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  1. Liver Disease and Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    Liver Disease Pulmonary & PH Hypertension Did you know that if you have liver disease, you are at risk for pulmonary hypertension? ... tissue diseases (scleroderma and lupus for example), chronic liver disease, congenital heart disease, or HIV infec- tion. ...

  2. Pulmonary manifestations of heartworm disease.

    PubMed

    Calvert, C A; Rawlings, C A

    1985-09-01

    The clinical signs associated with heartworm disease are the result of changes in the pulmonary arterial system. These clinical signs are the result of either pulmonary hypertension or lung parenchymal disease associated with vascular changes. An increase in pulmonary arterial pressure produces an increase in right ventricular afterload, which may lead to exercise intolerance, syncope, and right-sided congestive heart failure. Coughing, dyspnea, and hemoptysis are the results of pulmonary parenchymal disease.

  3. Drug-induced pulmonary disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... mediastinitis ) Abnormal buildup of fluid in the lungs ( pulmonary edema ) Buildup of fluid between the layers of tissue ... reactions Cardiovascular Chemotherapy Interstitial lung disease Pleural effusion Pulmonary edema Respiratory Systemic lupus erythematosus Patient Instructions Interstitial lung ...

  4. [Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Lange, Peter

    2013-04-15

    The new version of the GOLD document on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), introduces a profound change in the stratification of the patients. In addition to the level of forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1), the new stratification also includes the level of daily symptoms, in particular dyspnoea, and the history of exacerbations. This review describes this stratification and the treatment of stable COPD according to the GOLD document. It focuses on early diagnosis, smoking cessation, rehabilitation and medical treatment.

  5. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Vijayan, V K

    2013-02-01

    The global prevalence of physiologically defined chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in adults aged >40 yr is approximately 9-10 per cent. Recently, the Indian Study on Epidemiology of Asthma, Respiratory Symptoms and Chronic Bronchitis in Adults had shown that the overall prevalence of chronic bronchitis in adults >35 yr is 3.49 per cent. The development of COPD is multifactorial and the risk factors of COPD include genetic and environmental factors. Pathological changes in COPD are observed in central airways, small airways and alveolar space. The proposed pathogenesis of COPD includes proteinase-antiproteinase hypothesis, immunological mechanisms, oxidant-antioxidant balance, systemic inflammation, apoptosis and ineffective repair. Airflow limitation in COPD is defined as a postbronchodilator FEV1 (forced expiratory volume in 1 sec) to FVC (forced vital capacity) ratio <0.70. COPD is characterized by an accelerated decline in FEV1. Co morbidities associated with COPD are cardiovascular disorders (coronary artery disease and chronic heart failure), hypertension, metabolic diseases (diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome and obesity), bone disease (osteoporosis and osteopenia), stroke, lung cancer, cachexia, skeletal muscle weakness, anaemia, depression and cognitive decline. The assessment of COPD is required to determine the severity of the disease, its impact on the health status and the risk of future events (e.g., exacerbations, hospital admissions or death) and this is essential to guide therapy. COPD is treated with inhaled bronchodilators, inhaled corticosteroids, oral theophylline and oral phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor. Non pharmacological treatment of COPD includes smoking cessation, pulmonary rehabilitation and nutritional support. Lung volume reduction surgery and lung transplantation are advised in selected severe patients. Global strategy for the diagnosis, management and prevention of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease guidelines

  6. Cavitary Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gadkowski, L. Beth; Stout, Jason E.

    2008-01-01

    Summary: A pulmonary cavity is a gas-filled area of the lung in the center of a nodule or area of consolidation and may be clinically observed by use of plain chest radiography or computed tomography. Cavities are present in a wide variety of infectious and noninfectious processes. This review discusses the differential diagnosis of pathological processes associated with lung cavities, focusing on infections associated with lung cavities. The goal is to provide the clinician and clinical microbiologist with an overview of the diseases most commonly associated with lung cavities, with attention to the epidemiology and clinical characteristics of the host. PMID:18400799

  7. Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... disorder. Alternative Names Pulmonary vaso-occlusive disease Images Respiratory system References Chin K, Channick RN. Pulmonary hypertension. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst JD, et al, eds. Murray and Nadel's Textbook of Respiratory Medicine . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016: ...

  8. Diseases of Pulmonary Surfactant Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Whitsett, Jeffrey A.; Wert, Susan E.; Weaver, Timothy E.

    2015-01-01

    Advances in physiology and biochemistry have provided fundamental insights into the role of pulmonary surfactant in the pathogenesis and treatment of preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome. Identification of the surfactant proteins, lipid transporters, and transcriptional networks regulating their expression has provided the tools and insights needed to discern the molecular and cellular processes regulating the production and function of pulmonary surfactant prior to and after birth. Mutations in genes regulating surfactant homeostasis have been associated with severe lung disease in neonates and older infants. Biophysical and transgenic mouse models have provided insight into the mechanisms underlying surfactant protein and alveolar homeostasis. These studies have provided the framework for understanding the structure and function of pulmonary surfactant, which has informed understanding of the pathogenesis of diverse pulmonary disorders previously considered idiopathic. This review considers the pulmonary surfactant system and the genetic causes of acute and chronic lung disease caused by disruption of alveolar homeostasis. PMID:25621661

  9. Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease and pulmonary capillary hemangiomatosis.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Bautista, Carlos; Hernández-González, Ignacio; Escribano-Subías, Pilar

    2017-03-22

    Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease is a rare cause of pulmonary hypertension which is part, together with pulmonary capillary hemangiomatosis, of the special designation (subgroup 1') within pulmonary hypertension group 1 in the latest classification of the pulmonary hypertension World Symposium. Recent discovery that gene mutations in eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 alpha kinase 4 (EIF2AK4) are responsible for inherited forms of pulmonary veno-occlusive disease has changed the role of genetic testing, acquiring relevant importance in the diagnosis of these patients. Despite the advances in genetic, cellular and molecular basis knowledge in the last decade, pulmonary veno-occlusive disease remains as a rare aetiology of pulmonary hypertension without any effective medical treatment approved and poor outcomes. This document aims to review the advances occurred in the understanding of pulmonary veno-occlusive disease in the last years.

  10. Consistency of response and image recognition, pulmonary nodules

    PubMed Central

    Liu, M A Q; Galvan, E; Bassett, R; Murphy, W A; Matamoros, A; Marom, E M

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of recognition of a previously encountered radiograph on consistency of response in localized pulmonary nodules. Methods: 13 radiologists interpreted 40 radiographs each to locate pulmonary nodules. A few days later, they again interpreted 40 radiographs. Half of the images in the second set were new. We asked the radiologists whether each image had been in the first set. We used Fisher's exact test and Kruskal–Wallis test to evaluate the correlation between recognition of an image and consistency in its interpretation. We evaluated the data using all possible recognition levels—definitely, probably or possibly included vs definitely, probably or possibly not included by collapsing the recognition levels into two and by eliminating the “possibly included” and “possibly not included” scores. Results: With all but one of six methods of looking at the data, there was no significant correlation between consistency in interpretation and recognition of the image. When the possibly included and possibly not included scores were eliminated, there was a borderline statistical significance (p = 0.04) with slightly greater consistency in interpretation of recognized than that of non-recognized images. Conclusion: We found no convincing evidence that radiologists' recognition of images in an observer performance study affects their interpretation on a second encounter. Advances in knowledge: Conscious recognition of chest radiographs did not result in a greater degree of consistency in the tested interpretation than that in the interpretation of images that were not recognized. PMID:24697724

  11. Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease.

    PubMed

    Montani, David; Lau, Edmund M; Dorfmüller, Peter; Girerd, Barbara; Jaïs, Xavier; Savale, Laurent; Perros, Frederic; Nossent, Esther; Garcia, Gilles; Parent, Florence; Fadel, Elie; Soubrier, Florent; Sitbon, Olivier; Simonneau, Gérald; Humbert, Marc

    2016-05-01

    Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) is a rare form of pulmonary hypertension (PH) characterised by preferential remodelling of the pulmonary venules. In the current PH classification, PVOD and pulmonary capillary haemangiomatosis (PCH) are considered to be a common entity and represent varied expressions of the same disease. The recent discovery of biallelic mutations in the EIF2AK4 gene as the cause of heritable PVOD/PCH represents a major milestone in our understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of PVOD. Although PVOD and pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) share a similar clinical presentation, with features of severe precapillary PH, it is important to differentiate these two conditions as PVOD carries a worse prognosis and life-threatening pulmonary oedema may occur following the initiation of PAH therapy. An accurate diagnosis of PVOD based on noninvasive investigations is possible utilising oxygen parameters, low diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide and characteristic signs on high-resolution computed tomography of the chest. No evidence-based medical therapy exists for PVOD at present and lung transplantation remains the preferred definitive therapy for eligible patients.

  12. Pulmonary arterial hypertension in congenital heart diseases.

    PubMed

    Beghetti, Maurice; Tissot, Cecile

    2009-08-01

    Pulmonary hypertension complicates the course of many children and adults with congenital heart diseases (CHDs). The increase in pulmonary pressure associated with CHD is secondary to either increased pulmonary blood flow or increased postcapillary pressures. Pulmonary arterial hypertension is in the vast majority associated with congenital cardiac shunts. Despite major advances in the understanding of the regulation of the pulmonary vascular bed and the pulmonary endothelial lesions leading to pulmonary vascular disease, despite the advances in surgical repair and the discovery of potential therapies in the pre- and postoperative period, pulmonary hypertension still carries a significant mortality and morbidity in patients with CHD. The recent introduction of targeted therapies in other forms of pulmonary arterial hypertension has led to a renewed interest in pulmonary hypertension associated with CHD and this particularly for the most advanced form, the so-called Eisenmenger syndrome (ES). This review summarizes the current knowledge on pulmonary hypertension associated with CHD, focusing on the pathophysiology and treatment of ES.

  13. [Pulmonary hypertension in liver diseases].

    PubMed

    Savale, Laurent; Sattler, Caroline; Sitbon, Olivier

    2014-09-01

    Portopulmonary hypertension (PoPH) is defined by the combination of portal hypertension and precapillary pulmonary hypertension (mPAP ≥ 25 mmHg, PCWP < 15 mmHg and PVR > 3 Wood units). PoPH is characterised by pathobiological mechanisms that are similar to other forms of pulmonary arterial hypertension. Prevalence of PoPH is estimated at 0.5-5% among patients with portal hypertension with or without cirrhosis. Treatment strategies most commonly employed for PoPH patients are based on recommendations for idiopathic PAH management. Indeed, the choice of specific PAH treatment must take account the severity of the underlying liver disease. Prognosis of PoPH patients is dependent on both the severity of PAH and of the underlying liver disease. PoPH may be a contraindication for orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) if mean pulmonary arterial pressure is > 35 mmHg associated with severe right ventricular dysfunction or high level of pulmonary vascular resistance (> 3-4 Wood units). Bridge therapy with specific PAH therapies should be considered in those patients in an attempt to improve pulmonary hemodynamic and thereby allow OLT with acceptable risk. Recent data suggest that stabilize, improve or cure PoPH seems to be possible by combining specific PAH therapies and liver transplantation in selected patients. Clinical and experimental evidences suggest that IFN therapy may be a possible risk factor for PAH.

  14. Pulmonary function in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Hovestadt, A; Bogaard, J M; Meerwaldt, J D; van der Meché, F G; Stigt, J

    1989-01-01

    Pulmonary function was investigated in 31 consecutive patients with relatively severe Parkinson's disease. Clinical disability was assessed by Hoehn and Yahr scale, Northwestern University Disability Scale and Websterscore. All patients were on levodopa substitution therapy and used anticholinergics. Pulmonary function was investigated by spirography, determination of a maximal inspiratory and expiratory flow-volume curve and, when possible, maximal static mouth pressures were determined. Peak inspiratory and expiratory flow, maximal expiratory flow at 50% and maximal static mouth pressures were significantly below normal values. Vital capacity, forced inspiratory volume in 1 s and the ratio of forced expiratory volume in 1 s and vital capacity were relatively normal. Nine patients had upper airway obstruction (UAO) as judged by abnormal values for peak inspiratory flow, the ratio of forced expiratory volume in 1 s and peak expiratory flow and the ratio of maximal expiratory and inspiratory flow at 50%. Flow-volume curves were normal in eight patients; four patients demonstrated flow decelerations and accelerations (type A) and 16 had a rounded off flow-volume curve (type B). Type A can be explained by UAO and type B by a combination of decreased effective muscle strength and possible UAO. Overall results of pulmonary function tests in patients without any clinical signs or symptoms of pulmonary disease point to subclinical upper airway obstruction and decreased effective muscle strength in a significant proportion of patients. PMID:2926415

  15. Pulmonary function in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Hovestadt, A; Bogaard, J M; Meerwaldt, J D; van der Meché, F G; Stigt, J

    1989-03-01

    Pulmonary function was investigated in 31 consecutive patients with relatively severe Parkinson's disease. Clinical disability was assessed by Hoehn and Yahr scale, Northwestern University Disability Scale and Websterscore. All patients were on levodopa substitution therapy and used anticholinergics. Pulmonary function was investigated by spirography, determination of a maximal inspiratory and expiratory flow-volume curve and, when possible, maximal static mouth pressures were determined. Peak inspiratory and expiratory flow, maximal expiratory flow at 50% and maximal static mouth pressures were significantly below normal values. Vital capacity, forced inspiratory volume in 1 s and the ratio of forced expiratory volume in 1 s and vital capacity were relatively normal. Nine patients had upper airway obstruction (UAO) as judged by abnormal values for peak inspiratory flow, the ratio of forced expiratory volume in 1 s and peak expiratory flow and the ratio of maximal expiratory and inspiratory flow at 50%. Flow-volume curves were normal in eight patients; four patients demonstrated flow decelerations and accelerations (type A) and 16 had a rounded off flow-volume curve (type B). Type A can be explained by UAO and type B by a combination of decreased effective muscle strength and possible UAO. Overall results of pulmonary function tests in patients without any clinical signs or symptoms of pulmonary disease point to subclinical upper airway obstruction and decreased effective muscle strength in a significant proportion of patients.

  16. Sickle Cell Disease and Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    Sickle Cell Disease Pulmonary & PH Hypertension Did you know that if you have Sickle Cell Disease you are at risk for Pulmonary Hypertension? ... for example), chronic liver disease, congenital heart disease, sickle cell disease and HIV infection. Finally, PAH can be ...

  17. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... feel alone. Outlook (Prognosis) COPD is a long-term (chronic) illness. The disease will get worse more quickly if you do not stop smoking. If you have severe COPD, you will be short of breath with most activities. You may be ...

  18. Pulmonary complications of hepatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Surani, Salim R; Mendez, Yamely; Anjum, Humayun; Varon, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Severe chronic liver disease (CLD) may result from portal hypertension, hepatocellular failure or the combination of both. Some of these patients may develop pulmonary complications independent from any pulmonary pathology that they may have. Among them the hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS), portopulmonary hypertension (PPH) and hepatic hydrothorax (HH) are described in detail in this literature review. HPS is encountered in approximately 15% to 30% of the patients and its presence is associated with increase in mortality and also requires liver transplantation in many cases. PPH has been reported among 4%-8% of the patient with CLD who have undergone liver transplantation. The HH is another entity, which has the prevalence rate of 5% to 6% and is associated in the absence of cardiopulmonary disease. These clinical syndromes occur in similar pathophysiologic environments. Most treatment modalities work as temporizing measures. The ultimate treatment of choice is liver transplant. This clinical review provides basic concepts; pathophysiology and clinical presentation that will allow the clinician to better understand these potentially life-threatening complications. This article will review up-to-date information on the pathophysiology, clinical features and the treatment of the pulmonary complications among liver disease patients. PMID:27468192

  19. Pulmonary Strongyloidiasis Masquerading as Exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan, Gourahari; Behera, Priyadarshini; Bhuniya, Sourin; Mohapatra, Prasanta Raghab; Turuk, Jyotirmayee; Mohanty, Srujana

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary strongyloidiasis is an uncommon presentation of Strongyloides infection, usually seen in immunocompromised hosts. The manifestations are similar to that of acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Therefore, the diagnosis of pulmonary strongyloidiasis could be challenging in a COPD patient, unless a high index of suspicion is maintained. Here, we present a case of Strongyloides hyperinfection in a COPD patient mimicking acute exacerbation, who was on chronic steroid therapy. PMID:27790284

  20. Endocrinological disturbances in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Creutzberg, E C; Casaburi, R

    2003-11-01

    In this overview, the available literature on endocrinological disturbances in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is reviewed, with stress on growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), thyroid hormone and the anabolic steroids. In COPD, little is known about circulating growth hormone or IGF-I concentrations. Some authors find a decrease in growth hormone or IGF-I, others an increase. An increase of growth hormone might reflect a nonspecific response of the body to stress (for instance, hypoxaemia). Until now, only one controlled study on growth hormone supplementation has been published, which however did not reveal any functional benefits. Before growth hormone supplementation can be advised as part of the treatment in COPD, further controlled studies must be performed to investigate its functional efficacy. The prevalence of thyroid dysfunction in COPD and its role in pulmonary cachexia has not been extensively studied. So far, there is no evidence that thyroid function is consistently altered in COPD, except perhaps in a subgroup of patients with severe hypoxaemia. Further research is required to more extensively study the underlying mechanisms and consequences of disturbed thyroid function in this subgroup of COPD patients. A few studies have reported the results of anabolic steroid supplementation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Although some studies have discerned that low circulating levels of testosterone are common in males with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, little is known about the prevalence, the underlying causes or functional consequences of hypogonadism in these patients. The use of systemic glucocorticosteroids and an influence of the systemic inflammatory response have been suggested as contributing to low testosterone levels. It can be hypothesised that low anabolic hormones will reduce muscle mass and eventually result in a diminished muscle function. Further evidence is required before testosterone

  1. Pathophysiology of Pulmonary Hypertension in Chronic Parenchymal Lung Disease.

    PubMed

    Singh, Inderjit; Ma, Kevin Cong; Berlin, David Adam

    2016-04-01

    Pulmonary hypertension commonly complicates chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and interstitial lung disease. The association of chronic lung disease and pulmonary hypertension portends a worse prognosis. The pathophysiology of pulmonary hypertension differs in the presence or absence of lung disease. We describe the physiological determinants of the normal pulmonary circulation to better understand the pathophysiological factors implicated in chronic parenchymal lung disease-associated pulmonary hypertension. This review will focus on the pathophysiology of 3 forms of chronic lung disease-associated pulmonary hypertension: idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and sarcoidosis.

  2. [Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap].

    PubMed

    Müller, Veronika; Gálffy, Gabriella; Tamási, Lilla

    2011-01-16

    Asthma bronchiale and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are the most prevalent lung diseases characterized by inflammation of the airways. International and Hungarian guidelines provide proper definitions for clinical symptoms, diagnostics and therapy of both diseases. However, in everyday clinical practice, overlap of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease has become more frequent. As guidelines are mainly based on large, multicenter, randomized, controlled trials that exclude overlap patients, there is a lack of diagnostic and especially therapeutic strategies for these patients. This review summarizes clinical characteristics of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap, and provides daily practical examples for its management.

  3. Ciliate communities consistently associated with coral diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweet, M. J.; Séré, M. G.

    2016-07-01

    Incidences of coral disease are increasing. Most studies which focus on diseases in these organisms routinely assess variations in bacterial associates. However, other microorganism groups such as viruses, fungi and protozoa are only recently starting to receive attention. This study aimed at assessing the diversity of ciliates associated with coral diseases over a wide geographical range. Here we show that a wide variety of ciliates are associated with all nine coral diseases assessed. Many of these ciliates such as Trochilia petrani and Glauconema trihymene feed on the bacteria which are likely colonizing the bare skeleton exposed by the advancing disease lesion or the necrotic tissue itself. Others such as Pseudokeronopsis and Licnophora macfarlandi are common predators of other protozoans and will be attracted by the increase in other ciliate species to the lesion interface. However, a few ciliate species (namely Varistrombidium kielum, Philaster lucinda, Philaster guamense, a Euplotes sp., a Trachelotractus sp. and a Condylostoma sp.) appear to harbor symbiotic algae, potentially from the coral themselves, a result which may indicate that they play some role in the disease pathology at the very least. Although, from this study alone we are not able to discern what roles any of these ciliates play in disease causation, the consistent presence of such communities with disease lesion interfaces warrants further investigation.

  4. Pulmonary and tricuspid valvuloplasty in carcinoid heart disease.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Ashkan; Pourafshar, Negiin; Fudge, James C

    2016-12-28

    A 26-year-old female with carcinoid heart disease consisting of severe pulmonary and tricuspid valve stenosis was admitted with line associated sepsis. She recovered from sepsis with antibiotics and aggressive fluid resuscitation but became grossly volume overloaded with evidence of tense ascites and lower extremity edema. She developed worsening renal and hepatic function due to congestive nephropathy and hepatopathy, which did not respond to intravenous diuretics, and she was deemed too sick for surgical pulmonary and tricuspid valve replacement. Pulmonary and tricuspid valvuloplasty was performed as a rescue measure to alleviate her congestive symptoms and improve her candidacy for valve replacement. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Pulmonary manifestations of sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, A; Ahmed, S

    2003-01-01

    Pulmonary complications account for significant morbidity and mortality in patients with sickle cell disease. Clinical lung involvement manifests in two major forms: the acute chest syndrome and sickle cell chronic lung disease. Acute chest syndrome is characterised by fever, chest pain, and appearance of a new infiltrate on chest radiograph. Sickle cell chronic lung disease, on the other hand, manifests as radiographic interstitial abnormalities, impaired pulmonary function, and, in its most severe form, by the evidence of pulmonary hypertension. Progress has been made in understanding the pathophysiology and management of these complications. In this review the current knowledge of the mechanism, diagnosis, and treatment of pulmonary complications of sickle cell disease are discussed. PMID:12897216

  6. Pulmonary Hypertension in Diffuse Parenchymal Lung Diseases.

    PubMed

    Shlobin, Oksana A; Brown, A Whitney; Nathan, Steven D

    2017-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) can be triggered by any number of disease processes that result in increased pulmonary vascular resistance. Although historically associated with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), most patients with PH do not have the idiopathic subtype, but rather PH associated with another underlying diagnosis, such as left heart or lung disease. The World Health Organization (WHO) classification of PH helps conceptualize the different categories based on presumed etiology. WHO group 3 is PH associated with lung disease. This review focuses on PH in diffuse parenchymal lung diseases (DPLDs), such as the idiopathic interstitial pneumonias and other more rare forms of DPLD. Although there are clear associations of PH with DPLD, the exact pathophysiologic mechanisms and full clinical significance remain uncertain. Treatment of PH related to DPLD remains investigational, but an area of great interest given the negative prognostic implications and the growing number of available pulmonary vasoactive agents.

  7. Exacerbation phenotyping in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Martin; Korman, Tony; King, Paul; Hamza, Kais; Bardin, Philip

    2013-11-01

    Acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) are crucial events but causes remain poorly defined. A method to clinically 'phenotype' AECOPD have been proposed, and 52 hospitalized chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbations according to underlying aetiology have now been prospectively phenotyped. Multiple exacerbation phenotypes were identified. A subpopulation coinfected with virus and bacteria had a significantly longer length of hospital stay, and this pilot study indicates that exacerbation phenotyping may be advantageous.

  8. Gene polymorphisms and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaodan; Yuan, Bowei; López, Elena; Bai, Chunxue; Wang, Xiangdong

    2014-01-01

    The genetic component was suggested to contribute to the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a major and growing public health burden. The present review aims to characterize the evidence that gene polymorphisms contribute to the aetiology of COPD and related traits, and explore the potential relationship between certain gene polymorphisms and COPD susceptibility, severity, lung function, phenotypes, or drug effects, even though limited results from related studies lacked consistency. Most of these studies were association studies, rather than confirmatory studies. More large-sized and strictly controlled studies are needed to prove the relationship between gene polymorphisms and the reviewed traits. More importantly, prospective confirmatory studies beyond initial association studies will be necessary to evaluate true relationships between gene polymorphisms and COPD and help individualized treatment for patients with COPD.

  9. Nontuberculous mycobacterial pulmonary disease mimicking lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Su Jin; Kim, Tae Jung; Lee, Jae-Ho; Park, Jeong-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To describe the features and clinical implications of computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET), and percutaneous needle aspiration biopsy (PCNB) in pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) disease manifesting as a solitary nodule, mass, or mass-like consolidation mimicking malignancy. Among a cohort of 388 patients with NTM pulmonary disease, 14 patients with clinically and radiologically suspected lung cancer were included in our study. Two chest radiologists evaluated CT features, including lesion type (nodule, mass, or mass-like consolidation), morphologic features (margin, degree of enhancement, calcification), and presence of accompanying findings suggestive of NTM pulmonary disease (bronchiectasis with clustered centrilobular nodules or upper-lobe cavitary lesions) by consensus. Diagnostic procedures for microbiologic diagnosis of NTM disease and clinical outcome were reviewed. Incidence of NTM pulmonary disease presenting as solitary nodule/mass (n = 8) or mass-like consolidation (n = 6) was 3.6% (14 of 388). Most lesions were detected incidentally during routine health check-up or evaluation of other disease (11 of 14, 79%). Lesions typically showed poor contrast-enhancement (9 of 12) and internal calcification (6 of 14). No lesions had CT features suggestive of NTM pulmonary disease. All 4 lesions for which PET/CT imaging was performed showed strong fluorodeoxyglucose uptake simulating malignant lesions (mean, 4.9; range, 3.6–7.8). PCNB revealed mycobacterial histology in 6 of 11 specimens and positive culture results were obtained for 7 of 7 specimens. NTM pulmonary disease may present as a solitary nodule, mass, or mass-like consolidation mimicking malignancy. CT features and PCNB are important to diagnose NTM disease mimicking lung cancer to avoid unnecessary surgery. PMID:27367996

  10. [Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma].

    PubMed

    Cosío, Borja G; Fiorentino, Federico; Scrimini, Sergio

    2010-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma are both highly prevalent inflammatory diseases characterized by airway obstruction with distinct pathogenic mechanisms and different degrees of response to antiinflammatory therapy. However, forms of presentation that show overlap between both diseases and which are not clearly represented in clinical trials are frequently encountered in clinical practice. These patients may show accelerated loss of pulmonary function and have a worse prognosis. Therefore their early identification is essential. Biomarkers such as bronchial hyperreactivity or nitric oxide in exhaled air have yielded discrepant results. Phenotypic characterization will allow treatment with inhaled corticosteroids to be individually tailored and optimized.

  11. Microbiological diagnosis of nontuberculous mycobacterial pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    van Ingen, Jakko

    2015-03-01

    Pulmonary disease is by far the most frequent disease caused by nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM). To diagnose NTM pulmonary disease (NTM-PD), patients should have symptoms and radiologic signs suggestive of NTM-PD, and cultures of multiple respiratory tract samples must grow the same NTM species. Thus, the microbiological laboratory has a central role in the diagnosis of NTM-PD. This review summarizes currently available data on techniques involved in the microbiological diagnosis of NTM-PD, and aims to provide a framework for optimal microbiological diagnosis.

  12. Pulmonary nuclear medicine: Techniques in diagnosis of lung disease

    SciTech Connect

    Atkins, H.L.

    1984-01-01

    This book presents papers on the application of nuclear medicine to the diagnosis of lung diseases. Topics considered include lung physiology and anatomy, radiopharmaceuticals in pulmonary medicine, pulmonary embolism, obstructive pulmonary disease, diffuse infiltrative lung disease, pneumoconioses, tumor localization scans in primary lung tumors, the interactions of heart diseases and lung diseases on radionuclide tests of lung anatomy and function, radionuclide imaging in pediatric lung diseases, and future possibilities in pulmonary nuclear medicine.

  13. Cellular senescence mediates fibrotic pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Schafer, Marissa J.; White, Thomas A.; Iijima, Koji; Haak, Andrew J.; Ligresti, Giovanni; Atkinson, Elizabeth J.; Oberg, Ann L.; Birch, Jodie; Salmonowicz, Hanna; Zhu, Yi; Mazula, Daniel L.; Brooks, Robert W.; Fuhrmann-Stroissnigg, Heike; Pirtskhalava, Tamar; Prakash, Y. S.; Tchkonia, Tamara; Robbins, Paul D.; Aubry, Marie Christine; Passos, João F.; Kirkland, James L.; Tschumperlin, Daniel J.; Kita, Hirohito; LeBrasseur, Nathan K.

    2017-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a fatal disease characterized by interstitial remodelling, leading to compromised lung function. Cellular senescence markers are detectable within IPF lung tissue and senescent cell deletion rejuvenates pulmonary health in aged mice. Whether and how senescent cells regulate IPF or if their removal may be an efficacious intervention strategy is unknown. Here we demonstrate elevated abundance of senescence biomarkers in IPF lung, with p16 expression increasing with disease severity. We show that the secretome of senescent fibroblasts, which are selectively killed by a senolytic cocktail, dasatinib plus quercetin (DQ), is fibrogenic. Leveraging the bleomycin-injury IPF model, we demonstrate that early-intervention suicide-gene-mediated senescent cell ablation improves pulmonary function and physical health, although lung fibrosis is visibly unaltered. DQ treatment replicates benefits of transgenic clearance. Thus, our findings establish that fibrotic lung disease is mediated, in part, by senescent cells, which can be targeted to improve health and function. PMID:28230051

  14. Cellular senescence mediates fibrotic pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Schafer, Marissa J; White, Thomas A; Iijima, Koji; Haak, Andrew J; Ligresti, Giovanni; Atkinson, Elizabeth J; Oberg, Ann L; Birch, Jodie; Salmonowicz, Hanna; Zhu, Yi; Mazula, Daniel L; Brooks, Robert W; Fuhrmann-Stroissnigg, Heike; Pirtskhalava, Tamar; Prakash, Y S; Tchkonia, Tamara; Robbins, Paul D; Aubry, Marie Christine; Passos, João F; Kirkland, James L; Tschumperlin, Daniel J; Kita, Hirohito; LeBrasseur, Nathan K

    2017-02-23

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a fatal disease characterized by interstitial remodelling, leading to compromised lung function. Cellular senescence markers are detectable within IPF lung tissue and senescent cell deletion rejuvenates pulmonary health in aged mice. Whether and how senescent cells regulate IPF or if their removal may be an efficacious intervention strategy is unknown. Here we demonstrate elevated abundance of senescence biomarkers in IPF lung, with p16 expression increasing with disease severity. We show that the secretome of senescent fibroblasts, which are selectively killed by a senolytic cocktail, dasatinib plus quercetin (DQ), is fibrogenic. Leveraging the bleomycin-injury IPF model, we demonstrate that early-intervention suicide-gene-mediated senescent cell ablation improves pulmonary function and physical health, although lung fibrosis is visibly unaltered. DQ treatment replicates benefits of transgenic clearance. Thus, our findings establish that fibrotic lung disease is mediated, in part, by senescent cells, which can be targeted to improve health and function.

  15. CT pulmonary angiography of adult pulmonary vascular diseases: Technical considerations and interpretive pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Taslakian, Bedros; Latson, Larry A; Truong, Mylene T; Aaltonen, Eric; Shiau, Maria C; Girvin, Francis; Alpert, Jeffrey B; Wickstrom, Maj; Ko, Jane P

    2016-11-01

    Computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA) has become the primary imaging modality for evaluating the pulmonary arteries. Although pulmonary embolism is the primary indication for CTPA, various pulmonary vascular abnormalities can be detected in adults. Knowledge of these disease entities and understanding technical pitfalls that can occur when performing CTPA are essential to enable accurate diagnosis and allow timely management. This review will cover a spectrum of acquired abnormalities including pulmonary embolism due to thrombus and foreign bodies, primary and metastatic tumor involving the pulmonary arteries, pulmonary hypertension, as well as pulmonary artery aneurysms and stenoses. Additionally, methods to overcome technical pitfalls and interventional treatment options will be addressed.

  16. Pulmonary hypertension in chronic interstitial lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Caminati, Antonella; Cassandro, Roberto; Harari, Sergio

    2013-09-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a common complication of interstitial lung diseases (ILDs), particularly in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and ILD associated with connective tissue disease. However, other lung diseases, such as combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema syndrome, pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis, and lymphangioleiomyomatosis, may also include PH in their clinical manifestations. In all of these diseases, PH is associated with reduced exercise capacity and poor prognosis. The degree of PH in ILDs is typically mild-to-moderate. However, some of these patients may develop a disproportionate increase in PH that cannot be justified solely by hypoxia and parenchymal injury: this condition has been termed "out-of-proportion" PH. The pathogenesis of PH in these diseases is various, incompletely understood and may be multifactorial. The clinical suspicion (i.e. increased dyspnoea, low diffusion capacity) and echocardiographic assessment are the first steps towards proper diagnosis of PH; however, right heart catheterisation remains the current gold standard for diagnosis of PH. At present, no specific therapies have been approved for the treatment of PH in patients with ILDs.

  17. Pulmonary Hypertension in Congenital Heart Disease: Beyond Eisenmenger Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Krieger, Eric V; Leary, Peter J; Opotowsky, Alexander R

    2015-11-01

    Patients with adult congenital heart disease have an increased risk of developing pulmonary hypertension. There are several mechanisms of pulmonary hypertension in patients with adult congenital heart disease, and understanding them requires a systematic approach to define the patient's hemodynamics and physiology. This article reviews the updated classification of pulmonary hypertension in patients with adult congenital heart disease with a focus on pathophysiology, diagnostics, and the evaluation of pulmonary hypertension in special adult congenital heart disease populations.

  18. Inapparent pulmonary vascular disease in an ex-heroin user

    SciTech Connect

    Antonelli Incalzi, R.; Ludovico Maini, C.; Giuliano Bonetti, M.; Campioni, P.; Pistelli, R.; Fuso, L.

    1986-04-01

    A severe pulmonary vascular derangement, usually reported in drug addicts, was diagnosed in a 28-year-old asymptomatic ex-heroin user by means of fortuitously performed pulmonary perfusion imaging. Neither physical findings nor pulmonary function tests, aroused suspicion of the diagnosis. A search for asymptomatic pulmonary vascular disease probably should be undertaken in drug addicts.

  19. Pulmonary manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Majewski, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Bronchopulmonary signs and symptoms are examples of variable extraintestinal manifestations of the inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). These complications of Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) seem to be underrecognized by both pulmonary physicians and gastroenterologists. The objective of the present review was to gather and summarize information on this particular matter, on the basis of available up-to-date literature. Tracheobronchial involvement is the most prevalent respiratory presentation, whereas IBD-related interstitial lung disease is less frequent. Latent and asymptomatic pulmonary involvement is not unusual. Differential diagnosis should always consider infections (mainly tuberculosis) and drug-induced lung pathology. The common link between intestinal disease and lung pathology is unknown, but many hypotheses have been proposed. It is speculated that environmental pollution, common immunological mechanisms and predisposing genetic factors may play a role. PMID:26788078

  20. Pulmonary hypertension associated with connective tissue disease.

    PubMed

    Fagan, Karen A; Badesch, David B

    2002-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a life threatening complication of several connective tissue diseases including scleroderma (both diffuse and limited scleroderma, or the CREST syndrome--calcinosis cutis, Raynaud's phenomenon, esophageal dysfunction, sclerodactyly, and telangectasia), systemic lupus erythomatosis (SLE), mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD), and less commonly, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and dermatomyositis/polymyositis. This report reviews the occurrence of this complication, potential etiologies, clinical presentation, and treatment options.

  1. [Pulmonary involvement in connective tissue disease].

    PubMed

    Bartosiewicz, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    The connective tissue diseases are a variable group of autoimmune mediated disorders characterized by multiorgan damage. Pulmonary complications are common, usually occur after the onset of joint symptoms, but can also be initially presenting complaint. The respiratory system may be involved in all its component: airways, vessels, parenchyma, pleura and respiratory muscles. Lung involvement is an increasing cause of morbidity and mortality in the connective tissue diseases. Clinical course is highly variable - can range from mild to rapidly progressive, some processes are reversible, while others are irreversible. Thus, the identification of reversible disease , and separately progressive disease, are important clinical issues. The frequency, clinical presentation, prognosis and responce to therapy are different, depending on the pattern of involvement as well as on specyfic diagnostic method used to identify it. High- resolution computed tompography plays an important role in identifying patients with respiratory involvement. Pulmonary function tests are a sensitive tool detecting interstitial lung disease. In this article, pulmonary lung involvement accompanying most frequently apperaing connective tissue diseases - rheumatoid arthritis, systemic sclerosis, lupus erythematosus, polymyositis/dermatomyositis, Sjögrens syndrome and mixed connective tissue disaese are reviewed.

  2. Future of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease management.

    PubMed

    D'Urzo, Anthony; Vogelmeier, Claus

    2012-06-01

    Bronchodilators play a pivotal role in the management of symptomatic chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Inhaled short-acting bronchodilators are used for all stages of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, primarily for the immediate relief of symptoms; inhaled long-acting bronchodilators are recommended for maintenance therapy in patients with moderate-to-very severe disease and those with daily symptoms. When symptoms are not adequately controlled by a single bronchodilator, combining bronchodilators of different classes may prove effective. Several long-acting β(2)-agonists and long-acting muscarinic antagonists with 24-h duration of action and inhalers combining different classes of long-acting, once-daily bronchodilators are in development. The place of these agents in the treatment algorithm will be determined by their efficacy and safety profiles and their long-term impact on relevant clinical outcomes.

  3. Osteoporosis in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Malay; Bhardwaj, Rajeev; Madabhavi, Irappa; Khatana, Jasmin

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a lifestyle-related chronic inflammatory pulmonary disease associated with significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. COPD is associated with various comorbidities found in all stages of COPD. The comorbidities have significant impact in terms of morbidity, mortality, and economic burden in COPD. Management of comorbidities should be incorporated into the comprehensive management of COPD as this will also have an effect on the outcome in COPD patients. Various comorbidities reported in COPD include cardiovascular disease, skeletal muscle dysfunction, anemia, metabolic syndrome, and osteoporosis. Osteoporosis is a significant comorbidity in COPD patients. Various risk factors, such as tobacco smoking, systemic inflammation, vitamin D deficiency, and the use of oral or inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs) are responsible for its occurrence in patients with COPD. This review will focus on the prevalence, pathogenesis, risk factors, diagnosis, and treatment of osteoporosis in COPD patients. PMID:25788838

  4. Pulmonary hypertension in chronic lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Seeger, Werner; Adir, Yochai; Barberà, Joan Albert; Champion, Hunter; Coghlan, John Gerard; Cottin, Vincent; De Marco, Teresa; Galiè, Nazzareno; Ghio, Stefano; Gibbs, Simon; Martinez, Fernando J; Semigran, Marc J; Simonneau, Gerald; Wells, Athol U; Vachiéry, Jean-Luc

    2013-12-24

    Chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD) and diffuse parenchymal lung diseases (DPLD), including idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and sarcoidosis, are associated with a high incidence of pulmonary hypertension (PH), which is linked with exercise limitation and a worse prognosis. Patients with combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema (CPFE) are particularly prone to the development of PH. Echocardiography and right heart catheterization are the principal modalities for the diagnosis of COPD and DPLD. For discrimination between group 1 PH patients with concomitant respiratory abnormalities and group 3 PH patients (PH caused by lung disease), patients should be transferred to a center with expertise in both PH and lung diseases for comprehensive evaluation. The task force encompassing the authors of this article provided criteria for this discrimination and suggested using the following definitions for group 3 patients, as exemplified for COPD, IPF, and CPFE: COPD/IPF/CPFE without PH (mean pulmonary artery pressure [mPAP] <25 mm Hg); COPD/IPF/CPFE with PH (mPAP ≥25 mm Hg); PH-COPD, PH-IPF, and PH-CPFE); COPD/IPF/CPFE with severe PH (mPAP ≥35 mm Hg or mPAP ≥25 mm Hg with low cardiac index [CI <2.0 l/min/m(2)]; severe PH-COPD, severe PH-IPF, and severe PH-CPFE). The "severe PH group" includes only a minority of chronic lung disease patients who are suspected of having strong general vascular abnormalities (remodeling) accompanying the parenchymal disease and with evidence of an exhausted circulatory reserve rather than an exhausted ventilatory reserve underlying the limitation of exercise capacity. Exertional dyspnea disproportionate to pulmonary function tests, low carbon monoxide diffusion capacity, and rapid decline of arterial oxygenation upon exercise are typical clinical features of this subgroup with poor prognosis. Studies evaluating the effect of pulmonary arterial hypertension drugs currently not approved for group 3 PH patients should focus on

  5. [Pulmonary hypertension in chronic lung diseases].

    PubMed

    Seeger, Werner; Adir, Yochai; Barberà, Joan Albert; Champion, Hunter; Coghlan, John Gerard; Cottin, Vincent; De Marco, Teresa; Galiè, Nazzareno; Ghio, Stefano; Gibbs, Simon; Martinez, Fernando J; Semigran, Marc J; Simonneau, Gerald; Wells, Athol U; Vachiéy, Jean-Luc

    2014-10-01

    Chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD) and diffuse parenchymal lung diseases (DPLD), including idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and sarcoidosis, are associated with a high incidence of pulmonary hypertension (PH), which is linked with exercise limitation and a worse prognosis. Patients with combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema (CPFE) are particularly prone to the development of PH. Echocardiography and right heart catheterization are the principal modalities for the diagnosis of COPD and DPLD. For discrimination between group 1 PH patients with concomitant respiratory abnormalities and group 3 PH patients (PH caused by lung disease), patients should be transferred to a center with expertise in both PH and lung diseases for comprehensive evaluation. The task force encompassing the .authors of this article provided criteria for this discrimination and suggested using the following definitions for group 3 patients, as exemplified for COPD, IPF, and CPFE: COPD/IPF/CPFE without PH (mean pulmonary artery pressure [mPAP]<25mmHg); COPD/IPF/CPFE with PH (mPAP25mmHg); PH-COPD, PH-IPF, and PH-CPFE); COPD/IPF/CPFE with severe PH (mPAP 35 mmHg or mPAP 25 mmHg with low cardiac index [CI <2.0.l/min/m2]; severe PH-COPD, severe PH-IPF, and severe PH-CPFE). The "severe PH group" includes only a minority of chronic lung disease patients who are suspected of having strong general vascular abnormalities (remodeling) accompanying the parenchymal disease and with evidence of an exhausted circulatory reserve rather than an exhausted ventilatory reserve underlying the limitation of exercise capacity. Exertional dyspnea disproportionate to pulmonary function tests, low carbon monoxide diffusion capacity, and rapid decline of arterial oxygenation upon exercise are typical clinical features of this subgroup with poor prognosis. Studies evaluating the effect of pulmonary arterial hypertension drugs currently not approved for group 3 PH patients should focus on this severe PH group

  6. Thyroid gland in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Miłkowska-Dymanowska, Joanna; Białas, Adam J; Laskowska, Paulina; Górski, Paweł; Piotrowski, Wojciech J

    2017-01-01

    The risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), as well as thyroid diseases increases with age. COPD is a common systemic disease associated with chronic inflammation. Many endocrinological disorders, including thyroid gland diseases are related to systemic inflammation. Epidemiological studies suggest that patients with COPD are at higher risk of thyroid disorders. These associations are not well-studied and thyroid gland diseases are not included on the broadly acknowledged list of COPD comorbidities. They may seriously handicap quality of life of COPD patients. Unfortunately, the diagnosis may be difficult, as many signs are masked by the symptoms of the index disease. The comprehension of the correlation between thyroid gland disorders and COPD may contribute to better care of patients. In this review, we attempt to revise available literature describing existing links between COPD and thyroid diseases.

  7. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and left ventricle.

    PubMed

    Portillo, Karina; Abad-Capa, Jorge; Ruiz-Manzano, Juan

    2015-05-01

    Several studies have shown that the interaction between chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and cardiovascular comorbidity is complex and bidirectional, since each of these diseases complicates the prognosis of the other. Recent advances in imaging technology have led to better characterization of cardiac chambers and allowed the relationship between certain cardiac function parameters and COPD clinical and functional variables to be explored. Although cardiac abnormalities in COPD have been mainly associated with the right ventricle, several studies have reported that the left ventricle may also be affected in this disease. A better understanding of the mechanisms involved and their clinical implications will establish diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for patients with both these conditions.

  8. Extracellular Vesicles in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kadota, Tsukasa; Fujita, Yu; Yoshioka, Yusuke; Araya, Jun; Kuwano, Kazuyoshi; Ochiya, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by the progression of irreversible airflow limitation and is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although several crucial mechanisms of COPD pathogenesis have been studied, the precise mechanism remains unknown. Extracellular vesicles (EVs), including exosomes, microvesicles, and apoptotic bodies, are released from almost all cell types and are recognized as novel cell–cell communication tools. They have been shown to carry and transfer a wide variety of molecules, such as microRNAs, messenger RNAs, and proteins, which are involved in physiological functions and the pathology of various diseases. Recently, EVs have attracted considerable attention in pulmonary research. In this review, we summarize the recent findings of EV-mediated COPD pathogenesis. We also discuss the potential clinical usefulness of EVs as biomarkers and therapeutic agents for the treatment of COPD. PMID:27801806

  9. [Nutritional abnormalities in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Gea, Joaquim; Martínez-Llorens, Juana; Barreiro, Esther

    2014-07-22

    Nutritional abnormalities are associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with a frequency ranging from 2 to 50%, depending on the geographical area and the study design. Diagnostic tools include anthropometry, bioelectrical impedance, dual energy radioabsortiometry and deuterium dilution, being the body mass and the lean mass indices the most frequently used parameters. While the most important consequences of nutritional abnormalities are muscle dysfunction and exercise limitation, factors implicated include an imbalance between caloric intake and consumption, and between anabolic and catabolic hormones, inflammation, tobacco smoking, poor physical activity, hypoxemia, some drugs and aging/comorbidities. The most important molecular mechanism for malnutrition associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease appears to be the mismatching between protein synthesis and breakdown. Among the therapeutic measures proposed for these nutritional abnormalities are improvements in lifestyle and nutritional support, although the use of anabolic drugs (such as secretagogues of the growth hormone) offers a new therapeutic strategy.

  10. Hypoxic pulmonary hypertension in chronic lung diseases: novel vasoconstrictor pathways.

    PubMed

    Rowan, Simon C; Keane, Michael P; Gaine, Seán; McLoughlin, Paul

    2016-03-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a well recognised complication of chronic hypoxic lung diseases, which are among the most common causes of death and disability worldwide. Development of pulmonary hypertension independently predicts reduced life expectancy. In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, long-term oxygen therapy ameliorates pulmonary hypertension and greatly improves survival, although the correction of alveolar hypoxia and pulmonary hypertension is only partial. Advances in understanding of the regulation of vascular smooth muscle tone show that chronic vasoconstriction plays a more important part in the pathogenesis of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension than previously thought, and that structural vascular changes contribute less. Trials of existing vasodilators show that pulmonary hypertension can be ameliorated and systemic oxygen delivery improved in carefully selected patients, although systemic hypotensive effects limit the doses used. Vasoconstrictor pathways that are selective for the pulmonary circulation can be blocked to reduce hypoxic pulmonary hypertension without causing systemic hypotension, and thus provide potential targets for novel therapeutic strategies.

  11. Advances in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    McDonald, C F; Khor, Y

    2013-08-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterised by progressive airflow limitation in the presence of identifiable risk factors. Inflammation is the central pathological feature in the pathogenesis of COPD. In addition to its pulmonary effects, COPD is associated with significant extrapulmonary manifestations, including ischaemic heart disease, osteoporosis, stroke and diabetes. Anxiety and depression are also common. Spirometry remains the gold standard diagnostic tool. Pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic therapy can improve symptoms, quality of life and exercise capacity and, through their effects on reducing exacerbations, have the potential to modify disease progression. Bronchodilators are the mainstay of pharmacotherapy, with guidelines recommending a stepwise escalating approach. Smoking cessation is paramount in managing COPD, with promotion of physical activity and pulmonary rehabilitation being other key factors in management. Comorbidities should be actively sought and managed in their own right. Given the chronicity and progressive nature of COPD, ongoing monitoring and support with timely discussion of advanced-care planning and end-of-life issues are recommended.

  12. Pulmonary vascular response of dogs with heartworm disease.

    PubMed Central

    Rawlings, C A

    1978-01-01

    Heartworm diseases in dogs is an infectious disease that produces pulmonary hypertension. Dogs with the early vascular changes of heartworm disease, but without the clinical cardiopulmonary signs and pulmonary hypertension, were studied. Dogs with early heartworm were identified that had an exaggerated hypertensive response to hypoxia and to postaglandin F2alpha as compared to those of normal dogs. The pulmonary hypertensive response of dogs with spontaneous heartworm disease varied widely between individuals. PMID:743600

  13. Pulmonary vascular response of dogs with heartworm disease.

    PubMed

    Rawlings, C A

    1978-10-01

    Heartworm diseases in dogs is an infectious disease that produces pulmonary hypertension. Dogs with the early vascular changes of heartworm disease, but without the clinical cardiopulmonary signs and pulmonary hypertension, were studied. Dogs with early heartworm were identified that had an exaggerated hypertensive response to hypoxia and to postaglandin F2alpha as compared to those of normal dogs. The pulmonary hypertensive response of dogs with spontaneous heartworm disease varied widely between individuals.

  14. [Diagnosis of occupational chronic pulmonary diseases].

    PubMed

    Maestrelli, P; Guarnieri, G

    2010-01-01

    Occupational risk factors may induce chronic nonmalignant respiratory diseases such as pneumoconiosis, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma or bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome. Diagnosis is well codified by international guidelines for most of these occupational diseases except for COPD. The study of occupational COPD is complicated by several issues. In fact, COPD is a multifactorial disease and has a long latency between exposure to causative agents and the occurrence of disease. The main confounding factor is smoking. The quantitative estimation of cigarette smoked is easier and more accurate than that of occupational exposure. The diagnosis of COPD is based on the presence of chronic airflow limitation at spirometry; moreover, an accelerated decline in respiratory function may be observed in the longitudinal evaluation of workers. The retrospective assignment of occupational aetiology of COPD remains difficult in individual cases, especially with a significant history of smoking.

  15. Killer cells in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Fairclough, Lucy; Urbanowicz, Richard A; Corne, Jonathan; Lamb, Jonathan R

    2008-04-01

    COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) is a treatable and preventable disease state, characterized by progressive airflow limitation that is not fully reversible. It is a current and growing cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide, with the WHO (World Health Organization) projecting that total deaths attributed to COPD will increase by more than 30% in the next 10 years. The pathological hallmarks of COPD are destruction of the lung parenchyma (pulmonary emphysema), inflammation of the central airways (chronic bronchitis) and inflammation of the peripheral airways (respiratory bronchiolitis). The destructive changes and tissue remodelling observed in COPD are a result of complex interactions between cells of the innate and adaptive immune systems. The focus of the present review is directed towards the role of CD8(+) T-lymphocytes, NK (natural killer) cells and NKT cells (NK T-cells). These three classes of killer cell could all play an important part in the pathogenesis of COPD. The observed damage to the pulmonary tissue could be caused in three ways: (i) direct cytotoxic effect against the lung epithelium mediated by the activities of perforin and granzymes, (ii) FasL (Fas ligand)-induced apoptosis and/or (iii) cytokine and chemokine release. The present review considers the role of these killer cells in COPD.

  16. [Pulmonary arterial hypertension in connective tissue diseases].

    PubMed

    Cordier, Jean-François

    2009-11-01

    Among connective tissue diseases, pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is frequently associated with systemic sclerosis and systemic lupus erythematosus. PAH is less common in mixed connective tissue diseases and Sjögren's syndrome, and rare in rheumatoid arthritis. PAH in systemic sclerosis may be either isolated (prevalence about 8%) or associated with interstitial lung disease. Echocardiographic screening for PAH is worthwhile in patients with systemic sclerosis, especially as treatments for idiopathic PAH (endothelin receptor antagonists, phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors, and prostanoids) are effective in this setting. The prevalence of PAH among patients with systemic lupus erythematosus is poorly known; immunosuppressive treatment is sometimes effective by itself but most patients benefit from PAH treatment. PAH associated with connective tissue diseases has a worse prognosis than idiopathic PAH.

  17. Osteoporosis Associated with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Reiko; Inoue, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    Recent epidemiological studies have revealed that osteoporosis is closely associated with common chronic diseases including diabetes, hypertension, chronic kidney disorders, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). COPD is a chronic inflammatory airway disease but now well known to be associated with various systemic comorbidities including osteoporosis. Osteoporosis and osteoporotic fractures are extremely common in COPD patients, which have significant impacts on their quality of life (QOL), activities of daily life (ADL), respiratory function, and possibly their prognosis. COPD-associated osteoporosis is however extremely under-recognized, hence undertreated. Recent studies have suggested that both decreased bone mineral density (BMD) and impaired bone quality compromise bone strength causing fractures in COPD. In COPD patients, various general clinical risk factors for osteoporosis are present including smoking, older age, low body weight, and physical inactivity. In addition, disease-related risk factors such as decreased pulmonary function, inflammation, glucocorticoid use and vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency have been linked to the development of osteoporosis in COPD. Increased awareness of osteoporosis in COPD, especially that of high prevalence of vertebral fractures is called upon among general physicians as well as pulmonologists. Routine screening for osteoporosis and risk assessment of fractures will enable physicians to diagnose COPD patients with comorbid osteoporosis at an early stage. Timely prevention of developing osteoporosis together with appropriate treatment of established osteoporosis may improve QOL and ADL of the COPD patients, preserve their lung function and eventually result in better prognosis in these patients. PMID:27622174

  18. [Advances in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Belén Arnalich; Pumarega, Irene Cano; Ausiró, Anna Mola; Izquierdo Alonso, José Luis

    2009-01-01

    Although chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by poorly reversible, chronic airflow obstruction, from the clinical point of view we must continue to make progress in the diagnosis and management of these patients so that spirometry is not the only technique used. Understanding that COPD is a heterogeneous process and that patient complexity usually increases due to the presence of comorbidities will allow more individualized strategies to be designed, which may improve control of the process. The TORCH and UPLIFT trials have shown that current treatment can improve important aspects of the disease, including mortality. However, the finalizing of these two large trials has generated a current of opinion favoring a more individually-tailored approach that should include all the factors -both pulmonary and extrapulmonary- that can modify the patient's form of presentation. Although we are witnessing a change in the therapeutic approach to COPD, future treatment will probably be based on studies performed in specific patient subgroups and on clarifying the interrelation between COPD and other diseases that are common in these patients. Greater knowledge of the pathogenesis of the disease may improve pharmacological treatment but drugs that, by themselves, alter the short- and longterm course of COPD are not on the horizon. However, a more patient-focussed approach may be the main tool available to physicians to increase quality of life -and possibly survival- in these patients.

  19. Pulmonary Arterial Capacitance Predicts Cardiac Events in Pulmonary Hypertension Due to Left Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sugimoto, Koichi; Yoshihisa, Akiomi; Nakazato, Kazuhiko; Jin, Yuichiro; Suzuki, Satoshi; Yokokawa, Tetsuro; Misaka, Tomofumi; Yamaki, Takayoshi; Kunii, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Saitoh, Shu-ichi; Takeishi, Yasuchika

    2016-01-01

    Background Although pulmonary hypertension due to left heart disease (LHD-PH) accounts for the largest proportion of pulmonary hypertension, few reports on the epidemiological analysis of LHD-PH exist. Recently, pulmonary arterial capacitance (PAC) has attracted attention as a possible factor of right ventricular afterload along with pulmonary vascular resistance. We therefore investigated the clinical significance of PAC in LHD-PH. Methods The subject consisted of 252 LHD-PH patients (145 men, mean age 63.4 ± 14.7 years) diagnosed by right heart catheterization. PAC was estimated by the ratio between stroke volume and pulmonary arterial pulse pressure. Patients were classified into four groups according to the PAC (1st quartile was 0.74 to 1.76 ml/mmHg, the 2nd quartile 1.77 to 2.53 ml/mmHg, the 3rd quartile 2.54 to 3.59 ml/mmHg, and the 4th quartile 3.61 to 12.14 ml/mmHg). The end-points were defined as rehospitalization due to worsening heart failure and/or cardiac death. The Cox proportional hazard regression model was used to determine what variables were associated with cardiac events. Results The patients in the 1st quartile had the lowest cardiac index and stroke volume index, and the highest mean pulmonary arterial pressure, mean pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, and pulmonary vascular resistance compared with the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th quartiles. Fifty-four patients experienced cardiac events during the follow-up period (median 943 days). The event-free rate of the 1st quartile was significantly lower than that of the 3rd and 4th quartiles (66.7% vs 82.5% [3rd quartile], P = 0.008; and 92.1% [4th quartile], P < 0.001). The Cox hazard analysis revealed that PAC was significantly associated with cardiac events (HR 0.556, 95% CI 0.424–0.730, P < 0.001). Conclusion PAC is useful in the prediction of cardiac event risk in LHD-PH patients. PMID:27875533

  20. Pathophysiology and treatment of pulmonary hypertension in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Gordeuk, Victor R; Castro, Oswaldo L; Machado, Roberto F

    2016-02-18

    Pulmonary hypertension affects ∼10% of adult patients with sickle cell disease (SCD), particularly those with the homozygous genotype. An increase in pulmonary artery systolic pressure, estimated noninvasively by echocardiography, helps identify SCD patients at risk for pulmonary hypertension, but definitive diagnosis requires right-heart catheterization. About half of SCD-related pulmonary hypertension patients have precapillary pulmonary hypertension with potential etiologies of (1) a nitric oxide deficiency state and vasculopathy consequent to intravascular hemolysis, (2) chronic pulmonary thromboembolism, or (3) upregulated hypoxic responses secondary to anemia, low O2 saturation, and microvascular obstruction. The remainder have postcapillary pulmonary hypertension secondary to left ventricular dysfunction. Although the pulmonary artery pressure in SCD patients with pulmonary hypertension is only moderately elevated, they have a markedly higher risk of death than patients without pulmonary hypertension. Guidelines for diagnosis and management of SCD-related pulmonary hypertension were published recently by the American Thoracic Society. Management of adults with sickle-related pulmonary hypertension is based on anticoagulation for those with thromboembolism; oxygen therapy for those with low oxygen saturation; treatment of left ventricular failure in those with postcapillary pulmonary hypertension; and hydroxyurea or transfusions to raise the hemoglobin concentration, reduce hemolysis, and prevent vaso-occlusive events that cause additional increases in pulmonary pressure. Randomized trials have not identified drugs to lower pulmonary pressure in SCD patients with precapillary pulmonary hypertension. Patients with hemodynamics of pulmonary arterial hypertension should be referred to specialized centers and considered for treatments known to be effective in other forms of pulmonary arterial hypertension. There have been reports that some of these treatments

  1. Asbestos-related pulmonary disease in boilermakers

    SciTech Connect

    Demers, R.Y.; Neale, A.V.; Robins, T.; Herman, S.C. )

    1990-01-01

    Boilermakers are skilled building tradesmen who construct, repair, and dismantle boilers. The present study reports on the evaluation of members of a Michigan boilermaker's union for the presence of signs and symptoms of chronic pulmonary disease. Study variables included standardized evaluations of chest x-ray findings, pulmonary function testing, physical examination, and respiratory symptoms. An overall participation rate of 69% was achieved. A non-participant survey identified no significant differences between participants and non-participants in dyspnea, cough, age, or smoking history. Among participants with greater than 20 years experience in the trade, the mean FVC was 91% of predicted; the FEV1 was 86% of predicted; 25% showed at least a 1/0 profusion of interstitial markings on chest x-ray; 30% had bilateral pleural abnormalities; and 52% had audible inspiratory rales on physical examination. Forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume at one second both decreased with years in the trade. Chest x-ray findings of interstitial fibrosis and pleural plaques were related to ten or more years in the trade, as were respiratory symptoms of pulmonary rales, wheeze, and dyspnea.

  2. [Pulmonary hypertension due to left heart diseases].

    PubMed

    Vachiéry, Jean-Luc; Adir, Yochai; Barberà, Joan Albert; Champion, Hunter; Coghlan, John Gerard; Cottin, Vincent; De Marco, Teresa; Galiè, Nazzareno; Ghio, Stefano; Gibbs, J Simon R; Martinez, Fernando; Semigran, Marc; Simonneau, Gerald; Wells, Athol; Seeger, Werner

    2014-10-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH), a common complication of left heart diseases (LHD), negatively impacts symptoms, exercise capacity, and outcome. Although the true prevalence of PH-LHD is unknown, a subset of patients might present significant PH that cannot be explained by a passive increase in left-sided filling pressures. The term "out-of-proportion" PH has been used to identify that population without a clear definition, which has been found less than ideal and created confusion. We propose a change in terminology and a new definition of PH due to LHD. We suggest to abandon "out-of-proportion" PH and to distinguish "isolated post-capillary PH" from "post-capillary PH with a pre-capillary component" on the basis of the pressure difference between diastolic pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary artery wedge pressure. Although there is no validated treatment for PH-LHD, we provide insights into management and discuss completed and randomized trials in this condition. Finally, we provide recommendations for future clinical trials to establish safety and efficacy of novel compounds to target this area of unmet medical need. (J Am Coll Cardiol 2013;62:D100-8) ©2013 by the American College of Cardiology Foundation.

  3. Pulmonary hypertension due to left heart diseases.

    PubMed

    Vachiéry, Jean-Luc; Adir, Yochai; Barberà, Joan Albert; Champion, Hunter; Coghlan, John Gerard; Cottin, Vincent; De Marco, Teresa; Galiè, Nazzareno; Ghio, Stefano; Gibbs, J Simon R; Martinez, Fernando; Semigran, Marc; Simonneau, Gerald; Wells, Athol; Seeger, Werner

    2013-12-24

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH), a common complication of left heart diseases (LHD), negatively impacts symptoms, exercise capacity, and outcome. Although the true prevalence of PH-LHD is unknown, a subset of patients might present significant PH that cannot be explained by a passive increase in left-sided filling pressures. The term "out-of-proportion" PH has been used to identify that population without a clear definition, which has been found less than ideal and created confusion. We propose a change in terminology and a new definition of PH due to LHD. We suggest to abandon "out-of-proportion" PH and to distinguish "isolated post-capillary PH" from "post-capillary PH with a pre-capillary component" on the basis of the pressure difference between diastolic pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary artery wedge pressure. Although there is no validated treatment for PH-LHD, we provide insights into management and discuss completed and randomized trials in this condition. Finally, we provide recommendations for future clinical trials to establish safety and efficacy of novel compounds to target this area of unmet medical need.

  4. Evolving Concepts of Pulmonary Hypertension Secondary to Left Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Ramu, Bhavadharini; Thenappan, Thenappan

    2016-04-01

    Pulmonary hypertension associated with left heart disease is the most common form of pulmonary hypertension. Although its pathophysiology remains incompletely understood, it is now well recognized that the presence of pulmonary hypertension is associated with a worse prognosis. Right ventricular failure has independent and additive prognostic value over pulmonary hypertension for adverse outcomes in left heart disease. Recently, several new terminologies have been introduced to better define and characterize the nature and severity of pulmonary hypertension. Several new treatment options including the use of pulmonary arterial hypertension specific therapies are being considered, but there is lack of evidence. Here, we review the recent advances in this field and summarize the diagnostic and therapeutic modalities of use in the management of pulmonary hypertension associated with left heart disease.

  5. [Triple therapy in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Baloira, Adolfo

    2010-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the most important respiratory diseases, characterized by its multicomponent complexity, with chronic inflammation, increased airway resistance and exacerbations. Several drugs are currently available for its treatment, which act on distinct targets. Bronchodilators, especially prolonged-action bronchodilators, are the most potent and there are two groups: beta-2 mimetics and anticholinergics. Inhaled corticosteroids are the main anti-inflammatory drugs but have modest efficacy and their use is reserved for patients with severe disease and frequent exacerbations and/or asthma traits. Associating these three drugs can improve symptom control, improve quality of life and reduce the number of exacerbations. The present article reviews the evidence supporting this triple combination, as well as published studies.

  6. Autoimmune disease leading to pulmonary AL amyloidosis and pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ellender, Claire M; McLean, Catriona; Williams, Trevor J; Snell, Gregory I; Whitford, Helen M

    2015-01-01

    A 33-year-old woman with past history of Sjögren's syndrome and systemic lupus erythematosus presented with dyspnea and syncope secondary to pulmonary hypertension. After progressive symptoms over 4 years, she received bilateral lung transplantation. Histopathology of the explanted lungs showed isolated pulmonary amyloid light-chain amyloidosis and pulmonary cysts. No evidence of systemic amyloidosis was found at the time of transplantation. Seven years post lung transplantation, she remains well with no evidence of systemic amyloidosis recurrence. PMID:26090118

  7. Respiratory Conditions Update: Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Karel, Daphne J

    2016-09-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is defined as persistent airflow limitation due to irritant-induced chronic inflammation. A postbronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 second to forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC) ratio of 0.7 or less is diagnostic in a patient with dyspnea, chronic cough or sputum production, and a history of irritant exposure. Tobacco smoking is the most significant etiology, and smoking cessation is the only intervention shown to slow disease progression. Long-acting beta2-agonists and long-acting muscarinic antagonists are first-line treatments for patients with persistently symptomatic COPD with an FEV1 of 80% or less of predicted. When COPD is uncontrolled with a long-acting bronchodilator, combination therapy with a long-acting muscarinic antagonist-long-acting beta2-agonist or long-acting beta2-agonist-inhaled corticosteroid should be prescribed. Patients with COPD and reduced exercise tolerance should undergo pulmonary rehabilitation and be evaluated for supplemental oxygen therapy. Other treatment options for persistently symptomatic COPD include inhaler triple therapy (ie, long-acting muscarinic antagonist, long-acting beta2-agonist, inhaled corticosteroid), phosphodiesterase type 4 inhibitors, oxygen, and surgical interventions.

  8. Pulmonary hypertension associated with lung diseases and hypoxemia.

    PubMed

    Cuttica, Michael J

    2016-05-01

    Pulmonary hypertension that develops in the setting of underlying lung diseases such as COPD or idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is associated with decreased functional status, worsening hypoxemia and quality of life, and increased mortality. This complication of lung disease is complex in its origin and carries a unique set of diagnostic and therapeutic issues. This review attempts to provide an overview of mechanisms associated with the onset of pulmonary hypertension in COPD and IPF, touches on appropriate evaluation, and reviews the state of knowledge on treating pulmonary hypertension related to underlying lung disease.

  9. Pulmonary hypertension in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: current theories of pathogenesis and their implications for treatment

    PubMed Central

    Wright, J; Levy, R; Churg, A

    2005-01-01

    The development of pulmonary hypertension is a poor prognostic sign in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), affecting both mortality and quality of life. Although pulmonary hypertension in COPD is traditionally viewed as a result of emphysematous destruction of the vascular bed and/or hypoxia, recent studies indicate that neither of these factors correlates very well with pulmonary artery pressures. New human and animal experimental data are beginning to show that pulmonary hypertension in this setting is probably a result of the direct effect of tobacco smoke on the intrapulmonary vessels with abnormal production of mediators that control vasoconstriction, vasodilatation, and vascular cell proliferation, ultimately leading to aberrant vascular remodelling and aberrant vascular physiology. These changes are in many ways similar to those seen in other forms of pulmonary hypertension and suggest that the treatments used for primary pulmonary hypertension may be beneficial in patients with COPD. PMID:15994270

  10. Emerging drugs in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Seifart, Carola; Vogelmeier, Claus

    2009-03-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is one of the most relevant diseases with increasing incidence, morbidity and mortality. Although there have been therapeutic advances in the past decades, there is a lot of room for improvement. There are several new therapeutic strategies and a variety of novel drugs under development that are based on established concepts. These new drugs have the following targets: i) smoking; ii) airways obstruction; iii) inflammation; iv) protease-antiprotease imbalance; and v) regeneration of lung tissue. In the next few years, there will be bronchodilators with longer duration of action that may improve adherence. In addition, there will be fixed combinations of different bronchodilators and bronchodilators with corticosteroids, which may have a positive impact on parameters such as exacerbations, dyspnea and exercise capacity. Novel anti-inflammatory concepts that go beyond corticosteroids are in early phases of development and it remains to be seen how effective they are and what side effects they may carry.

  11. Pharmacological treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Montuschi, Paolo

    2006-01-01

    None of the drugs currently available for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are able to reduce the progressive decline in lung function which is the hallmark of this disease. Smoking cessation is the only intervention that has proved effective. The current pharmacological treatment of COPD is symptomatic and is mainly based on bronchodilators, such as selective β2-adrenergic agonists (short- and long-acting), anticholinergics, theophylline, or a combination of these drugs. Glucocorticoids are not generally recommended for patients with stable mild to moderate COPD due to their lack of efficacy, side effects, and high costs. However, glucocorticoids are recommended for severe COPD and frequent exacerbations of COPD. New pharmacological strategies for COPD need to be developed because the current treatment is inadequate. PMID:18044097

  12. Musculoskeletal Disorders in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cielen, Nele; Maes, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a lung disease characterized by airway obstruction and inflammation but also accompanied by several extrapulmonary consequences, such as skeletal muscle weakness and osteoporosis. Skeletal muscle weakness is of major concern, since it leads to poor functional capacity, impaired health status, increased healthcare utilization, and even mortality, independently of lung function. Osteoporosis leads to fractures and is associated with increased mortality, functional decline, loss of quality of life, and need for institutionalization. Therefore, the presence of the combination of these comorbidities will have a negative impact on daily life in patients with COPD. In this review, we will focus on these two comorbidities, their prevalence in COPD, combined risk factors, and pathogenesis. We will try to prove the clustering of these comorbidities and discuss possible preventive or therapeutic strategies. PMID:24783225

  13. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: an overview.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Deborah

    As chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the major causes of worldwide mortality, it is important to prevent, diagnose and manage it. COPD creates a huge burden on the NHS and has a significant impact on patients. This is a problem with the increase in morbidity and mortality rates. In primary care there is a lack of knowledge, under-use of quality-assured spirometry and under-diagnosis in about half of all cases. To be able to effectively diagnose, assess and manage COPD, health professionals must understand the physiology and aetiology of the disease. COPD is similar to asthma in its presentation and physiology but management of the condition can differ. The authors therefore looked at the similarities between the two conditions and what tests one can use to make a diagnosis of COPD.

  14. Recent updates in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Garvey, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), characterized by chronic airways inflammation and progressive airflow limitation, is a common, preventable and treatable disease. Worldwide, COPD is a major cause of morbidity and mortality; smoking tobacco is the most important risk factor. This translational review of recent updates in COPD care for the primary care audience, includes recommendations from the 2015 Global Initiative for chronic obstructive lung disease (GOLD) report on diagnosis, pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment, prevalence of comorbidities, management of exacerbations and the asthma and COPD overlap syndrome, with a focus on the importance and benefit of physical activity and exercise in COPD patients. Exacerbations and comorbidities contribute to the overall severity of COPD in individual patients. Management of exacerbations includes reducing the impact of the current exacerbation and preventing development of subsequent episodes. Healthcare professionals need to be alert to comorbidities, such as cardiovascular disease, anxiety/depression, lung cancer, infections and diabetes, which are common in COPD patients and can have a significant impact on HRQoL and prognosis. Pulmonary rehabilitation is recommended by a number of guidelines for all symptomatic COPD patients, regardless of severity, and involves exercise training, patient education, nutritional advice and psychosocial support. At all stages of COPD, regular physical activity and exercise can aid symptom control, improve HRQoL, reduce rates of hospitalization, and improve morbidity and respiratory mortality. Healthcare professionals play a pivotal role in improving HRQoL and health-related outcomes in COPD patients to meet their specific needs and in providing appropriate diagnosis, management and advice on smoking cessation.

  15. Common lung conditions: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Delzell, John E

    2013-06-01

    The etiology of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is chronic lung inflammation. In the United States, this inflammation most commonly is caused by smoking. COPD is diagnosed when an at-risk patient presents with respiratory symptoms and has irreversible airway obstruction indicated by a forced expiratory volume in 1 second/forced vital capacity ratio of less than 0.7. Management goals for COPD include smoking cessation, symptom reduction, exacerbation reduction, hospitalization avoidance, and improvement of quality of life. Stable patients with COPD who remain symptomatic despite using short-acting bronchodilators should start inhaled maintenance drugs to reduce symptoms and exacerbations, avoid hospitalizations, and improve quality of life. A long-acting anticholinergic or a long-acting beta2-agonist (LABA) can be used for initial therapy; these drugs have fewer adverse effects than inhaled corticosteroids (ICS). If patients remain symptomatic despite monotherapy, dual therapy with a long-acting anticholinergic and a LABA, or a LABA and an ICS, may be beneficial. Triple therapy (ie, a long-acting anticholinergic, a LABA, and an ICS) also is used, but it is unclear if triple therapy is superior to dual therapy. Roflumilast, an oral selective inhibitor of phosphodiesterase 4, is used to manage moderate to severe COPD. Continuous oxygen therapy is indicated for patients with COPD who have severe hypoxemia (ie, PaO2 less than 55 mm Hg or an oxygen saturation less than 88% on room air). Nonpharmacologic strategies also are useful to improve patient outcomes. Pulmonary rehabilitation improves dyspnea and quality of life. Pulmonary rehabilitation after an acute exacerbation reduces hospitalizations and mortality, and improves quality of life and exercise capacity. Smoking cessation is the most effective management strategy for reducing morbidity and mortality in patients with COPD. Lung volume reduction surgery, bullectomy, and lung transplantation are

  16. Epidemiology of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Antó, J M; Vermeire, P; Vestbo, J; Sunyer, J

    2001-05-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a leading cause of world-wide mortality and disability. On average approximately 5-15% of adults in industrialized countries have COPD defined by spirometry. In 1990, COPD was considered to be at the twelfth position world-wide as a cause of combined mortality and disability but is expected to become the fifth cause by the year 2020. COPD has a chronic long-lasting course characterized by irreversible decline of forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), increasing presence of dyspnoea and other respiratory symptoms, and progressive deterioration of health status. After diagnosis the 10-yr survival rate is approximately 50% with more than one-third of patients dying due to respiratory insufficiency. Several environmental exposures such as air pollution increase the risk of death in COPD patients. The aetiology of COPD is overwhelmingly dominated by smoking although many other factors could play a role. Particular genetic variants are likely to increase the susceptibility to environmental factors although little is known about which are the relevant genes. There is clear evidence about the role of the alpha-1-antitrypsin but the fraction of COPD attributable to the relevant variants is only 1%. Phenotypic traits that are considered to play a role in the development of COPD include sex, with females being at a higher risk, bronchial responsiveness and atopy. There is strong causal evidence regarding the relationship between smoking and COPD with decline in FEVI levelling off after smoking cessation. Passive smoking has been found to be associated with a small though statistically significant decline in FEV1. Other risk factors that are likely to be relevant in the development of COPD are occupation, low socioeconomic status, diet and possibly some environmental exposures in early life. Although there is accumulating evidence that oxygen therapy, pharmacological treatment and rehabilitation may improve the course of

  17. Telemedicine in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Vagheggini, Guido; Mazzoleni, Stefano; Vitacca, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Telemedicine is a medical application of advanced technology to disease management. This modality may provide benefits also to patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Different devices and systems are used. The legal problems associated with telemedicine are still controversial. Economic advantages for healthcare systems, though potentially high, are still poorly investigated. A European Respiratory Society Task Force has defined indications, follow-up, equipment, facilities, legal and economic issues of tele-monitoring of COPD patients including those undergoing home mechanical ventilation. Key points The costs of care assistance in chronic disease patients are dramatically increasing. Telemedicine may be a very useful application of information and communication technologies in high-quality healthcare services. Many remote health monitoring systems are available, ensuring safety, feasibility, effectiveness, sustainability and flexibility to face different patients’ needs. The legal problems associated with telemedicine are still controversial. National and European Union governments should develop guidelines and ethical, legal, regulatory, technical, administrative standards for remote medicine. The economic advantages, if any, of this new approach must be compared to a “gold standard” of homecare that is very variable among different European countries and within each European country. The efficacy of respiratory disease telemedicine projects is promising (i.e. to tailor therapeutic intervention; to avoid useless hospital and emergency department admissions, and reduce general practitioner and specialist visits; and to involve the patients and their families). Different programmes based on specific and local situations, and on specific diseases and levels of severity with a high level of flexibility should be utilised. A European Respiratory Society Task Force produced a statement on commonly accepted clinical criteria for indications

  18. Smoking cessation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Tashkin, Donald P; Murray, Robert P

    2009-07-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is increasing in prevalence, and is predicted to become the third leading cause of deaths worldwide by 2020. The precise prevalence of COPD is not known, as many individuals with the disease are left undiagnosed, despite the requirement of only simple spirometry testing for disease detection. The major risk factor for the development of COPD is cigarette smoking, with 90% of deaths from COPD directly attributable to smoking. Therefore smoking cessation is the most effective means of halting or slowing the progress of this disease. This review summarizes and compares the differential characteristics of smokers with COPD vs. those without COPD in relation to their smoking behavior and quitting attempts, and discusses the various strategies that can be used to help patients quit and improve their likelihood of long-term smoking cessation. Of the various behavioral interventions available that can increase the likelihood of smoking cessation, one of the simplest and most effective strategies that physicians can use is simply to advise their patients to quit, particularly if this advice is combined with informing the patients of their "lung age". We also discuss the pharmacologic therapies used to enhance the likelihood of quitting, including nicotine replacement, bupropion SR and varenicline, along with novel nicotine vaccines, which are currently undergoing clinical trials.

  19. [Anemias in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Budnevsky, A V; Esaulenko, I E; Ovsyannikov, E S; Zhusina, Yu G

    2016-01-01

    According to different studies, anemia occurs in 8--33% of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The paper describes the most important various causes of anemia in COPD, such as systemic inflammation and endocrine disorders, the use of some medications (theophylline, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors), frequent COPD exacerbations, and long-term oxygen therapy. Lower hemoglobin levels in COPD patients are accompanied by increased shortness of breath, reduced exercise tolerance, and lower quality of life. Furthermore, some investigations have shown that anemia is an independent predictor of death in patients with COPD. In spite of the fact that anemia may be successfully in these patients, the evidence suggesting the importance of its impact on the prognosis of COPD is limited.

  20. The pathology of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Hogg, James C; Timens, Wim

    2009-01-01

    The pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is based on the innate and adaptive inflammatory immune response to the inhalation of toxic particles and gases. Although tobacco smoking is the primary cause of this inhalation injury, many other environmental and occupational exposures contribute to the pathology of COPD. The immune inflammatory changes associated with COPD are linked to a tissue-repair and -remodeling process that increases mucus production and causes emphysematous destruction of the gas-exchanging surface of the lung. The common form of emphysema observed in smokers begins in the respiratory bronchioles near the thickened and narrowed small bronchioles that become the major site of obstruction in COPD. The mechanism(s) that allow small airways to thicken in such close proximity to lung tissue undergoing emphysematous destruction remains a puzzle that needs to be solved.

  1. [New treatments for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Miravitlles, Marc

    2005-06-11

    Treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has underwent a very important advance in the last five years. It has been developed a new long-lasting anticholynergic drug, tiotrope bromure, which has been found to improve lung function and exercise capacity and to decrease relapses. Also the combined treatment of long lasting beta 2 adrenergics with inhaled steroids (salmeterol/fluticasone and formoterol/budesonide) has proven similar results. However, the response to these new drugs is not the same in all patients. Individual characteristics such as gravity, degree of bronchial hyperresponsiveness, frequency of relapses, comorbidity, etc will determine the response to several agents. Thus, it is necessary to perform a detailed diagnostic study in COPD patients in order to select the best treatment in an individualized form. In the future, new specific antiinflammatories such as phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitors or agents with a potential action in tissue regeneration could lead to new perspectives, as well as to new questions, in COPD treatment.

  2. Rare lung diseases II: Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis

    PubMed Central

    Juvet, Stephen C; Hwang, David; Waddell, Thomas K; Downey, Gregory P

    2008-01-01

    The present article is the second in a series on rare lung diseases. It focuses on pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP), a disorder in which lipoproteinaceous material accumulates in the alveolar space. PAP was first described in 1958, and for many years the nature of the material accumulating in the lungs was unknown. Major insights into PAP have been made in the past decade, and these have led to the notion that PAP is an autoimmume disorder in which autoantibodies interfere with signalling through the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor, leading to macrophage and neutrophil dysfunction. This has spurred new therapeutic approaches to this disorder. The discussion of PAP will begin with a case report, then will highlight the classification of PAP and review recent insights into the pathogenesis of PAP. The approach to therapy and the prognosis of PAP will also be discussed. PMID:18551202

  3. Skeletal Implications of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Misof, Barbara M; Moreira, Carolina A; Klaushofer, Klaus; Roschger, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is associated with numerous comorbidities, among which osteoporosis is of high significance. Low bone mass and the occurrence of fragility fractures is a common finding in patients with COPD. Typical risk factors related directly or indirectly to these skeletal complications include systemic inflammation, tobacco smoking, vitamin D deficiency, and treatment with oral or inhaled corticosteroids. In particular, treatment with glucocorticoids appears to be a strong contributor to bone changes in COPD, but does not fully account for all skeletal complications. Additional to the effects of COPD on bone mass, there is evidence for COPD-related changes in bone microstructure and material properties. This review summarizes the clinical outcomes of low bone mass and increased fracture risk, and reports on recent observations in bone tissue and material in COPD patients.

  4. Pulmonary artery aneurysm in Behcet's disease: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kasikcioglu, Erdem; Akhan, Hulya; Cuhadaroglu, Caglar; Erkan, Feyza

    2004-05-01

    The pulmonary artery is the second most common site of arterial involvement in Behcet's disease. A 32-year-old man presented with bilateral ankle edema, abdominal discomfort, and hemoptysis. He had a history of recurrent oral and genital aphthous ulcerations for 1 year. The diagnosis of Behcet's disease was made on the basis of the criteria published by the International Study Group for Behcet's Disease. His chest X-ray revealed left hilar enlargement. A helical computed tomography (CT) scan showed a pulmonary aneurysm with intramural thrombosis in the left pulmonary artery and enlarged hepatic veins. Treatment with colchicine and cyclophosphamide was given for 24 months, and helical thoracic CT was performed again. Helical CT showed that the pulmonary aneurysm was reduced by treatment. Helical CT could be used in Behcet's disease for the diagnosis and follow-up of pulmonary involvement.

  5. Pulmonary Function Reduction in Diabetes With and Without Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kinney, Gregory L.; Black-Shinn, Jennifer L.; Wan, Emily S.; Make, Barry; Regan, Elizabeth; Lutz, Sharon; Soler, Xavier; Silverman, Edwin K.; Crapo, James; Hokanson, John E.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Diabetes damages major organ systems through disrupted glycemic control and increased inflammation. The effects of diabetes on the lung have been of interest for decades, but the modest reduction in pulmonary function and its nonprogressive nature have limited its investigation. A recent systematic review found that diabetes was associated with reductions in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), and diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide of the lung and increased FEV1/FVC. They reported pooled results including few smokers. This study will examine measures of pulmonary function in participants with extensive smoking exposure. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We examined pulmonary function in participants with a >10–pack-year history of smoking with and without diabetes with and without chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We measured pulmonary function, exercise capacity, and pulmonary-related quality of life in 10,129 participants in the Genetic Epidemiology of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPDGene) Study. RESULTS Participants with diabetes were observed to have reduced pulmonary function after controlling for known risk factors and also significant reductions in exercise capacity and quality of life across functional stages of COPD. CONCLUSIONS Pulmonary function in patients with ≥10 pack-years of smoking and diabetes is reduced, and this decrease is associated with significant reductions in activity-related quality of life and exercise capacity. PMID:24026562

  6. New modalities of pulmonary rehabilitation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Spruit, Martijn A; Wouters, Emiel F M

    2007-01-01

    Pulmonary rehabilitation has been shown to be an important part of the management of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Exercise training is the corner stone of a comprehensive, multidisciplinary pulmonary rehabilitation in COPD and has been shown to improve health-related quality of life and exercise capacity. Nevertheless, not every COPD patient responds well to pulmonary rehabilitation. Future trials should focus on new additions to conventional pulmonary rehabilitation programmes to optimise its effects on health-related quality of life, exercise capacity, body composition and muscle function in patients with COPD. Therefore, a patient-tailored approach is inevitable. Advantages and disadvantages of new modalities of pulmonary rehabilitation will be outlined in detail, including the following: endurance training and long-acting bronchodilatators; endurance training and technical modalities (inspiratory pressure support and inspiratory muscle training); interval training; resistance training; transcutaneous neuromuscular electrical stimulation; and exercise training and supplements (oxygen, oral creatine, anabolic steroids and polyunsaturated fatty acids). Based on well defined baseline characteristics, patients should most probably be individually selected. At present, these new modalities of pulmonary rehabilitation have been shown to improve body composition, skeletal muscle function and sometimes also exercise capacity. However, the translation to an improved health-related quality of life is mostly lacking, and cost effectiveness and long-term effects have not been studied. Moreover, future trials should study the effects of pulmonary rehabilitation in elderly patients with restrictive pulmonary diseases.

  7. Pulmonary Disease Due to Nontuberculous Mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Glassroth, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Since pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacteria (PNTM) lung disease was last reviewed in CHEST in 2008, new information has emerged spanning multiple domains, including epidemiology, transmission and pathogenesis, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment. The overall prevalence of PNTM is increasing, and in the United States, areas of highest prevalence are clustered in distinct geographic locations with common environmental and socioeconomic factors. Although the accepted paradigm for transmission continues to be inhalation from the environment, provocative reports suggest that person-to-person transmission may occur. A panoply of host factors have been investigated in an effort to elucidate why infection from this bacteria develops in ostensibly immunocompetent patients, and there has been clarification that immunocompetent patients exhibit different histopathology from immunocompromised patients with nontuberculous mycobacteria infection. It is now evident that Mycobacterium abscessus, an increasingly prevalent cause of PNTM lung disease, can be classified into three separate subspecies with differing genetic susceptibility or resistance to macrolides. Recent publications also raise the possibility of improved control of PNTM through enhanced adherence to current treatment guidelines as well as new approaches to treatment and even prevention. These and other recent developments and insights that may inform our approach to PNTM lung disease are reviewed and discussed. PMID:26225805

  8. Palliative care in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Lilly, Evan J; Senderovich, Helen

    2016-10-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the only major worldwide cause of mortality that is currently increasing in prevalence. Furthermore, COPD is incurable, and the only therapy that has been shown to increase survival is oxygen therapy in selected patients. Compared to patients with cancer, patients with COPD experience similar levels of pain, breathlessness, fatigue, depression, and anxiety and have a worse quality of life but have comparatively little access to palliative care. When these patients do receive palliative care, they tend to be referred later than patients with cancer. Many disease, patient-, and provider-related factors contribute to this phenomenon, including COPD's unpredictable course, misperceptions of palliative care among patients and physicians, and lack of advance care planning discussions outside of crisis situations. A new paradigm for palliative care would introduce palliative treatments alongside, rather than at the exclusion of disease-modifying interventions. This integrated approach would circumvent the issue of difficult prognostication in COPD, as any patient would receive individualized palliative interventions from the time of diagnosis. These points will be covered in this review, which discusses the challenges in providing palliative care to COPD patients, the strategies to mitigate the challenges, management of common symptoms, and the evidence for integrated palliative care models as well as some suggestions for future development.

  9. Pulmonary veins in the normal lung and pulmonary hypertension due to left heart disease.

    PubMed

    Hunt, James M; Bethea, Brian; Liu, Xiang; Gandjeva, Aneta; Mammen, Pradeep P A; Stacher, Elvira; Gandjeva, Marina R; Parish, Elisabeth; Perez, Mario; Smith, Lynelle; Graham, Brian B; Kuebler, Wolfgang M; Tuder, Rubin M

    2013-11-15

    Despite the importance of pulmonary veins in normal lung physiology and the pathobiology of pulmonary hypertension with left heart disease (PH-LHD), pulmonary veins remain largely understudied. Difficult to identify histologically, lung venous endothelium or smooth muscle cells display no unique characteristic functional and structural markers that distinguish them from pulmonary arteries. To address these challenges, we undertook a search for unique molecular markers in pulmonary veins. In addition, we addressed the expression pattern of a candidate molecular marker and analyzed the structural pattern of vascular remodeling of pulmonary veins in a rodent model of PH-LHD and in lung tissue of patients with PH-LHD obtained at time of placement on a left ventricular assist device. We detected urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) expression preferentially in normal pulmonary veins of mice, rats, and human lungs. Expression of uPAR remained elevated in pulmonary veins of rats with PH-LHD; however, we also detected induction of uPAR expression in remodeled pulmonary arteries. These findings were validated in lungs of patients with PH-LHD. In selected patients with sequential lung biopsy at the time of removal of the left ventricular assist device, we present early data suggesting improvement in pulmonary hemodynamics and venous remodeling, indicating potential regression of venous remodeling in response to assist device treatment. Our data indicate that remodeling of pulmonary veins is an integral part of PH-LHD and that pulmonary veins share some key features present in remodeled yet not normotensive pulmonary arteries.

  10. Successful treatment of pulmonary artery sarcoma by a two-drug combination chemotherapy consisting of ifosfamide and epirubicin.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Akiko; Tabata, Masahiro; Kiura, Katsuyuki; Tanimoto, Yasushi; Kanehiro, Arihiko; Aoe, Motoi; Ohohara, Nobuya; Ueoka, Hiroshi; Tanimoto, Mitsune

    2005-07-01

    We describe a case of 63-year-old woman with pulmonary artery sarcoma successfully treated with chemotherapy. She developed acute shortness of breath, and left chest and shoulder pain. Although a diagnosis of acute pulmonary embolism was made at a local hospital and she received anticoagulation and thrombolysis therapy, no improvement was achieved. Thereafter, she underwent a pulmonary thromboectomy in our hospital, and the histological diagnosis was intimal sarcoma of the pulmonary artery. Since post-operative computed tomography (CT) scans of the chest showed obvious persistence of an intraluminal hypoattenuated area in the left main pulmonary artery, the patient was treated with four cycles of a doublet chemotherapy consisting of ifosfamide (2.5 g/m(2)/day) on days 1-5 and epirubicin (45 mg/m(2)/day) on days 2 and 3. CT scans of the chest after four cycles showed marked regression of the intraluminal hypoattenuated area in the left main pulmonary artery. This is the first case of pulmonary artery sarcoma responding to chemotherapy. Surgical resection is currently the most hopeful treatment for pulmonary artery sarcoma. However, intensive chemotherapy is worth trying in unresectable patients.

  11. Pulmonary iron overload in thalassemia major presenting as small airway disease.

    PubMed

    Ooi, G C; Khong, P L; Lam, W K; Trendell-Smith, N J; Tsang, K W T

    2002-01-01

    Lung function abnormalities that are associated with thalassemia major are variable with etiology that is yet undetermined. Some studies have suggested that pulmonary iron deposition is a probable cause for these lung defects although there has been no antemortem histopathological and radiological evidence for this. We report a case of thalassemia major with biopsy-proven pulmonary iron overload, in which thoracic high-resolution computed tomography revealed a morphological-functional correlation consistent with small airway disease.

  12. Pulmonary rehabilitation for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a scientific and political agenda.

    PubMed

    Fahy, Bonnie F

    2004-01-01

    Pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) is the standard of care for patients suffering chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This report describes and defines PR and reviews the evidence regarding the efficacy of PR. COPD management guidelines that include PR have been published by the European Respiratory Society, the American Thoracic Society, and the British Thoracic Society, and those guidelines were supported by evidence-based guidelines published jointly by the American College of Chest Physicians and the American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation. The Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease, which is also evidence-based, included the recommendation for referral to PR. Despite those recommendations, the availability of comprehensive PR programs (defined as being compliant with national practice standards) is limited. In the United States the lack of a national policy for PR reimbursement has led to differences in compensation among insurance providers, based on differences in the Local Medical Review Policies established by the "fiscal intermediaries." Since 1998 the American Association for Respiratory Care, the American College of Chest Physicians, the American Thoracic Society, and the National Association for Medical Direction of Respiratory Care have jointly lobbied for clear, consistent guidelines from the United States Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA, which was recently renamed the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services [CMS]). In 2002 new Medicare/Medicaid billing codes ("G codes") became available for billing PR procedures, but unfortunately the instructions for the use of those codes differ among the Local Medical Review Policies. There has been little success in the effort to establish a national coverage policy for PR. The respiratory therapist holds a unique role in PR. In the respiratory therapist's training curriculum PR is specifically addressed, making the respiratory therapist an asset to

  13. Behcet Disease Presenting With Cardiac and Pulmonary Masses.

    PubMed

    Ng, Ming-Yen; Boutet, Alexandre; Carette, Simon; de Perrot, Marc; Cusimano, Robert James; Nguyen, Elsie Thao

    2015-09-01

    Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging features of inflammatory intracardiac and pulmonary masses secondary to Behcet disease have not been well described in the literature. We present a case of Behcet disease, presenting with enhancing cardiac and pulmonary inflammatory masses that mimicked the imaging appearance of metastatic cardiac angiosarcoma. Subsequent magnetic resonance imaging examination showed the mass reduced in size with immunosuppressive therapy. This case highlights the importance of considering Behcet disease in the differential diagnosis for an enhancing cardiac mass.

  14. Automated volumetric segmentation method for growth consistency of nonsolid pulmonary nodules in high-resolution CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browder, William A.; Reeves, Anthony P.; Apananosovich, Tatiyana V.; Cham, Matthew D.; Yankelevitz, David F.; Henschke, Claudia I.

    2007-03-01

    There is widespread clinical interest in the study of pulmonary nodules for early diagnosis of lung cancer. These nodules can be broadly classified into one of three types, solid, nonsolid and part-solid. Solid nodules have been extensively studied, while little research has focused on the characterization of nonsolid and part-solid nodules. Nonsolid nodules have an appearance in high-resolution CT consisting of voxels only slightly more dense than that of the surrounding lung parenchyma. For the solid nodule, robust techniques are available to estimate growth rate and this is commonly used to distinguish benign from malignant. For the nonsolid types, these techniques are less well developed. In this research, we propose an automated volumetric segmentation method for nonsolid nodules that accurately determines a nonsolid nodule's growth rate. Our method starts with an initial noise-filtering stage in the parenchyma region. Each voxel is then classified into one of three tissue types; lung parenchyma, nonsolid and solid. Removal of vessel attachments to the lesion is achieved with the use of a filter that focuses on vessel characteristics. Our results indicate that the automated method is more consistent than the radiologist with a median growth consistency of 1.87 compared to 3.12 for the radiologist on a database of 25 cases.

  15. Pulmonary necrobiotic nodules: a rare extraintestinal manifestation of Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Warwick, G; Leecy, T; Silverstone, E; Rainer, S; Feller, R; Yates, D H

    2009-03-01

    The present article reports the case of a 22-yr-old female with new onset Crohn's colitis, anterior uveitis and multiple pulmonary nodules which, on histological examination, were necrobiotic nodules. This is a rare but recognised pulmonary extraintestinal manifestation of Crohn's disease and only the fourth reported case. The present case report is followed by a brief review of the relevant literature.

  16. Pulmonary Rehabilitation in Patients with Neuromuscular Disease

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    In neuromuscular disease (NMD) patients with progressive muscle weakness, respiratory muscles are also affected and hypercapnia can increase gradually as the disease progresses. The fundamental respiratory problems NMD patients experience are decreased alveolar ventilation and coughing ability. For these reasons, it is necessary to precisely evaluate pulmonary function to provide the proper inspiratory and expiratory muscle aids in order to maintain adequate respiratory function. As inspiratory muscle weakening progresses, NMD patients experience hypoventilation. At this point, respiratory support by mechanical ventilator should be initiated to relieve respiratory distress symptoms. Patients with adequate bulbar muscle strength and cognitive function who use a non-invasive ventilation aid, via a mouthpiece or a nasal mask, may have their hypercapnia and associated symptoms resolved. For a proper cough assist, it is necessary to provide additional insufflation to patients with inspiratory muscle weakness before using abdominal thrust. Another effective method for managing airway secretions is a device that performs mechanical insufflation-exsufflation. In conclusion, application of non-invasive respiratory aids, taking into consideration characterization of respiratory pathophysiology, have made it possible to maintain a better quality of life in addition to prolonging the life span of patients with NMD. PMID:16807978

  17. Models of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Groneberg, David A; Chung, K Fan

    2004-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major global health problem and is predicted to become the third most common cause of death by 2020. Apart from the important preventive steps of smoking cessation, there are no other specific treatments for COPD that are as effective in reversing the condition, and therefore there is a need to understand the pathophysiological mechanisms that could lead to new therapeutic strategies. The development of experimental models will help to dissect these mechanisms at the cellular and molecular level. COPD is a disease characterized by progressive airflow obstruction of the peripheral airways, associated with lung inflammation, emphysema and mucus hypersecretion. Different approaches to mimic COPD have been developed but are limited in comparison to models of allergic asthma. COPD models usually do not mimic the major features of human COPD and are commonly based on the induction of COPD-like lesions in the lungs and airways using noxious inhalants such as tobacco smoke, nitrogen dioxide, or sulfur dioxide. Depending on the duration and intensity of exposure, these noxious stimuli induce signs of chronic inflammation and airway remodelling. Emphysema can be achieved by combining such exposure with instillation of tissue-degrading enzymes. Other approaches are based on genetically-targeted mice which develop COPD-like lesions with emphysema, and such mice provide deep insights into pathophysiological mechanisms. Future approaches should aim to mimic irreversible airflow obstruction, associated with cough and sputum production, with the possibility of inducing exacerbations. PMID:15522115

  18. Bile pigments in pulmonary and vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Ryter, Stefan W

    2012-01-01

    The bile pigments, biliverdin, and bilirubin, are endogenously derived substances generated during enzymatic heme degradation. These compounds have been shown to act as chemical antioxidants in vitro. Bilirubin formed in tissues circulates in the serum, prior to undergoing hepatic conjugation and biliary excretion. The excess production of bilirubin has been associated with neurotoxicity, in particular to the newborn. Nevertheless, clinical evidence suggests that mild states of hyperbilirubinemia may be beneficial in protecting against cardiovascular disease in adults. Pharmacological application of either bilirubin and/or its biological precursor biliverdin, can provide therapeutic benefit in several animal models of cardiovascular and pulmonary disease. Furthermore, biliverdin and bilirubin can confer protection against ischemia/reperfusion injury and graft rejection secondary to organ transplantation in animal models. Several possible mechanisms for these effects have been proposed, including direct antioxidant and scavenging effects, and modulation of signaling pathways regulating inflammation, apoptosis, cell proliferation, and immune responses. The practicality and therapeutic-effectiveness of bile pigment application to humans remains unclear.

  19. Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Associated with Congenital Heart Disease and Eisenmenger Syndrome: Current Practice in Pediatrics

    PubMed Central

    Frank, David B.; Hanna, Brian D.

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is an uncommon but serious disease characterized by severe pulmonary vascular disease and significant morbidity and mortality. PAH associated with congenital heart disease (APAH-CHD) is one etiology of PAH that has innate characteristics delineating it from other forms of PAH. The patient with APAH-CHD presents with unique challenges consisting of not only pulmonary vascular disease but also the complexity of the cardiac lesion. Eisenmenger syndrome (ES) represents the severe end of the spectrum for disease in APAH-CHD. Over time, systemic-to-pulmonary shunting through cardiac defects increases pulmonary vascular resistance to levels significant enough to reverse shunting across the defect. Historically, ES patients have been reported to have better outcomes than IPAH despite similarities in pulmonary vascular disease. However, recent studies are challenging this notion. Nonetheless, APAH-CHD survival has improved with the advent of modern PAH targeted therapies. New therapeutic options have allowed us to reconsider the dogma of inoperability in APAH-CHD patients with unrepaired defects. Certainly advances have been made, however, investigators must continue to advance the field through controlled clinical trials in both adult and pediatric APAH-CHD patients. PMID:25604592

  20. Group III Pulmonary Hypertension: Pulmonary Hypertension Associated with Lung Disease: Epidemiology, Pathophysiology, and Treatments.

    PubMed

    Klinger, James R

    2016-08-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) associated with chronic lung disease (WHO group 3) is the second leading cause of PH and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Elevation of pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP) is usually moderate and correlates with severity of lung disease. In a small minority, PAP may approach that seen in WHO group 1 pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Current medications for treating PAH have not shown benefit in controlled trials of group 3 PH and their routine use is discouraged. Patients with severe group 3 PH should be considered for referral to expert centers or entry into clinical trials.

  1. [Pulmonary arterial hypertension in adult patients with congenital heart disease].

    PubMed

    Serino, G; Giacomazzi, F

    2010-01-01

    Pulmonary Hypertension (PH) is definited by a mean pulmonary artery pressure (PAPm) >25 mmHg at rest. The Dana Point 2008 Revised Classification System represents the most recent classification system update with respect of various etiologies of PH. About 10 % of adolescents or adults with uncorrected congenital heart disease (CHD) with left-to-right shunt and high pulmonary blood flow develop Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension (PAH) . Progressive vascular remodeling and increase in pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) may ultimately lead to reversal of the shunt (pulmonary to systemic) causing cyanosis and determining the so-called Eisenmenger Syndrome (ES). Recent advances in the early diagnosis and medical targeted treatment of adult patients with CHD-PAH and ES can improve PAP, PVR and exercise tolerance, together with NYHA Class and survival, and may potentially reverse the vascular remodeling process in selected patients.

  2. [Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: The golden decade. Implications for the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    López-Giraldo, Alejandra; Rodríguez-Roisin, Robert; Agustí, Alvar

    2015-06-08

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a complex and heterogeneous illness, which causes an important socio-economic burden. The last decade has witnessed significant advances in the understanding and knowledge of COPD with a paradigm shift in both the assessment and management of the disease. The article here reviews these changes with a particular focus on the last revision (2013) of the Global Strategy for the Diagnosis, Management, and Prevention of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  3. Pulmonary vascular manifestations of mixed connective tissue disease.

    PubMed

    Bull, Todd M; Fagan, Karen A; Badesch, David B

    2005-08-01

    Mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) refers to a disease process with combined clinical features characteristic of systemic lupus erythematous, scleroderma, and polymyositis-dermatomyositis. This article focuses on the pulmonary vasculature manifestations of MCTD. We briefly discuss associations between MCTD and interstitial lung disease, pleural disease, and alveolar hemorrhage.

  4. The radiological spectrum of pulmonary lymphoproliferative disease

    PubMed Central

    Hare, S S; Souza, C A; Bain, G; Seely, J M; Frcpc; Gomes, M M; Quigley, M

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary lymphoproliferative disorders (LPD) are characterised by abnormal proliferation of indigenous cell lines or infiltration of lung parenchyma by lymphoid cells. They encompass a wide spectrum of focal or diffuse abnormalities, which may be classified as reactive or neoplastic on the basis of cellular morphology and clonality. The spectrum of reactive disorders results primarily from antigenic stimulation of bronchial mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) and comprises three main entities: follicular bronchiolitis, lymphoid interstitial pneumonia and (more rarely) nodular lymphoid hyperplasia. Primary parenchymal neoplasms are most commonly extranodal marginal zone lymphomas of MALT origin (MALT lymphomas), followed by diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCLs) and lymphomatoid granulomatosis (LYG). Secondary lymphomatous parenchymal neoplasms (both Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphomas) are far more prevalent than primary neoplasms. Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS)-related lymphoma (ARL) and post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) may also primarily affect the lung parenchyma. Modern advances in treatments for AIDS and transplant medicine are associated with an increase in the incidence of LPD and have heightened the need to understand the range of imaging appearance of these diseases. The multidetector CT (MDCT) findings of LPD are heterogeneous, thereby reflecting the wide spectrum of clinical manifestations of these entities. Understanding the spectrum of LPD and the various imaging manifestations is crucial because the radiologist is often the first one to suggest the diagnosis and has a pivotal role in differentiating these diseases. The current concepts of LPD are discussed together with a demonstration of the breadth of MDCT patterns within this disease spectrum. PMID:22745203

  5. Development of pulmonary arterial hypertension in women: interplay of sex hormones and pulmonary vascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Pugh, Meredith E; Hemnes, Anna R

    2010-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a progressive disease of the pulmonary vasculature, ultimately resulting in right heart failure and death. This disease is strongly predominant in females, although little is known regarding how sex influences disease development. Recent developments highlighting the importance of estrogen metabolites in both animal models and human disease have substantially increased our understanding of PAH in women. This review will focus on general knowledge of PAH, translational and basic science data regarding sex hormones in the pulmonary vasculature and on clinical issues that are particular to women with PAH. Future directions for study include the influence of sex hormones on right ventricular responses, improving the understanding of the influence of estrogen exposure in human disease and the study of dehydroepiandrosterone in basic science and human disease. PMID:20187732

  6. [Pediatric pulmonary hypertension and pulmonary arterial hypertension secondary to congenital heart diseases].

    PubMed

    Olguntürk, Rana

    2010-08-01

    Causes of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) are similar in adults and children. The main difference is that PAH secondary to congenital heart diseases, is the predominant cause in pediatric patients. Persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn shows completely different clinical course and pathophysiological mechanisms. It is usually seen in full term babies with a high morbidity and mortality rate. Improved prognosis has been reported with inhaled nitric oxide (NO) and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation therapy in babies hospitalized in well equipped and experienced newborn centers. Primary pulmonary hypertension and familial pulmonary hypertension are rare in pediatric age group because the diagnosis is initially made in adolescence. The incidence of PAH secondary to congenital heart disease is estimated as 1.6 - 12.5 case/million/year. Eisenmenger syndrome is diagnosed in 1% of patients with PAH. Patients with left to right shunts are the main group who develop pulmonary vascular disease if not treated in the early infancy. Some cyanotic congenital heart diseases are also the causes of PAH. The best treatment of patients at risk for the development of pulmonary vascular disease is prevention by early surgical elimination of defects or repairing the anatomy. Treatment options with vasodilating agents like NO, prostaglandin analogs, phosphodiesterase -5 inhibitors and endothelin receptor antagonists are used to improve survival and quality of life. Heart lung or bilateral lung transplantation is the only surgical option for many of these patients. Results of national and international registries will bring valuable epidemiological and prognostic perspectives to pediatric PAH.

  7. Pulmonary artery aneurysms in Behçet's disease.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Sema; Cimen, Kadriye Akar

    2010-08-01

    Behçet's disease is the most common cause of pulmonary artery aneurysms. Pulmonary artery aneurysms are rare, but they are life-threatening because of their high tendency to rupture. However, there is also a chance that the aneurysms may completely resolve with immunosuppressive therapy. A 30-year-old man was admitted with chest pain, painful oral and genital ulcers, skin rash, weakness, and intermittent hemoptysis. He had a history of Behçet's disease for 6 years. The chest radiography showed a round opacity superior part of hilus on right. The helical thoracic computed tomography (CT) angiography demonstrated pulmonary aneurysms associated with Behçet's disease. The patient was successfully treated with colchicine, corticosteroids, and cyclophosphamide. A discussion about pulmonary artery aneurysms associated with Behçet's disease is provided in this case.

  8. Chronic Bronchitis and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Criner, Gerard J.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic bronchitis (CB) is a common but variable phenomenon in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). It has numerous clinical consequences, including an accelerated decline in lung function, greater risk of the development of airflow obstruction in smokers, a predisposition to lower respiratory tract infection, higher exacerbation frequency, and worse overall mortality. CB is caused by overproduction and hypersecretion of mucus by goblet cells, which leads to worsening airflow obstruction by luminal obstruction of small airways, epithelial remodeling, and alteration of airway surface tension predisposing to collapse. Despite its clinical sequelae, little is known about the pathophysiology of CB and goblet cell hyperplasia in COPD, and treatment options are limited. In addition, it is becoming increasingly apparent that in the classic COPD spectrum, with emphysema on one end and CB on the other, most patients lie somewhere in the middle. It is known now that many patients with severe emphysema can develop CB, and small airway pathology has been linked to worse clinical outcomes, such as increased mortality and lesser improvement in lung function after lung volume reduction surgery. However, in recent years, a greater understanding of the importance of CB as a phenotype to identify patients with a beneficial response to therapy has been described. Herein we review the epidemiology of CB, the evidence behind its clinical consequences, the current understanding of the pathophysiology of goblet cell hyperplasia in COPD, and current therapies for CB. PMID:23204254

  9. [Phenotypic heterogeneity of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Garcia-Aymerich, Judith; Agustí, Alvar; Barberà, Joan A; Belda, José; Farrero, Eva; Ferrer, Antoni; Ferrer, Jaume; Gáldiz, Juan B; Gea, Joaquim; Gómez, Federico P; Monsó, Eduard; Morera, Josep; Roca, Josep; Sauleda, Jaume; Antó, Josep M

    2009-03-01

    A functional definition of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) based on airflow limitation has largely dominated the field. However, a view has emerged that COPD involves a complex array of cellular, organic, functional, and clinical events, with a growing interest in disentangling the phenotypic heterogeneity of COPD. The present review is based on the opinion of the authors, who have extensive research experience in several aspects of COPD. The starting assumption of the review is that current knowledge on the pathophysiology and clinical features of COPD allows us to classify phenotypic information in terms of the following dimensions: respiratory symptoms and health status, acute exacerbations, lung function, structural changes, local and systemic inflammation, and systemic effects. Twenty-six phenotypic traits were identified and assigned to one of the 6 dimensions. For each dimension, a summary is provided of the best evidence on the relationships among phenotypic traits, in particular among those corresponding to different dimensions, and on the relationship between these traits and relevant events in the natural history of COPD. The information has been organized graphically into a phenotypic matrix where each cell representing a pair of phenotypic traits is linked to relevant references. The information provided has the potential to increase our understanding of the heterogeneity of COPD phenotypes and help us plan future studies on aspects that are as yet unexplored.

  10. Acupuncture for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Junfei; Wang, Xuehui; Li, Xing; Zhao, Dejun; Xu, Jinquan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Acupuncture has been suggested to treat chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in China. However, current evidence is insufficient to draw a firm conclusion regarding the effectiveness of acupuncture in COPD. Therefore, this multicenter, randomized, sham-controlled study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of acupuncture for treating patients with COPD. Methods: This is a two-arm, parallel group, multicenter, randomized, sham-controlled trial with concealed allocation, and participants, assessor, and analyst blinding. Seventy-two participants with COPD were recruited and randomly divided into 2 groups (real acupuncture group and sham acupuncture group) in a 1:1 ratio. Patients received either real or sham needling at the same acupoints 3 times weekly for 8 weeks. The primary outcome was dyspnea on exertion evaluated using the 6-minute walk test. In addition, health-related quality of life was also evaluated. Measurements were obtained at baseline and after 8 weeks of treatment. Results: Six-minute walking distance measurements and health-related quality of life were significantly better in the real acupuncture group than that in the sham acupuncture group. Conclusion: The findings suggest that acupuncture can be used as an adjunctive therapy to reduce dyspnea in patients with COPD. PMID:27749542

  11. Anaesthesia for patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Duggappa, Devika Rani; Rao, G Venkateswara; Kannan, Sudheesh

    2015-01-01

    The chronic obstructive pulmonary disease has become a disease of public health importance. Among the various risk factors, smoking remains the main culprit. In addition to airway obstruction, the presence of intrinsic positive end expiratory pressure, respiratory muscle dysfunction contributes to the symptoms of the patient. Perioperative management of these patients includes identification of modifiable risk factors and their optimisation. Use of regional anaesthesia alone or in combination with general anaesthesia improves pulmonary functions and reduces the incidence of post-operative pulmonary complications. PMID:26556916

  12. Cognitive Impairment in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Crişan, Alexandru F.; Oancea, Cristian; Timar, Bogdan; Fira-Mladinescu, Ovidiu; Crişan, Alexandru; Tudorache, Voicu

    2014-01-01

    Background/Purpose Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), especially in severe forms, is commonly associated with multiple cognitive problems. Montreal Cognitive Assessment test (MoCA) is used to detect cognitive impairment evaluating several areas: visuospatial, memory, attention and fluency. Our study aim was to evaluate the impact of stable COPD and exacerbation (AECOPD) phases on cognitive status using MoCA questionnaire. Methods We enrolled 39 patients (pts), smokers with COPD group D (30 stable and 9 in AECOPD) and 13 healthy subjects (control group), having similar level of education and no significant differences regarding the anthropometric measurements. We analyzed the differences in MoCA score between these three groups and also the correlation between this score and inflammatory markers. Results Patients with AECOPD had a significant (p<0.001) decreased MoCA score (14.6±3.4) compared to stable COPD (20.2±2.4) and controls (24.2±5.8). The differences between groups were more accentuated for the language abstraction and attention (p<0.001) and delayed recall and orientation (p<0.001) sub-topics. No significant variance of score was observed between groups regarding visuospatial and naming score (p = 0.095). The MoCA score was significantly correlated with forced expiratory volume (r = 0.28) and reverse correlated with C-reactive protein (CRP) (r = −0.57), fibrinogen (r = −0.58), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) (r = −0.55) and with the partial pressure of CO2 (r = −0.47). Conclusions According to this study, COPD significantly decreases the cognitive status in advanced and acute stages of the disease. PMID:25033379

  13. Dysfunction of pulmonary vascular endothelium in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: basic considerations for future drug development.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qin; Underwood, Malcolm J; Hsin, Michael K Y; Liu, Xiao-Cheng; He, Guo-Wei

    2008-09-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the leading health problems worldwide and continues to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality in developed countries. The clinical features of COPD are chronic obstructive bronchiolitis and emphysema. Pulmonary vascular endothelial dysfunction is a characteristic pathological finding of COPD at different stages of the disease. Functional changes of pulmonary endothelial cells in COPD include antiplatelet abnormalities, anticoagulant disturbances, endothelial activation, atherogenesis, and compromised regulation of vascular tone which may adversely affect the ventilation-perfusion match in COPD. As the most important risk factor of COPD, cigarette smoking may initiate pulmonary vascular impairment through direct injury of endothelial cells or release of inflammatory mediators. Morphological changes such as denudation of endothelium and endothelial cell apoptosis have been observed in the pulmonary vasculature in COPD patients as well as functional alterations. Changes in the expression of tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI), thrombomodulin, selectins, and adhesion molecules in pulmonary endothelial cells as well as complex regulation and interaction of vasoactive substances and growth factors released from endothelium may underlie the mechanisms of pulmonary endothelial dysfunction in COPD. The mechanism of endothelial repair/regeneration in COPD, although not fully understood, may involve upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factors in the early stages along with an increased number of bone marrow-derived progenitor cells. These factors should be taken into account when developing new strategies for the pharmacological therapy of patients with COPD.

  14. Pulmonary CT and MRI phenotypes that help explain chronic pulmonary obstruction disease pathophysiology and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Eric A; Lynch, David A; Barr, R Graham; van Beek, Edwin J R; Parraga, Grace

    2016-03-01

    Pulmonary x-ray computed tomographic (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) research and development has been motivated, in part, by the quest to subphenotype common chronic lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). For thoracic CT and MRI, the main COPD research tools, disease biomarkers are being validated that go beyond anatomy and structure to include pulmonary functional measurements such as regional ventilation, perfusion, and inflammation. In addition, there has also been a drive to improve spatial and contrast resolution while at the same time reducing or eliminating radiation exposure. Therefore, this review focuses on our evolving understanding of patient-relevant and clinically important COPD endpoints and how current and emerging MRI and CT tools and measurements may be exploited for their identification, quantification, and utilization. Since reviews of the imaging physics of pulmonary CT and MRI and reviews of other COPD imaging methods were previously published and well-summarized, we focus on the current clinical challenges in COPD and the potential of newly emerging MR and CT imaging measurements to address them. Here we summarize MRI and CT imaging methods and their clinical translation for generating reproducible and sensitive measurements of COPD related to pulmonary ventilation and perfusion as well as parenchyma morphology. The key clinical problems in COPD provide an important framework in which pulmonary imaging needs to rapidly move in order to address the staggering burden, costs, as well as the mortality and morbidity associated with COPD.

  15. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease as disability: dilemma stories.

    PubMed

    McMillan Boyles, Christina; Hill Bailey, Patricia; Mossey, Sharolyn

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop an understanding of the meaning of disability for individuals living with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in a Canadian midwestern community from an emic perspective. A focused ethnographic design was used. Fifteen individuals participated in interviews. Narrative analysis was used to examine the interview data. Data analysis revealed 65 dilemma stories consisting of two structural components: the impairment, and the justification/explanation of the impairment. Participants' impairment might or might not have been known to others. In both situations, individuals were faced with choices of whether to explain/justify or attempt to conceal the impairment. Participants told these dilemma stories to convey the meaning of COPD as a disability invisible to others, and at times, to themselves. The information gained from this research will serve as an essential complement to the existing knowledge about this important yet often invisible chronic illness.

  16. [Problems of Diagnosis and Treatment of Pulmonary Hypertension in Old Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease].

    PubMed

    Malykhin, F T; Baturin, V A

    2016-03-01

    The article contains consideration of risk factors of pulmonary hypertension (PH), clinical states associated with PH, and effect of age on susceptibility to PH in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We have analyzed the prevalence of PH associated with COPD, its importance in the structure of diseases in patients of older age groups. Frequency of PH in old patients is associated with prevalence of concomitant diseases. Addition of LH to polymorbid complex of old age worsens quality of life and increases mortality. We also present in this article data on the use of modern drugs for the treatment of LH in COPD patients aged 60 years and older.

  17. Blunted Hypoxic Pulmonary Vasoconstriction in Experimental Neonatal Chronic Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rey-Parra, Gloria Juliana; Archer, Stephen L.; Bland, Richard D.; Albertine, Kurt H.; Carlton, David P.; Cho, Soo-Chul; Kirby, Beth; Haromy, Al; Eaton, Farah; Wu, Xichen; Thébaud, Bernard

    2008-01-01

    Rationale: Neonatal chronic lung disease (CLD), caused by prolonged mechanical ventilation (MV) with O2-rich gas, is the most common cause of long-term hospitalization and recurrent respiratory illness in extremely premature infants. Recurrent episodes of hypoxemia and associated ventilator adjustments often lead to worsening CLD. The mechanism that causes these hypoxemic episodes is unknown. Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV), which is partially controlled by O2-sensitive voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels, is an important adaptive response to local hypoxia that helps to match perfusion and ventilation in the lung. Objectives: To test the hypothesis that chronic lung injury (CLI) impairs HPV. Methods: We studied preterm lambs that had MV with O2-rich gas for 3 weeks and newborn rats that breathed 95%-O2 for 2 weeks, both of which resulted in airspace enlargement and pulmonary vascular changes consistent with CLD. Measurements and Main Results: HPV was attenuated in preterm lambs with CLI after 2 weeks of MV and in newborn rats with CLI after 2 weeks of hyperoxia. HPV and constriction to the Kv1.x-specific inhibitor, correolide, were preferentially blunted in excised distal pulmonary arteries (dPAs) from hyperoxic rats, whose dPAs exhibited decreased Kv1.5 and Kv2.1 mRNA and K+ current. Intrapulmonary gene transfer of Kv1.5, encoding the ion channel that is thought to trigger HPV, increased O2-sensitive K+ current in cultured smooth muscle cells from rat dPAs, and restored HPV in hyperoxic rats. Conclusions: Reduced expression/activity of O2-sensitive Kv channels in dPAs contributes to blunted HPV observed in neonatal CLD. PMID:18511704

  18. Saudi Guidelines on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Pulmonary Hypertension: Pulmonary hypertension due to lung diseases and/or hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Sakkijha, Husam; Idrees, Majdy M

    2014-07-01

    Chronic lung diseases are common causes of pulmonary hypertension. It ranks second after the left heart disease. Both obstructive and restrictive lung diseases are know to cause pulmonary hypertension. The pathophysiology of the disease is complex, and includes factors affecting the blood vessels, airways, and lung parenchyma. Hypoxia and the inhalation of toxic materials are another contributing factors. Recent guidelines have further clarified the association between pulmonary hypertension and chronic lung disease and made general guidelines concerning the diagnosis and management. In this article, we will provide a detailed revision about the new classification and give general recommendations about the management of pulmonary hypertension in chronic lung diseases.

  19. Smoking Cessation in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Tashkin, Donald P

    2015-08-01

    Smoking cessation is the most effective strategy for slowing down the progression of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and reducing mortality in the approximately 50% of patients with diagnosed COPD who continue to smoke. While behavioral interventions (including simple advice) have modest efficacy in improving smoking quit rates, the combination of counseling and pharmacotherapy is more effective than either alone. When combined with even brief counseling, nicotine replacement therapy (NRT), bupropion SR, and varenicline have all been shown to be effective in promoting smoking cessation and sustained abstinence in smokers with COPD to a degree comparable to that observed in the general smoking population. However, the recidivism rate is high after initial quitting so that at the end of 1 year, approximately 80% or more of patients are still smoking. Thus, new approaches to smoking cessation are needed. One approach is to combine different pharmacotherapies, for example, nicotine patch plus rapidly acting NRT (e.g., gum or nasal spray) and/or bupropion or even varenicline plus either NRT or bupropion, in a stepwise approach over a varying duration depending on the severity of nicotine dependence and nicotine withdrawal symptoms during the quit attempt, as proposed in the American College of Chest Physicians Tobacco Dependence Took Kit. Electronic (e)-cigarettes, which deliver vaporized nicotine without most of the noxious components in the smoke from burning tobacco cigarettes, also has potential efficacy as a smoking cessation aid, but their efficacy and safety as either substitutes for regular cigarettes or smoking cessation aids require additional study. This task is complicated because e-cigarettes are currently unregulated and hundreds of different brands are currently available.

  20. A translational preclinical model of interstitial pulmonary fibrosis and pulmonary hypertension: mechanistic pathways driving disease pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Jarman, Elizabeth R.; Khambata, Valerie S.; Yun Ye, Li; Cheung, Kenneth; Thomas, Matthew; Duggan, Nicholas; Jarai, Gabor

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a chronic progressive interstitial lung disease, in which a decline in patient prognosis is frequently associated with the onset of pulmonary hypertension (PH). Animal models exhibiting principle pathophysiological features of IPF and PH could provide greater insight into mechanistic pathways underlying disease progression and a means for evaluating novel therapeutic approaches for intervention. Here, we describe an in vivo disease model, in which animals develop progressive interstitial pulmonary fibrosis and associated PH, as defined by the presence of fibrotic foci adjacent to areas of alveolar injury and remodeling of the pulmonary vasculature. Associated changes in physiological parameters included a decline in lung function and increase in mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP) >25 mmHg. The early fibrotic pathology is associated with a profibrogenic microenvironment, elevated levels of the matrix metalloproteases, MMP‐2, MMP‐7, and MMP‐12, TIMP‐1, the chemoattractant and mitogen, PDGF‐β, and the chemokines CCL2 and CXCL12, that are associated with the recruitment of macrophages, mast cells, and fibrocytes. Principle mechanistic pathways associated with disease pathogenesis are upregulated in the lungs and pulmonary arteries, with sustained increases in gene transcripts for the profibrotic mediator TGF‐β1 and components of the TGF‐β signaling pathway; PAI‐1, Nox‐4, and HIF‐1α. Therapeutic treatment with the ALK‐5/TGF‐β RI inhibitor SB‐525334 reversed established pulmonary fibrosis and associated vascular remodeling, leading to normalization in clinically translatable physiological parameters including lung function and hemodynamic measurements of mPAP. These studies highlight the application of this model in validating potential approaches for targeting common mechanistic pathways driving disease pathogenesis. PMID:25214520

  1. Periodontal disease increases risk for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Ledić, Karla; Marinković, Sonja; Puhar, Ivan; Spalj, Stjepan; Popović-Grle, Sanja; Ivić-Kardum, Marija; Samarzija, Miroslav; Plancak, Darije

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to explore whether a periodontal disease could be a risk indicator for a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The examined group comprised 93 patients with COPD (mean age 65.8 years). The control group comprised 43 systemically healthy individuals (mean age 62.1 years). Respiratory and periodontal conditions were examined in both groups. COPB subjects had significantly worse periodontal conditions than controls (p < 0.05) with regard to each parameter of periodontal condition, except for gingival inflammation. COPD patients had higher Plaque Index than control patients (82.84 +/- 22.81 vs. 57.15 +/- 26.96; p < 0.001), higher periodontal depth (3.02 +/- 0.92 vs. 2.57 +/- 0.79 mm; p = 0.007), higher gingival recession (1.97 +/- 1.09 vs. 0.91 +/- 0.79 mm; p < 0.001), and higher mean clinical attachment loss (CAL) (4.12 +/- 1.74 vs. 2.91 +/- 1.27 mm; p < 0.001). Multiple logistic regression model, after controlling for other risk indicators, showed that periodontal disease, presented as CAL > or = 4 mm at > or = 60% sites, was associated with odds ratio of 3.2 (95% CI 1.0-9.8) for the COPB group. Data suggest that periodontal disease could be a risk indicator for COPD.

  2. Giant high-pressure pulmonary artery aneurysm in an elderly patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Morais, Sandra A; Oliveira, Hugo M; de Almeida, José R; Eiras, Eduardo; Silva, Ana Catarina; Gavina, Cristina

    2016-03-01

    The authors report the case of a 74-year-old man, with a history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), GOLD grade 3, stable for the past two decades, who was admitted to our center with severe right heart failure. The chest radiograph showed moderate heart enlargement mainly of the right atrium and pulmonary artery, similar to previous chest radiographs in the previous 20 years. The transthoracic echocardiogram showed a pulmonary artery aneurysm (PAA), dilatation of the right chambers with pulmonary artery systolic pressure of 52 mmHg, and preserved right ventricular systolic function. A thoracic computed tomography scan confirmed the presence of a giant PAA 72 mm in diameter. The patient was started on high-dose diuretics, with significant clinical improvement. After optimization of medical therapy right heart catheterization was carried out with the patient in optimal clinical condition, which revealed mild precapillary pulmonary hypertension with a mean pulmonary artery pressure of 26 mmHg. On the basis of the clinical and imaging findings a stable, giant, high-pressure, PAA was diagnosed secondary to pulmonary hypertension induced by COPD, with a 20-year follow-up without need for surgical repair, which helped in our decision to maintain medical surveillance. The recent onset of heart failure is explained by the unfavorable evolution of COPD. This case may change the attitude expressed in previous studies favoring the choice of an invasive approach to treat giant high-pressure PAAs, instead supporting the maintenance of medical treatment.

  3. [Pulmonary hypertension associated with congenital heart disease and Eisenmenger syndrome].

    PubMed

    Calderón-Colmenero, Juan; Sandoval Zárate, Julio; Beltrán Gámez, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a common complication of congenital heart disease (CHD). Congenital cardiopathies are the most frequent congenital malformations. The prevalence in our country remains unknown, based on birthrate, it is calculated that 12,000 to 16,000 infants in our country have some cardiac malformation. In patients with an uncorrected left-to-right shunt, increased pulmonary pressure leads to vascular remodeling and endothelial dysfunction secondary to an imbalance in vasoactive mediators which promotes vasoconstriction, inflammation, thrombosis, cell proliferation, impaired apotosis and fibrosis. The progressive rise in pulmonary vascular resistance and increased pressures in the right heart provocated reversal of the shunt may arise with the development of Eisenmenger' syndrome the most advanced form de Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with congenital heart disease. The prevalence of Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with CHD has fallen in developed countries in recent years that is not yet achieved in developing countries therefore diagnosed late as lack of hospital infrastructure and human resources for the care of patients with CHD. With the development of targeted medical treatments for pulmonary arterial hypertension, the concept of a combined medical and interventional/surgical approach for patients with Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with CHD is a reality. We need to know the pathophysiological factors involved as well as a careful evaluation to determine the best therapeutic strategy.

  4. NFATc3 and VIP in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Szema, Anthony M; Forsyth, Edward; Ying, Benjamin; Hamidi, Sayyed A; Chen, John J; Hwang, Sonya; Li, Jonathan C; Sabatini Dwyer, Debra; Ramiro-Diaz, Juan M; Giermakowska, Wieslawa; Gonzalez Bosc, Laura V

    2017-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are both debilitating lung diseases which can lead to hypoxemia and pulmonary hypertension (PH). Nuclear Factor of Activated T-cells (NFAT) is a transcription factor implicated in the etiology of vascular remodeling in hypoxic PH. We have previously shown that mice lacking the ability to generate Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide (VIP) develop spontaneous PH, pulmonary arterial remodeling and lung inflammation. Inhibition of NFAT attenuated PH in these mice suggesting a connection between NFAT and VIP. To test the hypotheses that: 1) VIP inhibits NFAT isoform c3 (NFATc3) activity in pulmonary vascular smooth muscle cells; 2) lung NFATc3 activation is associated with disease severity in IPF and COPD patients, and 3) VIP and NFATc3 expression correlate in lung tissue from IPF and COPD patients. NFAT activity was determined in isolated pulmonary arteries from NFAT-luciferase reporter mice. The % of nuclei with NFAT nuclear accumulation was determined in primary human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC) cultures; in lung airway epithelia and smooth muscle and pulmonary endothelia and smooth muscle from IPF and COPD patients; and in PASMC from mouse lung sections by fluorescence microscopy. Both NFAT and VIP mRNA levels were measured in lungs from IPF and COPD patients. Empirical strategies applied to test hypotheses regarding VIP, NFATc3 expression and activity, and disease type and severity. This study shows a significant negative correlation between NFAT isoform c3 protein expression levels in PASMC, activity of NFATc3 in pulmonary endothelial cells, expression and activity of NFATc3 in bronchial epithelial cells and lung function in IPF patients, supporting the concept that NFATc3 is activated in the early stages of IPF. We further show that there is a significant positive correlation between NFATc3 mRNA expression and VIP RNA expression only in lungs from IPF patients. In

  5. NFATc3 and VIP in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Szema, Anthony M.; Forsyth, Edward; Ying, Benjamin; Hamidi, Sayyed A.; Chen, John J.; Hwang, Sonya; Li, Jonathan C.; Sabatini Dwyer, Debra; Ramiro-Diaz, Juan M.; Giermakowska, Wieslawa; Gonzalez Bosc, Laura V.

    2017-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are both debilitating lung diseases which can lead to hypoxemia and pulmonary hypertension (PH). Nuclear Factor of Activated T-cells (NFAT) is a transcription factor implicated in the etiology of vascular remodeling in hypoxic PH. We have previously shown that mice lacking the ability to generate Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide (VIP) develop spontaneous PH, pulmonary arterial remodeling and lung inflammation. Inhibition of NFAT attenuated PH in these mice suggesting a connection between NFAT and VIP. To test the hypotheses that: 1) VIP inhibits NFAT isoform c3 (NFATc3) activity in pulmonary vascular smooth muscle cells; 2) lung NFATc3 activation is associated with disease severity in IPF and COPD patients, and 3) VIP and NFATc3 expression correlate in lung tissue from IPF and COPD patients. NFAT activity was determined in isolated pulmonary arteries from NFAT-luciferase reporter mice. The % of nuclei with NFAT nuclear accumulation was determined in primary human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC) cultures; in lung airway epithelia and smooth muscle and pulmonary endothelia and smooth muscle from IPF and COPD patients; and in PASMC from mouse lung sections by fluorescence microscopy. Both NFAT and VIP mRNA levels were measured in lungs from IPF and COPD patients. Empirical strategies applied to test hypotheses regarding VIP, NFATc3 expression and activity, and disease type and severity. This study shows a significant negative correlation between NFAT isoform c3 protein expression levels in PASMC, activity of NFATc3 in pulmonary endothelial cells, expression and activity of NFATc3 in bronchial epithelial cells and lung function in IPF patients, supporting the concept that NFATc3 is activated in the early stages of IPF. We further show that there is a significant positive correlation between NFATc3 mRNA expression and VIP RNA expression only in lungs from IPF patients. In

  6. Multiple pulmonary nodules in a patient with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Golpe, Rafael; Mateos, Alfonso; Pérez-Valcárcel, Javier; Lapeña, José A; García-Figueiras, Roberto; Blanco, Joaquín

    2003-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) can be associated with respiratory involvement. Multiple pulmonary nodules are an infrequent finding in patients with CD. When they are found, histology usually shows sterile necrobiotic nodules, which are spherical aggregates of neutrophils, which frequently cavitate. We report a patient with inactive CD treated with mesalazine, who presented with multiple pulmonary nodules. Transthoracic biopsy of one of the nodules disclosed a benign, nongranulomatous inflammatory lymphoid infiltration. The radiographic abnormalities responded well to oral prednisone. Focal, nongranulomatous lymphoid infiltration thus must be considered in the differential diagnosis of multiple pulmonary nodules in patients with CD.

  7. Cellular and molecular mechanisms of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Peter J

    2014-03-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is associated with chronic inflammation affecting predominantly lung parenchyma and peripheral airways and results in largely irreversible and progressive airflow limitation. This inflammation is characterized by increased numbers of alveolar macrophages, neutrophils, and T lymphocytes, which are recruited from the circulation. Oxidative stress plays a key role in driving this inflammation. The pulmonary inflammation may enhance the development and growth of lung cancer. The peripheral inflammation extends into the circulation, resulting in systemic inflammation with the same inflammatory proteins. Systemic inflammation may worsen comorbidities. Treatment of pulmonary inflammation may therefore have beneficial effects.

  8. Pathophysiology and clinical relevance of pulmonary remodelling in pulmonary hypertension due to left heart diseases.

    PubMed

    Dupuis, Jocelyn; Guazzi, Marco

    2015-04-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) in left heart disease, classified as group II, is the most common form of PH that occurs in approximately 60% of cases of reduced and preserved left ventricular ejection fraction. Although relatively much is known about hemodynamic stages (passive or reactive) and their consequences on the right ventricle (RV) there is no consensus on the best hemodynamic definition of group II PH. In addition, the main pathways that lead to lung capillary injury and impaired biology of small artery remodelling processes are largely unknown. Typical lung manifestations of an increased pulmonary pressure and progressive RV-pulmonary circulation uncoupling are an abnormal alveolar capillary gas diffusion, impaired lung mechanics (restriction), and exercise ventilation inefficiency. Of several classes of pulmonary vasodilators currently clinically available, oral phosphodiesterase 5 inhibition, because of its strong selectivity for targeting the cyclic guanosine monophosphate pathway in the pulmonary circulation, is increasingly emerging as an attractive opportunity to reach hemodynamic benefits, reverse capillary injury, and RV remodelling, and improve functional capacity. Guanylate cyclase stimulators offer an additional intriguing opportunity but the lack of selectivity and systemic effects might preclude some of the anticipated benefits on the pulmonary circulation. Future trials will determine whether new routes of pharmacologic strategy aimed at targeting lung structural and vascular remodelling might affect morbidity and mortality in left heart disease populations. We believe that this therapeutic goal rather than a pure hemodynamic effect might ultimately emerge as an important challenge for the clinician.

  9. Clinical review of pulmonary manifestations of IgG4-related disease.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Sabrina N; Rubio, Edmundo; Loschner, A Lukas

    2014-11-01

    IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is a recently recognized systemic disease characterized by tumefactive lesions in various organ systems. The list of organs that can be involved continues to expand, and recently computed tomography (CT) descriptions of the pulmonary lesions found in the disease have been described. The clinical symptoms are nonspecific and may include cough, dyspnea, chest pain, and fever. The appropriate clinical presentation along with elevated serum IgG4 concentrations and pathologic evidence of lymphoplasmacytic infiltrates with abundant IgG4-positive plasma cells and storiform fibrosis is consistent with the disease. Steroids are used to treat this disease in addition to immunosupressives such as cyclosporine or rituxumab for steroid refractory disease. The pulmonary manifestations and imaging features can often mimic malignancy, and as such knowledge of the diagnostic, clinicopathologic, and radiographic features of the disease is required in order to provide appropriate diagnostic workup and treatment.

  10. Pulmonary complications in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease following transthoracic esophagectomy

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Wen-Jie; Wang, Tian-You; Gong, Min; Pan, Hao; Liu, Yan-Bing; Liu, Zhi-Hua

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the incidence of various types of postoperative pulmonary complications (POPCs) and to evaluate the significance of perioperative arterial blood gases in patients with esophageal cancer accompanied with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) after esophagectomy. MEHTODS: Three hundred and fifty-eight patients were divided into POPC group and COPD group. We performed a retrospective review of the 358 consecutive patients after esophagectomy for esophageal cancer with or without COPD to assess the possible influence of COPD on postoperative pulmonary complications. We classified COPD into four grades according to percent-predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) and analyzed the incidence rate of complications among the four grades. Perioperative arterial blood gases were tested in patients with or without pulmonary complications in COPD group and compared with POPC group. RESULTS: Patients with COPD (29/86, 33.7%) had more pulmonary complications than those without COPD (36/272, 13.2%) (P < 0.001). Pneumonia (15/29, 51.7%), atelectasis (13/29, 44.8%), prolonged O2 supplement (10/29, 34.5%), and prolonged mechanical ventilation (8/29, 27.6%) were the major complications in COPD group. Moreover, patients with severe COPD (gradeIIB, FEV1 < 50% of predicted) had more POPCs than those with moderate(gradeIIA, 50%-80% of predicted) and mild (gradeI≥ 80% of predicted) COPD (P < 0.05). PaO2 was decreased and PaCO2 was increased in patients with pulmonary complications in COPD group in the first postoperative week. CONCLUSION: The criteria of COPD are the critical predictor for pulmonary complications in esophageal cancer patients undergoing esophagectomy. Severity of COPD affects the incidence rate of the pulmonary complication, and percent-predicted FEV1 is a good predictive variable for pulmonary complication in patients with COPD. Arterial blood gases are helpful in directing perioperative management. PMID:16688794

  11. Evaluation of the Effects of Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation of The Lower Limbs Combined with Pulmonary Rehabilitation on Exercise Tolerance in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Kucio, Cezary; Niesporek, Justyna; Kucio, Ewa; Narloch, Dominika; Węgrzyn, Bartosz

    2016-12-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a systemic disease with multiple extrapulmonary manifestations including impeded skeletal muscle function, leading to decreased muscular strength and endurance in patients with COPD. Pulmonary rehabilitation eases the symptoms of the condition and produces increased muscular endurance. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) may serve as a treatment alternative to traditional pulmonary rehabilitation. The aim of the study was to assess the effects of NMES combined with pulmonary rehabilitation on exercise tolerance in patients in comparison with pulmonary rehabilitation alone. The subjects included 30 patients with COPD randomly assigned to one of the two groups. The first group consisted of 15 patients who were treated with neuromuscular electrical stimulation at frequency of 35Hz and pulmonary rehabilitation (NMES+RP). The second group comprised 15 patients treated with pulmonary rehabilitation only (RP). Pre- and poststudy assessments were performed. The retrospective evaluation including an exercise tolerance test (i.e. six minute walk test (6MWT)), spirometry and blood gasometry was carried out after 3 weeks. Twenty-eight patients in total completed the study. In the NMES+RP group, an increase in exercise tolerance manifested by a longer distance walked in the 6MWT was observed in comparison to the pulmonary rehabilitation group. No effects of NMES combined with pulmonary rehabilitation on selected spirometric and gasometric parameters in patients with COPD were observed in comparison with traditional pulmonary rehabilitation. The acquired results suggest that NMES of the lower limbs may be applied as an additional form of pulmonary rehabilitation in patients with COPD.

  12. Evaluation of the Effects of Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation of The Lower Limbs Combined with Pulmonary Rehabilitation on Exercise Tolerance in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Niesporek, Justyna; Kucio, Ewa; Narloch, Dominika; Węgrzyn, Bartosz

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a systemic disease with multiple extrapulmonary manifestations including impeded skeletal muscle function, leading to decreased muscular strength and endurance in patients with COPD. Pulmonary rehabilitation eases the symptoms of the condition and produces increased muscular endurance. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) may serve as a treatment alternative to traditional pulmonary rehabilitation. The aim of the study was to assess the effects of NMES combined with pulmonary rehabilitation on exercise tolerance in patients in comparison with pulmonary rehabilitation alone. The subjects included 30 patients with COPD randomly assigned to one of the two groups. The first group consisted of 15 patients who were treated with neuromuscular electrical stimulation at frequency of 35Hz and pulmonary rehabilitation (NMES+RP). The second group comprised 15 patients treated with pulmonary rehabilitation only (RP). Pre- and poststudy assessments were performed. The retrospective evaluation including an exercise tolerance test (i.e. six minute walk test (6MWT)), spirometry and blood gasometry was carried out after 3 weeks. Twenty-eight patients in total completed the study. In the NMES+RP group, an increase in exercise tolerance manifested by a longer distance walked in the 6MWT was observed in comparison to the pulmonary rehabilitation group. No effects of NMES combined with pulmonary rehabilitation on selected spirometric and gasometric parameters in patients with COPD were observed in comparison with traditional pulmonary rehabilitation. The acquired results suggest that NMES of the lower limbs may be applied as an additional form of pulmonary rehabilitation in patients with COPD. PMID:28031759

  13. Outcomes of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease diagnosed with or without pulmonary function testing

    PubMed Central

    Gershon, Andrea; Mecredy, Graham; Croxford, Ruth; To, Teresa; Stanbrook, Matthew B.; Aaron, Shawn D.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A small number of people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) receive pulmonary function testing around the time of diagnosis. Because omitting testing increases misdiagnosis, we sought to determine whether health outcomes differed between patients whose COPD was diagnosed with or without pulmonary function testing. METHODS: We conducted a longitudinal population study of patients with physician-diagnosed COPD from 2005 to 2012 using health administrative data from Ontario, Canada. We assessed whether having pulmonary function testing around the time of diagnosis was associated with the composite outcome of admission to hospital for COPD or all-cause death, using adjusted survival analysis. RESULTS: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was diagnosed in 68 898 patients during the study period; 41.2% of patients received peridiagnostic pulmonary function testing. In adjusted analysis, patients who underwent testing were less likely to die or be admitted to hospital for COPD (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 0.91, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.89–0.94) and were more likely to be prescribed an inhaled long-acting bronchodilator than patients who did not undergo testing. Subgroup analysis suggested that the association of testing and outcomes was confined to patients with COPD diagnosed in the ambulatory care setting (adjusted HR 0.80, 95% CI 0.76–0.84). INTERPRETATION: Confirmation of a COPD diagnosis using pulmonary function testing is associated with a decreased risk of death and admission to hospital for COPD. In ambulatory patients, this effect may be from increased use of appropriate COPD medications. The findings of this study validate current guideline recommendations that encourage pulmonary function testing for diagnosis in all patients with suspected COPD.

  14. A Rhesus Macaque Model of Pulmonary Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Winthrop, Kevin; Rivera, Andrea; Engelmann, Flora; Rose, Sasha; Lewis, Anne; Ku, Jennifer; Bermudez, Luiz

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we sought to develop a nonhuman primate model of pulmonary Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) disease. Blood and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were collected from three female rhesus macaques infected intrabronchially with escalating doses of M. avium subsp. hominissuis. Immunity was determined by measuring cytokine levels, lymphocyte proliferation, and antigen-specific responses. Disease progression was monitored clinically and microbiologically with serial thoracic radiographs, computed tomography scans, and quantitative mycobacterial cultures. The animal subjected to the highest inoculum showed evidence of chronic pulmonary MAC disease. Therefore, rhesus macaques could provide a robust model in which to investigate host–pathogen interactions during MAC infection. PMID:26562499

  15. Management of Pulmonary Hypertension in Patients with Chronic Lung Disease.

    PubMed

    Barberà, Joan Albert; Blanco, Isabel

    2015-08-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a common complication of chronic pulmonary diseases, especially in advanced disease, and is associated with greater mortality and worse clinical course. Patients with symptoms that exceed those expected by their pulmonary disease should be further evaluated by echocardiography. Confirmatory right heart catheterization is indicated in those conditions where the results of the hemodynamic assessment will determine treatment options. The treatment of choice for patients who are hypoxemic and have pulmonary hypertension associated with chronic lung disease is long-term oxygen therapy. Conventional vasodilators or drugs approved for pulmonary arterial hypertension are not recommended in patients with mild-to-moderate PH because they may impair gas exchange and because there is a lack of evidence supporting their efficacy. Patients with severe PH should be considered for referral to a center with expertise in PH and lung diseases. Ideally, these patients should be included in randomized controlled trials to determine which patients are more likely to derive benefit and which therapies are most likely to be successful.

  16. IDENTIFICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF DISEASE USING PULMONARY FUNCTION TESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract
    Pulmonary function testing is used routinely in human medicine to objectively define functional deficits in individuals with respiratory disease. Despite the fact that respiratory disease is a common problem in veterinary medicine, evaluation of the small animal pa...

  17. Chest wall shrapnel-induced beryllium-sensitization and associated pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Fireman, E; Shai, A Bar; Lerman, Y; Topilsky, M; Blanc, P D; Maier, L; Li, L; Chandra, S; Abraham, J M; Fomin, I; Aviram, G; Abraham, J L

    2012-10-01

    Chronic beryllium disease (CBD) is an exposure-related granulomatous disease mimicking sarcoidosis. Beryllium exposure-associated disease occurs mainly via inhalation, but skin may also be a source of sensitization. A 65-year-old male with a history of war-related shrapnel wounds was initially diagnosed with pulmonary sarcoidosis. Twenty years later, the possibility of a metal-related etiology for the lung disease was raised. A beryllium lymphocyte proliferation test, elemental analysis of removed shrapnel, and genetic studies were consistent with a diagnosis of CBD. This case demonstrates that retained beryllium-containing foreign bodies can be linked to a pathophysiologic response in the lung consistent with CBD.

  18. Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap: asthmatic chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or chronic obstructive asthma?

    PubMed

    Slats, Annelies; Taube, Christian

    2016-02-01

    Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are different disease entities. They are both clinical diagnoses, with diagnostic tools to discriminate between one another. However, especially in older patients (>55 years) it seems more difficult to differentiate between asthma and COPD. This has led to the definition of a new phenotype called asthma COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS). However, our understanding of ACOS is at a very preliminary stage, as most research has involved subjects with existing diagnoses of asthma or COPD from studies with different definitions for ACOS. This has led to different and sometimes opposing results between studies on several features of ACOS, also depending on the comparison with COPD alone, asthma alone or both, which are summarized in this review.We suggest not using the term ACOS for a patient with features of both asthma and COPD, but to describe a patient with chronic obstructive airway disease as completely as possible, with regard to characteristics that determine treatment response (e.g. eosinophilic inflammation) and prognosis (such as smoking status, exacerbation rate, fixed airflow limitation, hyperresponsiveness, comorbidities). This will provide a far more clinically relevant diagnosis, and would aid in research on treatment in more homogenous groups of patients with chronic airways obstruction. More research is certainly needed to develop more evidence-based definitions for this patient group and to evaluate biomarkers, which will help to further classify these patients, treat them more adequately and unravel the underlying pathophysiological mechanism.

  19. Pulmonary thromboembolic disease. Clinical management of acute and chronic disease.

    PubMed

    Torbicki, Adam

    2010-07-01

    Pulmonary thromboembolism falls between the areas of pulmonology and cardiology, internal medicine and intensive care, radiology and nuclear medicine, and hematology and cardiothoracic surgery. Depending on their clinical background, physicians faced with a patient with a pulmonary thromboembolism may speak different languages and adopt different treatment approaches. Now, however, there is an opportunity to end the Tower of Babel surrounding pulmonary thromboembolism. There is a growing acknowledgement that the key clinical problems in both acute pulmonary embolism and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension are linked to right ventricular pressure overload and right ventricular failure. As a result, cardiologists and cardiac intensive care specialists are taking an increasing interest in understanding and combating these conditions. The European Society of Cardiology was the first to elaborate comprehensive clinical practice guidelines for pulmonary thromboembolism and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. The task forces involved in producing these guidelines included radiologists, pulmonologists, hematologists, intensive care physicians and surgeons, which ensured that the final document was universally acceptable. The aim of this article was to provide an overview of the epidemiology, risk factors, diagnosis, treatment, prognosis and prevention of acute pulmonary thromboembolism and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension, while taking into account European Society of Cardiology guidelines and incorporating new evidence where necessary.

  20. Pulmonary involvement in Behçet disease.

    PubMed

    Erkan, F

    1999-09-01

    Pulmonary artery aneurysms varying in size and number continue to be the principal feature of pulmonary involvement in Behçet disease (BD). Pulmonary aneurysms have been reported to be associated with cardiac thromboses, mainly in the right heart. Bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia has also been seen in the setting of pulmonary artery aneurysms. Aneurysms of the aortic arch and subclavian artery are rarely recognized thoracic manifestations of BD. Noninvasive imaging techniques, such as helical computed tomography and magnetic resonance angiography, are the safer and preferred methods for identifying aneurysms and thrombi. Digital substraction angiography has been found to be inadequate in showing thrombosed vessels. Follow-up computed tomography was performed in the documentation of the aneurysmal healing process. In patients receiving immunosuppressive treatment, intramural thrombus formation occurred and was followed by aneurysmal regression and disappearance. General principles for the treatment of systemic vasculitis are used in the treatment of BD.

  1. Pulmonary vascular disease in a rabbit a high altitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, Donald; Williams, David; Rios-Datenz, Jaime; Gosney, John

    1990-03-01

    A male weanling rabbit of the New Zealand White strain, born and living at an altitude of 3800 m in La Paz, Bolivia, developed right ventricular hypertrophy. This was found to be associated with growth of vascular smooth muscle cells in the intima of pulmonary arterioles, and contrasted with muscularization of the walls of pulmonary arterioles, without extension into the intima, found in a healthy, high-altitude control rabbit of the same strain. A low-altitude control showed no such muscularization. It is concluded that alveolar hypoxia, acting directly or through an intermediate agent, is a growth factor for vascular smooth muscle cells in pulmonary arterioles. This is the first report of pulmonary vascular disease due to high altitude in rabbits.

  2. Lumbo-sacral spine disease due to bovine tuberculosis in a patient with concurrent pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Nawaid; Srinivasan, Koottalai; Panayi, Jeannette; Moudgil, Harmesh

    2011-12-01

    Lumbo-sacral spinal disease due to bovine tuberculosis (TB) in a patient with concurrent pulmonary disease is rare. We report this unpredicted finding in an immunocompetent patient and discuss the natural history in an area of low prevalence.

  3. Treatment of pulmonary diseases with Holmium:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Mei-Jue; Zhu, Jing; Zhang, Hui-Guo; Wang, Fu-Juan; Ke, Lin; Ma, Wei; Luo, Qun-Hua; Zhang, Yue-E.

    1998-11-01

    We report 5 cases of pulmonary disease treated with Holmium:YAG laser through fibrous bronchoscope. 1 inflammatory granuloma was cured after three times of treatment. Compared with conventional methods such as electrocautery and microwave treatment, laser has the merit of good hemostasis effect and quick recovery of the operation area. The other 4 patients who were suffered late lung cancer received 3-7 times of palliative treatment. After the treatment, the tumor tissues become smaller variably, and tact were unobstructed, symptoms of tract- obstructed obviously alleviated. We think that laser treatment has some practical significance in alleviating tract blocking of pulmonary diseases of late stage, and therefore raise the life quality.

  4. Are prophylactic antibiotics useful in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease?

    PubMed

    Arenas, Alex; Rada, Gabriel

    2015-11-10

    Bacterial infections are one of the main causes of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation, so the use of prophylactic antibiotics, especially macrolides, has been proposed in these patients. However, it is unclear whether antibiotics use is worth the risk and cost. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified five systematic reviews including eight randomized trials. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings table following the GRADE approach. We concluded prophylactic antibiotics probably decrease exacerbations in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, but have no effect on hospitalizations or mortality.

  5. Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease in a female gardener.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Rodríguez, Paula; Pedraza Serrano, Fernando; Morán Caicedo, Liliana Patricia; Rodríguez de Guzmán, Maria Carmen; Cebollero Presmanes, María; de Miguel Díez, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) is a subgroup of pulmonary arterial hypertension with a poor prognosis. The diagnosis is usually delayed and treatment options other than lung transplantation are unfortunately limited. We report the case of 51-year-old female gardener diagnosed with PVOD by open lung biopsy before her death. Although there are many reported cases of hepatic veno-occlusive disease due to toxic agents present in nature, such as pyrrolizidine alkaloid exposure, to date this has not been linked to PVOD.

  6. Preventing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a multidisciplinary approach.

    PubMed

    Aronovitch, M; Groszman, M

    1980-10-01

    Chemoprophylaxis, combined with prolonged treatment of bronchospasm, in patients with incipient or minimal obstructive chest disease has shown promising results in 30 patients. Physicians should include in their regular examination some means of early detection for chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases and in suitable cases institute chemoprophylaxis during the winter, as well as preventive vaccinations. In addition, longterm treatment of bronchial problems should be continued. This combined approach will help prevent recurrent infections which accelerate the progress of chronic obstructive chest disease.

  7. Endothelial progenitor cells in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and emphysema.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Margaret F; Tracy, Russell P; Parikh, Megha A; Hoffman, Eric A; Shimbo, Daichi; Austin, John H M; Smith, Benjamin M; Hueper, Katja; Vogel-Claussen, Jens; Lima, Joao; Gomes, Antoinette; Watson, Karol; Kawut, Steven; Barr, R Graham

    2017-01-01

    Endothelial injury is implicated in the pathogenesis of COPD and emphysema; however the role of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), a marker of endothelial cell repair, and circulating endothelial cells (CECs), a marker of endothelial cell injury, in COPD and its subphenotypes is unresolved. We hypothesized that endothelial progenitor cell populations would be decreased in COPD and emphysema and that circulating endothelial cells would be increased. Associations with other subphenotypes were examined. The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis COPD Study recruited smokers with COPD and controls age 50-79 years without clinical cardiovascular disease. Endothelial progenitor cell populations (CD34+KDR+ and CD34+KDR+CD133+ cells) and circulating endothelial cells (CD45dimCD31+CD146+CD133-) were measured by flow cytometry. COPD was defined by standard spirometric criteria. Emphysema was assessed qualitatively and quantitatively on CT. Full pulmonary function testing and expiratory CTs were measured in a subset. Among 257 participants, both endothelial progenitor cell populations, and particularly CD34+KDR+ endothelial progenitor cells, were reduced in COPD. The CD34+KDR+CD133+ endothelial progenitor cells were associated inversely with emphysema extent. Both endothelial progenitor cell populations were associated inversely with extent of panlobular emphysema and positively with diffusing capacity. Circulating endothelial cells were not significantly altered in COPD but were inversely associated with pulmonary microvascular blood flow on MRI. There was no consistent association of endothelial progenitor cells or circulating endothelial cells with measures of gas trapping. These data provide evidence that endothelial repair is impaired in COPD and suggest that this pathological process is specific to emphysema.

  8. Endothelial progenitor cells in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and emphysema

    PubMed Central

    Tracy, Russell P.; Parikh, Megha A.; Hoffman, Eric A.; Shimbo, Daichi; Austin, John H. M.; Smith, Benjamin M.; Hueper, Katja; Vogel-Claussen, Jens; Lima, Joao; Gomes, Antoinette; Watson, Karol; Kawut, Steven; Barr, R. Graham

    2017-01-01

    Endothelial injury is implicated in the pathogenesis of COPD and emphysema; however the role of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), a marker of endothelial cell repair, and circulating endothelial cells (CECs), a marker of endothelial cell injury, in COPD and its subphenotypes is unresolved. We hypothesized that endothelial progenitor cell populations would be decreased in COPD and emphysema and that circulating endothelial cells would be increased. Associations with other subphenotypes were examined. The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis COPD Study recruited smokers with COPD and controls age 50–79 years without clinical cardiovascular disease. Endothelial progenitor cell populations (CD34+KDR+ and CD34+KDR+CD133+ cells) and circulating endothelial cells (CD45dimCD31+CD146+CD133-) were measured by flow cytometry. COPD was defined by standard spirometric criteria. Emphysema was assessed qualitatively and quantitatively on CT. Full pulmonary function testing and expiratory CTs were measured in a subset. Among 257 participants, both endothelial progenitor cell populations, and particularly CD34+KDR+ endothelial progenitor cells, were reduced in COPD. The CD34+KDR+CD133+ endothelial progenitor cells were associated inversely with emphysema extent. Both endothelial progenitor cell populations were associated inversely with extent of panlobular emphysema and positively with diffusing capacity. Circulating endothelial cells were not significantly altered in COPD but were inversely associated with pulmonary microvascular blood flow on MRI. There was no consistent association of endothelial progenitor cells or circulating endothelial cells with measures of gas trapping. These data provide evidence that endothelial repair is impaired in COPD and suggest that this pathological process is specific to emphysema. PMID:28291826

  9. Careful counseling is required for patients with pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Neinstein, L S; Katz, B

    1984-11-01

    Patients with asthma, cystic fibrosis, and other pulmonary diseases require careful family planning counseling. The asmatic patient should be given a birth control method that does not affect the disease or interfere with asthma medications. Oral contraceptives (OCs) are not contraindicated in asthmatic patients, although they may produce rhinitis symptoms. It is possible that the antiinflammatory action of steroids taken by asthmatics may decrease IUD effectiveness. Pregnancy can be a significant risk for patients with cystic fibrosis. In terms of contraception, there is concern that progesterone may cause bronchial mucus to thicken. Methods such as foam, the diaphragm, and condoms are preferred. An IUD can be offered to the patient who must avoid pregnancy due to poor cardiopulmonary status. It should be noted that pulmonary exacerbations of asthma and cystic fibrosis could potentially be confused with a pulmonary embolism.

  10. Current readings: Percutaneous ablation for pulmonary metastatic disease.

    PubMed

    Quirk, Matthew T; Pomykala, Kelsey L; Suh, Robert D

    2014-01-01

    Percutaneous image-guided ablation is a technique for maintaining local control of metastatic lung lesions that may, in selected patients, confer a survival benefit over no treatment or systemic therapy alone. Although the currently accepted treatment for oligometastatic pulmonary disease is surgical resection, the existing body of literature, including the recent investigations reviewed within this article, supports a role for percutaneous ablation as an important and relatively safe therapeutic option for nonsurgical and in carefully selected surgical patients, conferring survival benefits competitive with surgical metastasectomy. Continued clinical investigations are needed to further understand the nuances of thermal technologies and applications to treat lung primary and secondary pulmonary malignancy, directly compare available therapeutic options and further define the role of percutaneous image-guided ablation in the treatment of pulmonary metastatic disease.

  11. Pulmonary Rehabilitation and Physical Activity in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Spruit, Martijn A; Pitta, Fabio; McAuley, Edward; ZuWallack, Richard L; Nici, Linda

    2015-10-15

    Physical inactivity is common in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) compared with age-matched healthy individuals or patients with other chronic diseases. Physical inactivity independently predicts poor outcomes across several aspects of this disease, but it is (at least in principle) treatable in patients with COPD. Pulmonary rehabilitation has arguably the greatest positive effect of any current therapy on exercise capacity in COPD; as such, gains in this area should facilitate increases in physical activity. Furthermore, because pulmonary rehabilitation also emphasizes behavior change through collaborative self-management, it may aid in the translation of increased exercise capacity to greater participation in activities involving physical activity. Both increased exercise capacity and adaptive behavior change are necessary to achieve significant and lasting increases in physical activity in patients with COPD. Unfortunately, it is readily assumed that this translation occurs naturally. This concise clinical review will focus on the effects of a comprehensive pulmonary rehabilitation program on physical activity in patients with COPD. Changing physical activity behavior in patients with COPD needs an interdisciplinary approach, bringing together respiratory medicine, rehabilitation sciences, social sciences, and behavioral sciences.

  12. Decreased Neprilysin and Pulmonary Vascular Remodeling in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wick, Marilee J.; Buesing, Erica J.; Wehling, Carol A.; Loomis, Zoe L.; Cool, Carlyne D.; Zamora, Martin R.; Miller, York E.; Colgan, Sean P.; Hersh, Louis B.; Voelkel, Norbert F.; Dempsey, Edward C.

    2011-01-01

    Rationale: Studies with genetically engineered mice showed that decreased expression of the transmembrane peptidase neprilysin (NEP) increases susceptibility to hypoxic pulmonary vascular remodeling and hypertension; in hypoxic wild-type mice, expression is decreased early in distal pulmonary arteries, where prominent vascular remodeling occurs. Therefore, in humans with smoke- and hypoxia-induced vascular remodeling, as in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), pulmonary activity/expression of NEP may likewise be decreased. Objectives: To test whether NEP activity and expression are reduced in COPD lungs and pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (SMCs) exposed to cigarette smoke extract or hypoxia and begin to investigate mechanisms involved. Methods: Control and advanced COPD lung lysates (n = 13–14) were analyzed for NEP activity and protein and mRNA expression. As a control, dipeptidyl peptidase IV activity was analyzed. Lung sections were assessed for vascular remodeling and oxidant damage. Human pulmonary arterial SMCs were exposed to cigarette smoke extract, hypoxia, or H2O2, and incubated with antioxidants or lysosomal/proteasomal inhibitors. Measurements and Main Results: COPD lungs demonstrated areas of vascular rarification, distal muscularization, and variable intimal and prominent medial/adventitial thickening. NEP activity was reduced by 76%; NEP protein expression was decreased in alveolar walls and distal vessels; mRNA expression was also decreased. In SMCs exposed to cigarette smoke extract, hypoxia, and H2O2, NEP activity and expression were also reduced. Reactive oxygen species inactivated NEP activity; NEP protein degradation appeared to be substantially induced. Conclusions: Mechanisms responsible for reduced NEP activity and protein expression include oxidative reactions and protein degradation. Maintaining or increasing lung NEP may protect against pulmonary vascular remodeling in response to chronic smoke and hypoxia. PMID:20813891

  13. Home Telehealth for Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)

    PubMed Central

    Franek, J

    2012-01-01

    Executive Summary In July 2010, the Medical Advisory Secretariat (MAS) began work on a Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) evidentiary framework, an evidence-based review of the literature surrounding treatment strategies for patients with COPD. This project emerged from a request by the Health System Strategy Division of the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care that MAS provide them with an evidentiary platform on the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of COPD interventions. After an initial review of health technology assessments and systematic reviews of COPD literature, and consultation with experts, MAS identified the following topics for analysis: vaccinations (influenza and pneumococcal), smoking cessation, multidisciplinary care, pulmonary rehabilitation, long-term oxygen therapy, noninvasive positive pressure ventilation for acute and chronic respiratory failure, hospital-at-home for acute exacerbations of COPD, and telehealth (including telemonitoring and telephone support). Evidence-based analyses were prepared for each of these topics. For each technology, an economic analysis was also completed where appropriate. In addition, a review of the qualitative literature on patient, caregiver, and provider perspectives on living and dying with COPD was conducted, as were reviews of the qualitative literature on each of the technologies included in these analyses. The Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Mega-Analysis series is made up of the following reports, which can be publicly accessed at the MAS website at: http://www.hqontario.ca/en/mas/mas_ohtas_mn.html. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Evidentiary Framework Influenza and Pneumococcal Vaccinations for Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): An Evidence-Based Analysis Smoking Cessation for Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): An Evidence-Based Analysis Community-Based Multidisciplinary Care for Patients With Stable Chronic Obstructive

  14. The pathophysiology of pulmonary hypertension in left heart disease.

    PubMed

    Breitling, Siegfried; Ravindran, Krishnan; Goldenberg, Neil M; Kuebler, Wolfgang M

    2015-11-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is characterized by elevated pulmonary arterial pressure leading to right-sided heart failure and can arise from a wide range of etiologies. The most common cause of PH, termed Group 2 PH, is left-sided heart failure and is commonly known as pulmonary hypertension with left heart disease (PH-LHD). Importantly, while sharing many clinical features with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), PH-LHD differs significantly at the cellular and physiological levels. These fundamental pathophysiological differences largely account for the poor response to PAH therapies experienced by PH-LHD patients. The relatively high prevalence of this disease, coupled with its unique features compared with PAH, signal the importance of an in-depth understanding of the mechanistic details of PH-LHD. The present review will focus on the current state of knowledge regarding the pathomechanisms of PH-LHD, highlighting work carried out both in human trials and in preclinical animal models. Adaptive processes at the alveolocapillary barrier and in the pulmonary circulation, including alterations in alveolar fluid transport, endothelial junctional integrity, and vasoactive mediator secretion will be discussed in detail, highlighting the aspects that impact the response to, and development of, novel therapeutics.

  15. Stress failure of pulmonary capillaries: role in lung and heart disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, J. B.; Mathieu-Costello, O.

    1992-01-01

    Pulmonary capillaries have extremely thin walls to allow rapid exchange of respiratory gases across them. Recently it has been shown that the wall stresses become very large when the capillary pressure is raised, and in anaesthetised rabbits, ultrastructural damage to the walls is seen at pressures of 40 mm Hg and above. The changes include breaks in the capillary endothelial layer, alveolar epithelial layer, and sometimes all layers of the wall. The strength of the thin part of the capillary wall can be attributed to the type IV collagen in the extracellular matrix. Stress failure of pulmonary capillaries results in a high-permeability form of oedema, or even frank haemorrhage, and is apparently the mechanism of neurogenic pulmonary oedema and high-altitude pulmonary oedema. It also explains the exercise-induced pulmonary haemorrhage that occurs in all racehorses. Several features of mitral stenosis are consistent with stress failure. Overinflation of the lung also leads to stress failure, a common cause of increased capillary permeability in the intensive care environment. Stress failure also occurs if the type IV collagen of the capillary wall is weakened by autoantibodies as in Goodpasture's syndrome. Neutrophil elastase degrades type IV collagen and this may be the starting point of the breakdown of alveolar walls that is characteristic of emphysema. Stress failure of pulmonary capillaries is a hitherto overlooked and potentially important factor in lung and heart disease.

  16. Under pressure: pulmonary hypertension associated with left heart disease.

    PubMed

    Farber, Harrison W; Gibbs, Simon

    2015-12-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) associated with left heart disease (PH-LHD) is the most common type of PH, but its natural history is not well understood. PH-LHD is diagnosed by right heart catheterisation with a mean pulmonary arterial pressure ≥25 mmHg and a pulmonary capillary wedge pressure >15 mmHg. The primary causes of PH-LHD are left ventricular dysfunction of systolic and diastolic origin, and valvular disease. Prognosis is poor and survival rates are low. Limited progress has been made towards specific therapies for PH-LHD, and management focuses on addressing the underlying cause of the disease with supportive therapies, surgery and pharmacological treatments. Clinical trials of therapies for pulmonary arterial hypertension in patients with PH-LHD have thus far been limited and have provided disappointing or conflicting results. Robust, long-term clinical studies in appropriate target populations have the potential to improve the outlook for patients with PH-LHD. Herein, we discuss the knowledge gaps in our understanding of PH-LHD, and describe the current unmet needs and challenges that are faced by clinicians when identifying and managing patients with this disease.

  17. [Beta-blockers and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Sova, Milan; Kamasová, Monika; Václavík, Jan; Sovová, Eliška; Hajdová, Lenka; Kolek, Vítězslav

    2016-04-01

    This general article discusses the problems of beta-blockers use in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Its aim is to refute exaggerated concerns of physicians over possible undesirable effects of beta-blockers on the patient respiratory functions and present new data on the effects of beta-blockers on the extent of COPD exacerbations, bronchial reactivity and mortality of patients.

  18. Is tuberculosis a lymphatic disease with a pulmonary portal

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tuberculosis (TB) is commonly viewed as a pulmonary disease, in which infection, persistence, induction of pathology and bacterial expulsion all occur in the lungs. In this model, enlarged lymph nodes represent reactive adenitis and spread of organisms to extrapulmonary sites results in a non-transm...

  19. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Subtypes. Transitions over Time

    PubMed Central

    Esteban, Cristóbal; Arostegui, Inmaculada; Aburto, Myriam; Moraza, Javier; Quintana, José M.; García-Loizaga, Amaia; Basualdo, Luis V.; Aramburu, Amaia; Aizpiri, Susana; Uranga, Ane; Capelastegui, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Background Although subtypes of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are recognized, it is unknown what happens to these subtypes over time. Our objectives were to assess the stability of cluster-based subtypes in patients with stable disease and explore changes in clusters over 1 year. Methods Multiple correspondence and cluster analysis were used to evaluate data collected from 543 stable patients included consecutively from 5 respiratory outpatient clinics. Results Four subtypes were identified. Three of them, A, B, and C, had marked respiratory profiles with a continuum in severity of several variables, while the fourth, subtype D, had a more systemic profile with intermediate respiratory disease severity. Subtype A was associated with less dyspnea, better health-related quality of life and lower Charlson comorbidity scores, and subtype C with the most severe dyspnea, and poorer pulmonary function and quality of life, while subtype B was between subtypes A and C. Subtype D had higher rates of hospitalization the previous year, and comorbidities. After 1 year, all clusters remained stable. Generally, patients continued in the same subtype but 28% migrated to another cluster. Together with movement across clusters, patients showed changes in certain characteristics (especially exercise capacity, some variables of pulmonary function and physical activity) and changes in outcomes (quality of life, hospitalization and mortality) depending on the new cluster they belonged to. Conclusions Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease clusters remained stable over 1 year. Most patients stayed in their initial subtype cluster, but some moved to another subtype and accordingly had different outcomes. PMID:27611911

  20. Management of pulmonary hypertension in left heart disease.

    PubMed

    Schmeisser, Alexander; Schroetter, Hagen; Braun-Dulleaus, Ruediger C

    2013-06-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) due to left heart disease is classified as group II according to the Dana Point classification, which includes left ventricular systolic and/or diastolic left heart failure, and left-sided valvular disease. PH due to left heart disease is the most common cause and when present, especially with right ventricular dysfunction, is associated with a worse prognosis. Left heart disease with secondary PH is associated with increased left atrial pressure, which causes a passive increase in pulmonary pressure. Passive PH could be superimposed by an active protective, and in some patients by an 'out of proportion', elevated precapillary pulmonary vasoconstriction and vascular remodelling which leads to greater or lesser further increase of the pulmonary artery pressure. In this review, epidemiological and pathophysiologic mechanisms for the development of group II PH are summarized. The conflicting data about the haemodynamic and possible parameters to diagnose passive versus reactive and 'out of proportion' PH are presented. The different therapeutic concepts, along with novel treatment strategies, are reviewed in detail and critically discussed regarding their effectiveness and safety.

  1. Development of a Measure of Attitude toward Pulmonary Disease Prevention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGaghie, William C.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Systematic scale-development procedures, reliability analyses on 2,852 medical students (3 samples), and factor analysis were used to develop and refine a scale reflecting attitudes about pulmonary disease prevention. Development and verification samples included 110 and 2,691 students, respectively. The scale is promising for health education and…

  2. Evaluation of Continuing Medical Education for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Diseases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li Wang, Virginia; And Others

    1979-01-01

    A continuing medical education program is discussed that addresses chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and that links primary care physicians to a source of needed clinical knowledge at a relatively low cost. The educational methods, evaluation design, diagnosis of educational needs, selection of program content and behavioral outcomes are…

  3. GENETIC SUSCEPTIBILITY AND EXPERIMENTAL INDUCTION OF PULMONARY DISEASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Genetic Susceptibility and Experimental Induction of Pulmonary Disease. UP Kodavanti, MC Schladweiler, AD Ledbetter, PS Gilmour, P Evansky, KR Smith*, WP Watkinson, DL Costa, KE Pinkerton*. ETD, NHEERL, ORD, US EPA, RTP, NC; *Univ California, Davis, CA, USA.
    Conventional la...

  4. Cardiac catheterization in children with pulmonary hypertensive vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Bobhate, Prashant; Guo, Long; Jain, Shreepal; Haugen, Richard; Coe, James Y; Cave, Dominic; Rutledge, Jennifer; Adatia, Ian

    2015-04-01

    The risks associated with cardiac catheterization in children with pulmonary hypertension (PH) are increased compared with adults. We reviewed retrospectively all clinical data in children with PH [mean pulmonary artery pressure (mean PAp) ≥25 mmHg and pulmonary vascular resistance index (PVRI) ≥3 Wood units m(2)] undergoing cardiac catheterization between 2009 and 2014. Our strategy included a team approach, minimal catheter manipulation and sildenafil administration prior to extubation. Adverse events occurring within 48 h were noted. Seventy-five patients (36 males), median age 4 years (0.3-17) and median weight 14.6 kg (2.6-77 kg), underwent 97 cardiac catheterizations. Diagnoses included idiopathic or heritable pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) (29 %), PAH associated with congenital heart disease (52 %), left heart disease (5 %) and lung disease (14 %). Mean PAp was 43 ± 19 mmHg; mean PVRI was 9.7 ± 6 Wood units m(2). There were no deaths or serious arrhythmias. No patient required cardiac massage. Three patients who suffered adverse events had suprasystemic PAp (3/3), heritable PAH (2/3), decreased right ventricular function (3/3), and pulmonary artery capacitance index <1 ml/mmHg/m(2) (3/3) and were treatment naïve (3/3). No patient undergoing follow-up cardiac catheterization suffered a complication. In 45 % of cases, the data acquired from the follow-up cardiac catheterization resulted in an alteration of therapy. Three percent of children with PH undergoing cardiac catheterization suffered adverse events. However, there were no intra or post procedural deaths and no one required cardiac massage or cardioversion. Follow-up cardiac catheterization in patients receiving pulmonary hypertensive targeted therapy is safe and provides useful information.

  5. The disease burden of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in Greece

    PubMed Central

    Kourlaba, Georgia; Hillas, Georgios; Vassilakopoulos, Theodoros; Maniadakis, Nikos

    2016-01-01

    Background The objective of the study was to estimate the self-reported prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in Greece and to quantify its burden on patients’ daily activities, productivity, and psychological status. Methods A population-based, random digit-dialed telephone nationwide survey was conducted between July 10, 2015 and July 31, 2015 in order to recruit patients with COPD in Greece. Among the 11,471 persons contacted, 3,414 met the inclusion criterion of age ≥40 years and completed the screening questions regarding COPD. Of the 362 subjects who reported that they had been diagnosed with COPD, 351 completed the survey. Data on demographic and lifestyle characteristics, comorbidities, disease history, perceived disease severity, breathlessness severity, symptoms severity, limitations in daily activities, psychological distress, and productivity were collected. All data were collected through the telephone interview method using a structured questionnaire. Results The overall self-reported COPD prevalence was 10.6%. Among 351 participants, only 9% reported that they suffered from severe breathlessness. The mean COPD assessment test score was 19.0, with 84% of participants having a COPD assessment test score ≥10. As for the perceived severity of COPD, the majority of subjects considered that their respiratory condition was of moderate (34.2%) or mild severity (33.9%). Overall, the participants reported a significant impact of COPD on their daily life. For instance, 61.5% of them reported that their respiratory condition has affected their sports activities. Moreover, 73% of subjects considered that the health care system could do more for them than it actually does. Almost one-fourth of the participants reported that they had missed work during the past 12 months due to their respiratory symptoms, with the mean number of days lost being 10. Conclusion This survey provides insightful data regarding the impact of COPD on Greek

  6. Mortality from lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in New Mexico, 1958-82.

    PubMed

    Samet, J M; Wiggins, C L; Key, C R; Becker, T M

    1988-09-01

    We examined mortality from lung cancer and from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in Hispanic White, Other White, and Native American residents of New Mexico during the period 1958-82. Age-specific mortality was calculated by combining death certificate data with population estimates based on the 1960, 1970, and 1980 censuses that were adjusted for inconsistencies in the designation of race and ethnicity. In Other Whites, age-adjusted mortality rates from lung cancer and from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease increased progressively in males and females. Mortality rates for both diseases also increased in Hispanics during the study period, but the most recent rates for Hispanics were well below those for Other Whites. Age-specific mortality rates for lung cancer declined for more recently born Hispanic women at older ages. In Native Americans, rates for both diseases were low throughout the study period and did not show consistent temporal trends.

  7. Pulmonary disease management system with distributed wearable sensors.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yongji; Ayyagari, Deepak; Colquitt, Nhedti

    2009-01-01

    A pulmonary disease management system with on-body and near-body sensors is introduced in this presentation. The system is wearable for continuous ambulatory monitoring. Distributed sensor data is transferred through a wireless body area network (BAN) to a central controller for real time analysis. Physiological and environmental parameters are monitored and analyzed using prevailing clinical guidelines for self-management of environmentally-linked pulmonary ailments. The system provides patients with reminders, warnings, and instructions to reduce emergency room and physician visits, and improve clinical outcomes.

  8. [Rare pulmonary occupational diseases--importance of microanalytical examination].

    PubMed

    Brasch, Fank; Müller, Klaus-Michael

    2004-01-01

    In legal proceedings on the subject of occupational diseases concerning comparatively rare pneumoconioses, additional analyses such as energy dispersive x-ray microanalysis (EDX) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) offer decisive information for the pathologist in establishing causal connections between occupational exposure to hazardous substances, foreign particle deposits in lung tissue and pulmonary reaction patterns. Using the example of silver finisher's lung, dental technician's lung and talcosis, the connections between foreign particle deposits in lung tissue and granulomatous and fibrosing pulmonary changes are shown.

  9. [Problems on cortison therapy of obstructive pulmonary diseases (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Christ, R

    1979-03-01

    The use of cortison derivates is connected with some problems also in therapy of obstructive pulmonary diseases. Considering the multiplicity of new preparations and the variability of their application it is necessary to give this drugs under control depending individually on the stage of the disease. The present knowledge of pharmacodynamic actions of cortison therapy is mentioned. Refering to 30 own cases it is confirmed that depot cortison derivates have not fulfilled the expectations.

  10. [Palliative care of patients with terminal obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    von Plessen, Christian; Nielsen, Thyge L; Steffensen, Ida E; Larsen, Shuruk Al-Halwai; Taudorf, Ebbe

    2011-10-17

    Terminal chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and advanced cancer have similar prognosis and symptom burden. However, palliative care of patients with terminal COPD has been neglected in Denmark. We describe the symptoms of terminal COPD and suggest criteria for defining the palliative phase of the disease. Furthermore we discuss the prognostic and ethical challenges for patients, their families and their caregivers. Finally, we summarize the current evidence for palliative treatment of dyspnoea and ways to evaluate response to treatment.

  11. Pulmonary hypertension in connective tissue diseases: an update.

    PubMed

    Aithala, Ramya; Alex, Anoop G; Danda, Debashish

    2017-02-16

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a relatively commoner complication of systemic sclerosis (SSc) with estimated prevalence ranging between 8% and 12% as compared to much lower figures in other connective tissue diseases (CTD). It is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in CTDs. PH is classified into five major groups. CTD-associated PH belongs to group 1 PH, also known as pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Around 30% of scleroderma-related deaths are due to PAH. Underlying pathogenesis is related to pulmonary vasculopathy involving small vessels. The Evidence-based Detection of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension in Systemic sclerosis (DETECT) algorithm outperforms the current European Society of Cardiology/European Respiratory Society guidelines as a screening tool in SSc-PAH; it can, therefore, suggest when to refer a patient for right heart catheterization. CTD-PAH patients constitute at least 20% of patients included in all major trials of PH-specific therapy and the results are comparable to those of idiopathic PAH. The role of anticoagulation in CTD-PAH is associated with a high risk-benefit ratio with the caveat of its potential role in those with severe disease. There appears to be no role of immunosuppression in scleroderma-PAH; however, immunosuppressive agents, namely the combination of glucocorticoids and pulse cyclophosphamide / possibly mycophenolate, may result in clinical improvement in a subset of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and mixed connective tissue disease-related PAH.

  12. Pulmonary hypertension and right heart dysfunction in chronic lung disease.

    PubMed

    Zangiabadi, Amirmasoud; De Pasquale, Carmine G; Sajkov, Dimitar

    2014-01-01

    Group 3 pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a common complication of chronic lung disease (CLD), including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), interstitial lung disease, and sleep-disordered breathing. Development of PH is associated with poor prognosis and may progress to right heart failure, however, in the majority of the patients with CLD, PH is mild to moderate and only a small number of patients develop severe PH. The pathophysiology of PH in CLD is multifactorial and includes hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction, pulmonary vascular remodeling, small vessel destruction, and fibrosis. The effects of PH on the right ventricle (RV) range between early RV remodeling, hypertrophy, dilatation, and eventual failure with associated increased mortality. The golden standard for diagnosis of PH is right heart catheterization, however, evidence of PH can be appreciated on clinical examination, serology, radiological imaging, and Doppler echocardiography. Treatment of PH in CLD focuses on management of the underlying lung disorder and hypoxia. There is, however, limited evidence to suggest that PH-specific vasodilators such as phosphodiesterase-type 5 inhibitors, endothelin receptor antagonists, and prostanoids may have a role in the treatment of patients with CLD and moderate-to-severe PH.

  13. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease-Evolving Concepts in Treatment: Advances in Pulmonary Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Nici, Linda; ZuWallack, Richard

    2015-08-01

    Over the past three decades, pulmonary rehabilitation has risen to the stature as a gold standard for the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This rise is owing to both the development of science explaining mechanisms underlying its effectiveness and the demonstration of its substantial benefits across multiple outcome areas of importance to patients. Arguably, pulmonary rehabilitation provides the greatest improvements of any therapy in the areas of dyspnea-relief, exercise performance, and functional and health status. Emerging science also indicates that it reduces subsequent health care utilization and-when administered in the perihospital period-mortality risk. These beneficial effects are realized despite the fact that pulmonary rehabilitation has virtually no direct effect on lung function in COPD. Instead, this comprehensive, patient-centered intervention reduces the negative effects from systemic morbidity (such as muscle wasting) and comorbidity (such as depression and anxiety) that frequently accompany COPD. Two major components of pulmonary rehabilitation are exercise training and behavioral interventions. An example of the latter is a collaborative action plan for the early recognition and prompt treatment of the COPD exacerbation. Innovation in pulmonary rehabilitation includes (1) expanding its applicability, such as demonstrating effectiveness in the non-COPD respiratory patient, in milder COPD, in the periexacerbation period, and its provision in the home and community settings; (2) improving its process, such as refining the self-management and behavioral interventions, and the promotion of physical activity in the home and community settings; and (3) promoting its accessibility, such as exploring its potential usefulness in nontraditional settings (the home and community) and developing technology to assist in its implementation.

  14. Abnormal distribution of pulmonary blood flow in aortic valve disease

    PubMed Central

    Goodenday, Lucy S.; Simon, George; Craig, Hazel; Dalby, Lola

    1970-01-01

    Wasted ventilatory volume (VD) and its ratio to tidal volume (VD/VT) were measured at rest and during exertion in 17 patients with aortic valve disease. We considered VD/VT to indicate abnormal ventilation: perfusion relations if it did not decrease on exertion, or if the exercising value was greater than 40 per cent. Plain chest radiographs were independently examined for evidence of diversion of pulmonary blood to the upper lobes. There was significant agreement (p<0·05) between radiographic and pulmonary function estimations of abnormality. This suggests that the raised pulmonary venous pressure associated with left ventricular failure creates an abnormal pattern of blood flow through the lung, which is responsible for causing inadequate perfusion with respect to ventilation. Images PMID:5420086

  15. Pulmonary epithelial permeability in hyaline-membrane disease

    SciTech Connect

    Jefferies, A.L.; Coates, G.; O'Brodovich, H.

    1984-10-25

    Neonatal hyaline-membrane disease is complicated by pulmonary edema, yet left atrial pressures are normal. Alveolar-capillary-membrane permeability may therefore be increased. To assess pulmonary epithelial permeability, we measured the pulmonary clearance and half-life of aerosolized /sup 99m/Tc-diethylenetriamine pentacetate (/sup 99m/Tc-DTPA) on 31 occasions in 15 intubated premature infants with hyaline-membrane disease. Three infants with respiratory failure due to other diseases were studied on four occasions. All studies of infants with hyaline-membrane disease that were performed in the first 72 hours of life demonstrated a biphasic clearance curve with a rapid-phase half-life of 1.6 +/- 0.6 minutes (mean +/- S.D.). As these infants recovered, the curve became monophasic with a half-life of 56.0 +/- 32.1 minutes. Two infants remained dependent on oxygen and ventilator support and had persistent biphasic curves with a rapid-phase half-life of 1.5 +/- 0.7 minutes. All infants without hyaline-membrane disease had monophasic curves with a half-life of 65.4 +/- 33.6 minutes. Using a similar technique, we observed that newborn lambs and piglets have a monophasic pulmonary clearance of /sup 99m/Tc-DTPA (114 +/- 59 minutes in lambs and 52.5 +/- 16.3 minutes in piglets). We conclude that the lungs of neonates with hyaline-membrane disease are abnormally permeable to small solutes and that this abnormality persists in infants with subsequent chronic lung disease.

  16. IREB2 and GALC Are Associated with Pulmonary Artery Enlargement in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin Hwa; Cho, Michael H.; Hersh, Craig P.; McDonald, Merry-Lynn N.; Wells, J. Michael; Dransfield, Mark T.; Bowler, Russell P.; Lynch, David A.; Lomas, David A.; Crapo, James D.

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is associated with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), although pulmonary vascular changes occur early in the course of the disease. Pulmonary artery (PA) enlargement (PAE) measured by computed tomography correlates with pulmonary hypertension and COPD exacerbation frequency. Genome-wide association studies of PAE in subjects with COPD have not been reported. To investigate whether genetic variants are associated with PAE within subjects with COPD, we investigated data from current and former smokers from the COPDGene Study and the Evaluation of COPD Longitudinally to Identify Predictive Surrogate Endpoints study. The ratio of the diameter of the PA to the diameter of the aorta (A) was measured using computed tomography. PAE was defined as PA/A greater than 1. A genome-wide association study for COPD with PAE was performed using subjects with COPD without PAE (PA/A ≤ 1) as a control group. A secondary analysis used smokers with normal spirometry as a control group. Genotyping was performed on Illumina platforms. The results were summarized using fixed-effect meta-analysis. Both meta-analyses revealed a genome-wide significant locus on chromosome 15q25.1 in IREB2 (COPD with versus without PAE, rs7181486; odds ratio [OR] = 1.32; P = 2.10 × 10−8; versus smoking control subjects, rs2009746; OR = 1.42; P = 1.32 × 10−9). PAE was also associated with a region on 14q31.3 near the GALC gene (rs7140285; OR = 1.55; P = 3.75 × 10−8). Genetic variants near IREB2 and GALC likely contribute to genetic susceptibility to PAE associated with COPD. This study provides evidence for genetic heterogeneity associated with a clinically important COPD vascular subtype. PMID:25101718

  17. IREB2 and GALC are associated with pulmonary artery enlargement in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin Hwa; Cho, Michael H; Hersh, Craig P; McDonald, Merry-Lynn N; Wells, J Michael; Dransfield, Mark T; Bowler, Russell P; Lynch, David A; Lomas, David A; Crapo, James D; Silverman, Edwin K

    2015-03-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is associated with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), although pulmonary vascular changes occur early in the course of the disease. Pulmonary artery (PA) enlargement (PAE) measured by computed tomography correlates with pulmonary hypertension and COPD exacerbation frequency. Genome-wide association studies of PAE in subjects with COPD have not been reported. To investigate whether genetic variants are associated with PAE within subjects with COPD, we investigated data from current and former smokers from the COPDGene Study and the Evaluation of COPD Longitudinally to Identify Predictive Surrogate Endpoints study. The ratio of the diameter of the PA to the diameter of the aorta (A) was measured using computed tomography. PAE was defined as PA/A greater than 1. A genome-wide association study for COPD with PAE was performed using subjects with COPD without PAE (PA/A ≤ 1) as a control group. A secondary analysis used smokers with normal spirometry as a control group. Genotyping was performed on Illumina platforms. The results were summarized using fixed-effect meta-analysis. Both meta-analyses revealed a genome-wide significant locus on chromosome 15q25.1 in IREB2 (COPD with versus without PAE, rs7181486; odds ratio [OR] = 1.32; P = 2.10 × 10(-8); versus smoking control subjects, rs2009746; OR = 1.42; P = 1.32 × 10(-9)). PAE was also associated with a region on 14q31.3 near the GALC gene (rs7140285; OR = 1.55; P = 3.75 × 10(-8)). Genetic variants near IREB2 and GALC likely contribute to genetic susceptibility to PAE associated with COPD. This study provides evidence for genetic heterogeneity associated with a clinically important COPD vascular subtype.

  18. [Inhaled in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease therapy update].

    PubMed

    Viejo-Casas, A; Bonnardeaux-Chadburn, C; Ginel-Mendoza, L; Quintano-Jimenez, J A

    2016-10-01

    Knowledge of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease has increased significantly in recent years, and today we have a more comprehensive concept of the disease. Additionally, drug development allows having a wide range of therapeutic options. The inhaled route is the choice, as it allows drugs to act directly on the bronchial tree. In the past few months, new molecules and devices have been developed that increases our options when treating, but also our doubts when choosing one or the other, so an update of inhaled medications for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is necessary. The different types of inhalers currently available are reviewed in this article, as well as the advantages and disadvantages of each of them, in order to determine how to choose the right device.

  19. Granulomatous bronchiolitis with necrobiotic pulmonary nodules in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Hugh J; Davis, Jennifer E; Prest, Marcia E; Lawson, Edward J

    2004-11-01

    A 37-year-old man with extensive Crohn's disease of the stomach, small and large intestine for almost a decade developed respiratory symptoms and radiological findings suggestive of pneumonia that failed to resolve with antibiotic treatment. Computed tomography scanning of his lungs showed extensive changes with cavitated parenchymal nodules. Histological evaluation of an open lung biopsy showed granulomatous bronchiolitis and pulmonary necrobiosis. Treatment with steroids and immunosuppression resulted in complete resolution of his clinical symptoms of pneumonia and abnormal computed tomography imaging changes. Granulomatous bronchiolitis and necrobiotic nodules may be a manifestation of Crohn's disease in the absence of microbial agents, including mycobacteria or fungal agents. While a multiplicity of complex pulmonary changes may occur in Crohn's disease, their clinical recognition and precise pathological definition may be particularly important if treatment with a biological agent, such as infliximab, is being considered.

  20. Innovations in health information technologies for chronic pulmonary diseases.

    PubMed

    Himes, Blanca E; Weitzman, Elissa R

    2016-04-05

    Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are common chronic obstructive lung disorders in the US that affect over 49 million people. There is no cure for asthma or COPD, but clinical guidelines exist for controlling symptoms that are successful in most patients that adhere to their treatment plan. Health information technologies (HITs) are revolutionizing healthcare by becoming mainstream tools to assist patients in self-monitoring and decision-making, and subsequently, driving a shift toward a care model increasingly centered on personal adoption and use of digital and web-based tools. While the number of chronic pulmonary disease HITs is rapidly increasing, most have not been validated as clinically effective tools for the management of disease. Online communities for asthma and COPD patients are becoming sources of empowerment and support, as well as facilitators of patient-centered research efforts. In addition to empowering patients and facilitating disease self-management, HITs offer promise to aid researchers in identifying chronic pulmonary disease endotypes and personalized treatments based on patient-specific profiles that integrate symptom occurrence and medication usage with environmental and genomic data.

  1. Right or Left: The Role of Nanoparticles in Pulmonary Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xuefei; Zhu, Tao; Chen, Chunying; Liu, Ying

    2014-01-01

    Due to the rapid development of the nanotechnology industry in the last decade, nanoparticles (NPs) are omnipresent in our everyday life today. Many nanomaterials have been engineered for medical purposes. These purposes include therapy for pulmonary diseases. On other hand, people are endeavoring to develop nanomaterials for improvement or replacement of traditional therapies. On the other hand, nanoparticles, as foreign material in human bodies, are reported to have potential adverse effects on the lung, including oxidase stress, inflammation, fibrosis and genotoxicity. Further, these damages could induce pulmonary diseases and even injuries in other tissues. It seems that nanoparticles may exert two-sided effects. Toxic effects of nanomaterials should be considered when their use is developed for therapies. Hence this review will attempt to summarize the two-side roles of nanoparticles in both therapies for pulmonary diseases and initiation of lung diseases and even secondary diseases caused by lung injuries. Determinants of these effects such as physicochemical properties of nanoparticles will also be discussed. PMID:25268624

  2. Animal models of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Rial, Sandra; Girón-Martínez, Álvaro; Peces-Barba, Germán

    2015-03-01

    Animal models of disease have always been welcomed by the scientific community because they provide an approach to the investigation of certain aspects of the disease in question. Animal models of COPD cannot reproduce the heterogeneity of the disease and usually only manage to represent the disease in its milder stages. Moreover, airflow obstruction, the variable that determines patient diagnosis, not always taken into account in the models. For this reason, models have focused on the development of emphysema, easily detectable by lung morphometry, and have disregarded other components of the disease, such as airway injury or associated vascular changes. Continuous, long-term exposure to cigarette smoke is considered the main risk factor for this disease, justifying the fact that the cigarette smoke exposure model is the most widely used. Some variations on this basic model, related to exposure time, the association of other inducers or inhibitors, exacerbations or the use of transgenic animals to facilitate the identification of pathogenic pathways have been developed. Some variations or heterogeneity of this disease, then, can be reproduced and models can be designed for resolving researchers' questions on disease identification or treatment responses.

  3. Mechanics and Function of the Pulmonary Vasculature: Implications for Pulmonary Vascular Disease and Right Ventricular Function

    PubMed Central

    Lammers, Steven; Scott, Devon; Hunter, Kendall; Tan, Wei; Shandas, Robin; Stenmark, Kurt R.

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between cardiac function and the afterload against which the heart muscle must work to circulate blood throughout the pulmonary circulation is defined by a complex interaction between many coupled system parameters. These parameters range broadly and incorporate system effects originating primarily from three distinct locations: input power from the heart, hydraulic impedance from the large conduit pulmonary arteries, and hydraulic resistance from the more distal microcirculation. These organ systems are not independent, but rather, form a coupled system in which a change to any individual parameter affects all other system parameters. The result is a highly nonlinear system which requires not only detailed study of each specific component and the effect of disease on their specific function, but also requires study of the interconnected relationship between the microcirculation, the conduit arteries, and the heart in response to age and disease. Here, we investigate systems-level changes associated with pulmonary hypertensive disease progression in an effort to better understand this coupled relationship. PMID:23487595

  4. Are improvements maintained after in-home pulmonary telerehabilitation for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease?

    PubMed

    Marquis, Nicole; Larivée, Pierre; Dubois, Marie-France; Tousignant, Michel

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated if improvements can be maintained over 24 weeks when in-home pulmonary telerehabilitation is combined with asynchronous self-management education for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). Twenty-three community-living elders with moderate to very severe COPD participated in a pre/post-intervention study. Over 8 weeks, they had access to self-learning capsules on self-management, received 15 in-home teletreatment sessions and were encouraged to gradually engage in unsupervised sessions. Participants were assessed before the intervention (T1), immediately after the intervention (T2), and 6 months later (T3). Outcome measures were (1) exercise tolerance (6-minute walk test [6MWT]), Cycle Endurance Test [CET]), and (2) quality of life (Chronic Respiratory Questionnaire [CRQ]). Although there were significant improvements after 8 weeks of pulmonary telerehabilitation on the 6MWT, CET and three of four CRQ domains, none of these improvements were maintained after 6 months and scores returned to their baseline values (all p values > 0.05 when comparing T3 with T1). While pulmonary telerehabilitation is possible and has a positive impact on patients with moderate to very severe COPD, improvements were not maintained in the long-term even when physical therapy was accompanied by self-management education.

  5. Pulmonary complications after abdominal surgery in patients with mild-to-moderate chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Hoon; Lee, Jae Seung; Lee, Sei Won; Oh, Yeon-Mok

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative pulmonary complications (PPCs) are one of the most important causes of postoperative morbidity and mortality after abdominal surgery. Although chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has been considered a risk factor for PPCs, it remains unclear whether mild-to-moderate COPD is a risk factor. This retrospective cohort study included 387 subjects who underwent abdominal surgery with general anesthesia in a tertiary referral hospital. PPCs included pneumonia, pulmonary edema, pulmonary thromboembolism, atelectasis, and acute exacerbation of COPD. Among the 387 subjects, PPCs developed in 14 (12.0%) of 117 patients with mild-to-moderate COPD and in 13 (15.1%) of 86 control patients. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that mild-to-moderate COPD was not a significant risk factor for PPCs (odds ratio [OR] =0.79; 95% confidence interval [CI] =0.31–2.03; P=0.628). However, previous hospitalization for respiratory problems (OR =4.20; 95% CI =1.52–11.59), emergency surgery (OR =3.93; 95% CI =1.75–8.82), increased amount of red blood cell (RBC) transfusion (OR =1.09; 95% CI =1.05–1.14 for one pack increase of RBC transfusion), and laparoscopic surgery (OR =0.41; 95% CI =0.18–0.93) were independent predictors of PPCs. These findings suggested that mild-to-moderate COPD may not be a significant risk factor for PPCs after abdominal surgery. PMID:27877032

  6. Vasculopathy and pulmonary hypertension in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Potoka, Karin P; Gladwin, Mark T

    2015-02-15

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is an autosomal recessive disorder in the gene encoding the β-chain of hemoglobin. Deoxygenation causes the mutant hemoglobin S to polymerize, resulting in rigid, adherent red blood cells that are entrapped in the microcirculation and hemolyze. Cardinal features include severe painful crises and episodic acute lung injury, called acute chest syndrome. This population, with age, develops chronic organ injury, such as chronic kidney disease and pulmonary hypertension. A major risk factor for developing chronic organ injury is hemolytic anemia, which releases red blood cell contents into the circulation. Cell free plasma hemoglobin, heme, and arginase 1 disrupt endothelial function, drive oxidative and inflammatory stress, and have recently been referred to as erythrocyte damage-associated molecular pattern molecules (eDAMPs). Studies suggest that in addition to effects of cell free plasma hemoglobin on scavenging nitric oxide (NO) and generating reactive oxygen species (ROS), heme released from plasma hemoglobin can bind to the toll-like receptor 4 to activate the innate immune system. Persistent intravascular hemolysis over decades leads to chronic vasculopathy, with ∼10% of patients developing pulmonary hypertension. Progressive obstruction of small pulmonary arterioles, increase in pulmonary vascular resistance, decreased cardiac output, and eventual right heart failure causes death in many patients with this complication. This review provides an overview of the pathobiology of hemolysis-mediated endothelial dysfunction and eDAMPs and a summary of our present understanding of diagnosis and management of pulmonary hypertension in sickle cell disease, including a review of recent American Thoracic Society (ATS) consensus guidelines for risk stratification and management.

  7. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease - adults - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... visit when they're all better. Save Your Energy at Home Place items you use often in ... or the skin around your fingernails are blue Alternative Names COPD - adults - discharge; Chronic obstructive airways disease - ...

  8. Pulmonary Microvascular Blood Flow in Mild Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and Emphysema. The MESA COPD Study

    PubMed Central

    Hueper, Katja; Vogel-Claussen, Jens; Parikh, Megha A.; Austin, John H. M.; Bluemke, David A.; Carr, James; Choi, Jiwoong; Goldstein, Thomas A.; Gomes, Antoinette S.; Hoffman, Eric A.; Kawut, Steven M.; Lima, Joao; Michos, Erin D.; Post, Wendy S.; Po, Ming Jack; Prince, Martin R.; Liu, Kiang; Rabinowitz, Dan; Skrok, Jan; Smith, Ben M.; Watson, Karol; Yin, Youbing; Zambeli-Ljepovic, Alan M.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Smoking-related microvascular loss causes end-organ damage in the kidneys, heart, and brain. Basic research suggests a similar process in the lungs, but no large studies have assessed pulmonary microvascular blood flow (PMBF) in early chronic lung disease. Objectives: To investigate whether PMBF is reduced in mild as well as more severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and emphysema. Methods: PMBF was measured using gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) among smokers with COPD and control subjects age 50 to 79 years without clinical cardiovascular disease. COPD severity was defined by standard criteria. Emphysema on computed tomography (CT) was defined by the percentage of lung regions below −950 Hounsfield units (−950 HU) and by radiologists using a standard protocol. We adjusted for potential confounders, including smoking, oxygenation, and left ventricular cardiac output. Measurements and Main Results: Among 144 participants, PMBF was reduced by 30% in mild COPD, by 29% in moderate COPD, and by 52% in severe COPD (all P < 0.01 vs. control subjects). PMBF was reduced with greater percentage emphysema−950HU and radiologist-defined emphysema, particularly panlobular and centrilobular emphysema (all P ≤ 0.01). Registration of MRI and CT images revealed that PMBF was reduced in mild COPD in both nonemphysematous and emphysematous lung regions. Associations for PMBF were independent of measures of small airways disease on CT and gas trapping largely because emphysema and small airways disease occurred in different smokers. Conclusions: PMBF was reduced in mild COPD, including in regions of lung without frank emphysema, and may represent a distinct pathological process from small airways disease. PMBF may provide an imaging biomarker for therapeutic strategies targeting the pulmonary microvasculature. PMID:26067761

  9. Evidence summary: the relationship between oral health and pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Manger, D; Walshaw, M; Fitzgerald, R; Doughty, J; Wanyonyi, K L; White, S; Gallagher, J E

    2017-04-07

    Introduction This paper is the second of four reviews exploring the relationships between oral health and general medical conditions, in order to support teams within Public Health England, health practitioners and policymakers.Aim This review aimed to explore the most contemporary evidence on whether poor oral health and pulmonary disease occurs in the same individuals or populations, to outline the nature of the relationship between these two health outcomes, and discuss the implication of any findings for health services and future research.Methods The work was undertaken by a group comprising consultant clinicians from medicine and dentistry, trainees, public health, and academics. The methodology involved a streamlined rapid review process and synthesis of the data.Results The results identified a number of systematic reviews of medium to high quality which provide evidence that oral health and oral hygiene habits have an impact on incidence and outcomes of lung diseases, such as pneumonia and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in people living in the community and in long-term care facilities. The findings are discussed in relation to the implications for service and future research.Conclusion The cumulative evidence of this review suggests an association between oral and pulmonary disease, specifically COPD and pneumonia, and incidence of the latter can be reduced by oral hygiene measures such as chlorhexidine and povidone iodine in all patients, while toothbrushing reduces the incidence, duration, and mortality from pneumonia in community and hospital patients.

  10. Pulmonary administration of phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitor is a curative treatment for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease by alveolar regeneration.

    PubMed

    Horiguchi, Michiko; Oiso, Yuki; Sakai, Hitomi; Motomura, Tomoki; Yamashita, Chikamasa

    2015-09-10

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is an intractable pulmonary disease, causing widespread and irreversible alveoli collapse. The discovery of a low-molecular-weight compound that induces regeneration of pulmonary alveoli is of utmost urgency to cure intractable pulmonary diseases such as COPD. However, a practically useful compound for regenerating pulmonary alveoli is yet to be reported. Previously, we have elucidated that Akt phosphorylation is involved in a differentiation-inducing molecular mechanism of human alveolar epithelial stem cells, which play a role in regenerating pulmonary alveoli. In the present study, we directed our attention to phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)-Akt signaling and examined whether PI3K inhibitors display the pulmonary alveolus regeneration. Three PI3K inhibitors with different PI3K subtype specificities (Wortmannin, AS605240, PIK-75 hydrochloride) were tested for the differentiation-inducing effect on human alveolar epithelial stem cells, and Wortmannin demonstrated the most potent differentiation-inducing activity. We evaluated Akt phosphorylation in pulmonary tissues of an elastase-induced murine COPD model and found that Akt phosphorylation in the pulmonary tissue was enhanced in the murine COPD model compared with normal mice. Then, the alveolus-repairing effect of pulmonary administration of Wortmannin to murine COPD model was evaluated using X-ray CT analysis and hematoxylin-eosin staining. As a result, alveolar damages were repaired in the Wortmannin-administered group to a similar level of normal mice. Furthermore, pulmonary administration of Wortmannin induced a significant recovery of the respiratory function, compared to the control group. These results indicate that Wortmannin is capable of inducing differentiation of human alveolar epithelial stem cells and represents a promising drug candidate for curative treatment of pulmonary alveolar destruction in COPD.

  11. Outpatient Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Management: Going for the GOLD.

    PubMed

    Bellinger, Christina R; Peters, Stephen P

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the fourth leading cause of death in the United States with a burden of $50 billion in direct health care costs. The Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) defines airflow obstruction as spirometry where the ratio of forced expiratory volume in the first second to forced vital capacity after bronchodilation is less than 0.70. The guidelines also provided graded recommendations on current therapy for COPD. Treatment can be guided based on severity of disease and severity of symptoms. We review the GOLD guidelines to provide an overview of treatment modalities aimed at improving lung function, reducing hospitalization, and reducing mortality.

  12. Increased pulmonary and intestinal permeability in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Adenis, A; Colombel, J F; Lecouffe, P; Wallaert, B; Hecquet, B; Marchandise, X; Cortot, A

    1992-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that an increased epithelial permeability may affect sites other than the intestine in patients with Crohn's disease by simultaneously evaluating their pulmonary and intestinal permeability. Pulmonary and intestinal permeability were measured by clearance of inhaled technetium-99m diethylene triamine pentacetate (99mTc-DTPA) and by urinary recovery of chromium-51 ethylene diamine tetracetate respectively in 22 patients with Crohn's disease. The half time clearance of 99mTc-DTPA from lung to blood (t1/2LB) was decreased--that is pulmonary permeability increased--in the whole group of patients with Crohn's disease as compared with 13 controls (median 45.5 minutes (8-160) v 85 minutes (34-130) (p less than 0.003)). When analysed separately only patients with active Crohn's disease (n = 15) had a decreased t1/2 lung to blood v controls (42 minutes (8-160) v 85 minutes (34-130) (p less than 0.0025)). Among patients with active Crohn's disease, six were studied again when their disease was quiescent and their t1/2 lung to blood did not differ significantly. The intestinal permeability was increased in the whole group of Crohn's disease patients as compared with 15 controls (5.25% (1.2-24) v 1.7% (0.65-5.75) (p less than 0.0002)). When analysed separately both patients with active and inactive Crohn's disease had increased intestinal permeability v controls (8.1% (1.6-24) and 3.5% (1.2.9.2) v 1.7% (0.65-5.75)) (p less than 0.0001, p = 0.05 respectively). Six patients with active Crohn's disease were studied again when their disease was quiescent and their intestinal permeability decreased significantly p less than 0.04). Pulmonary permeability was increased in patients with Crohn's disease but was not greatly influenced by Crohn's disease activity as opposed to intestinal permeability. The mechanism of this increase is unknown, but may be related in some patients to the presence of an alveolitis. PMID:1612487

  13. A case of Amyopathic Dermatomyositis associated with Interstitial Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Ugan, Y; Sahin, M; Dogru, A; Bayram, D; Ceyhan, A M; Tunc, S E

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory myopathies are a heterogeneous group of diseases with unknown etiology characterized by inflammation of the skeletal muscles and proximal muscle weakness. Dermatomyositis (DM) is an idiopathic inflammatory myopathy with characteristic cutaneous findings such as heliotrope rash, Gottron's sign, Gottron's papules, shawl sign and machinist hand. Amyopathic dermatomyositis (ADM) is a rare but well-recognized clinical subtype of DM, constituting aproximately 10-20% of patients with this disease. It generally manifests only pathognomonic skin findings without clinical and laboratory evidence of muscle involvement. In this report, we present a rare case of ADM associated with interstitial pulmonary disease.

  14. Primary pulmonary hypertension, Castleman's disease and human herpesvirus-8.

    PubMed

    Bull, T M; Cool, C D; Serls, A E; Rai, P R; Parr, J; Neid, J M; Geraci, M W; Campbell, T B; Voelkel, N F; Badesch, D B

    2003-09-01

    Primary pulmonary hypertension (PPH) and Castleman's disease (CD) are rare conditions infrequently encountered in clinical practice. In this paper, two patients diagnosed with both of these diseases are reported. The authors speculate that rather than being a chance occurrence, these conditions are linked by a common angio-proliferative mechanism. Therefore, an association between infection with the human herpesvirus-8 and the diseases of PPH and CD was sought. Evidence of human herpesvirus-8 infection was found in the lung tissue and, specifically, in the plexiform lesions from one of the patients.

  15. Chronic Ethanol Exposure: Pathogenesis of Pulmonary Disease and Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Traphagen, Nicole; Tian, Zhi; Allen-Gipson, Diane

    2015-01-01

    Ethanol (EtOH) is the world’s most commonly used drug, and has been widely recognized as a risk factor for developing lung disorders. Chronic EtOH exposure affects all of the organ systems in the body and increases the risk of developing pulmonary diseases such as acute lung injury and pneumonia, while exacerbating the symptoms and resulting in increased mortality in many other lung disorders. EtOH and its metabolites inhibit the immune response of alveolar macrophages (AMs), increase airway leakage, produce damaging reactive oxygen species (ROS), and disrupt the balance of antioxidants/oxidants within the lungs. In this article, we review the role of EtOH exposure in the pathogenesis and progression of pulmonary disease. PMID:26492278

  16. Quantitative computed tomography imaging in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Lalita; Fernandes, Yasmin; Mesquita, Anthony Menezes

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a heterogeneous disease having small airway inflammation, emphysema, and pulmonary hypertension. It is now clear that spirometry alone cannot differentiate each component. Quantitative computed tomography (QCT) is increasingly used to quantify the amount of emphysema and small airway involvement in COPD. Inspiratory CT guides in assessing emphysema while expiratory CT identifies areas of air trapping which is a surrogate of small airway inflammation. By constructing a three-dimensional model of airways, we can also measure the airway wall thickness of segmental and subsegmental airways. The aim of this review is to present the current knowledge and methodologies in QCT of the lung that aid in identifying discrete COPD phenotypes. PMID:27890994

  17. Use of nitric oxide inhalation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Ashutosh, K.; Phadke, K.; Jackson, J. F.; Steele, D.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Inhalation of nitric oxide with oxygen could be a promising treatment in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and pulmonary hypertension. However, the current methods of delivery of NO are cumbersome and unsuitable for long term use. The present study was undertaken to investigate the safety and efficacy of a mixture of nitric oxide (NO) and oxygen administered via a nasal cannula for 24 hours in patients with oxygen dependent COPD.
METHODS—Twenty five parts per million (ppm) of NO was administered by inhalation combined with supplemental oxygen at a flow rate of 2 l/min via a nasal cannula for 24 hours to 11 ambulatory men with stable, oxygen dependent COPD. Room air with supplemental oxygen at 2 l/min was administered in an identical manner for another 24 hours as control therapy in a randomised, double blind, crossover fashion to all patients. Pulmonary function tests, exercise tolerance, dyspnoea grade, and lung volumes were measured at baseline, 24, and 48 hours. Pulmonary artery pressure (PAP), cardiac output (CO), pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR), arterial blood gas tensions, and minute ventilation were measured at baseline, after 30 minutes and 24 hours of breathing NO and oxygen. Venous admixture ratio (Qs/Qt) and dead space ratio (Vd/Vt) were also calculated. Concentrations of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and NO in the inhaled and ambient air were monitored continuously. Differences in pulmonary function, arterial blood gas tensions, pulmonary haemodynamics, exercise tolerance, and dyspnoea between oxygen and NO breathing periods were analysed for significance using paired t tests.
RESULTS—A significant (p<0.05) fall was observed in PVR (183.1 (116.05) and 137.2 (108.4) dynes.s.cm-3 before and after breathing NO for 24 hours, respectively) with NO administration without significant changes in symptoms, pulmonary function, arterial oxygen tension, or exercise tolerance.
CONCLUSIONS—NO at a concentration of 25 ppm

  18. [Cases of atypical pulmonary diseases under influence of industrial aerosols].

    PubMed

    Liubchenko, P N; Stashuk, G A; Terpigorev, S A; Atamanchuk, A A; Massarygin, V V

    2014-01-01

    The article includes discharge epicrises of patients working in contact with quartz-containing dust, welding aerosol, cotton dust, irritant gases emitted in wood burning. Description covers cases of lung fibrosis, idiopathic interstitial pneumonia, systemic vasculitis with lungs involvement, sarcoidosis. The authors suggest that further accumulation of materials, further investigations of lung tissue state, epidemiologic studies will help to widen the list of occupational pulmonary diseases.

  19. Noninvasive mechanical ventilation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and in acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Rialp Cervera, G; del Castillo Blanco, A; Pérez Aizcorreta, O; Parra Morais, L

    2014-03-01

    Noninvasive ventilation (NIV) with conventional therapy improves the outcome of patients with acute respiratory failure due to hypercapnic decompensation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema (ACPE). This review summarizes the main effects of NIV in these pathologies. In COPD, NIV improves gas exchange and symptoms, reducing the need for endotracheal intubation, hospital mortality and hospital stay compared with conventional oxygen therapy. NIV may also avoid reintubation and may decrease the length of invasive mechanical ventilation. In ACPE, NIV accelerates the remission of symptoms and the normalization of blood gas parameters, reduces the need for endotracheal intubation, and is associated with a trend towards lesser mortality, without increasing the incidence of myocardial infarction. The ventilation modality used in ACPE does not affect the patient prognosis.

  20. Elevated serum CA 19-9 levels in patients with pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial disease.

    PubMed

    Hong, Ji Young; Jang, Sun Hee; Kim, Song Yee; Chung, Kyung Soo; Song, Joo Han; Park, Moo Suk; Kim, Young Sam; Kim, Se Kyu; Chang, Joon; Kang, Young Ae

    2016-01-01

    Increased serum CA 19-9 levels in patients with nonmalignant diseases have been investigated in previous reports. This study evaluates the clinical significance of serum CA 19-9 elevation in pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial disease and pulmonary tuberculosis. The median CA 19-9 level was higher in patients with pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial disease than in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis (pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial disease: 13.80, tuberculosis: 5.85, p<0.001). A multivariate logistic regression analysis performed in this study showed that Mycobacterium abscessus (OR 9.97, 95% CI: 1.58, 62.80; p=0.014) and active phase of pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial disease (OR 12.18, 95% CI: 1.07, 138.36, p=0.044) were found to be risk factors for serum CA 19-9 elevation in pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial disease. The serum CA 19-9 levels showed a tendency to decrease during successful treatment of pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial disease but not in pulmonary tuberculosis. These findings suggest that CA 19-9 may be a useful marker for monitoring therapeutic responses in pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial disease, although it is not pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial disease-specific marker.

  1. Medical therapy for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in 2007.

    PubMed

    Ingenito, Edward P

    2007-01-01

    Medical treatment for patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has evolved significantly over the past 2 decades. Current World Health Organization recommendations suggest a stepwise approach to therapy depending upon disease severity. As-needed use of short-acting bronchodilators is recommended for patients with mild disease. Scheduled dosing of bronchodilators is recommended for patients with more advanced disease. Inhaled beta-agonists and anti-cholinergic agents in combination have proved to be more effective than either agent alone. Long-acting preparations are associated with better disease control and have not been associated with tachyphylaxis. Inhaled corticosteroids are useful for reducing the frequency of exacerbations in patients who experience one or more episodes per year. Oxygen therapy is clearly beneficial in patients with advanced COPD and chronic respiratory failure, and its potential benefits in less severe disease are currently being studied. Pulmonary rehabilitation benefits patients with mild-to-severe disease, although the greatest benefits have been demonstrated in those with moderate COPD. New ultra-long-acting inhaled bronchodilators, phosphodiesterase inhibitors, protease inhibitors, and retinoids intended to promote tissue regeneration are currently being evaluated in clinical trials as future therapeutic agents.

  2. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Are the times changing?

    PubMed

    Almagro, P; Sangil, A; Custardoy, J; San Román Terán, C; Martín Escudero, J C; Díez-Manglano, J

    2013-04-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the most prevalent diseases and a major cause of morbidity and mortality in Spain. Currently, COPD is considered a treatable disease with an inflammatory origin that is frequently associated with other diseases. The prevalence of comorbidity is clearly increased in patients with COPD, irrespective of other confounding variables such as smoking. Current treatments have been proven to slow the loss of lung function, decrease the number of exacerbations and improve health-related quality of life and survival. New advances regarding the classics and more recent phenotypes such as patients with frequent exacerbations or COPD with associated comorbidity should allow for more individualized treatment while advances in genetic research and inflammatory mechanisms of the disease will help us to increase our knowledge of the disease and the development of new treatments.

  3. Pulmonary diseases with imaging findings mimicking aspergilloma.

    PubMed

    Gazzoni, Fernando Ferreira; Severo, Luiz Carlos; Marchiori, Edson; Guimarães, Marcos Duarte; Garcia, Tiago Severo; Irion, Klaus L; Camargo, José Jesus; Felicetti, José Carlos; de Mattos Oliveira, Flavio; Hochhegger, Bruno

    2014-06-01

    Patients with preexisting lung cavities are at risk of developing intracavitary fungal colonization. Because Aspergillus spp. are the most commonly implicated fungi, these fungal masses are called aspergillomas. Their characteristic "ball-in-hole" appearance, however, may be found in a variety of other conditions that can produce radiologic findings mimicking aspergilloma. In this paper, we review the main diseases that may mimic the radiographic findings of aspergilloma, with brief descriptions of clinical, radiologic, and histopathologic findings.

  4. [Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis. Study of pulmonary circulation].

    PubMed

    Orea Tejeda, A; Atencio, C; Sandoval, J; Lupi Herrera, E

    1982-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis is a rare disease of unknown etiology which consists of alveolar deposit of calcium microspheres. We report the procedures for the diagnosis of this disease, as well as the hemodynamic features of the pulmonary circulation. Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), and cor pulmonale were documented. The active and passive factors involved in PAH are analyzed. We conclude that alveolar hypoxia and estructural vascular changes play a major role in the genesis of PAH.

  5. Pulmonary hypertension in chronic obstructive and interstitial lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Charlotte U; Mellemkjær, Søren; Nielsen-Kudsk, Jens Erik; Bendstrup, Elisabeth; Hilberg, Ole; Simonsen, Ulf

    2013-10-03

    The purpose of the present review is to summarize the current knowledge on PH in relation to COPD and ILD from a clinical perspective with emphasis on diagnosis, biomarkers, prevalence, impact, treatment, and practical implications. PH in COPD and ILD is associated with a poor prognosis, and is considered one of the most frequent types of PH. However, the prevalence of PH among patients with COPD and ILD is not clear. The diagnosis of PH in chronic lung disease is often established by echocardiographic screening, but definitive diagnosis requires right heart catheterization, which is not systematically performed in clinical practice. Given the large number of patients with chronic lung disease, biomarkers to preclude or increase suspicion of PH are needed. NT-proBNP may be used as a rule-out test, but biomarkers with a high specificity for PH are still required. It is not known whether specific treatment with existent drugs effective in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is beneficial in lung disease related PH. Studies investigating existing PAH drugs in animal models of lung disease related PH have indicated a positive effect, and so have case reports and open label studies. However, treatment with systemically administered pulmonary vasodilators implies the risk of worsening the ventilation-perfusion mismatch in patients with lung disease. Inhaled vasodilators may be better suited for PH in lung disease, but new treatment modalities are also required.

  6. Impact of Pulmonary Vascular Resistances in Heart Transplantation for Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gazit, Avihu Z; Canter, Charles E

    2011-01-01

    Congenital heart disease is one of the major diagnoses in pediatric heart transplantation recipients of all age groups. Assessment of pulmonary vascular resistance in these patients prior to transplantation is crucial to determine their candidacy, however, it is frequently inaccurate because of their abnormal anatomy and physiology. This problem places them at significant risk for pulmonary hypertension and right ventricular failure post transplantation. The pathophysiology of pulmonary vascular disease in children with congenital heart disease depends on their pulmonary blood flow patterns, systemic ventricle function, as well as semilunar valves and atrioventricular valves structure and function. In our review we analyze the pathophysiology of pulmonary vascular disease in children with congenital heart disease and end-stage heart failure, and outline the state of the art pre-transplantation medical and surgical management to achieve reverse remodeling of the pulmonary vasculature by using pulmonary vasodilators and mechanical circulatory support. PMID:22548028

  7. Nutrition in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: A review

    PubMed Central

    Rawal, Gautam; Yadav, Sankalp

    2015-01-01

    Cachexia and muscle wasting is a frequent but partly reversible complication in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and affects the disease progression and prognosis. Weight loss in COPD is a consequence of increased energy requirements unbalanced by dietary intake. Nutritional supplement therapy has been shown to be effective for maintaining and improving the muscle strength and exercise tolerance in poorly nourished COPD patients, thereby decreasing morbidity and mortality. This mini review discusses the role of nutritional supplement therapy in the treatment of COPD. PMID:27847905

  8. New anti-inflammatory targets for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Peter J

    2013-07-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is associated with chronic inflammation of the peripheral airways and lung parenchyma, which leads to progressive obstruction of the airways. Current management with long-acting bronchodilators does not reduce disease progression, and there are no treatments that effectively suppress chronic inflammation in COPD. An increased understanding of the inflammatory processes that are involved in the pathophysiology of COPD has identified several new therapeutic targets. This Review discusses some of the most promising of these targets, including new antioxidants, kinase inhibitors and drugs that target cellular senescence, microbial colonization, epigenetic regulation of inflammatory gene expression and corticosteroid resistance.

  9. Efficacy of pulmonary rehabilitation in patients with moderate chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Pulmonary Rehabilitation for moderate Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in primary care could improve patients’ quality of life. Methods This study aimed to assess the efficacy of a 3-month Pulmonary Rehabilitation (PR) program with a further 9 months of maintenance (RHBM group) compared with both PR for 3 months without further maintenance (RHB group) and usual care in improving the quality of life of patients with moderate COPD. We conducted a parallel-group, randomized clinical trial in Majorca primary health care in which 97 patients with moderate COPD were assigned to the 3 groups. Health outcomes were quality of life, exercise capacity, pulmonary function and exacerbations. Results We found statistically and clinically significant differences in the three groups at 3 months in the emotion dimension (0.53; 95%CI0.06-1.01) in the usual care group, (0.72; 95%CI0.26-1.18) the RHB group (0.87; 95%CI 0.44-1.30) and the RHBM group as well as in fatigue (0.47; 95%CI 0.17-0.78) in the RHBM group. After 1 year, these differences favored the long-term rehabilitation group in the domains of fatigue (0.56; 95%CI 0.22-0.91), mastery (0.79; 95%CI 0.03-1.55) and emotion (0.75; 95%CI 0.17-1.33). Between-group analysis only showed statistically and clinically significant differences between the RHB group and control group in the dyspnea dimension (0.79 95%CI 0.05-1.52). No differences were found for exacerbations, pulmonary function or exercise capacity. Conclusions We found that patients with moderate COPD and low level of impairment did not show meaningful changes in QoL, exercise tolerance, pulmonary function or exacerbation after a one-year, community based rehabilitation program. However, long-term improvements in the emotional, fatigue and mastery dimensions (within intervention groups) were identified. Trial registration ISRCTN94514482 PMID:23399113

  10. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and occupational exposure to silica.

    PubMed

    Rushton, Lesley

    2007-01-01

    Prolonged exposure to high levels of silica has long been known to cause silicosis This paper evaluates the evidence for an increased risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in occupations and industries in which exposure to crystalline silica is the primary exposure, with a focus on the magnitude of risks and levels of exposure causing disabling health effects. The literature suggests consistently elevated risks of developing COPD associated with silica exposure in several occupations, including the construction industry; tunneling; cement industry; brick manufacturing; pottery and ceramic work; silica sand, granite and diatomaceous earth industries; gold mining; and iron and steel founding, with risk estimates being high in some, even after taking into account the effect of confounders like smoking. Average dust levels vary from about 0.5 mg.m3 to over 10 mg.m3 and average silica levels from 0.04 to over 5 mg.m3, often well above occupational standards. Factors influencing the variation from industry to industry in risks associated with exposure to silica-containing dusts include (a) the presence of other minerals in the dust, particularly when associated with clay minerals; (b) the size of the particles and percentage of quartz; (c) the physicochemical characteristics, such as whether the dust is freshly fractured. Longitudinal studies suggest that loss of lung function occurs with exposure to silica dust at concentrations of between 0.1 and 0.2 mg.m3, and that the effect of cumulative silica dust exposure on airflow obstruction is independent of silicosis. Nevertheless, a disabling loss of lung function in the absence of silicosis would not occur until between 30 and 40 years exposure.

  11. Scintigraphic detection of pulmonary embolism in patients with obstructive pulmonary disease

    SciTech Connect

    Alderson, P.O.; Biello, D.R.; Sachariah, K.G.; Siegel, B.A.

    1981-03-01

    The 133Xe ventilation studies, 99mTc perfusion lung images, and pulmonary angiograms of 83 patients with obstructive pulmonary disease and suspected pulmonary emboli were reviewed. Each patient had ventilation abnormalities suggesting OPD and at least one region showing matched V-P abnormalities. All angiograms were obtained within 72 hours of the V-P study and were reviewed independently. The overall sensitivity of V-P imaging for PE in this population was 0.83 and its specificity was 0.92. False-negative interpretations occurred in three of the 16 patients who showed ventilation abnormalities in more than 50% of their lung fields. In the 67 patients with ventilation abnormalities in less than or equal to 50% of their lung fields the sensitivity and specificity for detecting PE were high, V-P imaging is a reliable method for detecting PE in patients with regions of V-P match, if the ventilation abnormalities are limited in extent.

  12. Pulmonary vascular disease in transposition of the great vessels and intact ventricular septum.

    PubMed

    Newfeld, E A; Paul, M H; Muster, A J; Idriss, F S

    1979-03-01

    Eight of 135 (6%) children with d-transposition of the great vessels and with intact ventricular septum and no patent ductus arteriosus had evidence of progressive pulmonary vascular disease. Seven of 101 (7%) patients for whom histologic data was available, had Heath-Edwards grades IV or V pulmonary vascular disease, six had grade II, and 88 had either normal or grade I findings. One of 34 patients for whom histologic data was not available had hemodynamic evidence of pulmonary vascular disease at cardiac catheterization after the Mustard operation. When infants younger than 3 months old were excluded, eight of 85 (9%) had advanced pulmonary vascular disease. Twenty-three patients had microthrombi in their pulmonary arteries and arterioles, and in one patient thrombi were observed before the development of pulmonary vascular disease. Clinically unrecognized pulmonary microthrombi are suggested as a possible etiologic agent in the development of pulmonary vascular disease in patients with transposition of the great vessels. Progressive pulmonary vascular disease can first be discovered after the Mustard operation, even in patients without preoperative evidence of pulmonary hypertension or elevated pulmonary vascular resistance.

  13. Polymeric nanoparticles in development for treatment of pulmonary infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Lim, Young H; Tiemann, Kristin M; Hunstad, David A; Elsabahy, Mahmoud; Wooley, Karen L

    2016-11-01

    Serious lung infections, such as pneumonia, tuberculosis, and chronic obstructive cystic fibrosis-related bacterial diseases, are increasingly difficult to treat and can be life-threatening. Over the last decades, an array of therapeutics and/or diagnostics have been exploited for management of pulmonary infections, but the advent of drug-resistant bacteria and the adverse conditions experienced upon reaching the lung environment urge the development of more effective delivery vehicles. Nanotechnology is revolutionizing the approach to circumventing these barriers, enabling better management of pulmonary infectious diseases. In particular, polymeric nanoparticle-based therapeutics have emerged as promising candidates, allowing for programmed design of multi-functional nanodevices and, subsequently, improved pharmacokinetics and therapeutic efficiency, as compared to conventional routes of delivery. Direct delivery to the lungs of such nanoparticles, loaded with appropriate antimicrobials and equipped with 'smart' features to overcome various mucosal and cellular barriers, is a promising approach to localize and concentrate therapeutics at the site of infection while minimizing systemic exposure to the therapeutic agents. The present review focuses on recent progress (2005-2015) important for the rational design of nanostructures, particularly polymeric nanoparticles, for the treatment of pulmonary infections with highlights on the influences of size, shape, composition, and surface characteristics of antimicrobial-bearing polymeric nanoparticles on their biodistribution, therapeutic efficacy, and toxicity. WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2016, 8:842-871. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1401 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  14. Role of macrolide therapy in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Fernando J; Curtis, Jeffrey L; Albert, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide. The Global Burden of Disease study has concluded that COPD will become the third leading cause of death worldwide by 2020, and will increase its ranking of disability-adjusted life years lost from 12th to 5th. Acute exacerbations of COPD (AECOPD) are associated with impaired quality of life and pulmonary function. More frequent or severe AECOPDs have been associated with especially markedly impaired quality of life and a greater longitudinal loss of pulmonary function. COPD and AECOPDs are characterized by an augmented inflammatory response. Macrolide antibiotics are macrocyclical lactones that provide adequate coverage for the most frequently identified pathogens in AECOPD and have been generally included in published guidelines for AECOPD management. In addition, they exert broad-ranging, immunomodulatory effects both in vitro and in vivo, as well as diverse actions that suppress microbial virulence factors. Macrolide antibiotics have been used to successfully treat a number of chronic, inflammatory lung disorders including diffuse panbronchiolitis, asthma, noncystic fibrosis associated bronchiectasis, and cystic fibrosis. Data in COPD patients have been limited and contradictory but the majority hint to a potential clinical and biological effect. Additional, prospective, controlled data are required to define any potential treatment effect, the nature of this effect, and the role of bronchiectasis, baseline colonization, and other cormorbidities. PMID:18990961

  15. Innate Immune Responses and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Schleimer, Robert P.

    2005-01-01

    Innate immune responses appear to be partially responsible for maintaining inflammation and tissue destruction in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In the early stages of the disease in smokers, the airways are bombarded with large quantities of particulate material, and activation of phagocytic cells results in the release of many of the mediators believed to remodel the airways. Ironically, failure of the innate immune defense system, either by inherited deficiency or as a result of chronic smoke inhalation, is likely to result in increased susceptibility to infectious disease and exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. It is well known that deficiencies in the production of collectins, pentraxins, and complement can lead to increased infections, and several studies indicate that deficiency in one or another innate defense component is associated with increased exacerbations. Corticosteroids reduce exacerbations in part because of their ability to boost the production of innate host-defense molecules. Therapeutic approaches that stimulate the generation of antimicrobial molecules in the lungs might be able to reduce disease exacerbations. PMID:16267360

  16. Approach to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Todd, David C.; McIvor, R. Andrew; Pugsley, Stewart O.; Cox, Gerard

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To review the diagnosis, assessment of severity, and management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and to address the systemic manifestations associated with COPD. SOURCES OF INFORMATION PubMed was searched from January 2000 to December 2007 using the key words COPD, practice guidelines, randomized controlled trials, therapy, and health outcomes. The Canadian Thoracic Society guideline on management of COPD was carefully reviewed. The authors, who have extensive experience in care of patients with COPD, provided expert opinion. MAIN MESSAGE Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is a common systemic disease caused primarily by smoking. Spirometry is essential for diagnosis of COPD and should be integrated into primary care practice. Pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic therapy improves symptoms, capacity for exercise, and quality of life. Smoking cessation is the only intervention shown to slow disease progression. The systemic manifestations and comorbidity associated with COPD need to be identified and addressed to optimize health and quality of life. CONCLUSION An evidence-based approach to managing COPD along with a primary care chronic disease management model could improve quality of life for patients with COPD. PMID:18474704

  17. Is tuberculosis a lymphatic disease with a pulmonary portal?

    PubMed

    Behr, Marcel A; Waters, W Ray

    2014-03-01

    Tuberculosis most commonly presents as a pulmonary disease, in which infection, persistence, and induction of transmissible pathology all occur in the lungs. If viewed as a pulmonary disease, enlarged lymph nodes represent reactive adenitis, and extrapulmonary forms of tuberculosis (including lymphatic tuberculosis) are not transmissible, hence representing an evolutionary dead-end for the pathogen. In an alternative theory, Mycobacterium tuberculosis passes asymptomatically through the lungs and rapidly establishes a chronic lymphatic infection. After a period of weeks to decades secondary lung pathology develops, ultimately allowing transmission to occur. Evidence that supports this lymphatic model includes historical descriptions of human tuberculosis from the preantibiotic era, analogy with other mycobacterial infections, observations of tuberculosis in non-human hosts, and experimental models of tuberculosis disease. At a fundamental level, a lymphocentric model proposes that spread of organisms outside the lung parenchyma is essential to induce adaptive immunity, which is crucial for the generation of transmissible pathology. Furthermore, a lymphatic model could explain why the lesion associated with primary infection (Ghon focus) is anatomically separated from the most common site of reactivation disease (the apex). More practically, an alternative perspective that classes tuberculosis as a lymphatic disease might affect strategies for preclinical and clinical assessment of novel diagnostics, drugs, and vaccines.

  18. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in non-smokers.

    PubMed

    Salvi, Sundeep S; Barnes, Peter J

    2009-08-29

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Tobacco smoking is established as a major risk factor, but emerging evidence suggests that other risk factors are important, especially in developing countries. An estimated 25-45% of patients with COPD have never smoked; the burden of non-smoking COPD is therefore much higher than previously believed. About 3 billion people, half the worldwide population, are exposed to smoke from biomass fuel compared with 1.01 billion people who smoke tobacco, which suggests that exposure to biomass smoke might be the biggest risk factor for COPD globally. We review the evidence for the association of COPD with biomass fuel, occupational exposure to dusts and gases, history of pulmonary tuberculosis, chronic asthma, respiratory-tract infections during childhood, outdoor air pollution, and poor socioeconomic status.

  19. Depression in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Garvey, Christine

    2012-05-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in adults in the United States and worldwide. Depression is a common comorbidity in this population, but often goes undiagnosed in persons with COPD. Because the presence of depression has the potential to negatively impact COPD-related outcomes, it is essential for health care practitioners involved in the care of patients with COPD to diagnose and treat COPD and the associated comorbidities, including depression. Although there is a lack of comprehensive guidelines for treating depression in those with COPD, an algorithm has been proposed to screen and manage depression in these patients. Several questionnaires are available that can be used to assess and assist in diagnosing depression in these patients. Following diagnosis, antidepressant therapy should be considered along with nonpharmacological strategies, such as pulmonary rehabilitation and cognitive behavioral therapy.

  20. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease phenotype desaturator with hypoxic vascular remodelling and pulmonary hypertension obtained by cluster analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Significant heterogeneity of clinical presentation and disease progression exists within chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This article discusses and refines the concept of desaturator phenotypes in COPD with pulmonary hypertension (PH) obtained by cluster analysis and presents a pattern of phenotypic markers that could be used as a framework for future diagnosis and research. Nocturnal oxygen desaturation results in sleep disturbances which predispose to nocturnal cardiac dysrhythmias, PH and possibly nocturnal death, particularly during acute exacerbations. We assume that in patients with COPD at least two factors play a role in PH: the severity of pulmonary impairment, and the severity of systemic nocturnal hypoxaemia due to reduced pulmonary functions. Establishing a common language for future research will facilitate our understanding and management of such a disease. This knowledge could lead to different pharmacological treatments and other interventions directed at specific phenotypic groups. PMID:23127203

  1. Nutritional and metabolic modulation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease management.

    PubMed

    Schols, A M W J

    2003-11-01

    In this paper the perspective for nutritional modulation of systemic impairment in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is discussed. Progressive weight loss is characterised by disease-specific elevated energy requirements unbalanced by dietary intake. Weight gain per se can be achieved by caloric supplementation while future studies may prove efficacy of amino acid modulation to stimulate protein synthesis and enhance muscle anabolism. Disproportionate muscle wasting resembles the cachexia syndrome as described in other chronic wasting diseases (cancer, chronic heart failure, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)). There is yet no adequate nutritional strategy available to treat cachexia in COPD. Muscle substrate metabolism has hardly been investigated, but the few data available point towards a decreased fat oxidative capacity that may show similarities with the "metabolic syndrome" as described in type II diabetes and obesity and could theoretically benefit from polyunsaturated fatty acid modulation. To adequately target the different therapeutic options, clearly more clinical (intervention) studies are needed in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients that are adequately characterised by local and systemic impairment and in which molecular and metabolic markers are linked to functional outcome.

  2. Prevalence and burden of comorbidities in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Corlateanu, Alexandru; Covantev, Serghei; Mathioudakis, Alexander G; Botnaru, Victor; Siafakas, Nikolaos

    2016-11-01

    The classical definition of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) as a lung condition characterized by irreversible airway obstruction is outdated. The systemic involvement in patients with COPD, as well as the interactions between COPD and its comorbidities, justify the description of chronic systemic inflammatory syndrome. The pathogenesis of COPD is closely linked with aging, as well as with cardiovascular, endocrine, musculoskeletal, renal, and gastrointestinal pathologies, decreasing the quality of life of patients with COPD and, furthermore, complicating the management of the disease. The most frequently described comorbidities include skeletal muscle wasting, cachexia (loss of fat-free mass), lung cancer (small cell or non-small cell), pulmonary hypertension, ischemic heart disease, hyperlipidemia, congestive heart failure, normocytic anemia, diabetes, metabolic syndrome, osteoporosis, obstructive sleep apnea, depression, and arthritis. These complex interactions are based on chronic low-grade systemic inflammation, chronic hypoxia, and multiple common predisposing factors, and are currently under intense research. This review article is an overview of the comorbidities of COPD, as well as their interaction and influence on mutual disease progression, prognosis, and quality of life.

  3. Human immunodeficiency virus, herpes virus infections, and pulmonary vascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Sonia C.; Almodovar, Sharilyn

    2013-01-01

    The following state-of-the-art seminar was delivered as part of the Aspen Lung Conference on Pulmonary Hypertension and Vascular Diseases held in Aspen, Colorado in June 2012. This paper will summarize the lecture and present results from a nonhuman primate model of infection with Simian (Human) Immunodeficiency Virus - nef chimeric virions as well as the idea that polymorphisms in the HIV-1 nef gene may be driving the immune response that results in exuberant inflammation and aberrant endothelial cell (EC) function. We will present data gathered from primary HIV nef isolates where we tested the biological consequences of these polymorphisms and how their presence in human populations may predict patients at risk for developing this disease. In this article, we also discuss how a dysregulated immune system, in conjunction with a viral infection, could contribute to pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Both autoimmune diseases and some viruses are associated with defects in the immune system, primarily in the function of regulatory T cells. These T-cell defects may be a common pathway in the formation of plexiform lesions. Regardless of the route by which viruses may lead to PAH, it is important to recognize their role in this rare disease. PMID:23662195

  4. Understanding asthma-chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wurst, Keele E; Kelly-Reif, Kaitlin; Bushnell, Greta A; Pascoe, Steven; Barnes, Neil

    2016-01-01

    Asthma-chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap syndrome (ACOS) is a loosely-defined clinical entity referring to patients who exhibit characteristics of both asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Clinical definitions and classifications for ACOS vary widely, which impacts our understanding of prevalence, diagnosis and treatment of the condition. This literature review was therefore conducted to characterize the prevalence of ACOS and the effect of different disease definitions on these estimates, as this has not previously been explored. From an analysis of English language literature published from 2000 to 2014, the estimated prevalence of ACOS ranges from 12.1% to 55.2% among patients with COPD and 13.3%-61.0% among patients with asthma alone. This variability is linked to differences in COPD and asthma diagnostic criteria, disease ascertainment methods (spirometry-based versus clinical or symptom-based diagnoses and claims data), and population characteristics including age, gender and smoking. Understanding the reasons for differences in prevalence estimates of ACOS across the literature may help guide decision making on the most appropriate criteria for defining ACOS and aid investigators in designing future ACOS clinical studies aimed at effective treatment.

  5. Respiratory viruses in acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Koul, Parvaiz A; Mir, Hyder; Akram, Shabir; Potdar, Varsha; Chadha, Mandeep S

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) cause significant morbidity, mortality, and an inexorable decline of lung function. Data from developed countries have shown viruses to be important causes of AECOPD, but data from developing countries like India are scant. We set out to determine the contribution of viruses in the causation of hospitalized patients with AECOPD. Methods: Twin nasopharyngeal/oropharyngeal swabs collected from 233 patients admitted with an acute AECOPD and tested for respiratory viruses including respiratory syncytial virus A and B, parainfluenza were (PIV) 1, 2, 3, and 4, human metapneumovirus (hMPV) A and B, influenza A and B, enterovirus, corona NL65, OC43, and 229E viruses, adenovirus 2 and 4, rhinovirus, and bocavirus, by duplex real time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) using CDC approved primers and probes. Samples positive for influenza A were subtyped for A/H1N1pdm09 and A/H3N2 whereas influenza B samples were subtyped into B/Yamagata and B/Victoria subtypes, using primers and probes recommended by CDC, USA. Results: Respiratory viruses were detected in 46 (19.7%) cases, influenza A/H3N2 and rhinoviruses being the most common viruses detected. More than one virus was isolated in four cases consisting of hMPV-B + adeno-2 + Inf-B; rhino + H3N2, PIV-1 + rhino; and PIV-1+ hMPV-B in one case each. Ancillary supportive therapeutic measures included bronchodilators, antibiotics, steroids, and ventilation (noninvasive in 42 and invasive in 4). Antiviral therapy was instituted in influenza-positive patients. Three patients with A/H3N2 infection died during hospitalization. Conclusions: We conclude that respiratory viruses are important contributors to AECOPD in India. Our data calls for prompt investigation during an exacerbation for viruses to obviate inappropriate antibiotic use and institute antiviral therapy in viral disease amenable to antiviral therapy. Appropriate

  6. Unusual Systemic Artery to Pulmonary Artery Malformation Without Evidence of Systemic Disease, Trauma or Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Geyik, Serdar; Yavuz, Kivilcim; Keller, Frederick S.

    2006-10-15

    Connections between the systemic and pulmonary arterial systems are rare conditions that can be due to either congenital or acquired diseases such as anomalous systemic arterial supply to normal lung, pulmonary sequestration, and systemic supply to pulmonary arteriovenous malformations. Herein, a unique case of systemic artery to pulmonary arterial malformation and its endovascular treatment in a patient with no history of the usual etiologies is reported.

  7. Does pulmonary rehabilitation reduce peripheral blood pressure in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease?

    PubMed

    Canavan, Jane L; Kaliaraju, Djeya; Nolan, Claire M; Clark, Amy L; Jones, Sarah E; Kon, Samantha S C; Polkey, Michael I; Man, William D-C

    2015-08-01

    Pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) can improve aerobic exercise capacity, health-related quality of life and dyspnoea in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Recent studies have suggested that exercise training may improve blood pressure and arterial stiffness, albeit in small highly selected cohorts. The aim of the study was to establish whether supervised outpatient or unsupervised home PR can reduce peripheral blood pressure. Resting blood pressure was measured in 418 patients with COPD before and after outpatient PR, supervised by a hospital-based team (HOSP). Seventy-four patients with COPD undergoing an unsupervised home-based programme acted as a comparator group (HOME). Despite significant improvements in mean (95% confidence interval) exercise capacity in the HOSP group (56 (50-60) m, p < 0.001) and HOME group (30 (17-42) m, p < 0.001) systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) did not change in either the HOSP (SBP: p = 0.47; DBP: p = 0.06; MAP: p = 0.38) or HOME group (SBP: p = 0.67; DBP: p = 0.38; MAP: p = 0.76). Planned subgroup analysis of HOSP patients with known hypertension and/or cardiovascular disease showed no impact of PR upon blood pressure. PR is unlikely to reduce blood pressure, and by implication, makes a mechanism of action in which arterial stiffness is reduced, less likely.

  8. [Role of stem cells in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and of pulmonary emphysema].

    PubMed

    Caramori, Gaetano; Casolari, Paolo; Garofano, Elvira; Mazzoni, Federico; Marchi, Irene; Contoli, Marco; Papi, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    There are only few human translational studies performed in the area of stem cell research in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and/or pulmonary emphysema. Before progress to clinical trials with stem cells we believe that more human translational studies are necessaries, otherwise the clinical rationale would be solely based on limited in vitro and animal studies. In the future, stem cell therapy could be a treatment for this disease. Currently, stem cell therapy is still to be considered as an area of active research, lacking a strong rationale for performing clinical trials in COPD. Although stem cells would be likely to represent a heterogeneous population of cells, the different cell subsets and their importance in the pathogenesis of the different clinical phenotypes need to be fully characterised before progressing to clinical trials. Moreover, the potential side effects of the stem cell therapy are often underestimated. We should not ignore that some of the most deadly neoplasms are arising from stem cells.

  9. [Body composition and heart rate variability in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease pulmonary rehabilitation candidates].

    PubMed

    Curilem Gatica, Cristian; Almagià Flores, Atilio; Yuing Farías, Tuillang; Rodríguez Rodríguez, Fernando

    2014-07-01

    Body composition is a non-invasive method, which gives us information about the distribution of tissues in the body structure, it is also an indicator of the risk of mortality in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The heart rate variability is a technique that gives us information of autonomic physiological condition, being recognized as an indicator which is decreased in a number of diseases. The purpose of this study was to assess body composition and heart rate variability. The methodology used is that of Debora Kerr (1988) endorsed by the International Society for advances in Cineantropometría for body composition and heart rate variability of the guidelines described by the American Heart Association (1996). Roscraff equipment, caliper Slimguide and watch Polar RS 800CX was used. , BMI 26.7 ± 3.9 kg / m²; Muscle Mass 26.1 ± 6.3 kg ; Bone Mass 1.3 kg ± 8.1 76 ± 9.9 years Age : 14 candidates for pulmonary rehabilitation patients were evaluated , Adipose mass 16.4 ± 3.6 kg ; FEV1 54 ± 14%. Increased waist circumference and waist hip ratio was associated with a lower overall heart rate variability. The bone component was positively related to the variability of heart rate and patients with higher forced expiratory volume in one second had lower high frequency component in heart rate variability. In these patients, the heart rate variability is reduced globally and is associated with cardiovascular risk parameters.

  10. Pulmonary performance of elderly normal subjects and subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exposed to 0. 3 ppm nitrogen dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Morrow, P.E.; Utell, M.J.; Bauer, M.A.; Smeglin, A.M.; Frampton, M.W.; Cox, C.; Speers, D.M.; Gibb, F.R. )

    1992-02-01

    Symptoms and changes in pulmonary function of subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and elderly normal subjects, induced by a 4-h exposure to 0.3 ppm NO2, were investigated using a double-blind, crossover design with purified air. The 5-day experimental protocol required approximately 2 wk with at least a 5-day separation between randomized 4-h exposures to either NO2 or air which included several periods of exercise. Over a 2-yr period, COPD subjects, all with a history of smoking, consisting of 13 men and 7 women (mean age of 60.0 yr) and 20 elderly normal subjects of comparable age and sex were evaluated. During intermittent light exercise, COPD subjects demonstrated progressive decrements in FVC and FEV1 compared with baseline with 0.3 ppm NO2, but not with air. Differences in percent changes from baseline data (air-NO2) showed an equivocal reduction in FVC by repeated measures of analysis of variance and cross-over t tests (p less than 0.10). Subgroup analyses suggested that responsiveness to NO2 decreased with severity of COPD; in elderly normal subjects, NO2-induced reduction in FEV1 was greater among smokers than never-smokers. A comparison of COPD and elderly normal subjects also revealed distinctions in NO2-induced responsiveness.

  11. SiRNA-based therapies for pulmonary diseases.

    PubMed

    Koli, Uday; Krishnan, R Akhil; Pofali, Prasad; Jain, Ratnesh; Dandekar, Prajakta

    2014-09-01

    Various delivery strategies, involving siRNA as a therapeutic tool for gene silencing, have been highlighted through several investigations all over the world. One such medical target, where the siRNA-based therapies have been immensely explored and have met with considerable success, is the area of pulmonary disorders. Lung diseases have presented themselves as attractive targets for studying siRNA-mediated cures due to their widespread persistence and lethality. Another interesting feature in this case is that the lung is accessible to therapeutic agents via multiple administration routes including the nasal, oral and intravenous routes. Recent advances in pulmonary delivery highlight the exploitation of all these routes for administration of siRNA-based therapies, particularly by employing non-viral carriers like nanoparticles. Through this manuscript we aim to provide a comprehensive overview of the most important and the latest developments in non-viral siRNA delivery for lung diseases. We have focused our discussion on the diverse systems, which have been investigated for a plethora of pulmonary disorders, ranging from inflammatory conditions like asthma and COPD, to infectious diseases like tuberculosis, and to lung cancer. An overview of the preclinical and clinical investigations conducted in this area has also been presented to the readers. While a variety of these systems have been found to be promising in pre-clinical studies, their successful transition as therapeutics will ultimately depend upon their clinical safety and efficacy, as well as the specificity of the carriers and methods employed for their administration.

  12. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbations: latest evidence and clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Hammad; Sharafkhaneh, Amir

    2014-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide and results in an economic and social burden that is both substantial and increasing. The natural history of COPD is punctuated by exacerbations which have major short- and long-term implications on the patient and healthcare system. Evidence-based guidelines stipulate that early detection and prompt treatment of exacerbations are essential to ensure optimal outcomes and to reduce the burden of COPD. Several factors can identify populations at risk of exacerbations. Implementing prevention measures in patients at risk is a major goal in the management of COPD. PMID:25177479

  13. The objective evaluation of obstructive pulmonary diseases with spirometry.

    PubMed

    Ozkaya, Sevket; Dirican, Adem; Tuna, Tibel

    2016-01-01

    Airway obstruction is variable in asthma, while it is progressive and persistent in chronic bronchitis and emphysema. However, some of the patients presenting with symptoms of chronic airway diseases have clinical features of both asthma and COPD. The group with "Asthma-COPD Overlap Syndrome" (ACOS) phenotype was characterized by definitely irreversible airway obstruction accompanied by symptoms and signs of reversibility. In this study, we aimed to classify obstructive airway diseases by clinical, radiological, and pulmonary function tests. Patients at Samsun Medical Park Hospital Chest Diseases outpatient clinic were evaluated between January 2013 and April 2016, and a total of 235 patients were included in this study. Mean age of the patients was 55.3±14.5 (15-88) years, and the male/female ratio was 45/190. The baseline pulmonary function test results of the patients were as follows: mean forced vital capacity (FVC) values 2,825±1,108 (710-6,870) mL and 74.3±22.4 (24-155)%, forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) values 1,789±774 (480-4,810) mL and 58.1±20.0 (20-130)%, FEV1/FVC values 62.5±6.8 (39-70)%. Reversibility criteria following bronchodilator treatment were present in 107 (45.5%) patients. We specified five subgroups for patients according to their clinical, radiological, and pulmonary test findings, namely Group 1 (asthma), Group 2 (ACOS), Group 3 (chronic bronchitis), and Group 4 (emphysema). Additionally, a group of patients who had clinical and spirometric features of both asthma and chronic bronchitis in association with underlying emphysema (emphysema with chronic bronchitis and emphysema with asthma) was defined as the undifferentiated obstruction (UNDO) group. Number and percentage distribution of patients by groups were 58 (24.7%) in the asthma group, 70 (29.8%) in the ACOS group, 61 (26%) in the chronic bronchitis group, 32 (13.6%) in the emphysema group, and 14 (6%) in the UNDO group. In conclusion, in our study, the types of

  14. Inflammation and repair processes in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Rennard, S I

    1999-11-01

    COPD is characterized by chronic inflammation and injury of both the airways and the parenchymal structures of the lung. These processes are associated with ongoing repair. Whether repair leads to restoration of normal tissue architecture or to altered tissue structure with loss of function depends on complex interrelationships of a variety of interacting mediators. The possibility that repair processes can be modulated by exogenous agents raises the possibility that therapeutic strategies aimed at repair can be effective. Such strategies offer tremendous promise both for slowing the relentlessly progressive natural history which most often characterizes COPD and, possibly, for restoring lung function. Rennard SI. Inflammation and repair processes in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  15. Incidence of Legionella pneumophila infections among Oklahoma pulmonary disease patients.

    PubMed Central

    Flournoy, D. J.; Guthrie, P. J.; Lawrence, C. H.; Silberg, S. L.; Beaver, S.

    1990-01-01

    Prior studies by the authors suggested high levels of Legionella pneumophila in the recreational and water supply reservoirs in central Oklahoma. This high exposure potential was supported by a relatively high prevalence of seropositive, asymptomatic infections among healthy blood donors in the area. In contrast, the present 9-month laboratory-based study confirmed only one clinical Legionella infection among 117 unidentified pulmonary disease patients admitted to the Oklahoma City Veterans Administration Medical Center. Comparison with the reports of others and with reported legionellosis in Oklahoma indicates that differences in cohort definition and variations in utilization and interpretation of clinical analyses leads to wide variations in the reported incidence of legionellosis. PMID:2304095

  16. Tiotropium Bromide in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and Bronchial Asthma.

    PubMed

    Alvarado-Gonzalez, Alcibey; Arce, Isabel

    2015-11-01

    Inhaled bronchodilators are the mainstay of pharmacological treatment for stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), including β2-agonists and muscarinic antagonists. Tiotropium bromide, a long-acting antimuscarinic bronchodilator (LAMA), is a treatment choice for moderate-to-severe COPD; its efficacy and safety have been demonstrated in recent trials. Studies also point to a beneficial role of tiotropium in the treatment of difficult-to-control asthma and a potential function in the asthma-COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS). Combination of different bronchodilator molecules and addition of inhaled corticosteroids are viable therapeutic alternatives. A condensation of the latest trials and the rationale behind these therapies will be presented in this article.

  17. [Preparing patients with chronic pulmonary disease for air travel].

    PubMed

    Felkai, Péter; Böszörményi Nagy, György; Gyarmati, Ildikó

    2013-03-03

    Flying is the most important way of travelling in the continually growing international tourism. Number of passengers and those with preexisting diseases, mainly with cardiopulmonary problems, is increasing over years. One of the main tasks of the pre-travel advice is to assess tolerance to hypoxia of the traveler, and specify the necessity, as well as the type and volume of supplementary oxygen therapy. It is indispensable to know the cabin-environment and impact of that on the travelers' health. Travel medicine specialist has to be aware of the examinations which provide information for the appropriate decision on the fit-to-fly condition of the patient. The physician who prepares the patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease for repatriation by regular flight and the escorting doctor have to be fully aware of the possibilities, modalities, advantages and contraindications of the on-board oxygen supply and therapy. In this review, the authors give a summary of literature data, outline the tools of in-flight oxygen therapy as well as discuss possibilities for the preflight assessment of patients' condition including blood gas parameters required for safe air travel, as recommended in international medical literature. The preparation process for repatriation of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is also discussed.

  18. [Pulmonary disease due to asbestos in steel industry workers].

    PubMed

    Zurbriggen, Rita; Capone, Lilian

    2013-01-01

    Asbestos-related diseases are caused by the inhalation of asbestos fibers in their variety chrysotile or white asbestos. Although the ban in Argentina dates from 2003, there are numerous industries where work continues with this mineral, including iron and steel industries. It is currently known the high pathogenicity of this material, so that in many countries there are programs to monitoring the exposed workers. Here we describe the general characteristics and pulmonary manifestations in 27 patients who had worked in a very huge steel factory in South America. The diagnosis of asbestos-related diseases was made by a medical-occupational record, history of asbestos exposure, additional studies of lung function and chest images. Then the sources of exposure (occupational, domestic and environmental), exposure time and latency period were analyzed, in those patients in whom a related disease was detected. Smoking history was also taken into account. Twenty-two patients had benigns pathologies (81.4%), sixteen of them with lesions localyzed in pleura, and other six pulmonary asbestosis. The malignant pathologies occurred in five patients (18.5%), in four of them mesothelioma and in other one lung cancer. The problem of asbestos exposure has contemporary relevance. Hence the need for a surveillance program in workers exposed to asbestos in the past or currently, to detect, report, record and investigate the characteristics of these pathologies.

  19. CFTR gene mutations in isolated chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    SciTech Connect

    Pignatti, P.F.; Bombien, C.; Marigo, C.

    1994-09-01

    In order to identify a possible hereditary predisposition to the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), we have looked for the presence of cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene DNA sequence modifications in 28 unrelated patients with no signs of cystic fibrosis. The known mutations in Italian CF patients, as well as the most frequent worldwide CF mutations, were investigated. In addition, a denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis of about half of the coding sequence of the gene in 56 chromosomes from the patients and in 102 chromosomes from control individuals affected by other pulmonary diseases and from normal controls was performed. Nine different CFTR gene mutations and polymorphisms were found in seven patients, a highly significant increase over controls. Two of the patients were compound heterozygotes. Two frequent CF mutations were detected: deletion F508 and R117H; two rare CF mutations: R1066C and 3667ins4; and five CF sequence variants: R75Q (which was also described as a disease-causing mutation in male sterility cases due to the absence of the vasa deferentia), G576A, 2736 A{r_arrow}G, L997F, and 3271+18C{r_arrow}T. Seven (78%) of the mutations are localized in transmembrane domains. Six (86%) of the patients with defined mutations and polymorphisms had bronchiectasis. These results indicate that CFTR gene mutations and sequence alterations may be involved in the etiopathogenesis of some cases of COPD.

  20. Electrocardiographic abnormalities and cardiac arrhythmias in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Goudis, Christos A; Konstantinidis, Athanasios K; Ntalas, Ioannis V; Korantzopoulos, Panagiotis

    2015-11-15

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is independently associated with an increased burden of cardiovascular disease. Besides coronary artery disease (CAD) and congestive heart failure (CHF), specific electrocardiographic (ECG) abnormalities and cardiac arrhythmias seem to have a significant impact on cardiovascular prognosis of COPD patients. Disturbances of heart rhythm include premature atrial contractions (PACs), premature ventricular contractions (PVCs), atrial fibrillation (AF), atrial flutter (AFL), multifocal atrial tachycardia (MAT), and ventricular tachycardia (VT). Of note, the identification of ECG abnormalities and the evaluation of the arrhythmic risk may have significant implications in the management and outcome of patients with COPD. This article provides a concise overview of the available data regarding ECG abnormalities and arrhythmias in these patients, including an elaborated description of the underlying arrhythmogenic mechanisms. The clinical impact and prognostic significance of ECG abnormalities and arrhythmias in COPD as well as the appropriate antiarrhythmic therapy and interventions in this setting are also discussed.

  1. Palliative care in the management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Blackler, Laura; Mooney, Caroline; Jones, Christine

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a slow, debilitating, progressive disease and, as symptoms worsen, quality of life is affected and issues surrounding end of life arise. There are known difficulties about the healthcare professional's ability to manage this area and this is reflected in the literature. It is recognized that palliative care services for people with non-malignant diseases are not developed but this needs to be addressed. Within a London teaching hospital the COPD team has been working towards improving the standard of service offered to patients with advanced COPD using various strategies. The team's approach to this area of care focuses on quality of life by recognizing when an individual may need further support, and patients have reported that they feel their needs are being addressed. This article aims to review current evidence on the management of palliative care for patients with COPD and identify what steps have been taken by a London teaching hospital to address this issue.

  2. Behavioral Medicine Approaches to Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fritzsche, Anja; Trueba, Ana F.; Meuret, Alicia E.; Ritz, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a prevalent respiratory disease and associated with considerable individual and socioeconomic burden. Recent research started examining the role of psychosocial factors for course and management of the disease. Purpose This review provides an overview on recent findings on psychosocial factors and behavioral medicine approaches in COPD. Results Research has identified several important psychosocial factors and effective behavioral medicine interventions in COPD. However, there is considerable need for future research in this field. Conclusions Although beneficial effects of some behavioral medicine interventions have been demonstrated in COPD, future research efforts are necessary to study the effects of distinct components of these interventions, to thoroughly examine promising but yet not sufficiently proven interventions, and to develop new creative interventions. PMID:22351032

  3. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease part 1: smoking cessation.

    PubMed

    Jones, Donna

    2015-04-15

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is common in the UK and causes a significant burden to patients and the NHS. Healthcare provision for COPD is largely focused on biomedical treatment, yet research suggests the complexity of factors contributing to this disease requires a deeper understanding of the patient experience and a more holistic approach to the provision of care. Smoking cessation is the single most cost-effective and significant way to slow the disease progress and improve outcomes for patients. However, barriers to smoking cessation are higher in patients with COPD than in other groups, requiring different approaches. This is part one of a two-part article, which focuses on patients with COPD caused by smoking. The second part will focus on non-pharmacological therapy.

  4. Evaluation and Management of Pulmonary Disease in Ataxia-Telangiectasia

    PubMed Central

    McGrath-Morrow, Sharon A.; Gower, W. Adam; Rothblum-Oviatt, Cynthia; Brody, Alan S.; Langston, Claire; Fan, Leland L.; Lefton-Greif, Maureen A.; Crawford, Thomas O.; Troche, Michelle; Sandlund, John T; Auwaerter, Paul G.; Easley, Blaine; Loughlin, Gerald M.; Carroll, John L.; Lederman, Howard M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the ATM gene, resulting in faulty repair of breakages in double-stranded DNA. The clinical phenotype is complex, and is characterized by neurologic abnormalities, immunodeficiencies, susceptibility to malignancies, recurrent sinopulmonary infections, and cutaneous abnormalities. Lung disease is common in patients with A-T and often progresses with age and neurological decline. Diseases of the respiratory system cause significant morbidity and are a frequent cause of death in the A-T population. Lung disease in this population is thought to exhibit features of one or more of the following phenotypes: recurrent sinopulmonary infections with bronchiectasis, interstitial lung disease, and lung disease associated with neurological abnormalities. Here, we review available evidence and present expert opinion on the diagnosis, evaluation, and management of lung disease in A-T, as discussed in a recent multidisciplinary workshop. Although more data are emerging on this unique population, many recommendations are made based on similarities to other more well-studied diseases. Gaps in current knowledge and areas for future research in the field of pulmonary disease in A-T are also outlined. PMID:20583220

  5. Costs and benefits of Pulmonary Rehabilitation in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Farias, Catharinne C.; Resqueti, Vanessa; Dias, Fernando A. L.; Borghi-Silva, Audrey; Arena, Ross; Fregonezi, Guilherme A. F.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The current study evaluated the costs and benefits of a simple aerobic walking program for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Method This was a blinded randomized controlled clinical trial that recruited 72 patients diagnosed with COPD, 40 of whom were included in the study and divided into two groups [control group (CG) and pulmonary rehabilitation group (GPR)]. We assessed pulmonary function, distance covered during the 6-minute walk test (6MWT), respiratory and peripheral muscle strength, health-related quality of life (HRQOL), body composition, and level of activities of daily living (ADLs) before and after an 8-week walking program. The financial costs were calculated according to the pricing table of the Brazilian Unified Health System (SUS). Results Only 34 of the 40 patients remained in the final sample; 16 in the CG and 18 in the GPR (FEV1: 50.9±14% predicted and FEV1: 56±0.5% predicted, respectively). The intervention group exhibited improvements in the 6MWT, sensation of dyspnea and fatigue, work performed, BODE index (p<0.01), HRQOL, ADL level (p<0.001), and lower limb strength (p<0.05). The final mean cost per patient for the GPR was R$ 148.75 (~US$ 75.00) and no patient significantly exceeded this value. However, 2 patients in the CG did exceed this value, incurring a cost of R$ 689.15 (~US$ 345.00). Conclusion Aerobic walking demonstrated significant clinical benefits in a cost-efficient manner in patients with COPD. PMID:24838809

  6. Pulmonary Rehabilitation Exercise Prescription in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: Review of Selected Guidelines: AN OFFICIAL STATEMENT FROM THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF CARDIOVASCULAR AND PULMONARY REHABILITATION.

    PubMed

    Garvey, Chris; Bayles, Madeline Paternostro; Hamm, Larry F; Hill, Kylie; Holland, Anne; Limberg, Trina M; Spruit, Martijn A

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is associated with disabling dyspnea, skeletal muscle dysfunction, and significant morbidity and mortality. Current guidelines recommend pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) to improve dyspnea, functional capacity, and quality of life. Translating exercise science into safe and effective exercise training requires interpretation and use of multiple guidelines and recommendations. The purpose of this statement is to summarize for clinicians 3 current chronic obstructive pulmonary disease guidelines for exercise that may be used to develop exercise prescriptions in the PR setting. The 3 guidelines have been published by the American College of Sports Medicine, the American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society, and the American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation. In addition to summarizing these 3 guidelines, this statement describes clinical applications, explores areas of uncertainty, and suggests strategies for providing effective exercise training, given the diversity of guidelines and patient complexity.

  7. Asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and the overlap syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nakawah, Mohammad Obadah; Hawkins, Clare; Barbandi, Farouk

    2013-01-01

    Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are highly prevalent chronic diseases in the general population. Both are characterized by heterogeneous chronic airway inflammation and airway obstruction. In both conditions, chronic inflammation affects the whole respiratory tract, from central to peripheral airways, with different inflammatory cells recruited, different mediators produced, and thus differing responses to therapy. Airway obstruction is typically intermittent and reversible in asthma but is progressive and largely irreversible in COPD. However, there is a considerable pathologic and functional overlap between these 2 heterogeneous disorders, particularly among the elderly, who may have components of both diseases (asthma-COPD overlap syndrome). The definitions for asthma and COPD recommended by current guidelines are useful but limited because they do not illustrate the full spectrum of obstructive airway diseases that is encountered in clinical practice. Defining asthma and COPD as separate entities neglects a considerable proportion of patients with overlapping features and is largely based on expert opinion rather than on the best current evidence. The presence of different phenotypes or components of obstructive airway diseases, therefore, needs to be addressed to individualize and optimize treatment to achieve the best effect with the fewest side effects for the patient. Although specific interventions vary by disease, the treatment goals of obstructive airway diseases are similar and driven primarily by the need to control symptoms, optimize health status, and prevent exacerbations.

  8. Pulmonary function in patients with Huntington’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Huntington’s disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive motor, cognitive and psychiatric disturbances. Chest muscle rigidity, respiratory muscle weakness, difficulty in clearing airway secretions and swallowing abnormalities have been described in patients with neurodegenerative disorders including HD. However limited information is available regarding respiratory function in HD patients. The purpose of this study was to investigate pulmonary function of patients with HD in comparison to healthy volunteers, and its association with motor severity. Methods Pulmonary function measures were taken from 18 (11 male, 7 female) manifest HD patients (53 ± 10 years), and 18 (10 male, 8 female) healthy volunteers (52 ± 11 years) with similar anthropometric and life-style characteristics to the recruited HD patients. Motor severity was quantified by the Unified Huntington’s Disease Rating Scale-Total Motor Score (UHDRS-TMS). Maximum respiratory pressure was measured on 3 separate days with a week interval to assess test-retest reliability. Results The test-retest reliability of maximum inspiratory and expiratory pressure measurements was acceptable for both HD patient and control groups (ICC ≥0.92), but the values over 3 days were more variable in the HD group (CV < 11.1%) than in the control group (CV < 7.6%). The HD group showed lower respiratory pressure, forced vital capacity, peak expiratory flow and maximum voluntary ventilation than the control group (p < 0.05). Forced vital capacity, maximum voluntary ventilation and maximum respiratory pressures were negatively (r = -0.57; -0.71) correlated with the UHDRS-TMS (p < 0.05). Conclusion Pulmonary function is decreased in manifest HD patients, and the magnitude of the decrease is associated with motor severity. PMID:24886346

  9. [Heart rhythm disturbances in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in aggregate with coronary heart disease].

    PubMed

    Shoĭkhet, Ia N; Klester, E B; Golovin, V A

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the research was to study kinds, frequencies and features of heart rhythm disturbances (HRD) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) subject to degree of severity, including presence of coronary heart disease (CHD). 1189 of patients with registered HRD were examined. 315 of them had COPD (group 1), 531--combination of COPD and CHD (group 2), 343 were CHD patients (group 3). The extent of examinations included electrocardiogram (ECG), Halter monitoring (HM), bicycle ergometry (BEM), external respiration function estimation. Supraventricular HRD were registered statistically more frequently in group 1: according to ECG data in rest - in 37.2% patients, by BEM results--in 18.8%, by HM--in 50%. Combined (supraventricular and ventricular) HRD were registered most frequently in group 2: 41.2 24.4, and 45.5% respectively. Ventricular HRD dominated in group 3: 47.6, 29.3 and 48.6% respectively. The results of the study indicate that supraventricular HRDprevaile in patients with COPD, combined HRD - in patients with COPD and CHD. Ventricular HRD, which most informatively reflect changes in intracardiac geometry and left ventricle hemodynamics, dominate in CHD patients. The optimization of therapy correction consists in early diagnostics of HRD subject to features of cardiorespiratory system functional state.

  10. A Behçet's disease patient with intracardiac thrombus, pulmonary artery aneurysms complicating recurrent pulmonary thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Ernam, Dilek; Atalay, Figen; Alp, Aysun; Hasanoğlu, H Canan

    2006-01-01

    Intracardiac thrombus and pulmonary embolism is a very rare manifestation of Behçet's disease. A twenty-years-old man was admitted to hospital due to dyspnea, haemoptysis, fever and partially loss of vision. On dynamic thorax computed tomography (CT), there was aneurysmatic dilatation and thrombus in bilateral pulmonary artery segments and also findings of pulmonary thromboembolism. A diagnosis of Behçet's disease was made based on his clinical course and radiological findings. During treatment, the patient was admitted two times to the hospital because of recurrent pulmonary thromboembolism. At the 10th months of follow up, partially dissolution of the thrombi and pulmonary defects were observed and right ventricular thrombus was revealed by dynamic thorax CT. On a follow up period of 16 months the patient is still under treatment and doing well. We present this case because Behçet's disease is a rarely considered cause of recurrent pulmonary embolism and intracardiac thrombus which is seen under treatment.

  11. Unicentric study of cell therapy in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease/pulmonary emphysema

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro-Paes, João Tadeu; Bilaqui, Aldemir; Greco, Oswaldo T; Ruiz, Milton Artur; Marcelino, Monica Y; Stessuk, Talita; de Faria, Carolina A; Lago, Mario R

    2011-01-01

    Within the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) spectrum, lung emphysema presents, as a primarily histopathologic feature, the destruction of pulmonary parenchyma and, accordingly, an increase in the airflow obstruction distal to the terminal bronchiole. Notwithstanding the significant advances in prevention and treatment of symptoms, no effective or curative therapy has been accomplished. In this context, cellular therapy with stem cells (SCs) arises as a new therapeutic approach, with a wide application potential. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the safety of SCs infusion procedure in patients with advanced COPD (stage IV dyspnea). After selection, patients underwent clinical examination and received granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, immediately prior to the bone marrow harvest. The bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMC) were isolated and infused into a peripheral vein. The 12-month follow-up showed a significant improvement in the quality of life, as well as a clinical stable condition, which suggest a change in the natural process of the disease. Therefore, the proposed methodology in this study for BMMC cell therapy in sufferers of advanced COPD was demonstrated to be free of significant adverse effects. Although a larger sample and a greater follow-up period are needed, it is possible to infer that BMMC cell therapy introduces an unprecedented change in the course or in the natural history of emphysema, inhibiting or slowing the progression of disease. This clinical trial was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01110252) and was approved by the Brazilian National Committee of Ethics in Research (registration no. 14764, CONEP report 233/2009). PMID:21311694

  12. Unicentric study of cell therapy in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease/pulmonary emphysema.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro-Paes, João Tadeu; Bilaqui, Aldemir; Greco, Oswaldo T; Ruiz, Milton Artur; Marcelino, Monica Y; Stessuk, Talita; de Faria, Carolina A; Lago, Mario R

    2011-01-01

    Within the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) spectrum, lung emphysema presents, as a primarily histopathologic feature, the destruction of pulmonary parenchyma and, accordingly, an increase in the airflow obstruction distal to the terminal bronchiole. Notwithstanding the significant advances in prevention and treatment of symptoms, no effective or curative therapy has been accomplished. In this context, cellular therapy with stem cells (SCs) arises as a new therapeutic approach, with a wide application potential. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the safety of SCs infusion procedure in patients with advanced COPD (stage IV dyspnea). After selection, patients underwent clinical examination and received granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, immediately prior to the bone marrow harvest. The bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMC) were isolated and infused into a peripheral vein. The 12-month follow-up showed a significant improvement in the quality of life, as well as a clinical stable condition, which suggest a change in the natural process of the disease. Therefore, the proposed methodology in this study for BMMC cell therapy in sufferers of advanced COPD was demonstrated to be free of significant adverse effects. Although a larger sample and a greater follow-up period are needed, it is possible to infer that BMMC cell therapy introduces an unprecedented change in the course or in the natural history of emphysema, inhibiting or slowing the progression of disease. This clinical trial was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01110252) and was approved by the Brazilian National Committee of Ethics in Research (registration no. 14764, CONEP report 233/2009).

  13. [Pulmonary artery aneurysms in Behçet's disease: contribution of imaging in 5 cases].

    PubMed

    Hassine, Elyès; Bousnina, Sophia; Marniche, Kamel; Fennira, Hammouda; Ben Khelil, Jalila; Ben Mustapha, Mohamed Ali; Megdiche, Mohamed Lamine; Chabbou, Abdellatif

    2002-05-01

    Pulmonary involvement in Behçet's disease is an uncommon condition (12%). Thromboembolism of the superior vena cava and/or other mediastinal veins, aneurysms of the aorta and pulmonary arteries are the main vascular manifestations in addition to pulmonary infarct and intrathoracic hemorrhage. Despite their scarcity, respiratory symptoms may be life-threatening. The aim of this study was to assess the contribution of thoracic imaging for one of the most serious aspects of the disease: pulmonary artery aneurysm. We report five patients with pulmonary artery aneurysms (mean age: 39.5 years). Hemoptysia revealed Behçet's disease in three. Initially explored by conventional radiography, computed tomography and angiography, pulmonary artery aneurysms are currently investigated well with helicoidal computed tomography, digital angiography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and angio-MRI. These imaging techniques provide helpful information for the diagnosis of Behçet's disease.

  14. Nanotechnology and pulmonary delivery to overcome resistance in infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Fernanda; Rafael, Diana; Videira, Mafalda; Ferreira, Domingos; Sosnik, Alejandro; Sarmento, Bruno

    2013-11-01

    Used since ancient times especially for the local treatment of pulmonary diseases, lungs and airways are a versatile target route for the administration of both local and systemic drugs. Despite the existence of different platforms and devices for the pulmonary administration of drugs, only a few formulations are marketed, partly due to physiological and technological limitations. Respiratory infections represent a significant burden to health systems worldwide mainly due to intrahospital infections that more easily affect immune-compromised patients. Moreover, tuberculosis (TB) is an endemic infectious disease in many developing nations and it has resurged in the developed world associated with the human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) epidemic. Currently, medicine faces the specter of antibiotic resistance. Besides the development of new anti-infectious drugs, the development of innovative and more efficient delivery systems for drugs that went off patent appears as a promising strategy pursued by the pharmaceutical industry to improve the therapeutic outcomes and to prolong the utilities of their intellectual property portfolio. In this context, nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems (nano-DDS) emerged as a promising approach to circumvent the limitations of conventional formulations and to treat drug resistance, opening the hypothesis for new developments in this area.

  15. Skeletal muscle dysfunction in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ho Cheol; Mofarrahi, Mahroo; Hussain, Sabah NA

    2008-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a debilitating disease characterized by inflammation-induced airflow limitation and parenchymal destruction. In addition to pulmonary manifestations, patients with COPD develop systemic problems, including skeletal muscle and other organ-specific dysfunctions, nutritional abnormalities, weight loss, and adverse psychological responses. Patients with COPD often complain of dyspnea on exertion, reduced exercise capacity, and develop a progressive decline in lung function with increasing age. These symptoms have been attributed to increases in the work of breathing and in impairments in gas exchange that result from airflow limitation and dynamic hyperinflation. However, there is mounting evidence to suggest that skeletal muscle dysfunction, independent of lung function, contributes significantly to reduced exercise capacity and poor quality of life in these patients. Limb and ventilatory skeletal muscle dysfunction in COPD patients has been attributed to a myriad of factors, including the presence of low grade systemic inflammatory processes, nutritional depletion, corticosteroid medications, chronic inactivity, age, hypoxemia, smoking, oxidative and nitrosative stresses, protein degradation and changes in vascular density. This review briefly summarizes the contribution of these factors to overall skeletal muscle dysfunction in patients with COPD, with particular attention paid to the latest advances in the field. PMID:19281080

  16. [Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Orvoen-Frija, E; Benoit, M; Catto, M; Chambouleyron, M; Duguet, A; Emeriau, J-P; Ferry, M; Hayot, M; Jeandel, C; Morize, V; Nassih, K; Ouksel, H; Piette, F; Prefaut, C; Roche, N; de Wazieres, B; Zureik, M

    2010-10-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a chronic disease characterized by incompletely reversible airflow limitation, measured by a decrease of FEV(1)/FVC ratio. International consensus does not agree on a single threshold for this ratio, which can define airflow obstruction. Although the prevalence of COPD in the elderly population varies according to the definition used, it definitely increases with age and could reach 15% in those over 65 years of age. Therefore, ageing of the population should result in increased prevalence and socioeconomical costs of COPD during coming years. In France, diagnosis of COPD in the elderly is difficult, late and insufficient. Management, which has the same goals as in younger populations, has to be global and coordinated. Some points should be considered with particular attention considering the cumulative risks related on the one hand to COPD and on the other to ageing: pharmacological side-effects, decreased physical and social autonomy, nutritional impairment, comorbidities. Given the lack of specific data in elderly populations, pharmacological indications are generally considered to be the same as in younger populations, but some additional precautionary measures are necessary. Pulmonary rehabilitation seems to be beneficial at any age. Palliative care comes up against important difficulties: an indefinite beginning of the palliative stage in COPD; insufficient palliative care resources; insufficient communication; insufficient utilization of palliative care resources. Global COPD management in elderly requires coordination, best reached in health care network organizations involving medical and/or social professionals.

  17. [Sleep disorders in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)].

    PubMed

    Böing, Sebastian; Randerath, Winfried J

    2014-05-01

    Sleep disturbances (SD) are a frequent finding in patients with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and have a negative impact on quality of life and the clinical course of the disease. The causes of SD are multiple and include for example respiratory symptoms and comorbidities. On the other hand sleep goes along with multiple physiological changes in respiration, so that sleep itself interacts with asthma and COPD. This interaction favors respiratory symptoms and may lead to hypoxemia and hypercapnia. A further complication of the respiratory situation and the clinical course can be found in asthma and COPD patients with coexisting obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). Due to the heterogeneity of SD in asthma and COPD, a detailed patient survey is the most important diagnostical tool. Based on the survey further technical examinations should be considered. Treatment strategies for the reduction of SD in asthma and COPD include an optimized medication and treatment of comorbidities. If indicated oxygen therapy, positive pressure breathing and pulmonary rehabilitation can contribute.

  18. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and glucose metabolism: a bitter sweet symphony

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, metabolic syndrome and diabetes mellitus are common and underdiagnosed medical conditions. It was predicted that chronic obstructive pulmonary disease will be the third leading cause of death worldwide by 2020. The healthcare burden of this disease is even greater if we consider the significant impact of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease on the cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease may be considered as a novel risk factor for new onset type 2 diabetes mellitus via multiple pathophysiological alterations such as: inflammation and oxidative stress, insulin resistance, weight gain and alterations in metabolism of adipokines. On the other hand, diabetes may act as an independent factor, negatively affecting pulmonary structure and function. Diabetes is associated with an increased risk of pulmonary infections, disease exacerbations and worsened COPD outcomes. On the top of that, coexistent OSA may increase the risk for type 2 DM in some individuals. The current scientific data necessitate a greater outlook on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease may be viewed as a risk factor for the new onset type 2 diabetes mellitus. Conversely, both types of diabetes mellitus should be viewed as strong contributing factors for the development of obstructive lung disease. Such approach can potentially improve the outcomes and medical control for both conditions, and, thus, decrease the healthcare burden of these major medical problems. PMID:23101436

  19. Defining and targeting health disparities in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Pleasants, Roy A; Riley, Isaretta L; Mannino, David M

    2016-01-01

    The global burden of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) continues to grow in part due to better outcomes in other major diseases and in part because a substantial portion of the worldwide population continues to be exposed to inhalant toxins. However, a disproportionate burden of COPD occurs in people of low socioeconomic status (SES) due to differences in health behaviors, sociopolitical factors, and social and structural environmental exposures. Tobacco use, occupations with exposure to inhalant toxins, and indoor biomass fuel (BF) exposure are more common in low SES populations. Not only does SES affect the risk of developing COPD and etiologies, it is also associated with worsened COPD health outcomes. Effective interventions in these people are needed to decrease these disparities. Efforts that may help lessen these health inequities in low SES include 1) better surveillance targeting diagnosed and undiagnosed COPD in disadvantaged people, 2) educating the public and those involved in health care provision about the disease, 3) improving access to cost-effective and affordable health care, and 4) markedly increasing the efforts to prevent disease through smoking cessation, minimizing use and exposure to BF, and decreasing occupational exposures. COPD is considered to be one the most preventable major causes of death from a chronic disease in the world; therefore, effective interventions could have a major impact on reducing the global burden of the disease, especially in socioeconomically disadvantaged populations. PMID:27785005

  20. Sirtuin 1 and Aging Theory for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Conti, V.; Corbi, G.; Manzo, V.; Pelaia, G.; Filippelli, A.; Vatrella, A.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary disease (COPD) is an inflammatory syndrome that represents an increasing health problem, especially in the elderly population. Drug therapies are symptomatic and inadequate to contrast disease progression and mortality. Thus, there is an urgent need to clarify the molecular mechanisms responsible for this condition in order to identify new biomarkers and therapeutic targets. Processes including oxidant/antioxidant, protease/antiprotease, and proliferative/antiproliferative balance and control of inflammatory response become dysfunctional during aging as well as in COPD. Recently it was suggested that Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), an antiaging molecule involved in the response to oxidative stress and chronic inflammation, is implicated in both development and progression of COPD. The present review focuses on the involvement of SIRT1 in the regulation of redox state, inflammation, and premature senescence, all crucial characteristics of COPD phenotypes. Recent evidence corroborating the statement of the “aging theory for COPD” was also discussed. PMID:26236580

  1. Weight loss in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Mechanisms and implications.

    PubMed

    Agust, Alvar G N; Gari, Patricia G; Sauleda, Jaume; Busquets, Xavier

    2002-01-01

    Weight loss occurs frequently in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Although the precise cellular mechanisms underlying weight loss in COPD are unclear, this is a clinically relevant phenomenon because it contributes to limit the exercise capacity of these patients and, therefore, it jeopardizes their quality of life. More importantly, it is a negative prognostic factor that is independent of the degree of lung function impairment present. Thus, weight loss in COPD constitutes a new therapeutic target. This article reviews the mechanisms and potential consequences of weight loss in COPD and highlights areas that needed future research. It is hoped that a better understanding of its pathogenesis may eventually contribute to the development of new therapeutic strategies that contribute to improve the well-being and/or long-term prognosis of patients suffering from this devastating disease and, potentially, from others characterized also by unexplained weight loss.

  2. [Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) - Rational Diagnostics and Therapy].

    PubMed

    Burkhardt, R; Pankow, W

    2016-08-01

    In general chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) can be diagnosed in family practice from history and spirometry. Inconclusive spirometry findings have to be assessed further by techniques available in a pulmonologist's office. Further testing is done for differential diagnostic reasons and for prognostic appraisal. Successful smoking cessation importantly alters the natural downhill course of the disease. Patient education and rehabilitative interventions (e. g. participation in lung sport groups) help to improve life quality. Medical therapies with bronchospasmolytics applied by inhalation as monotherapies, free and fixed combinations have symptomatic benefit. Considering the increase of pneumonia risk from inhaled corticosteroids their use should be restricted to patients with a straightforward indication, e. g. coexisting asthma.

  3. Pulmonary complications of neuromuscular disease: a respiratory mechanics perspective.

    PubMed

    Allen, Julian

    2010-03-01

    Paediatric neuromuscular disease compromises both the gas exchange and pump functions of the respiratory system. This can have profound implications for both growth and development of the respiratory system, as well as morbidity and mortality. Aspiration lung disease is common, and leads to increasingly restrictive pulmonary physiology over time. Abnormal lung and chest wall mechanics, and weak respiratory muscles, can combine to cause respiratory failure. Improving the balance between the work of breathing (by decreasing the respiratory load) and the respiratory pump (by improving respiratory muscle strength and decreasing respiratory muscle fatigue) can help prevent the onset of respiratory failure. Airway clearance techniques and non-invasive ventilation are two important tools in this effort. Better ways of assessing the respiratory pump, mechanical function, control and fatigue are needed especially in children.

  4. Pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: An African perspective.

    PubMed

    Allwood, B; Calligaro, G

    2015-09-01

    The importance of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) as a global health problem cannot be overstated. According to the latest World Health Organization statistics (2005), 210 million people suffer from COPD worldwide, and 5% of all deaths globally are estimated to be caused by this disease. This corresponds to >3 million deaths annually, of which 90% are thought to occur in low- and middle-income countries.While cigarette smoking remains the major risk factor, and much of the increase in COPD is associated with projected increases in tobacco use, epidemiological studies have demonstrated that in the majority of patients in developing countries the aetiology of COPD is multifactorial.This article summarises the epidemiology of and risk factors for COPD in Africa, including influences other than cigarette smoking that are important contributors to chronic irreversible airflow limitation in our setting.

  5. A brief review of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Hogg, James C

    2012-01-01

    A recent study, based on a combination of multidetector computed tomography scanning of an intact specimen with microcomputed tomography and histological analysis of lung tissue samples, reported that the number of terminal bronchioles were reduced from approximately 44,500/lung pair in control (donor) lungs to approximately 4800/lung pair in lungs donated by individuals with very severe (Global initiative for chronic Obstructive Lung Disease stage 4) chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) treated by lung transplantation. The present short review discusses the hypothesis that a rapid rate of terminal bronchiolar destruction causes the rapid decline in lung function leading to advanced COPD. With respect to why the terminal bronchioles are targeted for destruction, the postulated mechanisms of this destruction and the possibility that new treatments are able to either prevent or reverse the underlying cause of airway obstruction in COPD are addressed.

  6. Effects of sildenafil on pulmonary hypertension and exercise tolerance in severe cystic fibrosis-related lung disease.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Gregory S; Sagel, Scott D; Taylor, Amy L; Abman, Steven H

    2006-04-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with advanced lung disease are at risk for developing pulmonary vascular disease and pulmonary hypertension, characterized by progressive exercise intolerance beyond the exercise-limiting effects of airways disease in CF. We report on a patient with severe CF lung disease who experienced clinically significant improvements in exercise tolerance and pulmonary hypertension without changing lung function during sildenafil therapy.

  7. Home-based pulmonary rehabilitation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Fernanda Dultra; Sampaio, Luciana Maria Malosá; da Silva, Graziela Alves; Gomes, Évelim LF Dantas; do Nascimento, Eloisa Sanches Pereira; Alves, Vera Lucia Santos; Stirbulov, Roberto; Costa, Dirceu

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) is a multidisciplinary program of care for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) with the goal of improving the functional capacity and quality of life, as well as maintaining the clinical stability of COPD sufferers. However, not all patients are available for such a program despite discomfort with their condition. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a home-based PR (HBPR) program on functional ability, quality of life, and respiratory muscle strength and endurance. Patients and methods Patients with COPD according to the Global Initiative of Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease were randomized (double-blind) into two groups. One group performed a protocol at home with aerobic and muscle strength exercises and was called the intervention group; the other group received only instructions to perform breathing and stretching exercises, characterizing it as the control group (CG). We assessed the following variables at baseline and 2 months: exercise tolerance (incremental shuttle walk test and upper limb test), respiratory muscle (strength and endurance test), and health-related quality of life (Airways Questionnaire 20). Results There were no significant changes after the intervention in either of the two groups in exercise tolerance and quality of life. However, the intervention group had improved respiratory endurance compared with the CG, while the CG presented a decrease in the load sustained by the respiratory muscles after the HBPR. Conclusion A program of HBPR with biweekly supervision (although not enough to provide significant improvements in physical capacity or quality of life) played an important role in maintaining the stability of the clinical features of patients with COPD; the patients had no worsening of symptoms during the intervention period according to the daily log. PMID:24235824

  8. [A case of primary pulmonary hypertension in a patient with Raynaud's disease].

    PubMed

    Tłustochowicz, W; Cwetsch, A

    A case of a 50-year female patient with Raynaud's disease is presented. The primary pulmonary hypertension accompanying the underlying condition suggests that the excessive contractibility of the vessels, typical for the Raynaud's disease, may play a role in the etiology of the primary pulmonary hypertension.

  9. Superiority of pulmonary administration of mepenzolate bromide over other routes as treatment for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Ken-Ichiro; Kurotsu, Shota; Asano, Teita; Yamakawa, Naoki; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Yamashita, Yasunobu; Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Ishihara, Tomoaki; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Maruyama, Toru; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Mizushima, Tohru

    2014-03-28

    We recently proposed that mepenzolate bromide (mepenzolate) would be therapeutically effective against chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) due to its both anti-inflammatory and bronchodilatory activities. In this study, we examined the benefits and adverse effects associated with different routes of mepenzolate administration in mice. Oral administration of mepenzolate caused not only bronchodilation but also decreased the severity of elastase-induced pulmonary emphysema; however, compared with the intratracheal route of administration, about 5000 times higher dose was required to achieve this effect. Intravenously or intrarectally administered mepenzolate also showed these pharmacological effects. The intratracheal route of mepenzolate administration, but not other routes, resulted in protective effects against elastase-induced pulmonary damage and bronchodilation at a much lower dose than that which affected defecation and heart rate. These results suggest that the pulmonary route of mepenzolate administration may be superior to other routes (oral, intravenous or intrarectal) to treat COPD patients.

  10. Illness experiences of persons with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: self-perceived efficacy of home-based pulmonary rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Juliana Maria de Sousa; Martín-Nogueras, Ana; Nations, Marilyn

    2014-06-01

    This qualitative study explores the illness experiences, the efficacy of pulmonary rehabilitation as perceived by patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and their rationale for improvements in health. 23 patients participated in a daily, three-month home-based pulmonary rehabilitation. A pre-post self-perceived assessment of efficacy was conducted. Semi-structured interviews, illness narratives and participant-observation provided a "dense description" of patients' lived-experience before and after the program. Interviews and narratives were tape-recorded, transcribed and coded. Qualitative data was subjected to "thematic content analysis" and "contextualized semantic interpretation". Patients compare functional status before and after falling ill, experience loss, stigma and depression, describe health improvements and judge the pulmonary rehabilitation's efficacy. Giving voice to chronically-ill patients, as individuals, is needed. To reduce clinical conflicts, health professionals should encourage illness narratives and value their patients' lived-experience.

  11. [Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: Morbimortality and healthcare burden].

    PubMed

    Gómez Sáenz, J T; Quintano Jiménez, J A; Hidalgo Requena, A; González Béjar, M; Gérez Callejas, M J; Zangróniz Uruñuela, M R; Moreno Vilaseca, A; Hernández García, R

    2014-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is an enormous public health problem and of growing importance due to its high prevalence, elevated morbimortality, and socioeconomic costs. Many Spanish epidemiological studies report a prevalence of 10% of the adult population, with its growth appearing to have stabilised. Nevertheless, over 75% of cases are still underdiagnosed. The diagnosis of mild and moderate obstruction is associated with a higher survival and lower costs (14 years and €9,730) compared to 10 years survival and €43,785 of patients diagnosed in the severe obstruction phase. COPD was the fourth cause of death in Spain in 2011, although the adjusted mortality rates have decreased more than 20% in the last decade, particularly in males. Patients with advanced COPD die from it, but patients with mild or moderate COPD die due to cardiovascular diseases or cancer (mainly of the lung). It is estimated that the annual cost of the disease is around 3,000 million Euros. These increase with the spirometric severity, and is mainly associated with exacerbations (almost 60% of the direct costs). Comorbidity, that is the presence of diseases that coexist with the studied disease, is higher in patients with COPD than in the general population and affects health results.

  12. Preclinical murine models of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Vlahos, Ross; Bozinovski, Steven

    2015-07-15

    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is a major incurable global health burden and is the 4th leading cause of death worldwide. It is believed that an exaggerated inflammatory response to cigarette smoke causes progressive airflow limitation. This inflammation, where macrophages, neutrophils and T lymphocytes are prominent, leads to oxidative stress, emphysema, small airway fibrosis and mucus hypersecretion. Much of the disease burden and health care utilisation in COPD is associated with the management of its comorbidities and infectious (viral and bacterial) exacerbations (AECOPD). Comorbidities, defined as other chronic medical conditions, in particular skeletal muscle wasting and cardiovascular disease markedly impact on disease morbidity, progression and mortality. The mechanisms and mediators underlying COPD and its comorbidities are poorly understood and current COPD therapy is relatively ineffective. Thus, there is an obvious need for new therapies that can prevent the induction and progression of COPD and effectively treat AECOPD and comorbidities of COPD. Given that access to COPD patients can be difficult and that clinical samples often represent a "snapshot" at a particular time in the disease process, many researchers have used animal modelling systems to explore the mechanisms underlying COPD, AECOPD and comorbidities of COPD with the goal of identifying novel therapeutic targets. This review highlights the mouse models used to define the cellular, molecular and pathological consequences of cigarette smoke exposure and the recent advances in modelling infectious exacerbations and comorbidities of COPD.

  13. Bridging Lung Development with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease. Relevance of Developmental Pathways in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Boucherat, Olivier; Morissette, Mathieu C; Provencher, Steeve; Bonnet, Sébastien; Maltais, François

    2016-02-15

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by chronic airflow limitation. This generic term encompasses emphysema and chronic bronchitis, two common conditions, each having distinct but also overlapping features. Recent epidemiological and experimental studies have challenged the traditional view that COPD is exclusively an adult disease occurring after years of inhalational insults to the lungs, pinpointing abnormalities or disruption of the pathways that control lung development as an important susceptibility factor for adult COPD. In addition, there is growing evidence that emphysema is not solely a destructive process because it is also characterized by a failure in cell and molecular maintenance programs necessary for proper lung development. This leads to the concept that tissue regeneration required stimulation of signaling pathways that normally operate during development. We undertook a review of the literature to outline the contribution of developmental insults and genes in the occurrence and pathogenesis of COPD, respectively.

  14. Illness perception in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Borge, Christine Råheim; Moum, Torbjørn; Puline Lein, Martha; Austegard, Elise Lynn; Wahl, Astrid Klopstad

    2014-10-01

    Illness perception (IP) concerns how patients evaluate living with a disease. To get a broader understanding of IP in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), we investigated whether breathlessness is an important precursor of IP and whether IP in its turn is related to mental health, physical health and global quality of life (QOL). One hundred and fifty-four patients with COPD participated in a cross-sectional survey. Participants underwent pulmonary function testing, provided socio-demographic and clinical information, and completed the following standardized instruments: Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire, Respiratory Quality of Life Questionnaire, Short-Form 12 Health Survey and the Quality of Life Scale. Multiple regression analyses were performed. A high IP score indicates that a patient believes that his/her illness represents a threat. Participants with a high score on the IP dimensions consequences, identity, concern and emotional representation, experienced more breathlessness. High scores on the IP dimensions consequences, identity and concern were associated with impaired physical health and high scores on the IP dimensions consequences, identity and emotional representation were associated with impaired mental health. Impaired global QOL was associated with high scores on the IP dimensions consequences, identity, concern, coherence and emotional representation. The strength of the associations between breathlessness and physical/mental health and global QOL decreased when certain dimensions of IP were included as predictors, indicating that IP to some extent acts as a mediating factor. These findings may have practical implications of patient counselling by helping COPD patients to cope with their disease by restructuring their personal models of illness.

  15. Bone Marrow Stem Cell Contribution to Pulmonary Homeostasis and Disease

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Lindsay T; LaRue, Amanda C

    2015-01-01

    The understanding of bone marrow stem cell plasticity and contribution of bone marrow stem cells to pathophysiology is evolving with the advent of innovative technologies. Recent data has led to new mechanistic insights in the field of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) research, and an increased appreciation for the plasticity of the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC). In this review, we discuss current research examining the origin of pulmonary cell types from endogenous lung stem and progenitor cells as well as bone marrow-derived stem cells (MSCs and HSCs) and their contributions to lung homeostasis and pathology. We specifically highlight recent findings from our laboratory that demonstrate an HSC origin for pulmonary fibroblasts based on transplantation of a clonal population of cells derived from a single HSC. These findings demonstrate the importance of developing an understanding of the sources of effector cells in disease state. Finally, a perspective is given on the potential clinical implications of these studies and others addressing stem cell contributions to lung tissue homeostasis and pathology. PMID:26798846

  16. Plasma membrane wounding and repair in pulmonary diseases.

    PubMed

    Cong, Xiaofei; Hubmayr, Rolf D; Li, Changgong; Zhao, Xiaoli

    2017-03-01

    Various pathophysiological conditions such as surfactant dysfunction, mechanical ventilation, inflammation, pathogen products, environmental exposures, and gastric acid aspiration stress lung cells, and the compromise of plasma membranes occurs as a result. The mechanisms necessary for cells to repair plasma membrane defects have been extensively investigated in the last two decades, and some of these key repair mechanisms are also shown to occur following lung cell injury. Because it was theorized that lung wounding and repair are involved in the pathogenesis of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), in this review, we summarized the experimental evidence of lung cell injury in these two devastating syndromes and discuss relevant genetic, physical, and biological injury mechanisms, as well as mechanisms used by lung cells for cell survival and membrane repair. Finally, we discuss relevant signaling pathways that may be activated by chronic or repeated lung cell injury as an extension of our cell injury and repair focus in this review. We hope that a holistic view of injurious stimuli relevant for ARDS and IPF could lead to updated experimental models. In addition, parallel discussion of membrane repair mechanisms in lung cells and injury-activated signaling pathways would encourage research to bridge gaps in current knowledge. Indeed, deep understanding of lung cell wounding and repair, and discovery of relevant repair moieties for lung cells, should inspire the development of new therapies that are likely preventive and broadly effective for targeting injurious pulmonary diseases.

  17. Consistent Pulmonary and Systemic Responses from Inhalation of Fine Concentrated Ambient Particles: Roles of Rat Strains Used and Physicochemical Properties

    PubMed Central

    Kodavanti, Urmila P.; Schladweiler, Mette C.; Ledbetter, Allen D.; McGee, John K.; Walsh, Leon; Gilmour, Peter S.; Highfill, Jerry W.; Davies, David; Pinkerton, Kent E.; Richards, Judy H.; Crissman, Kay; Andrews, Debora; Costa, Daniel L.

    2005-01-01

    Several studies have reported health effects of concentrated ambient particles (CAP) in rodents and humans; however, toxicity end points in rodents have provided inconsistent results. In 2000 we conducted six 1-day exposure studies where spontaneously hypertensive (SH) rats were exposed to filtered air or CAPs (≤ 2.5 μm, 1,138–1,765 μg/m3) for 4 hr (analyzed 1–3 hr afterward). In seven 2-day exposure studies in 2001, SH and Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats were exposed to filtered air or CAP (≤ 2.5 μm, 144–2,758 μg/m3) for 4 hr/day × 2 days (analyzed 1 day afterward). Despite consistent and high CAP concentrations in the 1-day exposure studies, no biologic effects were noted. The exposure concentrations varied among the seven 2-day exposure studies. Except in the first study when CAP concentration was highest, lavageable total cells and macrophages decreased and neutrophils increased in WKY rats. SH rats demonstrated a consistent increase of lavage fluid γ -glutamyltransferase activity and plasma fibrinogen. Inspiratory and expiratory times increased in SH but not in WKY rats. Significant correlations were found between CAP mass (microgram per cubic meter) and sulfate, organic carbon, or zinc. No biologic effects correlated with CAP mass. Despite low chamber mass in the last six of seven 2-day exposure studies, the levels of zinc, copper, and aluminum were enriched severalfold, and organic carbon was increased to some extent when expressed per milligram of CAP. Biologic effects were evident in those six studies. These studies demonstrate a pattern of rat strain–specific pulmonary and systemic effects that are not linked to high mass but appear to be dependent on CAP chemical composition. PMID:16263512

  18. Acute vasoreactivity test results in severe pulmonary hypertension patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: our experience with 29 cases

    PubMed Central

    Asker, Selvi; Asker, Muntecep

    2015-01-01

    Aim The aim of the current study is to evaluate acute vasoreactivity test (AVT) results in severe pulmonary hypertension patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and to compare the demographical, clinical, and laboratory variables in positive and negative cases. Methods This retrospective, clinical study was performed on 29 cases in the departments of cardiology and chest diseases of our tertiary care center. AVT was positive in 12 (41.4%) cases and negative in 17 (58.6%) cases. Demographical variables, cardiopulmonary indicators, and laboratory findings were compared in these two subgroups. Results The mean age was 62.3±7.8 years for AVT negative group, while it was 64.8±7.3 years in AVT positive group (P=0.38). Except for the changes in systolic, diastolic, and mean pulmonary arterial pressures before and after iloprost administration, there were no statistically significant differences regarding any of the parameters under investigation in both groups. Conclusion Despite the high rate of positivity for AVT in severe pulmonary hypertension patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, none of the variables under investigation displayed a noteworthy difference between AVT negative and positive groups. Identification of factors likely to influence AVT results is important for establishment of appropriate treatment protocols especially for AVT negative cases. PMID:26064044

  19. New drugs for exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Hansel, Trevor T; Barnes, Peter J

    2009-08-29

    Tobacco smoking is the dominant risk factor for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), but viral and bacterial infections are the major causes of exacerbations in later stages of disease. Reactive oxygen species (ROS), pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), and damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) activate families of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) that include the toll-like receptors (TLRs). This understanding has led to the hypothesis that COPD is an archetypal disease of innate immunity. COPD is characterised by abnormal response to injury, with altered barrier function of the respiratory tract, an acute phase reaction, and excessive activation of macrophages, neutrophils, and fibroblasts in the lung. The activated non-specific immune system then mediates the processes of inflammation and repair, fibrosis, and proteolysis. COPD is also associated with corticosteroid resistance, abnormal macrophage and T-cell populations in the airway, autoinflammation and autoimmunity, aberrant fibrosis, accelerated ageing, systemic and concomitant disease, and defective regeneration. Such concepts have been used to generate a range of molecular targets, and clinical trials are taking place to identify effective drugs for the prevention and treatment of COPD exacerbations.

  20. Emerging concepts and therapies for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, Natya; McIvor, R Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although considerable advances have been made in the diagnosis and treatment of COPD, much remains to be done both to alleviate symptoms and reduce mortality associated with this condition. Previously, diagnosis, management, and research all centred on staging based on the forced expiratory flow in 1 second. It is now becoming apparent that this is inadequate to truly capture current disease burden and future deterioration. Fortunately, new approaches to care are constantly being identified. It is now known that symptoms and, in particular, exacerbations represent pivotal events in the patient's life that should trigger optimization of care. Much work is currently underway to identify various phenotypes in COPD because it has become obvious that this is a heterogeneous disease and applying the same management algorithms for all patients is insufficient. Several new medications are at various stages of development, some being approved and on the market, while others are undergoing clinical trials. These allow for more options for individualized care of patients. In addition, new applications of old medications, such as long‑term antibiotics, also provide new options for patients struggling with recurrent symptoms. Finally, the growing awareness that this is a heterogeneous disease composed not only of differing phenotypes but also having significant extrapulmonary comorbidities have opened new avenues of research and interdisciplinary collaboration that will further enable us to offer personalized care to patients.

  1. The role of phosphodiesterase inhibitors in the management of pulmonary vascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Butrous, Ghazwan

    2014-01-01

    Phosphodiesterase inhibitors (PDE) can be used as therapeutic agents for various diseases such as dementia, depression, schizophrenia and erectile dysfunction in men, as well as congestive heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, rheumatoid arthritis, other inflammatory diseases, diabetes and various other conditions. In this review we will concentrate on one type of PDE, mainly PDE5 and its role in pulmonary vascular diseases. PMID:25780785

  2. Classification of pulmonary airway disease based on mucosal color analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suter, Melissa; Reinhardt, Joseph M.; Riker, David; Ferguson, John Scott; McLennan, Geoffrey

    2005-04-01

    Airway mucosal color changes occur in response to the development of bronchial diseases including lung cancer, cystic fibrosis, chronic bronchitis, emphysema and asthma. These associated changes are often visualized using standard macro-optical bronchoscopy techniques. A limitation to this form of assessment is that the subtle changes that indicate early stages in disease development may often be missed as a result of this highly subjective assessment, especially in inexperienced bronchoscopists. Tri-chromatic CCD chip bronchoscopes allow for digital color analysis of the pulmonary airway mucosa. This form of analysis may facilitate a greater understanding of airway disease response. A 2-step image classification approach is employed: the first step is to distinguish between healthy and diseased bronchoscope images and the second is to classify the detected abnormal images into 1 of 4 possible disease categories. A database of airway mucosal color constructed from healthy human volunteers is used as a standard against which statistical comparisons are made from mucosa with known apparent airway abnormalities. This approach demonstrates great promise as an effective detection and diagnosis tool to highlight potentially abnormal airway mucosa identifying a region possibly suited to further analysis via airway forceps biopsy, or newly developed micro-optical biopsy strategies. Following the identification of abnormal airway images a neural network is used to distinguish between the different disease classes. We have shown that classification of potentially diseased airway mucosa is possible through comparative color analysis of digital bronchoscope images. The combination of the two strategies appears to increase the classification accuracy in addition to greatly decreasing the computational time.

  3. [Pulmonary embolism and sibilant types of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease decompensations].

    PubMed

    Mispelaere, D; Glerant, J C; Audebert, M; Remond, A; Sevestre-Pietri, M A; Jounieaux, V

    2002-09-01

    Pulmonary Embolism (PE) poses an important diagnostic problem in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Indeed PE may aggravate the already precarious respiratory state of these fragile patients. Moreover, these two conditions share common symptoms: dyspnoea, wheezing, pleural pain, haemoptysis, palpitations and signs of right cardiac insufficiency. In two studies, one retrospective and the other prospective, we investigated the incidence of PE in patients with non-infective exacerbations of their COPD. The retrospective study was carried out over two years and involved 50 COPD patients with non-infective respiratory exacerbations. In this population, 10 patients out of 50 (20%) had a documented PE. No predictive factor was identified. The prospective study was conducted over one year and COPD patients admitted to hospital with exacerbations were included in the study if they had a positive D-dimer blood test and no evidence of acute respiratory infection. 31 patients were studied with Doppler ultra-sound examination of the legs and a lung perfusion scan. The presence or absence of PE was determined and the two groups were compared. 9 patients out of 31 (29%) had a documented PE. Six of these nine patients had a deep venous thrombosis (DVT). Two predictive factors of PE were identified: existence of a DVT and a significant fall in PaO(2) from baseline state (DeltaPaO(2) > 22 mmHg). We conclude that PE is a frequent (20 to 30%) of non-infective respiratory decompensation in COPD patients. Faced with an unexplained respiratory exacerbation in these patients, a lung perfusion scan should be routinely undertaken to rule out a PE when the D-dimers are positive.

  4. Efficiency and Safety of Pulmonary Rehabilitation in Acute Exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    He, Mei; Yu, Sue; Wang, Lemin; Lv, Hanjing; Qiu, Zhongmin

    2015-01-01

    Background Pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) is able to improve dyspnea, endurance capacity, and health-related quality of life in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients, but it is rarely used in China. This study aimed to assess the effectiveness and safety of PR after exacerbation of COPD. Material/Methods Patients admitted to hospital due to an exacerbation of COPD were randomized to receive either PR or routine care (control group). The PR program was performed from the second day of admission until discharge. The pre-post changes in 6-minute walk distance (6MWD), self-reported quality of life (QOL) assessed by CAT score and CRQ-SAS score, and activity of daily life assessed by ADL-D score were determined. The perceived end-effort dyspnea (Borg scale) was measured throughout the study. Results A total of 101 patients were enrolled, of whom 7 withdrew after randomization, and 94 completed this study. There were 66 patients in the PR group and 28 in the control group. The 6MWD, resting SpO2, and exercise Borg dyspnea score were significantly improved in the PR group. In addition, the PR group had greater improvement in the total CRQ-SAS score and had a lower CAT score. Significant improvements were also found in the ADL-D and BODE index in the PR group. No adverse events were recorded during exercise. Conclusions Our study provides evidence that it is safe and feasible to apply an early PR in patients with acute exacerbation of COPD. PMID:25783889

  5. Inspiratory muscle training during pulmonary rehabilitation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: A randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Beaumont, M; Mialon, P; Le Ber-Moy, C; Lochon, C; Péran, L; Pichon, R; Gut-Gobert, C; Leroyer, C; Morelot-Panzini, C; Couturaud, F

    2015-11-01

    Although recommended by international guidelines, the benefit of inspiratory muscle training (IMT) in addition to rehabilitation remains uncertain. The objective was to demonstrate the effectiveness of IMT on dyspnea using Borg scale and multidimensional dyspnea profile questionnaire at the end of a 6-minute walk test (6MWT) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) with preserved average maximum inspiratory pressure (PImax) of 85 cm H2O (95% of predicted (pred.) value) and admitted for a rehabilitation program in a dedicated center. In a randomized trial, comparing IMT versus no IMT in 32 COPD patients without inspiratory muscle weakness (PImax >60 cm H2O) who were admitted for pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) for 3 weeks, we evaluated the effect of IMT on dyspnea, using both Borg scale and multidimensional dyspnea profile (MDP) at the end of the 6MWT, and on functional parameters included inspiratory muscle function (PImax) and 6MWT. All testings were performed at the start and the end of PR. In unadjusted analysis, IMT was not found to be associated with an improvement of either dyspnea or PImax. After adjustment on confounders (initial Borg score) and variables of interaction (forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1)), we found a trend toward an improvement of "dyspnea sensory intensity", items from MDP and a significant improvement on the variation in the 2 items of MDP ("tight or constricted" and "breathing a lot"). In the subgroup of patients with FEV1 < 50% pred., 5 items of MDP were significantly improved, whereas no benefit was observed in patients with FEV1 > 50% pred. IMT did not significantly improve dyspnea or functional parameter in COPD patients with PImax > 60 cm H2O. However, in the subgroup of patients with FEV1 < 50% pred., MDP was significantly improved.

  6. Asthma–Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Overlap Syndrome Associated with Risk of Pulmonary Embolism

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Jun-Jun; Wang, Yu-Chiao; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We conducted a cohort study to clarify this relationship between asthma–chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) overlap syndrome (ACOS) and pulmonary embolism (PE). Methods From the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan, we identified patients who had a diagnosis of asthma and a diagnosis of COPD (defined as ACOS) and concurrent treatment between January 1999 and December 2009 (ACOS cohort: n = 14,150; non-ACOS cohort: n = 55,876). Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was performed to determine the adjusted hazard ratios (aHRs) for PE of the ACOS cohort compared with the non-ACOS cohort. Results Comparing the ACOS cohort with the non-ACOS cohort, the aHR of PE was 2.08 (95% confidence intervals [CIs]: 1.56–2.76). The risk of PE was higher in ACOS cohort than non-ACOS cohort, regardless of age, sex, comorbidity, inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs) and oral steroids (OSs) used. For ages ranging from 20 to 65 years, the aHR of PE was 2.53 (95% CI: 1.44–4.44) in the ACOS cohort. ACOS patients using ICSs (aHR: 1.97, 95% CI: 1.29–3.01) or OSs (aHR: 1.97, 95% CI: 1.46–2.65), the risk of PE was higher than in the non-ACOS cohort. The risk of PE increased with the number of outpatient visits and hospitalizations necessitated, ranging from 2.32 (95% CI: 1.54–3.52) in patients having 3–9 visits to 4.20 (95% CI: 2.74–6.44) for those having >9 visits. Conclusions ACOS is associated with increased risk of PE, particularly patients with a high frequency of AE—even in young adults or people without comorbidities. PMID:27611495

  7. Pulmonary Rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topics Bronchitis COPD Cystic Fibrosis Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis Sarcoidosis Send a link to NHLBI to someone by ... people who have COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), sarcoidosis (sar-koy-DOE-sis), idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis , or ...

  8. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and infection. Disruption of the microbiome?

    PubMed

    Sethi, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    The dynamics of infection in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are complex, and microbiome technology has provided us with a new research tool for its better understanding. There is compartmentalization of the microbiota in the various parts of the lung. Studies of the lower airway lumen microbiota in COPD have yielded confusing results, and additional studies with scrupulous attention to prevent and account for upper airway contamination of bronchoalveolar lavage samples are required. Lung tissue microbiota has been examined in three studies, which also demonstrate varied results based on the site of sampling (bronchial mucosa, lung parenchyma), and this variation extends to sampling sites within a lobe of the lung. The Vicious Circle Hypothesis embodies how an altered lung microbiome could contribute to COPD progression. Relating microbiota composition to airway and systemic inflammation and clinical outcomes are important research questions. Although various obstacles need to be surmounted, ultimately lung microbiome studies will provide new insights into how infection contributes to COPD.

  9. Corticospinal control of respiratory muscles in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Hopkinson, Nicholas S; Sharshar, Tarek; Ross, Ewen T; Nickol, Annabel H; Dayer, Mark J; Porcher, Raphaël; Jonville, Sophie; Moxham, John; Polkey, Michael I

    2004-07-12

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) face an increased respiratory load and in consequence have an elevated respiratory drive. We used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to investigate associated changes in corticospinal excitability both at rest and during voluntary facilitation at different levels of inspiratory effort. Diaphragm and abdominal motor thresholds were significantly lower in COPD than healthy controls, but the quadriceps response was the same. In patients there was a significant increase in diaphragm response from rest during 20% inspiratory efforts but no further increase with greater efforts. In controls there was a further stepwise increase at 40% and 60% of inspiratory effort. The cortical silent period was significantly shorter in COPD. Using paired stimulation to study intracortical inhibitory and excitatory circuits we found significantly less excitability of intracortical facilitatory circuits in patients at long (>7 ms) interstimulus intervals. These results suggest that there is a ceiling effect in motor control output to the respiratory muscles of patients with COPD.

  10. Co-occurrence pulmonary haemosiderosis with coeliac disease in child.

    PubMed

    Hammami, S; Ghédira Besbès, L; Hadded, S; Chouchane, S; Ben Meriem, Ch; Gueddiche, M N

    2008-06-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary haemosiderosis (IPH) is a rare and serious disorder in children of unknown aetiolopathogeny. Association of IPH and coeliac disease (CD) is even rarer. Immunological origin of IPH is now well accepted. We report the case of an 11-year-old female admitted for evaluation of recurrent streaky haemoptysis that had been evolving over the previous 9 months. Physical examination revealed weight loss with normal weight, but there was cutaneous and mucosal pallor due to severe anaemia (haemoglobin 4.6g/dl). The chest X-rays showed unilateral alveolo-intertitial infiltrate. Broncho-alveolar lavage revealed 70% haemosiderin-laden macrophages. The diagnosis of IPH was made. Since severe anaemia is disproportionate to radiologic findings, searching associated CD was performed and then confirmed by biological and histological examinations. A gluten-free diet was initiated. Evolution was favourable. Looking for especially CD in IPH should be systematic, even in the absence of gastrointestinal symptoms.

  11. Lung Regeneration Therapy for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Oh, Dong Kyu; Kim, You-Sun; Oh, Yeon-Mok

    2017-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a critical condition with high morbidity and mortality. Although several medications are available, there are no definite treatments. However, recent advances in the understanding of stem and progenitor cells in the lung, and molecular changes during re-alveolization after pneumonectomy, have made it possible to envisage the regeneration of damaged lungs. With this background, numerous studies of stem cells and various stimulatory molecules have been undertaken, to try and regenerate destroyed lungs in animal models of COPD. Both the cell and drug therapies show promising results. However, in contrast to the successes in laboratories, no clinical trials have exhibited satisfactory efficacy, although they were generally safe and tolerable. In this article, we review the previous experimental and clinical trials, and summarize the recent advances in lung regeneration therapy for COPD. Furthermore, we discuss the current limitations and future perspectives of this emerging field.

  12. Inspiratory muscle strength in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Larson, Janet L; Covey, Margaret K; Corbridge, Susan

    2002-05-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is associated with a functional weakness of the inspiratory muscles. Multiple factors contribute to the decline in functional strength including hyperinflation of the chest, deterioration in nutritional status, and the indirect effects of an exacerbation. The decreased inspiratory muscle strength contributes to sensations of dyspnea and places individuals at risk for respiratory muscle fatigue. The worsening dyspnea causes individuals to reduce their physical activities and ultimately become physically deconditioned. Maximal inspiratory pressure is commonly used to measure functional strength of the inspiratory muscles, and interventions to minimize the extent of decline include inspiratory muscle training, aerobic exercise training, nutritional supplementation, and methods to prevent exacerbations. In the critical care unit, multiple comorbid conditions contribute to further decline in inspiratory muscle strength, making it important to assess respiratory muscle function regularly.

  13. Triple inhaled therapy for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Montuschi, Paolo; Malerba, Mario; Macis, Giuseppe; Mores, Nadia; Santini, Giuseppe

    2016-11-01

    Combining individual drugs in a single inhaler is the most convenient way to deliver triple therapy. A long-acting muscarinic receptor antagonist (LAMA) added to an inhaled corticosteroid (ICS)/long-acting β2-adrenoceptor agonist (LABA) fixed-dose combination (FDC) can improve efficacy of pharmacological treatment of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). New inhaled ICS/LABA/LAMA FDCs, including fluticasone furoate/vilanterol/umeclidinium, budesonide/formoterol/glycopyrronium and beclometasone/formoterol/glycopyrronium, are in Phase III of clinical development for COPD. Triple inhaled therapy might be particularly useful in patients with severe to very severe COPD, above all in those with peripheral blood or sputum eosinophilia, asthma-COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS) or frequent exacerbators. Future prospective studies should assess efficacy and safety of triple ICS/LABA/LAMA therapy in selected COPD phenotypes.

  14. Lung Regeneration Therapy for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Dong Kyu; Kim, You-Sun

    2017-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a critical condition with high morbidity and mortality. Although several medications are available, there are no definite treatments. However, recent advances in the understanding of stem and progenitor cells in the lung, and molecular changes during re-alveolization after pneumonectomy, have made it possible to envisage the regeneration of damaged lungs. With this background, numerous studies of stem cells and various stimulatory molecules have been undertaken, to try and regenerate destroyed lungs in animal models of COPD. Both the cell and drug therapies show promising results. However, in contrast to the successes in laboratories, no clinical trials have exhibited satisfactory efficacy, although they were generally safe and tolerable. In this article, we review the previous experimental and clinical trials, and summarize the recent advances in lung regeneration therapy for COPD. Furthermore, we discuss the current limitations and future perspectives of this emerging field. PMID:28119741

  15. Tiotropium Bromide in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and Bronchial Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado-Gonzalez, Alcibey; Arce, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Inhaled bronchodilators are the mainstay of pharmacological treatment for stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), including β2-agonists and muscarinic antagonists. Tiotropium bromide, a long-acting antimuscarinic bronchodilator (LAMA), is a treatment choice for moderate-to-severe COPD; its efficacy and safety have been demonstrated in recent trials. Studies also point to a beneficial role of tiotropium in the treatment of difficult-to-control asthma and a potential function in the asthma-COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS). Combination of different bronchodilator molecules and addition of inhaled corticosteroids are viable therapeutic alternatives. A condensation of the latest trials and the rationale behind these therapies will be presented in this article. PMID:26491494

  16. [Current optimization of combined therapy for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Popova, E N

    2015-01-01

    Testing the new combined bronchodilator Anoro Ellipta in different clinical trials gives to its high clinical efficacy and safety in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The drug contains the molecules of sustained-release selective β2-adrenergic receptor agonist (vilanterol) and a muscarinic cholinergic receptor antagonist (umeclidinium bromide). The bronchodilating mechanisms of umeclidinium bromide are in the competitive inhibition of the binding of acetylcholine with muscarinic acetylcholine receptors of airway smooth muscles whereas in those of vilanterol are in that with the stimulation of intracellular adenylate cyclase. On days 1 and 24 after inhalation of the first dose of vilanterol and umeclidinium bromide, there was a significant increase in the forced expiratory volume in one second as compared to placebo. No clinical effects on QT interval on an electrocardiogram and cardiac rhythm were found. The benefits of an inhalation device (Ellipta) are its innovation design ensuring the effective delivery of an aerosol dose into the airway, convenience, and simplicity.

  17. Noninvasive and invasive pulmonary function in mouse models of obstructive and restrictive respiratory diseases.

    PubMed

    Vanoirbeek, Jeroen A J; Rinaldi, Manuela; De Vooght, Vanessa; Haenen, Steven; Bobic, Sonja; Gayan-Ramirez, Ghislaine; Hoet, Peter H M; Verbeken, Erik; Decramer, Marc; Nemery, Benoit; Janssens, Wim

    2010-01-01

    Pulmonary function analysis is an important tool in the evaluation of mouse respiratory disease models, but much controversy still exists on the validity of some tests. Most commonly used pulmonary function variables of humans are not routinely applied in mice, and the question of which pulmonary function is optimal for the monitoring of a particular disease model remains largely unanswered. Our study aimed to delineate the potential and restrictions of existing pulmonary function techniques in different respiratory disease models, and to determine some common variables between humans and mice. A noninvasive (unrestrained plethysmography) and two invasive pulmonary function devices (forced maneuvers system from Buxco Research Systems [Wilmington, NC] and forced oscillation technique from SCIREQ [Montreal, PQ, Canada]) were evaluated in well-established models of asthma (protein and chemical induced): a model of elastase-induced pulmonary emphysema, and a model of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. In contrast to noninvasive tests, both invasive techniques were efficacious for the quantification of parenchymal disease via changes in functional residual capacity, total lung capacity, vital capacity, and compliance of the respiratory system. Airflow obstruction and airflow limitation at baseline were only present in emphysema, but could be significantly induced after methacholine challenge in mice with asthma, which correlated best with an increase of respiratory resistance. Invasive pulmonary functions allow distinction between respiratory diseases in mice by clinically relevant variables, and should become standard in the functional evaluation of pathological disease models.

  18. Treatment of stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: the GOLD guidelines.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hobart; Kim, Jeffrey; Tagmazyan, Karine

    2013-11-15

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common problem in primary care. COPD is diagnosed with spirometry only in clinically stable patients with a postbronchodilator forced expiratory volume in one second/forced vital capacity ratio of less than 0.70. All patients with COPD who smoke should be counseled about smoking cessation. Influenza and pneumococcal vaccinations are recommended for all patients with COPD. The Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease assigns patients with COPD into four groups based on the degree of airflow restriction, symptom score, and number of exacerbations in one year. Pulmonary rehabilitation is recommended for patients in groups B, C, and D. Those in group A should receive a short-acting anticholinergic or short-acting beta2 agonist for mild intermittent symptoms. For patients in group B, long-acting anticholinergics or long-acting beta2 agonists should be added. Patients in group C or D are at high risk of exacerbations and should receive a long-acting anticholinergic or a combination of an inhaled corticosteroid and a long-acting beta2 agonist. For patients whose symptoms are not controlled with one of these regimens, triple therapy with an inhaled corticosteroid, long-acting beta2 agonist, and anticholinergic should be considered. Prophylactic antibiotics and oral corticosteroids are not recommended for prevention of COPD exacerbations. Continuous oxygen therapy improves mortality rates in patients with severe hypoxemia and COPD. Lung volume reduction surgery can improve survival rates in patients with severe, upper lobe-predominant COPD with heterogeneous emphysema distribution.

  19. Variability of Spirometry in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Herpel, Laura B.; Kanner, Richard E.; Lee, Shing M.; Fessler, Henry E.; Sciurba, Frank C.; Connett, John E.; Wise, Robert A.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Our goal is to determine short-term intraindividual biologic and measurement variability in spirometry of patients with a wide range of stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease severity, using datasets from the National Emphysema Treatment Trial (NETT) and the Lung Health Study (LHS). This may be applied to determine criteria that can be used to assess a clinically meaningful change in spirometry. Methods: A total of 5,886 participants from the LHS and 1,215 participants from the NETT performed prebronchodilator spirometry during two baseline sessions. We analyzed varying criteria for absolute and percent change of FEV1 and FVC to determine which criterion was met by 90% of the participants. Results: The mean ± SD FEV1 for the initial session was 2.64 ± 0.60 L (75.1 ± 8.8% predicted) for the LHS and 0.68 ± 0.22 L (23.7 ± 6.5% predicted) for the NETT. The mean ± SD number of days between test sessions was 24.9 ± 17.1 for the LHS and 85.7 ± 21.7 for the NETT. As the degree of obstruction increased, the intersession percent difference of FEV1 increased. However, the absolute difference between tests remained relatively constant despite the severity of obstruction (0.106 ± 0.10 L). Over 90% of participants had an intersession FEV1 difference of less than 225 ml irrespective of the severity of obstruction. Conclusions: Absolute changes in FEV1 rather than percent change should be used to determine whether patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease have improved or worsened between test sessions. PMID:16497996

  20. Regulation of Wnt4 in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Durham, Andrew L.; McLaren, Alistair; Hayes, Brian P.; Caramori, Gaetano; Clayton, Chris L.; Barnes, Peter J.; Chung, K. Fan; Adcock, Ian M.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is associated with persistent inflammation and oxidative stress in susceptible individuals. Using microarray analysis of bronchial biopsy samples from patients with COPD and controls, we identified Wnt4 as being up-regulated in COPD. Analysis of bronchial biopsy samples showed a very strong correlation between Wnt4 and IL8 gene expression, suggesting that Wnt4 plays a role in chronic lung inflammation. In vitro, Wnt4 induced proliferation and inflammation in human epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) and normal primary human bronchial epithelial cells in a concentration-dependent manner. This effect was enhanced in the presence of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) as a result of activation of the p38 and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways. Hydrogen peroxide, but not proinflammatory stimuli, up-regulated Wnt4 expression in epithelial cells. In monocytic THP-1 and primary airway smooth muscle cells, Wnt4 induced inflammation and enhanced the inflammatory response to lipopolysaccharide and IL-1β but did not induce proliferation. In addition, these other cell types did not have enhanced Wnt4 expression in response to hydrogen peroxide. Our results indicate that airway epithelial activation, due to oxidative stress, may lead to Wnt4 induction. Wnt4, in turn, acts through the noncanonical pathway to activate epithelial cell remodeling and IL8 gene expression, leading to neutrophil infiltration and inflammation.—Durham, A. L., McLaren, A., Hayes, B. P., Caramori, G., Clayton, C. L., Barnes, P. J., Chung, K. F., Adcock, I. M. Regulation of Wnt4 in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. PMID:23463699

  1. [Pulmonary aneurysms in Behçet's disease completely resolved after medical therapy].

    PubMed

    Ben Dhaou, B; Ketari, S; Boussema, F; Aydi, Z; Baili, L; Rokbani, L

    2012-10-01

    Pulmonary artery aneurysm in Behcet disease compromises seriously the diagnosis since its fatal rupture is still the major cause of death in this disease. Pulmonary artery aneurysm requires urgent management and several treatments have been proposed, including steroids, immunosuppressive drugs, embolisation and surgery. Herein, we report a patient with Behçet's disease in whom multiple pulmonary artery aneurysms were completely resolved after a combined treatment with corticosteroids and azathioprine. Pulmonary artery aneurysms in Behçet's disease are reported to indicate poor prognosis and high mortality. Computed tomographic scans of the chest and angiography are the most common diagnostic procedures used in the diagnosis or evaluation of pulmonary artery aneurysm. Immunosuppression is the main therapy for the treatment of a vasculitis.

  2. Multidisciplinary treatment of chronic pulmonary insufficiency. 3. The effect of physical training on cardiopulmonary performance in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Chester, E H; Belman, M J; Bahler, R C; Baum, G L; Schey, G; Buch, P

    1977-12-01

    We examined the effect of physical training on cardiopulmonary function in 21 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and compared the results with similar observations in eight untrained patients. The training consisted of daily walking on a treadmill at increasing speeds and grades and other graded physical exercises. Evaluation of pulmonary function, including spirometric studies, lung volumes, and arterial blood gas levels, showed no significant change after training. Hemodynamic functions, including heart rate, cardiac index, stroke index, pulmonary vascular resistance, and arteriovenous oxygen content difference, were similarly unchanged at comparable submaximal loads. Pulmonary arterial wedge pressure increased after training in the treated group at rest and during exercise, but this may be related to changes in respiratory mechanics. Consumption of oxygen and minute ventilation decreased in the treated group during treadmill exercise, suggesting improved neuromuscular coordination and efficiency of walking on the treadmill. Total work performed on the treadmill increased significantly in the trained group. This increase was unexplained by physiologic observations but was thought to be due in part to increased efficiency of walking and increased motivation. We conclude that improvement in the capacity for exercise following physical training for four weeks is not associated with improvement in cardiopulmonary function at submaximal exercise.

  3. [Diffuse lung disease: cause of persistent pulmonary hypertension before one year of age].

    PubMed

    Dicembrino, Manuela; Haag, Dora; Álvarez, Mariana; Díaz Cazaux, Agustina; Castaños, Claudio

    2016-06-01

    Pulmonary vascular disease in children is multifactorial and heterogeneous. While it shares some features with pulmonary hypertension in adults, there are differences in the associated comorbidities and conditions, the coexistence of genetic or developmental diseases. Interstitial lung diseases may be responsible for this entity. One is alveolar capillary dysplasia with misalignment of pulmonary veins, a rare pathology but with a mortality rate of 100%, characterized by a failure in the formation of lung tissue that eventually results in impaired gas diffusion. We present a 5-month-old patient studied due to suspected congenital heart disease with persistent hypoxemia; diagnosis was made through lung biopsy.

  4. Overview of the prevalence, impact, and management of depression and anxiety in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Panagioti, Maria; Scott, Charlotte; Blakemore, Amy; Coventry, Peter A

    2014-01-01

    More than one third of individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) experience comorbid symptoms of depression and anxiety. This review aims to provide an overview of the burden of depression and anxiety in those with COPD and to outline the contemporary advances and challenges in the management of depression and anxiety in COPD. Symptoms of depression and anxiety in COPD lead to worse health outcomes, including impaired health-related quality of life and increased mortality risk. Depression and anxiety also increase health care utilization rates and costs. Although the quality of the data varies considerably, the cumulative evidence shows that complex interventions consisting of pulmonary rehabilitation interventions with or without psychological components improve symptoms of depression and anxiety in COPD. Cognitive behavioral therapy is also an effective intervention for managing depression in COPD, but treatment effects are small. Cognitive behavioral therapy could potentially lead to greater benefits in depression and anxiety in people with COPD if embedded in multidisciplinary collaborative care frameworks, but this hypothesis has not yet been empirically assessed. Mindfulness-based treatments are an alternative option for the management of depression and anxiety in people with long-term conditions, but their efficacy is unproven in COPD. Beyond pulmonary rehabilitation, the evidence about optimal approaches for managing depression and anxiety in COPD remains unclear and largely speculative. Future research to evaluate the effectiveness of novel and integrated care approaches for the management of depression and anxiety in COPD is warranted. PMID:25419126

  5. Overview of the prevalence, impact, and management of depression and anxiety in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Panagioti, Maria; Scott, Charlotte; Blakemore, Amy; Coventry, Peter A

    2014-01-01

    More than one third of individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) experience comorbid symptoms of depression and anxiety. This review aims to provide an overview of the burden of depression and anxiety in those with COPD and to outline the contemporary advances and challenges in the management of depression and anxiety in COPD. Symptoms of depression and anxiety in COPD lead to worse health outcomes, including impaired health-related quality of life and increased mortality risk. Depression and anxiety also increase health care utilization rates and costs. Although the quality of the data varies considerably, the cumulative evidence shows that complex interventions consisting of pulmonary rehabilitation interventions with or without psychological components improve symptoms of depression and anxiety in COPD. Cognitive behavioral therapy is also an effective intervention for managing depression in COPD, but treatment effects are small. Cognitive behavioral therapy could potentially lead to greater benefits in depression and anxiety in people with COPD if embedded in multidisciplinary collaborative care frameworks, but this hypothesis has not yet been empirically assessed. Mindfulness-based treatments are an alternative option for the management of depression and anxiety in people with long-term conditions, but their efficacy is unproven in COPD. Beyond pulmonary rehabilitation, the evidence about optimal approaches for managing depression and anxiety in COPD remains unclear and largely speculative. Future research to evaluate the effectiveness of novel and integrated care approaches for the management of depression and anxiety in COPD is warranted.

  6. Plasma Metabolomics in Human Pulmonary Tuberculosis Disease: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Frediani, Jennifer K.; Jones, Dean P.; Tukvadze, Nestan; Uppal, Karan; Sanikidze, Eka; Kipiani, Maia; Tran, ViLinh T.; Hebbar, Gautam; Walker, Douglas I.; Kempker, Russell R.; Kurani, Shaheen S.; Colas, Romain A.; Dalli, Jesmond; Tangpricha, Vin; Serhan, Charles N.; Blumberg, Henry M.; Ziegler, Thomas R.

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to characterize metabolites during tuberculosis (TB) disease and identify new pathophysiologic pathways involved in infection as well as biomarkers of TB onset, progression and resolution. Such data may inform development of new anti-tuberculosis drugs. Plasma samples from adults with newly diagnosed pulmonary TB disease and their matched, asymptomatic, sputum culture-negative household contacts were analyzed using liquid chromatography high-resolution mass spectrometry (LC-MS) to identify metabolites. Statistical and bioinformatics methods were used to select accurate mass/charge (m/z) ions that were significantly different between the two groups at a false discovery rate (FDR) of q<0.05. Two-way hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) was used to identify clusters of ions contributing to separation of cases and controls, and metabolomics databases were used to match these ions to known metabolites. Identity of specific D-series resolvins, glutamate and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb)-derived trehalose-6-mycolate was confirmed using LC-MS/MS analysis. Over 23,000 metabolites were detected in untargeted metabolomic analysis and 61 metabolites were significantly different between the two groups. HCA revealed 8 metabolite clusters containing metabolites largely upregulated in patients with TB disease, including anti-TB drugs, glutamate, choline derivatives, Mycobacterium tuberculosis-derived cell wall glycolipids (trehalose-6-mycolate and phosphatidylinositol) and pro-resolving lipid mediators of inflammation, known to stimulate resolution, efferocytosis and microbial killing. The resolvins were confirmed to be RvD1, aspirin-triggered RvD1, and RvD2. This study shows that high-resolution metabolomic analysis can differentiate patients with active TB disease from their asymptomatic household contacts. Specific metabolites upregulated in the plasma of patients with active TB disease, including Mtb-derived glycolipids and resolvins, have potential as biomarkers

  7. Multislice CT pulmonary findings in Behçet's disease (report of 16 cases).

    PubMed

    Emad, Y; Abdel-Razek, N; Gheita, T; el-Wakd, M; el-Gohary, T; Samadoni, A

    2007-06-01

    Pulmonary artery aneurysm is the best-defined type of pulmonary disease in Behçet's disease (BD) with an important morbidity and mortality. The objective of this study was to assess the contribution of high-resolution dynamic chest CT imaging for one of the most serious aspects of BD: pulmonary artery aneurysm and other pulmonary parenchymal involvement. Sixteen BD patients were recruited for this study, (14 men, 87.5%, and 2 women, 12.5%). All patients fulfilled the 1990 American College of Rheumatology criteria for classification of BD [International Study Group for Behçet's Disease, Lancet 335:1078-1080, (1990)]. All patients underwent thorough history taking, full clinical examination, and routine laboratory investigations. Plain chest X-rays and pulmonary CT angiography were performed on all patients in an attempt to assess the pulmonary vasculature and lung parenchyma. Pulmonary vascular abnormalities were as follows: pulmonary artery aneurysms of varying sizes in nine patients (56.3%), main pulmonary artery ectasia in two patients (12.5%), pulmonary artery embolism in two patients (12.5%), venacaval thrombosis in seven patients (43.8%), and pulmonary venous varices in four patients (25%). Pulmonary parenchymal abnormalities were as follows: three patients (18.8%) with mild central bronchiectasis, one patient (6.3%) with atelectasis, one patient (6.3%) with subpleural nodule, and four patients (25%) with interstitial lung disease. Eight of the male patients were smokers. Multislice CT is useful in demonstrating the entire spectrum of thoracic manifestations of BD. Multislice CT is noninvasive and provides excellent delineation of the vessel lumen and wall and perivascular tissues, as well as detailed information concerning the lung parenchyma, pleura, and mediastinal structures.

  8. PULMONARY ARTERIAL DISEASE ASSOCIATED WITH RIGHT-SIDED CARDIAC HYPERTROPHY AND CONGESTIVE HEART FAILURE IN ZOO MAMMALS HOUSED AT 2,100 M ABOVE SEA LEVEL.

    PubMed

    Juan-Sallés, Carles; Martínez, Liliana Sofía; Rosas-Rosas, Arely G; Parás, Alberto; Martínez, Osvaldo; Hernández, Alejandra; Garner, Michael M

    2015-12-01

    Subacute and chronic mountain sickness of humans and the related brisket disease of cattle are characterized by right-sided congestive heart failure in individuals living at high altitudes as a result of sustained hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. Adaptations to high altitude and disease resistance vary among species, breeds, and individuals. The authors conducted a retrospective survey of right-sided cardiac hypertrophy associated with pulmonary arterial hypertrophy or arteriosclerosis in zoo mammals housed at Africam Safari (Puebla, México), which is located at 2,100 m above sea level. Seventeen animals with detailed pathology records matched the study criterion. Included were 10 maras (Dolichotis patagonum), 2 cotton-top tamarins (Saguinus oedipus oedipus), 2 capybaras (Hydrochaeris hydrochaeris), and 1 case each of Bennet's wallaby (Macropus rufogriseus), nilgai antelope (Boselaphus tragocamelus), and scimitar-horned oryx (Oryx dammah). All had right-sided cardiac hypertrophy and a variety of arterial lesions restricted to the pulmonary circulation and causing arterial thickening with narrowing of the arterial lumen. Arterial lesions most often consisted of medial hypertrophy or hyperplasia of small and medium-sized pulmonary arteries. All maras also had single or multiple elevated plaques in the pulmonary arterial trunk consisting of fibrosis, accompanied by chondroid metaplasia in some cases. Both antelopes were juvenile and died with right-sided congestive heart failure associated with severe pulmonary arterial lesions. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first description of cardiac and pulmonary arterial disease in zoo mammals housed at high altitudes.

  9. Immune Inflammation and Disease Progression in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Balestro, Elisabetta; Calabrese, Fiorella; Turato, Graziella; Lunardi, Francesca; Bazzan, Erica; Marulli, Giuseppe; Biondini, Davide; Rossi, Emanuela; Sanduzzi, Alessandro; Rea, Federico; Rigobello, Chiara; Gregori, Dario; Baraldo, Simonetta; Spagnolo, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    The clinical course in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is highly heterogeneous, with some patients having a slow progression and others an accelerated clinical and functional decline. This study aims to clinically characterize the type of progression in IPF and to investigate the pathological basis that might account for the observed differences in disease behavior. Clinical and functional data were analyzed in 73 IPF patients, followed long-time as candidates for lung transplantation. The forced vital capacity (FVC) change/year (< or ≥10% predicted) was used to define “slow” or “rapid” disease progression. Pathological abnormalities were quantified in the explanted lung of 41 out of 73 patients undergoing lung transplantation. At diagnosis, slow progressors (n = 48) showed longer duration of symptoms and lower FVC than rapid progressors (n = 25). Eleven slow and 3 rapid progressors developed an acute exacerbation (AE) during follow-up. Quantitative lung pathology showed a severe innate and adaptive inflammatory infiltrate in rapid progressors, markedly increased compared to slow progressors and similar to that observed in patients experiencing AE. The extent of inflammation was correlated with the yearly FVC decline (r = 0.52, p = 0.005). In conclusion an innate and adaptive inflammation appears to be a prominent feature in the lung of patients with IPF and could contribute to determining of the rate of disease progression. PMID:27159038

  10. Updates in the management of stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Narsingam, Saiprasad; Bozarth, Andrew L; Abdeljalil, Asem

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a preventable and treatable disease state characterized by persistent airflow limitation that is usually progressive and associated with an enhanced chronic inflammatory process. It is increasingly recognized as a major public health problem, affecting more than 20 million adults in the US. It is also recognized as a leading cause of hospitalizations and is the fourth leading cause of death in the US. The Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) operates to promote evidence-based management of COPD, increase awareness and encourage research. In 2011, GOLD published a consensus report detailing evidence-based management strategies for COPD, which were last updated in 2015. In recent years, newer strategies and a growing number of new pharmacologic agents to treat symptoms of COPD have also been introduced and show promise in improving the management of COPD. We aim to provide an evidence-based review of the available and upcoming pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic treatment options for stable COPD, with continued emphasis on evidence-based management.

  11. Epigenetics and muscle dysfunction in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Barreiro, Esther; Gea, Joaquim

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common, preventable, and treatable disease and a major leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In COPD, comorbidities, acute exacerbations, and systemic manifestations negatively influence disease severity and progression regardless of the respiratory condition. Skeletal muscle dysfunction, which is one of the commonest systemic manifestations in patients with COPD, has a tremendous impact on their exercise capacity and quality of life. Several pathophysiological and molecular underlying mechanisms including epigenetics (the process whereby gene expression is regulated by heritable mechanisms that do not affect DNA sequence) have been shown to participate in the etiology of COPD muscle dysfunction. The epigenetic modifications identified so far in cells include DNA methylation, histone acetylation and methylation, and noncoding RNAs such as microRNAs. Herein, we first review the role of epigenetic mechanisms in muscle development and adaptation to environmental factors in several models. Moreover, the epigenetic events reported so far to be potentially involved in muscle dysfunction and mass loss of patients with COPD are also discussed. Furthermore, the different expression profile of several muscle-enriched microRNAs in the diaphragm and vastus lateralis muscles of patients with COPD are also reviewed from results recently obtained in our group. The role of protein hyperacetylation in enhanced muscle protein catabolism of limb muscles is also discussed. Future research should focus on the full elucidation of the triggers of epigenetic mechanisms and their specific downstream biological pathways in COPD muscle dysfunction and wasting.

  12. Immune Inflammation and Disease Progression in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Balestro, Elisabetta; Calabrese, Fiorella; Turato, Graziella; Lunardi, Francesca; Bazzan, Erica; Marulli, Giuseppe; Biondini, Davide; Rossi, Emanuela; Sanduzzi, Alessandro; Rea, Federico; Rigobello, Chiara; Gregori, Dario; Baraldo, Simonetta; Spagnolo, Paolo; Cosio, Manuel G; Saetta, Marina

    2016-01-01

    The clinical course in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is highly heterogeneous, with some patients having a slow progression and others an accelerated clinical and functional decline. This study aims to clinically characterize the type of progression in IPF and to investigate the pathological basis that might account for the observed differences in disease behavior. Clinical and functional data were analyzed in 73 IPF patients, followed long-time as candidates for lung transplantation. The forced vital capacity (FVC) change/year (< or ≥10% predicted) was used to define "slow" or "rapid" disease progression. Pathological abnormalities were quantified in the explanted lung of 41 out of 73 patients undergoing lung transplantation. At diagnosis, slow progressors (n = 48) showed longer duration of symptoms and lower FVC than rapid progressors (n = 25). Eleven slow and 3 rapid progressors developed an acute exacerbation (AE) during follow-up. Quantitative lung pathology showed a severe innate and adaptive inflammatory infiltrate in rapid progressors, markedly increased compared to slow progressors and similar to that observed in patients experiencing AE. The extent of inflammation was correlated with the yearly FVC decline (r = 0.52, p = 0.005). In conclusion an innate and adaptive inflammation appears to be a prominent feature in the lung of patients with IPF and could contribute to determining of the rate of disease progression.

  13. Bronchodilator reversibility testing in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Calverley, P; Burge, P; Spencer, S; Anderson, J; Jones, P

    2003-01-01

    Background: A limited or absent bronchodilator response is used to classify chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and can determine the treatment offered. The reliability of the recommended response criteria and their relationship to disease progression has not been established. Methods: 660 patients meeting European Respiratory Society (ERS) diagnostic criteria for irreversible COPD were studied. Spirometric parameters were measured on three occasions before and after salbutamol and ipratropium bromide sequentially or in combination over 2 months. Responses were classified using the American Thoracic Society/GOLD (ATS) and ERS criteria. Patients were followed for 3 years with post-bronchodilator FEV1 and exacerbation history recorded 3 monthly and health status 6 monthly. Results: FEV1 increased significantly with each bronchodilator, a response that was normally distributed. Mean post-bronchodilator FEV1 was reproducible between visits (intraclass correlation 0.93). The absolute change in FEV1 was independent of the pre-bronchodilator value but the percentage change correlated with pre-bronchodilator FEV1 (r=-0.44; p<0.0001). Using ATS criteria, 52.1% of patients changed responder status between visits compared with 38.2% using ERS criteria. Smoking status, atopy, and withdrawing inhaled corticosteroids were unrelated to bronchodilator response, as was the rate of decline in FEV1, decline in health status, and exacerbation rate. Conclusion: In moderate to severe COPD bronchodilator responsiveness is a continuous variable. Classifying patients as "responders" and "non-responders" can be misleading and does not predict disease progression. PMID:12885978

  14. Gene-environment interactions in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Molfino, Nestor A; Coyle, Anthony J

    2008-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the leading causes of death throughout the world and is largely associated with cigarette smoking. Despite the appreciation of the central role of smoking in the development of COPD, only a relatively small number of smokers (15%-20%) develop COPD. Recent studies depicting familial aggregation suggest that some subjects may have a genetic predisposition to developing COPD. In this respect, a number of single nucleotide polymorphisms have been reported in association with different COPD features (subphenotypes), although much of this data remains controversial. Classical genetic studies (including twin and family studies) assume an "equal-environment" scenario, but as gene-environment interactions occur in COPD, this assumption needs revision. Thus, new integrated models are needed to examine the major environmental factors associated with COPD which include smoking as well as air pollution, and respiratory infections, and not only genetic predisposition. Revisiting this area, may help answer the question of what has more bearing in the pathogenesis of COPD--the environment or the genomic sequence of the affected subjects. It is anticipated that an improved understanding of this interaction will both enable improved identification of individuals susceptible to developing this disease, as well as improved future treatments for this disease.

  15. Inflammatory Signalings Involved in Airway and Pulmonary Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, I-Ta; Yang, Chuen-Mao

    2013-01-01

    In respiratory diseases, there is an increased expression of multiple inflammatory proteins in the respiratory tract, including cytokines, chemokines, and adhesion molecules. Chemokines have been shown to regulate inflammation and immune cell differentiation. Moreover, many of the known inflammatory target proteins, such as matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2), are associated with airway and lung inflammation in response to various stimuli. Injuriously environmental stimuli can access the lung through either the airways or the pulmonary and systemic circulations. The time course and intensity of responses by resident and circulating cells may be regulated by various inflammatory signalings, including Src family kinases (SFKs), protein kinase C (PKC), growth factor tyrosine kinase receptors, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)/reactive oxygen species (ROS), PI3K/Akt, MAPKs, nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), activator protein-1 (AP-1), and other signaling molecules. These signaling molecules regulate both key inflammatory signaling transduction pathways and target proteins involved in airway and lung inflammation. Here, we discuss the mechanisms involved in the expression of inflammatory target proteins associated with the respiratory diseases. Knowledge of the mechanisms of inflammation regulation could lead to the pharmacological manipulation of anti-inflammatory drugs in the respiratory diseases. PMID:23690670

  16. [Smoking cessation in smokers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Underner, M; Perriot, J; Peiffer, G

    2014-12-01

    One out of two smokers who smoke throughout their lifetime will die from a disease related to smoking. Tobacco smoking therefore represents a major global public health issue. Smoking is the leading cause of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Projections for 2020 indicate that by then, COPD will have become the third cause of death and the fifth cause of disability worldwide. Stopping smoking reduces the risk of developing COPD and is an essential treatment for this inflammatory disease. Smoking cessation decreases the prevalence of respiratory symptoms, number of hospitalizations, and decline in FEV1, as well as exacerbation frequency and overall mortality. Among the patients, 38-77% with COPD are smokers. Their daily cigarette consumption and level of nicotine dependence are often high. The combination of high intensity behavioral interventions and medication treatments (nicotine replacement therapy, varenicline, bupropion) is the most effective strategy for smokers with COPD. In contrast, behavioral interventions without medication are not more effective than simple advice to stop. Two factors seem to predict the success of the attempt to quit in smokers with COPD: a strong motivation to quit and the use of smoking cessation medications.

  17. Regression to the mean: a limited issue in disease management programs for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Tinkelman, David; Wilson, Steve

    2008-04-01

    Our objective was to test for evidence of regression to the mean in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)-related health care utilization in a Colorado Medicaid population that met the criteria for, but were not participating in, a COPD disease management (DM) program. National Jewish Medical and Research Center had enrolled individuals who (1) had a diagnosis of COPD for at least 1 year and (2) were active participants in Colorado Medicaid's 1-year DM program called breatheWise; the present study sought a comparator group for that population. In order to test for evidence of regression to the mean (ie, high utilization from the recruitment period reducing without active intervention) in this case management model, we conducted a case-controlled analysis of total spending for a comparator population that would have met the inclusion criteria for the DM program. The present study assessed health care utilization for fiscal years 2002 and 2003 in terms of total rates of emergency room (ER) visits and hospitalizations for all causes in the comparator group of COPD patients. In addition, total costs related to both ER visits and hospitalizations were compiled. In total, 354 individuals met the inclusion criteria and were identified as the comparator group. ER visits and hospitalizations were consistent for 2002 and 2003. ER visits totaled 314 and 315 in 2002 and 2003, respectively, indicating a 0.3% increase that was not significant. Hospitalizations decreased from 0.53 admissions per patient in 2002 to 0.48 in 2003-a 9.4% reduction that was not significant. With comparable rates of ER visits and hospitalizations, total costs for health care utilization remained virtually unchanged between 2002 and 2003. There is minimal evidence of regression to the mean over 2 consecutive years in the Colorado Medicaid patients with moderate to severe COPD.

  18. Non-pulmonary allergic diseases and inflammatory bowel disease: a qualitative review.

    PubMed

    Kotlyar, David S; Shum, Mili; Hsieh, Jennifer; Blonski, Wojciech; Greenwald, David A

    2014-08-28

    While the etiological underpinnings of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are highly complex, it has been noted that both clinical and pathophysiological similarities exist between IBD and both asthma and non-pulmonary allergic phenomena. In this review, several key points on common biomarkers, pathophysiology, clinical manifestations and nutritional and probiotic interventions for both IBD and non-pulmonary allergic diseases are discussed. Histamine and mast cell activity show common behaviors in both IBD and in certain allergic disorders. IgE also represents a key immunoglobulin involved in both IBD and in certain allergic pathologies, though these links require further study. Probiotics remain a critically important intervention for both IBD subtypes as well as multiple allergic phenomena. Linked clinical phenomena, especially sinonasal disease and IBD, are discussed. In addition, nutritional interventions remain an underutilized and promising therapy for modification of both allergic disorders and IBD. Recommending new mothers breastfeed their infants, and increasing the duration of breastfeeding may also help prevent both IBD and allergic diseases, but requires more investigation. While much remains to be discovered, it is clear that non-pulmonary allergic phenomena are connected to IBD in a myriad number of ways and that the discovery of common immunological pathways may usher in an era of vastly improved treatments for patients.

  19. Home-based pulmonary rehabilitation improves clinical features and systemic inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients.

    PubMed

    do Nascimento, Eloisa Sanches Pereira; Sampaio, Luciana Maria Malosá; Peixoto-Souza, Fabiana Sobral; Dias, Fernanda Dultra; Gomes, Evelim Leal Freitas Dantas; Greiffo, Flavia Regina; Ligeiro de Oliveira, Ana Paula; Stirbulov, Roberto; Vieira, Rodolfo Paula; Costa, Dirceu

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a respiratory disease characterized by chronic airflow limitation that leads beyond the pulmonary changes to important systemic effects. COPD is characterized by pulmonary and systemic inflammation. However, increases in the levels of inflammatory cytokines in plasma are found even when the disease is stable. Pulmonary rehabilitation improves physical exercise capacity and quality of life and decreases dyspnea. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether a home-based pulmonary rehabilitation (HBPR) program improves exercise tolerance in COPD patients, as well as health-related quality of life and systemic inflammation. This prospective study was conducted at the Laboratory of Functional Respiratory Evaluation, Nove de Julho University, São Paulo, Brazil. After anamnesis, patients were subjected to evaluations of health-related quality of life and dyspnea, spirometry, respiratory muscle strength, upper limbs incremental test, incremental shuttle walk test, and blood test for quantification of systemic inflammatory markers (interleukin [IL]-6 and IL-8). At the end of the evaluations, patients received a booklet containing the physical exercises to be performed at home, three times per week for 8 consecutive weeks. Around 25 patients were enrolled, and 14 completed the pre- and post-HBPR ratings. There was a significant increase in the walked distance and the maximal inspiratory pressure, improvements on two components from the health-related quality-of-life questionnaire, and a decrease in plasma IL-8 levels after the intervention. The HBPR is an important and viable alternative to pulmonary rehabilitation for the treatment of patients with COPD; it improves exercise tolerance, inspiratory muscle strength, quality of life, and systemic inflammation in COPD patients.

  20. Home-based pulmonary rehabilitation improves clinical features and systemic inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients

    PubMed Central

    do Nascimento, Eloisa Sanches Pereira; Sampaio, Luciana Maria Malosá; Peixoto-Souza, Fabiana Sobral; Dias, Fernanda Dultra; Gomes, Evelim Leal Freitas Dantas; Greiffo, Flavia Regina; Ligeiro de Oliveira, Ana Paula; Stirbulov, Roberto; Vieira, Rodolfo Paula; Costa, Dirceu

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a respiratory disease characterized by chronic airflow limitation that leads beyond the pulmonary changes to important systemic effects. COPD is characterized by pulmonary and systemic inflammation. However, increases in the levels of inflammatory cytokines in plasma are found even when the disease is stable. Pulmonary rehabilitation improves physical exercise capacity and quality of life and decreases dyspnea. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether a home-based pulmonary rehabilitation (HBPR) program improves exercise tolerance in COPD patients, as well as health-related quality of life and systemic inflammation. This prospective study was conducted at the Laboratory of Functional Respiratory Evaluation, Nove de Julho University, São Paulo, Brazil. After anamnesis, patients were subjected to evaluations of health-related quality of life and dyspnea, spirometry, respiratory muscle strength, upper limbs incremental test, incremental shuttle walk test, and blood test for quantification of systemic inflammatory markers (interleukin [IL]-6 and IL-8). At the end of the evaluations, patients received a booklet containing the physical exercises to be performed at home, three times per week for 8 consecutive weeks. Around 25 patients were enrolled, and 14 completed the pre- and post-HBPR ratings. There was a significant increase in the walked distance and the maximal inspiratory pressure, improvements on two components from the health-related quality-of-life questionnaire, and a decrease in plasma IL-8 levels after the intervention. The HBPR is an important and viable alternative to pulmonary rehabilitation for the treatment of patients with COPD; it improves exercise tolerance, inspiratory muscle strength, quality of life, and systemic inflammation in COPD patients. PMID:25848241

  1. Oscillatory Positive Expiratory Pressure in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Svenningsen, Sarah; Paulin, Gregory A; Sheikh, Khadija; Guo, Fumin; Hasany, Aasim; Kirby, Miranda; Rezai, Roya Etemad; McCormack, David G; Parraga, Grace

    2016-01-01

    Evidence-based guidance for the use of airway clearance techniques (ACT) in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is lacking in-part because well-established measurements of pulmonary function such as the forced expiratory volume in 1s (FEV1) are relatively insensitive to ACT. The objective of this crossover study was to evaluate daily use of an oscillatory positive expiratory pressure (oPEP) device for 21-28 days in COPD patients who were self-identified as sputum-producers or non-sputum-producers. COPD volunteers provided written informed consent to daily oPEP use in a randomized crossover fashion. Participants completed baseline, crossover and study-end pulmonary function tests, St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ), Patient Evaluation Questionnaire (PEQ), Six-Minute Walk Test and (3)He magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the measurement of ventilation abnormalities using the ventilation defect percent (VDP). Fourteen COPD patients, self-identified as sputum-producers and 13 COPD-non-sputum-producers completed the study. Post-oPEP, the PEQ-ease-bringing-up-sputum was improved for sputum-producers (p = 0.005) and non-sputum-producers (p = 0.04), the magnitude of which was greater for sputum-producers (p = 0.03). There were significant post-oPEP improvements for sputum-producers only for FVC (p = 0.01), 6MWD (p = 0.04), SGRQ total score (p = 0.01) as well as PEQ-patient-global-assessment (p = 0.02). Clinically relevant post-oPEP improvements for PEQ-ease-bringing-up-sputum/PEQ-patient-global-assessment/SGRQ/VDP were observed in 8/7/9/6 of 14 sputum-producers and 2/0/3/3 of 13 non-sputum-producers. The post-oPEP change in (3)He MRI VDP was related to the change in PEQ-ease-bringing-up-sputum (r = 0.65, p = 0.0004) and FEV1 (r = -0.50, p = 0.009). In COPD patients with chronic sputum production, PEQ and SGRQ scores, FVC and 6MWD improved post-oPEP. FEV1 and PEQ-ease-bringing-up-sputum improvements were related to improved ventilation providing

  2. Development of Pulmonary Artery Aneurysms Due to Behçet's Disease and Resolution after Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kage, Hidenori; Goto, Yasushi; Amano, Yosuke; Makita, Kosuke; Isago, Hideaki; Kobayashi, Kouichi; Narumoto, Osamu; Okudaira, Reiko; Tanaka, Goh; Takami, Kazutaka; Ohishi, Nobuya; Nagase, Takahide

    2016-01-01

    We herein describe a patient with Behçet's disease in whom we followed the development and resolution of pulmonary artery aneurysms. He presented with intermittent hemoptysis, pulmonary thromboembolism was initially diagnosed, and anticoagulant therapy was started. Over the next several months, the expansion of pulmonary arteries was noted. Five months after his initial admission, he was readmitted for massive hemoptysis, and further examinations revealed that he had Behçet's disease. Corticosteroids and intravenous cyclophosphamide were started. Over the next five months, the pulmonary artery aneurysms and thrombosis resolved. The development of pulmonary artery aneurysms led to the diagnosis of Behçet's disease, and they resolved after immunosuppressive therapy. PMID:27853079

  3. Cell death, remodeling, and repair in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease?

    PubMed

    Henson, Peter M; Vandivier, R William; Douglas, Ivor S

    2006-11-01

    Apoptotic cells can be detected in the parenchyma and airways of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in greater numbers than seen in normal lungs or those from smokers without COPD. Implications include more apoptosis and/or decreased clearance of apoptotic cells. Both epithelial and endothelial cells become apoptotic. What role does the apoptosis play in the emphysema or small airway alterations seen in COPD? In simple terms, loss of cells by apoptosis would be expected to accompany, or perhaps initiate, the overall tissue destruction normally believed responsible. Indeed, direct induction of apoptosis in pulmonary endothelial or epithelial cells in rodents is accompanied by emphysematous changes. On the other hand, apoptotic cells are normally removed from tissues rapidly with minimal tissue response, to be followed by cell replacement to maintain homeostasis. The presence of detectable apoptotic cells, therefore, may imply defects in these clearance mechanisms, and, in keeping with this hypothesis, there is increasing evidence for such defects in patients with COPD. Mice with abnormalities in apoptotic cell removal also tend to develop spontaneous "emphysema." A reconciling hypothesis is that recognition of apoptotic cells not only leads to removal but also, normally, to signals for cell replacement. If this latter response is lacking in COPD-susceptible smokers, defects in normal alveolar or small airway repair could significantly contribute to the structural disruption. The concept puts emphasis on defective repair as well as initial injury (i.e., persistent alteration of dynamic tissue homeostasis, as a key contributor to COPD), with, it is hoped, additional approaches for mitigation.

  4. Multiple pulmonary artery aneurysms: a rare cause of massive hemoptysis as presentation of Behcet's disease.

    PubMed

    Al Amri, Salem Mohammad; Banjar, Ahmad Hassan; Cheema, Ahsan Iqbal

    2014-11-01

    We report a case of an acute episode of massive hemoptysis in a diagnosed patient of Behcet's disease, managed conservatively, using angio-guided vascular plug and coils for occluding the multiple bilateral pulmonary artery aneurysms with thoracic surgery backup. The episode of massive hemoptysis was caused by ruptured Pulmonary Artery Aneurysms (PAA).

  5. Successful treatment of osseous blastomycosis without pulmonary or disseminated disease and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Day, Shandra R; Weiss, David B; Hazen, Kevin C; Moore, Christopher C

    2014-06-01

    Blastomycosis commonly occurs following inhalation of Blastomyces dermatitidis conidia causing a pulmonary infection and can disseminate to extrapulmonary sites. Osseous involvement primarily results from hematogenous spread, but in rare cases, direct inoculation can occur. We describe a case of osseous blastomycosis without pulmonary or disseminated disease successfully treated with posaconazole.

  6. Successful Treatment of Osseous Blastomycosis without Pulmonary or Disseminated Disease and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Day, Shandra R.; Weiss, David B.; Hazen, Kevin C.; Moore, Christopher C.

    2014-01-01

    Blastomycosis commonly occurs following inhalation of Blastomyces dermatitidis conidia causing a pulmonary infection and can disseminate to extrapulmonary sites. Osseous involvement primarily results from hematogenous spread but in rare cases direct inoculation can occur. We describe a case of osseous blastomycosis without pulmonary or disseminated disease successfully treated with posaconazole. PMID:24703876

  7. Screening for Depression in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Julian, Laura J.; Gregorich, Steven E.; Earnest, Gillian; Eisner, Mark D.; Chen, Hubert; Blanc, Paul D.; Yelin, Ed H.; Katz, Patricia P.

    2010-01-01

    Depression and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are major causes of disability. Identifying COPD patients at risk for depression would facilitate the alleviation of an important comorbidity conferring additional risk for poor outcomes. The purpose of this study was to determine the utility of a brief screening measure, the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-15), in detecting the mood disorders in persons with COPD. This is a cross-sectional study of 188 persons with COPD, stratified by age (65 and older versus less than 65) and COPD severity using Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) staging. Screening cut-points were empirically derived using threshold selection methods and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were estimated. The GDS-15 was used as a screening measure and diagnoses of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) or other mood disorders were determined using a “gold standard” standardized structured clinical interview. Of the 188 persons with COPD, 25% met criteria for any mood disorder and 11% met criteria for MDD. Optimal threshold estimations suggested a GDS cut score of 5, which yielded adequate sensitivity and specificity in detecting MDD (81% and 87%, respectively) and correctly classified 86% of participants. To detect the presence of any mood disorder, a cut score of 4 was suggested yielding sensitivity and specificity of 67% and 82%, respectively; correctly classifying 79%. These results suggest that mood disorders are relatively common among persons with COPD. The GDS-15 is a useful screening measure to identify patients at risk for depression. PMID:19938969

  8. Screening for depression in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Julian, Laura J; Gregorich, Steven E; Earnest, Gillian; Eisner, Mark D; Chen, Hubert; Blanc, Paul D; Yelin, Ed H; Katz, Patricia P

    2009-12-01

    Depression and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are major causes of disability. Identifying COPD patients at risk for depression would facilitate the alleviation of an important comorbidity conferring additional risk for poor outcomes. The purpose of this study was to determine the utility of a brief screening measure, the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-15), in detecting the mood disorders in persons with COPD. This is a cross-sectional study of 188 persons with COPD, stratified by age (65 and older versus less than 65) and COPD severity using Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) staging. Screening cut-points were empirically derived using threshold selection methods and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were estimated. The GDS-15 was used as a screening measure and diagnoses of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) or other mood disorders were determined using a "gold standard" standardized structured clinical interview. Of the 188 persons with COPD, 25% met criteria for any mood disorder and 11% met criteria for MDD. Optimal threshold estimations suggested a GDS cut score of 5, which yielded adequate sensitivity and specificity in detecting MDD (81% and 87%, respectively) and correctly classified 86% of participants. To detect the presence of any mood disorder, a cut score of 4 was suggested yielding sensitivity and specificity of 67% and 82%, respectively; correctly classifying 79%. These results suggest that mood disorders are relatively common among persons with COPD. The GDS-15 is a useful screening measure to identify patients at risk for depression.

  9. Persistent disabling breathlessness in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Sundh, Josefin; Ekström, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the prevalence, change in breathlessness status over time, and risk factors for disabling and persistent disabling breathlessness in relation to treatments in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Materials and methods Longitudinal analysis of data from the Swedish National Register of COPD with breathlessness measured using modified Medical Research Council (mMRC) scores at two subsequent visits. Prevalence of disabling breathlessness (mMRC ≥2 at baseline) and persistent disabling breathlessness (disabling breathlessness at baseline and follow-up) was investigated in relation to COPD treatment. Risk factors for disabling breathlessness, change from non-disabling to disabling breathlessness, and persistent disabling breathlessness were analyzed using multiple logistic regression. Results A total of 1,689 patients were included in the study with a median follow-up of 12 months (interquartile range: 4 months). Prevalence of disabling breathlessness was 54% at baseline. Persistent disabling breathlessness was present in 43% of patients despite treatment and in 74% of patients despite combined inhaled triple therapy and physiotherapy. Risk factors for disabling breathlessness or change to disabling breathlessness were higher age, lower lung function, frequent exacerbations, obesity, heart failure, depression, and hypoxic respiratory failure (all P<0.05). Persistent disabling breathlessness was associated with lower lung function and ischemic heart disease (all P<0.05). Conclusion Disabling breathlessness is common in COPD despite treatment, which calls for improved symptomatic treatments and consideration of factors influencing disabling breathlessness. Factors influencing disabling breathlessness should be considered for COPD management. PMID:27877034

  10. A causal model of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) risk.

    PubMed

    Cox, Louis Anthony Tony

    2011-01-01

    Research on the etiology of chronic pulmonary disease (COPD), an irreversible degenerative lung disease affecting 15% to 20% of smokers, has blossomed over the past half-century. Profound new insights have emerged from a combination of in vitro and -omics studies on affected lung cell populations (including cytotoxic CD8(+) T lymphocytes, regulatory CD4(+) helper T cells, dendritic cells, alveolar macrophages and neutrophils, alveolar and bronchiolar epithelial cells, goblet cells, and fibroblasts) and extracellular matrix components (especially, elastin and collagen fibers); in vivo studies on wild-type and genetically engineered mice and other rodents; clinical investigation of cell- and molecular-level changes in asymptomatic smokers and COPD patients; genetic studies of susceptible and rapidly-progressing phenotypes (both human and animal); biomarker studies of enzyme and protein degradation products in induced sputum, bronchiolar lavage, urine, and blood; and epidemiological and clinical investigations of the time course of disease progression. To this rich mix of data, we add a relatively simple in silico computational model that incorporates recent insights into COPD disease causation and progression. Our model explains irreversible degeneration of lung tissue as resulting from a cascade of positive feedback loops: a macrophage inflammation loop, a neutrophil inflammation loop, and an alveolar epithelial cell apoptosis loop. Unrepaired damage results in clinical symptoms. The resulting model illustrates how to simplify and make more understandable the main aspects of the very complex dynamics of COPD initiation and progression, as well as how to predict the effects on risk of interventions that affect specific biological responses.

  11. Preoperative pulmonary rehabilitation in patients with non-small cell lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Mujovic, Nebojsa; Subotic, Dragan; Marinkovic, Milan; Milovanovic, Andjela; Stojsic, Jelena; Zugic, Vladimir; Grajic, Mirko; Nikolic, Dejan

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to assess the effects of preoperative pulmonary rehabilitation (PPR) on preoperative clinical status changes in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and net effects of PPR and cancer resection on residual pulmonary function and functional capacity. Material and methods This prospective single group study included 83 COPD patients (62 ±8 years, 85% males, FEV1 = 1844 ±618 ml, Tiffeneau index = 54 ±9%) with NSCLC, on 2–4-week PPR, before resection. Pulmonary function, and functional and symptom status were evaluated by spirometry, 6-minute walking distance (6MWD) and Borg scale, on admission, after PPR and after surgery. Results Following PPR significant improvement was registered in the majority of spirometry parameters (FEV1 by 374 ml, p < 0.001; VLC by 407 ml, p < 0.001; FEF50 by 3%, p = 0.003), 6MWD (for 56 m, p < 0.001) and dyspnoeal symptoms (by 1.0 Borg unit, p < 0.001). A positive correlation was identified between preoperative increments of FEV1 and 6MWD (r s = 0.503, p = 0.001). Negative correlations were found between basal FEV1 and its percentage increment (r s = –0.479, p = 0.001) and between basal 6MWD and its percentage change (r s = –0.603, p < 0.001) during PPR. Compared to basal values, after resection a significant reduction of most spirometry parameters and 6MWD were recorded, while Tiffeneau index, FEF25 and dyspnoea severity remained stable (p = NS). Conclusions Preoperative pulmonary rehabilitation significantly enhances clinical status of COPD patients before NSCLC resection. Preoperative increase of exercise tolerance was the result of pulmonary function improvement during PPR. The beneficial effects of PPR were most emphasized in patients with initially the worst pulmonary function and the weakest functional capacity. PMID:24701217

  12. The Effects of Statins on Pulmonary Artery Pressure in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Arian, Anahita; Moghadam, Sayyed Gholamreza Mortazavi; Kazemi, Toba; Hajihosseini, Morteza

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Pulmonary hypertension is a serious complication in patients suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of atorvastatin in reducing pulmonary arterial pressure in COPD patients. Methods: This double-blind, randomized trial was conducted on 42 known cases of COPD with systolic pulmonary arterial pressure of more than 25 mmHg. The patients were randomly assigned into two groups, 21 patients with atorvastatin treatment (40 mg/daily for 6 months) and 21 patients without receiving atorvastatin. All the patients participated voluntarily and provided written informed consent. The trial was registered in the Iranian Registry of Clinical Trials. Pulmonary pressure was also anticipated by Doppler echocardiography with peak pressure gradient of tricuspid regurgitation. Both groups were tested with echocardiography to measure systolic pulmonary pressure at baseline and posttreatment. Statistical analysis includes Chi-square, Student's t-test, and Wilcoxon test. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Findings: The mean age was 65.8 ± 11.5 years for atorvastatin group and 63.7 ± 7.6 years for control group (P = 0.45). Baseline and posttreatment mean systolic pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) levels in the atorvastatin group were 48.9 ± 3.3 and 38.4 ± 1.9 mmHg, respectively (P = 0.007). In the control group, mean systolic PAP levels at baseline and 6 months later were 45.6 ± 3.1 and 38.9 ± 2.4 mmHg, respectively (P = 0.073). The patients treated with atorvastatin showed significant decrease in total cholesterol (P = 0.001) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (P = 0.008). Conclusion: A 40 mg dose of atorvastatin daily for 6 months may have beneficial effects in reducing PAP in patients with COPD. Further studies are necessary to find long-term effects of statins in COPD patients.

  13. The Relationship between Small Pulmonary Vascular Alteration and Aortic Atherosclerosis in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: Quantitative CT Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Matsuoka, Shin; Yamashiro, Tsuneo; Diaz, Alejandro; Estépar, Raúl San José; Ross, James C.; Silverman, Edwin K.; Kobayashi, Yasuyuki; Dransfield, Mark T.; Bartholmai, Brian J.; Hatabu, Hiroto; Washko, George R.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives The relationship between chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and atherosclerosis has been suggested; this association may relate to systemic inflammation and endothelial dysfunction, which can lead to alteration of small pulmonary vessels. The relationship between atherosclerosis and small pulmonary vessel alteration, however, has not been assessed in COPD patients. We tested the hypothesis that the severity of thoracic aortic calcification measured by computed tomography (CT) would be associated with the total cross-sectional area of small pulmonary vessels (CSA) on CT images. Materials and Methods The study was approved by the institutional review board and was HIPAA compliant. Informed consent was waived. For 51 COPD patients enrolled in the NHBLI Lung Tissue Research Consortium (LTRC), we calculated the percentage of total CSAs of less than 5 mm2 for the total lung area (%CSA<5). Thoracic aortic calcification, quantified by modified Agatston score, was measured. The correlations between thoracic aortic calcification score and %CSA<5, pulmonary function, and extent of emphysema were evaluated. Multiple linear regression analysis using aortic calcification score as the dependent outcome was also performed. Results The %CSA<5 had a significant negative correlation with the thoracic aortic calcification score (r=−0.566, p<0.0001). Multiple linear regression analysis showed significant correlation between the aortic calcification score and %CSA<5 (p<0.0001) independent of age, pack-years, extent of emphysema, and FEV1%. Conclusions Atherosclerosis, assessed by aortic calcification, is associated with the small pulmonary vascular alteration in COPD. Systemic inflammation and endothelial dysfunction may cause the close relationship between atherosclerosis and small pulmonary vessel alteration. PMID:20947389

  14. [Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Current concepts and new therapeutic options].

    PubMed

    Klemmer, A; Greulich, T; Koczulla, A R; Vogelmeier, C F

    2014-04-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a very common chronic disease with increasing prevalence. Inhaled particles and gases (in particular tobacco smoke) induce chronic inflammation of the airways accompanied by a not fully reversible airflow limitation. Destruction of lung tissue and deterioration of gas exchange may follow. In parallel, several comorbidities can be observed. The COPD assessment was revised and now takes into account lung function, the patients' symptoms, and history of exacerbations. More recently, several new long-acting bronchodilators received approval. Combination products, consisting of long-acting β2-agonists and long-acting anticholinergics, and a new combination of a long-acting β-agonist and an inhaled corticosteroid will follow in the near future. Smoking cessation is of central importance.

  15. Pulmonary fibrosis is associated with an elevated risk of thromboembolic disease

    PubMed Central

    Sprunger, D.B.; Olson, A.L.; Huie, T.J.; Fernandez-Perez, E.R.; Fischer, A.; Solomon, J.J.; Brown, K.K.; Swigris, J.J.

    2013-01-01

    Recent epidemiological studies have suggested an increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in lung fibrosis. Large-scale epidemiological data regarding the risk of VTE in pulmonary fibrosis-associated mortality have not been published. Using data from the National Center for Health Statistics from 1988–2007, we determined the risk of VTE in decedents with pulmonary fibrosis in the USA. We analysed 46,450,489 records, of which 218,991 met our criteria for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Among these, 3,815 (1.74%) records also contained a diagnostic code for VTE. The risk of VTE in pulmonary fibrosis decedents was 34% higher than in the background population, and 44% and 54% greater than among decedents with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancer, respectively. Those with VTE and pulmonary fibrosis died at a younger age than those with pulmonary fibrosis alone (females: 74.3 versus 77.4 yrs (p<0.0001); males: 72.0 versus 74.4 yrs (p<0.0001)). Decedents with pulmonary fibrosis had a significantly greater risk of VTE. Those with VTE and pulmonary fibrosis died at a younger age than those with pulmonary fibrosis alone. These data suggest a link between a pro-fibrotic and a pro-coagulant state. PMID:21737559

  16. Abnormal distribution of pulmonary blood flow in aortic valve disease. Relation between pulmonary function and chest radiograph.

    PubMed

    Goodenday, L S; Simon, G; Craig, H; Dalby, L

    1970-05-01

    Wasted ventilatory volume (V(D)) and its ratio to tidal volume (V(D)/V(T)) were measured at rest and during exertion in 17 patients with aortic valve disease. We considered V(D)/V(T) to indicate abnormal ventilation: perfusion relations if it did not decrease on exertion, or if the exercising value was greater than 40 per cent. Plain chest radiographs were independently examined for evidence of diversion of pulmonary blood to the upper lobes. There was significant agreement (p<0.05) between radiographic and pulmonary function estimations of abnormality. This suggests that the raised pulmonary venous pressure associated with left ventricular failure creates an abnormal pattern of blood flow through the lung, which is responsible for causing inadequate perfusion with respect to ventilation.

  17. Behçet's disease with right ventricle thrombus and bilateral pulmonary artery aneurysms--a case report.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Akin; Ertan, Cağatay; Gürkan, Ozlem Ural; Fitöz, Suat; Atasoy, Cetin; Kiliçkap, Mustafa; Numanoğlu, Numan

    2004-01-01

    Behçet's disease is currently recognized as a multisystemic disease that may present with vascular, cutaneous, pulmonary, neurologic, rheumatologic, gastrointestinal, and genitourinary manifestations. Despite this multiplicity, cardiac involvement and also the coexistence of bilateral pulmonary arterial aneurysms are rare. An interesting case is presented here with intracardiac thrombi and bilateral pulmonary arterial aneurysms that showed clinical regression with immunosuppressive therapy.

  18. [Cell senescence and pathophysiology of chronic lung diseases: role in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Adnot, Serge

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of the biology of cellular senescence has improved markedly in recent years, helping us to understand the aging process. It is now clear that cellular senescence is involved in the pathogenesis of many age-related diseases, including respiratory diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). COPD occupies a special place among chronic respiratory diseases because of its frequency and socio-economic impact. The high morbidity and mortality associated with COPD are related to multiple systemic manifestations independent of the severity of airway obstruction. COPD, although most often due to smoking, is also an aging-related respiratory disease. According to a newly developed concept, lung-cell senescence could play a key role in the pathophysiology of COPD, including remodeling of blood vessels and lung parenchyma, as well as the characteristic inflammatory process. Systemic manifestations of COPD, including cardiovascular disease, weight loss, bone demineralization and muscle dysfunction, may reflect a general process of premature aging secondary to the pulmonary changes.

  19. Association of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and hemorrhoids

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Lih-Hwa; Siu, Justin Ji-Yuen; Liao, Po-Chi; Chiang, Jen-Huai; Chou, Pei-Chi; Chen, Huey-Yi; Ho, Tsung-Jung; Tsai, Ming-Yen; Chen, Yung-Hsiang; Chen, Wen-Chi

    2017-01-01

    Abstract According to traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) theory, a specific physiological and pathological relationship exists between the lungs and the large intestine. The aim of this study is to delineate the association of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and hemorrhoids in order to verify the “interior–exterior” relationship between the lungs and the large intestine. A retrospective cohort study is conceived from the National Health Insurance Research Database, Taiwan. The 2 samples (COPD cohort and non-COPD cohort) were selected from the 2000 to 2003 beneficiaries of the NHI, representing patients age 20 and older in Taiwan, with the follow-up ending on December 31, 2011. The COPD cohort (n = 51,506) includes every patient newly diagnosed as having Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD, ICD-9-CM: 490–492, 494, 496), who have made at least 2 confirmed visits to the hospital/clinic. The non-COPD cohort (n = 103,012) includes patients without COPD and is selected via a 1:2 (COPD: non-COPD) matching by age group (per 5 years), gender, and index date (diagnosis date of COPD for the COPD cohort). Compared with non-COPD cohorts, patients with COPD have a higher likelihood of having hemorrhoids and the age-, gender- and comorbidies-adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for hemorrhoids is 1.56 (95% confidence intervals [CI]:1.50–1.62). The adjusted HR of hemorrhoids for females is 0.79 (95% CI: 0.77–0.83), which is significantly less than that for males. The elderly groups, 40 to 59 years and aged 60 or above, have higher adjusted HRs than younger age groups (20–39 years), 1.19 (95% CI: 1.14–1.26), and 1.18 (95% CI: 1.12–1.24), respectively. Patients with COPD may have a higher likelihood to have hemorrhoids in this retrospective cohort study. This study verifies the fundamental theorem of TCM that there is a definite pathogenic association between the lungs and large intestine. PMID:28272246

  20. Strategies for reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Ferri, Claudio

    2015-06-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is frequently accompanied by multimorbidities in affected patients. Even though the majority of these comorbidities are also related to advanced age and cigarette smoke, also COPD itself has significant impact on insurgence, or worsening of these conditions. As a consequence, COPD is regarded as a complex disease with pulmonary and extra-pulmonary involvement. According to current guidelines for the management of COPD patients, the comprehensive treatment of this condition should target respiratory symptoms as well as comorbidities. Cardiovascular disease is one of the most frequent comorbidities in COPD patients and there are several strategies for reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease in COPD patients. These include smoking cessation, pharmacologic prevention of cardiovascular disease, and the treatment of COPD. Beta-blockers for the prevention of cardiovascular disease have been traditionally limited in COPD patients, albeit current evidence supporting their efficacy and safety in these patients. With regard to COPD medications, corticosteroids are generally not recommended, except for exacerbations, while long-acting beta2-agonists have demonstrated an acceptable profile of cardiovascular safety. Long-acting anticholinergic bronchodilators, in particular tiotropium in the mist inhaler formulation, have been associated with an increased risk of major cardiovascular events and mortality. Data on this issue remain, however, controversial. Glycopyrronium, a recently introduced anticholinergic, demonstrated. a rapid and sustained relief of respiratory symptoms with a favorable safety profile and no increase in cardiovascular risk, in monotherapy and in combination with a long-acting beta2-agonist in a comprehensive trial program indicating a valid option for COPD patients with CV comorbidities.

  1. The A2B adenosine receptor modulates pulmonary hypertension associated with interstitial lung disease

    PubMed Central

    Karmouty-Quintana, Harry; Zhong, Hongyan; Acero, Luis; Weng, Tingting; Melicoff, Ernestina; West, James D.; Hemnes, Anna; Grenz, Almut; Eltzschig, Holger K.; Blackwell, Timothy S.; Xia, Yang; Johnston, Richard A.; Zeng, Dewan; Belardinelli, Luiz; Blackburn, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Development of pulmonary hypertension is a common and deadly complication of interstitial lung disease. Little is known regarding the cellular and molecular mechanisms that lead to pulmonary hypertension in patients with interstitial lung disease, and effective treatment options are lacking. The purpose of this study was to examine the adenosine 2B receptor (A2BR) as a regulator of vascular remodeling and pulmonary hypertension secondary to pulmonary fibrosis. To accomplish this, cellular and molecular changes in vascular remodeling were monitored in mice exposed to bleomycin in conjunction with genetic removal of the A2BR or treatment with the A2BR antagonist GS-6201. Results demonstrated that GS-6201 treatment or genetic removal of the A2BR attenuated vascular remodeling and hypertension in our model. Furthermore, direct A2BR activation on vascular cells promoted interleukin-6 and endothelin-1 release. These studies identify a novel mechanism of disease progression to pulmonary hypertension and support the development of A2BR antagonists for the treatment of pulmonary hypertension secondary to interstitial lung disease.—Karmouty-Quintana, H., Zhong, H., Acero, L., Weng, T., Melicoff, E., West, J. D., Hemnes, A., Grenz, A., Eltzschig, H. K., Blackwell, T. S., Xia, Y., Johnston, R. A., Zeng, D., Belardinelli, L., Blackburn, M. R. The A2B adenosine receptor modulates pulmonary hypertension associated with interstitial lung disease. PMID:22415303

  2. Comparative efficacy of indacaterol in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Marcos; Chapman, Kenneth R

    2012-01-01

    Long-acting bronchodilators have been shown to improve multiple clinical outcomes in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) including lung function, symptoms, dyspnea, quality of life, and exacerbations. Indacaterol is a novel, inhaled, long-acting β2-agonist providing 24-hour bronchodilation with once-daily dosing. It is currently approved for the maintenance treatment of COPD to be administered as 150 or 300 μg once-daily doses as licensed in many countries and 75 μg as licensed in the US by means of a single-dose dry powder inhaler. The data from clinical development support a favorable safety and tolerability profile within the β2-agonist drug class, with no relevant issues identified. Current evidence indicates that indacaterol is suitable for use as first-line monotherapy in COPD patients with moderate disease (Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease [GOLD] stage II) and beyond that do not require an inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) as per GOLD guidelines, or in combination with an ICS in severe or very severe patients with repeated exacerbations. Data from trials with the novel once-daily β2-agonist, indacaterol, indicate superior bronchodilation and clinical efficacy over twice-daily long-acting β2-agonists and at least equipotent bronchodilation as once-daily tiotropium. Bronchodilators are central in the symptomatic management of COPD. It is likely that once-daily dosing of a bronchodilator would be a significant convenience and probably a compliance-enhancing advantage, leading to improved overall clinical outcomes in patients with COPD.

  3. Pneumocystis: a novel pathogen in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease?

    PubMed

    Morris, Alison; Sciurba, Frank C; Norris, Karen A

    2008-02-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) results in significant morbidity and mortality. Smoking has long been recognized as the primary risk factor for development of COPD, but factors determining the severity or pattern of disease in smokers are largely unknown. Recent interest has focused on the potential role of infectious agents and the associated host response in accelerating progression of airway obstruction or in perpetuating its progression following discontinuation of tobacco exposure. Pneumocystis jirovecii is a fungal pathogen that causes pneumonia in immunocompromised individuals. Recent evidence has linked this organism with COPD. Using sensitive molecular techniques, low levels of Pneumocystis have been detected in the respiratory tract of certain individuals and termed colonization. Several findings support the theory that colonization with Pneumocystis is involved in the "vicious circle" hypothesis of COPD in which colonization with organisms perpetuates an inflammatory and lung remodeling response. Pneumocystis colonization is more prevalent in smokers and in those with severe COPD. The presence of Pneumocystis in the lungs, even at low levels, produces inflammatory changes similar to those seen in COPD, with increases in numbers of neutrophils and CD8(+) lymphocytes. HIV-infected subjects who have had PCP develop permanent airway obstruction, and HIV-infected patients have a high prevalence of both emphysema and Pneumocystis colonization. In addition, a non-human primate model of colonization shows development of airway obstruction and radiographic emphysema. Additional studies are needed to confirm the role of Pneumocystis in the pathogenesis of COPD, given that this agent might be a treatable co-factor in disease progression.

  4. Management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in Asia and Africa.

    PubMed

    Chan-Yeung, M; Aït-Khaled, N; White, N; Tsang, K W; Tan, W C

    2004-02-01

    This review examines whether the comprehensive programme recommended by the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD), developed mostly by physicians in industrialised countries, can be applied in developing countries. In developing countries, there are several major limitations to the implementation of the programme. First, management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients is not a priority in competing for health care resources. Second, only major medical centres in developing countries have spirometers; the reliance on spirometric testing for diagnosis, staging and treatment options, as recommended by the GOLD guidelines, makes it almost impossible for the programme to be implemented. Third, in many Asian and African countries, regular monitoring is often restricted to patients with severe COPD who have frequent hospitalisations or clinic visits for exacerbations and complications. Fourth, the choice of therapy usually depends on the availability and cost of drugs. Finally, given the aetiological role of sequelae of lung infections, including tuberculosis, the appropriateness and safety of using intermittent courses of oral steroids during acute exacerbations and of long-term, high-dose inhaled corticosteroids for moderate to severe COPD in developing countries has not been evaluated. Developing countries in Asia and Africa may need to adapt the GOLD guidelines according to varying aetiology, local health care resources, socio-economic and cultural factors and development of health services. Prevention programmes, especially for tobacco control, are of paramount importance. National and international efforts must be directed towards controlling the tobacco epidemic in developing countries to reduce the burden of COPD and other tobacco-induced diseases.

  5. Chronic pediatric pulmonary disease and primary humoral antibody based immune disease.

    PubMed

    Dosanjh, A

    2011-04-01

    Chronic inflammation of the larger airways is a common occurrence in children. A number of factors such as younger age, premature birth, male gender, exposure to environmental smoke or pollution, and crowded housing can increase a child's susceptibility to chronic lung disease. Chronic bronchitis may be caused by an underlying humoral immunodeficiency if the clinical course is recurrent or prolonged. Primary humoral immunodeficiency accounts for approximately 70% of all immunodeficiencies. The differential of chronic bronchitis also includes Cystic Fibrosis, ciliary defects and immune cellular and phagocytic defects. This review will summarize the most common humoral antibody based immune based deficiencies associated with chronic pulmonary disease.

  6. Sample Survey of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and Associated Risk Factors in Isfahan, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Golshan, Mohammad; Welte, Tobias

    2011-01-01

    Background The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to estimate the number of individuals with chronic bronchitis and/or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in Isfahan. Our study results were compared with those of previous studies in Iran and similar studies in other countries. Materials and Methods As a part of a population-based, cross-sectional study, 2,200 randomly selected individuals aged 40 years or older were asked to take part in the survey; among whom, 1308 individuals (59.45%) agreed to fill out the respiratory questionnaire. This group consisted of 636 (48.6%) males and 672 (51.4%) females. Spirometric measurements were performed in 279 cases. COPD was defined by the “Global Initiative for Obstructive Lung Disease” criteria. Results One hundred-seven individuals (8.1%) fulfilled the clinical criteria for chronic bronchitis as the main sign of COPD. Multivariate analysis revealed that age and smoking were independent predictors for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Conclusion It is concluded that the prevalence of chronic bronchitis symptoms is approximately the same in our population as compared with western countries. The frequency of clinical chronic bronchitis has risen in comparison to a previous study in Isfahan. PMID:25191373

  7. Optimizing nonpharmacological management following an acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Samantha L; Goldstein, Roger; Desveaux, Laura; Tulloch, Verity; Brooks, Dina

    2014-01-01

    Though the guidelines for the optimal management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) following an acute exacerbation (AE) are well established, issues associated with poor adherence to nonpharmacological interventions such as self-management advice and pulmonary rehabilitation will impact on hospital readmission rates and health care costs. Systems developed for clinically stable patients with COPD may not be sufficient for those who are post-exacerbation. A redesign of the manner in which such interventions are delivered to patients following an AECOPD is necessary. Addressing two or more components of the chronic care model is effective in reducing health care utilization in patients with COPD, with self-management support contributing a key role. By refining self-management support to incorporate the identification and treatment of psychological symptoms and by providing health care professionals adequate time and training to deliver respiratory-specific advice and self-management strategies, adherence to nonpharmacological therapies following an AE may be enhanced. Furthermore, following up patients in their own homes allows for the tailoring of advice and for the delivery of consistent health care messages which may enable knowledge to be retained. By refining the delivery of nonpharmacological therapies following an AECOPD according to components of the chronic care model, adherence may be improved, resulting in better disease management and possibly reducing health care utilization.

  8. A Case of Pulmonary-Renal Syndrome Leading to the Diagnosis of Legionnaires' Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sabani, Erasmia; Kouloukourgiotou, Theodora; Stylianou, Konstantinos; Pantzaki, Afroditi; Efstratiadis, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 51-year-old Caucasian man referred at our department due to acute renal failure (ARF) complicating respiratory failure during hospitalization in a regional hospital. The patient was previously started on steroids due to the suspicion of rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis (RPGN) in the context of Goodpasture syndrome. However, clinical and laboratory findings did not support this diagnosis; instead a careful evaluation limited differential diagnosis of the renal insult to acute tubular necrosis or acute interstitial nephritis (AIN) following respiratory infection. With lung function fully improved but renal function not recovering, a renal biopsy revealed AIN, a finding leading to further diagnostic testing and finally to the diagnosis of Legionnaires' disease as a cause of this patient's pulmonary-renal syndrome. The management consisted of progressive tapering of oral steroids associated with full recovery of the patient's renal function. This is a rare case of Legionnaires' disease causing immune-mediated AIN and highlights the possibility of Legionella infection as a cause of pulmonary-renal syndrome. PMID:27999694

  9. Is alveolar destruction and emphysema in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease an immune disease?

    PubMed

    Taraseviciene-Stewart, Laima; Douglas, Ivor S; Nana-Sinkam, Patrick S; Lee, Jong D; Tuder, Rubin M; Nicolls, Mark R; Voelkel, Norbert F

    2006-11-01

    The alveolar destruction leading to airspace enlargement in patients with end-stage chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is frequently progressive, despite smoking cessation. Several laboratories have accumulated data demonstrating the presence of immune cells in bronchial biopsy specimens and lung tissue sections from patients with COPD. Recently, the accumulation of T and B lymphocytes, often forming follicles, in the lung parenchyma from patients with severe COPD has been reported. In addition, it has been postulated that there might be an autoimmune component to COPD. T-cell receptor analysis has provided data consistent with the concept of T-cell clones in the lung tissue from patients with COPD. Against this background, we developed a model of autoimmune emphysema in adult rats. Based on published data showing that immunization of mice with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) causes production of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor II (KDR) antibodies, and our own data indicating that administration of a VEGF receptor blocker in adult rats causes emphysema, we reasoned that intraperitoneal injection of HUVECs in rats would generate both anti-VEGF receptor antibodies and emphysema. Indeed, intraperitoneal injection of HUVECs caused emphysema. We further explored the autoimmune nature of this model, identified KDR antibodies in the serum of HUVEC-immunized rats, and injected serum from the emphysematous rats into naive rats and mice, which resulted in emphysema. Presently, we are in the process of investigating whether cigarette smoke extract causes emphysema. We recently identified anti-endothelial cell antibodies in the serum of patients with end-stage emphysema.

  10. Mortality from respiratory infections and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and associations with environmental quality.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Respiratory infections (RI) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have been identified by the World Health Organization as conditions which may be strongly influenced by environmental factors. We examined the associations between environmental quality and U.S. county m...

  11. Pulmonary Changes in Lung Purpura and Some of the Other Collagen Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Herbert W.; Hargraves, Malcolm M.; Andersen, Howard A.; Daugherty, Guy W.

    1963-01-01

    The physician who specializes in pulmonary diseases has a most helpful aid in the form of chest roentgenography. This examination is secured routinely in many hospitals and clinics today. The roentgenogram is very accurate in finding pulmonary lesions. Accuracy in determining the type of lesion depends on the experience of the physician who is studying the patient. Pulmonary lesions occur in many systemic diseases. They may occur in some of the collagen diseases and at times they may be the first and also the most striking findings noted during the examination of a patient. For this reason, attention is called to some of the pulmonary findings encountered in certain of these diseases. Some of the clinical, roentgenologic and pathologic manifestations of necrotizing alveolitis, periarteritis nodosa, glomerulonephritis, disseminated lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and scleroderma are described. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7 PMID:13991999

  12. Ambient air pollution particles and the acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    EPA Science Inventory

    Investigation has repeatedly demonstrated an association between exposure to ambient air pollution particles and numerous indices of human morbidity and mortality. Individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are among those with an increased sensitivity to air p...

  13. Pulmonary disease due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis in a horse: zoonotic concerns and limitations of antemortem testing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A case of pulmonary tuberculosis caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis was diagnosed in a horse. Clinical evaluation performed prior to euthanasia did not suggest tuberculosis, but postmortem examination provided pathological and bacteriological evidence of disease. In the lungs, multiple tuberculoid...

  14. Pulmonary oxidative stress, inflammation and dysregulated iron homeostatis in rat models of cardiovascular disease

    EPA Science Inventory

    Underlying cardiovascular disease (CVD) is considered a risk factor for the exacerbation of air pollution health effects. Therefore, rodent models of CVD are increasingly used to examine mechanisms ofvariation in susceptibility. Pulmonary oxidative stress, inflammation and altere...

  15. Pharmacology Update on Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Rheumatoid Arthritis, and Major Depression.

    PubMed

    Weatherspoon, Deborah; Weatherspoon, Christopher A; Abbott, Brianna

    2015-12-01

    This article presents a brief review and summarizes current therapies for the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, major depression, and rheumatoid arthritis. One new pharmaceutical agent is highlighted for each of the topics.

  16. Pulmonary Complications Resulting from Genetic Cardiovascular Disease in Two Rat Models

    EPA Science Inventory

    Underlying cardiovascular disease (CVD) has been considered a risk factor for exacerbation of air pollution health effects. Therefore, rodent models of CVD are increasingly used to examine mechanisms of variation in susceptibility. Pulmonary complications and altered iron homeost...

  17. Inhaled nitric oxide and arterial oxygen tension in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and severe pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Katayama, Y.; Higenbottam, T. W.; d Diaz; Cremona, G.; Akamine, S.; Barbera, J. A.; Rodriguez-Roisin, R.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Inhaled nitric oxide (NO) is a selective pulmonary vasodilator which can improve gas exchange in acute lung injury. However, it is uncertain that this effect on arterial oxygenation can be generalised to all lung diseases. METHODS: The effects of inhaled NO on gas exchange were studied in nine patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), 11 patients with severe pulmonary hypertension, and 14 healthy volunteers. A randomized sequence of 40 ppm of NO or air was inhaled for 20 minutes through an orofacial mask. RESULTS: Inhaled NO reduced mean (SE) transcutaneous arterial oxygen tension (TcPO2) from 9.6 (0.3) to 8.9 (0.4) kPa in healthy volunteers and from 7.4 (0.6) to 7.0 (0.5) kPa in patients with COPD. There was no change in TcPO2 in patients with severe pulmonary hypertension. During inhalation of NO and air no change occurred in transcutaneous arterial carbon dioxide tension (TcPCO2), arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2) measured by pulse oximeter, or cardiac output determined by the transthoracic impedance method. CONCLUSIONS: Inhaled NO does not improve TcPO2 nor increase cardiac output in normal subjects and patients with COPD, suggesting that inhaled NO worsens gas exchange. This could represent inhaled NO overriding hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction in COPD. The finding that TcPO2 also fell when normal subjects inhaled NO suggests that a similar mechanism normally contributes to optimal gas exchange. Whilst inhaled NO can improve oxygenation, this effect should not be considered to be a general response but is dependent on the type of lung disease. 


 PMID:9059470

  18. Vitamins and respiratory disease: antioxidant micronutrients in pulmonary health and disease.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Frank J

    2005-11-01

    The lungs are continually exposed to relatively-high O(2) tensions, and as such, in comparison with other organs, they represent a unique tissue for the damaging effects of oxidant attack. At particular times during a lifetime this every day challenge may increase exponentially. The first oxidative insult occurs at birth, when cells are exposed to a sudden 5-fold increase in O(2) concentration. Thereafter, the human lung, from infancy through to old age, can be subjected to deleterious oxidative events as a consequence of inhaling environmental pollutants or irritants, succumbing to several pulmonary diseases (including infant and adult respiratory distress syndromes, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cystic fibrosis and cancer) and receiving treatment for these diseases. The present paper will review the concept that consumption of a healthy diet and the consequent ability to establish and then maintain adequate micronutrient antioxidant concentrations in the lung throughout life, and following various oxidative insults, could prevent or reduce the incidence of oxidant-mediated respiratory diseases. Furthermore, the rationale, practicalities and complexities of boosting the antioxidant pool of the respiratory-tract lining fluid in diseases in which oxidative stress is actively involved, by direct application to the lung v. dietary modification, in order to achieve a therapeutic effect will be discussed.

  19. [Pharmacological treatment of stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Allain, Yves-Marie; Giraud, Frédérique; Huchon, Gérard; Roche, Nicolas

    2009-03-01

    The pharmacological treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) can significantly improve quality of life by reducing exacerbations, dyspnea and exercise intolerance, thereby limiting the degree of handicap and improving daily activities. Recently, large randomised trials showed that some treatments can alter the decline in FEV1, which was previously only accessible to smoking cessation, and maybe reduce mortality. Bronchodilators are the first-line pharmacological treatment of COPD. Their clinical efficacy cannot be predicted by the inconstant changes in FEV(1.) Their main mechanism of action is the reduction in lung hyperinflation. Theophylline has a lower efficacy/tolerance ratio than inhaled bronchodilators. In symptomatic patients with FEV1 <50/60% predicted and repeated exacerbations despite bronchodilators, inhaled corticosteroids combined with long acting beta-agonists can be used. Several other approaches targeting inflammation and oxidative stress, remodelling and lung regeneration are also being studied. Medications must be associated with non-pharmacological measures (including help towards smoking cessation, education, exercise training...). Systemic manifestations of COPD must also be taken into account.

  20. Systemic inflammation after inspiratory loading in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Fuster, Antonia; Sauleda, Jaume; Sala, Ernest; Barceló, Bernardí; Pons, Jaume; Carrera, Miguel; Noguera, Aina; Togores, Bernat; Agustí, Alvar GN

    2008-01-01

    Objective Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) present systemic inflammation. Strenuous resistive breathing induces systemic inflammation in healthy subjects. We hypothesized that the increased respiratory load that characterizes COPD can contribute to systemic inflammation in these patients. Patients and methods To test this hypothesis, we compared leukocyte numbers and levels of circulating cytokines (tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNFα], interleukin-1β [IL-1β], IL-6, IL-8, and IL-10), before and 1 hour after maximal incremental inspiratory loading in 13 patients with stable COPD (forced expiratory volume in one second [FEV1] 29 ± 2.5% ref) and in 8 healthy sedentary subjects (FEV1 98 ± 5% ref). Results We found that: (1) at baseline, patients with COPD showed higher leukocyte counts and IL-8 levels than controls (p < 0.01); and, (2) one hour after maximal inspiratory loading these values were unchanged, except for IL-10, which increased in controls (p < 0.05) but not in patients with COPD. Conclusions This study confirms the presence of systemic inflammation in COPD, shows that maximal inspiratory loading does not increase the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-8) in COPD patients or controls, but suggests that the former may be unable to mount an appropriate systemic anti-inflammatory response to exercise. PMID:18488438

  1. Macrolides: a promising pharmacologic therapy for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Shilin; Zhong, Xiaoning

    2017-03-01

    Chronic inflammation plays a central role in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, there are no effective anti-inflammatory pharmacologic therapies available for COPD so far. Recent evidence suggests that an immunologic mechanism has a role in the pathogenesis of COPD. Macrolides possess anti-inflammatory and immune-modulating effects may be helpful in the treatment of COPD. Several clinical studies have shown that long-term use of macrolides reduces the frequency of COPD exacerbations. However, the subgroups that most effectively respond to long-term treatment of macrolides still need to be determined. The potential adverse events to individuals and the microbial resistance in community populations raises great concern on the long-term use of macrolides. Thus, novel macrolides have anti-inflammatory and immuno-modulating effects, but without antibiotic effects, and are promising as an anti-inflammatory agent for the treatment of COPD. In addition, the combination of macrolides and other anti-inflammatory pharmacologic agents may be a new strategy for the treatment of COPD.

  2. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: nature-nurture interactions.

    PubMed

    Clancy, John; Nobes, Maggie

    A person's health status is rarely constant, it is usually subject to continual change as a person moves from health to illness and usually back to health again; the health-illness continuum illustrates this dynamism. This highlights the person's various states of health and illness (ranging from extremely good health to clinically defined mild, moderate and severe illness) and their fluctuations throughout the life span, until ultimately leading to the pathology associated with the person's death. Maintenance of a stable homeostatic environment within the body to support the stability of this continuum depends on a complex series of ultimately intracellular chemical reactions. These reactions are activated by environmental factors that cause the expression of genes associated with healthy phenotypes as well as illness susceptibility genes associated with homeostatic imbalances. Obviously, the body aims to support intracellular and extracellular environments allied with health; however, the complexity of these nature-nurture interactions results in illness throughout an individual's life span. This paper will discuss the nature-nurture interactions of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  3. Penalizing Hospitals for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Readmissions

    PubMed Central

    Au, David H.

    2014-01-01

    In October 2014, the U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) will expand its Hospital Readmission Reduction Program (HRRP) to include chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Under the new policy, hospitals with high risk-adjusted, 30-day all-cause unplanned readmission rates after an index hospitalization for a COPD exacerbation will be penalized with reduced reimbursement for the treatment of Medicare beneficiaries. In this perspective, we review the history of the HRRP, including the recent addition of COPD to the policy. We critically assess the use of 30-day all-cause COPD readmissions as an accountability measure, discussing potential benefits and then highlighting the substantial drawbacks and potential unintended consequences of the measure that could adversely affect providers, hospitals, and patients with COPD. We conclude by emphasizing the need to place the 30-day COPD readmission measure in the context of a reconceived model for postdischarge quality and review several frameworks that could help guide this process. PMID:24460431

  4. Pulmonary artery involvement and associated lung disease in Behçet disease: a series of 47 patients.

    PubMed

    Seyahi, Emire; Melikoglu, Melike; Akman, Canan; Hamuryudan, Vedat; Ozer, Harun; Hatemi, Gulen; Yurdakul, Sebahattin; Tuzun, Hasan; Oz, Buge; Yazici, Hasan

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary artery aneurysms (PAAs) are well known causes of mortality and morbidity in Behçet disease (BD). However, pulmonary artery involvement in BD is not limited to PAA; the other main type of pulmonary artery involvement is pulmonary artery thrombus (PAT), with or without associated PAA. In addition, other types of lung disease like nodules and cavities in the lung parenchyma are frequently associated with pulmonary artery involvement, and can be misinterpreted as being due to infection. We surveyed the clinical, radiologic, and laboratory characteristics and outcome of 47 BD patients with pulmonary artery involvement and the associated findings, all seen and followed at a single dedicated tertiary care center.We identified 47 (41 male, 6 female) patients in whom pulmonary artery involvement was diagnosed, who were registered in the multidisciplinary clinic at Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty between January 2000 and December 2007. Mean age at diagnosis was 29 ± 8 years, and mean disease duration to the onset of pulmonary artery involvement was 3.6 ± 4.8 years. Hemoptysis was the most common presenting symptom (79%) followed by cough, fever, dyspnea, and pleuritic chest pain. Thirty-four of 47 patients (72%) presented with PAA, including 8 with associated PAT. The remaining 13 patients (28%) had isolated PAT. Patients with isolated PAT in general have clinical features similar to patients with PAA. However, hemoptysis was less frequent and voluminous in patients with isolated PAT. Most (91%) of the patients had active disease outside the lungs when they presented with pulmonary artery involvement.Forty (85%) patients had nodules and 6 (13%) had cavities when first seen. Peripheral venous thrombosis was present in 36 of 47 (77%) patients, and intracardiac thrombi in 12 of the 36 (33%) patients. Nodules, cavities, and intracardiac thrombi were mainly present in the acute stages of pulmonary artery involvement.Pulmonary artery involvement is usually multiple, and

  5. Blood gas analysis in dogs with pulmonary heartworm disease.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, H; Yasuda, K; Sasaki, Y

    1993-04-01

    Blood gases were analyzed in dogs with pulmonary heartworm (HW) disease. The arterial oxygen tension (PaO2) in dogs with mild signs of dirofilariasis (mildly affected group, n = 48, 85.7 +/- 8.2 mmHg) and in dogs with signs of right heart failure (severely affected group, n = 13, 76.4 +/- 11.6 mmHg) was lower (p < 0.01) than in dogs without HW infection (HW-free group, n = 19, 91.5 +/- 7.3 mmHg). Only 2 dogs in the severely affected group had a PaO2 less than 60 mmHg. The arterial carbon dioxide tension (PaCO2, p < 0.01) and mixed venous O2 (p < 0.01) and CO2 (p < 0.01) tensions were lower, and alveolar-arterial oxygen difference (AaDO2, p < 0.01) was greater in the severely affected group than in the HW-free and mildly affected groups. Arterial pH and bicarbonate (HCO3-) concentrations were lower (p < 0.01) in both affected groups than in the HW-free groups. The anion gap level was not different among the 3 groups. Serum lactic acid level in the severely affected group was higher (p < 0.01) than in the HW-free and mildly affected groups. However, a slightly higher serum lactic acid concentration was found only in 2 dogs of the severely affected group (3.84 mmol/l and 3.82 mmol/l). The PaO2 (r = -0.62) and AaDO2 (r = 0.66) correlated significantly (p < 0.01) with mean pulmonary arterial pressure. One week after HW removal, blood gases, pH and HCO3- concentration remained unchanged in the mildly affected group. In the severely affected group, blood gas values were the same, but pH and HCO3- concentration improved slightly.

  6. The Sputum Microbiome in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Exacerbations.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yvonne J; Boushey, Homer A

    2015-11-01

    Acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are thought to be associated with--and perhaps to mediate--accelerated loss of lung function in COPD. Although the application of culture-independent methods for detection of bacteria have shown COPD to be associated with marked differences in the burden, diversity, and composition of the bronchial bacterial microbiome, few studies have examined the changes associated with community-acquired exacerbations of the disease. In a longitudinal cohort study of COPD, the availability of sputum samples from subjects obtained at the onset of an exacerbation and during periods of clinical stability before and after the event enabled us to recently address this gap in knowledge, using culture-independent, 16S rRNA-based analysis methods combined with in silico inference of metagenomic functions. We observed sputum bacterial composition to be generally stable over the preexacerbation period of clinical stability, but to change at the time of exacerbation, with specific enrichment in not only typical COPD-associated bacterial species (e.g., Haemophilus influenzae) but also other phylogenetically related species with pathogenic potential. Concurrently, we observed depleted abundance of other bacteria whose predicted metagenomes suggest functional capacities to produce a variety of antiinflammatory compounds. Most strikingly, we found that resolution of these exacerbation-related changes in sputum microbiota composition differed significantly, depending on the exacerbation treatments prescribed. Treatment with corticosteroids resulted in microbiome enrichment for a number of bacterial communities, mostly members of the Proteobacteria phylum, whereas prolonged suppression of microbiota was seen in those treated with antibiotics alone. Taken together, our findings suggest that exacerbations of COPD are associated with heterogeneous changes in the bronchial microbiome, with increases in the abundance of species

  7. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in Never-Smoking Dairy Farmers

    PubMed Central

    Stoleski, Saso; Minov, Jordan; Karadzinska-Bislimovska, Jovanka; Mijakoski, Dragan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction : Work-related chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) represents a considerable part of the disease burden globally. Objective : To assess the COPD prevalence and characteristics in never-smoking dairy farmers. Materials and Methodology : We have conducted a cross-sectional study with 75 male dairy farmers aged 26 to 59 years, and compared them with equivalent number of male office workers similar by age, and duration of employment. Data on chronic respiratory symptoms, job history and daily activities were obtained by questionnaire. Lung functional testing of the examined subjects included baseline spirometry, and bronchodilator reversibility measurement. Results : Dairy farmers showed higher prevalence of overall respiratory symptoms, but significant difference was noticed for cough, phlegm, and dyspnea. Dairy farmers had more prevalent work-related respiratory symptoms, being significant for overall symptoms, cough, and phlegm. The mean baseline values of spirometric parameters were lower in dairy farmers, but significance was reported for FEV1/FVC%, MEF50, MEF75, and MEF25-75. Dairy farmers had significantly higher COPD prevalence than office controls (10.7% vs 2.7%, P = 0,049). Dairy farmers and office controls showed significant association between COPD and age over 45 years. Dairy farmers had a significant association between COPD and employment duration of over 20 years (P = 0.023), but also between COPD and work-related chronic respiratory symptoms (P = 0.041). Conclusion : The study findings favor the cause-effect association between job exposure to respiratory hazards, and development of persistent airway obstruction among dairy farmers. PMID:25893027

  8. Cognitive status among patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Roncero, Carlos; Campuzano, Ana Isabel; Quintano, Jose Antonio; Molina, Jesús; Pérez, Joselín; Miravitlles, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We investigated the association between cognitive impairment and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), taking into account demographic and clinical variables evaluated during routine practice. Patients and methods We performed a post hoc analysis of a cross-sectional study that included subjects with stable COPD. Sociodemographic and clinical information was recorded using the Body mass index, airflow Obstruction, Dyspnea and Exacerbations index and the Charlson comorbidity index. Cognitive performance was studied by the mini-mental state examination, with a score less than 27 indicating clinical impairment. Depressive symptoms, physical activity, and quality of life (EuroQoL-5 dimensions and COPD Assessment Test) were also evaluated. Results The analysis included 940 subjects. The prevalence of cognitive impairment was 39.4%. Multivariate logistic regression models revealed that cognitive impairment was associated with educational level (odds ratio [OR] =0.096, 95% confidence interval [CI] =0.011–0.447) and poorer quality of life measured by the EuroQoL-5 dimensions social tariff (OR =0.967, 95% CI =0.950–0.983). When questionnaires were not included in the analysis, cognitive impairment was associated with educational level (OR =0.063, 95% CI =0.010–0.934), number of exacerbations (OR =11.070, 95% CI =1.450–84.534), Body mass index, airflow Obstruction, Dyspnea and Exacerbations index score (OR =1.261, 95% CI =1.049–1.515), and the Charlson comorbidity index (OR =1.412, 95% CI =1.118–1.783). Conclusion Cognitive impairment is common in COPD and is associated with low educational level, higher disease severity, and increased comorbidity. This could have therapeutic implications for this population. PMID:27042043

  9. A review of halotherapy for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Rashleigh, Rachael; Smith, Sheree MS; Roberts, Nicola J

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a chronic, progressive disease and is treated with inhaled medication to optimize the patient’s lung health through decreasing their symptoms, especially breathlessness. Halotherapy is the inhalation of micronized dry salt within a chamber that mimics a salt cave environment. Recent media reports suggest that this therapy may help with the symptoms of COPD. Objective To critically evaluate and summarize the evidence for the use of halotherapy as a treatment for COPD. Design A review using systematic approach and narrative synthesis. Data sources Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and Google Scholar were searched. Two reviewers independently reviewed abstracts and selected eligible studies based on predetermined selection criteria. Results Of the 151 articles retrieved from databases and relevant reference lists, only one randomized controlled trial met the inclusion criteria. A meta-analysis was unable to be conducted due to the limited number of published studies. Inclusion criteria were subsequently expanded to allow three case-control studies to be included, ensuring that a narrative synthesis could be completed. From the pooled data of the four studies, there were 1,041 participants (661 in the intervention group and 380 in the control group). The assessment of methodological quality raised issues associated with randomization and patient selection. Three themes were identified from the narrative synthesis: respiratory function, quality of life, and medication use. Conclusion Themes generated from the narrative synthesis data reflect outcome measures regularly used for interventional research associated with COPD. From this review, recommendations for inclusion of halotherapy as a therapy for COPD cannot be made at this point and there is a need for high quality studies to determine the effectiveness of this therapy. PMID:24591823

  10. Prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in asymptomatic smokers

    PubMed Central

    Sansores, Raúl H; Velázquez-Uncal, Mónica; Pérez-Bautista, Oliver; Villalba-Caloca, Jaime; Falfán-Valencia, Ramcés; Ramírez-Venegas, Alejandra

    2015-01-01

    Background Physicians do not routinely recommend smokers to undergo spirometry unless they are symptomatic. Objective To test the hypothesis that there are a significant number of asymptomatic smokers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), we estimated the prevalence of COPD in a group of asymptomatic smokers. Methods Two thousand nine hundred and sixty-one smokers with a cumulative consumption history of at least 10 pack-years, either smokers with symptoms or smokers without symptoms (WOS) were invited to perform a spirometry and complete a symptom questionnaire. Results Six hundred and thirty-seven (21.5%) smokers had no symptoms, whereas 2,324 (78.5%) had at least one symptom. The prevalence of COPD in subjects WOS was 1.5% when considering the whole group of smokers (45/2,961) and 7% when considering only the group WOS (45/637). From 329 smokers with COPD, 13.7% were WOS. Subjects WOS were younger, had better lung function and lower cumulative consumption of cigarettes, estimated as both cigarettes per day and pack-years. According to severity of airflow limitation, 69% vs 87% of subjects were classified as Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease stages I–II in the WOS and smokers with symptoms groups, respectively (P<0.001). A multivariate analysis showed that forced expiratory volume in 1 second (mL) was the only predictive factor for COPD in asymptomatic smokers. Conclusion Prevalence of COPD in asymptomatic smokers is 1.5%. This number of asymptomatic smokers may be excluded from the benefit of an “early” intervention, not just pharmacological but also from smoking cessation counseling. The higher forced expiratory volume in 1 second may contribute to prevent early diagnosis. PMID:26586941

  11. Inflammatory mechanisms in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Peter J

    2016-07-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is associated with chronic inflammation affecting predominantly the lung parenchyma and peripheral airways that results in largely irreversible and progressive airflow limitation. This inflammation is characterized by increased numbers of alveolar macrophages, neutrophils, T lymphocytes (predominantly TC1, TH1, and TH17 cells), and innate lymphoid cells recruited from the circulation. These cells and structural cells, including epithelial and endothelial cells and fibroblasts, secrete a variety of proinflammatory mediators, including cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, and lipid mediators. Although most patients with COPD have a predominantly neutrophilic inflammation, some have an increase in eosinophil counts, which might be orchestrated by TH2 cells and type 2 innate lymphoid cells though release of IL-33 from epithelial cells. These patients might be more responsive to corticosteroids and bronchodilators. Oxidative stress plays a key role in driving COPD-related inflammation, even in ex-smokers, and might result in activation of the proinflammatory transcription factor nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), impaired antiprotease defenses, DNA damage, cellular senescence, autoantibody generation, and corticosteroid resistance though inactivation of histone deacetylase 2. Systemic inflammation is also found in patients with COPD and can worsen comorbidities, such as cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, and osteoporosis. Accelerated aging in the lungs of patients with COPD can also generate inflammatory protein release from senescent cells in the lung. In the future, it will be important to recognize phenotypes of patients with optimal responses to more specific therapies, and development of biomarkers that identify the therapeutic phenotypes will be important.

  12. Acute effect of hydralazine administration on pulmonary artery hemodynamics in dogs with chronic heartworm disease.

    PubMed

    Atkins, C E; Keene, B W; McGuirk, S M; Sato, T

    1994-02-01

    In an effort to better understand the role of vasodilators in the management of pulmonary hypertension associated with chronic heartworm disease (HWD), pulmonary hemodynamic measurements were obtained from 7 experimentally infected, anesthetized dogs before and after hydralazine administration (mean dose, 1.96 mg/kg of body weight). Five dogs were maintained on room air, while 2 were maintained on 100% oxygen during the hydralazine study. The hemodynamic effect of hydralazine in dogs with HWD was evaluated, using heart rate, cardiac index, mean pulmonary artery pressure, mean arterial pressure, total pulmonary resistance, total systemic resistance, total systemic resistance/total pulmonary resistance, left ventricular dP/dtmax, left ventricular end diastolic pressure, and left and right ventricular double products ([mean arterial pressure x heart rate] and [mean pulmonary artery pressure x heart rate], respectively). Responders were defined as those in which total pulmonary resistance decreased > or = 20% without an increase in mean pulmonary arterial pressure and in which heart rate increase was < or = 10%. Comparison was also made between maximal hemodynamic effect of hydralazine with that after 100% oxygen administration for 15 minutes to previously normoxemic dogs (n = 5). Significance was determined if P < 0.05, using the paired t-test. Hydralazine induced significant reductions in mean pulmonary and systemic arterial pressures and total pulmonary resistance, with no significant change in heart rate, cardiac index, total systemic resistance, left ventricular dP/dtmax, left ventricular end diastolic pressure, or right and left ventricular double products. Four (57%) of the 7 dogs studied were considered responders. Pretreatment cardiac index, mean pulmonary artery pressure, and total pulmonary resistance did not allow differentiation of responders from nonresponders.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Skeletal muscle response to inflammation--lessons for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Reid, W Darlene; Rurak, Jennifer; Harris, R Luke

    2009-10-01

    To describe how inflammation affects muscle adaptation and performance in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, an increasingly sedentary lifestyle is a primary contributor to muscle dysfunction that results in a loss of mobility and independence and, ultimately, mortality. Given the systemic chronic inflammation and profound limb muscle atrophy in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, it is tempting to speculate that the inflammatory process is deleterious to skeletal muscle. In healthy people, however, the inflammatory process initially is dominated by a destructive phase that is tightly regulated and modulates a reparative, regenerative phase. Although the inflammatory process and associated oxidative stress is more closely connected to muscle wasting in animal models of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, the causative role of inflammation toward muscle atrophy and weakness in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease has not been definitively shown. Anti-inflammatory interventions aimed toward tempering muscle wasting and weakness in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease may not prove to be beneficial because of longer-term disruption of the regeneration of muscle tissue. Temporally and spatially targeted interventions aimed toward ameliorating oxidative stress, such as antioxidants, nutritional supplements, and chronic exercise training, may optimize outcomes toward maintaining muscle mass and performance.

  14. Relationships among subgross anatomy, computed tomography, and histologic findings in dogs with disease localized to the pulmonary acini.

    PubMed

    Scrivani, Peter V; Thompson, Margret S; Dykes, Nathan L; Holmes, Nedra L; Southard, Teresa L; Gerdin, Jodie A; Bezuidenhout, Abraham J

    2012-01-01

    During computed tomography (CT), the appearance of disease involving the pulmonary acinus may be described using terms such as atelectasis, ground-glass opacity, or consolidation. These CT signs, however, have not been correlated with histologic findings in canine pulmonary disease. To facilitate interpretation of lung diseases by CT signs, our goals were to review the morphologic organization of the lung and evaluate the medical records of four dogs with different types of pulmonary acinar disease. Anatomic review focused on understanding the pulmonary acinus and the secondary pulmonary lobule; the secondary pulmonary lobule is a fundamental unit for interpretation in people. All dogs had similar CT findings of fully expanded lungs with increased attenuation and partial-to-complete obscuring of the pulmonary blood vessels. Histologic findings varied between dogs and included partial-to-complete filling of airspaces with cells or fluid, interstitial thickening, increased capillary blood volume, or a combination of these findings. Final diagnoses were hemorrhagic pneumonia, bronchiolar carcinoma, metastatic mammary adenocarcinoma, and pulmonary edema. In summary, the morphologic organization of the lungs is complex and has implications for diagnostic interpretation needing further evaluation in dogs. In this study, increased lung attenuation during CT due to disease localized to the pulmonary acini was due to the displacement of air from the lungs and not to the microscopic distribution of lesions within the pulmonary acinus. Imaging descriptors that classify diseases according to structures larger than the pulmonary acini, for example, regions of the secondary pulmonary lobule or larger, may be appropriate for dogs.

  15. Severe pulmonary hypertension in lung disease: phenotypes and response to treatment.

    PubMed

    Brewis, Melanie J; Church, Alistair C; Johnson, Martin K; Peacock, Andrew J

    2015-11-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) due to lung disease (World Health Organization (WHO) group 3) is common, but severe PH, arbitrarily defined as mean pulmonary artery pressure ≥35 mmHg is reported in only a small proportion. Whether these should be treated as patients in WHO group 1 (i.e. pulmonary arterial hypertension) with PH-targeted therapies is unknown. We compared the phenotypic characteristics and outcomes of 118 incident patients with severe PH and lung disease with 74 idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) patients, all treated with pulmonary vasodilators. Lung disease patients were older, more hypoxaemic, and had lower gas transfer, worse New York Heart Association functional class and lower 6-min walking distance (6MWD) than IPAH patients. Poorer survival in those with lung disease was driven by the interstitial lung disease (ILD) cohort. In contrast to IPAH, where significant improvements in 6MWD and N-terminal pro-brain natruiretic peptide (NT-proBNP) occurred, PH therapy in severe PH lung disease did not lead to improvement in 6MWD or functional class, but neither was deterioration seen. NT-proBNP decreased from 2200 to 1596 pg·mL(-1) (p=0.015). Response varied by lung disease phenotype, with poorer outcomes in patients with ILD and emphysema with preserved forced expiratory volume in 1 s. Further study is required to investigate whether vasodilator therapy may delay disease progression in severe PH with lung disease.

  16. A prospective, randomized study: Evaluation of the effect of rosuvastatin in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Chogtu, Bharti; Kuriachan, Sanitha; Magazine, Rahul; Shetty, K. Ranjan; Kamath, Asha; George, Manu Mathew; Tripathy, Amruta; Kumar, D. Mahesh

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Statins by their anti-inflammatory and endothelial stabilizing effect can be beneficial in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and pulmonary hypertension (PH). The present study was done to evaluate the effect of rosuvastatin on pulmonary functions and quality of life (QOL) in patients with concomitant COPD and PH. Materials and Methods: It was a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, study conducted in patients with COPD and PH. A total of sixty patients were assigned to receive either rosuvastatin 10 mg or placebo once a day in addition to their conventional treatment for 12 weeks. Routine blood investigations, pulmonary functions, echocardiogram, exercise capacity, and QOL using a questionnaire were assessed at the baseline and after 12 weeks. Results: In patients of rosuvastatin group, there was a statistically significant increase in peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) (P = 0.04) but no significant change in other pulmonary functions: Forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume at 1 s (FVC, FEV1, FEV1/FVC), and echocardiogram parameters. There was a significant increase in 6-min walk test (6-min walk distance) (P = 0.03) at the end of 12 weeks. On comparing with placebo, rosuvastatin showed a significant reduction (P = 0.045) in COPD exacerbations while adverse effects did not differ. Conclusion: Statins have a favorable effect on patients with COPD and PH regarding the improvement in PEFR, COPD exacerbations, and exercise capacity. Such effects can be beneficial in these patients and more so in patients with concomitant coronary artery disease or hyperlipidemia where long-term benefits of statins have been established. PMID:27721534

  17. Pulmonary hypertension in children with congenital heart disease (PAH-CHD, PPHVD-CHD). Expert consensus statement on the diagnosis and treatment of paediatric pulmonary hypertension. The European Paediatric Pulmonary Vascular Disease Network, endorsed by ISHLT and DGPK.

    PubMed

    Kozlik-Feldmann, Rainer; Hansmann, Georg; Bonnet, Damien; Schranz, Dietmar; Apitz, Christian; Michel-Behnke, Ina

    2016-05-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with congenital heart disease (PAH-CHD) is a complex disease that presents with a broad spectrum of morphological and haemodynamic findings of varying severity. Recently, the aspect of paediatric pulmonary hypertensive vascular disease (PPHVD) has been introduced to expand the understanding of the full spectrum of pulmonary hypertension and increased pulmonary vascular resistance. Evaluation and treatment of PAH-CHD/PPHVD-CHD can be divided into in different topics. First, defining criteria for operability and initiation of advanced therapies preoperatively and postoperatively is an unresolved issue. Second, management of Eisenmenger syndrome is still an important question, with recent evidence on the severity of the disease and a more rapidly progressive course than previously described. Third, the Fontan circulation with no subpulmonary ventricle requires a distinct discussion, definition and classification since even a mild rise in pulmonary vascular resistance may lead to the so-called failing Fontan situation. Patients with CHD and single-ventricle physiology (Fontan/total cavopulmonary anastomosis) require a particularly stepwise and individualised approach. This consensus statement is on the current evidence for the most accurate evaluation and treatment of increased pulmonary artery pressure and resistance, as well as ventricular dysfunction, in children with congenital heart defects, and provides according practical recommendations. To optimise preoperative and postoperative management in patients with PAH-CHD, diagnostic and treatment algorithms are provided.

  18. Relationship between Dysphagia and Exacerbations in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Steidl, Eduardo; Ribeiro, Carla Simone; Gonçalves, Bruna Franciele; Fernandes, Natália; Antunes, Vívian; Mancopes, Renata

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The literature presents studies correlating chronic obstructive pulmonary disease to dysphagia and suggesting that the aspiration laryngeal phenomenon related to changes in the pharyngeal phase contributes significantly to the exacerbation of symptoms of lung disease. Objectives This study aimed to conduct a literature review to identify the relation between dysphagia and exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Data Synthesis We found 21 studies and included 19 in this review. The few studies that related to the subject agreed that the presence of dysphagia, due to lack of coordination between swallowing and breathing, may be one of the triggering factors of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation. Conclusions The review noted that there is a relationship between dysphagia and exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, identified by studies demonstrating that the difficulties associated with swallowing may lead to exacerbation of the disease. There was difficulty in comparing studies by their methodological differences. More research is needed to clarify the relationship between dysphagia and exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, making it possible to develop multiprofessional treatment strategies for these patients, catered to specific needs due to the systemic manifestations of the disease. PMID:25992155

  19. Pulmonary manifestations of Sjögren syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus, and mixed connective tissue disease.

    PubMed

    Mira-Avendano, Isabel C; Abril, Andy

    2015-05-01

    Interstitial lung disease is a common and often life-threatening manifestation of different connective tissue disorders, often affecting its overall prognosis. Systemic lupus erythematosus, Sjögren syndrome, and mixed connective tissue disease, although all unique diseases, can have lung manifestations as an important part of these conditions. This article reviews the different pulmonary manifestations seen in these 3 systemic rheumatologic conditions.

  20. Saudi Guidelines on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Pulmonary Hypertension: Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with connective tissue diseases

    PubMed Central

    Boueiz, Adel; Hassoun, Paul M.

    2014-01-01

    The explosive growth of medical literature on pulmonary hypertension (PH) has led to a steady increase in awareness of this disease within the medical community during the past decade. The recent revision of the classification of PH is presented in in the main guidelines. Group 1 PH or pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a heterogeneous group and includes PH due to inheritable, drug-induced, and toxin-induced causes and to such underlying systemic causes as connective tissue diseases, human immunodeficiency viral infection, portal hypertension, congenital heart disease, and schistosomiasis. Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is an autoimmune multisystem disorder, which affects over 240 persons per million in the United States.[1] Its manifestations are not confined to the skin but may also involve the lungs, kidneys, peripheral circulation, musculoskeletal system, gastrointestinal tract, and heart. The outcome of PAH associated with SSc is worse when compared to other subtypes of PAH. In this review, we summarize available information about the pulmonary vascular and cardiac manifestations of SSc with special emphasis on their prognostic implications as well as the peculiarity of their detection. PMID:25076994

  1. Effects of home-based pulmonary rehabilitation with a metronome-guided walking pace in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung-soon; Kim, Changhwan; Jin, Young-Soo; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Lee, Sang-Do; Yang, Yun Jun; Park, Yong Bum

    2013-05-01

    Despite documented efficacy and recommendations, pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has been underutilized. Home-based PR was proposed as an alternative, but there were limited data. The adequate exercise intensity was also a crucial issue. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of home-based PR with a metronome-guided walking pace on functional exercise capacity and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in COPD. The subjects participated in a 12-week home-based PR program. Exercise intensity was initially determined by cardiopulmonary exercise test, and was readjusted (the interval of metronome beeps was reset) according to submaximal endurance test. Six-minute walk test, pulmonary function test, cardiopulmonary exercise test, and St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) were done before and after the 12-week program, and at 6 months after completion of rehabilitation. Thirty-three patients participated in the program. Six-minute walking distance was significantly increased (48.8 m; P = 0.017) and the SGRQ score was also improved (-15; P < 0.001) over the six-month follow-up period after rehabilitation. There were no significant differences in pulmonary function and peak exercise parameters. We developed an effective home-based PR program with a metronome-guided walking pace for COPD patients. This rehabilitation program may improve functional exercise capacity and HRQOL.

  2. Pulmonary disease at autopsy in patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wallace, J M; Hannah, J B

    1988-08-01

    To characterize the postmortem pulmonary disease and analyze the effectiveness of antemortem diagnosis, we examined the clinical records and autopsy material from 54 patients who died of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. At autopsy, all patients had pulmonary disease. One or more specific diagnoses were made in 53, including opportunistic infection, nonopportunistic infection, and Kaposi's sarcoma. Multiple postmortem pulmonary diagnoses were established in 37. Respiratory failure was the most common cause of death. Of the 97 pulmonary disorders discovered at autopsy, only 31 were diagnosed before death. The frequency with which infections were diagnosed during life varied according to the organism, and was significantly higher for Pneumocystis carinii than for cytomegalovirus or bacterial agents. Pulmonary Kaposi's sarcoma was diagnosed in only 7% of patients with autopsy documentation. The yield of diagnostic procedures also varied according to the disease present. Sputum culture was relatively effective in detecting Cryptococcus neoformans and Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare, fiber-optic bronchoscopy was extremely useful for diagnosing P Carinii, and one or more diagnoses were provided in 4 of 7 patients who underwent thoracotomy, but significant disease including cytomegalovirus infection and pulmonary Kaposi's sarcoma was frequently missed. Although the spectrum of lung disease found at autopsy is similar to that observed during life, the frequency of some pathologic processes including cytomegalovirus infection and Kaposi's sarcoma may be underrepresented in antemortem series.

  3. Relationship between pulmonary arterial pressure and pulmonary thromboembolism associated with dead worms in canine heartworm disease.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Y; Kitagawa, H; Sasaki, Y

    1992-10-01

    To examine effects of thromboemboli due to dead worms on pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP), 20 to 50 dead heartworms were inserted into the pulmonary arteries of 4 heartworm uninfected dogs (uninfected group) and 11 dogs infected with heartworms (infected group). In the uninfected group, the mean PAP rose 1 week after worm insertion (10.9 to 166. mmHg), but it recovered by the 4th week. Clinical signs, hemodynamics and blood gas findings also deteriorated at the 1st week, but recovered at the 4th week. Angiographic and pathological findings indicated that blood flow recovered through the spaces between thromboemboli and vessel walls at the 4th week. The infected dogs were divided into three groups. In the infected-I group (5 dogs), the intimal lesions of the pulmonary arteries were slight, and clinical and laboratory findings showed changes similar to those of the uninfected group. In the infected-II group (4 dogs), the pulmonary arterial lesions were severe and the mean PAP was higher (25.7 mmHg) than in the uninfected group before worm insertion. An increase in PAP (34.1 mmHg) and worsening of clinical and laboratory findings were noticed till the 4th week. Thromboemboli adhered extensively to the vessel walls. Two dogs in the infected-III group died of severe dyspnea on the 9th and 10th day, and the mean PAP rose remarkably at the 1st week (from 19.4 to 28.2 mmHg). Severe pulmonary parenchymal lesions with edema or perforation were observed. From the above results, it was clarified that effects of dead worms on PAP and clinical signs depended on the severity of pulmonary arterial lesions before worm insertion.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Comparative effectiveness of drugs for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Cazzola, M; Segreti, A; Rogliani, P

    2012-12-01

    Current guidelines for the management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) recommend the use of inhaled long-acting bronchodilators, inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs) and their combinations for maintenance treatment of moderate to severe COPD. However, doctors still wonder if in patients with mild/moderate stable COPD it is best to start with a β-adrenoceptor agonist or an antimuscarinic agent. They also wonder if once- or twice-daily dosing is preferable, and if it is enough to develop a novel therapy that is dosed once daily rather than twice daily if the agents are both equally safe and effective. It also remains unclear whether and when a second bronchodilator with a different mechanism of action should be used in patients with stable COPD and when, in its place, an ICS must be added, and also whether long-acting antimuscarinic agent (LAMA)/long-acting β-adrenoceptor agonist (LABA) combination therapy is preferred over LAMA plus LABA/ICS. Moreover, there is no solid evidence of the best way to administer a triple combination product: should drugs be delivered concomitantly or sequentially? In any case, the growing evidence that COPD is a heterogeneous disease with characteristics that occur with different phenotypes suggests that a specific therapy may not be ultimately identified for every phenotype. Therefore, there is a clear need to move toward personalized treatment in COPD because phenotypic heterogeneity may affect treatment response and the clinical course of the disease. Unfortunately, however, there is not enough money or time to examine the impact of each treatment step or combination of treatments in each specific phenotype using randomized controlled trials. Consequently, doctors wonder if there is a role for comparative effectiveness research (CER), which can be considered a subset of patient-oriented research that examines available therapeutic options in particular patients to determine relevant health outcomes. There is a strong

  5. Improving in-office discussion of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: results and recommendations from an in-office linguistic study in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Meaghan; Hamilton, Heidi E

    2007-08-01

    Effective management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) requires successful physician-patient communication. Unfortunately, however, both parties often report problematic communication. Accommodating patients' desire for more information and an increased role in decision-making can increase their satisfaction surrounding the dialogue. This study analyzed naturally occurring interactions to assess in-office COPD discussions, identifying best practices and gaps in communication. In-office discussions of a study population of 17 community-based physicians and 32 outpatients with COPD (59% women; mean age, 69.5 years) were recorded during regularly scheduled visits. Individual postvisit interviews were conducted to clarify health history and perceptions of the office visit. Recordings were transcribed and analyzed using validated sociolinguistic techniques. Physicians initiated discussions of COPD with the term "breathing" in 56% of visits; these discussions focused on the acute nature of the disease, including an average of 6.4 physician-initiated, symptom-related questions. In postvisit interviews, participants (patients versus physicians) were frequently misaligned about the severity of, as well as the patient's level of concern about, the disease. Quality-of-life discussions were largely absent from visits, although patients offered emotionally charged responses postvisit about the impact of COPD in their lives. Despite accepted guidelines, discussions on smoking cessation, spirometry, and inhaler technique were underused. To reduce observed gaps in communication, physicians can focus on 4 topic areas: (1) communicating COPD diagnosis and test results, (2) optimizing disease education, (3) prioritizing smoking cessation, and (4) demonstrating correct inhaler use. Simple communication techniques, including consistent vocabulary, perspective display series, the 5 As of smoking cessation (ask about tobacco use, advise to quit, assess willingness to make a

  6. Principles of confrontational counselling in smokers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

    PubMed

    Kotz, D; Huibers, M J H; Vos, R; van Schayck, C P; Wesseling, G

    2008-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major public health problem. The use of spirometry for early detection of COPD is a current issue of debate because of lack of convincing evidence of the additional positive effect of spirometry on smoking cessation. In this article, we present conditions under which early detection of COPD and confrontation may be effective, highlighting the principles of "confrontational counselling". Confronting patients with COPD is not an isolated approach but should be integrated into state-of-the-art smoking cessation treatment. Confrontational counselling should consist of several counselling sessions on an individual, face-to-face level, under supervision of a trained smoking cessation specialist, and in combination with evidence-based pharmacological treatment for smoking cessation.

  7. High prevalence of known and unknown pulmonary diseases in patients with claudication during exercise oximetry

    PubMed Central

    Colas-Ribas, Christophe; Signolet, Isabelle; Henni, Samir; Feuillloy, Mathieu; Gagnadoux, Frédéric; Abraham, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The prevalence of pulmonary disease in patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD) has not been extensively studied. Recent evidence has shown that ∼20% of the patients have an atypical chest transcutaneous oxygen pressure (TcpO2) pattern during exercise, which suggests walking-induced hypoxemia. The main objectives of this study were to: (1) describe in a retrospective way the characteristics of the patients suffering from claudication, who attended a treadmill testing in our laboratory, (2) assess the prevalence of known or unknown pulmonary disease. The second aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of the therapeutic interventions on the walking capacities, after treatment, of the eventually detected pulmonary disorders. We retrospectively analyzed 1482 exercise TcpO2 test results. Patients that had no history of pulmonary disease, but either reported severe dyspnea or showed atypical profiles on their chest exercise-TcpO2, were advised to refer to the department of pneumology for additional investigations. In addition to the 166 patients with a history of pulmonary disease, 158 patients were suspected of unknown pulmonary disease from the result of their TcpO2 test. Many patients (n = 99/158, 62.7%) did not attend a pulmonologist visit. A pulmonary disease was established in 55 (93.2%) of the other 59 patients. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) was the one and only diagnosis retained in 42/59 patients (71.2%). Among the 47 patients who had a second evaluation of their walking capacity on treadmill, 38 had treatment of the pulmonary disease found, vascular surgery treatment or a severe restricted diet, 9 had no treatment. Only the “treated” group showed a significant improvement in the maximal walking distance on treadmill between the 2 evaluations, 313 ± 251 m to 433 ± 317 m (P = 0.03). This retrospective pilot study underlines the high prevalence of both known and unknown pulmonary disease in patients whose

  8. Airway microbiome dynamics in exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yvonne J; Sethi, Sanjay; Murphy, Timothy; Nariya, Snehal; Boushey, Homer A; Lynch, Susan V

    2014-08-01

    Specific bacterial species are implicated in the pathogenesis of exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, recent studies of clinically stable COPD patients have demonstrated a greater diversity of airway microbiota, whose role in acute exacerbations is unclear. In this study, temporal changes in the airway microbiome before, at the onset of, and after an acute exacerbation were examined in 60 sputum samples collected from subjects enrolled in a longitudinal study of bacterial infection in COPD. Microbiome composition and predicted functions were examined using 16S rRNA-based culture-independent profiling methods. Shifts in the abundance (≥ 2-fold, P < 0.05) of many taxa at exacerbation and after treatment were observed. Microbiota members that were increased at exacerbation were primarily of the Proteobacteria phylum, including nontypical COPD pathogens. Changes in the bacterial composition after treatment for an exacerbation differed significantly among the therapy regimens clinically prescribed (antibiotics only, oral corticosteroids only, or both). Treatment with antibiotics alone primarily decreased the abundance of Proteobacteria, with the prolonged suppression of some microbiota members being observed. In contrast, treatment with corticosteroids alone led to enrichment for Proteobacteria and members of other phyla. Predicted metagenomes of particular microbiota members involved in these compositional shifts indicated exacerbation-associated loss of functions involved in the synthesis of antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory products, alongside enrichment in functions related to pathogen-elicited inflammation. These trends reversed upon clinical recovery. Further larger studies will be necessary to determine whether specific compositional or functional changes detected in the airway microbiome could be useful indicators of exacerbation development or outcome.

  9. The role of indacaterol for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

    PubMed

    Cazzola, Mario; Bardaro, Floriana; Stirpe, Emanuele

    2013-08-01

    Indacaterol is the first long-acting β2-agonist (LABAs) approved for the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) that allows for once-daily (OD) administration. It is rapidly acting, with an onset of action in 5 minutes, like salbutamol and formoterol but with a sustained bronchodilator effect, that last for 24 hours, like tiotropium. In long-term clinical studies (12 weeks to 1 year) in patients with moderate to severe COPD, OD indacaterol 150 or 300 μg improved lung function (primary endpoint) significantly more than placebo, and improvements were significantly greater than twice-daily formoterol 12 μg or salmeterol 50 μg, and noninferior to OD tiotropium bromide 18 μg. Indacaterol was well tolerated at all doses and with a good overall safety profile. Cost-utility analyses show that indacaterol 150 μg has lower total costs and better outcomes than tiotropium and salmeterol. These findings suggest that indacaterol can be considered a first choice drug in the treatment of the patient with mild/moderate stable COPD. However, in people with COPD who remain symptomatic on treatment with indacaterol, adding a long-acting muscarinic antagonist (LAMA) is the preferable option. In any case, it is advisable to combine indacaterol with a OD inhaled corticosteroid (ICS), such as mometasone furoate or ciclesonide, in patients with low FEV1, and, in those patients who have many symptoms and a high risk of exacerbations, to combine it with a LAMA and a OD ICS.

  10. Increased risk of obstructive pulmonary disease in tunnel workers

    PubMed Central

    Ulvestad, B.; Bakke, B.; Melbostad, E.; Fuglerud, P.; Kongerud, J.; Lund, M. B.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Tunnel workers are exposed to gases and particles from blasting and diesel exhausts. The aim of this study was to assess the occurrence of respiratory symptoms and airflow limitation in tunnel workers and to relate these findings to years of exposure.
METHODS—Two hundred and twelve tunnel workers and a reference group of 205 other heavy construction workers participated in a cross sectional investigation. Exposure measurements were carried out to demonstrate the difference in exposure between the two occupational groups. Spirometric tests and a questionnaire on respiratory symptoms and smoking habits were applied. Atopy was determined by a multiple radioallergosorbent test (RAST). Radiological signs of silicosis were evaluated. Respiratory symptoms and lung function were studied in relation to years of exposure and adjusted for smoking habits and atopy.
RESULTS—Compared with the reference subjects the tunnel workers had a significant decrease in forced vital capacity (FVC) % predicted and forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) % predicted when related to years of exposure. Adjusted FEV1 decreased by 17 ml for each year of tunnel work exposure compared with 0.5 ml in outdoor heavy construction workers. The tunnel workers also reported significantly higher occurrence of respiratory symptoms. The prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) was 14% in the tunnel workers compared with 8% in the reference subjects.
CONCLUSION—Exposure to dust and gases from diesel exhaust, blasting, drilling and rock transport in tunnel work enhances the risk for accelerated decline in FEV1, respiratory symptoms, and COPD in tunnel workers compared with other heavy construction workers.

 PMID:10722766

  11. Abdominal muscle and quadriceps strength in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Man, W; Hopkinson, N; Harraf, F; Nikoletou, D; Polkey, M; Moxham, J

    2005-01-01

    Background: Quadriceps muscle weakness is common in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) but is not observed in a small hand muscle (adductor pollicis). Although this could be explained by reduced activity in the quadriceps, the observation could also be explained by anatomical location of the muscle or fibre type composition. However, the abdominal muscles are of a similar anatomical and fibre type distribution to the quadriceps, although they remain active in COPD. Cough gastric pressure is a recently described technique that assesses abdominal muscle (and hence expiratory muscle) strength more accurately than traditional techniques. A study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that more severe weakness exists in the quadriceps than in the abdominal muscles of patients with COPD compared with healthy elderly controls. Methods: Maximum cough gastric pressure and quadriceps isometric strength were measured in 43 patients with stable COPD and 25 healthy elderly volunteers matched for anthropometric variables. Results: Despite a significant reduction in mean quadriceps strength (29.9 kg v 41.2 kg; 95% CI –17.9 to –4.6; p = 0.001), cough gastric pressure was preserved in patients with COPD (227.3 cm H2O v 204.8 cm H2O; 95% CI –5.4 to 50.6; p = 0.11). Conclusions: Abdominal muscle strength is preserved in stable COPD outpatients in the presence of quadriceps weakness. This suggests that anatomical location and fibre type cannot explain quadriceps weakness in COPD. By inference, we conclude that disuse and consequent deconditioning are important factors in the development of quadriceps muscle weakness in COPD patients, or that activity protects the abdominal muscles from possible systemic myopathic processes. PMID:15923239

  12. Plasma sphingolipids in HIV-associated chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Hodgson, Shane; Griffin, Timothy J; Reilly, Cavan; Harvey, Stephen; Witthuhn, Bruce A; Sandri, Brian J; Wendt, Chris H

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a significant cause of morbidity in persons living with HIV (PLWH) and HIV appears to uniquely cause COPD, independent of smoking. The mechanisms by which HIV leads to COPD are not clear. The objective of this study was to identify metabolomic biomarkers and potential mechanistic pathways of HIV-associated COPD (HIV-COPD). Methods We performed case–control metabolite profiling via mass spectrometry in plasma from 38 individuals with HIV-COPD (cases), comparing to matched controls with/without HIV and with/without COPD. Untargeted metabolites of interest were identified with liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry (LC-MS/mass spectrometry (MS)), and targeted metabolomics for tryptophan (Trp) and kynurenine (Kyn) were measured by selective reaction monitoring (SRM) with LC-MS/MS. We used mixed-effects models to compare metabolite concentrations in cases compared with controls while controlling for relevant biological variables. Results We identified 1689 analytes associated with HIV-COPD at a false discovery rate (FDR) of 10%. In PLWH, we identified 263 analytes (10% FDR) between those with and without COPD. LC MS/MS identified Trp and 17 lipids, including sphingolipids and diacylglycerol. After adjusting for relevant covariates, the Kyn/Trp ratio measured by SRM was significantly higher in PLWH (p=0.022), but was not associated with COPD status (p=0.95). Conclusions There is a unique metabolite profile in HIV-COPD that includes sphingolipids. Trp metabolism is increased in HIV, but does not appear to independently contribute to HIV-COPD. Trial registration numbers NCT01810289, NCT01797367, NCT00608764.

  13. The role of indacaterol for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)

    PubMed Central

    Bardaro, Floriana; Stirpe, Emanuele

    2013-01-01

    Indacaterol is the first long-acting β2-agonist (LABAs) approved for the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) that allows for once-daily (OD) administration. It is rapidly acting, with an onset of action in 5 minutes, like salbutamol and formoterol but with a sustained bronchodilator effect, that last for 24 hours, like tiotropium. In long-term clinical studies (12 weeks to 1 year) in patients with moderate to severe COPD, OD indacaterol 150 or 300 μg improved lung function (primary endpoint) significantly more than placebo, and improvements were significantly greater than twice-daily formoterol 12 μg or salmeterol 50 μg, and noninferior to OD tiotropium bromide 18 μg. Indacaterol was well tolerated at all doses and with a good overall safety profile. Cost-utility analyses show that indacaterol 150 μg has lower total costs and better outcomes than tiotropium and salmeterol. These findings suggest that indacaterol can be considered a first choice drug in the treatment of the patient with mild/moderate stable COPD. However, in people with COPD who remain symptomatic on treatment with indacaterol, adding a long-acting muscarinic antagonist (LAMA) is the preferable option. In any case, it is advisable to combine indacaterol with a OD inhaled corticosteroid (ICS), such as mometasone furoate or ciclesonide, in patients with low FEV1, and, in those patients who have many symptoms and a high risk of exacerbations, to combine it with a LAMA and a OD ICS. PMID:23991316

  14. Pulmonary Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Infection. A Multisystem, Multigenic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Szymanski, Eva P.; Leung, Janice M.; Fowler, Cedar J.; Haney, Carissa; Hsu, Amy P.; Chen, Fei; Duggal, Priya; Oler, Andrew J.; McCormack, Ryan; Podack, Eckhard; Drummond, Rebecca A.; Lionakis, Michail S.; Browne, Sarah K.; Prevots, D. Rebecca; Knowles, Michael; Cutting, Gary; Liu, Xinyue; Devine, Scott E.; Fraser, Claire M.; Tettelin, Hervé; Olivier, Kenneth N.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: The clinical features of patients infected with pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacteria (PNTM) are well described, but the genetic components of infection susceptibility are not. Objectives: To examine genetic variants in patients with PNTM, their unaffected family members, and a control group. Methods: Whole-exome sequencing was done on 69 white patients with PNTM and 18 of their white unaffected family members. We performed a candidate gene analysis using immune, cystic fibrosis transmembrance conductance regulator (CFTR), cilia, and connective tissue gene sets. The numbers of patients, family members, and control subjects with variants in each category were compared, as was the average number of variants per person. Measurements and Main Results: A significantly higher number of patients with PNTM than the other subjects had low-frequency, protein-affecting variants in immune, CFTR, cilia, and connective tissue categories (35, 26, 90, and 90%, respectively). Patients with PNTM also had significantly more cilia and connective tissue variants per person than did control subjects (2.47 and 2.55 compared with 1.38 and 1.40, respectively; P = 1.4 × 10−6 and P = 2.7 × 10−8, respectively). Patients with PNTM had an average of 5.26 variants across all categories (1.98 in control subjects; P = 2.8 × 10−17), and they were more likely than control subjects to have variants in multiple categories. We observed similar results for family members without PNTM infection, with the exception of the immune category. Conclusions: Patients with PNTM have more low-frequency, protein-affecting variants in immune, CFTR, cilia, and connective tissue genes than their unaffected family members and control subjects. We propose that PNTM infection is a multigenic disease in which combinations of variants across gene categories, plus environmental exposures, increase susceptibility to the infection. PMID:26038974

  15. Chronic transfusion therapy improves but does not normalize systemic and pulmonary vasculopathy in sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Roberta M.; Rabai, Miklos; Meiselman, Herbert J.; Coates, Thomas D.; Wood, John C.

    2015-01-01

    Tricuspid regurgitant (TR) jet velocity and its relationship to pulmonary hypertension has been controversial in sickle cell disease (SCD). Plasma free hemoglobin is elevated in SCD patients and acutely impairs systemic vascular reactivity. We postulated that plasma free hemoglobin would be negatively associated with both systemic and pulmonary endothelial function, assessed by flow-mediated dilation (FMD) of the brachial artery and TR jet velocity, respectively. Whole blood viscosity, plasma free hemoglobin, TR jet, and FMD were measured in chronically transfused SCD pre- and posttransfusion (N = 25), in nontransfused SCD (N = 26), and in ethnicity-matched control subjects (N = 10). We found increased TR jet velocity and decreased FMD in nontransfused SCD patients compared with the other 2 groups. TR jet velocity was inversely correlated with FMD. There was a striking nonlinear relationship between plasma free hemoglobin and both TR jet velocity and FMD. A single transfusion in the chronically transfused cohort improved FMD. In our patient sample, TR jet velocity and FMD were most strongly associated with plasma free hemoglobin and transfusion status (transfusions being protective), and thus consistent with the hypothesis that intravascular hemolysis and increased endogenous erythropoiesis damage vascular endothelia. PMID:26036801

  16. Erdheim-Chester disease: a case report with pulmonary, kidney involvement and bone lesions.

    PubMed

    Mounach, Aziza; Nouijai, Abderrzak; Achemlal, Lahsen; El Maghraoui, Abdellah; Bezza, Ahmed

    2010-03-01

    We report the case of a 42-year-old woman who was admitted in 2002 for exploration of diffuse bone pain. She had medical history of pulmonary tuberculosis. Her current symptoms had started 9 months earlier and consisted of bone pain, affecting the legs. She had asthenia and weight loss. At admission, physical examination showed bilateral and symmetrical long bone pain, especially the knees and the ankles. Physical exam was normal elsewhere. Laboratory tests showed inflammation, with an erythrocyte sedimentation rate of 90 mm/h and C-reactive protein 8 mg/l. Protein electrophoresis, red and white blood cell count, renal, and liver function tests were normal. Serum calcium, phosphorus, and urinary calcium were normal. Radiographs showed multiple mixed bone lesions with sclerotic and lytic areas of the femora, tibiae, humerus. Chest radiographs and thoracic computed tomography (CT) scan showed pulmonary fibrosis. Biopsy of the tibial area displayed foamy lipid-laden histiocytes, confirming the diagnosis of Erdheim-Chester disease. Patient was treated with prednisolone plus cyclophosphamide. Her clinical condition improved remarkably during 4 years, but she developed acute renal failure leading to death.

  17. Animal Models of Pulmonary Hypertension: Matching Disease Mechanisms to Etiology of the Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Colvin, Kelley L.; Yeager, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Recently a great deal of progress has been made in our understanding of pulmonary hypertension (PH). Research from the past 30 years has resulted in newer treatments that provide symptomatic improvements and delayed disease progression. Unfortunately, the cure for patients with this lethal syndrome remains stubbornly elusive. With the relative explosion of scientific literature regarding PH, confusion has arisen regarding animal models of the disease and their correlation to the human condition. This short review uniquely focuses on the clear and present need to better correlate mechanistic insights from existing and emerging animal models of PH to specific etiologies and histopathologies of human PH. A better understanding of the pathologic processes in various animal models and how they relate to the human disease should accelerate the development of newer and more efficacious therapies. PMID:25705569

  18. Targeting the Mevalonate Cascade as a New Therapeutic Approach in Heart Disease, Cancer and Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yeganeh, Behzad; Wiechec, Emmilia; Ande, Sudharsana R; Sharma, Pawan; Moghadam, Adel Rezaei; Post, Martin; Freed, Darren H.; Hashemi, Mohammad; Shojaei, Shahla; Zeki, Amir A.; Ghavami, Saeid

    2014-01-01

    The cholesterol biosynthesis pathway, also known as the mevalonate (MVA) pathway, is an essential cellular pathway that is involved in diverse cell functions. The enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase (HMGCR) is the rate-limiting step in cholesterol biosynthesis and catalyzes the conversion of HMG-CoA to MVA. Given its role in cholesterol and isoprenoid biosynthesis, the regulation of HMGCR has been intensely investigated. Because all cells require a steady supply of MVA, both the sterol (i.e. cholesterol) and non-sterol (i.e. isoprenoid) products of MVA metabolism exert coordinated feedback regulation on HMGCR through different mechanisms. The proper functioning of HMGCR as the proximal enzyme in the MVA pathway is essential under both normal physiologic conditions and in many diseases given its role in cell cycle pathways and cell proliferation, cholesterol biosynthesis and metabolism, cell cytoskeletal dynamics and stability, cell membrane structure and fluidity, mitochondrial function, proliferation, and cell fate. The blockbuster statin drugs (‘statins’) directly bind to and inhibit HMGCR, and their use for the past thirty years has revolutionized the treatment of hypercholesterolemia and cardiovascular diseases, in particular coronary heart disease. Initially thought to exert their effects through cholesterol reduction, recent evidence indicates that statins also have pleiotropic immunomodulatory properties independent of cholesterol lowering. In this review we will focus on the therapeutic applications and mechanisms involved in the MVA cascade including Rho GTPase and Rho kinase (ROCK) signaling, statin inhibition of HMGCR, geranylgeranyltransferase (GGTase) inhibition, and farnesyltransferase (FTase) inhibition in cardiovascular disease, pulmonary diseases (e.g. asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and cancer. PMID:24582968

  19. The A2B adenosine receptor modulates pulmonary hypertension associated with interstitial lung disease.

    PubMed

    Karmouty-Quintana, Harry; Zhong, Hongyan; Acero, Luis; Weng, Tingting; Melicoff, Ernestina; West, James D; Hemnes, Anna; Grenz, Almut; Eltzschig, Holger K; Blackwell, Timothy S; Xia, Yang; Johnston, Richard A; Zeng, Dewan; Belardinelli, Luiz; Blackburn, Michael R

    2012-06-01

    Development of pulmonary hypertension is a common and deadly complication of interstitial lung disease. Little is known regarding the cellular and molecular mechanisms that lead to pulmonary hypertension in patients with interstitial lung disease, and effective treatment options are lacking. The purpose of this study was to examine the adenosine 2B receptor (A(2B)R) as a regulator of vascular remodeling and pulmonary hypertension secondary to pulmonary fibrosis. To accomplish this, cellular and molecular changes in vascular remodeling were monitored in mice exposed to bleomycin in conjunction with genetic removal of the A(2B)R or treatment with the A(2B)R antagonist GS-6201. Results demonstrated that GS-6201 treatment or genetic removal of the A(2B)R attenuated vascular remodeling and hypertension in our model. Furthermore, direct A(2B)R activation on vascular cells promoted interleukin-6 and endothelin-1 release. These studies identify a novel mechanism of disease progression to pulmonary hypertension and support the development of A(2B)R antagonists for the treatment of pulmonary hypertension secondary to interstitial lung disease.

  20. Responses of horses affected with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease to inhalation challenges with mould antigens.

    PubMed

    McGorum, B C; Dixon, P M; Halliwell, R E

    1993-07-01

    Eight control and 8 asymptomatic COPD-affected horses were given, on separate occasions, inhalation challenges with extracts of Micropolyspora faeni, Aspergillus fumigatus and Thermoactinomyces vulgaris. All horses were also given nebulised phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) challenges and 'natural challenges' (NCs), i.e. exposure to hay and straw, as control challenges. Responses were assessed by clinical, pulmonary mechanics, arterial blood gas tensions, arterial blood pH and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid cytological examinations. PBS challenges had no effect on control or COPD-affected horses, while NC induced COPD only in the COPD-affected horses. Pulmonary disease, similar to naturally occurring COPD, was induced, only in the COPD-affected horses, by M. faeni and A. fumigatus challenges, thus implicating these organisms in the aetiology of equine COPD. The role of T. vulgaris in the aetiology of equine COPD could not, however, be determined because the T. vulgaris challenges, in addition to inducing pulmonary disease in 4 COPD-affected horses, induced pulmonary disease in 2 control horses which had been unaffected by NC. The absence of pulmonary disease in control horses after M. faeni, A. fumigatus and NC challenges suggests that equine COPD is a pulmonary hypersensitivity, rather than a non-specific toxic response.

  1. Postadulticide pulmonary hypertension of canine heartworm disease: successful treatment with oxygen and failure of antihistamines.

    PubMed

    Rawlings, C A; Tackett, R L

    1990-10-01

    Postadulticide pulmonary hypertension mechanisms and treatment with antihistamines and supplemental oxygen were studied in eight dogs with heartworm disease. To ensure severe postadulticide thromboembolism, additional heartworms (either 20 or 40 into 4 dogs each) were transplanted into naturally infected dogs before thiacetarsamide treatment. During pentobarbital anesthesia, 2 pulmonary hemodynamic studies were conducted on each dog with a sequence of baseline, hypoxia with FlO2 = 10%, hyperoxia with FlO2 = 100%, a second baseline, treatment with either diphenhydramine (D) or cimetidine (C), and another hypoxia. All dogs were pulmonary hypertensive, with each dog having a mean pulmonary arterial pressure (PPA) greater than 20 mm of Hg. Mean PPA increased from baseline conditions (25.0 +/- 4.5 SD for D and 24.3 +/- 4.4 for C) to hypoxia (28.5 +/- 4.7 for D and 28.4 +/- 3.7 for C), and decreased during hyperoxia (16.9 +/- 3.0 for D and 17.4 +/- 3.0 for C), respectively. Neither antihistamine reduced PPA at normoxia. The degree of pulmonary hypertension when breathing room air increased even more during hypoxia, and this increase was not attenuated by either antihistamine. Histamine did not appear to mediate pulmonary hypertension during postadulticide thromboembolism, nor to modify the hypoxia-mediated pulmonary hypertension at this disease stage. Because baseline PO2 was low (66.6 +/- 11.7 mm of Hg for D and 69.4 +/- 14.2 for C) and because PPA decreased during administration of oxygen, the pulmonary hypertension was mostly hypoxia-induced. In addition to the arterial lesions, much of the pulmonary hypertensive mechanism was an active and reversible vasoconstriction in response to hypoxia caused by the secondary lung disease.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. A consensus approach to the classification of pediatric pulmonary hypertensive vascular disease: Report from the PVRI Pediatric Taskforce, Panama 2011

    PubMed Central

    del Cerro, Maria Jesus; Abman, Steven; Diaz, Gabriel; Freudenthal, Alexandra Heath; Freudenthal, Franz; Harikrishnan, S.; Haworth, Sheila G.; Ivy, Dunbar; Lopes, Antonio A.; Raj, J. Usha; Sandoval, Julio; Stenmark, Kurt; Adatia, Ian

    2011-01-01

    Current classifications of pulmonary hypertension have contributed a great deal to our understanding of pulmonary vascular disease, facilitated drug trials, and improved our understanding of congenital heart disease in adult survivors. However, these classifications are not applicable readily to pediatric disease. The classification system that we propose is based firmly in clinical practice. The specific aims of this new system are to improve diagnostic strategies, to promote appropriate clinical investigation, to improve our understanding of disease pathogenesis, physiology and epidemiology, and to guide the development of human disease models in laboratory and animal studies. It should be also an educational resource. We emphasize the concepts of perinatal maladaptation, maldevelopment and pulmonary hypoplasia as causative factors in pediatric pulmonary hypertension. We highlight the importance of genetic, chromosomal and multiple congenital malformation syndromes in the presentation of pediatric pulmonary hypertension. We divide pediatric pulmonary hypertensive vascular disease into 10 broad categories. PMID:21874158

  3. Inflammatory Leukocyte Phenotypes Correlate with Disease Progression in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Bethany B.; Fry, Chris; Zhou, Yueren; Murray, Susan; Han, MeiLan K.; Martinez, Fernando J.; Flaherty, Kevin R.

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is characterized by progressive deposition of extracellular matrix, worsening dyspnea, and eventual mortality. Pathogenesis of IPF is poorly understood and the role inflammation and activated leukocytes play in the disease process is controversial. Previous studies demonstrated that activated leukocyte subsets characterize IPF patients. We sought to validate this observation in a well-defined cohort of 35 IPF patients and to correlate the observed leukocyte phenotypes with robust parameters of disease progression. We demonstrate that in univariate and multivariate analyses, increases in the CD14hi, CD16hi subset of monocytes measured at baseline correlated with disease progression, with a threshold value >0.5% of the total peripheral blood mononuclear cells being a significant predictor for worse outcome. In addition, several T cell subsets, including CD25 expressing CD4 cells, and CXCR3 expressing CD4 and CD8 subsets correlated with disease progression when found in increased percentages in the peripheral blood of IPF patients when sampled at baseline. Somewhat surprising in comparison to previous literature, the CD4 T cells did not appear to have lost expression of the co-stimulatory molecule, CD28, but the CD8 T cells did. Taken together, these results are consistent with the presence of an inflammatory process in IPF patients who eventually progress. However, when longitudinal measurements of these same markers were examined, there was significant heterogeneity of expression and these biomarkers did not necessarily remain elevated in IPF patients with progressive disease. We interpret this heterogeneity to suggest that IPF patients experience episodic inflammatory events that once triggered, may lead to disease progression. This longitudinal heterogeneity in biomarker analyses may explain why such markers are not consistently measured in all IPF cohorts. PMID:25580363

  4. Computer-aided diagnosis of pulmonary diseases using x-ray darkfield radiography.

    PubMed

    Einarsdóttir, Hildur; Yaroshenko, Andre; Velroyen, Astrid; Bech, Martin; Hellbach, Katharina; Auweter, Sigrid; Yildirim, Önder; Meinel, Felix G; Eickelberg, Oliver; Reiser, Maximilian; Larsen, Rasmus; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2015-12-21

    In this work we develop a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) scheme for classification of pulmonary disease for grating-based x-ray radiography. In addition to conventional transmission radiography, the grating-based technique provides a dark-field imaging modality, which utilizes the scattering properties of the x-rays. This modality has shown great potential for diagnosing early stage emphysema and fibrosis in mouse lungs in vivo. The CAD scheme is developed to assist radiologists and other medical experts to develop new diagnostic methods when evaluating grating-based images. The scheme consists of three stages: (i) automatic lung segmentation; (ii) feature extraction from lung shape and dark-field image intensities; (iii) classification between healthy, emphysema and fibrosis lungs. A study of 102 mice was conducted with 34 healthy, 52 emphysema and 16 fibrosis subjects. Each image was manually annotated to build an experimental dataset. System performance was assessed by: (i) determining the quality of the segmentations; (ii) validating emphysema and fibrosis recognition by a linear support vector machine using leave-one-out cross-validation. In terms of segmentation quality, we obtained an overlap percentage (Ω) 92.63  ±  3.65%, Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) 89.74  ±  8.84% and Jaccard Similarity Coefficient 82.39  ±  12.62%. For classification, the accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of diseased lung recognition was 100%. Classification between emphysema and fibrosis resulted in an accuracy of 93%, whilst the sensitivity was 94% and specificity 88%. In addition to the automatic classification of lungs, deviation maps created by the CAD scheme provide a visual aid for medical experts to further assess the severity of pulmonary disease in the lung, and highlights regions affected.

  5. Computer-aided diagnosis of pulmonary diseases using x-ray darkfield radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Einarsdóttir, Hildur; Yaroshenko, Andre; Velroyen, Astrid; Bech, Martin; Hellbach, Katharina; Auweter, Sigrid; Yildirim, Önder; Meinel, Felix G.; Eickelberg, Oliver; Reiser, Maximilian; Larsen, Rasmus; Kjær Ersbøll, Bjarne; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2015-12-01

    In this work we develop a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) scheme for classification of pulmonary disease for grating-based x-ray radiography. In addition to conventional transmission radiography, the grating-based technique provides a dark-field imaging modality, which utilizes the scattering properties of the x-rays. This modality has shown great potential for diagnosing early stage emphysema and fibrosis in mouse lungs in vivo. The CAD scheme is developed to assist radiologists and other medical experts to develop new diagnostic methods when evaluating grating-based images. The scheme consists of three stages: (i) automatic lung segmentation; (ii) feature extraction from lung shape and dark-field image intensities; (iii) classification between healthy, emphysema and fibrosis lungs. A study of 102 mice was conducted with 34 healthy, 52 emphysema and 16 fibrosis subjects. Each image was manually annotated to build an experimental dataset. System performance was assessed by: (i) determining the quality of the segmentations; (ii) validating emphysema and fibrosis recognition by a linear support vector machine using leave-one-out cross-validation. In terms of segmentation quality, we obtained an overlap percentage (Ω) 92.63  ±  3.65%, Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) 89.74  ±  8.84% and Jaccard Similarity Coefficient 82.39  ±  12.62%. For classification, the accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of diseased lung recognition was 100%. Classification between emphysema and fibrosis resulted in an accuracy of 93%, whilst the sensitivity was 94% and specificity 88%. In addition to the automatic classification of lungs, deviation maps created by the CAD scheme provide a visual aid for medical experts to further assess the severity of pulmonary disease in the lung, and highlights regions affected.

  6. Comprehensive out-patient pulmonary rehabilitation: Treatment outcomes in early and late stages of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Ergün, Pinar; Kaymaz, Dicle; Günay, Ersin; Erdoğan, Yurdanur; Turay, Ülkü Yilmaz; Demir, Neşe; Çanak, Ebru; Sengül, Fatma; Egesel, Nurcan; Köse, Serdal Kenan

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim was to evaluate the outcomes of a comprehensive pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and to establish whether in early disease stage PR is as effective as in late stages of disease. METHODS: A total of 55 stable COPD patients, 28 with early and 27 with late disease stages, were assessed. Patients underwent a comprehensive out-patient PR program for 8 weeks. To eluciate the effects of PR and compare the level of improvement; lung function, dyspnea sensation [Medical Research Council (MRC)], body composition [body mass index (BMI), fat free mass (FFM), fat free mass index (FFMI)], exercise capacity [incremental shuttle walking test, endurance shuttle walking test], health related quality of life (HRQoL) with St. George Respiratory Disease Questionnaire, psycohological status (Hospital anxiety–depression (HAD) scale) were evaluated before and after PR. RESULTS: At the end of PR in the early disease stage group, the improvement in forced vital capacity (FVC) reached a statistically significant level (P < 0.05). In both disease stages, there were no significant differences in BMI, FFM, and FFMI. The decrease in exertional dyspnea for the two groups evaluated with the modified BORG scale were not found statistically significant, though the dyspnea scores evaluated with MRC showed significant improvements (P < 0.001). HRQoL and exercise capacity were significantly improved for the two groups (P < 0.001). Psychological status evaluated with the HAD scale improved after PR (P < 0.001) both in early and late stages. Gainings in the study parameters did not differ in the early and the late disease stages. CONCLUSIONS: These results showed that patients with COPD had benefited from a comprehensive PR program in an out-patient setting regardless of disease severity. Even patients with earlier stage of disease should be referred and encouraged to participate in a PR program. PMID:21572695

  7. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Xaubet, Antoni; Ancochea, Julio; Molina-Molina, María

    2017-02-23

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a fibrosing interstitial pneumonia associated with the radiological and/or histological pattern of usual interstitial pneumonia. Its aetiology is unknown, but probably comprises the action of endogenous and exogenous micro-environmental factors in subjects with genetic predisposition. Its diagnosis is based on the presence of characteristic findings of high-resolution computed tomography scans and pulmonary biopsies in absence of interstitial lung diseases of other aetiologies. Its clinical evolution is variable, although the mean survival rate is 2-5 years as of its clinical presentation. Patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis may present complications and comorbidities which modify the disease's clinical course and prognosis. In the mild-moderate disease, the treatment consists of the administration of anti-fibrotic drugs. In severe disease, the best therapeutic option is pulmonary transplantation. In this paper we review the diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of the disease.

  8. Multiple Circulating Cytokines Are Coelevated in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Todd, Ian; John, Michelle; Bolton, Charlotte E.; Harrison, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory biomarkers, including cytokines, are associated with COPD, but the association of particular circulating cytokines with systemic pathology remains equivocal. To investigate this, we developed a protein microarray system to detect multiple cytokines in small volumes of serum. Fourteen cytokines were measured in serum from never-smokers, ex-smokers, current smokers, and COPD patients (GOLD stages 1–3). Certain individual circulating cytokines (particularly TNFα and IL-1β) were significantly elevated in concentration in the serum of particular COPD patients (and some current/ex-smokers without COPD) and may serve as markers of particularly significant systemic inflammation. However, numerous circulating cytokines were raised such that their combined, but not individual, elevation was significantly associated with severity of disease, and these may be further indicators of, and contributors to, the systemic inflammatory manifestations of COPD. The coelevation of numerous circulating cytokines in COPD is consistent with the insidious development, chronic nature, and systemic comorbidities of the disease. PMID:27524865

  9. Multiple Circulating Cytokines Are Coelevated in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Selvarajah, Senthooran; Todd, Ian; Tighe, Patrick J; John, Michelle; Bolton, Charlotte E; Harrison, Timothy; Fairclough, Lucy C

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory biomarkers, including cytokines, are associated with COPD, but the association of particular circulating cytokines with systemic pathology remains equivocal. To investigate this, we developed a protein microarray system to detect multiple cytokines in small volumes of serum. Fourteen cytokines were measured in serum from never-smokers, ex-smokers, current smokers, and COPD patients (GOLD stages 1-3). Certain individual circulating cytokines (particularly TNFα and IL-1β) were significantly elevated in concentration in the serum of particular COPD patients (and some current/ex-smokers without COPD) and may serve as markers of particularly significant systemic inflammation. However, numerous circulating cytokines were raised such that their combined, but not individual, elevation was significantly associated with severity of disease, and these may be further indicators of, and contributors to, the systemic inflammatory manifestations of COPD. The coelevation of numerous circulating cytokines in COPD is consistent with the insidious development, chronic nature, and systemic comorbidities of the disease.

  10. Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1: Utility of KCNRG autoantibodies as a marker of active pulmonary disease and successful treatment with rituximab.

    PubMed

    Popler, Jonathan; Alimohammadi, Mohammad; Kämpe, Olle; Dalin, Frida; Dishop, Megan K; Barker, Jennifer M; Moriarty-Kelsey, Margaret; Soep, Jennifer B; Deterding, Robin R

    2012-01-01

    Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 (APS-1), also known as Autoimmune Polyendocrinopathy Candidiasis and Ectodermal Dysplasia (APECD) is a disorder caused by mutations in the autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene. In some APS-1 patients, significant pulmonary disease is observed. Autoantibodies directed against the potassium channel regulatory protein (KCNRG), found in epithelial cells of terminal bronchioles, have been suggested as a marker for pulmonary disease in APS-1 patients. We report two patients with APS-1; one with and one without lung disease. Patient 1 had multiple admissions for pneumonia and respiratory insufficiency, required non-invasive ventilation, and had findings of bronchiectasis on thoracic imaging and significant lymphocytic infiltrates of the airways on lung biopsy. To verify the autoimmune cause of pulmonary symptoms APS-1 patients, both were tested in a blinded manner for the presence of autoantibodies to KCNRG in serum. We found that only Patient 1 had autoantibodies present. Additionally, Patient 1 had progressive disease despite treatment with several immunomodulating agents, including corticosteroids, azathioprine, and mycophenolate. Patient 1 had a lung biopsy performed which was consistent with B cell lymphocytic aggregates. Rituximab treatment was initiated with apparent good response. This report illustrates the practical use of KCNRG autoantibodies to identify APS-1 patients with pulmonary risk and the successful use of the monoclonal antibody, Rituximab, to treat pulmonary disease in APS-1 patients.

  11. High prevalence of occult left heart disease in scleroderma-pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Fox, Benjamin D; Shimony, Avi; Langleben, David; Hirsch, Andrew; Rudski, Lawrence; Schlesinger, Robert; Eisenberg, Mark J; Joyal, Dominique; Hudson, Marie; Boutet, Kim; Serban, Alexandrina; Masetto, Ariel; Baron, Murray

    2013-10-01

    Our study aimed to determine the prevalence of occult left-heart disease in patients with scleroderma and pulmonary hypertension. In patients with pulmonary hypertension (mean pulmonary artery pressure (mean PAP)≥25 mmHg), differentiation between pre- and post-capillary pulmonary hypertension has been made according to pulmonary artery wedge pressure (PAWP) less than or more than 15 mmHg, respectively. We performed a retrospective chart review of 107 scleroderma patients. All patients with suspected pulmonary hypertension had routine right or left heart catheterisation with left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP) measurement pre-/post-fluid challenge. We extracted demographic, haemodynamic and echocardiographic data. Patients were classified into one of four groups: haemodynamically normal (mean PAP<25 mmHg); pulmonary venous hypertension (PVH) (mean PAP≥25 mmHg, PAWP>15 mmHg); occult PVH (mean PAP≥25 mmHg, PAWP≤15 mmHg, LVEDP>15 mmHg before or after fluid challenge); and pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) (mean PAP≥25 mmHg, PAWP≤15 mmHg and LVEDP≤15 mmHg before or after fluid challenge). 53 out of 107 patients had pulmonary hypertension. Based on the PAWP-based definition, 29 out of 53 had PAH and 24 out of 53 had PVH. After considering the resting and post-fluid-challenge LVEDP, 11 PAH patients were reclassified as occult PVH. The occult PVH group was haemodynamically, echocardiographically and demographically closer to the PVH group than the PAH group. PVH had high prevalence in our scleroderma-pulmonary hypertension population. Distinguishing PAH from PVH with only PAWP may result in some PVH patients being misclassified as having PAH.

  12. Bilateral pulmonary artery aneurysms with protein C and protein S deficiency in a patient with Behçet's disease.

    PubMed

    Ozge, C; Calikoğlu, M; Yildiz, A; Türsen, U; Tamer, L

    2004-01-01

    Behçet's disease is a chronic inflammatory disorder of unknown aetiology, characterized by recurrent attacks. Pulmonary artery aneurysm is a rare but serious complication of Behçet's disease. We describe a patient with Behçet's disease and protein C and S deficiency who developed bilateral pulmonary artery aneurysms.

  13. United in Prevention–Electrocardiographic Screening for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mazic, Sanja; Stajic, Zoran; Djelic, Marina; Zlatkovic-Svenda, Mirjana; Putnikovic, Biljana

    2013-01-01

    CONFLICT OF INTEREST: NONE DECLARED Introduction P-wave abnormalities on the resting electrocardiogram have been associated with cardiovascular or pulmonary disease. So far, “Gothic” P wave and verticalization of the frontal plane axis is related to lung disease, particularly obstructive lung disease. Aim We tested if inverted P wave in AVl as a lone criteria of P wave axis >70° could be screening tool for emphysema. Material and method 1095 routine electrocardiograms (ECGs) were reviewed which yielded 478 (82,1%) ECGs with vertical P-axis in sinus rhythm. Charts were reviewed for the diagnosis of COPD and emphysema based on medical history and pulmonary function tests. Conclusion Electrocardiogram is very effective screening tool not only in cardiovascular field but in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The verticality of the P axis is usually immediately apparent, making electrocardiogram rapid screening test for emphysema. PMID:24058253

  14. Anesthetic considerations in the patients of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease undergoing laparoscopic surgeries.

    PubMed

    Khetarpal, Ranjana; Bali, Kusum; Chatrath, Veena; Bansal, Divya

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to review the various anesthetic options which can be considered for laparoscopic surgeries in the patients with the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The literature search was performed in the Google, PubMed, and Medscape using key words "analgesia, anesthesia, general, laparoscopy, lung diseases, obstructive." More than thirty-five free full articles and books published from the year 1994 to 2014 were retrieved and studied. Retrospective data observed from various studies and case reports showed regional anesthesia (RA) to be valid and safer option in the patients who are not good candidates of general anesthesia like patients having obstructive pulmonary diseases. It showed better postoperative patient outcome with respect to safety, efficacy, postoperative pulmonary complications, and analgesia. So depending upon disease severity RA in various forms such as spinal anesthesia, paravertebral block, continuous epidural anesthesia, combined spinal epidural anesthesia (CSEA), and CSEA with bi-level positive airway pressure should be considered.

  15. Pulmonary necrobiotic nodules in Crohn's disease: a rare extra-intestinal manifestation.

    PubMed

    El-Kersh, Karim; Fraig, Mostafa; Cavallazzi, Rodrigo; Saad, Mohamed; Perez, Rafael L

    2014-12-01

    Pulmonary necrobiotic nodules represent a rare extra-intestinal manifestation of Crohn's disease. Histologically, they are composed of sterile aggregates of inflammatory cells with necrosis. The differential diagnosis is broad, and exclusion of infectious etiologies is mandatory before starting immunosuppressive therapy. Here, we present the fifth reported case of pulmonary necrobiotic nodules in Crohn's disease. Our patient had new-onset Crohn's disease associated with both cavitating and non-cavitating lung nodules that were confirmed to be necrobiotic nodules by biopsy. The patient was started on mesalamine and prednisone, with subsequent improvement of his gastrointestinal symptoms and regression of the necrobiotic nodules.

  16. The clinical and economic burden of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in the USA.

    PubMed

    Guarascio, Anthony J; Ray, Shauntá M; Finch, Christopher K; Self, Timothy H

    2013-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the third most common cause of death in the USA. In 2010, the cost of COPD in the USA was projected to be approximately US$50 billion, which includes $20 billion in indirect costs and $30 billion in direct health care expenditures. These costs can be expected to continue to rise with this progressive disease. Costs increase with increasing severity of disease, and hospital stays account for the majority of these costs. Patients are diagnosed with COPD following a multifactorial assessment that includes spirometry, clinical presentation, symptomatology, and risk factors. Smoking cessation interventions are the most influential factor in COPD management. The primary goal of chronic COPD management is stabilization of chronic disease and prevention of acute exacerbations. Bronchodilators are the mainstay of COPD therapy. Patients with few symptoms and low exacerbation risk should be treated with a short-acting bronchodilator as needed for breathlessness. Progression of symptoms, as well as possible decline in forced expiratory volume in the first second of expiration (FEV1), warrant the use of long-acting bronchodilators. For patients with frequent exacerbations with or without consistent symptoms, inhaled corticosteroids should be considered in addition to a long-acting beta2-agonist (LABA) or long-acting muscarinic antagonist (LAMA) and may even consist of "triple therapy" with all three agents with more severe disease. Phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitors may be an option in patients with frequent exacerbations and symptoms of chronic bronchitis. In addition to a variety of novel ultra-LABAs, LAMAs and combination bronchodilator and inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) therapies, other bronchodilators with a variety of mechanisms are also being considered, to expand therapeutic options for the treatment of COPD. With more than 50 new medications in the pipeline for the treatment of COPD, optimal management will continue to evolve

  17. Pulmonary Hypertension and Pulmonary Vasodilators.

    PubMed

    Keller, Roberta L

    2016-03-01

    Pulmonary hypertension in the perinatal period can present acutely (persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn) or chronically. Clinical and echocardiographic diagnosis of acute pulmonary hypertension is well accepted but there are no broadly validated criteria for echocardiographic diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension later in the clinical course, although there are significant populations of infants with lung disease at risk for this diagnosis. Contributing cardiovascular comorbidities are common in infants with pulmonary hypertension and lung disease. It is not clear who should be treated without confirmation of pulmonary vascular disease by cardiac catheterization, with concurrent evaluation of any contributing cardiovascular comorbidities.

  18. [Hemoptysis caused by pulmonary arterial aneurysm, disclosing Behçet disease. Apropos of 2 cases].

    PubMed

    Kooli, C; Salem, M; Hamzaoui, A; Fredj, M; Kaouache, Z; Khalfallah, N; Chabbou, A; Haddad, A

    1997-01-01

    Behçet's disease, frequent in our region, can have many clinical presentations. Arterial lesions generally lead to poor prognosis. We report two cases of pulmonary artery aneurysm in two young adults whose Behçet's disease was revealed by hemoptysia.

  19. Anxiety and Depression in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A New Intervention and Case Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanley, Melinda A.; Veazey, Connie; Hopko, Derek; Diefenbach, Gretchen; Kunik, Mark E.

    2005-01-01

    Anxiety and depression coexist frequently in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and compound the impact of the disease on quality of life and functional status. However, little attention has been given to the development of treatment strategies for this subset of patients. The current article describes the development of a new, multicomponent…

  20. Rheumatoid Arthritis-Associated Interstitial Lung Disease and Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis: Shared Mechanistic and Phenotypic Traits Suggest Overlapping Disease Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Paulin, Francisco; Doyle, Tracy J; Fletcher, Elaine A; Ascherman, Dana P; Rosas, Ivan O

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of clinically evident interstitial lung disease in patients with rheumatoid arthritis is approximately 10%. An additional 33% of undiagnosed patients have interstitial lung abnormalities that can be detected with high-resolution computed tomography. Rheumatoid arthritis-interstitial lung disease patients have three times the risk of death compared to those with rheumatoid arthritis occurring in the absence of interstitial lung disease, and the mortality related to interstitial lung disease is rising. Rheumatoid arthritis-interstitial lung disease is most commonly classified as the usual interstitial pneumonia pattern, overlapping mechanistically and phenotypically with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, but can occur in a non-usual interstitial pneumonia pattern, mainly nonspecific interstitial pneumonia. Based on this, we propose two possible pathways to explain the coexistence of rheumatoid arthritis and interstitial lung disease: (i) Rheumatoid arthritis-interstitial lung disease with a non-usual interstitial pneumonia pattern may come about when an immune response against citrullinated peptides taking place in another site (e.g. the joints) subsequently affects the lungs; (ii) Rheumatoid arthritis-interstitial lung disease with a usual interstitial pneumonia pattern may represent a disease process in which idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis-like pathology triggers an immune response against citrullinated proteins that promotes articular disease indicative of rheumatoid arthritis. More studies focused on elucidating the basic mechanisms leading to different sub-phenotypes of rheumatoid arthritis-interstitial lung disease and the overlap with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis are necessary to improve our understanding of the disease process and to define new therapeutic targets.

  1. Eosinophilic airway inflammation: role in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    George, Leena; Brightling, Christopher E.

    2016-01-01

    The chronic lung diseases, asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), are common affecting over 500 million people worldwide and causing substantial morbidity and mortality. Asthma is typically associated with Th2-mediated eosinophilic airway inflammation, in contrast to neutrophilic inflammation observed commonly in COPD. However, there is increasing evidence that the eosinophil might play an important role in 10–40% of patients with COPD. Consistently in both asthma and COPD a sputum eosinophilia is associated with a good response to corticosteroid therapy and tailored strategies aimed to normalize sputum eosinophils reduce exacerbation frequency and severity. Advances in our understanding of the multistep paradigm of eosinophil recruitment to the airway, and the consequence of eosinophilic inflammation, has led to the development of new therapies to target these molecular pathways. In this article we discuss the mechanisms of eosinophilic trafficking, the tools to assess eosinophilic airway inflammation in asthma and COPD during stable disease and exacerbations and review current and novel anti-eosinophilic treatments. PMID:26770668

  2. A Persistent and Diverse Airway Microbiota Present during Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Exacerbations

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yvonne J.; Kim, Eugenia; Cox, Michael J.; Brodie, Eoin L.; Brown, Ron; Wiener-Kronish, Jeanine P.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are a major source of morbidity and contribute significantly to healthcare costs. Although bacterial infections are implicated in nearly 50% of exacerbations, only a handful of pathogens have been consistently identified in COPD airways, primarily by culture-based methods, and the bacterial microbiota in acute exacerbations remains largely uncharacterized. The aim of this study was to comprehensively profile airway bacterial communities using a culture-independent microarray, the 16S rRNA PhyloChip, of a cohort of COPD patients requiring ventilatory support and antibiotic therapy for exacerbation-related respiratory failure. PhyloChip analysis revealed the presence of over 1,200 bacterial taxa representing 140 distinct families, many previously undetected in airway diseases; bacterial community composition was strongly influenced by the duration of intubation. A core community of 75 taxa was detected in all patients, many of which are known pathogens. Bacterial community diversity in COPD airways is substantially greater than previously recognized and includes a number of potential pathogens detected in the setting of antibiotic exposure. Comprehensive assessment of the COPD airway microbiota using high-throughput, culture-independent methods may prove key to understanding the relationships between airway bacterial colonization, acute exacerbation, and clinical outcomes in this and other chronic inflammatory airway diseases. PMID:20141328

  3. A persistent and diverse airway microbiota present during chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbations.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yvonne J; Kim, Eugenia; Cox, Michael J; Brodie, Eoin L; Brown, Ron; Wiener-Kronish, Jeanine P; Lynch, Susan V

    2010-02-01

    Acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are a major source of morbidity and contribute significantly to healthcare costs. Although bacterial infections are implicated in nearly 50% of exacerbations, only a handful of pathogens have been consistently identified in COPD airways, primarily by culture-based methods, and the bacterial microbiota in acute exacerbations remains largely uncharacterized. The aim of this study was to comprehensively profile airway bacterial communities using a culture-independent microarray, the 16S rRNA PhyloChip, of a cohort of COPD patients requiring ventilatory support and antibiotic therapy for exacerbation-related respiratory failure. PhyloChip analysis revealed the presence of over 1,200 bacterial taxa representing 140 distinct families, many previously undetected in airway diseases; bacterial community composition was strongly influenced by the duration of intubation. A core community of 75 taxa was detected in all patients, many of which are known pathogens. Bacterial community diversity in COPD airways is substantially greater than previously recognized and includes a number of potential pathogens detected in the setting of antibiotic exposure. Comprehensive assessment of the COPD airway microbiota using high-throughput, culture-independent methods may prove key to understanding the relationships between airway bacterial colonization, acute exacerbation, and clinical outcomes in this and other chronic inflammatory airway diseases.

  4. Nutrition therapy for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and related nutritional complications.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Amanda Carla; Bezerra, Olívia Maria de Paula Alves

    2006-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is characterized by progressive and partially reversible airway obstruction. The innumerable complications that occur during the progression of the disease can affect the nutritional state of patients suffering from this illness. The objective of this study was to present a brief review of the literature regarding the nutrition therapy used in the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. To that end, we performed a bibliographic search for related articles published within the last 18 years and indexed for the Literatura Latinoamericana y del Caribe en Ciencias de la Salud (LILACS, Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature) and Medline databases. Malnutrition is associated with a poor prognosis for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, since it predisposes such patients to infections, as well as reducing respiratory muscle force, exercise tolerance and quality of life. Despite the fact that such malnutrition is extremely common in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients, it should be recognized as an independent risk factor, since it can be modified through appropriate and efficacious diet therapy and monitoring. For patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, nutrition therapy is initiated after the evaluation of the nutritional state of the patient, which identifies nutritional risk, thereby allowing the proper level of treatment to be established. In this evaluation, anthropometric and biochemical markers, as well as indicators of dietary consumption and body composition, should be used. The prescribed diet should contain appropriate proportions of macronutrients, micronutrients and immunonutrients in order to regain or maintain the proper nutritional state and to avoid complications. The physical characteristics of the diet should be tailored to the individual needs and tolerances of each patient. In the treatment of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

  5. The role of vitamin D in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma and other respiratory diseases.

    PubMed

    García de Tena, Jaime; El Hachem Debek, Abdulkader; Hernández Gutiérrez, Cristina; Izquierdo Alonso, José Luis

    2014-05-01

    There has been growing interest in recent years in the extraosseous effects of vitamin D. In this article, we review the physiology of vitamin D, the physiopathological effects associated with vitamin D deficit and the available evidence on its etiopathogenic role in respiratory diseases. Given the pleiotropic actions of vitamin D, it is biologically plausible that the deficit of this vitamin could play a pathogenic role of in the development of various respiratory diseases. However, the many epidemiological studies that have shown an association between low vitamin D levels and a higher risk of developing various respiratory diseases or a poorer prognosis if they do appear, were unable to show causality. Post-hoc analyses of some clinical trials, particularly in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma, appear to suggest that some patient subtypes may benefit from correction of a vitamin D deficit. In this respect, it would be interesting to determine if the interindividual differences found in the effect of vitamin D deficit and responses to correcting this deficit could be explained by the genetic variants involved in vitamin D metabolism. Ultimately, only appropriately designed clinical trials will determine whether 25-OHD supplements can prevent or improve the course of the various respiratory diseases in which an epidemiological association between prognosis and vitamin D deficit has been described.

  6. Should we treat chronic obstructive pulmonary disease as a cardiovascular disease?

    PubMed

    Rabinovich, Roberto A; MacNee, William

    2015-08-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by largely irreversible airflow limitation and is associated with several extrapulmonary manifestations and co-morbidities. Cardiovascular diseases are among the most frequent co-morbid conditions affecting patients with COPD and have important prognostic implications for hospitalization and mortality. In turn, COPD shares common risk factors with several cardiovascular diseases (i.e., smoking habit), while several features of COPD can predispose to cardiovascular disease (i.e., gas exchange abnormalities, polycythemia, systemic inflammation and sedentary lifestyle). Cardiovascular co-morbidities in patients with COPD are under-recognized and undertreated and should be actively sought and treated according to usual guidelines. This review will discuss the increased prevalence and prognostic implications of cardiovascular co-morbidities in patients with COPD. The effect of COPD on the outcomes in cardiovascular disease will also be highlighted and the pathogenic mechanisms that underlie cardiovascular co-morbidities in patients with COPD will also be reviewed. Finally, options for the management of cardiovascular co-morbidities in patients with COPD will be discussed.

  7. Association of nsv823469 copy number loss with decreased risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and pulmonary function in Chinese

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaoliang; Lu, Xiaoxiao; Chen, Jiansong; Wu, Di; Qiu, Fuman; Xiong, Huali; Pan, Zihua; Yang, Lei; Yang, Binyao; Xie, Chenli; Zhou, Yifeng; Huang, Dongsheng; Zhou, Yumin; Lu, Jiachun

    2017-01-01

    It is highly possible that copy number variations (CNVs) in susceptible regions have effects on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) development, while long noncoding RNA (lncRNAs) have been shown to cause COPD. We hypothesized that the common CNV, named nsv823469 located on 6p22.1, and covering lncRNAs (major histocompatibility complex, class I, A (HLA-A) and HLA complex group 4B (HCG4B)) has an effect on COPD risk. This association was assessed through a two-stage case-control study, and was further confirmed with COPD and pulmonary function-based family analyses, respectively. The copy number loss (0-copy/1-copy) of nsv823469 significantly decreased risk of COPD compared with normal (2-copy) (OR = 0.77, 95% CI = 0.69–0.85). The loss allele, inducing copy number loss of nsv823469, has a tendency to transmit to offspring or siblings (P = 0.010) and is associated with forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) (P = 0.030). Furthermore, the copy number loss of nsv823469 in normal pulmonary tissue decreases the expression levels of HCG4B (r = 0.315, P = 0.031) and HLA-A (r = 0.296, P = 0.044). Our data demonstrates that nsv823469 plays a role in COPD and pulmonary function inheritance by potentially altering expression of HCG4B. PMID:28079130

  8. Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia: Chronic Lung Disease of Infancy and Long-Term Pulmonary Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Lauren M.; Berkelhamer, Sara K.

    2017-01-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is a chronic lung disease most commonly seen in premature infants who required mechanical ventilation and oxygen therapy for acute respiratory distress. While advances in neonatal care have resulted in improved survival rates of premature infants, limited progress has been made in reducing rates of BPD. Lack of progress may in part be attributed to the limited therapeutic options available for prevention and treatment of BPD. Several lung-protective strategies have been shown to reduce risks, including use of non-invasive support, as well as early extubation and volume ventilation when intubation is required. These approaches, along with optimal nutrition and medical therapy, decrease risk of BPD; however, impacts on long-term outcomes are poorly defined. Characterization of late outcomes remain a challenge as rapid advances in medical management result in current adult BPD survivors representing outdated neonatal care. While pulmonary disease improves with growth, long-term follow-up studies raise concerns for persistent pulmonary dysfunction; asthma-like symptoms and exercise intolerance in young adults after BPD. Abnormal ventilatory responses and pulmonary hypertension can further complicate disease. These pulmonary morbidities, combined with environmental and infectious exposures, may result in significant long-term pulmonary sequalae and represent a growing burden on health systems. Additional longitudinal studies are needed to determine outcomes beyond the second decade, and define risk factors and optimal treatment for late sequalae of disease. PMID:28067830

  9. The potential impact of the pulmonary microbiome on immunopathogenesis of Aspergillus-related lung disease.

    PubMed

    Kolwijck, Eva; van de Veerdonk, Frank L

    2014-11-01

    Aspergillosis is an infection or allergic response caused by fungi of the genus Aspergillus. The most common forms of aspergillosis are allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, chronic pulmonary aspergillosis, and invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. Aspergillus also plays an important role in fungal sensitized asthma. Humans inhale Aspergillus spores every day and when the host is immunocompromised, Aspergillus spp. may cause severe pulmonary disease. There is increasing evidence that the microbiome plays a significant role in immune regulation, chronic inflammatory diseases, metabolism, and other physiological processes, including recovery from the effects of antibiotic treatment. Bacterial microbiome mediated resistance mechanisms probably play a major role in limiting fungal colonization of the lungs, and may therefore prevent humans from contracting Aspergillus-related diseases. In this perspective, we review this emerging area of research and discuss the role of the microbiome in aspergillosis, role of Aspergillus in the microbiome, and the influence of the microbiome on anti-Aspergillus host defense and its role in preventing aspergillosis.

  10. Pulmonary cystic disease in HIV positive individuals in the Democratic Republic of Congo: three case reports

    PubMed Central

    Callens, Steven FJ; Kitetele, Faustin; Lelo, Patricia; Shabani, Nicole; Lusiama, Jean; Wemakoy, Okitolanda; Colebunders, Robert; Behets, Frieda; Van Rie, Annelies

    2007-01-01

    Pulmonary emphysema and bronchiectasis in HIV seropositive patients has been described in the presence of injection drug use, malnutrition, repeated opportunistic infections, such as Pneumocytis jirovici pneumonia and Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, and has been linked to the presence of HIV virus in lung tissue. Given the high burden of pulmonary infections and malnutrition among people living with HIV in resource poor settings, these individuals may be at increased risk of developing pulmonary emphysema, potentially reducing the long term benefit of antiretroviral therapy (ART) if initiated late in the course of HIV infection. In this report, we describe three HIV-infected individuals (one woman and two children) presenting with extensive pulmonary cystic disease. PMID:17888170

  11. Within-breath respiratory impedance and airway obstruction in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Karla Kristine Dames; Faria, Alvaro Camilo Dias; Lopes, Agnaldo José; de Melo, Pedro Lopes

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Recent work has suggested that within-breath respiratory impedance measurements performed using the forced oscillation technique may help to noninvasively evaluate respiratory mechanics. We investigated the influence of airway obstruction on the within-breath forced oscillation technique in smokers and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients and evaluated the contribution of this analysis to the diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. METHODS: Twenty healthy individuals and 20 smokers were assessed. The study also included 74 patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. We evaluated the mean respiratory impedance (Zm) as well as values for the inspiration (Zi) and expiration cycles (Ze) at the beginning of inspiration (Zbi) and expiration (Zbe), respectively. The peak-to-peak impedance (Zpp=Zbe-Zbi) and the respiratory cycle dependence (ΔZrs=Ze-Zi) were also analyzed. The diagnostic utility was evaluated by investigating the sensitivity, the specificity and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01888705. RESULTS: Airway obstruction increased the within-breath respiratory impedance parameters that were significantly correlated with the spirometric indices of airway obstruction (R=−0.65, p<0.0001). In contrast to the control subjects and the smokers, the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients presented significant expiratory-inspiratory differences (p<0.002). The adverse effects of moderate airway obstruction were detected based on the Zpp with an accuracy of 83%. Additionally, abnormal effects in severe and very severe patients were detected based on the Zm, Zi, Ze, Zbe, Zpp and ΔZrs with a high degree of accuracy (>90%). CONCLUSIONS: We conclude the following: (1) chronic obstructive pulmonary disease introduces higher respiratory cycle dependence, (2) this increase is proportional to airway obstruction, and (3) the within-breath forced oscillation technique may

  12. Laser plasmapheresis for treatment of pulmonary and pleural suppurative diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akopov, A. L.; Bely, K. P.; Berezin, Yu. D.; Orlov, S. V.

    1996-04-01

    Plasmapheresis in pulmonology is one of the leading methods of extracorporeal detoxification of patients with purulent lung and pleura diseases. However this method causes a decrease in patients' leukocyte level and humoral immunity indices. The medico-biological research conducted at the State Scientific Center of Pulmonology demonstrated that a combination of plasmapheresis with additional irradiation of the patients' reinfused erythrocyte mass with low intensive He-Ne laser light with the wavelength of 0.63 mkm considerably reduces the probability of these complications. It may be due to the fact that laser irradiation of autologous erythrocytes induces local and general stimulation, favoring in this way the inflammatory process involution. The suggested method of plasmapheresis was used in the process of treatment of 76 patients with lung abscess, empyema, purulent mediastinitis, sepsis. The essence of the method consists in irradiating with He-Ne laser the last portion of the erythrocyte mass (130 - 170 ml), diluted with saline, during its reinfusion in the course of a routine plasmapheresis. The positive impact of practical application of the above method allows to characterize it as highly effective for treatment of purulent diseases in pulmonology.

  13. [The paediatric roots of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    de Blic, J; Deschildre, A

    2011-02-01

    Early disturbances in pulmonary development seem to favour the occurrence of the functional impairments observed in COPD. In utero exposure to maternal smoking is the most commonly documented antenatal factor. Early life events such as the bronchopulmonary dysplasia are responsible for hypoalveolisation. The effects of passive smoking during childhood are prolonged into adulthood. The role of viral respiratory infections in early childhood remains a subject for debate. Finally the role of genes implied in pulmonary development both pre and post natally is beginning to be recognized. The decline of the respiratory function that occurs in adulthood leads then more rapidly to the functional criteria of COPD, particularly in the event of active smoking. There thus exist epidemiological and fundamental arguments, which support the idea that the COPD has at least, in part, a paediatric origin.

  14. Aortic lesion simulating pulmonary disease: a case report*

    PubMed Central

    do Amaral, Ricardo Holderbaum; de Souza, Vinícius Valério Silveira; Nin, Carlos Schuler; Pedraza, Cesar Adrian Alvarez; Biegelmeyer, Júlia; Maciel, Antonio Carlos

    2014-01-01

    The authors report the case of an elderly woman assessed for dyspnea and right costal margin pain, whose chest radiography demonstrated opacity simulating pulmonary lesion, and computed tomography revealed the vascular origin of the condition. Acute aortic syndrome due to ruptured atheromatous plaque penetrating through the elastic lamina in association with aortic hematoma and aneurysm is a relevant differential diagnosis to be considered in these cases. PMID:25741108

  15. Risk of Periodontal Diseases in Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Te-Chun; Chang, Pei-Ying; Lin, Cheng-Li; Chen, Chia-Hung; Tu, Chih-Yen; Hsia, Te-Chun; Shih, Chuen-Ming; Hsu, Wu-Huei; Sung, Fung-Chang; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Several studies have reported an association between chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and periodontal diseases. However, a large-scale population-based cohort study was previously absent from the literature. Therefore, we evaluated the risk of periodontal diseases in patients with COPD in a nationwide population. From the National Health Insurance claims data of Taiwan, we identified 22,332 patients with COPD who were newly diagnosed during 2000 to 2010. For each case, two individuals without COPD were randomly selected and frequency matched by age, sex, and diagnosis year. Both groups were followed up till the end of 2011. The overall incidence of periodontal diseases was 1.19-fold greater in the COPD group than in the comparison group (32.2 vs 26.4 per 1000 person-years; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.15–1.24). Compared with non-COPD patients, the adjusted hazard ratios of patients with COPD increased with the number of emergency room visits (from 1.14 [95% CI 1.10–1.19] to 5.09 [95% CI 4.53–5.72]) and admissions (from 1.15 [95% CI 1.10–1.20] to 3.17 [95% CI 2.81–3.57]). In addition, the adjusted hazard ratios of patients with COPD treated with inhaled corticosteroids (1.22, 95% CI 1.11–1.34) and systemic corticosteroids (1.15, 95% CI 1.07–1.23) were significantly higher than those of patients not treated with corticosteroids. Patient with COPD are at a higher risk of developing periodontal diseases than the general population. Our results also support that the risk of periodontal diseases is proportional to COPD control. In addition, patients who receive corticosteroid treatment are at a higher risk of developing periodontal diseases. PMID:26579813

  16. [Clinical consequences of muscle dysfunction in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Sauleda Roig, J

    2006-05-01

    The function of respiratory muscles, and mainly inspiratory muscles, is impaired in COPD patients. Most of these impairments are essentially due to pulmonary hyperinflation that puts these muscles in a disadvantageous situation. The main consequence of this dysfunction is respiratory muscle fatigue that may cause shortness of breath, exertion intolerance, and hypoventilation with onset of hypercapnic respiratory failure. This function may be measured at the pulmonary function laboratory by means of unspecific (spirometry, pulmonary volumes) or specific tests (maxim respiratory pressures [MIP - M], transdiaphragmatic pressure, tension-time index of the diaphragm, electromyography, or endura tests). Therapy should aim at improving hyperinflation with bronchodilator therapy, improving muscular strength with rehabilitation, and in severe cases muscle rest with mechanical ventilation. Peripheral muscle dysfunction is a common complication in moderate-severe COPD, and it may be the result of chronic inactivity, hypoxemia, electrolytic impairments, under nutrition, steroids, oxidative stress, and systemic inflammation. Besides, it may contribute to patients' quality of life worsening, disability, and even an increase in morbimortality. It may tested by impedanciometry, muscle strength tests (dynamometry), imaging tests, and even muscle biopsy in research studies. Peripheral muscle dysfunction is potentially manageable with rehabilitation, nutritional supplementation, and anabolic drugs. However, therapeutic success is often incomplete, so that further studies with new therapeutic strategies are needed.

  17. Swallowing transit times and valleculae residue in stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Breathing and swallowing are physiologically linked to ensure effortless gas exchange during oronasal breathing and to prevent aspiration during swallowing. Studies have indicated consistent aspiration in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, mainly related to delayed swallowing reflex and problems with lingual propulsion and pharyngeal peristalsis as a result of bilateral weakness and incoordination of the related muscles. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate swallowing transit times and valleculae residue characteristics of stable COPD patients who have no swallowing complaints. Methods Our study population included 20 stable patients with COPD and no swallowing complaints and 20 healthy controls. Swallowing was assessed through videofluoroscopic examination and involved the analysis of the following parameters: (1) pharyngeal stages of deglutition; (2) the duration of bolus movement through the oral cavity and pharynx (i.e. transit times); (3) valleculae residue ratio; (4) penetration/aspiration. Results Participants of the study did not present any signs of penetration-aspiration for any of the tested consistencies. Patients with COPD presented longer pharyngeal transit times during the ingestion of the liquid consistency and during the ingestion of the paste consistency. Regarding the duration of tongue base contact with the posterior pharyngeal wall, COPD patients also presented longer durations for the liquid and paste consistencies. No significant difference was observed for the distribution of individuals among the different valleculae residue severity levels. Conclusions Our study suggests that stable COPD patients may present physiological adaptations as a protective swallowing maneuver to avoid aspiration/penetration of pharyngeal contents. Moreover, valleculae residue cannot be seen as an isolated factor when trying to explain swallowing alterations in this population. PMID:24739506

  18. Pulmonary vascular resistance and compliance relationship in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Chemla, Denis; Lau, Edmund M T; Papelier, Yves; Attal, Pierre; Hervé, Philippe

    2015-10-01

    Right ventricular adaptation to the increased pulmonary arterial load is a key determinant of outcomes in pulmonary hypertension (PH). Pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) and total arterial compliance (C) quantify resistive and elastic properties of pulmonary arteries that modulate the steady and pulsatile components of pulmonary arterial load, respectively. PVR is commonly calculated as transpulmonary pressure gradient over pulmonary flow and total arterial compliance as stroke volume over pulmonary arterial pulse pressure (SV/PApp). Assuming that there is an inverse, hyperbolic relationship between PVR and C, recent studies have popularised the concept that their product (RC-time of the pulmonary circulation, in seconds) is "constant" in health and diseases. However, emerging evidence suggests that this concept should be challenged, with shortened RC-times documented in post-capillary PH and normotensive subjects. Furthermore, reported RC-times in the literature have consistently demonstrated significant scatter around the mean. In precapillary PH, the true PVR can be overestimated if one uses the standard PVR equation because the zero-flow pressure may be significantly higher than pulmonary arterial wedge pressure. Furthermore, SV/PApp may also overestimate true C. Further studies are needed to clarify some of the inconsistencies of pulmonary RC-time, as this has major implications for our understanding of the arterial load in diseases of the pulmonary circulation.

  19. Pulmonary Vascular Impedance in Chronic Pulmonary Hypertension.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    PULMONARY HYPERTENSION , *PULMONARY BLOOD CIRCULATION, BLOOD CIRCULATION, LUNG, PATHOLOGY, VASCULAR DISEASES, ARTERIES, OBSTRUCTION(PHYSIOLOGY...EMBOLISM, HISTOLOGY, DOGS, LABORATORY ANIMALS, BLOOD PRESSURE , EXPERIMENTAL DATA, PHYSIOLOGY.

  20. Genetic loci associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap with loci for lung function and pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, Brian D; de Jong, Kim; Lamontagne, Maxime; Bossé, Yohan; Shrine, Nick; Artigas, María Soler; Wain, Louise V; Hall, Ian P; Jackson, Victoria E; Wyss, Annah B; London, Stephanie J; North, Kari E; Franceschini, Nora; Strachan, David P; Beaty, Terri H; Hokanson, John E; Crapo, James D; Castaldi, Peter J; Chase, Robert P; Bartz, Traci M; Heckbert, Susan R; Psaty, Bruce M; Gharib, Sina A; Zanen, Pieter; Lammers, Jan W; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Groen, H J; Locantore, Nicholas; Tal-Singer, Ruth; Rennard, Stephen I; Vestbo, Jørgen; Timens, Wim; Paré, Peter D; Latourelle, Jeanne C; Dupuis, Josée; O'Connor, George T; Wilk, Jemma B; Kim, Woo Jin; Lee, Mi Kyeong; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Vonk, Judith M; de Koning, Harry J; Leng, Shuguang; Belinsky, Steven A; Tesfaigzi, Yohannes; Manichaikul, Ani; Wang, Xin-Qun; Rich, Stephen S; Barr, R Graham; Sparrow, David; Litonjua, Augusto A; Bakke, Per; Gulsvik, Amund; Lahousse, Lies; Brusselle, Guy G; Stricker, Bruno H; Uitterlinden, André G; Ampleford, Elizabeth J; Bleecker, Eugene R; Woodruff, Prescott G; Meyers, Deborah A; Qiao, Dandi; Lomas, David A; Yim, Jae-Joon; Kim, Deog Kyeom; Hawrylkiewicz, Iwona; Sliwinski, Pawel; Hardin, Megan; Fingerlin, Tasha E; Schwartz, David A; Postma, Dirkje S; MacNee, William; Tobin, Martin D; Silverman, Edwin K; Boezen, H Marike; Cho, Michael H

    2017-03-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a leading cause of mortality worldwide. We performed a genetic association study in 15,256 cases and 47,936 controls, with replication of select top results (P < 5 × 10(-6)) in 9,498 cases and 9,748 controls. In the combined meta-analysis, we identified 22 loci associated at genome-wide significance, including 13 new associations with COPD. Nine of these 13 loci have been associated with lung function in general population samples, while 4 (EEFSEC, DSP, MTCL1, and SFTPD) are new. We noted two loci shared with pulmonary fibrosis (FAM13A and DSP) but that had opposite risk alleles for COPD. None of our loci overlapped with genome-wide associations for asthma, although one locus has been implicated in joint susceptibility to asthma and obesity. We also identified genetic correlation between COPD and asthma. Our findings highlight new loci associated with COPD, demonstrate the importance of specific loci associated with lung function to COPD, and identify potential regions of genetic overlap between COPD and other respiratory diseases.

  1. Electronic health records and improved nursing management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fengping; Zou, Yeqing; Huang, Qingmei; Zheng, Li; Wang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    This paper identifies evolving trends in the diagnosis and treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and recommends the integration of nursing strategies in COPD management via widespread implementation of electronic health records. COPD is a complex lung disease with diverse origins, both physical and behavioral, manifested in a wide range of symptoms that further increase the patient's risk for comorbidities. Early diagnosis and effective management of COPD require monitoring of a dizzying array of COPD symptoms over extended periods of time, and nurses are especially well positioned to manage potential progressions of COPD, as frontline health care providers who obtain, record, and organize patient data. Developments in medical technology greatly aid nursing management of COPD, from the deployment of spirometry as a diagnostic tool at the family practice level to newly approved treatment options, including non-nicotine pharmacotherapies that reduce the cravings associated with tobacco withdrawal. Among new medical technologies, electronic health records have proven particularly advantageous in the management of COPD, enabling providers to gather, maintain, and reference more patient data than has ever been possible before. Thus, consistent and widespread implementation of electronic health records facilitates the coordination of diverse treatment strategies, resulting in increased positive health outcomes for patients with COPD.

  2. Validation of the French version of the Leicester Cough Questionnaire in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Reychler, Gregory; Schinckus, Mathilde; Fremault, Antoine; Liistro, Giuseppe; Pieters, Thierry

    2015-11-01

    Cough is one of the three major symptoms reported by chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients. The Leicester Cough Questionnaire (LCQ) is a questionnaire exploring the impact of cough, but it does not exist in French. The aim of this study was to develop a French version of LCQ and to assess its psychometrics properties. A forward-backward translation process was used to develop the French version of the LCQ. COPD patients completed LCQ and Cough and Sputum Assessment Questionnaire (CASA-Q) to determine concurrent validity, content validity and internal consistency. Two weeks later, the LCQ was repeated to evaluate the reproducibility. Seventy-four COPD patients were recruited. The concurrent validity showed highly significant correlations between all scores of LCQ and CASA-Q (p < 0.001). The content validity was good with domain total scores correlations ranging from 0.918 to 0.953. The LCQ domains and total scores showed a very good internal consistency with Cronbach's α coefficients ranging between 0.802 and 0.917. The test-retest reliability was high in COPD patients with no change in cough. In conclusion, The French version of the LCQ is a valid and reliable instrument to measure health status in COPD patients.

  3. Reporting of exercise attendance rates for people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Williams, Marie T; Lewis, Lucy K; McKeough, Zoe; Holland, Anne E; Lee, Annemarie; McNamara, Renae; Phillips, Anna; Wiles, Louise; Knapman, Leona; Wootton, Sally; Milross, Maree; Effing, Tanja

    2014-01-01

    While recommendations for the duration, frequency, mode and intensity of exercise programmes for people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are specified in consensus statements, criteria for exercise session attendance are less clear. The review questions were: (i) how commonly are a priori criteria and attendance rates reported for people with COPD participating in exercise programmes and (ii) what is the strength of association between attendance and improvements in functional exercise capacity. Database searches identified primary studies of people with COPD participating in exercise or pulmonary rehabilitation programmes of at least 2 weeks duration. Primary outcomes were a priori criteria for attendance, reports of attendance at supervised exercise sessions and mean improvements in functional exercise assessments. Data extraction processes were confirmed prospectively (>80% agreement). Variants of exercise attendance data were described. Linear associations between attendance and improvements in exercise outcomes were explored (Pearson r, P < 0.05). Of the 234 included studies, 86 (37%) reported attendance and 29 (12%) provided a priori criteria for attendance. In the small sample of studies which reported attendance and functional exercise data before and after the intervention, there was little to no relationship between improvements in functional exercise capacity and training volume (prescribed r = -0.03, P = 0.88; attended r = -0.24, P = 0.18). Reporting of exercise programme attendance rates is low and of variable quality for people with COPD. Consistent and explicit reporting of exercise attendance in people with COPD will enable calculation of dose-response relationships and determine the value of a priori exercise attendance criteria.

  4. Sequential Treatments with Tongsai and Bufei Yishen Granules Reduce Inflammation and Improve Pulmonary Function in Acute Exacerbation-Risk Window of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiaofan; Li, Ya; Wang, Haifeng; Wu, Zhaohuan; Li, Hangjie; Wang, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Background. Sequential treatments of Chinese medicines for acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) risk window (RW) have benefits for preventing reoccurrences of AEs; however, the effects on pulmonary function, pulmonary, and systemic inflammatory biomarkers remain unclear. Methods. Cigarette-smoke/bacterial infections induced rats were randomized into Control, COPD, AECOPD, Tongsai Granule/normal saline (TSG/NS), moxifloxacin + salbutamol/NS (MXF+STL/NS), TSG/Bufei Yishen Granule (BYG), MXF+STL/STL, and TSG+MXF+STL/BYG+STL groups and given corresponding medicine(s) in AE- and/or RW phase. Body temperature, pulmonary function, blood cytology, serum amyloid A (SAA) and C-reactive protein (CRP), pulmonary histomorphology and myeloperoxidase (MPO), polymorphonuclear (PMN) elastase, interleukins IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-10, and tumor necrosis factor- (TNF-) α expressions were determined. Results. Body temperature, inflammatory cells and cytokines, SAA, CRP, and pulmonary impairment were higher in AECOPD rats than stable COPD, while pulmonary function declined and recovered to COPD level in 14–18 days. All biomarkers were improved in treated groups with shorter recovery times of 4–10 days, especially in TSG+MXF+STL/BYG+STL group. Conclusion. Sequential treatments with Tongsai and Bufei Yishen Granules, during AECOPD-RW periods, can reduce inflammatory response and improve pulmonary function and shorten the recovery courses of AEs, especially the integrated Chinese and Western medicines. PMID:27563333

  5. Tigecycline Is Highly Efficacious against Mycobacterium abscessus Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ferro, Beatriz E.; Srivastava, Shashikant; Deshpande, Devyani; Pasipanodya, Jotam G.; van Soolingen, Dick; Mouton, Johan W.; van Ingen, Jakko

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium abscessus causes chronic pulmonary infections that are extremely difficult to cure. The currently recommended combination therapy is associated with high failure rates and relapse. Tigecycline has been explored in salvage regimens, with a response rate of 43% in those who received at least a month of therapy. We performed a dose-response study in a hollow-fiber system model of pulmonary M. abscessus infection in which we recapitulated tigecycline human pulmonary concentration-time profiles of 8 different doses for 21 days. We identified the maximal kill or efficacy in CFU per milliliter and the ratio of the 0- to 24-h area under the concentration-time curve to MIC (AUC/MIC) associated with 80% efficacy (EC80). The tigecycline efficacy was 5.38 ± 2.35 log10 CFU/ml, and the drug achieved the unprecedented feat of a bacterial level of 1.0 log10 CFU/ml below the pretreatment inoculum (1-log kill) of M. abscessus in the hollow-fiber system. The EC80 AUC/MIC ratio was 36.65, while that for a 1-log kill was 44.6. Monte Carlo experiments with 10,000 patients were used to identify the clinical dose best able to achieve the EC80 or 1-log kill. The standard dose of 100 mg/day had a cumulative fraction of response of 51% for the EC80 and 46% for 1-log kill. For both the EC80 target and 1-log kill, the optimal tigecycline clinical dose was identified as 200 mg/day. The susceptibility breakpoint was ≤0.5 mg/liter. Tigecycline is the most active single agent evaluated to date, and we propose that 200 mg/day be examined as the backbone of new combination therapy regimens to replace current treatment. PMID:26926649

  6. Emergency Endovascular Management of Pulmonary Artery Aneurysms In Behcet's Disease: Report of Two Cases and a Review of the Literature

    SciTech Connect

    Cantasdemir, Murat; Kantarci, Fatih; Mihmanli, Ismail; Akman, Canan; Numan, Furuzan; Islak, Civan; Bozkurt, A. Kursat

    2002-12-15

    his report describes two patients with a known history of Behcet's disease in whom massive hemoptysis developed from rupture of pulmonary artery aneurysms. The high recurrence rate of complications related to pulmonary artery aneurysms and even the aneurysms themselves due to inadequacy of medical therapy and the disadvantages of surgical treatment make these aneurysms candidates for endovascular management.The pulmonary artery aneurysms reported here were successfully treated with endovascular embolization using n-butylcyanoacrylate. Pulmonary artery aneurysm embolization in Behcet's disease has been reviewed in the light of relevant literature.

  7. Geographic disparity in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) mortality rates among the Taiwan population.

    PubMed

    Chan, Ta-Chien; Chiang, Po-Huang; Su, Ming-Daw; Wang, Hsuan-Wen; Liu, Michael Shi-yung

    2014-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) causes a high disease burden among the elderly worldwide. In Taiwan, the long-term temporal trend of COPD mortality is declining, but the geographical disparity of the disease is not yet known. Nationwide COPD age-adjusted mortality at the township level during 1999-2007 is used for elucidating the geographical distribution of the disease. With an ordinary least squares (OLS) model and geographically weighted regression (GWR), the ecologic risk factors such as smoking rate, area deprivation index, tuberculosis exposure, percentage of aborigines, density of health care facilities, air pollution and altitude are all considered in both models to evaluate their effects on mortality. Global and local Moran's I are used for examining their spatial autocorrelation and identifying clusters. During the study period, the COPD age-adjusted mortality rates in males declined from 26.83 to 19.67 per 100,000 population, and those in females declined from 8.98 to 5.70 per 100,000 population. Overall, males' COPD mortality rate was around three times higher than females'. In the results of GWR, the median coefficients of smoking rate, the percentage of aborigines, PM10 and the altitude are positively correlated with COPD mortality in males and females. The median value of density of health care facilities is negatively correlated with COPD mortality. The overall adjusted R-squares are about 20% higher in the GWR model than in the OLS model. The local Moran's I of the GWR's residuals reflected the consistent high-high cluster in southern Taiwan. The findings indicate that geographical disparities in COPD mortality exist. Future epidemiological investigation is required to understand the specific risk factors within the clustering areas.

  8. Palliative Senning in the Treatment of Congenital Heart Disease with Severe Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    da Penha, Juliano Gomes; Zorzanelli, Leina; Barbosa-Lopes, Antonio Augusto; Atik, Edimar; Miana, Leonardo Augusto; Tanamati, Carla; Caneo, Luiz Fernando; Miura, Nana; Aiello, Vera Demarchi; Jatene, Marcelo Biscegli

    2015-01-01

    Background Transposition of the great arteries (TGA) is the most common cyanotic cardiopathy, with an incidence ranging between 0.2 and 0.4 per 1000 live births. Many patients not treated in the first few months of life may progress with severe pulmonary vascular disease. Treatment of these patients may include palliative surgery to redirect the flow at the atrial level. Objective Report our institutional experience with the palliative Senning procedure in children diagnosed with TGA and double outlet right ventricle with severe pulmonary vascular disease, and to evaluate the early and late clinical progression of the palliative Senning procedure. Methods Retrospective study based on the evaluation of medical records in the period of 1991 to 2014. Only patients without an indication for definitive surgical treatment of the cardiopathy due to elevated pulmonary pressure were included. Results After one year of follow-up there was a mean increase in arterial oxygen saturation from 62.1% to 92.5% and a mean decrease in hematocrit from 49.4% to 36.3%. Lung histological analysis was feasible in 16 patients. In 8 patients, pulmonary biopsy grades 3 and 4 were evidenced. Conclusion The palliative Senning procedure improved arterial oxygen saturation, reduced polycythemia, and provided a better quality of life for patients with TGA with ventricular septal defect, severe pulmonary hypertension, and poor prognosis. PMID:26559982

  9. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps in Pulmonary Diseases: Too Much of a Good Thing?

    PubMed

    Porto, Bárbara Nery; Stein, Renato Tetelbom

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) arise from the release of granular and nuclear contents of neutrophils in the extracellular space in response to different classes of microorganisms, soluble factors, and host molecules. NETs are composed by decondensed chromatin fibers coated with antimicrobial granular and cytoplasmic proteins, such as myeloperoxidase, neutrophil elastase (NE), and α-defensins. Besides being expressed on NET fibers, NE and MPO also regulate NET formation. Furthermore, histone deimination by peptidylarginine deiminase 4 (PAD4) is a central step to NET formation. NET formation has been widely demonstrated to be an effective mechanism to fight against invading microorganisms, as deficiency in NET release or dismantling NET backbone by bacterial DNases renders the host susceptible to infections. Therefore, the primary role of NETs is to prevent microbial dissemination, avoiding overwhelming infections. However, an excess of NET formation has a dark side. The pathogenic role of NETs has been described for many human diseases, infectious and non-infectious. The detrimental effect of excessive NET release is particularly important to lung diseases, because NETs can expand more easily in the pulmonary alveoli, causing lung injury. Moreover, NETs and its associated molecules are able to directly induce epithelial and endothelial cell death. In this regard, massive NET formation has been reported in several pulmonary diseases, including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cystic fibrosis, respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis, influenza, bacterial pneumonia, and tuberculosis, among others. Thus, NET formation must be tightly regulated in order to avoid NET-mediated tissue damage. Recent development of therapies targeting NETs in pulmonary diseases includes DNA disintegration with recombinant human DNase, neutralization of NET proteins, with anti-histone antibodies and protease inhibitors. In this review, we summarize the recent

  10. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps in Pulmonary Diseases: Too Much of a Good Thing?

    PubMed Central

    Porto, Bárbara Nery; Stein, Renato Tetelbom

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) arise from the release of granular and nuclear contents of neutrophils in the extracellular space in response to different classes of microorganisms, soluble factors, and host molecules. NETs are composed by decondensed chromatin fibers coated with antimicrobial granular and cytoplasmic proteins, such as myeloperoxidase, neutrophil elastase (NE), and α-defensins. Besides being expressed on NET fibers, NE and MPO also regulate NET formation. Furthermore, histone deimination by peptidylarginine deiminase 4 (PAD4) is a central step to NET formation. NET formation has been widely demonstrated to be an effective mechanism to fight against invading microorganisms, as deficiency in NET release or dismantling NET backbone by bacterial DNases renders the host susceptible to infections. Therefore, the primary role of NETs is to prevent microbial dissemination, avoiding overwhelming infections. However, an excess of NET formation has a dark side. The pathogenic role of NETs has been described for many human diseases, infectious and non-infectious. The detrimental effect of excessive NET release is particularly important to lung diseases, because NETs can expand more easily in the pulmonary alveoli, causing lung injury. Moreover, NETs and its associated molecules are able to directly induce epithelial and endothelial cell death. In this regard, massive NET formation has been reported in several pulmonary diseases, including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cystic fibrosis, respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis, influenza, bacterial pneumonia, and tuberculosis, among others. Thus, NET formation must be tightly regulated in order to avoid NET-mediated tissue damage. Recent development of therapies targeting NETs in pulmonary diseases includes DNA disintegration with recombinant human DNase, neutralization of NET proteins, with anti-histone antibodies and protease inhibitors. In this review, we summarize the recent

  11. Genetically modified endothelial progenitor cells in the therapy of cardiovascular disease and pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Lavoie, Jessie R; Stewart, Duncan J

    2012-05-01

    Since their initial discovery, endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) have held tremendous promise for cell therapy for a variety of cardiovascular diseases including pulmonary hypertension. The clinical experience to date suggests that circulating or bone marrow mononuclear cells and EPCs can induce neovascularization, and enhance cardiac repair after myocardial function, as well as improvements in the hemodynamic and functional status of patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension. Although these results are promising, the overall magnitude of the clinical benefits seen in these trials appear to be rather modest. Indeed, strong experimental evidence points towards a reduction in mobilization and impairment in function of EPCs in preclinical models and patients with cardiac disease or with cardiovascular risk factors such as advanced age, type I and II diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, coronary artery disease, as well as other conditions such as pulmonary hypertension. Genetic engineering of EPCs ex vivo, prior to transplantation, is a promising cell-enhancement strategy for restoring the angiogenic potential of autologous, patient-derived cells. This review provides an update of the experimental studies that have used gene-modified EPC therapy to treat ischemic cardiovascular disease and pulmonary hypertension.

  12. Behavioral Exercise Programs in the Management of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkins, Catherine J.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Compared the effectiveness of behavior modification, cognitive modification, and cognitive-behavior modification in increasing compliance with an exercise prescription for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients (N=96). Although all treatment groups showed improvement, the cognitive-behavior modification strategy produced the most…

  13. Anesthetic management of nephrectomy in a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patient with recurrent spontaneous pneumothorax.

    PubMed

    Santhosh, Mysore Chandramouli Basappaji; Bhat Pai, Rohini; Rao, Raghavendra P

    2016-01-01

    Nephrectomies are usually performed under general anesthesia alone or in combination with regional anesthesia and rarely under regional anesthesia alone. We report the management of a patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with a history of recurrent spontaneous pneumothorax undergoing nephrectomy under regional anesthesia alone.

  14. [Anesthetic management of nephrectomy in a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patient with recurrent spontaneous pneumothorax].

    PubMed

    Santhosh, Mysore Chandramouli Basappaji; Bhat Pai, Rohini; Rao, Raghavendra P

    2016-01-01

    Nephrectomies are usually performed under general anesthesia alone or in combination with regional anesthesia and rarely under regional anesthesia alone. We report the management of a patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with a history of recurrent spontaneous pneumothorax undergoing nephrectomy under regional anesthesia alone.

  15. The Care Needs of Community-Dwelling Seniors Suffering from Advanced Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Donna M.; Ross, Carolyn; Goodridge, Donna; Davis, Penny; Landreville, Alison; Roebuck, Kim

    2008-01-01

    Aim: This study was undertaken to determine the care needs of Canadian seniors living at home with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Background: COPD is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although hospitalizations for illness exacerbations and end-stage care may be common, most persons with COPD live out…

  16. Guidelines for Curriculum Development for Undergraduate Medical Education in the Prevention of Pulmonary Diseases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Heart, Lung, and Blood Inst. (DHHS/NIH), Bethesda, MD. Div. of Lung Diseases.

    These guidelines for developing an undergraduate medical education curriculum in pulmonary disease prevention emphasize not only the most current scientific practice but also the active application of cognitive and behavioral skills related to patient education. Chapter 1 introduces the guidelines and the issues and trends in preventative…

  17. Estrogen exposure, obesity and thyroid disease in women with severe pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Severe pulmonary hypertension is a lethal group of disorders which preferentially afflicts women. It appears that in recent years the patient profile has shifted towards older, obese, and postmenopausal women, suggesting that endocrine factors may be important. Several studies have revealed an increased prevalence of thyroid disease in these patients, but no studies have evaluated for a coexistence of endocrine factors. In particular, no studies have attempted to evaluate for concurrent thyroid disease, obesity and long-term estrogen exposure in patients. 88 patients attending the Pulmonary Hypertension Association 8th International meeting completed a questionnaire and were interviewed. Information was collected regarding reproductive history, height, weight, and previous diagnosis of thyroid disease. 46% met criteria for obesity. 41% reported a diagnosis of thyroid disease. 81% of women reported prior use of hormone therapy. 70% reported greater than 10 years of exogenous hormone use. 74% of female patients reported two or more of potentially disease modifying endocrine factors (obesity, thyroid disease or estrogen therapy). The coexistent high prevalence in our cohort of exogenous estrogen exposure, thyroid disease and obesity suggests that an interaction of multiple endocrine factors might contribute to the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension and may represent epigenetic modifiers in genetically-susceptible individuals. PMID:19748850

  18. EIF2AK4 mutation in pulmonary veno-occlusive disease

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Li; Ma, Guofeng; Chen, Kai; Liu, Yangxiang; Wu, Xiaohong; Ying, Kejing; Zhang, Ruifeng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) is a rare and devastating cause of pulmonary arterial hypertension with a non-specific clinical presentation and a relatively specific presentation in high-resolution thoracic CT scan images. Definitive diagnosis is made by histological examination in previous. According to the 2015 ESC/ERS Guidelines, detection of a mutation in the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 alpha kinase 4 (EIF2AK4) without histological confirmation is recommended to validate the diagnosis of PVOD. Methods: We report the case of a 27-year-old man who was admitted for persistent cough and dyspnea that had lasted for 5 months and had developed and experienced progressive dyspnea for the last 2 months. The echocardiogram and right heart catheterization without vasodilator challenge confirmed the diagnosis of pulmonary arterial hypertension. Other tests, such as high-resolution thoracic CT scan, V/Q scan, pulmonary function test with diffusion capacity, and blood tests, excluded other associated diseases which could have caused pulmonary hypertension. Results: The initial diagnosis at admission was idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension and an oral vasodilator (sildenafil) was given. However, the dyspnea subsequently worsened, and the patient was transferred to a regional lung transplant center, where he died of heart failure 1 week later. Using exome sequencing, we found an EIF2AK4 mutation, which was sufficient to confirm the diagnosis of PVOD. Conclusion: This is the first reported case of EIF2AK4 mutation in PVOD in a Chinese patient population. We found the frameshift EIF2AK4 mutation c.1392delT (p.Arg465fs) in this case. Up to now, there has been a paucity of data on this rare disease, and the exact role of EIF2AK4 loss-of-function mutations in the pathogenesis of PVOD is still unknown. More investigations should be conducted in the future. PMID:27684876

  19. Natural and disease-specific autoantibodies in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Daffa, N I; Tighe, P J; Corne, J M; Fairclough, L C; Todd, I

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmunity may contribute to the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Studies have identified disease-specific autoantibodies (DSAAbs) in COPD patients, but natural autoantibodies (NAAbs) may also play a role. Previous studies have concentrated on circulating autoantibodies, but lung-associated autoantibodies may be most important. Our aim was to investigate NAAbs and DSAAbs in the circulation and lungs of COPD smoking (CS) patients compared to smokers (S) without airway obstruction and subjects who have never smoked (NS). Immunoglobulin (Ig)G antibodies that bind to lung tissue components were significantly lower in the circulation of CS patients than NS (with intermediate levels in S), as detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The levels of antibodies to collagen-1 (the major lung collagen) detected by ELISA were also reduced significantly in CS patients’ sera compared to NS. The detection of these antibodies in NS subjects indicates that they are NAAbs. The occurrence of DSAAbs in some CS patients and S subjects was indicated by high levels of serum IgG antibodies to cytokeratin-18 and collagen-5; furthermore, antibodies to collagen-5 eluted from homogenized lung tissue exposed to low pH (0·1 M glycine, pH 2·8) were raised significantly in CS compared to S and NS. Thus, this study supports a role in COPD for both NAAbs and DSAAbs. PMID:25469980

  20. Biological effects and mechanisms of action of mesenchymal stem cell therapy in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhixian; Pan, Xinghua; Zhou, Kaihua; Bi, Hong; Wang, Liyan; Yu, Lu; Wang, Qing

    2015-06-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the most frequent chronic respiratory disease and a leading cause of morbidity and mortality, worldwide. Given that the foremost risk factor leading to the development of COPD is cigarette smoke, the initial treatment for COPD is smoking cessation. Even after smoking cessation, inflammation, apoptosis and oxidative stress can persist and continue to contribute to COPD. Although current therapies for COPD (which are primarily based on anti-inflammatory drugs such as corticosteroids, theophylline and bronchodilators) reduce airway obstruction, limit COPD exacerbation and improve the patient's health-related quality-of-life, none can prevent disease progression or reduce mortality. Recent advances in stem cell research have provided novel insight into the potential of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in the treatment of several pulmonary diseases. This review article discusses the biological effects and mechanisms of action of MSC transplantation in COPD, and highlights the foundation that MSCs provide for novel therapeutic approaches in COPD.

  1. The effect of pulmonary rehabilitation on mortality, balance, and risk of fall in stable patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Hakamy, Ali; Bolton, Charlotte E; McKeever, Tricia M

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study is to conduct a systematic review of published studies that evaluate the impact of pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) on survival and fall (including balance) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease at stability. OVID, Medline, EMBASE, and Cochrane collaboration library were searched for literature dating from January 1980 up to November 2014 as well as an update in October 2015. Two reviewers screened titles, abstracts and full text records, extracted data, and assessed studies for risk of bias; any disagreements were resolved by a third member of the team, and consensus was always sought. Initial searches yielded 3216 records but after review only seven studies were included and there were no studies focused solely on falls. Two cohort studies found some positive benefits of PR on balance, but the results were inconsistent across the studies. Regarding survival, two randomized controlled trials were conducted; one study showed significant survival benefit at 1 year, while the other one showed nonsignificant survival benefit at 3 years. Neither were adequately powered and in both, survival was a secondary outcome. There was only limited inconclusive evidence to show that PR has a significant beneficial effect on balance or survival.

  2. Pulmonary Nodules as an Initial Manifestation of Behçet's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Malekmohammad, M.; Emamifar, A.

    2014-01-01

    Behçet's disease (BD) is a systemic vasculopathy, characterized by recurrent oral aphthae, genital ulcers, uveitis, and skin lesions. Although vascular involvement, including venous and arteries of any size, is a usual manifestation, cases with pulmonary thrombosis as the initial symptom are not common in the absence of pulmonary artery aneurysm (PAA). This report describes a 36-year-old man with recurrent fever, nonmassive hemoptysis, and persistent cough with lung nodules in CT scan who had undergone open lung biopsy. On the basis of morphological findings, BD was suggested and more precise evaluation confirmed the diagnosis. PMID:25436168

  3. [Vasodilator therapy in pulmonary hypertension and chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD). Hemodynamic studies exemplified by nifedipine and nitroglycerin].

    PubMed

    Gassner, A; Fridrich, L; Magometschnigg, D; Sommer, G; Klicpera, M

    1986-08-01

    In 41 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and pulmonary hypertension, the effects of sublingual administration of 20 mg nifedipine and 0.8 mg nitroglycerin on the hemodynamics were assessed at rest and during bicycle ergometry. Additionally, in six patients, the effects of nifedipine during longterm treatment were analyzed. On acute testing, at rest and during exercise nifedipine led to decreases in mean pulmonary artery pressure of 16% and 23% and pulmonary arteriolar resistance of 23 and 35%, respectively, in 81% (17/21) of the patients. The reduction in the pulmonary vascular resistance was greater than that of the systemic resistance. In all patients, cardiac output increased. There was a similar number of responders to nitroglycerin (16/20). The reductions in mean pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary arteriolar resistance ranging between 20 and 25% at rest and during exercise were comparable to those affected by nifedipine. In addition to the right ventricular afterload reduction, there was a decrease in cardiac output of 17%. During longterm treatment with nifedipine (average 18 months), the reduction in mean pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary arteriolar resistance was not of the same magnitude as seen on acute testing. This may be due primarily to progression of the underlying disease since pulmonary function studies demonstrated an increase in the obstructive component. With the intention of circumventing or postponing the onset of right ventricular failure, the individual patient should undergo hemodynamic studies to delineate the optimal medication.

  4. Urinary balantidiasis: A rare incidental finding in a patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Sukhpreet; Gupta, Avinash

    2016-01-01

    Balantidiasis is a rare zoonotic disease in humans. Balantidium coli is the causative ciliated protozoan. We present a case of urinary balantidiasis in a patient having chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) who was on steroids for a long time. He has no symptoms of bowel or urinary involvement. We are reporting this case because of its rarity in human urine and also for future references. PMID:27756993

  5. [Morphological changes in the respiratory organs in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Malykhin, F T; Kostornaya, I V

    2016-01-01

    The basis for airway remoldeling in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is tissue changes contributing to thickening of the walls of the airway and its obstruction. As the disease becomes severer, there are increases in mucosal metaplasia, submucosal hypertrophy, peribronchial fibrosis, and airway smooth muscle mass. Drug therapy for COPD does not virtually lead to regression of airway obstruction, except when eosinophilia is present.

  6. [Possible side effects of drugs in elderly patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and comorbidity].

    PubMed

    Malykhin, F T; Baturin, V A

    2016-01-01

    the papers gives data on the positive effects and adverse reactions of drugs used to treat chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and its comorbidity, first of all cardiovascular disease. The authors present alternative points of views based on both the data available in the literature and their findings. they propose to modify pharmacotherapy for COPD in the presence of comorbidity in patients of old age groups.

  7. Advances in paediatric pulmonary vascular disease associated with bronchopulmonary dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Rossor, Thomas; Greenough, Anne

    2015-02-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a common finding in infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). The aim of this review is to describe recent advances in the diagnosis and treatment of PH and discuss whether they will benefit infants and children with BPD related PH. Echocardiography remains the mainstay of diagnosis but has limitations, further developments in diagnostic techniques and identification of biomarkers are required. There are many potential therapies for PH associated with BPD. Inhaled nitric oxide has been shown to improve short term outcomes only. Sidenafil in resource limited settings was shown in three randomized trials to significantly reduce mortality. The efficacy of other therapies including prostacyclin, PDE3 inhibitors and endothelin receptor blockers has only been reported in case reports or case series. Randomized controlled trials with long term follow up are required to appropriately assess the efficacy of therapies aimed at improving the outcome of children with PH.

  8. Pre-operative pulmonary evaluation in the patient with suspected respiratory disease

    PubMed Central

    Bevacqua, Brian K

    2015-01-01

    Post-operative pulmonary complications (POPC) occur frequently, especially in patients with pre-existing pulmonary disease and have a significant effect on post-surgical morbidity and mortality. By understanding the patient's existing pulmonary diseases that have a significant effect on post-operative morbidities a combination of information has to be gathered from a thorough history and physical exam as well as selected laboratory and diagnostic tests. Evidence based scores can then be employed to predict the risk of significant POPC. Numbers and testing alone, however, such as diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease based on spirometry, may not provide as clear a picture as of the true risk of POPC that is determined by a combination of estimations of the patient's functional status, (b) measured by the patient's estimates of activity and (c) confirmed by the patient's ability to perform simple tasks such as the 6-minute walk test. This information can then be used to rationalize perioperative interventions and improve the safety of the perioperative experience. PMID:26556912

  9. Sustained CTL activation by murine pulmonary epithelial cells promotes the development of COPD-like disease

    PubMed Central

    Borchers, Michael T.; Wesselkamper, Scott C.; Curull, Victor; Ramirez-Sarmiento, Alba; Sánchez-Font, Albert; Garcia-Aymerich, Judith; Coronell, Carlos; Lloreta, Josep; Agusti, Alvar G.; Gea, Joaquim; Howington, John A.; Reed, Michael F.; Starnes, Sandra L.; Harris, Nathaniel L.; Vitucci, Mark; Eppert, Bryan L.; Motz, Gregory T.; Fogel, Kevin; McGraw, Dennis W.; Tichelaar, Jay W.; Orozco-Levi, Mauricio

    2009-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a lethal progressive lung disease culminating in permanent airway obstruction and alveolar enlargement. Previous studies suggest CTL involvement in COPD progression; however, their precise role remains unknown. Here, we investigated whether the CTL activation receptor NK cell group 2D (NKG2D) contributes to the development of COPD. Using primary murine lung epithelium isolated from mice chronically exposed to cigarette smoke and cultured epithelial cells exposed to cigarette smoke extract in vitro, we demonstrated induced expression of the NKG2D ligand retinoic acid early transcript 1 (RAET1) as well as NKG2D-mediated cytotoxicity. Furthermore, a genetic model of inducible RAET1 expression on mouse pulmonary epithelial cells yielded a severe emphysematous phenotype characterized by epithelial apoptosis and increased CTL activation, which was reversed by blocking NKG2D activation. We also assessed whether NKG2D ligand expression corresponded with pulmonary disease in human patients by staining airway and peripheral lung tissues from never smokers, smokers with normal lung function, and current and former smokers with COPD. NKG2D ligand expression was independent of NKG2D receptor expression in COPD patients, demonstrating that ligand expression is the limiting factor in CTL activation. These results demonstrate that aberrant, persistent NKG2D ligand expression in the pulmonary epithelium contributes to the development of COPD pathologies. PMID:19197141