neither rpS6 phosphorylation nor its kinase, S6K1, is essential for the translational response of these mRNAs. Thus, TOP mRNAs can be translationally activated by growth or mitogenic stimuli of ES cells, whose rpS6 is constitutively unphosphorylated due to the disruption of both alleles of S6K1. Similarly, complete inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and its effector S6K by rapamycin in various cell lines has only a mild repressive effect on the translation of TOP mRNAs. It therefore appears that translation of TOP mRNAs is primarily regulated by growth and mitogenic cues through the PI3-kinase pathway, with a minor role, if any, for the mTOR pathway. PMID:12417714

  18. RBP16 is a multifunctional gene regulatory protein involved in editing and stabilization of specific mitochondrial mRNAs in Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    PELLETIER, MICHEL; READ, LAURIE K.

    2003-01-01

    RBP16 is a Trypanosoma brucei mitochondrial RNA-binding protein that associates with guide RNAs (gRNAs), mRNAs, and ribosomal RNAs. Based on its inclusion in the multifunctional Y-box protein family and its ability to bind multiple RNA classes, we hypothesized that RBP16 plays a role in diverse aspects of mitochondrial gene regulation. To gain insight into RBP16 function, we generated cells expressing less than 10% of wild-type RBP16 levels by tetracycline-regulated RNA interference (RNAi). Poisoned primer extension analyses revealed that edited, but not unedited, CYb mRNA is reduced by ∼98% in tetracycline-induced RBP16 RNAi cells, suggesting that RBP16 is critical for CYb RNA editing. The down-regulation of CYb editing in RBP16 RNAi transfectants apparently entails a defect in gRNA utilization, as gCYb[560] abundance is similar in uninduced and induced cells. We observed a surprising degree of specificity regarding the ability of RBP16 to modulate editing, as editing of mRNAs other than CYb is not significantly affected upon RBP16 disruption. However, the abundance of the never edited mitochondrial RNAs COI and ND4 is reduced by 70%–80% in RBP16 RNAi transfectants, indicating an additional role for RBP16 in the stabilization of these mRNAs. Analysis of RNAs bound to RBP16 immunoprecipitated from wild-type cells reveals that RBP16 is associated with multiple gRNA sequence classes in vivo, including those whose abundance and usage appear unaffected by RBP16 disruption. Overall, our results indicate that RBP16 is an accessory factor that regulates the editing and stability of specific populations of mitochondrial mRNAs. PMID:12649497

  19. Mapping circulating serum miRNAs to their immune-related target mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Nosirov, Bakhtiyor; Billaud, Joël; Vandenbon, Alexis; Diez, Diego; Wijaya, Edward; Ishii, Ken J; Teraguchi, Shunsuke; Standley, Daron M

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Evidence suggests that circulating serum microRNAs (miRNAs) might preferentially target immune-related mRNAs. If this were the case, we hypothesized that immune-related mRNAs would have more predicted serum miRNA binding sites than other mRNAs and, reciprocally, that serum miRNAs would have more immune-related mRNA targets than non-serum miRNAs. Materials and methods We developed a consensus target predictor using the random forest framework and calculated the number of predicted miRNA–mRNA interactions in various subsets of miRNAs (serum, non-serum) and mRNAs (immune related, nonimmune related). Results Immune-related mRNAs were predicted to be targeted by serum miRNA more than other mRNAs. Moreover, serum miRNAs were predicted to target many more immune-related mRNA targets than non-serum miRNAs; however, these two biases in immune-related mRNAs and serum miRNAs appear to be completely independent. Conclusion Immune-related mRNAs have more miRNA binding sites in general, not just for serum miRNAs; likewise, serum miRNAs target many more mRNAs than non-serum miRNAs overall, regardless of whether they are immune related or not. Nevertheless, these two independent phenomena result in a significantly larger number of predicted serum miRNA–immune mRNA interactions than would be expected by chance. PMID:28203094

  20. Acetylcholine receptor alpha-subunit and myogenin mRNAs in thymus and thymomas.

    PubMed Central

    Kornstein, M. J.; Asher, O.; Fuchs, S.

    1995-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disorder characterized in most cases by serological antibody against the acetylcholine receptor (AChR). Evidence for intrathymic localization of AChR suggests that the thymus has an important role in the pathogenesis of this disorder. Using reverse transcription followed by the polymerase chain reaction, we have demonstrated AChR alpha-subunit mRNA in thymuses and thymomas from patients with and without myasthenia gravis. We have also studied the expression of myogenin which is known to be involved in the regulation of AChR expression. By using the reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, we found myogenin mRNAs in all of the thymuses and thymomas. Thus, both AChR alpha-subunit and myogenin mRNA are present in all of these specimens. By immunohistochemistry myoid cells (desmin and myoglobin positive) were present in all (four of four) thymuses studied and in two of five thymomas. Thus, in thymomas, nonmyoid cells might express both AChR and myogenin. These results indicate that cells within the thymus and thymoma express AChR and its regulatory protein myogenin and that such cells, under certain conditions, might play a role in the triggering of myasthenia gravis. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7778671

  1. Herpes simplex virus ICP27 increases translation of a subset of viral late mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Fontaine-Rodriguez, Errin C; Knipe, David M

    2008-04-01

    The herpes simplex virus (HSV) ICP27 immediate-early protein plays an essential role in the expression of viral late genes. ICP27 is a multifunctional protein and has been reported to regulate multiple steps of mRNA synthesis and processing, including transcription, splicing, and nuclear export. Recently, ICP27 was reported to interact with translation factors and to stimulate translation of the viral late mRNA encoding VP16. We examined the effects of ICP27 on accumulation, nuclear export, and translation of HSV 1 (HSV-1) late mRNAs encoding VP16, ICP5, and gD. We confirm here that ICP27 stimulates translation of VP16 mRNA as well as an additional HSV-1 late ICP5 mRNA. The data presented here demonstrate that translation levels of both VP16 and ICP5 mRNA is reduced during infections with the ICP27-null virus mutant d27-1, and with ICP27 C-terminal deletion mutant viruses n406 and n504, compared to wild-type virus. In contrast, the translation of gD mRNA is not affected by the presence of ICP27 during infection. These data demonstrate that ICP27 functions to increase the translation levels of a subset of HSV-1 late genes, and this function requires the C terminus of ICP27.

  2. Expression Variations of miRNAs and mRNAs in Rice (Oryza sativa)

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Ming; Xie, Munan; He, Lian; Wang, Yushuai; Shi, Suhua; Tang, Tian

    2016-01-01

    Differences in expression levels are an important source of phenotypic variation within and between populations. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are key players in post-transcriptional gene regulation that are important for plant development and stress responses. We surveyed expression variation of miRNAs and mRNAs of six accessions from two rice subspecies Oryza sativa L. ssp. indica and Oryza sativa L. ssp. japonica using deep sequencing. While more than half (53.7%) of the mature miRNAs exhibit differential expression between grains and seedlings of rice, only 11.0% show expression differences between subspecies, with an additional 2.2% differentiated for the development-by-subspecies interaction. Expression variation is greater for lowly conserved miRNAs than highly conserved miRNAs, whereas the latter show stronger negative correlation with their targets in expression changes between subspecies. Using a permutation test, we identified 51 miRNA–mRNA pairs that correlate negatively or positively in expression level among cultivated rice. Genes involved in various metabolic processes and stress responses are enriched in the differentially expressed genes between rice indica and japonica subspecies. Our results indicate that stabilizing selection is the major force governing miRNA expression in cultivated rice, albeit positive selection may be responsible for much of the between-subspecies expression divergence. PMID:27797952

  3. PINK1 and Parkin control localized translation of respiratory chain component mRNAs on mitochondria outer membrane.

    PubMed

    Gehrke, Stephan; Wu, Zhihao; Klinkenberg, Michael; Sun, Yaping; Auburger, Georg; Guo, Su; Lu, Bingwei

    2015-01-06

    Mitochondria play essential roles in many aspects of biology, and their dysfunction has been linked to diverse diseases. Central to mitochondrial function is oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), accomplished by respiratory chain complexes (RCCs) encoded by nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. How RCC biogenesis is regulated in metazoans is poorly understood. Here we show that Parkinson's disease (PD)-associated genes PINK1 and Parkin direct localized translation of certain nuclear-encoded RCC (nRCC) mRNAs. Translationally repressed nRCC mRNAs are localized in a PINK1/Tom20-dependent manner to mitochondrial outer membrane, where they are derepressed and activated by PINK1/Parkin through displacement of translation repressors, including Pumilio and Glorund/hnRNP-F, a Parkin substrate, and enhanced binding of activators such as eIF4G. Inhibiting the translation repressors rescued nRCC mRNA translation and neuromuscular-degeneration phenotypes of PINK1 mutant, whereas inhibiting eIF4G had opposite effects. Our results reveal previously unknown functions of PINK1/Parkin in RNA metabolism and suggest new approaches to mitochondrial restoration and disease intervention.

  4. Expression of muscarinic acetylcholine and dopamine receptor mRNAs in rat basal ganglia

    SciTech Connect

    Weiner, D.M. Howard Hughes Medical Inst., Bethesda, MD ); Levey, A.I. Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD ); Brann, M.R. )

    1990-09-01

    Within the basal ganglia, acetylcholine and dopamine play a central role in the extrapyramidal control of motor function. The physiologic effects of these neurotransmitters are mediated by a diversity of receptor subtypes, several of which have now been cloned. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors are encoded by five genes (m1-m5), and of the two known dopamine receptor subtypes (D1 and D2) the D2 receptor gene has been characterized. To gain insight into the physiological roles of each of these receptor subtypes, the authors prepared oligodeoxynucleotide probes to localize receptor subtype mRNAs within the rat striatum and substantia nigra by in situ hybridization histochemistry. Within the striatum, three muscarinic (m1, m2, m4) receptor mRNAs and the D2 receptor mRNA were detected. The m1 mRNA was expressed in most neurons; the m2 mRNA, in neurons which were both very large and rare; and the m4 and D2 mRNAs, in 40-50% of the neurons, one-third of which express both mRNAs. Within the substantia nigra, pars compacta, only the m5 and D2 mRNAs were detected, and most neurons expressed both mRNAs. These data provide anatomical evidence for the identity of the receptor subtypes which mediate the diverse effects of muscarinic and dopaminergic drugs on basal ganglia function.

  5. Comparison of the structure and cell cycle expression of mRNAs encoded by two histone H3-H4 loci in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Cross, S L; Smith, M M

    1988-01-01

    The haploid genome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains two nonallelic sets of histone H3 and H4 gene pairs, termed the copy I and copy II loci. The structures of the mRNA transcripts from each of these four genes were examined by nuclease protection and primer extension mapping. For each gene, several species of mRNAs were identified that differed in the lengths of their 5' and 3' untranslated regions. The cell cycle accumulation pattern of the H3 and H4 mRNAs was determined in cells from early-exponential-growth cultures fractionated by centrifugal elutriation. The RNA transcripts from all four genes were regulated with the cell division cycle, and transcripts from the nonallelic gene copies showed tight temporal coordination. Cell cycle regulation did not depend on selection of a particular histone mRNA transcript since the ratio of the multiple species from each gene remained the same across the division cycle. Quantitative measurements showed significant differences in the amounts of mRNA expressed from the two nonallelic gene sets. The mRNAs from the copy II H3 and H4 genes were five to seven times more abundant than the mRNAs from the copy I genes. There was no dosage compensation in the steady-state levels of mRNA when either set of genes was deleted. In particular, there was no increase in the amount of copy I H3 or H4 transcripts in cells in which the high-abundance copy II genes were deleted. Images PMID:3280973

  6. Synthesis of full length cDNAs from four partially purified oviduct mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Buell, G N; Wickens, M P; Payvar, F; Schimke, R T

    1978-04-10

    Total poly(A)-containing RNA prepared from hen oviduct and centrifuged on an isokinetic sucrose gradient displays four peaks of optical absorbance. These have been identified by translation in vitro as lysozyme, ovomucoid, ovalbumin, and conalbumin mRNAs. Isolation and recentrifugation of the peaks results in partial purification of each mRNA. Molecular weights have been determined for the mRNAs on agarose gels containing 20 mM methylmercury hydroxide. Each mRNA possesses a number of apparently untranslated nucleotides ranging from approximately 900 bases for ovalbumin and conalbumin mRNAs to 200 bases for ovomucoid and lysozyme mRNAs. The mRNAs have been copied with avian myeloblastosis virus reverse transcriptase. Each mRNA with the exception of conalbumin gives rise to a high proportion of full length cDNA. Several parameters previously reported to influence the size distribution of cDNA had no effect on the length of cDNA made from any mRNA fraction. The proportion of full length copy does depend on the reverse transcriptase lot.

  7. Different mRNAs code for dopa decarboxylase in tissues of neuronal and nonneuronal origin

    SciTech Connect

    Krieger, M.; Coge, F.; Gros, F.; Thibault, J. )

    1991-03-15

    A cDNA clone for dopa decarboxylase has been isolated from a rat pheochromocytoma cDNA library and the cDNA sequence has been determined. It corresponds to an mRNA of 2094 nucleotides. The length of the mRNA was measured by primer-extension of rat pheochromocytoma RNA and the 5{prime} end of the sequence of the mRNA was confirmed by the PCR. A probe spanning the translation initiation site of the mRNA was used to hybridize with mRNAs from various organs of the rat. S1 nuclease digestion of the mRNAs annealed with this probe revealed two classes of mRNAs. The comparison of the cDNA sequence and published sequences for rat liver, human pheochromocytoma, and Droxophila dopa decarboxylase supported the conclusion that two mRNAs are produced: one is specific for tissue of neuronal origin and the other is specific for tissues of nonneuronal (mesodermal or endodermal) origin. The neuronal mRNA contains a 5{prime} untranslated sequence that is highly conserved between human and rat pheochromocytoma including a GA stretch. The coding sequence and the 3{prime} untranslated sequence of mRNAs from rat liver and pheochromocytoma are identical. The rat mRNA differs only in the 5{prime} untranslated region. Thus a unique gene codes for dopa decarboxylase and this gene gives rise to at least two transcripts presumably in response to different signals during development.

  8. Stability and movement of mRNAs and their encoded proteins in Xenopus oocytes

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    The stability and movement of several polyadenylated (poly A+) and nonpolyadenylated (poly A-) mRNAs in Xenopus oocytes have been examined. At least 50% of the poly A+ mRNA molecules (9S rabbit globin mRNA, chicken ovalbumin, and lysozyme) were stable in oocytes over a 48- h period, irrespective of the amount injected. About 50% of injected poly A- reovirus mRNAs was degraded within the first 24 h of injection, irrespective of the amount injected, although no further degradation was observed over an additional 24 h. The movement of all poly A+ mRNAs injected at either the animal or vegetal pole of the oocyte was very slow. Little movement of RNA from the animal half to the vegetal half was observed even 48 h after injection. In contrast, similar amounts of mRNA were present in both halves 48 h after vegetal pole injection. Similar results were obtained after injection of poly A- reovirus mRNAs. The movement of the proteins encoded by the poly A+ mRNAs was studied in the 6-h period after injection when little mRNA movement had occurred. 85% of the globin synthesized accumulated in the animal half irrespective of injection site. The movement of the sequestered secretory proteins ovalbumin and lysozyme in the same oocytes as globin was much slower; very little lysozyme appeared in the half of the oocyte opposite the site of injection. PMID:2858488

  9. Promoter sequences direct cytoplasmic localization and translation of mRNAs during starvation in yeast.

    PubMed

    Zid, Brian M; O'Shea, Erin K

    2014-10-02

    A universal feature of the response to stress and nutrient limitation is transcriptional upregulation of genes that encode proteins important for survival. Under many such conditions, the overall protein synthesis level is reduced, thereby dampening the stress response at the level of protein expression. For example, during glucose starvation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast), translation is rapidly repressed, yet the transcription of many stress- and glucose-repressed genes is increased. Here we show, using ribosomal profiling and microscopy, that this transcriptionally upregulated gene set consists of two classes: one class produces messenger RNAs that are translated during glucose starvation and are diffusely localized in the cytoplasm, including many heat-shock protein mRNAs; and the other class produces mRNAs that are not efficiently translated during glucose starvation and are concentrated in foci that co-localize with P bodies and stress granules, a class that is enriched for mRNAs involved in glucose metabolism. Surprisingly, the information specifying the differential localization and protein production of these two classes of mRNA is encoded in the promoter sequence: promoter responsiveness to heat-shock factor 1 (Hsf1) specifies diffuse cytoplasmic localization and higher protein production on glucose starvation. Thus, promoter sequences can influence not only the levels of mRNAs but also the subcellular localization of mRNAs and the efficiency with which they are translated, enabling cells to tailor protein production to the environmental conditions.

  10. Isoform/variant mRNAs for sex steroid hormone receptors in humans.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Shuji; Shoda, Tomoko; Kato, Junzo; Hoshi, Kazuhiko

    2003-04-01

    The open reading frames of human sex steroid hormone receptors (hSSHRs) are composed of eight exons. In addition, the presence of various exons - including 5'-untranslated exons, alternative coding exons and novel 'intronic' exons - has been demonstrated in the genes encoding hSSHRs. The isoform/variant hSSHR mRNAs generated from thes e exons can be tentatively classified into seven types. In type 1, different mRNAs are generated with the use of alternative transcription start sites. In type 2, one or more exons are skipped. In type 3, one or more exons are duplicated. In type 4, distinct mRNAs containing different 5'-untranslated exon(s) are synthesized. In type 5, distinct mRNAs possessing different coding exon(s) are generated. In type 6, mRNA is synthesized by intronic exons and coding exons 4/5-8. In type 7, mRNA with insertion of intronic exon(s) is generated. Here, we review the isoform/variant hSSHR mRNAs and the structure of the genes encoding them.

  11. The role of deadenylation in the degradation of unstable mRNAs in trypanosomes

    PubMed Central

    Schwede, Angela; Manful, Theresa; Jha, Bhaskar Anand; Helbig, Claudia; Bercovich, Natalia; Stewart, Mhairi; Clayton, Christine

    2009-01-01

    Removal of the poly(A) tail is the first step in the degradation of many eukaryotic mRNAs. In metazoans and yeast, the Ccr4/Caf1/Not complex has the predominant deadenylase activity, while the Pan2/Pan3 complex may trim poly(A) tails to the correct size, or initiate deadenylation. In trypanosomes, turnover of several constitutively-expressed or long-lived mRNAs is not affected by depletion of the 5′–3′ exoribonuclease XRNA, but is almost completely inhibited by depletion of the deadenylase CAF1. In contrast, two highly unstable mRNAs, encoding EP procyclin and a phosphoglycerate kinase, PGKB, accumulate when XRNA levels are reduced. We here show that degradation of EP mRNA was partially inhibited after CAF1 depletion. RNAi-targeting trypanosome PAN2 had a mild effect on global deadenylation, and on degradation of a few mRNAs including EP. By amplifying and sequencing degradation intermediates, we demonstrated that a reduction in XRNA had no effect on degradation of a stable mRNA encoding a ribosomal protein, but caused accumulation of EP mRNA fragments that had lost substantial portions of the 5′ and 3′ ends. The results support a model in which trypanosome mRNAs can be degraded by at least two different, partially independent, cytoplasmic degradation pathways attacking both ends of the mRNA. PMID:19596809

  12. Tissue specificity of epithelial keratins: differential expression of mRNAs from two multigene families.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, K H; Rheinwald, J G; Fuchs, E V

    1983-01-01

    Human epithelial cells cultured from stratified and simple squamous tissues all produce keratins of 40,000 to 58,000 daltons, but within this range the number and sizes vary with different epithelial cells. We have shown that this tissue-specific variation in the keratins is not due to posttranslational modification or processing, but rather to the differential expression of a family of heterogeneous but closely related mRNAs. All of these epithelial keratin mRNAs can be further grouped into two distinct subfamilies by their ability to hybridize with either of two cloned epidermal keratin cDNAs. All of the keratin mRNAs hybridize to one or the other, but not both, of the two cloned cDNAs. However, the mRNAs within each group hybridize with varying degrees of stringency, indicating that they are of similar but not identical sequence. Both types of keratin mRNAs are always expressed in every epithelial cell line studied, suggesting that filament assembly is dependent on the presence of both types of keratins. Within each of these two groups, the slight sequence differences in each class may reflect subtle tissue-specific variations in the structural and functional requirements of the epithelial cytoskeleton. Images PMID:6190074

  13. A peptide inhibitor of exportin1 blocks shuttling of the adenoviral E1B 55 kDa protein but not export of viral late mRNAs

    SciTech Connect

    Flint, S.J. . E-mail: sjflint@molbio.princeton.edu; Huang, Wenying; Goodhouse, Joseph; Kyin, Saw

    2005-06-20

    The human subgroup C adenoviral E1B 55 kDa and E4 Orf6 proteins are required for efficient nuclear export of viral late mRNAs, but the cellular pathway that mediates such export has not been identified. As a first step to develop a general approach to address this issue, we have assessed the utility of cell-permeable peptide inhibitors of cellular export receptors. As both E1B and E4 proteins have been reported to contain a leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES), we synthesized a cell-permeable peptide containing such an NES. This peptide induced substantial inhibition of export of the E1B protein, whereas a control, non-functional peptide did not. However, under the same conditions, the NES peptide had no effect on export of viral late mRNAs. These observations establish that viral late mRNAs are not exported by exportin1, as well as the value of peptide inhibitors in investigation of mRNA export regulation in adenovirus-infected cells.

  14. Shwachman-Bodian-Diamond syndrome (SBDS) protein deficiency impairs translation re-initiation from C/EBPα and C/EBPβ mRNAs.

    PubMed

    In, Kyungmin; Zaini, Mohamad A; Müller, Christine; Warren, Alan J; von Lindern, Marieke; Calkhoven, Cornelis F

    2016-05-19

    Mutations in the Shwachman-Bodian-Diamond Syndrome (SBDS) gene cause Shwachman-Diamond Syndrome (SDS), a rare congenital disease characterized by bone marrow failure with neutropenia, exocrine pancreatic dysfunction and skeletal abnormalities. The SBDS protein is important for ribosome maturation and therefore SDS belongs to the ribosomopathies. It is unknown, however, if loss of SBDS functionality affects the translation of specific mRNAs and whether this could play a role in the development of the clinical features of SDS. Here, we report that translation of the C/EBPα and -β mRNAs, that are indispensible regulators of granulocytic differentiation, is altered by SBDS mutations or knockdown. We show that SBDS function is specifically required for efficient translation re-initiation into the protein isoforms C/EBPα-p30 and C/EBPβ-LIP, which is controlled by a single cis-regulatory upstream open reading frame (uORF) in the 5' untranslated regions (5' UTRs) of both mRNAs. Furthermore, we show that as a consequence of the C/EBPα and -β deregulation the expression of MYC is decreased with associated reduction in proliferation, suggesting that failure of progenitor proliferation contributes to the haematological phenotype of SDS. Therefore, our study provides the first indication that disturbance of specific translation by loss of SBDS function may contribute to the development of the SDS phenotype.

  15. A peptide inhibitor of exportin1 blocks shuttling of the adenoviral E1B 55 kDa protein but not export of viral late mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Flint, S J; Huang, Wenying; Goodhouse, Joseph; Kyin, Saw

    2005-06-20

    The human subgroup C adenoviral E1B 55 kDa and E4 Orf6 proteins are required for efficient nuclear export of viral late mRNAs, but the cellular pathway that mediates such export has not been identified. As a first step to develop a general approach to address this issue, we have assessed the utility of cell-permeable peptide inhibitors of cellular export receptors. As both E1B and E4 proteins have been reported to contain a leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES), we synthesized a cell-permeable peptide containing such an NES. This peptide induced substantial inhibition of export of the E1B protein, whereas a control, non-functional peptide did not. However, under the same conditions, the NES peptide had no effect on export of viral late mRNAs. These observations establish that viral late mRNAs are not exported by exportin1, as well as the value of peptide inhibitors in investigation of mRNA export regulation in adenovirus-infected cells.

  16. Gene expression in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) fiber: cloning of the mRNAs.

    PubMed

    John, M E; Crow, L J

    1992-07-01

    Cotton, an important natural fiber, is a differentiated epidermal cell. The number of genes that are active in fiber cells is similar to those in leaf, ovule, or root tissues. Through differential screening of a fiber cDNA library, we isolated five cDNA clones that are preferentially expressed in fiber. One of the cDNA clones, pCKE6, corresponded to an abundant mRNA in fiber. Transcripts for E6 were detected throughout the development of the fiber. Immunoprecipitation of in vitro translation products and Western blot analysis of fiber proteins showed two polypeptides in the range of 30-32 kDa as the products of E6 mRNA. Sequence analysis and hybrid-selected RNA translation also suggest that E6 mRNAs encode two polypeptides. Concentrations of E6 mRNA and protein are highest during the late primary cell wall and early secondary cell wall synthesis stages. Sequence comparison of E6 with other known eukaryotic and prokaryotic genes reveals no significant homology (GenBank; December 1991). E6 or a homologous gene(s) is conserved in several members of Malvaceae as well as in one other fiber-producing plant, kapok, but is not found in several other plants examined or in Acetobacter xylinum. A genomic clone corresponding to pCKE6 was isolated, and the promoter element of the E6 gene was shown to direct the expression of a carrot extensin mRNA in a tissue-specific and developmentally regulated fashion in transgenic cotton plants.

  17. Translation dynamics of single mRNAs in live cells and neurons.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bin; Eliscovich, Carolina; Yoon, Young J; Singer, Robert H

    2016-06-17

    Translation is the fundamental biological process converting mRNA information into proteins. Single-molecule imaging in live cells has illuminated the dynamics of RNA transcription; however, it is not yet applicable to translation. Here, we report single-molecule imaging of nascent peptides (SINAPS) to assess translation in live cells. The approach provides direct readout of initiation, elongation, and location of translation. We show that mRNAs coding for endoplasmic reticulum (ER) proteins are translated when they encounter the ER membrane. Single-molecule fluorescence recovery after photobleaching provides direct measurement of elongation speed (5 amino acids per second). In primary neurons, mRNAs are translated in proximal dendrites but repressed in distal dendrites and display "bursting" translation. This technology provides a tool with which to address the spatiotemporal translation mechanism of single mRNAs in living cells.

  18. Single particle imaging of mRNAs crossing the nuclear pore: Surfing on the edge.

    PubMed

    Palazzo, Alexander F; Truong, Mathew

    2016-08-01

    Six years ago, the Singer lab published a landmark paper which described how individual mRNA particles cross the nuclear pore complex in mammalian tissue culture cells. This involved the simultaneous imaging of mRNAs, each labeled by a large number of tethered fluorescent proteins and fluorescently tagged nuclear pore components. Now two groups have applied this technique to the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Their results indicate that in the course of nuclear export, mRNAs likely engage complexes that are present on either side of the pore and that these interactions are modulated by proteins present in the messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) complex. These findings lend support to the notion that just before and/or after the completion of nuclear export, mRNPs undergo one or more maturation steps that prepare the packaged mRNAs for translation. These results represent new and exciting insights into the mechanism of mRNA nuclear export.

  19. Characterization and Complexity of Wheat Developing Endosperm mRNAs 1

    PubMed Central

    Pernollet, Jean-Claude; Vaillant, Victor

    1984-01-01

    Free and membrane-bound (MB) polysomes and the corresponding polyadenylated RNAs (polyA+ RNAs) have been isolated from developing wheat endosperm (Triticum aestivum L.) Free and MB poly(A)+ RNAs, analyzed on isokinetic sucrose gradient with [3H]polyuridylic acid [poly(U)] hybridization detection, appear to be 11S to 12S in size with a 7% poly(A) tail for MB RNAs. cDNAs synthesized using both of these mRNA populations in presence of a potent RNase inhibitor (RNasin), have been used for hybridization kinetics experiments. The mean square fitting analysis of the hybridization kinetics between MB cDNA and its template reveals the presence of two abundance classes representing roughly ⅔ and ⅓ of the MB poly(A)+ RNAs and containing the information for approximately 75 superabundant species (21,000 copies per cell) and 750 intermediate species (530 copies per cell), respectively. The mRNA population extracted from free polysomes is divided into three abundance classes. The first one is composed of superabundant sequences which would correspond to the MB superabundant mRNAs. The free mRNAs consist of about 11,000 diverse sequences, most of them being rare sequences. Heterologous hybridizations of MB cDNAs to free mRNAs have shown that some mRNAs are common to both populations. This could be explained either by a partial contamination or by free polysomes en route to their membrane destination. Contrary to the low number of diverse mRNAs corresponding to the legume seed storage proteins, the wheat endosperm superabundant mRNAs consist of about 75 different sequences which would encode most of the seed storage proteins, especially gliadins. Images Fig. 2 PMID:16663795

  20. Labeling of target mRNAs using a photo-reactive microRNA probe.

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Kosuke; Minami, Koichiro; Akao, Yukihiro; Ueno, Yoshihito

    2016-05-10

    To identify target mRNAs of an miRNA, we synthesized photo-reactive miRNA probes, which contained a photo-reactive nucleoside analog, 1-O-[4-(3-trifluoromethyl-3H-diazirine-3-yl)]benzyl-β-d-ribofuranose, in the middle of the strand. The photo-reactive miRNA-145 probe was found to specifically label the target mRNAs, FSCN1 and KLF4, by UV-A irradiation in human colon cancer DLD-1 cells.

  1. Isolation and functional property of mRNAs coding for human interleukin 2.

    PubMed

    Beck, H P; Schneider, E M; Wallenfels, B; Lipps, H J; Schott, H; Sonneborn, H; Wernet, P

    1984-03-01

    Interleukin 2 (IL 2) is a lymphokine with specific growth promoting properties for activated T cells. The isolation and purification of specific mRNAs coding for this protein is reported. The analysis of total poly A + containing RNA from PHA stimulated T lymphocytes on agarose gels reveals the existence of at least two different IL-2 mRNAs. Isolated RNAs have been microinjected separately into Xenopus laevis oocytes for translation and consecutively the synthesized proteins were tested for activity on alloactivated T cell lines which were dependent on IL-2 for growth. Both RNAs coded for a protein which displayed clearly detectable IL-2 activity.

  2. Messengers, motors and mysteries: sorting of eukaryotic mRNAs by cytoskeletal transport.

    PubMed

    Bullock, Simon L

    2011-10-01

    It has become increasingly apparent in recent years that the subcellular localization of specific mRNAs is a prevalent method for spatially controlling gene expression. In most cases, targeting of mRNAs is mediated by transport along cytoskeletal filaments by molecular motors. However, the means by which specific messages are recognized and linked to the motors are poorly understood. Here, I will provide an overview of recent progress in elucidating the molecular mechanisms and principles of mRNA transport, including several studies highlighting the co-operation of different motors during the localization process. Important outstanding questions will also be highlighted.

  3. Human Cells Cultured under Physiological Oxygen Utilize Two Cap-binding Proteins to recruit Distinct mRNAs for Translation.

    PubMed

    Timpano, Sara; Uniacke, James

    2016-05-13

    Translation initiation is a focal point of translational control and requires the binding of eIF4E to the 5' cap of mRNA. Under conditions of extreme oxygen depletion (hypoxia), human cells repress eIF4E and switch to an alternative cap-dependent translation mediated by a homolog of eIF4E, eIF4E2. This homolog forms a complex with the oxygen-regulated hypoxia-inducible factor 2α and can escape translation repression. This complex mediates cap-dependent translation under cell culture conditions of 1% oxygen (to mimic tumor microenvironments), whereas eIF4E mediates cap-dependent translation at 21% oxygen (ambient air). However, emerging evidence suggests that culturing cells in ambient air, or "normoxia," is far from physiological or "normal." In fact, oxygen in human tissues ranges from 1-11% or "physioxia." Here we show that two distinct modes of cap-dependent translation initiation are active during physioxia and act on separate pools of mRNAs. The oxygen-dependent activities of eIF4E and eIF4E2 are elucidated by observing their polysome association and the status of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (eIF4E-dependent) or hypoxia-inducible factor 2α expression (eIF4E2-dependent). We have identified oxygen conditions where eIF4E is the dominant cap-binding protein (21% normoxia or standard cell culture conditions), where eIF4E2 is the dominant cap-binding protein (1% hypoxia or ischemic diseases and cancerous tumors), and where both cap-binding proteins act simultaneously to initiate the translation of distinct mRNAs (1-11% physioxia or during development and stem cell differentiation). These data suggest that the physioxic proteome is generated by initiating translation of mRNAs via two distinct but complementary cap-binding proteins.

  4. Zar1 represses translation in Xenopus oocytes and binds to the TCS in maternal mRNAs with different characteristics than Zar2.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Tomomi M; Cook, Jonathan M; Kotter, Cassandra V; Khat, Terry; Silva, Kevin D; Ferreyros, Michael; Holt, Justin W; Knight, Jefferson D; Charlesworth, Amanda

    2013-10-01

    Maternal mRNAs are translationally regulated during early development. Zar1 and its closely related homolog, Zar2, are both crucial in early development. Xenopus laevis Zygote arrest 2 (Zar2) binds to the Translational Control Sequence (TCS) in maternal mRNAs and regulates translation. The molecular mechanism of Zar1 has not been described. Here we report similarities and differences between Xenopus Zar1 and Zar2. Analysis of Zar sequences in vertebrates revealed two Zar family members with conserved, characteristic amino acid differences in the C-terminal domain. The presence of only two vertebrate Zar proteins was supported by analyzing Zar1 synteny. We propose that the criteria for naming Zar sequences are based on the characteristic amino acids and the chromosomal context. We also propose reclassification of some Zar sequences. We found that Zar1 is expressed throughout oogenesis and is stable during oocyte maturation. The N-terminal domain of Zar1 repressed translation of a reporter construct in immature oocytes. Both Zar1 and Zar2 bound to the TCS in the Wee1 and Mos 3' UTRs using a zinc finger in the C-terminal domain. However, Zar1 had much higher affinity for RNA than Zar2. To show the functional significance of the conserved amino acid substitutions, these residues in Zar2 were mutated to those found in Zar1. We show that these residues contributed to the different RNA binding characteristics of Zar1 compared to Zar2. Our study shows that Zar proteins have generally similar molecular functions in the translational regulation of maternal mRNAs, but they may have different roles in early development.

  5. Variations in activin receptor, inhibin/activin subunit and follistatin mRNAs in human prostate tumour tissues

    PubMed Central

    Schaik, R H N van; Wierikx, C D J; Timmerman, M A; Oomen, M H; Weerden, W M van; Kwast, T H van der; Steenbrugge, G J van; Jong, F H de

    1999-01-01

    The possible role of activin in the regulation of malignant prostatic growth was studied using RNAase protection assays of activin receptors, inhibin/activin subunits and follistatin mRNAs in the human prostatic carcinoma cell lines LNCaP-FGC, -R and -LNO, in human prostatic carcinoma xenografts and in human prostatic tissue. Activin receptor types IA (ActRIA), IB (ActRIB), IIA (ActRIIA) and IIB (ActRIIB) mRNAs were generally expressed in prostate pithelial cells, with significantly lower levels of ActRIB mRNA in prostate tumour aterial when compared to non-malignant tissue (P< 0.05; Mann–Whitney U -test). Inhibin/activin βA- and βB-subunit mRNA expression was also found in prostate tissue. Androgen-independent xenografts expressed significantly lower amounts of βB-subunit mRNA when compared to androgen-dependent xenografts (P< 0.05). While βB-subunit mRNA was expressed by LNCaP-FGC and -LNO cells, virtually no expression was found in the androgen-independent LNCaP-R line. Inhibin α-subunit mRNA levels were low or undetectable in all samples investigated. Follistatin mRNA was undetectable in LNCaP-sublines, while low levels were found in prostatic tissues. In androgen-independent LNCaP-R cells, activin inhibited cell growth in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that prostate tumour progression is accompanied by a decrease of the inhibitory effect of locally produced activin by either a decrease in the expression of activin βB-subunit mRNA or by a decrease of ActRIB mRNA levels. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10638976

  6. Imperfect centered miRNA binding sites are common and can mediate repression of target mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) bind to mRNAs and target them for translational inhibition or transcriptional degradation. It is thought that most miRNA-mRNA interactions involve the seed region at the 5′ end of the miRNA. The importance of seed sites is supported by experimental evidence, although there is growing interest in interactions mediated by the central region of the miRNA, termed centered sites. To investigate the prevalence of these interactions, we apply a biotin pull-down method to determine the direct targets of ten human miRNAs, including four isomiRs that share centered sites, but not seeds, with their canonical partner miRNAs. Results We confirm that miRNAs and their isomiRs can interact with hundreds of mRNAs, and that imperfect centered sites are common mediators of miRNA-mRNA interactions. We experimentally demonstrate that these sites can repress mRNA activity, typically through translational repression, and are enriched in regions of the transcriptome bound by AGO. Finally, we show that the identification of imperfect centered sites is unlikely to be an artifact of our protocol caused by the biotinylation of the miRNA. However, the fact that there was a slight bias against seed sites in our protocol may have inflated the apparent prevalence of centered site-mediated interactions. Conclusions Our results suggest that centered site-mediated interactions are much more frequent than previously thought. This may explain the evolutionary conservation of the central region of miRNAs, and has significant implications for decoding miRNA-regulated genetic networks, and for predicting the functional effect of variants that do not alter protein sequence. PMID:24629056

  7. Characteristics of glycine receptors expressed by embryonic rat brain mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    García-Alcocer, Guadalupe; García-Colunga, Jesús; Martínez-Torres, Ataúlfo; Miledi, Ricardo

    2001-01-01

    A study was made of glycine (Gly) and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes injected with rat mRNAs isolated from the encephalon, midbrain, and brainstem of 18-day-old rat embryos. In oocytes injected with encephalon, midbrain, or brainstem mRNAs, the Gly-current amplitudes (membrane current elicited by Gly; 1 mM Gly) were respectively 115 ± 35, 346 ± 28, and 389 ± 22 nA, whereas the GABA-currents (1 mM GABA) were all ≤40 nA. Moreover, the Gly-currents desensitized faster in oocytes injected with encephalon or brainstem mRNAs. The EC50 for Gly was 611 ± 77 μM for encephalon, 661 ± 28 μM for midbrain, and 506 ± 18 μM for brainstem mRNA-injected oocytes, and the corresponding Hill coefficients were all ≈2. Strychnine inhibited all of the Gly-currents, with an IC50 of 56 ± 3 nM for encephalon, 97 ± 4 nM for midbrain, and 72 ± 4 nM for brainstem mRNAs. During repetitive Gly applications, the Gly-currents were potentiated by 1.6-fold for encephalon, 2.1-fold for midbrain, and 1.3-fold for brainstem RNA-injected oocytes. Raising the extracellular Ca2+ concentration significantly increased the Gly-currents in oocytes injected with midbrain and brainstem mRNAs. Reverse transcription–PCR studies showed differences in the Gly receptor (GlyR) α-subunits expressed, whereas the β-subunit was present in all three types of mRNA. These results indicate differential expression of GlyR mRNAs in the brain areas examined, and these mRNAs lead to the expression of GlyRs that have different properties. The modulation of GlyRs by Ca2+ could play important functions during brain development. PMID:11226317

  8. Method for the isolation and identification of mRNAs, microRNAs and protein components of ribonucleoprotein complexes from cell extracts using RIP-Chip.

    PubMed

    Dahm, Garrett M; Gubin, Matthew M; Magee, Joseph D; Techasintana, Patsharaporn; Calaluce, Robert; Atasoy, Ulus

    2012-09-29

    As a result of the development of high-throughput sequencing and efficient microarray analysis, global gene expression analysis has become an easy and readily available form of data collection. In many research and disease models however, steady state levels of target gene mRNA does not always directly correlate with steady state protein levels. Post-transcriptional gene regulation is a likely explanation of the divergence between the two. Driven by the binding of RNA Binding Proteins (RBP), post-transcriptional regulation affects mRNA localization, stability and translation by forming a Ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex with target mRNAs. Identifying these unknown de novo mRNA targets from cellular extracts in the RNP complex is pivotal to understanding mechanisms and functions of the RBP and their resulting effect on protein output. This protocol outlines a method termed RNP immunoprecipitation-microarray (RIP-Chip), which allows for the identification of specific mRNAs associated in the ribonucleoprotein complex, under changing experimental conditions, along with options to further optimize an experiment for the individual researcher. With this important experimental tool, researchers can explore the intricate mechanisms associated with post-transcriptional gene regulation as well as other ribonucleoprotein interactions.

  9. Altered expression of retinoic acid (RA) receptor mRNAs in the fetal mouse secondary palate by all-trans and 13-cis RAs: implications for RA-induced teratogenesis.

    PubMed

    Naitoh, H; Mori, C; Nishimura, Y; Shiota, K

    1998-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) is mandatory for various biological processes and normal embryonic development but is teratogenic at high concentrations. In rodents, one of the major malformations induced by RA is cleft palate (CP). RA mediates its effects by RA receptors (RARs), but the expression patterns of RARs in the developing palate are still unclear. We investigated the normal expression of RAR alpha, beta, and gamma messenger RNAs (mRNAs) in the fetal mouse secondary palate and the effects of all-trans and 13-cis RAs on the expression of RAR mRNAs by Northern blot analysis. RAR alpha (2.8, 3.8 kb), RAR beta (3.3 kb), and RAR gamma (3.7 kb) mRNAs were detected in the fetal palate on gestational days (GD) 12.5-14.5. The expression of RAR alpha and gamma mRNAs did not show apparent sequential changes, but that of RAR beta mRNA increased at GD 13.5. Treatment of pregnant mice with 100 mg/kg all-trans RA induced CP in 94% of the fetuses and elevated the levels of RAR beta and gamma mRNAs in the fetal palate. The up-regulation of RAR beta mRNA by all-trans RA was more marked than that of RAR gamma mRNA. Treatment with 100 mg/kg 13-cis RA induced CP in only 19% of the fetuses. Although 13-cis RA elevated the RAR beta and gamma mRNA levels in fetal palates, its up-regulation was slower and less marked than that induced by all-trans RA. These findings indicate that the induction of RAR beta mRNA in the fetal palate correlates well with the tissue concentration of all-trans RA after RA treatment, and RAR beta may be one of the most influential candidate molecules for RA-induced teratogenesis.

  10. Obesity-Dependent Increases in Oocyte mRNAs Are Associated With Increases in Proinflammatory Signaling and Gut Microbial Abundance of Lachnospiraceae in Female Mice.

    PubMed

    Xie, Fang; Anderson, Christopher L; Timme, Kelsey R; Kurz, Scott G; Fernando, Samodha C; Wood, Jennifer R

    2016-04-01

    RNAs stored in the metaphase II-arrested oocyte play important roles in successful embryonic development. Their abundance is defined by transcriptional activity during oocyte growth and selective degradation of transcripts during LH-induced oocyte maturation. Our previous studies demonstrated that mRNA abundance is increased in mature ovulated oocytes collected from obese humans and mice and therefore may contribute to reduced oocyte developmental competence associated with metabolic dysfunction. In the current study mouse models of diet-induced obesity were used to determine whether obesity-dependent increases in proinflammatory signaling regulate ovarian abundance of oocyte-specific mRNAs. The abundance of oocyte-specific Bnc1, Dppa3, and Pou5f1 mRNAs as well as markers of proinflammatory signaling were significantly increased in ovaries of obese compared with lean mice which were depleted of fully grown preovulatory follicles. Chromatin-immunoprecipitation analyses also demonstrated increased association of phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 with the Pou5f1 promoter in ovaries of obese mice suggesting that proinflammatory signaling regulates transcription of this gene in the oocyte. The cecum microbial content of lean and obese female mice was subsequently examined to identify potential relationships between microbial composition and proinflammatory signaling in the ovary. Multivariate Association with Linear Models identified significant positive correlations between cecum abundance of the bacterial family Lachnospiraceae and ovarian abundance of Tnfa as well as Dppa3, Bnc1, and Pou5f1 mRNAs. Together, these data suggest that diet-induced changes in gut microbial composition may be contributing to ovarian inflammation which in turn alters ovarian gene expression and ultimately contributes to obesity-dependent reduction in oocyte quality and development of infertility in obese patients.

  11. DND1 maintains germline stem cells via recruitment of the CCR4-NOT complex to target mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Yamaji, Masashi; Jishage, Miki; Meyer, Cindy; Suryawanshi, Hemant; Der, Evan; Yamaji, Misaki; Garzia, Aitor; Morozov, Pavel; Manickavel, Sudhir; McFarland, Hannah L; Roeder, Robert G; Hafner, Markus; Tuschl, Thomas

    2017-03-23

    The vertebrate-conserved RNA-binding protein DND1 is required for the survival of primordial germ cells (PGCs), as well as the suppression of germ cell tumours in mice. Here we show that in mice DND1 binds a UU(A/U) trinucleotide motif predominantly in the 3' untranslated regions of mRNA, and destabilizes target mRNAs through direct recruitment of the CCR4-NOT deadenylase complex. Transcriptomic analysis reveals that the extent of suppression is dependent on the number of DND1-binding sites. This DND1-dependent mRNA destabilization is required for the survival of mouse PGCs and spermatogonial stem cells by suppressing apoptosis. The spectrum of target RNAs includes positive regulators of apoptosis and inflammation, and modulators of signalling pathways that regulate stem-cell pluripotency, including the TGFβ superfamily, all of which are aberrantly elevated in DND1-deficient PGCs. We propose that the induction of the post-transcriptional suppressor DND1 synergizes with concurrent transcriptional changes to ensure precise developmental transitions during cellular differentiation and maintenance of the germ line.

  12. Kid cleaves specific mRNAs at UUACU sites to rescue the copy number of plasmid R1.

    PubMed

    Pimentel, Belén; Madine, Mark A; de la Cueva-Méndez, Guillermo

    2005-10-05

    Stability and copy number of extra-chromosomal elements are tightly regulated in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Toxin Kid and antitoxin Kis are the components of the parD stability system of prokaryotic plasmid R1 and they can also function in eukaryotes. In bacteria, Kid was thought to become active only in cells that lose plasmid R1 and to cleave exclusively host mRNAs at UA(A/C/U) trinucleotide sites to eliminate plasmid-free cells. Instead, we demonstrate here that Kid becomes active in plasmid-containing cells when plasmid copy number decreases, cleaving not only host- but also a specific plasmid-encoded mRNA at the longer and more specific target sequence UUACU. This specific cleavage by Kid inhibits bacterial growth and, at the same time, helps to restore the plasmid copy number. Kid targets a plasmid RNA that encodes a repressor of the synthesis of an R1 replication protein, resulting in increased plasmid DNA replication. This mechanism resembles that employed by some human herpesviruses to regulate viral amplification during infection.

  13. Expression of mRNAs coding for the alpha 1 chain of type XIII collagen in human fetal tissues: comparison with expression of mRNAs for collagen types I, II, and III

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the topographic distribution of the multiple mRNAs coding for a novel human short-chain collagen, the alpha 1 chain of type XIII collagen. To identify the tissues and cells expressing these mRNAs, human fetal tissues of 15-19 gestational wk were studied by Northern and in situ hybridizations. The distribution pattern of the type XIII collagen mRNAs was compared with that of fibrillar collagen types I, II, and III using specific human cDNA probes for each collagen type. Northern hybridization showed the bone, cartilage, intestine, skin, and striated muscle to contain mRNAs for type XIII collagen. An intense in situ hybridization signal was obtained with the type XIII collagen cDNAs in the epidermis, hair follicles, and nail root cells of the skin, whereas the fibrillar collagen mRNAs were detected in the dermis. Cells in the intestinal mucosal layer also appeared to contain high levels of alpha 1(XIII) collagen mRNAs, but contained none of the fibrillar collagen mRNAs. In the bone and striated muscle, alpha 1(XIII) collagen mRNAs were detected in the mesenchymal cells forming the reticulin fibers of the bone marrow and endomycium. The hybridization signal obtained with the alpha 1(XIII) collagen cDNA probe in cartilaginous areas of the growth plates was similar, but less intense, to that obtained with the type II collagen probe. A clear hybridization signal was also detected at the (pre)articular surfaces and at the margins of the epiphyses, whereas it was weaker in the resting chondrocytes in the middle of the epiphyses. The brain, heart, kidney, liver, lung, placenta, spleen, testis, tendon, and thymus did not appear to contain alpha 1(XIII) collagen mRNAs. PMID:2768343

  14. The 3'-terminal region of the mRNAs for VSG and procyclin can confer stage specificity to gene expression in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Berberof, M; Vanhamme, L; Tebabi, P; Pays, A; Jefferies, D; Welburn, S; Pays, E

    1995-06-15

    The variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) and procyclin are the respective major surface antigens of the bloodstream and the procyclic forms of Trypanosoma brucei. These proteins and their mRNAs are both the most abundant and absolutely characteristic of their respective life cycle stages. We show that the 3'-terminal region of these mRNAs regulates expression of a reporter gene in an inverse manner, depending on the developmental form of the parasite. In the case of VSG mRNA, the 97 nt sequence upstream from the polyadenylation site is responsible for these effects. The regulation occurs through a variation of mRNA abundance which is not due to a change in primary transcription. In the bloodstream form this effect is manifested by an increase in RNA stability, whereas in the procyclic form it seems to be related to a reduction in the efficiency of mRNA maturation. The 3'-end of VSG mRNA can obviate the 5- to 10-fold stimulation of transcription driven by the procyclin promoter during differentiation from the bloodstream to the procyclic form. The predominance of posttranscriptional over transcriptional controls is probably linked to the organization of the trypanosome genome in polycistronic transcription units.

  15. A cell type-specific view on the translation of mRNAs from ROS-responsive genes upon paraquat treatment of Arabidopsis thaliana leaves.

    PubMed

    Benina, Maria; Ribeiro, Dimas Mendes; Gechev, Tsanko S; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd; Schippers, Jos H M

    2015-02-01

    Oxidative stress causes dramatic changes in the expression levels of many genes. The formation of a functional protein through successful mRNA translation is central to a coordinated cellular response. To what extent the response towards reactive oxygen species (ROS) is regulated at the translational level is poorly understood. Here we analysed leaf- and tissue-specific translatomes using a set of transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana lines expressing a FLAG-tagged ribosomal protein to immunopurify polysome-bound mRNAs before and after oxidative stress. We determined transcript levels of 171 ROS-responsive genes upon paraquat treatment, which causes formation of superoxide radicals, at the whole-organ level. Furthermore, the translation of mRNAs was determined for five cell types: mesophyll, bundle sheath, phloem companion, epidermal and guard cells. Mesophyll and bundle sheath cells showed the strongest response to paraquat treatment. Interestingly, several ROS-responsive transcription factors displayed cell type-specific translation patterns, while others were translated in all cell types. In part, cell type-specific translation could be explained by the length of the 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR) and the presence of upstream open reading frames (uORFs). Our analysis reveals insights into the translational regulation of ROS-responsive genes, which is important to understanding cell-specific responses and functions during oxidative stress.

  16. Endogenous siRNAs Derived from Transposons and mRNAs in Drosophila Somatic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ghildiyal, Megha; Seitz, Hervé; Horwich, Michael D.; Li, Chengjian; Du, Tingting; Lee, Soohyun; Xu, Jia; Kittler, Ellen L.W.; Zapp, Maria L.; Weng, Zhiping; Zamore, Phillip D.

    2009-01-01

    Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) direct RNA interference (RNAi) in eukaryotes. In flies, somatic cells produce siRNAs from exogenous double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) as a defense against viral infection. We identified endogenous siRNAs (endo-siRNAs), 21 nucleotides in length, that correspond to transposons and heterochromatic sequences in the somatic cells of Drosophila melanogaster. We also detected endo-siRNAs complementary to messenger RNAs (mRNAs); these siRNAs disproportionately mapped to the complementary regions of overlapping mRNAs predicted to form double-stranded RNA in vivo. Normal accumulation of somatic endo-siRNAs requires the siRNA-generating ribonuclease Dicer-2 and the RNAi effector protein Argonaute2 (Ago2). We propose that endo-siRNAs generated by the fly RNAi pathway silence selfish genetic elements in the soma, much as Piwi-interacting RNAs do in the germ line. PMID:18403677

  17. Sequence-dependent but not sequence-specific piRNA adhesion traps mRNAs to the germ plasm

    PubMed Central

    Vrettos, Nicholas; Maragkakis, Manolis; Mourelatos, Zissimos

    2016-01-01

    The conserved Piwi family of proteins and piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) play a central role in genomic stability, which is inextricably tied with germ cell formation, by forming ribonucleoproteins (piRNPs) that silence transposable elements (TEs)1. In Drosophila melanogaster and other animals, primordial germ cell (PGC) specification in the developing embryo is driven by maternal mRNAs and proteins that assemble into specialized mRNPs localized in the germ (pole) plasm at the posterior of the oocyte2,3. Maternal piRNPs, especially those loaded on Aubergine (Aub), a Piwi protein, are transmitted to the germ plasm to initiate transposon silencing in the offspring germline4–7. Transport of mRNAs to the oocyte by midoogenesis is an active, microtubule-dependent process8; mRNAs necessary for PGC formation are enriched in the germ plasm at late oogenesis via a diffusion and entrapment mechanism, whose molecular identity remains unknown8,9. Aub is a central component of germ granule RNPs, which house mRNAs in the germ plasm10–12 and interactions between Aub and Tudor are essential for the formation of germ granules13–16. Here we show that Aub-loaded piRNAs use partial base pairing characteristic of Argonaute RNPs to bind mRNAs randomly, acting as an adhesive trap that captures mRNAs in the germ plasm, in a Tudor-dependent manner. Strikingly, germ plasm mRNAs in Drosophilids are generally longer and more abundant than other mRNAs, suggesting that they provide more target sites for piRNAs to promote their preferential tethering in germ granules. Thus complexes containing Tudor, Aub piRNPs and mRNAs couple piRNA inheritance with germline specification. Our findings reveal an unexpected function for Piwi ribonucleoprotein complexes in mRNA trapping that may be generally relevant to the function of animal germ granules. PMID:26950602

  18. Fragile X mental retardation protein FMRP binds mRNAs in the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Miri; Bellini, Michel; Ceman, Stephanie

    2009-01-01

    The fragile X mental retardation protein FMRP is an RNA binding protein that associates with a large collection of mRNAs. Since FMRP was previously shown to be a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling protein, we examined the hypothesis that FMRP binds its cargo mRNAs in the nucleus. The enhanced green fluorescent protein-tagged FMRP construct (EGFP-FMRP) expressed in Cos-7 cells was efficiently exported from the nucleus in the absence of its nuclear export sequence and in the presence of a strong nuclear localization sequence (the simian virus 40 [SV40] NLS), suggesting an efficient mechanism for nuclear export. We hypothesized that nuclear FMRP exits the nucleus through its bound mRNAs. Using silencing RNAs to the bulk mRNA exporter Tap/NXF1, we observed a significantly increased number of cells containing EGFP-FMRP in the nucleus, which was further augmented by removal of FMRP's nuclear export sequence. Nuclear-retained SV40-FMRP could be released upon treatment with RNase. Further, Tap/NXF1 coimmunoprecipitated with EGFP-FMRP in an RNA-dependent manner and contained the FMR1 mRNA. To determine whether FMRP binds pre-mRNAs cotranscriptionally, we expressed hemagglutinin-SV40 FMRP in amphibian oocytes and found it, as well as endogenous Xenopus FMRP, on the active transcription units of lampbrush chromosomes. Collectively, our data provide the first lines of evidence that FMRP binds mRNA in the nucleus.

  19. Reprogramming of Pancreatic Exocrine Cells AR42J Into Insulin-producing Cells Using mRNAs for Pdx1, Ngn3, and MafA Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Koblas, Tomas; Leontovyc, Ivan; Loukotova, Sarka; Kosinova, Lucie; Saudek, Frantisek

    2016-01-01

    Direct reprogramming of pancreatic nonendocrine cells into insulin-producing β-cells represents a promising approach for the treatment of insulin-dependent diabetes. However, its clinical application is limited by the potential for insertional mutagenesis associated with the viral vectors currently used for cell reprogramming. With the aim of developing a nonintegrative reprogramming strategy for derivation of insulin-producing cells, here, we evaluated a new approach utilizing synthetic messenger RNAs encoding reprogramming transcription factors. Administration of synthetic mRNAs encoding three key transcription regulators of β-cell differentiation—Pdx1, Neurogenin3, and MafA—efficiently reprogrammed the pancreatic exocrine cells into insulin-producing cells. In addition to the insulin genes expression, the synthetic mRNAs also induced the expressions of genes important for proper pancreatic β-cell function, including Sur1, Kir6.2, Pcsk1, and Pcsk2. Pretreating cells with the chromatin-modifying agent 5-Aza-2′-deoxycytidine further enhanced reprogramming efficiency, increasing the proportion of insulin-producing cells from 3.5 ± 0.9 to 14.3 ± 1.9% (n = 4). Moreover, 5-Aza-2′-deoxycytidine pretreatment enabled the reprogrammed cells to respond to glucose challenge with increased insulin secretion. In conclusion, our results support that the reprogramming of pancreatic exocrine cells into insulin-producing cells, induced by synthetic mRNAs encoding pancreatic transcription factors, represents a promising approach for cell-based diabetes therapy. PMID:27187823

  20. An "up, no change, or down" system: Time-dependent expression of mRNAs in contused skeletal muscle of rats used for wound age estimation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jun-Hong; Zhu, Xi-Yan; Dong, Ta-Na; Zhang, Xiao-Hong; Liu, Qi-Qing; Li, San-Qiang; Du, Qiu-Xiang

    2017-03-01

    The combined use of multiple markers is considered a promising strategy in estimating the age of wounds. We sought to develop an "up, no change, or down" system and to explore how to combine and use various parameters. In total, 78 Sprague Dawley rats were divided randomly into a control group and contusion groups of 4-, 8-, 12-, 16-, 20-, 24-, 28-, 32-, 36-, 40-, 44-, and 48-h post-injury (n=6 per group). A contusion was produced in the right limb of the rats under diethyl ether anesthesia by a drop-ball technique; the animals were sacrificed at certain time points thereafter, using a lethal dose of pentobarbital. Levels of PUM2, TAB2, GJC1, and CHRNA1 mRNAs were detected in contused muscle using real-time PCR. An up, no change, or down system was developed with the relative quantities of the four mRNAs recorded as black, dark gray, or light gray boxes, representing up-, no change, or down-regulation of the gene of interest during wound repair. The four transcripts were combined and used as a marker cluster for color model analysis of each contusion group. Levels of PUM2, TAB2, and GJC1 mRNAs decreased, whereas that of CHRNA1 increased in wound repair (P<0.05). The up, no change, or down system was adequate to distinguish most time groups with the color model. Thus, the proposed up, no change, or down system provide the means to determine the minimal periods of early wounds.

  1. Deletion of intestinal epithelial insulin receptor attenuates high-fat diet-induced elevations in cholesterol and stem, enteroendocrine, and Paneth cell mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Andres, Sarah F; Santoro, M Agostina; Mah, Amanda T; Keku, J Adeola; Bortvedt, Amy E; Blue, R Eric; Lund, P Kay

    2015-01-15

    The insulin receptor (IR) regulates nutrient uptake and utilization in multiple organs, but its role in the intestinal epithelium is not defined. This study developed a mouse model with villin-Cre (VC) recombinase-mediated intestinal epithelial cell (IEC)-specific IR deletion (VC-IR(Δ/Δ)) and littermate controls with floxed, but intact, IR (IR(fl/fl)) to define in vivo roles of IEC-IR in mice fed chow or high-fat diet (HFD). We hypothesized that loss of IEC-IR would alter intestinal growth, biomarkers of intestinal epithelial stem cells (IESC) or other lineages, body weight, adiposity, and glucose or lipid handling. In lean, chow-fed mice, IEC-IR deletion did not affect body or fat mass, plasma glucose, or IEC proliferation. In chow-fed VC-IR(Δ/Δ) mice, mRNA levels of the Paneth cell marker lysozyme (Lyz) were decreased, but markers of other differentiated lineages were unchanged. During HFD-induced obesity, IR(fl/fl) and VC-IR(Δ/Δ) mice exhibited similar increases in body and fat mass, plasma insulin, mRNAs encoding several lipid-handling proteins, a decrease in Paneth cell number, and impaired glucose tolerance. In IR(fl/fl) mice, HFD-induced obesity increased circulating cholesterol; numbers of chromogranin A (CHGA)-positive enteroendocrine cells (EEC); and mRNAs encoding Chga, glucose-dependent insulinotrophic peptide (Gip), glucagon (Gcg), Lyz, IESC biomarkers, and the enterocyte cholesterol transporter Scarb1. All these effects were attenuated or lost in VC-IR(Δ/Δ) mice. These results demonstrate that IEC-IR is not required for normal growth of the intestinal epithelium in lean adult mice. However, our findings provide novel evidence that, during HFD-induced obesity, IEC-IR contributes to increases in EEC, plasma cholesterol, and increased expression of Scarb1 or IESC-, EEC-, and Paneth cell-derived mRNAs.

  2. Deletion of intestinal epithelial insulin receptor attenuates high-fat diet-induced elevations in cholesterol and stem, enteroendocrine, and Paneth cell mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Andres, Sarah F.; Santoro, M. Agostina; Mah, Amanda T.; Keku, J. Adeola; Bortvedt, Amy E.; Blue, R. Eric

    2014-01-01

    The insulin receptor (IR) regulates nutrient uptake and utilization in multiple organs, but its role in the intestinal epithelium is not defined. This study developed a mouse model with villin-Cre (VC) recombinase-mediated intestinal epithelial cell (IEC)-specific IR deletion (VC-IRΔ/Δ) and littermate controls with floxed, but intact, IR (IRfl/fl) to define in vivo roles of IEC-IR in mice fed chow or high-fat diet (HFD). We hypothesized that loss of IEC-IR would alter intestinal growth, biomarkers of intestinal epithelial stem cells (IESC) or other lineages, body weight, adiposity, and glucose or lipid handling. In lean, chow-fed mice, IEC-IR deletion did not affect body or fat mass, plasma glucose, or IEC proliferation. In chow-fed VC-IRΔ/Δ mice, mRNA levels of the Paneth cell marker lysozyme (Lyz) were decreased, but markers of other differentiated lineages were unchanged. During HFD-induced obesity, IRfl/fl and VC-IRΔ/Δ mice exhibited similar increases in body and fat mass, plasma insulin, mRNAs encoding several lipid-handling proteins, a decrease in Paneth cell number, and impaired glucose tolerance. In IRfl/fl mice, HFD-induced obesity increased circulating cholesterol; numbers of chromogranin A (CHGA)-positive enteroendocrine cells (EEC); and mRNAs encoding Chga, glucose-dependent insulinotrophic peptide (Gip), glucagon (Gcg), Lyz, IESC biomarkers, and the enterocyte cholesterol transporter Scarb1. All these effects were attenuated or lost in VC-IRΔ/Δ mice. These results demonstrate that IEC-IR is not required for normal growth of the intestinal epithelium in lean adult mice. However, our findings provide novel evidence that, during HFD-induced obesity, IEC-IR contributes to increases in EEC, plasma cholesterol, and increased expression of Scarb1 or IESC-, EEC-, and Paneth cell-derived mRNAs. PMID:25394660

  3. Cellular Selenoprotein mRNA Tethering via Antisense Interactions with Ebola and HIV-1 mRNAs May Impact Host Selenium Biochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Ethan Will; Ruzicka, Jan A.; Premadasa, Lakmini; Zhao, Lijun

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of protein expression by non-coding RNAs typically involves effects on mRNA degradation and/or ribosomal translation. The possibility of virus-host mRNA-mRNA antisense tethering interactions (ATI) as a gain-of-function strategy, via the capture of functional RNA motifs, has not been hitherto considered. We present evidence that ATIs may be exploited by certain RNA viruses in order to tether the mRNAs of host selenoproteins, potentially exploiting the proximity of a captured host selenocysteine insertion sequence (SECIS) element to enable the expression of virally-encoded selenoprotein modules, via translation of in-frame UGA stop codons as selenocysteine. Computational analysis predicts thermodynamically stable ATIs between several widely expressed mammalian selenoprotein mRNAs (e.g., isoforms of thioredoxin reductase) and specific Ebola virus mRNAs, and HIV-1 mRNA, which we demonstrate via DNA gel shift assays. The probable functional significance of these ATIs is further supported by the observation that, in both viruses, they are located in close proximity to highly conserved in-frame UGA stop codons at the 3′ end of open reading frames that encode essential viral proteins (the HIV-1 nef protein and the Ebola nucleoprotein). Significantly, in HIV/AIDS patients, an inverse correlation between serum selenium and mortality has been repeatedly documented, and clinical benefits of selenium in the context of multi-micronutrient supplementation have been demonstrated in several well-controlled clinical trials. Hence, in the light of our findings, the possibility of a similar role for selenium in Ebola pathogenesis and treatment merits serious investigation. PMID:26369818

  4. Capped mRNAs with reduced secondary structure can function in extracts from poliovirus-infected cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sonenberg, N.; Guertin, D.; Lee, K.A.W.

    1982-12-01

    Extracts form poliovirus-infected HeLa cells were used to study ribosome binding of native and denatured reovirus mRNAs and translation of capped mRNAs with different degrees of secondary structure. Here, the authors demonstrate that ribosomes in extracts from poliovirus-infected cells could form initiation complexes with denatured reovirus mRNA, in contrast to their inability to bind native reovirus mRNA. Furthermore, the capped alfalfa mosiac virus 4 RNA, which is most probable devoid of stable secondary structure at its 5' end, could be translated at much higher efficiency than could other capped mRNAs in extracts from poliovirus-infected cells.

  5. Making scent of the presence and local translation of odorant receptor mRNAs in olfactory axons.

    PubMed

    Dubacq, Caroline; Fouquet, Coralie; Trembleau, Alain

    2014-03-01

    Rodents contain in their genome more than 1000 functional odorant receptor genes, which are specifically expressed by the olfactory sensory neurons projecting from the olfactory epithelium to the olfactory bulb. Strong evidence for the presence and local translation of odorant receptor mRNAs in the axon of olfactory sensory neurons was obtained, but no function has been assigned to these axonal mRNAs yet. The aim of this review is to discuss the evidence for the presence and local translation of odorant receptor mRNAs in olfactory sensory axons, and to speculate on their possible function in the wiring of the mouse olfactory sensory projections.

  6. In vivo translation and stability of trans-spliced mRNAs in nematode embryos.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Guofeng; Cohen, Leah; Mikhli, Claudette; Jankowska-Anyszka, Marzena; Stepinski, Janusz; Darzynkiewicz, Edward; Davis, Richard E

    2007-06-01

    Spliced leader trans-splicing adds a short exon, the spliced leader (SL), to pre-mRNAs to generate 5' ends of mRNAs. Addition of the SL in metazoa also adds a new cap to the mRNA, a trimethylguanosine (m(3)(2,2,7)GpppN) (TMG) that replaces the typical eukaryotic monomethylguanosine (m7GpppN)(m7G) cap. Both trans-spliced (m3(2,2,7)GpppN-SL-RNA) and not trans-spliced (m7GpppN-RNA) mRNAs are present in the same cells. Previous studies using cell-free systems to compare the overall translation of trans-spliced versus non-trans-spliced RNAs led to different conclusions. Here, we examine the contribution of m3(2,2,7)GpppG-cap and SL sequence and other RNA elements to in vivo mRNA translation and stability in nematode embryos. Although 70-90% of all nematode mRNAs have a TMG-cap, the TMG cap does not support translation as well as an m7G-cap. However, when the TMG cap and SL are present together, they synergistically interact and translation is enhanced, indicating both trans-spliced elements are necessary to promote efficient translation. The SL by itself does not act as a cap-independent enhancer of translation. The poly(A)-tail synergistically interacts with the mRNA cap enhancing translation and plays a greater role in facilitating translation of TMG-SL mRNAs. In general, recipient mRNA sequences between the SL and AUG and the 3' UTR do not significantly contribute to the translation of trans-spliced mRNAs. Overall, the combination of TMG cap and SL contribute to mRNA translation and stability in a manner typical of a eukaryotic m7G-cap and 5' UTRs, but they do not differentially enhance mRNA translation or stability compared to RNAs without the trans-spliced elements.

  7. Sink limitation induces the expression of multiple soybean vegetative lipoxygenase mRNAs while the endogenous jasmonic acid level remains low.

    PubMed

    Bunker, T W; Koetje, D S; Stephenson, L C; Creelman, R A; Mullet, J E; Grimes, H D

    1995-08-01

    The response of individual members of the lipoxygenase multigene family in soybeans to sink deprivation was analyzed. RNase protection assays indicated that a novel vegetative lipoxygenase gene, vlxC, and three other vegetative lipoxygenase mRNAs accumulated in mature leaves in response to a variety of sink limitations. These data suggest that several members of the lipoxygenase multigene family are involved in assimilate partitioning. The possible involvement of jasmonic acid as a signaling molecule regulating assimilate partitioning into the vegetative storage proteins and lipoxygenases was directly assessed by determining the endogenous level of jasmonic acid in leaves from plants with their pods removed. There was no rise in the level of endogenous jasmonic acid coincident with the strong increase in both vlxC and vegetative storage protein VspB transcripts in response to sink limitation. Thus, expression of the vegetative lipoxygenases and vegetative storage proteins is not regulated by jasmonic acid in sink-limited leaves.

  8. ROCK inhibition enhances microRNA function by promoting deadenylation of targeted mRNAs via increasing PAIP2 expression

    PubMed Central

    Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Wu, Jianfeng; Otsuka, Motoyuki; Kishikawa, Takahiro; Ohno, Motoko; Shibata, Chikako; Takata, Akemi; Han, Felicia; Kang, Young Jun; Chen, Chyi-Ying A.; Shyu, Ann-Bin; Han, Jiahuai; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    The reduced expression levels and functional impairment of global miRNAs are related to various human diseases, including cancers. However, relatively little is known about how global miRNA function may be upregulated. Here, we report that global miRNA function can be enhanced by Rho-associated, coiled-coil-containing protein kinase (ROCK) inhibitors. The regulation of miRNA function by ROCK inhibitors is mediated, at least in part, by poly(A)-binding protein-interacting protein 2 (PAIP2), which enhances poly(A)-shortening of miRNA-targeted mRNAs and leads to global upregulation of miRNA function. In the presence of a ROCK inhibitor, PAIP2 expression is enhanced by the transcription factor hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha (HNF4A) through increased ROCK1 nuclear localization and enhanced ROCK1 association with HNF4A. Our data reveal an unexpected role of ROCK1 as a cofactor of HNF4A in enhancing PAIP2 transcription. ROCK inhibitors may be useful for the various pathologies associated with the impairment of global miRNA function. PMID:26187994

  9. Imaging single mRNAs to study dynamics of mRNA export in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Bensidoun, Pierre; Raymond, Pascal; Oeffinger, Marlene; Zenklusen, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Regulation of mRNA and protein expression occurs at many levels, initiated at transcription and followed by mRNA processing, export, localization, translation and mRNA degradation. The ability to study mRNAs in living cells has become a critical tool to study and analyze how the various steps of the gene expression pathway are carried out. Here we describe a detailed protocol for real time fluorescent RNA imaging using the PP7 bacteriophage coat protein, which allows mRNA detection with high spatial and temporal resolution in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and can be applied to study various stages of mRNA metabolism. We describe the different parameters required for quantitative single molecule imaging in yeast, including strategies for genomic integration, expression of a PP7 coat protein GFP fusion protein, microscope setup and analysis strategies. We illustrate the method's use by analyzing the behavior of nuclear mRNA in yeast and the role of the nuclear basket in mRNA export.

  10. Putting an ‘End’ to HIV mRNAs: capping and polyadenylation as potential therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Like most cellular mRNAs, the 5′ end of HIV mRNAs is capped and the 3′ end matured by the process of polyadenylation. There are, however, several rather unique and interesting aspects of these post-transcriptional processes on HIV transcripts. Capping of the highly structured 5′ end of HIV mRNAs is influenced by the viral TAT protein and a population of HIV mRNAs contains a trimethyl-G cap reminiscent of U snRNAs involved in splicing. HIV polyadenylation involves active repression of a promoter-proximal polyadenylation signal, auxiliary upstream regulatory elements and moonlighting polyadenylation factors that have additional impacts on HIV biology outside of the constraints of classical mRNA 3’ end formation. This review describes these post-transcriptional novelties of HIV gene expression as well as their implications in viral biology and as possible targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:24330569

  11. Expressed miRNAs target feather related mRNAs involved in cell signaling, cell adhesion and structure during chicken epidermal development.

    PubMed

    Bao, Weier; Greenwold, Matthew J; Sawyer, Roger H

    2016-10-15

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Previous studies have shown that miRNA regulation contributes to a diverse set of processes including cellular differentiation and morphogenesis which leads to the creation of different cell types in multicellular organisms and is thus key to animal development. Feathers are one of the most distinctive features of extant birds and are important for multiple functions including flight, thermal regulation, and sexual selection. However, the role of miRNAs in feather development has been woefully understudied despite the identification of cell signaling pathways, cell adhesion molecules and structural genes involved in feather development. In this study, we performed a microarray experiment comparing the expression of miRNAs and mRNAs among three embryonic stages of development and two tissues (scutate scale and feather) of the chicken. We combined this expression data with miRNA target prediction tools and a curated list of feather related genes to produce a set of 19 miRNA-mRNA duplexes. These targeted mRNAs have been previously identified as important cell signaling and cell adhesion genes as well as structural genes involved in feather and scale morphogenesis. Interestingly, the miRNA target site of the cell signaling pathway gene, Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 1 Family, Member A3 (ALDH1A3), is unique to birds indicating a novel role in Aves. The identified miRNA target site of the cell adhesion gene, Tenascin C (TNC), is only found in specific chicken TNC splice variants that are differentially expressed in developing scutate scale and feather tissue indicating an important role of miRNA regulation in epidermal differentiation. Additionally, we found that β-keratins, a major structural component of avian and reptilian epidermal appendages, are targeted by multiple miRNA genes. In conclusion, our work provides quantitative expression data on miRNAs and mRNAs

  12. Co-expression changes of lncRNAs and mRNAs in the cervical sympathetic ganglia in diabetic cardiac autonomic neuropathic rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Guilin; Sheng, Xuan; Xu, Yurong; Jiang, Huaide; Zheng, Chaoran; Guo, Jingjing; Sun, Shanshan; Yi, Zhihua; Qin, Shulan; Liu, Shuangmei; Gao, Yun; Zhang, Chunping; Xu, Hong; Wu, Bing; Zou, Lifang; Liang, Shangdong; Zhu, Gaochun

    2016-12-19

    Cardiac autonomic neuropathy in Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is often a devastating complication. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have important effects on both normal development and disease pathogenesis. In this study, we explored the expression profiles of some lncRNAs involved in inflammation which may be co-expressed with messenger RNA (mRNA) in superior cervical and stellate ganglia after type 2 diabetic injuries. Total RNA isolated from 10 pairs of superior cervical and stellate ganglia in diabetic and normal male rats was hybridized to lncRNA arrays for detections. Pathway analysis indicated that the most significant gene ontology (GO) processes that were upregulated in diabetes were associated with immune response, cell migration, defense response, taxis, and chemotaxis. The Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway revealed that most of the target genes of the lncRNAs were located in cytokine-cytokine receptor interactions, the chemokine signaling pathway and cell adhesion molecules, which were involved in T2D. Gene co-expression network construction showed that the co-expression network in the experimental rats consisted of 268 regulation edges among 105 lncRNAs and 11 mRNAs. Our studies demonstrated the co-expression profile of lncRNAs and mRNAs in diabetic cardiac autonomic ganglia, suggesting possible roles for multiple lncRNAs as potential targets for the development of therapeutic strategies or biomarkers for diabetic cardiac autonomic neuropathy. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Human selenoprotein P and S variant mRNAs with different numbers of SECIS elements and inferences from mutant mice of the roles of multiple SECIS elements

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Sen; Mariotti, Marco; Santesmasses, Didac; Hill, Kristina E.; Baclaocos, Janinah; Aparicio-Prat, Estel; Li, Shuping; Mackrill, John; Wu, Yuanyuan; Howard, Michael T.; Capecchi, Mario; Guigó, Roderic; Burk, Raymond F.

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic redefinition of the 10 UGAs in human and mouse selenoprotein P (Sepp1) mRNAs to specify selenocysteine instead of termination involves two 3′ UTR structural elements (SECIS) and is regulated by selenium availability. In addition to the previously known human Sepp1 mRNA poly(A) addition site just 3′ of SECIS 2, two further sites were identified with one resulting in 10–25% of the mRNA lacking SECIS 2. To address function, mutant mice were generated with either SECIS 1 or SECIS 2 deleted or with the first UGA substituted with a serine codon. They were fed on either high or selenium-deficient diets. The mutants had very different effects on the proportions of shorter and longer product Sepp1 protein isoforms isolated from plasma, and on viability. Spatially and functionally distinctive effects of the two SECIS elements on UGA decoding were inferred. We also bioinformatically identify two selenoprotein S mRNAs with different 5′ sequences predicted to yield products with different N-termini. These results provide insights into SECIS function and mRNA processing in selenoprotein isoform diversity. PMID:27881738

  14. Human selenoprotein P and S variant mRNAs with different numbers of SECIS elements and inferences from mutant mice of the roles of multiple SECIS elements.

    PubMed

    Wu, Sen; Mariotti, Marco; Santesmasses, Didac; Hill, Kristina E; Baclaocos, Janinah; Aparicio-Prat, Estel; Li, Shuping; Mackrill, John; Wu, Yuanyuan; Howard, Michael T; Capecchi, Mario; Guigó, Roderic; Burk, Raymond F; Atkins, John F

    2016-11-01

    Dynamic redefinition of the 10 UGAs in human and mouse selenoprotein P (Sepp1) mRNAs to specify selenocysteine instead of termination involves two 3' UTR structural elements (SECIS) and is regulated by selenium availability. In addition to the previously known human Sepp1 mRNA poly(A) addition site just 3' of SECIS 2, two further sites were identified with one resulting in 10-25% of the mRNA lacking SECIS 2. To address function, mutant mice were generated with either SECIS 1 or SECIS 2 deleted or with the first UGA substituted with a serine codon. They were fed on either high or selenium-deficient diets. The mutants had very different effects on the proportions of shorter and longer product Sepp1 protein isoforms isolated from plasma, and on viability. Spatially and functionally distinctive effects of the two SECIS elements on UGA decoding were inferred. We also bioinformatically identify two selenoprotein S mRNAs with different 5' sequences predicted to yield products with different N-termini. These results provide insights into SECIS function and mRNA processing in selenoprotein isoform diversity.

  15. Glucose triggers different global responses in yeast, depending on the strength of the signal, and transiently stabilizes ribosomal protein mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Yin, Zhikang; Wilson, Séan; Hauser, Nicole C; Tournu, Helene; Hoheisel, Jörg D; Brown, Alistair J P

    2003-05-01

    Glucose exerts profound effects upon yeast physiology. In general, the effects of high glucose concentrations (>1%) upon Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been studied. In this paper, we have characterized the global responses of yeast cells to very low (0.01%), low (0.1%) and high glucose signals (1.0%) by transcript profiling. We show that yeast is more sensitive to very low glucose signals than was previously thought, and that yeast displays different responses to these different glucose signals. Genes involved in central metabolic pathways respond rapidly to very low glucose signals, whereas genes involved in the biogenesis of cytoplasmic ribosomes generally respond only to glucose concentrations of> 0.1%. We also show that cytoplasmic ribosomal protein mRNAs are transiently stabilized by glucose, indicating that both transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms combine to accelerate the accumulation of ribosomal protein mRNAs. Presumably, this facilitates rapid ribosome biogenesis after exposure to glucose. However, our data indicate that yeast activates ribosome biogenesis only when sufficient glucose is available to make this metabolic investment worthwhile. In contrast, the regulation of metabolic functions in response to very low glucose signals presumably ensures that yeast can exploit even minute amounts of this preferred nutrient.

  16. TOP mRNAs are translationally inhibited by a titratable repressor in both wheat germ extract and reticulocyte lysate.

    PubMed

    Biberman, Y; Meyuhas, O

    1999-08-13

    Vertebrate TOP mRNAs contain a 5' terminal oligopyrimidine tract (5' TOP), which is subject to selective translational repression in non-growing cells or in cell-free translation systems. In the present study, we monitored in vitro the effect of increasing amounts of a 16 nucleotides long oligoribonucleotide representing the 5' terminus of mouse ribosomal protein S16 mRNA on the translation of TOP and non-TOP mRNAs. Our results demonstrate that the wild-type sequence (but not its mutant counterparts) derepresses the translation of mRNAs containing 5' TOP motifs, but failed to stimulate the translation of non-TOP mRNAs, even if the latter differed only by a single nucleotide from their 5' TOP-containing counterparts. Similar results have been obtained with both wheat germ extract and rabbit reticulocyte lysate. It appears, therefore, that translational repression of TOP mRNAs is achieved in vitro by the accumulation of a titratable repressor rather than by the loss of an activator and that this repressor recognizes multiple TOP mRNAs with a diverse set of 5' TOP motifs.

  17. Regional Localization of Suspensor mRNAs during Early Embryo Development

    PubMed Central

    Weterings, Koen; Apuya, Nestor R.; Bi, Yuping; Fischer, Robert L.; Harada, John J.; Goldberg, Robert B.

    2001-01-01

    We investigated gene activity within the giant embryos of the scarlet runner bean (Phaseolus coccineus) to gain understanding of the processes by which the apical and basal cells become specified to follow different developmental pathways after division of the zygote. We identified two mRNAs, designated G564 and C541, that accumulate specifically within the suspensor of globular-stage embryos. G564 mRNA accumulates uniformly throughout the suspensor, whereas C541 mRNA accumulates to a higher level within the large basal cells of the suspensor that anchor the embryo to the surrounding seed tissue. Both G564 and C541 mRNAs begin to accumulate shortly after fertilization and are present within the two basal cells of embryos at the four-cell stage. In contrast, at the same stage, these mRNAs are not detectable within the two descendants of the apical cell. Nor are they detectable within cells of the embryo sac before fertilization, including the egg cell. We used a G564/β-glucuronidase reporter gene to show that the G564 promoter is activated specifically within the basal region and suspensor of preglobular tobacco embryos. Analysis of the G564 promoter identified a sequence domain required for transcription within the suspensor that contains several copies of a conserved motif. These results show that derivatives of the apical and basal cells transcribe different genes as early as the four-cell stage of embryo development and suggest that the apical and basal cells are specified at the molecular level after division of the zygote. PMID:11701878

  18. Novel factor rescues ribosomes trapped on non-stop mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Himeno, Hyouta

    2010-11-01

    Ribosomes are trapped at the 3′ ends of mRNAs that lack a natural stop codon. In bacteria, a reaction called trans-translation recycles ribosomes entrapped at such ‘non-stop’ mRNAs. The main player in trans-translation is tmRNA (SsrA-RNA), a bi-functional RNA that acts as both a tRNA and an mRNA. In the trans-translation reaction, alanine-charged tmRNA loads at the ribosomal A-site and translation shifts to the resume codon in tmRNA. Translation of tmRNA stops at a natural stop codon at the end of the small reading frame of tmRNA. In this way, the reaction simultaneously adds a peptide tag to the end of the nascent, incomplete polypeptide and recycles the stalled ribosomes. The peptide tag is recognized by cellular proteases that rapidly degrade the incomplete, potentially harmful polypeptides. The trans-translation reaction is not essential in most bacteria, raising the possibility that ribosomes stalled at non-stop mRNAs can be rescued by alternative routes. In this issue of Molecular Microbiology, Chadani et al. show that a novel translation factor, ArfA, can recycle a ribosome trapped at the 3′ end of a non-stop mRNA in the absence of trans-translation. AfrA is essential in the absence of tmRNA, showing that the two systems work in parallel to resolve stalled ribosomes.

  19. Polycistronic mRNAs code for polypeptides of the Vibrio harveyi luminescence system

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, C.M.; Graham, A.D.; Boylan, M.; Evans, J.F.; Hasel, K.W.; Meighen, E.A.; Graham, A.F.

    1985-03-01

    DNA coding for the ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. subunits of Vibrio harveyi luciferase, the luxA and luxB genes, and the adjoining chromosomal regions on both sides of these genes (total of 18 kilobase pairs) was cloned into Escherichia coli. Using labeled DNA coding for the ..cap alpha.. subunit as a hybridization probe, the authors identified a set of polycistronic mRNAs (2.6, 4, 7, and 8 kilobases) by Northern blotting; the most prominent of these was the one 4 kilobases long. This set of mRNAs was induced during the development of bioluminescence in V. harveyi. Furthermore, the same set of mRNAs was synthesized in E. coli by a recombinant plasmid that contained a 12-kilobase pair length of V. harveyi DNA and expressed the genes for the luciferase subunits. A cloned DNA segment corresponding to the major 4-kilobase mRNA coded for the ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. subunits of luciferase, as well as a 32,000-dalton protein upstream from these genes that could be specifically modified by acyl-coenzyme A and is a component of the bioluminescence system. V. harveyi mRNA that was hybridized to the released from cloned DNA encompassing the luxA and luxB genes was translated in vitro. Luciferase ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. subunits and the 32,000-dalton polypeptide were detected among the products, along with 42,000- and 55,000-dalton polypeptides, which are encoded downstream from the lux genes and are thought to be involved in luminescence.

  20. Quantification and distribution of α1-adrenoceptor subtype mRNAs in human proximal urethra

    PubMed Central

    Nasu, Kimio; Moriyama, Nobuo; Fukasawa, Ritsu; Tsujimoto, Gozoh; Tanaka, Teruo; Yano, Junichi; Kawabe, Kazuki

    1998-01-01

    We performed RNase protection assays and in situ hybridization to investigate the ratio of the three α1-adrenoceptor subtype mRNAs, α1a, α1b and α1d, in human proximal urethra, and their localization in urethral cross-sections. As revealed by the RNase protection assays, α1a was the predominant subtype mRNA in both male and female urethral samples. α1d mRNA was detected only in the female sample, and α1b mRNA was not detected in any of the samples tested. The ratio of the abundance of the subtype mRNAs, α1a : α1b : α1d, was 100 : 0 : 0 in the male urethra and 90 : 0 : 10 in the female urethra.In situ hybridization studies showed no significant differences in the cross-sectional distribution of α1-adrenoceptor subtype mRNAs between male and female urethras. Intense α1a staining was observed in the smooth muscle of the urethra, but α1b and α1d staining was much less intense.Of the three cloned α1 subtypes, α1a is the most likely to be responsible for the contraction of the human urethra. Owing to the side effects of nonselective α1 drugs, α1-selective drugs may be clinically superior to nonselective drugs for the treatment of urethral disorders. PMID:9579721

  1. Interplay of noncoding RNAs, mRNAs, and proteins during the growth of eukaryotic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhdanov, V. P.

    2010-10-15

    Numerous biological functions of noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) in eukaryotic cells are based primarily on their ability to pair with target mRNAs and then either to prevent translation or to result in rapid degradation of the mRNA-ncRNA complex. Using a general model describing this scenario, we show that ncRNAs may help to maintain constant mRNA and protein concentrations during the growth of cells. The possibility of observation of this effect on the global scale is briefly discussed.

  2. Dexamethasone induction of osteoblast mRNAs in rat marrow stromal cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Leboy, P S; Beresford, J N; Devlin, C; Owen, M E

    1991-03-01

    We have examined the ability of dexamethasone, retinoic acid, and vitamin D3 to induce osteogenic differentiation in rat marrow stromal cell cultures by measuring the expression of mRNAs associated with the differentiated osteoblast phenotype as well as analyzing collagen secretion and alkaline phosphatase activity. Marrow cells were cultured for 8 days in primary culture and 8 days in secondary culture, with and without 10 nM dexamethasone or 1 microM retinoic acid. Under all conditions, cultures produced high levels of osteonectin mRNA. Cells grown with dexamethasone in both primary and secondary culture contained elevated alkaline phosphatase mRNA and significant amounts of type I collagen and osteopontin mRNA. Addition of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 to these dexamethasone-treated cultures induced expression of osteocalcin mRNA and increased osteopontin mRNA. The levels of alkaline phosphatase, osteopontin, and osteocalcin mRNAs in Dex/Dex/VitD3 cultures were comparable to those of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3-treated ROS 17/2.8 osteosarcoma cells. Omitting dexamethasone from either primary or secondary culture resulted in significantly less alkaline phosphatase mRNA, little osteopontin mRNA, and no osteocalcin mRNA. Retinoic acid increased alkaline phosphatase activity to a greater extent than did dexamethasone but did not have a parallel effect on the expression of alkaline phosphatase mRNA and induced neither osteopontin or osteocalcin mRNAs. In all conditions, marrow stromal cells synthesized and secreted a mixture of type I and III collagens. However, dexamethasone-treated cells also synthesized an additional collagen type, provisionally identified as type V. The synthesis and secretion of collagens type I and III was decreased by both dexamethasone and retinoic acid. Neither dexamethasone nor retinoic acid induced mRNAs associated with the chondrogenic phenotype. We conclude that dexamethasone, but not retinoic acid, promotes the expression of markers of the

  3. Analysis of Ribosome-Associated mRNAs in Rice Reveals the Importance of Transcript Size and GC Content in Translation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Dongyan; Hamilton, John P.; Hardigan, Michael; Yin, Dongmei; He, Tao; Vaillancourt, Brieanne; Reynoso, Mauricio; Pauluzzi, Germain; Funkhouser, Scott; Cui, Yuehua; Bailey-Serres, Julia; Jiang, Jiming; Buell, C. Robin; Jiang, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Gene expression is controlled at transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels including decoding of messenger RNA (mRNA) into polypeptides via ribosome-mediated translation. Translational regulation has been intensively studied in the model dicot plant Arabidopsis thaliana, and in this study, we assessed the translational status [proportion of steady-state mRNA associated with ribosomes] of mRNAs by Translating Ribosome Affinity Purification followed by mRNA-sequencing (TRAP-seq) in rice (Oryza sativa), a model monocot plant and the most important food crop. A survey of three tissues found that most transcribed rice genes are translated whereas few transposable elements are associated with ribosomes. Genes with short and GC-rich coding regions are overrepresented in ribosome-associated mRNAs, suggesting that the GC-richness characteristic of coding sequences in grasses may be an adaptation that favors efficient translation. Transcripts with retained introns and extended 5′ untranslated regions are underrepresented on ribosomes, and rice genes belonging to different evolutionary lineages exhibited differential enrichment on the ribosomes that was associated with GC content. Genes involved in photosynthesis and stress responses are preferentially associated with ribosomes, whereas genes in epigenetic regulation pathways are the least enriched on ribosomes. Such variation is more dramatic in rice than that in Arabidopsis and is correlated with the wide variation of GC content of transcripts in rice. Taken together, variation in the translation status of individual transcripts reflects important mechanisms of gene regulation, which may have a role in evolution and diversification. PMID:27852012

  4. Effects of pathogen reduction systems on platelet microRNAs, mRNAs, activation, and function.

    PubMed

    Osman, Abdimajid; Hitzler, Walter E; Meyer, Claudius U; Landry, Patricia; Corduan, Aurélie; Laffont, Benoit; Boilard, Eric; Hellstern, Peter; Vamvakas, Eleftherios C; Provost, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Pathogen reduction (PR) systems for platelets, based on chemically induced cross-linking and inactivation of nucleic acids, potentially prevent transfusion transmission of infectious agents, but can increase clinically significant bleeding in some clinical studies. Here, we documented the effects of PR systems on microRNA and mRNA levels of platelets stored in the blood bank, and assessed their impact on platelet activation and function. Unlike platelets subjected to gamma irradiation or stored in additive solution, platelets treated with Intercept (amotosalen+ ultraviolet-A [UVA] light) exhibited significantly reduced levels of 6 of the 11 microRNAs, and 2 of the 3 anti-apoptotic mRNAs (Bcl-xl and Clusterin) that we monitored, compared with platelets stored in plasma. Mirasol (riboflavin+ UVB light) treatment of platelets did not produce these effects. PR neither affected platelet microRNA synthesis or function nor induced cross-linking of microRNA-sized endogenous platelet RNA species. However, the reduction in the platelet microRNA levels induced by Intercept correlated with the platelet activation (p < 0.05) and an impaired platelet aggregation response to ADP (p < 0.05). These results suggest that Intercept treatment may induce platelet activation, resulting in the release of microRNAs and mRNAs from platelets. The clinical implications of this reduction in platelet nucleic acids secondary to Intercept remain to be established.

  5. Effects of pathogen reduction systems on platelet microRNAs, mRNAs, activation, and function

    PubMed Central

    Osman, Abdimajid; Hitzler, Walter E.; Meyer, Claudius U.; Landry, Patricia; Corduan, Aurélie; Laffont, Benoit; Boilard, Eric; Hellstern, Peter; Vamvakas, Eleftherios C.

    2015-01-01

    Pathogen reduction (PR) systems for platelets, based on chemically induced cross-linking and inactivation of nucleic acids, potentially prevent transfusion transmission of infectious agents, but can increase clinically significant bleeding in some clinical studies. Here, we documented the effects of PR systems on microRNA and mRNA levels of platelets stored in the blood bank, and assessed their impact on platelet activation and function. Unlike platelets subjected to gamma irradiation or stored in additive solution, platelets treated with Intercept (amotosalen + ultraviolet-A [UVA] light) exhibited significantly reduced levels of 6 of the 11 microRNAs, and 2 of the 3 anti-apoptotic mRNAs (Bcl-xl and Clusterin) that we monitored, compared with platelets stored in plasma. Mirasol (riboflavin + UVB light) treatment of platelets did not produce these effects. PR neither affected platelet microRNA synthesis or function nor induced cross-linking of microRNA-sized endogenous platelet RNA species. However, the reduction in the platelet microRNA levels induced by Intercept correlated with the platelet activation (p < 0.05) and an impaired platelet aggregation response to ADP (p < 0.05). These results suggest that Intercept treatment may induce platelet activation, resulting in the release of microRNAs and mRNAs from platelets. The clinical implications of this reduction in platelet nucleic acids secondary to Intercept remain to be established. PMID:24749844

  6. Interrogating the degradation pathways of unstable mRNAs with XRN1-resistant sequences

    PubMed Central

    Boehm, Volker; Gerbracht, Jennifer V.; Marx, Marie-Charlotte; Gehring, Niels H.

    2016-01-01

    The turnover of messenger RNAs (mRNAs) is a key regulatory step of gene expression in eukaryotic cells. Due to the complexity of the mammalian degradation machinery, the contribution of decay factors to the directionality of mRNA decay is poorly understood. Here we characterize a molecular tool to interrogate mRNA turnover via the detection of XRN1-resistant decay fragments (xrFrag). Using nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) as a model pathway, we establish xrFrag analysis as a robust indicator of accelerated 5′–3′ mRNA decay. In tethering assays, monitoring xrFrag accumulation allows to distinguish decapping and endocleavage activities from deadenylation. Moreover, xrFrag analysis of mRNA degradation induced by miRNAs, AU-rich elements (AREs) as well as the 3′ UTRs of cytokine mRNAs reveals the contribution of 5′–3′ decay and endonucleolytic cleavage. Our work uncovers formerly unrecognized modes of mRNA turnover and establishes xrFrag as a powerful tool for RNA decay analyses. PMID:27917860

  7. Adaptation of aphid stylectomy for analyses of proteins and mRNAs in barley phloem sap.

    PubMed

    Gaupels, Frank; Buhtz, Anja; Knauer, Torsten; Deshmukh, Sachin; Waller, Frank; van Bel, Aart J E; Kogel, Karl-Heinz; Kehr, Julia

    2008-01-01

    Sieve tubes are transport conduits not only for photoassimilates but also for macromolecules and other compounds that are involved in sieve tube maintenance and systemic signalling. In order to gain sufficient amounts of pure phloem exudates from barley plants for analyses of the protein and mRNA composition, a previously described stylectomy set-up was optimized. Aphids were placed in sealed cages, which, immediately after microcauterization of the stylets, were flooded with water-saturated silicon oil. The exuding phloem sap was collected with a capillary connected to a pump. Using up to 30 plants and 600 aphids (Rhopalosiphum padi) in parallel, an average of 10 mul of phloem sap could be obtained within 6 h of sampling. In first analyses of the macromolecular content, eight so far unknown phloem mRNAs were identified by cDNA-amplified fragment length polymorphism. Transcripts in barley phloem exudates are related to metabolism, signalling, and pathogen defence, for example coding for a protein kinase and a pathogen- and insect-responsive WIR1A (wheat-induced resistance 1A)-like protein. Further, one-dimensional gel electrophoresis and subsequent partial sequencing by mass spectrometry led to the identification of seven major proteins with putative functions in stress responses and transport of mRNAs, proteins, and sugars. Two of the discovered proteins probably represent isoforms of a new phloem-mobile sucrose transporter. Notably, two-dimensional electrophoresis confirmed that there are >250 phloem proteins awaiting identification in future studies.

  8. Appraisal of the Missing Proteins Based on the mRNAs Bound to Ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shaohang; Zhou, Ruo; Ren, Zhe; Zhou, Baojin; Lin, Zhilong; Hou, Guixue; Deng, Yamei; Zi, Jin; Lin, Liang; Wang, Quanhui; Liu, Xin; Xu, Xun; Wen, Bo; Liu, Siqi

    2015-12-04

    Considering the technical limitations of mass spectrometry in protein identification, the mRNAs bound to ribosomes (RNC-mRNA) are assumed to reflect the mRNAs participating in the translational process. The RNC-mRNA data are reasoned to be useful for appraising the missing proteins. A set of the multiomics data including free-mRNAs, RNC-mRNAs, and proteomes was acquired from three liver cancer cell lines. On the basis of the missing proteins in neXtProt (release 2014-09-19), the bioinformatics analysis was carried out in three phases: (1) finding how many neXtProt missing proteins have or do not have RNA-seq and/or MS/MS evidence, (2) analyzing specific physicochemical and biological properties of the missing proteins that lack both RNA-seq and MS/MS evidence, and (3) analyzing the combined properties of these missing proteins. Total of 1501 missing proteins were found by neither RNC-mRNA nor MS/MS in the three liver cancer cell lines. For these missing proteins, some are expected higher hydrophobicity, unsuitable detection, or sensory functions as properties at the protein level, while some are predicted to have nonexpressing chromatin structures on the corresponding gene level. With further integrated analysis, we could attribute 93% of them (1391/1501) to these causal factors, which result in the expression products scarcely detected by RNA-seq or MS/MS.

  9. Operon mRNAs are organized into ORF-centric structures that predict translation efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Burkhardt, David H; Rouskin, Silvi; Zhang, Yan; Li, Gene-Wei; Weissman, Jonathan S; Gross, Carol A

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial mRNAs are organized into operons consisting of discrete open reading frames (ORFs) in a single polycistronic mRNA. Individual ORFs on the mRNA are differentially translated, with rates varying as much as 100-fold. The signals controlling differential translation are poorly understood. Our genome-wide mRNA secondary structure analysis indicated that operonic mRNAs are comprised of ORF-wide units of secondary structure that vary across ORF boundaries such that adjacent ORFs on the same mRNA molecule are structurally distinct. ORF translation rate is strongly correlated with its mRNA structure in vivo, and correlation persists, albeit in a reduced form, with its structure when translation is inhibited and with that of in vitro refolded mRNA. These data suggest that intrinsic ORF mRNA structure encodes a rough blueprint for translation efficiency. This structure is then amplified by translation, in a self-reinforcing loop, to provide the structure that ultimately specifies the translation of each ORF. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22037.001 PMID:28139975

  10. Varicella-zoster virus IE4 protein interacts with SR proteins and exports mRNAs through the TAP/NXF1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Ote, Isabelle; Lebrun, Marielle; Vandevenne, Patricia; Bontems, Sébastien; Medina-Palazon, Cahora; Manet, Evelyne; Piette, Jacques; Sadzot-Delvaux, Catherine

    2009-11-18

    Available data suggest that the Varicella-Zoster virus (VZV) IE4 protein acts as an important regulator on VZV and cellular genes expression and could exert its functions at post-transcriptional level. However, the molecular mechanisms supported by this protein are not yet fully characterized. In the present study, we have attempted to clarify this IE4-mediated gene regulation and identify some cellular partners of IE4. By yeast two-hybrid and immunoprecipitation analysis, we showed that IE4 interacts with three shuttling SR proteins, namely ASF/SF2, 9G8 and SRp20. We positioned the binding domain in the IE4 RbRc region and we showed that these interactions are not bridged by RNA. We demonstrated also that IE4 strongly interacts with the main SR protein kinase, SRPK1, and is phosphorylated in in vitro kinase assay on residue Ser-136 contained in the Rb domain. By Northwestern analysis, we showed that IE4 is able to bind RNA through its arginine-rich region and in immunoprecipitation experiments the presence of RNA stabilizes complexes containing IE4 and the cellular export factors TAP/NXF1 and Aly/REF since the interactions are RNase-sensitive. Finally, we determined that IE4 influences the export of reporter mRNAs and clearly showed, by TAP/NXF1 knockdown, that VZV infection requires the TAP/NXF1 export pathway to express some viral transcripts. We thus highlighted a new example of viral mRNA export factor and proposed a model of IE4-mediated viral mRNAs export.

  11. Transforming growth factor beta (TGF beta) causes a persistent increase in steady-state amounts of type I and type III collagen and fibronectin mRNAs in normal human dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Varga, J; Rosenbloom, J; Jimenez, S A

    1987-01-01

    It has been previously shown that transforming growth factor beta (TGF beta) is capable of stimulating fibroblast collagen and fibronectin biosynthesis. The purpose of this study was to examine the mechanisms involved in TGF beta stimulation of fibroblast biosynthetic activity. Our results indicate that TGF beta causes a marked enhancement of the production of types I and III collagens and fibronectin by cultured normal human dermal fibroblasts. The rate of collagen production by fibroblasts exposed to TGF beta was 2-3-fold greater than that of control cells. These effects were associated with a 2-3-fold increase in the steady-state amounts of types I and III collagen mRNAs and a 5-8-fold increase in the amounts of fibronectin mRNAs as determined by dot-blot hybridization with specific cloned cDNA probes. In addition, the increased production of collagen and fibronectin and the increased amounts of their corresponding mRNAs remained elevated for at least 72 h after removal of TGF beta. These findings suggest that TGF beta may play a major role in the normal regulation of extracellular matrix production in vivo and may contribute to the development of pathological states of fibrosis. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 4. PMID:3501287

  12. Coexistence of sense and anti-sense mRNAs of variant surface protein in Giardia lamblia trophozoites.

    PubMed

    Guo, Junli; Zheng, Wenyu; Wang, Yuehua; Li, Yao; Lu, Siqi; Feng, Xianmin

    2014-02-14

    A strategy of the parasitic protozoan Giardia lamblia to evade attack from the host immune system is periodic changes of its surface antigen, a member of the variant surface protein (VSP) family. A post-transcriptional gene silencing mechanism has been proposed to explain the presence of only one among many possible VSPs at any time. To investigate this phenomenon further, we extracted total RNA from cultured trophozoites of the G. lamblia C2 isolate, and cDNA was reverse-transcribed from the RNA. Sense and anti-sense VSPs were amplified from the total cDNA using nested PCR with primers designed from the 3'-conserved region and the known 5' or 3' end of the cDNA library. Sequence analyses of the amplified products revealed more than 34 full-length antisense VSPs and a smear of sense VSPs. Sequence alignments and comparisons revealed that these VSPs contained variable N-termini and conserved C-termini, and could be classified into 5 clades based on the sizes and variations of the N-terminal sequence. All antisense VSPs existed in the sense forms, but no corresponding antisense VSP existed for sense RNA (snsRNA) 16. The coexistence of sense and antisense VSP mRNAs in cultured G. lamblia supports the post-transcriptional regulation of VSP expression. We propose that VSPs transcribed simultaneously in the sense and antisense forms form double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) which are degraded by the Dicer endonuclease, while a VSP without an antisense transcription (e.g., snsRNA16) will be expressed on the surface of Giardia. In addition, in the course of this investigation VSPs were identified that were previously not known. PCR-based amplification of specific sense and antisense VSP cDNAs can be used to identify the specific VSP on G. lamblia trophozoites, which is easier than using specific monoclonal antibody approaches.

  13. Administration of haloperidol with biperiden reduces mRNAs related to the ubiquitin-proteasome system in mice.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Shin-Ichi; Morioka, Hirofumi; Iwabuchi, Mika; Shinohara, Kazuya; Maeda, Maki; Shimizu, Takao; Miyata, Atsuro

    2005-06-15

    In order to find molecules affected by administration of an antipsychotic drug with an antimuscarinic drug, which is a common prescription used to prevent extrapyramidal adverse effects caused by the antipsychotic drugs, gene expression profiling in the frontal cortex was studied in mice. After 14 days of administration with 2 mg/kg haloperidol, a typical antipsychotic drug, and 2 mg/kg biperiden, a high-affinity antagonist for muscarinic receptors in the brain, approximately 500 mRNAs related to synaptic function were investigated. The levels of the mRNAs related to the ubiquitin-related systems were significantly reduced after the combined administration. However, the separate administration of either haloperidol or biperiden had little effect on the levels of the mRNAs. This result suggests that coadministration of haloperidol and biperiden specifically affects the ubiquitin-related system.

  14. miR-190 is upregulated in Epstein-Barr Virus type I latency and modulates cellular mRNAs involved in cell survival and viral reactivation.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Elizabeth M; Shao, Ying; Wang, Yan; Yuan, Yan

    2014-09-01

    Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) is a prevalent human pathogen infecting over 90% of the population. Much of the success of the virus is attributed to its ability to maintain latency. The detailed mechanisms underlying the establishment and maintenance of EBV latency remain poorly understood. A microRNA profiling study revealed differential expression of many cellular miRNAs between types I and III latency cells, suggesting cellular miRNAs may play roles in regulating EBV latency. mir-190 is the most differentially up-regulated miRNA in type I latency cells as compared with type III latency cells and the up-regulation appears to be attributed to EBER RNAs that express in higher levels in type I latency cells than type III cells. With the aide of a lentiviral overexpression system and microarray analysis, several cellular mRNAs are identified as potential targets of mir-190. By targeting TP53INP1, miR-190 enhances cell survival by preventing apoptosis and relieving G0/G1 cell cycle arrest. Additionally, miR-190 down-regulates NR4A3, a cellular immediate-early gene for EBV reactivation, and inhibits the expression of the viral immediate-early gene bzlf1 and viral lytic DNA replication. Taken together, our data revealed a mechanism that EBV utilizes a cellular microRNA to promote host cell survival and prevent virus from entering lytic life cycle for latency maintenance.

  15. A subset of replication-dependent histone mRNAs are expressed as polyadenylated RNAs in terminally differentiated tissues

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Shawn M.; Cunningham, Clark H.; Welch, Joshua D.; Groh, Beezly; Guo, Andrew Y.; Wei, Bruce; Whitfield, Michael L.; Xiong, Yue; Marzluff, William F.

    2016-01-01

    Histone proteins are synthesized in large amounts during S-phase to package the newly replicated DNA, and are among the most stable proteins in the cell. The replication-dependent (RD)-histone mRNAs expressed during S-phase end in a conserved stem-loop rather than a polyA tail. In addition, there are replication-independent (RI)-histone genes that encode histone variants as polyadenylated mRNAs. Most variants have specific functions in chromatin, but H3.3 also serves as a replacement histone for damaged histones in long-lived terminally differentiated cells. There are no reported replacement histone genes for histones H2A, H2B or H4. We report that a subset of RD-histone genes are expressed in terminally differentiated tissues as polyadenylated mRNAs, likely serving as replacement histone genes in long-lived non-dividing cells. Expression of two genes, HIST2H2AA3 and HIST1H2BC, is conserved in mammals. They are expressed as polyadenylated mRNAs in fibroblasts differentiated in vitro, but not in serum starved fibroblasts, suggesting that their expression is part of the terminal differentiation program. There are two histone H4 genes and an H3 gene that encode mRNAs that are polyadenylated and expressed at 5- to 10-fold lower levels than the mRNAs from H2A and H2B genes, which may be replacement genes for the H3.1 and H4 proteins. PMID:27402160

  16. Translation elongation can control translation initiation on eukaryotic mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Dominique; Kazana, Eleanna; Bellanger, Noémie; Singh, Tarun; Tuite, Mick F; von der Haar, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Synonymous codons encode the same amino acid, but differ in other biophysical properties. The evolutionary selection of codons whose properties are optimal for a cell generates the phenomenon of codon bias. Although recent studies have shown strong effects of codon usage changes on protein expression levels and cellular physiology, no translational control mechanism is known that links codon usage to protein expression levels. Here, we demonstrate a novel translational control mechanism that responds to the speed of ribosome movement immediately after the start codon. High initiation rates are only possible if start codons are liberated sufficiently fast, thus accounting for the observation that fast codons are overrepresented in highly expressed proteins. In contrast, slow codons lead to slow liberation of the start codon by initiating ribosomes, thereby interfering with efficient translation initiation. Codon usage thus evolved as a means to optimise translation on individual mRNAs, as well as global optimisation of ribosome availability. PMID:24357599

  17. Analyses of gene function in amphioxus embryos by microinjection of mRNAs and morpholino oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Holland, Linda Z; Onai, Takayuki

    2011-01-01

    The invertebrate chordate amphioxus (Branchiostoma), which is the most basal living chordate, has become an accepted model for the vertebrate ancestor in studies of development and evolution. Amphioxus resembles vertebrates in regard to morphology, developmental gene expression, and gene function. In addition, the amphioxus genome has representatives of most vertebrate gene families. Although it has not undergone the two rounds of whole genome duplications that occurred early in the vertebrate lineage, the amphioxus genome has retained considerable synteny with vertebrate genomes. Thus, studies of genes and development in amphioxus embryos can reveal the fundamental genetic basis of the vertebrate body plan, giving insights into the developmental mechanisms of such organs as the somites, pharynx, kidney, and the central nervous system. Moreover, amphioxus is very useful for understanding how these characters evolved. This chapter details methods for microinjection of amphioxus eggs with mRNAs or morpholino antisense oligonucleotides to analyze gene networks operating in early development.

  18. Polyribosome targeting to microtubules: enrichment of specific mRNAs in a reconstituted microtubule preparation from sea urchin embryos

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    A subset of mRNAs, polyribosomes, and poly(A)-binding proteins copurify with microtubules from sea urchin embryos. Several lines of evidence indicate that the interaction of microtubules with ribosomes is specific: a distinct stalk-like structure appears to mediate their association; ribosomes bind to microtubules with a constant stoichiometry through several purification cycles; and the presence of ribosomes in these preparations depends on the presence of intact microtubules. Five specific mRNAs are enriched with the microtubule- bound ribosomes, indicating that translation of specific proteins may occur on the microtubule scaffolding in vivo. PMID:7962079

  19. Adaptation of aphid stylectomy for analyses of proteins and mRNAs in barley phloem sap

    PubMed Central

    Gaupels, Frank; Buhtz, Anja; Knauer, Torsten; Deshmukh, Sachin; Waller, Frank; van Bel, Aart J. E.; Kogel, Karl-Heinz; Kehr, Julia

    2008-01-01

    Sieve tubes are transport conduits not only for photoassimilates but also for macromolecules and other compounds that are involved in sieve tube maintenance and systemic signalling. In order to gain sufficient amounts of pure phloem exudates from barley plants for analyses of the protein and mRNA composition, a previously described stylectomy set-up was optimized. Aphids were placed in sealed cages, which, immediately after microcauterization of the stylets, were flooded with water-saturated silicon oil. The exuding phloem sap was collected with a capillary connected to a pump. Using up to 30 plants and 600 aphids (Rhopalosiphum padi) in parallel, an average of 10 μl of phloem sap could be obtained within 6 h of sampling. In first analyses of the macromolecular content, eight so far unknown phloem mRNAs were identified by cDNA-amplified fragment length polymorphism. Transcripts in barley phloem exudates are related to metabolism, signalling, and pathogen defence, for example coding for a protein kinase and a pathogen- and insect-responsive WIR1A (wheat-induced resistance 1A)-like protein. Further, one-dimensional gel electrophoresis and subsequent partial sequencing by mass spectrometry led to the identification of seven major proteins with putative functions in stress responses and transport of mRNAs, proteins, and sugars. Two of the discovered proteins probably represent isoforms of a new phloem-mobile sucrose transporter. Notably, two-dimensional electrophoresis confirmed that there are >250 phloem proteins awaiting identification in future studies. PMID:18632729

  20. Neuronal Expression of CB2 Cannabinoid Receptor mRNAs in the Mouse Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yong; Kim, Jimok

    2015-01-01

    In the brain, CB1 cannabinoid receptors primarily mediate the effects of cannabinoids, but CB2 cannabinoid receptors (CB2Rs) have recently been discovered in the nervous system and also implicated in neuromodulatory roles. To understand the mechanisms of CB2R functions in the brain, it is essential to localize CB2Rs, but the types of cells expressing CB2Rs have been controversial. Unequivocal localization of CB2Rs in the brain has been impeded in part by the low expression levels of CB2Rs and poor specificity of detection methods. Here, we used an ultrasensitive and specific in situ hybridization method called the RNAscope to determine the spatial pattern of CB2R mRNA expression in the mouse hippocampus. CB2R mRNAs were mostly expressed in a subset of excitatory and inhibitory neurons in the CA1, CA3 and dentate gyrus areas, but rarely in microglia. CB2R knock-out mice were used as a negative control. Using the quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, we also found that the temporal pattern of CB2R mRNA expression was stable during postnatal development. Consistent with previous reports, the immunological detection of CB2Rs was not reliable, implying extremely low levels of the protein expression and/or insufficient specificity of the current anti-CB2R antibodies. Our findings of the expression patterns of CB2R mRNAs may help determine the cell types involved in, and hence the mechanisms of, the CB2R-mediated neuromodulation. PMID:26515747

  1. Characterization of target mRNAs for grapevine microRNAs with an integrated strategy of modified RLM-RACE, newly developed PPM-RACE and qPCRs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen; Han, Jian; Korir, Nicholas Kibet; Wang, Xicheng; Liu, Hong; Li, Xiaoying; Leng, Xiangpeng; Fang, Jinggui

    2013-07-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate target gene expression by mediating target gene cleavage or inhibition of translation at transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels in higher plants. Until now, many grapevine microRNAs (Vv-miRNAs) have been identified and quite a number of miRNA target genes were also verified by various analysis. However, global interaction of miRNAs with their target genes still remained to perform more research. We reported experimental validation of a number of miRNA target genes in table grapevine that had been previously identified by bioinformatics in our earlier studies. To verify more predicted target genes of Vv-miRNAs and elucidate the modes by which these Vv-miRNAs work on their target genes, 31 unverified potential target genes for 18 Vv-miRNAs were experimentally verified by a new integrated strategy employing a modified 5'-RLM-RACE (RNA ligase-mediated 5' rapid amplification of cDNA ends), 3'-PPM-RACE (poly(A) polymerase-mediated 3' rapid amplification of cDNA ends) and qRT-PCRs of cleavage products. The results showed that these Vv-miRNAs negatively regulated expression of their target messenger RNAs (mRNAs) through guiding corresponding target mRNA cleavage, of which about 94.4% Vv-miRNAs cleaved their target mRNAs mainly at the tenth nucleotide of 5'-end of miRNAs. Expression levels of both miRNAs and their target mRNAs in eight tissues exhibited inverse relationships, and expressions both of cleaved targets and miRNAs indicated a cleavage mode of Vv-miRNAs on their target genes. Our results confirm the importance of Vv-miRNAs in grapevine growth and development, and suggest more study on Vv-miRNAs and targets can enrich the knowledge of miRNA mediated-regulation in grapevine.

  2. Destabilization of CARP mRNAs by aloe-emodin contributes to caspase-8-mediated p53-independent apoptosis of human carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Meng-Liang; Lu, Yao-Cheng; Su, Hong-Lin; Lin, Hsin-Ting; Lee, Chuan-Chun; Kang, Shang-En; Lai, Tan-Chen; Chung, Jing-Gung; Chen, Shih-Shun

    2011-04-01

    Using short hairpin RNA against p53, transient ectopic expression of wild-type p53 or mutant p53 (R248W or R175H), and a p53- and p21-dependent luciferase reporter assay, we demonstrated that growth arrest and apoptosis of FaDu (human pharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma), Hep3B (hepatoma), and MG-63 (osteosarcoma) cells induced by aloe-emodin (AE) are p53-independent. Co-immunoprecipitation and small interfering RNA (siRNA) studies demonstrated that AE caused S-phase cell cycle arrest by inducing the formation of cyclin A-Cdk2-p21 complexes through extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation. Ectopic expression of Bcl-X(L) and siRNA-mediated Bax attenuation significantly inhibited apoptosis induced by AE. Cyclosporin A or the caspase-8 inhibitor Z-IETD-FMK blocked AE-induced loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and prevented increases in reactive oxygen species and Ca(++). Z-IETD-FMK inhibited AE-induced apoptosis, Bax expression, Bid cleavage, translocation of tBid to mitochondria, ERK phosphorylation, caspase-9 activation, and the release of cytochrome c, apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF), and endonuclease G from mitochondria. The stability of the mRNAs encoding caspase-8 and -10-associated RING proteins (CARPs) 1 and 2 was affected by AE, whereas CARP1 or 2 overexpression inhibited caspase-8 activation and apoptosis induced by AE. Collectively, our data indicate AE induces caspase-8-mediated activation of mitochondrial death pathways by decreasing the stability of CARP mRNAs in a p53-independent manner.

  3. Hormonal and photoperiodic modulation of testicular mRNAs coding for inhibin/activin subunits and follistatin in Clethrionomys glareolus, Schreber.

    PubMed

    Tähkä, K M; Kaipia, A; Toppari, J; Tähkä, S; Tuuri, T; Tuohimaa, P

    1998-07-01

    Photoperiodic and hormonal modulation of mRNAs for testicular inhibin/activin subunits and follistatin were studied in a seasonally breeding rodent, the bank vole (Clethrionomys glareolus). Photoperiod-induced testicular regression had no effect on the relatively low steady-state levels of follistatin mRNA. Inhibin alpha (I alpha) and beta B (I beta B) mRNA levels were significantly higher in regressed than in active gonads, but inhibin beta A was undetectable. The effect of gonadotropin administration on testicular weight and mRNA concentrations differed between the sexually active and quiescent voles. Neither FSH (1.2 U/kg; s.c. for 5 days) nor hCG (600 IU/kg; s.c. for 5 days) affected testicular weight in sexually active voles, whereas both gonadotropins significantly increased testicular weight in photo-regressed individuals. FSH had no effect on I alpha or I beta B mRNA concentrations in the active testes, whereas excessive hCG challenge induced a decrease in the steady-state levels of these mRNAs. FSH induced an increase in I alpha mRNA concentrations in the regressed gonad, whereas both gonadotropins concomitantly down-regulated I beta B mRNA levels. In conclusion, the high expression of I alpha and I beta B mRNA in the regressed testis imply autocrine and paracrine roles for inhibin/activin in the quiescent gonad of seasonal breeders. Inhibin alpha-subunit expression is at least partly under the control of FSH in the bank vole testis.

  4. Regional heterogeneity of expression of renal NPRs, TonEBP, and AQP-2 mRNAs in rats with acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Cha, Seung Ah; Park, Byung Mun; Jung, Yu Jin; Kim, Soo Mi; Kang, Kyung Pyo; Kim, Won; Kim, Suhn Hee

    2015-07-01

    To understand the pathophysiology of ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) - induced acute kidney injury (AKI), the present study defined changes in renal function, plasma renotropic hormones and its receptors in the kidney 2, 5, or 7 days after 45 min-renal ischemia in rats. Blood urea nitrogen, plasma creatinine, and osmolarity increased 2 days after I/R injury and tended to return to control level 7 days after I/R injury. Decreased renal function tended to return to control level 5 days after I/R injury. However, plasma concentrations of atrial natriuretic peptide and renin did not change. In control kidney, natriuretic peptide receptor (NPR)-A, -B and -C mRNAs were highly expressed in medulla (ME), inner cortex (IC), and outer cortex (OC), respectively, and tonicity-responsive enhancer binding protein (TonEBP), auqaporin-2 (AQP-2) and eNOS mRNAs were highly expressed in ME. NPR-A and -B mRNA expressions were markedly decreased 2 days after I/R injury. On 5 days after I/R injury, NPR-A mRNA expression increased in OC and recovered to control level in IC but not in ME. NPR-B mRNA expression was increased in OC, and recovered to control level in IC and ME. NPR-C mRNA expression was markedly decreased in OC 2 and 5 days after I/R injury. TonEBP, APQ-2 and eNOS mRNA expressions were markedly decreased 2 days after I/R injury and did not recover in ME 7 days after I/R injury. Therefore, we suggest that there is a regional heterogeneity of regulation of renal NPRs, TonEBP, and APQ-2 mRNA in AKI.

  5. Comparative expression profiles of mRNAs and microRNAs among human mesenchymal stem cells derived from breast, face, and abdominal adipose tissues.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai-Hung; Kao, An-Pei; Singh, Sher; Yu, Sung-Liang; Kao, Li-Pin; Tsai, Zong Yun; Lin, Sin-Daw; Li, Steven Shoei-Lung

    2010-03-01

    We determined the expression of both mRNAs and microRNAs (miRNAs) from human mesenchymal stem cells BM19, FM30, and AM3, which is derived from breast, face, and abdominal adipose tissues, respectively. BM19, FM30, and AM3 cells exhibited considerably similar mRNA profiles, and their 1,038 abundantly common genes were involved in regulating six cell adhesion and three cytoskeleton remodeling processes among the top ten GeneGo canonical pathway maps. The 39 most abundant miRNAs in AM3 cells were expressed at very similar levels in BM19 cells. However, seven abundant miRNAs (miR-19b, miR-320, miR-186, miR-199a, miR-339, miR-99a, and miR-152) in AM3 cells were expressed at much lower levels than that in FM30 cells, and 38 genes targeted by these miRNAs were consequently upregulated more than 3-fold in FM30 cells compared with AM3 cells. Therefore, autologous abdominal adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells are suitable for tissue engineering of breast reconstruction because of very similar expression profiles of mRNAs and miRNAs between AM3 and BM19 cells. Conversely, abdominal AM3 cells might not be suitable for facial rejuvenation, since the 38 highly expressed genes targeted by miRNAs in FM30 cells might play an important role(s) in the development of facial tissue.

  6. Two separate modules of the conserved regulatory RNA AbcR1 address multiple target mRNAs in and outside of the translation initiation region

    PubMed Central

    Overlöper, Aaron; Kraus, Alexander; Gurski, Rosemarie; Wright, Patrick R; Georg, Jens; Hess, Wolfgang R; Narberhaus, Franz

    2014-01-01

    The small RNA AbcR1 regulates the expression of ABC transporters in the plant pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens, the plant symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti, and the human pathogen Brucella abortus. A combination of proteomic and bioinformatic approaches suggested dozens of AbcR1 targets in A. tumefaciens. Several of these newly discovered targets are involved in the uptake of amino acids, their derivatives, and sugars. Among the latter is the periplasmic sugar-binding protein ChvE, a component of the virulence signal transduction system. We examined 16 targets and their interaction with AbcR1 in close detail. In addition to the previously described mRNA interaction site of AbcR1 (M1), the CopraRNA program predicted a second functional module (M2) as target-binding site. Both M1 and M2 contain single-stranded anti-SD motifs. Using mutated AbcR1 variants, we systematically tested by band shift experiments, which sRNA region is responsible for mRNA binding and gene regulation. On the target site, we find that AbcR1 interacts with some mRNAs in the translation initiation region and with others far into their coding sequence. Our data show that AbcR1 is a versatile master regulator of nutrient uptake systems in A. tumefaciens and related bacteria. PMID:24921646

  7. SV40-IMMORTALIZED NON-TUMORIGENIC AND TUMORIGENIC CELL LINES DIFFER IN EXPRESSION OF HALLMARK VIRAL RESPONSE MRNAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    SV40-Immortalized Non-Tumorigenic and Tumorigenic Cell Lines Differ in Expression of Hallmark Viral Response mRNAs.

    Prior to the use of an in vitra/in viva transformation system to examine the tumorigenic activity of environmental contaminants, in vitra gene expression pa...

  8. Translation of nad9 mRNAs in mitochondria from Solanum tuberosum is restricted to completely edited transcripts.

    PubMed Central

    Grohmann, L; Thieck, O; Herz, U; Schröder, W; Brennicke, A

    1994-01-01

    The pool of partially and completely edited mRNAs present in plant mitochondria could potentially be translated into a mixture of divergent proteins. This possibility was investigated for the nad9 gene in potato by characterization of the mRNA population and the corresponding protein sequence. The deduced amino acid sequence of the nad9 gene product has significant similarity to the nuclear-encoded 30 kDa subunit of the bovine and Neurospora NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) and to the chloroplast ndhJ gene product. Immunoprecipitation of a 27 kDa in-organello 35S labelled mitochondrial translation product with an antibody directed against the wheat nad9 gene product demonstrates its functional expression in potato and wheat. Comparison of the nad9 genomic DNA and cDNA sequences reveals seven codons to be changed by a C to U RNA-editing. Direct sequencing of RT-PCR products derived from cDNAs of different tissues of potato plants shows the presence of a significant portion of only partially edited nad9 transcripts in the various tissues. Amino acid sequencing of internal peptides of the isolated 27 kDa protein from potato tubers demonstrates homogenous translation products of only completely edited nad9 mRNAs even in the presence of partially edited mRNAs. This result suggests a pretranslational selection between edited and incompletely edited mRNAs in plant mitochondria. Images PMID:8078764

  9. Single-molecule imaging of beta-actin mRNAs in the cytoplasm of a living cell.

    PubMed

    Yamagishi, Mai; Ishihama, Yo; Shirasaki, Yoshitaka; Kurama, Hideki; Funatsu, Takashi

    2009-04-15

    Beta-actin mRNA labeled with an MS2-EGFP fusion protein was expressed in chicken embryo fibroblasts and its localization and movement were analyzed by single-molecule imaging. Most beta-Actin mRNAs localized to the leading edge, while some others were observed in the perinuclear region. Singe-molecule tracking of individual mRNAs revealed that the majority of mRNAs were in unrestricted Brownian motion at the leading edge and in restricted Brownian motion in the perinuclear region. The macroscopic diffusion coefficient of mRNA (D(MACRO)) at the leading edge was 0.3 microm(2)/s. On the other hand, D(MACRO) in the perinuclear region was 0.02 microm(2)/s. The destruction of microfilaments with cytochalasin D, which is known to delocalize beta-actin mRNAs, led to an increase in D(MACRO) to 0.2 microm(2)/s in the perinuclear region. These results suggest that the microstructure, composed of microfilaments, serves as a barrier for the movement of beta-actin mRNA.

  10. Protein-tyrosine-kinase-dependent expression of cyclo-oxygenase-1 and -2 mRNAs in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hirai, K; Takayama, H; Tomo, K; Okuma, M

    1997-01-01

    Endothelial cells possess constitutive or inducible cyclo-oxygenase (COX) isoenzymes for prostacyclin production, but the mechanisms for their expression are largely unknown. We found that vanadate, an inhibitor of protein-tyrosine phosphatases, induced the expression of two COX isoenzyme mRNAs in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Vanadate also stimulated an increase in COX-2 protein levels, but did not affect significantly the levels of constitutively expressed COX-1 protein. Synergistic enhancement of expression of the two COX isoenzyme mRNAs was observed on stimulation of HUVEC with vanadate plus interleukin-1alpha. Tyrphostin-47, which as an inhibitor of protein-tyrosine kinases abolished vanadate-induced protein-tyrosine phosphorylation, inhibited expression of the two COX isoenzyme mRNAs in HUVEC stimulated with vanadate or interleukin-1alpha. These data provide conclusive evidence that activation of protein-tyrosine kinases is causally linked to expression of the mRNAs for the two COX isoenzymes in HUVEC. PMID:9065752

  11. Granules Harboring Translationally Active mRNAs Provide a Platform for P-Body Formation following Stress

    PubMed Central

    Lui, Jennifer; Castelli, Lydia M.; Pizzinga, Mariavittoria; Simpson, Clare E.; Hoyle, Nathaniel P.; Bailey, Kathryn L.; Campbell, Susan G.; Ashe, Mark P.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The localization of mRNA to defined cytoplasmic sites in eukaryotic cells not only allows localized protein production but also determines the fate of mRNAs. For instance, translationally repressed mRNAs localize to P-bodies and stress granules where their decay and storage, respectively, are directed. Here, we find that several mRNAs are localized to granules in unstressed, actively growing cells. These granules play a key role in the stress-dependent formation of P-bodies. Specific glycolytic mRNAs are colocalized in multiple granules per cell, which aggregate during P-body formation. Such aggregation is still observed under conditions or in mutants where P-bodies do not form. In unstressed cells, the mRNA granules appear associated with active translation; this might enable a coregulation of protein expression from the same pathways or complexes. Parallels can be drawn between this coregulation and the advantage of operons in prokaryotic systems. PMID:25437551

  12. Single-molecule imaging of {beta}-actin mRNAs in the cytoplasm of a living cell

    SciTech Connect

    Yamagishi, Mai; Ishihama, Yo; Shirasaki, Yoshitaka; Kurama, Hideki; Funatsu, Takashi

    2009-04-15

    {beta}-Actin mRNA labeled with an MS2-EGFP fusion protein was expressed in chicken embryo fibroblasts and its localization and movement were analyzed by single-molecule imaging. Most {beta}-Actin mRNAs localized to the leading edge, while some others were observed in the perinuclear region. Singe-molecule tracking of individual mRNAs revealed that the majority of mRNAs were in unrestricted Brownian motion at the leading edge and in restricted Brownian motion in the perinuclear region. The macroscopic diffusion coefficient of mRNA (D{sub MACRO}) at the leading edge was 0.3 {mu}m{sup 2}/s. On the other hand, D{sub MACRO} in the perinuclear region was 0.02 {mu}m{sup 2}/s. The destruction of microfilaments with cytochalasin D, which is known to delocalize {beta}-actin mRNAs, led to an increase in D{sub MACRO} to 0.2 {mu}m{sup 2}/s in the perinuclear region. These results suggest that the microstructure, composed of microfilaments, serves as a barrier for the movement of {beta}-actin mRNA.

  13. Multiple microRNAs within the 14q32 cluster target the mRNAs of major type 1 diabetes autoantigens IA-2, IA-2β, and GAD65.

    PubMed

    Abuhatzira, Liron; Xu, Huanyu; Tahhan, Georges; Boulougoura, Afroditi; Schäffer, Alejandro A; Notkins, Abner L

    2015-10-01

    Islet antigen (IA)-2, IA-2β, and glutamate decarboxylase (GAD65) are major autoantigens in type 1 diabetes (T1D). Autoantibodies to these autoantigens appear years before disease onset and are widely used as predictive markers. Little is known, however, about what regulates the expression of these autoantigens. The present experiments were initiated to test the hypothesis that microRNAs (miRNAs) can target and affect the levels of these autoantigens. Bioinformatics was used to identify miRNAs predicted to target the mRNAs coding IA-2, IA-2β, and GAD65. RNA interference for the miRNA processing enzyme Dicer1 and individual miRNA mimics and inhibitors were used to confirm the effect in mouse islets and MIN6 cells. We show that the imprinted 14q32 miRNA cluster contains 56 miRNAs, 32 of which are predicted to target the mRNAs of T1D autoantigens and 12 of which are glucose-sensitive. Using miRNA mimics and inhibitors, we confirmed that at least 7 of these miRNAs modulate the mRNA levels of the T1D autoantigens. Dicer1 knockdown significantly reduced the mRNA levels of all 3 autoantigens, further confirming the importance of miRNAs in this regulation. We conclude that miRNAs are involved in regulating the expression of the major T1D autoantigens.

  14. Elucidation of a C-rich signature motif in target mRNAs of RNA-binding protein TIAR.

    PubMed

    Kim, Henry S; Kuwano, Yuki; Zhan, Ming; Pullmann, Rudolf; Mazan-Mamczarz, Krystyna; Li, Huai; Kedersha, Nancy; Anderson, Paul; Wilce, Matthew C J; Gorospe, Myriam; Wilce, Jacqueline A

    2007-10-01

    The RNA-binding protein TIAR (related to TIA-1 [T-cell-restricted intracellular antigen 1]) was shown to associate with subsets of mRNAs bearing U-rich sequences in their 3' untranslated regions. TIAR can function as a translational repressor, particularly in response to cytotoxic agents. Using unstressed colon cancer cells, collections of mRNAs associated with TIAR were isolated by immunoprecipitation (IP) of (TIAR-RNA) ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes, identified by microarray analysis, and used to elucidate a common signature motif present among TIAR target transcripts. The predicted TIAR motif was an unexpectedly cytosine-rich, 28- to 32-nucleotide-long element forming a stem and a loop of variable size with an additional side loop. The ability of TIAR to bind an RNA oligonucleotide with a representative C-rich TIAR motif sequence was verified in vitro using surface plasmon resonance. By this analysis, TIAR containing two or three RNA recognition domains (TIAR12 and TIAR123) showed low but significant binding to the C-rich sequence. In vivo, insertion of the C-rich motif into a heterologous reporter strongly suppressed its translation in cultured cells. Using this signature motif, an additional approximately 2,209 UniGene targets were identified (2.0% of the total UniGene database). A subset of specific mRNAs were validated by RNP IP analysis. Interestingly, in response to treatment with short-wavelength UV light (UVC), a stress agent causing DNA damage, each of these target mRNAs bearing C-rich motifs dissociated from TIAR. In turn, expression of the encoded proteins was elevated in a TIAR-dependent manner. In sum, we report the identification of a C-rich signature motif present in TIAR target mRNAs whose association with TIAR decreases following exposure to a stress-causing agent.

  15. Exosomes enriched in stemness/metastatic-related mRNAS promote oncogenic potential in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Marta; Silva, Javier; Herrera, Alberto; Herrera, Mercedes; Peña, Cristina; Martín, Paloma; Gil-Calderón, Beatriz; Larriba, María Jesús; Coronado, Mª José; Soldevilla, Beatriz; Turrión, Víctor S.; Provencio, Mariano; Sánchez, Antonio; Bonilla, Félix; García-Barberán, Vanesa

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells efficiently transfer exosome contents (essentially mRNAs and microRNAs) to other cell types, modifying immune responses, cell growth, angiogenesis and metastasis. Here we analyzed the exosomes release by breast tumor cells with different capacities of stemness/metastasis based on CXCR4 expression, and evaluated their capacity to generate oncogenic features in recipient cells. Breast cancer cells overexpressing CXCR4 showed an increase in stemness-related markers, and in proliferation, migration and invasion capacities. Furthermore, recipient cells treated with exosomes from CXCR4-cells showed increased in the same abilities. Moreover, inoculation of CXCR4-cell-derived exosomes in immunocompromised mice stimulated primary tumor growth and metastatic potential. Comparison of nucleic acids contained into exosomes isolated from patients revealed a “stemness and metastatic” signature in exosomes of patients with worse prognosis. Finally, our data supported the view that cancer cells with stem-like properties show concomitant metastatic behavior, and their exosomes stimulate tumor progression and metastasis. Exosomes-derived nucleic acids from plasma of breast cancer patients are suitable markers in the prognosis of such patients. PMID:26528758

  16. Discovery of m7G-cap in eukaryotic mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    FURUICHI, Yasuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Terminal structure analysis of an insect cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus (CPV) genome RNA in the early 1970s at the National Institute of Genetics in Japan yielded a 2′-O-methylated nucleotide in the 5′ end of double-stranded RNA genome. This finding prompted me to add S-adenosyl-L-methionine, a natural methylation donor, to the in vitro transcription reaction of viruses that contain RNA polymerase. This effort resulted in unprecedented mRNA synthesis that generates a unique blocked and methylated 5′ terminal structure (referred later to as “cap” or “m7G-cap”) in the transcription of silkworm CPV and human reovirus and vaccinia viruses that contain RNA polymerase in virus particles. Initial studies with viruses paved the way to discover the 5′-cap m7GpppNm structure present generally in cellular mRNAs of eukaryotes. I participated in those studies and was able to explain the pathway of cap synthesis and the significance of the 5′ cap (and capping) in gene expression processes, including transcription and protein synthesis. In this review article I concentrate on the description of these initial studies that eventually led us to a new paradigm of mRNA capping. PMID:26460318

  17. An efficient system for selectively altering genetic information within mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Montiel-González, Maria Fernanda; Vallecillo-Viejo, Isabel C.; Rosenthal, Joshua J. C.

    2016-01-01

    Site-directed RNA editing (SDRE) is a strategy to precisely alter genetic information within mRNAs. By linking the catalytic domain of the RNA editing enzyme ADAR to an antisense guide RNA, specific adenosines can be converted to inosines, biological mimics for guanosine. Previously, we showed that a genetically encoded iteration of SDRE could target adenosines expressed in human cells, but not efficiently. Here we developed a reporter assay to quantify editing, and used it to improve our strategy. By enhancing the linkage between ADAR's catalytic domain and the guide RNA, and by introducing a mutation in the catalytic domain, the efficiency of converting a UAG premature termination codon (PTC) to tryptophan (UGG) was improved from ∼11 % to ∼70 %. Other PTCs were edited, but less efficiently. Numerous off-target edits were identified in the targeted mRNA, but not in randomly selected endogenous messages. Off-target edits could be eliminated by reducing the amount of guide RNA with a reduction in on-target editing. The catalytic rate of SDRE was compared with those for human ADARs on various substrates and found to be within an order of magnitude of most. These data underscore the promise of site-directed RNA editing as a therapeutic or experimental tool. PMID:27557710

  18. Expression of metallothionein mRNAs on mouse cerebellum microglia cells by thimerosal and its metabolites.

    PubMed

    Minami, Takeshi; Miyata, Eriko; Sakamoto, Yamato; Kohama, Azusa; Yamazaki, Hideo; Ichida, Seiji

    2009-06-30

    Effects of thimerosal and its metabolites, ethyl mercury and thiosalicylate, on the expression of metallothionein (MT) mRNAs in mouse cerebellum microglia cell line, C8-B4 cells, were studied. The level of MT-1 mRNA significantly decreased at early hours and recovered time-dependently 24h after thimerosal was added to the C8-B4 cells. However, MT-2 and MT-3 mRNA expressions did not change from the control group. In contrast, the expression of MT-1 mRNA increased in a mouse neuroblastoma cell line 6h after incubation with thimerosal. In addition, the level of MT-1 mRNA decreased in C8-B4 cells 6h after the addition of thiosalicylate, but ethyl mercury induced MT-1 mRNA expression. When cell viability was compared with thimerosal, thiosalicylate, and ethyl mercury, the viability of C8-B4 cells decreased dose-dependently 24h after either thimerosal or ethyl mercury was added; however, the viability increased dose-dependently until 15 microM thiosalicylate was added. From the present results, it is concluded that the expression of MT-1 mRNA may be mediated by different factors than the expression of MT-2 mRNA in C8-B4 cells. The reduction of MT-1 mRNA level by thiosalicylate may affect the proliferation of C8-B4 cells.

  19. Irregular G-quadruplexes Found in the Untranslated Regions of Human mRNAs Influence Translation.

    PubMed

    Bolduc, François; Garant, Jean-Michel; Allard, Félix; Perreault, Jean-Pierre

    2016-10-07

    G-quadruplex structures are composed of coplanar guanines and are found in both DNA and RNA. They are formed by the stacking of two or more G-quartets that are linked together by three loops. The current belief is that RNA G-quadruplexes include loops of l to 7 nucleotides in length, although recent evidence indicates that the central loop (loop 2) can be longer if loops 1 and 3 are limited to a single nucleotide each. With the objective of broadening the definition of irregular RNA G-quadruplexes, a bioinformatic search was performed to find potential G-quadruplexes located in the untranslated regions of human mRNAs (i.e. in the 5' and 3'-UTRs) that contain either a long loop 1 or 3 of up to 40 nucleotides in length. RNA molecules including the potential sequences were then synthesized and examined in vitro by in-line probing for the formation of G-quadruplex structures. The sequences that adopted a G-quadruplex structure were cloned into a luciferase dual vector and examined for their ability to modulate translation in cellulo Some irregular G-quadruplexes were observed to either promote or repress translation regardless of the position or the size of the long loop they possessed. Even if the composition of a RNA G-quadruplex is not quite completely understood, the results presented in this report clearly demonstrate that what defines a RNA G-quadruplex is much broader than what we previously believed.

  20. Effect of zinc deficiency of expression of specific mRNAs in rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.J.; Kimball, S.R.; Leure-duPree, A.E.; Jefferson, L.S. )

    1991-03-15

    Retinol is released from the liver bound to a specific transport protein, retinol binding protein (RBP), which binds to transthyretin (TTR) to transport retinol to the retinal pigment epithelium for use in the visual cycle. The synthesis of RBP as well as the transport of vitamin A from the liver is especially sensitive to zinc deficiency (ZD). Impaired hepatic synthesis of RBP has been reported in zinc-deficient rats. In the present study, the effect of ZD on the expression of mRNAs in the liver was examined by isolating total RNA from control, pair-fed, and zinc-deficient rats and translating the RNA in a messenger-dependent reticulocyte lysate. The radiolabeled translation products were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by autoradiography. The amounts of 12 of the approximately 200 radiolabeled translation products which could be distinguished were found to be altered in zinc-deficient compare to control samples. To investigate the expression of a specific mRNA, a cDNA to TTR was employed to probe the RNA samples. Slot blot analysis revealed that TTR mRNA was reduced to 57 {plus minus} 14% of the control in pair-fed rats to 29 {plus minus} 19% of control in zinc-deficient rats. The decrease in TTR mRNA is consistent with the observation that serum TTR is decreased during zinc deficiency caused by cirrhosis.

  1. Kinetics and intracellular compartmentalization of HTLV-1 gene expression: nuclear retention of HBZ mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Rende, Francesca; Cavallari, Ilaria; Corradin, Alberto; Silic-Benussi, Micol; Toulza, Frederic; Toffolo, Gianna M.; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Jacobson, Steven; Taylor, Graham P.; D'Agostino, Donna M.; Bangham, Charles R. M.

    2011-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) codes for 9 alternatively spliced transcripts and 2 major regulatory proteins named Tax and Rex that function at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels, respectively. We investigated the temporal sequence of HTLV-1 gene expression in primary cells from infected patients using splice site-specific quantitative RT-PCR. The results indicated a two-phase kinetics with the tax/rex mRNA preceding expression of other viral transcripts. Analysis of mRNA compartmentalization in cells transfected with HTLV-1 molecular clones demonstrated the strict Rex-dependency of the two-phase kinetics and revealed strong nuclear retention of HBZ mRNAs, supporting their function as noncoding transcripts. Mathematical modeling underscored the importance of a delay between the functions of Tax and Rex, which was supported by experimental evidence of the longer half-life of Rex. These data provide evidence for a temporal pattern of HTLV-1 expression and reveal major differences in the intracellular compartmentalization of HTLV-1 transcripts. PMID:21398577

  2. Deadenylase depletion protects inherited mRNAs in primordial germ cells.

    PubMed

    Swartz, S Zachary; Reich, Adrian M; Oulhen, Nathalie; Raz, Tal; Milos, Patrice M; Campanale, Joseph P; Hamdoun, Amro; Wessel, Gary M

    2014-08-01

    A crucial event in animal development is the specification of primordial germ cells (PGCs), which become the stem cells that create sperm and eggs. How PGCs are created provides a valuable paradigm for understanding stem cells in general. We find that the PGCs of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus exhibit broad transcriptional repression, yet enrichment for a set of inherited mRNAs. Enrichment of several germline determinants in the PGCs requires the RNA-binding protein Nanos to target the transcript that encodes CNOT6, a deadenylase, for degradation in the PGCs, thereby creating a stable environment for RNA. Misexpression of CNOT6 in the PGCs results in their failure to retain Seawi transcripts and Vasa protein. Conversely, broad knockdown of CNOT6 expands the domain of Seawi RNA as well as exogenous reporters. Thus, Nanos-dependent spatially restricted CNOT6 differential expression is used to selectively localize germline RNAs to the PGCs. Our findings support a 'time capsule' model of germline determination, whereby the PGCs are insulated from differentiation by retaining the molecular characteristics of the totipotent egg and early embryo.

  3. Changes of adrenomedullin and its receptor components mRNAs expression in the brain stem and hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis of stress-induced hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Xia; Li, Liang; Shen, Lin-Lin; Qian, Yuan; Cao, Yin-Xiang; Zhu, Da-Nian

    2004-12-25

    In this study, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to detect the changes in mRNAs levels of preproadrenomedullin (ppADM) gene encoding adrenomedullin (ADM) and the essential receptor components of ADM, calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CRLR), and the receptor activity modifying protein 2 and 3 (RAMP2 and RAMP3) in the medulla oblongata, hypothalamus, midbrain, pituitary gland and adrenal gland of the stress-induced hypertensive rats. It was shown that chronic foot-shock and noise stress for 15 consecutive days induced a significant increase in systolic blood pressure (SBP) and unique changes in ppADM and its receptor components mRNAs in all areas studied. As compared with the control group, the level of ppADM mRNA, normalized against a glyceraldehydes-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) control, was up-regulated in the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, but down-regulated in the medulla oblongata and midbrain (P<0.01 and P<0.05, respectively). The relative amount of CRLR mRNA was higher in the hypothalamus than that in other areas. The level of CRLR mRNA expression was significantly increased in the medulla oblongata of the stress group (P<0.01), but decreased in the midbrain (P<0.01) as well as hypothalamus(P<0.05), as compared with that of the control group. Chronic stress for 15 consecutive days produced an increase in the level of RAMP2 mRNA expression in the medulla oblongata (P<0.01) and a decrease in the adrenal gland (P<0.01), as compared with the control. No significant stress-related changes in RAMP2 mRNA were observed in the midbrain, hypothalamus and pituitary gland. The amount of RAMP3 mRNA was relatively higher in the midbrain and hypothalamus than that in the medulla oblongata, adrenal gland and adrenal gland. Stress-induced hypertensive rats exhibited an increased RAMP3 mRNA expression in the hypothalamus and pituitary gland (P<0.01 and P<0.05, respectively) and a decrease in the adrenal gland and midbrain (P<0

  4. Peptide nucleic acids targeting β-globin mRNAs selectively inhibit hemoglobin production in murine erythroleukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    MONTAGNER, GIULIA; GEMMO, CHIARA; FABBRI, ENRICA; MANICARDI, ALEX; ACCARDO, IGEA; BIANCHI, NICOLETTA; FINOTTI, ALESSIA; BREVEGLIERI, GIULIA; SALVATORI, FRANCESCA; BORGATTI, MONICA; LAMPRONTI, ILARIA; BRESCIANI, ALBERTO; ALTAMURA, SERGIO; CORRADINI, ROBERTO; GAMBARI, ROBERTO

    2015-01-01

    In the treatment of hemoglobinopathies, amending altered hemoglobins and/or globins produced in excess is an important part of therapeutic strategies and the selective inhibition of globin production may be clinically beneficial. Therefore the development of drug-based methods for the selective inhibition of globin accumulation is required. In this study, we employed peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) to alter globin gene expression. The main conclusion of the present study was that PNAs designed to target adult murine β-globin mRNA inhibit hemoglobin accumulation and erythroid differentiation of murine erythroleukemia (MEL) cells with high efficiency and fair selectivity. No major effects were observed on cell proliferation. Our study supports the concept that PNAs may be used to target mRNAs that, similar to globin mRNAs, are expressed at very high levels in differentiating erythroid cells. Our data suggest that PNAs inhibit the excess production of globins involved in the pathophysiology of hemoglobinopathies. PMID:25405921

  5. Increased plasma mRNAs of placenta-specific 1 (PLAC1) and glial cells-missing 1 (GCM1) in mothers with pre-eclampsia.

    PubMed

    Fujito, Naoya; Samura, Osamu; Miharu, Norio; Tanigawa, Miho; Hyodo, Maki; Kudo, Yoshiki

    2006-03-01

    In this study we have investigated whether quantitative analysis of placental mRNAs in maternal plasma provides a way to monitor placental status. We measured plasma concentrations of human chorionic gonadotropin beta-subunit (betahCG) and human placental lactogen (hPL) mRNAs as previously reported mRNAs and pregnancy associated plasma protein A (PAPP-A), placenta-specific 1 (PLAC1) and glial cells-missing 1 (GCM1) mRNAs, which have not been measured during the course of normal pregnancy. Firstly, peripheral blood was obtained at various times from healthy pregnant women to clarify the time course of placental mRNAs. Secondly, blood was obtained from women with pre-eclampsia and gestational age-matched controls to examine whether placental mRNAs change in pre-eclampsia. Plasma was separated from these samples for extraction of RNA, followed by reverse transcription polymerse chain reaction analysis. Median concentrations of PLAC1 and GCM1 mRNA in plasma of pre-eclamptic subjects respectively were 1625 and 2141 copies/ml, significantly higher than 195 and 881 copies/ml, the values for controls (Mann-Whitney test, p<0.001). No significant difference was seen in hPL, betahCG, or PAPP-A mRNA concentration between pre-eclamptic and control groups. Plasma PLAC1 and GCM1 mRNAs appear promising as noninvasively measurable molecular markers for pre-eclampsia.

  6. Double In situ Hybridization for MicroRNAs and mRNAs in Brain Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Kasai, Atsushi; Kakihara, Sora; Miura, Hiroki; Okada, Ryo; Hayata-Takano, Atsuko; Hazama, Keisuke; Niu, Misaki; Shintani, Norihito; Nakazawa, Takanobu; Hashimoto, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) participate in a variety of functions in the brain. Understanding the in vivo localization of miRNAs is an important step for uncovering their roles in brain function. However, the in situ detection of low-abundance miRNAs in brain tissues remains difficult and requires extensive optimization of in situ hybridization (ISH) protocols in individual laboratories. Thus, detailed information regarding experimental conditions would serve as a useful reference for researchers in this field. Here, we investigated and summarized the effects of adjusting a series of critical steps, including tissue fixation, probe accessibility and hybridization stringency, to standardize the currently used miRNA ISH procedures. As a result, we successfully detected several low-abundance miRNAs by ISH using the following experimental conditions: (1) use of fresh brain tissues, (2) digestion of brain samples with proteinase K, (3) LNA-probe hybridization at a temperature 37°C below the melting temperature of the RNA, (4) performance of high-stringency wash steps using 50% formamide in 1 × standard saline citrate (SSC) buffer. RT-PCR of the punched-out tissues using TaqManTM primers confirmed the ISH results. Finally, double-fluorescence ISH successfully demonstrated the colocalization of miRNAs and mRNAs. Thus, the detailed information regarding the miRNA ISH procedures used in this study may help to resolve the technical hurdles observed in the in vivo localization of miRNAs, and the elucidation of the specific roles of miRNAs. PMID:27920667

  7. Irregular G-quadruplexes Found in the Untranslated Regions of Human mRNAs Influence Translation*

    PubMed Central

    Bolduc, François; Garant, Jean-Michel; Allard, Félix; Perreault, Jean-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    G-quadruplex structures are composed of coplanar guanines and are found in both DNA and RNA. They are formed by the stacking of two or more G-quartets that are linked together by three loops. The current belief is that RNA G-quadruplexes include loops of l to 7 nucleotides in length, although recent evidence indicates that the central loop (loop 2) can be longer if loops 1 and 3 are limited to a single nucleotide each. With the objective of broadening the definition of irregular RNA G-quadruplexes, a bioinformatic search was performed to find potential G-quadruplexes located in the untranslated regions of human mRNAs (i.e. in the 5′ and 3′-UTRs) that contain either a long loop 1 or 3 of up to 40 nucleotides in length. RNA molecules including the potential sequences were then synthesized and examined in vitro by in-line probing for the formation of G-quadruplex structures. The sequences that adopted a G-quadruplex structure were cloned into a luciferase dual vector and examined for their ability to modulate translation in cellulo. Some irregular G-quadruplexes were observed to either promote or repress translation regardless of the position or the size of the long loop they possessed. Even if the composition of a RNA G-quadruplex is not quite completely understood, the results presented in this report clearly demonstrate that what defines a RNA G-quadruplex is much broader than what we previously believed. PMID:27557661

  8. Differential expression of pancreatic protein and chemosensing receptor mRNAs in NKCC1-null intestine

    PubMed Central

    Bradford, Emily M; Vairamani, Kanimozhi; Shull, Gary E

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the intestinal functions of the NKCC1 Na+-K+-2Cl cotransporter (SLC12a2 gene), differential mRNA expression changes in NKCC1-null intestine were analyzed. METHODS: Microarray analysis of mRNA from intestines of adult wild-type mice and gene-targeted NKCC1-null mice (n = 6 of each genotype) was performed to identify patterns of differential gene expression changes. Differential expression patterns were further examined by Gene Ontology analysis using the online Gorilla program, and expression changes of selected genes were verified using northern blot analysis and quantitative real time-polymerase chain reaction. Histological staining and immunofluorescence were performed to identify cell types in which upregulated pancreatic digestive enzymes were expressed. RESULTS: Genes typically associated with pancreatic function were upregulated. These included lipase, amylase, elastase, and serine proteases indicative of pancreatic exocrine function, as well as insulin and regenerating islet genes, representative of endocrine function. Northern blot analysis and immunohistochemistry showed that differential expression of exocrine pancreas mRNAs was specific to the duodenum and localized to a subset of goblet cells. In addition, a major pattern of changes involving differential expression of olfactory receptors that function in chemical sensing, as well as other chemosensing G-protein coupled receptors, was observed. These changes in chemosensory receptor expression may be related to the failure of intestinal function and dependency on parenteral nutrition observed in humans with SLC12a2 mutations. CONCLUSION: The results suggest that loss of NKCC1 affects not only secretion, but also goblet cell function and chemosensing of intestinal contents via G-protein coupled chemosensory receptors. PMID:26909237

  9. Rhn1, a nuclear protein, is required for suppression of meiotic mRNAs in mitotically dividing fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Tomoyasu; Sugioka-Sugiyama, Rie; Hada, Kazumasa; Niwa, Ryusuke

    2012-01-01

    In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, many meiotic mRNAs are transcribed during mitosis and meiosis and selectively eliminated in mitotic cells. However, this pathway for mRNA decay, called the determinant of selective removal (DSR)-Mmi1 system, targets only some of the numerous meiotic mRNAs that are transcribed in mitotic cells. Here we describe Rhn1, a nuclear protein involved in meiotic mRNA suppression in vegetative fission yeast. Rhn1 is homologous to budding yeast Rtt103 and localizes to one or a few discrete nuclear dots in growing vegetative cells. Rhn1 colocalizes with a pre-mRNA 3'-end processing factor, Pcf11, and with the 5'-3' exoribonuclease, Dhp1; moreover, Rhn1 coimmunoprecipitates with Pcf11. Loss of rhn1 results in elevated sensitivity to high temperature, to thiabendazole (TBZ), and to UV. Interestingly, meiotic mRNAs--including moa1(+), mcp5(+), and mug96(+)--accumulate in mitotic rhn1Δ cells. Accumulation of meiotic mRNAs also occurs in strains lacking Lsk1, a kinase that phosphorylates serine 2 (Ser-2) in the C-terminal domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase II (Pol II), and in strains lacking Sen1, an ATP-dependent 5'-3' RNA/DNA helicase: notably, both Lsk1 and Sen1 have been implicated in termination of Pol II-dependent transcription. Furthermore, RNAi knockdown of cids-2, a Caenorhabditis elegans ortholog of rhn1(+), leads to elevated expression of a germline-specific gene, pgl-1, in somatic cells. These results indicate that Rhn1 contributes to the suppression of meiotic mRNAs in vegetative fission yeast and that the mechanism by which Rhn1 downregulates germline-specific transcripts may be conserved in unicellular and multicellular organisms.

  10. Expressional potency of mRNAs encoding receptors and voltage-activated channels in the postmortem rat brain.

    PubMed Central

    Ragsdale, D S; Miledi, R

    1991-01-01

    The stability and integrity of mRNAs encoding neurotransmitter receptors and voltage-activated channels in the postmortem rat brain was investigated by isolating poly(A)+ mRNA, injecting it into Xenopus oocytes, and then examining the expression of functional neurotransmitter receptors and voltage-activated channels in the oocyte membrane by electrophysiological recording. This approach was also used to assess the stability of mRNAs in brains that were incubated in oxygenated mammalian Ringer's solution for various lengths of time and from brains that were freshly frozen and then thawed at room temperature. Oocytes injected with mRNA from up to 21-hr postmortem brains gave large agonist- and voltage-activated responses, indicating that mRNAs encoding neurotransmitter receptors and voltage-activated channels are relatively stable in postmortem brain tissue. In contrast, oocytes injected with mRNA from brains incubated in Ringer's solution exhibited smaller responses, and oocytes injected with mRNA from tissue that was frozen and then thawed displayed very small or undetectable responses. Northern blot analysis using a nucleic acid probe for rat brain Na(+)-channel mRNA indicated that the size of the Na+ currents in injected oocytes reflected the levels of mRNA for Na+ channels in the different mRNA preparations. Thus, the expressional potency of mRNAs encoding neurotransmitter receptors and voltage-activated channels is quite stable in postmortem brains in situ, but it is reduced if the brains are kept in oxygenated saline, and freezing and thawing of tissue results in rapid degeneration of mRNA. Images PMID:1705710

  11. Rapid Degradation of Host mRNAs by Stimulation of RNase E Activity by Srd of Bacteriophage T4

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Dan; Alawneh, Abdulraheem M.; Yonesaki, Tetsuro; Otsuka, Yuichi

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli messenger RNAs (mRNAs) are rapidly degraded immediately after bacteriophage T4 infection, and the host RNase E contributes to this process. Here, we found that a previously uncharacterized factor of T4 phage, Srd (Similarity with rpoD), was involved in T4-induced host mRNA degradation. The rapid decay of ompA and lpp mRNAs was partially alleviated and a decay intermediate of lpp mRNA rapidly accumulated in cells infected with T4 phage lacking srd. Exogenous expression of Srd in uninfected cells significantly accelerated the decay of these mRNAs. In addition, lpp(T) RNA, with a sequence identical to the decay intermediate of lpp mRNA and a triphosphate at 5′-end, was also destabilized by Srd. The destabilization of these RNAs by Srd was not observed in RNase E-defective cells. The initial cleavage of a primary transcript by RNase E can be either direct or dependent on the 5′-end of transcript. In the latter case, host RppH is required to convert the triphosphate at 5′-end to a monophosphate. lpp(T) RNA, but not lpp and ompA mRNAs, required RppH for Srd-stimulated degradation, indicating that Srd stimulates both 5′-end-dependent and -independent cleavage activities of RNase E. Furthermore, pull-down and immunoprecipitation analyses strongly suggested that Srd physically associates with the N-terminal half of RNase E containing the catalytic moiety and the membrane target sequence. Finally, the growth of T4 phage was significantly decreased by the disruption of srd. These results strongly suggest that the stimulation of RNase E activity by T4 Srd is required for efficient phage growth. PMID:26323881

  12. Inhibition of host protein synthesis and degradation of cellular mRNAs during infection by influenza and herpes simplex virus

    SciTech Connect

    Inglis, S.C.

    1982-12-01

    Cloned DNA copies of two cellular genes were used to monitor, by blot hybridization, the stability of particular cell mRNAs after infection by influenza virus and herpes virus. The results indicated that the inhibition of host cell protein synthesis that accompanied infection by each virus could be explained by a reduction in the amounts of cellular mRN As in the cytoplasm, and they suggested that this decrease was due to virus-mediated mRNA degradation.

  13. Simultaneous gene editing by injection of mRNAs encoding transcription activator-like effector nucleases into mouse zygotes.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunliang; Qi, Rong; Singleterry, Rebecca; Hyle, Judith; Balch, Amanda; Li, Xiuling; Sublett, Jack; Berns, Hartmut; Valentine, Marcus; Valentine, Virginia; Sherr, Charles J

    2014-05-01

    Injection of transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALEN) mRNAs into mouse zygotes transferred into foster mothers efficiently generated founder mice with heritable mutations in targeted genes. Immunofluorescence visualization of phosphorylated histone 2A (γH2AX) combined with fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed that TALEN pairs targeting the Agouti locus induced site-directed DNA breaks in zygotes within 6 h of injection, an activity that continued at reduced efficiency in two-cell embryos. TALEN-Agouti mRNAs injected into zygotes of brown FvB × C57BL/6 hybrid mice generated completely black pups, confirming that mutations were induced prior to, and/or early after, cell division. Founder mice, many of which were mosaic, transmitted altered Agouti alleles to F1 pups to yield an allelic series of mutant strains. Although mutations were targeted to "spacer" sequences flanked by TALEN binding sites, larger deletions that extended beyond the TALEN-binding sequences were also detected and were similarly inherited through the germ line. Zygotic coinjection of TALEN mRNAs directed to the Agouti, miR-205, and the Arf tumor suppressor loci yielded pups containing frequent and heritable mutations of two or three genes. Simultaneous gene editing in zygotes affords an efficient approach for producing mice with compound mutant phenotypes, bypassing constraints of conventional mouse knockout technology in embryonic stem cells.

  14. Efficient in situ detection of mRNAs using the Chlorella virus DNA ligase for padlock probe ligation.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Nils; Meier, Matthias

    2017-02-01

    Padlock probes are single-stranded DNA molecules that are circularized upon hybridization to their target sequence by a DNA ligase. In the following, the circulated padlock probes are amplified and detected with fluorescently labeled probes complementary to the amplification product. The hallmark of padlock probe assays is a high detection specificity gained by the ligation reaction. Concomitantly, the ligation reaction is the largest drawback for a quantitative in situ detection of mRNAs due to the low affinities of common DNA or RNA ligases to RNA-DNA duplex strands. Therefore, current protocols require that mRNAs be reverse transcribed to DNA before detection with padlock probes. Recently, it was found that the DNA ligase from Paramecium bursaria Chlorella virus 1 (PBCV-1) is able to efficiently ligate RNA-splinted DNA. Hence, we designed a padlock probe assay for direct in situ detection of mRNAs using the PBCV-1 DNA ligase. Experimental single-cell data were used to optimize and characterize the efficiency of mRNA detection with padlock probes. Our results demonstrate that the PBCV-1 DNA ligase overcomes the efficiency limitation of current protocols for direct in situ mRNA detection, making the PBCV-1 DNA ligase an attractive tool to simplify in situ ligation sequencing applications.

  15. Isolation of a trans-acting factor involved in localization of Paracentrotus lividus maternal mRNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Costa, C; Romancino, D P; Ingrassia, A; Vizzini, A; Di Carlo, M

    1999-01-01

    Localization of Paracentrotus lividus bep maternal mRNAs at the animal pole occurs by association with the cytoskeleton and involves a 54-kDa protein, called LP54, that is able to bind to the 3' untranslated regions (UTRs) of bep mRNAs. We describe here the isolation and purification of this protein. Antibodies raised against purified LP54 allowed us to establish its localization in P. lividus eggs and embryos. This localization coincides with the mRNAs with which it is associated, that is, the animal pole in the egg, and, after fertilization, the regions derived from this part of the egg, and finally the oral ectoderm of the pluteus. Association with the cytoskeleton was shown by the copurification of LP54 in a microtubule preparation. Involvement in bep mRNA localization was demonstrated by microinjection of anti-LP54 antibodies in P. lividus eggs, which caused alteration of spatial distribution of bep3 mRNA. PMID:10573120

  16. Stromal expression of 72 kda type IV collagenase (MMP-2) and TIMP-2 mRNAs in colorectal neoplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Poulsom, R.; Pignatelli, M.; Stetler-Stevenson, W. G.; Liotta, L. A.; Wright, P. A.; Jeffery, R. E.; Longcroft, J. M.; Rogers, L.; Stamp, G. W.

    1992-01-01

    We undertook an in situ hybridization study to localize the mRNAs for the 72 kda type IV collagenase (MMP-2) and its specific inhibitor (TIMP-2) in 12 colorectal carcinomas, 3 adenomas, and 4 uninvolved resection margins to see how their distributions correlated with that of the reported distribution of MMP-2 protein. Labeling for MMP-2 and TIMP-2 mRNAs was detectable in 10 of 12 carcinomas and in 2 of 3 adenomas. Unexpectedly, we found much stronger signals for MMP-2 and TIMP-2 mRNAs within the mesenchymal cells in the desmoplastic stroma, of endothelial and/or (myo)fibroblastic nature, rather than in tumor epithelial cells in which localization of MMP-2 was anticipated. Our data indicate that stromal cells may have the ability to synthesize a metalloproteinase that degrades basement membrane, and may together with the neoplastic epithelial cells participate actively in the tissue remodeling and disruption of the basement membrane integrity which is characteristic of invasive tumors. Images Figure 1 to 6 PMID:1323219

  17. High-resolution Identification and Separation of Living Cell Types by Multiple microRNA-responsive Synthetic mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Endo, Kei; Hayashi, Karin; Saito, Hirohide

    2016-01-01

    The precise identification and separation of living cell types is critical to both study cell function and prepare cells for medical applications. However, intracellular information to distinguish live cells remains largely inaccessible. Here, we develop a method for high-resolution identification and separation of cell types by quantifying multiple microRNA (miRNA) activities in live cell populations. We found that a set of miRNA-responsive, in vitro synthesized mRNAs identify a specific cell population as a sharp peak and clearly separate different cell types based on less than two-fold differences in miRNA activities. Increasing the number of miRNA-responsive mRNAs enhanced the capability for cell identification and separation, as we precisely and simultaneously distinguished different cell types with similar miRNA profiles. In addition, the set of synthetic mRNAs separated HeLa cells into subgroups, uncovering heterogeneity of the cells and the level of resolution achievable. Our method could identify target live cells and improve the efficiency of cell purification from heterogeneous populations. PMID:26902536

  18. Mechanism for stabilizing mRNAs involved in methanol-dependent methanogenesis of cold-adaptive Methanosarcina mazei zm-15.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yi; Li, Jie; Jiang, Na; Dong, Xiuzhu

    2014-02-01

    Methylotrophic methanogenesis predominates at low temperatures in the cold Zoige wetland in Tibet. To elucidate the basis of cold-adapted methanogenesis in these habitats, Methanosarcina mazei zm-15 was isolated, and the molecular basis of its cold activity was studied. For this strain, aceticlastic methanogenesis was reduced 7.7-fold during growth at 15°C versus 30°C. Methanol-derived methanogenesis decreased only 3-fold under the same conditions, suggesting that it is more cold adaptive. Reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) detected <2-fold difference in the transcript abundances of mtaA1, mtaB1, and mtaC1, the methanol methyltransferase (Mta) genes, in 30°C versus 15°C culture, while ackA and pta mRNAs, encoding acetate kinase (Ack) and phosphotransacetylase (Pta) in aceticlastic methanogenesis, were 4.5- and 6.8-fold higher in 30°C culture than in 15°C culture. The in vivo half-lives of mtaA1 and mtaC1B1 mRNAs were similar in 30°C and 15°C cultures. However, the pta-ackA mRNA half-life was significantly reduced in 15°C culture compared to 30°C culture. Using circularized RNA RT-PCR, large 5' untranslated regions (UTRs) (270 nucleotides [nt] and 238 nt) were identified for mtaA1 and mtaC1B1 mRNAs, while only a 27-nt 5' UTR was present in the pta-ackA transcript. Removal of the 5' UTRs significantly reduced the in vitro half-lives of mtaA1 and mtaC1B1 mRNAs. Remarkably, fusion of the mtaA1 or mtaC1B1 5' UTRs to pta-ackA mRNA increased its in vitro half-life at both 30°C and 15°C. These results demonstrate that the large 5' UTRs significantly enhance the stability of the mRNAs involved in methanol-derived methanogenesis in the cold-adaptive M. mazei zm-15.

  19. Mechanism for Stabilizing mRNAs Involved in Methanol-Dependent Methanogenesis of Cold-Adaptive Methanosarcina mazei zm-15

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yi; Li, Jie; Jiang, Na

    2014-01-01

    Methylotrophic methanogenesis predominates at low temperatures in the cold Zoige wetland in Tibet. To elucidate the basis of cold-adapted methanogenesis in these habitats, Methanosarcina mazei zm-15 was isolated, and the molecular basis of its cold activity was studied. For this strain, aceticlastic methanogenesis was reduced 7.7-fold during growth at 15°C versus 30°C. Methanol-derived methanogenesis decreased only 3-fold under the same conditions, suggesting that it is more cold adaptive. Reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) detected <2-fold difference in the transcript abundances of mtaA1, mtaB1, and mtaC1, the methanol methyltransferase (Mta) genes, in 30°C versus 15°C culture, while ackA and pta mRNAs, encoding acetate kinase (Ack) and phosphotransacetylase (Pta) in aceticlastic methanogenesis, were 4.5- and 6.8-fold higher in 30°C culture than in 15°C culture. The in vivo half-lives of mtaA1 and mtaC1B1 mRNAs were similar in 30°C and 15°C cultures. However, the pta-ackA mRNA half-life was significantly reduced in 15°C culture compared to 30°C culture. Using circularized RNA RT-PCR, large 5′ untranslated regions (UTRs) (270 nucleotides [nt] and 238 nt) were identified for mtaA1 and mtaC1B1 mRNAs, while only a 27-nt 5′ UTR was present in the pta-ackA transcript. Removal of the 5′ UTRs significantly reduced the in vitro half-lives of mtaA1 and mtaC1B1 mRNAs. Remarkably, fusion of the mtaA1 or mtaC1B1 5′ UTRs to pta-ackA mRNA increased its in vitro half-life at both 30°C and 15°C. These results demonstrate that the large 5′ UTRs significantly enhance the stability of the mRNAs involved in methanol-derived methanogenesis in the cold-adaptive M. mazei zm-15. PMID:24317083

  20. Overlapping cis sites used for splicing of HIV-1 env/nef and rev mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Swanson, A K; Stoltzfus, C M

    1998-12-18

    Alternative splicing is used to generate more than 30 human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) spliced and unspliced mRNAs from a single primary transcript. The abundance of HIV-1 mRNAs is determined by the efficiencies with which its different 5' and 3' splice sites are used. Three splice sites (A4c, A4a, and A4b) are upstream of the rev initiator AUG. RNAs spliced at A4c, A4a, and A4b are used as mRNAs for Rev. Another 3' splice site (A5) is immediately downstream of the rev initiator. RNAs spliced at A5 are used as mRNAs for Env and Nef. In this report, primer extension analysis of splicing intermediates was used to show that there are eight branch points in this region, all of which map to adenosine residues. In addition, cis elements recognized by the cellular splicing machinery overlap; the two most 3' branch points overlap with the AG dinucleotides at rev 3' splice sites A4a and A4b. Competition of the overlapping cis sites for different splicing factors may play a role in maintaining the appropriate balance of mRNAs in HIV-1-infected cells. In support of this possibility, mutations at rev 3' splice site A4b AG dinucleotide dramatically increased splicing of the env/nef 3' splice site A5. This correlated with increased usage of the four most 3' branch points, which include those within the rev 3' splice site AG dinucleotides. Consistent with these results, analysis of a mutant in which three of the four env/nef branch points were inactivated indicated that use of splice site A5 was inhibited and splicing was shifted predominantly to the most 5' rev 3' splice site A4c with preferential use of the two most 5' branch points. Our results suggest that spliceosomes formed at rev A4a-4b, rev A4c, and env/nef A5 3' splice sites each recognize different subsets of the eight branch point sequences.

  1. Notch and Delta mRNAs in early-stage and mid-stage Drosophila embryos exhibit complementary patterns of protein producing potentials

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, Andrew; Wesley, Uma; Wesley, Cedric

    2010-01-01

    Notch and Delta proteins generate Notch signaling that specifies cell fates during animal development. There is an intriguing phenomenon in Drosophila embryogenesis that has not received much attention and whose significance to embryogenesis is unknown. Notch and Delta mRNAs expressed in early-stage embryos are shorter than their counterparts in mid-stage embryos. We show here that the difference in sizes is due to mRNA 3′ processing at alternate polyadenylation sites. While the early-stage Notch mRNA has a lower protein-producing potential than the mid-stage Notch mRNA, the early-stage Delta mRNA has a higher protein-producing potential than the mid-stage Delta mRNA. Our data can explain the complementary patterns of Notch and Delta protein levels in early-stage and mid-stage embryos. Our data also raise the possibility that the manner and regulation of Notch signaling change in the course of embryogenesis and that this change is effected by 3′ UTR and mRNA 3′ processing factors. PMID:20201103

  2. Undifferentiated embryonic stem cells express ionotropic glutamate receptor mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Pachernegg, Svenja; Joshi, Illah; Muth-Köhne, Elke; Pahl, Steffen; Münster, Yvonne; Terhag, Jan; Karus, Michael; Werner, Markus; Ma-Högemeier, Zhan-Lu; Körber, Christoph; Grunwald, Thomas; Faissner, Andreas; Wiese, Stefan; Hollmann, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) do not only mediate the majority of excitatory neurotransmission in the vertebrate CNS, but also modulate pre- and postnatal neurogenesis. Most of the studies on the developmental role of iGluRs are performed on neural progenitors and neural stem cells (NSCs). We took a step back in our study by examining the role of iGluRs in the earliest possible cell type, embryonic stem cells (ESCs), by looking at the mRNA expression of the major iGluR subfamilies in undifferentiated mouse ESCs. For that, we used two distinct murine ES cell lines, 46C ESCs and J1 ESCs. Regarding 46C ESCs, we found transcripts of kainate receptors (KARs) (GluK2 to GluK5), AMPA receptors (AMPARs) (GluA1, GluA3, and GluA4), and NMDA receptors (NMDARs) (GluN1, and GluN2A to GluN2D). Analysis of 46C-derived cells of later developmental stages, namely neuroepithelial precursor cells (NEPs) and NSCs, revealed that the mRNA expression of KARs is significantly upregulated in NEPs and, subsequently, downregulated in NSCs. However, we could not detect any protein expression of any of the KAR subunits present on the mRNA level either in ESCs, NEPs, or NSCs. Regarding AMPARs and NMDARs, GluN2A is weakly expressed at the protein level only in NSCs. Matching our findings for iGluRs, all three cell types were found to weakly express pre- and postsynaptic markers of glutamatergic synapses only at the mRNA level. Finally, we performed patch-clamp recordings of 46C ESCs and could not detect any current upon iGluR agonist application. Similar to 46C ESCs, J1 ESCs express KARs (GluK2 to GluK5), AMPARs (GluA3), and NMDARs (GluN1, and GluN2A to GluN2D) at the mRNA level, but these transcripts are not translated into receptor proteins either. Thus, we conclude that ESCs do not contain functional iGluRs, although they do express an almost complete set of iGluR subunit mRNAs. PMID:24348335

  3. Identification and characterization of antioxidant enzyme mRNAs in the rat epididymis.

    PubMed

    Zini, A; Schlegel, P N

    1997-04-01

    Spermatozoa are highly sensitive to oxidative stress. The epididymis, a natural sperm reservoir, has maturational and storage functions. The epididymis may also protect spermatozoa from oxidative injury by elaborating scavengers of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Therefore, we have evaluated the mRNA expression of antioxidant enzymes in the normal rat epididymis and the effects of efferent duct ligation no the expression of these enzymes. Adult rat epididymides were harvested, divided into caput, corpus and cauda and processed for RNA extraction. Additional adult rats were subjected to unilateral efferent duct ligation and the epididymides harvested at 1, 4, 8, 16 or 28 days after the procedure. Antioxidant enzyme mRNA expression was assessed by Northern blot analysis using 32P-labelled DNA probes derived from known cDNA sequences for classical cellular glutathione peroxidase (GSHPx), phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase (PHGPX), secretory epididymal glutathione peroxidase (E-GPX), copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD), secretory epididymal superoxide dismutase (E-SOD) and catalase. Specific mRNA levels were measured, with gene expression evaluated relative to total RNA, not per organ. Variations in lane loading were controlled by measuring the levels of 28S ribosomal RNA. GSHPx, PHGPX, SOD and catalase mRNA were detected in the caput, corpus and cauda epididymis. E-GPX mRNA was only detected in the caput, whereas E-SOD mRNA was primarily detected in the corpus. At 28 days after efferent duct ligation, epididymal weight decreased by 34% relative to controls (p < 0.05). With the exception of PHGPX, the relative mRNA levels of the antioxidant enzymes studied did not change after efferent duct ligation. This study demonstrates that mRNAs for multiple antioxidant enzymes are expressed in the epididymis and that the relative expression of these enzymes remains largely unchanged in response to efferent duct ligation. Taken together, these results suggest

  4. Cloning of growth hormone, somatolactin, and their receptor mRNAs, their expression in organs, during development, and on salinity stress in the hermaphroditic fish, Kryptolebias marmoratus.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Jae-Sung; Kim, Bo-Mi; Seo, Jung Soo; Kim, Il-Chan; Lee, Young-Mi; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2012-04-01

    Salinity is an important parameter that affects survival and metabolism in fish. In fish, pituitary growth hormone (GH) regulates physiological functions including adaptation to different salinity as well as somatic growth. GH is stimulated by growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) and exerts its function via binding to growth hormone receptor (GHR). As Kryptolebias marmoratus is a euryhaline fish, this species would be a useful model species for studying the adaptation to osmotic stress conditions. Here, we cloned GH, -GHR, somatolactin (SL), and somatolactin receptor (SLR) genes, and analyzed their expression patterns in different tissues and during early developmental stages by using real-time RT-PCR. We also further examined expression of them after acclimation to different salinity. Tissue distribution studies revealed that Km-GH and -SL mRNAs were remarkably expressed in brain and pituitary, whereas Km-GHR and -SLR mRNAs were predominantly expressed in liver, followed by gonad, muscle, pituitary, and brain. During embryonic developmental stages, the expression of their mRNA was increased at stage 3 (9 dpf). The Km-GH and -SL mRNA transcripts were constantly elevated until stage 5 (5h post hatch), whereas Km-GHR and -SLR mRNA levels decreased at this stage. After we transferred K. marmoratus from control (12 psu) to hyper-osmotic condition (hyperseawater, HSW; 33 psu), Km-GH, -SL, and GHR mRNA levels were enhanced. In hypo-osmotic conditions like freshwater (FW), Km-GH and -SL expressions were modulated 24 h after exposure, and Km-SLR transcripts were significantly upregulated. This finding suggests that Km-GH and -SL may be involved in the osmoregulatory mechanism under hyper-osmotic as well as hypo-osmotic stress. This is the first report on transcriptional modulation and relationship of GH, GHR, SL, and SLR during early development and after salinity stress. This study will be helpful to a better understanding on molecular mechanisms of adaptation response

  5. Anchoring a Defined Sequence to the 55' Ends of mRNAs : The Bolt to Clone Rare Full Length mRNAs and Generate cDNA Libraries porn a Few Cells.

    PubMed

    Baptiste, J; Milne Edwards, D; Delort, J; Mallet, J

    1993-01-01

    Among numerous applications, the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) (1,2) provides a convenient means to clone 5' ends of rare mRNAs and to generate cDNA libraries from tissue available in amounts too low to be processed by conventional methods. Basically, the amplification of cDNAs by the PCR requires the availability of the sequences of two stretches of the molecule to be amplified. A sequence can easily be imposed at the 5' end of the first-strand cDNAs (corresponding to the 3' end of the mRNAs) by priming the reverse transcription with a specific primer (for cloning the 5' end of rare messenger) or with an oligonucleotide tailored with a poly (dT) stretch (for cDNA library construction), taking advantage of the poly (A) sequence that is located at the 3' end of mRNAs. Several strategies have been devised to tag the 3' end of the ss-cDNAs (corresponding to the 55' end of the mRNAs). We (3) and others have described strategies based on the addition of a homopolymeric dG (4,5) or dA (6,7) tail using terminal deoxyribonucleotide transferase (TdT) ("anchor-PCR" [4]). However, this strategy has important limitations. The TdT reaction is difficult to control and has a low efficiency (unpublished observations). But most importantly, the return primers containing a homopolymeric (dC or dT) tail generate nonspecific amplifications, a phenomenon that prevents the isolation of low abundance mRNA species and/or interferes with the relative abundance of primary clones in the library. To circumvent these drawbacks, we have used two approaches. First, we devised a strategy based on a cRNA enrichment procedure, which has been useful to eliminate nonspecific-PCR products and to allow detection and cloning of cDNAs of low abundance (3). More recently, to avoid the nonspecific amplification resulting from the annealing of the homopolymeric tail oligonucleotide, we have developed a novel anchoring strategy that is based on the ligation of an oligonucleotide to the 35' end of ss

  6. Toward the mechanism of eIF4F-mediated ribosomal attachment to mammalian capped mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Parimal; Hellen, Christopher U.T.; Pestova, Tatyana V.

    2016-01-01

    Ribosomal attachment to mammalian capped mRNAs is achieved through the cap–eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E)–eIF4G–eIF3–40S chain of interactions, but the mechanism by which mRNA enters the mRNA-binding channel of the 40S subunit remains unknown. To investigate this process, we recapitulated initiation on capped mRNAs in vitro using a reconstituted translation system. Formation of initiation complexes at 5′-terminal AUGs was stimulated by the eIF4E–cap interaction and followed “the first AUG” rule, indicating that it did not occur by backward scanning. Initiation complexes formed even at the very 5′ end of mRNA, implying that Met-tRNAiMet inspects mRNA from the first nucleotide and that initiation does not have a “blind spot.” In assembled initiation complexes, the cap was no longer associated with eIF4E. Omission of eIF4A or disruption of eIF4E–eIF4G–eIF3 interactions converted eIF4E into a specific inhibitor of initiation on capped mRNAs. Taken together, these results are consistent with the model in which eIF4E–eIF4G–eIF3–40S interactions place eIF4E at the leading edge of the 40S subunit, and mRNA is threaded into the mRNA-binding channel such that Met-tRNAiMet can inspect it from the first nucleotide. Before entering, eIF4E likely dissociates from the cap to overcome steric hindrance. We also found that the m7G cap specifically interacts with eIF3l. PMID:27401559

  7. Localization of types I, II, and III collagen mRNAs in developing human skeletal tissues by in situ hybridization

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    Paraffin sections of human skeletal tissues were studied in order to identify cells responsible for production of types I, II, and III collagens by in situ hybridization. Northern hybridization and sequence information were used to select restriction fragments of cDNA clones for the corresponding mRNAs to obtain probes with a minimum of cross- hybridization. The specificity of the probes was proven in hybridizations to sections of developing fingers: osteoblasts and chondrocytes, known to produce only one type of fibrillar collagen each (I and II, respectively) were only recognized by the corresponding cDNA probes. Smooth connective tissues exhibited variable hybridization intensities with types I and III collagen cDNA probes. The technique was used to localize the activity of type II collagen production in the different zones of cartilage during the growth of long bones. Visual inspection and grain counting revealed the highest levels of pro alpha 1(II) collagen mRNAs in chondrocytes of the lower proliferative and upper hypertrophic zones of the growth plate cartilage. This finding was confirmed by Northern blotting of RNAs isolated from epiphyseal (resting) cartilage and from growth zone cartilage. Analysis of the osseochondral junction revealed virtually no overlap between hybridization patterns obtained with probes specific for type I and type II collagen mRNAs. Only a fraction of the chondrocytes in the degenerative zone were recognized by the pro alpha 1(II) collagen cDNA probe, and none by the type I collagen cDNA probe. In the mineralizing zone virtually all cells were recognized by the type I collagen cDNA probe, but only very few scattered cells appeared to contain type II collagen mRNA. These data indicate that in situ hybridization is a valuable tool for identification of connective tissue cells which are actively producing different types of collagens at the various stages of development, differentiation, and growth. PMID:3558480

  8. Structural basis for ArfA-RF2-mediated translation termination on mRNAs lacking stop codons.

    PubMed

    Huter, Paul; Müller, Claudia; Beckert, Bertrand; Arenz, Stefan; Berninghausen, Otto; Beckmann, Roland; Wilson, Daniel N

    2017-01-26

    In bacteria, ribosomes stalled on truncated mRNAs that lack a stop codon are rescued by the transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA), alternative rescue factor A (ArfA) or ArfB systems. Although tmRNA-ribosome and ArfB-ribosome structures have been determined, how ArfA recognizes the presence of truncated mRNAs and recruits the canonical termination release factor RF2 to rescue the stalled ribosomes is unclear. Here we present a cryo-electron microscopy reconstruction of the Escherichia coli 70S ribosome stalled on a truncated mRNA in the presence of ArfA and RF2. The structure shows that the C terminus of ArfA binds within the mRNA entry channel on the small ribosomal subunit, and explains how ArfA distinguishes between ribosomes that bear truncated or full-length mRNAs. The N terminus of ArfA establishes several interactions with the decoding domain of RF2, and this finding illustrates how ArfA recruits RF2 to the stalled ribosome. Furthermore, ArfA is shown to stabilize a unique conformation of the switch loop of RF2, which mimics the canonical translation termination state by directing the catalytically important GGQ motif within domain 3 of RF2 towards the peptidyl-transferase centre of the ribosome. Thus, our structure reveals not only how ArfA recruits RF2 to the ribosome but also how it promotes an active conformation of RF2 to enable translation termination in the absence of a stop codon.

  9. Characterization and differential expression patterns of conserved microRNAs and mRNAs in three genders of the rice field eel (Monopterus albus).

    PubMed

    Gao, Yu; Guo, Wei; Hu, Qing; Zou, Ming; Tang, Rong; Chi, Wei; Li, Dapeng

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous small RNAs that can regulate target mRNAs by binding to their sequences in the 3' untranslated region. The expression of miRNAs and their biogenetic pathway are involved in sexual differentiation and in the regulation of the development of germ cells and gonadal somatic cells. The rice field eel (Monopterus albus) undergoes a natural sexual transformation from female to male via an intersex stage during its life cycle. To investigate the molecular mechanisms of this sexual transformation, miRNAs present in the different sexual stages of the rice field eel were identified by high-throughput sequencing technology. A significantly differential expression among the 3 genders (p < 0.001) was observed for 48 unique miRNAs and 3 miRNAs*. Only 9 unique miRNAs showed a more than 8-fold change in their expression among the 3 genders, including mal-miR-430a and mal-miR-430c which were higher in females than in males. However, mal-miR-430b was only detected in males. Several potential miRNA target genes (cyp19a, cyp19b, nr5a1b, foxl2 amh, and vasa) were also investigated. Real-time RT-PCR demonstrated highly specific expression patterns of these genes in the 3 genders of the rice field eel. Many of these genes are targets of mal-miR-430b according to the TargetScan and miRTarBase. These results suggest that the miR-430 family may be involved in the sexual transformation of the rice field eel.

  10. Selective translational control and nonspecific posttranscriptional regulation of ribosomal protein gene expression during development and regeneration of rat liver.

    PubMed Central

    Aloni, R; Peleg, D; Meyuhas, O

    1992-01-01

    Mammalian liver development is accompanied by a transition from rapid growth in the fetus to a quiescent state in the adult. However, extensive proliferation can be induced in the adult liver by partial hepatectomy. In this study, we examined the regulation of ribosomal protein (rp) gene expression in the developing and regenerating rat liver. Our results indicate that the translation of rp mRNAs is selectively repressed by about 70% upon development from fetal to adult life, as illustrated by the decrease in ribosomal loading. In addition, the relative abundance of these mRNAs, like that of several other, but not all, housekeeping mRNAs, declines during development through a posttranscriptional mechanism. When liver cells commence growth following partial hepatectomy, translation of rp mRNAs is resumed to near-maximal capacity, as judged by their very efficient recruitment into polysomes. The concomitant increase in the abundance rp mRNAs under these circumstances is achieved by a posttranscriptional mechanism. The apparent fluctuations in the translation efficiency of rp mRNAs are accompanied by parallel changes in the expression of the genes encoding the initiation factors eIF-4E and eIF-4A. Our results indicate that selective translational control of rp mRNAs in mammals is not confined to manipulated cells in culture but constitutes an important regulatory mechanism operating in vivo in the course of liver development and regeneration. Images PMID:1373810

  11. The ribosomal protein Asc1/RACK1 is required for efficient translation of short mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Mary K; Rojas-Duran, Maria F; Gangaramani, Paritosh; Gilbert, Wendy V

    2016-01-01

    Translation is a core cellular process carried out by a highly conserved macromolecular machine, the ribosome. There has been remarkable evolutionary adaptation of this machine through the addition of eukaryote-specific ribosomal proteins whose individual effects on ribosome function are largely unknown. Here we show that eukaryote-specific Asc1/RACK1 is required for efficient translation of mRNAs with short open reading frames that show greater than average translational efficiency in diverse eukaryotes. ASC1 mutants in S. cerevisiae display compromised translation of specific functional groups, including cytoplasmic and mitochondrial ribosomal proteins, and display cellular phenotypes consistent with their gene-specific translation defects. Asc1-sensitive mRNAs are preferentially associated with the translational ‘closed loop’ complex comprised of eIF4E, eIF4G, and Pab1, and depletion of eIF4G mimics the translational defects of ASC1 mutants. Together our results reveal a role for Asc1/RACK1 in a length-dependent initiation mechanism optimized for efficient translation of genes with important housekeeping functions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11154.001 PMID:27117520

  12. Translational efficiency of polycistronic mRNAs and their utilization to express heterologous genes in mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, R J; Murtha, P; Davies, M V

    1987-01-01

    The translation of polycistronic mRNAs in mammalian cells was studied. Transcription units, constructed to contain one, two or three open reading frames (ORFs), were introduced stably into Chinese hamster ovary cells and transiently into COS monkey cells. The analysis of mRNA levels and protein synthesis in these cells demonstrated that the mRNAs transcribed were translated to generate multiple proteins. The efficiency of translation was reduced approximately 40- to 300-fold by the insertion of an upstream ORF. The results support a modified 'scanning' model for translation initiation which allows for translation initiation at internal AUG codons. High-level expression of human granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor was achieved utilizing a vector that contains a polycistronic transcription unit encoding an amplifiable dihydrofolate reductase marker gene in its 3' end. Thus, polycistronic expression vectors can be exploited to obtain high-level expression of foreign genes in mammalian cells. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. PMID:3582359

  13. Highly efficient gene knockout by injection of TALEN mRNAs into oocytes and host transfer in Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Keisuke; Yaoita, Yoshio

    2015-01-16

    Zinc-finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and the CRISPR/Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated proteins) system are potentially powerful tools for producing tailor-made knockout animals. However, their mutagenic activity is not high enough to induce mutations at all loci of a target gene throughout an entire tadpole. In this study, we present a highly efficient method for introducing gene modifications at almost all target sequences in randomly selected embryos. The gene modification activity of TALEN is enhanced by adopting the host-transfer technique. In our method, the efficiency is further improved by injecting TALEN mRNAs fused to the 3'UTR of the Xenopus DEADSouth gene into oocytes, which are then transferred into a host female frog, where they are ovulated and fertilized. The addition of the 3'UTR of the DEADSouth gene promotes mRNA translation in the oocytes and increases the expression of TALEN proteins to near-maximal levels three hours post fertilization (hpf). In contrast, TALEN mRNAs without this 3'UTR are translated infrequently in oocytes. Our data suggest that genomic DNA is more sensitive to TALEN proteins from fertilization to the midblastula (MBT) stage. Our method works by increasing the levels of TALEN proteins during the pre-MBT stages.

  14. The efficiency of 3'-end formation contributes to the relative levels of different histone mRNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, T J; Levine, B J; Skoultchi, A I; Marzluff, W F

    1989-01-01

    Sequences at both the 5' and 3' ends of mouse histone genes contribute to the expression of individual genes. The 3' sequences required for high expression of the mouse H2a-614 gene are the same as the sequences required for 3'-end formation. When these sequences were substituted for the 3' end of the poorly expressed H2a-291 gene, expression of the H2a-291 gene was increased fivefold. A 65-nucleotide fragment containing the H2a-614 3' processing signal increased expression of the H2a-291 gene when it was placed in the proper orientation downstream of the H2a-291 3' end. The only mRNAs that accumulated from this gene ended at the H2a-291 3' end, which suggests that the transcript is sequentially processed. In an in vitro processing system, the different histone 3' ends showed different processing efficiencies, which correlated with their expression in cells. These results suggest that the efficiency of processing is important in determining the steady-state levels of individual mouse histone mRNAs. Images PMID:2796992

  15. Discrimination of heterogenous mRNAs encoding strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors in Xenopus oocytes by antisense oligonucleotides.

    PubMed Central

    Akagi, H; Patton, D E; Miledi, R

    1989-01-01

    Three synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides complementary to different parts of an RNA encoding a glycine receptor subunit were used to discriminate heterogenous mRNAs coding for glycine receptors in adult and neonatal rat spinal cord. Injection of the three antisense oligonucleotides into Xenopus oocytes specifically inhibited the expression of glycine receptors by adult spinal cord mRNA. In contrast, the antisense oligonucleotides were much less potent in inhibiting the expression of glycine receptors encoded by neonatal spinal cord mRNA. Northern blot analysis revealed that the oligonucleotides hybridized mostly to an adult cord transcript of approximately 10 kilobases in size. This band was also present in neonatal spinal cord mRNA but its density was about one-fourth of the adult cord message. There was no intense band in the low molecular weight position (approximately 2 kilobases), the existence of which was expected from electrophysiological studies with size-fractionated mRNA of neonatal spinal cord. Our results suggest that in the rat spinal cord there are at least three different types of mRNAs encoding functional strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors. Images PMID:2479016

  16. Influenza A Virus Polymerase Recruits the RNA Helicase DDX19 to Promote the Nuclear Export of Viral mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Diot, Cédric; Fournier, Guillaume; Dos Santos, Mélanie; Magnus, Julie; Komarova, Anastasia; van der Werf, Sylvie; Munier, Sandie; Naffakh, Nadia

    2016-01-01

    Enhancing the knowledge of host factors that are required for efficient influenza A virus (IAV) replication is essential to address questions related to pathogenicity and to identify targets for antiviral drug development. Here we focused on the interplay between IAV and DExD-box RNA helicases (DDX), which play a key role in cellular RNA metabolism by remodeling RNA-RNA or RNA-protein complexes. We performed a targeted RNAi screen on 35 human DDX proteins to identify those involved in IAV life cycle. DDX19 was a major hit. In DDX19-depleted cells the accumulation of viral RNAs and proteins was delayed, and the production of infectious IAV particles was strongly reduced. We show that DDX19 associates with intronless, unspliced and spliced IAV mRNAs and promotes their nuclear export. In addition, we demonstrate an RNA-independent association between DDX19 and the viral polymerase, that is modulated by the ATPase activity of DDX19. Our results provide a model in which DDX19 is recruited to viral mRNAs in the nucleus of infected cells to enhance their nuclear export. Information gained from this virus-host interaction improves the understanding of both the IAV replication cycle and the cellular function of DDX19. PMID:27653209

  17. The Bicoid Stability Factor Controls Polyadenylation and Expression of Specific Mitochondrial mRNAs in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Grönke, Sebastian; Stewart, James B.; Mourier, Arnaud; Ruzzenente, Benedetta; Kukat, Christian; Wibom, Rolf; Habermann, Bianca; Partridge, Linda; Larsson, Nils-Göran

    2011-01-01

    The bicoid stability factor (BSF) of Drosophila melanogaster has been reported to be present in the cytoplasm, where it stabilizes the maternally contributed bicoid mRNA and binds mRNAs expressed from early zygotic genes. BSF may also have other roles, as it is ubiquitously expressed and essential for survival of adult flies. We have performed immunofluorescence and cell fractionation analyses and show here that BSF is mainly a mitochondrial protein. We studied two independent RNAi knockdown fly lines and report that reduced BSF protein levels lead to a severe respiratory deficiency and delayed development at the late larvae stage. Ubiquitous knockdown of BSF results in a severe reduction of the polyadenylation tail lengths of specific mitochondrial mRNAs, accompanied by an enrichment of unprocessed polycistronic RNA intermediates. Furthermore, we observed a significant reduction in mRNA steady state levels, despite increased de novo transcription. Surprisingly, mitochondrial de novo translation is increased and abnormal mitochondrial translation products are present in knockdown flies, suggesting that BSF also has a role in coordinating the mitochondrial translation in addition to its role in mRNA maturation and stability. We thus report a novel function of BSF in flies and demonstrate that it has an important intra-mitochondrial role, which is essential for maintaining mtDNA gene expression and oxidative phosphorylation. PMID:22022283

  18. Use of in situ hybridization to identify collagen and albumin mRNAs in isolated mouse hepatocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Saber, M A; Zern, M A; Shafritz, D A

    1983-01-01

    We present a simple and improved method for in situ localization of albumin and collagen mRNAs in isolated mouse hepatocytes. The cells were isolated by collagenase perfusion, mincing, and differential centrifugation. Nick-translated 3H-labeled mouse albumin cDNA (pmalb-2) and chicken pro-alpha 2(I) collagen cDNA (pCg45) probes were then hybridized with the cells in silane-treated microcentrifuge tubes. The cells were transferred and fixed to a microscope slide and hybridization was evaluated semiquantitatively by counting exposure of grains in autoradiographic emulsion placed over the cells. With this method of in situ hybridization, all hepatocytes appear to have significant, but highly variable, amounts of albumin mRNA. In addition, type I procollagen mRNA appears to be present at low abundance in hepatocytes. These results indicate that in situ hybridization can effectively demonstrate the presence of specific low- or high-abundance mRNAs in isolated well-differentiated eukaryotic cells. Images PMID:6575392

  19. Differential stability of host mRNAs in Friend erythroleukemia cells infected with herpes simplex virus type 1

    SciTech Connect

    Mayman, B.A.; Nishioka, Y.

    1985-01-01

    The consequences of herpes simplex virus type 1 infection on cellular macromolecules were investigated in Friend erythroleukemia cells. The patterns of protein synthesis, examined by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, demonstrated that by 4 h postinfection the synthesis of many host proteins, with the exception of histones, was inhibited. Examination of the steady-state level of histone H3 mRNA by molecular hybridization of total RNA to a cloned mouse histone H3 complementary DNA probe demonstrated that the ratio of histone H3 mRNA to total RNA remained unchanged for the first 4 h postinfection. In contrast, the steady-state levels of globin and actin mRNAs decreased progressively at early intervals postinfection. Studies on RNA synthesis in isolated nuclei demonstrated that the transcription of the histone H3 gene was inhibited to approximately the same extent as that of actin gene. It was concluded that the stabilization of preexisting histone H3 mRNA was responsible for the persistence of H3 mRNA and histone protein synthesis in herpes simplex virus type 1-infected Friend erythroleukemia cells. The possible mechanisms influencing the differential stability of host mRNAs during the course of productive infection with herpes simplex virus type 1 are discussed.

  20. Regulation of protein synthesis during sea urchin early development

    SciTech Connect

    Kelso, L.C.

    1989-01-01

    Fertilization of the sea urchin egg results in a 20-40 fold increase in the rate of protein synthesis. The masked message hypothesis proposes that mRNAs are masked or unavailable for translation in the egg. We devised an in vivo assay to test this hypothesis. Our results show that masked mRNAs limit protein synthesis in the unfertilized egg. In addition, we show that protein synthesis is also regulated at the level of translational machinery. Following fertilization is a period of rapid cell divisions. This period, known as the rapid cleavage stage, is characterized by the transient synthesis of a novel set of proteins. The synthesis of these proteins is programmed by maternal mRNAs stored in the unfertilized egg. To study the behavior of these mRNAs, we prepared a cDNA library from polysomal poly (A+) RNA from 2-hour embryos. ({sup 32}P) labeled probes, prepared from the cDNA library, were used to monitor the levels of individual mRNAs in polysomes at fertilization and during early development.

  1. Intracellular and intercellular transport of many germ cell mRNAs is mediated by the DNA- and RNA-binding protein, testis-brain-RNA-binding protein (TB-RBP).

    PubMed

    Hecht, N B

    2000-06-01

    Functions ranging from RNA transport and translational regulation to DNA rearrangement and repair have been proposed for the DNA- and RNA-binding protein, testis-brain-RNA-binding protein (TB-RBP). TB-RBP is primarily in the nuclei of male germ cells during meiosis and in the cytoplasm of male cells after metaphase I of meiosis. Based on its shift in subcellular locations as germ cells differentiate and its binding to microtubules and microfilaments, a model is presented proposing an involvement of TB-RBP in mRNA transport from nucleus to cytoplasm and in the sharing of mRNAs transcribed from the sex chromosomes by movement through intercellular bridges of germ cells.

  2. Expression of transforming growth factor-beta 2 and beta 3 mRNAs and proteins in the developing chicken embryo.

    PubMed

    Jakowlew, S B; Ciment, G; Tuan, R S; Sporn, M B; Roberts, A B

    1994-01-01

    Specific cDNA probes and antibodies for chicken transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta 2 and beta 3 were used to study expression of TGF-beta 2 and beta 3 mRNAs and proteins in the developing chicken embryo. Expression of the mRNAs for both TGF-beta isoforms was detected by day 1.5 of incubation (Hamburger and Hamilton stage 10) by RNA Northern blot analysis and increased with developmental age. Expression of TGF-beta 2 and beta 3 mRNAs was detected in every embryonic tissue examined, with the level of expression of both isoforms being high in heart, brain and muscle and low in kidney and liver. Coordinate unidirectional upregulation of expression of TGF-beta 2 and beta 3 mRNAs occurred in most embryonic tissues with development except the heart, where the steady-state level of expression of TGF-beta 2 mRNA decreased with age, while that of TGF-beta 3 mRNA increased. In situ hybridization analysis detected TGF-beta 2 and beta 3 mRNAs as early as the definitive primitive streak stage (stage 4). During neurulation (stage 10), TGF-beta 2 and beta 3 mRNAs were detected in cells of all three germ layers; TGF-beta 3 mRNA was detected in neurectoderm as well. Following neurulation, TGF-beta 3 mRNA was detected in the neural tube, notochord, ectoderm, endoderm, sclerotome and dermomyotome at stage 16; expression of TGF-beta 2 mRNA was not as prominent as TGF-beta 3 mRNA in these structures. By stage 29, both TGF-beta 2 and beta 3 mRNAs were localized in several tissues including heart, lung, gizzard and feathers. Immunohistochemical staining analysis detected immunoreactive TGF-beta 2 and beta 3 proteins in all three germ layers of stage 4 embryos. Staining for TGF-beta 2 and beta 3 proteins was detected in several cell types and tissues in the early developing embryo frequently in the same locations as TGF-beta 2 and beta 3 mRNAs, with staining for TGF-beta 2 being less intense than TGF-beta 3. However, in some cases, localization of TGF-beta 2 and beta 3 proteins was

  3. Generation of Foxo3-targeted Mice by Injection of mRNAs Encoding Transcription Activator-like Effector Nucleases (TALENs) into Zygotes.

    PubMed

    Zhu, P; Liu, Q; Liu, S; Su, X; Feng, W; Lei, X; Liu, J; Cui, K; Huang, B; Shi, D

    2015-06-01

    In this study, for exploring the mechanism of forkhead box O3(Foxo3) participating in regulation of the activation of primordial oocytes, Foxo3-targeted mice were generated by injection of mRNAs encoding transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) into mouse zygotes. The TALEN sites were designed with high conservative homologous region among pig, bovine, buffalo and mouse by commercial bio-companies. The TALENs mutagenic non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) repair activity were determined to be 31.3% in human embryonic kidney 293T (HEK-293T) cells by dual luciferase reporter assay system. Then, we firstly injected TALEN-mRNAs into the cytoplasm of mouse zygotes by micromanipulation, and four of 48 mouse blastocysts were identified as mutation by sequencing. Subsequently, by the method of TALEN-mRNAs injected into the zygotes with pronucleus micromanipulation technique, we obtained seven Foxo3 mutants of 20 FVB/NJ backgrounds mice which were Foxo3-independent alleles with frameshift and deletion mutations. It was very interesting that all seven were heterozygous mutants (Foxo3(-/+) ), and the gene mutagenesis rates of the mice reached 35%. The five Foxo3 mutant females were all infertile in the following 6 months after birth. The histological examination results showed that there were rare primordial follicles and primary follicles in the ovary of Foxo3 mutant compared to that of wide-type female mice. Moreover, one of two mutant males was subfertile and another was fertile normally. Those results suggested that the mutant of Foxo3 severely affected the fertile ability of female and perhaps male in some degree; furthermore, an even more efficient TALENs-based gene mutation method has been established to be poised to revolutionize the study of mouse and other species genetics.

  4. Hypoglycemic Effects of Three Medicinal Plants in Experimental Diabetes: Inhibition of Rat Intestinal α-glucosidase and Enhanced Pancreatic Insulin and Cardiac Glut-4 mRNAs Expression.

    PubMed

    Moradabadi, Leila; Montasser Kouhsari, Shideh; Fehresti Sani, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Garlic (Allium sativum L., Alliaceae), Persian shallot (Allium ascalonicum L., Alliaceae ) and Sage (Salvia officinalis L., Lamiaceae) are believed to have hypoglycemic properties and have been used traditionally as antidiabetic herbal medicines in Iran. In this study, diabetes was induced by subcutaneous injection of alloxan monohydrate (100 mg kg(-1)) to male Wistar rats. Antidiabetic effects of methanolic extracts of the above mentioned three plants on alloxan-diabetic rats was investigated in comparison with the effects of antidiabetic drugs such as acarbose, glibenclamide and metformin by measuring postprandial blood glucose (PBG), oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), inhibition of rat intestinal α-glucosidase enzymes activities and pancreatic Insulin and cardiac Glut-4 mRNAs expression. In short term period, hypoglycemic effects of A. sativum and A. ascalonicum showed significant reduction of PBG similar to glibenclamide (5 mg kg(-1) bw) while S. officinalis significantly reduced PBG similar to acarbose (20 mg kg(-1) bw). After 3 weeks of treatment by methanolic plant extracts, significant chronic decrease in the PBG was observed similar to metformin (100 mg kg(-1) bw). For OGTT, S. officinalis reduced PBG in a similar way as acarbose (20 mg kg(-1) bw). Intestinal sucrase and maltase activities were inhibited significantly by A. sativum, A. ascalonicum and S. officinalis. In addition, we observed increased expression of Insulin and Glut-4 genes in diabetic rats treated with these plants extracts. Up regulation of Insulin and Glut-4 genes expression and inhibition of α-glucosidaseactivities are the two mechanisms that play a considerable role in hypoglycemic action of garlic, shallot and sage.

  5. Hypoglycemic Effects of Three Medicinal Plants in Experimental Diabetes: Inhibition of Rat Intestinal α-glucosidase and Enhanced Pancreatic Insulin and Cardiac Glut-4 mRNAs Expression

    PubMed Central

    Moradabadi, Leila; Montasser Kouhsari, Shideh; Fehresti Sani, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Garlic (Allium sativum L., Alliaceae), Persian shallot (Allium ascalonicum L., Alliaceae ) and Sage (Salvia officinalis L., Lamiaceae) are believed to have hypoglycemic properties and have been used traditionally as antidiabetic herbal medicines in Iran. In this study, diabetes was induced by subcutaneous injection of alloxan monohydrate (100 mg kg−1) to male Wistar rats. Antidiabetic effects of methanolic extracts of the above mentioned three plants on alloxan-diabetic rats was investigated in comparison with the effects of antidiabetic drugs such as acarbose, glibenclamide and metformin by measuring postprandial blood glucose (PBG), oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), inhibition of rat intestinal α-glucosidase enzymes activities and pancreatic Insulin and cardiac Glut-4 mRNAs expression. In short term period, hypoglycemic effects of A. sativum and A. ascalonicum showed significant reduction of PBG similar to glibenclamide (5 mg kg−1 bw) while S. officinalis significantly reduced PBG similar to acarbose (20 mg kg−1 bw). After 3 weeks of treatment by methanolic plant extracts, significant chronic decrease in the PBG was observed similar to metformin (100 mg kg−1 bw). For OGTT, S. officinalis reduced PBG in a similar way as acarbose (20 mg kg−1 bw). Intestinal sucrase and maltase activities were inhibited significantly by A. sativum, A. ascalonicum and S. officinalis. In addition, we observed increased expression of Insulin and Glut-4 genes in diabetic rats treated with these plants extracts. Up regulation of Insulin and Glut-4 genes expression and inhibition of α-glucosidaseactivities are the two mechanisms that play a considerable role in hypoglycemic action of garlic, shallot and sage. PMID:24250646

  6. Cellular hybridization for BDNF, trkB, and NGF mRNAs and BDNF-immunoreactivity in rat forebrain after pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Schmidt-Kastner, R; Humpel, C; Wetmore, C; Olson, L

    1996-01-01

    The messenger RNAs (mRNAs) for the neurotrophins, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and nerve growth factor (NGF), are upregulated during epileptic seizure activity, as visualized by in situ hybridization techniques. Neurotrophins might be protective against excitotoxic cell stress, and the upregulation during seizures might provide such cell protection. In this study, a high dose of pilocarpine (300 mg/kg) was used to induce long-lasting, limbic motor status epilepticus and a selective pattern of brain damage. The regulation of BDNF, trkB, and NGF mRNA was studied by in situ hybridization at 1, 3, 6, and 24 h after induction of limbic motor status epilepticus. BDNF immunoreactivity was examined with an anti-peptide antibody and the neuropathological process studied in parallel. BDNF mRNA increased in hippocampus, neocortex, piriform cortex, striatum, and thalamus with a maximum at 3-6 h. Hybridization levels increased earlier in the resistant granule and CA1 cells as compared to the vulnerable CA3 neurons. BDNF immunoreactivity was elevated in dentate gyrus at 3-6 h. trkB mRNA increased in the entire hippocampus. NGF mRNA in hippocampus appeared in dentate gyrus at 3-6 h and declined in hilar neurons at 6-24 h. Cell damage was found in the CA3 area, entire basal cortex, and layers II/III of neocortex. Endogenous neurotrophins are upregulated during status epilepticus caused by pilocarpine, which is related to the coupling between neuronal excitation and trophic factor expression. This upregulation of neurotrophic factors may serve endogenous protective effects; however, the excessive levels of neuronal hyperexcitation resulting from pilocarpine seizures lead to cell damage which cannot be prevented by endogenous neurotrophins.

  7. Development of an in situ hybridization assay for the detection of ostreid herpesvirus type 1 mRNAs in the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Corbeil, Serge; Faury, Nicole; Segarra, Amélie; Renault, Tristan

    2015-01-01

    An in situ hybridization protocol for detecting mRNAs of ostreid herpesvirus type 1 (OsHV-1) which infects Pacific oysters, Crassostrea gigas, was developed. Three RNA probes were synthesized by cloning three partial OsHV-1 genes into plasmids using three specific primer pairs, and performing a transcription in the presence of digoxigenin dUTP. The RNA probes were able to detect the virus mRNAs in paraffin sections of experimentally infected oysters 26 h post-injection. The in situ hybridization showed that the OsHV-1 mRNAs were mainly present in connective tissues in gills, mantle, adductor muscle, digestive gland and gonads. DNA detection by in situ hybridization using a DNA probe and viral DNA quantitation by real-time PCR were also performed and results were compared with those obtained using RNA probes.

  8. Identification and developmental expression of mRNAs encoding putative insect cuticle hardening hormone, bursicon in the green shore crab Carcinus maenas.

    PubMed

    Wilcockson, David C; Webster, Simon G

    2008-03-01

    Bursicon is the ultimate hormone in insect ecdysis, which is involved in cuticle hardening. Here we show that mRNAs encoding the heterodimeric cystine knot protein bursicon (Burs alpha, beta), are present in crustaceans, suggesting ubiquity of this hormone in arthropods. We firstly report the cloning, sequencing of mRNAs encoding subunits from the water flea, Daphnia arenata and the CNS of the crab, Carcinus maenas, in comparison with insect bursicon subunits. Expression patterns of alpha and beta burs mRNAs were examined by in-situ hybridisation (ISH) and quantitative RT-PCR. In the thoracic ganglion, burs alpha and beta mRNAs were completely colocalised in neurones expressing crustacean cardioactive peptide (CCAP). However, in the brain and eyestalk, bursicon transcripts were never observed, despite a complex expression pattern of CCAP interneurones. Patterns of expression of burs alpha and beta mRNAs were constitutive during the moult cycle of adult crabs, in stark contrast to the situation in insects. Whilst copy numbers of burs beta transcripts closely matched those of CCAP, those of burs alpha mRNA were around 3-fold higher than burs beta. This pattern was apparent during embryogenesis, where bursicon transcripts were first observed at around 50% development-the same time as first expression of CCAP mRNA. Transcript ratios (burs alpha: beta) increased during development. Our studies have shown, for the first time, that bursicon mRNAs are expressed in identified neurones in the nervous system of crustaceans. These findings will now promote further investigation into the functions of bursicon during the moult cycle and development of crustaceans.

  9. Identification of a protein complex that binds to a dodecamer sequence found at the 3' ends of yeast mitochondrial mRNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Min, J; Zassenhaus, H P

    1993-01-01

    An activity from Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondria was identified that specifically bound to a 12-nucleotide sequence, AAUAA(U/C)AUUCUU, that is a site for processing of pre-mRNAs so as to generate the mature 3' ends of mRNAs. Because processing occurs 3' to the end of the dodecamer site, all mRNAs in yeast mitochondria terminate with that sequence. RNase T1 digestion fragments which terminated precisely at their 3' ends with the dodecamer sequence bound the activity, indicating that mRNAs in vivo would be capable of binding. Gel mobility shift analyses using RNA oligonucleotides showed that binding was reduced by a U-to-A substitution at position 3 of the dodecamer sequence; a C-to-A substitution at position 10 eliminated binding. UV cross-linking identified three polypeptides with approximate molecular masses of 19, 60, and 70 kDa as constituents of the binding activity. These estimates included the contribution of the 32P-labeled RNA oligonucleotide used to tag these polypeptides. An oligonucleotide with a UA-->AU substitution at positions 3 and 4 of the dodecamer site formed complexes deficient in the 19-kDa species, suggesting that binding specificity was inherent to the higher-molecular-weight polypeptides. Assembly of the complex at a dodecamer site on an RNA protected sequences located 5' to the dodecamer site from digestion by a nucleoside triphosphate-dependent 3' exoribonuclease found in yeast mitochondria. Since mitochondrial mRNAs terminate with an intact dodecamer sequence, the binding activity may function in the stabilization of mRNAs in addition to 3'-end formation of mRNAs. Images PMID:7686618

  10. Multiple Mobile mRNA Signals Regulate Tuber Development in Potato.

    PubMed

    Hannapel, David J; Banerjee, Anjan K

    2017-02-10

    Included among the many signals that traffic through the sieve element system are full-length mRNAs that function to respond to the environment and to regulate development. In potato, several mRNAs that encode transcription factors from the three-amino-loop-extension (TALE) superfamily move from leaves to roots and stolons via the phloem to control growth and signal the onset of tuber formation. This RNA transport is enhanced by short-day conditions and is facilitated by RNA-binding proteins from the polypyrimidine tract-binding family of proteins. Regulation of growth is mediated by three mobile mRNAs that arise from vasculature in the leaf. One mRNA, StBEL5, functions to activate growth, whereas two other, sequence-related StBEL's, StBEL11 and StBEL29, function antagonistically to repress StBEL5 target genes involved in promoting tuber development. This dynamic system utilizes closely-linked phloem-mobile mRNAs to control growth in developing potato tubers. In creating a complex signaling pathway, potato has evolved a long-distance transport system that regulates underground organ development through closely-associated, full-length mRNAs that function as either activators or repressors.

  11. Multiple Mobile mRNA Signals Regulate Tuber Development in Potato

    PubMed Central

    Hannapel, David J.; Banerjee, Anjan K.

    2017-01-01

    Included among the many signals that traffic through the sieve element system are full-length mRNAs that function to respond to the environment and to regulate development. In potato, several mRNAs that encode transcription factors from the three-amino-loop-extension (TALE) superfamily move from leaves to roots and stolons via the phloem to control growth and signal the onset of tuber formation. This RNA transport is enhanced by short-day conditions and is facilitated by RNA-binding proteins from the polypyrimidine tract-binding family of proteins. Regulation of growth is mediated by three mobile mRNAs that arise from vasculature in the leaf. One mRNA, StBEL5, functions to activate growth, whereas two other, sequence-related StBEL’s, StBEL11 and StBEL29, function antagonistically to repress StBEL5 target genes involved in promoting tuber development. This dynamic system utilizes closely-linked phloem-mobile mRNAs to control growth in developing potato tubers. In creating a complex signaling pathway, potato has evolved a long-distance transport system that regulates underground organ development through closely-associated, full-length mRNAs that function as either activators or repressors. PMID:28208608

  12. Molecular beacon-enabled purification of living cells by targeting cell type-specific mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Wile, Brian M; Ban, Kiwon; Yoon, Young-Sup; Bao, Gang

    2014-10-01

    Molecular beacons (MBs) are dual-labeled oligonucleotides that fluoresce only in the presence of complementary mRNA. The use of MBs to target specific mRNAs allows sorting of specific cells from a mixed cell population. In contrast to existing approaches that are limited by available surface markers or selectable metabolic characteristics, the MB-based method enables the isolation of a wide variety of cells. For example, the ability to purify specific cell types derived from pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) is important for basic research and therapeutics. In addition to providing a general protocol for MB design, validation and nucleofection into cells, we describe how to isolate a specific cell population from differentiating PSCs. By using this protocol, we have successfully isolated cardiomyocytes differentiated from mouse or human PSCs (hPSCs) with ∼ 97% purity, as confirmed by electrophysiology and immunocytochemistry. After designing MBs, their ordering and validation requires 2 weeks, and the isolation process requires 3 h.

  13. Rapid differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells into functional neurons by mRNAs encoding transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Goparaju, Sravan Kumar; Kohda, Kazuhisa; Ibata, Keiji; Soma, Atsumi; Nakatake, Yukhi; Akiyama, Tomohiko; Wakabayashi, Shunichi; Matsushita, Misako; Sakota, Miki; Kimura, Hiromi; Yuzaki, Michisuke; Ko, Shigeru B. H.; Ko, Minoru S. H.

    2017-01-01

    Efficient differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) into neurons is paramount for disease modeling, drug screening, and cell transplantation therapy in regenerative medicine. In this manuscript, we report the capability of five transcription factors (TFs) toward this aim: NEUROG1, NEUROG2, NEUROG3, NEUROD1, and NEUROD2. In contrast to previous methods that have shortcomings in their speed and efficiency, a cocktail of these TFs as synthetic mRNAs can differentiate hPSCs into neurons in 7 days, judged by calcium imaging and electrophysiology. They exhibit motor neuron phenotypes based on immunostaining. These results indicate the establishment of a novel method for rapid, efficient, and footprint-free differentiation of functional neurons from hPSCs. PMID:28205555

  14. Initiation factor 2, tRNA, and 50S subunits cooperatively stabilize mRNAs on the ribosome during initiation

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Tomoaki; Petrov, Alexey N.; Iizuka, Ryo; Funatsu, Takashi; Puglisi, Joseph D.; Uemura, Sotaro

    2012-01-01

    Initiation factor 2 (IF2) is a key factor in initiation of bacterial protein synthesis. It recruits initiator tRNA to the small ribosomal subunit and facilitates joining of the large ribosomal subunit. Using reconstituted translation system of Escherichia coli and optical tweezers, we directly measure the rupture force between single ribosomal complexes and mRNAs for initiation complexes in the presence and the absence of IF2. We demonstrate that IF2 together with codon recognition by initiator tRNA increases the force required to dislocate mRNA from the ribosome complexes; mRNA stabilization by IF2 required the presence of a joined 50S subunit, and was independent of bound guanine nucleotide. IF2 thus helps lock the 70S ribosome over the start codon during initiation, thus maintaining reading frame. Our results show how mRNA is progressively stabilized on the ribosome through distinct steps of initiation. PMID:22411833

  15. Endothelin: Visualization of mRNAs by in situ hybridization provides evidence for local action

    SciTech Connect

    MacCumber, M.W.; Ross, C.A.; Glaser, B.M.; Snyder, S.H. )

    1989-09-01

    Endothelin (ET) is a recently identified vasoactive peptide with three isoforms for which three genes have been cloned. The cellular sites of synthesis of this peptide have not yet been identified in vivo. Using Northern blot analysis, we have detected two forms of ET mRNA in rat tissues: a 3.7-kilobase form in the kidney, eye, and brain, a 2.5-kilobase form in the intestine, and both forms in the lung. We have localized these forms of ET mRNA in several rat tissues using in situ hybridization. In the 19-day rat fetus, ET mRNA is highest in the lung, intestine, and meninges. At high resolution, ET mRNA is localized in the lung to respiratory epithelial cells of bronchioles and apparently in blood vessels. In adult tissues, ET mRNA is present throughout the lung, in the renal medulla vasa recta, and in the iris of the eye. ET mRNA is synthesized in close proximity to ET binding sites in many organs (e.g., lung, kidney, intestine, and eye), suggesting a local action of this peptide. However, in other areas (e.g., heart and renal cortex), ET binding sites are present in the absence of ET mRNA, suggesting an action of ET from the bloodstream or from neurons. Northern blot analysis of ET mRNA in microvascular endothelial cells in culture indicates that ET is synthesized in small blood vessels and regulated similarly to its regulation in large vessels. Our results provide evidence that ET, like other regulatory peptides, may serve in several tissues as a neuromodulator or local hormone.

  16. G3BP1, G3BP2 and CAPRIN1 are required for translation of interferon stimulated mRNAs and are targeted by a dengue virus non-coding RNA.

    PubMed

    Bidet, Katell; Dadlani, Dhivya; Garcia-Blanco, Mariano A

    2014-07-01

    Viral RNA-host protein interactions are critical for replication of flaviviruses, a genus of positive-strand RNA viruses comprising major vector-borne human pathogens including dengue viruses (DENV). We examined three conserved host RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) G3BP1, G3BP2 and CAPRIN1 in dengue virus (DENV-2) infection and found them to be novel regulators of the interferon (IFN) response against DENV-2. The three RBPs were required for the accumulation of the protein products of several interferon stimulated genes (ISGs), and for efficient translation of PKR and IFITM2 mRNAs. This identifies G3BP1, G3BP2 and CAPRIN1 as novel regulators of the antiviral state. Their antiviral activity was antagonized by the abundant DENV-2 non-coding subgenomic flaviviral RNA (sfRNA), which bound to G3BP1, G3BP2 and CAPRIN1, inhibited their activity and lead to profound inhibition of ISG mRNA translation. This work describes a new and unexpected level of regulation for interferon stimulated gene expression and presents the first mechanism of action for an sfRNA as a molecular sponge of anti-viral effectors in human cells.

  17. G3BP1, G3BP2 and CAPRIN1 Are Required for Translation of Interferon Stimulated mRNAs and Are Targeted by a Dengue Virus Non-coding RNA

    PubMed Central

    Bidet, Katell; Dadlani, Dhivya; Garcia-Blanco, Mariano A.

    2014-01-01

    Viral RNA-host protein interactions are critical for replication of flaviviruses, a genus of positive-strand RNA viruses comprising major vector-borne human pathogens including dengue viruses (DENV). We examined three conserved host RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) G3BP1, G3BP2 and CAPRIN1 in dengue virus (DENV-2) infection and found them to be novel regulators of the interferon (IFN) response against DENV-2. The three RBPs were required for the accumulation of the protein products of several interferon stimulated genes (ISGs), and for efficient translation of PKR and IFITM2 mRNAs. This identifies G3BP1, G3BP2 and CAPRIN1 as novel regulators of the antiviral state. Their antiviral activity was antagonized by the abundant DENV-2 non-coding subgenomic flaviviral RNA (sfRNA), which bound to G3BP1, G3BP2 and CAPRIN1, inhibited their activity and lead to profound inhibition of ISG mRNA translation. This work describes a new and unexpected level of regulation for interferon stimulated gene expression and presents the first mechanism of action for an sfRNA as a molecular sponge of anti-viral effectors in human cells. PMID:24992036

  18. Red5 and three nuclear pore components are essential for efficient suppression of specific mRNAs during vegetative growth of fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Tomoyasu; Wanatabe, Nobuyoshi; Kitahata, Eri; Tani, Tokio; Sugioka-Sugiyama, Rie

    2013-07-01

    Zinc-finger domains are found in many nucleic acid-binding proteins in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Proteins carrying zinc-finger domains have important roles in various nuclear transactions, including transcription, mRNA processing and mRNA export; however, for many individual zinc-finger proteins in eukaryotes, the exact function of the protein is not fully understood. Here, we report that Red5 is involved in efficient suppression of specific mRNAs during vegetative growth of Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Red5, which contains five C3H1-type zinc-finger domains, localizes to the nucleus where it forms discrete dots. A red5 point mutation, red5-2, results in the upregulation of specific meiotic mRNAs in vegetative mutant red5-2 cells; northern blot data indicated that these meiotic mRNAs in red5-2 cells have elongated poly(A) tails. RNA-fluorescence in situ hybridization results demonstrate that poly(A)(+) RNA species accumulate in the nucleolar regions of red5-deficient cells. Moreover, Red5 genetically interacts with several mRNA export factors. Unexpectedly, three components of the nuclear pore complex also suppress a specific set of meiotic mRNAs. These results indicate that Red5 function is important to meiotic mRNA degradation; they also suggest possible connections among selective mRNA decay, mRNA export and the nuclear pore complex in vegetative fission yeast.

  19. eIF4AIII enhances translation of nuclear cap-binding complex-bound mRNAs by promoting disruption of secondary structures in 5'UTR.

    PubMed

    Choe, Junho; Ryu, Incheol; Park, Ok Hyun; Park, Joori; Cho, Hana; Yoo, Jin Seon; Chi, Sung Wook; Kim, Min Kyung; Song, Hyun Kyu; Kim, Yoon Ki

    2014-10-28

    It has long been considered that intron-containing (spliced) mRNAs are translationally more active than intronless mRNAs (identical mRNA not produced by splicing). The splicing-dependent translational enhancement is mediated, in part, by the exon junction complex (EJC). Nonetheless, the molecular mechanism by which each EJC component contributes to the translational enhancement remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate the previously unappreciated role of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4AIII (eIF4AIII), a component of EJC, in the translation of mRNAs bound by the nuclear cap-binding complex (CBC), a heterodimer of cap-binding protein 80 (CBP80) and CBP20. eIF4AIII is recruited to the 5'-end of mRNAs bound by the CBC by direct interaction with the CBC-dependent translation initiation factor (CTIF); this recruitment of eIF4AIII is independent of the presence of introns (deposited EJCs after splicing). Polysome fractionation, tethering experiments, and in vitro reconstitution experiments using recombinant proteins show that eIF4AIII promotes efficient unwinding of secondary structures in 5'UTR, and consequently enhances CBC-dependent translation in vivo and in vitro. Therefore, our data provide evidence that eIF4AIII is a specific translation initiation factor for CBC-dependent translation.

  20. The RNA recognition motif protein CP33A is a global ligand of chloroplast mRNAs and is essential for plastid biogenesis and plant development.

    PubMed

    Teubner, Marlene; Fuß, Janina; Kühn, Kristina; Krause, Kirsten; Schmitz-Linneweber, Christian

    2017-02-01

    Chloroplast RNA metabolism depends on a multitude of nuclear-encoded RNA-binding proteins (RBPs). Most known chloroplast RBPs address specific RNA targets and RNA-processing functions. However, members of the small chloroplast ribonucleoprotein family (cpRNPs) play a global role in processing and stabilizing chloroplast RNAs. Here, we show that the cpRNP CP33A localizes to a distinct sub-chloroplastic domain and is essential for chloroplast development. The loss of CP33A yields albino seedlings that exhibit aberrant leaf development and can only survive in the presence of an external carbon source. Genome-wide RNA association studies demonstrate that CP33A associates with all chloroplast mRNAs. For a given transcript, quantification of CP33A-bound versus free RNAs demonstrates that CP33A associates with the majority of most mRNAs analyzed. Our results further show that CP33A is required for the accumulation of a number of tested mRNAs, and is particularly relevant for unspliced and unprocessed precursor mRNAs. Finally, CP33A fails to associate with polysomes or to strongly co-precipitate with ribosomal RNA, suggesting that it defines a ribodomain that is separate from the chloroplast translation machinery. Collectively, these findings suggest that CP33A contributes to globally essential RNA processes in the chloroplasts of higher plants.

  1. The Herpes Simplex Virus Virion Host Shutoff Protein Enhances Translation of Viral True Late mRNAs Independently of Suppressing Protein Kinase R and Stress Granule Formation

    PubMed Central

    Dauber, Bianca; Poon, David; dos Santos, Theodore; Duguay, Brett A.; Mehta, Ninad; Saffran, Holly A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The herpes simplex virus (HSV) virion host shutoff (vhs) RNase destabilizes cellular and viral mRNAs, suppresses host protein synthesis, dampens antiviral responses, and stimulates translation of viral mRNAs. vhs mutants display a host range phenotype: translation of viral true late mRNAs is severely impaired and stress granules accumulate in HeLa cells, while translation proceeds normally in Vero cells. We found that vhs-deficient virus activates the double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase R (PKR) much more strongly than the wild-type virus does in HeLa cells, while PKR is not activated in Vero cells, raising the possibility that PKR might play roles in stress granule induction and/or inhibiting translation in restrictive cells. We tested this possibility by evaluating the effects of inactivating PKR. Eliminating PKR in HeLa cells abolished stress granule formation but had only minor effects on viral true late protein levels. These results document an essential role for PKR in stress granule formation by a nuclear DNA virus, indicate that induction of stress granules is the consequence rather than the cause of the translational defect, and are consistent with our previous suggestion that vhs promotes translation of viral true late mRNAs by preventing mRNA overload rather than by suppressing eIF2α phosphorylation. IMPORTANCE The herpes simplex virus vhs RNase plays multiple roles during infection, including suppressing PKR activation, inhibiting the formation of stress granules, and promoting translation of viral late mRNAs. A key question is the extent to which these activities are mechanistically connected. Our results demonstrate that PKR is essential for stress granule formation in the absence of vhs, but at best, it plays a secondary role in suppressing translation of viral mRNAs. Thus, the ability of vhs to promote translation of viral mRNAs can be largely uncoupled from PKR suppression, demonstrating that this viral RNase modulates at least

  2. Developmental expression of the G protein-coupled receptor 54 and three GnRH mRNAs in the teleost fish cobia.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, J Shaik; Benninghoff, Abby D; Holt, G Joan; Khan, Izhar A

    2007-02-01

    The cDNAs of the G protein-coupled receptor 54 (GPR54) and three prepro-gonadotropin-releasing hormones, GnRH-I (seabream GnRH), GnRH-II (chicken GnRH-II), and GnRH-III (salmon GnRH) were isolated and cloned from the brain of the teleost fish cobia, Rachycentron canadum. The cobia GPR54 cDNA was 95 and 51-56% identical to those of tilapia and mammalian models respectively. The GnRH cDNA sequences of cobia showed strong identities to those of tilapia, Atlantic croaker, red drum, and the seabass and seabream species. The real-time quantitative RT-PCR methods allowed detection of all three GnRH mRNAs on the first day after hatching (DAH). The GnRH-I mRNA levels, which were the lowest among the three GnRHs, increased gradually with two distinct peaks in larvae at 3 and 4 DAH. On the other hand, GnRH-II and GnRH-III mRNAs were significantly higher in larvae at 2 and 6 DAH compared with those on the preceding days. In addition, significant peaks of all the three GnRH mRNAs were observed in the brains of 26-day-old fish. The finding of higher GnRH-I and GnRH-II mRNAs in males than females at 153 DAH may be related to early puberty observed during the first year in laboratory-reared male cobia. Moreover, this study demonstrates for the first time the expression of GPR54 mRNA during larval development in a vertebrate species. The concomitant expression patterns of GPR54 and GnRH mRNAs during different stages of larval and juvenile developments, and during early puberty in male cobia suggest a potential relationship between GPR54 and multiple GnRHs during these stages of development consistent with the role of GPR54 in controlling GnRH release in mammals. The increase in GPR54 and GnRH mRNAs observed during early puberty in cobia is consistent with a similar change reported in pubertal rats. This finding together with the localization of GPR54 mRNAs on GnRH neurons in fish and mammals suggests that the GPR54-GnRH interactions may be conserved in different vertebrate groups.

  3. Regulation of Transcript Elongation

    PubMed Central

    Belogurov, Georgiy A.; Artsimovitch, Irina

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria lack subcellular compartments and harbor a single RNA polymerase that synthesizes both structural and protein-coding RNAs, which are cotranscriptionally processed by distinct pathways. Nascent rRNAs fold into elaborate secondary structures and associate with ribosomal proteins, whereas nascent mRNAs are translated by ribosomes. During elongation, nucleic acid signals and regulatory proteins modulate concurrent RNA-processing events, instruct RNA polymerase where to pause and terminate transcription, or act as roadblocks to the moving enzyme. Communications among complexes that carry out transcription, translation, repair, and other cellular processes ensure timely execution of the gene expression program and survival under conditions of stress. This network is maintained by auxiliary proteins that act as bridges between RNA polymerase, ribosome, and repair enzymes, blurring boundaries between separate information-processing steps and making assignments of unique regulatory functions meaningless. Understanding the regulation of transcript elongation thus requires genome-wide approaches, which confirm known and reveal new regulatory connections. PMID:26132790

  4. mRNAs coding for neurotransmitter receptors and voltage-gated sodium channels in the adult rabbit visual cortex after monocular deafferentiation

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Quoc-Thang; Matute, Carlos; Miledi, Ricardo

    1998-01-01

    It has been postulated that, in the adult visual cortex, visual inputs modulate levels of mRNAs coding for neurotransmitter receptors in an activity-dependent manner. To investigate this possibility, we performed a monocular enucleation in adult rabbits and, 15 days later, collected their left and right visual cortices. Levels of mRNAs coding for voltage-activated sodium channels, and for receptors for kainate/α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA), N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA), γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), and glycine were semiquantitatively estimated in the visual cortices ipsilateral and contralateral to the lesion by the Xenopus oocyte/voltage-clamp expression system. This technique also allowed us to study some of the pharmacological and physiological properties of the channels and receptors expressed in the oocytes. In cells injected with mRNA from left or right cortices of monocularly enucleated and control animals, the amplitudes of currents elicited by kainate or AMPA, which reflect the abundance of mRNAs coding for kainate and AMPA receptors, were similar. There was no difference in the sensitivity to kainate and in the voltage dependence of the kainate response. Responses mediated by NMDA, GABA, and glycine were unaffected by monocular enucleation. Sodium channel peak currents, activation, steady-state inactivation, and sensitivity to tetrodotoxin also remained unchanged after the enucleation. Our data show that mRNAs for major neurotransmitter receptors and ion channels in the adult rabbit visual cortex are not obviously modified by monocular deafferentiation. Thus, our results do not support the idea of a widespread dynamic modulation of mRNAs coding for receptors and ion channels by visual activity in the rabbit visual system. PMID:9501250

  5. De novo translation initiation on membrane-bound ribosomes as a mechanism for localization of cytosolic protein mRNAs to the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Jagannathan, Sujatha; Reid, David W; Cox, Amanda H; Nicchitta, Christopher V

    2014-10-01

    The specialized protein synthesis functions of the cytosol and endoplasmic reticulum compartments are conferred by the signal recognition particle (SRP) pathway, which directs the cotranslational trafficking of signal sequence-encoding mRNAs from the cytosol to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Although subcellular mRNA distributions largely mirror the binary pattern predicted by the SRP pathway model, studies in mammalian cells, yeast, and Drosophila have also demonstrated that cytosolic protein-encoding mRNAs are broadly represented on ER-bound ribosomes. A mechanism for such noncanonical mRNA localization remains, however, to be identified. Here, we examine the hypothesis that de novo translation initiation on ER-bound ribosomes serves as a mechanism for localizing cytosolic protein-encoding mRNAs to the ER. As a test of this hypothesis, we performed single molecule RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization studies of subcellular mRNA distributions and report that a substantial fraction of mRNAs encoding the cytosolic protein GAPDH resides in close proximity to the ER. Consistent with these data, analyses of subcellular mRNA and ribosome distributions in multiple cell lines demonstrated that cytosolic protein mRNA-ribosome distributions were strongly correlated, whereas signal sequence-encoding mRNA-ribosome distributions were divergent. Ribosome footprinting studies of ER-bound polysomes revealed a substantial initiation codon read density enrichment for cytosolic protein-encoding mRNAs. We also demonstrate that eukaryotic initiation factor 2α is bound to the ER via a salt-sensitive, ribosome-independent mechanism. Combined, these data support ER-localized translation initiation as a mechanism for mRNA recruitment to the ER.

  6. Distribution of albumin and alpha-fetoprotein mRNAs in normal, hyperplastic, and preneoplastic rat liver.

    PubMed Central

    Alpini, G.; Aragona, E.; Dabeva, M.; Salvi, R.; Shafritz, D. A.; Tavoloni, N.

    1992-01-01

    The nature of bile duct-like (oval) cells proliferating during chemical hepatocarcinogenesis has been controversial. To investigate this issue further, the authors compared the hepatic distribution of albumin (ALB) and alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) mRNAs in rats in which oval cell proliferation was induced by feeding a choline-devoid diet containing 0.1% ethionine (CDE, a hepatocarcinogenic diet) with that in normal rats and in rats in which biliary epithelial cell hyperplasia was induced by either bile duct ligation or feeding alpha-naphthylisothiocyanate (ANIT). Northern blot analysis in parenchymal and nonparenchymal liver cells isolated from these animals demonstrated that ALB mRNA was present in the hepatocytes of both control and experimental animals, whereas this transcript was detected in nonparenchymal epithelial cells only in CDE-fed rats. Alpha-fetoprotein mRNA was not seen in either parenchymal or nonparenchymal cells isolated from normal or hyperplastic livers induced by bile duct ligation or ANIT feeding. In CDE-fed rats, however, both parenchymal and nonparenchymal cell populations displayed AFP message. In situ hybridization directly demonstrated nonparenchymal cell expression of both ALB and AFP transcripts in CDE-fed rats. Most surprisingly, ALB and AFP mRNAs were also detected by in situ hybridization in occasional nonparenchymal cells located in portal tracts near the limiting plate in normal liver, as well as under conditions associated with bile duct hyperplasia. Immunohistochemical studies of intermediate filament proteins, cytokeratin 19 (a marker of glandular epithelia), vimentin (a marker of mesenchymal lineage), and desmin (a marker of muscle cell differentiation) demonstrated that oval cells, as well as normal and hyperplastic bile duct cells, were positive for cytokeratin 19 and negative for both vimentin and desmin. Cytokeratin-positive oval cells formed duct profiles and were connected to preexisting ductules and ducts. These results are

  7. In plants, decapping prevents RDR6-dependent production of small interfering RNAs from endogenous mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Martínez de Alba, Angel Emilio; Moreno, Ana Beatriz; Gabriel, Marc; Mallory, Allison C; Christ, Aurélie; Bounon, Rémi; Balzergue, Sandrine; Aubourg, Sebastien; Gautheret, Daniel; Crespi, Martin D; Vaucheret, Hervé; Maizel, Alexis

    2015-03-11

    Cytoplasmic degradation of endogenous RNAs is an integral part of RNA quality control (RQC) and often relies on the removal of the 5' cap structure and their subsequent 5' to 3' degradation in cytoplasmic processing (P-)bodies. In parallel, many eukaryotes degrade exogenous and selected endogenous RNAs through post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS). In plants, PTGS depends on small interfering (si)RNAs produced after the conversion of single-stranded RNAs to double-stranded RNAs by the cellular RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 6 (RDR6) in cytoplasmic siRNA-bodies. PTGS and RQC compete for transgene-derived RNAs, but it is unknown whether this competition also occurs for endogenous transcripts. We show that the lethality of decapping mutants is suppressed by impairing RDR6 activity. We establish that upon decapping impairment hundreds of endogenous mRNAs give rise to a new class of rqc-siRNAs, that over-accumulate when RQC processes are impaired, a subset of which depending on RDR6 for their production. We observe that P- and siRNA-bodies often are dynamically juxtaposed, potentially allowing for cross-talk of the two machineries. Our results suggest that the decapping of endogenous RNA limits their entry into the PTGS pathway. We anticipate that the rqc-siRNAs identified in decapping mutants represent a subset of a larger ensemble of endogenous siRNAs.

  8. In plants, decapping prevents RDR6-dependent production of small interfering RNAs from endogenous mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Martínez de Alba, Angel Emilio; Moreno, Ana Beatriz; Gabriel, Marc; Mallory, Allison C.; Christ, Aurélie; Bounon, Rémi; Balzergue, Sandrine; Aubourg, Sebastien; Gautheret, Daniel; Crespi, Martin D.; Vaucheret, Hervé; Maizel, Alexis

    2015-01-01

    Cytoplasmic degradation of endogenous RNAs is an integral part of RNA quality control (RQC) and often relies on the removal of the 5′ cap structure and their subsequent 5′ to 3′ degradation in cytoplasmic processing (P-)bodies. In parallel, many eukaryotes degrade exogenous and selected endogenous RNAs through post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS). In plants, PTGS depends on small interfering (si)RNAs produced after the conversion of single-stranded RNAs to double-stranded RNAs by the cellular RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 6 (RDR6) in cytoplasmic siRNA-bodies. PTGS and RQC compete for transgene-derived RNAs, but it is unknown whether this competition also occurs for endogenous transcripts. We show that the lethality of decapping mutants is suppressed by impairing RDR6 activity. We establish that upon decapping impairment hundreds of endogenous mRNAs give rise to a new class of rqc-siRNAs, that over-accumulate when RQC processes are impaired, a subset of which depending on RDR6 for their production. We observe that P- and siRNA-bodies often are dynamically juxtaposed, potentially allowing for cross-talk of the two machineries. Our results suggest that the decapping of endogenous RNA limits their entry into the PTGS pathway. We anticipate that the rqc-siRNAs identified in decapping mutants represent a subset of a larger ensemble of endogenous siRNAs. PMID:25694514

  9. The rotaviral NSP3 protein stimulates translation of polyadenylated target mRNAs independently of its RNA-binding domain

    SciTech Connect

    Keryer-Bibens, Cecile; Legagneux, Vincent; Namanda-Vanderbeken, Allen; Cosson, Bertrand; Paillard, Luc; Poncet, Didier; Osborne, H. Beverley

    2009-12-11

    The non-structural protein 3 (NSP3) of rotaviruses is an RNA-binding protein that specifically recognises a 4 nucleotide sequence at the 3' extremity of the non-polyadenylated viral mRNAs. NSP3 also has a high affinity for eIF4G. These two functions are clearly delimited in separate domains the structures of which have been determined. They are joined by a central domain implicated in the dimerisation of the full length protein. The bridging function of NSP3 between the 3' end of the viral mRNA and eIF4G has been proposed to enhance the synthesis of viral proteins. However, this role has been questioned as knock-down of NSP3 did not impair viral protein synthesis. We show here using a MS2/MS2-CP tethering assay that a C-terminal fragment of NSP3 containing the eIF4G binding domain and the dimerisation domain can increase the expression of a protein encoded by a target reporter mRNA in HEK 293 cells. The amount of reporter mRNA in the cells is not significantly affected by the presence of the NSP3 derived fusion protein showing that the enhanced protein expression is due to increased translation. These results show that NSP3 can act as a translational enhancer even on a polyadenylated mRNA that should be a substrate for PABP1.

  10. Mesangial cells express PDGF (platelet-derived growth factor) mRNAs and proliferate in response to PDGF

    SciTech Connect

    Shultz, P.J.; DiCorleto, P.E.; Silver, B.J.; Abboud, H.E. Research Institute of the Cleveland Clinic Foundation, OH )

    1988-10-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) is a potent mitogen for cells of mesenchymal origin and is released and/or synthesized by platelets, macrophages, endothelial cells and rat mesangial cells. In the present investigation, the authors found that human glomerular mesangial cells in culture release a PDGF-like protein which competes for {sup 125}I-PDGF binding to human foreskin fibroblasts and is mitogenic for these fibroblasts. The competing and to a lesser extent the mitogenic activities present in the conditioned medium are partially recognized by an anti-PDGF antibody. Northern blot analysis of poly(A){sup +} RNA from human mesangial cells demonstrates the expression of both PDGF A- and B-chain mRNAs. PDGF also binds to mesangial cells in a specific manner and stimulates DNA synthesis and cell proliferation. These data suggest that a PDGF-like protein secreted by mesangial cells or released from platelets, monocytes, or endothelial cells during glomerular inflammation may function as an autocrine or a paracrine growth factor for these cells. The biological role of PDGF in mediating proliferative and other inflammatory events in the glomerulus remains to be identified.

  11. The oxidative stress response in yeast cells involves changes in the stability of Aft1 regulon mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Castells-Roca, Laia; Mühlenhoff, Ulrich; Lill, Roland; Herrero, Enrique; Bellí, Gemma

    2011-07-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae can import iron through a high-affinity system consisting of the Ftr1/Fet3-mediated reductive pathway and the siderophore-mediated non-reductive one. Expression of components of the high-affinity system is controlled by the Aft1 transcriptional factor. In this study we show that, upon oxidative stress, Aft1 is transitorily internalized into the nucleus, followed by transcription activation of components of its regulon. In these conditions, the mRNA levels of the genes of the non-reductive pathway become increased, while those of FTR1 and FET3 remain low because of destabilization of the mRNAs. Consequently, the respective protein levels also remain low. Such mRNA destabilization is mediated by the general 5'-3' mRNA decay pathway and is independent of the RNA binding protein Cth2. Yeast cells are hypersensitive to peroxides in growth conditions where only the high-affinity reductive pathway is functional for iron assimilation. On the contrary, peroxide does not affect growth when iron uptake occurs exclusively through the non-reductive pathway. This reinforces the idea that upon oxidative stress S. cerevisiae cells redirect iron assimilation through the non-reductive pathway to minimize oxidative damage by the ferrous ions, which are formed during iron import through the Ftr1/Fet3 complexes.

  12. A 40 kd protein binds specifically to the 5'-untranslated regions of yeast mitochondrial mRNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Papadopoulou, B; Dekker, P; Blom, J; Grivell, L A

    1990-01-01

    Using a gel mobility shift assay we show that a 40 kd protein (p40), present in extracts of yeast mitochondria, binds specifically to the 5'-untranslated leader of cytochrome c oxidase subunit II mRNA. Binding of p40 to coxII RNA protects an 8-10 nucleotide segment from diethylpyocarbonate modification, indicating that the protein interacts with only a restricted region of the 5'-leader. This segment is located at position -12 with respect to the initiation AUG. Deletion of 10 nucleotides encompassing this site completely abolishes protein binding. Nevertheless, Bal31 deletion analysis within the coxII leader shows that a major part of the leader is essential for p40 binding, suggesting that binding of the protein is also dependent on secondary structural features. p40 binds to other mitochondrial leader mRNAs including those for coxI, coxIII and cyt b. p40 is present in a cytoplasmic (rho0) petite mutant lacking mitochondrial protein synthesis. It is therefore presumably nuclear encoded. The possible biological function of the protein is discussed. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 8. Fig. 9. PMID:1701144

  13. Microarray analysis of cytoplasmic versus whole cell RNA reveals a considerable number of missed and false positive mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Trask, Heidi W; Cowper-Sal-lari, Richard; Sartor, Maureen A; Gui, Jiang; Heath, Catherine V; Renuka, Janhavi; Higgins, Azara-Jane; Andrews, Peter; Korc, Murray; Moore, Jason H; Tomlinson, Craig R

    2009-10-01

    With no known exceptions, every published microarray study to determine differential mRNA levels in eukaryotes used RNA extracted from whole cells. It is assumed that the use of whole cell RNA in microarray gene expression analysis provides a legitimate profile of steady-state mRNA. Standard labeling methods and the prevailing dogma that mRNA resides almost exclusively in the cytoplasm has led to the long-standing belief that the nuclear RNA contribution is negligible. We report that unadulterated cytoplasmic RNA uncovers differentially expressed mRNAs that otherwise would not have been detected when using whole cell RNA and that the inclusion of nuclear RNA has a large impact on whole cell gene expression microarray results by distorting the mRNA profile to the extent that a substantial number of false positives are generated. We conclude that to produce a valid profile of the steady-state mRNA population, the nuclear component must be excluded, and to arrive at a more realistic view of a cell's gene expression profile, the nuclear and cytoplasmic RNA fractions should be analyzed separately.

  14. Evolutionary conservation of a molecular machinery for export and expression of mRNAs with retained introns

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Baomin; Rekosh, David

    2015-01-01

    Intron retention is one of the least studied forms of alternative splicing. Through the use of retrovirus and other model systems, it was established many years ago that mRNAs with retained introns are subject to restriction both at the level of nucleocytoplasmic export and cytoplasmic expression. It was also demonstrated that specific cis-acting elements in the mRNA could serve to bypass these restrictions. Here we show that one of these elements, the constitutive transport element (CTE), first identified in the retrovirus MPMV and subsequently in the human NXF1 gene, is a highly conserved element. Using GERP analysis, CTEs with strong primary sequence homology, predicted to display identical secondary structure, were identified in NXF genes from >30 mammalian species. CTEs were also identified in the predicted NXF1 genes of zebrafish and coelacanths. The CTE from the zebrafish NXF1 was shown to function efficiently to achieve expression of mRNA with a retained intron in human cells in conjunction with zebrafish Nxf1 and cofactor Nxt proteins. This demonstrates that all essential functional components for expression of mRNA with retained introns have been conserved from fish to man. PMID:25605961

  15. Effects of pergolide mesilate on metallothionein mRNAs expression in a mouse model for Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Ono, Shin-ichi; Hirai, Kohji; Tokuda, Ei-ichi

    2009-10-01

    Dopamine agonists have neuroprotective properties in addition to their original pharmacologic function. We examined the effects of pergolide mesilate (PM) on the levels of metallothionein mRNA expression and lipid peroxidation in the corpus striata of 1-methyl 4-phenyl 1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-induced Parkinsonian mice. Mice were administered normal saline (vehicle as a control), PM, or MPTP. A consecutive 7-d administration of MPTP via a gastric tube at a dose of 30 mg/kg significantly decreased metallothionein (MT)-I mRNA expression but did not influence MT-III mRNA expression. Lipid peroxidation, measured as the production of malondialdehyde reactive substances, did not increase after MPTP treatment. Although PM administration alone did not effect MT-I expression, an additional consecutive 7-d administration of PM (30 mug/kg) following MPTP treatment recovered the decreased MT-I level and increased MT-III expression. Lipid peroxidation was significantly suppressed. These results suggest that PM exerts an antioxidative property through the induction of MT-I and MT-III mRNAs simultaneously in response to cellular and/or tissue injury.

  16. Impact of Dietary Interventions on Noncoding RNA Networks and mRNAs Encoding Chromatin-Related Factors.

    PubMed

    Green, Christopher D; Huang, Yi; Dou, Xiaoyang; Yang, Liu; Liu, Yong; Han, Jing-Dong J

    2017-03-21

    Dietary interventions dramatically affect metabolic disease and lifespan in various aging models. Here, we profiled liver microRNA (miRNA), coding, and long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) expression by high-throughput deep sequencing in mice across multiple energy intake and expenditure interventions. Strikingly, three dietary intervention network design patterns were uncovered: (1) lifespan-extending interventions largely repressed the expression of miRNAs, lncRNAs, and transposable elements; (2) protein-coding mRNAs with expression positively correlated with long lifespan are highly targeted by miRNAs; and (3) miRNA-targeting interactions mainly target chromatin-related functions. We experimentally validated miR-34a, miR-107, and miR-212-3p targeting of the chromatin remodeler Chd1 and further demonstrate that Chd1 knockdown mimics high-fat diet and aging-induced gene expression changes and activation of transposons. Our findings demonstrate lifespan-extending diets repress miRNA-chromatin remodeler interactions and safeguard against deregulated transcription induced by aging and lifespan shortening diets, events linked by microRNA, chromatin, and ncRNA crosstalk.

  17. Aging and infection reduce expression of specific brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNAs in hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Timothy R; Barrientos, Ruth M; Ahrendsen, Jared T; Hoover, Jennifer M; Maier, Steven F; Patterson, Susan L

    2012-04-01

    Aging increases the likelihood of cognitive decline after negative life events such as infection or injury. We have modeled this increased vulnerability in aged (24-month-old), but otherwise unimpaired F344xBN rats. In these animals, but not in younger (3-month-old) counterparts, a single intraperitoneal injection of E. coli leads to specific deficits in long-term memory and long-lasting synaptic plasticity in hippocampal area CA1-processes strongly dependent on brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Here we have investigated the effects of age and infection on basal and fear-conditioning-stimulated expression of Bdnf in hippocampus. We performed in situ hybridization with 6 probes recognizing: total (pan-)BDNF mRNA, the 4 predominant 5' exon-specific transcripts (I, II, IV, and VI), and BDNF mRNAs with a long 3' untranslated region (3' UTR). In CA1, aging reduced basal levels and fear-conditioning-induced expression of total BDNF mRNA, exon IV-specific transcripts, and transcripts with long 3' UTRs; effects of infection were similar and sometimes compounded the effects of aging. In CA3, aging reduced all of the transcripts to some degree; infection had no effect. Effects in dentate were minimal. Northern blot analysis confirmed an aging-associated loss of total BDNF mRNA in areas CA1 and CA3, and revealed a parallel, preferential loss of BDNF mRNA transcripts with long 3' UTRs.

  18. Multiple binding of repressed mRNAs by the P-body protein Rck/p54

    PubMed Central

    Ernoult-Lange, Michèle; Baconnais, Sonia; Harper, Maryannick; Minshall, Nicola; Souquere, Sylvie; Boudier, Thomas; Bénard, Marianne; Andrey, Philippe; Pierron, Gérard; Kress, Michel; Standart, Nancy; le Cam, Eric; Weil, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    Translational repression is achieved by protein complexes that typically bind 3′ UTR mRNA motifs and interfere with the formation of the cap-dependent initiation complex, resulting in mRNPs with a closed-loop conformation. We demonstrate here that the human DEAD-box protein Rck/p54, which is a component of such complexes and central to P-body assembly, is in considerable molecular excess with respect to cellular mRNAs and enriched to a concentration of 0.5 mM in P-bodies, where it is organized in clusters. Accordingly, multiple binding of p54 proteins along mRNA molecules was detected in vivo. Consistently, the purified protein bound RNA with no sequence specificity and high nanomolar affinity. Moreover, bound RNA molecules had a relaxed conformation. While RNA binding was ATP independent, relaxing of bound RNA was dependent on ATP, though not on its hydrolysis. We propose that Rck/p54 recruitment by sequence-specific translational repressors leads to further binding of Rck/p54 along mRNA molecules, resulting in their masking, unwinding, and ultimately recruitment to P-bodies. Rck/p54 proteins located at the 5′ extremity of mRNA can then recruit the decapping complex, thus coupling translational repression and mRNA degradation. PMID:22836354

  19. SR proteins SRp20 and 9G8 contribute to efficient export of herpes simplex virus 1 mRNAs

    SciTech Connect

    Escudero-Paunetto, Laurimar; Li Ling; Hernandez, Felicia P.; Sandri-Goldin, Rozanne M.

    2010-06-05

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) mRNAs are exported to the cytoplasm through the export receptor TAP/NFX1. HSV-1 multifunctional protein ICP27 interacts with TAP/NXF1, binds viral RNAs, and is required for efficient viral RNA export. In ICP27 mutant infections, viral RNA export is reduced but not ablated, indicating that other export adaptors can aid in viral RNA export. Export adaptor protein Aly/REF is recruited to viral replication compartments, however, Aly/REF knockdown has little effect on viral RNA export. SR proteins SRp20 and 9G8 interact with TAP/NXF1 and mediate export of some cellular RNAs. We report that siRNA knockdown of SRp20 or 9G8 resulted in about a 10 fold decrease in virus yields and in nuclear accumulation of poly(A+) RNA. In infected cells depleted of SRp20, newly transcribed Bromouridine-labeled RNA also accumulated in the nucleus. We conclude that SRp20 and 9G8 contribute to HSV-1 RNA export.

  20. Induced ectopic expression of HigB toxin in Mycobacterium tuberculosis results in growth inhibition, reduced abundance of a subset of mRNAs and cleavage of tmRNA

    PubMed Central

    Schuessler, Dorothée L; Cortes, Teresa; Fivian-Hughes, Amanda S; Lougheed, Kathryn E A; Harvey, Evelyn; Buxton, Roger S; Davis, Elaine O; Young, Douglas B

    2013-01-01

    In Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the genes Rv1954A–Rv1957 form an operon that includes Rv1955 and Rv1956 which encode the HigB toxin and the HigA antitoxin respectively. We are interested in the role and regulation of this operon, since toxin–antitoxin systems have been suggested to play a part in the formation of persister cells in mycobacteria. To investigate the function of the higBA locus, effects of toxin expression on mycobacterial growth and transcript levels were assessed in M. tuberculosis H37Rv wild type and in an operon deletion background. We show that expression of HigB toxin in the absence of HigA antitoxin arrests growth and causes cell death in M. tuberculosis. We demonstrate HigB expression to reduce the abundance of IdeR and Zur regulated mRNAs and to cleave tmRNA in M. tuberculosis, Escherichia coli and Mycobacterium smegmatis. This study provides the first identification of possible target transcripts of HigB in M. tuberculosis. PMID:23927792

  1. RNA splicing regulates the temporal order of TNF-induced gene expression.

    PubMed

    Hao, Shengli; Baltimore, David

    2013-07-16

    When cells are induced to express inflammatory genes by treatment with TNF, the mRNAs for the induced genes appear in three distinct waves, defining gene groups I, II, and III, or early, intermediate, and late genes. To examine the basis for these different kinetic classes, we have developed a PCR-based procedure to distinguish pre-mRNAs from mRNAs. It shows that the three groups initiate transcription virtually simultaneously but that delays in splicing characterize groups II and III. We also examined the elongation times, concluding that pre-mRNA synthesis is coordinate but splicing differences directly regulate the timing of mRNA production.

  2. Analysis of Human mRNAs With the Reference Genome Sequence Reveals Potential Errors, Polymorphisms, and RNA Editing

    PubMed Central

    Furey, Terrence S.; Diekhans, Mark; Lu, Yontao; Graves, Tina A.; Oddy, Lachlan; Randall-Maher, Jennifer; Hillier, LaDeana W.; Wilson, Richard K.; Haussler, David

    2004-01-01

    The NCBI Reference Sequence (RefSeq) project and the NIH Mammalian Gene Collection (MGC) together define a set of ∼30,000 nonredundant human mRNA sequences with identified coding regions representing 17,000 distinct loci. These high-quality mRNA sequences allow for the identification of transcribed regions in the human genome sequence, and many researchers accept them as the correct representation of each defined gene sequence. Computational comparison of these mRNA sequences and the recently published essentially finished human genome sequence reveals several thousand undocumented nonsynonymous substitution and frame shift discrepancies between the two resources. Additional analysis is undertaken to verify that the euchromatic human genome is sufficiently complete—containing nearly the whole mRNA collection, thus allowing for a comprehensive analysis to be undertaken. Many of the discrepancies will prove to be genuine polymorphisms in the human population, somatic cell genomic variants, or examples of RNA editing. It is observed that the genome sequence variant has significant additional support from other mRNAs and ESTs, almost four times more often than does the mRNA variant, suggesting that the genome sequence is more accurate. In ∼15% of these cases, there is substantial support for both variants, suggestive of an undocumented polymorphism. An initial screening against a 24-individual genomic DNA diversity panel verified 60% of a small set of potential single nucleotide polymorphisms from which successful results could be obtained. We also find statistical evidence that a few of these discrepancies are due to RNA editing. Overall, these results suggest that the mRNA collections may contain a substantial number of errors. For current and future mRNA collections, it may be prudent to fully reconcile each genome sequence discrepancy, classifying each as a polymorphism, site of RNA editing or somatic cell variation, or genome sequence error. PMID:15489323

  3. Temporal regulation of adenovirus major late alternative RNA splicing.

    PubMed

    Akusjarvi, Goran

    2008-05-01

    Adenovirus makes extensive use of alternative RNA splicing to produce a complex set of spliced mRNAs during replication. The accumulation of viral mRNAs is subjected to a temporal regulation, a mechanism that ensures that proteins that are needed at certain stages of the virus life cycle are produced in a timely fashion. The complex interactions between the virus and the host cell RNA splicing machinery has been studied in detail during the last decade. These studies have resulted in the characterization of two viral proteins, E4-ORF4 and L4-33K, that adenovirus uses to remodel the host cell RNA splicing machinery. Here I will review the current knowledge of how mRNA expression from the adenovirus major late transcription unit is controlled with a particular emphasis on how cis-acting sequence element, trans-acting factors and mechanisms regulating adenovirus major late L1 alternative RNA splicing is controlled.

  4. Long-range RNA interaction of two sequence elements required for endonucleolytic cleavage of human insulin-like growth factor II mRNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Scheper, W; Meinsma, D; Holthuizen, P E; Sussenbach, J S

    1995-01-01

    Human insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) mRNAs are subject to site-specific endonucleolytic cleavage in the 3' untranslated region, leading to an unstable 5' cleavage product containing the IGF-II coding region and a very stable 3' cleavage product of 1.8 kb. This endonucleolytic cleavage is most probably the first and rate-limiting step in degradation of IGF-II mRNAs. Two sequence elements within the 3' untranslated region are required for cleavage: element I, located approximately 2 kb upstream of the cleavage site, and element II, encompassing the cleavage site itself. We have identified a stable double-stranded RNA stem structure (delta G = -100 kcal/mol [418.4 kJ/mol]) that can be formed between element I and a region downstream of the cleavage site in element II. This structure is conserved among human, rat, and mouse mRNAs. Detailed analysis of the requirements for cleavage shows that the relative position of the elements is not essential for cleavage. Furthermore, the distance between the coding region and the cleavage site does not affect the cleavage reaction. Mutational analysis of the long-range RNA-RNA interaction shows that not only the double-stranded character but also the sequence of the stable RNA stem is important for cleavage. PMID:7799930

  5. Phenol emulsion-enhanced DNA-driven subtractive cDNA cloning: isolation of low-abundance monkey cortex-specific mRNAs

    SciTech Connect

    Travis, G.H.; Sutcliffe, J.G.

    1988-03-01

    To isolate cDNA clones of low-abundance mRNAs expressed in monkey cerebral cortex but absent from cerebellum, the authors developed an improved subtractive cDNA cloning procedure that requires only modest quantities of mRNA. Plasmid DNA from a monkey cerebellum cDNA library was hybridized in large excess to radiolabeled monkey cortex cDNA in a phenol emulsion-enhanced reaction. The unhybridized cortex cDNA was isolated by chromatography on hydroxyapatite and used to probe colonies from a monkey cortex cDNA library. Of 60,000 colonies screened, 163 clones were isolated and confirmed by colony hybridization or RNA blotting to represent mRNAs, ranging from 0.001% to 0.1% abundance, specific to or highly enriched in cerebral cortex relative to cerebellum. Clones of one medium-abundance mRNA were recovered almost quantitatively. Two of the lower-abundance mRNAs were expressed at levels reduced by a factor of 10 in Alzheimer disease relative to normal human cortex. One of these was identified as the monkey preprosomatostatin I mRNA.

  6. Transcriptome-wide identification of NMD-targeted human mRNAs reveals extensive redundancy between SMG6- and SMG7-mediated degradation pathways

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, Martino; Karousis, Evangelos D.; Bourquin, Joël; Bruggmann, Rémy; Mühlemann, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    Besides degrading aberrant mRNAs that harbor a premature translation termination codon (PTC), nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) also targets many seemingly “normal” mRNAs that encode for full-length proteins. To identify a bona fide set of such endogenous NMD targets in human cells, we applied a meta-analysis approach in which we combined transcriptome profiling of knockdowns and rescues of the three NMD factors UPF1, SMG6, and SMG7. We provide evidence that this combinatorial approach identifies NMD-targeted transcripts more reliably than previous attempts that focused on inactivation of single NMD factors. Our data revealed that SMG6 and SMG7 act on essentially the same transcripts, indicating extensive redundancy between the endo- and exonucleolytic decay routes. Besides mRNAs, we also identified as NMD targets many long noncoding RNAs as well as miRNA and snoRNA host genes. The NMD target feature with the most predictive value is an intron in the 3′ UTR, followed by the presence of upstream open reading frames (uORFs) and long 3′ UTRs. Furthermore, the 3′ UTRs of NMD-targeted transcripts tend to have an increased GC content and to be phylogenetically less conserved when compared to 3′ UTRs of NMD insensitive transcripts. PMID:27864472

  7. Altered RNA processing and export lead to retention of mRNAs near transcription sites and nuclear pore complexes or within the nucleolus

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Biplab; Montpetit, Ben

    2016-01-01

    Many protein factors are required for mRNA biogenesis and nuclear export, which are central to the eukaryotic gene expression program. It is unclear, however, whether all factors have been identified. Here we report on a screen of >1000 essential gene mutants in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for defects in mRNA processing and export, identifying 26 mutants with defects in this process. Single-molecule FISH data showed that the majority of these mutants accumulated mRNA within specific regions of the nucleus, which included 1) mRNAs within the nucleolus when nucleocytoplasmic transport, rRNA biogenesis, or RNA processing and surveillance was disrupted, 2) the buildup of mRNAs near transcription sites in 3′-end processing and chromosome segregation mutants, and 3) transcripts being enriched near nuclear pore complexes when components of the mRNA export machinery were mutated. These data show that alterations to various nuclear processes lead to the retention of mRNAs at discrete locations within the nucleus. PMID:27385342

  8. RhoA/ROCK pathway activity is essential for the correct localization of the germ plasm mRNAs in zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    Miranda-Rodríguez, Jerónimo Roberto; Salas-Vidal, Enrique; Lomelí, Hilda; Zurita, Mario; Schnabel, Denhi

    2017-01-01

    Zebrafish germ plasm is composed of mRNAs such as vasa and nanos and of proteins such as Bucky ball, all of which localize symmetrically in four aggregates at the distal region of the first two cleavage furrows. The coordination of actin microfilaments, microtubules and kinesin is essential for the correct localization of the germ plasm. Rho-GTPases, through their effectors, coordinate cytoskeletal dynamics. We address the participation of RhoA and its effector ROCK in germ plasm localization during the transition from two- to eight-cell embryos. We found that active RhoA is enriched along the cleavage furrow during the first two division cycles, whereas ROCK localizes at the distal region of the cleavage furrows in a similar pattern as the germ plasm mRNAs. Specific inhibition of RhoA and ROCK affected microtubules organization at the cleavage furrow; these caused the incorrect localization of the germ plasm mRNAs. The incorrect localization of the germ plasm led to a dramatic change in the number of germ cells during the blastula and 24hpf embryo stages without affecting any other developmental processes. We demonstrate that the Rho/ROCK pathway is intimately related to the determination of germ cells in zebrafish embryos.

  9. Quantum Chemical Calculations and Experimental Validation of the Photoclick Reaction for Fluorescent Labeling of the 5’ cap of Eukaryotic mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Stummer, Daniela; Herrmann, Carmen; Rentmeister, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Bioorthogonal click reactions are powerful tools to specifically label biomolecules in living cells. Considerable progress has been made in site-specific labeling of proteins and glycans in complex biological systems, but equivalent methods for mRNAs are rare. We present a chemo-enzymatic approach to label the 5’ cap of eukaryotic mRNAs using a bioorthogonal photoclick reaction. Herein, the N7-methylated guanosine of the 5’ cap is enzymatically equipped with an allyl group using a variant of the trimethylguanosine synthase 2 from Giardia lamblia (GlaTgs2). To elucidate whether the resulting N2-modified 5’ cap is a suitable dipolarophile for photoclick reactions, we used Kohn–Sham density functional theory (KS-DFT) and calculated the HOMO and LUMO energies of this molecule and nitrile imines. Our in silico studies suggested that combining enzymatic allylation of the cap with subsequent labeling in a photoclick reaction was feasible. This could be experimentally validated. Our approach generates a turn-on fluorophore site-specifically at the 5’ cap and therefore presents an important step towards labeling of eukaryotic mRNAs in a bioorthogonal manner. PMID:26246991

  10. Morphohistological change and expression of HSP70, osteopontin and osteocalcin mRNAs in rat dental pulp cells with orthodontic tooth movement.

    PubMed

    Shigehara, Satoshi; Matsuzaka, Kenichi; Inoue, Takashi

    2006-08-01

    Morphological change and expression of osteopontin, osteocalcin, and HSP70 mRNAs in rat dental pulp cells with experimental orthodontic tooth movement were investigated. Elastic rubber blocks, 0.65 mm in thickness, were inserted between the maxillary first and second molars in rats. In addition to morphological observations of HE staining and TUNEL staining at days 3, 7, 14 and 28 after insertion of elastic rubber blocks, expression of HSP70, osteopontin and osteocalcin mRNAs was also analyzed using quantitative RT-PCR with a LightCycler. Morphologically, proliferation and vasodilation of capillaries was evident in the pulp at days 3 and 7, and a sparse odontoblast layer and apoptosis in the pulp were observed at days 7 and 14 after rubber block insertion. Expression of HSP70, osteopontin and osteocalcin mRNAs in the experimental groups was higher than that in the control group at all time points. This suggests that orthodontic tooth movement causes degenerative changes and apoptosis in pulp cells, while pulp homeostasis is maintained at the genetic level.

  11. A modified protocol for the detection of three different mRNAs with a new-generation in situ hybridization chain reaction on frozen sections.

    PubMed

    Sui, Qian-Qian; Zhu, Jiao; Li, Xiangnan; Knight, Gillian E; He, Cheng; Burnstock, Geoffrey; Yuan, Hongbin; Xiang, Zhenghua

    2016-12-01

    A new multiple fluorescence in situ hybridization method based on hybridization chain reaction was recently reported, enabling simultaneous mapping of multiple target mRNAs within intact zebrafish and mouse embryos. With this approach, DNA probes complementary to target mRNAs trigger chain reactions in which metastable fluorophore-labeled DNA hairpins self-assemble into fluorescent amplification polymers. The formation of the specific polymers enhances greatly the sensitivity of multiple fluorescence in situ hybridization. In this study we describe the optimal parameters (hybridization chain reaction time and temperature, hairpin and salt concentration) for multiple fluorescence in situ hybridization via amplification of hybridization chain reaction for frozen tissue sections. The combined use of fluorescence in situ hybridization and immunofluorescence, together with other control experiments (sense probe, neutralization and competition, RNase treatment, and anti-sense probe without initiator) confirmed the high specificity of the fluorescence in situ hybridization used in this study. Two sets of three different mRNAs for oxytocin, vasopressin and somatostatin or oxytocin, vasopressin and thyrotropin releasing hormone were successfully visualized via this new method. We believe that this modified protocol for multiple fluorescence in situ hybridization via hybridization chain reaction would allow researchers to visualize multiple target nucleic acids in the future.

  12. Glucocorticoid treatment of astrocytes results in temporally dynamic transcriptome regulation and astrocyte-enriched mRNA changes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Carter, Bradley S; Meng, Fan; Thompson, Robert C

    2012-12-18

    While general effects of glucocorticoids are well established, the specific cellular mechanisms by which these hormones exert tissue-dependent effects continue to be elaborated. Diseases that demonstrate altered glucocorticoid signaling have been associated with alterations in astrocytes, yet relatively little is known about the effects of glucocorticoids upon this cell type. We have analyzed mRNA expression patterns following glucocorticoid treatment of mouse primary astrocyte cultures. Microarray analysis of cortical astrocyte cultures treated with dexamethasone over an eight-point, 24 h time course identified 854 unique genes with ≥twofold change in mRNA expression at one or more time points. Clustering analysis associated subsets of these mRNA expression changes with gene ontology categories known to be impacted by glucocorticoids. Numerous mRNAs regulated by dexamethasone were also regulated by the natural ligand corticosterone; all of the mRNAs regulated ≥twofold by corticosterone were substantially attenuated by cotreatment with the glucocorticoid receptor antagonist RU486. Of the mRNAs demonstrating ≥twofold expression change in response to both glucocorticoids, 33 mRNAs were previously associated with glucocorticoid regulation, and 36 mRNAs were novel glucocorticoid targets. All genes tested by qPCR for glucocorticoid regulation in cortical astrocyte cultures were also regulated by glucocorticoids in hippocampal astrocyte cultures (18/18). Interestingly, a portion of glucocorticoid-regulated genes were astrocyte enriched; the percentage of astrocyte-enriched genes per total number of regulated genes was highest for the early time points and steadily decreased over the time course. These findings suggest that astrocytes in vitro may initially deploy cell type-specific patterns of mRNA regulatory responses to glucocorticoids and subsequently activate additional cell type-independent responses.

  13. Alternatively spliced type II procollagen mRNAs define distinct populations of cells during vertebral development: differential expression of the amino-propeptide

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    Type II collagen is a major component of cartilage providing structural integrity to the tissue. Type II procollagen can be expressed in two forms by differential splicing of the primary gene transcript. The two mRNAs either include (type IIA) or exclude (type IIB) an exon (exon 2) encoding the major portion of the amino (NH2)-propeptide (Ryan, M. C., and L. J. Sandell. 1990. J. Biol. Chem. 265:10334-10339). The expression of the two procollagens was examined in order to establish a potential functional significance for the two type II procollagen mRNAs. First, to establish whether the two mRNAs are functional, we showed that both mRNAs can be translated and the proteins secreted into the extracellular environment. Both proteins were identified as type II procollagens. Secondly, to test the hypothesis that differential expression of type II procollagens may be a marker for a distinct population of cells, specific procollagen mRNAs were localized in tissue by in situ hybridization to oligonucleotides spanning the exon junctions. Embryonic vertebral column was chosen as a source of tissue undergoing rapid chondrogenesis, allowing the examination of a variety of cell types related to cartilage. In this issue, each procollagen mRNA had a distinct tissue distribution during chondrogenesis with type IIB expressed in chondrocytes and type IIA expressed in cells surrounding cartilage in prechondrocytes. The morphology of the cells expressing the two collagen types was distinct: the cells expressing type IIA are narrow, elongated, and "fibroblastic" in appearance while the cells expressing type IIB are large and round. The expression of type IIB appears to be correlated with abundant synthesis and accumulation of cartilagenous extracellular matrix. The expression of type IIB is spatially correlated with the high level expression of the cartilage proteoglycan, aggrecan, establishing type IIB procollagen and aggrecan as markers for the chondrocyte phenotype. Transcripts of

  14. Identification of altered microRNAs and mRNAs in the cumulus cells of PCOS patients: miRNA-509-3p promotes oestradiol secretion by targeting MAP3K8.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xin; Liu, Chang; Hao, Cuifang; Tang, Qianqing; Liu, Riming; Lin, Shaoxia; Zhang, Luping; Yan, Wei

    2016-06-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common endocrine and metabolic disorder in women and is characterised by polycystic ovaries, hyperandrogenism and chronic anovulation. Although the clinical and biochemical signs of PCOS are typically heterogeneous, abnormal folliculogenesis is considered a common characteristic of PCOS. Our aim is to identify the altered miRNA and mRNA expression profiles in the cumulus cells of PCOS patients to investigate their molecular function in the aetiology and pathophysiology of PCOS. In this study, the miRNA expression profiles of the cumulus cell samples isolated from five PCOS and five control patients were determined by an miRNA microarray. At the same time, the altered mRNA profiles of the same cumulus cell samples were also identified by a cDNA microarray. From the microarray data, 17 miRNAs and 1263 mRNAs showed significantly different expression in the PCOS cumulus cells. The differentially expressed miRNA-509-3p and its potential target gene (MAP3K8) were identified from the miRNA and mRNA microarrays respectively. The expression of miRNA-509-3p was up-regulated and MAP3K8 was down-regulated in the PCOS cumulus cells. The direct interaction between miRNA-509-3p and MAP3K8 was confirmed by a luciferase activity assay in KGN cells. In addition, miRNA-509-3p mimics or inhibitor transfection tests in KGN cells further confirmed that miRNA-509-3p improved oestradiol (E2) secretion by inhibiting the expression of MAP3K8 These results help to characterise the pathogenesis of anovulation in PCOS, especially the regulation of E2 production.

  15. Correlation of ghrelin concentration and ghrelin, ghrelin-O-acetyltransferase (GOAT) and growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a mRNAs expression in the proventriculus and brain of the growing chicken.

    PubMed

    Kitazawa, Takio; Hiraga, Takeo; Teraoka, Hiroki; Yaosaka, Noriko; Kaiya, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    To determine mechanisms for age-related decrease of GHS-R1a expression in the chicken proventriculus, changes in mRNA expression of ghrelin and ghrelin-O-acetyltransferase (GOAT) as well as ghrelin concentrations in the proventriculus and plasma were examined in growing chickens. Changes in expression levels of ghrelin, GOAT and GHS-R1a mRNAs were also examined in different brain regions (pituitary, hypothalamus, thalamus, cerebellum, cerebral cortex, olfactory bulb, midbrain and medulla oblongata). Ghrelin concentrations in the proventriculus and plasma increased with aging and reached plateaus at 30-50 days after hatching. High level of ghrelin mRNA decreased at 3 days after hatching, and it became stable at half of the initial level. Expression levels of GHS-R1a and GOAT decreased 3 or 5 days after hatching and became stable at low levels. Significant negative correlations were found between plasma ghrelin and mRNA levels of GOAT and GHS-R1a. Expression levels of ghrelin mRNA were different in the brain regions, but a significant change was not seen with aging. GHS-R1a expression was detected in all brain regions, and age-dependent changes were observed in the pituitary and cerebellum. Different from the proventriculus, the expression of GOAT in the brain increased or did not change with aging. These results suggest that decreased GHS-R1a and GOAT mRNA expression in the proventriculus is due to endogenous ghrelin-induced down-regulation. Expression levels of ghrelin, GOAT and GHS-R1a in the brain were independently regulated from that in the proventriculus, and age-related and region-dependent regulation pattern suggests a local effect of ghrelin system in chicken brain.

  16. Bacterial Small RNA Regulators: Versatile Roles and Rapidly Evolving Variations

    PubMed Central

    Gottesman, Susan; Storz, Gisela

    2011-01-01

    Small RNA regulators (sRNAs) have been identified in a wide range of bacteria and found to play critical regulatory roles in many processes. The major families of sRNAs include true antisense RNAs, synthesized from the strand complementary to the mRNA they regulate, sRNAs that also act by pairing but have limited complementarity with their targets, and sRNAs that regulate proteins by binding to and affecting protein activity. The sRNAs with limited complementarity are akin to eukaryotic microRNAs in their ability to modulate the activity and stability of multiple mRNAs. In many bacterial species, the RNA chaperone Hfq is required to promote pairing between these sRNAs and their target mRNAs. Understanding the evolution of regulatory sRNAs remains a challenge; sRNA genes show evidence of duplication and horizontal transfer but also could be evolved from tRNAs, mRNAs or random transcription. PMID:20980440

  17. Altered expression of antiviral cytokine mRNAs associated with cyclophosphamide’s enhancement of viral oncolysis

    PubMed Central

    Wakimoto, H; Fulci, G; Timinski, E; Chiocca, E Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses (OVs) are being used as anticancer agents in preclinical and clinical trials. Propagation of OVs inside infected tumors is critical to their efficacy and is mediated by the productive generation of progeny OVs within infected tumor cells. In turn, this progeny can spread the infection to other tumor cells in successive rounds of oncolysis. Previously, we had found that, in rats, cyclophosphamide (CPA) pretreatment increased infection of brain tumors by an intra-arterially administered herpessimplex virus type 1 OV, because it inhibited activation of complement responses, mediated by innate IgM. We also have previously shown that other pharmacologic inhibitors of complement, such as cobra venom factor (CVF), allowed for increased infection. However, in these studies, further inhibition of complement responses by CVF did not result in additional infection of brain tumor cells or in propagation of OV to surrounding tumor cells. In this study, we sought to determine if CPA did lead to increased infection/propagation from initially infected tumor cells. Unlike our results with CVF, we find that CPA administration does result in a time-dependent increase in infection of tumor cells, suggestive of increased propagation, in both syngeneic and athymic models of brain tumors. This increase was due to increased survival of OV within infected tumors and brain surrounding tumors. CPA’s effect was not due to a direct enhancement of viral replication in tumor cells, rather was associated with its immunosuppressive effects. RT-PCR analysis revealed that CPA administration resulted in impaired mRNA production by peripheral blood mono-nuclear cells (PBMCs) of several cytokines (interferons α/β, interferon γ, TNFα, IL-15, and IL-18) with anti-HSV function. These findings suggest that the CPA-mediated facilitation of OV intraneoplastic propagation is associated with a general decrease of antiviral cytokines mRNAs in PBMCs. These findings not only suggest a

  18. Expression of CGRP, Vasculogenesis and Osteogenesis Associated mRNAs in the Developing Mouse Mandible and Tibia

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Yuuki; Miwa, Yoko; Sato, Iwao

    2017-01-01

    The neuropeptide Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide (CGRP) is a well-characterized neurotransmitter. However, little is known about the role of CGRP in osteogenesis and vascular genesis during the developmental formation of bone. In the present study, we assessed the abundance of CGRP mRNA and the mRNA of osteogenesis and vascular genesis markers in the foetal mouse mandible and leg bone (tibia). We also analysed the expression and localization of CGRP, osteopontin (OPN) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-A) using in situ hybridization and immunohistochemical localization in the mouse mandible and tibia at embryonic days 12.5 (E12.5), E14.5, E17.5, and postnatal day 1 (P1). CGRP was clearly detected in the mandible relative to the tibia at E14.5. Hybridization using an anti-sense probe for CGRP was not detected in the mandible at P1. Hybridization with an anti-sense probe for OPN was detected at E14.5, later in the mandible and at P1 in Meckel’s cartilage. However, OPN was only detected in the tibia at E17.5 and later. The abundance of CGRP mRNA differed between the mandible and tibia. The level of vasculogenesis markers, such as VEGF-A, was similar to that of CGRP in the mandible. The levels of VEGF-A, cluster of differentiation 31 (CD31) and lymphatic vessel endothelial hyaluronan receptor 1 (LIVE-1) differed from that of OPN in the mandible. In contrast, the levels of VEGF-A, CD31, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), collagen I (Col I), collagen II (Col II) and OPN mRNA differed from E12.5 to P1 (P<0.001) in the tibia. The abundance of mRNA of CGRP and bone matrix markers (Col I, Col II, and OPN) was low at P5 in the tibia. These differences in CGRP and other mRNAs may induce a different manner of ossification between the mandible and tibia. Therefore, a time lag of ossification occurs between the mandible and tibia during foetal development.

  19. Post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression by Piwi proteins and piRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Toshiaki; Lin, Haifan

    2014-01-01

    Summary Piwi proteins and Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) are essential for gametogenesis, embryogenesis, and stem cell maintenance in animals. Piwi proteins act on transposon RNAs by cleaving the RNAs and by interacting with factors involved in RNA regulation. Additionally, piRNAs generated from transposons and psuedogenes can be used by Piwi proteins to regulate mRNAs at the post-transcriptional level. Here, we discuss piRNA biogenesis, recent findings on post-transcriptional regulation of mRNAs by the piRNA pathway, and the potential importance of this post-transcriptional regulation for a variety of biological processes such as gametogenesis, developmental transitions, and sex determination. PMID:25280102

  20. mRNA decay rates in late-developing Dictyostelium discoideum cells are heterogeneous, and cyclic AMP does not act directly to stabilize cell-type-specific mRNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Manrow, R E; Jacobson, A

    1988-01-01

    We reevaluated the use of 32PO4 pulse-chases for analyzing mRNA decay rates in late-developing Dictyostelium cells. We found that completely effective PO4 chases could not be obtained in developing cells and that, as a consequence, the decay rates exhibited by some mRNAs were influenced by the rates at which they were transcribed. In developing cells disaggregated in the presence of cyclic AMP, the poly(A)+ mRNA population turned over with an apparent half-life of 4 h, individual mRNA decay rates were heterogeneous, and some prestalk and prespore mRNAs appeared to decay with biphasic kinetics. In cells disaggregated in the absence of cyclic AMP, all prestalk and prespore mRNAs decayed with biphasic kinetics. During the first 1 to 1.5 h after disaggregation in the absence of cyclic AMP, the cell-type-specific mRNAs were selectively degraded, decaying with half-lives of 20 to 30 min; thereafter, the residual prestalk and prespore mRNA molecules decayed at rates that were similar to those measured in the presence of cyclic AMP. This short-term labilization of cell-type-specific mRNAs was observed even for those species not requiring cyclic AMP for their accumulation in developing cells. The observation that cell-type specific mRNAs can decay at similar rates in disaggregated cells with or without cyclic AMP indicates that this compound does not act directly to stabilize prestalk and prespore mRNAs during development and that its primary role in the maintenance of cyclic-AMP-dependent mRNAs is likely to be transcriptional. Images PMID:2847029

  1. Mitochondrial Dysfunction Reveals the Role of mRNA Poly(A) Tail Regulation in Oculopharyngeal Muscular Dystrophy Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Chartier, Aymeric; Klein, Pierre; Pierson, Stéphanie; Barbezier, Nicolas; Gidaro, Teresa; Casas, François; Carberry, Steven; Dowling, Paul; Maynadier, Laurie; Bellec, Maëlle; Oloko, Martine; Jardel, Claude; Moritz, Bodo; Dickson, George; Mouly, Vincent; Ohlendieck, Kay; Butler-Browne, Gillian; Trollet, Capucine; Simonelig, Martine

    2015-01-01

    Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD), a late-onset disorder characterized by progressive degeneration of specific muscles, results from the extension of a polyalanine tract in poly(A) binding protein nuclear 1 (PABPN1). While the roles of PABPN1 in nuclear polyadenylation and regulation of alternative poly(A) site choice are established, the molecular mechanisms behind OPMD remain undetermined. Here, we show, using Drosophila and mouse models, that OPMD pathogenesis depends on affected poly(A) tail lengths of specific mRNAs. We identify a set of mRNAs encoding mitochondrial proteins that are down-regulated starting at the earliest stages of OPMD progression. The down-regulation of these mRNAs correlates with their shortened poly(A) tails and partial rescue of their levels when deadenylation is genetically reduced improves muscle function. Genetic analysis of candidate genes encoding RNA binding proteins using the Drosophila OPMD model uncovers a potential role of a number of them. We focus on the deadenylation regulator Smaug and show that it is expressed in adult muscles and specifically binds to the down-regulated mRNAs. In addition, the first step of the cleavage and polyadenylation reaction, mRNA cleavage, is affected in muscles expressing alanine-expanded PABPN1. We propose that impaired cleavage during nuclear cleavage/polyadenylation is an early defect in OPMD. This defect followed by active deadenylation of specific mRNAs, involving Smaug and the CCR4-NOT deadenylation complex, leads to their destabilization and mitochondrial dysfunction. These results broaden our understanding of the role of mRNA regulation in pathologies and might help to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying neurodegenerative disorders that involve mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:25816335

  2. Mitochondrial dysfunction reveals the role of mRNA poly(A) tail regulation in oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Chartier, Aymeric; Klein, Pierre; Pierson, Stéphanie; Barbezier, Nicolas; Gidaro, Teresa; Casas, François; Carberry, Steven; Dowling, Paul; Maynadier, Laurie; Bellec, Maëlle; Oloko, Martine; Jardel, Claude; Moritz, Bodo; Dickson, George; Mouly, Vincent; Ohlendieck, Kay; Butler-Browne, Gillian; Trollet, Capucine; Simonelig, Martine

    2015-03-01

    Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD), a late-onset disorder characterized by progressive degeneration of specific muscles, results from the extension of a polyalanine tract in poly(A) binding protein nuclear 1 (PABPN1). While the roles of PABPN1 in nuclear polyadenylation and regulation of alternative poly(A) site choice are established, the molecular mechanisms behind OPMD remain undetermined. Here, we show, using Drosophila and mouse models, that OPMD pathogenesis depends on affected poly(A) tail lengths of specific mRNAs. We identify a set of mRNAs encoding mitochondrial proteins that are down-regulated starting at the earliest stages of OPMD progression. The down-regulation of these mRNAs correlates with their shortened poly(A) tails and partial rescue of their levels when deadenylation is genetically reduced improves muscle function. Genetic analysis of candidate genes encoding RNA binding proteins using the Drosophila OPMD model uncovers a potential role of a number of them. We focus on the deadenylation regulator Smaug and show that it is expressed in adult muscles and specifically binds to the down-regulated mRNAs. In addition, the first step of the cleavage and polyadenylation reaction, mRNA cleavage, is affected in muscles expressing alanine-expanded PABPN1. We propose that impaired cleavage during nuclear cleavage/polyadenylation is an early defect in OPMD. This defect followed by active deadenylation of specific mRNAs, involving Smaug and the CCR4-NOT deadenylation complex, leads to their destabilization and mitochondrial dysfunction. These results broaden our understanding of the role of mRNA regulation in pathologies and might help to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying neurodegenerative disorders that involve mitochondrial dysfunction.

  3. RNA-Binding Proteins in the Regulation of miRNA Activity: A Focus on Neuronal Functions

    PubMed Central

    Loffreda, Alessia; Rigamonti, Aurora; Barabino, Silvia M. L.; Lenzken, Silvia C.

    2015-01-01

    Posttranscriptional modifications of messenger RNAs (mRNAs) are key processes in the fine-tuning of cellular homeostasis. Two major actors in this scenario are RNA binding proteins (RBPs) and microRNAs (miRNAs) that together play important roles in the biogenesis, turnover, translation and localization of mRNAs. This review will highlight recent advances in the understanding of the role of RBPs in the regulation of the maturation and the function of miRNAs. The interplay between miRNAs and RBPs is discussed specifically in the context of neuronal development and function. PMID:26437437

  4. Expression of gelatinase A and TIMP-2 mRNAs in desmoplastic fibroblasts in both mammary carcinomas and basal cell carcinomas of the skin.

    PubMed Central

    Poulsom, R; Hanby, A M; Pignatelli, M; Jeffery, R E; Longcroft, J M; Rogers, L; Stamp, G W

    1993-01-01

    AIMS--To compare the localisation of mRNAs for the basement membrane degrading enzyme gelatinase A (72 kilodalton type IV collagenase) and its inhibitor TIMP-2 in carcinomas of the breast and basal cell carcinomas of the skin which have little or no ability to metastasize. METHODS--In situ hybridisation was performed on formalin fixed, paraffin wax embedded blocks using 35S-labelled riboprobes on 16 mammary carcinomas, three fibroadenomas, and a benign phyllodes tumour, and on 15 basal cell carcinomas of the skin (BCC). RESULTS--Labelling for both mRNAs was detectable in 14 of 16 mammary carcinomas and in 13 of 15 BCC, most often over organising desmoplastic fibroblasts in the stroma around invasive epithelial aggregates. Some sparse labelling was seen over malignant epithelial cells in six of the mammary carcinomas but not in the BCC. Some expression of gelatinase A mRNA was also seen in fibroblasts of breast lobules adjacent to the mammary carcinomas and around engulfed adnexal elements in the BCC, but not in unaffected breast tissues, fibroadenomas, the phyllodes tumour or unaffected skin. CONCLUSIONS--Maximal expression of gelatinase A and TIMP-2 mRNAs occurs in malignant neoplasms as part of the host response to the presence of established neoplastic cells rather than as an initial response to invasion. The degree to which this is present suggests this may be a highly relevant mechanism modulating tumour differentiation, growth and progression, possibly entailing uptake via specific receptors on the tumour cell surface. Images PMID:8391548

  5. Hypothyroidism advances mammary involution in lactating rats through inhibition of PRL signaling and induction of LIF/STAT3 mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Campo Verde Arboccó, Fiorella; Sasso, Corina V; Actis, Esteban A; Carón, Rubén W; Hapon, María Belén; Jahn, Graciela A

    2016-01-05

    Thyroid diseases have deleterious effects on lactation, litter growth and survival, and hinder the suckling-induced hormone release, leading in the case of hyperthyroidism, to premature mammary involution. To determine the effects of hypothyroidism (HypoT) on late lactation, we analyzed the effect of chronic 6-propyl-2-thiouracil (PTU)-induced HypoT on mammary histology and the expression of members of the JAK/STAT/SOCS signaling pathway, milk proteins, prolactin (PRLR), estrogen (ER), progesterone (PR) and thyroid hormone (TR) receptors, markers of involution (such as stat3, lif, bcl2, BAX and PARP) on lactation (L) day 21. HypoT mothers showed increased histological markers of involution compared with control rats, such as adipose/epithelial ratio, inactive alveoli, picnotic nuclei and numerous detached apoptotic cells within the alveolar lumina. We also found decreased PRLR, β-casein and α-lactoalbumin mRNAs, but increased SOCS1, SOCS3, STAT3 and LIF mRNAs, suggesting a decrease in PRL signaling and induction of involution markers. Furthermore, Caspase-3 and 8 and PARP labeled cells and the expression of structural proteins such as β-Actin, α-Tubulin and Lamin B were increased, indicating the activation of apoptotic pathways and tissue remodelation. HypoT also increased PRA (mRNA and protein) and erβ and decreased erα mRNAs, and increased strongly TRα1, TRβ1, PRA and ERα protein levels. These results show that lactating HypoT rats have premature mammary involution, most probably induced by the inhibition of prolactin signaling along with the activation of the LIF-STAT3 pathway.

  6. A Tale of Two RNAs during Viral Infection: How Viruses Antagonize mRNAs and Small Non-Coding RNAs in The Host Cell

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, Kristina M.; Nag, Anita

    2016-01-01

    Viral infection initiates an array of changes in host gene expression. Many viruses dampen host protein expression and attempt to evade the host anti-viral defense machinery. Host gene expression is suppressed at several stages of host messenger RNA (mRNA) formation including selective degradation of translationally competent messenger RNAs. Besides mRNAs, host cells also express a variety of noncoding RNAs, including small RNAs, that may also be subject to inhibition upon viral infection. In this review we focused on different ways viruses antagonize coding and noncoding RNAs in the host cell to its advantage. PMID:27271653

  7. Light regulates alternative splicing of hydroxypyruvate reductase in pumpkin.

    PubMed

    Mano, S; Hayashi, M; Nishimura, M

    1999-02-01

    Hydroxypyruvate reductase (HPR) is a leaf peroxisomal enzyme that functions in the glycolate pathway of photorespiration in plants. We have obtained two highly similar cDNAs for pumpkin HPR (HPR1 and HPR2). It has been revealed that two HPR mRNAs might be produced by alternative splicing from a single type of pre-mRNA. The HPR1 protein, but not the HPR2 protein, was found to have a targeting sequence into leaf peroxisomes at the C-terminus, suggesting that alternative splicing controls the subcellular localization of the two HPR proteins. Immunoblot analysis and subcellular fractionation experiments showed that HPR1 and HPR2 proteins are localized in leaf peroxisomes and the cytosol, respectively. Moreover, indirect fluorescence microscopy and analyses of transgenic tobacco cultured cells and Arabidopsis thaliana expressing fusion proteins with green fluorescent protein (GFP) revealed the different subcellular localizations of the two HPR proteins. Both mRNAs were induced developmentally and by light, but with quantitative differences. Almost equal amounts of the mRNAs were detected in pumpkin cotyledons grown in darkness, but treatment with light greatly enhanced the production of HPR2 mRNA. These findings indicate that light regulates alternative splicing of HPR mRNA, suggesting the presence of a novel mechanism of mRNA maturation, namely light-regulated alternative splicing, in higher plants.

  8. Transcriptional regulation of decreased protein synthesis during skeletal muscle unloading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, G.; Steffen, J. M.; Geoghegan, T. E.

    1989-01-01

    The regulatory role of transcriptional alterations in unloaded skeletal muscles was investigated by determining levels of total muscle RNA and mRNA fractions in soleus, gastrocnemius, and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) of rats subjected to whole-body suspension for up to 7 days. After 7 days, total RNA and mRNA contents were lower in soleus and gastrocnemius, compared with controls, but the concentrations of both RNAs per g muscle were unaltered. Alpha-actin mRNA (assessed by dot hybridization) was significantly reduced in soleus after 1, 3, and 7 days of suspension and in gastrocnemius after 3 and 7 days, but was unchanged in EDL. Protein synthesis directed by RNA extracted from soleus and EDL indicated marked alteration in mRNAs coding for several small proteins. Results suggest that altered transcription and availability of specific mRNAs contribute significantly to the regulation of protein synthesis during skeletal muscle unloading.

  9. Noise-induced multistability in the regulation of cancer by genes and pseudogenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrosyan, K. G.; Hu, Chin-Kun

    2016-07-01

    We extend a previously introduced model of stochastic gene regulation of cancer to a nonlinear case having both gene and pseudogene messenger RNAs (mRNAs) self-regulated. The model consists of stochastic Boolean genetic elements and possesses noise-induced multistability (multimodality). We obtain analytical expressions for probabilities for the case of constant but finite number of microRNA molecules which act as a noise source for the competing gene and pseudogene mRNAs. The probability distribution functions display both the global bistability regime as well as even-odd number oscillations for a certain range of model parameters. Statistical characteristics of the mRNA's level fluctuations are evaluated. The obtained results of the extended model advance our understanding of the process of stochastic gene and pseudogene expressions that is crucial in regulation of cancer.

  10. Pitfalls of the CAT reporter gene for analyzing translational regulation in Leishmania.

    PubMed

    Folgueira, Cristina; Requena, Jose M

    2007-10-01

    Heterologous reporter genes are widely used for the characterization of gene expression in many organisms. Particularly, constructs bearing reporter genes have greatly contributed to our understanding of gene regulation in kinetoplastids. In some specific circumstances, however, such heterologous reporter has a risk of resulting in irrelevant observations and conclusions, which are primarily due to the introduction of foreign sequence elements. This communication describes our recent experience using the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene as a reporter for analysis of the translational regulation of HSP70 genes in Leishmania infantum. We show that chimeric mRNAs consisting of the CAT open reading frame (ORF) and the untranslated regions (UTRs) from HSP70-II genes behave differently as endogenous HSP70-II mRNAs and that this difference is due to the presence of CAT sequences. Thus, the main purpose of this communication is to alert researchers working in gene regulation to be cautious when interpreting results based on heterologous reporter genes.

  11. Transcription factor Wilms’ tumor 1 regulates developmental RNAs through 3′ UTR interaction

    PubMed Central

    Bharathavikru, Ruthrothaselvi; Dudnakova, Tatiana; Aitken, Stuart; Slight, Joan; Artibani, Mara; Hohenstein, Peter; Tollervey, David; Hastie, Nick

    2017-01-01

    Wilms’ tumor 1 (WT1) is essential for the development and homeostasis of multiple mesodermal tissues. Despite evidence for post-transcriptional roles, no endogenous WT1 target RNAs exist. Using RNA immunoprecipitation and UV cross-linking, we show that WT1 binds preferentially to 3′ untranslated regions (UTRs) of developmental targets. These target mRNAs are down-regulated upon WT1 depletion in cell culture and developing kidney mesenchyme. Wt1 deletion leads to rapid turnover of specific mRNAs. WT1 regulates reporter gene expression through interaction with 3′ UTR-binding sites. Combining experimental and computational analyses, we propose that WT1 influences key developmental and disease processes in part through regulating mRNA turnover. PMID:28289143

  12. A short conserved motif in ALYREF directs cap- and EJC-dependent assembly of export complexes on spliced mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Gromadzka, Agnieszka M; Steckelberg, Anna-Lena; Singh, Kusum K; Hofmann, Kay; Gehring, Niels H

    2016-03-18

    The export of messenger RNAs (mRNAs) is the final of several nuclear posttranscriptional steps of gene expression. The formation of export-competent mRNPs involves the recruitment of export factors that are assumed to facilitate transport of the mature mRNAs. Using in vitro splicing assays, we show that a core set of export factors, including ALYREF, UAP56 and DDX39, readily associate with the spliced RNAs in an EJC (exon junction complex)- and cap-dependent manner. In order to elucidate how ALYREF and other export adaptors mediate mRNA export, we conducted a computational analysis and discovered four short, conserved, linear motifs present in RNA-binding proteins. We show that mutation in one of the new motifs (WxHD) in an unstructured region of ALYREF reduced RNA binding and abolished the interaction with eIF4A3 and CBP80. Additionally, the mutation impaired proper localization to nuclear speckles and export of a spliced reporter mRNA. Our results reveal important details of the orchestrated recruitment of export factors during the formation of export competent mRNPs.

  13. Adenovirus E4orf6 targets pp32/LANP to control the fate of ARE-containing mRNAs by perturbing the CRM1-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Higashino, Fumihiro; Aoyagi, Mariko; Takahashi, Akiko; Ishino, Masaho; Taoka, Masato; Isobe, Toshiaki; Kobayashi, Masanobu; Totsuka, Yasunori; Kohgo, Takao; Shindoh, Masanobu

    2005-07-04

    E4orf6 plays an important role in the transportation of cellular and viral mRNAs and is known as an oncogene product of adenovirus. Here, we show that E4orf6 interacts with pp32/leucine-rich acidic nuclear protein (LANP). E4orf6 exports pp32/LANP from the nucleus to the cytoplasm with its binding partner, HuR, which binds to an AU-rich element (ARE) present within many protooncogene and cytokine mRNAs. We found that ARE-mRNAs, such as c-fos, c-myc, and cyclooxygenase-2, were also exported to and stabilized in the cytoplasm of E4orf6-expressing cells. The oncodomain of E4orf6 was necessary for both binding to pp32/LANP and effect for ARE-mRNA. C-fos mRNA was exported together with E4orf6, E1B-55kD, pp32/LANP, and HuR proteins. Moreover, inhibition of the CRM1-dependent export pathway failed to block the export of ARE-mRNAs mediated by E4orf6. Thus, E4orf6 interacts with pp32/LANP to modulate the fate of ARE-mRNAs by altering the CRM1-dependent export pathway.

  14. Gibberellin-induced changes in the populations of translatable mRNAs and accumulated polypeptides in dwarfs of maize and pea

    SciTech Connect

    Chory, J.; Voytas, D.F.; Olszewski, N.E.; Ausubel, F.M.

    1987-01-01

    Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was used to characterize the molecular mechanism of gibberellin-induced stem elongation in maize and pea. Dwarf mutants of maize and pea lack endogenous gibberellin (GA/sub 1/) but become phenotypically normal with exogenous applications of this hormone. Sections from either etiolated maize or green pea seedlings were incubated in the presence of (/sup 35/S) methionine for 3 hours with or without gibberellin. Labeled proteins from soluble and particulate fractions were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and specific changes in the patterns of protein synthesis were observed upon treatment with gibberellin. Polyadenylated mRNAs from etiolated or green maize shoots and green pea epicotyls treated or not with gibberellin (a 0.5 to 16 hour time course) were assayed by translation in a rabbit reticulocyte extract and separation of products by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Both increases and decreases in the levels of specific polypeptides were seen for pea and corn, and these changes were observed within 30 minutes of treatment with gibberellin. Together, these data indicate that gibberellin induces changes in the expression of a subset of gene products within elongating dwarfs. This may be due to changes in transcription rate, mRNA stability, or increased efficiency of translation of certain mRNAs.

  15. Cross talk between ABC transporter mRNAs via a target mRNA-derived sponge of the GcvB small RNA

    PubMed Central

    Miyakoshi, Masatoshi; Chao, Yanjie; Vogel, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    There is an expanding list of examples by which one mRNA can posttranscriptionally influence the expression of others. This can involve RNA sponges that sequester regulatory RNAs of mRNAs in the same regulon, but the underlying molecular mechanism of such mRNA cross talk remains little understood. Here, we report sponge-mediated mRNA cross talk in the posttranscriptional network of GcvB, a conserved Hfq-dependent small RNA with one of the largest regulons known in bacteria. We show that mRNA decay from the gltIJKL locus encoding an amino acid ABC transporter generates a stable fragment (SroC) that base-pairs with GcvB. This interaction triggers the degradation of GcvB by RNase E, alleviating the GcvB-mediated mRNA repression of other amino acid-related transport and metabolic genes. Intriguingly, since the gltIJKL mRNA itself is a target of GcvB, the SroC sponge seems to enable both an internal feed-forward loop to activate its parental mRNA in cis and activation of many trans-encoded mRNAs in the same pathway. Disabling this mRNA cross talk affects bacterial growth when peptides are the sole carbon and nitrogen sources. PMID:25630703

  16. A short conserved motif in ALYREF directs cap- and EJC-dependent assembly of export complexes on spliced mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Gromadzka, Agnieszka M.; Steckelberg, Anna-Lena; Singh, Kusum K.; Hofmann, Kay; Gehring, Niels H.

    2016-01-01

    The export of messenger RNAs (mRNAs) is the final of several nuclear posttranscriptional steps of gene expression. The formation of export-competent mRNPs involves the recruitment of export factors that are assumed to facilitate transport of the mature mRNAs. Using in vitro splicing assays, we show that a core set of export factors, including ALYREF, UAP56 and DDX39, readily associate with the spliced RNAs in an EJC (exon junction complex)- and cap-dependent manner. In order to elucidate how ALYREF and other export adaptors mediate mRNA export, we conducted a computational analysis and discovered four short, conserved, linear motifs present in RNA-binding proteins. We show that mutation in one of the new motifs (WxHD) in an unstructured region of ALYREF reduced RNA binding and abolished the interaction with eIF4A3 and CBP80. Additionally, the mutation impaired proper localization to nuclear speckles and export of a spliced reporter mRNA. Our results reveal important details of the orchestrated recruitment of export factors during the formation of export competent mRNPs. PMID:26773052

  17. Resorption-cycle-dependent polarization of mRNAs for different subunits of V-ATPase in bone-resorbing osteoclasts.

    PubMed Central

    Laitala-Leinonen, T; Howell, M L; Dean, G E; Väänänen, H K

    1996-01-01

    Protein sorting in eukaryotic cells is mainly done by specific targeting of polypeptides. The present evidence from oocytes, neurons, and some other polarized cells suggests that protein sorting can be further facilitated by concentrating mRNAs to their corresponding subcellular areas. However, very little is known about the mechanism(s) involved in mRNA targeting, or how widespread and dynamic such mRNA sorting might be. In this study, we have used an in vitro cell culture system, where large multinucleated osteoclasts undergo continuous structural and functional changes from polarized (resorbing) to a nonpolarized (resting) stage. We demonstrate here, using a nonradioactive in situ hybridization technique and confocal microscopy, that mRNAs for several vacuolar H(+)-ATPase subunits change their localization and polarity in osteoclasts according to the resorption cycle, whereas mRNA for cytoplasmic carbonic anhydrase II is found diffusely located throughout the osteoclast during the whole resorption cycle. Antisense RNA against the 16-kDa or 60-kDa V-ATPase subunit inhibits polarization of the osteoclasts, as determined by cytoskeleton staining. Antisense RNA against carbonic anhydrase II, however, has no such effect. Images PMID:8741845

  18. Cells infected with herpes simplex virus 1 export to uninfected cells exosomes containing STING, viral mRNAs, and microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Kalamvoki, Maria; Du, Te; Roizman, Bernard

    2014-11-18

    STING (stimulator of IFN genes) activates the IFN-dependent innate immune response to infection on sensing the presence of DNA in cytosol. The quantity of STING accumulating in cultured cells varies; it is relatively high in some cell lines [e.g., HEp-2, human embryonic lung fibroblasts (HEL), and HeLa] and low in others (e.g., Vero cells). In a preceding publication we reported that STING was stable in four cell lines infected with herpes simplex virus 1 and that it was actively stabilized in at least two cell lines derived from human cancers. In this report we show that STING is exported from HEp-2 cells to Vero cells along with virions, viral mRNAs, microRNAs, and the exosome marker protein CD9. The virions and exosomes copurified. The quantity of STING and CD9 exported from one cell line to another was inoculum-size-dependent and reflected the levels of STING and CD9 accumulating in the cells in which the virus inoculum was made. The export of STING, an innate immune sensor, and of viral mRNAs whose major role may be in silencing viral genes in latently infected neurons, suggests that the virus has evolved mechanisms that curtail rather than foster the spread of infection under certain conditions.

  19. Translation of partially overlapping psbD-psbC mRNAs in chloroplasts: the role of 5'-processing and translational coupling.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Yuka; Kuroda, Hiroshi; Yukawa, Yasushi; Sugiura, Masahiro

    2012-04-01

    The chloroplast psbD and psbC genes encode the D2 and CP43 proteins of the photosystem II complex, and they are generally cotranscribed. We report studies on the basic translation process of tobacco psbD-psbC mRNAs using an in vitro translation system from tobacco chloroplasts. The primary transcript has an unusually long 5'-UTR (905 nt). We show that it is translatable. Processing of the 5'-UTR greatly enhances the translation efficiency of the psbD cistron. A striking feature is that psbD and psbC cistrons overlap by 14 nt. Removal of the psbD 5'-UTR plus the start codon and introduction of a premature termination codon in the psbD cistron considerably reduce the translation efficiency of the downstream psbC cistron. These results indicate that translation of the psbC cistron depends largely on that of the upstream psbD cistron and thus shows translational coupling; however, a portion is independently translated. These observations, together with the presence of monocistronic psbC mRNAs, suggest that the psbD and psbC cistrons are translated via multiple processes to produce necessary amounts of D2 and CP43 proteins.

  20. Intratesticular expression of mRNAs of both interferon γ and tumor necrosis factor α is significantly increased in experimental autoimmune orchitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Terayama, Hayato; Naito, Munekazu; Qu, Ning; Hirai, Shuichi; Kitaoka, Miyuki; Ogawa, Yuki; Itoh, Masahiro

    2011-04-01

    Experimental autoimmune orchitis (EAO) is one of the models of immunological male infertility. Murine EAO is CD4+T cell-dependent and classically induced by immunization with a testicular homogenate and adjuvants. We previously established that immunization with viable syngeneic testicular germ cells (TGC) can also induce murine EAO with no use of any adjuvant. Analyses of this EAO model have already revealed that cultured spleen cells of immunized mice secreted interferon (IFN)-γ and that treatment of the immunized mice with anti-IFN-γ monoclonal antibodies significantly suppressed the EAO. It is known that both IFN-γ and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α are representative cytokines of Th1 cells and exhibit local toxicity toward the seminiferous epithelium in vivo. However, changes in these two cytokines in EAO-affected testes have not yet been investigated. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated the expression of intratesticular IFN-γ and TNF- α mRNAs in TGC-induced EAO using real-time RT-PCR. The results demonstrated that the intratesticular mRNAs for both IFN-γ and TNF-α significantly increased, while other cytokines such as IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6 and TGF-β did not show dramatic changes in the immunized mice. These results suggest that secretion of significant amounts of IFN-γ and TNF-α in situ contributes to the spermatogenic disturbance in EAO.

  1. Effects of chronic ethanol administration on expression of BDNF and trkB mRNAs in rat hippocampus after experimental brain injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Dhillon, H S; Barron, S; Hicks1, R R; Prasad, R M; Seroogy, K B

    2000-06-23

    Previous evidence indicates that both chronic alcohol treatment and traumatic brain injury modulate expression of certain neurotrophins and neurotrophin receptors in cortical tissue. However, the combined effects of chronic alcohol and brain trauma on expression of neurotrophins and their receptors have not been investigated. In the present study, we examined the effects of 6 weeks of chronic ethanol administration on lateral fluid percussion (FP) brain injury-induced alterations in expression of mRNAs for the neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its high affinity receptor, trkB, in rat hippocampus. In both the control- (pair-fed isocaloric sucrose) diet and the chronic ethanol-diet groups, unilateral FP brain injury induced a bilateral increase in levels of both BDNF and trkB mRNAs in the dentate gyrus granule cell layer, and of BDNF mRNA in hippocampal region CA3. However, no significant differences in expression were found between the control-diet and ethanol-diet groups, in either the sham-injured or FP-injured animals. These findings suggest that 6 weeks of chronic ethanol administration does not alter the plasticity of hippocampal BDNF/trkB expression in response to experimental brain injury.

  2. SMN is essential for the biogenesis of U7 snRNP and 3′-end formation of histone mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Tisdale, Sarah; Lotti, Francesco; Saieva, Luciano; Van Meerbeke, James P.; Crawford, Thomas O.; Sumner, Charlotte J.; Mentis, George Z.; Pellizzoni, Livio

    2013-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a neurodegenerative disease caused by a deficiency in the survival motor neuron (SMN) protein. SMN mediates the assembly of spliceosomal small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs) and possibly other RNPs. Here we investigated SMN requirement for the biogenesis and function of U7—an snRNP specialized in the 3′-end formation of replication-dependent histone mRNAs that normally are not polyadenylated. We show that SMN deficiency impairs U7 snRNP assembly and decreases U7 levels in mammalian cells. The SMN-dependent U7 reduction affects endonucleolytic cleavage of histone mRNAs leading to abnormal accumulation of 3′-extended and polyadenylated transcripts, followed by downstream changes in histone gene expression. Importantly, SMN deficiency induces defects of histone mRNA 3′-end formation in both SMA mice and human patients. These findings demonstrate that SMN is essential for U7 biogenesis and histone mRNA processing in vivo, and identify a novel RNA pathway disrupted in SMA. PMID:24332368

  3. Multiple G-quartet structures in pre-edited mRNAs suggest evolutionary driving force for RNA editing in trypanosomes

    PubMed Central

    Leeder, W.-Matthias; Hummel, Niklas F. C.; Göringer, H. Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial transcript maturation in African trypanosomes requires a U-nucleotide specific RNA editing reaction. In its most extreme form hundreds of U’s are inserted into and deleted from primary transcripts to generate functional mRNAs. Unfortunately, both origin and biological role of the process have remained enigmatic. Here we report a so far unrecognized structural feature of pre-edited mRNAs. We demonstrate that the cryptic pre-mRNAs contain numerous clustered G-nt, which fold into G-quadruplex (GQ) structures. We identified 27 GQ’s in the different pre-mRNAs and demonstrate a positive correlation between the steady state abundance of guide (g)RNAs and the sequence position of GQ-elements. We postulate that the driving force for selecting G-rich sequences lies in the formation of DNA/RNA hybrid G-quadruplex (HQ) structures between the pre-edited transcripts and the non-template strands of mitochondrial DNA. HQ’s are transcription termination/replication initiation sites and thus guarantee an unperturbed replication of the mt-genome. This is of special importance in the insect-stage of the parasite. In the transcription-on state, the identified GQ’s require editing as a GQ-resolving activity indicating a link between replication, transcription and RNA editing. We propose that the different processes have coevolved and suggest the parasite life-cycle and the single mitochondrion as evolutionary driving forces. PMID:27436151

  4. RNA helicase MOV10 functions as a co-factor of HIV-1 Rev to facilitate Rev/RRE-dependent nuclear export of viral mRNAs

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Feng; Zhang, Junsong; Zhang, Yijun; Geng, Guannan; Liang, Juanran; Li, Yingniang; Chen, Jingliang; Liu, Chao; Zhang, Hui

    2015-12-15

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) exploits multiple host factors during its replication. The REV/RRE-dependent nuclear export of unspliced/partially spliced viral transcripts needs the assistance of host proteins. Recent studies have shown that MOV10 overexpression inhibited HIV-1 replication at various steps. However, the endogenous MOV10 was required in certain step(s) of HIV-1 replication. In this report, we found that MOV10 potently enhances the nuclear export of viral mRNAs and subsequently increases the expression of Gag protein and other late products through affecting the Rev/RRE axis. The co-immunoprecipitation analysis indicated that MOV10 interacts with Rev in an RNA-independent manner. The DEAG-box of MOV10 was required for the enhancement of Rev/RRE-dependent nuclear export and the DEAG-box mutant showed a dominant-negative activity. Our data propose that HIV-1 utilizes the anti-viral factor MOV10 to function as a co-factor of Rev and demonstrate the complicated effects of MOV10 on HIV-1 life cycle. - Highlights: • MOV10 can function as a co-factor of HIV-1 Rev. • MOV10 facilitates Rev/RRE-dependent transport of viral mRNAs. • MOV10 interacts with Rev in an RNA-independent manner. • The DEAG-box of MOV10 is required for the enhancement of Rev/RRE-dependent export.

  5. Translatome profiling in dormant and nondormant sunflower (Helianthus annuus) seeds highlights post-transcriptional regulation of germination.

    PubMed

    Layat, Elodie; Leymarie, Juliette; El-Maarouf-Bouteau, Hayat; Caius, José; Langlade, Nicolas; Bailly, Christophe

    2014-12-01

    Seed dormancy, which blocks germination in apparently favourable conditions, is a key regulatory control point of plant population establishment. As germination requires de novo translation, its regulation by dormancy is likely to be related to the association of individual transcripts to polysomes. Here, the polysome-associated mRNAs, that is, the translatome, were fractionated and characterized with microarrays in dormant and nondormant sunflower (Helianthus annuus) embryos during their imbibition at 10°C, a temperature preventing germination of dormant embryos. Profiling of mRNAs in polysomal complexes revealed that the translatome differs between germinating and nongerminating embryos. Association of transcripts with polysomes reached a maximum after 15 h of imbibition; at this time-point 194 polysome-associated transcripts were specifically found in nondormant embryos and 47 in dormant embryos only. The proteins corresponding to the polysomal mRNAs in nondormant embryos appeared to be very pertinent for germination and were involved mainly in transport, regulation of transcription or cell wall modifications. This work demonstrates that seed germination results from a timely regulated and selective recruitment of mRNAs to polysomes, thus opening novel fields of investigation for the understanding of this developmental process.

  6. A genetic approach for finding small RNAs regulators of genes of interest identifies RybC as regulating the DpiA/DpiB two-component system.

    PubMed

    Mandin, Pierre; Gottesman, Susan

    2009-05-01

    In Escherichia coli, the largest class of small regulatory RNAs binds to the RNA chaperone Hfq and regulates the stability and/or translation of specific mRNAs. While recent studies have shown that some mRNAs could be subject to post-transcriptional regulation by sRNAs (e.g. mRNAs found by co-immunoprecipitation with Hfq), no method has yet been described to identify small RNAs that regulate them. We developed a method to easily make translational fusions of genes of interest to the lacZ reporter gene, under the control of a P(BAD)-inducible promoter. A multicopy plasmid library of the E. coli genome can then be used to screen for small RNAs that affect the activity of the fusion. This screening method was first applied to the dpiB gene from the dpiBA operon, which encodes a two-component signal transduction system involved in the SOS response to beta-lactams. One small RNA, RybC, was found to negatively regulate the expression of dpiB. Using mutants in the dpiB-lacZ fusion and compensatory mutations in the RybC sRNA, we demonstrate that RybC directly base pairs with the dpiBA mRNA.

  7. Hypoxia Induces Autophagy through Translational Up-Regulation of Lysosomal Proteins in Human Colon Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Ming-Chih; Chang, Chiao-May; Sun, H. Sunny

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia occurs in a wide variety of physiological and pathological conditions, including tumorigenesis. Tumor cells have to adapt to hypoxia by altering their gene expression and protein synthesis. Here, we showed that hypoxia inhibits translation through activation of PERK and inactivation of mTOR in human colon cancer HCT116 cells. Prolonged hypoxia (1% O2, 16 h) dramatically inhibits general translation in HCT116 cells, yet selected mRNAs remain efficiently translated under such a condition. Using microarray analysis of polysome- associated mRNAs, we identified a large number of hypoxia-regulated genes at the translational level. Efficiently translated mRNAs during hypoxia were validated by polysome profiling and quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Pathway enrichment analysis showed that many of the up-regulated genes are involved in lysosome, glycan and lipid metabolism, antigen presentation, cell adhesion, and remodeling of the extracellular matrix and cytoskeleton. The majority of down-regulated genes are involved in apoptosis, ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis, and oxidative phosphorylation. Further investigation showed that hypoxia induces lysosomal autophagy and mitochondrial dysfunction through translational regulation in HCT116 cells. The abundance of several translation factors and the mTOR kinase activity are involved in hypoxia-induced mitochondrial autophagy in HCT116 cells. Our studies highlight the importance of translational regulation for tumor cell adaptation to hypoxia. PMID:27078027

  8. A universal strategy for regulating mRNA translation in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jicong; Arha, Manish; Sudrik, Chaitanya; Mukherjee, Abhirup; Wu, Xia; Kane, Ravi S

    2015-04-30

    We describe a simple strategy to control mRNA translation in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells which relies on a unique protein-RNA interaction. Specifically, we used the Pumilio/FBF (PUF) protein to repress translation by binding in between the ribosome binding site (RBS) and the start codon (in Escherichia coli), or by binding to the 5' untranslated region of target mRNAs (in mammalian cells). The design principle is straightforward, the extent of translational repression can be tuned and the regulator is genetically encoded, enabling the construction of artificial signal cascades. We demonstrate that this approach can also be used to regulate polycistronic mRNAs; such regulation has rarely been achieved in previous reports. Since the regulator used in this study is a modular RNA-binding protein, which can be engineered to target different 8-nucleotide RNA sequences, our strategy could be used in the future to target endogenous mRNAs for regulating metabolic flows and signaling pathways in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.

  9. Genome-Wide Screen of miRNAs and Targeting mRNAs Reveals the Negatively Regulatory Effect of miR-130b-3p on PTEN by PI3K and Integrin β1 Signaling Pathways in Bladder Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Mengxin; Zhong, Zhenyu; Chi, Hong; Huang, Mengge; Jiang, Rong; Chen, Junxia

    2016-01-01

    miRNAs have emerged as promising markers for tumors. However, the underlying mechanism of specific miRNAs in bladder cancer (BC) remains largely unknown. Here, a comprehensive miRNA/mRNA expression profile was executed by microarray assay for four pairs of bladder carcinoma and para-carcinoma tissues from patients with grade 2 (G2) T2. A total of 99 miRNAs and 4416 mRNAs were discovered to be significantly differentially expressed in BC tissues compared with controls. Five microRNAs and two mRNAs were validated by qRT-PCR in 30 pairs of samples, including G1–G3/T1–T4. Subsequently, we constructed a network with the five miRNAs-target mRNAs; gene ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) enrichment analyses were utilized to recognize the functions and associated pathways. Moreover, we further found that miR-130b-3p was significantly up-regulated and negatively correlated with phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) expression in bladder cancer tissues. Next, we demonstrated that miR-130b-3p might target PTEN through bioinformatics and dual-luciferase reporter assay. Finally, we showed that miR-130b-3p could down-regulate PTEN expression, which promoted proliferation, migration, invasion and rearranged cytoskeleton through the activation of the PI3K and integrin β1 signaling pathway in bladder cancer cells. Inversely, miR-130b-3p inhibitors induced apoptosis. Taken together, this research investigated, for the first time, miR-130b-3p by an incorporated analysis of microRNA/mRNA expressions of a genome-wide screen in BC. Our findings suggest that the miR-130b-3p/PTEN/integrin β1 axis could play a critical role in the progression and development of BC and that miR-130b-3p might be a valuable clinical marker and therapeutical target for BC patients. PMID:28042869

  10. LARP6 Meets Collagen mRNA: Specific Regulation of Type I Collagen Expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yujie; Stefanovic, Branko

    2016-01-01

    Type I collagen is the most abundant structural protein in all vertebrates, but its constitutive rate of synthesis is low due to long half-life of the protein (60–70 days). However, several hundred fold increased production of type I collagen is often seen in reparative or reactive fibrosis. The mechanism which is responsible for this dramatic upregulation is complex, including multiple levels of regulation. However, posttranscriptional regulation evidently plays a predominant role. Posttranscriptional regulation comprises processing, transport, stabilization and translation of mRNAs and is executed by RNA binding proteins. There are about 800 RNA binding proteins, but only one, La ribonucleoprotein domain family member 6 (LARP6), is specifically involved in type I collagen regulation. In the 5′untranslated region (5’UTR) of mRNAs encoding for type I and type III collagens there is an evolutionally conserved stem-loop (SL) structure; this structure is not found in any other mRNA, including any other collagen mRNA. LARP6 binds to the 5′SL in sequence specific manner to regulate stability of collagen mRNAs and their translatability. Here, we will review current understanding of how is LARP6 involved in posttranscriptional regulation of collagen mRNAs. We will also discuss how other proteins recruited by LARP6, including nonmuscle myosin, vimentin, serine threonine kinase receptor associated protein (STRAP), 25 kD FK506 binding protein (FKBP25) and RNA helicase A (RHA), contribute to this process. PMID:27011170

  11. A germline-specific isoform of eIF4E (IFE-1) is required for efficient translation of stored mRNAs and maturation of both oocytes and sperm.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Melissa A; Cronland, Elizabeth; Dunkelbarger, Steve; Contreras, Vince; Strome, Susan; Keiper, Brett D

    2009-05-15

    Fertility and embryonic viability are measures of efficient germ cell growth and development. During oogenesis and spermatogenesis, new proteins are required for both mitotic expansion and differentiation. Qualitative and quantitative changes in protein synthesis occur by translational control of mRNAs, mediated in part by eIF4E, which binds the mRNAs 5' cap. IFE-1 is one of five eIF4E isoforms identified in C. elegans. IFE-1 is expressed primarily in the germ line and associates with P granules, large mRNPs that store mRNAs. We isolated a strain that lacks IFE-1 [ife-1(bn127)] and demonstrated that the translation of several maternal mRNAs (pos-1, pal-1, mex-1 and oma-1) was inefficient relative to that in wild-type worms. At 25 degrees C, ife-1(bn127) spermatocytes failed in cytokinesis, prematurely expressed the pro-apoptotic protein CED-4/Apaf-1, and accumulated as multinucleate cells unable to mature to spermatids. A modest defect in oocyte development was also observed. Oocytes progressed normally through mitosis and meiosis, but subsequent production of competent oocytes became limiting, even in the presence of wild-type sperm. Combined gametogenesis defects decreased worm fertility by 80% at 20 degrees C; ife-1 worms were completely sterile at 25 degrees C. Thus, IFE-1 plays independent roles in late oogenesis and spermatogenesis through selective translation of germline-specific mRNAs.

  12. Tomato ovary-to-fruit transition is characterized by a spatial shift of mRNAs for cell wall invertase and its inhibitor with the encoded proteins localized to sieve elements.

    PubMed

    Palmer, William M; Ru, Lei; Jin, Ye; Patrick, John W; Ruan, Yong-Ling

    2015-02-01

    Central to understanding fruit development is to elucidate the processes mediating a successful transition from pre-pollination ovaries to newly set fruit, a key step in establishing fruit yield potential. In tomato, cell wall invertase (CWIN) LIN5 and its inhibitor INH1 are essential for fruit growth. However, the molecular and cellular basis by which they exert their roles in ovary-to-fruit transition remains unknown. To address this issue, we conducted a study focusing on ovaries and fruitlets at 2 days before and 2 days after anthesis, respectively. In situ hybridization analyses revealed that LIN5 and INH1 exhibited a dispersed expression in ovaries compared with their phloem-specific expression in fruitlets. Remarkably, LIN5 and INH1 proteins were immunologically co-localized to cell walls of sieve elements (SEs) in ovaries immediately prior to anthesis and in young fruitlets, but were undetectable in provascular bundles of younger ovaries. A burst in CWIN activity occurred during ovary-to-fruit transition. Interestingly, the ovaries, but not the fruitlets, exhibited high expression of a defective invertase, SldeCWIN1, an ortholog of which is known to enhance inhibition of INH on CWIN activity in tobacco. Imaging of a fluorescent symplasmic tracer indicated an apoplasmic phloem unloading pathway operated in ovaries, contrary to the previously observed symplasmic unloading pathway in fruit pericarp. These new data indicate that (1) a phloem-specific patterning of the CWIN and INH mRNAs is induced during ovary-to-fruit transition, and (2) LIN5 protein functions specifically in walls of SEs and increases its activity during ovary-to-fruit transition, probably to facilitate phloem unloading and to generate a glucose signal positively regulating cell division, hence fruit set.

  13. Quantification and distribution of α1-adrenoceptor subtype mRNAs in human vas deferens: comparison with those of epididymal and pelvic portions

    PubMed Central

    Moriyama, Nobuo; Nasu, Kimio; Takeuchi, Takumi; Akiyama, Katsuyoshi; Murata, Satoshi; Nishimatsu, Hiroaki; Yano, Junichi; Tsujimoto, Gozoh; Kawabe, Kazuki

    1997-01-01

    This study was intended to quantify the amounts of the α1-adrenoceptor subtype mRNAs in human vas deferens, and demonstrate the receptor subtype responsible for the vas contraction. The RNase protection assay showed that the mean total amount of α1a mRNA was 7.4±2.2 pg/5 μg of poly (A)+ RNA (97.0% of the total α1 mRNA) in the epididymal portion (E-vas) and 4.9±0.8 pg/5 μg of poly (A)+ RNA (96.3% of the total) in the pelvic portion (P-vas). The E-vas showed a tendency to have a greater α1a mRNA abundance than the P-vas (P=0.11). The α1b and α1d mRNAs were absent or of extremely low abundance. By an in situ hybridization, the α1a and α1d mRNAs were recognized in the smooth muscle cells of the E-vas and the P-vas, and the distribution pattern the same in both tissues. The α1b mRNA positive site was scarcely detectable in both vas portions. In a functional study, l-phenylephrine produced concentration-dependent contraction in the E-vas (Emax=2.24±0.70 g; pD2=5.32±0.09) and the P-vas (Emax=2.46±0.46 g; pD2=5.07±0.12). KMD-3213, a novel α1A-adrenoceptor-selective antagonist, caused parallel rightward shifts of the concentration–response curves for l-phenylephrine. Apparent pKB values were 9.90±0.16 for the E-vas and 9.71±0.17 for the P-vas. There was no significant difference in Emax, pD2 or pKB estimates between the two portions. We have found that α1a mRNA is predominant in the human vas deferens, and confirmed that contraction of this organ is mediated by the α1A-adrenoceptor. PMID:9401762

  14. A TB-RBP and Ter ATPase complex accompanies specific mRNAs from nuclei through the nuclear pores and into intercellular bridges in mouse male germ cells.

    PubMed

    Morales, Carlos R; Lefrancois, Stephane; Chennathukuzhi, Vargheese; El-Alfy, Mohamed; Wu, XinQi; Yang, Juxiang; Gerton, George L; Hecht, Norman B

    2002-06-15

    The testis brain RNA-binding protein (TB-RBP) functions as an RNA-binding protein in brain and testis, binding to conserved sequence elements present in specific mRNAs, such as protamine 1 and 2. We show here by RNA gel shift assays, immunoprecipitation, and by a novel in situ hybridization immunohistochemical technique that TB-RBP binds to AKAP4 mRNA in male mouse germ cells. AKAP4 is a component of the fibrous sheath and functions as a scaffolding protein in the sperm flagellum. AKAP4 is encoded by an X-linked gene, is expressed solely in postmeiotic (haploid) male germ cells, and is an essential protein in all spermatozoa, requiring its transport between spermatids as a protein or mRNA. AKAP4 mRNA forms a complex with TB-RBP and the Ter ATPase in nuclei and remains associated with these proteins as it exits nuclei into the cytoplasm and as it passes through intercellular bridges between spermatids. A similar mRNA-TB-RBP-Ter ATPase association is seen for protamine 2 mRNA, which is stored in the cytoplasm of postmeiotic germ cells about 7 days before translation. In contrast, no association is seen with PGK-2 mRNA which is initially transcribed early in meiosis with increased transcription in postmeiotic male germ cells. Although PGK-2 mRNA is subject to translational control, it lacks TB-RBP-binding sequences in its mRNA. The AKAP4 or protamine 2 mRNA-protein complexes dissociate in late-stage male germ cells when the mRNAs are translated. We propose that TB-RBP and the Ter ATPase are part of a complex that accompanies specific mRNAs in haploid mouse male germ cells in intracellular and intercellular movement. The temporal relationship of TB-RBP binding and mRNA inactivation in conjunction with the subsequent dissociation of the mRNA-protein complex at the time of mRNA translation suggests a role in translational suppression and/or mRNA stabilization.

  15. Comparative Analysis of Differentially Expressed miRNAs and their Downstream mRNAs in Ovarian Cancer and its Associated Endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Richard Licheng; Ali, Shadan; Bandyopadhyay, Sudeshna; Alosh, Baraa; Hayek, Kinda; Daaboul, MHD Fayez; Winer, Ira; Sarkar, Fazlul H; Ali-Fehmi, Rouba

    2015-01-01

    Objective There is an increased risk of developing ovarian cancer (OC) in patients with endometriosis. Hence, development of new biomarkers may provide a positive clinical outcome for early detection. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that play an important role in biological and pathological process and are currently used as diagnostic and prognostic markers in various cancers. In the current study, we assessed the differential expression of miRNAs from 19 paired ovarian cancer and its associated endometriosis tissue samples. In addition we also analyzed the downstream targets of those miRNAs. Methods Nineteen paired cases of ovarian cancer and endometriosis foci were identified by a gynecologic pathologist and macro-dissected. The total RNAs were extracted and subjected to comprehensive miRNA profiling from the pooled samples of these two different entities using microarray analysis. Later, the abnormal expressions of few selected miRNAs were validated in individual cases by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). Ingenuity pathway analysis revealed target mRNAs which were validated by qRT-PCR. Results The miRNA profiling identified deregulation of greater than 1156 miRNAs in OC, of which the top seven were further validated by qRT-PCR. The expression of miR-1, miR-133a, and miR-451 were reduced significantly (p<0.0001) in the OC patients compared to its associated endometriosis. In contrast, the expression of miR-141, miR-200a, miR-200c, and miR-3613 were elevated significantly (p<0.05) in most of the OC patients. Furthermore, among the downstream mRNAs of these miRNAs, the level of PTEN expression was significantly (p<0.05) reduced in OC compared to endometriosis while no significant difference was observed in NF-κB expression. Conclusion The expression of miRNAs and mRNAs in OC were significantly different compared to its concurrent endometriosis. These differential expressed miRNAs may serve as potential diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers for OC

  16. Rapid detection of tdh and trh mRNAs of Vibrio parahaemolyticus by the transcription-reverse transcription concerted (TRC) method.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Noriyoshi; Yasukawa, Kiyoshi; Isawa, Yuichi; Horie, Ryuichi; Saitoh, Juichi; Ishiguro, Takahiko; Nakaguchi, Yoshitsugu; Nishibuchi, Mitsuaki; Hayashi, Toshinori

    2004-01-01

    We developed a novel method named the transcription-reverse transcription concerted (TRC) method and an instrument that allowed rapid and completely homogeneous real-time monitoring of RNA isothermal sequence amplification without any post-amplification analysis in our previous study [Ishiguro et al., Anal. Biochem., 314, 77-86 (2003)]. In this study, we newly established rapid and sensitive TRC systems for the detection of the mRNAs transcribed from two major virulence genes of Vibrio parahaemolyticus: the tdh gene encoding the thermostable direct hemolysin (tdh) and the trh gene encoding the thermostable direct hemolysin-related hemolysin. Examination of the standard RNAs prepared in vitro showed that a positive result, increase in the fluorescence intensity to the cut-off value within 25 min, was obtained for as few as 100 copies of RNA. The TRC method specific to the trh mRNA detected the mRNAs transcribed from the trh1 and trh2 genes, two representative trh variants sharing 84% sequence identity. The detection time gave a linear relationship to the logarithm of starting RNA copies ranging from 10(3) to 10(7) copies, showing that quantitative analysis is possible. The detection time for 10(3) copies of the standard RNAs ranged from 11 to 15 min. Examination of the total RNAs extracted from the standard strains of V. parahaemolyticus demonstrated that the new TRC systems are sufficiently sensitive to detect as few as 100 CFUs of the strains carrying the target genes. Total RNA preparations extracted from 24 strains of V. parahaemolyticus, 52 strains belonging to 31 other species of the genus Vibrio and 11 strains belonging to 8 species of non-Vibrio genera were examined. The results of the detection of tdh- and trh-specific mRNAs by the two TRC systems and those of the respective genes by the DNA colony hybridization method agreed. We conclude that the new TRC systems are rapid, highly sensitive, easy to manipulate, and are suitable for routine examination of

  17. Regional expression and androgen regulation of carbonic anhydrase IV and II in the adult rat epididymis.

    PubMed

    Kaunisto, K; Fleming, R E; Kneer, J; Sly, W S; Rajaniemi, H

    1999-12-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) is implicated in the acidification of epididymal fluid and thereby in the regulation of sperm maturation and motility. Among the CA isoenzymes, CA IV and II have been shown to be present in the rat epididymal duct epithelium. In the present study, we examined the expression and androgen regulation of CA IV and II mRNAs along the epididymal duct. Northern blot analysis revealed the presence of CA II mRNA in all regions of the epididymis with the strongest signal in the corpus region, while CA IV mRNA was expressed predominantly in the corpus epididymidis. Three days after bilateral castration, CA IV and II mRNAs were decreased by 80-90% in the corpus epididymidis. Testosterone (T) replacement maintained the expression of CA mRNAs at 50-60% of the control levels, indicating that circulating androgens alone are not sufficient to recover the CA expression in the corpus region. However, unilateral castration did not affect the mRNA levels of CA IV and II, suggesting that factors in testicular fluid do not play a major role in the regulation of CA expression in the corpus epididymidis. Immunoblot analysis showed that CA IV protein levels decreased 3 days after castration, while T administration maintained the protein expression virtually at the precastration levels. These data demonstrate that mRNAs for CA IV and II are predominantly expressed in the corpus region of the rat epididymis and can be regulated by androgens in that region. The present data suggest that the regulation of CA expression in the corpus epididymidis by androgens contributes to the known androgen effects on epididymal acidification.

  18. RNA-binding proteins involved in post-transcriptional regulation in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Van Assche, Elke; Van Puyvelde, Sandra; Vanderleyden, Jos; Steenackers, Hans P.

    2015-01-01

    Post-transcriptional regulation is a very important mechanism to control gene expression in changing environments. In the past decade, a lot of interest has been directed toward the role of small RNAs (sRNAs) in bacterial post-transcriptional regulation. However, sRNAs are not the only molecules controlling gene expression at this level, RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play an important role as well. CsrA and Hfq are the two best studied bacterial proteins of this type, but recently, additional proteins involved in post-transcriptional control have been identified. This review focuses on the general working mechanisms of post-transcriptionally active RBPs, which include (i) adaptation of the susceptibility of mRNAs and sRNAs to RNases, (ii) modulating the accessibility of the ribosome binding site of mRNAs, (iii) recruiting and assisting in the interaction of mRNAs with other molecules and (iv) regulating transcription terminator/antiterminator formation, and gives an overview of both the well-studied and the newly identified proteins that are involved in post-transcriptional regulatory processes. Additionally, the post-transcriptional mechanisms by which the expression or the activity of these proteins is regulated, are described. For many of the newly identified proteins, however, mechanistic questions remain. Most likely, more post-transcriptionally active proteins will be identified in the future. PMID:25784899

  19. Regulation of mRNA translation during mitosis.

    PubMed

    Tanenbaum, Marvin E; Stern-Ginossar, Noam; Weissman, Jonathan S; Vale, Ronald D

    2015-08-25

    Passage through mitosis is driven by precisely-timed changes in transcriptional regulation and protein degradation. However, the importance of translational regulation during mitosis remains poorly understood. Here, using ribosome profiling, we find both a global translational repression and identified ~200 mRNAs that undergo specific translational regulation at mitotic entry. In contrast, few changes in mRNA abundance are observed, indicating that regulation of translation is the primary mechanism of modulating protein expression during mitosis. Interestingly, 91% of the mRNAs that undergo gene-specific regulation in mitosis are translationally repressed, rather than activated. One of the most pronounced translationally-repressed genes is Emi1, an inhibitor of the anaphase promoting complex (APC) which is degraded during mitosis. We show that full APC activation requires translational repression of Emi1 in addition to its degradation. These results identify gene-specific translational repression as a means of controlling the mitotic proteome, which may complement post-translational mechanisms for inactivating protein function.

  20. Dysregulated expression of microRNAs and mRNAs in pulmonary artery remodeling in ascites syndrome in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ping; Yang, Fei; Zhuang, Yu; Xiao, Qingyang; Cao, Huabin; Zhang, Caiying; Wang, Tiancheng; Lin, Huayuan; Guo, Xiaoquan; Hu, Guoliang

    2017-01-10

    Ascites syndrome (AS), also known as pulmonary artery hypertension, remains a challenging disease that severely affects both humans and broiler chickens. Pulmonary artery remodeling presents a key step in the development of AS. In this study, we obtained pulmonary artery tissues from broilers with and without AS to perform miRNA sequencing analysis, miRNA-mRNA association analysis and pathological examinations. 29 significantly differentially expressed miRNAs were found both in known and novel miRNAs with 18 up-regulated and 11 down-regulated miRNAs. Their predicted potential targets were involved in a wide range of functional clusters as indicated via GO (Gene Ontology) and KEGG (Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes) analyses. The upregulation of miR-155, miR-23b-3p, miR-146b-5p and miR-146b-3p were found closely associated with the pathogenesis of pulmonary artery remodeling in AS progression. The association analysis for the miRNAs-mRNAs showed that these 29 significantly differentially expressed miRNAs regulate 162 differentially expressed target genes. Among them, 20 miRNAs correlated with 18 predicted target genes that appear to be involved in pulmonary artery remodeling, mainly in three broad physiological processes: the hypoxia sensing response (HIF1α, NHE1, STAT5 and STAT3), endothelial permeability dysfunction (CD44, TRAF2, CDK2AP1, LZTFL1, JAZF1, PEBP1, LRP1B, RPS14 and THBS2) and inflammation (MEOX2, STAT5, STAT3, IRF8, MAP3K8, IL-1BETA and TNFRSF1B). Pathological pulmonary artery remodeling in the AS broilers was consistently observed in the present study. Taken together, the current analysis further illuminates the molecular mechanism of pulmonary artery remodeling underlying AS progression.

  1. The mRNAs for the three chains of human collagen type XI are widely distributed but not necessarily co-expressed: implications for homotrimeric, heterotrimeric and heterotypic collagen molecules.

    PubMed Central

    Lui, V C; Kong, R Y; Nicholls, J; Cheung, A N; Cheah, K S

    1995-01-01

    In cartilage collagen type XI exists as heterotrimeric molecules composed of alpha 1(XI), alpha 2(XI) and alpha 3(XI) subunits. Messenger RNAs for some of the alpha chains of collagen type XI have also been found in non-chondrogenic tissues but the chain composition of the molecule in these sites is not known. Some non-chondrogenic tissues also contain heterotrimers containing collagen alpha 2(V) and alpha 1(XI) chains. We have explored the possibility that collagen type XI could exist in differing trimeric forms in non-chondrogenic tissues and aimed to predict the subunit composition of this collagen in those tissues. The distribution and relative levels of expression of collagen alpha 1(XI), alpha 2(XI) and alpha 3(XI)/alpha 1(II) mRNAs in different human fetal tissues were studied. Expression of mRNAs for all three genes of collagen type XI is not restricted to cartilage but is widespread. However, in some non-chondrogenic tissues, the mRNAs for all three alpha chains of collagen type XI were not co-expressed, but collagen alpha 1(XI) and alpha 2(XI) mRNAs were found either singly or without collagen alpha 3(XI) transcripts. Collagen type XI may therefore exist as homotrimers and/or heterotrimers composed of two collagen alpha(XI) chains in some tissues. The distribution of mRNAs for collagen alpha 2(V) and alpha 1(I) were also studied. Co-expression of collagen type XI, alpha 2(V) and alpha 1(I) mRNAs was found for many tissues. These findings have implications for the possibility of additional chain associations for collagen types XI and V in cross-type heterotrimers within heterotypic fibrils. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7487888

  2. Isolation and preliminary characterisation of cDNA clones representing mRNAs associated with tumour progression and metastasis in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Elvin, P.; Kerr, I. B.; McArdle, C. S.; Birnie, G. D.

    1988-01-01

    We have constructed cDNA libraries from the poly(A)+ RNA of normal colonic mucosa and a liver metastasis from a colonic adenocarcinoma. Differential screening of these libraries using 32P-labelled cDNAs transcribed from poly(A)+ RNAs isolated from specimens of four normal colonic mucosae, five adenocarcinomas, and three liver metastases by Grunstein-Hogness and dot-blot hybridization has identified a number of recombinant cDNA clones homologous to mRNAs that appear to differ significantly in abundance between normal and neoplastic colon and metastases. These cDNA clones, and others identified in the libraries, may be of considerable importance both as diagnostic tools and in defining the phenotypic changes associated with tumour progression and metastasis. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:2450556

  3. Removal of 5'-terminal m7G from eukaryotic mRNAs by potato nucleotide pyrophosphatase and its effect on translation.

    PubMed Central

    Zan-Kowalczewska, M; Bretner, M; Sierakowska, H; Szczesna, E; Filipowicz, W; Shatkin, A J

    1977-01-01

    The procedure for isolation of nucleotide pyrophosphatase (E.C. 3.6.1.9.) from potato has been modified to yield an endonuclease-free preparation purified 2300-fold. The enzyme was used for specific cleavage of pyrophosphate linkages in the 5'-terminal cap (m7GpppN) of several eukaryotic messenger RNAs. Enzymatic removal of 5'-terminal pm7G from reovirus, rabbit globin and Artemia salina mRNAs resulted in an almost complete loss (greater than 80%) of their template activities in a cell-free protein synthesizing system from wheat germ. Incubation with nucleotide pyrophosphatase did not decrease the translation of phage f2 RNA in an Escherichia coli cell-free system. Images PMID:909799

  4. The Nine Genes of the Nocardia lactamdurans Cephamycin Cluster Are Transcribed into Large mRNAs from Three Promoters, Two of Them Located in a Bidirectional Promoter Region

    PubMed Central

    Enguita, Francisco J.; Coque, Juan Jose R.; Liras, Paloma; Martin, Juan F.

    1998-01-01

    The nine biosynthesis genes of the Nocardia lactamdurans cephamycin cluster are expressed as three different mRNAs initiating at promoters latp, cefDp, and pcbABp, as shown by low-resolution S1 nuclease protection assays and Northern blotting analysis. Bidirectional expression occurred from divergent promoters (latp and cefDp) located in a 629-bp intergenic region that contains three heptameric direct repeats similar to those recognized by members of the SARP (Streptomyces antibiotic regulatory proteins) family. The lat gene is transcribed in a single monocistronic transcript initiating at latp. A second unusually long polycistronic mRNA (more than 16 kb) corresponding to six biosynthesis genes (pcbAB, pcbC, cmcI, cmcJ, cefF, and cmcH) started at pcbABp. A third polycistronic mRNA corresponding to the cefD and cefE genes started at cefDp. PMID:9765587

  5. The influence of oral bacteria on tissue levels of Toll-like receptor and cytokine mRNAs in feline chronic gingivostomatitis and oral health.

    PubMed

    Dolieslager, Sanne Maria Johanna; Lappin, David Francis; Bennett, David; Graham, Libby; Johnston, Norman; Riggio, Marcello Pasquale

    2013-02-15

    Feline chronic gingivostomatitis (FCGS) is an inflammatory disease of the oral cavity that causes severe pain and distress in affected cats. Treatment methods are currently very limited. The aims of this study were to assess the feline innate immune response by investigating the levels of cytokine and Toll-like receptor (TLR) mRNAs in tissue biopsies of cats with and without FCGS, and to relate this to the presence or absence of putative oral pathogens identified previously within these cats. Mucosal biopsies were collected from 28 cats with FCGS and eight healthy cats. The levels of TLR (TLR2, TLR3, TLR4, TLR7, TLR9) and cytokine (IL-1β, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, TNF-α, IFN-γ) mRNA was determined using quantitative PCR. In the FCGS group a statistically significant increase was seen in TLR2, TLR7, TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-1β and IL-6 mRNA levels compared to the healthy group. In cats where Tannerella forsythia was present, statistically significant increases were seen in TLR2, TLR4, TLR7, TLR9, TNF-α and IL-1β mRNA levels compared to cats where this putative pathogen was absent. Statistically significant increases in mRNA expression were also seen in cats harbouring feline calicivirus (FCV) (TLR2, IL-1β, IL-6, IFN-γ) and Porphyromonas circumdentaria (TLR2, TLR3) compared to cats where these putative pathogens were absent. Pasteurella multocida subsp. multocida and Pseudomonas sp. did not significantly alter the expression of any TLR or cytokine mRNAs when compared to animals who tested negative for these species, while cats colonised with P. multocida subsp. septica demonstrated a statistically significant reduction in the expression of TLR7, TNF-α and IFN-γ mRNAs compared to cats free of this species. The expression of mRNA for several TLRs and cytokines is elevated in FCGS. A positive correlation was observed between clinical disease severity and the presence of FCV (p=0.001; Rho=0.58). Although the number of cats harbouring T. forsythia was low by

  6. SUMOylation Is an Inhibitory Constraint that Regulates the Prion-like Aggregation and Activity of CPEB3.

    PubMed

    Drisaldi, Bettina; Colnaghi, Luca; Fioriti, Luana; Rao, Nishta; Myers, Cory; Snyder, Anna M; Metzger, Daniel J; Tarasoff, Jenna; Konstantinov, Edward; Fraser, Paul E; Manley, James L; Kandel, Eric R

    2015-06-23

    Protein synthesis is crucial for the maintenance of long-term-memory-related synaptic plasticity. The prion-like cytoplasmic polyadenylation element-binding protein 3 (CPEB3) regulates the translation of several mRNAs important for long-term synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus. Here, we provide evidence that the prion-like aggregation and activity of CPEB3 is controlled by SUMOylation. In the basal state, CPEB3 is a repressor and is soluble. Under these circumstances, CPEB3 is SUMOylated in hippocampal neurons both in vitro and in vivo. Following neuronal stimulation, CPEB3 is converted into an active form that promotes the translation of target mRNAs, and this is associated with a decrease of SUMOylation and an increase of aggregation. A chimeric CPEB3 protein fused to SUMO cannot form aggregates and cannot activate the translation of target mRNAs. These findings suggest a model whereby SUMO regulates translation of mRNAs and structural synaptic plasticity by modulating the aggregation of the prion-like protein CPEB3.

  7. Global Analysis of mRNA, Translation, and Protein Localization: Local Translation Is a Key Regulator of Cell Protrusions.

    PubMed

    Mardakheh, Faraz K; Paul, Angela; Kümper, Sandra; Sadok, Amine; Paterson, Hugh; Mccarthy, Afshan; Yuan, Yinyin; Marshall, Christopher J

    2015-11-09

    Polarization of cells into a protrusive front and a retracting cell body is the hallmark of mesenchymal-like cell migration. Many mRNAs are localized to protrusions, but it is unclear to what degree mRNA localization contributes toward protrusion formation. We performed global quantitative analysis of the distributions of mRNAs, proteins, and translation rates between protrusions and the cell body by RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) and quantitative proteomics. Our results reveal local translation as a key determinant of protein localization to protrusions. Accordingly, inhibition of local translation destabilizes protrusions and inhibits mesenchymal-like morphology. Interestingly, many mRNAs localized to protrusions are translationally repressed. Specific cis-regulatory elements within mRNA UTRs define whether mRNAs are locally translated or repressed. Finally, RNAi screening of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) enriched in protrusions revealed trans-regulators of localized translation that are functionally important for protrusions. We propose that by deciphering the localized mRNA UTR code, these proteins regulate protrusion stability and mesenchymal-like morphology.

  8. mTAIL-seq reveals dynamic poly(A) tail regulation in oocyte-to-embryo development

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Jaechul; Lee, Mihye; Son, Ahyeon; Chang, Hyeshik; Kim, V. Narry

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic mRNAs are subject to multiple types of tailing that critically influence mRNA stability and translatability. To investigate RNA tails at the genomic scale, we previously developed TAIL-seq, but its low sensitivity precluded its application to biological materials of minute quantity. In this study, we report a new version of TAIL-seq (mRNA TAIL-seq [mTAIL-seq]) with enhanced sequencing depth for mRNAs (by ∼1000-fold compared with the previous version). The improved method allows us to investigate the regulation of poly(A) tails in Drosophila oocytes and embryos. We found that maternal mRNAs are polyadenylated mainly during late oogenesis, prior to fertilization, and that further modulation occurs upon egg activation. Wispy, a noncanonical poly(A) polymerase, adenylates the vast majority of maternal mRNAs, with a few intriguing exceptions such as ribosomal protein transcripts. By comparing mTAIL-seq data with ribosome profiling data, we found a strong coupling between poly(A) tail length and translational efficiency during egg activation. Our data suggest that regulation of poly(A) tails in oocytes shapes the translatomic landscape of embryos, thereby directing the onset of animal development. By virtue of the high sensitivity, low cost, technical robustness, and broad accessibility, mTAIL-seq will be a potent tool to improve our understanding of mRNA tailing in diverse biological systems. PMID:27445395

  9. High-throughput sequence analysis of Ciona intestinalis SL trans-spliced mRNAs: alternative expression modes and gene function correlates.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Jun; Dewar, Ken; Wasserscheid, Jessica; Wiley, Graham B; Macmil, Simone L; Roe, Bruce A; Zeller, Robert W; Satou, Yutaka; Hastings, Kenneth E M

    2010-05-01

    Pre-mRNA 5' spliced-leader (SL) trans-splicing occurs in some metazoan groups but not in others. Genome-wide characterization of the trans-spliced mRNA subpopulation has not yet been reported for any metazoan. We carried out a high-throughput analysis of the SL trans-spliced mRNA population of the ascidian tunicate Ciona intestinalis by 454 Life Sciences (Roche) pyrosequencing of SL-PCR-amplified random-primed reverse transcripts of tailbud embryo RNA. We obtained approximately 250,000 high-quality reads corresponding to 8790 genes, approximately 58% of the Ciona total gene number. The great depth of this data revealed new aspects of trans-splicing, including the existence of a significant class of "infrequently trans-spliced" genes, accounting for approximately 28% of represented genes, that generate largely non-trans-spliced mRNAs, but also produce trans-spliced mRNAs, in part through alternative promoter use. Thus, the conventional qualitative dichotomy of trans-spliced versus non-trans-spliced genes should be supplanted by a more accurate quantitative view recognizing frequently and infrequently trans-spliced gene categories. Our data include reads representing approximately 80% of Ciona frequently trans-spliced genes. Our analysis also revealed significant use of closely spaced alternative trans-splice acceptor sites which further underscores the mechanistic similarity of cis- and trans-splicing and indicates that the prevalence of +/-3-nt alternative splicing events at tandem acceptor sites, NAGNAG, is driven by spliceosomal mechanisms, and not nonsense-mediated decay, or selection at the protein level. The breadth of gene representation data enabled us to find new correlations between trans-splicing status and gene function, namely the overrepresentation in the frequently trans-spliced gene class of genes associated with plasma/endomembrane system, Ca(2+) homeostasis, and actin cytoskeleton.

  10. Postplasmic/PEM RNAs: a class of localized maternal mRNAs with multiple roles in cell polarity and development in ascidian embryos.

    PubMed

    Prodon, François; Yamada, Lixy; Shirae-Kurabayashi, Maki; Nakamura, Yoriko; Sasakura, Yasunori

    2007-07-01

    Ascidian is a good model to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for mRNA localization with the discovery of a large family of localized maternal mRNAs, called postplasmic/PEM RNAs, which includes more than 40 members in three different ascidian species (Halocynthia roretzi, Ciona intestinalis, and C. savignyi). Among these mRNAs, two types (Type I and Type II) have been identified and show two different localization patterns from fertilization to the eight-cell stage. At the eight-cell stage, both types concentrate to a macromolecular cortical structure called CAB (for Centrosome Attracting Body) in the posterior-vegetal B4.1 blastomeres. The CAB is responsible for unequal cleavages and the partitioning of postplasmic/PEM RNAs at the posterior pole of embryos during cleavage stages. It has also been suggested that the CAB region could contain putative germ granules. In this review, we discuss recent data obtained on the distribution of Type I postplasmic/PEM RNAs from oogenesis to late development, in relation to their localization and translational control. We have first regrouped localization patterns for Type I and Type II into a comparative diagram and included all important definitions in the field. We also have made an exhaustive classification of their embryonic expression profiles (Type I or Type II), and analyzed their functions after knockdown and/or overexpression experiments and the role of the 3'-untranslated region (3'UTR) controlling both their localization and translation. Finally, we propose a speculative model integrating recent data, and we also discuss the relationship between postplasmic/PEM RNAs, posterior specification, and germ cell formation in ascidians.

  11. Expression of beta-keratin mRNAs and proline uptake in epidermal cells of growing scales and pad lamellae of gecko lizards.

    PubMed

    Alibardi, Lorenzo; Toni, Mattia; Dalla Valle, Luisa

    2007-07-01

    Beta-keratins form a large part of the proteins contained in the hard beta layer of reptilian scales. The expression of genes encoding glycine-proline-rich beta-keratins in normal and regenerating epidermis of two species of gecko lizards has been studied by in situ hybridization. The probes localize mRNAs in differentiating oberhautchen and beta cells of growing scales and in modified scales, termed pad lamellae, on the digits of gecko lizards. In situ localization at the ultrastructural level shows clusters of gold particles in the cytoplasm among beta-keratin filaments of oberhautchen and beta cells. They are also present in the differentiating elongation or setae of oberhautchen cells present in pad lamellae. Setae allow geckos to adhere and climb vertical surfaces. Oberhautchen and beta cells also incorporate tritiated proline. The fine localization of the beta-keratin mRNAs and the uptake of proline confirms the biomolecular data that identified glycine-proline-rich beta-keratin in differentiating beta cells of gecko epidermis. The present study also shows the presence of differentiating and metabolically active cells in both inner and outer oberhautchen/beta cells at the base of the outer setae localized at the tip of pad lamellae. The addition of new beta and alpha cells to the corneous layer near the tip of the outer setae explains the anterior movement of the setae along the apical free-margin of pad lamellae. The rapid replacement of setae ensures the continuous usage of the gecko's adhesive devices, the pad lamellae, during most of their active life.

  12. Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay modulates immune receptor levels to regulate plant antibacterial defense.

    PubMed

    Gloggnitzer, Jiradet; Akimcheva, Svetlana; Srinivasan, Arunkumar; Kusenda, Branislav; Riehs, Nina; Stampfl, Hansjörg; Bautor, Jaqueline; Dekrout, Bettina; Jonak, Claudia; Jiménez-Gómez, José M; Parker, Jane E; Riha, Karel

    2014-09-10

    Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) is a conserved eukaryotic RNA surveillance mechanism that degrades aberrant mRNAs. NMD impairment in Arabidopsis is linked to constitutive immune response activation and enhanced antibacterial resistance, but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Here we show that NMD contributes to innate immunity in Arabidopsis by controlling the turnover of numerous TIR domain-containing, nucleotide-binding, leucine-rich repeat (TNL) immune receptor-encoding mRNAs. Autoimmunity resulting from NMD impairment depends on TNL signaling pathway components and can be triggered through deregulation of a single TNL gene, RPS6. Bacterial infection of plants causes host-programmed inhibition of NMD, leading to stabilization of NMD-regulated TNL transcripts. Conversely, constitutive NMD activity prevents TNL stabilization and impairs plant defense, demonstrating that host-regulated NMD contributes to disease resistance. Thus, NMD shapes plant innate immunity by controlling the threshold for activation of TNL resistance pathways.

  13. Mechanism and regulation of eukaryotic protein synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Merrick, W C

    1992-01-01

    This review presents a description of the numerous eukaryotic protein synthesis factors and their apparent sequential utilization in the processes of initiation, elongation, and termination. Additionally, the rare use of reinitiation and internal initiation is discussed, although little is known biochemically about these processes. Subsequently, control of translation is addressed in two different settings. The first is the global control of translation, which is effected by protein phosphorylation. The second is a series of specific mRNAs for which there is a direct and unique regulation of the synthesis of the gene product under study. Other examples of translational control are cited but not discussed, because the general mechanism for the regulation is unknown. Finally, as is often seen in an active area of investigation, there are several observations that cannot be readily accommodated by the general model presented in the first part of the review. Alternate explanations and various lines of experimentation are proposed to resolve these apparent contradictions. PMID:1620067

  14. Is post-transcriptional stabilization, splicing and translation of selective mRNAs a key to the DNA damage response?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In response to DNA damage, cells activate a complex, kinase-based signaling network that consists of two components—a rapid phosphorylation-driven signaling cascade that results in immediate inhibition of Cdk/cyclin complexes to arrest the cell cycle along with recruitment of repair machinery to damaged DNA, followed by a delayed transcriptional response that promotes cell cycle arrest through the induction of Cdk inhibitors, such as p21. In recent years a third layer of complexity has emerged that involves post-transcriptional control of mRNA stability, splicing and translation as a critical part of the DNA damage response. Here, we describe recent work implicating DNA damage-dependent modification of RNA-binding proteins that are responsible for some of these mRNA effects, highlighting recent work on post-transcriptional regulation of the cell cycle checkpoint protein/apoptosis inducer Gadd45α by the checkpoint kinase MAPKAP Kinase-2. PMID:21173571

  15. Enhanced stability and polyadenylation of select mRNAs support rapid thermogenesis in the brown fat of a hibernator.

    PubMed

    Grabek, Katharine R; Diniz Behn, Cecilia; Barsh, Gregory S; Hesselberth, Jay R; Martin, Sandra L

    2015-01-27

    During hibernation, animals cycle between torpor and arousal. These cycles involve dramatic but poorly understood mechanisms of dynamic physiological regulation at the level of gene expression. Each cycle, Brown Adipose Tissue (BAT) drives periodic arousal from torpor by generating essential heat. We applied digital transcriptome analysis to precisely timed samples to identify molecular pathways that underlie the intense activity cycles of hibernator BAT. A cohort of transcripts increased during torpor, paradoxical because transcription effectively ceases at these low temperatures. We show that this increase occurs not by elevated transcription but rather by enhanced stabilization associated with maintenance and/or extension of long poly(A) tails. Mathematical modeling further supports a temperature-sensitive mechanism to protect a subset of transcripts from ongoing bulk degradation instead of increased transcription. This subset was enriched in a C-rich motif and genes required for BAT activation, suggesting a model and mechanism to prioritize translation of key proteins for thermogenesis.

  16. Organization of the murine and human interleukin-7 receptor genes: Two mRNAs: Two mRNAs generated by differential splicing and presence of a type I-interferon-inducible promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Pleiman, C.M.; Gimpel, S.D.; Ziegler, S.F.; Park, L.S. ); Harada, Hisashi; Taniguchi, Tadatsugu )

    1991-06-01

    To better understand the regulation of interleukin-7 receptor (IL-7R) expression, the authors have pursued a detailed analysis of the structure of the murine and human IL-7R genes. The genes consist of eight exons, the sizes of which are conserved in mouse and human cells, spread out over 24 kbp (murine) and 19 kbp (human). A differential splicing event results in an mRNA encoding a secreted form of the human IL-7R gene. Primer extension and S1 nuclease analysis show a single transcriptional start site for the murine IL-7R gene. The 5{prime}-flanking region of the murine IL-7R gene contains TATA- and CAAT-like sequences. The promoter region also contains a functional interferon regulatory element, to which the interferon-induced nuclear factors IRF-1 and IRF-2 are capable of binding and which is able to confer interferon-inducible expression on a heterologous gene. There are also potential binding sites for the transcription factors Ap-1 and Ap-2 as well as multiple glucocorticoid response elements. Comparison of the murine and human IL-7R exon/intron boundaries with those of other hematopoietin receptor superfamily members whose exon/intron boundaries are also known reveals a conserved evolutionary structure.

  17. COMBINING PROTEIN AND mRNA QUANTIFICATION TO DECIPHER TRANSCRIPTIONAL REGULATION

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Heng; Sepúlveda, Leonardo A.; Figard, Lauren; Sokac, Anna Marie; Golding, Ido

    2015-01-01

    We combine immunofluorescence and single-molecule fluorescence in situ hybridization (smFISH), followed by automated image analysis, to quantify the concentration of nuclear transcription factors, number of transcription factors bound, and number of nascent mRNAs synthesized at individual gene loci. A theoretical model is used to decipher how transcription-factor binding modulates the stochastic kinetics of mRNA production. We demonstrate this approach by examining the regulation of hunchback in the early Drosophila embryo. PMID:26098021

  18. Increased expression of proenkephalin and prodynorphin mRNAs in the nucleus accumbens of compulsive methamphetamine taking rats

    PubMed Central

    Cadet, Jean Lud; Krasnova, Irina N.; Walther, Donna; Brannock, Christie; Ladenheim, Bruce; McCoy, Michael T.; Collector, Daniel; Torres, Oscar V.; Terry, Ndeah; Jayanthi, Subramaniam

    2016-01-01

    Addiction is associated with neuroadaptive changes in the brain. In the present paper, we used a model of methamphetamine self-administration during which we used footshocks to divide rats into animals that continue to press a lever to get methamphetamine (shock-resistant) and those that significantly reduce pressing the lever (shock-sensitive) despite the shocks. We trained male Sprague-Dawley rats to self-administer methamphetamine (0.1 mg/kg/infusion) for 9 hours daily for 20 days. Control group self-administered saline. Subsequently, methamphetamine self-administration rats were punished by mild electric footshocks for 10 days with gradual increases in shock intensity. Two hours after stopping behavioral experiments, we euthanized rats and isolated nucleus accumbens (NAc) samples. Affymetrix Array experiments revealed 24 differentially expressed genes between the shock-resistant and shock-sensitive rats, with 15 up- and 9 downregulated transcripts. Ingenuity pathway analysis showed that these transcripts belong to classes of genes involved in nervous system function, behavior, and disorders of the basal ganglia. These genes included prodynorphin (PDYN) and proenkephalin (PENK), among others. Because PDYN and PENK are expressed in dopamine D1- and D2-containing NAc neurons, respectively, these findings suggest that mechanisms, which impact both cell types may play a role in the regulation of compulsive methamphetamine taking by rats. PMID:27841313

  19. Expression of growth factor and receptor mRNAs in skin epithelial cells following acute cutaneous injury.

    PubMed Central

    Antoniades, H. N.; Galanopoulos, T.; Neville-Golden, J.; Kiritsy, C. P.; Lynch, S. E.

    1993-01-01

    We report that acute injury induces the expression of selective growth factor and growth factor receptors in the epithelial cells of the wounded tissue. In situ hybridization analysis of skin biopsy specimens obtained after cutaneous injury in swine demonstrated the induction of the expression of transforming growth factor-alpha, its receptor, epidermal growth factor-R, acidic fibroblast growth factor, and basic fibroblast growth factor messenger RNAs in the skin epithelial cells of the wounded tissue. There was no significant expression in the epithelial cells of control, uninjured tissues. The expression levels were maximal during the period of active tissue repair (1 to 5 days after injury) and were totally suppressed upon the healing of the wounded tissues. In contrast, insulinlike growth factor-I, (IGF-I), IGF-I receptor, and IGF-II receptor messenger RNAs were expressed in the epithelial cells of both the control, uninjured tissues and in tissue specimens obtained after injury. There was no significant expression of IGF-II messenger RNA in the epithelial cells before or after injury. It seems that injury induces the coordinated expression of selective growth factor and growth factor receptor genes whose products contribute to the regulation of the complex processes involved in tissue repair and remodeling. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8386442

  20. Expression profiles of subtracted mRNAs during cellular senescence in human mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jung Ki; Choi, Seong-jun; Kim, Jin Kyeoung

    2013-05-01

    Cellular senescence is an irreversible cell cycle arrest that limits the replicative lifespan of cells. Senescence suppresses development of tumors by regulating aging factors, such as cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor (CKI) and telomerase. Suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) was used to identify genes that were differentially expressed between young human mesenchymal stem cells (Y-hMSCs) and senescent human mesenchymal stem cells (S-hMSCs). We selected positive clones that were functionally characterized by referring to public databases using NCBI BLAST tool. This search revealed that 19 genes were downregulated, and 43 genes were upregulated in S-hMSCs relative to Y-hMSCs. Among subtracted clones in Y-hMSCs, most of genes markedly were related to metabolic functions. These genes, PDIA3, WDR1, FSTL1, COPG1, LMAN1, and PDIA6, significantly downregulated. Conversely, genes for subtracted clones in S-hMSCs were mostly associated with cell adhesion. In particular, the expression levels of 9 genes, HSP90B1, EID1, ATP2B4, DDAH1, PRNP, RAB1A, PGS5, TM4SF1 and SSR3, gradually increased during senescence. These genes have not previously been identified as being related to cellular senescence, but they seemed to be potentially affected during cellular senescence.

  1. Rapid induction of neurotrophin mRNAs in rat glial cell cultures by Semax, an adrenocorticotropic hormone analog.

    PubMed

    Shadrina, M I; Dolotov, O V; Grivennikov, I A; Slominsky, P A; Andreeva, L A; Inozemtseva, L S; Limborska, S A; Myasoedov, N F

    2001-08-03

    The proliferation, differentiation and survival of neuronal and glial cells are affected by a number of neurotrophic factors, such as nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and others. In a previous study, we observed the effects of 'Semax' (Met-Glu-His-Phe-Pro-Gly-Pro), the physiologically active analogue of adrenocorticotropic hormone(4--10), on neuronal cell survival in vitro. We hypothesized that these effects may be mediated by the regulation of expression of some neurotrophic factors. To test this hypothesis we analyzed NGF and BDNF gene expression in glial cells obtained from the basal forebrain of newborn rats, following in vitro treatment with 'Semax'. We observed changes in mRNA levels for both the NGF and BDNF genes. The greatest increase in expression was found after 30 min of 'Semax' administration. At this time, BDNF mRNA level was increased eight-fold in comparison with control, and NGF mRNA level was increased five-fold.

  2. Increased expression of proenkephalin and prodynorphin mRNAs in the nucleus accumbens of compulsive methamphetamine taking rats.

    PubMed

    Cadet, Jean Lud; Krasnova, Irina N; Walther, Donna; Brannock, Christie; Ladenheim, Bruce; McCoy, Michael T; Collector, Daniel; Torres, Oscar V; Terry, Ndeah; Jayanthi, Subramaniam

    2016-11-14

    Addiction is associated with neuroadaptive changes in the brain. In the present paper, we used a model of methamphetamine self-administration during which we used footshocks to divide rats into animals that continue to press a lever to get methamphetamine (shock-resistant) and those that significantly reduce pressing the lever (shock-sensitive) despite the shocks. We trained male Sprague-Dawley rats to self-administer methamphetamine (0.1 mg/kg/infusion) for 9 hours daily for 20 days. Control group self-administered saline. Subsequently, methamphetamine self-administration rats were punished by mild electric footshocks for 10 days with gradual increases in shock intensity. Two hours after stopping behavioral experiments, we euthanized rats and isolated nucleus accumbens (NAc) samples. Affymetrix Array experiments revealed 24 differentially expressed genes between the shock-resistant and shock-sensitive rats, with 15 up- and 9 downregulated transcripts. Ingenuity pathway analysis showed that these transcripts belong to classes of genes involved in nervous system function, behavior, and disorders of the basal ganglia. These genes included prodynorphin (PDYN) and proenkephalin (PENK), among others. Because PDYN and PENK are expressed in dopamine D1- and D2-containing NAc neurons, respectively, these findings suggest that mechanisms, which impact both cell types may play a role in the regulation of compulsive methamphetamine taking by rats.

  3. Induction of neuron-specific tropomyosin mRNAs by nerve growth factor is dependent on morphological differentiation

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    We have examined the expression of brain-specific tropomyosins during neuronal differentiation. Both TmBr-1 and TmBr-3 were shown to be neuron specific. TmBr-1 and TmBr-3 mRNA levels increased during the most active phase of neurite outgrowth in the developing rat cerebellum. In PC12 cells stimulated by nerve growth factor (NGF) to differentiate to the neuronal phenotype, TmBr-1 and TmBr-3 levels increased with an increasing degree of morphological differentiation. Induction of TmBr-1 and TmBr-3 expression only occurred under conditions where PC12 cells were permitted to extend neurites. NGF was unable to maintain levels of TmBr-1 and TmBr-3 with the loss of neuronal phenotype by resuspension of differentiated PC12 cells. The unique cellular expression and regulation in vivo and in vitro of TmBr- 1 and TmBr-3 strongly suggests a critical role of these tropomyosins in neuronal microfilament function. The findings reveal that the induction and maintenance of the neuronal tropomyosins is dependent on morphological differentiation and the maintenance of the neuronal phenotype. PMID:8416988

  4. Enhanced stability and polyadenylation of select mRNAs support rapid thermogenesis in the brown fat of a hibernator

    PubMed Central

    Grabek, Katharine R; Diniz Behn, Cecilia; Barsh, Gregory S; Hesselberth, Jay R; Martin, Sandra L

    2015-01-01

    During hibernation, animals cycle between torpor and arousal. These cycles involve dramatic but poorly understood mechanisms of dynamic physiological regulation at the level of gene expression. Each cycle, Brown Adipose Tissue (BAT) drives periodic arousal from torpor by generating essential heat. We applied digital transcriptome analysis to precisely timed samples to identify molecular pathways that underlie the intense activity cycles of hibernator BAT. A cohort of transcripts increased during torpor, paradoxical because transcription effectively ceases at these low temperatures. We show that this increase occurs not by elevated transcription but rather by enhanced stabilization associated with maintenance and/or extension of long poly(A) tails. Mathematical modeling further supports a temperature-sensitive mechanism to protect a subset of transcripts from ongoing bulk degradation instead of increased transcription. This subset was enriched in a C-rich motif and genes required for BAT activation, suggesting a model and mechanism to prioritize translation of key proteins for thermogenesis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04517.001 PMID:25626169

  5. HLA-G and HLA-E specific mRNAs connote opposite prognostic significance in renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is characterized by its resistance to radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy. On the other hand, it is an immunogenic tumor - it is able to stimulate antitumor responses. A prognostic significance of HLA-G expression by neoplastic cells in RCC is not well characterized; significance HLA-E expression in RCC is not characterized at all. Methods In our study, we evaluated the expression of HLA-G and HLA-E specific mRNA transcripts produced by neoplastic cells in 38 cases of RCC and in 10 samples of normal kidney parenchyma. The results were statistically correlated with various clinico-pathological parameters. Results We confirmed that HLA-G is downregulated in normal kidney tissue; if it is up-regulated in RCC, then it is connected to worse prognosis. On the other hand, HLA-E mRNA transcripts were present in both normal kidney tissue and RCC and their increasing concentrations counterintuitively carried better prognosis, more favorable pT stage and lower nuclear Fuhrmann’s grade. Conclusion Considering the fact that there is known aberrant activation of HLA-G and HLA-E expression by interferons, identification of HLA-G and HLA-E status could contribute to better selection of RCC patients who could possibly benefit from more tailored neoadjuvant biological/immunological therapy. Thus, these molecules could represent useful prognostic biomarkers in RCC, and the expression of both these molecules in RCC deserves further study. The virtual Slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/7383071387016614 PMID:22640987

  6. Expression profiles of LHbeta, FSHbeta and their gonadal receptor mRNAs during sexual differentiation of Xenopus laevis tadpoles.

    PubMed

    Urbatzka, R; Lorenz, C; Lutz, I; Kloas, W

    2010-09-01

    The gonadotropins, luteinising hormone (LH) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), are important hormones regulating reproductive biology in vertebrates, especially the processes of steroidogenesis and gamete maturation. Despite the role of gonadotropins during the reproductive cycle in amphibians is well established, much less is known about the functional maturation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonad axis during larval development. Therefore, the present study aimed to analyze the expression profiles of hypophyseal LHbeta and FSHbeta mRNA and of their corresponding gonadal receptors (LH-R, FSH-R) in Xenopus laevis tadpoles during their ontogeny and sexual differentiation. The first significant elevation of LHbeta and FSHbeta mRNA was observed at late premetamorphosis. A clear raise of LHbeta mRNA was present during prometamorphic stages especially in males, while the LH-R only slowly increased during ontogeny with highest levels during metamorphic climax. In contrast, FSHbeta mRNA expression only slightly increased during ontogeny, however in both sexes the FSH-R mRNA was considerably elevated at prometamorphosis and further at metamorphic climax. Our results suggest that LHbeta and LH-R mRNA expression might be involved in initial maturation events of gametes, at least in males, while the gradually increase of FSH-R mRNA coincided with the advancing process of gamete maturation in both sexes. The present study provides for the first time evidence based on expression of gonadotropins and their corresponding gonadal receptors that the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonad axis evolves already at early stages of ontogeny and sexual differentiation in amphibians.

  7. Correlation of microRNA levels during hypoxia with predicted target mRNAs through genome-wide microarray analysis

    PubMed Central

    Guimbellot, Jennifer S; Erickson, Stephen W; Mehta, Tapan; Wen, Hui; Page, Grier P; Sorscher, Eric J; Hong, Jeong S

    2009-01-01

    Background Low levels of oxygen in tissues, seen in situations such as chronic lung disease, necrotic tumors, and high altitude exposures, initiate a signaling pathway that results in active transcription of genes possessing a hypoxia response element (HRE). The aim of this study was to investigate whether a change in miRNA expression following hypoxia could account for changes in the cellular transcriptome based on currently available miRNA target prediction tools. Methods To identify changes induced by hypoxia, we conducted mRNA- and miRNA-array-based experiments in HT29 cells, and performed comparative analysis of the resulting data sets based on multiple target prediction algorithms. To date, few studies have investigated an environmental perturbation for effects on genome-wide miRNA levels, or their consequent influence on mRNA output. Results Comparison of miRNAs with predicted mRNA targets indicated a lower level of concordance than expected. We did, however, find preliminary evidence of combinatorial regulation of mRNA expression by miRNA. Conclusion Target prediction programs and expression profiling techniques do not yet adequately represent the complexity of miRNA-mediated gene repression, and new methods may be required to better elucidate these pathways. Our data suggest the physiologic impact of miRNAs on cellular transcription results from a multifaceted network of miRNA and mRNA relationships, working together in an interconnected system and in context of hundreds of RNA species. The methods described here for comparative analysis of cellular miRNA and mRNA will be useful for understanding genome wide regulatory responsiveness and refining miRNA predictive algorithms. PMID:19320992

  8. Equol, an Isoflavone Metabolite, Regulates Cancer Cell Viability and Protein Synthesis Initiation via c-Myc and eIF4G*

    PubMed Central

    de la Parra, Columba; Borrero-Garcia, Luis D.; Cruz-Collazo, Ailed; Schneider, Robert J.; Dharmawardhane, Suranganie

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies implicate dietary soy isoflavones as breast cancer preventives, especially due to their anti-estrogenic properties. However, soy isoflavones may also have a role in promoting breast cancer, which has yet to be clarified. We previously reported that equol, a metabolite of the soy isoflavone daidzein, may advance breast cancer potential via up-regulation of the eukaryotic initiation factor 4GI (eIF4GI). In estrogen receptor negative (ER−) metastatic breast cancer cells, equol induced elevated levels of eIF4G, which were associated with increased cell viability and the selective translation of mRNAs that use non-canonical means of initiation, including internal ribosome entry site (IRES), ribosome shunting, and eIF4G enhancers. These mRNAs typically code for oncogenic, survival, and cell stress molecules. Among those mRNAs translationally increased by equol was the oncogene and eIF4G enhancer, c-Myc. Here we report that siRNA-mediated knockdown of c-Myc abrogates the increase in cancer cell viability and mammosphere formation by equol, and results in a significant down-regulation of eIF4GI (the major eIF4G isoform), as well as reduces levels of some, but not all, proteins encoded by mRNAs that are translationally stimulated by equol treatment. Knockdown of eIF4GI also markedly reduces an equol-mediated increase in IRES-dependent mRNA translation and the expression of specific oncogenic proteins. However, eIF4GI knockdown did not reciprocally affect c-Myc levels or cell viability. This study therefore implicates c-Myc as a potential regulator of the cancer-promoting effects of equol via up-regulation of eIF4GI and selective initiation of translation on mRNAs that utilize non-canonical initiation, including certain oncogenes. PMID:25593313

  9. Characterization of cDNAs, mRNAs, and proteins related to human liver microsomal cytochrome P-450 (S)-mephenytoin 4'-hydroxylase.

    PubMed

    Ged, C; Umbenhauer, D R; Bellew, T M; Bork, R W; Srivastava, P K; Shinriki, N; Lloyd, R S; Guengerich, F P

    1988-09-06

    A cytochrome P-450 (P-450) multigene family codes for several related human liver enzymes, including the P-450 responsible for (S)-mephenytoin 4'-hydroxylation. This enzyme activity has previously been shown to be associated with a genetic polymorphism. Genomic (Southern) blot analysis using non-overlapping 5' and 3' portions of a cDNA clone suggests that approximately seven related sequences are present in this gene family. In this study four cDNA clones, all nearly full-length, were isolated from a bacteriophage lambda gt11 library prepared from a single human liver. These clones can be grouped into two categories that are approximately 85% identical at the level of DNA sequence. The cDNA clones in one category (MP-4, MP-8) both match the N-terminal sequences of the P-450MP-1 and P-450MP-2 proteins, which had previously been shown to be catalytically active in (S)-mephenytoin 4'-hydroxylation. These two cDNAs, MP-4 and MP-8, differ in only two bases in the coding region but are quite distinct in their 3' noncoding regions. Another protein (P-450MP-3) was isolated on the basis of its immunochemical similarity to P-450MP-1 but was found to be catalytically inactive; amino acid sequencing of tryptic peptides of P-450MP-3 showed a correspondence to the second category of cDNA clones (MP-12, MP-20), which differ from each other in only four (nonsilent) base changes. Oligonucleotides specific for the two groups of cDNA clones were used as probes of human liver mRNAs--individual liver samples examined expressed both types of mRNAs but no correlation was observed between the abundance levels of any mRNA and catalytic activity. Further, oligonucleotide probes indicated that mRNAs corresponding to both the MP-4 and MP-8 clones were apparently present in individual liver samples. A monoclonal antibody was isolated that recognized P-450MP-1 but not P-450MP-2 or P-450MP-3; the amount of protein detected by the antibody in different liver samples was not correlated with the

  10. Expression of nerve growth factor and neurotrophin-3 mRNAs in hippocampal interneurons: morphological characterization, levels of expression, and colocalization of nerve growth factor and neurotrophin-3.

    PubMed

    Pascual, M; Rocamora, N; Acsády, L; Freund, T F; Soriano, E

    1998-05-25

    We have investigated the distribution and morphology of hippocampal interneurons that express the neurotrophins nerve growth factor (NGF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) in the rat. For this study, we combined in situ hybridization for the detection of NGF and NT-3 mRNAs and immunocytochemistry against the calcium-binding proteins parvalbumin (PARV), calretinin (CALR), and calbindin (CALB). Whereas the majority of PARV+ interneurons expressed NGF mRNA, only subsets of CALR- and CALB-immunoreactive interneurons (23% and 24%, respectively) displayed NGF hybridization. Most CALB/NGF+ cells were located in the stratum oriens/alveus of the CA3-CA1 regions, suggesting that they may include the population of CALB+, hippocamposeptal, nonpyramidal neurons. Most of the nonspiny CALR/NGF+ neurons were located within or in the vicinity of the pyramidal layer and had faint CALR immunostaining and stellate, thin dendrites. Regarding the spiny CALR-immunoreactive cells, we found that most of these neurons in the hilus were NGF+, whereas only 59% of displayed NGF hybridization in the stratum lucidum of the CA3 region. A small subset of PARV- and CALR-immunoreactive cells expressed NT-3 mRNA (16% and 13%, respectively). NT-3 message was not found in the large basket cells of the dentate gyrus, whereas the distribution and morphology of CALR/NT-3+ cells were similar to those of nonspiny CALR/NGF+ cells. In fact, double in situ hybridization analysis confirmed that most NT-3+ neurons also expressed NGF mRNA, indicating coexpression of both neurotrophins in subpopulations of PARV+ and CALR+ neurons. Moreover, the level of NGF mRNA expression was higher in PARV+ neurons than in CALR- and CALB-immunoreactive interneurons, whereas NT-3 message was expressed similarly in PARV+ and CALR+ neurons. The present findings show a differential expression of NGF and NT-3 mRNAs in subsets of hippocampal interneurons and suggest that the expression of these transcripts depends on factors intrinsic to

  11. MicroRNAs act complementarily to regulate disease-related mRNA modules in human diseases.

    PubMed

    Chavali, Sreenivas; Bruhn, Sören; Tiemann, Katrin; Saetrom, Pål; Barrenäs, Fredrik; Saito, Takaya; Kanduri, Kartiek; Wang, Hui; Benson, Mikael

    2013-11-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play a key role in regulating mRNA expression, and individual miRNAs have been proposed as diagnostic and therapeutic candidates. The identification of such candidates is complicated by the involvement of multiple miRNAs and mRNAs as well as unknown disease topology of the miRNAs. Here, we investigated if disease-associated miRNAs regulate modules of disease-associated mRNAs, if those miRNAs act complementarily or synergistically, and if single or combinations of miRNAs can be targeted to alter module functions. We first analyzed publicly available miRNA and mRNA expression data for five different diseases. Integrated target prediction and network-based analysis showed that the miRNAs regulated modules of disease-relevant genes. Most of the miRNAs acted complementarily to regulate multiple mRNAs. To functionally test these findings, we repeated the analysis using our own miRNA and mRNA expression data from CD4+ T cells from patients with seasonal allergic rhinitis. This is a good model of complex diseases because of its well-defined phenotype and pathogenesis. Combined computational and functional studies confirmed that miRNAs mainly acted complementarily and that a combination of two complementary miRNAs, miR-223 and miR-139-3p, could be targeted to alter disease-relevant module functions, namely, the release of type 2 helper T-cell (Th2) cytokines. Taken together, our findings indicate that miRNAs act complementarily to regulate modules of disease-related mRNAs and can be targeted to alter disease-relevant functions.

  12. MicroRNA-27a regulates basal transcription by targeting the p44 subunit of general transcription factor IIH

    PubMed Central

    Portal, Maximiliano M.

    2011-01-01

    General transcription factor IIH (TFIIH) is a complex RNA polymerase II basal transcription factor comprising 10 different polypeptides that display activities involved in transcription and DNA repair processes. Although biochemical studies have uncovered TFIIH importance, little is known about how the mRNAs that code for TFIIH subunits are regulated. Here it is shown that mRNAs encoding seven of the TFIIH subunits (p34, p44, p52, p62, XPB, CDK7, and p8) are regulated at the posttranscriptional level in a Dicer-dependent manner. Indeed, abolition of the miRNA pathway induces abnormal accumulation, stabilization, and translational activation of these seven mRNAs. Herein, miR-27a was identified as a key regulator of p44 mRNA. Moreover, miR-27a was shown to destabilize the p44 subunit of the TFIIH complex during the G2-M phase, thereby modulating the transcriptional shutdown observed during this transition. This work is unique in providing a demonstration of global transcriptional regulation through the action of a single miRNA. PMID:21558443

  13. Targeting deoxyhypusine hydroxylase activity impairs cap-independent translation initiation driven by the 5'untranslated region of the HIV-1, HTLV-1, and MMTV mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Cáceres, C Joaquín; Angulo, Jenniffer; Contreras, Nataly; Pino, Karla; Vera-Otarola, Jorge; López-Lastra, Marcelo

    2016-10-01

    Replication of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is dependent on eIF5A hypusination. Hypusine is formed post-translationally on the eIF5A precursor by two consecutive enzymatic steps; a reversible reaction involving the enzyme deoxyhypusine synthase (DHS) and an irreversible step involving the enzyme deoxyhypusine hydroxylase (DOHH). In this study we explored the effect of inhibiting DOHH activity and therefore eIF5A hypusination, on HIV-1 gene expression. Results show that the expression of proteins from an HIV-1 molecular clone is reduced when DOHH activity is inhibited by Deferiprone (DFP) or Ciclopirox (CPX). Next we evaluated the requirement of DOHH activity for internal ribosome entry site (IRES)-mediated translation initiation driven by the 5'untranslated region (5'UTR) of the full length HIV-1 mRNA. Results show that HIV-1 IRES activity relies on DOHH protein concentration and enzymatic activity. Similar results were obtained for IRES-dependent translation initiation mediated by 5'UTR of the human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) and the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) mRNAs. Interestingly, activity of the poliovirus IRES, was less sensitive to the targeting of DOHH suggesting that not all viral IRESs are equally dependent on the cellular concentration or the activity of DOHH. In summary we present evidence indicating that the cellular concentration of DOHH and its enzymatic activity play a role in HIV-1, HTLV-1 and MMTV IRES-mediated translation initiation.

  14. Microfluidic molecular assay platform for the detection of miRNAs, mRNAs, proteins, and post-translational modifications at single-cell resolution

    DOE PAGES

    Wu, Meiye; Singh, Anup K.

    2014-07-15

    In this study, cell signaling is a dynamic and complex process. A typical signaling pathway may begin with activation of cell surface receptors, leading to activation kinase cascade that culminates in induction of mRNA and non-coding miRNA production in the nucleus, followed by modulation of mRNA expression by miRNAs in the cytosol, and end with production of proteins in response to the signaling pathway. Signaling pathways involve proteins, miRNA, and mRNAs, along with various forms of transient post-translational modifications, and detecting each type of signaling molecule requires categorically different sample preparation methods such as Western blotting for proteins, PCR formore » nucleic acids, and flow cytometry for post-translational modifications. Since we know that cells in populations behave heterogeneously1, especially in the cases of stem cells, cancer, and hematopoiesis, there is need for a new technology that provides capability to detect and quantify multiple categories of signaling molecules in intact single cells to provide a comprehensive view of the cell’s physiological state. In this technical brief, we describe our microfluidic platform with a portfolio of customized molecular assays that can detect nucleic acids, proteins, and post-translational modifications in single intact cells with >95% reduction in reagent requirement in under 8 hours.« less

  15. The two Cg-timp mRNAs expressed in oyster hemocytes are generated by two gene families and differentially expressed during ontogenesis.

    PubMed

    Montagnani, Caroline; Tirape, Ana; Boulo, Viviane; Escoubas, Jean-Michel

    2005-01-01

    We previously characterized a Crassostrea gigas tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (Cg-timp 1.3) with potential role in wound healing and defense mechanisms. Here we isolated a second cDNA (Cg-timp 1.1) encoding a protein that contains the characteristic signature of TIMP proteins. Sequence analysis of the two transcripts showed that they originate from two distinct genes. The two proteins, Cg-TIMP 1.1 and 1.3, are closely related and share 81% identity. Northern blot analysis of Cg-timp gene expression in adult oyster hemocytes indicated that the ratio between the two transcripts was constant from one oyster to another (Cg-timp 1.1 and 1.3 represent 32 and 68%, respectively). Conversely, during ontogenesis the expression pattern of the two Cg-timp genes was different. Indeed, Cg-timp 1.3 mRNAs were detected from the larval D stage whereas Cg-timp 1.1 transcripts were undetectable up to 22 days post-fertilization. The difference in expression pattern of the two Cg-timp genes may reveal distinct implications of these genes in the embryos and larvae developments.

  16. Molecular classification of an elasmobranch angiotensin receptor: quantification of angiotensin receptor and natriuretic peptide receptor mRNAs in saltwater and freshwater populations of the Atlantic stingray.

    PubMed

    Evans, Andrew N; Henning, Toni; Gelsleichter, James; Nunez, B Scott

    2010-12-01

    Among the most conserved osmoregulatory hormone systems in vertebrates are the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and the natriuretic peptides (NPs). We examined the RAS and NP system in the euryhaline Atlantic stingray, Dasyatis sabina (Lesueur). To determine the relative sensitivity of target organs to these hormonal systems, we isolated cDNA sequences encoding the D. sabina angiotensin receptor (AT) and natriuretic peptide type-B receptor (NPR-B). We then determined the tissue-specific expression of their mRNAs in saltwater D. sabina from local Texas waters and an isolated freshwater population in Lake Monroe, Florida. AT mRNA was most abundant in interrenal tissue from both populations. NPR-B mRNA was most abundant in rectal gland tissue from both populations, and also highly abundant in the kidney of saltwater D. sabina. This study is the first to report the sequence of an elasmobranch angiotensin receptor, and phylogenetic analysis indicates that the D. sabina receptor is more similar to AT(1) vs. AT(2) proteins. This classification is further supported by molecular analysis of AT(1) and AT(2) proteins demonstrating conservation of AT(1)-specific amino acid residues and motifs in D. sabina AT. Molecular classification of the elasmobranch angiotensin receptor as an AT(1)-like protein provides fundamental insight into the evolution of the vertebrate RAS.

  17. DEAD-box protein DDX3 associates with eIF4F to promote translation of selected mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Soto-Rifo, Ricardo; Rubilar, Paulina S; Limousin, Taran; de Breyne, Sylvain; Décimo, Didier; Ohlmann, Théophile

    2012-01-01

    Here, we have characterized a step in translation initiation of viral and cellular mRNAs that contain RNA secondary structures immediately at the vicinity of their m7GTP cap. This is mediated by the DEAD-box helicase DDX3 which can directly bind to the 5′ of the target mRNA where it clamps the entry of eIF4F through an eIF4G and Poly A-binding protein cytoplasmic 1 (PABP) double interaction. This could induce limited local strand separation of the secondary structure to allow 43S pre-initiation complex attachment to the 5′ free extremity of the mRNA. We further demonstrate that the requirement for DDX3 is highly specific to some selected transcripts, cannot be replaced or substituted by eIF4A and is only needed in the very early steps of ribosome binding and prior to 43S ribosomal scanning. Altogether, these data define an unprecedented role for a DEAD-box RNA helicase in translation initiation. PMID:22872150

  18. SKAR links pre-mRNA splicing to mTOR/S6K1-mediated enhanced translation efficiency of spliced mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaoju Max; Yoon, Sang-Oh; Richardson, Celeste J; Jülich, Kristina; Blenis, John

    2008-04-18

    Different protein complexes form on newly spliced mRNA to ensure the accuracy and efficiency of eukaryotic gene expression. For example, the exon junction complex (EJC) plays an important role in mRNA surveillance. The EJC also influences the first, or pioneer round of protein synthesis through a mechanism that is poorly understood. We show that the nutrient-, stress-, and energy-sensing checkpoint kinase, mTOR, contributes to the observed enhanced translation efficiency of spliced over nonspliced mRNAs. We demonstrate that, when activated, S6K1 is recruited to the newly synthesized mRNA by SKAR, which is deposited at the EJC during splicing, and that SKAR and S6K1 increase the translation efficiency of spliced mRNA. Thus, SKAR-mediated recruitment of activated S6K1 to newly processed mRNPs serves as a conduit between mTOR checkpoint signaling and the pioneer round of translation when cells exist in conditions supportive of protein synthesis.

  19. Microfluidic molecular assay platform for the detection of miRNAs, mRNAs, proteins, and post-translational modifications at single-cell resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Meiye; Singh, Anup K.

    2014-07-15

    In this study, cell signaling is a dynamic and complex process. A typical signaling pathway may begin with activation of cell surface receptors, leading to activation kinase cascade that culminates in induction of mRNA and non-coding miRNA production in the nucleus, followed by modulation of mRNA expression by miRNAs in the cytosol, and end with production of proteins in response to the signaling pathway. Signaling pathways involve proteins, miRNA, and mRNAs, along with various forms of transient post-translational modifications, and detecting each type of signaling molecule requires categorically different sample preparation methods such as Western blotting for proteins, PCR for nucleic acids, and flow cytometry for post-translational modifications. Since we know that cells in populations behave heterogeneously1, especially in the cases of stem cells, cancer, and hematopoiesis, there is need for a new technology that provides capability to detect and quantify multiple categories of signaling molecules in intact single cells to provide a comprehensive view of the cell’s physiological state. In this technical brief, we describe our microfluidic platform with a portfolio of customized molecular assays that can detect nucleic acids, proteins, and post-translational modifications in single intact cells with >95% reduction in reagent requirement in under 8 hours.

  20. Interleukin-1β induced Stress Granules Sequester COX-2 mRNA and Regulates its Stability and Translation in Human OA Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Mohammad Y.; Haqqi, Tariq M.

    2016-01-01

    Enhanced and immediate expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) mRNA is observed in IL-1β-stimulated OA chondrocytes but the synthesis of protein found significantly delayed. Here we investigated the role of stress granules (SGs), ribonucleoprotein complexes that regulate mRNA translation, in the delayed translation of COX-2 mRNAs in IL-1β-stimulated OA chondrocytes. Stimulation of human chondrocytes with IL-1β activated the stress response genes and the phosphorylation of eIF2α that triggered the assembly of SGs. Using combined immunofluorescence staining of SGs markers and COX-2 protein, RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization and RNA immunoprecipitation, the COX-2 mRNAs were found sequestered in SGs in IL-1β-stimulated OA chondrocytes. No increase in COX-2 protein expression was observed during the persistence of SGs but enhanced expression of COX-2 protein was noted upon clearance of the SGs. Inhibition of SGs clearance blocked COX-2 mRNA translation whereas blocking the assembly of SGs by TIA-1 depletion resulted in rapid and increased production of COX-2 and PGE2. Our findings show for the first time assembly of SGs and sequestration of COX-2 mRNAs in human OA chondrocytes under pathological conditions. Post-transcriptional regulation of COX-2 mRNAs translation by SGs indicates a role in IL-1β-mediated catabolic response that could be therapeutically targeted in OA. PMID:27271770

  1. Use of in vitro translation extract depleted in specific initiation factors for the investigation of translational regulation.

    PubMed

    Gallie, Daniel R

    2007-01-01

    Regulation of gene expression often involves the control of translation mediated through one or more initiation factors that are required for the translation of eukaryotic mRNAs. Genetic and molecular biological approaches can be highly useful in the initial identification of translational regulation, but the use of in vitro translation lysates can be essential in elucidating the details of translational regulatory mechanisms. Wheat germ lysate has long been used for in vitro translation studies. The noncompetitive conditions that prevail in this lysate as it is normally produced, however, preclude the translational regulatory analysis of many mRNAs involving the preferential recruitment of initiation factors. The development of lysate depleted in specific translation initiation factors converts wheat germ lysate from a noncompetitive system to one that is competitive in a fast and simple procedure that enables it to be used in the analysis of many more translational regulatory mechanisms than is currently possible with unfractionated lysate.

  2. A developmentally regulated membrane protein gene in Dictyostelium discoideum is also induced by heat shock and cold shock.

    PubMed Central

    Maniak, M; Nellen, W

    1988-01-01

    We have analyzed the expression of the Dictyostelium gene P8A7 which had been isolated as a cDNA clone from an early developmentally regulated gene. The single genomic copy generated two mRNAs which were subject to different control mechanisms: while one mRNA (P8A7S) was regulated like the cell-type-nonspecific late genes, the other one (P8A7L) was induced during development, when cells were allowed to attach to a substrate, and when cells were subjected to stress, such as heat shock and cadmium. Interestingly the same induction was also observed with cold shock. RNA processing was inhibited by heat and cold shock, leading to nuclear accumulation of a precursor. The translated region of the cDNA was common to both mRNAs and encoded an unusually hydrophobic peptide with the characteristics of a membrane protein. Images PMID:3336356

  3. The expression patterns of beta1,4 galactosyltransferase I and V mRNAs, and Galbeta1-4GlcNAc group in rat gastrocnemius muscles post sciatic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Yan, Meijuan; Cheng, Chun; Ding, Fei; Jiang, Jing; Gao, Lingling; Xia, Chunlin; Shen, Aiguo

    2008-10-01

    Glycosylation is one of the most important post-translational modifications. It is clear that the single step of beta1,4-galactosylation is performed by a family of beta1,4-galactosyltransferases (beta1,4-GalTs), and that each member of this family may play a distinct role in different tissues and cells. beta1,4-GalT I and V are involved in the biosynthesis of N-linked oligosaccharides and play roles in sciatic nerve regeneration after sciatic nerve injury. In the present study, the expression of beta1,4-galactosyltransferase (beta1,4-GalT) I, V mRNAs and Galbeta1-4GlcNAc group were examined in rat gastrocnemius muscles after sciatic nerve crush and transection. Real time PCR revealed that beta1,4-GalT I and V mRNAs expressed at a high level in normal gastrocnemius muscles and decreased gradually from 6 h, reached the lowest level at 2 weeks, then restored gradually to relatively normal level at 4 weeks after sciatic nerve crush. In contrast, in sciatic nerve transection model, beta1,4-GalT I and V mRNAs decreased gradually from 6 h, and remained on a low level at 4 weeks in gastrocnemius muscles after sciatic nerve transection. In situ hybridization indicated that beta1,4-GalT I and V mRNAs localized in numerous myocytes and muscle satellite cells under normal conditions and at 4 weeks after sciatic nerve crush, and in a few muscle satellite cells at 4 weeks after sciatic nerve transection. Furthermore, lectin blotting showed that the expression level of the Galbeta1-4GlcNAc group decreased from 6 h, reached the lowest level at 2 weeks, and restored to relatively normal level at 4 weeks after sciatic nerve crush. RCA-I lectin histochemistry demonstrated that Galbeta1-4GlcNAc group localized in numerous membranes of myocytes and muscle satellite cells in normal and at 4 weeks after sciatic nerve crush, and in a few muscle satellite cells at 2 and 4 weeks after sciatic nerve transection. These results indicated that the expressions of beta1,4-GalT I, V mRNAs and

  4. Reprogramming the genetic code: the emerging role of ribosomal frameshifting in regulating cellular gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Advani, Vivek M.; Dinman, Jonathan D.

    2016-01-01

    Reading frame maintenance is a critical property of ribosomes. However, a number of genetic elements have been described that can induce ribosomes to shift on mRNAs, the most well understood of which are a class that directs ribosomal slippage by one base in 5′ (-1) direction. This is referred to as programmed -1 ribosomal frameshifting (-1 PRF). Recently, a new -1 PRF promoting element was serendipitously discovered in a study examining the effects of stretches of adenosines in the coding sequences of mRNAs. Here, we discuss this finding, recent studies describing how -1 PRF is used to control gene expression in eukaryotes, and how -1 PRF is itself regulated. The implications of dysregulation of -1 PRF on human health are examined, as are possible new areas in which novel -1 PRF promoting elements might be discovered. PMID:26661048

  5. Neurogenesis: Regulation by Alternative Splicing and Related Posttranscriptional Processes.

    PubMed

    Lara-Pezzi, Enrique; Desco, Manuel; Gatto, Alberto; Gómez-Gaviro, María Victoria

    2016-11-10

    The complexity of the mammalian brain requires highly specialized protein function and diversity. As neurons differentiate and the neuronal circuitry is established, several mRNAs undergo alternative splicing and other posttranscriptional changes that expand the variety of protein isoforms produced. Recent advances are beginning to shed light on the molecular mechanisms that regulate isoform switching during neurogenesis and the role played by specific RNA binding proteins in this process. Neurogenesis and neuronal wiring were recently shown to also be regulated by RNA degradation through nonsense-mediated decay. An additional layer of regulatory complexity in these biological processes is the interplay between alternative splicing and long noncoding RNAs. Dysregulation of posttranscriptional regulation results in defective neuronal differentiation and/or synaptic connections that lead to neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders.

  6. Post-transcriptional Regulation of Immunological Responses through Riboclustering

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, Koelina; Giddaluru, Jeevan; August, Avery; Khan, Nooruddin

    2016-01-01

    Immunological programing of immune cells varies in response to changing environmental signals. This process is facilitated by modifiers that regulate the translational fate of mRNAs encoding various immune mediators, including cytokines and chemokines, which in turn determine the rapid activation, tolerance, and plasticity of the immune system. RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) recruited by the specific sequence elements in mRNA transcripts are one such modifiers. These RBPs form RBP–RNA complexes known as “riboclusters.” These riboclusters serve as RNA sorting machinery, where depending upon the composition of the ribocluster, translation, degradation, or storage of mRNA is controlled. Recent findings suggest that this regulation of mRNA homeostasis is critical for controlling the immune response. Here, we present the current knowledge of the ribocluster-mediated post-transcriptional regulation of immune mediators and highlight recent findings regarding their implications for the pathogenesis of acute or chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:27199986

  7. Nucleus-encoded mRNAs for chloroplast proteins GapA, PetA, and PsbO are trans-spliced in the flagellate Euglena gracilis irrespective of light and plastid function.

    PubMed

    Mateášiková-Kováčová, Bianka; Vesteg, Matej; Drahovská, Hana; Záhonová, Kristína; Vacula, Rostislav; Krajčovič, Juraj

    2012-01-01

    Euglena gracilis is a fresh-water flagellate possessing secondary chloroplasts of green algal origin. In contrast with organisms possessing primary plastids, mRNA levels of nucleus-encoded genes for chloroplast proteins in E. gracilis depend on neither light nor plastid function. However, it remains unknown, if all these mRNAs are trans-spliced and possess spliced leader sequence at the 5'-end and if trans-splicing depends on light or functional plastids. This study revealed that polyadenylated mRNAs encoding the chloroplast proteins glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GapA), cytochrome f (PetA), and subunit O of photosystem II (PsbO) are trans-spliced irrespective of light or plastid function.

  8. Localization of five steroidogenic enzyme mRNAs in Japanese black bear (Ursus thibetanus japonicus) testes during the mating season by in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Iibuchi, Ruriko; Shimozuru, Michito; Kamine, Akari; Nio-Kobayashi, Junko; Iwanaga, Toshihiko; Tsubota, Toshio

    2010-04-01

    The Japanese black bear (Ursus thibetanus japonicus) is a typical seasonal breeder that has a mating season in early summer. Spermatogenesis and testicular steroidogenesis are known to develop and regress annually; however, its molecular mechanism has not yet been investigated. In the present study, we clarified the mRNA sequence of 5 steroidogenic enzymes (P450scc, 3betaHSD, P450c17, 17betaHSD3 and P450arom) using RT-PCR and RACE methods and the localization of these gene expressions in the bear testis using an in situ hybridization technique. The amino acid sequence deduced from each mRNA sequence had high homology with the corresponding sequences of other species and possessed a motif typical of the P450 family or short chain alcohol dehydrogenase family. Expression of P450scc, 3betaHSD and P450c17 mRNA in interstitial tissue indicated that conversion from cholesterol to androstenedione occurs in Leydig cells. On the other hand, the mRNA of 17betaHSD3, which plays a central role in synthesizing testosterone, was detected not only in the interstitium but also inside the seminiferous tubules, along the basement membrane. P450arom mRNAs were distributed in the seminiferous tubules. These results suggest the possibility of testosterone and estradiol-17beta synthesis inside the seminiferous tubules in the bear testis. We expect that the results of this study will be useful for further investigation of the molecular mechanism of steroidogenic seasonality in the bear testis.

  9. A Sub-Element in PRE enhances nuclear export of intronless mRNAs by recruiting the TREX complex via ZC3H18.

    PubMed

    Chi, Binkai; Wang, Ke; Du, Yanhua; Gui, Bin; Chang, Xingya; Wang, Lantian; Fan, Jing; Chen, She; Wu, Xudong; Li, Guohui; Cheng, Hong

    2014-06-01

    Viral RNA elements that facilitate mRNA export are useful tools for identifying cellular RNA export factors. Here we show that hepatitis B virus post-transcriptional element (PRE) is one such element, and using PRE several new cellular mRNA export factors were identified. We found that PRE drastically enhances the cytoplasmic accumulation of cDNA transcripts independent of any viral protein. Systematic deletion analysis revealed the existence of a 116 nt functional Sub-Element of PRE (SEP1). The RNP that forms on the SEP1 RNA was affinity purified, in which TREX components as well as several other proteins were identified. TREX components and the SEP1-associating protein ZC3H18 are required for SEP1-mediated mRNA export. Significantly, ZC3H18 directly binds to the SEP1 RNA, interacts with TREX and is required for stable association of TREX with the SEP1-containing mRNA. Requirements for SEP1-mediated mRNA export are similar to those for splicing-dependent mRNA export. Consistent with these similarities, several SEP1-interacting proteins, including ZC3H18, ARS2, Acinus and Brr2, are required for efficient nuclear export of polyA RNAs. Together, our data indicate that SEP1 enhances mRNA export by recruiting TREX via ZC3H18. The new mRNA export factors that we identified might be involved in cap- and splicing-dependent TREX recruitment to cellular mRNAs.

  10. Identification of reference genes for quantitative RT-PCR analysis of microRNAs and mRNAs in castor bean (Ricinus communis L.) under drought stress.

    PubMed

    Cassol, Daniela; Cruz, Fernanda P; Espindola, Kauê; Mangeon, Amanda; Müller, Caroline; Loureiro, Marcelo Ehlers; Corrêa, Régis L; Sachetto-Martins, Gilberto

    2016-09-01

    Quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR) is one of the most powerful and sensitive techniques to the study of gene expression. Several factors influence RT-qPCR performance though, including the stability of the reference genes used for data normalization. While the selection of appropriate reference genes is crucial for accurate and reliable gene expression analysis, no suitable reference genes have been previously identified in castor bean under drought stress. In this study, the expression stability of eleven mRNAs, thirteen microRNAs (miRNAs) and one small nuclear RNA were analyzed in roots and leaves across different levels of water deficit. Three different algorithms were employed to analyze the RT-qPCR data, and the resulting outputs were merged using a non-weighted unsupervised rank aggregation method. Our analysis indicated that the Elongation factor 1-beta (EF1B), Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and ADP-ribosylation factor (ADP) ranked as the best candidates across diverse samples submitted to different levels of drought conditions. EF1B and Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), and EF1B and SKP1/ASK-interacting protein 16 (SKIP16) were found as the most suitable reference genes for expression analysis in roots and leaves, respectively. In addition, miRNAs miR168, miR160 and miR397 were selected as optimal reference genes across all tissues and treatments. miR168 and miR156 were recommended as reference for roots, while miR168 and miR160 were recommended for leaves. Together, our results constitute the first attempt to identify and validate the most suitable reference genes for accurate normalization of gene expression in castor bean under drought stress.

  11. Identification of true differentially expressed mRNAs in a pair of human bladder transitional cell carcinomas using an improved differential display procedure.

    PubMed

    Gromova, I; Gromov, P; Celis, J E

    1999-02-01

    Differential display in combination with arbitrarily primed polymerase chain reaction (PCR) fingerprinting has become one of the most powerful techniques to identify and isolate mRNAs that are differentially expressed in pairs of biological samples. However, in many cases the cDNA band corresponding to the differentially amplified product contains several cDNA species that comigrate with the cDNA of interest due to the poor resolution of the fingerprinting gels, thus hampering further analysis and identification of the desirable cDNA. To improve the electrophoretic resolution of differentially amplified cDNAs, we have utilized Resolver Gold agarose gel electrophoresis (Ingenius) as an additional step to overcome downstream problems encountered during RNA fingerprinting experiments. To illustrate the power of the modified differential display procedure we present a detailed analysis of the cDNA products differentially displayed in tumor biopsies obtained from a noninvasive (grade II, Ta) and an invasive (grade III, T2-T4) human bladder transitional cell carcinoma (TCC). Several genes that were differentially expressed in this tumor pair were identified. These included: tropomyosin 4, the protein disulfide isomerase precursor (PDI), MRP14, signal transducer CD24, keratins 8 and 13, cytochrome oxidase subunit IV (COXIV), putative transcription factor HOX-1.3, as well as two novel genes of yet unknown function. All of the identified cDNAs were shown to be truly differentially expressed by Northern blotting, reverse transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR), and two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE) analysis of the corresponding lesions.

  12. Identification of reference genes for quantitative expression analysis of microRNAs and mRNAs in barley under various stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Ferdous, Jannatul; Li, Yuan; Reid, Nicolas; Langridge, Peter; Shi, Bu-Jun; Tricker, Penny J

    2015-01-01

    For accurate and reliable gene expression analysis using quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR (qPCR), the selection of appropriate reference genes as an internal control for normalization is crucial. We hypothesized that non-coding, small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs)would be stably expressed in different barley varieties and under different experimental treatments,in different tissues and at different developmental stages of plant growth and therefore might prove to be suitable reference genes for expression analysis of both microRNAs (miRNAs)and mRNAs. In this study, we examined the expression stability of ten candidate reference genes in six barley genotypes under five experimental stresses, drought, fungal infection,boron toxicity, nutrient deficiency and salinity. We compared four commonly used housekeeping genes; Actin (ACT), alpha-Tubulin (α-TUB), Glycolytic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase(GAPDH), ADP-ribosylation factor 1-like protein (ADP), four snoRNAs; (U18,U61, snoR14 and snoR23) and two microRNAs (miR168, miR159) as candidate reference genes. We found that ADP, snoR14 and snoR23 were ranked as the best of these candidates across diverse samples. Additionally, we found that miR168 was a suitable reference gene for expression analysis in barley. Finally, we validated the performance of our stable and unstable candidate reference genes for both mRNA and miRNA qPCR data normalization under different stress conditions and demonstrated the superiority of the stable candidates. Our data demonstrate the suitability of barley snoRNAs and miRNAs as potential reference genes form iRNA and mRNA qPCR data normalization under different stress treatments [corrected].

  13. Conditional deletion of Notch1 and Notch2 genes in excitatory neurons of postnatal forebrain does not cause neurodegeneration or reduction of Notch mRNAs and proteins.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jin; Watanabe, Hirotaka; Wines-Samuelson, Mary; Zhao, Huailong; Gridley, Thomas; Kopan, Raphael; Shen, Jie

    2012-06-08

    Activation of Notch signaling requires intramembranous cleavage by γ-secretase to release the intracellular domain. We previously demonstrated that presenilin and nicastrin, components of the γ-secretase complex, are required for neuronal survival in the adult cerebral cortex. Here we investigate whether Notch1 and/or Notch2 are functional targets of presenilin/γ-secretase in promoting survival of excitatory neurons in the adult cerebral cortex by generating Notch1, Notch2, and Notch1/Notch2 conditional knock-out (cKO) mice. Unexpectedly, we did not detect any neuronal degeneration in the adult cerebral cortex of these Notch cKO mice up to ∼2 years of age, whereas conditional inactivation of presenilin or nicastrin using the same αCaMKII-Cre transgenic mouse caused progressive, striking neuronal loss beginning at 4 months of age. More surprisingly, we failed to detect any reduction of Notch1 and Notch2 mRNAs and proteins in the cerebral cortex of Notch1 and Notch2 cKO mice, respectively, even though Cre-mediated genomic deletion of the floxed Notch1 and Notch2 exons clearly took place in the cerebral cortex of these cKO mice. Furthermore, introduction of Cre recombinase into primary cortical cultures prepared from postnatal floxed Notch1/Notch2 pups, where Notch1 and Notch2 are highly expressed, completely eliminated their expression, indicating that the floxed Notch1 and Notch2 alleles can be efficiently inactivated in the presence of Cre. Together, these results demonstrate that Notch1 and Notch2 are not involved in the age-related neurodegeneration caused by loss of presenilin or γ-secretase and suggest that there is no detectable expression of Notch1 and Notch2 in pyramidal neurons of the adult cerebral cortex.

  14. Human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) genomes integrated in head and neck cancers and in HPV-16-immortalized human keratinocyte clones express chimeric virus-cell mRNAs similar to those found in cervical cancers.

    PubMed

    Lace, Michael J; Anson, James R; Klussmann, Jens P; Wang, Dong Hong; Smith, Elaine M; Haugen, Thomas H; Turek, Lubomir P

    2011-02-01

    Many human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive high-grade lesions and cancers of the uterine cervix harbor integrated HPV genomes expressing the E6 and E7 oncogenes from chimeric virus-cell mRNAs, but less is known about HPV integration in head and neck cancer (HNC). Here we compared viral DNA status and E6-E7 mRNA sequences in HPV-16-positive HNC tumors to those in independent human keratinocyte cell clones derived from primary tonsillar or foreskin epithelia immortalized with HPV-16 genomes. Three of nine HNC tumors and epithelial clones containing unintegrated HPV-16 genomes expressed mRNAs spliced from HPV-16 SD880 to SA3358 and terminating at the viral early gene p(A) signal. In contrast, most integrated HPV genomes in six HNCs and a set of 31 keratinocyte clones expressed HPV-16 major early promoter (MEP)-initiated mRNAs spliced from viral SD880 directly to diverse cellular sequences, with a minority spliced to SA3358 followed by a cellular DNA junction. Sequence analysis of chimeric virus-cell mRNAs from HNC tumors and keratinocyte clones identified viral integration sites in a variety of chromosomes, with some located in or near growth control genes, including the c-myc protooncogene and the gene encoding FAP-1 phosphatase. Taken together, these findings support the hypothesis that HPV integration in cancers is a stochastic process resulting in clonal selection of aggressively expanding cells with altered gene expression of integrated HPV genomes and potential perturbations of cellular genes at or near viral integration sites. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that this selection also takes place and can be studied in primary human keratinocytes in culture.

  15. Isolation of Estrogen Regulated Genes from MCF-7 Human Mammary Cancer Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-07-13

    cycle regulation of histone mRNAs ( Luscher and SchumperU, 1987). A 180 nucleotide fragment derived from the 3’ 19 end of exon 1 of c-myc reduces...Oncol. 4: 1321-1325. Luscher , B., and D. SchumperU. (1987) RNA 3’ Processing Regulates Histone mRNA Levels in a Mammalian Cell Cycle Mutant. A...P.W.J., M. Dieckmann, C Rhodes, and R Berg . (1977) Labeling Deoxyribonucleic Add to High Spedfic Activity in Vitro by Nick Translation witii DNA

  16. Osteoblast extracellular Ca2+ -sensing receptor regulates bone development, mineralization, and turnover.

    PubMed

    Dvorak-Ewell, Melita M; Chen, Tsui-Hua; Liang, Nathan; Garvey, Caitlin; Liu, Betty; Tu, Chialing; Chang, Wenhan; Bikle, Daniel D; Shoback, Dolores M

    2011-12-01

    The extracellular Ca(2+) -sensing receptor (CaR), a G protein-coupled receptor responsible for maintenance of calcium homeostasis, is implicated in regulation of skeletal metabolism. To discern the role of the osteoblast CaR in regulation of bone development and remodeling, we generated mice in which the CaR is excised in a broad population of osteoblasts expressing the 3.6-kb a(1) (I) collagen promoter. Conditional knockouts had abnormal skeletal histology at birth and developed progressively reduced mineralization secondary to retarded osteoblast differentiation, evident by significantly reduced numbers of osteoblasts and decreased expression of collagen I, osteocalcin, and sclerostin mRNAs. Elevated expression of ankylosis protein, ectonucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase 1, and osteopontin mRNAs in the conditional knockout indicate altered regulation of genes important in mineralization. Knockout of the osteoblast CaR also resulted in increased expression of the receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL), the major stimulator of osteoclast differentiation and function, consistent with elevated osteoclast numbers in vivo. Osteoblasts from the conditional knockouts exhibited delayed differentiation, reduced mineralizing capacity, altered expression of regulators of mineralization, and increased ability to promote osteoclastogenesis in coculture experiments. We conclude that CaR signaling in a broad population of osteoblasts is essential for bone development and remodeling and plays an important role in the regulation of differentiation and expression of regulators of bone resorption and mineralization.

  17. Expression Profiling Reveals Developmentally Regulated lncRNA Repertoire in the Mouse Male Germline1

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Jianqiang; Wu, Jingwen; Schuster, Andrew S.; Hennig, Grant W.; Yan, Wei

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT In mammals, the transcriptome of large noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) is believed to be greater than that of messenger RNAs (mRNAs). Some lncRNAs, especially large intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs), participate in epigenetic regulation by binding chromatin-modifying protein complexes and regulating protein-coding gene expression. Given that epigenetic regulation plays a critical role in male germline development, we embarked on expression profiling of both lncRNAs and mRNAs during male germline reprogramming and postnatal development using microarray analyses. We identified thousands of lncRNAs and hundreds of lincRNAs that are either up- or downregulated at six critical time points during male germ cell development. In addition, highly regulated lncRNAs were correlated with nearby (<30 kb) mRNA gene clusters, which were also significantly up- or downregulated. Large ncRNAs can be localized to both the nucleus and cytoplasm, with nuclear lncRNAs mostly associated with key components of the chromatin-remodeling protein complexes. Our data indicate that expression of lncRNAs is dynamically regulated during male germline development and that lncRNAs may function to regulate gene expression at both transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels via genetic and epigenetic mechanisms. PMID:24048575

  18. miRNAs regulated by estrogens, tamoxifen, and endocrine disruptors and their downstream gene targets

    PubMed Central

    Klinge, Carolyn M.

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short (22 nucleotides), single-stranded, non-coding RNAs that form complimentary base-pairs with the 3’ untranslated region of target mRNAs within the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) and block translation and/or stimulate mRNA transcript degradation. The non-coding miRBase (release 21, June 2014) reports that human genome contains ~2,588 mature miRNAs which regulate ~ 60% of human protein-coding mRNAs. Dysregulation of miRNA expression has been implicated in estrogen-related diseases including breast and endometrial cancers. The mechanism for estrogen regulation of miRNA expression and the role of estrogen-regulated miRNAs in normal homeostasis, reproduction, lactation, and in cancer is an area of great research and clinical interest. Estrogens regulate miRNAs transcription through estrogen receptors α and β in a tissue-specific and cell-dependent manner. This review focuses primary on the regulation of miRNA expression by ligand-activated ERs and their bona fide gene targets and includes miRNAs regulation by tamoxifen and endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in breast cancer and cell lines. PMID:25659536

  19. Accelerated development of liver fibrosis in CCl4-treated rats by the weekly induction of acute phase response episodes: upregulation of alpha1(I) procollagen and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Greenwel, P; Rojkind, M

    1997-08-22

    Patients with alcoholic hepatitis have several manifestations of the acute phase response (APR) and have elevated blood levels of interleukin-1, interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha. We have previously shown that liver stellate cells express interleukin-6 mRNA and protein and respond to this cytokine with increased expression of alpha1(I) procollagen mRNA. We further showed that the production of an APR episode stimulates a transient expression of alpha1(I) procollagen mRNA in the liver. In this communication we demonstrate that the concomitant induction of a weekly APR episode in rats with a schedule of CCl4 to produce cirrhosis, accelerates the development of liver fibrosis. We show that the enhancement of liver fibrosis is due, in part, to further upregulation in the expression of alpha1(I) procollagen and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 mRNAs above values observed in control rats receiving only CCl4. The effect of the APR appears to have specificity since not all the mRNAs measured were equally affected. Altogether, these results suggest that increased blood or liver levels of APR cytokines, whether induced by APR episodes, endotoxin or other unrelated causes, may contribute to the development of liver fibrosis by enhancing the expression of type I collagen and of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 mRNAs.

  20. Expression of mRNAs for PPT, CGRP, NF-200, and MAP-2 in cocultures of dissociated DRG neurons and skeletal muscle cells in administration of NGF or NT-3.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weiwei; Li, Hao; Xing, Ziying; Yuan, Hongtu; Kindy, Mark S; Li, Zhenzhong

    2012-07-05

    Both neurotrophins (NTs) and target skeletal muscle (SKM) cells are essential for the maintenance of the function of neurons and nerve-muscle communication. However, much less is known about the association of target SKM cells with distinct NTs on the expression of mRNAs for preprotachykinin (PPT), calcitonin-gene related peptide (CGRP), neurofilament 200 (NF-200), and microtubule associated protein 2 (MAP-2) in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) sensory neurons. In the present study, a neuromuscular coculture model of dissociated dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and SKM cells was established. The morphology of DRG neurons and SKM cells in coculture was observed with an inverted phase contrast microscope. The effects of nerve growth factor (NGF) or neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) on the expression of mRNAs for PPT, CGRP, NF-200, and MAP-2 was analyzed by real time-PCR assay. The morphology of DRG neuronal cell bodies and SKM cells in neuromuscular coculture at different conditions was similar. The neurons presented evidence of dense neurite outgrowth in the presence of distinct NTs in neuromuscular cocultures. NGF and NT-3 increased mRNA levels of PPT, CGRP, and NF-200, but not MAP-2, in neuromuscular cocultures. These results offer new clues towards a better understanding of the association of target SKM cells with distinct NTs on the expression of mRNAs for PPT, CGRP, NF-200 and MAP-2, and implicate the association of target SKM cells and NTs with DRG sensory neuronal phenotypes.

  1. TOR-dependent post-transcriptional regulation of autophagy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Guowu; McQuiston, Travis; Bernard, Amélie; Park, Yoon-Dong; Qiu, Jin; Vural, Ali; Zhang, Nannan; Waterman, Scott R; Blewett, Nathan H; Myers, Timothy G; Maraia, Richard J; Kehrl, John H; Uzel, Gulbu; Klionsky, Daniel J; Williamson, Peter R

    2015-01-01

    Regulation of autophagy is required to maintain cellular equilibrium and prevent disease. While extensive study of post-translational mechanisms has yielded important insights into autophagy induction, less is known about post-transcriptional mechanisms that could potentiate homeostatic control. In our study, we showed that the RNA-binding protein, Dhh1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Vad1 in the pathogenic yeast Cryptococcus neoformans is involved in recruitment and degradation of key autophagy mRNAs. In addition, phosphorylation of the decapping protein Dcp2 by the target of rapamycin (TOR), facilitates decapping and degradation of autophagy-related mRNAs, resulting in repression of autophagy under nutrient-replete conditions. The post-transcriptional regulatory process is conserved in both mouse and human cells and plays a role in autophagy-related modulation of the inflammasome product IL1B. These results were then applied to provide mechanistic insight into autoimmunity of a patient with a PIK3CD/p110δ gain-of-function mutation. These results thus identify an important new post-transcriptional mechanism of autophagy regulation that is highly conserved between yeast and mammals.

  2. Regulation of Flavonoid Biosynthetic Genes in Germinating Arabidopsis Seedlings.

    PubMed Central

    Kubasek, WL; Shirley, BW; McKillop, A; Goodman, HM; Briggs, W; Ausubel, FM

    1992-01-01

    Many higher plants, including Arabidopsis, transiently display purple anthocyanin pigments just after seed germination. We observed that steady state levels of mRNAs encoded by four flavonoid biosynthetic genes, PAL1 (encoding phenylalanine ammonia-lyase 1), CHS (encoding chalcone synthase), CHI (encoding chalcone isomerase), and DFR (encoding dihydroflavonol reductase), were temporally regulated, peaking in 3-day-old seedlings grown in continuous white light. Except for the case of PAL1 mRNA, mRNA levels for these flavonoid genes were very low in seedlings grown in darkness. Light induction studies using seedlings grown in darkness showed that PAL1 mRNA began to accumulate before CHS and CHI mRNAs, which, in turn, began to accumulate before DFR mRNA. This order of induction is the same as the order of the biosynthetic steps in flavonoid biosynthesis. Our results suggest that the flavonoid biosynthetic pathway is coordinately regulated by a developmental timing mechanism during germination. Blue light and UVB light induction experiments using red light- and dark-grown seedlings showed that the flavonoid biosynthetic genes are induced most effectively by UVB light and that blue light induction is mediated by a specific blue light receptor. PMID:12297632

  3. Formation of mos RNA granules in the zebrafish oocyte that differ from cyclin B1 RNA granules in distribution, density and regulation.

    PubMed

    Horie, Mayu; Kotani, Tomoya

    2016-12-01

    Many translationally repressed mRNAs are deposited in the oocyte cytoplasm for progression of the meiotic cell cycle and early development. mos and cyclin B1 mRNAs encode proteins promoting oocyte meiosis, and translational control of these mRNAs is important for normal progression of meiotic cell division. We previously demonstrated that cyclin B1 mRNA forms RNA granules in the zebrafish and mouse oocyte cytoplasm and that the formation of RNA granules is crucial for regulating the timing of translational activation of the mRNA. However, whether the granule formation is specific to cyclin B1 mRNA remains unknown. In this study, we found that zebrafish mos mRNA forms granules distinct from those of cyclin B1 mRNA. Fluorescent in situ hybridization analysis showed that cyclin B1 RNA granules were assembled in dense clusters, while mos RNA granules were distributed diffusely in the animal polar cytoplasm. Sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation analysis showed that the density of mos RNA granules was partly lower than that of cyclin B1 mRNA. Similar to cyclin B1 RNA granules, mos RNA granules were disassembled after initiation of oocyte maturation at the timing at which the poly(A) tail was elongated. However, while almost all of the granules of cyclin B1 were disassembled simultaneously, a fraction of mos RNA granules firstly disappeared and then a large part of them was disassembled. In addition, while cyclin B1 RNA granules were disassembled in a manner dependent on actin filament depolymerization, certain fractions of mos RNA granules were disassembled independently of actin filaments. These results suggest that cytoplasmic regulation of translationally repressed mRNAs by formation of different RNA granules is a key mechanism for translational control of distinct mRNAs in the oocyte.

  4. eIF4B stimulates translation of long mRNAs with structured 5′ UTRs and low closed-loop potential but weak dependence on eIF4G

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Neelam Dabas; Zhou, Fujun; Harris, Michael S.; Ingolia, Nicholas T.

    2016-01-01

    DEAD-box RNA helicases eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4A (eIF4A) and Ded1 promote translation by resolving mRNA secondary structures that impede preinitiation complex (PIC) attachment to mRNA or scanning. Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4B (eIF4B) is a cofactor for eIF4A but also might function independently of eIF4A. Ribosome profiling of mutants lacking eIF4B or with impaired eIF4A or Ded1 activity revealed that eliminating eIF4B reduces the relative translational efficiencies of many more genes than does inactivation of eIF4A, despite comparable reductions in bulk translation, and few genes display unusually strong requirements for both factors. However, either eliminating eIF4B or inactivating eIF4A preferentially impacts mRNAs with longer, more structured 5′ untranslated regions (UTRs). These findings reveal an eIF4A-independent role for eIF4B in addition to its function as eIF4A cofactor in promoting PIC attachment or scanning on structured mRNAs. eIF4B, eIF4A, and Ded1 mutations also preferentially impair translation of longer mRNAs in a fashion mitigated by the ability to form closed-loop messenger ribonucleoprotein particles (mRNPs) via eIF4F–poly(A)-binding protein 1 (Pab1) association, suggesting cooperation between closed-loop assembly and eIF4B/helicase functions. Remarkably, depleting eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4G (eIF4G), the scaffold subunit of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4F (eIF4F), preferentially impacts short mRNAs with strong closed-loop potential and unstructured 5′ UTRs, exactly the opposite features associated with hyperdependence on the eIF4B/helicases. We propose that short, highly efficient mRNAs preferentially depend on the stimulatory effects of eIF4G-dependent closed-loop assembly. PMID:27601676

  5. VOLTAGE REGULATOR

    DOEpatents

    Von Eschen, R.L.; Scheele, P.F.

    1962-04-24

    A transistorized voltage regulator which provides very close voitage regulation up to about 180 deg F is described. A diode in the positive line provides a constant voltage drop from the input to a regulating transistor emitter. An amplifier is coupled to the positive line through a resistor and is connected between a difference circuit and the regulating transistor base which is negative due to the difference in voltage drop across thc diode and the resistor so that a change in the regulator output causes the amplifier to increase or decrease the base voltage and current and incrcase or decrease the transistor impedance to return the regulator output to normal. (AEC)

  6. The role of RNA structure at 5' untranslated region in microRNA-mediated gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Gu, Wanjun; Xu, Yuming; Xie, Xueying; Wang, Ting; Ko, Jae-Hong; Zhou, Tong

    2014-09-01

    Recent studies have suggested that the secondary structure of the 5' untranslated region (5' UTR) of messenger RNA (mRNA) is important for microRNA (miRNA)-mediated gene regulation in humans. mRNAs that are targeted by miRNA tend to have a higher degree of local secondary structure in their 5' UTR; however, the general role of the 5' UTR in miRNA-mediated gene regulation remains unknown. We systematically surveyed the secondary structure of 5' UTRs in both plant and animal species and found a universal trend of increased mRNA stability near the 5' cap in mRNAs that are regulated by miRNA in animals, but not in plants. Intra-genome comparison showed that gene expression level, GC content of the 5' UTR, number of miRNA target sites, and 5' UTR length may influence mRNA structure near the 5' cap. Our results suggest that the 5' UTR secondary structure performs multiple functions in regulating post-transcriptional processes. Although the local structure immediately upstream of the start codon is involved in translation initiation, RNA structure near the 5' cap site, rather than the structure of the full-length 5' UTR sequences, plays an important role in miRNA-mediated gene regulation.

  7. Regulation of cel genes of C. cellulolyticum: identification of GlyR2, a transcriptional regulator regulating cel5D gene expression.

    PubMed

    Fendri, Imen; Abdou, Laetitia; Trotter, Valentine; Dedieu, Luc; Maamar, Hédia; Minton, Nigel P; Tardif, Chantal

    2013-01-01

    Transcription and expression regulation of some individual cel genes (cel5A, cel5I, cel5D and cel44O) of Clostridium cellulolyticum were investigated. Unlike the cip-cel operon, these genes are transcribed as monocistronic units of transcription, except cel5D. The location of the transcription initiation sites was determined using RT-PCR and the mRNA 5'-end extremities were detected using primer extension experiments. Similarly to the cip-cel operon, cel5A and cel5I expressions are regulated by a carbon catabolite repression mechanism, whereas cel44O and cel5D expressions do not seem to be submitted to this regulation. The role of the putative transcriptional regulator GlyR2 in the regulation of cel5D expression was investigated. The recombinant protein GlyR2 was produced and was shown to bind in vitro to the cel5D and glyR2 promoter regions, suggesting that besides regulating its own expression, GlyR2 may regulate cel5D expression. To test this hypothesis in vivo, an insertional glyR2 mutant was generated and the effect of this disruption on cel5D expression was evaluated. Levels of cel5D mRNAs in the mutant were 16 fold lower than that of the wild-type strain suggesting that GlyR2 acts as an activator of cel5D expression.

  8. Determinants that contribute to cytoplasmic stability of human c-fos and. beta. -globin mRNAs are located at several sites in each mRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Kabnick, K.S.; Housman, D.E.

    1988-08-01

    The authors have analyzed the contributions to cytoplasmic stability in an mRNA species with a very short half-life (human c-fos) and an mRNA species with a very long half-life (human ..beta..-globin). When the human c-fos promoter was used to drive the expression of human c-fos, ..beta..-globin, and chimeric DNAs between c-fos and ..beta..-globin in transfected cells, a pulse of mRNA synthesis was obtained following induction of transcription by refeeding quiescent cells with medium containing 15% calf serum. The mRNA half-life was determined by using Northern (RNA) blot analysis of mRNAs prepared at various times following the pulse of transcription. Under these conditions human c-fos mRNA exhibited a half-life of 6.6 min and human ..beta..-globin mRNA exhibited a half-life of 17.5 h. Replacement of the 3' end of the c-fos mRNA with the 3' end of the ..beta..-globin mRNA increased the half-life of the resultant RNA from 6.6 to 34 min. The reciprocal chimera had a half-life of 34.6 min compared with the 17.5-half-life of ..beta..-globin mRNA. These results suggest that sequences which make a major contribution to mRNA stability reside in the 3' end of either or both molecules. A chimera in which the 5' untranslated region of globin was replaced by part of the 5' untranslated region of fos led to destabilization of the encoded mRNA. This construct produced an mRNA with a half-life of 6.8 h instead of the 17.5-h half-life of globin. This result suggests that additional determinants of stability reside in the 5' end of these mRNA molecules. Substitution of part of the 5' untranslated region of fox by the 5' untranslated region of ..beta..-globin yielded an mRNA with stability similar to fos mRNA. These results suggest that interactions among sequences within each mRNA contribute to the stability of the respective molecules.

  9. Towards simultaneous individual and tissue identification: A proof-of-principle study on parallel sequencing of STRs, amelogenin, and mRNAs with the Ion Torrent PGM.

    PubMed

    Zubakov, D; Kokmeijer, I; Ralf, A; Rajagopalan, N; Calandro, L; Wootton, S; Langit, R; Chang, C; Lagace, R; Kayser, M

    2015-07-01

    DNA-based individual identification and RNA-based tissue identification represent two commonly-used tools in forensic investigation, aiming to identify crime scene sample donors and helping to provide links between DNA-identified sample donors and criminal acts. Currently however, both analyses are typically performed separately. In this proof-of-principle study, we developed an approach for the simultaneous analysis of forensic STRs, amelogenin, and forensic mRNAs based on parallel targeted DNA/RNA sequencing using the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine(®) (PGM™) System coupled with the AmpliSeq™ targeted amplification. We demonstrated that 9 autosomal STRs commonly used for individual identification (CSF1PO, D16S539, D3S1358, D5S818, D7S820, D8S1179, TH01, TPOX, and vWA), the AMELX/AMELY system widely applied for sex identification, and 12 mRNA markers previously established for forensic tissue identification (ALAS2 and SPTB for peripheral blood, MMP10 and MMP11 for menstrual blood, HTN3 and STATH for saliva, PRM1 and TGM4 for semen, CYP2B7P1 and MUC4 for vaginal secretion, CCL27 and LCE1C for skin) together with two candidate reference mRNA markers (HPRT1 and SDHA) can all be successfully combined. Unambiguous mRNA-based tissue identification was achieved in all samples from all forensically relevant tissues tested, and STR sequencing analysis of the tissue sample donors was 100% concordant with conventional STR profiling using a commercial kit. Successful STR analysis was obtained from 1ng of genomic DNA and mRNA analysis from 10ng total RNA; however, sensitivity limits were not investigated in this proof-of-principle study and are expected to be much lower. Since dried materials with noticeable RNA degradation and small DNA/RNA amplicons with high-coverage sequencing were used, the achieved correct individual and tissue identification demonstrates the suitability of this approach for analyzing degraded materials in future forensic applications. Overall

  10. Post-transcriptional regulation in the myo1Δ mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Saccharomyces cerevisiae myosin type II-deficient (myo1Δ) strains remain viable and divide, despite the absence of a cytokinetic ring, by activation of the PKC1-dependent cell wall integrity pathway (CWIP). Since the myo1Δ transcriptional fingerprint is a subset of the CWIP fingerprint, the myo1Δ strain may provide a simplified paradigm for cell wall stress survival. Results To explore the post-transcriptional regulation of the myo1Δ stress response, 1,301 differentially regulated ribosome-bound mRNAs were identified by microarray analysis of which 204 were co-regulated by transcription and translation. Four categories of mRNA were significantly affected - protein biosynthesis, metabolism, carbohydrate metabolism, and unknown functions. Nine genes of the 20 CWIP fingerprint genes were post-transcriptionally regulated. Down and up regulation of selected ribosomal protein and cell wall biosynthesis mRNAs was validated by their distribution in polysomes from wild type and myo1Δ strains. Western blot analysis revealed accumulation of the phosphorylated form of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 (eIF2α-P) and a reduction in the steady state levels of the translation initiation factor eIF4Gp in myo1Δ strains. Deletion of GCN2 in myo1Δ abolished eIF2αp phosphorylation, and showed a severe growth defect. The presence of P-bodies in myo1Δ strains suggests that the process of mRNA sequestration is active, however, the three representative down regulated RP mRNAs, RPS8A, RPL3 and RPL7B were present at equivalent levels in Dcp2p-mCh-positive immunoprecipitated fractions from myo1Δ and wild type cells. These same RP mRNAs were also selectively co-precipitated with eIF2α-P in myo1Δ strains. Conclusions Quantitative analysis of ribosome-associated mRNAs and their polyribosome distributions suggests selective regulation of mRNA translation efficiency in myo1Δ strains. Inhibition of translation initiation factor eIF2α (eIF2α-P) in these strains

  11. Tissue-specific variation in C4 and Slp gene regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Cox, B J; Robins, D M

    1988-01-01

    C4 and Slp are highly homologous mouse genes that differ in function and regulation. Allelic variants exist in quantitative regulation of C4 and in hormonal regulation of Slp. We have examined expression in several tissues, including liver and peritoneal macrophages which are the major sites of synthesis, using a probe that allows direct comparison of C4 and Slp mRNAs. Correctly-sized and initiated RNA, within an order of magnitude of liver levels, is found in mammary gland, lung, spleen, and kidney; lower levels are detectable in testis, brain, heart and submaxillary gland. By comparing expression in congenic mouse strains differing in C4 and Slp loci, regulation of these genes is seen to vary in different tissues. This provides a well-defined genetic system in which to examine cis-acting sequences and trans-acting factors that result in tissue-specific patterns of gene regulation. Images PMID:3405752

  12. Rasputin Functions as a Positive Regulator of Orb in Drosophila Oogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sinsimer, Kristina S.; Wong, Li Chin; McLeod, Ian; Yates, John; Haynes, Susan; Schedl, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The determination of cell fate and the establishment of polarity axes during Drosophila oogenesis depend upon pathways that localize mRNAs within the egg chamber and control their on-site translation. One factor that plays a central role in regulating on-site translation of mRNAs is Orb. Orb is a founding member of the conserved CPEB family of RNA-binding proteins. These proteins bind to target sequences in 3′ UTRs and regulate mRNA translation by modulating poly(A) tail length. In addition to controlling the translation of axis-determining mRNAs like grk, fs(1)K10, and osk, Orb protein autoregulates its own synthesis by binding to orb mRNA and activating its translation. We have previously shown that Rasputin (Rin), the Drosophila homologue of Ras-GAP SH3 Binding Protein (G3BP), associates with Orb in a messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) complex. Rin is an evolutionarily conserved RNA-binding protein believed to function as a link between Ras signaling and RNA metabolism. Here we show that Orb and Rin form a complex in the female germline. Characterization of a new rin allele shows that rin is essential for oogenesis. Co-localization studies suggest that Orb and Rin form a complex in the oocyte at different stages of oogenesis. This is supported by genetic and biochemical analyses showing that rin functions as a positive regulator in the orb autoregulatory pathway by increasing Orb protein expression. Tandem Mass Spectrometry analysis shows that several canonical stress granule proteins are associated with the Orb-Rin complex suggesting that a conserved mRNP complex regulates localized translation during oogenesis in Drosophila. PMID:24069162

  13. Rasputin functions as a positive regulator of orb in Drosophila oogenesis.

    PubMed

    Costa, Alexandre; Pazman, Cecilia; Sinsimer, Kristina S; Wong, Li Chin; McLeod, Ian; Yates, John; Haynes, Susan; Schedl, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The determination of cell fate and the establishment of polarity axes during Drosophila oogenesis depend upon pathways that localize mRNAs within the egg chamber and control their on-site translation. One factor that plays a central role in regulating on-site translation of mRNAs is Orb. Orb is a founding member of the conserved CPEB family of RNA-binding proteins. These proteins bind to target sequences in 3' UTRs and regulate mRNA translation by modulating poly(A) tail length. In addition to controlling the translation of axis-determining mRNAs like grk, fs(1)K10, and osk, Orb protein autoregulates its own synthesis by binding to orb mRNA and activating its translation. We have previously shown that Rasputin (Rin), the Drosophila homologue of Ras-GAP SH3 Binding Protein (G3BP), associates with Orb in a messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) complex. Rin is an evolutionarily conserved RNA-binding protein believed to function as a link between Ras signaling and RNA metabolism. Here we show that Orb and Rin form a complex in the female germline. Characterization of a new rin allele shows that rin is essential for oogenesis. Co-localization studies suggest that Orb and Rin form a complex in the oocyte at different stages of oogenesis. This is supported by genetic and biochemical analyses showing that rin functions as a positive regulator in the orb autoregulatory pathway by increasing Orb protein expression. Tandem Mass Spectrometry analysis shows that several canonical stress granule proteins are associated with the Orb-Rin complex suggesting that a conserved mRNP complex regulates localized translation during oogenesis in Drosophila.

  14. Dopaminergic regulation of orexin neurons.

    PubMed

    Bubser, Michael; Fadel, Jim R; Jackson, Lela L; Meador-Woodruff, James H; Jing, Deqiang; Deutch, Ariel Y

    2005-06-01

    Orexin/hypocretin neurons in the lateral hypothalamus and adjacent perifornical area (LH/PFA) innervate midbrain dopamine (DA) neurons that project to corticolimbic sites and subserve psychostimulant-induced locomotor activity. However, it is not known whether dopamine neurons in turn regulate the activity of orexin cells. We examined the ability of dopamine agonists to activate orexin neurons in the rat, as reflected by induction of Fos. The mixed dopamine agonist apomorphine increased Fos expression in orexin cells, with a greater effect on orexin neurons located medial to the fornix. Both the selective D1-like agonist, A-77636, and the D2-like agonist, quinpirole, also induced Fos in orexin cells, suggesting that stimulation of either receptor subtype is sufficient to activate orexin neurons. Consistent with this finding, combined SCH 23390 (D1 antagonist)-haloperidol (D2 antagonist) pretreatment blocked apomorphine-induced activation of medial as well as lateral orexin neurons; in contrast, pretreatment with either the D1-like or D2-like antagonists alone did not attenuate apomorphine-induced activation of medial orexin cells. In situ hybridization histochemistry revealed that LH/PFA cells rarely express mRNAs encoding dopamine receptors, suggesting that orexin cells are transsynaptically activated by apomorphine. We therefore lesioned the nucleus accumbens, a site known to regulate orexin cells, but this treatment did not alter apomorphine-elicited activation of medial or lateral orexin neurons. Interestingly, apomorphine failed to activate orexin cells in isoflurane-anaesthetized animals. These data suggest that apomorphine-induced arousal but not accumbens-mediated hyperactivity is required for dopamine to transsynaptically activate orexin neurons.

  15. Dynamic Post-Transcriptional Regulation of HIV-1 Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Kula, Anna; Marcello, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    Gene expression of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is a highly regulated process. Basal transcription of the integrated provirus generates early transcripts that encode for the viral products Tat and Rev. Tat promotes the elongation of RNA polymerase while Rev mediates the nuclear export of viral RNAs that contain the Rev-responsive RNA element (RRE). These RNAs are exported from the nucleus to allow expression of Gag-Pol and Env proteins and for the production of full-length genomic RNAs. A balance exists between completely processed mRNAs and RRE-containing RNAs. Rev functions as an adaptor that recruits cellular factors to re-direct singly spliced and unspliced viral RNAs to nuclear export. The aim of this review is to address the dynamic regulation of this post-transcriptional pathway in light of recent findings that implicate several novel cellular cofactors of Rev function. PMID:24832221

  16. INITIATION AND REGULATION OF PARAMYXOVIRUS TRANSCRIPTION AND REPLICATION

    PubMed Central

    Noton, Sarah L.; Fearns, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    The paramyxovirus family has a genome consisting of a single strand of negative sense RNA. This genome acts as a template for two distinct processes: transcription to generate subgenomic, capped and polyadenylated mRNAs, and genome replication. These viruses only encode one polymerase. Thus, an intriguing question is, how does the viral polymerase initiate and become committed to either transcription or replication? By answering this we can begin to understand how these two processes are regulated. In this review article, we present recent findings from studies on the paramyxovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, which show how its polymerase is able to initiate transcription and replication from a single promoter. We discuss how these findings apply to other paramyxoviruses. Then, we examine how trans-acting proteins and promoter secondary structure might serve to regulate transcription and replication during different phases of the paramyxovirus replication cycle. PMID:25683441

  17. Mechanism and Regulation of Protein Synthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Dever, Thomas E; Kinzy, Terri Goss; Pavitt, Graham D

    2016-05-01

    In this review, we provide an overview of protein synthesis in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae The mechanism of protein synthesis is well conserved between yeast and other eukaryotes, and molecular genetic studies in budding yeast have provided critical insights into the fundamental process of translation as well as its regulation. The review focuses on the initiation and elongation phases of protein synthesis with descriptions of the roles of translation initiation and elongation factors that assist the ribosome in binding the messenger RNA (mRNA), selecting the start codon, and synthesizing the polypeptide. We also examine mechanisms of translational control highlighting the mRNA cap-binding proteins and the regulation of GCN4 and CPA1 mRNAs.

  18. The regulation and functions of the nuclear RNA exosome complex.

    PubMed

    Kilchert, Cornelia; Wittmann, Sina; Vasiljeva, Lidia

    2016-04-01

    The RNA exosome complex is the most versatile RNA-degradation machine in eukaryotes. The exosome has a central role in several aspects of RNA biogenesis, including RNA maturation and surveillance. Moreover, it is emerging as an important player in regulating the expression levels of specific mRNAs in response to environmental cues and during cell differentiation and development. Although the mechanisms by which RNA is targeted to (or escapes from) the exosome are still not fully understood, general principles have begun to emerge, which we discuss in this Review. In addition, we introduce and discuss novel, previously unappreciated functions of the nuclear exosome, including in transcription regulation and in the maintenance of genome stability.

  19. Inferring RBP-Mediated Regulation in Lung Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lafzi, Atefeh; Kazan, Hilal

    2016-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play key roles in post-transcriptional regulation of mRNAs. Dysregulations in RBP-mediated mechanisms have been found to be associated with many steps of cancer initiation and progression. Despite this, previous studies of gene expression in cancer have ignored the effect of RBPs. To this end, we developed a lasso regression model that predicts gene expression in cancer by incorporating RBP-mediated regulation as well as the effects of other well-studied factors such as copy-number variation, DNA methylation, TFs and miRNAs. As a case study, we applied our model to Lung squamous cell carcinoma (LUSC) data as we found that there are several RBPs differentially expressed in LUSC. Including RBP-mediated regulatory effects in addition to the other features significantly increased the Spearman rank correlation between predicted and measured expression of held-out genes. Using a feature selection procedure that accounts for the adaptive search employed by lasso regularization, we identified the candidate regulators in LUSC. Remarkably, several of these candidate regulators are RBPs. Furthermore, majority of the candidate regulators have been previously found to be associated with lung cancer. To investigate the mechanisms that are controlled by these regulators, we predicted their target gene sets based on our model. We validated the target gene sets by comparing against experimentally verified targets. Our results suggest that the future studies of gene expression in cancer must consider the effect of RBP-mediated regulation. PMID:27186987

  20. Dense spermatozoa in stallion ejaculates contain lower concentrations of mRNAs encoding the sperm specific calcium channel 1, ornithine decarboxylase antizyme 3, aromatase, and estrogen receptor alpha than less dense spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Ing, N H; Forrest, D W; Love, C C; Varner, D D

    2014-07-15

    Stallions are unique among livestock in that, like men, they commonly receive medical treatment for subfertility. In both species, about 15% of individuals have normal semen parameters but are subfertile, indicating a need for novel analyses of spermatozoa function. One procedure for improving fertilizing capability of stallions and men is isolation of dense spermatozoa from an ejaculate for use in artificial insemination. In the current study, dense and less dense spermatozoa were purified by density gradient centrifugation from individual ejaculates from seven reproductively normal adult stallions. The RNA isolated from the spermatozoa seemed to be naturally fragmented to an average length of 250 bases, consistent with reports of spermatozoa RNA from other species. The DNAse treatment of RNA prepared from spermatozoa removed any genomic DNA contamination, as assessed by PCR with intron spanning primers for the protamine 1 (PRM1) gene. Concentrations of seven mRNAs in spermatozoa, correlated with the fertility of men and bulls, were quantified by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction in dense and less dense spermatozoa. Concentrations of four mRNAs were two- to four-fold lower in dense spermatozoa compared with less dense spermatozoa: Encoding the spermatozoa-specific calcium channel (P < 0.03), ornithine decarboxylase antizyme 3 (P < 0.02), aromatase (P < 0.02), and estrogen receptor alpha (P < 0.08). In contrast, concentrations of three other mRNAs, encoding PRM1 and heat shock proteins HSPA8 and DNAJC4, were not different (P > 0.1). These results identify new differences in mRNA concentrations in populations of spermatozoa with dissimilar densities.

  1. Hypoxia and Hypoglycemia Synergistically Regulate mRNA Stability.

    PubMed

    Carraway, Kristen R; Johnson, Ellen M; Kauffmann, Travis C; Fry, Nate J; Mansfield, Kyle D

    2017-03-31

    Ischemic events, common in many diseases, result from decreased blood flow and impaired delivery of oxygen and glucose to tissues of the body. While much is known about the cellular transcriptional response to ischemia, much less is known about the posttranscriptional response to oxygen and glucose deprivation. The goal of this project was to investigate one such posttranscriptional response, the regulation of mRNA stability. To that end, we have identified a number of novel ischemia-related mRNAs that are synergistically stabilized by oxygen and glucose deprivation including VEGF, MYC, MDM2, and CYR61. This increase in mRNA half-life requires the synergistic effects of both low oxygen (1%) as well as low glucose (≤1 g/L) conditions. Oxygen or glucose deprivation alone fails to initiate the response, as exposure to either high glucose (4 g/L) or normoxic conditions inhibits the response. Furthermore, in response to hypoxia/hypoglycemia, the identified mRNAs are released from the RNA binding protein KHSRP which likely contributes to their stabilization.

  2. Nonsense-mediated RNA decay regulation by cellular stress: implications for tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Lawrence B

    2010-03-01

    Nonsense-mediated RNA decay (NMD) has long been viewed as an important constitutive mechanism to rapidly eliminate mutated mRNAs. More recently, it has been appreciated that NMD also degrades multiple nonmutated transcripts and that NMD can be regulated by wide variety of cellular stresses. Many of the stresses that inhibit NMD, including cellular hypoxia and amino acid deprivation, are experienced in cells exposed to hostile microenvironments, and several NMD-targeted transcripts promote cellular adaptation in response to these environmental stresses. Because adaptation to the microenvironment is crucial in tumorigenesis, and because NMD targets many mutated tumor suppressor gene transcripts, the regulation of NMD may have particularly important implications in cancer. This review briefly outlines the mechanisms by which transcripts are identified and targeted by NMD and reviews the evidence showing that NMD is a regulated process that can dynamically alter gene expression. Although much of the focus in NMD research has been in identifying the proteins that play a role in NMD and identifying NMD-targeted transcripts, recent data about the potential functional significance of NMD regulation, including the stabilization of alternatively spliced mRNA isoforms, the validation of mRNAs as bona fide NMD targets, and the role of NMD in tumorigenesis, are explored.

  3. Induction of cytokine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and chemokine macrophage inflammatory protein 2 mRNAs in macrophages by Legionella pneumophila or Salmonella typhimurium attachment requires different ligand-receptor systems.

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Y; Klein, T W; Friedman, H

    1996-01-01

    The attachment of bacteria to macrophages is mediated by different ligands and receptors and induces various intracellular molecular responses. In the present study, induction of cytokines and chemokines, especially granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (MIP-2), was examined, following bacterial attachment, with regard to the ligand-receptor systems involved. Attachment of Legionella pneumophila or Salmonella typhimurium to cultured mouse peritoneal macrophages increased the steady-state levels of cellular mRNAs for the cytokines interleukin 1beta (IL-1beta), IL-6, and GM-CSF as well as the chemokines MIP-1beta, MIP-2, and KC. However, when macrophages were treated with alpha-methyl-D-mannoside (alphaMM), a competitor of glycopeptide ligands, induction of cytokine mRNAs was inhibited, but the levels of chemokine mRNAs were not. Pretreatment of the bacteria with fresh mouse serum enhanced the level of GM-CSF mRNA but not the level of MIP-2 mRNA. In addition, serum treatment reduced the inhibitory effect of alphaMM on GM-CSF mRNA. These results indicate that bacterial attachment increases the steady-state levels of the cytokine and chemokine mRNAs tested by at least two distinct receptor-ligand systems, namely, one linked to cytokine induction and involving mannose or other sugar residues and the other linked to chemokine induction and relatively alphaMM insensitive. Furthermore, opsonization with serum engages other pathways in the cytokine response which are relatively independent of the alphaMM-sensitive system. Regarding bacterial surface ligands involved in cytokine mRNA induction, evidence is presented that the flagellum may be important in stimulating cytokine GM-CSF message but not chemokine MIP-2 message. Analysis of cytokine GM-CSF and chemokine MIP-2 signaling pathways with protein kinase inhibitors revealed the involvement of calmodulin and myosin light-chain kinase in GM-CSF but not MIP-2 m

  4. The ribosome as a missing link in prebiotic evolution II: Ribosomes encode ribosomal proteins that bind to common regions of their own mRNAs and rRNAs.

    PubMed

    Root-Bernstein, Robert; Root-Bernstein, Meredith

    2016-05-21

    We have proposed that the ribosome may represent a missing link between prebiotic chemistries and the first cells. One of the predictions that follows from this hypothesis, which we test here, is that ribosomal RNA (rRNA) must have encoded the proteins necessary for ribosomal function. In other words, the rRNA also functioned pre-biotically as mRNA. Since these ribosome-binding proteins (rb-proteins) must bind to the rRNA, but the rRNA also functioned as mRNA, it follows that rb-proteins should bind to their own mRNA as well. This hypothesis can be contrasted to a "null" hypothesis in which rb-proteins evolved independently of the rRNA sequences and therefore there should be no necessary similarity between the rRNA to which rb-proteins bind and the mRNA that encodes the rb-protein. Five types of evidence reported here support the plausibility of the hypothesis that the mRNA encoding rb-proteins evolved from rRNA: (1) the ubiquity of rb-protein binding to their own mRNAs and autogenous control of their own translation; (2) the higher-than-expected incidence of Arginine-rich modules associated with RNA binding that occurs in rRNA-encoded proteins; (3) the fact that rRNA-binding regions of rb-proteins are homologous to their mRNA binding regions; (4) the higher than expected incidence of rb-protein sequences encoded in rRNA that are of a high degree of homology to their mRNA as compared with a random selection of other proteins; and (5) rRNA in modern prokaryotes and eukaryotes encodes functional proteins. None of these results can be explained by the null hypothesis that assumes independent evolution of rRNA and the mRNAs encoding ribosomal proteins. Also noteworthy is that very few proteins bind their own mRNAs that are not associated with ribosome function. Further tests of the hypothesis are suggested: (1) experimental testing of whether rRNA-encoded proteins bind to rRNA at their coding sites; (2) whether tRNA synthetases, which are also known to bind to their

  5. The predicted RNA binding proteins Pes4 and Mip6 regulate mRNA levels, translation, and localization during sporulation in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Jin, Liang; Zhang, Kai; Sternglanz, Rolf; Neiman, Aaron M

    2017-02-13

    In response to starvation, diploid cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae undergo meiosis and form haploid spores, a process collectively referred to as sporulation. The differentiation into spores requires extensive changes in gene expression. The transcriptional activator Ndt80 is a central regulator of this process, which controls many genes essential for sporulation. Ndt80 induces ∼300 genes coordinately during meiotic prophase, but different mRNAs within the NDT80-regulon are translated at different times during sporulation. The protein kinase Ime2 and RNA binding protein Rim4 are general regulators of meiotic translational delay, but how differential timing of individual transcripts is achieved was not known. This report describes the characterization of two related NDT80-induced genes, PES4 and MIP6, encoding predicted RNA binding proteins. These genes are necessary to regulate the steady state expression, translational timing, and localization of a set of mRNAs that are transcribed by NDT80 but not translated until the end of meiosis II. Mutations in the predicted RNA binding domains within PES4 alter the stability of target mRNAs. PES4 and MIP6 affect only a small portion of the NDT80-regulon indicating that they act as modulators of the general Ime2/Rim4 pathway for specific transcripts.

  6. MiR-421, miR-155 and miR-650: emerging trends of regulation of cancer and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Farooqi, Ammad Ahmad; Qureshi, Muhammad Zahid; Coskunpinar, Ender; Naqvi, Syed Kamran-Ul-Hassan; Yaylim, Ilhan; Ismail, Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    It is becoming progressively more understandable that between transcription and translation there lies another versatile regulator that quantitatively controls the expression of mRNAs. Identification of miRNAs as key regulators of wide ranging signaling cascades and modulators of different cell-type and context dependent activities attracted basic and clinical scientists to study modes and mechanisms in details. In line with this approach overwhelmingly increasing in vivo and in vitro studies are deepening our understanding regarding miR-421, mir-155 and miR-650 mediated regulation of cellular activities. We also attempt to provide an overview of long non coding RNAs.

  7. Alternative Splicing in Plant Genes: A Means of Regulating the Environmental Fitness of Plants

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Xudong; Cao, Ying; Ma, Ligeng

    2017-01-01

    Gene expression can be regulated through transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms. Transcription in eukaryotes produces pre-mRNA molecules, which are processed and spliced post-transcriptionally to create translatable mRNAs. More than one mRNA may be produced from a single pre-mRNA by alternative splicing (AS); thus, AS serves to diversify an organism’s transcriptome and proteome. Previous studies of gene expression in plants have focused on the role of transcriptional regulation in response to environmental changes. However, recent data suggest that post-transcriptional regulation, especially AS, is necessary for plants to adapt to a changing environment. In this review, we summarize recent advances in our understanding of AS during plant development in response to environmental changes. We suggest that alternative gene splicing is a novel means of regulating the environmental fitness of plants. PMID:28230724

  8. RNA-binding proteins and translational regulation in axons and growth cones

    PubMed Central

    Hörnberg, Hanna; Holt, Christine

    2013-01-01

    RNA localization and regulation play an important role in the developing and adult nervous system. In navigating axons, extrinsic cues can elicit rapid local protein synthesis that mediates directional or morphological responses. The mRNA repertoire in axons is large and dynamically changing, yet studies suggest that only a subset of these mRNAs are translated after cue stimulation, suggesting the need for a high level of translational regulation. Here, we review the role of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) as local regulators of translation in developing axons. We focus on their role in growth, guidance, and synapse formation, and discuss the mechanisms by which they regulate translation in axons. PMID:23734093

  9. Evaluating Posttranscriptional Regulation of Cytokine Genes

    PubMed Central

    Rattenbacher, Bernd; Bohjanen, Paul R.

    2014-01-01

    A wide variety of cytokines are necessary for cell–cell communication in multicellular organisms, and cytokine dysregulation has detrimental effects, leading to disease states. Thus, it is a necessity that the expression of cytokines is tightly controlled. Regulation of cytokine gene expression takes place at different levels, including transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. Ultimately, the steady-state levels of cytokine transcripts are determined by the equilibrium of transcription and degradation of this mRNA. Degradation rates of cytokine mRNAs can be measured in cells by blocking transcription with actinomycin D, harvesting RNA after different time points, and evaluating mRNA levels over time by northern blot. Cis-acting elements that mediate the rapid decay of numerous cytokine transcripts, including AU-rich elements (AREs), are found in the 3′ untranslated region (UTR) of these transcripts. Putative regulatory cis-elements can be cloned into the 3′ UTR of a reporter transcript in order to assess their function in regulating mRNA decay. Cis-elements, such as AREs, regulate cytokine mRNA decay by binding to trans-acting proteins, such as tristetraprolin or HuR. These RNA-binding proteins can be visualized using electromobility shift assays or UV crosslinking assays based on their binding to radioactively labeled RNA sequences. RNA-binding proteins that regulate cytokine mRNA decay can be purified using an RNA affinity method, using their target RNA sequence as the bait. In this chapter, we review the methods for measuring cytokine mRNA decay and methods for characterizing the cis-acting elements and trans-acting factors that regulate cytokine mRNA decay. PMID:22131026

  10. Regulation of rat luteinizing hormone subunit messenger ribonucleic acids by gonadal steroid hormones.

    PubMed Central

    Gharib, S D; Bowers, S M; Need, L R; Chin, W W

    1986-01-01

    Little is known about the hormonal regulation of luteinizing hormone (LH) biosynthesis. We have studied the regulation of LH messenger RNA (mRNA) levels by gonadal-steroid hormones in the rat. In one set of experiments, male and female rats were surgically gonadectomized (GDX) and killed 1, 3, 7, 14, 22, and 31 d postoperatively. In another set of experiments, male and female rats were surgically GDX and were injected subcutaneously with testosterone propionate (500 micrograms/100 g body wt per d) or 17 beta-estradiol 3-benzoate (10 micrograms/100 g body wt per d), respectively, beginning 3 wk postoperatively. Levels of serum LH were determined by radioimmunoassay and levels of LH subunit mRNAs in single pituitary glands were determined by blot hybridization analysis using labeled synthetic oligodeoxyribonucleotide probes that correspond to portions of the coding regions of the rat alpha- and LH beta-subunit mRNAs. 4 wk after gonadectomy, serum LH levels rose nine- and 20-fold, while alpha-subunit mRNA levels rose six- and 10-fold, and LH beta-subunit levels rose seven- and 14-fold, compared with controls in males and females, respectively. In gonadal-steroid hormone-treated male and female GDX rats, serum LH levels fell to 8 and 36% of control values, while alpha-subunit mRNA levels declined to 22 and 19%, and LH beta-subunit mRNA levels declined to 6 and 10% of control values, 48 h after injections were initiated, in males and females, respectively. We conclude that gonadal-steroid hormones negatively regulate the levels of both subunit mRNAs in GDX rats in a pattern that parallels the changes in serum LH values. These data suggest that gonadal-steroid hormone regulation of LH biosynthesis occurs, at least in part, at the level of LH subunit mRNAs due to effects at the transcriptional and/or RNA stability levels. Images PMID:2418065

  11. Post-transcriptional regulation of interferons and their signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Savan, Ram

    2014-05-01

    Interferons (IFNs) are low molecular weight cell-derived proteins that include the type I, II, and III IFN families. IFNs are critical for an optimal immune response during microbial infections while dysregulated expression can lead to autoimmune diseases. Given its role in disease, it is important to understand cellular mechanisms of IFN regulation. 3' untranslated regions (3' UTRs) have emerged as potent regulators of mRNA and protein dosage and are controlled through multiple regulatory elements including adenylate uridylate (AU)-rich elements (AREs) and microRNA (miRNA) recognition elements. These AREs are targeted by RNA-binding proteins (ARE-BPs) for degradation and/or stabilization through an ARE-mediated decay process. miRNA are endogenous, single-stranded RNA molecules ~22 nucleotides in length that regulate mRNA translation through the miRNA-induced silencing complex. IFN transcripts, like other labile mRNAs, harbor AREs in their 3' UTRs that dictate the turnover of mRNA. This review is a survey of the literature related to IFN regulation by miRNA, ARE-BPs, and how these complexes interact dynamically on the 3' UTR. Additionally, downstream effects of these post-transcriptional regulators on the immune response will be discussed. Review topics include past studies, current understanding, and future challenges in the study of post-transcriptional regulation affecting IFN responses.

  12. Post-Transcriptional Regulation of Interferons and Their Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Interferons (IFNs) are low molecular weight cell-derived proteins that include the type I, II, and III IFN families. IFNs are critical for an optimal immune response during microbial infections while dysregulated expression can lead to autoimmune diseases. Given its role in disease, it is important to understand cellular mechanisms of IFN regulation. 3′ untranslated regions (3′ UTRs) have emerged as potent regulators of mRNA and protein dosage and are controlled through multiple regulatory elements including adenylate uridylate (AU)-rich elements (AREs) and microRNA (miRNA) recognition elements. These AREs are targeted by RNA-binding proteins (ARE-BPs) for degradation and/or stabilization through an ARE-mediated decay process. miRNA are endogenous, single-stranded RNA molecules ∼22 nucleotides in length that regulate mRNA translation through the miRNA-induced silencing complex. IFN transcripts, like other labile mRNAs, harbor AREs in their 3′ UTRs that dictate the turnover of mRNA. This review is a survey of the literature related to IFN regulation by miRNA, ARE-BPs, and how these complexes interact dynamically on the 3′ UTR. Additionally, downstream effects of these post-transcriptional regulators on the immune response will be discussed. Review topics include past studies, current understanding, and future challenges in the study of post-transcriptional regulation affecting IFN responses. PMID:24702117

  13. Injury induces in vivo expression of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and PDGF receptor mRNAs in skin epithelial cells and PDGF mRNA in connective tissue fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Antoniades, H.N. Center for Blood Research, Boston, MA Inst. of Molecular Biology, Boston, MA ); Galanopoulos, T.; Neville-Golden, J.; Kiritsy, C.P. Inst. of Molecular Biology, Boston, MA ); Lynch, S.E. Inst. of Molecular Biology, Boston, MA Harvard School of Dental Medicine, Boston, MA )

    1991-01-15

    Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) stimulates many of the processes important in tissue repair, including proliferation of fibroblasts and synthesis of extracellular matrices. In this study, the authors have demonstrated with in situ hydridization and immunocytochemistry the reversible expression of 3-sis/PDGF-2 and PDGF receptor (PDGF-R) b mRNAs and their respective protein products in epithelial cells and fibroblasts following cutaneous injury in pigs. Epithelial cells in control, unwounded skin did not express c-sis and PDGF-R mRNAs, and fibroblasts expressed only PDGF-R mRNA. The expression levels in the injured site were correlated with the stage of tissue repair, being highest during the initial stages of the repair process and declining at the time of complete re-epithelialization and tissue remodeling. These studies provide a mulecular basis for understanding the mechanisms contributing to normal tissue repair. They suggest the possibility that a defect in these mechanisms may be associated with defective wound healing. It is also conceivable that chronic injury may induce irreversible gene expression leading to pathologic, unregulated cell growth.

  14. Expression changes of mRNAs encoding kisspeptins and their receptors and gonadotropin-releasing hormones during early development and gonadal sex differentiation periods in the brain of chub mackerel (Scomber japonicus).

    PubMed

    Selvaraj, Sethu; Kitano, Hajime; Ohga, Hirofumi; Yamaguchi, Akihiko; Matsuyama, Michiya

    2015-10-01

    In recent years, brain kisspeptin system has been shown to be involved in diverse reproductive function, including sexual differentiation in vertebrates. Our previous reports demonstrated that the chub mackerel (Scomber japonicus) brain expresses two kisspeptin (kiss1, kiss2), two kisspeptin receptor (kissr1, kissr2) and three gonadotropin-releasing hormone (gnrh1, gnrh2, gnrh3) genes. In the present study, using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) assays, we analysed expression changes of these genes during early development (0-30dphs) and gonadal sex differentiation periods (37-60dphs). Absolute expression level of kiss-kissr-gnrh in the whole head was higher between 0 and 15dphs, in comparison to later developmental periods. Histological analyses revealed presence of sexually differentiated males and females with testicular and ovarian features at 37, 45, and 60dphs. In both males and females, kiss2, kissr1, and kissr2 levels were higher at 37dph, in comparison to 45 and 60dphs, with kiss1 showing no significant differences. Levels of all three gnrh mRNAs were higher at 45dph, in comparison to 60dph. Changes in the expression level of kiss-kissr-gnrh mRNAs in different brain regions of sexually differentiated males and females indicated differences in their regional distribution. These results suggest possible involvement of Kiss-KissR-GnRH systems during early development and gonadal sex differentiation in the chub mackerel.

  15. The Regulation of Transcription in Memory Consolidation

    PubMed Central

    Alberini, Cristina M.; Kandel, Eric R.

    2015-01-01

    De novo transcription of DNA is a fundamental requirement for the formation of long-term memory. It is required during both consolidation and reconsolidation, the posttraining and postreactivation phases that change the state of the memory from a fragile into a stable and long-lasting form. Transcription generates both mRNAs that are translated into proteins, which are necessary for the growth of new synaptic connections, as well as noncoding RNA transcripts that have regulatory or effector roles in gene expression. The result is a cascade of events that ultimately leads to structural changes in the neurons that mediate long-term memory storage. The de novo transcription, critical for synaptic plasticity and memory formation, is orchestrated by chromatin and epigenetic modifications. The complexity of transcription regulation, its temporal progression, and the effectors produced all contribute to the flexibility and persistence of long-term memory formation. In this article, we provide an overview of the mechanisms contributing to this transcriptional regulation underlying long-term memory formation. PMID:25475090

  16. The regulation of transcription in memory consolidation.

    PubMed

    Alberini, Cristina M; Kandel, Eric R

    2014-12-04

    De novo transcription of DNA is a fundamental requirement for the formation of long-term memory. It is required during both consolidation and reconsolidation, the posttraining and postreactivation phases that change the state of the memory from a fragile into a stable and long-lasting form. Transcription generates both mRNAs that are translated into proteins, which are necessary for the growth of new synaptic connections, as well as noncoding RNA transcripts that have regulatory or effector roles in gene expression. The result is a cascade of events that ultimately leads to structural changes in the neurons that mediate long-term memory storage. The de novo transcription, critical for synaptic plasticity and memory formation, is orchestrated by chromatin and epigenetic modifications. The complexity of transcription regulation, its temporal progression, and the effectors produced all contribute to the flexibility and persistence of long-term memory formation. In this article, we provide an overview of the mechanisms contributing to this transcriptional regulation underlying long-term memory formation.

  17. An NS-segment exonic splicing enhancer regulates influenza A virus replication in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiaofeng; Zheng, Min; Wang, Pui; Mok, Bobo Wing-Yee; Liu, Siwen; Lau, Siu-Ying; Chen, Pin; Liu, Yen-Chin; Liu, Honglian; Chen, Yixin; Song, Wenjun; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Chen, Honglin

    2017-01-01

    Influenza virus utilizes host splicing machinery to process viral mRNAs expressed from both M and NS segments. Through genetic analysis and functional characterization, we here show that the NS segment of H7N9 virus contains a unique G540A substitution, located within a previously undefined exonic splicing enhancer (ESE) motif present in the NEP mRNA of influenza A viruses. G540A supports virus replication in mammalian cells while retaining replication ability in avian cells. Host splicing regulator, SF2, interacts with this ESE to regulate splicing of NEP/NS1 mRNA and G540A substitution affects SF2–ESE interaction. The NS1 protein directly interacts with SF2 in the nucleus and modulates splicing of NS mRNAs during virus replication. We demonstrate that splicing of NEP/NS1 mRNA is regulated through a cis NEP-ESE motif and suggest a unique NEP-ESE may contribute to provide H7N9 virus with the ability to both circulate efficiently in avian hosts and replicate in mammalian cells. PMID:28323816

  18. Iron-independent phosphorylation of iron regulatory protein 2 regulates ferritin during the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Wallander, Michelle L; Zumbrennen, Kimberly B; Rodansky, Eva S; Romney, S Joshua; Leibold, Elizabeth A

    2008-08-29

    Iron regulatory protein 2 (IRP2) is a key iron sensor that post-transcriptionally regulates mammalian iron homeostasis by binding to iron-responsive elements (IREs) in mRNAs that encode proteins involved in iron metabolism (e.g. ferritin and transferrin receptor 1). During iron deficiency, IRP2 binds IREs to regulate mRNA translation or stability, whereas during iron sufficiency IRP2 is degraded by the proteasome. Here, we identify an iron-independent IRP2 phosphorylation site that is regulated by the cell cycle. IRP2 Ser-157 is phosphorylated by Cdk1/cyclin B1 during G(2)/M and is dephosphorylated during mitotic exit by the phosphatase Cdc14A. Ser-157 phosphorylation during G(2)/M reduces IRP2 RNA-binding activity and increases ferritin synthesis, whereas Ser-157 dephosphorylation during mitotic exit restores IRP2 RNA-binding activity and represses ferritin synthesis. These data show that reversible phosphorylation of IRP2 during G(2)/M has a role in modulating the iron-independent expression of ferritin and other IRE-containing mRNAs during the cell cycle.

  19. CXCL12 methylation-mediated epigenetic regulation of gene expression in papillary thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sijia; Wang, Yihan; Chen, Meijun; Sun, Lulu; Han, Jun; Elena, V Kazakova; Qiao, Hong

    2017-03-08

    Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) is the most common type of thyroid cancer, and its incidence rate is rapidly growing. It is necessary to understand the pathogenesis of PTC to develop effective diagnosis methods. Promoter methylation has been recognized to contribute to the alterations in gene expression observed in tumorigenesis. Our RNA-seq data identified 1191 differentially expressed mRNAs and 147 differentially expressed lncRNAs in PTC. Next, promoter methylation of these genes was detected by reduced representation bisulfite sequencing (RRBS) technology and comprehensively analyzed to identify differential methylation. In total, 14 genes (13 mRNAs and 1 lncRNA), in which methylation was intimately involved in regulating gene expression, were proposed as novel diagnostic biomarkers. To gain insights into the relationships among these 14 genes, a core co-function network was constructed based on co-expression, co-function and co-methylation data. Notably, CXCL12 was identified as an essential gene in the network that was closely connected with the other genes. These data suggested that CXCL12 down-regulation in PTC may be caused by promoter hypermethylation. Our study was the first to perform an RRBS analysis for PTC and suggested that CXCL12 may contribute to PTC development by methylation-mediated epigenetic regulation of gene expression.

  20. CXCL12 methylation-mediated epigenetic regulation of gene expression in papillary thyroid carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Sijia; Wang, Yihan; Chen, Meijun; Sun, Lulu; Han, Jun; Elena, V. Kazakova; Qiao, Hong

    2017-01-01

    Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) is the most common type of thyroid cancer, and its incidence rate is rapidly growing. It is necessary to understand the pathogenesis of PTC to develop effective diagnosis methods. Promoter methylation has been recognized to contribute to the alterations in gene expression observed in tumorigenesis. Our RNA-seq data identified 1191 differentially expressed mRNAs and 147 differentially expressed lncRNAs in PTC. Next, promoter methylation of these genes was detected by reduced representation bisulfite sequencing (RRBS) technology and comprehensively analyzed to identify differential methylation. In total, 14 genes (13 mRNAs and 1 lncRNA), in which methylation was intimately involved in regulating gene expression, were proposed as novel diagnostic biomarkers. To gain insights into the relationships among these 14 genes, a core co-function network was constructed based on co-expression, co-function and co-methylation data. Notably, CXCL12 was identified as an essential gene in the network that was closely connected with the other genes. These data suggested that CXCL12 down-regulation in PTC may be caused by promoter hypermethylation. Our study was the first to perform an RRBS analysis for PTC and suggested that CXCL12 may contribute to PTC development by methylation-mediated epigenetic regulation of gene expression. PMID:28272462

  1. Long noncoding RNA SPRY4-IT1 regulates intestinal epithelial barrier function by modulating the expression levels of tight junction proteins.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Lan; Rao, Jaladanki N; Cao, Shan; Liu, Lan; Chung, Hee Kyoung; Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Jennifer; Liu, Yulan; Gorospe, Myriam; Wang, Jian-Ying

    2016-02-15

    Epithelial cells line the intestinal mucosa and form an important barrier to a wide array of noxious substances in the lumen. Disruption of the barrier integrity occurs commonly in various pathologies. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) control diverse biological processes, but little is known about the role of lncRNAs in regulation of the gut permeability. Here we show that the lncRNA SPRY4-IT1 regulates the intestinal epithelial barrier function by altering expression of tight junction (TJ) proteins. SPRY4-IT1 silencing led to dysfunction of the epithelial barrier in cultured cells by decreasing the stability of mRNAs encoding TJ proteins claudin-1, claudin-3, occludin, and JAM-1 and repressing their translation. In contrast, increasing the levels of SPRY4-IT1 in the intestinal mucosa protected the gut barrier in mice exposed to septic stress by increasing the abundance of TJ proteins. SPRY4-IT1 directly interacted with TJ mRNAs, and this process was enhanced through the association with the RNA-binding protein HuR. Of interest, the intestinal mucosa from patients with increased gut permeability exhibited a decrease in the levels of SPRY4-IT1. These findings highlight a novel role for SPRY4-IT1 in controlling the intestinal epithelial barrier and define a mechanism by which SPRY4-IT1 modulates TJ expression by altering the stability and translation of TJ mRNAs.

  2. Long noncoding RNA SPRY4-IT1 regulates intestinal epithelial barrier function by modulating the expression levels of tight junction proteins

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Lan; Rao, Jaladanki N.; Cao, Shan; Liu, Lan; Chung, Hee Kyoung; Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Jennifer; Liu, Yulan; Gorospe, Myriam; Wang, Jian-Ying

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial cells line the intestinal mucosa and form an important barrier to a wide array of noxious substances in the lumen. Disruption of the barrier integrity occurs commonly in various pathologies. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) control diverse biological processes, but little is known about the role of lncRNAs in regulation of the gut permeability. Here we show that the lncRNA SPRY4-IT1 regulates the intestinal epithelial barrier function by altering expression of tight junction (TJ) proteins. SPRY4-IT1 silencing led to dysfunction of the epithelial barrier in cultured cells by decreasing the stability of mRNAs encoding TJ proteins claudin-1, claudin-3, occludin, and JAM-1 and repressing their translation. In contrast, increasing the levels of SPRY4-IT1 in the intestinal mucosa protected the gut barrier in mice exposed to septic stress by increasing the abundance of TJ proteins. SPRY4-IT1 directly interacted with TJ mRNAs, and this process was enhanced through the association with the RNA-binding protein HuR. Of interest, the intestinal mucosa from patients with increased gut permeability exhibited a decrease in the levels of SPRY4-IT1. These findings highlight a novel role for SPRY4-IT1 in controlling the intestinal epithelial barrier and define a mechanism by which SPRY4-IT1 modulates TJ expression by altering the stability and translation of TJ mRNAs. PMID:26680741

  3. Social regulation of cortisol receptor gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Korzan, Wayne J.; Grone, Brian P.; Fernald, Russell D.

    2014-01-01

    In many social species, individuals influence the reproductive capacity of conspecifics. In a well-studied African cichlid fish species, Astatotilapia burtoni, males are either dominant (D) and reproductively competent or non-dominant (ND) and reproductively suppressed as evidenced by reduced gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH1) release, regressed gonads, lower levels of androgens and elevated levels of cortisol. Here, we asked whether androgen and cortisol levels might regulate this reproductive suppression. Astatotilapia burtoni has four glucocorticoid receptors (GR1a, GR1b, GR2 and MR), encoded by three genes, and two androgen receptors (ARα and ARβ), encoded by two genes. We previously showed that ARα and ARβ are expressed in GnRH1 neurons in the preoptic area (POA), which regulates reproduction, and that the mRNA levels of these receptors are regulated by social status. Here, we show that GR1, GR2 and MR mRNAs are also expressed in GnRH1 neurons in the POA, revealing potential mechanisms for both androgens and cortisol to influence reproductive capacity. We measured AR, MR and GR mRNA expression levels in a microdissected region of the POA containing GnRH1 neurons, comparing D and ND males. Using quantitative PCR (qPCR), we found D males had higher mRNA levels of ARα, MR, total GR1a and GR2 in the POA compared with ND males. In contrast, ND males had significantly higher levels of GR1b mRNA, a receptor subtype with a reduced transcriptional response to cortisol. Through this novel regulation of receptor type, neurons in the POA of an ND male will be less affected by the higher levels of cortisol typical of low status, suggesting GR receptor type change as a potential adaptive mechanism to mediate high cortisol levels during social suppression. PMID:25013108

  4. Involvement of ethylene biosynthesis and perception in the susceptibility of citrus fruits to Penicillium digitatum infection and the accumulation of defence-related mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Marcos, Jose F; González-Candelas, Luis; Zacarías, Lorenzo

    2005-08-01

    Citrus fruits infected with the fungus Penicillium digitatum substantially increase the production of the plant hormone ethylene. In this study, the regulation of ethylene biosynthesis in Citrus sinensis-infected fruits and its putative involvement in an active defence response against P. digitatum infection is examined. Ethylene production is demonstrated as being the result of the co-ordinated and differential up-regulation of at least three ethylene biosynthetic genes: ACS1, ACS2, and ACO. Blocking ethylene perception by 1-MCP resulted in an increased ethylene production and ACS2 expression during infection and mechanical wounding, suggesting that this gene is negatively regulated by ethylene. ACO expression was induced by ethylene in the absence of wounding or infection, although further results indicate that its induction during the course of infection may not be primarily mediated by ethylene. Treatment with 1-MCP also increased susceptibility to Penicillium decay, showing an involvement of ethylene perception in promoting defence responses in citrus fruits. The changes in the expression of two defence-related genes up-regulated during infection were also studied: the ones coding for phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) and an acidic class II chitinase (ACR311). The onset of PAL expression after mechanical wounding or inoculation was not changed in 1-MCP-pretreated fruits, while its later increase during the course of infection was abolished. Chitinase gene induction was more related to mechanical damage and was partially repressed by ethylene. These studies indicate distinct possible regulatory mechanisms of plant fruit defence genes in the context of fungal infection and ethylene perception.

  5. Post-Transcriptional Regulation of Catalase Isozyme Expression in Cotton Seeds.

    PubMed Central

    Ni, W; Trelease, RN

    1991-01-01

    We reported previously that expression of the five tetrameric catalase isozymes during postgerminative growth of cotton seedings was a consequence of interactions between two subunits (SU 1 and SU 2) temporally synthesized from two distinct catalase genes. In this study, we focused on the regulation of the expression of these two catalase subunits during the changeover from glyoxysomal to leaf-type peroxisomal metabolism. The steady-state level of glyoxysomal SU 1 protein (present in 12-hour-old seeds) increased through day 3 and then declined linearly through day 6, whereas SU 2 protein (first detected in 24-hour-old seeds) increased continuously through day 6. The time courses for steady-state levels of the mRNAs encoding these two subunits revealed two clearly separated peaks: the first at day 1 (SU 1) and the other at day 4 (SU 2). Accumulation of these mRNAs preceded the accumulation of their corresponding proteins by at least 24 hours, suggesting temporal, pretranslational regulation of synthesis of both subunits. Results from run-on transcriptional assays with isolated nuclei, however, revealed that transcripts encoding both subunits were synthesized together on days 1 through 5. Hence, it appears that the accumulations of SU 1 and SU 2 mRNAs are controlled primarily at the post-transcriptional level, which has not been reported for catalase or any other eukaryotic peroxisomal enzymes. The accumulation of SU 1 mRNA is not light dependent, whereas the accumulation of SU 2 mRNA, which directs synthesis of the predominant subunit comprising the leaf-type peroxisomal isozyme, occurs only after exposure of seedlings to light. PMID:12324611

  6. Post-transcriptional gene regulation by mRNA modifications

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Boxuan Simen; Roundtree, Ian A.; He, Chuan

    2016-01-01

    The recent discovery of reversible mRNA methylation has opened a new realm of post-transcriptional gene regulation in eukaryotes. The identification and functional characterization of proteins that specifically recognize RNA N6-methyladenosine (m6A) unveiled it as a modification that cells utilize to accelerate mRNA metabolism and translation. N6-adenosine methylation directs mRNAs to distinct fates by grouping them for differential processing, translation and decay in processes such as cell differentiation, embryonic development and stress responses. Other mRNA modifications, including N1-methyladenosine (m1A), 5-methylcytosine (m5C) and pseudouridine, together with m6A form the epitranscriptome and collectively code a new layer of information that controls protein synthesis. PMID:27808276

  7. The role of RNases in the regulation of small RNAs.

    PubMed

    Saramago, Margarida; Bárria, Cátia; Dos Santos, Ricardo F; Silva, Inês J; Pobre, Vânia; Domingues, Susana; Andrade, José M; Viegas, Sandra C; Arraiano, Cecília M

    2014-04-01

    Ribonucleases (RNases) are key factors in the control of biological processes, since they modulate the processing, degradation and quality control of RNAs. This review gives many illustrative examples of the role of RNases in the regulation of small RNAs (sRNAs). RNase E and PNPase have been shown to degrade the free pool of sRNAs. RNase E can also be recruited to cleave mRNAs when they are interacting with sRNAs. RNase III cleaves double-stranded structures, and can cut both the sRNA and its RNA target when they are hybridized. Overall, ribonucleases act as conductors in the control of sRNAs. Therefore, it is very important to further understand their role in the post-transcriptional control of gene expression.

  8. NORM regulations

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, P.

    1997-02-01

    The author reviews the question of regulation for naturally occuring radioactive material (NORM), and the factors that have made this a more prominent concern today. Past practices have been very relaxed, and have often involved very poor records, the involvment of contractors, and the disposition of contaminated equipment back into commercial service. The rationale behind the establishment of regulations is to provide worker protection, to exempt low risk materials, to aid in scrap recycling, to provide direction for remediation and to examine disposal options. The author reviews existing regulations at federal and state levels, impending legislation, and touches on the issue of site remediation and potential liabilities affecting the release of sites contaminated by NORM.

  9. Lin-28 homologue A (LIN28A) promotes cell cycle progression via regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2), cyclin D1 (CCND1), and cell division cycle 25 homolog A (CDC25A) expression in cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Zhong, Xiaomin; Lin, Xiaojuan; Guo, Jinyi; Zou, Lian; Tanyi, Janos L; Shao, Zhongjun; Liang, Shun; Wang, Li-Ping; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Katsaros, Dionyssios; Montone, Kathleen; Zhao, Xia; Zhang, Lin

    2012-05-18

    The RNA-binding protein LIN28A regulates the translation and stability of a large number of mRNAs as well as the biogenesis of certain miRNAs in embryonic stem cells and developing tissues. Increasing evidence indicates that LIN28A functions as an oncogene promoting cancer cell growth. However, little is known about its molecular mechanism of cell cycle regulation in cancer. Using tissue microarrays, we found that strong LIN28A expression was reactivated in about 10% (7.1-17.1%) of epithelial tumors (six tumor types, n = 369). Both in vitro and in vivo experiments demonstrate that LIN28A promotes cell cycle progression in cancer cells. Genome-wide RNA-IP-chip experiments indicate that LIN28A binds to thousands of mRNAs, including a large group of cell cycle regulatory mRNAs in cancer and embryonic stem cells. Furthermore, the ability of LIN28A to stimulate translation of LIN28A-binding mRNAs, such as CDK2, was validated in vitro and in vivo. Finally, using a combined gene expression microarray and bioinformatics approach, we found that LIN28A also regulates CCND1 and CDC25A expression and that this is mediated by inhibiting the biogenesis of let-7 miRNA. Taken together, these results demonstrate that LIN28A is reactivated in about 10% of epithelial tumors and promotes cell cycle progression by regulation of both mRNA translation (let-7-independent) and miRNA biogenesis (let-7-dependent).

  10. Small RNA sX13: a multifaceted regulator of virulence in the plant pathogen Xanthomonas.

    PubMed

    Schmidtke, Cornelius; Abendroth, Ulrike; Brock, Juliane; Serrania, Javier; Becker, Anke; Bonas, Ulla

    2013-09-01

    Small noncoding RNAs (sRNAs) are ubiquitous posttranscriptional regulators of gene expression. Using the model plant-pathogenic bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Xcv), we investigated the highly expressed and conserved sRNA sX13 in detail. Deletion of sX13 impinged on Xcv virulence and the expression of genes encoding components and substrates of the Hrp type III secretion (T3S) system. qRT-PCR analyses revealed that sX13 promotes mRNA accumulation of HrpX, a key regulator of the T3S system, whereas the mRNA level of the master regulator HrpG was unaffected. Complementation studies suggest that sX13 acts upstream of HrpG. Microarray analyses identified 63 sX13-regulated genes, which are involved in signal transduction, motility, transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation and virulence. Structure analyses of in vitro transcribed sX13 revealed a structure with three stable stems and three apical C-rich loops. A computational search for putative regulatory motifs revealed that sX13-repressed mRNAs predominantly harbor G-rich motifs in proximity of translation start sites. Mutation of sX13 loops differentially affected Xcv virulence and the mRNA abundance of putative targets. Using a GFP-based reporter system, we demonstrated that sX13-mediated repression of protein synthesis requires both the C-rich motifs in sX13 and G-rich motifs in potential target mRNAs. Although the RNA-binding protein Hfq was dispensable for sX13 activity, the hfq mRNA and Hfq::GFP abundance were negatively regulated by sX13. In addition, we found that G-rich motifs in sX13-repressed mRNAs can serve as translational enhancers and are located at the ribosome-binding site in 5% of all protein-coding Xcv genes. Our study revealed that sX13 represents a novel class of virulence regulators and provides insights into sRNA-mediated modulation of adaptive processes in the plant pathogen Xanthomonas.

  11. Products of lipid, protein and RNA oxidation as signals and regulators of gene expression in plants

    PubMed Central

    Chmielowska-Bąk, Jagna; Izbiańska, Karolina; Deckert, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are engaged in several processes essential for normal cell functioning, such as differentiation, anti-microbial defense, stimulus sensing and signaling. Interestingly, recent studies imply that cellular signal transduction and gene regulation are mediated not only directly by ROS but also by the molecules derived from ROS-mediated oxidation. Lipid peroxidation leads to non-enzymatic formation of oxylipins. These molecules were shown to modulate expression of signaling associated genes including genes encoding phosphatases, kinases and transcription factors. Oxidized peptides derived from protein oxidation might be engaged in organelle-specific ROS signaling. In turn, oxidation of particular mRNAs leads to decrease in the level of encoded proteins and thus, contributes to the post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. Present mini review summarizes latest findings concerning involvement of products of lipid, protein and RNA oxidation in signal transduction and gene regulation. PMID:26082792

  12. Specialized ribosomes: a new frontier in gene regulation and organismal biology.

    PubMed

    Xue, Shifeng; Barna, Maria

    2012-05-23

    Historically, the ribosome has been viewed as a complex ribozyme with constitutive rather than intrinsic regulatory capacity in mRNA translation. However, emerging studies reveal that ribosome activity may be highly regulated. Heterogeneity in ribosome composition resulting from differential expression and post-translational modifications of ribosomal proteins, ribosomal RNA (rRNA) diversity and the activity of ribosome-associated factors may generate 'specialized ribosomes' that have a substantial impact on how the genomic template is translated into functional proteins. Moreover, constitutive components of the ribosome may also exert more specialized activities by virtue of their interactions with specific mRNA regulatory elements such as internal ribosome entry sites (IRESs) or upstream open reading frames (uORFs). Here we discuss the hypothesis that intrinsic regulation by the ribosome acts to selectively translate subsets of mRNAs harbouring unique cis-regulatory elements, thereby introducing an additional level of regulation in gene expression and the life of an organism.

  13. Increase of insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1, IGF binding protein-2 and -4 mRNAs following cerebral contusion.

    PubMed

    Sandberg Nordqvist, A C; von Holst, H; Holmin, S; Sara, V R; Bellander, B M; Schalling, M

    1996-06-01

    The insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system has a role in repair following hypoxic-ischemic injury in many tissues including the brain. To study the involvement of the IGF system following head trauma, we used a rat contusion model, which produces a focal lesion of the cerebral cortex. Molecules in the IGF system were analyzed using in situ hybridization at different times following impact. We observed a dramatic up-regulation of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-2 (IGFBP-2) mRNA in cortical areas adjacent to the injury 24 h after impact, with a peak 10-fold increase engaging most of the ipsilateral cortex 2 and 3 days post-contusion. Seven days after the contusion, IGFBP-2 expression was only moderately up-regulated and again concentrated around the injury. IGFBP-4 mRNA levels increased 4-fold ipsilateral to the site of injury, with retained pattern of cortical expression. IGFBP-3, IGFBP-5 and IGFBP-6 mRNA all displayed distinct expression patterns in the brain but no significant changes were observed following injury. In contrast, IGF-1 mRNA levels were very low prior to contusion, but increased markedly at the site of injury with a peak at day 3. We were unable to detect any changes in the type 1 IGF-receptor or IGF-2 mRNA following contusion. The neuropeptide cholecystokinin (CCK) mRNA was clearly up-regulated following contusion, with an even distribution over the ipsilateral cortex. The expression pattern of molecules in the IGF system post-contusion differs in part to changes observed following hypoxic-ischemia or ischemia alone, perhaps reflecting different regulatory mechanisms depending on the type of injury.

  14. Food deprivation explains effects of mouthbrooding on ovaries and steroid hormones, but not brain neuropeptide and receptor mRNAs, in an African cichlid fish.

    PubMed

    Grone, Brian P; Carpenter, Russ E; Lee, Malinda; Maruska, Karen P; Fernald, Russell D

    2012-06-01

    Feeding behavior and reproduction are coordinately regulated by the brain via neurotransmitters, circulating hormones, and neuropeptides. Reduced feeding allows animals to engage in other behaviors important for fitness, including mating and parental care. Some fishes cease feeding for weeks at a time in order to provide care to their young by brooding them inside the male or female parent's mouth. Maternal mouthbrooding is known to impact circulating hormones and subsequent reproductive cycles, but neither the full effects of food deprivation nor the neural mechanisms are known. Here we ask what effects mouthbrooding has on several physiological processes including gonad and body mass, brain neuropeptide and receptor gene expression, and circulating steroid hormones in a mouthbrooding cichlid species, Astatotilapia burtoni. We ask whether any observed changes can be explained by food deprivation, and show that during mouthbrooding, ovary size and circulating levels of androgens and estrogens match those seen during food deprivation. Levels of gonadotropin-releasing hormone 1 (GnRH1) mRNA in the brain were low in food-deprived females compared to controls and in mouthbrooding females compared to gravid females. Levels of mRNA encoding two peptides involved in regulating feeding, hypocretin and cholecystokinin, were increased in the brains of food-deprived females. Brain mRNA levels of two receptors, GnRH receptor 2 and NPY receptor Y8c, were elevated in mouthbrooding females compared to the fed condition, but NPY receptor Y8b mRNA was differently regulated by mouthbrooding. These results suggest that many, but not all, of the characteristic physiological changes that occur during mouthbrooding are consequences of food deprivation.

  15. Acidic digestion in a teleost: postprandial and circadian pattern of gastric pH, pepsin activity, and pepsinogen and proton pump mRNAs expression.

    PubMed

    Yúfera, Manuel; Moyano, Francisco J; Astola, Antonio; Pousão-Ferreira, Pedro; Martínez-Rodríguez, Gonzalo

    2012-01-01

    Two different modes for regulation of stomach acid secretion have been described in vertebrates. Some species exhibit a continuous acid secretion maintaining a low gastric pH during fasting. Others, as some teleosts, maintain a neutral gastric pH during fasting while the hydrochloric acid is released only after the ingestion of a meal. Those different patterns seem to be closely related to specific feeding habits. However, our recent observations suggest that this acidification pattern could be modified by changes in daily feeding frequency and time schedule. The aim of this study was to advance in understanding the regulation mechanisms of stomach digestion and pattern of acid secretion in teleost fish. We have examined the postprandial pattern of gastric pH, pepsin activity, and mRNA expression for pepsinogen and proton pump in white seabream juveniles maintained under a light/dark 12/12 hours cycle and receiving only one morning meal. The pepsin activity was analyzed according to the standard protocol buffering at pH 2 and using the actual pH measured in the stomach. The results show how the enzyme precursor is permanently available while the hydrochloric acid, which activates the zymogen fraction, is secreted just after the ingestion of food. Results also reveal that analytical protocol at pH 2 notably overestimates true pepsin activity in fish stomach. The expression of the mRNA encoding pepsinogen and proton pump exhibited almost parallel patterns, with notable increases during the darkness period and sharp decreases just before the morning meal. These results indicate that white seabream uses the resting hours for recovering the mRNA stock that will be quickly used during the feeding process. Our data clearly shows that both daily illumination pattern and feeding time are involved at different level in the regulation of the secretion of digestive juices.

  16. RNA editing makes mistakes in plant mitochondria: editing loses sense in transcripts of a rps19 pseudogene and in creating stop codons in coxI and rps3 mRNAs of Oenothera.

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, W; Brennicke, A

    1991-01-01

    An intact gene for the ribosomal protein S19 (rps19) is absent from Oenothera mitochondria. The conserved rps19 reading frame found in the mitochondrial genome is interrupted by a termination codon. This rps19 pseudogene is cotranscribed with the downstream rps3 gene and is edited on both sides of the translational stop. Editing, however, changes the amino acid sequence at positions that were well conserved before editing. Other strange editings create translational stops in open reading frames coding for functional proteins. In coxI and rps3 mRNAs CGA codons are edited to UGA stop codons only five and three codons, respectively, downstream to the initiation codon. These aberrant editings in essential open reading frames and in the rps19 pseudogene appear to have been shifted to these positions from other editing sites. These observations suggest a requirement for a continuous evolutionary constraint on the editing specificities in plant mitochondria. Images PMID:1762921

  17. Identification of mRNAs coding for mammalian-type melanin-concentrating hormone and its receptors in the scalloped hammerhead shark Sphyrna lewini.

    PubMed

    Mizusawa, Kanta; Amiya, Noriko; Yamaguchi, Yoko; Takabe, Souichirou; Amano, Masafumi; Breves, Jason P; Fox, Bradley K; Grau, E Gordon; Hyodo, Susumu; Takahashi, Akiyoshi

    2012-10-01

    Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) is a neuromodulator, synthesized in the hypothalamus, that regulates both appetite and energy homeostasis in mammals. MCH was initially identified in teleost fishes as a pituitary gland hormone that induced melanin aggregation in chromatophores in the skin; however, this function of MCH has not been observed in other vertebrates. Recent studies suggest that MCH is involved in teleost feeding behavior, spurring the hypothesis that the original function of MCH in early vertebrates was appetite regulation. The present study reports the results of cDNAs cloning encoding preproMCH and two MCH receptors from an elasmobranch fish, Sphyrna lewini, a member of Chondrichthyes, the earliest diverged class in gnathostomes. The putative MCH peptide is composed of 19 amino acids, similar in length to the mammalian MCH. Reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction revealed that MCH is expressed in the hypothalamus in S. lewini MCH cell bodies and fibers were identified by immunochemistry in the hypothalamus, but not in the pituitary gland, suggesting that MCH is not released via the pituitary gland into general circulation. MCH receptor genes mch-r1 and mch-r2 were expressed in the S. lewini hypothalamus, but were not found in the skin. These results indicate that MCH does not have a peripheral function, such as a melanin-concentrating effect, in the skin of S. lewini hypothalamic MCH mRNA levels were not affected by fasting, suggesting that feeding conditions might not affect the expression of MCH in the hypothalamus.

  18. Proportions of myosin heavy chain mRNAs, protein isoforms and fiber types in the slow and fast skeletal muscles are maintained after alterations of thyroid status in rats.

    PubMed

    Soukup, T; Diallo, M

    2015-01-01

    Recently, we have established that slow soleus (SOL) and fast extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles of e