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Sample records for pulmonary resection due

  1. Risk assessment for pulmonary resection.

    PubMed

    Brunelli, Alessandro

    2010-01-01

    Risk assessment for pulmonary resection must include a preliminary cardiac evaluation. Patients deemed at prohibitive cardiac risk should be evaluated and treated as per American Heart Association/American Society of Cardiology guidelines. Those with low cardiac risk or with optimized treatment can proceed with pulmonary assessment. A systematic measurement of lung carbon monoxide diffusing capacity is recommended. In addition, predicted postoperative forced expiratory volume in 1 second should not be used alone for patient selection because it is not an accurate predictor of complications, particularly in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The use of exercise testing should be emphasized. Low-technology tests, such as stair climbing, can be used whenever a formal cardiopulmonary exercise test is not readily available. However, in case of suboptimal performance (ie, <22 m in the stair-climbing test) patients should be referred to cardiopulmonary exercise testing with measurement of Vo(2max) for a better definition of their aerobic reserve. A Vo(2max) less than 10 mL/kg/min (or <35% of predicted) indicates a high risk for major lung resection.

  2. Awake operative videothoracoscopic pulmonary resections.

    PubMed

    Pompeo, Eugenio; Mineo, Tommaso C

    2008-08-01

    The authors' initial experience with awake videothoracoscopic lung resection suggests that these procedures can be easily and safely performed under sole thoracic epidural anesthesia with no mortality and negligible morbidity. One major concern was that operating on a ventilating lung would render surgical maneuvers more difficult because of the lung movements and lack of a sufficient operating space. Instead, the open pneumothorax created after trocar insertion produces a satisfactory lung collapse that does not hamper surgical maneuvers. These results contradict the accepted assumption that the main prerequisite for allowing successful thoracoscopic lung surgery is general anesthesia with one-lung ventilation. No particular training is necessary to accomplish an awake pulmonary resection for teams experienced in thoracoscopic surgery, and conversions to general anesthesia are mainly caused by the presence of extensive fibrous pleural adhesions or the development of intractable panic attacks. Overall, awake pulmonary resection is easily accepted and well tolerated by patients, as confirmed by the high anesthesia satisfaction score, which was better than in nonawake control patients. Nonetheless, thoracic epidural anesthesia has potential complications, including epidural hematoma, spinal cord injury, and phrenic nerve palsy caused by inadvertently high anesthetic level, but these never occurred in the authors' experience. Further concerns relate to patient participation in operating room conversations or risk for development of perioperative panic attacks. However, the authors have found that reassuring the patient during the procedure, explaining step-by-step what is being performed, and even showing the ongoing procedure on the operating video can greatly improve the perioperative wellness and expectations of patients, particularly if the procedure is performed for oncologic diseases. Panic attacks occurred in few patients and could be usually managed through

  3. The impact of pulmonary metastasectomy in patients with previously resected colorectal cancer liver metastases

    PubMed Central

    Riegel, Johannes; Wagner, Johanna; Kunzmann, Volker; Baur, Johannes; Walles, Thorsten; Dietz, Ulrich; Loeb, Stefan; Germer, Christoph-Thomas; Steger, Ulrich; Klein, Ingo

    2017-01-01

    Background 40–50% of patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) will develop liver metastases (CRLM) during the course of the disease. One third of these patients will additionally develop pulmonary metastases. Methods 137 consecutive patients with CRLM, were analyzed regarding survival data, clinical, histological data and treatment. Results were stratified according to the occurrence of pulmonary metastases and metastases resection. Results 39% of all patients with liver resection due to CRLM developed additional lung metastases. 44% of these patients underwent subsequent pulmonary resection. Patients undergoing pulmonary metastasectomy showed a significantly better five-year survival compared to patients not qualified for curative resection (5-year survival 71.2% vs. 28.0%; p = 0.001). Interestingly, the 5-year survival of these patients was even superior to all patients with CRLM, who did not develop pulmonary metastases (77.5% vs. 63.5%; p = 0.015). Patients, whose pulmonary metastases were not resected, were more likely to redevelop liver metastases (50.0% vs 78.6%; p = 0.034). However, the rate of distant metastases did not differ between both groups (54.5 vs.53.6; p = 0.945). Conclusion The occurrence of colorectal lung metastases after curative liver resection does not impact patient survival if pulmonary metastasectomy is feasible. Those patients clearly benefit from repeated resections of the liver and the lung metastases. PMID:28328956

  4. Unilateral pulmonary edema during laparoscopic resection of adrenal tumor

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Smita; Nayar, Pavan; Virmani, Pooja; Bansal, Shipra; Pawar, Mridula

    2015-01-01

    Despite technological, therapeutic and diagnostic advancements, surgical intervention in pheochromocytoma may result in a life-threatening situation. We report a patient who developed unilateral pulmonary edema during laparoscopic resection of adrenal tumor. PMID:26330724

  5. Resection of pulmonary nodule in a patient with subglottic stenosis under modified spontaneous ventilation anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jianfei; Chen, Xuewei; Phan, Kevin; Chen, Jin-Shing; Ng, Calvin S. H.; Petersen, Rene Horsleben; González-Rivas, Diego

    2017-01-01

    Subglottic stenosis is an uncommon structural abnormality that can pose as a difficulty for patients undergoing surgery, and treatment is complex due to the special anatomical location. Pulmonary nodule resection in patients with subglottic stenosis is challenging and has not yet been reported. Here we present a case of pulmonary nodule resection in a patient with subglottic stenosis using uniportal thoracoscopy under spontaneous ventilation anesthesia (SVA). Compared with traditional double lumen endotracheal intubation, we believe this modified technique can significantly reduce airway trauma, and accelerate patient recovery. PMID:28275495

  6. The Prevention and Management of Air Leaks Following Pulmonary Resection.

    PubMed

    Burt, Bryan M; Shrager, Joseph B

    2015-11-01

    Alveolar air leaks are a common problem in the daily practice of thoracic surgeons. Prolonged air leak following pulmonary resection is associated with increased morbidity, increased length of hospital stay, and increased costs. This article reviews the evidence for the various intraoperative and postoperative options to prevent and manage postoperative air leak.

  7. [Bilateral pulmonary artery occlusion due to primary pulmonary artery sarcoma; report of a case].

    PubMed

    Shingaki, Masami; Kobayashi, Yutaka

    2014-07-01

    60-year-old female who complained of severe dyspnea was admitted with a diagnosis of massive pulmonary embolism. An emergency operation was undertaken due to right side heart failure. Under extracorporeal circulation with beating heart, large, white and smooth surface mass which was originated from right pulmonary artery was removed. Pathology of the mass showed low differentiated sarcoma. No evidence of other primary lesion by positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) suggested primary pulmonary artery sarcoma. We scheduled total resection of the right lung, however postoperative CT showed large mass occupying from right pulmonary artery to main pulmonary trunk. Palliative chemo radiation therapy was introduced. Pulmonary artery sarcoma mimicking pulmonary thromboembolism is so malignant that the diagnosis and treatment should not be delayed.

  8. Unusual presentation of a complication after pulmonary wedge resection for coccidioma.

    PubMed

    Leduc, François; Thipphavong, Seng; Matzinger, Fred; Dennie, Carole; Sundaresan, Sudhir

    2009-12-01

    We report an unusual presentation of a complication after pulmonary wedge resection. A patient with a history of pulmonary wedge resection for coccidioma presented postoperatively with dyspnea and severe hypoxemia. Cerebral infarctions were diagnosed less than 1 year later. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and pulmonary angiogram revealed a pulmonary arteriovenous fistula. Surgical resection of the pulmonary arteriovenous fistula led to improved oxygen saturation and discontinuation of home oxygen.

  9. Anesthetic Management for Resection of Bilateral Pulmonary Artery Sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Hoogma, Danny; Meyns, Bart; Van Raemdonck, Dirk; Van de Velde, Marc; Missant, Carlo; Rex, Steffen

    2015-08-15

    We describe a patient who presented with a bilateral pulmonary artery sarcoma, initially treated as pulmonary embolism, that necessitated concomitant pulmonary endarterectomy and pneumonectomy. We reviewed the anesthetic management used for this procedure, which bears many similarities to the management of patients undergoing pulmonary thromboendarterectomy. Right ventricular failure, pulmonary hemorrhage, and cerebral ischemia due to circulatory arrest are life-threatening perioperative complications. The anesthesiologist can play a key role in the prevention (or timely recognition and treatment) of these perioperative complications by establishing adequate hemodynamic, echocardiographic, and neurologic monitoring and by optimizing cardiopulmonary function and coagulation.

  10. Single-stage bilateral pulmonary resections by video-assisted thoracic surgery for multiple small nodules

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Feng; Yang, Haitang

    2016-01-01

    Background Surgical treatment is thought to be the most effective strategy for multiple small nodules. However, in general, one-stage bilateral resection is not recommended due to its highly invasive nature. Methods Clinical records of patients undergoing one-stage bilateral resections of multiple pulmonary nodules between January 2009 and September 2014 in a single institution were retrospectively reviewed. Results Simultaneous bilateral pulmonary resection by conventional video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) was undertaken in 29 patients. Ground glass opacity (GGO) accounted for 71.9% (46/64) of total lesions, including 26 pure GGO and 20 mixed GGO lesions. One case underwent bilateral lobectomy that was complicated by postoperative dyspnea. Lobar-sublobar (L/SL) resection and bilateral sublobar resection (SL-SL) were conducted in 16 and 12 cases, respectively, and most of these cases had uneventful postoperative courses. There was no significant difference with regard to postoperative complications (P=0.703), duration of use of chest drains (P=0.485), between one- and two-stage groups. Mean postoperative follow-up in cases of primary lung cancer was 31.4 (range, 10–51) months. There was neither recurrence nor deaths at final follow-up. Conclusions Single-stage bilateral surgery in selected cases with synchronous bilateral multiple nodules (SBMNs) is feasible and associated with satisfactory outcomes. PMID:27076942

  11. [Pulmonary Carcinoid Tumor with Cushing's Syndrome in a Patient who Underwent Pulmonary Resection by Video-Assisted Thoracic Surgery;Report of a Case].

    PubMed

    Sato, Hiroshi; Mishina, Taijiro; Miyajima, Masahiro; Watanabe, Atsushi

    2015-07-01

    Pulmonary carcinoid tumor with Cushing's syndrome is comparatively rare disease. It is difficult to make an early diagnosis due to small size lesion in its early stage. We report a case of pulmonary carcinoid tumor with Cushing's syndrome successfully localised by positron emission tomography/computed tomography and was resected in the early stage. The levels of serum cortisol and adrenocorticotropic hormone( ACTH) decreased immediately after surgery, and the symptoms of Cushing's syndrome were relieved.

  12. Sudden death due to pulmonary aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Bhagavath, Prashantha; Rastogi, Prateek; Menezes, Ritesh G; Valiathan, Manna; Mohan Kumar, T S; Raghavendra Babu, Y P; Kanchan, Tanuj; Monteiro, Francis N P; Nayak, Vinod C

    2009-01-01

    Sudden death due to respiratory pathology is not uncommon and tuberculosis with its complications is well known to cause death. We report a case of a male, train passenger, who started coughing out blood and died on reaching the hospital. Medicolegal autopsy confirmed the sudden unexpected death to be due to pulmonary aspergillosis in the person with past medical history of tuberculosis.

  13. Single-stage nonintubated uniportal thoracoscopic resection of synchronous bilateral pulmonary nodules after coil labeling

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Miao; Wang, Tao; Zhang, You-Wei; Wu, Wen-Bin; Wang, Heng; Xu, Rong-Hua

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Preoperative localization of small pulmonary nodules is essential for precise resection, besides, the optimal treatment for pulmonary nodules is controversial and the prognosis without surgery is uncertain. Patient concerns: Herein we present a patient with compromised pulmonary function harboring synchronous triple ground-glass nodules located separately in different pulmonary lobes. Diagnoses: The pathological diagnosis of the nodules were chronic inflammation, inflammatory pseudotumor and atypical adenomatous hyperplasia, respectively. Interventions: The patient underwent single-stage, non-intubated thoracoscopic pulmonary wedge resection after computed tomography-guided coil labeling of the nodules. Outcomes: The postoperative recovery was encouragingly fast without obvious complications. Lessons: Non-intubated thoracoscopic pulmonary wedge resection is feasible for patients with compromised lung function, meanwhile, preoperative coil labeling of small nodules is reliable. PMID:28328859

  14. [Pulmonary hypertension due to left heart diseases].

    PubMed

    Vachiéry, Jean-Luc; Adir, Yochai; Barberà, Joan Albert; Champion, Hunter; Coghlan, John Gerard; Cottin, Vincent; De Marco, Teresa; Galiè, Nazzareno; Ghio, Stefano; Gibbs, J Simon R; Martinez, Fernando; Semigran, Marc; Simonneau, Gerald; Wells, Athol; Seeger, Werner

    2014-10-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH), a common complication of left heart diseases (LHD), negatively impacts symptoms, exercise capacity, and outcome. Although the true prevalence of PH-LHD is unknown, a subset of patients might present significant PH that cannot be explained by a passive increase in left-sided filling pressures. The term "out-of-proportion" PH has been used to identify that population without a clear definition, which has been found less than ideal and created confusion. We propose a change in terminology and a new definition of PH due to LHD. We suggest to abandon "out-of-proportion" PH and to distinguish "isolated post-capillary PH" from "post-capillary PH with a pre-capillary component" on the basis of the pressure difference between diastolic pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary artery wedge pressure. Although there is no validated treatment for PH-LHD, we provide insights into management and discuss completed and randomized trials in this condition. Finally, we provide recommendations for future clinical trials to establish safety and efficacy of novel compounds to target this area of unmet medical need. (J Am Coll Cardiol 2013;62:D100-8) ©2013 by the American College of Cardiology Foundation.

  15. Pulmonary hypertension due to left heart diseases.

    PubMed

    Vachiéry, Jean-Luc; Adir, Yochai; Barberà, Joan Albert; Champion, Hunter; Coghlan, John Gerard; Cottin, Vincent; De Marco, Teresa; Galiè, Nazzareno; Ghio, Stefano; Gibbs, J Simon R; Martinez, Fernando; Semigran, Marc; Simonneau, Gerald; Wells, Athol; Seeger, Werner

    2013-12-24

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH), a common complication of left heart diseases (LHD), negatively impacts symptoms, exercise capacity, and outcome. Although the true prevalence of PH-LHD is unknown, a subset of patients might present significant PH that cannot be explained by a passive increase in left-sided filling pressures. The term "out-of-proportion" PH has been used to identify that population without a clear definition, which has been found less than ideal and created confusion. We propose a change in terminology and a new definition of PH due to LHD. We suggest to abandon "out-of-proportion" PH and to distinguish "isolated post-capillary PH" from "post-capillary PH with a pre-capillary component" on the basis of the pressure difference between diastolic pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary artery wedge pressure. Although there is no validated treatment for PH-LHD, we provide insights into management and discuss completed and randomized trials in this condition. Finally, we provide recommendations for future clinical trials to establish safety and efficacy of novel compounds to target this area of unmet medical need.

  16. [Pulmonary edemas due to acute heroin poisoning].

    PubMed

    Francois, G; Faizende, J; Reboul, J

    1975-01-01

    Their frequency is estimated with difficulty, although on autopsy pulmonary edema is found almost routinely. It is a major complication of overdoses (48 p. 100 of severe intoxications). Their formation can be suspected, when after the first phase of respiratory depressions, with coma, myosis, and a variable latent period, a second attack of respiratory insufficiency occurs with tachypnea, and cyanosis. The chest X-ray shows diffuse alveolar infiltration, sparing the apices. The heart being generally of normal size. Rapid disappearance of this infiltrate (24 to 48 hours) enables the elimination of two diagnoses: pneumonia due to inhalation of gastric fluid, an infectious pneumonia. Their pathogenesis remains very debatable: - in the majority of cases abrupt L.V.F. can be eliminated: -on the other hand it could be an allergic accident of the anaphylactic type, or local liberation of histamine, or a local toxic action on the pulmonary capillaries; - hypoxia, secondary to respiratory depression, could lead to pulmonary edema, by the same mechanism as at altitude; - finally, owing to the central neurological disorders a neurogenic theory can be put forward. Their treatment is essentially a combination of Nalorphine with oxygen therapy (by mask, or if necessary by assisted, controlled ventilation) with prevention of inhalation of gastric fluid (gastric emptying) or curative treatment of possible aspiration by antibiotics, and cortico-steroids. Diuretics can be useful, as well as cardiotonics.

  17. Endovascular embolization prior to surgical resection of symptomatic intralobar pulmonary sequestration in an adult.

    PubMed

    Avsenik, Jernej; Štupnik, Tomaž; Popovič, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Intralobar pulmonary sequestration is a rare congenital malformation, conventionally managed by surgical resection. Recently, the endovascular embolization has been proposed for the definite treatment of this disease. Additionally, preoperative embolization of aberrant arteries to minimize the risk of serious intraoperative haemorrhage has also been described. We report the case of 43-year old female patient who presented with cough and haemoptysis, and was successfully treated with endovascular embolization followed by a Video-assisted thoracoscopic wedge resection.

  18. CT-Guided Radiofrequency Ablation of a Pulmonary Metastasis Followed by Surgical Resection

    SciTech Connect

    Steinke, Karin; Habicht, James M.; Thomsen, Sharon; Soler, Markus; Jacob, Augustinus L.

    2002-12-15

    Outpatient CT-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA)of a pulmonary metastasis followed by surgical resection and histopathological analysis was performed in a 72-year-old lady suffering from a peritoneal leiomyosarcoma. Histological workup 3 weeks post-ablation showed complete devitalization of the metastasis. This case report demonstrates that complete thermal destruction of a pulmonary metastasis by percutaneous image-guided RFA is possible.

  19. Resection of Late Pulmonary Metastases from Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma: Is Surgery an Option?

    PubMed

    Brieau, Bertrand; Barret, Maximilien; Rouquette, Alexandre; Dréanic, Johann; Brezault, Catherine; Regnard, Jean François; Coriat, Romain

    2015-01-01

    Patients with recurrences from pancreas adenocarcinoma have a poor survival rate despite new chemotherapy treatment options. Recurrences are mainly hepatic metastases or peritoneal dissemination and surgical treatment is not recommended. Late and single metachronous pulmonary recurrences are uncommon and may mimic primary lung carcinoma. We report two patients with late and unique pulmonary metastasis from pancreatic cancer. These two patients underwent surgical resection; three and five years later, they did not experience recurrences. Cases called for a surgical approach in late and unique pulmonary metastases from pancreatic cancer, and paved the way for a prolonged chemotherapy free period.

  20. Effect of lung resection on pleuro-pulmonary mechanics and fluid balance.

    PubMed

    Salito, C; Bovio, D; Orsetti, G; Salati, M; Brunelli, A; Aliverti, A; Miserocchi, G

    2016-01-15

    The aim of the study was to determine in human patients the effect of lung resection on lung compliance and on pleuro-pulmonary fluid balance. Pre and post-operative values of compliance were measured in anesthetized patients undergoing resection for lung cancer (N=11) through double-lumen bronchial intubation. Lung compliance was measured for 10-12 cm H2O increase in alveolar pressure from 5 cm H2O PEEP in control and repeated after resection. No air leak was assessed and pleural fluid was collected during hospital stay. A significant negative correlation (r(2)=0.68) was found between compliance at 10 min and resected mass. Based on the pre-operative estimated lung weight, the decrease in compliance following lung resection exceeded by 10-15% that expected from resected mass. Significant negative relationships were found by relating pleural fluid drainage flow to the remaining lung mass and to post-operative lung compliance. Following lung re-expansion, data suggest a causative relationship between the decrease in compliance and the perturbation in pleuro-pulmonary fluid balance.

  1. Agar blue localization of small pulmonary nodules and ground glass opacifications for thoracoscopic resection

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Screening for lung cancer using high resolution computed tomography (CT) has produced encouraging early results. Extremely small nodules and non-palpable areas of opacifications are able to be detected, but pose a challenge to the thoracic surgeon trying to resect these areas. Methods Forty five patients with ground glass opacifications (GGOs) or small pulmonary nodules underwent pre-operative CT-guided placement of methylene blue dyed agar and/or hook wire needle localization prior to thoracoscopic resection. Progel was applied to any intraoperative air leaks observed after successful resection. Results All lesions were successfully excised thoracoscopically. The blue agar aided in localization of these areas and did not affect the histological architecture during pathologic evaluation. Conclusions Careful pre-operative evaluation and planning, including use of selective CT-guided blue agar localization and hook wire placement, may greatly assist in thoracoscopically locating and resecting these often difficult-to-visualize lesions. PMID:28066669

  2. Reduction of Pulmonary Function After Surgical Lung Resections of Different Volume

    PubMed Central

    Cukic, Vesna

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: In recent years an increasing number of lung resections are being done because of the rising prevalence of lung cancer that occurs mainly in patients with limited lung function, what is caused with common etiologic factor - smoking cigarettes. Objective: To determine how big the loss of lung function is after surgical resection of lung of different range. Methods: The study was done on 58 patients operated at the Clinic for thoracic surgery KCU Sarajevo, previously treated at the Clinic for pulmonary diseases “Podhrastovi” in the period from 01.06.2012. to 01.06.2014. The following resections were done: pulmectomy (left, right), lobectomy (upper, lower: left and right). The values of postoperative pulmonary function were compared with preoperative ones. As a parameter of lung function we used FEV1 (forced expiratory volume in one second), and changes in FEV1 are expressed in liters and in percentage of the recorded preoperative and normal values of FEV1. Measurements of lung function were performed seven days before and 2 months after surgery. Results: Postoperative FEV1 was decreased compared to preoperative values. After pulmectomy the maximum reduction of FEV1 was 44%, and after lobectomy it was 22% of the preoperative values. Conclusion: Patients with airway obstruction are limited in their daily life before the surgery, and an additional loss of lung tissue after resection contributes to their inability. Potential benefits of lung resection surgery should be balanced in relation to postoperative morbidity and mortality. PMID:25568542

  3. Fast-track rehabilitation following video-assisted pulmonary sublobar wedge resection: A prospective randomized study

    PubMed Central

    Asteriou, Christos; Lazopoulos, Achilleas; Rallis, Thomas; Gogakos, Apostolos S; Paliouras, Dimitrios; Barbetakis, Nikolaos

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Postoperative morbidity and inhospital length of stay are considered major determinants of total health care expenditure associated with thoracic operations. The aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate the role of video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) compared to mini-muscle-sparing thoracotomy in facilitating early recovery and hospital discharge after pulmonary sublobar wedge resections. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A total number of 120 patients undergoing elective pulmonary sublobar wedge resection were randomly assigned to VATS (n = 60) or mini-muscle-sparing thoracotomy (n = 60). The primary endpoint was time to hospital discharge. Postoperative complications, cardiopulmonary morbidity and 30-day mortality served as secondary endpoints. RESULTS: Patients' baseline demographic and clinical data did not differ among study arms as well as the number of pulmonary segments resected and the morphology of the nodular lesions. Total hospital stay was significantly shorter in patients assigned to the thoracoscopic technique as opposed to those who were operated using the mini-muscle-sparing thoracotomy approach (4 ± 0.6 versus 4.4 ± 0.6 days respectively, P = 0.006). Multivariate analysis revealed that VATS approach was inversely associated with longer inhospital stay whereas the number of resected segments was positively associated with an increased duration of hospitalization. Patients in the VATS group were less likely to develop atelectasis (≥1 lobe) compared to those who underwent thoracotomy (0% versus 6.7% respectively, P = 0.042). Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed similar 30-day mortality rates in both study arms (Log-rank P = 0.560). CONCLUSION: VATS was associated with shorter duration of hospitalization positively affecting the patients' quality of life and satisfaction. Significant suppression of the total cost of recovery after thoracoscopic pulmonary resections is expected. PMID:27279390

  4. [Resection and reconstruction of intimal sarcoma of the pulmonary artery with autologous pericardial roll].

    PubMed

    Takai, Noriko; Yamamoto, Yoshio; Kitayama, Hitoshi; Nakagawa, Tatsushi

    2010-09-01

    Tumors of the pulmonary artery (PA) are rare and their prognosis is poor. Proper diagnosis is often delayed or made post mortem despite diagnostic advances. Although the only treatment of choice is radical surgical resection, local recurrences are soon recognized after the operation. There is no standard regimen of perioperative additional therapy, and its effectiveness is still unknown. We report a case of an 80-year-old male whose PA was almost completely obstructed by the intimal sarcoma. It was resected and reconstructed with autologous pericardial roll. His postoperative course was uneventful.

  5. Physiologic assessment before video thoracoscopic resection for lung cancer in patients with abnormal pulmonary function

    PubMed Central

    Benattia, Amira; Debeaumont, David; Guyader, Vincent; Tardif, Catherine; Peillon, Christophe; Cuvelier, Antoine

    2016-01-01

    Background Impaired respiratory function may prevent curative surgery for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) reduces postoperative morbility-mortality and could change preoperative assessment practices and therapeutic decisions. We evaluated the relation between preoperative pulmonary function tests and the occurrence of postoperative complications after VATS pulmonary resection in patients with abnormal pulmonary function. Methods We included 106 consecutive patients with ≤80% predicted value of presurgical expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) and/or diffusing capacity of carbon monoxide (DLCO) and who underwent VATS pulmonary resection for NSCLC from a prospective surgical database. Results Patients (64±9.5 years) had lobectomy (n=91), segmentectomy (n=7), bilobectomy (n=4), or pneumonectomy (n=4). FEV1 and DLCO preoperative averages were 68%±21% and 60%±18%. Operative mortality was 1.89%. Only FEV1 was predictive of postoperative complications [odds ratio (OR), 0.96; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.926–0.991, P=0.016], but there was no determinable threshold. Twenty-five patients underwent incremental exercise testing. Desaturations during exercise (OR, 0.462; 95% CI, 0.191–0.878, P=0.039) and heart rate (HR) response (OR, 0.953; 95% CI, 0.895–0.993, P=0.05) were associated with postoperative complications. Conclusions FEV1 but not DLCO was a significant predictor of pulmonary complications after VATS pulmonary resection despite a low rate of severe morbidity. Incremental exercise testing seems more discriminating. Further investigation is required in a larger patient population to change current pre-operative threshold in a new era of minimally invasive surgery. PMID:27293834

  6. Preoperative high-intensity training in frail old patients undergoing pulmonary resection for NSCLC

    PubMed Central

    Cennamo, Antonio; Perrotta, Fabio; Saverio Cerqua, Francesco; Montesano, Raffaele; Curcio, Carlo; Lassandro, Francesco; Stefanelli, Francesco; Grella, Edoardo; Tafuri, Domenico; Mazzarella, Gennaro

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Thoracic surgery remains the better therapeutic option for non-small cell lung cancer patients that are diagnosed in early stage disease. Preoperative lung function assessment includes respiratory function tests (RFT) and cardio-pulmonary exercise testing (CPET). Vo2 peak, FEV1 and DLCO as well as recognition of performance status, presence of co-morbidities, frailty indexes, and age predict the potential impact of surgical resection on patient health status and survival risk. In this study we have retrospectively assessed the benefit of a high-intensity preoperative pulmonary rehabilitation program (PRP) in 14 patients with underlying lung function impairment prior to surgery. Amongst these, three patients candidate to surgical resection exhibited severe functional impairment associated with high score of frailty according CHS and SOF index, resulting in a substantial mortality risk. Our observations indicate that PRP appear to reduce the mortality and morbidity risk in frail patients with concurrent lung function impairment undergoing thoracic surgery. PRP produced improvement of VO2 peak degree and pulmonary function resulting in reduced postoperative complications in high-risk patients from our cases. Our results indicate that a preoperative training program may improve postoperative clinical outcomes in fraillung cancer patients with impaired lung function prior to surgical resection.

  7. Preoperative high-intensity training in frail old patients undergoing pulmonary resection for NSCLC.

    PubMed

    Salvi, Rosario; Meoli, Ilernando; Cennamo, Antonio; Perrotta, Fabio; Saverio Cerqua, Francesco; Montesano, Raffaele; Curcio, Carlo; Lassandro, Francesco; Stefanelli, Francesco; Grella, Edoardo; Tafuri, Domenico; Mazzarella, Gennaro; Bianco, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Thoracic surgery remains the better therapeutic option for non-small cell lung cancer patients that are diagnosed in early stage disease. Preoperative lung function assessment includes respiratory function tests (RFT) and cardio-pulmonary exercise testing (CPET). Vo2 peak, FEV1 and DLCO as well as recognition of performance status, presence of co-morbidities, frailty indexes, and age predict the potential impact of surgical resection on patient health status and survival risk. In this study we have retrospectively assessed the benefit of a high-intensity preoperative pulmonary rehabilitation program (PRP) in 14 patients with underlying lung function impairment prior to surgery. Amongst these, three patients candidate to surgical resection exhibited severe functional impairment associated with high score of frailty according CHS and SOF index, resulting in a substantial mortality risk. Our observations indicate that PRP appear to reduce the mortality and morbidity risk in frail patients with concurrent lung function impairment undergoing thoracic surgery. PRP produced improvement of VO2 peak degree and pulmonary function resulting in reduced postoperative complications in high-risk patients from our cases. Our results indicate that a preoperative training program may improve postoperative clinical outcomes in fraillung cancer patients with impaired lung function prior to surgical resection.

  8. [Pulmonary contusion and hemothorax due to explosion].

    PubMed

    Baeza-Herrera, Carlos; Sanjuán-Fabián, Héctor; Medellín-Sierra, Ulises Darío; Nájera-Garduño, Heladio; García-Cabello, Luis Manuel

    2006-01-01

    Folklore and "uses and customs" in countries such as Mexico, under certain circumstances, have direct influences on risks for traumatic injuries. Such is the case of gunpowder explosive objects used during celebration holidays. We present a 14-year-old male who suffered a pulmonary contusion as a consequence of an explosion of "huevo de codorniz." A pleurostomy tube was required to resolve symptomatic hemothorax. The patient was discharged 5 days after admission.

  9. Adjuvant systemic chemotherapy with or without bevacizumab in patients with resected pulmonary metastases from colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Turan, Nedim; Benekli, Mustafa; Dane, Faysal; Unal, Olcun Umit; Kara, Hasan Volkan; Koca, Dogan; Balvan, Ozlem; Eren, Tulay; Tastekin, Didem; Helvaci, Kaan; Berk, Veli; Demirci, Umut; Ozturk, Selcuk Cemil; Dogan, Erkan; Cetin, Bulent; Kucukoner, Mehmet; Tonyali, Onder; Tufan, Gulnihal; Oztop, Ilhan; Gumus, Mahmut; Coskun, Ugur; Uner, Aytug; Ozet, Ahmet; Buyukberber, Suleyman

    2014-01-01

    Introduction We investigated the impact of modern chemotherapy regimens and bevacizumab following pulmonary metastasectomy (PM) from metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). Methods A total of 122 consecutive patients who were curatively resected for pulmonary metastases of CRC in twelve oncology centers were retrospectively analysed between January 2000 and April 2012. Results Of 122 patients, 14 did not receive any treatment following PM. The remaining 108 patients received fluoropyrimidine-based (n = 12), irinotecan-based (n = 56) and oxaliplatin-based (n = 40) chemotherapy combinations. Among these, 52 patients received bevacizumab (BEV) while 56 did not (NoBEV). Median recurrence-free survival (RFS) was 17 months and median overall survival (OS) has not been reached at a median follow-up of 25 months after PM. Three and five-year OS rates were 66% and 53%, respectively. RFS and OS were similar, irrespective of the chemotherapy regimen or BEV use. Positive pulmonary margin, KRAS mutation status, and previous liver metastasectomy were negative independent prognostic factors for RFS, while pathologically confirmed thoracic lymph node involvement was the only negative independent prognostic for OS in multivariate analysis. Conclusions No significant RFS or OS difference was observed in respect to chemotherapy regimens with or without BEV in patients with pulmonary metastases of CRC following curative resection. PMID:26763794

  10. Targeted therapy of multiple liver metastases after resected solitary gastric metastasis and primary pulmonary adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Ling-yu; Liu, Ke-jun; Jiang, Zhe-long; Wu, Hai-ying; Wu, Shi-xiu

    2016-01-01

    Gastric metastases from lung adenocarcinoma are rare and usually asymptomatic. A 61-year-old woman was referred to our department because of a right lower pulmonary mass found on a chest X-ray film in August 2012. Right lower lobectomy was performed for pulmonary adenocarcinoma. Four months later, she developed epigastric discomfort. A fluoro-deoxy-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) scan showed a malignancy at the cardias of the stomach. A biopsy diagnosed poorly differentiated carcinoma and a gastric carcinoma was suspected. She underwent a subtotal gastrectomy and part of esophagectomy. The histologic diagnosis was metastasis from the pulmonary adenocarcinoma. She visited us again for her increasing level of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) after two months. FDG-PET/CT showed multiple malignant lesions in her liver, considering metastases from pulmonary origin. As she harbored activating epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation, she received erlotinib from April, 2013. She survives 4 years after the lung resection and is still on erotinib treatment with complete response. Although gastric metastasis from lung cancer is considered a late stage of the disease, a radical resection might provide survival in solitary metastasis. Moreover, systemic therapy was emphasized after local treatment in some late stage cases. PMID:27829227

  11. Pulmonary hemorrhage due to inhalation of vapor containing pyromellitic dianhydride.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, V; Baur, X; Czuppon, A; Ruegger, M; Russi, E; Speich, R

    1993-08-01

    Pulmonary hemorrhage due to inhalation of fumes or powders containing trimellitic anhydride (TMA) is well known. We report pulmonary hemorrhage in a young man exposed to epoxy resin vapor containing pyromellitic dianhydride (PMDA). Serum IgG antibodies to PMDA could be detected. We conclude that the pulmonary hemorrhage was mediated by a reaction to PMDA in analogy to the TMA-induced disease. We suggest that exposure to any acid anhydride should be considered a possible cause of pulmonary hemorrhage since these compounds share structural and functional similarities.

  12. Renal failure due to granulomatous interstitial nephritis after pulmonary sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    van Dorp, W T; Jie, K; Lobatto, S; Weening, J J; Valentijn, R M

    1987-01-01

    Two patients, who had had pulmonary sarcoidosis, developed renal failure due to sarcoid granulomatous interstitial nephritis after their original pulmonary symptoms had subsided. Treatment with prednisone resulted in almost complete recovery of renal function. Lysozyme and angiotensin-converting enzyme levels and gallium scintigraphy can be of diagnostic value.

  13. Anatomic pulmonary resection by video-assisted thoracoscopy: the Brazilian experience (VATS Brazil study)

    PubMed Central

    Terra, Ricardo Mingarini; Kazantzis, Thamara; Pinto-Filho, Darcy Ribeiro; Camargo, Spencer Marcantonio; Martins-Neto, Francisco; Guimarães, Anderson Nassar; Araújo, Carlos Alberto; Losso, Luis Carlos; Ghefter, Mario Claudio; de Lima, Nuno Ferreira; Gomes-Neto, Antero; Brito-Filho, Flávio; Haddad, Rui; Saueressig, Maurício Guidi; Lima, Alexandre Marcelo Rodrigues; de Siqueira, Rafael Pontes; Pinho, Astunaldo Júnior de Macedo e; Vannucci, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: The objective of this study was to describe the results of anatomic pulmonary resections performed by video-assisted thoracoscopy in Brazil. Methods: Thoracic surgeons (members of the Brazilian Society of Thoracic Surgery) were invited, via e-mail, to participate in the study. Eighteen surgeons participated in the project by providing us with retrospective databases containing information related to anatomic pulmonary resections performed by video-assisted thoracoscopy. Demographic, surgical, and postoperative data were collected with a standardized instrument, after which they were compiled and analyzed. Results: The surgeons provided data related to a collective total of 786 patients (mean number of resections per surgeon, 43.6). However, 137 patients were excluded because some data were missing. Therefore, the study sample comprised 649 patients. The mean age of the patients was 61.7 years. Of the 649 patients, 295 (45.5%) were male. The majority-521 (89.8%)-had undergone surgery for neoplasia, which was most often classified as stage IA. The median duration of pleural drainage was 3 days, and the median hospital stay was 4 days. Of the 649 procedures evaluated, 598 (91.2%) were lobectomies. Conversion to thoracotomy was necessary in 30 cases (4.6%). Postoperative complications occurred in 124 patients (19.1%), the most common complications being pneumonia, prolonged air leaks, and atelectasis. The 30-day mortality rate was 2.0%, advanced age and diabetes being found to be predictors of mortality. Conclusions: Our analysis of this representative sample of patients undergoing pulmonary resection by video-assisted thoracoscopy in Brazil showed that the procedure is practicable and safe, as well as being comparable to those performed in other countries. PMID:27383936

  14. [Primary pulmonary artery sarcoma in 36-year-old women: 3-years follow-up after partial resection and radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Drożdż, Jarosław; Warchoł, Ewa; Fijuth, Jacek; Filipiak, Krzysztof; Spych, Michał; Maciejewski, Marek; Piestrzeniewicz, Katarzyna; Ludomir, Stafańczyk; Janaszek-Sitkowska, Hanna; Januszewicz, Andrzej; Zembala, Marian

    2013-01-01

    Intimal sarcoma of the heart and pulmonary artery is a very rare, malignant, primary tumour. The prognosis in patients with primary sarcoma of the pulmonary artery, including intimal sarcoma, is poor. We present the case and 3-years follow-up of 36-year-old woman who was successfully treated with surgical, partial resection of the tumour followed by radiotherapy.

  15. Pulmonary Angiography and Embolization for Severe Hemoptysis Due to Cavitary Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Sanyika, Charles; Corr, Peter; Royston, Duncan; Blyth, David F.

    1999-11-15

    Purpose: To identify the role of pulmonary angiography in the diagnosis and treatment of severe hemoptysis due to cavitary pulmonary tuberculosis. Methods: Selective pulmonary angiography was performed on eight patients with severe hemoptysis uncontrolled by previous bronchial and systemic arterial embolization. Results: Three (38%) patients had Rasmussen aneurysms, which were successfully embolized with steel coils. Five patients demonstrated pulmonary arterial hypoperfusion in the diseased lung. Conclusions: We recommend pulmonary angiography in cavitary tuberculous patients with severe hemoptysis who do not respond to systemic arterial embolization. Rasmussen aneurysms are effectively treated by steel coil occlusion.

  16. The Role of Video-Assisted Thoracoscopic Therapeutic Resection for Medically Failed Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Yau-Lin; Chang, Jia-Ming; Liu, Yi-Sheng; Cheng, Lili; Chen, Ying-Yuan; Wu, Ming-Ho; Lu, Chung-Lan; Yen, Yi-Ting

    2016-01-01

    Abstract There are few reports regarding video-assisted thoracoscopic therapeutic resection for medically failed pulmonary tuberculosis (TB). We reviewed our surgical results of video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) therapeutic resection for pulmonary TB with medical failure, and its correlation with image characteristics on chest computed tomography (CT) scan. Between January 2007 and December 2012, among the 203 patients who had surgery for TB, the medical records of 89 patients undergoing therapeutic resection for medically failed pulmonary TB were reviewed. Clinical information and the image characteristics of CT scan were investigated and analyzed. Forty-six of the 89 patients undergoing successful VATS therapeutic resection had significantly lower grading in pleural thickening (P < 0.001), peribronchial lymph node calcification (P < 0.001), tuberculoma (P = 0.015), cavity (P = 0.006), and aspergilloma (P = 0.038); they had less operative blood loss (171.0 ± 218.7 vs 542.8 ± 622.8 mL; P < 0.001) and shorter hospital stay (5.2 ± 2.2 vs 15.6 ± 15.6 days; P < 0.001). They also had a lower percentage of anatomic resection (73.9% vs 93.0%; P = 0.016), a higher percentage of sublobar resection (56.5% vs 32.6%; P = 0.023), and a lower disease relapse rate (4.3% vs 23.3%; P = 0.009). Eighteen of the 38 patients with multi-drug resistant pulmonary tuberculosis (MDRTB) who successfully underwent VATS had significantly lower grading in pleural thickening (P = 0.001), peribronchial lymph node calcification (P = 0.019), and cavity (P = 0.017). They were preoperatively medicated for a shorter period of time (221.6 ± 90.8 vs 596.1 ± 432.5 days; P = 0.001), and had more sublobar resection (44.4% vs 10%), less blood loss (165.3 ± 148.3 vs 468.0 ± 439.9 mL; P = 0.009), and shorter hospital stay (5.4 ± 2.6 vs 11.8 ± 6.9 days; P = 0.001). Without multiple

  17. Utilization of the walking oximetry test to allow safe ambulation after pulmonary resection.

    PubMed

    Kageyama, Y; Urabe, N; Chiba, A

    2001-01-01

    Supplemental oxygen therapy after pulmonary resection can generally be tapered according to arterial blood gases at rest or pulse oximetry (SpO2). However, detecting exercise-induced oxygen desaturation can be difficult. We developed the walking oximetry test (WOT) so that thoracotomy patients could be rehabilitated without the risk of undetected ambulatory hypoxemia. The subjects were 58 patients who had undergone pulmonary resection and could walk at the bedside, with oxygen at 3 l/min via a nasal cannula. Patients with a value of more than 100 torr were allowed to walk with assistance for 6 min in the corridor. The oxygen flow rate was kept at 3 l/min and the walking pace was less than 50 m/min. SpO2 was determined using a wristwatch pulse oximeter. The test was stopped if the SpO2 fell below 90% or there was a score of 5 or more on the Borg scale (range 1-10). Oxygen desaturation occurred in six patients (10%) during the WOT. These patients underwent ambulatory training with sufficient oxygen supplementation and were then tested again. Patients whose SpO2 values remained higher than 90% and who showed no more than 5% desaturation were permitted to walk in the corridor with oxygen at 3 l/min via a nasal cannula. All these patients had a Borg score of 4 or lower. The WOT is a reliable, nonvasive method for detecting exercise-induced oxygen desaturation during ambulation after pulmonary resection.

  18. Pulmonary Disease Due to Nontuberculous Mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Glassroth, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Since pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacteria (PNTM) lung disease was last reviewed in CHEST in 2008, new information has emerged spanning multiple domains, including epidemiology, transmission and pathogenesis, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment. The overall prevalence of PNTM is increasing, and in the United States, areas of highest prevalence are clustered in distinct geographic locations with common environmental and socioeconomic factors. Although the accepted paradigm for transmission continues to be inhalation from the environment, provocative reports suggest that person-to-person transmission may occur. A panoply of host factors have been investigated in an effort to elucidate why infection from this bacteria develops in ostensibly immunocompetent patients, and there has been clarification that immunocompetent patients exhibit different histopathology from immunocompromised patients with nontuberculous mycobacteria infection. It is now evident that Mycobacterium abscessus, an increasingly prevalent cause of PNTM lung disease, can be classified into three separate subspecies with differing genetic susceptibility or resistance to macrolides. Recent publications also raise the possibility of improved control of PNTM through enhanced adherence to current treatment guidelines as well as new approaches to treatment and even prevention. These and other recent developments and insights that may inform our approach to PNTM lung disease are reviewed and discussed. PMID:26225805

  19. Pulmonary artery aneurysm with patent arterial duct: resection of aneurysm and ductal division.

    PubMed

    Tefera, Endale; Teodori, Michael

    2013-10-01

    Congenital or acquired aneurysm of the pulmonary artery (PA) is rare. Although aneurysms are described following surgical treatment of patent ductus arteriosus (PDA), occurrence of this lesion in association with PDA without previous surgery is extremely uncommon. An eight-year-old patient with PDA and aneurysm of the main PA is described in this report. Clinical diagnosis of PDA was made upon presentation. Diagnosis of PA aneurysm was suspected on chest x-ray and was confirmed on transthoracic echocardiography. Successful surgical resection of the aneurysm and division of the duct were performed under cardiopulmonary bypass. The patient did well on follow-up both from clinical and echocardiographic point of view.

  20. Suction or Nonsuction: How to Manage a Chest Tube After Pulmonary Resection.

    PubMed

    Rocco, Gaetano; Brunelli, Alessandro; Rocco, Raffaele

    2017-02-01

    Despite several randomized trials and meta-analyses, the dilemma as to whether to apply suction after subtotal pulmonary resection has not been solved. The combination of a poorly understood pathophysiology of the air leak phenomenon and the inadequate quality of the published randomized trials is actually preventing thoracic surgeons from abandoning an empirical management of chest drains. Even digital systems do not seem to have made the difference so far. Based on the evidence of the literature, the authors propose a new air leak predictor score (ALPS) as a contributing step toward appropriateness in using intraoperative sealants, opting for an external suction and managing and chest tubes.

  1. Late-onset pulmonary edema due to propofol.

    PubMed

    Inal, M T; Memis, D; Vatan, I; Cakir, U; Yildiz, B

    2008-08-01

    Pulmonary edema after the administration of propofol has rarely been reported. In this case report, we describe pulmonary edema due to the administration of propofol during a Cesarean section and while in the intensive care unit. The skin tests demonstrated strong positive weal and flare reactions to propofol. The patient was treated successfully with mechanical ventilatory support. This report emphasizes that this fatal complication may be seen with propofol and underlying mechanisms and therapeutic approach are discussed.

  2. Pulmonary scintigraphy in fibrosing mediastinitis due to histoplasmosis

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H.M.; Jay, S.J.; Brandt, M.J.; Holden, R.W.

    1981-04-01

    The pulmonary scintigraphic findings from our patients with fibrosing mediastinitis due to histoplasmosis are reported. The ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) mismatch mimicked pulmonary emboli. However, in these cases the chest radiographs and/or gallium-67 scintigraphy were abnormal, suggesting mediastinal or hilar disease. Awareness of the nonembolic conditions that can result in V/Q mismatches is important in the interpretation of lung scans.

  3. Pulmonary Resection for Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer in Patients With Prior Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Brunworth, Louis S; Dharmasena, Dharson; Virgo, Katherine S; Johnson, Frank E

    2006-01-01

    Background/Objective: We sought to determine the clinical course of patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) who subsequently developed bronchogenic carcinoma and underwent pulmonary resection. Methods: A nationwide retrospective study was conducted of all veterans at Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Centers for fiscal years 1993–2002 who were diagnosed with SCI, subsequently developed non–small cell lung cancer, and were surgically treated with curative intent. Inclusion criteria included American Spinal Injury Association type A injury (complete loss of neural function distal to the injury site) and traumatic etiology. Data were compiled from national Department of Veterans Affairs data sets and supplemented by operative reports, pathology reports, progress notes, and discharge summaries. Results: Seven patients met the inclusion/exclusion criteria and were considered evaluable. Five (71%) had one or more comorbid conditions in addition to their SCIs. All 7 underwent pulmonary lobectomy. Postoperative complications occurred in 4 patients (57%). Two patients died postoperatively on days 29 and 499, yielding a 30-day mortality rate of 14% and an in-hospital mortality rate of 29%. Conclusions: This seems to be the only case study in the English language literature on this topic. Patients with SCI who had resectable lung cancer had a high incidence of comorbid conditions. Those who underwent curative-intent surgery had high morbidity and mortality rates. Available evidence suggests that SCI should be considered a risk factor for adverse outcomes in major surgery of all types, including operations for primary lung cancer. PMID:16739556

  4. A Case Report of Onyx Pulmonary Arterial Embolism Contributing to Hypoxemia During Awake Craniotomy for Arteriovenous Malformation Resection.

    PubMed

    Tolly, Brian T; Kosky, Jenna L; Koht, Antoun; Hemmer, Laura B

    2017-02-15

    A healthy 26-year-old man with cerebral arteriovenous malformation underwent staged endovascular embolization with Onyx followed by awake craniotomy for resection. The perioperative course was complicated by tachycardia and severe intraoperative hypoxemia requiring significant oxygen supplementation. Postoperative chest computed tomography (CT) revealed hyperattenuating Onyx embolization material within the pulmonary vasculature, and an electrocardiogram indicated possible right heart strain, supporting clinically significant embolism. With awake arteriovenous malformation resection following adjunctive Onyx embolization becoming increasingly employed for lesions involving the eloquent cortex, anesthesiologists need to be aware of pulmonary migration of Onyx material as a potential contributor to significant perioperative hypoxemia.

  5. A Case Report of Onyx Pulmonary Arterial Embolism Contributing to Hypoxemia During Awake Craniotomy for Arteriovenous Malformation Resection.

    PubMed

    Tolly, Brian T; Kosky, Jenna L; Koht, Antoun; Hemmer, Laura B

    2016-11-02

    A healthy 26-year-old man with cerebral arteriovenous malformation underwent staged endovascular embolization with Onyx followed by awake craniotomy for resection. The perioperative course was complicated by tachycardia and severe intraoperative hypoxemia requiring significant oxygen supplementation. Postoperative chest computed tomography (CT) revealed hyperattenuating Onyx embolization material within the pulmonary vasculature, and an electrocardiogram indicated possible right heart strain, supporting clinically significant embolism. With awake arteriovenous malformation resection following adjunctive Onyx embolization becoming increasingly employed for lesions involving the eloquent cortex, anesthesiologists need to be aware of pulmonary migration of Onyx material as a potential contributor to significant perioperative hypoxemia.

  6. Preoperative pulmonary rehabilitation before lung cancer resection: results from two randomized studies.

    PubMed

    Benzo, Roberto; Wigle, Dennis; Novotny, Paul; Wetzstein, Marnie; Nichols, Francis; Shen, Robert K; Cassivi, Steve; Deschamps, Claude

    2011-12-01

    Complete surgical resection is the most effective curative treatment for lung cancer. However, many patients with lung cancer also have severe COPD which increases their risk of postoperative complications and their likelihood of being considered "inoperable." Preoperative pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) has been proposed as an intervention to decrease surgical morbidity but there is no established protocol and no randomized study has been published to date. We tested two preoperative PR interventions in patients undergoing lung cancer resection and with moderate-severe COPD in a randomized single blinded design. Outcomes were length of hospital stay and postoperative complications. The first study tested 4 weeks of guideline-based PR vs. usual care: that study proved to be very difficult to recruit as patients and providers were reluctant to delay surgery. Nine patients were randomized and no differences were found between arms. The second study tested ten preoperative PR sessions using a customized protocol with nonstandard components (exercise prescription based on self efficacy, inspiratory muscle training, and the practice of slow breathing) (n=10) vs. usual care (n=9). The PR arm had shorter length of hospital stay by 3 days (p=0.058), fewer prolonged chest tubes (11% vs. 63%, p=0.03) and fewer days needing a chest tube (8.8 vs. 4.3 days p=0.04) compared to the controlled arm. A ten-session preoperative PR intervention may improve post operative lung reexpansion evidenced by shorter chest tube times and decrease the length of hospital stay, a crude estimator of post operative morbidity and costs. Our results suggest the potential for short term preoperative pulmonary rehabilitation interventions in patients with moderate-severe COPD undergoing curative lung resection. 4 weeks of conventional preoperative PR seems non feasible.

  7. Obstructive Jaundice Due to Hepatocarcinoma With Intraductal Growth. Report of a Successful Resection

    PubMed Central

    Teruel, Ana; Mezquita, Susana; Martínez, J.; Colina, F.

    1990-01-01

    We present a patient with hepatocellular carcinoma causing obstructive jaundice due to intraductal growth, diagnosed intraoperatively by cholangiography and histological examination, and radically treated by left lobectomy, extrahepatic biliary tract resection and Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy. Survival after operation was 13 months. Other similar cases reported in the literature are reviewed. PMID:2178000

  8. Sarcoma of the pulmonary trunk and the main pulmonary arteries.

    PubMed

    Huwer, Hanno; Ozbek, Cem; Waldmann, Rita; Winning, Johannes; Isringhaus, Helmut; Kalweit, Gerhard

    2008-04-01

    We report on a sarcoma of the central pulmonary arteries. Surgical therapy consisted in replacing both main pulmonary arteries and the pulmonary trunk including the pulmonary valve. Six months later a left-sided pneumonectomy had to be performed due to an intravascular tumor. Fifteen months after first resection treatment, recurrent tumors of the right pulmonary artery and the right ventricle were resected. Two years after the first operation the patient has no detectable tumor.

  9. Survival following lung resection in immunocompromised patients with pulmonary invasive fungal infection

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Geena X.; Khojabekyan, Marine; Wang, Jami; Tegtmeier, Bernard R.; O'Donnell, Margaret R.; Kim, Jae Y.; Grannis, Frederic W.; Raz, Dan J.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Pulmonary invasive fungal infections (IFIs) are associated with high mortality in patients being treated for haematological malignancy. There is limited understanding of the role for surgical lung resection and outcomes in this patient population. METHODS This is a retrospective cohort of 50 immunocompromised patients who underwent lung resection for IFI. Patient charts were reviewed for details on primary malignancy and treatment course, presentation and work-up of IFI, reasons for surgery, type of resection and outcomes including postoperative complications, mortality, disease relapse and survival. Analysis was also performed on two subgroups based on year of surgery from 1990–2000 and 2001–2014. RESULTS The median age was 39 years (range: 5–64 years). Forty-seven patients (94%) had haematological malignancies and 38 (76%) underwent haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Surgical indications included haemoptysis, antifungal therapy failure and need for eradication before HSCT. The most common pathogen was Aspergillus in 34 patients (74%). Wedge resections were performed in 32 patients (64%), lobectomy in 9 (18%), segmentectomy in 2 (4%) and some combination of the 3 in 7 (14%) for locally extensive, multifocal disease. There were 9 (18%) minor and 14 (28%) major postoperative complications. Postoperative mortality at 30 days was 12% (n = 6). Acute respiratory distress syndrome was the most common cause of postoperative death. Overall 5-year survival was 19%. Patients who had surgery in the early period had a median survival of 24 months compared with 5 months for those who had surgery before 2001 (P = 0.046). At the time of death, 15 patients (30%) had probable or proven recurrent IFI. Causes of death were predominantly related to refractory malignancy, fungal lung disease or complications of graft versus host disease (GVHD). Patients who had positive preoperative bronchoscopy cultures had a trend towards worse survival compared with

  10. Pulmonary Nocardiosis due to Nocardia asiatica in an Immunocompetent Host.

    PubMed

    Okawa, Sakina; Sonobe, Kazunari; Nakamura, Yuzo; Nei, Takahito; Kamio, Koichiro; Gemma, Akihiko

    2015-01-01

    We describe a case of pulmonary nocardiosis due to Nocardia asiatica in an immunocompent 64-year-old-female. Wadowsky-Yee-Okuda-α-ketoglutarate (WYOα) agar, a selective media for Legionella species, was useful for the detection based on the growth-inhibition of normal oral flora and growth-promotion of Nocardia species.

  11. The influence of preoperative risk stratification on fast-tracking patients after pulmonary resection.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Ayesha S; Cerfolio, Robert J

    2008-02-01

    Fast-tracking protocols or postoperative care computerized algorithms have been shown to reduce hospital length of stay and reduce costs; however, not all patients can be fast-tracked. Certain patient characteristics may put patients at increased risk to fail fast-tracking. Additionally some patients have multiple risk factors that have an additive effect that puts them at an even increased risk to fail fast-tracking, and more importantly, to significant morbidity. It is a mistake to force these protocols on all patients because it can lead to increased complications, readmissions, and low patient and family satisfaction. By carefully analyzing surgical results via accurate prospective databases, the types of patients who fail fast-tracking and the reasons they fail can be identified. Once these characteristics are pinpointed, specific changes to the postoperative algorithm can be implemented, and these alterations can lead to improved outcomes. The authors have shown that by using pain pumps instead of epidurals in elderly patients we can improve outcomes and still fast-track octogenarians with minimal morbidity and high-patient satisfaction. We have also shown that the increased use of physical therapy and respiratory treatments (important parts of the care of all patients after pulmonary resection, but a limited resource in most hospitals) may also lead to improved surgical results for those who have low FEV1% and DLco%. Further studies are needed. Although fast-tracking protocols cannot be applied to all, the vast majority of patients who undergo elective pulmonary resection, even those at high risk, can undergo safe, efficient, and cost-saving care via preset postoperative algorithms. When the typical daily events are convened each morning and the planned date of discharge is frequently communicated with the patient and family before surgery and each day in the hospital, most patients can be safely fast-tracked with high satisfaction and outstanding results.

  12. Preoperative predictive factors for intensive care unit admission after pulmonary resection*

    PubMed Central

    Pinheiro, Liana; Santoro, Ilka Lopes; Perfeito, João Aléssio Juliano; Izbicki, Meyer; Ramos, Roberta Pulcheri; Faresin, Sonia Maria

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether the use of a set of preoperative variables can predict the need for postoperative ICU admission. Methods: This was a prospective observational cohort study of 120 patients undergoing elective pulmonary resection between July of 2009 and April of 2012. Prediction of ICU admission was based on the presence of one or more of the following preoperative characteristics: predicted pneumonectomy; severe/very severe COPD; severe restrictive lung disease; FEV1 or DLCO predicted to be < 40% postoperatively; SpO2 on room air at rest < 90%; need for cardiac monitoring as a precautionary measure; or American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status ≥ 3. The gold standard for mandatory admission to the ICU was based on the presence of one or more of the following postoperative characteristics: maintenance of mechanical ventilation or reintubation; acute respiratory failure or need for noninvasive ventilation; hemodynamic instability or shock; intraoperative or immediate postoperative complications (clinical or surgical); or a recommendation by the anesthesiologist or surgeon to continue treatment in the ICU. Results: Among the 120 patients evaluated, 24 (20.0%) were predicted to require ICU admission, and ICU admission was considered mandatory in 16 (66.6%) of those 24. In contrast, among the 96 patients for whom ICU admission was not predicted, it was required in 14 (14.5%). The use of the criteria for predicting ICU admission showed good accuracy (81.6%), sensitivity of 53.3%, specificity of 91%, positive predictive value of 66.6%, and negative predictive value of 85.4%. Conclusions: The use of preoperative criteria for predicting the need for ICU admission after elective pulmonary resection is feasible and can reduce the number of patients staying in the ICU only for monitoring. PMID:25750672

  13. Management of residual pleural space and air leaks after major pulmonary resection.

    PubMed

    Korasidis, Stylianos; Andreetti, Claudio; D'Andrilli, Antonio; Ibrahim, Mohsen; Ciccone, Annamaria; Poggi, Camilla; Siciliani, Alessandra; Rendina, Erino A

    2010-06-01

    Postoperative air leaks associated with residual pleural space is a well known complication contributing to prolong hospitalization. Many techniques have been proposed for the treatment of this complication. Between 1999 and 2009, 39 patients with air leaks associated with residual pleural space (>3 cm at chest X-ray) persisting over three days after major lung resection were enrolled in this study. All patients were treated with combined pneumoperitoneum and autologus blood patch. Pneumoperitoneum is obtained by the injection of 30 ml/kg of air under the diaphragm, using a Verres needle through the periumbilical area. The blood patch is obtained by instillating 100 ml of autologus blood through the chest tubes. No patients experienced complications related to the procedure. Obliteration of pleural space was obtained in all the patients at a maximum of 96 h postoperatively. Air leaks stopped in all the cases at a maximum of 144 h from surgery. Chest tube was removed 24 h after the air leakage disappearance. Our 10-year experience supports the early, combined use of pneumoperitoneum and blood patch whenever pleural space and air leaks present after major pulmonary resection. This approach may be recommended because of its easiness, safety, effectiveness, and the low costs.

  14. Does videomediastinoscopy with frozen sections improve mediastinal staging during video-assisted thoracic surgery pulmonary resections?

    PubMed Central

    Gonfiotti, Alessandro; Viggiano, Domenico; Borgianni, Sara; Borrelli, Roberto; Tancredi, Giorgia; Jaus, Massimo O.; Politi, Leonardo; Comin, Camilla E.; Voltolini, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Background To assess if video-mediastinoscopy (VM) with frozen sections (FS) combined with a video-assisted thoracic surgery major pulmonary resection (VMPRS) is able to improve VATS mediastinal intraoperative staging. Methods From June 2012 to March 2015 a total of 146 patients underwent VMPRS lymphadenectomy. NCCN guidelines were followed for pre-operative staging, including VM with FS in 27 patients (19%). Procedural time, dissected nodal stations, complications related to VM and VATS lymphadenectomy and definitive histology, were evaluated. Results Operative time for VATS resection with VM (group 1) and VATS pulmonary resection alone (group 2) was 198±64 vs. 167±43 min (P=0.003). Mean/median numbers of dissected nodal stations were 4.93±1.1/5 (range, 4–8) in group 1 and 3.25±0.5/5 (range, 3–8) in group 2 (P<0.001). Group 1 vs. group 2 right-sided lymphadenectomy (n=86) was performed at station 2R/4R in 18 (90%) and 46 (69.7%); at station 3a/3p in 14 (51.8%) and 22 (31%); at station 7 in 18 (90%) and 44 (66.7%); at station 8/9 in 11 (55%) and 24 (36.4%) respectively. On the left side (n=60) group 1 vs. group 2 lymphadenectomy resulted at station 4 in 6 (85.7%) and 38 (71.7%); at station 5/6 in 6 (85.7%) and 26 (49%); at station 7 in 6 (85.7%) and 33 (62.3%), and at station 8/9 in 1 (14.3%) and 18 (34%). There were no early deaths and recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy occurred in 1 (0.8%) in group 2. Pathological upstaging (pN1; pN2) was found in 5 patients (17%) in group 1, and 13 (11%) in group 2 (P=0.23). About FS (n=29), formal paraffin histology resulted in 0% of both, false negative and false positive results. Conclusions Based on our experience, the combination “VM with FS followed by VMPRS in sequence”, seems to be effective and offers an alternative approach to improve intraoperative mediastinal staging. PMID:28149542

  15. Thick lung wedge resection for acute life-threatening massive hemoptysis due to aortobronchial fistula

    PubMed Central

    Ozawa, Yuichiro; Nakajima, Tomomi; Ikeda, Akihiko; Konishi, Taisuke; Matsuzaki, Kanji

    2016-01-01

    Massive hemoptysis from an aortobronchial fistula due to thoracic aortic dissection is an extremely rare symptom, but is a potentially life-threatening condition. We report a case of acute massive hemoptysis due to aortobronchial fistula that was successfully controlled by a simple and rapid thick wedge resection of the lung with hematoma by using the black cartilage stapler. A 65-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with acute massive hemoptysis. After tracheal intubation, chest computed tomography revealed hematoma in the left lung and ruptured aortic dissection from the distal arch to the descending aorta. He was diagnosed with aortobronchial fistula and underwent an emergency surgery on the same day. We performed posterolateral thoracotomy. A dissecting aortic aneurysm (diameter, ~80 mm) with adhesion of the left upper lobe and the superior segment of the lower lobe was found. The lung parenchyma expanded with the hematoma. We stapled the upper and lower lobes by using the black cartridge stapler along the aortopulmonary window. Massive hemoptysis disappeared, and the complete aortic dissection appeared. Aortic dissection with adherent lung was excised, and graft replacement of the distal arch and descending thoracic aorta was performed. Proximal lung wedge resection using black cartridge stapler is a simple and quick method to control massive hemoptysis from aortic dissection; hence, this procedure is an effective option to control massive hemoptysis due to aortobronchial fistula. This technique could rapidly stop massive hemoptysis and prevent dissection of the adherent lung tissue and intra-thoracic bleeding. PMID:27747035

  16. Pulmonary Arterial Capacitance Predicts Cardiac Events in Pulmonary Hypertension Due to Left Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sugimoto, Koichi; Yoshihisa, Akiomi; Nakazato, Kazuhiko; Jin, Yuichiro; Suzuki, Satoshi; Yokokawa, Tetsuro; Misaka, Tomofumi; Yamaki, Takayoshi; Kunii, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Saitoh, Shu-ichi; Takeishi, Yasuchika

    2016-01-01

    Background Although pulmonary hypertension due to left heart disease (LHD-PH) accounts for the largest proportion of pulmonary hypertension, few reports on the epidemiological analysis of LHD-PH exist. Recently, pulmonary arterial capacitance (PAC) has attracted attention as a possible factor of right ventricular afterload along with pulmonary vascular resistance. We therefore investigated the clinical significance of PAC in LHD-PH. Methods The subject consisted of 252 LHD-PH patients (145 men, mean age 63.4 ± 14.7 years) diagnosed by right heart catheterization. PAC was estimated by the ratio between stroke volume and pulmonary arterial pulse pressure. Patients were classified into four groups according to the PAC (1st quartile was 0.74 to 1.76 ml/mmHg, the 2nd quartile 1.77 to 2.53 ml/mmHg, the 3rd quartile 2.54 to 3.59 ml/mmHg, and the 4th quartile 3.61 to 12.14 ml/mmHg). The end-points were defined as rehospitalization due to worsening heart failure and/or cardiac death. The Cox proportional hazard regression model was used to determine what variables were associated with cardiac events. Results The patients in the 1st quartile had the lowest cardiac index and stroke volume index, and the highest mean pulmonary arterial pressure, mean pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, and pulmonary vascular resistance compared with the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th quartiles. Fifty-four patients experienced cardiac events during the follow-up period (median 943 days). The event-free rate of the 1st quartile was significantly lower than that of the 3rd and 4th quartiles (66.7% vs 82.5% [3rd quartile], P = 0.008; and 92.1% [4th quartile], P < 0.001). The Cox hazard analysis revealed that PAC was significantly associated with cardiac events (HR 0.556, 95% CI 0.424–0.730, P < 0.001). Conclusion PAC is useful in the prediction of cardiac event risk in LHD-PH patients. PMID:27875533

  17. Digital versus traditional air leak evaluation after elective pulmonary resection: a prospective and comparative mono-institutional study

    PubMed Central

    Nigra, Victor Auguste; Lanza, Giovanni; Costardi, Lorena; Bora, Giulia; Solidoro, Paolo; Cristofori, Riccardo Carlo; Molinatti, Massimo; Lausi, Paolo Olivo; Ruffini, Enrico; Oliaro, Alberto; Guerrera, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Background The increased demand to reduce costs and hospitalization in general pushed several institution worldwide to develop fast-tracking protocols after pulmonary resections. One of the commonest causes of protracted hospital stay remains prolonged air leaks (ALs). We reviewed our clinical practice with the aim to compare traditional vs. digital chest drainages in order to evaluate which is the more effective to correctly manage the chest tube after pulmonary resection. Methods All patients submitted to elective pulmonary resection for lung malignancies, between April to December, 2014 in our General Thoracic Surgery Department were included in the study. The primary outcome was the chest tube duration, the secondary the postoperative overall hospitalization. Significant differences between traditional and digital groups were investigated with logistic regression models. Numerical variables between the groups were compared by means of the unpaired Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test. Results Both series of patients were comparable for clinical, surgical and pathological characteristics. Chest tube duration showed to be significantly shorter in the digital group (3 vs. 5 days, P=0.0009), while the hospitalization was longer in traditional one [8 vs. 7 days in digital drainage (DD); P=0.0385]. No chest drainage replacement was required at 30-day, in both groups. Conclusions We were able to demonstrate that patients managed with a digital system experienced a shorter chest tube duration as well as a lower overall hospital length of stay, compared to those who received the traditional drainage (TD). PMID:26623093

  18. Comparison of methods for placing and managing a silastic drain after pulmonary resection.

    PubMed

    Fukui, Takayuki; Sakakura, Noriaki; Kobayashi, Rei; Katayama, Tatsuya; Ito, Simon; Hatooka, Shunzo; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya

    2009-10-01

    We have been using a silastic drain [Blake drain (BD)] after pulmonary resection by different placement methods and reviewed the daily amount of drainage in each patient. A 19-Fr BD was placed for each of 110 patients. First, a drain was inserted from the anterior chest wall and the tip reached the dorsal part of the diaphragm [anterior-to-posterior (AP)]. For the others [posterior-to-anterior (PA); n=37], we inserted a drain from the lower intercostal space, turned it around the apex and placed its tip in the lower front. Patients in the AP group included those placed under a water seal (AP-WS; n=43) or suction (AP-SC; n=30). The reference group consisted of 68 patients with a 32-Fr plastic drain during the same period [conventional drains (CD)]. The amount of drainage on the day of surgery in the PA group was significantly higher than that in the AP-WS group (P<0.0001) and similar to that in the CD group (P=0.54). The mean amount of drainage on postoperative day 1 and total amounts accumulating during drain placement showed no significant differences between the four groups. A BD placed using a PA approach with suction might be efficient for drainage.

  19. Combined use of preoperative methylene blue dye and microcoil localization facilitates thoracoscopic wedge resection of indeterminate pulmonary nodules in children.

    PubMed

    Pursnani, Seema K; Rausen, Aaron R; Contractor, Sohail; Nadler, Evan P

    2006-04-01

    The ability to biopsy indeterminate pulmonary lesions in children has evolved with advances in minimal access surgery. Recent advances in preoperative localization including image-guided dye injection or wire implantation have expanded the types of lesions that are accessible via minimal access surgery. We present a case of a 13-year-old boy who underwent preoperative localization using both methylene blue dye and microcoil labeling, and a subsequent thoracoscopic pulmonary wedge resection under the same anesthesia. The combined use of both dye and microcoil localization provides the advantage of superior intraoperative visualization of the lesion and the ability to use fluoroscopy to confirm the presence of the nodule in the surgical specimen. We recommend this technique for the biopsy of indeterminate pulmonary lesions that would not otherwise be accessible via a minimally invasive approach.

  20. Chronic pneumonia due to Klebsiella oxytoca mimicking pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Gera, Kamal; Roshan, Rahul; Varma-Basil, Mandira; Shah, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Klebsiella species infrequently cause acute community acquired pneumonia (CAP). The chronic form of the disease caused by K. pneumoniae (Friedlander's bacillus) was occasionally seen in the pre-antibiotic era. K. oxytoca is a singularly uncommon cause of CAP. The chronic form of the disease caused by K. oxytoca has been documented only once before. A 50-year-old immunocompetent male smoker presented with haemoptysis for 12 months. Imaging demonstrated a cavitary lesion in the right upper lobe with emphysematous changes. Sputum stains and cultures for Mycobacterium tuberculosis were negative. However, three sputum samples for aerobic culture as well as bronchial aspirate cultured pure growth of K. oxytoca. A diagnosis of chronic pneumonia due to K. oxytoca was established and with appropriate therapy, the patient was largely asymptomatic. The remarkable clinical and radiological similarity to pulmonary tuberculosis can result in patients with chronic Klebsiella pneumonia erroneously receiving anti-tuberculous therapy.

  1. [The relation between the frequency of exercise oxygen desaturation following major lung resection and the predictions of postoperative pulmonary function].

    PubMed

    Takeichi, Haruka; Urabe, N; Asai, K

    2008-04-01

    The predictors of oxygen desaturation during exercise in patients submitted to major pulmonary resection for lung cancer are to be determined. We analyzed retrospectively the relation between the oxygen saturation by pulse oxymetry (Spo2) during exercise and the predictions of postoperative pulmonary function. A hundred twenty-two patients with lung cancer who underwent lung resection from January 1999 to May 2004 were included (79 men, 43 women, average age 66.9 +/- 9.2). A fall over 5% in Spo2 during exercise was termed 'desaturation'. Twenty-eight patients developed desaturation [group D(+)] and 94 patients did not [group D(-)]. We compared the predictions of postoperative pulmonary function (%ppoVC, %ppoFEV1.0, %ppoDLco) between these 2 groups. As a result, only %ppoDLco was significantly different between 2 groups [D(+) 68.7 +/- 19.1%, D(-) 83.8 +/- 24.9%]. Patients with poor %ppoDLco are at increased risk to develop a postoperative exercise oxygen desaturation.

  2. Use of free subcutaneous fat pad for reduction of intraoperative air leak in thoracoscopic pulmonary resection cases with lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Shintani, Yasushi; Inoue, Masayoshi; Nakagiri, Tomoyuki; Okumura, Meinoshin

    2014-08-01

    Intraoperative alveolar air leaks occur in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) following a pulmonary resection using thoracoscopic surgery. We showed the efficacy of covering damaged lung tissue with a subcutaneous fat pad for preventing postoperative air leak. Thoracoscopic surgery was performed for NSCLC patients with three incisions along with a 3-4 cm anterior utility incision. When an air leak originated from deep within the pulmonary parenchyma or was large, a subcutaneous fat pad ∼2 × 2 cm in size was harvested from the utility incision and placed on the damaged lung tissue with fibrin glue and 2-3 mattress sutures. Subcutaneous fat pads were used for 50 patients with NSCLC during thoracoscopic surgery procedures. There were no intraoperative complications in any of the patients. A prolonged air leak (>7 days) was noted in 3 (6%) of the 50 patients. Air leak was diminished at 1.5 ± 2.6 postoperative days and the chest tubes removed at 3.2 ± 2.8 postoperative days. Reinforcement of damaged lung tissues by use of subcutaneous free fat pads is a safe and intriguing procedure in NSCLC patients who underwent a pulmonary resection in thoracoscopic surgery.

  3. Surgical Resection during Chemotherapy of Pulmonary Cryptococcoma in a Patient with Cryptococcal Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Yuji; Satomi, Kazuo

    2017-01-01

    We herein report the case of a 72-year-old-man with pulmonary cryptococcoma along with cryptococcal meningitis who underwent surgery for pulmonary lesions while receiving chemotherapy. We noted two major clinical issues. First, the presence of pulmonary cryptococcoma had a detrimental influence on the cryptococcal meningitis. Second, resolution of the pulmonary cryptococcoma through antifungal therapy had a beneficial influence on the recovery from cryptococcal meningitis. As observed in the current case with pulmonary and meningeal cryptococcosis, surgery for pulmonary cryptococcoma with continuous antifungal treatment should be considered for cases where the symptoms respond poorly to antifungal therapy and radiographic abnormalities persist. PMID:28050006

  4. Pulmonary hypertension due to a pulmonary artery leiomyosarcoma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Adeli, Hassan; Nemati, Bardia; Jandaghi, Mahboubeh; Riahi, Mohammad Mahdi; Salarvand, Fatemeh

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Primary pulmonary artery sarcomas are very rare and their histologic type called leiomyosarcoma is even rarer. These tumors are frequently misdiagnosed as pulmonary thromboembolism in clinical settings. Many patients receive anticoagulant therapy without response, and many are diagnosed postmortem only. Most of the tumors reported in the literature have involved the right ventricular outflow tract and the main pulmonary trunk, often extending into the main pulmonary artery (MPA) branches. CASE REPORT A 64-year-old woman presented with weakness, fatigue, malaise, dyspnea, and marked elevation of pulmonary artery pressure was admitted to our hospital. She was initially diagnosed with chronic pulmonary thromboembolism, and chest computed tomography (CT) scan revealed lobulated heterogeneous left hilar mass extended to precarinal and subcarinal space. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated a polypoid lesion at the trunk with extension to left MPA and its first branch. The patient was operated, and a yellowish-shiny solid mass in pulmonary trunk was seen intra-operation and pulmonary endarterectomy was performed. Her tumor was pathologically diagnosed as pulmonary artery leiomyosarcoma. CONCLUSION Clinicians must consider pulmonary artery sarcoma when making the differential diagnosis for patients with pulmonary artery masses. The clinical prediction scores and the CT and MRI findings can help identifying patients with pulmonary artery sarcoma. PMID:25161682

  5. Uniportal thoracoscopic surgery: from medical thoracoscopy to non-intubated uniportal video-assisted major pulmonary resections.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Rivas, Diego

    2016-03-01

    The development of thoracoscopy has more than one hundred years of history since Jacobaeus described the first procedure in 1910. He used the thoracoscope to lyse adhesions in tuberculosis patients. This technique was adopted throughout Europe in the early decades of the 20(th) century for minor and diagnostic procedures. It is only in the last two decades that interest in minimally invasive thoracic surgery was reintroduced by two key technological improvements: the development of better thoracoscopic cameras and the availability of endoscopic linear mechanical staplers. From these advances the first video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) major pulmonary resection was performed in 1992. In the following years, the progress of VATS was slow until studies showing clear benefits of VATS over open surgery started to be published. From that point on, the technique spread throughout the world and variations of the technique started to emerge. The information available on internet, live surgery events and experimental courses has contributed to the rapid learning of minimally invasive surgery during the last decade. While initially slow to catch on, the traditional multi-port approach has evolved into a uniportal approach that mimics open surgical vantage points while utilizing a non-rib-spreading single small incision. The early period of uniportal VATS development was focused on minor procedures until 2010 with the adoption of the technique for major pulmonary resections. Currently, experts in the technique are able to use uniportal VATS to encompass the most complex procedures such as bronchial sleeve, vascular reconstructions or carinal resections. In contrast, non-intubated and awake thoracic surgery techniques, described since the early history of thoracic surgery, peaked in the decades before the invention of the double lumen endotracheal tube and have failed to gain widespread acceptance following their re-emergence over a decade ago thanks to the improvements in

  6. Uniportal thoracoscopic surgery: from medical thoracoscopy to non-intubated uniportal video-assisted major pulmonary resections

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The development of thoracoscopy has more than one hundred years of history since Jacobaeus described the first procedure in 1910. He used the thoracoscope to lyse adhesions in tuberculosis patients. This technique was adopted throughout Europe in the early decades of the 20th century for minor and diagnostic procedures. It is only in the last two decades that interest in minimally invasive thoracic surgery was reintroduced by two key technological improvements: the development of better thoracoscopic cameras and the availability of endoscopic linear mechanical staplers. From these advances the first video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) major pulmonary resection was performed in 1992. In the following years, the progress of VATS was slow until studies showing clear benefits of VATS over open surgery started to be published. From that point on, the technique spread throughout the world and variations of the technique started to emerge. The information available on internet, live surgery events and experimental courses has contributed to the rapid learning of minimally invasive surgery during the last decade. While initially slow to catch on, the traditional multi-port approach has evolved into a uniportal approach that mimics open surgical vantage points while utilizing a non-rib-spreading single small incision. The early period of uniportal VATS development was focused on minor procedures until 2010 with the adoption of the technique for major pulmonary resections. Currently, experts in the technique are able to use uniportal VATS to encompass the most complex procedures such as bronchial sleeve, vascular reconstructions or carinal resections. In contrast, non-intubated and awake thoracic surgery techniques, described since the early history of thoracic surgery, peaked in the decades before the invention of the double lumen endotracheal tube and have failed to gain widespread acceptance following their re-emergence over a decade ago thanks to the improvements in

  7. Pulmonary veins in the normal lung and pulmonary hypertension due to left heart disease.

    PubMed

    Hunt, James M; Bethea, Brian; Liu, Xiang; Gandjeva, Aneta; Mammen, Pradeep P A; Stacher, Elvira; Gandjeva, Marina R; Parish, Elisabeth; Perez, Mario; Smith, Lynelle; Graham, Brian B; Kuebler, Wolfgang M; Tuder, Rubin M

    2013-11-15

    Despite the importance of pulmonary veins in normal lung physiology and the pathobiology of pulmonary hypertension with left heart disease (PH-LHD), pulmonary veins remain largely understudied. Difficult to identify histologically, lung venous endothelium or smooth muscle cells display no unique characteristic functional and structural markers that distinguish them from pulmonary arteries. To address these challenges, we undertook a search for unique molecular markers in pulmonary veins. In addition, we addressed the expression pattern of a candidate molecular marker and analyzed the structural pattern of vascular remodeling of pulmonary veins in a rodent model of PH-LHD and in lung tissue of patients with PH-LHD obtained at time of placement on a left ventricular assist device. We detected urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) expression preferentially in normal pulmonary veins of mice, rats, and human lungs. Expression of uPAR remained elevated in pulmonary veins of rats with PH-LHD; however, we also detected induction of uPAR expression in remodeled pulmonary arteries. These findings were validated in lungs of patients with PH-LHD. In selected patients with sequential lung biopsy at the time of removal of the left ventricular assist device, we present early data suggesting improvement in pulmonary hemodynamics and venous remodeling, indicating potential regression of venous remodeling in response to assist device treatment. Our data indicate that remodeling of pulmonary veins is an integral part of PH-LHD and that pulmonary veins share some key features present in remodeled yet not normotensive pulmonary arteries.

  8. Left main bronchus compression due to main pulmonary artery dilatation in pulmonary hypertension: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Jaijee, Shareen K; Ariff, Ben; Howard, Luke; O'Regan, Declan P; Gin-Sing, Wendy; Davies, Rachel; Gibbs, J Simon R

    2015-12-01

    Pulmonary arterial dilatation associated with pulmonary hypertension may result in significant compression of local structures. Left main coronary artery and left recurrent laryngeal nerve compression have been described. Tracheobronchial compression from pulmonary arterial dilatation is rare in adults, and there are no reports in the literature of its occurrence in idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension. Compression in infants with congenital heart disease has been well described. We report 2 cases of tracheobronchial compression: first, an adult patient with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension who presents with symptomatic left main bronchus compression, and second, an adult patient with Eisenmenger ventricular septal defect and right-sided aortic arch, with progressive intermedius and right middle lobe bronchi compression in association with enlarged pulmonary arteries.

  9. Diagnostic discrepancies in malignant astrocytoma due to limited surgical resection can be overcome by IDH1 testing

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Betty Y. S.; Jiang, Wen.; Beiko, Jason; Prabhu, Sujit S.; DeMonte, Franco; Gilbert, Mark R.; Sawaya, Raymond; Aldape, Kenneth D.; Cahill, Daniel P.; McCutcheon, Ian E.

    2015-01-01

    Background The accurate grading of malignant astrocytomas has significant prognostic and therapeutic implications. Traditional histopathological grading can be challenging due to regional tumor heterogeneity, especially in scenarios where small amounts of tissue are available for pathologic review. Here, we hypothesized that a critical tumor resection volume is needed for correct grading of astrocytomas by histopathology. For insufficient tissue sampling, IDH1 molecular testing can act as a complementary marker to improve diagnostic accuracy. Methods Volumetric analyses were obtained using preoperative and postoperative MRI images. Histological specimens were gathered from 403 patients with malignant astrocytoma who underwent craniotomy. IDH1 status was assessed by immunohistochemistry and sequencing. Results Patients with >20 cubic centimeters (cc) of the total tumor volume resected on MRI have higher rate of GBM diagnosis compared to <20cc (OR 2.57, 95% CI 1.6-4.06, P<0.0001). The rate of IDH1 status remained constant regardless of the tumor volume resected (OR 0.81, 95% CI 0.48-1.36, P<0.43). The rate of GBM diagnosis is 2-fold greater for individual surgical specimen >10cc than those of lower volume (OR 2.48, 95% CI 1.88-3.28, P<0.0001). Overall survival for AA patients with >20cc tumor resection on MRI is significantly better than those with <20cc tumor resected (P<0.05). No volume-dependent differences were observed in patients with GBM (P<0.4), IDH1 wild type (P<0.1) or IDH1 mutation (P<0.88). Conclusions IDH1 status should be considered when total resection volume is <20cc based on MRI analysis and for surgical specimen < 10cc to complement histopathologic diagnosis of malignant astrocytomas. In these specimens, under-diagnosis of GBM may occur when analysis is restricted to histopathology alone. PMID:24777756

  10. Pulmonary insults due to transfusions, radiation, and hyperoxia

    SciTech Connect

    Duane, P.

    1988-09-01

    Pulmonary insults caused by transfusion, radiation, and hyperoxia share many clinical features with insults caused by serious pulmonary infections. The major objective in evaluating these patients is to establish the diagnosis with as much certainty as possible. Unfortunately, there are no clinical aspects or laboratory tests that are pathognomonic for these diseases; therefore, it is often necessary to rely on a knowledge of those features which help to distinguish these disorders from infectious etiologies. For example, patients suffering from transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) experience onset of insult within 6 hours of a transfusion and have the presence of leukoagglutinins in their serum. Patients with radiation injuries frequently have roentgenographic infiltrates that conform to the ports of radiation. Despite extensive animal and human studies, factors distinguishing hyperoxic injury from infectious disorders remain poorly defined. These clinical features and others are reviewed to identify the essential components in the diagnosis of TRALI, acute radiation pneumonitis, and hyperoxic pneumonitis. 84 references.

  11. Pulmonary Hypertension Due to Common Respiratory Conditions: Classification, Evaluation and Management Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Fein, Daniel G.; Zaidi, Ali N.; Sulica, Roxana

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) due to chronic respiratory disease and/or hypoxia is classified as World Health Organization (WHO) Group III pulmonary hypertension. The patients most commonly encountered in clinical practice with group III PH include those with chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD), diffuse parenchymal lung disease, and sleep-disordered breathing. The purpose of this review is to outline the variable clinical significance of pulmonary hypertension in the most common pulmonary disease states and how a clinician may approach the management of these patients. PMID:27571110

  12. Effectiveness of milrinone for cardiogenic shock due to massive pulmonary aspiration: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jeong Heon; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Seok-Kon; Jeon, Dae Geun; Song, Jaegyok; Ji, Seung Heon; Lee, Gwan Woo; Kang, Bong Jin

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary aspiration of gastric contents is one of the most frightening complications during anesthesia. Although pulmonary aspiration of gastric contents in general surgical patients is not common and resulting long-term morbidity and mortality are rare, severe hypoxemia and other sequelae of pulmonary aspiration continue to be reported. We report a case of massive aspiration of gastric contents during induction of general anesthesia, resulting in cardiac arrest due to severe pulmonary hypertension and myocardial infarction. Sustained cardiac arrest and shock that did not respond the conventional resuscitation was successfully treated using milrinone. The patient was discharged without complications in 20 days. PMID:25006374

  13. Pathophysiology and clinical relevance of pulmonary remodelling in pulmonary hypertension due to left heart diseases.

    PubMed

    Dupuis, Jocelyn; Guazzi, Marco

    2015-04-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) in left heart disease, classified as group II, is the most common form of PH that occurs in approximately 60% of cases of reduced and preserved left ventricular ejection fraction. Although relatively much is known about hemodynamic stages (passive or reactive) and their consequences on the right ventricle (RV) there is no consensus on the best hemodynamic definition of group II PH. In addition, the main pathways that lead to lung capillary injury and impaired biology of small artery remodelling processes are largely unknown. Typical lung manifestations of an increased pulmonary pressure and progressive RV-pulmonary circulation uncoupling are an abnormal alveolar capillary gas diffusion, impaired lung mechanics (restriction), and exercise ventilation inefficiency. Of several classes of pulmonary vasodilators currently clinically available, oral phosphodiesterase 5 inhibition, because of its strong selectivity for targeting the cyclic guanosine monophosphate pathway in the pulmonary circulation, is increasingly emerging as an attractive opportunity to reach hemodynamic benefits, reverse capillary injury, and RV remodelling, and improve functional capacity. Guanylate cyclase stimulators offer an additional intriguing opportunity but the lack of selectivity and systemic effects might preclude some of the anticipated benefits on the pulmonary circulation. Future trials will determine whether new routes of pharmacologic strategy aimed at targeting lung structural and vascular remodelling might affect morbidity and mortality in left heart disease populations. We believe that this therapeutic goal rather than a pure hemodynamic effect might ultimately emerge as an important challenge for the clinician.

  14. [Pulmonary disease due to asbestos in steel industry workers].

    PubMed

    Zurbriggen, Rita; Capone, Lilian

    2013-01-01

    Asbestos-related diseases are caused by the inhalation of asbestos fibers in their variety chrysotile or white asbestos. Although the ban in Argentina dates from 2003, there are numerous industries where work continues with this mineral, including iron and steel industries. It is currently known the high pathogenicity of this material, so that in many countries there are programs to monitoring the exposed workers. Here we describe the general characteristics and pulmonary manifestations in 27 patients who had worked in a very huge steel factory in South America. The diagnosis of asbestos-related diseases was made by a medical-occupational record, history of asbestos exposure, additional studies of lung function and chest images. Then the sources of exposure (occupational, domestic and environmental), exposure time and latency period were analyzed, in those patients in whom a related disease was detected. Smoking history was also taken into account. Twenty-two patients had benigns pathologies (81.4%), sixteen of them with lesions localyzed in pleura, and other six pulmonary asbestosis. The malignant pathologies occurred in five patients (18.5%), in four of them mesothelioma and in other one lung cancer. The problem of asbestos exposure has contemporary relevance. Hence the need for a surveillance program in workers exposed to asbestos in the past or currently, to detect, report, record and investigate the characteristics of these pathologies.

  15. Lumbo-sacral spine disease due to bovine tuberculosis in a patient with concurrent pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Nawaid; Srinivasan, Koottalai; Panayi, Jeannette; Moudgil, Harmesh

    2011-12-01

    Lumbo-sacral spinal disease due to bovine tuberculosis (TB) in a patient with concurrent pulmonary disease is rare. We report this unpredicted finding in an immunocompetent patient and discuss the natural history in an area of low prevalence.

  16. Non-invasive assessment of bleeding pulmonary artery aneurysms due to Behçet disease.

    PubMed

    Greene, R M; Saleh, A; Taylor, A K; Callaghan, M; Addis, B J; Nzewi, O C; van Zyl, W V

    1998-01-01

    Because of its ability to depict intravascular, intramural, and extramural pathology, non-invasive imaging is well suited to assessing life-threatening hemoptysis that may complicate Behçet disease. We made exclusive use of CT angiography supplemented by MR to identify pulmonary thromboembolism, mediastinal lymphadenopathy, and bilateral pulmonary artery aneurysms with signs of previous unilateral rupture. Two-dimensional reformatted CT images provided surgeons with a road map of upstream and downstream vascular relationships prior to aneurysm resection. Imaging findings were confirmed by surgery and pathology. Non-invasive imaging proved to be a useful alternative to standard catheter arteriography in the preoperative assessment of hemoptysis in this patient with Behçet disease.

  17. Does the sequence of pulmonary vasculature ligation have any oncological impact during an anatomical lung resection for non-small-cell lung cancer?

    PubMed

    Toufektzian, Levon; Attia, Rizwan; Polydorou, Nicolaos; Veres, Lukacs

    2015-02-01

    A best evidence topic in thoracic surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was 'in patients with primary lung carcinoma, does the sequence of pulmonary vasculature ligation during anatomical lung resection influence the oncological outcomes?' A total of 48 papers were found using the reported search, of which 7 represented the best evidence to answer the question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. Among six prospective studies included, five of them randomized patients to either pulmonary vein or artery occlusion first during anatomical lung resection, while one study was retrospective. Two reports did not find any difference between pulmonary vein and artery occlusion first during long-term follow-up in terms of either disease recurrence (51 vs 53%, P = 0.7), or 5-year overall survival (54 vs 50%, P = 0.82). One report did not find any difference with regard to circulating tumour cells either after thoracotomy (5.0 vs 3.9, P = 0.4), or after the completion of lobectomy (38.0 vs 70.0, P = 0.23). One report found a higher expression of CD44v6 (P = 0.008) and CK19 (P = 0.05) in patients undergoing pulmonary arterial occlusion first. One report found that pulmonary vein occlusion before that of the pulmonary arterial branches has a favourable outcome on circulating carcino-embryonic antigen (CEA) mRNA in the peripheral blood, while another one did not find a significant difference in circulating levels of CEA mRNA (P = 0.075) and CK19 mRNA (P = 0.086) with either method. Another study reported no correlation between circulating pin1 mRNA levels in peripheral blood after the completion of the resection and the sequence of ligation of pulmonary vessels (9.95 ± 0.91 vs 14.71 ± 1.64, P > 0.05). Based on the two studies assessing the long-term outcome of patients with primary lung cancer undergoing anatomical curative

  18. Does video-assisted thoracic surgery provide a safe alternative to conventional techniques in patients with limited pulmonary function who are otherwise suitable for lung resection?

    PubMed

    Oparka, Jonathan; Yan, Tristan D; Ryan, Eilise; Dunning, Joel

    2013-07-01

    A best evidence topic in thoracic surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was: does video-assisted thoracic surgery provide a safe alternative to conventional techniques in patients with limited pulmonary function who are otherwise suitable for lung resection? Altogether, more than 280 papers were found using the reported search, of which 7 represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. One of the largest studies reviewed was a retrospective review of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons database. The authors compared 4531 patients who underwent lobectomy by video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) with 8431 patients who had thoracotomy. In patients with a predicted postoperative forced expiratory volume in 1 s (ppoFEV1%) of <60, it was demonstrated that thoracotomy patients have markedly increased pulmonary complications when compared with VATS patients (P = 0.023). Another study compared perioperative outcomes in patients with a ppoFEV1% of <40% who underwent thoracoscopic resection with similar patients who underwent open resection. Patients undergoing thoracoscopic resection as opposed to open thoracotomy had a lower incidence of pneumonia (4.3 vs 21.7%, P < 0.05), a shorter intensive care stay (2 vs 4 days, P = 0.05) and a shorter hospital stay (7 vs 10 days, P = 0.058). A similar study compared recurrence and survival in patients with a ppoFEV1% of <40% who underwent resection by VATS or anatomical segmentectomy (study group) with open resection (control group). Relative to the control group, patients in the study group had a shorter length of hospital stay (8 vs 12 days, P = 0.054) and an improved 5-year survival (42 vs 18%, P = 0.02). Analysis suggested that VATS lobectomy was the principal driver of survival benefit in the study group. We conclude that

  19. Successful surgical management of osteonecrosis of the jaw due to RANK-ligand inhibitor treatment using fluorescence guided bone resection.

    PubMed

    Otto, Sven; Baumann, Sebastian; Ehrenfeld, Michael; Pautke, Christoph

    2013-10-01

    Osteonecrosis of the jaw has recently been described in patients receiving subcutaneous administration of RANKL-inhibitors (denosumab). However, due to promising study results, more patients will receive denosumab in order to avoid skeletal complications due to metastatic bone disease and osteoporosis. Therefore, this has the potential to become a comparable challenge to the bisphosphonate induced jaw necrosis in the area of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery. Indeed, so far no convincing surgical technique has been described to overcome the non-healing mucosal lesions with exposed bone due to RANKL-inhibitor therapy. In this technical note, we report two successful cases of surgical treatment of jaw-bone necrosis under RANKL-inhibitor treatment using fluorescence guided bone resection. In conclusion, the technique is suggested as treatment option for this entity of osteonecrosis of the jaw.

  20. Impact of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease on postoperative recurrence in patients with resected non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Qiang, Guangliang; Liang, Chaoyang; Xiao, Fei; Yu, Qiduo; Wen, Huanshun; Song, Zhiyi; Tian, Yanchu; Shi, Bin; Guo, Yongqing; Liu, Deruo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to determine whether the severity of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) affects recurrence-free survival in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients after surgical resection. Patients and methods A retrospective study was performed on 421 consecutive patients who had undergone lobectomy for NSCLC from January 2008 to June 2011. Classification of COPD severity was based on guidelines of the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD). Characteristics among the three subgroups were compared and recurrence-free survivals were analyzed. Results A total of 172 patients were diagnosed with COPD (124 as GOLD-1, 46 as GOLD-2, and two as GOLD-3). The frequencies of recurrence were significantly higher in patients with higher COPD grades (P<0.001). Recurrence-free survival at 5 years was 78.1%, 70.4%, and 46.4% in non-COPD, mild COPD, and moderate/severe COPD groups, respectively (P<0.001). By univariate analysis, the age, sex, smoking history, COPD severity, tumor size, histology, and pathological stage were associated with recurrence-free survival. Multivariate analysis showed that older age, male, moderate/severe COPD, and advanced stage were independent risk factors associated with recurrence-free survival. Conclusion NSCLC patients with COPD are at high risk for postoperative recurrence, and moderate/severe COPD is an independent unfavorable prognostic factor. PMID:26766906

  1. Bronchial closure methods and risks for bronchopleural fistula in pulmonary resections: how a surgeon may choose the optimum method?

    PubMed

    Uçvet, Ahmet; Gursoy, Soner; Sirzai, Serdar; Erbaycu, Ahmet E; Ozturk, Ali A; Ceylan, Kenan C; Kaya, Seyda O

    2011-04-01

    There is debate about which bronchial closure technique is the best to prevent bronchopleural fistulas (BPFs). We aim to assess the effect of bronchial closure procedures and patients' characteristics on BPF occurrence in pulmonary resections. Bronchial closures in 625 consecutive patients were assessed. Stumps were closed by manual suturing in 204 and by mechanical stapling in 421 cases. In the mechanical stapling group, stapling supported by manual suture was performed in 170 cases. BPFs occurred in 3.8%. Of these, stapling was used in 5.0%, whereas manual suturing was used in 1.5% (P=0.04). BPFs were more prevalent among patients who had undergone pneumonectomy (P<0.01), right pneumonectomy (P<0.01), stapler closure (P<0.01), patients with co-factors (P<0.01), and patients who had undergone preoperative neo-adjuvant (P=0.01) or postoperative adjuvant therapy (P=0.03). There was no difference in the frequency of BPF between patients with and without adjuvant support in the stapling group. The optimum bronchial closure method has to be chosen by considering the patient and bronchus based characteristics. This has to be assessed carefully, especially in pneumonectomy and co-factors. The manual closure seems to be the more preferable method in risky patients. An additive support suture on the bronchial stump does not decrease the risk of BPF.

  2. Hemoptysis due to pulmonary pseudosequestration secondary to gastro-pulmonary fistula after a revisional bariatric operation.

    PubMed

    Santacruz, Carlos Cerdán; Rodríguez, María Conde; Sánchez-Pernaute, Andrés; García, Antonio José Torres

    2014-10-01

    We report the case of a patient with a history of a complicated revisional bariatric operation who developed a lung pseudosequestration secondary to a gastro-pulmonary fistula. As the patient presented with recurrent hemoptysis, she was initially submitted to embolization of the aberrant vessels and later to a definite operation, which consisted on a diversion of the gastric fistula into a Roux-en-Y intestinal loop. It is an exceptional case about late complications of bariatric surgery, and it underlines the importance of discarding these complications even when the clinical manifestations affect another anatomic region different from the operated abdomen.

  3. [A successful case of systemic chemotherapy followed by liver resection for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma with highly vascular invasion and multiple pulmonary metastases].

    PubMed

    Mizukami, Tatsuzo; Kamiyama, Toshiya; Nakanishi, Kazuaki; Taniguchi, Masahiko; Yokoo, Hideki; Tahara, Munenori; Kakisaka, Tatsuhiko; Kamachi, Hirofumi; Matsushita, Michiaki; Todo, Satoru

    2011-05-01

    The prognosis for hepatocellular carcinoma with extrahepatic metastasis or vascular invasion is very poor. We treated a case successfully by combining chemotherapy and liver resection for hepatocellular carcinoma with multiple pulmonary metastases and vascular invasion. A 56-year-old man who complained of abdominal pain in his right side was transported to the hospital by ambulance. Because CT scan revealed the rupture of hepatocellular carcinoma, he underwent emergency transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE). A close examination revealed tumor thrombus in the inferior vena cava and posterior segment of the portal vein branch, with multiple pulmonary metastases. We conducted right hepatic lobectomy and removal of the inferior vena cava tumor thrombus. After the operation, pulmonary metastatic lesions gradually grew larger, so the oral administration of S-1 at 120 mg per day was started. At the end of the first course, the CT scan revealed that multiple pulmonary metastases were significantly reduced, and treatment was maintained until the end of 4 courses. A prolongation of survival could be expected by combining systemic chemotherapy and liver resection for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma such as the present case.

  4. Peritoneal ultrafiltration for refractory fluid overload and ascites due to pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Husain-Syed, Faeq; Muciño-Bermejo, María-Jimena; Ronco, Claudio; Seeger, Werner; Birk, Horst-Walter

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a common finding in patients with advanced liver disease. Similarly, among patients with advanced pulmonary arterial hypertension, right heart failure leads to congestive hepatopathy. Diuretic resistant fluid overload in both advanced pulmonary hypertension and chronic liver disease is a demanding challenge for physicians. Venous congestion and ascites-induced increased intra-abdominal pressure are essential regarding recurrent hospitalization, morbidity and mortality. Due to impaired right-ventricular function, many patients cannot tolerate extracorporeal ultrafiltration. Peritoneal dialysis, a well-established, hemodynamically tolerated treatment for outpatients may be a good alternative to control fluid status. We present a patient with pulmonary arterial hypertension and congestive hepatopathy hospitalized for over 3 months due to ascites induced refractory volume overload treated with peritoneal ultrafiltration. We report the treatment benefits on fluid balance, cardiorenal and pulmonary function, as well as its safety. In conclusion, we report a case in which peritoneal ultrafiltration was an efficient treatment option for refractory ascites in patients with congestive hepatopathy.

  5. Pulmonary and hepatic granulomatous disorders due to the inhalation of cement and mica dusts.

    PubMed Central

    Cortex Pimentel, J; Peixoto Menezes, A

    1978-01-01

    Hepatic and pulmonary granulomas were recognised in two workers exposed respectively to Portland cement and to muscovite dusts. The pulmonary lesions in the patient exposed to cement consisted of histiocytic granulomas and irregular fibrohyaline scars, and in the patient exposed to mica of a diffuse thickening of all interalveolar septa due to new formation of reticulin and collagen fibres and proliferation of fibroblasts and histiocytes. In the liver the following pathological findings were observed: focal or diffuse swelling of sinusoidal lining cells, sarcoid-type granulomas, and, in the case of mica exposure, perisinusoidal and portal tract fibrosis. Abundant inclusions of the inhaled material were identified within the pulmonary and hepatic lesions by histochemical and x-ray diffraction techniques. Images PMID:663882

  6. [Syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone associated with resection of pulmonary squamous cell carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Seki, Kouji; Segawa, Masataka; Kusajima, Yoshinori; Saito, Katsuhiko

    2010-02-01

    Syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH) shows various symptoms based on hyponatremia and brings catastrophic outcome occasionally. A 75-years-old man was found to have an abnormal shadow of the right lung on chest X-ray. Bronchoscopic examination showed that the abnormal shadow was aterectasis caused by the squamous cell carcinoma of middle lobe bronchus, and middle and lower lobectomy of the right lung was performed. On the postoperative day 2, suddenly the serum sodium concentration decreased to 116 mEq/l and serum osmolarity also decreased to 246 mOsm/l. Inspite of hyponatremia, the urine sodium level elevated to 73 mEq/l. So the urine osmolarity elevated to 752 mOsm/l, too. In addition to these data, edema and dehydration were absent, and both renal and adrenal function were normal. So we diagnosed that this abnormal conditions-hyponatremia with corresponding serum hypoosmolality and an inappropriately high urinary osmolality due to continued sodium excretion was induced by SIADH. Fluid restriction and antibiotics therapy for pneumonia resulted in an appropriate rise in the serum sodium level to 138 mEq/l on the postoperative day 21. To avoid catastrophic outcome in the cases of hyponatremia after surgery, it is important to remember that hyponatremia may be induced by SIADH.

  7. Implantation of a stent graft in the right pulmonary artery enables radical resection of a central endothelial sarcoma of the left pulmonary artery.

    PubMed

    Kissling, Pascal; Brosi, Philippe; Kull, Christof; Toia, Damien; Maurer, Christoph Andreas

    2013-09-01

    In a patient with a huge endothelial sarcoma of the left pulmonary artery, we report successful implantation of a stent graft in the right pulmonary artery, including the pulmonary arterial trunk. This preoperative measure enabled a safe and radical left-sided pneumonectomy, including the tumor and the central parts of the left pulmonary artery. No major blood loss occurred, and neither use of a heart-lung machine nor cardiopulmonary bypass was necessary.

  8. Efficacy of subpleural continuous infusion of local anesthetics after thoracoscopic pulmonary resection for primary lung cancer compared to intravenous patient-controlled analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Joonho; Haam, Seokjin

    2016-01-01

    Background This study compared the efficacy and side effects of intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IV-PCA) with those of a subpleural continuous infusion of local anesthetic (ON-Q system) in patients undergoing thoracoscopic pulmonary resection for primary lung cancer. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 66 patients who underwent thoracoscopic pulmonary resection for primary lung cancer from January 2014 to August 2015 (36 in the IV-PCA group and 30 in the ON-Q group). The numeric pain intensity scale (NPIS), additional IV injections for pain control, side effects, and early discontinuation of the pain control device were compared. Results There were no differences in the general characteristics of the two groups. The NPIS scores gradually decreased with time (P<0.001), but the two groups had differences in pattern of NPIS scores (P=0.111). There were no differences in the highest NPIS score during admission (4.75±2.35 vs. 5.27±1.87, P=0.334) or the number of additional IV injections for pain control in the same period (0.72±0.94 for IV-PCA vs. 0.83±0.65 for ON-Q; P=0.575). Side effects such as nausea, dizziness, and drowsiness were significantly more frequent with IV-PCA (36.1% vs. 10.0%, P=0.014), and early discontinuation of the pain control device was more frequent in the IV-PCA group (33.3% vs. 6.7%, P=0.008). Conclusions The ON-Q system was equivalent to the IV-PCA for postoperative pain control after thoracoscopic pulmonary resection for primary lung cancer, and it also had fewer effects and early discontinuations. PMID:27499973

  9. Transition from multiple port to single port video-assisted thoracoscopic anatomic pulmonary resection: early experience and comparison of perioperative outcomes

    PubMed Central

    French, Daniel G.; Thompson, Calvin

    2016-01-01

    Background Single port thoracoscopy is an approach aimed at minimizing trauma to the chest wall during lung resection. The objectives of this study were to describe early experience in the transition from multiple port video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) to single port surgery (S-VATS) and to compare perioperative outcomes between approaches. Methods Consecutive anatomic lung resections using S-VATS were reviewed and compared to a historical, prospective cohort of multiple port VATS cases. Outcomes analysis was focused on the use of operating room resources and postoperative recovery. Results Over 12 months, 50 S-VATS procedures were completed by one surgeon and compared to an equal number of VATS patients. The groups were similar in age, gender, BMI, comorbidity, tumor size and pulmonary function. There was no statistically significant difference in operative time. All tumors were completely resected (R0) and the median number of lymph nodes evaluated pathologically was equivalent {S-VATS=7 [4-10]; VATS=7 [4-10]; P=0.92}. There was no significant difference in conversion rate {S-VATS=2 (4%); VATS=1 (2%); P=0.56}. The median length of stay was similar in both groups {S-VATS=4 [3-7]; VATS=4 [3-7]; P=0.99}. There was no mortality and no significant difference in the rate of major complications {S-VATS=10/50 [20%]; VATS=5/50 [10%]; P=0.26}. There was no difference in patient reported pain as measured by a visual analog scale at 24 hours {S-VATS=4 [2-5]; VATS=4 [3-5]; P=0.63}. Conclusions Early experience in the transition from multiple port VATS to S-VATS lung resection indicates that safety, efficiency and surgical quality are preserved. More long-term data are required. Alternative approaches to perform thoracoscopic lung resection should be carefully evaluated and compared to established minimally invasive techniques. PMID:27134834

  10. Prolonged length of stay associated with air leak following pulmonary resection has a negative impact on hospital margin

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Douglas E; Lauer, Lisa M; Layton, Andrew; Tong, Kuo B

    2016-01-01

    Background Protracted hospitalizations due to air leaks following lung resections are a significant source of morbidity and prolonged hospital length of stay (LOS), with potentially significant impact on hospital margins. This study aimed to evaluate the relationship between air leaks, LOS, and financial outcomes among discharges following lung resections. Materials and methods The Medicare Provider Analysis and Review file for fiscal year 2012 was utilized to identify inpatient hospital discharges that recorded International Classification of Diseases (ICD-9) procedure codes for lobectomy, segmentectomy, and lung volume reduction surgery (n=21,717). Discharges coded with postoperative air leaks (ICD-9-CM codes 512.2 and 512.84) were defined as the air leak diagnosis group (n=2,947), then subcategorized by LOS: 1) <7 days; 2) 7–10 days; and 3) ≥11 days. Median hospital charges, costs, payments, and payment-to-cost ratios were compared between non-air leak and air leak groups, and across LOS subcategories. Results For identified patients, hospital charges, costs, and payments were significantly greater among patients with air leak diagnoses compared to patients without (P<0.001). Hospital charges and costs increased substantially with prolonged LOS, but were not matched by a proportionate increase in hospital payments. Patients with LOS <7, 7–10, and ≥11 days had median hospital charges of US $57,129, $73,572, and $115,623, and costs of $17,594, $21,711, and $33,786, respectively. Hospital payment increases were substantially lower at $16,494, $16,307, and $19,337, respectively. The payment-to-cost ratio significantly lowered with each LOS increase (P<0.001). Higher inpatient hospital mortality was observed among the LOS ≥11 days subgroup compared with the LOS <11 days subgroup (P<0.001). Conclusion Patients who develop prolonged air leaks after lobectomy, segmentectomy, or lung volume reduction surgery have the best clinical and financial outcomes

  11. Recurrent Stroke Due to Metastatic Pulmonary Tumor Emboli as an Important Clinical Entity.

    PubMed

    Takasugi, Junji; Sakaguchi, Manabu; Oyama, Naoki; Gon, Yasufumi; Terasaki, Yasukazu; Sasaki, Tsutomu; Nakahara, Susumu; Ohshima, Kenji; Hori, Yumiko; Morii, Eiichi; Mochizuki, Hideki

    2017-03-30

    We present an autopsy case of repetitive stroke due to tumor emboli, indistinguishable from thromboembolism with a hypercoagulable state in its clinical course. A 72-year-old man diagnosed with stage IVA oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma received chemoradiotherapy. Follow-up imaging revealed mediastinal lymph nodes and pulmonary metastasis. One year later, the patient experienced right arm weakness, and brain magnetic resonance imaging showed acute ischemic lesions in multiple vascular territories. He was diagnosed with paradoxical cerebral embolism due to cancer-associated venous thrombosis and treated with rivaroxaban. However, newly developed cerebral infarcts were confirmed 1 month later. Then, rivaroxaban treatment was switched to subcutaneous unfractionated heparin injection. He was admitted again for stroke recurrence and died of respiratory failure 8 days after admission. Autopsy demonstrated pulmonary metastasis invading the veins and tumor emboli in the culprit cerebral arteries. D-dimer was kept constant at a slightly higher level, ranging from 1 to 3 µg/mL during the course of recurrence. We should consider tumor embolism in the differential diagnosis of recurrent stroke along with pulmonary tumor and resistance to heparin preparations with unchanged D-dimer levels.

  12. Unilateral pulmonary edema: a rare initial presentation of cardiogenic shock due to acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jeong Hun; Kim, Seok Hwan; Park, Jinkyu; Lim, Young-Hyo; Park, Hwan-Cheol; Choi, Sung Il; Shin, Jinho; Kim, Kyung-Soo; Kim, Soon-Gil; Hong, Mun K; Lee, Jae Ung

    2012-02-01

    Cardiogenic unilateral pulmonary edema (UPE) is a rare clinical entity that is often misdiagnosed at first. Most cases of cardiogenic UPE occur in the right upper lobe and are caused by severe mitral regurgitation (MR). We present an unusual case of right-sided UPE in a patient with cardiogenic shock due to acute myocardial infarction (AMI) without severe MR. The patient was successfully treated by percutaneous coronary intervention and medical therapy for heart failure. Follow-up chest Radiography showed complete resolution of the UPE. This case reminds us that AMI can present as UPE even in patients without severe MR or any preexisting pulmonary disease affecting the vasculature or parenchyma of the lung.

  13. Saudi Guidelines on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Pulmonary Hypertension: Pulmonary hypertension due to lung diseases and/or hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Sakkijha, Husam; Idrees, Majdy M

    2014-07-01

    Chronic lung diseases are common causes of pulmonary hypertension. It ranks second after the left heart disease. Both obstructive and restrictive lung diseases are know to cause pulmonary hypertension. The pathophysiology of the disease is complex, and includes factors affecting the blood vessels, airways, and lung parenchyma. Hypoxia and the inhalation of toxic materials are another contributing factors. Recent guidelines have further clarified the association between pulmonary hypertension and chronic lung disease and made general guidelines concerning the diagnosis and management. In this article, we will provide a detailed revision about the new classification and give general recommendations about the management of pulmonary hypertension in chronic lung diseases.

  14. [Pulmonary edema due to venous air embolism during craniotomy: a case report].

    PubMed

    Ishida, Kumiko; Hishinuma, Miwako; Miyazawa, Mikiko; Tanaka, Toshiyuki; Iwasawa, Ken; Kitoh, Takeshi

    2008-10-01

    We present a 35-year-old healthy male patient who developed pulmonary edema (PE) probably due to venous air embolism during craniotomy in the semi-sitting position for arteriovenous malformation (AVM). Anesthesia was maintained with oxygen, nitrous oxide, propofol and fentanyl. During craniotomy, end-tidal carbon dioxide pressure decreased suddenly from 26 to 9 mmHg. Concurrently, a decrease in oxygen saturation from 99% to 91% occurred. There were no serious changes in blood pressure and heart rate. A "mill-wheel murmur" was confirmed. PE due to venous air embolism was suspected. The operation was discontinued and the patient was transferred to the intensive care unit. In the post-operative period, the patient developed PE and made a full recovery within a week. Four months later, the patient was scheduled again for surgical excision of AVM in the semi-sitting position in the same way as the first time. Anesthesia was maintained with oxygen, air, propofol and fentanyl. Transoesophageal echocardiography and pulmonary artery catheter were used. Saline was filled at the surgical site to prevent aspiration of air bubbles and surgical procedure was performed carefully without large vein injury and uneventfully. During neurosurgical intervention in the sitting position, special attention should be paid to entry of air bubbles into the venous system which may lead to PE.

  15. Development of Pulmonary Artery Aneurysms Due to Behçet's Disease and Resolution after Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kage, Hidenori; Goto, Yasushi; Amano, Yosuke; Makita, Kosuke; Isago, Hideaki; Kobayashi, Kouichi; Narumoto, Osamu; Okudaira, Reiko; Tanaka, Goh; Takami, Kazutaka; Ohishi, Nobuya; Nagase, Takahide

    2016-01-01

    We herein describe a patient with Behçet's disease in whom we followed the development and resolution of pulmonary artery aneurysms. He presented with intermittent hemoptysis, pulmonary thromboembolism was initially diagnosed, and anticoagulant therapy was started. Over the next several months, the expansion of pulmonary arteries was noted. Five months after his initial admission, he was readmitted for massive hemoptysis, and further examinations revealed that he had Behçet's disease. Corticosteroids and intravenous cyclophosphamide were started. Over the next five months, the pulmonary artery aneurysms and thrombosis resolved. The development of pulmonary artery aneurysms led to the diagnosis of Behçet's disease, and they resolved after immunosuppressive therapy. PMID:27853079

  16. Intravascular Talcosis due to Intravenous Drug Use Is an Underrecognized Cause of Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, Christopher C.; Raval, Jay S.; Nichols, Larry

    2012-01-01

    Intravenous injection of illegal drugs or medications meant for oral administration can cause granulomatous disease of the lung. This intravascular talcosis results in pulmonary fibrosis and pulmonary hypertension. Nine cases of histologically confirmed intravascular talcosis were reviewed with specific attention given to the clinical histories in these patients. Five autopsy cases were included in this series with detailed investigation in the anatomic features associated with intravascular talcosis and pulmonary hypertension. All nine patients showed perivascular and/or intravascular deposition of polarizable foreign material in their lungs. Intravascular talcosis as a result of previous intravenous drug use was not clinically suspected in any patient despite clinically diagnosed pulmonary hypertension in five. All patients showed dilatation of the right and left heart, but none had dilatation of the aortic valve. Congestive heart failure with hepatosplenomegaly was also common. We conclude that intravascular talcosis is an underdiagnosed cause of pulmonary hypertension in patients with known history of intravenous drug use. PMID:22645680

  17. Intravascular Talcosis due to Intravenous Drug Use Is an Underrecognized Cause of Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Christopher C; Raval, Jay S; Nichols, Larry

    2012-01-01

    Intravenous injection of illegal drugs or medications meant for oral administration can cause granulomatous disease of the lung. This intravascular talcosis results in pulmonary fibrosis and pulmonary hypertension. Nine cases of histologically confirmed intravascular talcosis were reviewed with specific attention given to the clinical histories in these patients. Five autopsy cases were included in this series with detailed investigation in the anatomic features associated with intravascular talcosis and pulmonary hypertension. All nine patients showed perivascular and/or intravascular deposition of polarizable foreign material in their lungs. Intravascular talcosis as a result of previous intravenous drug use was not clinically suspected in any patient despite clinically diagnosed pulmonary hypertension in five. All patients showed dilatation of the right and left heart, but none had dilatation of the aortic valve. Congestive heart failure with hepatosplenomegaly was also common. We conclude that intravascular talcosis is an underdiagnosed cause of pulmonary hypertension in patients with known history of intravenous drug use.

  18. Pulmonary mucormycosis due to Lichtheimia ramosa in a patient with HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Kutlu, Murat; Ergin, Cağrı; Bir, Ferda; Hilmioğlu-Polat, Süleyha; Gümral, Ramazan; Necan, Ceyda; Koçyiğit, Ali; Sayın-Kutlu, Selda

    2014-08-01

    Mucormycosis is increasingly common in patients with risk factors such as diabetes mellitus, neutropenia, and corticosteroid therapy. However, mucormycosis seems to be less common in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection compared to patients with other risk factors. Despite their lower virulence, Lichtheimia species should be regarded as emerging pathogens among Mucoralean fungi. We report a fatal case of pulmonary mucormycosis due to Lichtheimia ramosa in a 52-year-old man with an end-stage HIV infection. He had a cachectic appearance and his CD4 count was 8 cells/mm(3). The fungal infection was diagnosed based on a positive sputum culture with histopathologic confirmation. The fungus was resistant to caspofungin, anidulafungin, and voriconazole [minimum inhibitory concentration (MCI) >32 µg/ml], whereas the E test MIC values of itraconazole, posaconazole, and amphotericin B were 0.38, 0.38, and 0.5 µg/ml, respectively. Although intravenous drug use is the main risk factor for the development of mucormycosis in HIV-infected patients, it may also develop in patients with low CD4 count, opportunistic infections and/or additional diseases, such as Kaposi's sarcoma or severe immunodeficiency, as in our case.

  19. [Pulmonary and cardiovascular syndrome due to hantavirus: clinical aspects of an emerging disease in southeastern Brazil].

    PubMed

    Campos, Gelse Mazzoni; Borges, Alessandra Abel; Badra, Soraya Jabur; Figueiredo, Glauciane Garcia; Souza, Ricardo Luiz Moro de; Moreli, Marcos Lázaro; Figueiredo, Luiz Tadeu Moraes

    2009-01-01

    Pulmonary and cardiovascular syndrome due to hantavirus is a disease caused by inhalation of aerosols from the excreta of wild rodents contaminated by viruses of the Bunyaviridae family. We studied the clinical and laboratory manifestations of 70 cases that occurred in the region of Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brazil, between 1998 and 2007. The frequency of symptoms was as follows: dyspnea (87%), fever (81%), coughing (44%), headache (34%), tachycardia (81%), low arterial blood pressure (56%), metabolic acidosis (57%), lymphocytopenia (51%), hematocrit > 45% (70%), leukocytosis with left deviation (67%), creatinine (51%) and urea (42%). Mortality (54.3%) occurred mainly on the fourth day. Respiratory insufficiency, low arterial blood pressure and shock occurred after 24 to 48 hours. High hematocrit and decreased platelet levels were signs strongly suggestive of the disease. The diagnostic hypothesis of atypical pneumonia was associated with a good prognosis (p = 0.0136). Fluid infusion greater than 2,000 ml and arterial hypotension were associated with a poor prognosis (p = 0.0286 and p = 0.0453).

  20. Severe hyponatremia and repeated intestinal resections for intestinal dysmotility mimicking congenital aganglionic megacolon due to delay in the diagnosis of congenital hypothyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Buyukyilmaz, Gonul; Baltu, Demet; Soyer, Tutku; Tanyıldız, Murat

    2016-01-01

    Congenital hypothyroidism (CH) may present with nonspecific signs and symptoms, though, majority of infants can be asymptomatic. Therefore, understimation and delay in diagnosis may result in severe complications. A 5-month-old female admitted to our clinic with the history of repeated surgical operations due to the diagnosis of congenital aganglionic megacolon. Investigations performed in our clinic revealed the diagnosis of congenital (primary) hypothyroidism due to thyroid agenesis. Histopathologic evaluation of previously resected colon sample revealed normal ganglionic cell included colon. During follow-up she developed severe hyponatremia with a plasma sodium level of 106 mEq/L. Eunatremia was maintained following achievement of euthyroid state. In conclusion, since presenting symptoms can be variable and nonspecific, hypotyhroidism should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of patients with persistent abdominal distention mimicking aganglionic megacolon and severe hyponatremia of unknown origin. PMID:28164077

  1. Severe hyponatremia and repeated intestinal resections for intestinal dysmotility mimicking congenital aganglionic megacolon due to delay in the diagnosis of congenital hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Buyukyilmaz, Gonul; Baltu, Demet; Soyer, Tutku; Tanyıldız, Murat; Demirbilek, Huseyin

    2016-12-01

    Congenital hypothyroidism (CH) may present with nonspecific signs and symptoms, though, majority of infants can be asymptomatic. Therefore, understimation and delay in diagnosis may result in severe complications. A 5-month-old female admitted to our clinic with the history of repeated surgical operations due to the diagnosis of congenital aganglionic megacolon. Investigations performed in our clinic revealed the diagnosis of congenital (primary) hypothyroidism due to thyroid agenesis. Histopathologic evaluation of previously resected colon sample revealed normal ganglionic cell included colon. During follow-up she developed severe hyponatremia with a plasma sodium level of 106 mEq/L. Eunatremia was maintained following achievement of euthyroid state. In conclusion, since presenting symptoms can be variable and nonspecific, hypotyhroidism should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of patients with persistent abdominal distention mimicking aganglionic megacolon and severe hyponatremia of unknown origin.

  2. Pulmonary disease due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis in a horse: zoonotic concerns and limitations of antemortem testing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A case of pulmonary tuberculosis caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis was diagnosed in a horse. Clinical evaluation performed prior to euthanasia did not suggest tuberculosis, but postmortem examination provided pathological and bacteriological evidence of disease. In the lungs, multiple tuberculoid...

  3. Pulmonary artery sarcoma presenting as an isolated lung mass.

    PubMed

    Mori, Shohei; Uehara, Hirofumi; Motoi, Noriko; Okumura, Sakae

    2017-03-01

    We report a very rare case of pulmonary artery sarcoma that presented as an isolated lung mass, which we attempted to resect via lobectomy, although this resulted in incomplete resection due to unnoticed latent proximal presentations. A 54-year-old man complained of a dry cough that had persisted for 2 months. Enhanced chest computed tomography revealed a lobular mass in his left lower lobe. Therefore, left lower lobectomy was performed as a radical surgery, and the tumor was ultimately diagnosed as pulmonary artery sarcoma. However, follow-up computed tomography at 16 months revealed proximal presentations in the pulmonary trunk and right pulmonary artery, which we retrospectively discovered were present before the surgery. This case highlights the importance of evaluating the lumen of the pulmonary artery, to accurately determine the required extent of any radical surgery, even in cases of pulmonary artery sarcoma that presents as an isolated lung mass.

  4. Comparison of nifedipine and captopril in children with pulmonary hypertension due to bronchopneumonia.

    PubMed

    Uner, A; Dogan, M; Demirtas, M; Açikgöz, M; Temel, H; Kaya, A; Caksen, H

    2008-10-01

    This study included 40 children, who were diagnosed with pneumonia and pulmonary hypertension (from the radiographic and clinical features), was performed at Yuzuncu Yil University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, from September 2003 to July 2005. Patients who had pneumonia and congenital heart disease or systemic hypertension or renal and liver disease together were excluded from the study. Blood gas analysis and oxygen concentration, measured with pulse oximetry, were performed in all patients. Besides chest X-ray, electrocardiography and echocardiographic search was also carried out. Echocardiographic examination was performed by using M mode, two-dimensional echocardiography and colored Doppler sonotron Vingmed CFM 725. At echocardiographic examination, pulmonary hypertension is defined as above 35 mmHg of pulmonary artery pressure. For echocardiographic examination, patients with pulmonary hypertension were divided into two groups. Captopril (2 mg/kg/day, three doses a day) and nifedipine (0.5 mg/kg/day, three doses a day) were given to the first and the second group, respectively. Echocardiography was performed daily until normal pulmonary artery pressure was achieved. At the beginning of the treatment, the patients were treated with double antibiotics and antibiotic change was carried out in needed cases at the follow up. Digoxin was administered to the cases of respiratory infection with heart failure.

  5. Pulmonary arterial hypertension in rats due to age-related arginase activation in intermittent hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Nara, Akina; Nagai, Hisashi; Shintani-Ishida, Kaori; Ogura, Sayoko; Shimosawa, Tatsuo; Kuwahira, Ichiro; Shirai, Mikiyasu; Yoshida, Ken-ichi

    2015-08-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is prevalent in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). Aging induces arginase activation and reduces nitric oxide (NO) production in the arteries. Intermittent hypoxia (IH), conferred by cycles of brief hypoxia and normoxia, contributes to OSAS pathogenesis. Here, we studied the role of arginase and aging in the pathogenesis of PAH in adult (9-mo-old) and young (2-mo-old) male Sprague-Dawley rats subjected to IH or normoxia for 4 weeks and analyzed them with a pressure-volume catheter inserted into the right ventricle (RV) and by pulsed Doppler echocardiography. Western blot analysis was conducted on arginase, NO synthase isoforms, and nitrotyrosine. IH induced PAH, as shown by increased RV systolic pressure and RV hypertrophy, in adult rats but not in young rats. IH increased expression levels of arginase I and II proteins in the adult rats. IH also increased arginase I expression in the pulmonary artery endothelium and arginase II in the pulmonary artery adventitia. Furthermore, IH reduced pulmonary levels of nitrate and nitrite but increased nitrotyrosine levels in adult rats. An arginase inhibitor (N(ω)-hydroxy-nor-1-arginine) prevented IH-induced PAH and normalized nitrite and nitrate levels in adult rats. IH induced arginase up-regulation and PAH in adult rats, but not in young rats, through reduced NO production. Our findings suggest that arginase inhibition prevents or reverses PAH.

  6. An autopsy case of subacute cor pulmonale due to pulmonary tumor cell emboli in a patient with gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Iwakami, Shin-ichiro; Sato, Teruhiko; Takagi, Haruhi; Fujii, Mitsuhiro; Iwakami, Naoko; Yoshimi, Kaku; Koyama, Ryo; Ichikawa, Masako; Yoshioka, Masakata; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2009-01-01

    A 53-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital due to a severe respiratory condition and malnutrition. Radiological and electrophysiological findings suggested the existence of inexplicable cor pulmonale. Although we commenced to determine the causes of her severe condition, she suddenly died 3 days after admission. Postmortem autopsy revealed tumor cell microemboli in the small pulmonary arteries due to gastric cancer. Such a case of cor pulmonale as the first clinical manifestation is exceptionally rare. Occult malignancy should be considered as a differential diagnosis when one encounters a patient with subacutely aggravated respiratory condition and inexplicable cor pulmonale.

  7. Acute pulmonary edema due to rosiglitazone use in a patient with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Cekmen, Nedim; Cesur, Mustafa; Cetinbas, Riza; Bedel, Pasa; Erdemli, Ozcan

    2006-01-01

    Rosiglitazone is a peroxisome proliferator active receptor. gamma agonist, which increases insulin sensitivity in adipose tissue, muscle, and liver. Rosiglitazone is a member of the thiazolidinedione group, and because of its significantly positive effect on glycemic control, it is especially preferred in type 2 diabetic patients with a high cardiovascular disease risk. This drug, because of its decreasing effect on insulin resistance, is used alone or combined with type 2 diabetic drugs. A 73-year-old female patient was admitted to the emergency department with dyspnea, pink frothing phlegm, cyanosis, and tiredness. She was lethargic, uncooperative, and had no orientation. In arterial blood gases, hypoxemia and hypercapnia were found. She was taken to the general intensive care unit, and oxygen was applied via mask. The patient had a history of 10 years of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and atherosclerotic cardiac disease, and she was using rosiglitazone for the past 6 weeks. Her chest x-ray was taken, and acute pulmonary edema was diagnosed. In her last echocardiography, which was performed 1 year before, no signs indicating cardiac failure and pleural effusion could be found. Therefore, it was concluded that pulmonary edema occurred as a complication of rosiglitazone use. After stabilizing the patient's vital signs, blood glucose levels, and lactate levels, medical treatment of diabetes mellitus was rearranged, and she was discharged on the seventh day after her admittance. In a patient with diabetes mellitus who has been admitted to the intensive care unit because of acute pulmonary edema, for differential diagnosis, use of rosiglitazone should be kept in mind during the determination of treatment. Therefore, the authors aim to discuss the effect of rosiglitazone on creating acute pulmonary edema with a case report presentation.

  8. [Pulmonary hypertension due to chronic lung disease: Recommendations of the Cologne Consensus Conference 2016].

    PubMed

    Olschewski, H; Behr, J; Bremer, H; Claussen, M; Douschan, P; Halank, M; Held, M; Hoeper, M M; Holt, S; Klose, H; Krüger, S; Lange, T J; Reichenberger, F; Skowasch, D; Ulrich, S; Wilkens, H; Seeger, W

    2016-10-01

    The 2015 European Guidelines on Pulmonary Hypertension did not cover only pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) but also some aspects of pulmonary hypertension (PH) associated with chronic lung disease. The European Guidelines point out that the drugs currently used to treat patients with PAH (prostanoids, endothelin receptor antagonists, phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors, sGC stimulators) have not been sufficiently investigated in other forms of PH. Therefore, the European Guidelines do not recommend the use of these drugs in patients with chronic lung disease and PH. This recommendation, however, is not always in agreement with medical ethics as physicians feel sometimes inclined to treat other form of PH which may affect quality of life and survival of these patients in a similar manner. To this end, it is crucial to consider the severity of both PH and the underlying lung disease. In June 2016, a Consensus Conference organized by the PH working groups of the German Society of Cardiology (DGK), the German Society of Respiratory Medicine (DGP) and the German Society of Pediatric Cardiology (DGPK) was held in Cologne, Germany, to discuss open and controversial issues surrounding the practical implementation of the European Guidelines. Several working groups were initiated, one of which was dedicated to the diagnosis and treatment of PH in patients with chronic lung disease. The recommendations of this working group are summarized in the present paper.

  9. Fatal Pulmonary Infection Due to Multidrug-Resistant Mycobacterium abscessus in a Patient with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Ardito, Fausta; Fiscarelli, Ersilia; La Sorda, Marilena; D'Argenio, Patrizia; Ricciotti, Gabriella; Fadda, Giovanni

    2001-01-01

    We report a case of fatal pulmonary infection caused by Mycobacterium abscessus in a young patient with cystic fibrosis, who underwent bipulmonary transplantation after a 1-year history of severe lung disease. Fifteen days after surgery he developed septic fever with progressive deterioration in lung function. M. abscessus, initially isolated from a pleural fluid specimen, was then recovered from repeated blood samples, suggesting a disseminated nature of the mycobacterial disease. Drug susceptibility testing assay, performed on two sequential isolates of the microorganism, showed a pattern of multidrug resistance. Despite aggressive therapy with several antimycobacterial drugs, including clarithromycin, the infection persisted, and the patient died. PMID:11158161

  10. [Qualification of patients for procedures to resect lung parenchyma during general anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Traczewska, H; Pasowicz, M; Andres, J

    2001-01-01

    Authors described the methods and techniques of pulmonary and circulatory assessment of patients undergoing pulmonary resection. The most emphasis has been put on the perioperative management specially in patients with compromised pulmonary and circulatory system.

  11. Pathogenic mechanisms in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease due to biomass smoke exposure.

    PubMed

    Silva, Rafael; Oyarzún, Manuel; Olloquequi, Jordi

    2015-06-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) mortality and morbidity have increased significantly worldwide in recent decades. Although cigarette smoke is still considered the main risk factor for the development of the disease, estimates suggest that between 25% and 33% of COPD patients are non-smokers. Among the factors that may increase the risk of developing COPD, biomass smoke has been proposed as one of the most important, affecting especially women and children in developing countries. Despite the epidemiological evidence linking exposure to biomass smoke with adverse health effects, the specific cellular and molecular mechanisms by which this pollutant can be harmful for the respiratory and cardiovascular systems remain unclear. In this article we review the main pathogenic mechanisms proposed to date that make biomass smoke one of the major risk factors for COPD.

  12. [Case of pneumothorax associated with pulmonary Mycobacterium fortuitum infection].

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, Eri; Sekine, Akimasa; Sato, Tomohide; Baba, Tomohisa; Shinohara, Takeshi; Endo, Takahiro; Sogo, Yoko; Nishihira, Ryuichi; Komatsu, Shigeru; Matsumoto, Yutaka; Ogura, Takashi; Takahashi, Hiroshi

    2008-03-01

    A 39-year-old man with dyspnea was revealed to have severe pneumothorax and received partial resection of the left upper lobe after unsuccessful drainage. Necrotizing epitheloid granuloma was found in the resected lung and Mycobacterium fortuitum was detected from the lesion. Chemotherapy with levofloxacin and clarithromycin was started one year after surgery because of the newly found nodular shadow near the lesion. The case experienced pyothorax due to pulmonary tuberculosis three years before and Mycobacterium avium pleuritis one year before this episode. Three-time mycobacterial pleural infection in three years seems to be uncommon. Furthermore this is the first report of pneumothorax associated with pulmonary Mycobacterium fortuitum infection.

  13. [Pulmonary segmental mediolytic arteriopathy].

    PubMed

    Müller, A M; Kullmann, H J

    2006-03-01

    Segmental mediolytic arteriopathy (SMA) is defined as non-inflammatory arteriopathy with mediolysis due to segmental loss of media and consecutive formation of vascular gaps. Up to now, less than 40 cases of visceral and cerebral SMA and, to our knowledge, only one case of pulmonary SMA have been reported. We present the history of a 21 year old female patient, admitted to hospital with hemoptysis, but without other symptoms. Apart from two lesions in the sixth and tenth pulmonary segment, documented by CT and interpreted as colliquations, there were no other clinical and laboratory findings. Repeated bronchoscopy supplied no further information. Histomorphology of the resected lesion revealed SMA without evidence of vasculitis. Wegener's disease could be excluded. The aetiology of the disease is still unknown. Acute vasospasm (due to inappropriate reactions to catecholamine or endothelial dysfunction), as well as SMA as a precursor or subtype of fibromuscular dysplasia, are two theories still under discussion.

  14. Neodymium yttrium-aluminium-garnet laser resection significantly improves quality of life in patients with malignant central airway obstruction due to lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Zaric, B; Kovacevic, T; Stojsic, V; Sarcev, T; Kocic, M; Urosevic, M; Kalem, D; Perin, B

    2015-07-01

    Neodymium yttrium-aluminium-garnet (Nd : YAG) laser resection is one of the mostly used interventional pulmonology techniques for urgent desobstruction of malignant central airway obstruction (CAO). The major aim of this trial was to evaluate potential influence of Nd : YAG laser resection on overall quality of life (QoL) in patients with central lung cancer. Patients with malignant CAO scheduled for Nd : YAG laser resection were prospectively recruited in the trial. All patients were given European Organization for Research and Treatment, Quality of Life questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-30 v.3) before the procedure and approximately 2 weeks after the treatment. There were 37 male and 10 female patients, average age 54 ± 10 years. Most common tumour type was adenocarcinoma diagnosed in 51% of patients. Majority of patients were diagnosed in stage IIIB (53.2%) and stage IV (25.5%). Most common Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status was 1 (72.3%). Nd : YAG laser resection significantly improved (P<0.0001) QoL and overall health according to EORTC QLQ-30. However, in some of the questions dealing with nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea, constipation, family life, social activities and financial situation, we did not observe statistically significant improvement. Nd : YAG laser resection of malignant CAO significantly improves QoL and overall health in patients with lung cancer.

  15. [Severe primary liver abscess and septic pulmonary embolism due to Klebsiella pneumoniae with hypermucoviscosity phenotype].

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Keitaro; Koide, Takashi; Nagatomo, Tomoko; Tamura, Masaki; Higaki, Manabu; Takata, Saori; Wada, Hiroo; Ishii, Haruyuki; Okazaki, Mitsuhiro; Takahashi, Shinichi; Goto, Hajime

    2011-07-01

    A 70-year-old man with diabetes mellitus seen for fever, right chest pain, and right-lung field consolidation on chest X-ray was found in thoracoabdominal computed tomography (CT) to have variable-sized nodules in both lung fields and multiple low-density hepatic areas. On physical examination, his pulse was 145 beats per minute and blood pressure 92/68mmHg, indicating a preshock state. Laboratory tests showed elevated WBC of 15,200/microL, serum-C-reactive protein (CRP) of 34.4 mg/dL, and a decreased platelet count of 16,000/microL. Suspecting liver abscesses complicated by a septic pulmonary embolism, we immediately conducted percutaneous transhepatic abscess drainage (PTAD). Liver abscess blood culture and drainage fluid grew the Klebsiella pneumoniae hypermucoviscosity phenotype, carrying the rmpA gene. Although the man had been in critical condition on admission, broad-spectrum antibiotics and PTAD treatment improved his clinical condition to where he could be discharged without problem.

  16. Ambient carbon monoxide and the risk of hospitalization due to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Tian, Linwei; Ho, Kin-fai; Wang, Tong; Qiu, Hong; Pun, Vivian C; Chan, Chi Sing; Louie, Peter K K; Yu, Ignatius T S

    2014-12-15

    Data from recent experimental and clinical studies have indicated that lower concentrations of inhaled carbon monoxide might have beneficial antiinflammatory effects. Inhaled carbon monoxide has the potential to be a therapeutic agent for chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD). However, population-based epidemiologic studies of environmentally relevant carbon monoxide exposure have generated mixed findings. We conducted a time-series study in Hong Kong to estimate the association of short-term exposure to ambient carbon monoxide with emergency hospitalizations for COPD. We collected daily emergency hospital admission data and air pollution data from January 2001 to December 2007. We used log-linear Poisson models to estimate the associations between daily hospital admissions for COPD and the average daily concentrations of carbon monoxide while controlling for the traffic-related co-pollutants nitrogen dioxide and particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 μm. Results showed that ambient carbon monoxide was negatively associated with the risk of hospitalizations for COPD. After adjustment for levels nitrogen dioxide or particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 μm, the negative associations of carbon monoxide with COPD hospitalizations became stronger. The risk estimates were similar for female and male subjects. In conclusion, short-term exposure to ambient carbon monoxide was associated with a decreased risk of hospitalization for COPD, which suggests that carbon monoxide exposure provides some acute protection of against exacerbation of COPD.

  17. Curative resection for lung cancer in octogenarians is justified

    PubMed Central

    Tutic-Horn, Michaela; Gambazzi, Franco; Rocco, Gaetano; Mosimann, Monique; Schneiter, Didier; Opitz, Isabelle; Martucci, Nono; Hillinger, Sven; Weder, Walter

    2017-01-01

    Background Due to an increased life expectancy in a healthy aging population and a progressive incidence of lung cancer, curative pulmonary resections can be performed even in octogenarians. The present study aims to investigate whether surgery is justified in patients reaching the age of 80 years and older who undergo resection for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods In this retrospective multi-centre analysis, the morbidity, mortality and long-term survival of 88 patients (24 females) aged ≥80 who underwent complete resection for lung cancer between 2000 and 2013 were analysed. Only fit patients with few comorbidities, low cardiopulmonary risk, good quality of life and a life expectancy of at least 5 years were included. Results Curative resections from three thoracic surgery centres included 61 lobectomies, 9 bilobectomies, 6 pneumonectomies and 12 segmentectomies or wide wedge resections with additional systematic mediastinal lymphadenectomy in all cases. Final histology revealed squamous cell carcinoma [33], adenocarcinoma [41], large cell carcinoma [5] or other histological types [9]. Lung cancer stage distribution was 0 [1], I [53], II [17] and IIIA [14]. The overall 90-day mortality was 1.1%. The median hospitalisation and chest drainage times were 10 days (range, 5–27 days) and 5 days (range, 0–17 days), respectively. Thirty-six patients were complication-free (41%). In particular, pulmonary complications occurred in 25 patients (28%). In addition, 23 patients (26%) developed cardiovascular complications requiring medical intervention, while 24 patients (27%) had cerebrovascular complications, urinary tract infection and others. The median survival time was 51 months (range, 1–110 months), and the 5-year overall survival reached 45% without significance between tumour stages. Conclusions Curative lung resections in selected octogenarians can be safely performed up to pneumonectomy for all tumour stages with a perioperative mortality

  18. The Role of Inspiratory Muscle Training in Sickle Cell Anemia Related Pulmonary Damage due to Recurrent Acute Chest Syndrome Attacks

    PubMed Central

    Camcıoğlu, Burcu; Boşnak-Güçlü, Meral; Karadallı, Müşerrefe Nur; Akı, Şahika Zeynep; Türköz-Sucak, Gülsan

    2015-01-01

    Background. The sickling of red blood cells causes a constellation of musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, and pulmonary manifestations. A 32-year-old gentleman with sickle cell anemia (SCA) had been suffering from recurrent acute chest syndrome (ACS). Aim. To examine the effects of inspiratory muscle training (IMT) on pulmonary functions, respiratory and peripheral muscle strength, functional exercise capacity, and quality of life in this patient with SCA. Methods. Functional exercise capacity was evaluated using six-minute walk test, respiratory muscle strength using mouth pressure device, hand grip strength using hand-held dynamometer, pain using Visual Analogue Scale, fatigue using Fatigue Severity Scale, dyspnea using Modified Medical Research Council Scale, and health related quality of life using European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QOL measurement. Results. A significant improvement has been demonstrated in respiratory muscle strength, functional exercise capacity, pain, fatigue, dyspnea, and quality of life. There was no admission to emergency department due to acute chest syndrome in the following 12 months after commencing regular erythrocytapheresis. Conclusion. This is the first report demonstrating the beneficial effects of inspiratory muscle training on functional exercise capacity, respiratory muscle strength, pain, fatigue, dyspnea, and quality of life in a patient with recurrent ACS. PMID:26060589

  19. [Hepatic resections].

    PubMed

    Mercado, M A; Paquet, K J

    1990-07-01

    Liver resection are now accepted as a part of the surgical therapeutic armamentarium. In this review the anatomical and technical aspects, as well as the main indications, are discussed. The new image technique have largely contributed to the early detection of lesions that can be resected. The main indication for these procedures are malignant lesions (primary or metastatic) as well as symptomatic benign lesions. The importance to study, diagnose and treat benign lesions are justified by the possibility to detect and resect a potentially curable malignant disease. Major liver resections are contraindicated in patients with liver cirrhosis, because of a high morbimortality. Operative mortality for major liver resection is about 10% in most centers and the survival of patients with malignant disease treated by this modality is better than that of the patients treated with conservative measures. All patients with space-occupying lesions of the liver deserve the benefit of the doubt to be considered for surgical treatment. The individual features of each patient, with a judicious balance between risk and benefit, indicate or contraindicate these procedures.

  20. Pulmonary tumor thrombotic microangiopathy with cor pulmonale due to desmoplastic small round cell tumor.

    PubMed

    Sadimin, Evita T; Collier, Adrienne G; Gaffney, Joseph W; Fyfe, Billie

    2012-04-01

    A 12-year-old boy presented acutely after an episode of syncope with perioral cyanosis. He died 19 hours after admission due to cor pulmonale as a complication of metastatic desmoplastic small round cell tumor in the lungs with associated tumor thrombotic microangiopathy.

  1. Large bowel resection

    MedlinePlus

    ... colectomy; Right hemicolectomy; Left hemicolectomy; Hand assisted bowel surgery; Low anterior resection; Sigmoid colectomy; Subtotal colectomy; Proctocolectomy; Colon resection; Laparoscopic colectomy; Colectomy - partial; Abdominal perineal resection

  2. Evidence-based diagnosis and thrombolytic treatment of cardiac arrest or periarrest due to suspected pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Logan, Jill K; Pantle, Hardin; Huiras, Paul; Bessman, Edward; Bright, Leah

    2014-07-01

    When a previously healthy adult experiences atraumatic cardiac arrest, providers must quickly identify the etiology and implement potentially lifesaving interventions such as advanced cardiac life support. A subset of these patients develop cardiac arrest or periarrest due to pulmonary embolism (PE). For these patients, an early, presumptive diagnosis of PE is critical in this patient population because administration of thrombolytic therapy may significantly improve outcomes. This article reviews thrombolysis as a potential treatment option for patients in cardiac arrest or periarrest due to presumed PE, identifies features associated with a high incidence of PE, evaluates thrombolytic agents, and systemically reviews trials evaluating thrombolytics in cardiac arrest or periarrest. Despite potentially improved outcomes with thrombolytic therapy, this intervention is not without risks. Patients exposed to thrombolytics may experience major bleeding events, with the most devastating complication usually being intracranial hemorrhage. To optimize the risk-benefit ratio of thrombolytics for treatment of cardiac arrest due to PE, the clinician must correctly identify patients with a high likelihood of PE and must also select an appropriate thrombolytic agent and dosing protocol.

  3. Recurrent acute pulmonary oedema after aortic and mitral valve surgery due to trachea malacia and obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sankatsing, S.U.C.; Hanselaar, W.E.J.J.; van Steenwijk, R.P.; van der Sloot, J.A.P.; Broekhuis, E.; Kok, W.E.M.

    2008-01-01

    In this report we describe a patient with recurrent episodes of acute pulmonary oedema after aortic and mitral valve surgery. The first episode of pulmonary oedema was caused by mitral valve dysfunction. The second episode of pulmonary oedema was not clearly associated with a mitral valve problem, but reoperation was performed in the absence of another explanation. After the third episode of acute pulmonary oedema occurred, the diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) was considered and confirmed. After starting treatment with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) during his sleep the patient had no further episodes of acute respiratory failure. Our case demonstrates that acute pulmonary oedema after cardiothoracic surgery can be caused or at least be precipitated by OSAS and should be suspected in patients with unexplained episodes of (recurrent) pulmonary oedema. (Neth Heart J 2008;16:310-2.) PMID:18827875

  4. Pulmonary artery sarcoma masquerading as chronic pulmonary thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Coskun, Ugur; Sinan, Umit Yasar; Calpar, Ilknur; Yildizeli, Bedrettin; Yanartas, Mehmet; Filinte, Deniz; Kucukoglu, Mehmet Serdar

    2014-10-01

    We describe the case of a 60-year-old woman who presented with pulmonary artery sarcoma, a very rare tumor of the cardiovascular system. Her tumor was initially misdiagnosed as chronic pulmonary thromboembolism, and she underwent pulmonary endarterectomy. Early diagnosis of primary pulmonary artery sarcoma is crucial. That alternative should always be considered before settling on a diagnosis of pulmonary embolism. Suspicion should be aroused by the failure of anticoagulant treatment to alleviate pulmonary perfusion abnormalities and systemic symptoms. Surgical resection of the tumor-preferably by pulmonary endarterectomy, followed by reconstruction as needed-is currently the most promising treatment for pulmonary artery sarcoma.

  5. Pulmonary Artery Sarcoma Masquerading as Chronic Pulmonary Thromboembolism

    PubMed Central

    Coskun, Ugur; Calpar, Ilknur; Yildizeli, Bedrettin; Yanartas, Mehmet; Filinte, Deniz; Kucukoglu, Mehmet Serdar

    2014-01-01

    We describe the case of a 60-year-old woman who presented with pulmonary artery sarcoma, a very rare tumor of the cardiovascular system. Her tumor was initially misdiagnosed as chronic pulmonary thromboembolism, and she underwent pulmonary endarterectomy. Early diagnosis of primary pulmonary artery sarcoma is crucial. That alternative should always be considered before settling on a diagnosis of pulmonary embolism. Suspicion should be aroused by the failure of anticoagulant treatment to alleviate pulmonary perfusion abnormalities and systemic symptoms. Surgical resection of the tumor—preferably by pulmonary endarterectomy, followed by reconstruction as needed—is currently the most promising treatment for pulmonary artery sarcoma. PMID:25425987

  6. [Broncho-pulmonary complications due to aspiration of foreign bodies by children].

    PubMed

    Pogorzelski, A; Zebrak, J; Pawlik, J; Cherian, Z; Buchwald, J

    1995-04-01

    The paper describes 239 children with bronchopulmonary disease due to foreign body (f.b.) aspiration treated in our center during between 1980-1992. Twenty-eight percent of the cases had been referred to hospital without any suspicion of f.b. aspiration. Almost half of the children (49.7%) were below the age of 2 years. Boys were affected more often (61.5%) than girls. In 61.1% the cases the f.b. had been aspirated into the right bronchial tree. Pieces of nuts were the most common f.b. - 35.1%. The most common chest X-ray symptoms were disturbances of bronchial patency (74.1%). Non-metalic, but potential shadowing f.b. like bones and teeth gave the clear signs only in 17.6% of the cases. After f.b. aspiration chronic irreversible lesions such as bronchiectasis and lung fibrosis were observed in 18.8% of the children. The prevalence of bronchiectasis was proportional to the duration of deposition. If the f.b. had been removed within the first month after aspiration we observed no complications. After aspiration of ears of grain, bronchiectasis was present in 80% of cases. Aspiration of f.b. into the left bronchial tree very often caused ventilation disturbations. Such cases were diagnosed and treated earlier than cases of right side f.b. aspirations. As a consequence bronchiectasis in the left lung was observed 2.7 less frequently.

  7. Management of patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension due to congenital heart disease: recent advances and future directions.

    PubMed

    Blok, Ilja M; van Riel, Annelieke C M J; Mulder, Barbara J M; Bouma, Berto J

    2015-12-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a serious complication of adult congenital heart disease associated with systemic-to-pulmonary shunts. Although early shunt closure restricts development of pulmonary arterial hypertension, patients remain at risk even after repair. The development of pulmonary arterial hypertension is associated with a markedly increased morbidity and mortality. It is important to identify patients with a poor prognosis using disease specific markers. Echocardiography and biomarkers arise as practical tools to determine the risk of mortality. Although pulmonary arterial hypertension cannot be cured, four classes of disease-targeting therapies are currently available and several promising therapies are being studied. There is a shift in drug studies towards more clinically relevant endpoints such as time to clinical worsening and morbidity and mortality events.

  8. [A case of primary pulmonary intimal sarcoma of the pulmonary artery].

    PubMed

    Araki, Y; Tajima, K; Yoshikawa, M; Abe, T; Suenaga, Y

    1997-07-01

    We report the pulmonary intimal sarcoma of the pulmonary artery which is encountered infrequently. The patient, a 67-year-old man, was admitted with right heart failure. Diagnosis was not established completely by computed tomography of the thorax, pulmonary angiogram and pulmonary scintigram, therefore chronic pulmonary thromboembolism was suspected. Palliative resection was performed with cardiopulmonary bypass and total circulatory arrest. Pathologic examination of the resected tumor revealed pulmonary intimal sarcoma, which originated from the pulmonary artery. The patient died four months postoperatively. The cause of death was determined by autopsy to be recurrent pulmonary intimal sarcoma invading the left atrium and multiple metastasis of the brain, pancreas, adrenal glands and right lung.

  9. Interleukin 13- and interleukin 17A-induced pulmonary hypertension phenotype due to inhalation of antigen and fine particles from air pollution.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung-Hyun; Chen, Wen-Chi; Esmaeil, Nafiseh; Lucas, Benjamin; Marsh, Leigh M; Reibman, Joan; Grunig, Gabriele

    2014-12-01

    Pulmonary hypertension has a marked detrimental effect on quality of life and life expectancy. In a mouse model of antigen-induced pulmonary arterial remodeling, we have recently shown that coexposure to urban ambient particulate matter (PM) significantly increased the thickening of the pulmonary arteries and also resulted in significantly increased right ventricular systolic pressures. Here we interrogate the mechanism and show that combined neutralization of interleukin 13 (IL-13) and IL-17A significantly ameliorated the increase in right ventricular systolic pressure, the circumferential muscularization of pulmonary arteries, and the molecular change in the right ventricle. Surprisingly, our data revealed a protective role of IL-17A for the antigen- and PM-induced severe thickening of pulmonary arteries. This protection was due to the inhibition of the effects of IL-13, which drove this response, and the expression of metalloelastase and resistin-like molecule α. However, the latter was redundant for the arterial thickening response. Anti-IL-13 exacerbated airway neutrophilia, which was due to a resulting excess effect of IL-17A, confirming concurrent cross inhibition of IL-13- and IL-17A-dependent responses in the lungs of animals exposed to antigen and PM. Our experiments also identified IL-13/IL-17A-independent molecular reprogramming in the lungs induced by exposure to antigen and PM, which indicates a risk for arterial remodeling and protection from arterial constriction. Our study points to IL-13- and IL-17A-coinduced inflammation as a new template for biomarkers and therapeutic targeting for the management of immune response-induced pulmonary hypertension.

  10. Comparison of the effects of pulmonary rehabilitation with chest physical therapy on the levels of fibrinogen and albumin in patients with lung cancer awaiting lung resection: a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Systemic inflammation plays an important role in the initiation, promotion, and progression of lung carcinogenesis. In patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), fibrinogen levels correlate with neoplasia. Here we compared the effects of pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) with chest physical therapy (CPT) on fibrinogen and albumin levels in patients with LC and previous inflammatory lung disease awaiting lung resection. Methods We conducted a randomized clinical trial with 24 patients who were randomly assigned to Pulmonary Rehabilitation (PR) and Chest Physical Therapy (CPT) groups. Each group underwent training 5 days weekly for 4 weeks. All patients were assessed before and after four weeks of training through clinical assessment, measurement of fibrinogen and albumin levels, spirometry, 6-minute Walk Test (6MWT), quality of life survey, and anxiety and depression scale. PR involved strength and endurance training, and CPT involved lung expansion techniques. Both groups attended educational classes. Results A mixed between-within subjects analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed a significant interaction between time (before and after intervention) and group (PR vs. CPT) on fibrinogen levels (F(1, 22) = 0.57, p < 0.0001) and a significant main effect of time (F(1, 22) = 0.68, p = 0.004). Changes in albumin levels were not statistically significant relative to the interaction effect between time and group (F(1, 22) = 0.96, p = 0.37) nor the main effects of time (F(1, 22) = 1.00, p = 1.00) and group (F(1, 22 ) = 0.59, p = 0.45). A mixed between-within subjects ANOVA revealed significant interaction effects between time and group for the peak work rate of the unsupported upper limb exercise (F(1, 22) = 0.77, p = 0.02), endurance time (F(1, 22) = 0.60, p = 0.001), levels of anxiety (F(1, 22) = 0.60, p = 0.002) and depression (F(1, 22) = 0.74, p = 0.02), and the SF-36 physical

  11. Investigations of Pulmonary Epithelial Cell Damage due to Air-Liquid Interfacial Stresses in a Microgravity Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaver, Donald P., III; Bilek, A. M.; Kay, S.; Dee, K. C.

    2004-01-01

    Pulmonary airway closure is a potentially dangerous event that can occur in microgravity environments and may result in limited gas exchange for flight crew during long-term space flight. Repetitive airway collapse and reopening subjects the pulmonary epithelium to large, dynamic, and potentially injurious mechanical stresses. During ventilation at low lung volumes and pressures, airway instability leads to repetitive collapse and reopening. During reopening, air must progress through a collapsed airway, generating stresses on the airway walls, potentially damaging airway tissues. The normal lung can tolerate repetitive collapse and reopening. However, combined with insufficient or dysfunctional pulmonary surfactant, repetitive airway collapse and reopening produces severe lung injury. Particularly at risk is the pulmonary epithelium. As an important regulator of lung function and physiology, the degree of pulmonary epithelial damage influences the course and outcome of lung injury. In this paper we present experimental and computational studies to explore the hypothesis that the mechanical stresses associated with airway reopening inflict injury to the pulmonary epithelium.

  12. Nontuberculous mycobacterial pulmonary infections

    PubMed Central

    Odell, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary infections due to nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are increasingly recognized worldwide. Although over 150 different species of NTM have been described, pulmonary infections are most commonly due to Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC), Mycobacterium kansasii, and Mycobacterium abscessus. The identification of these organisms in pulmonary specimens does not always equate with active infection; supportive radiographic and clinical findings are needed to establish the diagnosis. It is difficult to eradicate NTM infections. A prolonged course of therapy with a combination of drugs is required. Unfortunately, recurrent infection with new strains of mycobacteria or a relapse of infection caused by the original organism is not uncommon. Surgical resection is appropriate in selected cases of localized disease or in cases in which the infecting organism is resistant to medical therapy. Additionally, surgery may be required for infections complicated by hemoptysis or abscess formation. This review will summarize the practical aspects of the diagnosis and management of NTM thoracic infections, with emphasis on the indications for surgery and the results of surgical intervention. The management of NTM disease in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections is beyond the scope of this article and, unless otherwise noted, comments apply to hosts without HIV infection PMID:24624285

  13. Surgical management of extensive pulmonary artery sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Shehatha, Jaffar; Saxena, Pankaj; Clarke, Belinda; Dunning, John; Konstantinov, Igor E

    2009-04-01

    Primary pulmonary artery sarcoma is a rare tumor that can be misdiagnosed as acute or chronic pulmonary thromboembolic disease. This article reports a patient with a preoperative diagnosis of pulmonary embolism who was found to have an extensive pulmonary artery tumor. Surgical resection of the primary pulmonary artery sarcoma and reconstruction of the central pulmonary arteries, followed by adjuvant chemoradiotherapy, provided significant improvement in his clinical symptoms.

  14. Pulmonary hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension; Sporadic primary pulmonary hypertension; Familial primary pulmonary hypertension; Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension; Primary pulmonary hypertension; PPH; Secondary pulmonary ...

  15. Early-Lethal Costello syndrome due to rare HRAS tandem base substitution (c.35_36GC>AA; p.G12E) associated pulmonary vascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Nicole Weaver, K.; Wang, Dehua; Cnota, James; Gardner, Nicholas; Stabley, Deborah; Sol-Church, Katia; Gripp, Karen W.; Witte, David P.; Bove, Kevin E.; Hopkin, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Costello syndrome is a rare, autosomal dominant syndrome caused by activating missense mutations in the Harvey rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (HRAS), most often p.G12S. Several rare mutations have consistently been associated with a more severe phenotype which is often lethal in infancy. Cause of death is most often respiratory failure with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy playing a significant role in morbidity. Impaired fibroblast elastogenesis is thought to contribute to the Costello phenotype, but reports of histologic evidence of disordered elastogenesis at autopsy are limited. We report a patient with Costello syndrome due to a rare tandem base substitution (c.35_36GC>AA) resulting in the p.G12E missense change. The proband died at age 3 months from respiratory failure, with minimal evidence for cardiomyopathy. Autopsy disclosed pulmonary vascular dysplasia affecting small arteries and veins associated with abnormal elastin distribution in tortuous dilated arteries and veins, with non-uniform wall thickness and semi-obstructive lesions at artery branch points typical of early pulmonary hypertensive vascular disease. Elastic fibers in the dermis were abnormally short and fragmented. This case suggests that disordered elastogenesis in the pulmonary vasculature and undiagnosed (or underdiagnosed) pulmonary hypertension may contribute to morbidity in patients with Costello syndrome. PMID:25133308

  16. Fatal foreign-body granulomatous pulmonary embolization due to microcrystalline cellulose in a patient receiving total parenteral nutrition: all crystals are not what they seem.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Sarah; Pena, Elena; Walker, Alfredo E

    2015-06-01

    Pulmonary foreign-body granulomatous embolization has been described secondary to crystal precipitation in total parenteral nutrition (TPN) as well as when pharmaceutical tablets are crushed and injected intravenously. Extensive granulomatous embolization may cause pulmonary hypertension and death due to acute cor pulmonale. We report the case of a 34-year old woman who had been receiving TPN post-operatively secondary to complications of a paraesophageal hernia repair. During and following receiving TPN, she experienced episodes of hypoxia, tachycardia, fever, and hypotension. Computed tomography scans of the thorax showed centrilobular nodules, tree-in-bud and ground-glass opacities, as well as findings of pulmonary hypertension. Following an episode of hypoxia she was found unresponsive and died despite resuscitative efforts. Microscopic examination of the lungs following post-mortem examination revealed occlusive granulomatous inflammation of the pulmonary arterial vasculature by crystalline material. The morphologic and histochemical patterns of the crystals were suggestive of microcrystalline cellulose, a finding that was confirmed by energy dispersive X-spectroscopy and infrared spectroscopy. Ancillary tests did not support that the crystalline material was the result of TPN precipitation. Foreign-body granulomatous embolization leading to acute core pulmonale may occur as a complication of both intravenous injection of oral medications as well as of TPN crystallization. The source of crystalline material may be difficult to discern based solely on morphological assessment or by histochemical staining. Ancillary studies such as energy dispersive X-spectroscopy or infrared spectroscopy should be performed to definitively discern the two entities.

  17. Always expect the unexpected: lung abscess due to pseudomonas aeruginosa mimicking pulmonary aspergilloma in acute B-cell leukemia.

    PubMed

    Dieks, J-K; von Bueren, A O; Schaefer, I-M; Menke, J; Lex, C; Krause, U; Zenker, D; Kühnle, I; Kramm, C M

    2013-11-01

    We report on a case of Pseudomonas aeruginosa sepsis and consecutive lung abscess in a 13-year-old patient with acute B-cell leukemia. At first, radiographic findings strongly suggested presence of pulmonary aspergilloma and only microbiological testing of the surgically enucleated mass revealed the correct underlying pathogen and confirmed final diagnosis.

  18. Primary pulmonary artery sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Jin, Tao; Zhang, Chong; Feng, Zhiying; Ni, Yiming

    2008-08-01

    Primary pulmonary artery sarcoma is an uncommon tumor. We report a case of a 73-year-old male patient with a two-week history of palpitations and shortness of breath, aggravated for two days and was believed to be pulmonary hypertension. Emergency heart ultrasound after admission presented a massive pulmonary embolism in the pulmonary artery. The patient's condition was successfully managed with urgent pulmonary artery embolectomy. The patient demonstrated improvement in hemodynamics after the operation. Histologic and immunohistochemical assays were performed and a diagnosis was made as primary pulmonary artery sarcoma arising from the left pulmonary artery. Resection of the tumor is recommended for the treatment of this rare malignant tumor. The corresponding chemotherapy, follow-up and prognosis are described as well in this case report.

  19. Invasive pulmonary mycosis due to Chaetomium globosum with false-positive galactomannan test: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Capoor, Malini R; Agarwal, Poojan; Goel, Manoj; Jain, Sarika; Shivaprakash, Mandya Rudramurthy; Honnavar, Prasanna; Gupta, Sunita; Chakrabarti, Arunaloke

    2016-03-01

    In this case, the authors report Chaetomium globosum as a cause of invasive pulmonary infection in a patient with Wegener's granulomatosis. Fungal hyphae (KOH and Calcofluor) were seen on direct microscopy of lung biopsy sample and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) sample. C. globosum isolated on culture clinched the diagnosis of invasive pulmonary infection by Chaetomium spp. A positive galactomannan of serum and BAL was repeatedly seen and was utilised for follow-up and as prognostic marker in patient management. The patient was successfully treated with liposomal amphotericin B followed by voriconazole. All the Chaetomium infections reported till date since 1980 are reviewed. Chaetomium spp. with its unique ecology has a hidden clinical potential to cause invasive mould infections.

  20. A rare case of human pulmonary dirofilariasis with a growing pulmonary nodule after migrating infiltration shadows, mimicking primary lung carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Haro, Akira; Tamiya, Sadafumi; Nagashima, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Pulmonary dirofilariasis is a rare pulmonary parasitic infection by the nematode Dirofilaria immitis. It is characterized by an asymptomatic pulmonary nodule usually seen on chest X-ray. The differential diagnosis of pulmonary dirofilariasis includes other pulmonary diseases, primary lung carcinoma and metastatic lung tumor. Case presentation Pulmonary dirofilariasis was diagnosed in a woman who presented with interstitial pneumonia. Growth of the pulmonary nodule was detected subsequent to hemoptysis. The histological diagnosis was made based on a wedge resection performed under video-associated thoracic surgery (VATS). Conclusion Pulmonary dirofilariasis often varies in its clinical course. The diagnosis is best made using wedge resection under VATS. PMID:27015012

  1. [Multiple primary pulmonary carcinomas].

    PubMed

    Guitart, A C; Gómez, G; Estrada, G; Rodríguez, C; León, C; Cornudella, R

    1991-02-01

    Three cases of multiple simultaneous primary lung carcinomas are presented, in which diagnosis was established by post-surgery pathological exam. In all three cases, chest X-ray showed pulmonary masses suggestive or clinical malignancy, and pre-surgery pathological diagnosis or squamous lung carcinoma. During thoracotomy or in the resected segment, a second lesion we confirmed which made resection necessary being this second lesion classified as lung adenocarcinoma.

  2. World Health Organization Pulmonary Hypertension group 2: pulmonary hypertension due to left heart disease in the adult--a summary statement from the Pulmonary Hypertension Council of the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Fang, James C; DeMarco, Teresa; Givertz, Michael M; Borlaug, Barry A; Lewis, Gregory D; Rame, J Eduardo; Gomberg-Maitland, Mardi; Murali, Srinivas; Frantz, Robert P; McGlothlin, Dana; Horn, Evelyn M; Benza, Raymond L

    2012-09-01

    Pulmonary hypertension associated with left heart disease is the most common form of pulmonary hypertension encountered in clinical practice today. Although frequently a target of therapy, its pathophysiology remains poorly understood and its treatment remains undefined. Pulmonary hypertension in the context of left heart disease is a marker of worse prognosis and disease severity, but whether its primary treatment is beneficial or harmful is unknown. An important step to the future study of this important clinical problem will be to standardize definitions across disciplines to facilitate an evidence base that is interpretable and applicable to clinical practice. In this current statement, we provide an extensive review and interpretation of the current available literature to guide current practice and future investigation. At the request of the Pulmonary Hypertension (PH) Council of the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation (ISHLT), a writing group was assembled and tasked to put forth this document as described above. The review process was facilitated through the peer review process of the Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation and ultimately endorsed by the leadership of the ISHLT PH Council.

  3. Unresolved pulmonary embolism leading to a diagnosis of pulmonary artery sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Alejandra; Sauler, Maor; Mitchell, James M; Siegel, Mark D; Trow, Terence K; Bacchetta, Matthew; Fares, Wassim H

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary artery sarcomas (PAS) are rare tumors with a poor prognosis. They are often misdiagnosed as pulmonary embolism (PE) leading to futile anticoagulation treatment and delay in proper diagnosis. We present a case of a patient who was initially misdiagnosed and anticoagulated for presumed pulmonary embolism. Progressive symptoms and additional imaging led to the diagnosis of intimal pulmonary artery sarcoma for which he underwent surgical resection. This case serves as a reminder to consider pulmonary artery sarcoma in the differential diagnosis of patients with dyspnea and filling defects on CT pulmonary angiogram offering the potential for resection prior to metastasis.

  4. Two cases of delayed cardiac tamponade due to pericarditis after pulmonary vein (PV) isolation for atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Torihashi, Sadayoshi; Shiraishi, Hirokazu; Hamaoka, Tetsuro; Imai, Mikimasa; Kuroyanagi, Akira; Nakanishi, Naohiko; Nakamura, Takeshi; Yamano, Tetsuhiro; Matsumuro, Akiyoshi; Shirayama, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    Catheter ablation is an established treatment for atrial fibrillation (AF). The incidence of major complications related to the procedure is reported to be 4.5%, and delayed cardiac tamponade (DCT) is a rare, although recently recognized, complication. However, the mechanisms underlying the development of DCT remain unclear. We herein report the cases of two men, both 49 years of age, who developed cardiac tamponade requiring pericardiocentesis a few weeks after undergoing pulmonary vein isolation for persistent AF. Physicians should explain to the patient the potential for DCT as a complication prior to performing catheter ablation and provide careful follow-up for at least a few weeks after the session.

  5. [Anesthetic Management of a Parturient with Eclampsia, Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome and Pulmonary Edema due to Pregnancy-induced Hypertension].

    PubMed

    Aida, Junko; Okutani, Hiroai; Oda, Yutaka; Okutani, Ryu

    2015-08-01

    A 27-year-old woman with mental retardation was admitted to a nearby hospital for an abrupt onset of seizure. Physical examination revealed remarkable hypertension and pregnancy with estimated gestational age of 28th week. Severe pulmonary edema and hypoxia led to a diagnosis of pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) accompanied by eclampsia. She was orotracheally intubated because of refractory seizure and hypoxemia, and transferred to our hospital for further treatment. Besides severe hypoxia and hypercapnea, an enhanced lesion was detected in the left posterior cerebrum by brain MRI. No abnormal findings were detected in the fetus, with heart rate of 150 beats x min. She was diagnosed with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) caused by PIH and emergency cesarean section under general anesthesia was scheduled. A male newborn was delivered with Apgar score of 1/4 (1/5 min), followed by starting continuous infusion of nicardipine for controlling hypertension. Chest X-P on completion of surgery revealed remarkably alleviated pulmonary edema. She received intensive treatment and continued positive pressure ventilation for four days after delivery. She recovered with no neurological deficits and her child was well without any complications.

  6. Portal triad clamping or hepatic vascular exclusion for major liver resection. A controlled study.

    PubMed Central

    Belghiti, J; Noun, R; Zante, E; Ballet, T; Sauvanet, A

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors compared operative course of patients undergoing major liver resections under portal triad clamping (PTC) or under hepatic vascular exclusion (HVE). SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Reduced blood loss during liver resection is achieved by PTC or HVE. Specific complications and postoperative hepatocellular injury mediated with two procedures have not been compared. METHODS: Fifty-two noncirrhotic patients undergoing major liver resections were included in a prospective randomized study comparing both the intraoperative and postoperative courses under PTC (n = 24) or under HVE (n = 28). RESULTS: The two groups were similar at entry, but eight patients were crossed over to the other group during resection. In the HVE group, hemodynamic intolerance occurred in four (14%) patients. In the PTC group, pedicular clamping was not efficient in four patients, including three with involvement of the cavohepatic intersection and one with persistent bleeding due to tricuspid insufficiency. Intraoperative blood losses and postoperative enzyme level reflecting hepatocellular injury were similar in the two groups. Mean operative duration and mean clampage duration were significantly increased after HVE. Postoperative abdominal collections and pulmonary complications were 2.5-fold higher after HVE but without statistical significance, whereas the mean length of postoperative hospital stay was longer after HVE. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows that both methods of vascular occlusion are equally effective in reducing blood loss in major liver resections. The HVE is associated with unpredictable hemodynamic intolerance, increased postoperative complications with a longer hospital stay, and should be restricted to lesions involving the cavo-hepatic intersection. PMID:8757378

  7. Anaesthetic management in thoracoscopic distal tracheal resection.

    PubMed

    Acosta Martínez, J; Beato López, J; Domínguez Blanco, A; López Romero, J L; López Villalobos, J L

    2017-03-01

    Surgical resection of tracheal tumours, especially distal tracheal tumours, is a challenge for the anaesthesiologists involved, mainly due to difficulties in ensuring adequate control of the airway and ventilation. We report the case of a patient undergoing tracheal resection and anastomosis by VATS, emphasizing the anaesthetic management.

  8. Effect of recombinant human IFNγ in the treatment of chronic pulmonary complications due to sulfur mustard intoxication.

    PubMed

    Panahi, Yunes; Ghanei, Mostafa; Vahedi, Ensieh; Ghazvini, Ali; Parvin, Shahram; Madanchi, Nima; Bagheri, Mahsa; Sahebkar, Amirhossein

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary problems are among the most common chronic complications of sulfur mustard (SM) intoxication and adversely affect patients' quality-of-life. The present trial investigated the impact of immunotherapy with interferon (IFN)-γ on quality-of-life, respiratory symptoms, and circulating immunologic and oxidative parameters in patients suffering from chronic SM-induced complications. Patients (n = 15) were administered IFNγ (100 μg) every other day for a period of 6 months. Assessment of quality-of-life [using St. George respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) and COPD Assessment Test (CAT) indices], the severity and frequency of respiratory symptoms, and serum levels of immunologic [including interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, IFNγ, calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP), matrix metallopeptidase (MMP)-9, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α], oxidative stress [malondialdehyde (MDA) as well as total and reduced glutathione, and catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity], and fibrogenic [transforming growth factor (TGF)-β] parameters were performed at baseline and at trial end. The results indicated that IFNγ therapy is associated with improvements in SGRQ (p < 0.001) and CAT (p < 0.001) scores, decreased severity of cough (p = 0.001), dyspnea (p < 0.001), and morning dyspnea (p < 0.001), reduced frequency of sputum production (p < 0.001) and hemoptysis (p < 0.001), and elevated FEV1 (p = 0.065). Serum levels of IL-4 (p < 0.001), IL-6 (p < 0.001), IL-10 (p < 0.001), CGRP (p < 0.001), MMP-9 (p = 0.001), TNFα (p < 0.001), TGFβ (p < 0.001) and MDA (p = 0.001) were decreased while those of IL-2 (p < 0.001), IFNγ (p < 0.001), and both total (p = 0.005) and reduced glutathione (p = 0.061) increased by the end of the trial. It was concluded that IFNγ has favorable effects on the quality-of-life and alleviates respiratory symptoms in patients suffering from chronic SM

  9. Time-dependent changes in pulmonary surfactant function and composition in acute respiratory distress syndrome due to pneumonia or aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Reinhold; Markart, Philipp; Ruppert, Clemens; Wygrecka, Malgorzata; Kuchenbuch, Tim; Walmrath, Dieter; Seeger, Werner; Guenther, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    Background Alterations to pulmonary surfactant composition have been encountered in the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS). However, only few data are available regarding the time-course and duration of surfactant changes in ARDS patients, although this information may largely influence the optimum design of clinical trials addressing surfactant replacement therapy. We therefore examined the time-course of surfactant changes in 15 patients with direct ARDS (pneumonia, aspiration) over the first 8 days after onset of mechanical ventilation. Methods Three consecutive bronchoalveolar lavages (BAL) were performed shortly after intubation (T0), and four days (T1) and eight days (T2) after intubation. Fifteen healthy volunteers served as controls. Phospholipid-to-protein ratio in BAL fluids, phospholipid class profiles, phosphatidylcholine (PC) molecular species, surfactant proteins (SP)-A, -B, -C, -D, and relative content and surface tension properties of large surfactant aggregates (LA) were assessed. Results At T0, a severe and highly significant reduction in SP-A, SP-B and SP-C, the LA fraction, PC and phosphatidylglycerol (PG) percentages, and dipalmitoylation of PC (DPPC) was encountered. Surface activity of the LA fraction was greatly impaired. Over time, significant improvements were encountered especially in view of LA content, DPPC, PG and SP-A, but minimum surface tension of LA was not fully restored (15 mN/m at T2). A highly significant correlation was observed between PaO2/FiO2 and minimum surface tension (r = -0.83; p < 0.001), SP-C (r = 0.64; p < 0.001), and DPPC (r = 0.59; p = 0.003). Outcome analysis revealed that non-survivors had even more unfavourable surfactant properties as compared to survivors. Conclusion We concluded that a profound impairment of pulmonary surfactant composition and function occurs in the very early stage of the disease and only gradually resolves over time. These observations may explain why former surfactant replacement

  10. Clinical features of pulmonary artery sarcoma: A report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guangfa; Pu, Xin; Guo, Hongjuang; Huang, Xiaoyong; Chen, Dong; Gan, Huili

    2016-08-01

    Pulmonary artery sarcoma (PAS) is a rare and highly malignant tumor of pulmonary artery origin. Since 1923, when the first case was reported, <300 cases have been reported worldwide. PAS has a poor prognosis, and early diagnosis with radical surgical resection offers patients with PAS the only chance of survival. However, due to its rarity and the non-specificity of its clinical manifestations and imaging presentation, PAS is frequently misdiagnosed as a pulmonary thromboembolic disease, including pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE) and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH). The present study reports three cases of PAS that were initially misdiagnosed as PTE or CTEPH, and were later shown to be PAS following surgery. In addition, the clinical features of these patients are examined in order to improve the differential diagnosis of PAS during the early stages of the disease, when the prognosis of patients with PAS is at its optimum.

  11. Clinical features of pulmonary artery sarcoma: A report of three cases

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Guangfa; Pu, Xin; Guo, Hongjuang; Huang, Xiaoyong; Chen, Dong; Gan, Huili

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary artery sarcoma (PAS) is a rare and highly malignant tumor of pulmonary artery origin. Since 1923, when the first case was reported, <300 cases have been reported worldwide. PAS has a poor prognosis, and early diagnosis with radical surgical resection offers patients with PAS the only chance of survival. However, due to its rarity and the non-specificity of its clinical manifestations and imaging presentation, PAS is frequently misdiagnosed as a pulmonary thromboembolic disease, including pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE) and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH). The present study reports three cases of PAS that were initially misdiagnosed as PTE or CTEPH, and were later shown to be PAS following surgery. In addition, the clinical features of these patients are examined in order to improve the differential diagnosis of PAS during the early stages of the disease, when the prognosis of patients with PAS is at its optimum. PMID:27446344

  12. Pulmonary artery sarcoma mimicking pulmonary thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Celik, Gökhan; Ciledağ, Aydin; Yüksel, Cabir; Yenigün, Bülent Mustafa; Kutlay, Hakan; Yazicıoğlu, Levent; Perçinel, Sibel; Kaya, Akin

    2011-01-01

    A 30 years old male patient was referred to our hospital with a diagnosis of pulmonary thromboembolism due to thorax-computerized tomography (CT) angiography, revealing a thrombus totally occluding left main pulmonary artery. The lesion was evaluated as tumoural mass. Positron emission tomography (PET)-CT revealed pathologic uptake at pulmonary artery mass. Due to localization of tumour, left pneumonectomy was performed. The pathological diagnosis revealed to be pulmonary artery sarcoma. The patient was presented because pulmonary artery sarcomas are very rare tumors and can mimick pulmonary thromboembolism. The true prevalence is underestimated as many pulmonary artery sarcomas are misdiagnosed as pulmonary thromboembolism. PET-CT may help to make a differential diagnosis.

  13. Changes of Arterial Blood Gases After Different Ranges of Surgical Lung Resection

    PubMed Central

    Cukic, Vesna; Lovre, Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: In recent years there has been increase in the number of patients who need thoracic surgery – first of all different types of pulmonary resection because of primary bronchial cancer, and very often among patients whose lung function is impaired due to different degree of bronchial obstruction so it is necessary to assess functional status before and after lung surgery to avoid the development of respiratory insufficiency. Objective: To show the changes in the level of arterial blood gases after various ranges of lung resection. Material and methods: The study was done on 71 patients surgically treated at the Clinic for Thoracic Surgery KCU Sarajevo, who were previously treated at the Clinic for Pulmonary Diseases “Podhrastovi” in the period from 01. 06. 2009. to 01. 09. 2011. Different types of lung resection were made. Patients whose percentage of ppoFEV1 was (prognosed postoperative FEV1) was less than 30% of normal values of FEV1 for that patients were not given a permission for lung resection. We monitored the changes in levels-partial pressures of blood gases (PaO2, PaCO2 and SaO2) one and two months after resection and compared them to preoperative values. As there were no significant differences between the values obtained one and two months after surgery, in the results we showed arterial blood gas analysis obtained two months after surgical resection. Results were statistically analyzed by SPSS and Microsoft Office Excel. Statistical significance was determined at an interval of 95%. Results: In 59 patients (83%) there was an increase, and in 12 patients (17%) there was a decrease of PaO2, compared to preoperative values. In 58 patients (82%) there was a decrease, and in 13 patients (18%) there was an increase in PaCO2, compared to preoperative values. For all subjects (group as whole): The value of the PaO2 was significantly increased after lung surgery compared to preoperative values (p <0.05) so is the value of the SaO2%. The value

  14. Radiation dose from MDCT using Monte Carlo simulations: estimating fetal dose due to pulmonary embolism scans accounting for overscan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angel, E.; Wellnitz, C.; Goodsitt, M.; DeMarco, J.; Cagnon, C.; Ghatali, M.; Cody, D.; Stevens, D.; McCollough, C.; Primak, A.; McNitt-Gray, M.

    2007-03-01

    Pregnant women with shortness of breath are increasingly referred for CT Angiography to rule out Pulmonary Embolism (PE). While this exam is typically focused on the lungs, extending scan boundaries and overscan can add to the irradiated volume and have implications on fetal dose. The purpose of this work was to estimate radiation dose to the fetus when various levels of overscan were encountered. Two voxelized models of pregnant patients derived from actual patient anatomy were created based on image data. The models represent an early (< 7 weeks) and late term pregnancy (36 weeks). A previously validated Monte Carlo model of an MDCT scanner was used that takes into account physical details of the scanner. Simulated helical scans used 120 kVp, 4x5 mm beam collimation, pitch 1, and varying beam-off locations (edge of the irradiated volume) were used to represent different protocols plus overscan. Normalized dose (mGy/100mAs) was calculated for each fetus. For the early term and the late term pregnancy models, fetal dose estimates for a standard thoracic PE exam were estimated to be 0.05 and 0.3 mGy/100mAs, respectively, increasing to 9 mGy/100mAs when the beam-off location was extended to encompass the fetus. When performing PE exams to rule out PE in pregnant patients, the beam-off location may have a large effect on fetal dose, especially for late term pregnancies. Careful consideration of ending location of the x-ray beam - and not the end of image data - could result in significant reduction in radiation dose to the fetus.

  15. Primary Pulmonary Synovial Sarcoma Showing a Prolonged Survival with Multimodality Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ogino, Hirokazu; Hanibuchi, Masaki; Takizawa, Hiromitsu; Sakiyama, Shoji; Sumitomo, Hiroyuki; Iwamoto, Seiji; Ikushima, Hitoshi; Nakajima, Kohei; Nagahiro, Shinji; Yamago, Taito; Toyoda, Yuko; Bando, Yoshimi; Nishioka, Yasuhiko

    2016-01-01

    A 54-year-old man was referred to our hospital due to a mass shadow noted on a chest X-ray. Thoracoscopic lobectomy yielded a diagnosis of primary pulmonary synovial sarcoma according to the histology and SYT-SSX1 gene analyses. Five months after the thoracic surgery, he developed brain metastasis; therefore, we performed resection of the brain metastatic focus followed by radiotherapy. As a local recurrence in the thoracic cavity concurrently emerged, systemic chemotherapy was also administered. These observations indicated that a multidisciplinary approach may be useful against primary pulmonary synovial sarcoma, although there is presently no established therapeutic strategy due to its rarity and highly aggressive nature.

  16. [Redo operation for recurrent pulmonary artery aneurysm associated with pulmonary stenosis and regurgitation].

    PubMed

    Nakashima, S; Kuwaki, K; Komatsu, K; Tsukamoto, M; Abe, T

    1997-12-01

    A 63-year-old woman who underwent surgical correction of a recurrent pulmonary artery aneurysm associated with pulmonary stenosis and regurgitation is reported. On April 1986, she underwent commissurotomy of pulmonary valve, reconstruction of right ventricle out flow tract using a Polystan monocusp patch and pulmonary aneurysmorrhaphy for pulmonary artery aneurysm. Pathological examination of the resected pulmonary arterial wall revealed mucoid degeneration of media and fragmentation of elastic fiber. Nine years after the operation, recurrence of pulmonary artery aneurysm, pulmonary stenosis and regurgitation were recognized. On September 1995, she underwent redo operation with graft replacement of pulmonary artery and pulmonary valve replacement using woven Dacron prosthesis containing a Carpentier-Edwards bioprosthetic valve. We should choose as an initial procedure with graft replacement for pulmonary artery aneurysm with fragility of the pulmonary arterial wall. She is now doing very well at one year and 5 months after the redo operation.

  17. Laparoscopic resection of duodenal gastrointestinal stromal tumour

    PubMed Central

    Zioni, Tammy; Dizengof, Vitaliy; Kirshtein, Boris

    2017-01-01

    Only a few studies have revealed using laparoscopic technique with limited resection of gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST) of the duodenum. A 68-year-old man was admitted to the hospital due to upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Evaluation revealed an ulcerated, bleeding GI tumour in the second part of the duodenum. After control of bleeding during gastroduodenoscopy, he underwent a laparoscopic wedge resection of the area. During 1.5 years of follow-up, the patient is disease free, eats drinks well, and has regained weight. Surgical resection of duodenal GIST with free margins is the main treatment of this tumour. Various surgical treatment options have been reported. Laparoscopic resection of duodenal GIST is an advanced and challenging procedure requiring experience and good surgical technique. The laparoscopic limited resection of duodenal GIST is feasible and safe, reducing postoperative morbidity without compromising oncologic results. PMID:28281485

  18. Nurse led Patient Education Programme for patients undergoing a lung resection for primary lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    There has been an increase in the number of patients undergoing lung resection for primary or suspected primary lung cancer in the UK due to improved staging techniques, dedicated thoracic surgeons and other initiatives such as preoperative pulmonary rehabilitation. This has had an impact on local healthcare resources requiring new ways of delivering thoracic surgical services. When considering service changes, patient reported outcomes are pivotal in terms of ensuring that the experience of care is enhanced and may include elements such as involving patients in their care, reducing the length of inpatient stay and reducing postoperative complications. The implementation of a thoracic surgical Patient Education Programme (PEP) has the potential to address these measures and improve the psychological and physical wellbeing of patients who require a lung resection. It may also assist in their care as an inpatient and to enhance recovery after surgery both in the short and long term. PMID:25984358

  19. Pulmonary Hypertension in Sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Baughman, Robert P; Engel, Peter J; Nathan, Steven

    2015-12-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a complication of sarcoidosis leading to dyspnea and associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Sarcoidosis-associated pulmonary hypertension (SAPH) can be due to several factors, including vascular involvement by the granulomatous inflammation, compression of the pulmonary arteries by adenopathy, fibrotic changes within the lung, and left ventricular diastolic dysfunction. Several case series have suggested that some patients with SAPH benefit from specific therapy for pulmonary hypertension. A randomized, placebo-controlled trial found 16 weeks' bosentan therapy to be associated with significant improvement in pulmonary artery pressure. Future studies may better define who would respond to treatment of pulmonary hypertension.

  20. Transurethral Resection of the Prostate (TURP) Versus Original and PErFecTED Prostate Artery Embolization (PAE) Due to Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH): Preliminary Results of a Single Center, Prospective, Urodynamic-Controlled Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Carnevale, Francisco C.; Iscaife, Alexandre Yoshinaga, Eduardo M.; Moreira, Airton Mota; Antunes, Alberto A. Srougi, Miguel

    2016-01-15

    PurposeTo compare clinical and urodynamic results of transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) to original and PErFecTED prostate artery embolization (PAE) methods for benign prostatic hyperplasia.MethodsWe prospectively randomized 30 patients to receive TURP or original PAE (oPAE) and compared them to a cohort of patients treated by PErFecTED PAE, with a minimum of 1-year follow-up. Patients were assessed for urodynamic parameters, prostate volume, international prostate symptom score (IPSS), and quality of life (QoL).ResultsAll groups were comparable for all pre-treatment parameters except bladder contractility and peak urine flow rate (Q{sub max}), both of which were significantly better in the TURP group, and IIEF score, which was significantly higher among PErFecTED PAE patients than TURP patients. All groups experienced significant improvement in IPSS, QoL, prostate volume, and Q{sub max}. TURP and PErFecTED PAE both resulted in significantly lower IPSS than oPAE but were not significantly different from one another. TURP resulted in significantly higher Q{sub max} and significantly smaller prostate volume than either original or PErFecTED PAE but required spinal anesthesia and hospitalization. Two patients in the oPAE group with hypocontractile bladders experienced recurrence of symptoms and were treated with TURP. In the TURP group, urinary incontinence occurred in 4/15 patients (26.7 %), rupture of the prostatic capsule in 1/15 (6.7 %), retrograde ejaculation in all patients (100 %), and one patient was readmitted for temporary bladder irrigation due to hematuria.ConclusionsTURP and PAE are both safe and effective treatments. TURP and PErFecTED PAE yield similar symptom improvement, but TURP is associated with both better urodynamic results and more adverse events.

  1. Liver Resections for Metastases from Intraabdominal Leiomyosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Bianca De Lourdes; Brenner, Marcia Cristina Lima; Pereira-Lima, Luiz

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses liver resection for intraabdominal leiomyosarcoma metastases as a therapy for carefully selected patients. Of the 83 hepatectomies performed from 1992 to 1996, five were resections for liver metastases due to intraabdominal leiomyosarcoma, in 3 patients. The surgical indication was single liver metastases, without any evidence of extrahepatic disease. No mortality occurred during surgery and the longest survival was 38 months. We concluded that liver resection for leiomyosarcoma metastases can be performed, allowing a long term survival in an occasional patient. PMID:10468118

  2. Laparoscopic partial splenic resection.

    PubMed

    Uranüs, S; Pfeifer, J; Schauer, C; Kronberger, L; Rabl, H; Ranftl, G; Hauser, H; Bahadori, K

    1995-04-01

    Twenty domestic pigs with an average weight of 30 kg were subjected to laparoscopic partial splenic resection with the aim of determining the feasibility, reliability, and safety of this procedure. Unlike the human spleen, the pig spleen is perpendicular to the body's long axis, and it is long and slender. The parenchyma was severed through the middle third, where the organ is thickest. An 18-mm trocar with a 60-mm Endopath linear cutter was used for the resection. The tissue was removed with a 33-mm trocar. The operation was successfully concluded in all animals. No capsule tears occurred as a result of applying the stapler. Optimal hemostasis was achieved on the resected edges in all animals. Although these findings cannot be extended to human surgery without reservations, we suggest that diagnostic partial resection and minor cyst resections are ideal initial indications for this minimally invasive approach.

  3. Mucormycosis pulmonary abscess, containment in a patient with uncontrolled diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Jaffer, Faraz; Beatty, Norman; Ahmad, Kareem

    2017-01-18

    A 56-year-old Hispanic male with solo risk factor of uncontrolled diabetes mellitus presented with recurrent haemoptysis. Initial concern was for malignancy with postobstructive pneumonia; however, invasive testing and biopsy confirmed infectious mass of fungal aetiology requiring surgical resection followed by a prolonged course of anti-fungal therapy. Discussion centred on approach to, progression of and course of action in the management of pulmonary abscess due to mucormycosis.

  4. Pulmonary intimal sarcoma treated by a left pneumonectomy with pulmonary arterioplasty under cardiopulmonary bypass: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Jun; Morota, Tetsuro; Matsumoto, Jun; Takazawa, Yutaka; Murakawa, Tomohiro; Fukami, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Tetsufumi; Takamoto, Shinichi

    2007-01-01

    Intimal sarcoma of the pulmonary artery is a rare disease. This neoplasm was characterized by an aggressive extension to the lumen of the pulmonary artery, thus mimicking a pulmonary thromboembolism. We herein report a 44-year-old woman who was diagnosed as having primary intimal sarcoma of the left lung preoperatively by transbronchial biopsy. The tumor originated in the pulmonary artery in the left lung, extending to the main pulmonary trunk via the pulmonary arterial lumen, thus resulting in stenosis of the main pulmonary trunk. A complete resection of the tumor with the left pneumonectomy and the pulmonary arterioplasty was successfully performed under cardiopulmonary bypass with vacuum assisted venous drainage.

  5. Variability in proteinase-antiproteinase balance, nutritional status, and quality of life in stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease due to tobacco and nontobacco etiology

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Anant; Sharma, Mini; Uniyal, Arvind; Borah, Rajlaxmi; Luthra, Kalpana; Pandey, R M; Madan, Karan; Hadda, Vijay; Guleria, Randeep

    2016-01-01

    Context: Although the role of proteinase/antiproteinase imbalance in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) due to tobacco is well established, information in COPD due to nontobacco etiology is sparse. Aims: To assess the variability in metalloproteinase activity in COPD related to tobacco and nontobacco causes. Settings and Design: This is a hospital-based, prospective, observational study. Subjects and Methods: Serum matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) were estimated in 200 subjects divided equally into four groups, i.e. COPD in tobacco smokers, COPD in nonsmokers but with exposure to biomass-related indoor air pollution, smokers without COPD, and nonsmoking healthy controls. Anthropometric skinfold measurements, quality of life (QOL) using St. George Respiratory Questionnaire, and exercise capacity using the 6-min walk test (6-MWT) were carried out. Groups were compared using analysis of variance and Kruskal–Wallis plus Mann–Whitney U-test to assess differences between groups. The Chi-square and Fisher's exact tests were used to evaluate associations among categorical variables. Spearman's rank correlation was calculated to assess the correlation between data. Results: Patients with COPD due to either tobacco or nontobacco etiology were older, more malnourished, had worse QOL, and poorer exercise capacity compared to non-COPD subjects. Triceps, subscapular, and suprailiac skinfold thicknesses were less in smokers with COPD than biomass-related COPD. MMP-9 and TIMP-1 levels were similar across all groups. TIMP-1 significantly correlated with 6-MWT among all groups. Conclusions: The protease-antiprotease balance in COPD is similar irrespective of the presence or absence of tobacco exposure but is related to poor exercise capacity. PMID:27890988

  6. Pulmonary artery sarcoma mimicking pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    El-Sayed Ahmed, Magdy M; Aftab, Muhammad; Al-Najjar, Raed M; de la Cruz, Kim I; Benjamin, Robert S; Hallman, Charles H

    2014-10-01

    Primary sarcomas that arise from major blood vessels are exceedingly rare, and some of the published cases have been autopsy reports. Most patients are adults. We report a case of pulmonary artery sarcoma in a 77-year-old man who presented with acute onset of dyspnea. Magnetic resonance imaging of the chest revealed a large mass within the pulmonary trunk and its main branches. Because massive pulmonary embolism was suspected, both anticoagulant and thrombolytic therapies were initiated. The patient responded poorly to these therapies, which then necessitated resection of both the mass and the pulmonary valve. A bioprosthetic porcine valve replaced the native valve, and we reconstructed the right ventricular outflow tract with a Dacron patch. Histopathologic examination revealed a high-grade sarcoma with focal myogenic and chondrogenic differentiation. The patient tolerated the procedure well and was discharged from the hospital on postoperative day 7. He was subsequently treated with chemotherapy and radiation and continued to show no evidence of disease. The diagnosis of pulmonary artery sarcoma should be suspected in patients who present with manifestations of pulmonary embolism, especially when there is no evidence of deep venous thrombosis and poor response to anticoagulant therapy. Multimodal therapy can provide prolonged survival.

  7. Pulmonary Artery Sarcoma Mimicking Pulmonary Embolism

    PubMed Central

    Aftab, Muhammad; Al-Najjar, Raed M.; de la Cruz, Kim I.; Benjamin, Robert S.; Hallman, Charles H.

    2014-01-01

    Primary sarcomas that arise from major blood vessels are exceedingly rare, and some of the published cases have been autopsy reports. Most patients are adults. We report a case of pulmonary artery sarcoma in a 77-year-old man who presented with acute onset of dyspnea. Magnetic resonance imaging of the chest revealed a large mass within the pulmonary trunk and its main branches. Because massive pulmonary embolism was suspected, both anticoagulant and thrombolytic therapies were initiated. The patient responded poorly to these therapies, which then necessitated resection of both the mass and the pulmonary valve. A bioprosthetic porcine valve replaced the native valve, and we reconstructed the right ventricular outflow tract with a Dacron patch. Histopathologic examination revealed a high-grade sarcoma with focal myogenic and chondrogenic differentiation. The patient tolerated the procedure well and was discharged from the hospital on postoperative day 7. He was subsequently treated with chemotherapy and radiation and continued to show no evidence of disease. The diagnosis of pulmonary artery sarcoma should be suspected in patients who present with manifestations of pulmonary embolism, especially when there is no evidence of deep venous thrombosis and poor response to anticoagulant therapy. Multimodal therapy can provide prolonged survival. PMID:25425986

  8. Pulmonary embolism caused by intimal sarcoma of the pulmonary artery.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kei; Nozue, Tsuyoshi; Tsuchida, Masayuki; Iwaki, Taku; Nagamine, Hiroshi; Yasuda, Tamotsu; Kawase, Hiroshi; Matsushita, Kazuhiko; Michishita, Ichiro

    2012-01-01

    We herein report the case of a 39-year-old woman with a pulmonary embolism caused by intimal sarcoma of the pulmonary artery. She presented with shortness of breath and leg edema. Computed tomography showed a low density area that extended from the main pulmonary artery to the bilateral pulmonary arteries. We diagnosed her to have a pulmonary thromboembolism. The thrombosis did not decrease after the administration of anti-coagulant therapy, and she underwent resection of the thrombotic tissue. Histopathologically, the surgical specimen was not found to be thrombotic tissue but rather an intimal sarcoma of the pulmonary artery. After undergoing surgery, she received radiation therapy and chemotherapy; however, she died 31 months after being diagnosed.

  9. Aggressive multiple surgical interventions to pulmonary artery sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Akiko; Shirasaka, Tomonori; Okada, Kenji; Okita, Yutaka

    2015-02-01

    We describe our experience with a patient who had metastasized pulmonary artery sarcoma, but survived 7 years after diagnosis. A 61-year-old man was diagnosed with pulmonary artery intimal sarcoma after resection of metastatic tumours to the bilateral lungs. The primary lesion in the pulmonary artery trunk extending into the bilateral branches was treated by tumour endoarterectomy followed by chemotherapy. He underwent resections of lung metastases two more times before detection of recurrent obstructive pulmonary artery sarcoma 4 years after the tumour endoarterectomy. En bloc resection of the tumour including the pulmonary artery trunk, valve and interventricular septum was performed, and the right ventricular out flow tract was reconstructed with a stentless pulmonary valve and equine pericardium. He died of the disease soon after an operation for metastatic brain tumour 3 years later. Pulmonary artery sarcoma has a dismal prognosis, but aggressively repeated surgical interventions may lengthen survival.

  10. Influence of air pressure, humidity, solar radiation, temperature, and wind speed on ambulatory visits due to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in Bavaria, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, Uta; Exner, Teresa; Wanka, Eva R.; Bergemann, Christoph; Meyer-Arnek, Julian; Hildenbrand, Beate; Tufman, Amanda; Heumann, Christian; Huber, Rudolf M.; Bittner, Michael; Fischer, Rainald

    2012-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the most important causes of morbidity and mortality in the world. The disease is often aggravated by periods of increased symptoms requiring medical attention. Among the possible triggers for these exacerbations, meteorological factors are under consideration. The objective of this study was to assess the influence of various meteorological factors on the health status of patients with COPD. For this purpose, the daily number of ambulatory care visits due to COPD was analysed in Bavaria, Germany, for the years 2006 and 2007. The meteorological factors were provided by the model at the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF). For the multivariate analysis, a generalised linear model was used. In Bavaria, an increase of 1% of daily consultations (about 103 visits per day) was found to be associated with a change of 0.72 K temperature, 209.55 of log air surface pressure in Pa, and a decrease of 1% of daily consultations with 1,453,763 Ws m2 of solar radiation. There also seem to be regional differences between north and south Bavaria; for instance, the effect of wind speed and specific humidity with a lag of 1 day were only significant in the north. This study could contribute to a tool for the prevention of exacerbations. It also serves as a model for the further evaluation of the impact of meteorological factors on health, and could easily be applied to other diseases or other regions.

  11. Influence of air pressure, humidity, solar radiation, temperature, and wind speed on ambulatory visits due to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in Bavaria, Germany.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Uta; Exner, Teresa; Wanka, Eva R; Bergemann, Christoph; Meyer-Arnek, Julian; Hildenbrand, Beate; Tufman, Amanda; Heumann, Christian; Huber, Rudolf M; Bittner, Michael; Fischer, Rainald

    2012-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the most important causes of morbidity and mortality in the world. The disease is often aggravated by periods of increased symptoms requiring medical attention. Among the possible triggers for these exacerbations, meteorological factors are under consideration. The objective of this study was to assess the influence of various meteorological factors on the health status of patients with COPD. For this purpose, the daily number of ambulatory care visits due to COPD was analysed in Bavaria, Germany, for the years 2006 and 2007. The meteorological factors were provided by the model at the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF). For the multivariate analysis, a generalised linear model was used. In Bavaria, an increase of 1% of daily consultations (about 103 visits per day) was found to be associated with a change of 0.72 K temperature, 209.55 of log air surface pressure in Pa, and a decrease of 1% of daily consultations with 1,453,763 Ws m(2) of solar radiation. There also seem to be regional differences between north and south Bavaria; for instance, the effect of wind speed and specific humidity with a lag of 1 day were only significant in the north. This study could contribute to a tool for the prevention of exacerbations. It also serves as a model for the further evaluation of the impact of meteorological factors on health, and could easily be applied to other diseases or other regions.

  12. Pulmonary edema

    MedlinePlus

    ... congestion; Lung water; Pulmonary congestion; Heart failure - pulmonary edema ... Pulmonary edema is often caused by congestive heart failure . When the heart is not able to pump efficiently, blood ...

  13. Laparoscopic Colon Resection

    MedlinePlus

    ... inches to complete the procedure. What are the Advantages of Laparoscopic Colon Resection? Results may vary depending ... type of procedure and patient’s overall condition. Common advantages are: Less postoperative pain May shorten hospital stay ...

  14. Prostate resection - minimally invasive

    MedlinePlus

    ... invasive - discharge Transurethral resection of the prostate - discharge Review Date 6/29/2015 Updated by: Jennifer Sobol, ... the Michigan Institute of Urology, West Bloomfield, MI. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by ...

  15. Large bowel resection - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... 26. Read More Colon cancer Colostomy Crohn disease Intestinal obstruction Large bowel resection Ulcerative colitis Patient Instructions Bland ... Diseases Colonic Polyps Colorectal Cancer Diverticulosis and Diverticulitis Intestinal Obstruction Ulcerative Colitis Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A. ...

  16. Small bowel resection - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... chap 26. Read More Colon cancer Crohn disease Intestinal obstruction Small bowel resection Patient Instructions Bland diet Crohn ... Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Intestinal Cancer Intestinal Obstruction Small Intestine Disorders Browse the Encyclopedia A.D. ...

  17. Cavitating lung disease due to concomitant drug resistant tuberculosis and invasive pulmonary Aspergillosis in a post-partum patient: A case report.

    PubMed

    Ray, Animesh; Suri, J C; Sen, M K; Chakrabarti, S; Gupta, Ayush; Capoor, Malini

    2015-01-01

    Many disorders can present as cavitating lesions in the lung. In this case report, a case of mixed infection with drug resistant tuberculosis and invasive pulmonary aspergillosis in a post-partum patient has been presented.

  18. Pulmonary embolus

    MedlinePlus

    ... clot - lung; Embolus; Tumor embolus; Embolism - pulmonary; DVT-pulmonary embolism; Thrombosis - pulmonary embolism ... Main symptoms of a pulmonary embolism include chest pain that may be any of the following: Under the breastbone or on one side Sharp or stabbing ...

  19. Alteration in Intrapulmonary Pharmacokinetics of Aerosolized Model Compounds Due to Disruption of the Alveolar Epithelial Barriers Following Bleomycin-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis in Rats.

    PubMed

    Togami, Kohei; Chono, Sumio; Tada, Hitoshi

    2016-03-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a lethal lung disease that is characterized by the accumulation of extracellular matrix and a change in lung structure. In this study, intrapulmonary pharmacokinetics of aerosolized model compounds were evaluated using rats with bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. Aerosol formulations of indocyanine green, 6-carboxyfluorescein (6-CF), and fluorescein isothiocyanate dextrans (FD; 4.4, 10, 70, and 250 kDa) were administered to rat lungs using a MicroSprayer. Indocyanine green fluorescence signals were significantly weaker in fibrotic lungs than in control lungs and 6-CF and FD concentrations in the plasma of pulmonary fibrotic animals were markedly higher than in the plasma of control animals. Moreover, disrupted epithelial tight junctions, including claudins-1, -3, and -5, were observed in pulmonary fibrotic lesions using immunofluorescence microscopy. In addition, destruction of tight junctions on model alveolar epithelial cells (NCI-H441) by transforming growth factor-β1 treatment enhanced the permeability of 6-CF and FDs through NCI-H441 cell monolayers. These results indicate that aerosolized drugs are easily distributed into the plasma after leakage through damaged tight junctions of alveolar epithelium. Therefore, the development of delivery systems for anti-fibrotic agents to improve intrapulmonary pharmacokinetics may be necessary for effective idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis therapy.

  20. The application of capnography to differentiate peri-chest tube air leak from parenchymal leak following pulmonary surgery

    PubMed Central

    Walker, William S.

    2014-01-01

    Prolonged air leak is a common complication of pulmonary resection. However, while a bubbling chest drain is commonly related to parenchymal air leakage, it may also be caused by air entering the pleural cavity via an incomplete seal of the tissues at the chest tube insertion site. Examination alone is not sufficient to guide the surgeon as to which of the above complications is responsible for drain bubbling. We describe a simple method, whereby a CO2 monitoring device is attached to the chest drain to determine whether the air loss observed is in fact due to a pulmonary air leak. PMID:24790853

  1. Physeal bridge resection.

    PubMed

    Khoshhal, Khalid I; Kiefer, Gerhard N

    2005-01-01

    Growth arrest secondary to physeal bridge formation is an uncommon but well-recognized complication of physeal fractures and other injuries. Regardless of the underlying etiology, physeal bridges may cause angular and/or longitudinal growth disturbances, with progression dependent on the remaining physeal growth potential. Physeal bridge resection and insertion of interposition material releases the tethering effect of the bridge. Physeal bridge resection has become an accepted treatment option for patients with existing or developing deformity and for those with at least 2 years or 2 cm of growth remaining. Current experimental research is focused on the use of gene therapy and other factors that enhance chondrocyte proliferation to improve the management of growth arrest. The use of cartilage and cultured chondrocytes as interposition material after physeal bridge resection is an area of active research.

  2. [Isolated Pulmonary Valve Endocarditis in a Patient with Aortic Regurgitation and Patent Foramen Ovale;Report of a Case].

    PubMed

    Doi, Toshio; Gyoten, Takayuki; Sakata, Kimimasa; Nagura, Saori; Yamashita, Akio; Fukahara, Kazuaki; Kotoh, Keiju; Yoshimura, Naoki

    2016-07-01

    Isolated pulmonary valve endocarditis is an extremely rare clinical condition. Here, we report a case of pulmonary valve endocarditis caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). An 84-year-old man with a history of aortic regurgitation and patent foramen ovale was admitted to our hospital due to fever of unknown origin for 4 weeks' duration. MRSA was detected in his blood cultures. Transthoracic echocardiography demonstrated a mobile vegetation attached to the pulmonary valve, moderate to severe aortic regurgitation, and patent foramen ovale with left-to-right shunt. After 30-days' treatment with vancomycin, gentamicin and rifampicin, he defervesced and blood cultures became negative. At surgery, a large vegetation was still attached to the pulmonary valve, but the leaflets remained with minimum damage. Aortic valve replacement, direct closure of the patent foramen ovale, and simple resection of the vegetation were performed. The postoperative course was uneventful.

  3. Laparoscopic anatomic liver resection

    PubMed Central

    Vibert, Eric; Kouider, Ali

    2004-01-01

    Background Liver resection is reputed to be one of the most difficult procedures embraced in laparoscopy. This report shows that with adequate training, anatomical liver resection including major hepatectomies can be performed. Methods This is a retrospective study. Results From 1995 to 2004, among 84 laparoscopic liver resections, 46 (54%) anatomical laparoscopic hepatectomies were performed in our institution by laparoscopy. Nine (20%) patients had benign disease while 37 (80%) had malignant lesions. Among those with malignant lesions, 14 patients had hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), 18 had colorectal metastasis (CRM), while 5 had miscellaneous tumours. For benign disease, minor (two Couinaud's segments or less) and major anatomic hepatectomies were performed in five and four patients, respectively. For malignant lesions, minor and major anatomic hepatectomies were performed in 15 and 22 patients, respectively. Overall, conversion to laparotomy was necessary in 7 (15%) patients. Blood transfusion was required in five (10%) patients. One patient died of cerebral infarction 8 days after a massive peroperative haemorrhage. The overall morbidity rate was 34% whatever the type of resection. Three patients required reoperation, either for haemorrhage (n=1) and/or biliary leak (n=2). For CRM (n=18), overall and disease-free survival at 24 months (mean follow-up of 17 months) were 100% and 56%, respectively. For HCC (n=14), overall and disease-free survival at 36 months (mean follow-up of 29 months) were 91% and 65%, respectively. No port site metastasis occurred in patients with malignancy. Conclusions After a long training with limited liver resection in superficial segments, laparoscopic anatomical minor and major resections are feasible. Short-term carcinological results seem to be similar to those obtained with laparotomy. PMID:18333079

  4. Efficiency and outcome of non-invasive versus invasive positive pressure ventilation therapy in respiratory failure due to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed Central

    Amri Maleh, Valiollah; Monadi, Mahmood; Heidari, Behzad; Maleh, Parviz Amri; Bijani, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background: Application noninvasive ventilation in the patients with exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) reduced mortality. This case-control study was designed to compare efficiency and outcome of non-invasive (NIV) versus invasive positive pressure ventilation (IPPV) in respiratory failure due to COPD. Methods: The patients were assigned to NIV or IPPV intermittantly.The clinical parameters, including RR (respiratory rate), BP (blood pressure), HR (heart rate) and PH, PaCO2, PaO2 before and 1, 4 and 24 h after treatment were measured. Demographic information such as age, sex, severity of disease based on APACHE score, length of stay and outcome were recorded. Results: Fifty patients were enrolled in the NIV group and 50 patients in IPPV. The mean age was 70.5 in NIV and 63.9 in invasive ventilation group (p>0.05). In IPPV group, the average values of PH: PCO2: and PO2, were 7.22±0.11, 69.64 + 24.25: and 68.86±24.41 .In NIV, the respective values were 7.30±0.07, 83.94±18.95, and 60.60±19.88. In NIV group, after 1, 4 and 24 h treatment, the clinical and ventilation parameters were stable. The mean APACHE score in was IPPV, 26.46±5.45 and in NIV was 12.26±5.54 (p<0.05). The average length of hospital stay in IPPV was 15.90±10 and in NIV 8.12±6.49 days (p<0.05). The total mortality in the NIV was 4 (8%) and in IPPV, 27 patients (54%) (p<0.05). Conclusion: This study indicates that using NIPPV is a useful therapeutic mode of treatment for respiratory failure with acceptable success rate and lower mortality. The application of NIPPV reduces hospital stay, intubation and its consequent complications. PMID:27386061

  5. Primary Pulmonary Epithelioid Hemangioendothelioma: A Rare Cause of PET-Negative Pulmonary Nodules

    PubMed Central

    Cazzuffi, Riccardo; Calia, Nunzio; Ravenna, Franco; Pasquini, Claudio; Saturni, Sara; Cavallesco, Giorgio Narciso; Quarantotto, Francesco; Rinaldi, Rosa; Cogo, Annaluisa; Caramori, Gaetano; Papi, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    We report here a case of primary pulmonary epithelioid hemangioendothelioma diagnosed in a 67-year-old Caucasian man, presenting with exertion dyspnoea, dry cough, and multiple bilateral pulmonary nodules revealed by computed tomography. At the 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography, these nodules were negative. The histopathological diagnosis was made on a pulmonary wedge resection (performed during video-thoracoscopic surgery). PMID:21869893

  6. Extralobar pulmonary sequestration as a cause of recurrent pulmonary hemorrhage in a neonate.

    PubMed

    Akdag, Arzu; Arici, Sule; Kaya, Mete; Turgut, Ahmet

    2016-02-01

    Pulmonary sequestration is acystic or solid congenital lung malformation comprised of non functional lung tissue that does not communicate with the normal tracheobronchial tree and has a systemic arterial blood supply. There are two forms of sequestration: intralobar and extralobar. Its treatment is surgical resection. Here we presented a case of premature neonate with extralobar pulmonary sequestration who had respiratory failure and recurrent pulmonary hemorrhage. Following surgery, the patient showed significant clinical improvement.

  7. Intestinal adaptation following resection.

    PubMed

    Tappenden, Kelly A

    2014-05-01

    Intestinal adaptation is a natural compensatory process that occurs following extensive intestinal resection, whereby structural and functional changes in the intestine improve nutrient and fluid absorption in the remnant bowel. In animal studies, postresection structural adaptations include bowel lengthening and thickening and increases in villus height and crypt depth. Functional changes include increased nutrient transporter expression, accelerated crypt cell differentiation, and slowed transit time. In adult humans, data regarding adaptive changes are sparse, and the mechanisms underlying intestinal adaptation remain to be fully elucidated. Several factors influence the degree of intestinal adaptation that occurs post resection, including site and extent of resection, luminal stimulation with enteral nutrients, and intestinotrophic factors. Two intestinotrophic growth factors, the glucagon-like peptide 2 analog teduglutide and recombinant growth hormone (somatropin), are now approved for clinical use in patients with short bowel syndrome (SBS). Both agents enhance fluid absorption and decrease requirements for parenteral nutrition (PN) and/or intravenous fluid. Intestinal adaptation has been thought to be limited to the first 1-2 years following resection in humans. However, recent data suggest that a significant proportion of adult patients with SBS can achieve enteral autonomy, even after many years of PN dependence, particularly with trophic stimulation.

  8. Clinical analysis of 68 patients with pulmonary mycosis in China

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Due to the lack of specific clinical manifestations and imaging features, the diagnosis of pulmonary mycosis is difficult. This study aimed to investigate the pathogens, clinical manifestations, imaging features, diagnosis and management of pulmonary mycosis. Methods Data on 68 patients diagnosed as pulmonary mycosis in Xiang Ya hospital from January 2001 to December 2010 were collected and their clinical manifestations, radiographic characterization, diagnostic methods and management were analyzed. Results All patients were diagnosed by pathological examination. Of the 68 cases, 38 (55.9%) had pulmonary aspergillosis and 19 (27.9%) pulmonary cryptococcosis. Open-lung surgery was performed in 38 patients (55.9%), transbronchial biopsy in 15 (22.0%), and computerized tomography (CT) guided percutaneous needle biopsy in 11 (16.2%). Main symptoms were as follows: cough in 51 cases (75.0%), expectoration in 38 (55.9%), hemoptysis in 25 (37.8%), fever in 20 (29.4%), while 6 cases (11.1%) were asymptomatic. X-ray and chest CT showed masses or nodular lesions in 52 cases (76.5%), patchy lesions in 10 (14.7%), cavity formation in 15 (22.0%), and diffuse miliary nodules in 1 case. In 51 cases (75.0%) misdiagnosis before pathological examination occurred. Surgical resection was performed in 38 patients (55.9%). In 25 patients (36.7%) systemic antifungal therapy was administered, and 20 patients (29.4%) experienced complete responses or partial responses. Conclusion The main pathogens of pulmonary mycosis are Aspergillus, followed by cryptococcosis. Final diagnosis of pulmonary mycosis mainly depends on pathological examination. The clinical manifestations, imaging features, diagnostic methods and management differ depending on the pathogens. Satisfactory therapy can be obtained by both antifungal and surgical treatment. PMID:22958675

  9. Right ventricular metastatic tumor from a primary carcinoma of uterine cervix: A cause of pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    Han, Gwan Hee; Kwon, Do Youn; Ulak, Roshani; Lee, Jong-Min; Lee, Seon-Kyung

    2017-01-01

    The presence of intracavitary cardiac metastasis from squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix is extremely rare. The diagnosis is made almost exclusively postmortem. Apart from causing intracardiac obstruction, it can present as pulmonary emboli and the prognosis is extremely poor. It is important to suspect this diagnosis in patient with recurrent pulmonary emboli. Due to the rarity of this condition it is very difficult to standardize care for these patients. However, it is possible that aggressive therapy may lengthen patients' survival and quality of life. We present a case of isolated intracavitary cardiac metastasis arising from a squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix, 44-year-old woman, diagnosed as stage complaint of fatigue and dyspnea on mild exertion. The echocardiogram showed a mass in the right ventricle and suspicious pulmonary embolism. We took an aggressive therapeutic approach. The pathological examination of the resected tissue revealed metastatic squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:28217685

  10. Successful liver transplantation in a patient with splanchnic vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism due to polycythemia vera with Jak2v617f mutation and heparin-induced thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Biagioni, Emanuela; Pedrazzi, Paola; Marietta, Marco; Di Benedetto, Fabrizio; Villa, Erica; Luppi, Mario; Girardis, Massimo

    2013-10-01

    Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is a rare complication of heparin treatment resulting in a severe acquired thrombophilic condition with an associated mortality of about 10 %. We report the first case of successful urgent liver transplantation (LT) in a patient with end-stage liver disease due to a Budd-Chiari syndrome, portal vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism due to acquired thrombophilia associated to polycythemia vera carrying JAK2V617F gene mutation and HIT in the acute phase. Lepirudin was used to provide anticoagulation in the LT perioperative period that was performed without haemorrhagic and thrombotic complications despite the donor received heparin during liver explantation.

  11. Thromboembolism in pulmonary artery sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Farsad, Mohsen; Pernter, Patrizia; Triani, Antonio; Osele, Luzian; Wiedermann, Christian J

    2009-04-01

    Pulmonary artery sarcoma, although rare, must be considered in the differential diagnosis of pulmonary thromboembolism. Clinically and radiologically, it may imitate pulmonary embolism, making diagnosis difficult and delaying treatment. Patients often have no symptom resolution despite therapeutic anticoagulation. Visualization of filling defects within a pulmonary artery on contrast-enhanced CT cannot reliably differentiate between pulmonary thromboembolism and malignant lesions like leiomyosarcoma. FDG PET-CT offers the potential for identification of malignant lesions. The authors report a case with pulmonary artery thromboembolism due to thrombi formed on a pulmonary artery leiomyosarcoma. Integrated FDG PET-CT showed no FDG-uptake along the major part of the filling defect within the right main pulmonary artery suggesting blood clot and increased uptake along the posterior wall of the right main pulmonary artery and the left lower lobar artery suggesting malignancy.

  12. Lung cancer with chest wall invasion: retrospective analysis comparing en-bloc resection and ‘resection in bird cage’

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Invasion of the chest wall per se is not a contraindication for tumor resection in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), provided there is no mediastinal lymph node or vital structure involvement. Although widely known to Brazilian surgeons, the ‘resection in bird cage’ technique has never been widely studied in terms of patient survival. Thus, the objective of this study was to evaluate the postoperative consequences and overall survival of extra-musculoperiosteal resection compared with en-bloc resection in NSCLC patients with invasion of the endothoracic fascia. Methods Between January 1990 and December 2009, 33 NSCLC patients with invasion of the thoracic wall who underwent pulmonary resection were retrospectively analyzed. Of the 33 patients evaluated, 20 patients underwent en-bloc resection and 13 underwent ‘resection in bird cage.’ For each patient, a retrospective case note review was made. Results The median age at surgery, gender, indication, rate of comorbidities, tumor size and the degree of uptake in the costal margin were similar for both groups. The rate of postoperative complications and the duration of hospitalization did not differ between the groups. Regarding the outcome variables, the disease-free interval, rate of local recurrence, metastasis-free time after surgery, overall mortality rate, mortality rate related to metastatic disease, duration following surgery in which deaths occurred, and overall survival were also similar between groups. The cumulative survival curves between the ‘resection in bird cage’ and en-bloc resection and between stages Ia + Ib and IIb + IIIa + IV were not significantly different (p = 0.68 and p = 0.64, respectively). The cumulative metastasis-free survival curves were not significantly different between the two types of surgery (p = 0.38). Conclusions In NSCLC patients with invasion of the endothoracic fascia, ‘resection in bird cage’ is a less aggressive procedure

  13. Pulmonary artery intimal sarcoma: case report.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yulong; Shen, Zhenya; Gao, Wei; Ye, Wenxue

    2010-01-01

    A 72-year-old woman with pulmonary artery intimal sarcoma was successfully treated with surgery. With heightened clinical awareness and technological advancement, more and more cases were diagnosed definitely before operation. Computed tomography of the chest showed a mass in right ventricular extending to pulmonary trunk and the left pulmonary artery. The patient underwent complete surgical resection and repair of the pulmonary artery with no evidence of recurrence during the 12-month follow-up, suggesting that early identification and aggressive surgical intervention would improve survival.

  14. Cardiorespiratory collapse and pulmonary oedema due to intravascular absorption of prostaglandin F2 alpha administered extraamniotically for midtrimester termination of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Wein, P; Robertson, B; Ratten, G J

    1989-08-01

    A case of severe reaction to extraamniotically administered prostaglandin F2 alpha, with cardiorespiratory collapse and pulmonary oedema necessitating transfer to an intensive care unit, is presented. Attention is drawn to the profound haemodynamic effects of systemically administered prostaglandin, and the need for caution and ready availability of facilities for resuscitation when this potent substance is administered. Treatment for the effects of intravascular absorption of prostaglandin F2 alpha is discussed.

  15. Short-term Curcuminoid Supplementation for Chronic Pulmonary Complications due to Sulfur Mustard Intoxication: Positive Results of a Randomized Double-blind Placebo-controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Panahi, Y; Ghanei, M; Bashiri, S; Hajihashemi, A; Sahebkar, A

    2015-11-01

    Pulmonary problems are among the most frequent chronic complications of sulfur mustard (SM) intoxication and are often accompanied by deregulated production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Curcuminoids, comprising curcumin, demethoxycurcumin and bisdemethoxycurcumin, are phytochemicals with remarkable anti-inflammatory properties that are derived from dried rhizomes of the plant Curcuma longa L. (turmeric). The present pilot study aimed to investigate the clinical effects of supplementation with curcuminoids on markers of pulmonary function and systemic inflammation in SM-intoxicated subjects. In a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial, 89 male subjects who were suffering from chronic SM-induced pulmonary complications were recruited and assigned to either curcuminoids (500 mg TID per oral; n=45) or placebo (n=44) for a period of 4 weeks. Efficacy measures were changes in the spirometric parameters (FVC, FEV1, FEV1/FVC) and serum levels of inflammatory mediators including interleukins 6 (IL-6) and 8 (IL-8), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα), transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP), substance P and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1). 78 subjects completed the trial. Although FEV1 and FVC remained comparable between the groups, there was a greater effect of curcuminoids vs. placebo in improving FEV1/FVC (p=0.002). Curcuminoids were also significantly more efficacious compared to placebo in modulating all assessed inflammatory mediators: IL-6 (p<0.001), IL-8 (p=0.035), TNFα (p<0.001), TGFβ (p<0.001), substance P (p=0.016), hs-CRP (p<0.001), CGRP (p<0.001) and MCP-1 (p<0.001). Curcuminoids were safe and well-tolerated throughout the trial. Short-term adjunctive therapy with curcuminoids can suppress systemic inflammation in patients suffering from SM-induced chronic pulmonary complications.

  16. Pulmonary angiography

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pulmonary arteriography; Pulmonary angiogram; Angiogram of the lungs Images Pulmonary arteries References Jackson JE, Meaney JFM. Angiography. ... urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows ...

  17. Pulmonary Rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topics Bronchitis COPD Cystic Fibrosis Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis Sarcoidosis Send a link to NHLBI to someone by ... people who have COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), sarcoidosis (sar-koy-DOE-sis), idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis , or ...

  18. Pulmonary Artery Sarcoma - Multimodality Imaging.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Nari; Seol, Sang-Hoon; Kim, Il Hwan; Kim, Ji Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary artery sarcoma (PAS) is a rare and fatal disease. PAS can often be misdiagnosed as pulmonary thromboembolism. Moreover, the correct diagnosis is frequently delayed due to nonspecific signs and symptoms. The prognosis of patients with PAS is poor. We report a case of a woman with a primary PAS who was initially diagnosed with pulmonary thromboembolism.

  19. Pulmonary Artery Sarcoma - Multimodality Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Nari; Seol, Sang-Hoon; Kim, Il Hwan; Kim, Ji Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary artery sarcoma (PAS) is a rare and fatal disease. PAS can often be misdiagnosed as pulmonary thromboembolism. Moreover, the correct diagnosis is frequently delayed due to nonspecific signs and symptoms. The prognosis of patients with PAS is poor. We report a case of a woman with a primary PAS who was initially diagnosed with pulmonary thromboembolism. PMID:27833785

  20. Lobectomy and limited resection in small-sized peripheral non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Koike, Terumoto; Sato, Seijiro; Hashimoto, Takehisa; Aoki, Tadashi; Yoshiya, Katsuo; Yamato, Yasushi; Watanabe, Takehiro; Akazawa, Kohei; Toyabe, Shin-Ichi; Tsuchida, Masanori

    2016-01-01

    Background Although lobectomy is the standard surgical procedure for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), recent studies show favorable outcomes after limited resection in patients with small-sized peripheral tumors. We conducted a randomized controlled trial of such patients to estimate postoperative outcomes and pulmonary function following these surgical techniques. Methods Between 2005 and 2008, eligible patients with tumors of 2 cm or less were randomly assigned 1:1 to undergo lobectomy or limited resection; 32 and 33 NSCLC patients in each group, respectively, were analyzed. The primary end points were 5-year overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS), while the secondary end points were postoperative pulmonary function including forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1). Results The 5-year OS rates were 93.8% and 90.9% in the lobectomy and limited resection groups, respectively (P=0.921). The 5-year DFS rates were 93.8% and 90.9% in the lobectomy and limited resection groups, respectively (P=0.714). These rates did not differ significantly between the two resection groups. The median postoperative/preoperative FVC ratios were 84.1% and 90.0% in the lobectomy and limited resection groups, respectively, while the median postoperative/preoperative FEV1 ratios were 81.9% and 89.1%, respectively. Both ratios were significantly higher in the limited resection group (P=0.032 and P=0.005 for FVC and FEV1 ratios, respectively). Conclusions A similar outcome, with more preserved postoperative pulmonary function, was observed in patients who underwent limited resection compared to those who underwent lobectomy. Ongoing large-scale multi-institutional prospective randomized trials of lobar versus sublobar resection in patients with small peripheral NSCLCs will hopefully provide definitive information about intentional limited resection of small peripheral tumors. PMID:28066606

  1. Fluid extravasation caused by bladder perforation during bipolar transurethral resection using saline solution -a case report-.

    PubMed

    Park, Sun-Kyung; Cho, Woo-Jin; Choi, Yun-Suk

    2013-08-01

    Transurethral resection of the prostate is the gold standard in the operative management of benign prostatic hyperplasia. Bipolar transurethral resection of the prostate using saline solution is a safe technique and reduces the risk of transurethral resection syndrome. This report discusses a rare complication of bipolar transurethral resection of the prostate: the extravasation of 0.9% saline solution into intraperitoneal and retroperitoneal cavities due to bladder perforation, resulting in respiratory difficulties.

  2. Endosonography of a Pulmonary Artery Obstruction in Echinococcosis

    PubMed Central

    Schuuring, Mark J.; Bonta, Peter I.; van Vugt, Michele; Smithuis, Frank; van Delden, Otto M.; Annema, Jouke T.; Stijnis, Kees

    2016-01-01

    A 44-year-old woman with a history of pulmonary embolism and abdominal echinococcosis complained of sudden thoracic pain and shortness of breath. A D-dimer of 77.5 mg/l (reference ≤0.5 mg/l) was found. Chest CT scan revealed obstruction of the right lower and middle lobe pulmonary artery (PA). Anticoagulation therapy was initiated for the presumed diagnosis of recurrent pulmonary embolism. However, due to persistent symptoms of dyspnea, follow-up CT angiography of the chest was performed 3 months later. A persistent PA obstruction was found and the presumed diagnosis of embolism was questioned. Subsequently, endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS) imaging was performed to support an alternative diagnosis. EBUS imaging showed an inhomogeneous, sharply demarcated, intravascular lesion with round hypoechoic areas compatible with cysts. The diagnosis of embolism was rejected and treatment with albendazole was initiated for pulmonary echinococcosis. Echinococcosis is a parasitic disease and cystic spread in the PA is exceptional. The patient has remained stable for more than 4 years. In case of disease progression, including progressive PA obstruction or life-threatening hemoptysis, surgical resection will be considered. PMID:27760423

  3. A case report: Pulmonary venous malformation complicated with pulmonary hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Supakul, Nucharin; Fan, Rong; Karmazyn, Boaz

    2012-12-01

    Pulmonary venous malformation is extremely rare. We present imaging and clinical findings of a 17-year-old male with multifocal subcutaneous venous malformations and multiple cystic lesions in the liver and spleen, suggestive of slow flow vascular malformation. In the right lung, chest radiography followed by chest CT demonstrated large tortuous pulmonary veins and cystic emphysematous changes. Tc99m-MAA (pertechnetate-labeled macroaggregated albumin) lung perfusion scan demonstrated only 3% of normal perfusion to the right lung, with no evidence of arteriovenous shunting. The child had diffuse intraparenchymal hemorrhage throughout the right lower and middle lobes and underwent resection. Pathology confirmed the diagnosis of venous malformation complicated with bleeding.

  4. Non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema and life-threatening shock due to calcium channel blocker overdose: a case report and clinical review.

    PubMed

    Siddiqi, Tauseef Afaq; Hill, Jennifer; Huckleberry, Yvonne; Parthasarathy, Sairam

    2014-02-01

    Calcium channel blockers (CCBs) overdose can be life-threatening when manifest as catastrophic shock and non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema. We describe a case of massive overdose of multiple medications, including sustained-release verapamil, which was resistant to conventional support. Initial treatment for CCB overdose is primarily supportive, and includes fluid resuscitation. The mechanism of non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema is not well known, and reported cases have been successfully treated with mechanical ventilation. Circulatory shock may fail to respond to atropine, glucagon, and calcium in severely poisoned patients, and vasopressors are usually required. Attempting to overcome calcium-channel antagonism with the supra-therapeutic doses of calcium salts is clinically indicated to reverse hypotension and bradycardia. There is evidence that hyperinsulinemia-euglycemia therapy is superior to other therapies for CCB poisoning, and the mechanism is thought to be the insulin-mediated active transport of glucose into the cells, which counters the CCB-induced intra-cellular carbohydrate-deficient state. Conventional decontamination measures are ineffective in accelerating clearance of CCB. Experience with intravenous lipid emulsion for lipophilic drug overdose, such as verapamil, is limited, but has been proposed as a rescue therapy and might improve cardiac inotropy through intravascular sequestration of the lipophilic CCB.

  5. Resection of gastrinomas.

    PubMed Central

    Deveney, C W; Deveney, K E; Stark, D; Moss, A; Stein, S; Way, L W

    1983-01-01

    Exploratory laparotomy and a search for gastrinomas was performed in 52 patients with the Zollinger-Ellison syndrome (ZES). Gastrinoma tissue was resected in 11 patients (21%), 6 (12%) of whom appear to have been cured. After surgery, serum gastrin levels in these six patients have remained normal from 10 months to 10 years. In the 46 other patients, tumor was unresectable because of metastases or multiple primary tumors (21 patients; 40%) or inability to find the tumor at laparotomy (21 patients; 40%). Multiple pancreatic islet cell adenomata were found in six of seven patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN), indicating that patients with this condition usually have diffuse involvement of the pancreas. The results of CT scans correlated with findings at laparotomy in 13 of 16 patients. The smallest tumor detected by CT scans was 1 cm in diameter. CT technology is more accurate in finding gastrinomas now than in the past and has a useful role in preoperative evaluation. The possibility of resection should be seriously considered in every patient with Zollinger-Ellison syndrome. Abdominal CT scans, transhepatic portal venous sampling, and laparotomy should be used to find the tumor and to determine whether it is resectable. Using presently available methods, it should be possible to cure about 25% of patients with gastrinomas who do not have MEN and over 70% of those without MEN who appear to have a solitary tumor. Total pancreatectomy may be necessary to cure some patients with MEN, but that operation is rarely justified. The morbidity and mortality of surgical attempts at curing this disease have become minimal; we have had no deaths or serious complications following such operations in over 10 yrs. Total gastrectomy and indefinite use of H2-receptor blocking agents are the therapeutic options for patients with unresectable gastrinomas. Because H2-receptor blocking agents fail to control acid secretion in many patients after several yrs of therapy, total

  6. Resection of Perihilar Cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hartog, Hermien; Ijzermans, Jan N M; van Gulik, Thomas M; Groot Koerkamp, Bas

    2016-04-01

    Perihilar cholangiocarcinoma presents at the biliary and vascular junction of the hepatic hilum with a tendency to extend longitudinally into segmental bile ducts. Most patients show metastatic or unresectable disease at time of presentation or surgical exploration. In patients eligible for surgical resection, challenges are to achieve negative bile duct margins, adequate liver remnant function, and adequate portal and arterial inflow to the liver remnant. Surgical treatment is characterized by high rates of postoperative morbidity and mortality. This article reviews the various strategies and techniques, the role of staging laparoscopy, intraoperative frozen section, caudate lobectomy, and vascular reconstruction.

  7. [The malignant tumor of the pulmonary artery; report of a case].

    PubMed

    Ooi, Masaya; Omoto, T; Ishikawa, N; Mouri, M; Okayama, T; Fukusumi, M; Ono, M; Tedoriya, T

    2008-01-01

    Primary sarcoma of the pulmonary artery is rare. Diagnosis is difficult and often delayed; pulmonary embolism is part of the differential diagnosis. We treated a 46-year-old woman with progressive dyspnea. Computed tomography showed a lesion occupying the main pulmonary artery and peripheral branches on both sides. The pulmonary artery tumor, resected under cardiopulmonary bypass, was diagnosed pathologically as intimal sarcoma. Two weeks after the operation, the patient was feeling well and discharged from our hospital. Although the prognosis of pulmonary artery sarcoma is poor, early diagnosis and resection may prolong survival.

  8. Intra-abdominal pulmonary secuestration as an exceptional cause of abdominal mass in the adult☆

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Sanz, C.; Herrero Bogajo, M.L.; Picazo-Yeste, J.; Morandeira Rivas, A.; Manzanera-Diaz, M.; Sedano-Vizcaino, C.

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Pulmonary sequestration (PS) is an extremely rare malformation defined as a portion of lung tissue isolated from the pulmonary system. PSs are classified into intralobar type and intra-abdominal PS that represents only 2.5% of cases. There are 20 cases of PS reported in adults and only two were managed by laparoscopic approach. We report a case of intra-abdominal PS mimicking a gastroesophageal duplication cyst in an adult. Besides its rarity, this is the first intra-abdominal PS in an adult managed by an anterior laparoscopic approach. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 60-year-old female patient had had epigastric and left upper quadrant pain for several days. Physical examination was normal. Image test were consistent with a gastroesophageal duplication. The patient was taken to the operating room for laparoscopic exploration and resection. The pathological diagnosis was extralobar pulmonary sequestration. DISCUSSION Less than 20 cases of PS have been reported in adults and only two cases were managed by a lateral laparoscopic approach. In contrast to these reports, we used an anterior approach due to the GEJ suspected origin of the mass. CONCLUSION Extralobar intra-abdominal PS is an extremely rare condition during adulthood but this diagnosis should be included in the differential diagnosis of a left-sided suprarenal mass. Due to the difficulty in achieving a definitive preoperative diagnosis, surgery is recommended. Laparoscopic resection is safe and effective but careful preoperative imaging studies are recommended in order to plan the most suitable approach. PMID:24091075

  9. Deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism in patients with acute spinal cord injury: a comparison with nonparalyzed patients immobilized due to spinal fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Myllynen, P.; Kammonen, M.; Rokkanen, P.; Boestman, O.L.; Lalla, M.; Laasonen, E.

    1985-06-01

    The occurrence of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) was studied in the series of 23 consecutive patients with acute spinal cord injury and 14 immobilized patients with spinal fractures without paralysis. The incidence of DVT in paralyzed patients was 100% as detected by the /sup 125/I-labeled fibrinogen test and confirmed by contrast venography, and 64% as detected by repeated clinical examinations and confirmed by contrast venography. The respective incidence of DVT in nonparalyzed patients with spinal fractures was 0%. The diagnosis of DVT was reached earlier with the radiofibrinogen test than with the clinical followup (5 days vs. 25 days). Two of the 23 paralyzed patients (9%) developed nonfatal clinical pulmonary embolism (PE). There were no differences in the values of routine coagulation tests. The result justifies prophylactic anticoagulant therapy in all cases of spinal cord injury during the acute post-traumatic phase.

  10. Endoscopic resection of esthesioneuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Gallia, Gary L; Reh, Douglas D; Lane, Andrew P; Higgins, Thomas S; Koch, Wayne; Ishii, Masaru

    2012-11-01

    Esthesioneuroblastoma, or olfactory neuroblastoma, is an uncommon malignant tumor arising in the upper nasal cavity. Surgical approaches to this and other sinonasal malignancies involving the anterior skull base have traditionally involved craniofacial resections. Over the past 10 years to 15 years, there have been advances in endoscopic approaches to skull base pathologies, including malignant tumors. In this study, we review our experience with purely endoscopic approaches to esthesioneuroblastomas. Between January 2005 and February 2012, 11 patients (seven men and four women, average age 53.3 years) with esthesioneuroblastoma were treated endoscopically. Nine patients presented with newly diagnosed disease and two were treated for tumor recurrence. The modified Kadish staging was: A, two patients (18.2%); B, two patients (18.2%); C, five patients (45.5%); and D, two patients (18.2%). All patients had a complete resection with negative intraoperative margins. Three patients had 2-deoxy-2-((18)F)fluoro-d-glucose avid neck nodes on their preoperative positron emission tomography-CT scan. These patients underwent neck dissections; two had positive neck nodes. Perioperative complications included an intraoperative hypertensive urgency and pneumocephalus in two different patients. Mean follow-up was over 28 months and all patients were free of disease. This series adds to the growing experience of purely endoscopic surgical approaches in the treatment of skull base tumors including esthesioneuroblastoma. Longer follow-up on larger numbers of patients is required to clarify the utility of purely endoscopic approaches in the management of this malignant tumor.

  11. Intraorbital meningioma: resection through modified orbitozygomatic craniotomy.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A

    2012-01-01

    Intraorbital meningiomas are challenging lesions to excise because of their location and the restricted surgical corridor available due to the presence of important neighboring structures. Lesions located in the posterior one-third of the orbit require skull base approaches for their exposure and safe resection. Frontoorbital and modified orbitozygomatic (OZ) craniotomies may facilitate the exposure and resection of masses in the posterior intraorbital space. Specifically, the one-piece modified OZ craniotomy provides many advantages of the "full" OZ craniotomy (which includes a more extensive zygomatic osteotomy). The modified OZ approach minimizes the extent of frontal lobe retraction and provides ample amount of space for the surgeon to exploit all the working angles to resect the tumor. The following video presentation discusses the nuances of technique for resection of an intraorbital meningioma through modified OZ approach and optic nerve decompression. The nuances of technique will be discussed. The video can be found here: http://youtu.be/fP5X2QNr5qk.

  12. Chest wall reconstruction after extended resection

    PubMed Central

    Seder, Christopher W.

    2016-01-01

    Extensive chest wall resection and reconstruction is a challenging procedure that requires a multidisciplinary approach, including input from thoracic surgeons, plastic surgeons, neurosurgeons, and radiation oncologists. The primary goals of any chest wall reconstruction is to obliterate dead space, restore chest wall rigidity, preserve pulmonary mechanics, protect intrathoracic organs, provide soft tissue coverage, minimize deformity, and allow patients to receive adjuvant radiotherapy. Successful chest wall reconstruction requires the re-establishment of skeletal stability to prevent chest wall hernias, avoids thoracoplasty-like contraction of the operated side, protects underlying viscera, and maintain a cosmetically-acceptable appearance. After skeletal stability is established, full tissue coverage can be achieved using direct closure, skin grafts, local advancement flaps, pedicled myocutaneous flaps, or free flaps. This review examines the indications for chest wall reconstruction and describes techniques for establishment of chest wall rigidity and soft tissue coverage. PMID:27942408

  13. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement: transapical resection of the aortic valve in vivo.

    PubMed

    Bombien Quaden, René; Leester-Schaedel, Monika; Lozonschi, Lucian; Lutter, Georg

    2012-09-01

    The resection of pulmonary valves has already been demonstrated in an experimental beating-heart model. The aim of this study was to analyse the transapical laser-assisted resection of aortic valves in an in vivo porcine model in a non-beating heart. The resection was performed in a porcine model (n = 10) using a Thullium:YAG laser. After establishing a standard extracorporeal circulatory support, the aortic valve isolation chamber (AVIC) system was inserted transapically. The resection of the aortic leaflets was carried out step-by-step in the arrested heart. The AVIC implantation, the resection process, and the gross anatomy of intracardiac lesions were analysed. The procedure for installing the AVIC took 5.8 ± 1.5 min. A sealed chamber was achieved in 9/10 cases. The resection of the valves was performed in 8/10 and completed in 7/10 cases. The resection took, on average, 7.4 ± 2.7 min/cusp. In 9/10 cases, the sealing was sufficient. Gross anatomy and histological analysis demonstrated only superficial damage to the surrounding tissue. In this study, the in vivo on-pump isolation of the left ventricular outflow tract and the laser resection of the native aortic valve could be demonstrated successfully. Nevertheless, this model is the next step towards a beating-heart resection of the aortic valve using the isolation chamber.

  14. Aggressive surgical resection for concomitant liver and lung metastasis in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung Hwan; Kim, Sung Hyun; Lim, Jin Hong; Kim, Sung Hoon; Lee, Jin Gu; Kim, Dae Joon; Choi, Gi Hong; Choi, Jin Sub

    2016-01-01

    Backgrounds/Aims Aggressive surgical resection for hepatic metastasis is validated, however, concomitant liver and lung metastasis in colorectal cancer patients is equivocal. Methods Clinicopathologic data from January 2008 through December 2012 were retrospectively reviewed in 234 patients with colorectal cancer with concomitant liver and lung metastasis. Clinicopathologic factors and survival data were analyzed. Results Of the 234 patients, 129 (55.1%) had synchronous concomitant liver and lung metastasis from colorectal cancer and 36 (15.4%) had metachronous metastasis. Surgical resection was performed in 33 patients (25.6%) with synchronous and 6 (16.7%) with metachronous metastasis. Surgical resection showed better overall survival in both groups (synchronous, p=0.001; metachronous, p=0.028). In the synchronous metastatic group, complete resection of both liver and lung metastatic lesions had better survival outcomes than incomplete resection of two metastatic lesions (p=0.037). The primary site of colorectal cancer and complete resection were significant prognostic factors (p=0.06 and p=0.003, respectively). Conclusions Surgical resection for hepatic and pulmonary metastasis in colorectal cancer can improve complete remission and survival rate in resectable cases. Colorectal cancer with concomitant liver and lung metastasis is not a poor prognostic factor or a contraindication for surgical treatments, hence, an aggressive surgical approach may be recommended in well-selected resectable cases. PMID:27621747

  15. CT pulmonary angiography of adult pulmonary vascular diseases: Technical considerations and interpretive pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Taslakian, Bedros; Latson, Larry A; Truong, Mylene T; Aaltonen, Eric; Shiau, Maria C; Girvin, Francis; Alpert, Jeffrey B; Wickstrom, Maj; Ko, Jane P

    2016-11-01

    Computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA) has become the primary imaging modality for evaluating the pulmonary arteries. Although pulmonary embolism is the primary indication for CTPA, various pulmonary vascular abnormalities can be detected in adults. Knowledge of these disease entities and understanding technical pitfalls that can occur when performing CTPA are essential to enable accurate diagnosis and allow timely management. This review will cover a spectrum of acquired abnormalities including pulmonary embolism due to thrombus and foreign bodies, primary and metastatic tumor involving the pulmonary arteries, pulmonary hypertension, as well as pulmonary artery aneurysms and stenoses. Additionally, methods to overcome technical pitfalls and interventional treatment options will be addressed.

  16. Bosentan for pulmonary hypertension secondary to idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Onda, Naomi; Tanaka, Yosuke; Hino, Mitsunori; Gemma, Akihiko

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a poor prognostic factor in patients with interstitial lung disease. No established treatment exists for pulmonary hypertension secondary to interstitial pneumonia. We describe the case of an 81-year-old woman with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), who was admitted to our hospital due to aggravation of dyspnea and decreased oxygen saturation, as well as onset of orthopnea and rapidly progressing edema. The transthoracic echocardiography and right heart catheterization showed the mean pulmonary artery pressure was 39 mmHg and the mean pulmonary capillary wedge pressure was 9 mmHg. After various examinations, the diagnoses of pulmonary hypertension (PH) due to IPF and of congestive heart failure secondary to PH were established. Diuretic therapy was started, but the patient's condition showed poor improvement. Subsequent initiation of oral bosentan therapy led to improvement in symptoms and findings. At the follow-up assessment one year later her pulmonary function showed no significant changes and no apparent worsening of arterial blood gases, with evident improvement of PH, WHO functional class, maximum exercise tolerance on treadmill exercise testing, right heart catheterization, and transthoracic echocardiography. This report describes a case of successful treatment with bosentan for severe pulmonary hypertension in a patient with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. We also present a review of the literature on treatment of pulmonary hypertension in patients with chronic lung disease. Bosentan appears to be efficacious in some patients with pulmonary hypertension secondary to idiopathic interstitial pneumonitis.

  17. [Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension].

    PubMed

    Zonzin, Pietro; Vizza, Carmine Dario; Favretto, Giuseppe

    2003-10-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension is due to unresolved or recurrent pulmonary embolism. In the United States the estimated prevalence is 0.1-0.5% among survived patients with pulmonary embolism. The survival rate at 5 years was 30% among patients with a mean pulmonary artery pressure > 40 mmHg at the time of diagnosis and only 10% among those with a value > 50 mmHg. The interval between the onset of disturbances and the diagnosis may be as long as 3 years. Doppler echocardiography permits to establish the diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension. Radionuclide scanning determines whether pulmonary hypertension has a thromboembolic basis. Right heart catheterization and pulmonary angiography are performed in order to establish the extension and the accessibility to surgery of thrombi and to rule out other causes. The surgical treatment is thromboendarterectomy. A dramatic reduction in the pulmonary vascular resistance can be achieved; corresponding improvements in the NYHA class--from class III or IV before surgery to class I-II after surgery--are usually observed. Patients who are not considered candidates for thromboendarterectomy may be considered candidates for lung transplantation.

  18. Perioperative physiotherapy in patients undergoing lung cancer resection.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Larrad, Ana; Lascurain-Aguirrebena, Ion; Abecia-Inchaurregui, Luis Carlos; Seco, Jesús

    2014-08-01

    Physiotherapy is considered an important component of the perioperative period of lung resection surgery. A systematic review was conducted to assess evidence for the effectiveness of different physiotherapy interventions in patients undergoing lung cancer resection surgery. Online literature databases [Medline, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), EMBASE, SCOPUS, PEDro and CINAHL] were searched up until June 2013. Studies were included if they were randomized controlled trials, compared 2 or more perioperative physiotherapy interventions or compared one intervention with no intervention, included only patients undergoing pulmonary resection for lung cancer and assessed at least 2 or more of the following variables: functional capacity parameters, postoperative pulmonary complications or length of hospital stay. Reviews and meta-analyses were excluded. Eight studies were selected for inclusion in this review. They included a total of 599 patients. Seven of the studies were identified as having a low risk of bias. Two studies assessed preoperative interventions, 4 postoperative interventions and the remaining 2 investigated the efficacy of interventions that were started preoperatively and then continued after surgery. The substantial heterogeneity in the interventions across the studies meant that it was not possible to conduct a meta-analysis. The most important finding of this systematic review is that presurgical interventions based on moderate-intense aerobic exercise in patients undergoing lung resection for lung cancer improve functional capacity and reduce postoperative morbidity, whereas interventions performed only during the postoperative period do not seem to reduce postoperative pulmonary complications or length of hospital stay. Nevertheless, no firm conclusions can be drawn because of the heterogeneity of the studies included. Further research into the efficacy and effectiveness of perioperative respiratory physiotherapy in

  19. Carinal resection and sleeve pneumonectomy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Carinal resection (CR) and sleeve pneumonectomy (SP) are one of the challenging issues in thoracic surgery and performed rarely. In spite of the knowledge of the technique, the incidence of postoperative complications is higher compared to standard resections. Adequate patient selection, improved anesthetic management, surgical technique and better postoperative management might reduce the rate of postoperative morbidity and mortality. PMID:27942410

  20. Shifting sources of functional limitation following extensive (70%) lung resection.

    PubMed

    Hsia, Connie C W; Dane, D Merrill; Estrera, Aaron S; Wagner, Harrieth E; Wagner, Peter D; Johnson, Robert L

    2008-04-01

    We previously found that, following surgical resection of approximately 58% of lung units by right pneumonectomy (PNX) in adult canines, oxygen-diffusing capacity (Dl(O(2))) fell sufficiently to become a major factor limiting exercise capacity, although the decline was mitigated by recruitment, remodeling, and growth of the remaining lung units. To determine whether an upper limit of compensation is reached following the loss of even more lung units, we measured pulmonary gas exchange, hemodynamics, and ventilatory power requirements in adult canines during treadmill exercise following two-stage resection of approximately 70% of lung units in the presence or absence of mediastinal distortion. Results were compared with that in control animals following right PNX or thoracotomy without resection (Sham). Following 70% lung resection, peak O(2) uptake was 45% below normal. Ventilation-perfusion mismatch developed, and pulmonary arterial pressure and ventilatory power requirements became markedly elevated. In contrast, the relationship of Dl(O(2)) to cardiac output remained normal, indicating preservation of Dl(O(2))-to-cardiac output ratio and alveolar-capillary recruitment up to peak exercise. The impairment in airway and vascular function exceeded the impairment in gas exchange and imposed the major limitation to exercise following 70% resection. Mediastinal distortion further reduced air and blood flow conductance, resulting in CO(2) retention. Results suggest that adaptation of extra-acinar airways and blood vessels lagged behind that of acinar tissue. As more lung units were lost, functional compensation became limited by the disproportionately reduced convective conductance rather than by alveolar diffusion disequilibrium.

  1. Effects of Curcuminoids-Piperine Combination on Systemic Oxidative Stress, Clinical Symptoms and Quality of Life in Subjects with Chronic Pulmonary Complications Due to Sulfur Mustard: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Panahi, Yunes; Ghanei, Mostafa; Hajhashemi, Ali; Sahebkar, Amirhossein

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays a key role in the development of chronic pulmonary complications of sulfur mustard (SM). Curcuminoids are polyphenols with documented safety and antioxidant activity. The present study aimed to investigate the efficacy of short-term supplementation with curcuminoids (co-administered with piperine to enhance the bioavailability of curcuminoids) in alleviating systemic oxidative stress and clinical symptoms, and improvement of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in subjects suffering from chronic pulmonary complications due to SM exposure who are receiving standard respiratory treatments. Eighty-nine subjects were recruited to this randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial, being randomly allocated to either curcuminoids (1500 mg/day) + piperine (15 mg/day) combination (n = 45) or placebo (n = 44) for a period of 4 weeks. High-resolution computed tomography suggested the diagnosis of bronchiolitis obliterans in all subjects. Efficacy measures were changes in serum levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) and malonedialdehyde (MDA). The severity and frequency of respiratory symptoms and HRQoL were also assessed using St. George respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) and COPD Assessment Test (CAT) indices. Serum levels of GSH were increased whilst those of MDA decreased by the end of trial in both groups. Likewise, there were significant improvements in the total as well as subscale (symptoms, activity and impact) SGRQ and CAT scores in both groups. However, comparison of magnitude of changes revealed a greater effect of curcuminoids-piperine combination compared to placebo in elevating GSH, reducing MDA and improving CAT and SGRQ (total and subscale) scores (p < 0.001). Regarding the promising effects of curcuminoids on the measures of systemic oxidative stress, clinical symptoms and HRQoL, these phytochemicals may be used as safe adjuvants in patients suffering from chronic SM-induced pulmonary complications who are receiving standard treatments.

  2. Anesthesia and pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    McGlothlin, Dana; Ivascu, Natalia; Heerdt, Paul M

    2012-01-01

    Anesthesia and surgery are associated with significantly increased morbidity and mortality in patients with pulmonary hypertension due mainly to right ventricular failure, arrhythmias, postoperative hypoxemia, and myocardial ischemia. Preoperative risk assessment and successful management of patients with pulmonary hypertension undergoing cardiac surgery involve an understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease, screening of patients at-risk for pulmonary arterial hypertension, analysis of preoperative and operative risk factors, thorough multidisciplinary planning, careful intraoperative management, and early recognition and treatment of postoperative complications. This article will cover each of these aspects with particular focus on the anesthetic approach for non-cardiothoracic surgeries.

  3. Pulmonary Hypertension and Pulmonary Vasodilators.

    PubMed

    Keller, Roberta L

    2016-03-01

    Pulmonary hypertension in the perinatal period can present acutely (persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn) or chronically. Clinical and echocardiographic diagnosis of acute pulmonary hypertension is well accepted but there are no broadly validated criteria for echocardiographic diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension later in the clinical course, although there are significant populations of infants with lung disease at risk for this diagnosis. Contributing cardiovascular comorbidities are common in infants with pulmonary hypertension and lung disease. It is not clear who should be treated without confirmation of pulmonary vascular disease by cardiac catheterization, with concurrent evaluation of any contributing cardiovascular comorbidities.

  4. Pulmonary Edema

    MedlinePlus

    ... suddenly or develop over time. Sudden (acute) pulmonary edema symptoms Extreme shortness of breath or difficulty breathing ( ... fatal if not treated. Long-term (chronic) pulmonary edema symptoms Having more shortness of breath than normal ...

  5. Pulmonary Rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    Pulmonary Rehabilitation If you have shortness of breath because of lung problems, you may have asked yourself: • Can I ... medications do I really need to take? Pulmonary rehabilitation can help answer these and other questions. Enrolling ...

  6. Pulmonary Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    Pulmonary fibrosis is a condition in which the tissue deep in your lungs becomes scarred over time. This tissue ... may not get enough oxygen. Causes of pulmonary fibrosis include environmental pollutants, some medicines, some connective tissue ...

  7. Pulmonary Embolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... pulmonary embolism is a sudden blockage in a lung artery. The cause is usually a blood clot ... loose and travels through the bloodstream to the lung. Pulmonary embolism is a serious condition that can ...

  8. Diaphragmatic Hernia Masquerading as a Pulmonary Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Appiah, S; Tcherveniakov, P; Krysiak, P

    2015-01-01

    Iatrogenic injury accounts for the second most common cause of acquired diaphragmatic hernias after penetrating trauma. An increased incidence of these hernias has been observed with the widespread use of laparoscopic surgery. We present the case of a 65-year-old woman who initially underwent sigmoid resection for an adenocarcinoma and a subsequent liver resection for metastasis. She was noted to have a left lower lobe pulmonary nodule on surveillance computed tomography, for which she underwent a mini-thoracotomy for a planned resection. At the time of surgery, the pulmonary nodule was discovered to be a diaphragmatic hernia, most probably of iatrogenic origin. We discuss the difficulty in diagnosis given her history and the location of such a lesion. PMID:25723679

  9. Pulmonary langerhans cell histiocytosis case with diabetes insipidus and tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Ugurlu, E; Altinisik, G; Aydogmus, U; Bir, F

    2017-04-01

    A 19-year-old male patient was observed due to having central diabetes insipidus (DI) for five years. He had a history of smoking 5-10 cigarettes a day for two years, but stopped smoking from the last month. The computerized tomography revealed thin-walled cystic lesions in different sizes more dominantly in the upper lobes and consolidated areas in the left upper and lower lobes. The wedge resection from the right lower lobe revealed pulmonary langerhans cell histiocytosis. Follow-up acid-fast bacteria (AFB) examinations revealed (+++) and antituberculous treatment was started. On the 40th day of the anti-tuberculosis treatment, the patient applied once again due to fever and chest pain. Although infiltrations persisted in the left upper and middle zones in the postero-anterior lung rontgenogram, right-sided pneumothorax was detected. The case is considered tuberculosis and the patient continued to receive anti-TB treatment under the close supervision.

  10. Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... on Twitter. What Is Pulmonary Hypertension? Pulmonary hypertension (PULL-mun-ary HI-per-TEN-shun), or PH, is increased pressure in the pulmonary arteries. These arteries carry blood from your heart to your lungs to pick up oxygen. PH causes symptoms such as shortness of ...

  11. Major Lung Resections Using Manual Suturing Versus Staplers During Fiscal Crisis.

    PubMed

    Potaris, Konstantinos; Kapetanakis, Emmanuil; Papamichail, Konstantinos; Midvighi, Elena; Verveniotis, Alexis; Parissis, Fotios; Apostolou, Demetrios; Tziortziotis, Vaios; Maimani, Spiridoula; Pouliara, Evangelia; Vogiatzis, Gregorios; Kakaris, Stamatis; Konstantinou, Marios

    2015-07-27

    AbstractObjective: During fiscal crisis there was a period of shortage of staplers in our hospital, which drove us to manual suturing of bronchi and pulmonary vessels during major lung resections. We present our experience during that period in comparison to a subsequent period when staplers became available again.

  12. 3D-printed guiding templates for improved osteosarcoma resection

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Limin; Zhou, Ye; Zhu, Ye; Lin, Zefeng; Wang, Yingjun; Zhang, Yu; Xia, Hong; Mao, Chuanbin

    2016-01-01

    Osteosarcoma resection is challenging due to the variable location of tumors and their proximity with surrounding tissues. It also carries a high risk of postoperative complications. To overcome the challenge in precise osteosarcoma resection, computer-aided design (CAD) was used to design patient-specific guiding templates for osteosarcoma resection on the basis of the computer tomography (CT) scan and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the osteosarcoma of human patients. Then 3D printing technique was used to fabricate the guiding templates. The guiding templates were used to guide the osteosarcoma surgery, leading to more precise resection of the tumorous bone and the implantation of the bone implants, less blood loss, shorter operation time and reduced radiation exposure during the operation. Follow-up studies show that the patients recovered well to reach a mean Musculoskeletal Tumor Society score of 27.125. PMID:26997197

  13. 3D-printed guiding templates for improved osteosarcoma resection.

    PubMed

    Ma, Limin; Zhou, Ye; Zhu, Ye; Lin, Zefeng; Wang, Yingjun; Zhang, Yu; Xia, Hong; Mao, Chuanbin

    2016-03-21

    Osteosarcoma resection is challenging due to the variable location of tumors and their proximity with surrounding tissues. It also carries a high risk of postoperative complications. To overcome the challenge in precise osteosarcoma resection, computer-aided design (CAD) was used to design patient-specific guiding templates for osteosarcoma resection on the basis of the computer tomography (CT) scan and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the osteosarcoma of human patients. Then 3D printing technique was used to fabricate the guiding templates. The guiding templates were used to guide the osteosarcoma surgery, leading to more precise resection of the tumorous bone and the implantation of the bone implants, less blood loss, shorter operation time and reduced radiation exposure during the operation. Follow-up studies show that the patients recovered well to reach a mean Musculoskeletal Tumor Society score of 27.125.

  14. Computer-Assisted Resection and Reconstruction of Pelvic Tumor Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Docquier, Pierre-Louis; Paul, Laurent; Cartiaux, Olivier; Delloye, Christian; Banse, Xavier

    2010-01-01

    Pelvic sarcoma is associated with a relatively poor prognosis, due to the difficulty in obtaining an adequate surgical margin given the complex pelvic anatomy. Magnetic resonance imaging and computerized tomography allow valuable surgical resection planning, but intraoperative localization remains hazardous. Surgical navigation systems could be of great benefit in surgical oncology, especially in difficult tumor location; however, no commercial surgical oncology software is currently available. A customized navigation software was developed and used to perform a synovial sarcoma resection and allograft reconstruction. The software permitted preoperative planning with defined target planes and intraoperative navigation with a free-hand saw blade. The allograft was cut according to the same planes. Histological examination revealed tumor-free resection margins. Allograft fitting to the pelvis of the patient was excellent and allowed stable osteosynthesis. We believe this to be the first case of combined computer-assisted tumor resection and reconstruction with an allograft. PMID:21127723

  15. Computer-assisted resection and reconstruction of pelvic tumor sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Docquier, Pierre-Louis; Paul, Laurent; Cartiaux, Olivier; Delloye, Christian; Banse, Xavier

    2010-01-01

    Pelvic sarcoma is associated with a relatively poor prognosis, due to the difficulty in obtaining an adequate surgical margin given the complex pelvic anatomy. Magnetic resonance imaging and computerized tomography allow valuable surgical resection planning, but intraoperative localization remains hazardous. Surgical navigation systems could be of great benefit in surgical oncology, especially in difficult tumor location; however, no commercial surgical oncology software is currently available. A customized navigation software was developed and used to perform a synovial sarcoma resection and allograft reconstruction. The software permitted preoperative planning with defined target planes and intraoperative navigation with a free-hand saw blade. The allograft was cut according to the same planes. Histological examination revealed tumor-free resection margins. Allograft fitting to the pelvis of the patient was excellent and allowed stable osteosynthesis. We believe this to be the first case of combined computer-assisted tumor resection and reconstruction with an allograft.

  16. 3D-printed guiding templates for improved osteosarcoma resection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Limin; Zhou, Ye; Zhu, Ye; Lin, Zefeng; Wang, Yingjun; Zhang, Yu; Xia, Hong; Mao, Chuanbin

    2016-03-01

    Osteosarcoma resection is challenging due to the variable location of tumors and their proximity with surrounding tissues. It also carries a high risk of postoperative complications. To overcome the challenge in precise osteosarcoma resection, computer-aided design (CAD) was used to design patient-specific guiding templates for osteosarcoma resection on the basis of the computer tomography (CT) scan and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the osteosarcoma of human patients. Then 3D printing technique was used to fabricate the guiding templates. The guiding templates were used to guide the osteosarcoma surgery, leading to more precise resection of the tumorous bone and the implantation of the bone implants, less blood loss, shorter operation time and reduced radiation exposure during the operation. Follow-up studies show that the patients recovered well to reach a mean Musculoskeletal Tumor Society score of 27.125.

  17. Transurethral resection of the prostate

    MedlinePlus

    TURP; Prostate resection - transurethral ... used to remove the inside part of your prostate gland using electricity. ... if you have benign prostatic hyperplasia ( BPH ). The prostate gland often grows larger as men get older. ...

  18. [Preoperative evaluation and predictors of mortality in lung cancer resection].

    PubMed

    Rojas, Andrés; Opazo, Marcela; Hernández, Marcela; Ávila, Paulina; Villalobos, Daniel

    2015-06-01

    Surgical resection of lung cancer, the only available curative option today, is strongly associated with mortality. The goal during the perioperative period is to identify and evaluate appropriate candidates for lung resection in a more careful way and reduce the immediate perioperative risk and posterior disability. This is a narrative review of perioperative risk assessment in lung cancer resection. Instruments designed to facilitate decision-making have been implemented in recent years but with contradictory results. Cardiovascular risk assessment should be the first step before a potential lung resection, considering that most of these patients are old, smokers and have atherosclerosis. Respiratory mechanics determined by postoperative forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1), the evaluation of the alveolar-capillary membrane by diffusing capacity of carbon monoxide and cardiopulmonary function measuring the maximum O2 consumption, will give clues about the patient's respiratory and cardiac response to stress. With these assessments, the patient and its attending team can reach a treatment decision balancing the perioperative risk, the chances of survival and the pulmonary long-term disability.

  19. Reperfusion pulmonary edema

    SciTech Connect

    Klausner, J.M.; Paterson, I.S.; Mannick, J.A.; Valeri, C.R.; Shepro, D.; Hechtman, H.B. )

    1989-02-17

    Reperfusion following lower-torso ischemia in humans leads to respiratory failure manifest by pulmonary hypertension, hypoxemia, and noncardiogenic pulmonary edema. The mechanism of injury has been studied in the sheep lung lymph preparation, where it has been demonstrated that the reperfusion resulting in pulmonary edema is due to an increase in microvascular permeability of the lung to protein. This respiratory failure caused by reperfusion appears to be an inflammatory reaction associated with intravascular release of the chemoattractants leukotriene B{sub 4} and thromboxane. Histological studies of the lung in experimental animals revealed significant accumulation of neutrophils but not platelets in alveolar capillaries. The authors conclude that thromboxane generated and released from the ischemic tissue is responsible for the transient pulmonary hypertension. Second, it is likely that the chemoattractants are responsible for leukosequestration, and third, neutrophils, oxygen-derived free radicals, and thromboxane moderate the altered lung permeability.

  20. [Resection of intracardiac myxoma. Case report].

    PubMed

    Carmona-Delgado, Víctor Manuel; Deloya-Maldonado, Angélica María; Carranza-Bernal, María Lourdes; Hinojosa-Pérez, Arturo; Farías-Mayene, Leobardo

    2017-01-01

    Myxomas are the most common benign cardiac tumors, which are considered emergency surgery. The resection should not be delayed because 8-9% of affected patients may die due to intracardiac blood flow obstruction. We presente a clinical case of a 47 year old female, history of dyslipidemia. Disease starts with retrosternal oppression feeling, dyspnea on moderate exercise, dizziness, pain in joints hands. Arrhytmic heart sounds, diastolic mitral murmur II/IV, breth sounds present, no lymph. Laboratory: hemoglobin 11.0, leucocyte 9000, glucose 96 mg/dL, chest RX medium arch prominence cardiac silhouette. ECO transthoracic LVEF 60 %, with left atrial intracardiac tumor 13x11 cm, pedicle fixed the interatrial septum, the mitral valve bulges, with mild mitral valve. Half sternotomy is performed intracardiac tumor resection, pericardial placement interatrial with extracorporeal circulation support 65', aortic clamping time of 40'. Intracardiac tumor surgical findings interatrial septum fixed to left side, pedicle, rounded, yellow, multiloculated, soft, 13x10 cm in diameter. Histopathological diagnosis cardiac myxoma. We conclude that the tumor resection was carried in a timely manner with satisfactory evolution.

  1. Clinical and radiologic features of pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Gluecker, T; Capasso, P; Schnyder, P; Gudinchet, F; Schaller, M D; Revelly, J P; Chiolero, R; Vock, P; Wicky, S

    1999-01-01

    Pulmonary edema may be classified as increased hydrostatic pressure edema, permeability edema with diffuse alveolar damage (DAD), permeability edema without DAD, or mixed edema. Pulmonary edema has variable manifestations. Postobstructive pulmonary edema typically manifests radiologically as septal lines, peribronchial cuffing, and, in more severe cases, central alveolar edema. Pulmonary edema with chronic pulmonary embolism manifests as sharply demarcated areas of increased ground-glass attenuation. Pulmonary edema with veno-occlusive disease manifests as large pulmonary arteries, diffuse interstitial edema with numerous Kerley lines, peribronchial cuffing, and a dilated right ventricle. Stage 1 near drowning pulmonary edema manifests as Kerley lines, peribronchial cuffing, and patchy, perihilar alveolar areas of airspace consolidation; stage 2 and 3 lesions are radiologically nonspecific. Pulmonary edema following administration of cytokines demonstrates bilateral, symmetric interstitial edema with thickened septal lines. High-altitude pulmonary edema usually manifests as central interstitial edema associated with peribronchial cuffing, ill-defined vessels, and patchy airspace consolidation. Neurogenic pulmonary edema manifests as bilateral, rather homogeneous airspace consolidations that predominate at the apices in about 50% of cases. Reperfusion pulmonary edema usually demonstrates heterogeneous airspace consolidations that predominate in the areas distal to the recanalized vessels. Postreduction pulmonary edema manifests as mild airspace consolidation involving the ipsilateral lung, whereas pulmonary edema due to air embolism initially demonstrates interstitial edema followed by bilateral, peripheral alveolar areas of increased opacity that predominate at the lung bases. Familiarity with the spectrum of radiologic findings in pulmonary edema from various causes will often help narrow the differential diagnosis.

  2. Electromagnetic navigation bronchoscopy guided injection of methylene blue combined with hookwire for preoperative localization of small pulmonary lesions in thoracoscopic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jiayuan; Mao, Xiaowei; Xie, Fangfang

    2015-01-01

    Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) has been widely used in the resection of small pulmonary lesions in the clinical practice. The accurate preoperative localization of small pulmonary lesions is significant to guide the operation. We report a thoracoscopic pulmonary wedge resection with electromagnetic navigation bronchoscopy (ENB) guided injection of methylene blue combined with hookwire to localize the small pulmonary lesion in a 50-year-old woman. We successfully performed VATS followed by the combined localization of these two methods. This localization method has a higher accuracy and fewer complications, which can effectively guide the surgical resection. PMID:26793384

  3. When a pulmonary embolism is not a pulmonary embolism: a rare case of primary pulmonary leiomyosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Muganlinskaya, Nargiz; Guzman, Amanda; Dahagam, Chanukya; Selinger, Stephen R.

    2015-01-01

    Arterial leiomyosarcomas account for up to 21% of vascular leiomyosarcomas, with 56% of arterial leiomyosarcomas occurring in the pulmonary artery. While isolated cases of primary pulmonary artery leiomyosarcoma document survival up to 36 months after treatment, these uncommon, aggressive tumors are highly lethal, with 1-year survival estimated at 20% from the onset of symptoms. We discuss a rare case of a pulmonary artery leiomyosarcoma that was originally diagnosed as a pulmonary embolism (PE). A 72-year-old Caucasian female was initially diagnosed with ‘saddle pulmonary embolism’ based on computerized tomographic angiography of the chest 2 months prior to admission and placed on anticoagulation. Dyspnea escalated, and serial computed tomography scans showed cardiomegaly with pulmonary emboli involving the right and left main pulmonary arteries with extension into the right and left upper and lower lobe branches. An echocardiogram on admission showed severe pulmonary hypertension with a pulmonary artery pressure of 82.9 mm Hg, and a severely enlarged right ventricle. Respiratory distress and multiorgan failure developed and, unfortunately, the patient expired. Autopsy showed a lobulated, yellow mass throughout the main pulmonary arteries measuring 13 cm in diameter. The mass extended into the parenchyma of the right upper lobe. On microscopy, the mass was consistent with a high-grade primary pulmonary artery leiomyosarcoma. Median survival of patients with primary pulmonary artery leiomyosarcoma without surgery is one and a half months, and mortality is usually due to right-sided heart failure. Pulmonary artery leiomyosarcoma is a rare but highly lethal disease commonly mistaken for PE. Thus, we recommend clinicians to suspect this malignancy when anticoagulation fails to relieve initial symptoms. In conclusion, early detection and suspicion of pulmonary artery leiomyosarcoma should be considered in patients refractory to anticoagulation, prompting initiation

  4. Large Vessel Vasculitis with an Isolated Lesion of a Single-lobe Pulmonary Artery.

    PubMed

    Kitajima, Takamasa; Marumo, Satoshi; Shoji, Tsuyoshi; Huang, Cheng-Long; Yuba, Yoshiaki; Fukui, Motonari

    2016-01-01

    Chronic pulmonary arterial obstructions are caused mostly by chronic pulmonary artery thromboembolism and rarely by vasculitis or intimal sarcoma of the pulmonary artery. We herein report an unusual case of a 42-year-old woman with a solitary obstruction of the pulmonary artery in the right lower lobe of her lung. Because we could not exclude the possibility of intimal sarcoma, middle and lower lobectomy was performed. The resected specimens revealed large vessel vasculitis (LVV) and an isolated lesion in the right lower lobe pulmonary artery. LVV should therefore be considered in the differential diagnosis for single pulmonary arterial stenosis or obstruction.

  5. Resection Interposition Arthroplasty for Failed Distal Ulna Resections

    PubMed Central

    Papatheodorou, Loukia K.; Rubright, James H.; Kokkalis, Zinon T.; Sotereanos, Dean G.

    2013-01-01

    The major complications of distal ulna resection, the Darrach procedure, are radioulnar impingement and instability. High failure rates have been reported despite published modifications of the Darrach procedure. Several surgical techniques have been developed to treat this difficult problem and to mitigate the symptoms associated with painful convergence and impingement. No technique has demonstrated clinical superiority. Recently, implant arthroplasty of the distal ulna has been endorsed as an option for the management of the symptomatic patient with a failed distal ulna resection. However, there are concerns for implant longevity, especially in young, active adults. Resection interposition arthroplasty relies on interposition of an Achilles tendon allograft between the distal radius and the resected distal ulna. Although this technique does not restore normal mechanics of the distal radioulnar joint, it can prevent painful convergence of the radius on the ulna. Achilles allograft interposition arthroplasty is a safe and highly effective alternative for failed distal ulna resections, especially for young, active patients, in whom an implant or alternative procedure may not be appropriate. PMID:24436784

  6. Adjuvant therapy of resectable rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Minsky, Bruce D

    2002-08-01

    The two conventional treatments for clinically resectable rectal cancer are surgery followed by postoperative combined modality therapy and preoperative combined modality therapy followed by surgery and postoperative chemotherapy. Preoperative therapy (most commonly combined modality therapy) has gained acceptance as a standard adjuvant therapy. The potential advantages of the preoperative approach include decreased tumor seeding, less acute toxicity, increased radiosensitivity due to more oxygenated cells, and enhanced sphincter preservation. There are a number of new chemotherapeutic agents that have been developed for the treatment of patients with colorectal cancer. Phase I/II trials examining the use of new chemotherapeutic agents in combination with pelvic radiation therapy are in progress.

  7. Transurethral resection of the ejaculatory duct.

    PubMed

    Paick, J S

    2000-05-01

    comprehensive diagnosis of ejaculatory duct obstruction. In patients showing atrophic seminal vesicles on transrectal ultrasonography and having a history of pulmonary tuberculosis, further study is not necessary and microscopic epididymal sperm aspiration is recommended for in vitro fertilization. Qualitative measurement of semen fructose may be helpful in the diagnosis of partial ejaculatory duct obstruction. Patients having midline cyst and being treated by transurethral resection are expected to have the best outcome.

  8. Pulmonary Metastasectomy in Adult Patients with Synovial Sarcoma: A Single-Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kanghoon; Kang, Moon Chul; Lee, Hae Won; Park, Jong Ho; Baek, Hee Jong; Cho, Sung Joon; Jeon, Dae-Geun

    2016-01-01

    Background This study assessed the efficacy of pulmonary metastasectomy for synovial sarcoma in adult patients. Methods Fifty patients, diagnosed with pulmonary metastasis from June 1990 to August 2010, were reviewed retrospectively. Twenty-eight patients underwent complete pulmonary metastasectomy, and their survival was evaluated. Age, sex, time to metastatic progression, laterality, number of tumors, size of largest nodule, and number of metastasectomies were analyzed as potential prognostic factors. Results In all, 29 patients underwent at least one pulmonary metastasectomy, and 51 resections were performed. One intraoperative mortality occurred, and the 5-year survival rate was 58.4%. Bilateral metastases and early metastatic progression were associated with poor survival in multivariate analyses. Conclusion Surgical resection can be a good option for treating pulmonary metastasis in patients with synovial sarcoma. Repeated resection was feasible with low mortality and morbidity. PMID:27965922

  9. Long-term survival in a patient with repeated resections for lung metastasis after hepatectomy for ruptured hepatocellular carcinoma: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Kai-Lun; Chen, Yang-Yuan; Teng, Tsung-Han; Soon, Maw-Soan

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Tumor rupture and pulmonary metastasis in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma are both associated with poor prognosis and treatment strategies are controversial. Case presentation Here we report a 50-year-old man with survival of over 90 months after undergoing an extended right lobectomy for a ruptured hepatocellular carcinoma and then repeated resections for pulmonary metastasis during the followup period. Conclusion This case report shows that surgical resection can be an effective treatment for patients with both ruptured hepatocellular carcinoma and pulmonary recurrences. PMID:18588711

  10. Status postpneumonectomy for pulmonary artery sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Siordia, Juan A; Garlish, Amanda; Truong, Huong

    2015-07-02

    Primary pulmonary artery sarcoma is a rare disease that has a poor survival prognosis due to misdiagnosis with pulmonary thromboembolism or metastatic embolisation, detailed image findings and complicated surgical procedures. Surgical procedures established for treatment include pneumonectomy and pulmonary endarterectomy. Survival after surgery still remains at 1 year survival of 50%. The following case report demonstrates a patient's status postpneumonectomy for pulmonary artery sarcoma that presented with no complications after 1.5-year follow-up.

  11. Pulmonary Embolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... for the Public » Health Topics » Pulmonary Embolism Explore Pulmonary Embolism What Is... Other Names Causes Who Is at Risk Signs & Symptoms Diagnosis Treatments Prevention Living With Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Arrhythmia Deep Vein Thrombosis Lung VQ Scan Overweight and Obesity Send a ...

  12. Pulmonary Artery Leiomyosarcoma Diagnosed without Delay.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Motohisa; Sumi, Yuki; Sakakibara, Yumi; Tamaoka, Meiyo; Miyazaki, Yasunari; Arai, Hirokumi; Kojima, Katsuo; Itoh, Fusahiko; Amano, Tomonari; Yoshizawa, Yasuyuki; Inase, Naohiko

    2011-05-01

    A 63-year-old female presented with abnormal lung shadows but had, apart from this, few symptoms. Computed tomography (CT) revealed multiple nodules and blockage of the pulmonary artery. She was immediately diagnosed with pulmonary artery sarcoma based on a careful differential diagnosis and underwent surgery. Her tumor was pathologically diagnosed as leiomyosarcoma (i.e. intimal sarcoma). Pulmonary artery sarcoma can be easily confounded with thromboembolism in a clinical setting and some cases are diagnosed post mortem only. In our case, clinical prediction scores (Wells score, Geneva score, and revised Geneva score) for the pulmonary embolism showed low probability. Moreover, chest CT showed uncommon findings for pulmonary thromboembolism, as the nodules were too big for thrombi. Because surgical resection can provide the only hope of long-term survival in cases of pulmonary artery sarcoma, clinicians should consider this possibility in the differential diagnosis of pulmonary embolism. Clinical prediction scores and CT findings might help to reach the correct diagnosis of pulmonary artery sarcoma.

  13. Pulmonary blastomycosis.

    PubMed

    Bariola, J Ryan; Vyas, Keyur S

    2011-12-01

    Blastomyces dermatitidis is acquired in almost all cases via inhalation, and pulmonary disease is the most frequent clinical manifestation of blastomycosis. Pulmonary disease can range from asymptomatic infection to rapidly severe and fatal disease. Most cases will present as pneumonia, either acute or chronic, or as a lung mass. In rare cases pulmonary blastomycosis is associated with the acute respiratory distress syndrome. Blastomycosis can present as isolated pulmonary disease or along with coexisting extrapulmonary disease that usually will involve the skin, bony structures, genitourinary tract, or central nervous system. Diagnosis is largely based on isolation of the organism via culture or visualization of the organism in clinical specimens. Detection of urinary Blastomyces antigen is a recent addition to diagnostic options. Itraconazole is the drug of choice for most forms of the disease; amphotericin B is reserved for the more severe forms. Newer azoles such as voriconazole and posaconazole have a limited role in the treatment of pulmonary blastomycosis.

  14. Local resection of ampullary tumors.

    PubMed

    Meneghetti, Adam T; Safadi, Bassem; Stewart, Lygia; Way, Lawrence W

    2005-12-01

    There is no consensus on the appropriateness of local resection for ampullary tumors, because malignant recurrence of what were thought to be benign tumors has been reported. This study examined the role of local resection in the management of ampullary tumors. Thirty patients (mean age 66 years) had transduodenal local resections performed at UCSF-Moffitt Hospital or the San Francisco VA Medical Center (February, 1992 to March, 2004). Mean follow-up time was 5.8 years. Preoperative biopsies (obtained in all patients) showed 18 adenomas, four adenomas with dysplasia, five adenomas with atypia, one adenoma with dysplasia and focal adenocarcinoma, and two tumors seen on endoscopy, whose biopsies showed only duodenal mucosa. In comparison with the final pathology findings, the results of frozen section examinations for malignancy in 20 patients, during the operation, were false-negative in three cases. The final pathologic diagnosis was 23 villous adenomas, six adenocarcinomas, and one paraganglioma. On preoperative biopsies, all patients who had high-grade dysplasia and one of five patients with atypia turned out to have invasive adenocarcinoma when the entire specimen was examined postoperatively. Two (33%) adenocarcinomas recurred at a mean of 4 years; both had negative margins at the initial resection. Among the 23 adenomas, three (13%) recurred (all as adenomas) at a mean of 3.2 years; in only one of these cases was the margin positive at the time of resection. Tumor size did not influence recurrence rate. Ampullary tumors with high-grade dysplasia on preoperative biopsy should be treated by pancreaticoduodenectomy because they usually harbor malignancy. Recurrence is too common and unpredictable after local resection of malignant lesions for this to be considered an acceptable alternative to pancreaticoduodenectomy. Ampullary adenomas can be resected locally with good results, but the recurrence rate was 13%, so endoscopic surveillance is indicated

  15. [Surgical management of pulmonary aspergilloma].

    PubMed

    Guerra, Miguel; Santos, Nelson; Miranda, José; Carlos Mota, João; Leal, Francisco; Vouga, Luis

    2008-01-01

    After formation of fungus ball in pre-existing cavities, antifungal agents are very hard to control the infection. Surgical resection offers the only realistic chance of a permanent cure for aspergilloma. However, surgical indications are still a controversy because of the high incidence of postoperative complications. The purpose of this study was to evaluate our indications and results in the surgical treatment of aspergilloma, focusing attention on the postoperative complications and risk factors. From 1990 to 2004, 60 patients with mean age of 44.6 (range, 20-69) were submitted to pulmonary surgery for excision of aspergilloma. Forty-one patients (68.3%) were male, 25 patients (41.7%) were smokers and 47 (78.3%) had tuberculosis as the underlying lung disease. The most frequent indication for surgery was haemoptysis (88.3%). The cavities were mainly situated in the upper lobes (85.0%) and in the right lung (68.3%). Approximately half of aspergillomas (56.7%) were classified as complex aspergillomas. The procedures performed were : 7 pneumectomies (11.7%), 3 bilobectomies (5.0%), 42 lobectomies (70.0%), 7 wedge resections (11.7%) and one cavernostomy (1.7%). There were 3 postoperative deaths (5%), and major complications occurred in 16.3% of the patients including: bleeding (n=3) and bronchopleural fistula (n=2). Recurrence rate was 3.3%. Surgical resection of pulmonary aspergilloma is effective in preventing recurrence of hemoptysis. Preoperative preparation of the patient, meticulous surgical technique, asn postoperative care reduced the rate of complications. We recommend early surgical resection of symptomatic cases with reasonable complications.

  16. [Liver resection by water jet].

    PubMed

    Horie, T

    1989-01-01

    Major problem in resecting liver parenchyma is how to control the bleeding. Recently, resection of the liver by water jet has been reported. So, experimental and clinical studies were performed to investigate the usefulness of the water jet equipment. Ten pigs weighing around 17kg were used. The optimal pressure to resect the porcine liver was 7 to 15kg/cm2. By 4 weeks the cut surface was covered with fibrous capsule. Portal angiography showed no abnormality in the resected area. The water jet was also used in 30 human operations. The optimal pressure was 12 to 18kg/cm2 for non cirrhotic liver and 15 to 20kg/cm2 for cirrhotic liver. The surface immediately after jet cutting was more smooth than that of CUSA and histologically there was slight bleeding and necrosis. The volume of blood loss during dissection was not different between water jet group and CUSA group. No significant changes were found in the laboratory data. These results suggest that water jet is as useful as CUSA for cutting the liver parenchyma.

  17. En Bloc Resection of Solitary Functional Secreting Spinal Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, C. Rory; Clarke, Michelle J.; Gokaslan, Ziya L.; Fisher, Charles; Laufer, Ilya; Weber, Michael H.; Sciubba, Daniel M.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Literature review. Objective Functional secretory tumors metastatic to the spine can secrete hormones, growth factors, peptides, and/or molecules into the systemic circulation that cause distinct syndromes, clinically symptomatic effects, and/or additional morbidity and mortality. En bloc resection has a limited role in metastatic spine disease due to the current paradigm that systemic burden usually determines morbidity and mortality. Our objective is to review the literature for studies focused on en bloc resection of functionally active spinal metastasis as the primary indication. Methods A review of the PubMed literature was performed to identify studies focused on functional secreting metastatic tumors to the spinal column. We identified five cases of patients undergoing en bloc resection of spinal metastases from functional secreting tumors. Results The primary histologies of these spinal metastases were pheochromocytoma, carcinoid tumor, choriocarcinoma, and a fibroblast growth factor 23–secreting phosphaturic mesenchymal tumor. Although studies of en bloc resection for these rare tumor subtypes are confined to case reports, this surgical treatment option resulted in metabolic cures and decreased clinical symptoms postoperatively for patients diagnosed with solitary functional secretory spinal metastasis. Conclusion Although the ability to formulate comprehensive conclusions is limited, case reports demonstrate that en bloc resection may be considered as a potential surgical option for the treatment of patients diagnosed with solitary functional secretory spinal metastatic tumors. Future prospective investigations into clinical outcomes should be conducted comparing intralesional resection and en bloc resection for patients diagnosed with solitary functional secretory spinal metastasis. PMID:27099819

  18. Transurethral resection of the prostate - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    TURP - discharge; Prostate resection - transurethral - discharge ... You had transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) surgery to treat an enlarged prostate. Your surgeon inserted a tube-like tool called a cystoscope (or endoscope) through your urethra ( ...

  19. Challenge or opportunity: outcomes of laparoscopic resection for rectal cancer in patients with high operative risk.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ai-Guo; Zhao, Xue-wei; Mao, Zhi-hai; Han, Ding-pei; Zhao, Jing-kun; Wang, Puxiongzhi; Zhang, Zhuo; Zong, Ya-ping; Thasler, Wolfgang; Feng, Hao

    2014-11-01

    This study investigated the impact of laparoscopic rectal cancer resection for patients with high operative risk, which was defined as American Society of Anesthesiology (ASA) grades III and IV. This study was conducted at a single center on patients undergoing rectal resection from 2006 to 2010. After screening by ASA grade III or IV, 248 patients who met the inclusion criteria were identified, involving 104 open and 144 laparoscopic rectal resections. The distribution of the Charlson Comorbidity Index was similar between the two groups. Compared with open rectal resection, laparoscopic resection had a significantly lower total complication rate (P<.0001), lower pain rate (P=.0002), and lower blood loss (P<.0001). It is notable that the two groups of patients had no significant difference in cardiac and pulmonary complication rates. Thus, these data showed that the laparoscopic group for rectal cancer could provide short-term outcomes similar to those of their open resection counterparts with high operative risk. The 5-year actuarial survival rates were 0.8361 and 0.8119 in the laparoscopic and open groups for stage I/II (difference not significant), as was the 5-year overall survival rate in stage III/IV (P=.0548). In patients with preoperative cardiovascular or pulmonary disease, the 5-year survival curves were significantly different (P=.0165 and P=.0210), respectively. The cost per patient did not differ between the two procedures. The results of this analysis demonstrate the potential advantages of laparoscopic rectal cancer resection for high-risk patients, although a randomized controlled trial should be conducted to confirm the findings of the present study.

  20. Successful surgical treatment of impending rupture of thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm in an elderly patient with severe pulmonary emphysema.

    PubMed

    Uezu, T; Koja, K; Kuniyoshi, Y; Akasaki, M; Miyagi, K; Shimoji, M

    1999-08-01

    In a case of successful surgery for impending thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysmic rupture, an 83-year-old man with severe pulmonary emphysema was transferred to our hospital diagnosed with impending aneurysmic rupture. The aneurysm had been pointed out 2.5 years ago but surgical repair was not undertaken due to the patient's severe pulmonary emphysema. After admission, computed tomography showed an enlarging saccular thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm. Emergency surgery was conducted because of severe pain below the left costal margin. We resected the wall of the saccular aortic aneurysm and reconstructed the aorta with an on-lay patch under femoro-femoral bypass and selective visceral organ perfusion. Tracheostomy provided respiratory care on the day following surgery. The patient was weaned from respiratory support 6 days after surgery. Postoperative aortography showed that the reconstructed thoracoabdominal aorta functioned satisfactorily. The patient remains in good health 18 months after surgery.

  1. Pulmonary aspergilloma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Coccidioidomycosis Cystic fibrosis Histoplasmosis Lung abscess Lung cancer Sarcoidosis The most common species of fungus that causes ... fibrosis Histoplasmosis Lung cancer - small cell Pulmonary tuberculosis Sarcoidosis Review Date 7/31/2016 Updated by: Jatin ...

  2. Pulmonary atresia

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood flow from the right ventricle (right side pumping chamber) to the lungs. In pulmonary atresia, a ... Reconstructing the heart as a single ventricle (1 pumping chamber instead of 2) Heart transplant Outlook (Prognosis) ...

  3. Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is high blood pressure in the arteries to your lungs. It is a serious condition. If you have ... and you can develop heart failure. Symptoms of PH include Shortness of breath during routine activity, such ...

  4. Pulmonary Agenesis.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Rakesh K; Madan, Arun; Chawla, Aditya; Arora, Harsh Nandini; Chawla, Kiran

    2015-01-01

    Unilateral opaque lung with ipsilateral mediastinal shift is an uncommon cause of respiratory distress in newborn which can be found on simple radiograph of the chest. Pulmonary agenesis is a rare cause of unilateral opaque lung in the newborn. Nearly 50% cases of pulmonary agenesis are associated with other congenital defects including cardiovascular, skeletal, gastrointestinal or genitourinary systems. We report an infant with agenesis of the right lung associated with other congenital anomalies.

  5. Pulmonary Vein Thrombosis: A Recent Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Vishnubhotla, Priya

    2017-01-01

    The pulmonary veins (PVs) are the most proximal source of arterial thromboembolism. Pulmonary vein thrombosis (PVT) is a rare but potentially lethal disease; its incidence is unclear, as most of the literature includes case reports. It most commonly occurs as a complica­tion of malignancy, post lung surgery, or atrial fibrillation and can be idiopathic in some cases. Most patients with PVT are commonly asymptomatic or have nonspecific symptoms such as cough, hemoptysis, and dyspnea from pulmonary edema or infarction. The thrombi are typically detected using a variety of imaging modalities including transesophageal echocardiogram (TEE), computed tomography (CT) scanning, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), or pulmonary angiog­raphy. Treatment should be determined by the obstructing pathological finding and can include antibiotic therapy, anticoagulation, thrombectomy, and/or pulmonary resection. The delay in diagnosing this medical entity can lead to complications including pulmonary infarction, pulmonary edema, right ventricular failure, allograft failure, and peripheral embolism resulting in limb ischemia, stroke, and renal infarction (RI). PMID:28265529

  6. A review of pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Gan, C.T.; Noordegraaf, A. Vonk; Marques, K.M.J.; Bronzwaer, J.G.F.; Postmus, P.E.; Boonstra, A.

    2004-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a disease characterised by an increased pulmonary artery pressure. The precapillary pulmonary arteries show distinct pathobiological changes, i.e. medial hypertrophy, intimal fibrosis, microthrombi and plexiform lesions. Although the pathogenesis is not completely understood, pulmonary vascular proliferation and remodelling, due to a variety of mediators, is believed to play the pathogenetic key role. Genetic research reveals molecular deformities and gene mutations associated with phenotypic PAH. This article covers novel insights into pathobiology, pathogenesis and genes of PAH, which led to a novel classification system and a diagnostic work-up, emanated from the World Health Organisation Symposium on Pulmonary Hypertension in Venice in June 2003. PMID:25696347

  7. Pulmonary artery sarcoma: a rare thoracic tumor frequently misdiagnosed at presentation.

    PubMed

    Evison, Matthew; Crosbie, Philip; Chaturvedi, Anshuman; Shah, Rajesh; Booton, Richard

    2015-11-01

    This case illustrates a rare but important differential diagnosis of pulmonary emboli in the field of thoracic oncology, that of pulmonary artery sarcoma. It describes particular clinical features that may raise suspicion of this tumor in cases of suspected pulmonary emboli, and highlights novel radiological modalities and tissue sampling techniques in such cases. Surgical resection, as part of multi-modality therapy, is the cornerstone of treatment that has seen survival dramatically improve in recent years for patients with this rare cancer.

  8. Hepatic resection for breast cancer metastases.

    PubMed Central

    Okaro, A. C.; Durkin, D. J.; Layer, G. T.; Kissin, M. W.; Karanjia, N. D.

    2005-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Hepatic resection is an established modality of treatment for colorectal cancer metastases. Resection of breast cancer liver metastases remains controversial, but has been shown to be an effective treatment in selected cases. This study reports the outcome of 8 patients with liver metastases from breast cancer. PATIENTS & METHODS: 8 patients with liver metastases from previously treated breast cancer were referred for hepatic resection between September 1996 and December 2002. Six were eligible for liver resection. The mean age was 45.8 years. The resections performed included 1 segmentectomy and 5 hemihepatectomies of which one was an extended hemihepatectomy. One patient had a repeat hepatectomy 44 months after the first resection. RESULTS: There were no postoperative deaths or major morbidity. The resectability rate was 75%. Follow-up periods range from 6 to 70 months with a median survival of 31 months following resection. There have been 2 deaths, one died of recurrence in the residual liver at 6 months and one died disease-free from a stroke. Of the remaining 4 patients, 1 has had a further liver resection at 44 months following which she is alive and 'disease-free' at 70 months. The one patient with peritoneal recurrence is alive 49 months after her liver resection with 2 patients remaining disease-free. CONCLUSION: Hepatic resection for breast cancer liver metastases is a safe procedure with low morbidity and mortality. PMID:15901375

  9. Percutaneous pulmonary valve implantation in left pulmonary artery branch in a patient with a functional single lung.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Athar M; Krasuski, Richard A; Prieto, Lourdes R

    2012-09-01

    Percutaneous pulmonary valve technology has had a great impact on patients with congenital and acquired heart disease. In some patients, implantation of a percutaneous pulmonary valve may not be possible due to the morphology of the existing right ventricular outflow tract. In this report, we describe implantation of a Melody transcatheter pulmonary valve in the left pulmonary artery in a patient with acquired right pulmonary artery occlusion and a large right ventricular outflow tract.

  10. Lung isolation in patients with previous lung resections: Selective sequential lobar blockade using a Fuji Uniblocker(®) endobronchial blocker.

    PubMed

    Valencia Orgaz, O; Real Navacerrada, M I; Cortés Guerrero, M; García Gutierrez, A F; Marrón Fernández, C; Pérez-Cerdá Silvestre, F

    2016-11-01

    Lung isolation is essential during thoracic surgery, as it allows the thoracic surgeon to visualise and work in the surgical field. The occurrence of hypoxaemia during lung isolation is common, and is even more so in patients with decreased pulmonary functional reserve. The clinical cases are presented of 2 patients with a history of left pulmonary resections (1st left lower lobectomy, 2nd left lower lobectomy and left upper lobe segmentectomy), in which sequential selective lobar blockade was performed with Fuji Uniblocker(®) endobronchial blocker for performing right lung atypical resections (right upper lobe, middle lobe, and right lower lobe). In our experience the technique was successful, the surgical field was optimal and no intra- or post-operative complications were found. This technique may be an alternative to traditional lung isolation in patients with compromised respiratory function (low functional reserve or previous contralateral lung resections).

  11. [Intimal sarcoma of the pulmonary artery: a rare cause of pulmonary hypertension].

    PubMed

    Furest, I; Marín, M; Escribano, P; Gómez, M A; Cortinac, J; Blanquer, R

    2006-03-01

    Intimal sarcoma of the pulmonary artery is a rare tumor that is usually diagnosed during surgery or autopsy. Such tumors are characterized by local growth, with only slight ability to metastasize. Diagnosis is difficult and often delayed owing to the nonspecific nature of the symptoms. Since intimal sarcoma of the pulmonary artery is so rare and insidious it is often confused with pulmonary thromboembolism and is therefore treated inappropriately with prolonged anticoagulation or thrombolysis. With a mean survival of 12 months from the onset of symptoms, the prognosis is poor. We present the case of a woman who was preoperatively diagnosed with intimal sarcoma of the pulmonary artery and who underwent surgical resection with no apparent recurrence at long term follow-up. A review of the literature is also included.

  12. Minute pulmonary meningothelial-like nodules coexisting with pulmonary cryptococcosis mimicking lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, Kazunori; Yoshizu, Akira; Kashizaki, Fumihiro; Hida, Naoya; Hayashi, Hiroyuki

    2013-11-01

    A 68-year-old woman was found to have an abnormal shadow on chest X-ray. Computed tomography showed some small ground-glass opacities in the bilateral lung field and also a 22-mm tumor in the left lower lobe, which showed high accumulation on (18)F fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography. Each of them was difficult to distinguish from lung cancer clinically. Preoperative localization of a small ground-glass opacity nodule with computed tomography-guided lipiodol marking and resection of each using a fluoroscopic unit was performed. Pathological findings from the small nodule showed minute pulmonary meningothelial-like nodule, and those from the tumor and fungal culture showed pulmonary cryptococcosis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of coexisting minute pulmonary meningothelial-like nodules and pulmonary cryptococcosis mimicking lung cancer. Thoracoscopy assisted by computed tomography-guided lipiodol marking enabled us to diagnose them.

  13. Cytoplasmic inclusions in pulmonary macrophages of cigarette smokers.

    PubMed

    Brody, A R; Craighead, J E

    1975-02-01

    Alveolar and bronchiolar spaces in the lungs of cigarette smokers usually contain numerous macrophages with pigmented cytoplasmic granules. By electron microscopy the pigmentation appears to be due, at least in part, to increased numbers of lysosomes and phagolysosomes. Within these cytoplasmic organelles, structures are found which we designate "smokers' inclusions", since they are observed exclusively in the interstitial and alveolar macrophages of cigarette users. The inclusions have been referred to by other investigators as "needle-shaped" and "fiber-like". Since cross-sections of the structures are never seen in electron micrographs, a fiber or needle shape seems unlikely. On the other hand, thin sectioning techniques impart varying lengths to the inclusions, suggesting that they have a disc, or platelet, configuration. Surgically resected lung tissue from smokers and nonsmokers was digested in hot potassium hydroxide. Digestates contained varying numbers of hexagonal platelike particles which had features consistent with those of the aluminum silicate kaolinite, and energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometry confirmed the presence of these two elements. The origin of aluminum silicate inclusions in pulmonary macrophages has yet to be determined, although preliminary evidence strongly suggests that they are derived from inhaled tobacco smoke. The cytotoxicity of kaolinite in vitro and the possible role of aluminum silicate crystals in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis are discussed.

  14. Primary pulmonary artery sarcoma: a new surgical technique for pulmonary artery reconstruction using a self-made stapled bovine pericardial graft conduit.

    PubMed

    Obeso Carillo, Gerardo Andrés; Casais Pampín, Rocío; Legarra Calderón, Juan José; Pradas Montilla, Gonzalo

    2015-01-01

    Primary pulmonary artery sarcoma is an uncommon neoplasm with a grim prognosis. Complete resection is the only treatment that can improve the patient's survival. The role of multimodality treatment is still controversial, although adjuvant chemotherapy possibly could improve outcomes of these patients. Several pulmonary artery reconstructive techniques have been reported in the scientific literature, such as patch reconstruction, end-to-end anastomosis, synthetic prosthesis or biological grafts. In this article, we propose a new surgical option for pulmonary artery reconstruction after radical tumour resection using a self-made stapled bovine pericardial graft conduit in a patient with a mass in the pulmonary trunk and right pulmonary artery. We believe that the use of this technique adds safety and effectiveness, and reduces the surgical time.

  15. Concomitant cardiac and pulmonary operations for lung cancer.

    PubMed Central

    La Francesca, S; Frazier, O H; Radovancĕvić, B; De Caro, L F; Reul, G J; Cooley, D A

    1995-01-01

    From 1973 through 1990, 21 patients (17 men and 4 women) underwent concomitant cardiac operation and pulmonary resection for lung cancer. The mean age was 65.3 years (range, 50 to 80 years). Eighteen patients underwent coronary artery bypass; 1 underwent coronary bypass and mitral valve replacement; 1, aortic valve replacement; and 1, left ventricular aneurysmectomy. Pulmonary procedures included 16 lobectomies, 3 segmentectomies, and 2 wedge resections. Nine resections were performed during cardiopulmonary bypass, and 12 were performed either before or after bypass. On final pathologic diagnosis, 11 patients had adenocarcinoma, 7 had squamous cell carcinoma, and 3 had undifferentiated lesions. Twelve patients were in cancer stage 1 and 9 were in stage II. Placement of an intraaortic balloon pump was required in 3 patients. No patient sustained excessive blood loss requiring reoperation. Only 2 incidents (9.5%) of disseminated infection were reported. The overall 1-year survival rate was 90.5% and the 5-year survival rate was 52.4%. We found concomitant cardiac operation and pulmonary resection for lung cancer to be a safe and effective alternative to staged treatment in patients not requiring a pneumonectomy. Combined cardiac and pulmonary surgery spares the patient the risk and cost of a 2nd major surgical procedure without compromising long-term survival. PMID:8605428

  16. Pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma presenting with dysphagia: a rare presentation.

    PubMed

    Khan, Fazal; Hamid, Arsalan; Fatima, Benish; Hashmi, Shiraz; Fatimi, Saulat

    2017-01-01

    A 25-year-old man presented with a 2-month history of dysphagia and past history of pulmonary and intestinal tuberculosis. A barium swallow showed a point of constriction 42 mm above the gastroesophageal junction. Computed tomography revealed large opacities in bilateral lung fields, encroaching more on the esophagus. The lesion progressively compressed the esophagus as it moved inferiorly. A right posterolateral thoracotomy was performed for sub-anatomical resection of the mass. A biopsy revealed homogenous whirling hyalinized collagen fibers, highly suggestive of pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma, with no evidence of malignancy. Pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of longstanding dysphagia.

  17. Pulmonary Vascular Impedance in Chronic Pulmonary Hypertension.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    PULMONARY HYPERTENSION , *PULMONARY BLOOD CIRCULATION, BLOOD CIRCULATION, LUNG, PATHOLOGY, VASCULAR DISEASES, ARTERIES, OBSTRUCTION(PHYSIOLOGY...EMBOLISM, HISTOLOGY, DOGS, LABORATORY ANIMALS, BLOOD PRESSURE , EXPERIMENTAL DATA, PHYSIOLOGY.

  18. Clinical Score Predicting Long-Term Survival after Repeat Resection for Recurrent Adrenocortical Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Thuy B; Maithel, Shishir K; Pawlik, Timothy M; Wang, Tracy S; Hatzaras, Ioannis; Phay, John E; Fields, Ryan C; Weber, Sharon M; Sicklick, Jason K; Yopp, Adam C; Duh, Quan-Yang; Solorzano, Carmen C; Votanopoulos, Konstantinos I; Poultsides, George A

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is an aggressive malignancy typically resistant to chemotherapy and radiation. Surgery, even in the setting of locally recurrent or metastatic disease, remains the only potentially curative option. However, the subset of patients who will benefit from repeat resection in this setting remains ill defined. The objective of this study was to propose a prognostic clinical score that facilitates selection of patients for repeat resection of recurrent ACC. STUDY DESIGN Patients who underwent curative-intent repeat resection for recurrent ACC at 1 of 13 academic medical centers participating in the US ACC Study Group were identified. End points included morbidity, mortality, and overall survival. RESULTS Fifty-six patients underwent repeat curative-intent resection for recurrent ACC (representing 21% of 265 patients who underwent resection for primary ACC) from 1997 to 2014. Median age was 52 years. Sites of resected recurrence included locoregional only (54%), lung only (14%), liver only (12%), combined locoregional and lung (4%), combined liver and lung (4%), and other distant sites (12%). Thirty-day morbidity and mortality rates were 40% and 5.4%, respectively. Cox regression analysis revealed that the presence of multifocal recurrence, disease-free interval <12 months, and extrapulmonary distant metastases were independent predictors of poor survival. A clinical score consisting of 1-point each for the 3 variables demonstrated good discrimination in predicting survival after repeat resection (5-year: 72% for 0 points, 32% for 1 point, 0% for 2 or 3 points; p = 0.0006, area under the curve = 0.78). CONCLUSIONS Long-term survival after repeat resection for recurrent ACC is feasible when 2 of the following factors are present: solitary tumor, disease-free interval >12 months, and locoregional or pulmonary recurrence. PMID:27618748

  19. Preoperative pulmonary rehabilitation in patients with non-small cell lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Mujovic, Nebojsa; Subotic, Dragan; Marinkovic, Milan; Milovanovic, Andjela; Stojsic, Jelena; Zugic, Vladimir; Grajic, Mirko; Nikolic, Dejan

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to assess the effects of preoperative pulmonary rehabilitation (PPR) on preoperative clinical status changes in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and net effects of PPR and cancer resection on residual pulmonary function and functional capacity. Material and methods This prospective single group study included 83 COPD patients (62 ±8 years, 85% males, FEV1 = 1844 ±618 ml, Tiffeneau index = 54 ±9%) with NSCLC, on 2–4-week PPR, before resection. Pulmonary function, and functional and symptom status were evaluated by spirometry, 6-minute walking distance (6MWD) and Borg scale, on admission, after PPR and after surgery. Results Following PPR significant improvement was registered in the majority of spirometry parameters (FEV1 by 374 ml, p < 0.001; VLC by 407 ml, p < 0.001; FEF50 by 3%, p = 0.003), 6MWD (for 56 m, p < 0.001) and dyspnoeal symptoms (by 1.0 Borg unit, p < 0.001). A positive correlation was identified between preoperative increments of FEV1 and 6MWD (r s = 0.503, p = 0.001). Negative correlations were found between basal FEV1 and its percentage increment (r s = –0.479, p = 0.001) and between basal 6MWD and its percentage change (r s = –0.603, p < 0.001) during PPR. Compared to basal values, after resection a significant reduction of most spirometry parameters and 6MWD were recorded, while Tiffeneau index, FEF25 and dyspnoea severity remained stable (p = NS). Conclusions Preoperative pulmonary rehabilitation significantly enhances clinical status of COPD patients before NSCLC resection. Preoperative increase of exercise tolerance was the result of pulmonary function improvement during PPR. The beneficial effects of PPR were most emphasized in patients with initially the worst pulmonary function and the weakest functional capacity. PMID:24701217

  20. Long-term results after 110 tracheal resections

    PubMed Central

    Friedel, Godehard; Kyriss, Thomas; Leitenberger, Andrea; Toomes, Heikki

    2003-01-01

    Objective: Among the many therapeutic options for treating tracheal stenosis (e.g. bouginage, laser resection and stenting), segmental resection and reconstruction with end-to-end anastomosis is the method of choice. We verified this in an analysis of clinical material. Patients and methods: We retrospectively evaluated 110 tracheal sleeve resections performed between 1985 and 2001. Data before and after resection were analyzed, and the patients were interviewed. Results: The aetiology of stenosis was mainly postintubation injury (n = 92) (83.6%), followed by goiter with malacia (n = 8) (7.3%) and tumor (n = 6) (5.5%). There were a few other causes (n = 3) (2.7%). 48 patients (43.6%) had undergone prior conservative or surgical treatment other than sleeve resection. A cervical approach was used in 93 (84.6%), a cervicomediastinal in 15 (13.6%), and a transthoracic in two. Healing of anastomosis was uncomplicated in 101 patients (91.8%). Major and minor complications occurred in 29 patients (26.4); there were 4 dehiscences (3.6%), 3 restenoses (2.7%), 2 suture line granulations (1.8%) and 4 vocal cord dysfunctions (3.6%). The 30-day mortality rate was 0.9%. 77 patients were interviewed after surgery (median 80.1 months); 93.5% (n = 72) were satisfied with the surgical treatment. Conclusions: Resection and reconstruction offer the best treatment for tracheal stenosis. Lethal complications were due to severe comorbidity. Many patients today still undergo unsuccessful conservative treatment before being referred to surgery. PMID:19675708

  1. Chronic laminitis: strategic hoof wall resection.

    PubMed

    Rucker, Amy

    2010-04-01

    In the chronic-laminitic foot, severe soft-tissue compression and compromised circulation can result in osteitis and sepsis at the margin of the distal phalanx. Resultant inflammation and sepsis may cause the coronary corium to swell, drain, or separate from the hoof capsule, usually within 8 weeks of laminitis onset. Slow-onset cases of soft-tissue impingement can develop secondary to distal phalanx displacement due to lack of wall attachment. With either presentation, partial upper wall resection is required to reverse compression and vascular impingement by the hoof capsule. If the pathology is not overwhelming, the area reepithelializes and grows attached tubular horn. Firm bandaging and restricted exercise until tubular horn has regrown enhances recovery and the return of a strong hoof.

  2. Pulmonary Artery Intimal Sarcoma: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Kriz, Joseph P; Munfakh, Nabil A; King, Gregory S; Carden, Juan O

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary artery intimal sarcomas are rare and lethal malignant tumors that typically affect larger vessels: the aorta, inferior vena cava, and pulmonary arteries. Since symptoms and imaging of pulmonary arterial intimal sarcomas mimic pulmonary thromboembolism, the differential diagnosis of a patient presenting with chest pain, dyspnea, and filling defect within the pulmonary arteries should include intimal sarcoma. Often right ventricular failure is observed due to pulmonary hypertension caused by the obstructive effect of the tumor and concomitant chronic thromboembolism. We report the case of a 72-year-old African-American male with arterial intimal sarcoma of the left and right pulmonary artery with extension through the right artery into the bronchus and right lung.

  3. Pulmonary Artery Intimal Sarcoma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kriz, Joseph P.; Munfakh, Nabil A.; King, Gregory S.; Carden, Juan O.

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary artery intimal sarcomas are rare and lethal malignant tumors that typically affect larger vessels: the aorta, inferior vena cava, and pulmonary arteries. Since symptoms and imaging of pulmonary arterial intimal sarcomas mimic pulmonary thromboembolism, the differential diagnosis of a patient presenting with chest pain, dyspnea, and filling defect within the pulmonary arteries should include intimal sarcoma. Often right ventricular failure is observed due to pulmonary hypertension caused by the obstructive effect of the tumor and concomitant chronic thromboembolism. We report the case of a 72-year-old African-American male with arterial intimal sarcoma of the left and right pulmonary artery with extension through the right artery into the bronchus and right lung. PMID:27239183

  4. Application of intra-aortic balloon pump in resection and anastomosis of trachea.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Zargham Hossein; Rahnemai-Azar, Amir Ali; Shadmehr, Mohammad Behgam; Parsa, Tahereh; Behzadnia, Neda; Aval, Zahra Ansari; Mokri, Bahareh; Gholamhoseini, Hamideh

    2014-01-01

    The intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP) is a mechanical device used to assist cardiac circulatory function in patients suffering from cardiogenic shock, congestive heart failure, refractory angina and complications of myocardial infarction. While using IABP in cardiac surgery is well established, there are few studies on the utility of IABP support in high-risk cardiac patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery. Major non-cardiac surgeries are associated with high rates of cardiac complications in patients with advanced coronary disease. Recent case studies have reported favorable outcomes with the use of IABP support in non-cardiac surgery in patients with severe cardiac compromise. Using IABP may reduce cardiac complications by providing hemodynamic stability. Here, we present five cases of IABP use in high-risk cardiac patients undergoing resection and anastomosis of the trachea. IABP was inserted prior to induction of anesthesia in four of the cases, while IABP insertion was withheld in one case. In the four cases where IABP support was utilized, the IABP was removed between 6-48 hours postoperatively with no complications. The patient who did not undergo IABP insertion died on the 8th postoperative day due to uncontrollable pulmonary edema and progressive myocardial infarction. We also review the literature and discuss the role of IABP use in non-cardiac surgery.

  5. Biphasic Pulmonary Blastoma Associated with Cerebral Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Kilic, Dalokay; Yilmaz, Cem; Tepeoglu, Merih; Vural, Cigdem; Caner, Hakan

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary blastoma is a very rare malignant tumor of the lungs. A biphasic pulmonary blastoma was histologically diagnosed by a characteristic finding as it was mainly constituted of immature tumor tissue that had both epithelial and mesenchymal components. We present a case of a 68-year-old man with biphasic pulmonary blastoma. The patient underwent cranial metastatectomy and left lung upper lobectomy. Although the tumor was resected, there was rapid metastasis to the cranial, liver, kidney and multiple bones. Although radiotherapy and chemotherapy were administrated, the patient died about 6 months postoperatively. Close follow-up and aggressive chemotherapy should be considered for such tumours. In the light of this case, the authors review the pathologic, clinical, radiological and therapeutic features of this very rare malignant lung tumor.

  6. Incidental pleural-based pulmonary lymphangioma.

    PubMed

    Benninghoff, Michael G; Todd, William U; Bascom, Rebecca

    2008-09-01

    Adult benign thoracic lymphangiomas typically present as incidental mediastinal lesions, or, more rarely, as solitary pulmonary nodules. Symptomatic compression of vital structures may require lesion resection or sclerotherapy. In the present report, we describe the incidental finding of a solitary pleural-based pulmonary lymphangioma in a 38-year-old woman with chronic arm and shoulder pain. Positron emission tomography revealed that the lesion was highly fluorodeoxyglucose-avid. Biopsy exposed benign tissue consistent with lymphangioma. After continued radiographic tests, the lesion was determined to be an unlikely source of the patient's chronic pain. The present report is, to our knowledge, the first published case of solitary pleural-based pulmonary lymphangioma in the medical literature.

  7. Surgical resection of synchronous and metachronous lung and liver metastases of colorectal cancers

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Shinseok; Park, Jin Young; Choi, Dong Wook; Choi, Seong Ho

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Surgical resection of isolated hepatic or pulmonary metastases of colorectal cancer is an established procedure, with a 5-year survival rate of about 50%. However, the role of surgical resections in patients with both hepatic and pulmonary metastases is not well established. We aimed to analyze overall survival of these patients and associated factors. Methods Data retrospectively collected from 66 patients who underwent both hepatic and pulmonary metastasectomy after colorectal cancer surgery from August 2002 through August 2013 were analyzed. In univariate analysis, the log-rank test compared patient survival between groups. P < 0.1 was considered indicative of significance. Multivariate analysis of the significance data using a Cox proportional hazard model identified factors associated with overall survival. The synchronous group (n = 57) was defined as patients who had metastasectomy within 3 months from primary colorectal cancer surgery. The remaining nine patients constituted the metachronous group. Results Median follow-up was 126 months from the primary colorectal cancer surgery. The 5-year survival was 73.4%. There was no difference in overall survival between the synchronous and metachronous groups, consistent with previous studies. Distribution (involving one hemiliver or both, P = 0.010 in multivariate analysis) of liver metastases and multiplicity of the pulmonary metastasis (P = 0.039) were predictors of poor prognosis. Conclusion Sequential or simultaneous resection of both hepatic and pulmonary metastasis of colorectal cancer resulted in good long-term survival in selected patients. Thus, an aggressive surgical approach and multidisciplinary decision making with surgeons seems to be justified. PMID:28203555

  8. [An intimal sarcoma of the pulmonary artery. An immunohistochemical study].

    PubMed

    Pérez del Río, M J; Molina Suárez, R; Fresno Forcelledo, M F; Veiga González, M; Madrigal Rubiales, B; González González, M; Herrero Zapatero, A

    1998-10-01

    Pulmonary artery intimal sarcomas tend to be presented with symptoms of pulmonary thromboembolism and grow regionally, with little capacity to metastasize. They probably originate from subendothelial cells, that become myofibroblasts. Knowledge of it is important to establish a presurgery diagnosis, with the possibility of a total resection, the only useful treatment until now. We report a case of a pulmonary artery primary sarcoma, in a 73 year old woman, admitted with hemoptysis and pleuritic chest pain, who died ten days after. Autopsy revealed an intraluminal mass at the pulmonary artery trunk, without regional nor distance involvement. Microscopic study showed a pleomorphic tumor with spindle and epithelioid cells, positive for actin, desmin and vimentin. All these data support the diagnosis of primary intimal sarcoma of the pulmonary artery. We want to emphasize the myogenic differentiation of the tumor, uncommon in previously reported cases.

  9. PULMONARY TOXICOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pulmonary disease and dysfunction exact a tremendous health burden on society. In a recent survey of lung disease published by the American Lung Association in 2012, upwards of 10 million Americans were diagnosed with chronic bronchitis while over 4 million Americans had emphysem...

  10. Anticoagulation in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Jeffrey C; Pugliese, Steven C; Fox, Daniel L; Badesch, David B

    2016-06-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by molecular and pathologic alteration to the pulmonary circulation, resulting in increased pulmonary vascular resistance, right ventricular failure, and eventual death. Pharmacologic treatment of PAH consists of use of a multitude of pulmonary vasodilators, sometimes in combination. PAH has been associated with increased thrombosis and disrupted coagulation and fibrinolysis, making anticoagulation an attractive and frequently employed therapeutic modality. Observational studies have provided some insight into the therapeutic potential of anticoagulation in idiopathic PAH, but there is a distinct lack of well-controlled prospective trials. Due to the conflicting evidence, there is a large amount of heterogeneity in the application of therapeutic anticoagulation in PAH and further well-controlled prospective trials are needed to clarify its role in treating PAH.

  11. [Pulmonary alterations in Hodgkin lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Jóna, Ádám; Illés, Árpád; Szemes, Katalin; Miltényi, Zsófia

    2016-01-31

    Most of Hodgkin lymphoma patients survive due to combined chemo/radiotherapy. Improved survival brings long-term side effects to the front, which may determine the patients' subsequent quality of life and expected lifetime. This manuscript aims to analyze lung manifestations of Hodgkin lymphoma and treatment related pulmonary complications, demonstrated with own cases. The lung involvement in Hodgkin lymphoma is often secondary, and primary pulmonary involvement is very rare. The authors found 8-12% of lung involvement among their patients. Side effects of treatment consist of pulmonary infections in conjuction with immunosuppression, while on the other hand bleomycin and chest irradiation as part of current standard of care induced pneumonitis and fibrosis are reported. The pulmonary involvement in Hodgkin lymphoma may cause differential diagnostic difficulty. Lung involvement could modify stage and consequently treatment, and the development of side effects might determine later quality of life and expected lifetime. Therefore, identification of lung involvement is crucial.

  12. Vasopressors induce passive pulmonary hypertension by blood redistribution from systemic to pulmonary circulation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chunling; Qian, Hong; Luo, Shuhua; Lin, Jing; Yu, Jerry; Li, Yajiao; An, Qi; Luo, Nanfu; Du, Lei

    2017-05-01

    Vasopressors are widely used in resuscitation, ventricular failure, and sepsis, and often induce pulmonary hypertension with undefined mechanisms. We hypothesize that vasopressor-induced pulmonary hypertension is caused by increased pulmonary blood volume and tested this hypothesis in dogs under general anesthesia. In normal hearts (model 1), phenylephrine (2.5 μg/kg/min) transiently increased right but decreased left cardiac output, associated with increased pulmonary blood volume (63% ± 11.8, P = 0.007) and pressures in the left atrium, pulmonary capillary, and pulmonary artery. However, the trans-pulmonary gradient and pulmonary vascular resistance remained stable. These changes were absent after decreasing blood volume or during right cardiac dysfunction to reduce pulmonary blood volume (model 2). During double-ventricle bypass (model 3), phenylephrine (1, 2.5 and 10 μg/kg/min) only slightly induced pulmonary vasoconstriction. Vasopressin (1U and 2U) dose-dependently increased pulmonary artery pressure (52 ± 8.4 and 71 ± 10.3%), but did not cause pulmonary vasoconstriction in normally beating hearts (model 1). Pulmonary artery and left atrial pressures increased during left ventricle dysfunction (model 4), and further increased after phenylephrine injection by 31 ± 5.6 and 43 ± 7.5%, respectively. In conclusion, vasopressors increased blood volume in the lung with minimal pulmonary vasoconstriction. Thus, this pulmonary hypertension is similar to the hemodynamic pattern observed in left heart diseases and is passive, due to redistribution of blood from systemic to pulmonary circulation. Understanding the underlying mechanisms may improve clinical management of patients who are taking vasopressors, especially those with coexisting heart disease.

  13. Pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a chronic and progressive disease leading to right heart failure and ultimately death if untreated. The first classification of PH was proposed in 1973. In 2008, the fourth World Symposium on PH held in Dana Point (California, USA) revised previous classifications. Currently, PH is devided into five subgroups. Group 1 includes patients suffering from idiopathic or familial PAH with or without germline mutations. Patients with a diagnosis of PAH should systematically been screened regarding to underlying mutations of BMPR2 gene (bone morphogenetic protein receptor type 2) or more rarely of ACVRL1 (activine receptor-like kinase type 1), ENG (endogline) or Smad8 genes. Pulmonary veno occusive disease and pulmonary capillary hemagiomatosis are individualized and designated as clinical group 1'. Group 2 'Pulmonary hypertension due to left heart diseases' is divided into three sub-groups: systolic dysfonction, diastolic dysfonction and valvular dysfonction. Group 3 'Pulmonary hypertension due to respiratory diseases' includes a heterogenous subgroup of respiratory diseases like PH due to pulmonary fibrosis, COPD, lung emphysema or interstitial lung disease for exemple. Group 4 includes chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension without any distinction of proximal or distal forms. Group 5 regroup PH patients with unclear multifactorial mechanisms. Invasive hemodynamic assessment with right heart catheterization is requested to confirm the definite diagnosis of PH showing a resting mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP) of ≥ 25 mmHg and a normal pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) of ≤ 15 mmHg. The assessment of PCWP may allow the distinction between pre-capillary and post-capillary PH (PCWP > 15 mmHg). Echocardiography is an important tool in the management of patients with underlying suspicion of PH. The European Society of Cardiology and the European Respiratory Society (ESC-ERS) guidelines specify its role

  14. Pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Montani, David; Günther, Sven; Dorfmüller, Peter; Perros, Frédéric; Girerd, Barbara; Garcia, Gilles; Jaïs, Xavier; Savale, Laurent; Artaud-Macari, Elise; Price, Laura C; Humbert, Marc; Simonneau, Gérald; Sitbon, Olivier

    2013-07-06

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a chronic and progressive disease leading to right heart failure and ultimately death if untreated. The first classification of PH was proposed in 1973. In 2008, the fourth World Symposium on PH held in Dana Point (California, USA) revised previous classifications. Currently, PH is devided into five subgroups. Group 1 includes patients suffering from idiopathic or familial PAH with or without germline mutations. Patients with a diagnosis of PAH should systematically been screened regarding to underlying mutations of BMPR2 gene (bone morphogenetic protein receptor type 2) or more rarely of ACVRL1 (activine receptor-like kinase type 1), ENG (endogline) or Smad8 genes. Pulmonary veno occusive disease and pulmonary capillary hemagiomatosis are individualized and designated as clinical group 1'. Group 2 'Pulmonary hypertension due to left heart diseases' is divided into three sub-groups: systolic dysfonction, diastolic dysfonction and valvular dysfonction. Group 3 'Pulmonary hypertension due to respiratory diseases' includes a heterogenous subgroup of respiratory diseases like PH due to pulmonary fibrosis, COPD, lung emphysema or interstitial lung disease for exemple. Group 4 includes chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension without any distinction of proximal or distal forms. Group 5 regroup PH patients with unclear multifactorial mechanisms. Invasive hemodynamic assessment with right heart catheterization is requested to confirm the definite diagnosis of PH showing a resting mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP) of ≥ 25 mmHg and a normal pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) of ≤ 15 mmHg. The assessment of PCWP may allow the distinction between pre-capillary and post-capillary PH (PCWP > 15 mmHg). Echocardiography is an important tool in the management of patients with underlying suspicion of PH. The European Society of Cardiology and the European Respiratory Society (ESC-ERS) guidelines specify its role

  15. Pulmonary artery sarcoma: a rare cause of dyspnoea.

    PubMed

    Chaachoui, Najia; Haik, William; Tournoux, François

    2011-03-01

    A 72-year-old woman with no significant medical history presented to the emergency room for severe dyspnoea. The initial clinical diagnosis was acute pulmonary embolism. Heparin infusion was initiated while awaiting a computed tomographic scan but the patient's condition deteriorated dramatically and stat echocardiogram showed tamponade. Post-evacuation echo showed a dilated right ventricle with pulmonary hypertension and obstruction of the right pulmonary artery by a homogeneous mass attached to the pulmonary artery, suggesting a tumour rather than a thrombus. Computed tomographic scan confirmed the presence of an obstructive mass with almost no perfusion of the right lung. The patient was referred to cardiac surgery and the mass was removed, with anatomo-pathological diagnosis of a typical pulmonary artery sarcoma. Unfortunately, the patient died a few days after surgery. Primary pulmonary artery sarcoma is a rare tumour that arises in the central pulmonary arteries. Clinical presentation is often attributed to other causes of pulmonary hypertension, like pulmonary embolism. Magnetic resonance imaging could help to distinguish a soft tissue mass from a thrombus but definitive diagnosis is almost always made at surgery or autopsy since patients usually present in acute and unstable situations. Prognosis is poor, from several months to a few years, and depends on how early the diagnosis is made, the presence of recurrence or metastasis after surgical resection, and the use of adjuvant therapy like radiation and chemotherapy.

  16. A Successfully Resected Case of Recurrent Lung and Liver Metastases of Rectal Cancer Treated with XELIRI + Bevacizumab Therapy.

    PubMed

    Aisu, Naoya; Yoshida, Yoichiro; Ishii, Fuminori; Miyake, Toru; Tanimura, Shu; Wada, Yoshito; Yamauchi, Yasushi; Hoshino, Seiichiro; Noritomi, Tomoaki; Yamashita, Yuichi

    2013-01-01

    It has been reported that many colorectal cancer (CRC) patients with synchronous or metachronous liver metastases underwent surgery subsequent to neoadjuvant combination chemotherapy with folinic acid, fluorouracil, and oxaliplatin (FOLFOX), folinic acid, fluorouracil, and irinotecan (FOLFIRI), or capecitabine and oxaliplatin (XELOX). However, there are very few reports of the use of capecitabine and irinotecan (XELIRI). We herein report a successfully resected case of recurrent lung and liver metastases of rectal cancer treated with combination chemotherapy with XELIRI + bevacizumab (BV) therapy. A 63-year-old male developed recurrence of a solitary nodule in the right lower lobe of the lung and multiple liver metastases after low anterior resection for rectal cancer 1 year previously. Partial resection of the right lower lobe of the lung was performed and treatment with XELIRI + BV was initiated. A computed tomography scan revealed a reduction in tumor size without any new lesions after four cycles of XELIRI + BV therapy. Partial hepatectomy of S1, S5, and S7 was safely performed. The patient is now undergoing adjuvant chemotherapy and has been free from recurrence for 18 months following surgery. There are only few studies with relatively low patient numbers reporting on the outcome after resection of both pulmonary and hepatic metastases of CRC. We therefore report a patient who underwent sequential resection of pulmonary and hepatic metastases with XELIRI + BV therapy.

  17. An Autopsy Case of Lepidic Pulmonary Metastasis from Cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Nagayoshi, Yohsuke; Yamamoto, Kazuko; Hashimoto, Satoru; Hisatomi, Keiko; Doi, Seiji; Nagashima, Seiji; Kurohama, Hirokazu; Ito, Masahiro; Takazono, Takahiro; Nakamura, Shigeki; Miyazaki, Taiga; Kohno, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    We herein report the first case of pulmonary metastasis with lepidic growth that originated from cholangiocarcinoma. A 77-year-old man was admitted to our hospital due to exertional dyspnea and liver dysfunction. Computed tomography showed widespread infiltration and a ground-glass opacity in the lung and dilation of the intrahepatic bile duct. The pulmonary lesion progressed rapidly, and the patient died of respiratory failure. Cholangiocarcinoma and lepidic pulmonary metastasis were pathologically diagnosed by an autopsy. Lepidic pulmonary growth is an atypical pattern of metastasis, and immunopathological staining is useful to distinguish pulmonary metastasis from extrapulmonary cancer and primary pulmonary adenocarcinoma. PMID:27725547

  18. Small-bowel resection for metastatic melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Al-Sheneber, Ibrahim F.; Meterissian, Sarkis H.; Loutfi, Antoine; Watters, A. Kevin; Shibata, Henry R.

    1996-01-01

    Objective To determine whether complete resection of small-bowel metastases from melanoma improves patient survival. Design A computer-aided chart review. Setting Hospitals associated with McGill University. Patients Twenty patients (17 men, 3 women), identified from 1524 patients with melanoma, who underwent surgery to the small bowel for metastases. Patient age and clinical presentation, tumour site and stage were recorded. Intervention Exploratory laparotomy with complete or partial resection of involved small bowel. Main Outcome Measures Operative morbidity, mortality and length of survival related to the extent of small-bowel resection. Results Eleven patients had complete resection, 8 patients had partial resection and 1 patient had a palliative bypass only. Long-term survival (ranging from 2 to 10 years) was 36% in those who had complete resection and 0% in those who had partial resection; operative morbidity and mortality were 20% and 15% respectively. Conclusion Complete resection of small-bowel metastases in patients with metastatic melanoma can result in long-term survival. PMID:8640618

  19. Laterally extended endopelvic resection (LEER)--principles and practice.

    PubMed

    Höckel, Michael

    2008-11-01

    Exenteration has been used for the last 6 decades, mainly to treat cancers of the lower and middle female genital tract in the irradiated pelvis. New ablative techniques based on developmentally derived surgical anatomy termed laterally extended endopelvic resection (LEER) aim to increase the curative resection rate, even of tumors extending to and fixed to the pelvic side wall. LEER is performed as a combination of at least two of the following procedures: total mesorectal excision, total mesometrial resection, and total mesovesical resection. In cases of lateral tumor fixation, the inclusion of pelvic side wall and floor muscles, such as the obturator internus muscle and pubococcygeus, iliococcygeus and coccygeus muscles, and eventually of the internal iliac vessel system assures the completeness of the multicompartmental resection. One hundred patients with locally advanced (n=25) and recurrent (n=75) gynecologic tumors have been treated with these new procedures. In 76 patients, the tumors were fixed to the pelvic side wall. Two patients with advanced age and extensive comorbidity died during the early postoperative period. Moderate and severe treatment-related morbidity was 70%, mainly due to compromised healing of irradiated tissue and the performance of complex reconstructions. At a median follow-up period of 30 months (range, 1-136 months), 5-year recurrence-free and disease-specific overall survival probabilities are 62% (95% CI, 52-72%) and 55% (95% CI, 43-67%), respectively. LEER has significant potential to salvage selected patients with locally advanced and recurrent gynecologic malignancies, including those with pelvic side wall disease, traditionally not considered for surgical therapy.

  20. Preceding bronchial cutting for exposure of the pulmonary artery buried in scar tissue after chemoradiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Nomori, Hiroaki; Cong, Yue; Sugimura, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    It is often difficult to expose the pulmonary artery buried in a scar tissue, especially in lung cancer patients that responded well to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Difficulty to access pulmonary artery branches may lead to potentially unnecessary pneumonectomy. To complete lobectomy in such cases, a technique with preceding bronchial cutting for exposure of the pulmonary artery is presented. After dissecting the pulmonary vein, the lobar bronchus is cut from the opposite side of the pulmonary artery with scissors. The back wall of the lobar bronchus is cut using a surgical knife from the luminal face, which can expose the pulmonary artery behind the bronchial stump and then complete lobectomy. Fourteen patients have been treated using the present technique, enabling complete resection by lobectomy (including sleeve lobectomy in 3 patients) without major bleeding. The present procedure can expose pulmonary artery buried in scar tissue, resulting in making the lobectomy safer.

  1. Advances in the Surgical Management of Resectable and Borderline Resectable Pancreas Cancer.

    PubMed

    Helmink, Beth A; Snyder, Rebecca A; Idrees, Kamran; Merchant, Nipun B; Parikh, Alexander A

    2016-04-01

    Successful surgical resection offers the only chance for cure in patients with pancreatic cancer. However, pancreatic resection is feasible in less than 20% of the patients. In this review, the current state of surgical management of pancreatic cancer is discussed. The definition of resectability based on cross-sectional imaging and the technical aspects of surgery, including vascular resection and/or reconstruction, management of aberrant vascular anatomy and extent of lymphadenectomy, are appraised. Furthermore, common pancreatic resection-specific postoperative complications and their management are reviewed.

  2. Gut hormone release after intestinal resection.

    PubMed Central

    Besterman, H S; Adrian, T E; Mallinson, C N; Christofides, N D; Sarson, D L; Pera, A; Lombardo, L; Modigliani, R; Bloom, S R

    1982-01-01

    To investigate the possible role of gut and pancreatic hormones in the adaptive responses to gut resection, plasma concentrations of the circulating hormones were measured, in response to a test breakfast, in patients with either small or large intestinal resection and in healthy control subjects. In 18 patients with partial ileal resection a significant threefold rise was found in basal and postprandial levels of pancreatic polypeptide, a fourfold increase in motilin, and more than a twofold increase in gastrin and enteroglucagon levels compared with healthy controls. In contrast, nine patients with colonic resection had a threefold rise in levels of pancreatic polypeptide only. One or more of these peptides may have a role in stimulating the adaptive changes found after gut resection. PMID:7117905

  3. Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Is Pulmonary Hypertension? To understand pulmonary hypertension (PH) it helps to understand how blood ows throughout ... is too high, it is called pulmonary hypertension (PH). How the pressure in the right side of ...

  4. Familial Pulmonary Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Training Home Conditions Familial Pulmonary Fibrosis Familial Pulmonary Fibrosis Make an Appointment Find a Doctor Ask a ... members within the same family have Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF) or any other form of Idiopathic Interstitial ...

  5. Pulmonary Hypertension in Scleroderma

    MedlinePlus

    PULMONARY HYPERTENSION IN SCLERODERMA PULMONARY HYPERTENSION Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is high blood pressure in the blood vessels ... with scleroderma are at increased risk for developing PH from several mechanisms. Frequently patients with scleroderma have ...

  6. Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Kim, John S.; McSweeney, Julia; Lee, Joanne; Ivy, Dunbar

    2015-01-01

    Objective Review the pharmacologic treatment options for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) in the cardiac intensive care setting and summarize the most-recent literature supporting these therapies. Data Sources and Study Selection Literature search for prospective studies, retrospective analyses, and case reports evaluating the safety and efficacy of PAH therapies. Data Extraction Mechanisms of action and pharmacokinetics, treatment recommendations, safety considerations, and outcomes for specific medical therapies. Data Synthesis Specific targeted therapies developed for the treatment of adult patients with PAH have been applied for the benefit of children with PAH. With the exception of inhaled nitric oxide, there are no PAH medications approved for children in the US by the FDA. Unfortunately, data on treatment strategies in children with PAH are limited by the small number of randomized controlled clinical trials evaluating the safety and efficacy of specific treatments. The treatment options for PAH in children focus on endothelial-based pathways. Calcium channel blockers are recommended for use in a very small, select group of children who are responsive to vasoreactivity testing at cardiac catheterization. Phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor therapy is the most-commonly recommended oral treatment option in children with PAH. Prostacyclins provide adjunctive therapy for the treatment of PAH as infusions (intravenous and subcutaneous) and inhalation agents. Inhaled nitric oxide is the first line vasodilator therapy in persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn, and is commonly used in the treatment of PAH in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Endothelin receptor antagonists have been shown to improve exercise tolerance and survival in adult patients with PAH. Soluble Guanylate Cyclase Stimulators are the first drug class to be FDA approved for the treatment of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. Conclusions Literature and data supporting the

  7. Epoprostenol Therapy for Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Akagi, Satoshi; Nakamura, Kazufumi; Matsubara, Hiromi; Ogawa, Aiko; Sarashina, Toshihiro; Ejiri, Kentaro; Ito, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by elevation of pulmonary artery pressure caused by pulmonary vasoconstriction and vascular remodeling, which leads to right heart failure and death. Epoprostenol (prostaglandin I2) has a potent short-acting vasodilator property, and intravenous continuous epoprostenol is therefore used for treatment of PAH. Here we review evidence for the usefulness of intravenous continuous epoprostenol therapy in patients with PAH. Epoprostenol therapy is effective in idiopathic PAH patients and in patients with PAH associated with connective tissue disease, portal hypertension or congenital heart diseases, but it is not effective in patients with pulmonary veno-occlusive disease or pulmonary capillary hemangiomatosis. High-dose epoprostenol therapy markedly improved hemodynamics in some patients with PAH, possibly due to reverse remodeling of pulmonary arteries. This therapy has several side effects and complications such as headache, hypotension and catheter-related infections. Intravenous continuous epoprostenol is an effective treatment, but there are still some problems to be resolved.

  8. Transsphincteric tumor resection in case of a pararectal solitary fibrous tumor

    PubMed Central

    Troja, Achim; El-Sourani, Nader; Antolovic, Dalibor; Raab, Hans Rudolf

    2015-01-01

    Transsphincteric resection of rectal tumors was first described about 120 years ago. Nowadays, this approach faded into obscurity due to standardized guidelines and practice in surgical oncology including lymphadenectomy, mesorectal excision and radical dissection of veins. However, transsphincteric resection seems reasonable in some cases, especially if an abdominal approach can be avoided. In the following, we will present and describe the technique of the transsphincteric approach with its variations in rectal surgery in the case of a rare pararectal tumor. PMID:26773876

  9. Colon resection for ovarian cancer: intraoperative decisions.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Mitchel S; Zervose, Emmanuel

    2008-11-01

    To discuss the benefits and morbidity of and indications for colon resection during cytoreductive operations for ovarian cancer. The history of cytoreductive surgery for ovarian cancer is discussed, with special attention to the incorporation of colon resection. Literature regarding cytoreductive surgery for ovarian cancer is then reviewed, again with attention to the role of colon resection. The focus of the review is directed at broad technical considerations and rationales, for both primary and secondary cytoreduction. Over the past 15 to 20 years the standard cytoreductive operation for ovarian cancer has shifted from an abdominal hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy and omentectomy to an en bloc radical resection of the pelvic tumor and an omentectomy, and more recently to include increasing use of extensive upper abdominal surgery. En bloc pelvic resection frequently includes rectosigmoid resection, almost always accompanied by a primary anastomosis. Other portions of the colon are at risk for metastatic involvement and sometimes require resection in order to achieve optimal cytoreduction. The data regarding colon resection for the purpose of surgical cytoreduction of ovarian cancer are conflicting (in terms of benefit) and all retrospective. However, the preponderance of information supports a benefit in terms of survival when cytoreduction is clearly optimal. Similar to primary surgery, benefit from secondary cytoreduction of ovarian cancer occurs when only a small volume of disease is left behind. The preponderance of data suggests that colon resection to achieve optimal cytoreduction has a positive impact on survival. In order to better understand the role of colon resection as well as other extensive cytoreductive procedures for ovarian cancer, it will be important to continue to improve our understanding of prognostic variables such as the nuances of metastatic bowel involvement in order to better guide appropriate surgical management.

  10. Hypercalcemia due to talc granulomatosis.

    PubMed

    Woywodt, A; Schneider, W; Goebel, U; Luft, F C

    2000-04-01

    Pulmonary disease due to talc, a group of hydrous magnesium silicates, is almost exclusively encountered after occupational exposure. One form of this rare disorder is talc granulomatosis. In varying degrees, hypercalcemia is typical of granulomatous disease but has not yet been reported in talcosis. We report the case of a former mold maker who presented with hypercalcemia. Laboratory findings indicated extra-renal 1-alpha-hydroxylation of 25-hydroxyvitamin D. Pulmonary infiltrates prompted a lung biopsy that disclosed talc granulomatosis. We suggest that talc granulomatosis should be added to the list of granulomatous disorders capable of causing hypercalcemia due to increased extra-renal 1-alpha-hydroxylation of 25-hydroxyvitamin D.

  11. Adamantinoma of the tibia and fibula with pulmonary metastasis: an unusual presentation.

    PubMed

    Khémiri, Chékib; Mrabet, Dalila; Mizouni, Habiba; Abbes, Imen; Mnif, Emna; Sellami, Slaheddine; Essaddem, Hamza

    2011-10-16

    Adamantinoma is a rare tumour of long bones, representing less than 1% of them. Adamantinoma commonly occurs in the tibia. It is locally aggressive and recurrences are uncommon after resection. Metastases have been reported in less than 10% of cases. The most common radiographic appearance is multiple sharply demarcated radiolucent lesions surrounded by areas of dense sclerotic bone. The authors report a patient who developed pulmonary metastasis 1 year after complete resection of primary neoplasm.

  12. Pulmonary hypertension in dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Kosmadakis, George; Aguilera, Didier; Carceles, Odette; Da Costa Correia, Enrique; Boletis, Ioannis

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension in end-stage renal disease patients is associated with significantly increased morbidity and mortality. The prevalence of pulmonary hypertension in dialysis patients is relatively high and varies in different studies from 17% to 49.53% depending on the mode of dialysis and other selection factors, such as the presence of other cardiovascular comorbidities. The etiopathogenic mechanisms that have been studied in relatively small studies mainly include arteriovenous fistula-induced increased cardiac output, which cannot be accomodated by, the spacious under normal conditions pulmonary circulation. Additionally, pulmonary vessels show signs of endothelial dysfunction, dysregulation of vascular tone due to an imbalance in vasoactive substances, and local as well as systemic inflammation. It is also believed that microbubbles escaping from the dialysis circuit can trigger vasoconstriction and vascular sclerosis. The non-specific therapeutic options that proved to be beneficial in pulmonary artery pressure reduction are endothelin inhibitors, phosphodiesterase inhibitor sildenafil, and vasodilatory prostaglandins in various forms. The specific modes of treatment are renal transplantation, size reduction or closure of high-flow arteriovenous fistulas, and transfer from hemodialysis to peritoneal dialysis-a modality that is associated with a lesser prevalence of pulmonary hypertension.

  13. Pathophysiology of short bowel syndrome: considerations of resected and residual anatomy.

    PubMed

    Tappenden, Kelly A

    2014-05-01

    The human small intestine is organized with a proximal-to-distal gradient of mucosal structure and nutrient processing capacity. However, certain nutrients undergo site-specific digestion and absorption, such as iron and folate in the duodenum/jejunum vs vitamin B12 and bile salts in the ileum. Intestinal resection can result in short bowel syndrome (SBS) due to reduction of total and/or site-specific nutrient processing areas. Depending on the segment(s) of intestine resected, malabsorption can be nutrient specific (eg, vitamin B12 or fat) or sweeping, with deficiencies in energy, protein, and various micronutrients. Jejunal resections are generally better tolerated than ileal resections because of greater postresection adaptive capacity than that of the jejunum. Following intestinal resection, energy scavenging and fluid absorption become particularly important in the colon owing to loss of digestive and absorptive surface area in the resection portion. Resection-induced alterations in enteroendocrine cell abundance can further disrupt intestinal function. For example, patients with end jejunostomy have depressed circulating peptide YY and glucagon-like peptide 2 concentrations, which likely contribute to the rapid intestinal transit and blunted intestinal adaptation observed in this population. SBS-associated pathophysiology often extends beyond the gastrointestinal tract, with hepatobiliary disease, metabolic bone disease, D-lactic acidosis, and kidney stone formation being chronic complications. Clinical management of SBS must be individualized to account for the specific nutrient processing deficit within the remnant bowel and to mitigate potential complications, both inside and outside the gastrointestinal tract.

  14. Right Ventricular Outflow Tract Obstruction Due to Immunoglobulin G4-Related Disease.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Masaru; Sakaguchi, Taichi; Miyagawa, Shigeru; Nishi, Hiroyuki; Yoshikawa, Yasushi; Fukushima, Satsuki; Kawamura, Ai; Ueno, Takayoshi; Ishibashi-Ueda, Hatsue; Sawa, Yoshiki

    2017-03-01

    A 64-year-old man with extensive tumorous infiltration of the pulmonary valve underwent partial resection of a tumor of the right ventricular outflow tract and replacement of the affected valve. A diagnosis of immunoglobulin-G4 related disease of the heart was made based on the immunohistologic findings. One year after the surgical resection, growth of the tumorous mass was observed, and steroid therapy was initiated. He had no sign of tumor progression four years after the steroid therapy.

  15. [Pulmonary strongyloidiasis].

    PubMed

    Lozada, Heiler; Daza, Jorge E

    2016-10-01

    Strongyloidiasis is an infection caused by the parasite Strongyloides stercoralis, which can be asymptomatic and means a high morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised hosts, severe malnutrition and coinfection with HTLV-1 virus. The parasite has the potential to produce and multiply internal autoinfection in humans, thus an hyperinfection can be developed. A case of pulmonary infection by this parasite is presented in this study, infection which advanced into a respiratory failure and required mechanical ventilation and hemodynamic support in an intensive care unit. The standard treatment combined with ivermectin and albendazole was provided, achieving an appropriate response.

  16. Nanomedicine in pulmonary delivery

    PubMed Central

    Mansour, Heidi M; Rhee, Yun-Seok; Wu, Xiao

    2009-01-01

    The lung is an attractive target for drug delivery due to noninvasive administration via inhalation aerosols, avoidance of first-pass metabolism, direct delivery to the site of action for the treatment of respiratory diseases, and the availability of a huge surface area for local drug action and systemic absorption of drug. Colloidal carriers (ie, nanocarrier systems) in pulmonary drug delivery offer many advantages such as the potential to achieve relatively uniform distribution of drug dose among the alveoli, achievement of improved solubility of the drug from its own aqueous solubility, a sustained drug release which consequently reduces dosing frequency, improves patient compliance, decreases incidence of side effects, and the potential of drug internalization by cells. This review focuses on the current status and explores the potential of colloidal carriers (ie, nanocarrier systems) in pulmonary drug delivery with special attention to their pharmaceutical aspects. Manufacturing processes, in vitro/in vivo evaluation methods, and regulatory/toxicity issues of nanomedicines in pulmonary delivery are also discussed. PMID:20054434

  17. Laparoscopic liver resection: Experience based guidelines.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Fabricio Ferreira; Kruger, Jaime Arthur Pirola; Fonseca, Gilton Marques; Araújo, Raphael Leonardo Cunha; Jeismann, Vagner Birk; Perini, Marcos Vinícius; Lupinacci, Renato Micelli; Cecconello, Ivan; Herman, Paulo

    2016-01-27

    Laparoscopic liver resection (LLR) has been progressively developed along the past two decades. Despite initial skepticism, improved operative results made laparoscopic approach incorporated to surgical practice and operations increased in frequency and complexity. Evidence supporting LLR comes from case-series, comparative studies and meta-analysis. Despite lack of level 1 evidence, the body of literature is stronger and existing data confirms the safety, feasibility and benefits of laparoscopic approach when compared to open resection. Indications for LLR do not differ from those for open surgery. They include benign and malignant (both primary and metastatic) tumors and living donor liver harvesting. Currently, resection of lesions located on anterolateral segments and left lateral sectionectomy are performed systematically by laparoscopy in hepatobiliary specialized centers. Resection of lesions located on posterosuperior segments (1, 4a, 7, 8) and major liver resections were shown to be feasible but remain technically demanding procedures, which should be reserved to experienced surgeons. Hand-assisted and laparoscopy-assisted procedures appeared to increase the indications of minimally invasive liver surgery and are useful strategies applied to difficult and major resections. LLR proved to be safe for malignant lesions and offers some short-term advantages over open resection. Oncological results including resection margin status and long-term survival were not inferior to open resection. At present, surgical community expects high quality studies to base the already perceived better outcomes achieved by laparoscopy in major centers' practice. Continuous surgical training, as well as new technologies should augment the application of laparoscopic liver surgery. Future applicability of new technologies such as robot assistance and image-guided surgery is still under investigation.

  18. [Idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis with dendriform pulmonary ossification].

    PubMed

    Barrera, Ana Madeleine; Vargas, Leslie

    2016-12-01

    Pulmonary ossification is a rare and usually asymptomatic finding reported as incidental in lung biopsies. Similarly, idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis is a rare cause of pulmonary infiltrates. We report the case of a 64-year old man with chronic respiratory symptoms in whom these two histopathological findings converged.

  19. Endoscopic full-thickness resection: Current status

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Arthur; Meier, Benjamin; Caca, Karel

    2015-01-01

    Conventional endoscopic resection techniques such as endoscopic mucosal resection or endoscopic submucosal dissection are powerful tools for treatment of gastrointestinal neoplasms. However, those techniques are restricted to superficial layers of the gastrointestinal wall. Endoscopic full-thickness resection (EFTR) is an evolving technique, which is just about to enter clinical routine. It is not only a powerful tool for diagnostic tissue acquisition but also has the potential to spare surgical therapy in selected patients. This review will give an overview about current EFTR techniques and devices. PMID:26309354

  20. Pulmonary artery haemodynamic properties in patients with pulmonary hypertension secondary to rheumatic mitral stenosis.

    PubMed

    Yan, Tao; Zhang, Guan-xin; Li, Bai-lin; Zhong, Keng; Xu, Zhi-yun; Han, Lin

    2012-12-01

    We sought to explore the pulmonary haemodynamic changes in rheumatic mitral stenosis patients with secondary pulmonary hypertension. The pulmonary artery resistance and compliance of 35 patients with rheumatic mitral stenosis and 12 controls without cardiopulmonary vascular disease were evaluated by using an improved method, which is based on making calculations with parameters obtained from right heart catheterisation. The results are as follows: (1) pulmonary artery compliance in patients with secondary pulmonary hypertension was significantly lower than that of the control group (P<0.01); (2) linear correlation analyses showed that preoperative mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP) closely correlated with zero-pressure compliance in the mitral stenosis group (r=-0.745, P<0.05); (3) PAP and pulmonary vascular resistance decreased significantly in both groups with mitral stenosis after infusing 0.5 μg kg(-1) min(-1) of sodium nitroprusside (P<0.01). The pulmonary zero pressure compliance and mean pressure compliance increased significantly in the group with mild pulmonary hypertension; whereas in the severe group, the mean compliance changed with significance as the mPAP decreased (1.51 ± 0.59 vs 1.81 ± 0.77 ml/mmHg), however no significant change occurred in the pulmonary zero pressure compliance (2.35 ± 1.24 ml/mmHg vs. 2.24 ± 1.53 ml/mmHg, P>0.05) The walls of pulmonary artery vessels in patients with pulmonary hypertension secondary to rheumatic mitral stenosis appeared to be remodelled by varying degrees as indicated by their haemodynamic properties. Structural remodelling may be a factor affecting preoperative pulmonary artery pressure. Mitral stenosis patients with severe pulmonary hypertension have significantly lower responses to sodium nitroprusside possibly due to aggradation and deposition of collagen in the artery walls, decreasing constriction and dilation, or atrophy of smooth muscle cells.

  1. Pulmonary Aspects of Exercise and Sports

    PubMed Central

    Bove, Alfred A.

    2016-01-01

    Although the lungs are a critical component of exercise performance, their response to exercise and other environmental stresses is often overlooked when evaluating pulmonary performance during high workloads. Exercise can produce capillary leakage, particularly when left atrial pressure increases related to left ventricular (LV) systolic or diastolic failure. Diastolic LV dysfunction that results in elevated left atrial pressure during exercise is particularly likely to result in pulmonary edema and capillary hemorrhage. Data from race horses, endurance athletes, and triathletes support the concept that the lungs can react to exercise and immersion stress with pulmonary edema and pulmonary hemorrhage. Immersion in water by swimmers and divers can also increase stress on pulmonary capillaries and result in pulmonary edema. Swimming-induced pulmonary edema and immersion pulmonary edema in scuba divers are well-documented events caused by the fluid shifts that occur with immersion, elevated pulmonary venous pressure during extreme exercise, and negative alveolar pressure due to inhalation resistance. Prevention strategies include avoiding extreme exercise, avoiding over hydration, and assuring that inspiratory resistance is minimized. PMID:27486491

  2. Acute Intraoperative Pulmonary Aspiration.

    PubMed

    Nason, Katie S

    2015-08-01

    Acute intraoperative aspiration is a potentially fatal complication with significant associated morbidity. Patients undergoing thoracic surgery are at increased risk for anesthesia-related aspiration, largely due to the predisposing conditions associated with this complication. Awareness of the risk factors, predisposing conditions, maneuvers to decrease risk, and immediate management options by the thoracic surgeon and the anesthesia team is imperative to reducing risk and optimizing patient outcomes associated with acute intraoperative pulmonary aspiration. Based on the root-cause analyses that many of the aspiration events can be traced back to provider factors, having an experienced anesthesiologist present for high-risk cases is also critical.

  3. Does getting smokers to stop smoking before lung resections reduce their risk?

    PubMed Central

    Zaman, Mahvash; Bilal, Haris; Mahmood, Sarah; Tang, Augustine

    2012-01-01

    A best-evidence topic in thoracic surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question of whether the incidence of major pulmonary morbidity after lung resection was associated with the timing of smoking cessation was addressed. Overall 49 papers were found using the reported search outlined below, of which 7 represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. In most studies, smoking abstinence was shown to reduce the incidence of post-operative pulmonary complications (PPCs) such as pneumonia, respiratory distress, atelectasis, air leakage, bronchopleural fistula and re-intubation. The timing of cessation is not clearly identified, although there is some evidence showing reduction in risk of PPCs with increasing interval since cessation. Two studies suggested that smoking abstinence for at least 4 weeks prior to surgery was necessary in order to reduce the incidence of major pulmonary events. Furthermore, it was also shown that a pre-operative smoke-free period of >10 weeks produced complication rates similar to those of patients who had never smoked. We conclude that smoking cessation reduces the risk of PPCs. All patients should be advised and counseled to stop smoking before any form of lung resection. PMID:22159264

  4. ACR Appropriateness Criteria on Resectable Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Suh, W. Warren; Konski, Andre A.; Mohiuddin, Mohammed; Poggi, Matthew M.; Regine, William F.; Cosman, Bard C.; Saltz, Leonard; Johnstone, Peter A.S.

    2008-04-01

    The American College of Radiology (ACR) Appropriateness Criteria on Resectable Rectal Cancer was updated by the Expert Panel on Radiation Oncology-Rectal/Anal Cancer, based on a literature review completed in 2007.

  5. Optimizing Adjuvant Therapy for Resected Pancreatic Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    In this clinical trial, patients with resected pancreatic head cancer will be randomly assigned to receive either gemcitabine with or without erlotinib for 5 treatment cycles. Patients who do not experience disease progression or recurrence will then be r

  6. Safety of pancreatic resection in the elderly: a retrospective analysis of 556 patients

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Daniel; Aronsson, Linus; Fredriksson, Joakim; Andersson, Bodil; Andersson, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Background The safety of pancreatic resection for elderly patients is still controversial. We examined the postoperative morbidity and mortality in patients aged 75 years or more undergoing pancreatic resection. Methods Patients undergoing pancreatic resection were studied retrospectively and the outcomes were compared between patients aged <75 and ≥75 years. Results Of the 556 patients enrolled, 78 (14%) were ≥75 years old. Elderly patients had significantly more co-morbidities, especially cardiovascular pathology (P=0.005). Also, elderly patients had significantly lower body mass index prior to surgery (P=0.005). There were no significant differences in terms of surgical procedures and tumor types between age groups. The incidence of postoperative pancreatic fistula grade A was significantly lower in the elderly group (P=0.022), but no significant differences were noted in the overall morbidity or the incidence of postpancreatectomy hemorrhage, delayed gastric emptying, bile leakage, cardiac complications, pulmonary complications or septic complications. The 30-day mortality rate was similar between groups (0.8% vs. 1.3%; P=0.532). Conclusion Pancreatic resection is a safe option for selected elderly patients. Our study confirms that age alone should not preclude potentially curative surgical therapy. PMID:27065736

  7. Clinical Evaluation and Outcomes of Digital Chest Drainage after Lung Resection

    PubMed Central

    Takamori, Shinkichi; Akamine, Takaki; Toyokawa, Gouji; Morodomi, Yosuke; Okamoto, Tatsuro; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2016-01-01

    Background: Analog chest drainage systems (ACS) are generally used to monitor postoperative alveolar air leakage (PAL) after lung resection. An electronic digital chest drainage system (DCS) has recently been developed that reportedly has several advantages over the traditional ACS. Here, we report a single institution’s experience of PAL management with the DCS. We also sought to establish whether DCS had superior clinical benefits and outcomes compared with ACS. Methods: We enrolled 112 consecutive patients who underwent lung resection and were subsequently managed with DCS. We compared PAL rate, duration of chest drainage, and the incidence of complications with a group of 121 consecutive patients previously managed with ACS after lung resection, using propensity score matching. Results: Mean maximum and minimum PAL rates during DCS chest drainage were 48.9 ml/min (range: 2.0–868.6 ml/min) and 0.1 ml/min (0.0–1.2 ml/min), respectively. Mean PAL rate at DCS removal was 1.3 ml/min (0.0–10.0 ml/min). After propensity score matching, mean duration of chest drainage was significantly shorter with DCS than ACS (2.7 days, range: 1–9 days, compared with 3.7 days, range: 1–21 days, respectively; P = 0.031). Conclusions: Managing PAL with DCS after pulmonary resection appears to reduce the duration of chest drainage. PMID:27885215

  8. Impact of video-assisted thoracoscopic major lung resection on immune function.

    PubMed

    Ng, Calvin S H; Wan, Innes Y P; Yim, Anthony P C

    2009-08-01

    Video-assisted thoracoscopic major lung resection for early stage non-small-cell lung carcinoma has been associated with less postoperative pain, better preserved pulmonary function, shorter hospital stay, and enhanced tolerance of adjuvant chemotherapy compared to thoracotomy. Initial concerns regarding safety, oncological clearance, and cost effectiveness were unfounded. Several recent trials have reported improved long-term survival in patients with early stage non-small-cell lung carcinoma undergoing video-assisted thoracoscopic major lung resection, compared to the open technique, although there are inconsistencies. Interestingly, the immune status and autologous tumor killing ability of lung cancer patients have previously been associated with long-term survival. Video-assisted thoracoscopic lung resection results in an attenuated postoperative inflammatory response, but more importantly, it better preserves postoperative immune function. Circulating natural killer and T-cell numbers, T-cell oxidative activity, and levels of immunochemokines such as insulin growth factor binding protein-3 are higher after video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery than after thoracotomy. Recently, interest has developed in the role of the angiogenesis factor, vascular endothelial growth factor, after cancer surgery. Whether differences in immunological and biochemical mediators contribute towards improved long-term survival following video-assisted thoracoscopic major lung resection for cancer remains to be confirmed.

  9. Negative pressure pulmonary oedema after septoplasty.

    PubMed

    García de Hombre, Alina M; Cuffini, Alejandro; Bonadeo, Alejandro

    2013-01-01

    Negative pressure pulmonary oedema (NPPO) is an anaesthetic complication due to acute obstruction of the upper airway, whose main cause is laryngospasm. The pathophysiology involves a strong negative intrapleural pressure during inspiration against a closed glottis, which triggers excessive pressure in the pulmonary microvasculature. Although its diagnosis can be difficult, its recognition helps to minimise morbidity and mortality. This article presents a case of NPPO due to postextubation laryngospasm.

  10. Mitotic figure counts are significantly overestimated in resection specimens of invasive breast carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Lehr, Hans-Anton; Rochat, Candice; Schaper, Cornelia; Nobile, Antoine; Shanouda, Sherien; Vijgen, Sandrine; Gauthier, Arnaud; Obermann, Ellen; Leuba, Susana; Schmidt, Marcus; C, Curzio Ruegg; Delaloye, Jean-Francois; Simiantonaki, Nectaria; Schaefer, Stephan C

    2013-03-01

    Several authors have demonstrated an increased number of mitotic figures in breast cancer resection specimen when compared with biopsy material. This has been ascribed to a sampling artifact where biopsies are (i) either too small to allow formal mitotic figure counting or (ii) not necessarily taken form the proliferating tumor periphery. Herein, we propose a different explanation for this phenomenon. Biopsy and resection material of 52 invasive ductal carcinomas was studied. We counted mitotic figures in 10 representative high power fields and quantified MIB-1 immunohistochemistry by visual estimation, counting and image analysis. We found that mitotic figures were elevated by more than three-fold on average in resection specimen over biopsy material from the same tumors (20±6 vs 6±2 mitoses per 10 high power fields, P=0.008), and that this resulted in a relative diminution of post-metaphase figures (anaphase/telophase), which made up 7% of all mitotic figures in biopsies but only 3% in resection specimen (P<0.005). At the same time, the percentages of MIB-1 immunostained tumor cells among total tumor cells were comparable in biopsy and resection material, irrespective of the mode of MIB-1 quantification. Finally, we found no association between the size of the biopsy material and the relative increase of mitotic figures in resection specimen. We propose that the increase in mitotic figures in resection specimen and the significant shift towards metaphase figures is not due to a sampling artifact, but reflects ongoing cell cycle activity in the resected tumor tissue due to fixation delay. The dwindling energy supply will eventually arrest tumor cells in metaphase, where they are readily identified by the diagnostic pathologist. Taken together, we suggest that the rapidly fixed biopsy material better represents true tumor biology and should be privileged as predictive marker of putative response to cytotoxic chemotherapy.

  11. Cecal Leiomyoma: Can We Attempt Endoscopic Resection?

    PubMed Central

    Badipatla, Kanthi Rekha; Kamireddy, Chandana; Niazi, Masooma; Nayudu, Suresh Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal leiomyomas are smooth muscle tumors arising from the muscularis mucosae, muscularis propriae and possibly from smooth muscle of the vessel wall. Management depends on the size, location and the clinical scenario. Endoscopic snare cauterization with or without saline lift has been described in literature for tumors involving the left colon. To the best of our knowledge, endoscopic resection of right colon leiomyoma was never attempted in the past. We present a case of cecal leiomyoma which was resected endoscopically. PMID:28058080

  12. [Laparoscopic distal resection of the pancreas].

    PubMed

    Gürlich, R; Sixta, B; Oliverius, M; Kment, M; Rusina, R; Spicák, J; Sváb, J

    2005-09-01

    During the last two years, reports on laparoscopic procedures of the pancreas have been on increase. Laparoscopic resection of the pancreatic cauda is indicated, primarily, for benign cystic lesions of the cauda of the pancreas and for neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas (mainly insulinomas). We have not recorded any report on the above procedure in the Czech literature. Therefore, in our case review, we have described laparoscopic distal resection of the pancreas with splenectomy for a pseudopapillary tumor of the pancreas.

  13. Resection for oesophageal cancer - complications and survival.

    PubMed

    Grøtting, Marie Sæthre; Løberg, Else Marit; Johannessen, Hans-Olaf; Johnson, Egil

    2016-05-01

    BACKGROUND Surgery is considered necessary to achieve a cure for oesophageal cancer. Minimally invasive oesophageal resection is increasingly performed with the aim of reducing the number of complications compared with open surgery. The purpose of this study was to investigate postoperative complications, mortality and long-term survival following hybrid oesophageal resection by laparoscopy and thoracotomy.MATERIAL AND METHOD Patients with oesophageal cancer who underwent hybrid resection with curative intent at Oslo University Hospital Ullevål from 1 November 2007 to 1 June 2013 were included (n = 109). Complications were graded according to the Clavien-Dindo classification and survival figures were recorded.RESULTS Median age was 65 years, 79 % were men. Altogether 118 complications were recorded in 70 patients (64.2 %). Distribution of complications was 1.8 % for stage I, 29.4 % for stage II, 22.1 % for stage III and 11.0 % for stage IV. Anastomotic leakage occurred in 4.6 %. There was no postoperative mortality. The proportion of R0 resections with microscopic radicality was 91 % (n = 100). For the entire patient population, the estimated 5-year survival rate was 48 % (95 % CI 36 - 60 %), for R0 resection 51 % (38 - 63 %) and for R1-2 resection 0 %. Estimated median survival with R0-2, R0 and R1-2 resection was 55, 55 and 10 months (0 - 28 months), respectively. R status and stage had a significant bearing on survival.INTERPRETATION There was a low percentage of serious complications, no mortality and few anastomotic leakages after hybrid resection for oesophageal cancer. The 5-year survival rate was good.

  14. LAPAROSCOPIC RESECTION OF GASTROINTESTINAL STROMAL TUMORS (GIST)

    PubMed Central

    LOUREIRO, Marcelo de Paula; de ALMEIDA, Rômulo Augusto Andrade; CLAUS, Christiano Marlo Paggi; BONIN, Eduardo Aimoré; CURY-FILHO,, Antônio Moris; DIMBARRE, Daniellson; da COSTA, Marco Aurélio Raeder; VITAL, Marcílio Lisboa

    2016-01-01

    Background Gastrointestinal mesenchymal or stromal tumors (GIST) are lesions originated on digestive tract walls, which are treated by surgical resection. Several laparoscopic techniques, from gastrectomies to segmental resections, have been used successfully. Aim Describe a single center experience on laparoscopic GIST resection. Method Charts of 15 operated patients were retrospectively reviewed. Thirteen had gastric lesions, of which ten were sub epithelial, ranging from 2-8 cm; and three were pure exofitic growing lesions. The remaining two patients had small bowel lesions. Surgical laparoscopic treatment consisted of two distal gastrectomies, 11 wedge gastric resections and two segmental enterectomies. Mechanical suture was used in the majority of patients except on six, which underwent resection and closure using manual absorbable sutures. There were no conversions to open technique. Results Mean operative time was 1h 29 min±92 (40-420 min). Average lenght of hospital stay was three days (2-6 days). There were no leaks, postoperative bleeding or need for reintervention. Mean postoperative follow-up was 38±17 months (6-60 months). Three patients underwent adjuvant Imatinib treatment, one for recurrence five months postoperatively and two for tumors with moderate risk for recurrence . Conclusion Laparoscopic GIST resection, not only for small lesions but also for tumors above 5 cm, is safe and acceptable technique. PMID:27120729

  15. Extralevator abdominoperineal resection in the prone position.

    PubMed

    Flor-Lorente, Blas; Frasson, Matteo; Montilla, Erick

    2014-03-01

    The Miles operation is every day more in the limelight. The abdominoperineal resection compared to anterior resection results in increased rate of circumferential resection margin (CRM) infiltration, increased iatrogenic tumor perforation rate and poorer quality of the mesorectum. These worse results may be caused by excessive dissection between the distal mesorectum and the plane of the levator ani and the consequent "resection waist" or "cone" effect in the specimen. A wider excision of the pelvic floor muscles, known as extraelevator abdominoperineal resection (ELAPE), would provide a "cylindrical" specimen which would hypothetically reduce the risk of tumor perforation and CRM infiltration and local recurrence rate. However, there is insufficient evidence to conclude that the ELAPE is oncologically superior compared to standard abdominoperineal resection. Independently from the surgical technique adopted, another actual point of discussion is the position of the patient during the perineal part of the operation. The position on "prone" provides excellent pelvic exposure, a top-down dissection under direct vision and is very comfortable for the operating surgeons. However, there is no clear scientific evidence of the superiority of prone ELAPE over supine ELAPE in terms of oncologic results, morbidity and mortality. The laparoscopy seems to be the best surgical approach for the abdominal part of the operation, although it has not been validated so far by large prospective studies. Prospective, controlled and randomized trials are necessary to resolve all these issues. The current interest in a more accurate and standardized perineal surgery to obtain a cylindrical specimen, undoubtedly, will improve results.

  16. Liver resection for intermediate hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Peng-Sheng; Zhang, Ming; Zhao, Ji-Tong; Xu, Ming-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignant tumors in China. The Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer (BCLC) staging system is regarded as the gold standard staging system for HCC, classifying HCC as early, intermediate, or advanced. For intermediate HCC, trans-catheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) is recommended as the optimal strategy by the BCLC guideline. This review investigates whether liver resection is better than TACE for intermediate HCC. Based on published studies, we compare the survival benefits and complications of liver resection and TACE for intermediate HCC. We also compare the survival benefits of liver resection in early and intermediate HCC. We find that liver resection can achieve better or at least comparable survival outcomes compared with TACE for intermediate HCC; however, we do not observe a significant difference between liver resection and TACE in terms of safety and morbidity. We conclude that liver resection may improve the short- and long-term survival of carefully selected intermediate HCC patients, and the procedure may be safely performed in the management of intermediate HCC. PMID:27190577

  17. Radiological contribution to the diagnosis of early postoperative complications after lung resection for primary tumor: a revisional study

    PubMed Central

    Priola, Adriano Massimiliano; Priola, Sandro Massimo; Boccuzzi, Francesco; Dervishi, Najada; Lisi, Elena; Veltri, Andrea; Ardissone, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    In the post-operative course of the interventions of lung resection for primary tumor, complications of different nature and severity can arise, recognizing different pathogenetic mechanisms and differing according to the type of resection performed and to the time elapsed after surgery. The low diagnostic accuracy of chest radiography requires a thorough knowledge of the radiologist about all radiographic findings, both normal and pathological, which can be found in the immediate post-operative period (within 30 days after surgery). This article aims to describe the incidence, the clinical features and the radiological aspects of immediate complications following pulmonary resections, with specific reference to those in which the diagnostic imaging provides a fundamental contribution. PMID:27621893

  18. Aseptic Meningitis with Craniopharyngioma Resection: Consideration after Endoscopic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jenny X; Alkire, Blake C; Lam, Allen C; Curry, William T; Holbrook, Eric H

    2016-10-01

    Objectives While bacterial meningitis is a concerning complication after endoscopic skull base surgery, the diagnosis can be made without consideration for aseptic meningitis. This article aims to (1) present a patient with recurrent craniopharyngioma and multiple postoperative episodes of aseptic meningitis and (2) discuss the diagnosis and management of aseptic meningitis. Design Case report and literature review. Results A 65-year-old female patient with a symptomatic craniopharyngioma underwent transsphenoidal resection. She returned postoperatively with symptoms concerning for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak and bacterial meningitis. Lumbar puncture demonstrated mildly elevated leukocytes with normal glucose levels. Cultures were sterile and she was discharged on antibiotics. She returned 18 days postoperatively with altered mental status and fever. Again, negative CSF cultures suggested aseptic meningitis. Radiological and intraoperative findings were now concerning for widespread cerebrovascular vasospasm due to leaked craniopharyngioma fluids. In the following months, her craniopharyngioma recurred and required multiple surgical resections. Days after her last operation, she returned with mental status changes and a sterile CSF culture. She was diagnosed with recurrent aseptic meningitis and antibiotics were discontinued. The patient experienced near complete resolution of symptoms. Conclusions Consideration of aseptic meningitis following craniopharyngioma resection is critical to avoid unnecessary surgical re-exploration and prolonged courses of antibiotics.

  19. Endoport-assisted microsurgical resection of cerebral cavernous malformations.

    PubMed

    Ding, Dale; Starke, Robert M; Crowley, R Webster; Liu, Kenneth C

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this case series is to describe the surgical technique and postoperative outcomes for endoport-assisted microsurgical resection (EAMR) of cerebral cavernous malformations (CCM). Significant manipulation of subcortical white matter tracts may be necessary for the successful resection of CCM located in deep brain regions. Minimally invasive neurosurgical devices such as endoport systems can decrease disruption of the cortex and white matter tracts overlying deep-seated CCM through small cranial and dural openings. The role of endoport technology in modern CCM surgery is incompletely understood. Three patients with symptomatic CCM underwent EAMR at our institution using the BrainPath endoport system (NICO Corporation, Indianapolis, IN, USA). Complete resection was achieved in two patients. One patient with a large 4.5cm callosal CCM was left with a small residual lesion. There were no postoperative complications and all patients were functionally independent (modified Rankin Scale score 2 or less) at follow-up. Based on our initial experience with EAMR for CCM we believe the endoport can be an effective alternative to traditional retractor systems. Due to the nature of the small craniotomy and durotomy performed for endoport placement EAMR has the potential to improve surgical outcomes by reducing postoperative pain, analgesic requirements and hospital stays. Therefore, EAMR may be considered for appropriately selected CCM patients, although additional experience is necessary to improve our understanding of its role in CCM management.

  20. Aseptic Meningitis with Craniopharyngioma Resection: Consideration after Endoscopic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jenny X.; Alkire, Blake C.; Lam, Allen C.; Curry, William T.; Holbrook, Eric H.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives While bacterial meningitis is a concerning complication after endoscopic skull base surgery, the diagnosis can be made without consideration for aseptic meningitis. This article aims to (1) present a patient with recurrent craniopharyngioma and multiple postoperative episodes of aseptic meningitis and (2) discuss the diagnosis and management of aseptic meningitis. Design Case report and literature review. Results A 65-year-old female patient with a symptomatic craniopharyngioma underwent transsphenoidal resection. She returned postoperatively with symptoms concerning for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak and bacterial meningitis. Lumbar puncture demonstrated mildly elevated leukocytes with normal glucose levels. Cultures were sterile and she was discharged on antibiotics. She returned 18 days postoperatively with altered mental status and fever. Again, negative CSF cultures suggested aseptic meningitis. Radiological and intraoperative findings were now concerning for widespread cerebrovascular vasospasm due to leaked craniopharyngioma fluids. In the following months, her craniopharyngioma recurred and required multiple surgical resections. Days after her last operation, she returned with mental status changes and a sterile CSF culture. She was diagnosed with recurrent aseptic meningitis and antibiotics were discontinued. The patient experienced near complete resolution of symptoms. Conclusions Consideration of aseptic meningitis following craniopharyngioma resection is critical to avoid unnecessary surgical re-exploration and prolonged courses of antibiotics. PMID:27722072

  1. Optical assessment of tumor resection margins in the breast

    PubMed Central

    Brown, J. Quincy; Bydlon, Torre M.; Richards, Lisa M.; Yu, Bing; Kennedy, Stephanie A.; Geradts, Joseph; Wilke, Lee G.; Junker, Marlee; Gallagher, Jennifer; Barry, William; Ramanujam, Nimmi

    2011-01-01

    Breast conserving surgery, in which the breast tumor and surrounding normal tissue are removed, is the primary mode of treatment for invasive and in situ carcinomas of the breast, conditions that affect nearly 200,000 women annually. Of these nearly 200,000 patients who undergo this surgical procedure, between 20–70% of them may undergo additional surgeries to remove tumor that was left behind in the first surgery, due to the lack of intra-operative tools which can detect whether the boundaries of the excised specimens are free from residual cancer. Optical techniques have many attractive attributes which may make them useful tools for intra-operative assessment of breast tumor resection margins. In this manuscript, we discuss clinical design criteria for intra-operative breast tumor margin assessment, and review optical techniques appied to this problem. In addition, we report on the development and clinical testing of quantitative diffuse reflectance imaging (Q-DRI) as a potential solution to this clinical need. Q-DRI is a spectral imaging tool which has been applied to 56 resection margins in 48 patients at Duke University Medical Center. Clear sources of contrast between cancerous and cancer-free resection margins were identified with the device, and resulted in an overall accuracy of 75% in detecting positive margins. PMID:21544237

  2. Pulmonary Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Kevin K.

    2006-01-01

    Pulmonary vasculitis describes a number of distinct disorders that are pathologically characterized by the destruction of blood vessels. The clinical manifestations of each disorder are defined by the size, type, and location of the affected vasculature. The clinical approach to these disorders rests upon an astute clinician considering the diagnosis and identifying the specific patterns of clinical, radiologic, laboratory, and pathologic abnormalities. Lung involvement is most commonly seen with the primary, idiopathic, small-vessel, or antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody–associated vasculitides; Wegener's granulomatosis, microscopic polyangiitis, and Churg-Strauss syndrome. However, primary, idiopathic medium and large-vessel vasculitis, primary immune complex–mediated vasculitis, and secondary vasculitis are all capable of presenting with lung involvement. In this article, we focus on the more common, antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody–associated disorder, vasculitides. PMID:16493151

  3. Pulmonary artery sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Blackmon, Shanda H; Reardon, Michael J

    2010-01-01

    Primary heart tumors are rare, and malignant primary heart tumors are only a small subset of these. Most primary malignant tumors are sarcomas arising from the cells of the structural elements of the heart such as blood vessels, muscle, connective tissue, fat and even bone. Unlike most malignancies, where cell type often dictates treatment choices and prognosis and is used for classification, the histology in primary cardiac sarcoma plays little role in determining therapeutic options or prognosis. We have found that anatomic location within the heart is the major determining factor in clinical presentation, treatment options and prognosis in cardiac sarcoma. Therefore, we accordingly classify primary cardiac sarcomas into right heart sarcomas, left heart sarcomas and pulmonary artery (PA) sarcomas. Since the first autopsy report of a primary PA sarcoma in 1923, there have been fewer than 250 cases reported in the English literature. Most of these reports have been single autopsy or case reports, and patient prognosis has generally been dismal. Since few institutions and even fewer individual physicians acquire much exposure to this disease, the diagnostic and treatment approaches have remained unresolved. Our cardiac sarcoma group working at the Methodist DeBakey Heart & Vascular Center and the MD Anderson Cancer Center has undertaken a systematic study of this disease, and operated on 9 patients using a radical resection with curative intent and multimodality approach. Based on this work, we have suggested a diagnostic strategy, treatment approach and staging system for primary PA sarcoma. A substantial improvement in patient survival over historical controls has also been demonstrated and will be discussed in this review.

  4. Clinical challenges of persistent pulmonary air-leaks--case report.

    PubMed

    van Zeller, M; Bastos, P; Fernandes, G; Magalhães, A

    2014-01-01

    Air leaks are a common problem after pulmonary resection and can be a source of significant morbidity and mortality. The authors describe the case of a 68-year-old male patient who presented with a persistent air-leak after pulmonary resection. Watchful waiting, surgical procedures, as well as medical therapy like pleurodesis and implantation of endobronchial one-way valves on the bronchial segments identified using systematic occlusion of the bronchial segments, were all tried unsuccessfully. During that time the patient remained hospitalized with a chest tube. The instillation of methylene blue through the chest tube was used to identify the segments leading to the persistent air-leak; this enabled successful endobronchial valve placement which sufficiently reduced the size of the air-leak so that the chest tube could be removed. Nonsurgical approaches seem promising and, for some patients may be the only treatment option after all conventional treatments have failed or are considered too high risk.

  5. Primary pulmonary artery sarcoma extending retrograde into the superior vena cava.

    PubMed

    Portillo-Sanchez, José; Hessein-Abdou, Yasser; Puga-Alcalde, Eugenio; Perez-Martinez, Maria Angeles; Del Carmen Jimenez-Meneses, Maria; Camacho-Pedrero, Agustín; Valdepeñas-Herrero, Luís Ruíz

    2011-01-01

    Primary pulmonary artery sarcoma is a rare tumor that is highly fatal. It can be misdiagnosed as acute or chronic pulmonary thromboembolic disease. Herein, we report the case of a 22-year-old woman with a preoperative diagnosis of pulmonary embolism and superior vena caval thrombosis. Intraoperatively, an extensive sarcoma was seen to extend retrograde from the pulmonary artery, past the right ventricle and right atrium, and into the superior vena cava. Surgical resection of the tumor and reconstruction of the central pulmonary arteries, followed by adjuvant chemotherapy, relieved the clinical symptoms. The patient remained free of cancer at 14 months postoperatively. We believe that this is the 1st report of a primary pulmonary artery sarcoma that extended retrograde into the superior vena cava.

  6. A case of intimal sarcoma of the pulmonary artery treated with chemoradiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Takashi; Ishikawa, Noboru; Hamada, Kenji; Inagaki, Tomoko; Kusumoto, Sojiro; Shirai, Takao; Okuda, Kentaro; Ohnishi, Tsukasa; Kadokura, Mitsutaka; Adachi, Mitsuru

    2009-01-01

    We report on a 45-year-old woman with intimal sarcoma of the pulmonary artery. She presented with a chief complaint of shortness of breath. Computed tomography (CT) of the chest showed an intraluminal hypoattenuated area extending from the main pulmonary artery into the right main pulmonary artery and bilateral lobar pulmonary arteries. She underwent resection of the lobulated mass from the pulmonary artery. The tumor was diagnosed as an intimal sarcoma. Although she received chemotherapy with amrubicin and carboplatin when the tumor recurred, the tumor enlarged. After radiotherapy was performed, CT of the chest showed shrinkage of the tumor and the regression of consolidation and ground-glass opacity. Radiotherapy and chemotherapy are treatment option for patients with pulmonary artery sarcoma.

  7. Primary Intrapulmonary Thymoma Presenting as a Solitary Pulmonary Nodule

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Woohyun; Kang, Chang Hyun; Kim, Young Tae; Park, In Kyu

    2017-01-01

    Primary intrapulmonary thymoma (PIT) is a very rare lesion of uncertain pathogenesis. PIT should be considered when the histopathological appearance of a lung tumor shows features that are uncommon but similar to those of a thymoma. In this case report, we discuss the case of a 59-year-old female with a solitary pulmonary nodule that was confirmed to be PIT on the basis of pathological tests. Treatment with complete resection showed good results. PMID:28180106

  8. Spontaneous pneumothorax associated with talc pulmonary granulomatosis after cocaine inhalation.

    PubMed

    Fiorelli, Alfonso; Accardo, Marina; Rossi, Francesco; Santini, Mario

    2016-03-01

    We report a case of recurrent spontaneous pneumothorax in a patient with cocaine abuse through inhalation alone. He underwent thoracoscopic apical lung resection with mechanical pleurodesis. Despite the lack of significant radiological features of talc induced pulmonary granulomatosis, pathological findings showed granulomas with foreign materials suggestive of being talc. Electronic microscopy showed that the size of talc particles were <4.0 µm and thus small enough to reach the alveoli.

  9. [Pathogenesis of chronic necrotizing pulmonary aspergillosis].

    PubMed

    Tashiro, Takayoshi

    2015-01-01

    Chronic necrotizing pulmonary aspergillosis (CNPA) is a slowly progressive inflammatory destruction of lung tissue due to Aspergillus infection. The main radiographic features are chronic pulmonary infiltrates, progressive cavitation, and subsequent aspergilloma formation. Although pre-existing cavity is not seen, the presence of pre-existing airspaces such as emphysematous bullae, cannot be excluded. Chronic cavitary pulmonary aspergillosis (CCPA), which is synonymous with complex aspergilloma, shows one or more pre-existing and / or newly formed pulmonary cavities that may or may not contain an aspergilloma, and cavity expansion and / or increasing pericavitary infiltrates. CNPA can be distinguished from CCPA by careful observation of progression of the cavitary lesion if a series of adequate radiography films are available. In some cases, however, it is difficult to distinguish the two subtypes if prior radiographs are not available Aiso, intermediate or overlapping types may exist. We therefore clinically and therapeutically proposed the syndrome including both CNPA and CCPA as chronic progressive pulmonary aspergillosis (CPPA).

  10. [Sildenafil in the treatment of pulmonary hypertension].

    PubMed

    García Martínez, E; Ibarra de la Rosa, I; Pérez Navero, J L; Tejero Mateo, I; Expósito Montes, J F; Suárez de Lezo y Cruz Conde, J

    2003-07-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PHT) is a rare entity that is difficult to treat. Prognosis is poor. Sildenafil, a selective inhibitor of type 5 phosphodiesterase, has been proposed among the many treatments available for primary and secondary pulmonary hypertension. We report our experience with an infant with pulmonary hypertension due to congenital mitral stenosis and persistent ductus arteriosus, who developed congestive cardiac failure with persistent PHT despite surgical correction. Conventional treatment was unsuccessful and the patient was treated with sildenafil. The clinical course was satisfactory, allowing extubation and withdrawal of vasoactive drugs; pulmonary and left atrial pressure decreased and the patient was discharged. She is currently being treated on an outpatient basis with oral sildenafil and shows satisfactory hemodynamic status. We review alternatives to conventional treatments for pulmonary hypertension with special reference to pediatrics.

  11. Occupational asthma due to azodicarbonamide.

    PubMed

    Kim, Cheol-Woo; Cho, Jae-Hwa; Leem, Jong-Han; Ryu, Jeong-Seon; Lee, Hong-Lyeol; Hong, Yun-Chul

    2004-04-30

    Azodicarbonamide is a low molecular weight foaming agent for plastics and rubbers. Azodicarbonamide can elicit acute and chronic health related problems due to its potential for pulmonary and cutaneous sensitization. Some cases of occupational asthma associated with exposure to azodicarbonamide have been reported, of which only a few cases were confirmed by specific inhalation challenges. Here, the first case of occupational asthma due to azodicarbonamide in Korea, in which the diagnosis was confirmed by specific inhalation challenge, is reported.

  12. Winged scapula due to osteochondroma. Report of 3 children.

    PubMed

    Danielsson, L G; el-Haddad, I

    1989-12-01

    Three children with winged scapula due to subscapular osteochondromata are reported. One case with multiple osteochondromatosis had two subscapular lesions. After resection, our cases became normal immediately and had no recurrence.

  13. Significance of Follow-up in Detection of Pulmonary Metastasis of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jae Won; Lee, Sun Il

    2010-01-01

    Purpose This study was performed to evaluate the effectiveness of conventional chest radiography, carcinoembrionic antigen (CEA) level and abdominal computed tomography (CT) or chest CT for early detection of pulmonary metastasis after a curative resection of colorectal cancer. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 84 cases of pulmonary metastasis from a group of colorectal cancer patients who had a curative surgical resection from 2000 to 2006 at the Korea University Medical Center. Results Stage I tumors were detected in 4 patients, stage II tumors in 18, stage III tumors in 43 and stage IV tumors in 19. The detection rates for pulmonary metastasis were 28.5% by conventional chest radiography, 40.5% by increased CEA level and 28.5% by abdominal CT or chest CT. Among them, fourteen patients underwent a radical pneumonectomy. After detection of pulmonary metastasis, the survival outcome for the patients who underwent a resection of the lung was superior to the survival outcome of the patients who did not undergo a resection of the lung (43.7 months vs. 17.4 months, P = 0.001). For patients who underwent resections of the lung, pulmonary metastasis was detected by conventional chest radiography in 2 (14%) patients, by elevated CEA level in 6 (42%) patients, and by abdominal CT or chest CT in 6 (42%) patients. Conclusion Conventional chest radiography is no more useful in detecting early pulmonary metastasis after a curative colorectal surgery than a routine chest CT. Thus, we propose the use of routine chest CT for screening for lung metastasis. PMID:21152232

  14. Fatal fat embolism following femoral head resection in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Walker, N M; Bateson, T; Reavley, P; Prakash, D

    2008-01-01

    We report a rare complication during primary total hip arthroplasty. A fatal fat pulmonary embolism immediately followed removal of the femoral head, prior to further preparation of the acetabulum or femoral shaft. Fat embolism syndrome is a well-known complication during total joint arthroplasty, usually attributed to preparation of the femoral shaft, particularly intramedullary reaming and insertion of the prosthesis. These risk factors have previously been identified in the literature. We believe that this case highlights the need for further research to establish the intramedullary pressures during the processes of dislocation and resection of the femoral neck and the attendant risk.

  15. Drug-induced pulmonary edema and acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lee-Chiong, Teofilo; Matthay, Richard A

    2004-03-01

    Noncardiogenic pulmonary edema, and, to a lesser extent, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), are common clinical manifestations of drug-induced lung diseases. Clinical features and radiographic appearances are generally indistinguishable from other causes of pulmonary edema and ARDS. Typical manifestations include dyspnea, chest discomfort, tachypnea, and hypoxemia. Chest radiographs commonly reveal interstitial and alveolar filling infiltrates. Unlike pulmonary edema that is due to congestive heart failure, cardiomegaly and pulmonary vascular redistribution are generally absent in cases that are drug-related. Rare cases of drug-induced myocarditis with heart failure and pulmonary edema have been described. Results from laboratory evaluation and respiratory function tests are nonspecific.

  16. Diffuse persistent interstitial pulmonary emphysema treated by lobectomy.

    PubMed

    Matta, Reva; Matta, Judy; Hage, Pierre; Nassif, Yolla; Mansour, Nabil; Diab, Nabil

    2011-10-01

    Persistent interstitial pulmonary emphysema is a rare condition that occurs in preterm infants on mechanical ventilation, characterized by abnormal accumulation of air in the pulmonary interstitium, due to disruption of the basement membrane. Diffuse persistent interstitial pulmonary emphysema is observed when small cysts are noted in all lobes of the lung. The management of infants suffering from diffuse persistent interstitial pulmonary emphysema varies according to severity and stability of the patient, being either conservative treatment or aggressive surgical treatment by pneumonectomy. We report a case of an unstable patient with diffuse persistent interstitial pulmonary emphysema successfully treated by lobectomy as a form of conservative surgical approach.

  17. Diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary hypertension in infancy.

    PubMed

    Steinhorn, Robin H

    2013-11-01

    Normal pulmonary vascular development in infancy requires maintenance of low pulmonary vascular resistance after birth, and is necessary for normal lung function and growth. The developing lung is subject to multiple genetic, pathological and/or environmental influences that can adversely affect lung adaptation, development, and growth, leading to pulmonary hypertension. New classifications of pulmonary hypertension are beginning to account for these diverse phenotypes, and or pulmonary hypertension in infants due to PPHN, congenital diaphragmatic hernia, and bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). The most effective pharmacotherapeutic strategies for infants with PPHN are directed at selective reduction of PVR, and take advantage of a rapidly advancing understanding of the altered signaling pathways in the remodeled vasculature.

  18. Resection after preoperative chemotherapy versus synchronous liver resection of colorectal cancer liver metastases

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chan W.; Lee, Jong L.; Yoon, Yong S.; Park, In J.; Lim, Seok-Byung; Yu, Chang S.; Kim, Tae W.; Kim, Jin C.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to determine the prognostic effects of preoperative chemotherapy for colorectal cancer liver metastasis (CLM). We retrospectively evaluated 2 groups of patients between January 2006 and August 2012. A total of 53 patients who had ≥3 hepatic metastases underwent resection after preoperative chemotherapy (preoperative chemotherapy group), whereas 96 patients who had ≥3 hepatic metastases underwent resection with a curative intent before chemotherapy for CLM (primary resection group). A propensity score (PS) model was used to compare the both groups. The 3-year disease-free survival (DFS) rates were 31.7% and 20.4% in the preoperative chemotherapy and primary resection groups, respectively (log-rank = 0.015). Analyzing 32 PS matched pairs, we found that the DFS rate was significantly higher in the preoperative chemotherapy group than in the primary resection group (3-year DFS rates were 34.2% and 16.8%, respectively [log-rank = 0.019]). Preoperative chemotherapy group patients had better DFSs than primary resection group patients in various multivariate analyses, including crude, multivariable, average treatment effect with inverse probability of treatment weighting model and PS matching. Responses to chemotherapy are as important as achieving complete resection in cases of multiple hepatic metastases. Preoperative chemotherapy may therefore be preferentially considered for patients who experience difficulty undergoing complete resection for multiple hepatic metastases. PMID:28207557

  19. Type 1 neurofibromatosis and pulmonary hypertension: a report of two cases and a review

    PubMed Central

    Malviya, Amit; Mishra, Sundeep; Kothari, Shyam S

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension in type 1 neurofibromatosis is not well known and was previously attributed to diffuse fibrosing alveolitis and parenchymal tumours. More recently, cases of severe pulmonary hypertension due to pulmonary vasculopathy have been described. Involvement of vascular beds, both large and medium calibre vessels, but not pulmonary vasculature, in type 1 neurofibromatosis is well known. The authors describe two such cases and briefly review the literature. Pulmonary arterial hypertension in neurofibromatosis warrants further studies. PMID:27326022

  20. [Combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema syndrome].

    PubMed

    Alilović, Marija; Peroš-Golubićić, Tatjana; Tekavec Trkanjec, Jasna; Hećimović, Ana; Smojver-Ježek, Silvana

    2015-01-01

    CPFE-combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema is a new term for a syndrome whose main characteristic is fibrosis in lower pulmonary lobes with simultaneous emphysema in upper pulmonary lobes. CPFE patients have well preserved pulmonary test values for unexpectedly long period, but extremely lowered carbon monoxide diffusion capacity and significant arterial hypertension. All CPFE studies indicate that CPFE occurs predominately in older male population. Smoking is considered main cause in developing CPFE. Reduced survival rate is linked with arterial hypertension extent, and mortality rate is greater than that for patients with isolated pulmonary fibrosis or emphysema. This study is focused on characteristics of twelve CPFE patients. This paper describes cases of 12 patients with the syndrome of pulmonary fibrosis associated with emphysema. All patients were male, mean age of 68 years. At the certain period of life they all were smokers, but most of them were also exposed to air pollution due to their profession. Shortness of breath on exertion was present in all patients. All patients had neat pulmonary function tests with significantly reduced diffusing capacity for carbon mon- oxide (average 39%). Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) averaged 56 mmHg (range 25-75 mmHg) was present in 75% of patients. Four patients died during the period of four months, of which three patients had PAH greater than 70 mmHg. The fourth patient died of lung cancer.

  1. Pulmonary oedema following exercise in humans.

    PubMed

    Hodges, Alastair N H; Mayo, John R; McKenzie, Donald C

    2006-01-01

    Pulmonary physiologists have documented many transient changes in the lung and the respiratory system during and following exercise, including the incomplete oxygen saturation of arterial blood in some subjects, possibly due to transient pulmonary oedema. The large increase in pulmonary arterial pressure during exercise, leading to either increased pulmonary capillary leakage and/or pulmonary capillary stress failure, is likely to be responsible for any increase in extravascular lung water during exercise. The purpose of this article is to summarise the studies to date that have specifically examined lung water following exercise. A limited number of studies have been completed with the specific purpose of identifying pulmonary oedema following exercise or a similar intervention. Of these, approximately 50% have observed a positive change and the remaining have provided results that are either inconclusive or show no change in extravascular lung water. While it is difficult to draw a firm conclusion from these studies, we believe that pulmonary oedema does occur in some humans following exercise. As such, this is a phenomenon of significance to pulmonary and exercise physiologists. This possibility warrants further study in the area with more precise measurement tools than has previously been undertaken.

  2. Pulmonary vasculature in COPD: The silent component.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Isabel; Piccari, Lucilla; Barberà, Joan Albert

    2016-08-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by airflow obstruction that results from an inflammatory process affecting the airways and lung parenchyma. Despite major abnormalities taking place in bronchial and alveolar structures, changes in pulmonary vessels also represent an important component of the disease. Alterations in vessel structure are highly prevalent and abnormalities in their function impair gas exchange and may result in pulmonary hypertension (PH), an important complication of the disease associated with reduced survival and worse clinical course. The prevalence of PH is high in COPD, particularly in advanced stages, although it remains of mild to moderate severity in the majority of cases. Endothelial dysfunction, with imbalance between vasodilator/vasoconstrictive mediators, is a key determinant of changes taking place in pulmonary vasculature in COPD. Cigarette smoke products may perturb endothelial cells and play a critical role in initiating vascular changes. The concurrence of inflammation, hypoxia and emphysema further contributes to vascular damage and to the development of PH. The use of drugs that target endothelium-dependent signalling pathways, currently employed in pulmonary arterial hypertension, is discouraged in COPD due to the lack of efficacy observed in randomized clinical trials and because there is compelling evidence indicating that these drugs may worsen pulmonary gas exchange. The subgroup of patients with severe PH should be ideally managed in centres with expertise in both PH and chronic lung diseases because alterations of pulmonary vasculature might resemble those observed in pulmonary arterial hypertension. Because this condition entails poor prognosis, it warrants specialist treatment.

  3. [Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis. Study of pulmonary circulation].

    PubMed

    Orea Tejeda, A; Atencio, C; Sandoval, J; Lupi Herrera, E

    1982-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis is a rare disease of unknown etiology which consists of alveolar deposit of calcium microspheres. We report the procedures for the diagnosis of this disease, as well as the hemodynamic features of the pulmonary circulation. Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), and cor pulmonale were documented. The active and passive factors involved in PAH are analyzed. We conclude that alveolar hypoxia and estructural vascular changes play a major role in the genesis of PAH.

  4. Murine Ileocolic Bowel Resection with Primary Anastomosis

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Troy; Borowiec, Anna; Dicken, Bryan; Fedorak, Richard; Madsen, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal resections are frequently required for treatment of diseases involving the gastrointestinal tract, with Crohn’s disease and colon cancer being two common examples. Despite the frequency of these procedures, a significant knowledge gap remains in describing the inherent effects of intestinal resection on host physiology and disease pathophysiology. This article provides detailed instructions for an ileocolic resection with primary end-to-end anastomosis in mice, as well as essential aspects of peri-operative care to maximize post-operative success. When followed closely, this procedure yields a 95% long-term survival rate, no failure to thrive, and minimizes post-operative complications of bowel obstruction and anastomotic leak. The technical challenges of performing the procedure in mice are a barrier to its wide spread use in research. The skills described in this article can be acquired without previous surgical experience. Once mastered, the murine ileocolic resection procedure will provide a reproducible tool for studying the effects of intestinal resection in models of human disease. PMID:25406841

  5. Stress response to laparoscopic liver resection

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Kazuki; Turner, Patricia

    2004-01-01

    Background: The magnitude of the systemic response is proportional to the degree of surgical trauma. Much has been reported in the literature comparing metabolic and immune responses, analgesia use, or length of hospital stay between laparoscopic and open procedures. In particular, metabolic and immune responses are represented by measuring various chemical mediators as stress responses. Laparoscopic procedures are associated with reduced operative trauma compared with open procedures, resulting in lower systemic response. As a result, laparoscopic procedures are now well accepted for both benign and malignant processes. Laparoscopic liver resection, specifically, is employed for symptomatic and some malignant tumors, following improvements in diagnostic accuracy, laparoscopic devices, and techniques. However, laparoscopic liver resection is still controversial in malignant disease because of complex anatomy, the technical difficulty of the procedure, and questionable indications. There are few reports describing the stress responses associated with laparoscopic liver resection, even though many studies reviewing stress responses have been performed recently in both humans and animal models comparing laparoscopic to conventional open surgery. Although this review examines stress response after laparoscopic liver resection in both an animal and human clinical model, further controlled randomized studies with additional investigations of immunologic parameters are needed to demonstrate the consequences of either minimally invasive surgery or open procedures on perioperative or postoperative stress responses for laparoscopic liver resection. PMID:18333082

  6. Pulmonary function in advanced pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed Central

    Burke, C M; Glanville, A R; Morris, A J; Rubin, D; Harvey, J A; Theodore, J; Robin, E D

    1987-01-01

    Pulmonary mechanical function and gas exchange were studied in 33 patients with advanced pulmonary vascular disease, resulting from primary pulmonary hypertension in 18 cases and from Eisenmenger physiology in 15 cases. Evidence of airway obstruction was found in most patients. In addition, mean total lung capacity (TLC) was only 81.5% of predicted and 27% of our subjects had values of TLC less than one standard deviation below the mean predicted value. The mean value for transfer factor (TLCO) was 71.8% of predicted and appreciable arterial hypoxaemia was present, which was disproportionate to the mild derangements in pulmonary mechanics. Patients with Eisenmenger physiology had significantly lower values of arterial oxygen tension (PaO2) (p less than 0.05) and of maximum mid expiratory flow (p less than 0.05) and significantly higher pulmonary arterial pressure (p less than 0.05) than those with primary pulmonary hypertension, but no other variables were significantly different between the two subpopulations. It is concluded that advanced pulmonary vascular disease in patients with primary pulmonary hypertension and Eisenmenger physiology is associated not only with severe hypoxaemia but also with altered pulmonary mechanical function. PMID:3433237

  7. Fractalkine-induced smooth muscle cell proliferation in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Perros, F; Dorfmüller, P; Souza, R; Durand-Gasselin, I; Godot, V; Capel, F; Adnot, S; Eddahibi, S; Mazmanian, M; Fadel, E; Hervé, P; Simonneau, G; Emilie, D; Humbert, M

    2007-05-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is characterised by a progressive increase in pulmonary arterial resistance due to endothelial and smooth muscle cell proliferation resulting in chronic obstruction of small pulmonary arteries. There is evidence that inflammatory mechanisms may contribute to the pathogenesis of human and experimental pulmonary hypertension. The aim of the study was to address the role of fractalkine (CX3CL1) in the inflammatory responses and pulmonary vascular remodelling of a monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension model. The expression of CX3CL1 and its receptor CX3CR1 was studied in monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension by means of immunohistochemistry and quantitative reverse-transcription PCR on laser-captured microdissected pulmonary arteries. It was demonstrated that CX3CL1 was expressed by inflammatory cells surrounding pulmonary arterial lesions and that smooth muscle cells from these vessels had increased CX3CR1 expression. It was then shown that cultured rat pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells expressed CX3CR1 and that CX3CL1 induced proliferation but not migration of these cells. In conclusion, the current authors proposed that fractalkine may act as a growth factor for pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells. Chemokines may thus play a role in pulmonary artery remodelling.

  8. Pulmonary Arteriovenous Malformations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Within the past decade, pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs) have evolved from rare curiosities to not uncommon clinical states, with the latest estimates suggesting a prevalence of ∼1 in 2,600. PAVMs provide anatomic right-to-left shunts, allowing systemic venous blood to bypass gas exchange and pulmonary capillary bed processing. Hypoxemia and enhanced ventilatory demands result, although both are usually asymptomatic. Paradoxical emboli lead to strokes and cerebral abscesses, and these commonly occur in individuals with previously undiagnosed PAVMs. PAVM hemorrhage is rare but is the main cause of maternal death in pregnancy. PAVM occlusion by embolization is the standard of care to reduce these risks. However, recent data demonstrate that currently recommended management protocols can result in levels of radiation exposure that would be classified as harmful. Recent publications also provide a better appreciation of the hematologic and cardiovascular demands required to maintain arterial oxygen content and oxygen consumption in hypoxemic patients, identify patient subgroups at higher risk of complications, and emphasize the proportion of radiologically visible PAVMs too small to treat by embolization. This review, therefore, outlines medical states that exacerbate the consequences of PAVMs. Chief among these is iron deficiency, which is commonly present due to concurrent hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia: iron deficiency impairs hypoxemia compensations by restricting erythropoiesis and increases the risk of ischemic strokes. Management of periodontal disease, dental interventions, pulmonary hypertension, and pregnancy also requires specific consideration in the setting of PAVMs. The review concludes by discussing to what extent previously recommended protocols may benefit from modification or revision. PMID:25420112

  9. Clinical characteristics of pulmonary embolism with concomitant pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Cha, Seung-Ick; Choi, Keum-Ju; Shin, Kyung-Min; Lim, Jae-Kwang; Yoo, Seung-Soo; Lee, Jaehee; Lee, Shin-Yup; Kim, Chang-Ho; Park, Jae-Yong

    2016-04-01

    Although pneumonia is associated with an increased risk of venous thromboembolism, patients with pulmonary embolism and concomitant pneumonia are uncommon. The aim of the present study was to investigate the clinical features of pulmonary embolism with coexisting pneumonia. We retrospectively compared clinical, radiologic and laboratory parameters between patients with pulmonary embolism and concomitant pneumonia (pneumonia group) and those with unprovoked pulmonary embolism (unprovoked group), and then between the pneumonia group and those with pulmonary infarction (infarction group). Of 794 patients with pulmonary embolism, 36 (5%) had coexisting pneumonia and six (1%) had no provoking factor other than pneumonia. Stroke was significantly more common in the pneumonia group, than either the unprovoked group or the infarction group. In the pneumonia group, fever was significantly more common and serum C-reactive protein levels were significantly higher. By contrast, central pulmonary embolism and right ventricular dilation on computed tomography were significantly less frequent in the pneumonia group. In addition, an adverse outcome due to pulmonary embolism was less common in the pneumonia group than in either of the other two groups. The coexistence of pulmonary embolism and pneumonia is rarely encountered in clinical practice, especially without the presence of other factors that could provoke venous thromboembolism and is commonly associated with stroke. It is characterized by lower incidences of central pulmonary embolism and right ventricular dilation and by a lower rate of adverse outcomes due to pulmonary embolism itself.

  10. Intimal sarcoma of the left pulmonary artery: diagnosis, treatment and survival.

    PubMed

    Gosalbez, F; Gudin, C; Miralles, M; Naya, J; Valle, J M

    1993-08-01

    A rare case of intimal sarcoma of the left pulmonary artery, diagnosed by fine needle aspiration biopsy and treated by pneumonectomy, is presented. Survival was nearly 4 years and the patient died as the result of attempted resection of a local recurrence. The literature is reviewed.

  11. Endoscopic Resection of the Tarsal Tunnel Ganglion.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2016-10-01

    The tarsal tunnel ganglion is a cause of posterior tarsal tunnel syndrome. Open resection of the ganglion calls for release of the flexor retinaculum and dissection around the tibial neurovascular bundle. This can induce fibrosis around the tibial nerve. We report the technique of endoscopic resection of the tarsal tunnel ganglion. It is indicated for tarsal tunnel ganglia arising from the adjacent joints or tendon sheaths and compressing the tibial nerve from its deep side. It is contraindicated if there is other pathology of the tarsal tunnel that demands open surgery; if the ganglion compresses the tibial nerve from its superficial side, which calls for a different endoscopic approach using the ganglion portal; or if an intraneural ganglion of the tibial nerve is present. The purpose of this technical note is to describe a minimally invasive approach for endoscopic resection of the tarsal tunnel ganglion.

  12. The difficulty of laparoscopic liver resection.

    PubMed

    Ban, Daisuke; Kudo, Atsushi; Ito, Hiromitsu; Mitsunori, Yusuke; Matsumura, Satoshi; Aihara, Arihiro; Ochiai, Takanori; Tanaka, Shinji; Tanabe, Minoru; Itano, Osamu; Kaneko, Hironori; Wakabayashi, Go

    2015-06-01

    Grading of difficulty is needed for laparoscopic liver resection (LLR). Indications for LLR are expanding worldwide from minor to major resections, particularly in institutions having surgeons with advanced skills. If the degrees of surgical difficulty were defined, it would serve as a useful guide when introducing LLR and stepping up to the more advanced LLR. As no previous study has addressed the degrees of difficulty of various LLR procedures, we devised a practical scoring system for this purpose. We extracted the following five factors from preoperative information to score difficulty levels: (1) tumor location, (2) extent of liver resection, (3) tumor size, (4) proximity to major vessels, and (5) liver function. This difficulty index is comprised of the cumulative score for the five individual factors. There has not yet been a standard definition of difficulty. Our proposed scoring system might be a practical means of assessing the difficulty of LLR procedures. However, this system must be prospectively validated.

  13. Correction of Double-Chambered Right Ventricle 40 Years after Pulmonary Valvuloplasty

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, Elmar W.; Bennink, Gerardus; Wahlers, Thorsten; Wippermann, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Background Double-chambered right ventricle is a partial separation of the right ventricle by pathological tissue. This anomaly is described in infants and children but can also be diagnosed in young adults. Case Description A 47-year-old patient presented with chest pain and exercise intolerance. Further evaluation revealed a double-chambered right ventricle. During the surgical procedure, fibrotic tissue was transected, and a pulmonary valve replacement including enlargement of the main pulmonary artery was performed. Conclusion Subpulmonary obstruction of the right ventricle can be related to double-chambered right ventricle even in adulthood. Treatment options include surgical resection with pulmonary valve replacement. PMID:26693124

  14. Pulmonary pathophysiology and lung mechanics in anesthesiology: a case-based overview.

    PubMed

    Vidal Melo, Marcos F; Musch, Guido; Kaczka, David W

    2012-12-01

    Anesthesia, surgical requirements, and patients' unique pathophysiology all combine to make the accumulated knowledge of respiratory physiology and lung mechanics vital in patient management. This article take a case-based approach to discuss how the complex interactions between anesthesia, surgery, and patient disease affect patient care with respect to pulmonary pathophysiology and clinical decision making. Two disparate scenarios are examined: a patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease undergoing a lung resection, and a patient with coronary artery disease undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass. The impacts of important concepts in pulmonary physiology and respiratory mechanics on clinical management decisions are discussed.

  15. Pulmonary artery sarcoma: a rare thoracic tumor frequently misdiagnosed at presentation

    PubMed Central

    Evison, Matthew; Crosbie, Philip; Chaturvedi, Anshuman; Shah, Rajesh; Booton, Richard

    2015-01-01

    This case illustrates a rare but important differential diagnosis of pulmonary emboli in the field of thoracic oncology, that of pulmonary artery sarcoma. It describes particular clinical features that may raise suspicion of this tumor in cases of suspected pulmonary emboli, and highlights novel radiological modalities and tissue sampling techniques in such cases. Surgical resection, as part of multi-modality therapy, is the cornerstone of treatment that has seen survival dramatically improve in recent years for patients with this rare cancer. PMID:26557921

  16. [Tetralogy of Fallot with absent pulmonary valve in a newborn and infant. Complete surgical correction].

    PubMed

    Cabrera Duro, A; Rodrigo Carbonero, D; Martínez Corrales, P; Aramendi Gallardo, J; Alcíbar Villa, J; López de Heredia Goya, J; Romero Ibarra, C

    2004-02-01

    We report two patients, a newborn and a 7-month old infant, with tetralogy of Fallot and absent pulmonary valve syndrome. Both had severe obstruction at the level of the ring with aneurysmal pulmonary artery branches, which compressed and displaced the trachea and main bronchial tubes. The neonate required mechanical ventilation from birth. Treatment was aggressive in both patients with interventricular septum defect closure, arterioplasty of the branches and homograft in the infant, and resection of the truncus and pulmonary branches with posterior face suture of both branches associated with a valved conduit in orthotopic position in the neonate. We believe that early treatment avoids airway degeneration and right ventricle volume overload.

  17. Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy in Resected Extrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, John W.; Ghafoori, A. Paiman; Willett, Christopher G.; Tyler, Douglas S.; Pappas, Theodore N.; Clary, Bryan M.; Hurwitz, Herbert I.; Bendell, Johanna C.; Morse, Michael A.; Clough, Robert W.; Czito, Brian G.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma is a rare malignancy. Despite radical resection, survival remains poor, with high rates of local and distant failure. To clarify the role of radiotherapy with chemotherapy, we performed a retrospective analysis of resected patients who had undergone chemoradiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 45 patients (13 with proximal and 32 with distal disease) underwent resection plus radiotherapy (median dose, 50.4 Gy). All but 1 patient received concurrent fluoropyrimidine-based chemotherapy. The median follow-up was 30 months for all patients and 40 months for survivors. Results: Of the 45 patients, 33 underwent adjuvant radiotherapy, and 12 were treated neoadjuvantly. The 5-year actuarial overall survival, disease-free survival, metastasis-free survival, and locoregional control rates were 33%, 37%, 42%, and 78%, respectively. The median survival was 34 months. No patient died perioperatively. Patient age {<=}60 years and perineural involvement adversely affected survival on univariate analysis. Patients undergoing R0 resection had a significantly improved rate of local control but no survival advantage. Despite having more advanced disease at presentation, patients treated neoadjuvantly had a longer survival (5-year survival 53% vs. 23%, p = 0.16) and similar rates of Grade 2-3 surgical morbidity (16% vs. 33%, p = 0.24) compared with those treated in the postoperative setting. Conclusion: These study results suggest a possible local control benefit from chemoradiotherapy combined with surgery in patients with advanced, resected biliary cancer. Furthermore, our results suggest that a treatment strategy that includes preoperative chemoradiotherapy might result in improved tumor resectability with similar surgical morbidity compared with patients treated postoperatively, as well as potentially improved survival outcomes. Distant failure remains a significant failure pattern, suggesting the need for more effective systemic

  18. Abdominosacral resection for locally recurring rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Belli, Filiberto; Gronchi, Alessandro; Corbellini, Carlo; Milione, Massimo; Leo, Ermanno

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate feasibility and outcome of abdominal-sacral resection for treatment of locally recurrent rectal adenocarcinoma. METHODS A population of patients who underwent an abdominal-sacral resection for posterior recurrent adenocarcinoma of the rectum at the National Cancer Institute of Milano, between 2005 and 2013, is considered. Retrospectively collected data includes patient characteristics, treatment and pathology details regarding the primary and the recurrent rectal tumor surgical resection. A clinical and instrumental follow-up was performed. Surgical and oncological outcome were investigated. Furthermore an analytical review of literature was conducted in order to compare our case series with other reported experiences. RESULTS At the time of abdomino-sacral resection, the mean age of patients was 55 (range, 38-64). The median operating time was 380 min (range, 270-480). Sacral resection was performed at S2/S3 level in 3 patients, S3/S4 in 3 patients and S4/S5 in 4 patients. The median operating time was 380 ± 58 min. Mean intraoperative blood loss was 1750 mL (range, 200-680). The median hospital stay was 22 d. Overall morbidity was 80%, mainly type II complication according to the Clavien-Dindo classification. Microscopically negative margins (R0) is obtained in all patients. Overall 5-year survival after first surgical procedure is 60%, with a median survival from the first surgery of 88 ± 56 mo. The most common site of re-recurrence was intrapelvic. CONCLUSION Sacral resection represents a feasible approach to posterior rectal cancer recurrence without evidence of distant spreading. An accurate staging is essential for planning the best therapy. PMID:28070232

  19. Pulmonary hypertension - at home

    MedlinePlus

    Pulmonary hypertension (PAH) is abnormally high blood pressure in the arteries of the lungs. With PAH, the right side ... Chin K, Channick RN. Pulmonary hypertension. In: Broaddus VC, Mason ... Textbook of Respiratory Medicine . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  20. Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... for a friend. Ways to Give Announcements CHICAGO BEAR JORDAN HOWARD BRINGS HIS FIGHT TO PULMONARY FIBROSIS ... 22-year-old lead rusher for the Chicago Bears, will announce his commitment to fight pulmonary fibrosis ( ...

  1. Living with Pulmonary Embolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... on Twitter. Living With Pulmonary Embolism Pulmonary embolism (PE) usually is treated in a hospital. After leaving ... you're taking medicine. Medicines used to treat PE can thin your blood too much. This can ...

  2. Who Needs Pulmonary Rehabilitation?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topics Bronchitis COPD Cystic Fibrosis Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis Sarcoidosis Send a link to NHLBI to someone by ... other symptoms. Examples of interstitial lung diseases include sarcoidosis and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis . Cystic fibrosis (CF). CF ...

  3. Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis? Pulmonary fibrosis (PULL-mun-ary fi-BRO-sis) is a ... time. The formation of scar tissue is called fibrosis. As the lung tissue thickens, your lungs can' ...

  4. Types of Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hypertension The World Health Organization divides pulmonary hypertension (PH) into five groups. These groups are organized based ... lungs. Group 2 Pulmonary Hypertension Group 2 includes PH with left heart disease. Conditions that affect the ...

  5. Solitary PSMA-Positive Pulmonary Metastasis in Biochemical Relapse of Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Groe Hokamp, Nils; Kobe, Carsten; Linzenich, Eric; Maintz, David; Drzezga, Alexander

    2017-02-13

    A 63-year-old man with a history of prostate cancer, treated with resection, radiation, and androgen-depriving therapy over 4 years, was referred to our department with suspicion of recurrence based on increased blood PSA levels (1.60 ng/mL). Ga PSMA PET/CT identified a solitary, PSMA-positive pulmonary nodule in the right lung. After resection, histologic analysis confirmed prostatic origin, and the blood PSA level decreased to 0.13 ng/mL. Solitary pulmonary metastasis from prostate cancer is rare. The benefits of local treatment of a single metastasis even in advanced disease are disputed among oncologists. Here, biochemical response to resection was excellent.

  6. Right Thoracoabdominal Approach for Retrocardiac Paraganglioma Resection

    PubMed Central

    Laparra-Escareno, Hugo; Anaya-Ayala, Javier E.; Lizola, Rene; Torres-Machorro, Adriana; Gamboa-Domínguez, Armando

    2017-01-01

    Paragangliomas are rare extra-adrenal tumors of sympathetic or parasympathetic paraganglia origin; of these, mediastinal paragangliomas are 2% of all cases. We present the case of a 21-year-old woman with uncontrolled arterial hypertension who had a functioning 6.5 × 6.2-cm retrocardiac paraganglioma firmly attached to the pericardium. The patient underwent tumor resection via a right thoracoabdominal incision; this surgical approach enabled adequate exposure for complete resection without institution of cardiopulmonary bypass or need for cardiac reconstruction or autotransplantation. Ten months postoperatively, the patient was doing well and was no longer hypertensive. PMID:28265216

  7. Pulmonary Function after Adenotonsillectomy

    PubMed Central

    Rogha, Mehrdad; Amini, Jaleh; Raisi, Mostafa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Adenotonsillar hypertrophy is a common disorder among children which, without proper treatment, may lead to considerable problems. Although the consequences of this disorder have been studied in other articles, we decided to evaluate the changes in pulmonary function tests in these children after adenotonsillectomy, and the correlation between clinical and spirometric parameters. Materials and Methods: We conducted a before- and after- clinical trial. Forty children (17 females and 23 males) with a diagnosis of upper airway obstruction due to adenotonsillar hypertrophy were enrolled in this study. Mean age of the participants was 6.9±1.9 years. Eight spirometric parameters were selected for evaluation pre-operatively and 40 days postoperatively. Besides, symptom scores were defined for each patient to assess their disease severity, pre- and postoperatively. Data were analyzed statistically. Results: Forced vital capacity (FVC) increased from 1.28±0.26% pre-operatively to 1.33±0.24%postoperatively (P=0.05). Peak expiratory flow increased from 2.74±0.65% pre-operatively to 2.84±0.51% postoperatively (P=0.02) and mid expiratory forced expiratory flow (FEF25–75) was 1.81±0.48% pre-operatively, increasing to 1.91±0.50% postoperatively (P=0.02). Maximal expiratory flow at 25% of FVC (MEF25) increased from 1.09±0.36% pre-operatively to 1.21±0.34% postoperatively (P=0.02). There was no correlation among the other spirometric parameters (FEV1, FEV1/FVC, MEF50 and MEF75) pre- and post-operatively (P>0.05). Despite some improvements in pulmonary function indices, there was no correlation between changes in spirometric parameters and severity of the snoring (P>0.05). Conclusion: Although our findings reveal that adenotonsillectomy had a positive effect on pulmonary function tests, we found no significant correlation between alterations in spirometric parameters and severity of snoring. However, performing a spirometric examination in children with

  8. Pulmonary gas exchange in diving.

    PubMed

    Moon, R E; Cherry, A D; Stolp, B W; Camporesi, E M

    2009-02-01

    Diving-related pulmonary effects are due mostly to increased gas density, immersion-related increase in pulmonary blood volume, and (usually) a higher inspired Po(2). Higher gas density produces an increase in airways resistance and work of breathing, and a reduced maximum breathing capacity. An additional mechanical load is due to immersion, which can impose a static transrespiratory pressure load as well as a decrease in pulmonary compliance. The combination of resistive and elastic loads is largely responsible for the reduction in ventilation during underwater exercise. Additionally, there is a density-related increase in dead space/tidal volume ratio (Vd/Vt), possibly due to impairment of intrapulmonary gas phase diffusion and distribution of ventilation. The net result of relative hypoventilation and increased Vd/Vt is hypercapnia. The effect of high inspired Po(2) and inert gas narcosis on respiratory drive appear to be minimal. Exchange of oxygen by the lung is not impaired, at least up to a gas density of 25 g/l. There are few effects of pressure per se, other than a reduction in the P50 of hemoglobin, probably due to either a conformational change or an effect of inert gas binding.

  9. Evaluation and management of the patient with pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Lewis J; Badesch, David B

    2005-08-16

    Increased pressure in the pulmonary circulation, or pulmonary hypertension, is a common disorder that may complicate various cardiopulmonary conditions, including severe obstructive airways disease and left ventricular dysfunction. An increase in pulmonary arterial pressure that is not due to coexistent cardiopulmonary disease, known as pulmonary arterial hypertension, may occur in the absence of a demonstrable cause (idiopathic or familial); as a complication of systemic conditions, such as connective tissue disease, HIV infection, or chronic liver disease; or as a result of the use of fenfluramine anorexigens, amphetamines, or cocaine. The development of disease-specific therapies for pulmonary arterial hypertension over the past decade underscores the importance of diagnosing pulmonary hypertension early in the course of the condition and implementing a treatment strategy that is based on the condition's cause and severity. In this review, the authors present approaches to the diagnosis and management of pulmonary arterial hypertension, using a hypothetical case to highlight the key management points.

  10. Current concepts in the pathogenesis of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is characterized by fibrotic obstruction of the proximal pulmonary arteries, and it is believed to result from incomplete thrombus resolution after acute pulmonary embolism. While treatment for this condition with surgery and medical therapy has improved outcomes, our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying CTEPH is incomplete. Numerous risk factors have been associated with the development of CTEPH, including but not limited to acquired thrombophilias and chronic inflammatory states. A minority of patients with CTEPH have an abnormal fibrin structure that may delay thrombus resolution. Recently, examination of resected scar material in patients with CTEPH has suggested that deficient angiogenesis may play a role in thrombus nonresolution, and there is increasing interest in factors that drive intravascular scar formation. An additional challenge in CTEPH research is understanding the etiology and implications of the small-vessel disease present in many patients. Future work will likely be directed at understanding the pathways important to disease pathogenesis through further examinations of resected tissue material, continued work on animal models, and genomic approaches to identify alterations in gene expression or gene variants that may distinguish CTEPH from other forms of pulmonary hypertension. PMID:27252839

  11. [Pulmonary artery intimal sarcoma].

    PubMed

    Bourry, N; Chabrot, P; Jeannin, G; Filaire, M; Charpy, C; Bay, J O; Kemeny, J L; Caillaud, D; Escande, G; Boyer, L

    2008-02-01

    Pulmonary artery sarcoma is a rare tumor. We present a case of intimal sarcoma arising from right pulmonary artery and left lower pulmonary vein observed in a 44-year-old man with a non-productive cough. Computed tomographic scans and magnetic resonance imaging showing filling defect enhancement contributed early, suggesting the diagnosis of primary vascular tumor, hypothesis confirmed by pathologist findings.

  12. Huge Lymphangioma of the Esophagus Resected by Endoscopic Piecemeal Mucosal Resection

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Liping; Wu, Weidan; Zheng, Haihong

    2017-01-01

    We present an unusual case of a 41-year-old male patient with a large lymphangioma of the esophagus. Endoscopy revealed that the structure measured 60 × 10 mm in the mucosa and the submucosa and had a heterogenous echo pattern. The esophageal mass was successfully resected by endoscopic piecemeal mucosal resection. However, most esophageal lymphangiomas that are larger than 2 cm in diameter reported in the literature can be removed only through open surgery. Thus far, we know of no reported cases of endoscopic resection as a treatment for this case.

  13. ACR Appropriateness Criteria® Resectable Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Jones, William E; Suh, W Waren; Abdel-Wahab, May; Abrams, Ross A; Azad, Nilofer; Das, Prajnan; Dragovic, Jadranka; Goodman, Karyn A; Jabbour, Salma K; Konski, Andre A; Koong, Albert C; Kumar, Rachit; Lee, Percy; Pawlik, Timothy M; Small, William; Herman, Joseph M

    2017-04-01

    Management of resectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma continues to present a challenge due to a paucity of high-quality randomized studies. Administration of adjuvant chemotherapy is widely accepted due to the high risk of systemic spread associated with pancreatic adenocarcinoma, but the role of radiation therapy is less clear. This paper reviews literature associated with resectable pancreatic cancer to include prognostic factors to aid in the selection of patients appropriate for adjuvant therapies. The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed annually by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and revision include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer reviewed journals and the application of well-established methodologies (RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method and Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation or GRADE) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures for specific clinical scenarios. In those instances where evidence is lacking or equivocal, expert opinion may supplement the available evidence to recommend imaging or treatment.

  14. Endovascular pseudoaneurysm repair after distal pancreatectomy with celiac axis resection

    PubMed Central

    Sumiyoshi, Tatsuaki; Shima, Yasuo; Noda, Yoshihiro; Hosoki, Shingo; Hata, Yasuhiro; Okabayashi, Takehiro; Kozuki, Akihito; Nakamura, Toshio

    2013-01-01

    Erosive hemorrhage due to pseudoaneurysm is one of the most life-threatening complications after pancreatectomy. Here, we report an extremely rare case of rupture of a pseudoaneurysm of the common hepatic artery (CHA) stump that developed after distal pancreatectomy with en block celiac axis resection (DP-CAR), and was successfully treated through covered stent placement. The patient is a 66-year-old woman who underwent DP-CAR after adjuvant chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced pancreatic body cancer. She developed an intra-abdominal abscess around the remnant pancreas head 31 d after the surgery, and computed tomography (CT) showed an occluded portal vein due to the spreading inflammation around the abscess. Her general condition improved after CT-guided drainage of the abscess. However, 19 d later, she presented with melena, and CT showed a pseudoaneurysm arising from the CHA stump. Because the CHA had been resected during the DP-CAR, this artery could not be used as the access route for endovascular treatment, and instead, we placed a covered stent via the inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery originating from the superior mesenteric artery. After stent placement, cessation of bleeding and anterograde hepatic artery flow were confirmed, and the patient recovered well without any further complications. CT angiography at the 6-mo follow-up indicated the patency of the covered stent with sustained hepatic artery flow. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of endovascular repair of a pseudoaneurysm that developed after DP-CAR. PMID:24363537

  15. Current readings: Percutaneous ablation for pulmonary metastatic disease.

    PubMed

    Quirk, Matthew T; Pomykala, Kelsey L; Suh, Robert D

    2014-01-01

    Percutaneous image-guided ablation is a technique for maintaining local control of metastatic lung lesions that may, in selected patients, confer a survival benefit over no treatment or systemic therapy alone. Although the currently accepted treatment for oligometastatic pulmonary disease is surgical resection, the existing body of literature, including the recent investigations reviewed within this article, supports a role for percutaneous ablation as an important and relatively safe therapeutic option for nonsurgical and in carefully selected surgical patients, conferring survival benefits competitive with surgical metastasectomy. Continued clinical investigations are needed to further understand the nuances of thermal technologies and applications to treat lung primary and secondary pulmonary malignancy, directly compare available therapeutic options and further define the role of percutaneous image-guided ablation in the treatment of pulmonary metastatic disease.

  16. Conditions for NIR fluorescence-guided tumor resectioning in preclinical lung cancer model (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Minji; Quan, Yuhua; Choi, Byeong Hyun; Choi, Yeonho; Kim, Hyun Koo; Kim, Beop-Min

    2016-03-01

    Pulmonary nodule could be identified by intraoperative fluorescence imaging system from systemic injection of indocyanine green (ICG) which achieves enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effects. This study was performed to evaluate optimal injection time of ICG for detecting cancer during surgery in rabbit lung cancer model. VX2 carcinoma cell was injected in rabbit lung under fluoroscopic computed tomography-guidance. Solitary lung cancer was confirmed on positron emitting tomography with CT (PET/CT) 2 weeks after inoculation. ICG was administered intravenously and fluorescent intensity of lung tumor was measured using the custom-built intraoperative color and fluorescence merged imaging system (ICFIS) for 15 hours. Solitary lung cancer was resected through thoracoscopic version of ICFIS. ICG was observed in all animals. Because Lung has fast blood pulmonary circulation, Fluorescent signal showed maximum intensity earlier than previous studies in other organs. Fluorescent intensity showed maximum intensity within 6-9 hours in rabbit lung cancer. Overall, Fluorescent intensity decreased with increasing time, however, all tumors were detectable using fluorescent images until 12 hours. In conclusion, while there had been studies in other organs showed that optimal injection time was at least 24 hours before operation, this study showed shorter optimal injection time at lung cancer. Since fluorescent signal showed the maximum intensity within 6-9 hours, cancer resection could be performed during this time. This data informed us that optimal injection time of ICG should be evaluated in each different solid organ tumor for fluorescent image guided surgery.

  17. Arthroscopically assisted central physeal bar resection.

    PubMed

    Marsh, James S; Polzhofer, Gert K

    2006-01-01

    Thirty-seven central physeal bars were removed with an arthroscopically assisted technique. Thirty children (32 cases) have been followed to maturity or physeal closure. There were 19 boys and 11 girls, aged 4-14 years (mean, 9.5 years). Site of arrest was distal femur (15), proximal tibia (9), distal tibia (6), and distal radius (2). Mean follow-up was 6.5 years (range, 2-12 years). Adequate longitudinal growth was realized in 21 patients (70%) just after bar resection. Five patients (17%) required osteotomy, lengthening, or epiphysiodesis in addition to bar resection. In 4 patients (13%), bar resection failed. Failures occurred in those patients whose source of growth arrest was infection (3) or degree of physeal trauma approached 50% (1 case). This is the first series that studies and documents the efficacy of the arthroscope in central physeal bar resection. It provides the best visualization with minimal morbidity. The technique is described, including a discussion of technical tips and pitfalls.

  18. Laparoscopic resection of retroperitoneal benign neurilemmoma

    PubMed Central

    Park, Joon Seong; Kang, Chang Moo; Yoon, Dong Sup; Lee, Woo Jung

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to verify that laparoscopic resection for treating retroperitoneal benign neurilemmoma (NL) is expected to be favorable for complete resection of tumor with technical feasibility and safety. Methods We retrospectively analyzed 47 operations for retroperitoneal neurogenic tumor at Yonsei University College of Medicine, Severance Hospital and Gangnam Severance Hospital between January 2005 and September 2015. After excluding 21 patients, the remaining 26 were divided into 2 groups: those who underwent open surgery (OS) and those who underwent laparoscopic surgery (LS). We compared clinicopathological features between the 2 groups. Results There was no significant difference in operation time, estimated blood loss, transfusion, complication, recurrence, or follow-up period between 2 groups. Postoperative hospital stay was significantly shorter in the LS group versus the OS group (OS vs. LS, 7.00 ± 3.43 days vs. 4.50 ± 2.16 days; P = 0.031). Conclusion We suggest that laparoscopic resection of retroperitoneal benign NL is feasible and safe by obtaining complete resection of the tumor. LS for treating retroperitoneal benign NL could be useful with appropriate laparoscopic technique and proper patient selection. PMID:28289669

  19. Resection planning for robotic acoustic neuroma surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBrayer, Kepra L.; Wanna, George B.; Dawant, Benoit M.; Balachandran, Ramya; Labadie, Robert F.; Noble, Jack H.

    2016-03-01

    Acoustic neuroma surgery is a procedure in which a benign mass is removed from the Internal Auditory Canal (IAC). Currently this surgical procedure requires manual drilling of the temporal bone followed by exposure and removal of the acoustic neuroma. This procedure is physically and mentally taxing to the surgeon. Our group is working to develop an Acoustic Neuroma Surgery Robot (ANSR) to perform the initial drilling procedure. Planning the ANSR's drilling region using pre-operative CT requires expertise and around 35 minutes' time. We propose an approach for automatically producing a resection plan for the ANSR that would avoid damage to sensitive ear structures and require minimal editing by the surgeon. We first compute an atlas-based segmentation of the mastoid section of the temporal bone, refine it based on the position of anatomical landmarks, and apply a safety margin to the result to produce the automatic resection plan. In experiments with CTs from 9 subjects, our automated process resulted in a resection plan that was verified to be safe in every case. Approximately 2 minutes were required in each case for the surgeon to verify and edit the plan to permit functional access to the IAC. We measured a mean Dice coefficient of 0.99 and surface error of 0.08 mm between the final and automatically proposed plans. These preliminary results indicate that our approach is a viable method for resection planning for the ANSR and drastically reduces the surgeon's planning effort.

  20. Polyp Resection - Controversial Practices and Unanswered Questions.

    PubMed

    von Renteln, Daniel; Pohl, Heiko

    2017-03-09

    Detection and complete removal of precancerous neoplastic polyps are central to effective colorectal cancer screening. The prevalence of neoplastic polyps in the screening population in the United States is likely >50%. However, most persons with neoplastic polyps are never destined to develop cancer, and do not benefit for finding and removing polyps, and may only be harmed by the procedure. Further 70-80% of polyps are diminutive (≤5 mm) and such polyps almost never contain cancer. Given the questionable benefit, the high-cost and the potential risk changing our approach to the management of diminutive polyps is currently debated. Deemphasizing diminutive polyps and shifting our efforts to detection and complete removal of larger and higher-risk polyps deserves discussion and study. This article explores three controversies, and emerging concepts related to endoscopic polyp resection. First, we discuss challenges of optical resect-and-discard strategy and possible alternatives. Second, we review recent studies that support the use of cold snare resection for ≥5 mm polyps. Thirdly, we examine current evidence for prophylactic clipping after resection of large polyps.

  1. Pulmonary Artery Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Shomaf, Maha; Obeidat, Nathir; Najjar, Saleh

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary artery sarcomas (PAS) are extremely rare sarcomas of uncertain histogenesis that often mimic pulmonary thromboemboli. This is a report of a 60-year-old female patient who presented with recurrent chest pain and cough. The patient was first diagnosed with pulmonary embolism but she did not improve on anticoagulant therapy. Follow-up imaging studies revealed a mass in the left hilar region extending into the pulmonary trunk and branches of the left pulmonary artery. The tru-cut biopsy revealed an undifferentiated sarcoma. The patient died 10 months after her initial presentation. PMID:26425600

  2. Clinical Characteristics and Treatment Outcomes of Primary Pulmonary Artery Sarcoma in Korea

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary artery sarcomas (PAS) are rare malignant neoplasms. Right heart failure due to tumour location is the main cause of death in PAS patients. The hemodynamic influence of PAS may effect prognosis, but this has not been proven. We aimed to identify the clinical characteristics and prognostic factors of PAS in Korea, their association with pulmonary hypertension (PH). PAS patients treated at the Asan Medical Center between 2000 and 2014 were reviewed. We examined demographic characteristics, diagnostic and treatment modalities. Potential prognostic factors were evaluated by univariate and multivariate analysis. Twenty patients were diagnosed with PAS. Ten patients were male, the median age was 54 years (range, 33–75 years). The most common symptom observed was dyspnea (65%). The most common histologic type was spindle cell sarcoma (30%). Ten patients had a presumptive diagnosis of pulmonary embolism (PE) and received anticoagulation therapy. Seventeen patients underwent surgery, but only 5 patients had complete resection. Eleven patients received post-operative treatment (chemotherapy = 3, radiotherapy = 5, chemoradiotherapy = 3). PH was observed in 12 patients before treatment and in 6 patients after treatment. Overall median survival was 24 months. Post-treatment PH was associated with poor prognosis (HR 9.501, 95% CI 1.79–50.32; P = 0.008) while chemotherapy was negatively associated with mortality (HR 0.102, 95% CI 0.013–0.826; P = 0.032) in univariate analysis. Post-treatment PH was also associated with poor prognosis in multivariate analysis (HR 5.7, 95% CI 1.08–30.91; P = 0.041). PAS patients are frequently misdiagnosed with PE in Korea. Post-treatment PH is associated with a poor prognosis. PMID:27709853

  3. Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension, pregnancy, and a pulmonary endarterectomy: a rare challenge

    PubMed Central

    Biscotti, Mauer; Cleary, Kirsten; Smiley, Richard; Bacchetta, Matthew D.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract It is well described that patients with group 1 forms of pulmonary arterial hypertension have a high risk of mortality during pregnancy and in the early postpartum period. However, to the authors’ knowledge, the diagnosis and management of group 4 pulmonary hypertension due to chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) during pregnancy with early postpartum pulmonary endarterectomy (PEA) has not been previously reported. We report the case of a 28-year-old woman who received a diagnosis of CTEPH during her pregnancy, was managed as an inpatient by a multidisciplinary team throughout the pregnancy and early postpartum period, and underwent PEA 6 weeks after delivery. While the management of acute pulmonary embolus in pregnancy is well described, this unique case of CTEPH diagnosed during pregnancy illustrates several challenging management issues. PMID:27683616

  4. Resection Followed by Stereotactic Radiosurgery to Resection Cavity for Intracranial Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Do, Ly Pezner, Richard; Radany, Eric; Liu An; Staud, Cecil; Badie, Benham

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: In patients who undergo resection of central nervous system metastases, whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) is added to reduce the rates of recurrence and neurologic death. However, the risk of late neurotoxicity has led many patients to decline WBRT. We offered adjuvant stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) or stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) as an alternative to select patients with resected brain metastases. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective review of patients who underwent brain metastasis resection followed by SRS/SRT. WBRT was administered only as salvage treatment. Patients had one to four brain metastases. The dose was 15-18 Gy for SRS and 22-27.5 Gy in four to six fractions for SRT. Target margins were typically expanded by 1 mm for rigid immobilization and 3 mm for mask immobilization. SRS/SRT involved the use of linear accelerator radiosurgery using the IMRT 21EX or Helical Tomotherapy unit. Results: Between December 1999 and January 2007, 30 patients diagnosed with intracranial metastases were treated with resection followed by SRS or SRT to the resection cavity. Of the 30 patients, 4 (13.3%) developed recurrence in the resection cavity, and 19 (63%) developed recurrences in new intracranial sites. The actuarial 12-month survival rate was 82% for local recurrence-free survival, 31% for freedom from new brain metastases, 67% for neurologic deficit-free survival, and 51% for overall survival. Salvage WBRT was performed in 14 (47%) of the 30 patients. Conclusion: Our results suggest that for patients with newly diagnosed brain metastases treated with surgical resection, postoperative SRS/SRT to the resection cavity is a feasible option. WBRT can be reserved as salvage treatment with acceptable neurologic deficit-free survival.

  5. Hypoxia Does neither Stimulate Pulmonary Artery Endothelial Cell Proliferation in Mice and Rats with Pulmonary Hypertension and Vascular Remodeling nor in Human Pulmonary Artery Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lunyin; Hales, Charles A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Hypoxia results in pulmonary hypertension and vascular remodeling due to induction of pulmonary artery cell proliferation. Besides pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells, pulmonary artery endothelial cells (PAECs) are also involved in the development of pulmonary hypertension, but the effect of hypoxia on PAEC proliferation has not been completely understood. Methods We investigated PAEC proliferation in mice and rats with hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension and vascular remodeling as well as in human PAECs under hypoxia. Results and Conclusion We did not find significant PAEC proliferation in chronically hypoxic rats or mice. There was a slight decrease in proliferation in mice and rats with pulmonary hypertension and vascular remodeling. We also did not find significant human PAEC proliferation and cell cycle progression under different levels of oxygen (1, 2, 3, 5 and 10%) for one day, although the same conditions of hypoxia induced significant proliferation and cell cycle progression in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells and pulmonary artery fibroblasts. Exposure to hypoxia for 7 days also did not increase PAEC proliferation. These results demonstrated that hypoxia alone is not a stimulus to PAEC proliferation in vivo and in vitro. The present study provides a novel role for PAECs in hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension and vascular remodeling. PMID:21691120

  6. Cystic lesions in the pancreas: when to watch, when to resect.

    PubMed

    Balcom IV, J H; Fernandez-Del Castillo, C; Warshaw, A L

    2000-04-01

    The diagnosis of cystic lesions in the pancreas is becoming more common, largely due to the increases in diagnostic imaging done for other reasons. This review considers pseudocysts, mucinous cystic neoplasms, intraductal papillary mucinous tumors, and serous cystadenomas in some detail. The emphasis is on the fact that, through a careful history, physical examination, radiologic studies, and, often, cyst fluid analysis, a diagnosis can be reached expeditiously. This pursuit is important because two thirds of pancreatic cystic neoplasms are malignant or premalignant and should be resected, whereas pseudocysts and serous cystadenomas are benign, and, depending on the case, may be treated through observation, resection, or, for pseudocysts, by internal drainage.

  7. Endovascular angioplasty before resection of a sphenoidal meningioma with vascular encasement.

    PubMed

    Chivoret, N; Fontaine, D; Lachaud, S; Chau, Y; Sedat, J

    2011-09-01

    We describe a case of sphenoid wing meningioma presenting with cerebral infarction due to extended vascular encasement in which endovascular angioplasty was performed before surgery to avoid perioperative ischemia. A severe stenosis involved the intracranial internal carotid artery and the proximal segments of the middle and anterior cerebral arteries. Endovascular dilatation was followed by complete surgical resection. Preoperative mild aphasia and hemiparesia resolved completely after surgery. Endovascular angioplasty of arterial trunks and their branches can be proposed before the resection of skull base meningiomas encasing these arteries to decrease the risk of perioperative brain ischemia related to their surgical manipulation or vasospasm.

  8. Endovascular Angioplasty before Resection of a Sphenoidal Meningioma with Vascular Encasement

    PubMed Central

    Chivoret, N.; Fontaine, D.; Lachaud, S.; Chau, Y.; Sedat, J.

    2011-01-01

    Summary We describe a case of sphenoid wing meningioma presenting with cerebral infarction due to extended vascular encasement in which endovascular angioplasty was performed before surgery to avoid perioperative ischemia. A severe stenosis involved the intracranial internal carotid artery and the proximal segments of the middle and anterior cerebral arteries. Endovascular dilatation was followed by complete surgical resection. Preoperative mild aphasia and hemiparesia resolved completely after surgery. Endovascular angioplasty of arterial trunks and their branches can be proposed before the resection of skull base meningiomas encasing these arteries to decrease the risk of perioperative brain ischemia related to their surgical manipulation or vasospasm. PMID:22005706

  9. Successful Pulmonary Endarterectomy in a Patient with Klinefelter Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wierda, E.; Reesink, H. J.; Bruining, H.; van Delden, O. M.; Kloek, J. J.; Bresser, P.

    2012-01-01

    Klinefelter syndrome (KS) is a frequent genetic disorder due to one or more supernumerary X chromosomes. KS is associated with an increased risk for venous thromboembolic events like deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. This paper describes a 37-year-old male patient with KS referred to our tertiary center with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension, and who was successfully treated by pulmonary endarterectomy. PMID:23304604

  10. Pulmonary function evaluation during and following Skylab space flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawin, C. F.; Nicogossian, A. E.; Schachter, A. P.; Rummel, J. A.; Michel, E. L.

    1977-01-01

    Cardiac output measurements were made in the laboratory during preflight and postflight exercise tests. Due to the magnitude of decreases in cardiac output following the first and second manned Skylab missions and because the method used is based upon normal pulmonary function, it was decided to perform more thorough pulmonary function screening in conjunction with the final and longest duration Skylab mission. This paper summarized pulmonary function data obtained during all three Skylab missions.

  11. [Struma resection in Basedow hyperthyroidism].

    PubMed

    Riccabona, G

    1987-01-01

    The presented data show that thyroid surgery for Graves' Disease had a high therapeutic efficiency in more than 500 own patients. Considering our actual knowledge about the pathogenesis of Graves' Disease it is obvious that inadequate results of surgery are mostly due to surgical technique, which is not radical enough. Therefore subtotal bilateral thyroidectomies leaving remnants of only 4-6 g are recommended. Even as adequate premedication has shrunk the lethality of surgery to 0--which is especially significant concerning the previously dreaded postoperative thyroid storm--complications such as vocal chord paralysis and tetany do occur in a few percent. These complications, however, can usually be controlled as well as the frequent postoperative hypothyroidism. Overall thyroid surgery for therapy of Graves' Disease seems the method of choice for the treatment of younger patients with considerable thyroid enlargement and with insufficient response to antithyroid drugs.

  12. Optimizing treatment of hepatic metastases from colorectal cancer: Resection or resection plus ablation?

    PubMed

    Chiappa, Antonio; Bertani, Emilio; Zbar, Andrew P; Foschi, Diego; Fazio, Nicola; Zampino, Maria; Belluco, Claudio; Orsi, Franco; Della Vigna, Paolo; Bonomo, Guido; Venturino, Marco; Ferrari, Carlo; Biffi, Roberto

    2016-03-01

    The present study determines the oncologic outcome of the combined resection and ablation strategy for colorectal liver metastases (CRLM). Between January 1994 and December 2014, 360 patients underwent surgery for CRLM. There were 280 patients who underwent hepatic resection only (group 1) and 80 hepatic resection plus ablation (group 2). group 2 patients had a higher incidence of multiple metastases than group 1 cases (100% in group 2 vs. 28.2% in group 1; P<0.001) and bilobar involvement (76.5% in group 2 vs. 12.9% in group 1; P<0.001). Perioperative mortality was nil in either group with a higher postoperative complication rate amongst group 1 vs. group 2 cases (18 vs. 0, respectively). The median follow-up was 90 months (range, 1-180) with a 5-year overall survival for group 1 and group 2 of 49 and 80%, respectively (P=0.193). The median disease-free survival for patients with R0 resection was 50, 43 and 34% at 1, 2 and 3 years, respectively, and remained steadily higher (at 50%) in those patients treated with resection combined with ablation up to 5 years (P=0.069). The only intraoperative ablation failure was for a large lesion (≥5 cm). Our data support the use of intraoperative ablation when complete hepatic resection cannot be achieved.

  13. [Reoperations of rectal resection for recurrence after previous resection for rectosigmoid cancer].

    PubMed

    Paineau, J; Letessier, E; Hamy, A; Hamelin, E; Courant, O; Visset, J

    1993-12-01

    From June 1986 to December 1992, 16 patients (12 men and 4 women, 63 years-old [36 to 79]) who underwent a prior sphincter-saving resection for colorectal adenocarcinoma were operated on for locoregional recurrence with a surgical resection. Eight patients had a second anterior resection (5 colorectal, 2 coloanal and 1 ileoanal anastomosis), one a resection without anastomosis, and 7 an abdomino-perineal resection. Nine patients received an intraoperative irradiation (10 to 25 Gy). Excisions of surrounding organs were often necessary. Post-operative complications occurred in most of the patients. Excluding 3 post-operative deaths, 9 patients died of disease in a median of 12.9 months after surgery (range: 3 to 32 months). Four patients are still living 5 to 14 months after the second resection. There is little in the surgical literature dealing with these difficult surgical problem of which results are always uncertain. An earlier diagnosis of the recurrence would result in a more satisfactory procedure, but is difficult because of the limited possibilities of detection after surgical treatment and often external irradiation.

  14. Circumferential periosteal sleeve resection for limb length inequality complicated by growth plate tether.

    PubMed

    Al Hussainy, H A J; Jones, S; Ali, F; Davies, A G

    2004-09-01

    Correction of limb length inequality can be achieved by stimulation of growth of the short limb. Circumferential periosteal sleeve resection has been reported as a safe and reliable method of stimulating longitudinal bone growth. We report the complication of growth tethers to the distal tibial physes in two patients following circumferential periosteal sleeve resection to the distal femur, tibia and fibula. This was done under direct vision. This complication may have arisen due to damage to the perichondrial ring as a result of raising the periosteum too close to the distal tibial physes. A limited response may be seen in young patients following this procedure as a result of this complication. Circumferential periosteal sleeve resection for limb length inequality is a treatment option that is not without complication.

  15. Ozone inhibits prostacyclin synthesis in pulmonary endothelium.

    PubMed

    Friedman, M; Madden, M C; Saunders, D S; Gammon, K; White, G C; Kwock, L

    1985-12-01

    The effects of ozone on lung arachidonate metabolism in-vitro were studied in cultured bovine pulmonary endothelial cells exposed for 2 hours to ozone in concentrations up to 1.0 ppm. A concentration-dependent decrease in prostacyclin synthesis was found (90% decrease at the highest ozone level of 1.0 ppm). The inhibition of prostacyclin synthesis was not due to a decreased release of arachidonic acid from membrane lipids. We also examined the hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstrictive response to 10% oxygen inhalation in anesthetized dogs in-vivo after exposure to 1.0 ppm ozone for 1 hour. Pulmonary vascular resistance was significantly increased after ozone exposure, similar to the findings in dogs given indomethacin (15 mg/kg). The percentage change in the hypoxic pulmonary pressor response was similar between the ozone exposure and indomethacin-treated groups, although due to the variance of the pulmonary vascular resistance values during hypoxia the results did not reach statistical significance. These results suggest that ozone inhalation affects pulmonary endothelial arachidonate metabolism in-vivo as well as in-vitro.

  16. Interstitial Pulmonary Edema Following Bromocarbamide Intoxication

    PubMed Central

    Sugihara, H.; Hagedorn, M.; Bōttcher, D.; Neuhof, H.; Mittermayer, Ch.

    1974-01-01

    Bromocarbamides are sleep-inducing drugs which can lead, in man, to intoxication and death due to respiratory failure. To prove whether hemodynamic factors or the changed endothelial permeability induce pulmonary edema, animal experiments were performed. The fine structural changes in pulmonary edema in rabbits were observed at 60, 90 and 120 minutes after oral administration. The major findings were a) large blebs between capillary endothelium and alveolar epithelium and b) interstitial edema of the vessel wall. The bleb contents were much less electron dense than the blood contents in the capillary. Colloidal carbon did not enter the bleb or the edematous interstitial tissue. Exogenous peroxidase uptake in pinocytotie vesicles increased in pathologic cases. The hemodynamic measurements in animal receiving artificial respiration which maintained the blood pO2 at a steady state showed similar blebs in the pulmonary vessels, indicating that anoxia is not the major cause of the vascular lesion. Moreover, pulmonary arterial pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance could be held in the normal range in artificially respirated animals under bromocarbamide intoxication. Thus, hemodynamic factors are not likely to play a pathogenetic role in bringing about pulmonary edema. The chief, early factor is the increased endothelial permeability due to increased cytoplasmic transport. From this a practical suggestion for treating patients with bromocarbamide intoxication is derived: the usual fluid replacement in shock patients should be handled with great care to avoid fluid overload of the lung. ImagesFig 1Fig 2Fig 3Fig 4Fig 5Fig 6 PMID:4835993

  17. Nonanatomical resection is comparable with anatomical resection in solitary hepatocellular carcinoma <5 cm in the right posterior section

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong Man; Kwon, Choon Hyuck David; Joh, Jae-Won; Na, Byung-Gon; Lee, Kyo-Won; Choi, Gyu-Seong; Lee, Joon Hyeok

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Anatomical resection (AR) is superior to nonanatomical resection (NAR) in theory, but the actual clinical benefit of AR for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is controversial due to the substantial heterogeneity of HCC. Here, we retrospectively compared AR and NAR outcomes for solitary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) <5 cm in the right posterior section (RPS) and investigated the risk factors for HCC recurrence and liver-related mortality. The study included 99 consecutive patients who underwent curative surgical resection of an HCC in the RPS (S6 and S7) between January 2003 and December 2009. Each patient had a solitary HCC <5 cm and a noncirrhotic liver. The median estimated blood loss during operation and median operative time were significantly worse in the AR group. In addition, the median tumor size and incidence of microvascular invasion were significantly worse in the AR group. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year disease-free survival rates were 74.1%, 66.3%, and 58.2% in the AR group and 84.7%, 64.4%, and 48.2% in the NAR group, respectively (P = 0.172). The corresponding liver-related overall survival rates were 96.3%, 84.7%, and 77.0% in the AR group and 97.2%, 90.1%, and 88.7% in the NAR group, respectively (P = 0.335). NAR was not associated with HCC recurrence or liver-related mortality in multivariate analysis. The outcomes of NAR for a solitary HCC <5 cm in the RPS are comparable to those achieved with AR with respect to long-term liver-related overall survival and disease-free survival. PMID:28002324

  18. [Pulmonary hypertension in pediatric heart surgery].

    PubMed

    Falcone, N

    2001-12-01

    Congenital heart disease can increase or decrease pulmonary blood flow, pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) or pulmonary artery pressure (PAP). PAP is the product of PVR and pulmonary minute volume (Qp), such that pulmonary hypertension (PHT) may develop as a result of an increase in either PVR or Qp or both. Given that the pulmonary vascular bed is a low pressure system with high flow, any increase in resistance would generate PHT. The normal value of PVR is 2 Woods units (mm Hg/l/min). Increased PAP is due to hypoxic lesions of the endothelium, which release proteolytic enzymes that alter the balance of metabolites of arachidonic acid, regulators of pulmonary vasomotor tone. Hypoxia and acidosis cause intense pulmonary vasoconstriction (hypoxic vasoconstrictor reflex). An increase of PVR is due to a combination of vasoconstrictive processes and remodeling, with hypertrophy of the pulmonary artery. Structural lesions are related to hypertrophy of the endothelium, the transformation of fibroblasts to myocytes and the decrease of the alveolar/arteriolar ratio with the formation of new vessels.PHT may be primary or secondary to another disease. Primary PHT is a rare genetic disease. The most common secondary forms of PHT in pediatrics are due to persistence of neonatal anatomy (neonatal PHT), to heart diseases with left-right shunt (CIV, DAP, etc.), to diseases of the pulmonary parenchyma (interstitial viral infection, mucoviscidosis), and complications of heart surgery. All congenital heart diseases can lead to PHT if not treated promptly. Clinical signs of PHT are highly non-specific: dyspnea, fatigue, syncopes, exercise intolerance, precordialgia, cyanosis and edema. The best approaches to diagnosis and prognosis are echocardiography and cardiac catheterization with vasodilators. Anesthetics that do not alter PVR should be used in such patients, who are sensitive to changes in pulmonary ventilation, to changes in cardiac output and to anesthetics. The treatment of

  19. Pulmonary Sporotrichosis: An Evolving Clinical Paradigm.

    PubMed

    Aung, Ar K; Spelman, Denis W; Thompson, Philip J

    2015-10-01

    In recent decades, sporotrichosis, caused by thermally dimorphic fungi Sporothrix schenckii complex, has become an emerging infection in many parts of the world. Pulmonary infection with S. schenckii still remains relatively uncommon, possibly due to underrecognition. Pulmonary sporotrichosis presents with distinct clinical and radiological patterns in both immunocompetent and immunocompromised hosts and can often result in significant morbidity and mortality despite treatment. Current understanding regarding S. schenckii biology, epidemiology, immunopathology, clinical diagnostics, and treatment options has been evolving in the recent years with increased availability of molecular sequencing techniques. However, this changing knowledge has not yet been fully translated into a better understanding of the clinical aspects of pulmonary sporotrichosis, as such current management guidelines remain unsupported by high-level clinical evidence. This article examines recent advances in the knowledge of sporotrichosis and its application to the difficult challenges of managing pulmonary sporotrichosis.

  20. Comparison between thulium laser resection of prostate and transurethral plasmakinetic resection of prostate or transurethral resection of prostate

    PubMed Central

    DeCao, Hong; Wang, Jia; Huang, Yu; LiangLiu, Ren; JunLei, Hao; Gao, Liang; Tang, Zhuang; YingHu, Chun; Li, Xiang; JiuYuan, Hong; Dong, Qiang; Wei, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is one of the most common diseases in middle-aged and elderly men. In the present study, we aimed to compare the efficacy and safety of thulium laser resection of the prostate (TMLRP) with either transurethral plasmakinetic resection of the prostate (TUPKP) or transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP). A literature search was performed, eventually, 14 studies involving 1587 patients were included. Forest plots were produced by using Revman 5.2.0 software. Our meta-analysis showed that operation time, decrease in hemoglobin level, length of hospital stay, catheterization time, and development of urethral stricture significantly differed, whereas the transitory urge incontinence rate, urinary tract infection rate, and recatheterization rate did not significantly differ between TMLRP and either TURP or TUPKP. The blood transfusion rate was significantly different between TMLRP and TURP, but not between TMLRP and TUPKP. In addition, the retrograde ejaculation rate between TMLRP and TURP did not significantly differ. At 1, 3, 6, and 12 months of postoperative follow-up, the maximum flow rate, post-void residual, quality of life, and International Prostate Symptom Score did not significantly differ among the procedures. Thus, the findings of this study indicate that TMLRP may be a safe and feasible alternative. PMID:26444930

  1. Comparison between thulium laser resection of prostate and transurethral plasmakinetic resection of prostate or transurethral resection of prostate.

    PubMed

    DeCao, Hong; Wang, Jia; Huang, Yu; LiangLiu, Ren; JunLei, Hao; Gao, Liang; Tang, Zhuang; YingHu, Chun; Li, Xiang; JiuYuan, Hong; Dong, Qiang; Wei, Qiang

    2015-10-07

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is one of the most common diseases in middle-aged and elderly men. In the present study, we aimed to compare the efficacy and safety of thulium laser resection of the prostate (TMLRP) with either transurethral plasmakinetic resection of the prostate (TUPKP) or transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP). A literature search was performed, eventually, 14 studies involving 1587 patients were included. Forest plots were produced by using Revman 5.2.0 software. Our meta-analysis showed that operation time, decrease in hemoglobin level, length of hospital stay, catheterization time, and development of urethral stricture significantly differed, whereas the transitory urge incontinence rate, urinary tract infection rate, and recatheterization rate did not significantly differ between TMLRP and either TURP or TUPKP. The blood transfusion rate was significantly different between TMLRP and TURP, but not between TMLRP and TUPKP. In addition, the retrograde ejaculation rate between TMLRP and TURP did not significantly differ. At 1, 3, 6, and 12 months of postoperative follow-up, the maximum flow rate, post-void residual, quality of life, and International Prostate Symptom Score did not significantly differ among the procedures. Thus, the findings of this study indicate that TMLRP may be a safe and feasible alternative.

  2. Is sagittal sinus resection in falcine meningiomas a factor of bad surgical outcome?

    PubMed Central

    Pires de Aguiar, Paulo Henrique; Aires, Rogério; Maldaun, Marcos Vinicius Calfatt; Tahara, Adriana; de Souza Filho, Antonio Marcos; Zicarelli, Carlos Alexandre; Ramina, Ricardo

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Meningiomas arising purely from the falx below the longitudinal sinus represents a surgical challenge for the neurosurgeon. The authors discuss the new aspects of surgical details that may avoid complications and determine the prognosis. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively evaluated our surgical experience from June 2004 to January 2010. Seventy patients harboring falcine meningiomas were included and submitted for surgical resection. All historical records, office charts and images were reviewed in order to sample the most important data regarding epidemiology, clinical pictures, radiological findings and surgical results, as well as the main complications. The patients were divided into three main groups: anterior third 32 patients (Group A), middle third 15 patients (Group B), 23 patients in the posterior third of falx (Group C). Results: In Group A, total macroscopic resection was achieved in 31 out of 32 cases (96.87%). Twenty five patients had Rankin 0, five patients had Rankin 1-2, two patients had Rankin 6. In Group B (15 patients), 10 patients had gross resection and Rankin 0, four patients had Rankin 1-2 and one patient had Rankin 6. In Group C (23 patients), 20 patients were absolutely able, Rankin score 0, after six months postoperative period (83.3% had excellent results) and no mortality. Four cases had Rankin score 1 – 2 (16.6%). Ten cases (43.47%) had Simpson I resection and ten cases (43.47%) had Simpson II. Conclusion: Despite larger lesion volumes, Group A meningiomas had a better outcome due to the position they were in, the tumor and surrounding structures. The preoperative preparation and surgical planning can preserve sagittal sinus; but in some cases, this is not possible. Sagittal sinus resection, as proven by this paper, is still a factor of bad surgical outcome. In the middle and posterior third, resection of sagittal sinus is a factor of a bad outcome, due to cerebral infartion. PMID:21125007

  3. Preoperative Portal Vein Embolization Tailored to Prepare the Liver for Complex Resections: Initial Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Baere, T. de Robinson, J. M.; Deschamps, F.; Rao, P.; Teriitheau, C.; Goere, D.; Elias, D.

    2010-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of preoperative portal vein embolization (PVE) tailored to prepare the liver for complex and extended resections. During the past 5 years, 12 PVEs were performed in noncirrhotic patients with liver metastases from colon cancer (n = 10), choroidal melanoma (n = 1), and leiomyosarcoma (n = 1) to prepare complex anatomical liver resections in patients with small future remnant livers. These liver resections planned to preserve only segment IV in four patients, segments IV, V, and VIII in four patients, segments II, III, VI, and VII in three patients, and segments V and VI in one patient. PVE was performed under general anesthesia with a flow-guided injection of a mixture of cyanoacrylate and Lipiodol using a 5-Fr catheter. All portal branches feeding the liver segments to be resected were successfully embolized with cyanoacrylate except one, which was occluded with coils due to the risk of reflux with cyanoacrylate. After a mean of 32 days, CT volumetry revealed a mean hypertrophy of the unembolized liver of 47 {+-} 25% (range, 21-88%). Liver resections could be performed in 10 patients but were canceled in 2, due to the occurrence of a new hepatic tumor in one and an insufficiently increased volume in the other. Among the 10 patients who underwent the liver resection, 1 died of postoperative sepsis, 3 died 3 to 32 months after surgery, including 1 death unrelated to cancer, and 6 were alive after 6 to 36 months after surgery. In conclusion, in this preliminary report, PVE appears to be feasible and able to induce hypertrophy of the future remnant liver before a complex and extended hepatectomy. Further evaluation is needed in a larger cohort.

  4. Pulmonary artery sarcoma mimicking a pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, A; Yates, T J; Kuriakose, P

    2008-01-01

    Sarcomas involving the lung are a rare occurrence, often a result of metastatic disease from primary malignancies involving the skin, liver, breast or heart. Primary pulmonary artery sarcomas are rarer still, with limited cases reported world-wide and consequently data regarding treatment modalities are sparse and largely experimental. These tumors are often mistaken for a pulmonary embolism and seemingly supported by radiological findings. Patients will often present without symptom resolution despite therapeutic anticoagulation. The following case illustrates how a soft tissue sarcoma of the pulmonary artery can mimic a pulmonary embolism, thus, resulting in both a diagnostic and therapeutic dilemma. A positron emission tomography scan was an invaluable tool in this case, showing increased radiotracer uptake and placing neoplasm at the top of the differential diagnosis. This ultimately led to a biopsy that was vimentin positive, cytokeratin negative and CD117 negative, thus consistent with soft tissue sarcoma.

  5. Femoral head-neck junction reconstruction, after iatrogenic bone resection.

    PubMed

    Guevara-Alvarez, Alberto; Lash, Nicholas; Beck, Martin

    2015-07-01

    Arthroscopic over-resection of the head-neck junction during the treatment of a cam deformity can be a devastating complication and is difficult to treat. Large defects of the femoral head-neck junction (FHNJ) increase the risk of femoral neck fracture and can also affect hip biomechanics. We describe a case of an iatrogenic defect of the FHNJ due to excessive bone resection, and a previously non-described treatment using iliac crest autograft to restore femoral head-neck sphericity and hip joint stability. After protecting the femoral neck with an angled blade plate, the large anterior FHNJ defect was reconstructed using autogenous iliac crest bone graft; sphericity was restored by contouring the graft using spherical templates. Clinical and radiographic follow-up was performed up to 2 years. Results at 2 years showed no residual groin pain and normal range of motion. The Oxford Hip Score was 46/48, rated as excellent. Computed tomography (CT) scanning showed union of bone graft without resorption, and CT arthrogram indicating retained sphericity of the FHNJ without evidence of degenerative changes in the articular surface. This novel surgical technique can be used to restore the structural integrity and contour of the FHNJ that contains a significant anterior defect.

  6. Imaging of Resected Nonfunctioning Pituitary Adenomas: The Cost of Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Kistka, Heather M.; Kasl, Rebecca A.; Nayeri, Arash; Utz, Andrea L.; Weaver, Kyle D.; Chambless, Lola B.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To determine the cost of annual magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) surveillance after resection of nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas (NFPAs) and its effectiveness in reducing visual compromise due to tumor recurrence. Design Retrospective case series. Setting Vanderbilt University Medical Center (2003–2011). Participants A total of 120 patients underwent primary transsphenoidal resection and surveillance of NFPAs between 2003 and 2011. Main Outcome Measures Time from initial surgery to most recent imaging or progression. Surveillance MRI costs according to Centers for Medicare and Medicaid database and visual field deficits. Results Patients received 382 surveillance scans at a total cost of $218,477.30. The median follow-up was 47 months (interquartile range [IQR]: 26–76), and the median interval between scans was 357 days (IQR: 225–434). Overall, 50 scans (13%) revealed tumor growth. The cost per scan revealing growth was $4,369.55. The cost to identify 19 patients (16%) with clinically significant growth was $11,498.80 per patient. A total of 5 of 19 patients (26%) experienced new visual deficits prior to intervention. Patients with visual decline tended to have longer scan intervals than those with preserved vision (mean: 239 versus 794 days; p = 0.0584). No patient with annual surveillance imaging experienced visual decline. Conclusions Annual MRI scans are a sensitive and cost-conscious method to identify NFPA recurrence prior to visual decline. PMID:26401475

  7. Diagnosis and management of cardiogenic pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Alwi, Idrus

    2010-07-01

    Acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema (ACPE) is a common cardiogenic emergency with a quite high in-hospital mortality rate. ACPE is defined as pulmonary edema with increased secondary hydrostatic capillary pressure due to elevated pulmonary venous pressure. Increased hydrostatic pressure may result from various causes including excessive administration of intravascular volume, obstruction of pulmonary venous outflow or secondary left ventricular failure due to left ventricular systolic or diastolic dysfunction. ACPE must be distinguished from pulmonary edema associated with injury of alveolar capillary membrane caused by various etiologies, i.e. direct pulmonary injury such as pneumonia and indirect pulmonary injury such as sepsis. Numerous clinical manifestations may differentiate ACPE and Non-ACPE. ACPE usually presents with a history of acute cardiac catastrophe. Physical examination reveals a low-flow state, S3 gallop, jugular venous distention and fine crepitant rales with auscultation. The diagnosis of pulmonary edema is made based on symptoms and clinical signs are found through history taking, physical examination, ECG, chest X-ray, echocardiography and laboratory tests including blood gas analysis and specific biomarkers. Medical treatment of ACPE has 3 main objectives, i.e.: (1) reduced venous return (preload reduction); (2) reduced resistance of systemic vascular (afterload reduction); and (3) inotropic support in some cases. Treatment that can be administered includes: vasodilator when there is normal or high BP, diuretics when there is volume overload or fluid retention, and inotropic drugs when there is hypotension or signs of organ hypoperfusion. Intubation and mechanical ventilation may be necessary to achieve adequate oxygenation.

  8. Extent of resection and postoperative functional declination of Klekamp's type A intramedullary tumors in adult patients

    PubMed Central

    Rabadán, Alejandra T.; Hernandez, Diego; Paz, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    Background: The most commonly primary intramedullary spinal cord tumors (ISCT) in adults are the noninfiltrative lesions, corresponding to Klekamp's type A classification. There are few reports exclusively considering this type of lesions, their resectability and postoperative functional declination risk, and to our knowledge, none from Latin America. This led us to evaluate our results to provide information that might contribute to the decision making process in our region. Methods: A retrospective observational study was conducted comprising a cohort of 21 adults having primary Klekamp's type A ISCT. Diagnosis was made by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), along with diffusion tensor/tractography in the last 7 cases. Preoperative functional status was assessed using the McCormick's modified scale (mMs), which was also used for the postoperative assessment within postoperative 90 days period. MRI was used to confirm the extent of resection. Results: Radical resection was obtained in 20/21 cases. The postoperative functional status was stable in 42.8% of the cases, and in 57.4% was even better than in the preoperative period. Temporary declination was observed in 2 cases in the early postoperative period. There were 2 cases with complications; one patient had cerebrospinal fluid fistula with meningitis, which was conservatively resolved, and another patient died from pulmonary embolism. Conclusion: Although the number of patients in this series does not allow to conclude from a statistical point of view, the outcomes showed that the modern surgery of Klekamp's type A ISCT permits a complete resection with low functional declination risk. PMID:28144469

  9. Short-term outcomes of en bloc resection of solitary bone metastases in limbs

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qingcheng; Zhao, Bizeng; Zhang, Zhichang; Dong, Yang; Pan, Yao; Du, Xinhui

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background To evaluate the pain, quality of life (QOL), and limb function of patients after en bloc resection of solitary metastatic bone cancer in the limbs. Material/Methods A total of 27 patients with solitary metastatic bone cancer in the limbs were recruited. All these patients underwent limb-salvage surgery with en bloc resection of the metastatic tumor. Pain and QOL were evaluated before and after surgery. Pain was assessed with a 10-point scale before and 1 month after surgery. The QOL was evaluated with the SF-30 scale before and 3 months after surgery. Limb function was evaluated with the Musculoskeletal Tumor Society scale (MSTS) 3 months after surgery. Follow-up was performed for 6~31 months (mean: 16.15±7.47 months). Results All procedures were successfully performed. Post-operative complications were found in 6 patients, including incision infection, prosthesis dislocation, deep vein thrombosis, and pulmonary infection. The pain score before and 1 month after surgery was 6.85±3.11 and 1.26±0.81, respectively, indicating obvious improvement (t=9.978, P<0.001). The QOL score before and 3 months after surgery was 38.30±13.05 and 65.78±10.65, respectively, indicating pronounced improvement (t=−18.550, P<0.001). The mean post-operative MSTS score was 23±3 (range: 17–30) (t=−1.450, P=0.016). No local recurrence was observed in any patient during the follow-up. Conclusions Limb salvage surgery with wide or marginal resection for solitary metastatic bone cancer may significantly improve the pain, QOL, and limb function, but there is no difference in local control between wide and marginal resection. PMID:23111740

  10. Intensive care unit (ICU) readmission after major lung resection: Prevalence, patterns, and mortality

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jae Jun; Cho, Jong Ho; Hong, Tae Hee; Kim, Hong Kwan; Choi, Yong Soo; Kim, Jhingook; Shim, Young Mog

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to identify risk factors associated with mortality in patients re‐admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU) after initial recovery from major lung resection. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the case records of all patients who underwent major lung resection between February 2011 and May 2013. A total of 1916 patients underwent major resection surgery for various lung diseases, 63 (3.3%) of which required ICU admission after initial recovery. We analyzed preoperative and perioperative data, including ICU factors and outcomes. Results The patient group included 57 men (90.5%) with a mean age of 65.3 years. Pathologic diagnosis was malignancy in 92.1% of patients, while 7.9% had benign disease. Open thoracotomy was performed in 84.1%, whereas minimally invasive approaches were performed in 15.9%. In‐hospital mortality occurred in 16 (25.4%) patients. Patients were classified as either survivors (n = 47, 74.6%) or non‐survivors (n = 16, 25.4%). The most common reason for ICU readmission was pulmonary complication (n = 50, 79.4%). Thirty‐one patients (49.2%) required mechanical ventilation, seven (11.1%) required extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, and three (4.8%) required renal support. Multivariate analysis showed that acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and delirium were independent risk factors for in‐hospital mortality. In addition, delirium frequently occurred in patients with ARDS. Conclusion ARDS and delirium were independent risk factors for in‐hospital mortality in patients who were readmitted to the ICU after major lung resection. Future studies are needed to determine if the prevention of delirium and ARDS can improve postoperative outcomes for patients with lung cancer. PMID:27925393

  11. Laparoscopic Resection of an Adrenal Schwannoma

    PubMed Central

    Konstantinos, Toutouzas G.; Panagiotis, Kekis B.; Nikolaos, Michalopoulos V.; Ioannis, Flessas; Andreas, Manouras; Geogrios, Zografos

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Schwannomas are tumors originating from Schwann cells of the peripheral nerve sheath (neurilemma) of the neuroectoderm. Rarely, schwannomas can arise from the retroperitoneum and adrenal medulla. We describe a case of a 71-y-old woman who presented with an incidentally discovered adrenal tumor. Methods: Ultrasound and computed tomography scans revealed a lesion with solid and cystic areas originating from the left adrenal gland. The patient underwent complete laparoscopic resection of the tumor and the left adrenal gland. Results: Histopathological examination and immunohistochemical staining of the excised specimen revealed a benign schwannoma measuring 5.5×5×3.7 cm. To our knowledge, few other cases of laparoscopic resection of adrenal schwannomas have been reported. Conclusion: Because preoperative diagnosis of adrenal tumors is inconclusive, complete laparoscopic excision allows for definitive diagnosis with histological evaluation and represents the treatment of choice. PMID:23484583

  12. Laparoscopic Resection of Symptomatic Gastric Diverticula

    PubMed Central

    Zelisko, Andrea; Rodriguez, John; El-Hayek, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Gastric diverticula are rare and usually asymptomatic. This report, however, describes two examples of symptomatic gastric diverticula successfully treated by laparoscopic resection. Both patients were male and in their sixth decade of life. One patient was relatively healthy with no past medical history, whereas the other patient had chronic pain issues and at presentation was also undergoing evaluation for hyperaldosteronism. The patients presented with gastrointestinal symptoms, including nausea, emesis, abdominal pain, and change in bowel function. In both cases, a gastric diverticulum was identified by CT scan, and precise anatomic position was determined by upper endoscopy. After discussion with the treating teams, including a gastroenterologist and surgeon, surgical treatment and resection was elected. Successful laparoscopic removal was accomplished in both patients, and they were discharged home after tolerating liquid diets. Both patients reported resolution of their abdominal symptoms at follow-up. PMID:24680154

  13. Computed tomographic appearance of resectable pancreatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Itai, Y.; Araki, T.; Tasaka, A.; Maruyama, M.

    1982-06-01

    Thirteen patients with resectable pancreatic carcinoma were examined by computed tomography (CT). Nine had a mass, 2 had dilatation of the main pancreatic duct, 1 appeared to have ductal dilatation, and 1 had no sign of abnormality. Resectable carcinoma was diagnosed retrospectively in 8 cases, based on the following criteria: a mass with a distinct contour, frequently containing a tiny or irregular low-density area and accompanied by dilatation of the caudal portion of the main pancreatic duct without involvement of the large vessels, liver, or lymph nodes. Including unresectable cancer, chronic pancreatitis, and obstructive jaundice from causes other than cancer, the false-positive rate was less than 6%. However, a small cancer without change in pancreatic contour is difficult to detect with CT.

  14. Does ambroxol confer a protective effect on the lungs in patients undergoing cardiac surgery or having lung resection?

    PubMed

    Wang, Shaohua; Huang, Dayu; Ma, Qinyun; Chen, Xiaofeng

    2014-06-01

    A best evidence topic in perioperative care was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was 'Does ambroxol confer a protective effect on the lung in patients undergoing cardiac surgery or having lung resection?' A total of 247 papers were found using the reported search, of which 7 represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers were tabulated. Several studies indicate that for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) who undergo cardiac surgery or upper abdominal surgery, perioperative ambroxol administration is associated with improved pulmonary function and reduced postoperative pulmonary complications (PPCs). In patients with pulmonary lobectomy, large-dose ambroxol treatment (1000 mg/day for 3 days) is correlated with reduced PPCs (6 vs 19%, P = 0.02), decreased postoperative hospital stay (5.6 vs 8.1 days, P = 0.02) and lower postoperative cost (2499 vs 5254 €, P = 0.04) compared with low-dose ambroxol treatment. Ambroxol also has a protective effect on the lungs during extracorporeal bypass, ameliorating inflammatory reaction and oxygen stress and preserving pulmonary surfactant. However, there is no evidence for any advantage of reducing PPCs after extracorporeal circulation. We conclude that perioperative application of ambroxol, a versatile mucoactive drug, particularly in high doses, is associated with lower PPCs, especially in high-risk patients with fundamental lung disease such as COPD. Large doses of ambroxol are correlated with even lower PPCs after lung resection. We recommend that routine intravenous ambroxol should be used in large doses in high-risk patients in the perioperative period to reduce the risk of PPCs.

  15. CT features of pulmonary artery sarcoma: critical aid to a challenging diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Singla Long, Svati; Johnson, Pamela T; Hruban, Ralph H; Fishman, Elliot K

    2010-03-01

    Pulmonary artery sarcoma is an uncommon and highly malignant neoplasm that presents a diagnostic challenge to radiologists due to its tendency to mimic the more common condition of pulmonary thromboembolism. Presented in this case report is a patient with pulmonary artery sarcoma who was initially diagnosed with saddle pulmonary embolism based upon computed tomography (CT) findings. The case emphasizes the importance of including pulmonary artery sarcoma in the differential diagnosis of a large filling defect in the pulmonary arteries when specific CT findings are identified in the appropriate clinical setting.

  16. Outcome after rectum or sigmoid resection: a review for gynecologists.

    PubMed

    Ret Dávalos, María Lorena; De Cicco, Carlo; D'Hoore, Andre; De Decker, Bert; Koninckx, Philippe Robert

    2007-01-01

    It remains unclear when to perform a discoid or segmental bowel resection for large endometriotic nodules with intestinal invasion. Moreover, endometriosis series are rather small to fully evaluate functional consequences of bowel resection. We therefore reviewed the incidence of leakage and functional problems after anterior and sigmoid resection as reported in the surgical literature albeit for other indications. Endoscopic resection clearly is feasible but requires an experienced surgeon. The incidence of leakage is not different after hand-sewn or stapled anastomosis, but is higher after a low rectum resection than after a sigmoid resection. Similarly, functional bowel problems are higher after a low rectum resection than after sigmoid resection. Low rectum resection in addition can be associated with functional bladder problems and sexual disturbances as anorgasmia. In conclusion, short- and long-term complications are much higher after a low rectum than after a sigmoid resection. This seems to be important in making the decision to perform a discoid or a segmental bowel resection for severe endometriosis.

  17. Pulmonary artery sarcoma mimicking massive pulmonary embolus: a case report.

    PubMed

    Alsoufi, Bahaaldin; Slater, Matthew; Smith, Pamela P; Karamlou, Tara; Mansoor, Atiya; Ravichandran, Pasala

    2006-08-01

    Intimal sarcomas of the pulmonary artery are rare tumors that are often difficult to distinguish from pulmonary thromboembolic disease, complicating accurate diagnosis and timely therapy. We report the case of a gentleman with a primary pulmonary artery sarcoma who presented with a massive pulmonary embolism and complete right ventricular outflow tract obstruction. The patient's condition was successfully managed with urgent pulmonary artery thromboendarterectomy, pulmonary valve replacement, and tricuspid valve annuloplasty.

  18. Pulmonary Paragonimiasis Mimicking Tuberculous Pleuritis

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jian; Wang, Mao-Yun; Liu, Dan; Zhu, Hui; Yang, Sai; Liang, Bin-Miao; Liang, Zong-An

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary paragonimiasis is a food-borne zoonosis with a wide variety of radiologic findings, which sometimes can be confused with tuberculosis and carcinoma. Therefore, differential diagnosis is always warranted. A 43-year-old male farmer, with productive cough, blood-tinged sputum and chest pain, as well as patchy consolidation and pleural effusions in chest computer tomography, was misdiagnosed of community-acquired pneumonia and tuberculosis. Complete blood cell count, sputum smear and culture, chest computer tomography, thoracoscopy, and biopsy. The diagnosis of pulmonary paragonimiasis was established due to the finding of Charcot–Leyden crystals in the pleural necrosis, and antibodies against Paragonimus westermani in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Paragonimiasis should be considered as a possibility in the differential diagnosis of tuberculosis. Thoracoscopy is an effective and valuable technology that can help make an accurate diagnosis. PMID:27082624

  19. Dysphagia due to cervical osteophytes.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohammad Saeed; Bansal, Meghana; Agarwal, Abhishek

    2012-05-01

    Cervical bony outgrowths or osteophytes are common and usually asymptomatic. In some cases, they may be associated with dysphagia, dysphonia, dyspnea and pulmonary aspiration. The most common causes of cervical osteophytes are osteoarthritis, ankylosing spondylitis and ankylosing hyperostosis or Diffuse Idiopathic Spinal Hyperostosis (DISH), also known as Forestier's Disease. Other causes are hypoparathyroidism, trauma, acromegaly, ochronosis and flourosis. However, while dysphagia due to osteophytes is reported in the setting of DISH, it is very rare with osteoarthritis. We report a case of a patient who developed dysphagia due to anterior cervical osteophytes in the setting of osteoarthritis.

  20. Liver Resection in Children with Hepatic Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Randolph, Judson G.; Altman, R. Peter; Arensman, Robert M.; Matlak, Michael E.; Leikin, Sanford L.

    1978-01-01

    In the past ten years, 28 patients with primary tumors of the liver have been treated. There were 11 benign tumors, including four hamartomas, three patients with focal nodular hyperplasia, and two each with congenital cysts and hemangioma. Hamartomas and masses of focal nodular hyperplasia should be excised when possible, but both are benign lesions; therefore life threatening excisions at the porta hepatis should be avoided. Cysts are often resectable, but when occupying all lobes of the liver, they can be successfully managed by marsupialization into the free peritoneal cavity. If resectable, hemangiomas should be removed; when occupying most of the liver as they often do, patients may be subject to platelet trapping or to cardiac failure. In some instances these lesions have been controlled by steroids, radiation therapy or hepatic artery ligation. Of 17 malignant tumors seen, 12 proved to be hepatoblastomas. Nine of the 12 patients underwent liver resection, of whom four are cured, (33%). There were three children with hepatocellular carcinomas and two with embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma. One child from each of these groups is cured by surgical excision. At present the only known cures in children with primary malignant liver neoplasms have been achieved by operative removal. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2.Fig. 3.Fig. 4. PMID:206216

  1. Laparoscopic intersphincteric resection: indications and results.

    PubMed

    Scala, Dario; Niglio, Antonello; Pace, Ugo; Ruffolo, Fulvio; Rega, Daniela; Delrio, Paolo

    2016-03-01

    Surgical treatment of distal rectal cancer has long been based only on abdominoperineal excision, resulting in a permanent stoma and not always offering a definitive local control. Sphincter saving surgery has emerged in the last 20 years and can be offered also to patients with low lying tumours, provided that the external sphincter is not involved by the disease. An intersphincteric resection (ISR) is based on the resection of the rectum with a distal dissection proceeding into the space between the internal and the external anal sphincter. Originally described as an open procedure, it has also been developed with the laparoscopic approach, and also this technically demanding procedure is inscribed among those offered to the patient by a minimally invasive surgery. Indications have to be strict and patient selection is crucial to obtain both oncological and functional optimal results. The level of distal dissection and the extent of internal sphincter resected are chosen according to the distal margin of the tumour and is based on MRI findings: accurate imaging is therefore mandatory to better define the surgical approach. We here present our actual indications for ISR, results in terms of operative time, median hospital stay for ISR in our experience and review the updated literature.

  2. Esophageal carcinoid tumor treated by endoscopic resection.

    PubMed

    Yagi, Makoto; Abe, Yasuhiko; Sasaki, Yu; Nomura, Eiki; Sato, Takeshi; Iwano, Daisuke; Yoshizawa, Kazuya; Sakuta, Kazuhiro; Kanno, Nana; Nishise, Syouichi; Ueno, Yoshiyuki

    2015-05-01

    The present report describes a rare case of esophageal carcinoid tumor that was treated by endoscopic resection. A 43-year-old woman underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy at her family clinic for screening of the upper digestive tract and a small lesion resembling a submucosal tumor was detected in the lower esophagus. A biopsy sample from the lesion was diagnosed as esophageal carcinoid tumor and the patient visited our hospital for detailed examination. The tumor was approximately 3 mm in diameter and its surface appeared to be covered with normal squamous epithelium. The tumor had a shiny reddish surface without ulceration or erosion. Magnifying endoscopy with narrow-band imaging showed structures resembling reticular vessels under the epithelium. Endoscopic ultrasonography depicted the tumor as a low-echoic mass within the lamina propria. Computed tomography did not detect the tumor and no metastatic lesions were evident in other organs. With the patient's informed consent, the tumor was resected using endoscopic submucosal dissection, with a sufficient free margin in both the vertical and horizontal directions. Magnifying endoscopic examination showed the resected tumor to have abundant reticular vessels. Finally, the tumor was diagnosed immunopathologically as an esophageal carcinoid tumor (neuroendocrine cell tumor, grade 1), without lymphatic or vascular invasion.

  3. Formation of multiple pulmonary nodules during treatment with leflunomide*

    PubMed Central

    Yoshikawa, Gilberto Toshikawa; Dias, George Alberto da Silva; Fujihara, Satomi; Silva, Luigi Ferreira e; Cruz, Lorena de Britto Pereira; Fuzii, Hellen Thais; Koyama, Roberta Vilela Lopes

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary involvement is one of the extra-articular manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis and can be due to the disease itself or secondary to the medications used in order to treat it. We report the case of a 60-year-old woman who had been diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis and developed multiple pulmonary nodules during treatment with leflunomide. PMID:26176527

  4. Handbook of pulmonary emergencies

    SciTech Connect

    Spaquolo, S.V.; Medinger, A

    1986-01-01

    This book presents information on the following topics: clinical assessment of the patient with pulmonary disease; interpretation of arterial blood gases in the emergency patient; life-threatening pneumonia; extrapulmonic ventilatory failure; acute inhalation lung disease; pulmonary edema; near drowning; chest trauma; upper airway emergencies; chronic lung disease with acute respiratory decompensation; acute respiratory failure in the patient with chronic airflow obstruction; asthma; hemoptysis; embolic pulmonary disease; superior vena cava syndrome; catastrophic pleural disease; ventilatory assistance and its complications; and ventilator emergencies.

  5. Cystic pulmonary hydatidosis

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Malay; Pathania, Rajnish; Jhobta, Anupam; Thakur, Babu Ram; Chopra, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Cystic echinococcosis (CE) is a zoonotic parasitic disease caused by the larval stages of the cestode Echinococcus granulosus. Worldwide, pulmonary hydatid cyst is a significant problem medically, socially, and economically. Surgery is the definitive therapy of pulmonary hydatidosis. Benzimidazoles may be considered in patients with a surgical contraindication. This review will focus on pathogenesis, lifecycle, clinical features, and management of pulmonary hydatid disease. PMID:27051107

  6. Peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis as a cause of pulmonary hypertension in adults

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Mostafa; Hamed, Fadi; Prieto, Lourdes R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis (PPAS) is an underrecognized condition in the adult population. PPAS can lead to pulmonary hypertension but is likely misdiagnosed as either idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension or chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. We retrospectively identified adult patients with PPAS either in its isolated form or related to other congenital defects from January 1998 to September 2012. We reviewed the patients’ clinical data by using our hospital electronic medical records and/or their paper charts. We identified 6 adult patients with PPAS with an age range of 16–56 years (1 woman and the rest men). Presenting signs and symptoms were thoracic murmurs, progressive dyspnea, and syncope. Three patients had Williams-Beuren syndrome. Pulmonary angiography showed that PPAS was predominantly located in main branches or lobar pulmonary arteries in 5 patients, while in 1 patient the arterial narrowing was at the level of the segmental pulmonary arteries. Right heart catheterization showed a mean pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) ranging from 35 to 60 mmHg. Balloon dilation was performed in all patients, predominantly in the lobar arteries, and it caused a decrease in mean PAP that ranged from 16% to 46% in 5 patients. In 1 patient the mean PAP did not decrease. All but 1 patient had follow-up echocardiograms at 1 year that showed stable echocardiographic findings. Pulmonary hypertension due to PPAS continues to presents a diagnostic challenge. Therefore, a high index of suspicion during the initial evaluation of pulmonary hypertension is essential for its prompt diagnosis and adequate treatment. PMID:25992283

  7. Contemporary role of minimally invasive thoracic surgery in the management of pulmonary arteriovenous malformations: report of two cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Bakhos, Charles T; Wang, Stephani C; Rosen, Jonathan M

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVM) can have potentially serious neurological and cardiac consequences if left untreated. Embolization has supplanted surgical resection as the first line treatment modality. However, this technique is not always successful and carries risks of air embolism, migration of the coil, myocardial rupture, vascular injury, pulmonary hypertension, and pulmonary infarction. We present two patients with symptomatic PAVM despite multiple embolizations: the first one with recurrent and persistent hemoptysis who underwent a thoracoscopic lobectomy, and the second one with chronic debilitating pleuritic pain subsequent to embolization who underwent a thoracoscopic wedge resection. Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) with lung resection was successfully performed in both patients, with complete resolution of their symptoms. We also review the literature regarding the contemporary role of surgery in PAVM, particularly thoracoscopy.

  8. Idiopathic pulmonary artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Kotwica, Tomasz; Szumarska, Joanna; Staniszewska-Marszalek, Edyta; Mazurek, Walentyna; Kosmala, Wojciech

    2009-05-01

    Pulmonary artery aneurysm (PAA) is an uncommon lesion, which may be associated with different etiologies including congenital cardiovascular diseases, systemic vasculitis, connective tissue diseases, infections, and trauma. Idiopathic PAA is sporadically diagnosed by exclusion of concomitant major pathology. We report a case of a 56-year-old female with an idiopathic pulmonary artery dilatation identified fortuitously by echocardiography and confirmed by contrast-enhanced computed tomography. Neither significant pulmonary valve dysfunction nor pulmonary hypertension and other cardiac abnormalities which might contribute to the PAA development were found. Here, we describe echocardiographic and computed tomography findings and review the literature on PAA management.

  9. Miliary pulmonary cryptococcosis.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Shane; Marriott, Deborah

    2014-10-01

    A 32-year-old HIV positive male presents with fevers and a non-productive cough. Initial X-ray and subsequent computerised tomography of the chest shows a bilateral miliary pattern of pulmonary infiltration highly suggestive of disseminated tuberculosis. However subsequent results were consistent with disseminated cryptococcosis, including pulmonary involvement, with cryptococcus identified on transbronchial tissue biopsy, and on blood and cerebrospinal fluid cultures. Imaging features of pulmonary cryptococcosis are generally of well-defined pleural-based nodules and less commonly alveolar infiltrates, lymphadenopathy, pleural effusions or cavitating lesions. Miliary pulmonary infiltrates are an exceptionally rare presentation.

  10. Late recurrent pulmonary typical carcinoid tumor: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Ciment, Ari; Gil, Joan; Teirstein, Alvin

    2006-10-01

    Carcinoid tumors are uncommon pulmonary neoplasms. They are classified histologically as either atypical or typical. Atypical carcinoids are aggressive malignancies that require radical surgical resection and have a guarded prognosis with a propensity to metastasize and recur. Typical carcinoids are low-grade malignancies with relatively less metastatic or recurring potential and are usually treated with simple excision. Recurrence of a typical pulmonary carcinoid tumor more than a decade after initial resection is very rare. A patient with recurrence of a typical carcinoid tumor 11 years after resection of the primary lesion with one involved lymph node is reported here. Late recurrences are rare in both atypical and typical varieties, but are much more common in atypical carcinoids. The patient reported here represents the fifth case of recurrence of a typical carcinoid tumor more than ten years after resection. This suggests that, after resection of a typical carcinoid neoplasm, patients should be monitored carefully, especially if lymph node metastases are present at the time of surgery.

  11. 78 FR 17413 - Pulmonary-Allergy Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Pulmonary-Allergy Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of..., Pulmonary-Allergy Drugs Advisory Committee meeting due to unanticipated weather conditions. Name of Committee: Pulmonary-Allergy Drugs Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide...

  12. Pulmonary hypertension management in neonates.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Kartikey A; Puligandla, Pramod S

    2015-02-01

    The management of pulmonary hypertension is multi-faceted, with therapies directed at supporting cardiovascular and pulmonary function, treating the underlying cause (if feasible), and preventing irreversible remodeling of the pulmonary vasculature. Recently, manipulation of signaling pathways and mediators contained within the pulmonary vascular endothelial cell has become a new target. This article will review the pathophysiology of pulmonary hypertension and the broad principles involved in its management, with specific emphasis on pharmacological therapies directed at the pulmonary vascular endothelium.

  13. Estimating the economic consequences of an increased medication adherence due to a potential improvement in the inhaler technique with Spiromax® compared with Turbuhaler® in patients with moderate-to-severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Darbà, Josep; Ramírez, Gabriela; García-Rivero, Juan L; Mayoralas, Sagrario; Pascual, José Francisco; Vargas, Diego; Bijedic, Adi

    2017-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to estimate the economic impact of the introduction of DuoResp® Spiromax®, budesonide/formoterol fixed-dose combination (FDC), focusing on an increase in medication adherence due to an enhancement of the inhalation technique for the treatment of COPD patients in Spain and 5 regions including Andalusia, Catalonia, Galicia, Madrid, and Valencia. Methods A 4-year budget impact model was developed for the time period of 2015–2018. This study aimed at evaluating the budget impact associated with the introduction of DuoResp Spiromax in comparison with Symbicort® Turbuhaler® and Rilast® Turbuhaler. National and regional data on COPD prevalence were obtained from the literature. Input data on health care resource utilization were obtained by clinical consultation. Resource included primary care visits, specialist visits, hospitalization, and emergency room visits as well as the length of hospital stay. Based on both pharmacological and health care resource costs, overall annual treatment cost per patient was estimated in EUR 2015. Results It was calculated that 130,777 adults were treated with budesonide/formoterol FDC delivered by a dry powder inhaler, Turbuhaler, in Spain in 2015. However, the target population decreases over the next 4 years. This pattern was observed in 4 regions, but for Andalusia, the treated population increased slightly. The overall budget savings in Spain with the market share of DuoResp Spiromax were estimated to be €6.01 million for the time period of 2015–2018. Region-specific data resulted in savings of €902,133 in Andalusia, €740,520 in Catalonia, €464,281 in Galicia, €748,996 in Madrid, and €495,812 in Valencia for the time period of 2015–2018. Conclusion The introduction of budesonide/formoterol FDC delivered by Spiromax for COPD treatment is likely to contribute in a reduction of health care costs for Spain and in 5 Spanish regions. This model forecasts that Spain and these 5

  14. [Place of surgery in pulmonary aspergillosis and other pulmonary mycotic infections].

    PubMed

    Pagès, P-B; Abou Hanna, H; Caillot, D; Bernard, A

    2012-04-01

    Surgery is part of the therapeutic strategy of aspergillosis and mucormycosis. The aspergilloma is defined as a rounded mass, developing in a cavity by the proliferation of spores of Aspergillus. The most common complication was haemoptysis reported in 50-95% of cases. The pleuropulmonary lesions predisposing are: tuberculosis, residual pleural space, emphysema and lung destroyed by fibrosis or radiotherapy or bronchiectasis. The indications for surgery depend on symptoms, respiratory function, the parenchyma and the type of aspergilloma (simple or complex). In a patient with an intrapulmonary aspergilloma, lung resection preceded by embolization is recommended based on respiratory function. For intrapleural aspergilloma, thoracoplasty is recommended according to the patient's general condition. The invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) is characterized by an invasion of lung tissue and blood vessels by hyphae in immunocompromised patients. The death rate of patients who have an API after treatment for leukemia or lymphoma was 30 to 40%, after bone marrow transplantation 60%, after solid organ transplantation from 50 to 60% and after any other cause of immunocompromising from 70 to 85%. The main cause of these deaths is massive hemoptysis. Surgery (lobectomy) is indicated for the prevention of hemoptysis when the mass is in contact with the pulmonary artery or one of its branches, and if it increases in size with the disappearance of border security between the mass and the vessel wall. The patient will be operated in an emergency before the white blood cells do not exceed the threshold of 1000 cells/μl. A persistent residual mass after antifungal treatment may justify a lung resection (lobectomy or wedge) before a new aggressive therapy. Mucormycosis affects patients following immunocompromising states--haematologic malignancy, diabetes mellitus, transplantation, burns and malnutrition. The treatment of pulmonary mucormycosis combines surgical and medical

  15. Assessing idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) with bronchoscopic OCT (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hariri, Lida P.; Adams, David C.; Colby, Thomas V.; Tager, Andrew M.; Suter, Melissa J.

    2016-03-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a progressive, fatal form of fibrotic lung disease, with a 3 year survival rate of 50%. Diagnostic certainty of IPF is essential to determine the most effective therapy for patients, but often requires surgery to resect lung tissue and look for microscopic honeycombing not seen on chest computed tomography (CT). Unfortunately, surgical lung resection has high risks of associated morbidity and mortality in this patient population. We aim to determine whether bronchoscopic optical coherence tomography (OCT) can serve as a novel, low-risk paradigm for in vivo IPF diagnosis without surgery or tissue removal. OCT provides rapid 3D visualization of large tissue volumes with microscopic resolutions well beyond the capabilities of CT. We have designed bronchoscopic OCT catheters to effectively and safely access the peripheral lung, and conducted in vivo peripheral lung imaging in patients, including those with pulmonary fibrosis. We utilized these OCT catheters to perform bronchoscopic imaging in lung tissue from patients with pulmonary fibrosis to determine if bronchoscopic OCT could successfully visualize features of IPF through the peripheral airways. OCT was able to visualize characteristic features of IPF through the airway, including microscopic honeycombing (< 1 mm diameter) not visible by CT, dense peripheral fibrosis, and spatial disease heterogeneity. These findings support the potential of bronchoscopic OCT as a minimally-invasive method for in vivo IPF diagnosis. However, future clinical studies are needed to validate these findings.

  16. The postoperative trismus, nerve injury and secondary angle formation after partial masseter muscle resection combined with mandibular angle reduction: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    A patient, who underwent partial masseter muscle resection and mandibular angle reduction at a plastic surgery clinic, visited this hospital with major complaints of trismus and dysesthesia. A secondary angle formation due to a wrong surgical method was observed via clinical and radiological examinations, and the patient complained of trismus due to the postoperative scars and muscular atrophy caused by the masseter muscle resection. The need for a masseter muscle resection in square jaw patients must be approached with caution. In addition, surgical techniques must be carefully selected in order to prevent complications, and obtain effective and satisfactory surgery results. PMID:28280710

  17. Congenital pulmonary sling, aorto-pulmonary window and pulmonary vein obstruction as a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge in an infant with VACTERL association.

    PubMed

    Trowitzsch, Eckardt; Schneider, Martin; Urban, Andreas; Asfour, Boulos

    2006-06-01

    In a newborn with anal atresia and urethral valves an incomplete VACTERL association, was diagnosed and a colon anus praeter was placed. Sweating and heart murmur led to cardiac diagnostics. By 2D colour Doppler echocardiography a huge atrial septal defect and pulmonary venous stenoses were diagnosed. Additionally, a pulmonary sling combined with an aortopulmonary window (AoPAw) was suspected and later confirmed by angiography. Heart failure developed and closure of the AoPAw, transplantation of the left pulmonary artery and closure of the atrial septal defect was performed at the age of 4 weeks. But the patient did not improve. Pulmonary hypertension with suprasystemic pressure in the right ventricle originating from a stenosis of the new orifice of the left pulmonary artery and obstruction of the right pulmonary veins was diagnosed by echocardiography and confirmed by angiography. At the age of 8 months the orifice of the left pulmonary artery was enlarged by a patch, the obstruction of left sided pulmonary veins was opened, and the rightsided pulmonary veins were newly implanted into the left atrium. Finally the inter-atrial communication was closed by a patch plastic. Again, postoperatively the patient improved only slightly. At the age of 10 months trans-septal catheterisation was performed. Angiography revealed a successful balloon dilatation of the long obstruction of the right pulmonary veins. Later on, an absorbable magnesium stent was implanted into the right upper pulmonary vein and medication with an endothelin antagonist was started. Temporarily the patient improved significantly. Within 6 weeks, right ventricular systolic pressure was again suprasystemic due to extreme inflow obstruction of the right pulmonary vein diagnosed by echocardiography. Severe heart failure developed and at the age of 1 year the patient died.

  18. Radiofrequency ablation to treat non-small cell lung cancer and pulmonary metastases.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Hiran C

    2008-02-01

    Radiofrequency ablation is being reported with increasing frequency for the treatment of lung tumors. Several studies have demonstrated that this is a feasible and safe approach. Intermediate outcomes are now becoming available. Although tumors up to 5 cm in size can be effectively treated with radiofrequency ablation, results are better for smaller tumors (3 cm or less). This review describes the techniques, available ablation devices, and the potential role of radiofrequency ablation for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and pulmonary metastases. Resection (lobar or sublobar) should remain the standard therapy for NSCLC. Radiofrequency ablation may be better than conventional external-beam radiation for the treatment of the high-risk individual with NSCLC. Preliminary results for pulmonary metastases are similar to those reported after resection. In addition, patients with pulmonary metastases have been demonstrated to develop recurrences even after thoracotomy and bimanual palpation of the lung. Radiofrequency ablation may be an alternative to resection for the patient with small-diameter pulmonary metastases, and future study of this may be indicated.

  19. Definitions and diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hoeper, Marius M; Bogaard, Harm Jan; Condliffe, Robin; Frantz, Robert; Khanna, Dinesh; Kurzyna, Marcin; Langleben, David; Manes, Alessandra; Satoh, Toru; Torres, Fernando; Wilkins, Martin R; Badesch, David B

    2013-12-24

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is defined by a mean pulmonary artery pressure ≥ 25 mm Hg at rest, measured during right heart catheterization. There is still insufficient evidence to add an exercise criterion to this definition. The term pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) describes a subpopulation of patients with PH characterized hemodynamically by the presence of pre-capillary PH including an end-expiratory pulmonary artery wedge pressure (PAWP) ≤ 15 mm Hg and a pulmonary vascular resistance >3 Wood units. Right heart catheterization remains essential for a diagnosis of PH or PAH. This procedure requires further standardization, including uniformity of the pressure transducer zero level at the midthoracic line, which is at the level of the left atrium. One of the most common problems in the diagnostic workup of patients with PH is the distinction between PAH and PH due to left heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). A normal PAWP does not rule out the presence of HFpEF. Volume or exercise challenge during right heart catheterization may be useful to unmask the presence of left heart disease, but both tools require further evaluation before their use in general practice can be recommended. Early diagnosis of PAH remains difficult, and screening programs in asymptomatic patients are feasible only in high-risk populations, particularly in patients with systemic sclerosis, for whom recent data suggest that a combination of clinical assessment and pulmonary function testing including diffusion capacity for carbon monoxide, biomarkers, and echocardiography has a higher predictive value than echocardiography alone.

  20. What Causes Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis? Sometimes doctors can find out what is causing pulmonary fibrosis (lung scarring). For example, exposure to environmental pollutants ...

  1. Resection of Large Metachronous Liver Metastasis with Gastric Origin: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Runcanu, Alexandru; Paun, Sorin; Negoi, Ruxandra Irina; Beuran, Mircea

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Increasing evidence suggests that surgical resection may be offered to a subgroup of patients with liver metastasis of gastric adenocarcinoma. The aim of this case report is to illustrate the surgical resection of a single liver metachronous recurrence twelve months after a radical total gastrectomy for cancer. Case report: A 63-year-old male patient with an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 1 was referred to our hospital for a single, large liver metastasis, twelve months after a radical total gastrectomy and DII lymphadenectomy for upper third gastric adenocarcinoma. As the adjuvant treatment, the patient received 12 cycles of FOLFOX chemotherapy. During the present admission, the abdominal computed tomography (CT) revealed a single liver metastasis located in the segments 5 and 6, of 105/85 mm in diameter. Surgical resection by an open approach of liver metastasis was decided. We performed a non-anatomical liver resection, without inflow control due to significant peritoneal adhesions in the liver hilum secondary to the previous lymphadenectomy. The patient was discharged after seven days, with an uneventful recovery. Six months after the second surgical procedure, the patient developed a local liver recurrence. The surgical resection of the liver recurrence was performed, with no postoperative morbidities, and the patient was discharged after eight days. Three months after the latest surgery, the patient is under adjuvant chemotherapy, with no imagistic signs of further recurrences. Conclusions:  Hepatic resection for liver metastasis of gastric origin may offer satisfactory oncological outcomes in a very selected subgroup of patients. PMID:27843732

  2. Supratotal resection of diffuse gliomas - an overview of its multifaceted implications.

    PubMed

    Yordanova, Y N; Duffau, H

    2017-02-06

    Successful management of diffuse low-grade and high-grade gliomas in adults is a challenge for neuro-oncologists. Indeed, due to their highly infiltrative feature, these diseases remain incurable despite therapeutic advances. Nevertheless, the elaboration of individualized therapeutic strategies has led to an improvement of both overall survival and quality of life. In particular, the impact of surgical resection on diffuse glioma survival has been extensively demonstrated. However, this impact is significant only when the resection is total (i.e., complete removal of the T2-hyperintensity in diffuse low-grade gliomas, or complete removal of the enhancement in high-grade gliomas), or at least subtotal. Interestingly, biopsy samples within and beyond the abnormalities, defined by magnetic resonance imaging, have shown that the actual spatial extent of gliomas was underestimated by this conventional imaging modality, since glioma cells were present outside the signal abnormalities. Thus, it was suggested that the removal of a margin around the tumor visible on magnetic resonance imaging, i.e. "supratotal resection", might improve the outcomes in diffuse gliomas. To achieve this type of supramaximal resection, while preserving the quality of life, a new concept is to switch from an image-guided surgery to a functional-guided surgery, i.e. to pursue the resection up to the eloquent neural networks using intraoperative direct electrical stimulation mapping in awake patients. The aim of this article was to review the recent data about supratotal resection, including both oncological and functional results. Favorable outcomes have recently opened the door to the principle of "preventive surgery" in incidentally discovered gliomas, and to the proposal of a medical screening.

  3. Diagnosis and management of pulmonary arteriovenous malformations

    PubMed Central

    Papagiannis, J; Apostolopoulou, S; Sarris, GE; Rammos, S

    2002-01-01

    Pulmonary arteriovenous malformation is a rare anomaly that presents in several different ways. It can present as an isolated finding, or more often in the context of hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia. It can also complicate palliative surgery such as the Glenn operation for complex congenital heart disease with single ventricle physiology. Its management includes transcatheter embolization, which is the preferred mode of therapy, surgery (including resection of the affected lobe, segment, or the fistula itself), or rarely, medical therapy. Complications of the disease itself and of various modes of treatment are relatively common, and patients require close surveillance for possible recurrence, or development of new fistulas. In cases related to the Glenn operation, redirection of hepatic venous flow or heart transplantation may cure the problem. PMID:22368610

  4. PULMONARY CIRCULATION AT EXERCISE

    PubMed Central

    NAEIJE, R; CHESLER, N

    2012-01-01

    The pulmonary circulation is a high flow and low pressure circuit, with an average resistance of 1 mmHg.min.L−1 in young adults, increasing to 2.5 mmHg.min.L−1 over 4–6 decades of life. Pulmonary vascular mechanics at exercise are best described by distensible models. Exercise does not appear to affect the time constant of the pulmonary circulation or the longitudinal distribution of resistances. Very high flows are associated with high capillary pressures, up to a 20–25 mmHg threshold associated with interstitial lung edema and altered ventilation/perfusion relationships. Pulmonary artery pressures of 40–50 mmHg, which can be achieved at maximal exercise, may correspond to the extreme of tolerable right ventricular afterload. Distension of capillaries that decrease resistance may be of adaptative value during exercise, but this is limited by hypoxemia from altered diffusion/perfusion relationships. Exercise in hypoxia is associated with higher pulmonary vascular pressures and lower maximal cardiac output, with increased likelihood of right ventricular function limitation and altered gas exchange by interstitial lung edema. Pharmacological interventions aimed at the reduction of pulmonary vascular tone have little effect on pulmonary vascular pressure-flow relationships in normoxia, but may decrease resistance in hypoxia, unloading the right ventricle and thereby improving exercise capacity. Exercise in patients with pulmonary hypertension is associated with sharp increases in pulmonary artery pressure and a right ventricular limitation of aerobic capacity. Exercise stress testing to determine multipoint pulmonary vascular pressures-flow relationships may uncover early stage pulmonary vascular disease. PMID:23105961

  5. Pulmonary circulation at exercise.

    PubMed

    Naeije, Robert; Chesler, N

    2012-01-01

    The pulmonary circulation is a high-flow and low-pressure circuit, with an average resistance of 1 mmHg/min/L in young adults, increasing to 2.5 mmHg/min/L over four to six decades of life. Pulmonary vascular mechanics at exercise are best described by distensible models. Exercise does not appear to affect the time constant of the pulmonary circulation or the longitudinal distribution of resistances. Very high flows are associated with high capillary pressures, up to a 20 to 25 mmHg threshold associated with interstitial lung edema and altered ventilation/perfusion relationships. Pulmonary artery pressures of 40 to 50 mmHg, which can be achieved at maximal exercise, may correspond to the extreme of tolerable right ventricular afterload. Distension of capillaries that decrease resistance may be of adaptative value during exercise, but this is limited by hypoxemia from altered diffusion/perfusion relationships. Exercise in hypoxia is associated with higher pulmonary vascular pressures and lower maximal cardiac output, with increased likelihood of right ventricular function limitation and altered gas exchange by interstitial lung edema. Pharmacological interventions aimed at the reduction of pulmonary vascular tone have little effect on pulmonary vascular pressure-flow relationships in normoxia, but may decrease resistance in hypoxia, unloading the right ventricle and thereby improving exercise capacity. Exercise in patients with pulmonary hypertension is associated with sharp increases in pulmonary artery pressure and a right ventricular limitation of aerobic capacity. Exercise stress testing to determine multipoint pulmonary vascular pressures-flow relationships may uncover early stage pulmonary vascular disease.

  6. Unusual Systemic Artery to Pulmonary Artery Malformation Without Evidence of Systemic Disease, Trauma or Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Geyik, Serdar; Yavuz, Kivilcim; Keller, Frederick S.

    2006-10-15

    Connections between the systemic and pulmonary arterial systems are rare conditions that can be due to either congenital or acquired diseases such as anomalous systemic arterial supply to normal lung, pulmonary sequestration, and systemic supply to pulmonary arteriovenous malformations. Herein, a unique case of systemic artery to pulmonary arterial malformation and its endovascular treatment in a patient with no history of the usual etiologies is reported.

  7. Pulmonary mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma associated with pulmonary sarcoidosis: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Kokuho, Nariaki; Terasaki, Yasuhiro; Urushiyama, Hirokazu; Terasaki, Mika; Kunugi, Shinobu; Morimoto, Taisuke; Azuma, Arata; Usuda, Jitsuo; Gemma, Akihiko; Eishi, Yoshinobu; Shimizu, Akira

    2016-05-01

    Differentiating low-grade lymphoma from preexisting sarcoidosis is difficult because of their pathological similarity. This article describes a case of pulmonary mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma associated with pulmonary sarcoidosis. The patient, a 45-year-old Japanese man, presented with a 10-year history of pulmonary sarcoidosis and 5-year history of ocular sarcoidosis with histologic findings. Because only the right S3 lung nodule had gradually enlarged, partial resection was performed. Pathological study revealed noncaseous epithelioid granulomas with lymphoplasmacytic proliferation but also marked lymphoid cell proliferation with lymphoepithelial lesion findings that differed from findings of typical sarcoid lesions. Our lymphoepithelial lesion evaluation via immunohistochemistry and analysis of Ig heavy-chain gene rearrangements with assessment of Propionibacterium acnes-specific antibody reactions allow us to report, for the first time, this case of pulmonary mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma associated with pulmonary sarcoidosis in exactly the same location, which may be significant for differentiating these diseases and understanding their pathogenic association.

  8. Preoperative pulmonary rehabilitation for marginal-function lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Hashmi, Asra; Baciewicz, Frank A; Soubani, Ayman O; Gadgeel, Shirish M

    2017-01-01

    Background This study aimed to evaluate the impact of preoperative pulmonary rehabilitation in lung cancer patients undergoing pulmonary resection surgery with marginal lung function. Methods Short-term outcomes of 42 patients with forced expiratory volume in 1 s < 1.6 L who underwent lung resection between 01/2006 and 12/2010 were reviewed retrospectively. They were divided into group A (no preoperative pulmonary rehabilitation) and group B (receiving pulmonary rehabilitation). In group B, a second set of pulmonary function tests was obtained. Results There were no significant differences in terms of sex, age, race, pathologic stage, operative procedure, or smoking years. Mean forced expiratory volume in 1 s and diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide in group A was 1.40 ± 0.22 L and 10.28 ± 2.64 g∙dL(-1) vs. 1.39 ± 0.13 L and 10.75 ± 2.08 g∙dL(-1) in group B. Group B showed significant improvement in forced expiratory volume in 1 s from 1.39 ± 0.13 to 1.55 ± 0.06 L ( p = 0.02). Mean intensive care unit stay was 6 ± 5 days in group A vs. 9 ± 9 days in group B ( p = 0.22). Mean hospital stay was 10 ± 4 days in group A vs. 14 ± 9 days in group B ( p = 0.31). There was no significant difference in morbidity or mortality between groups. Conclusion Preoperative pulmonary rehabilitation can significantly improve forced expiratory volume in 1 s in some marginal patients undergoing lung cancer resection. However, it does not improve length of stay, morbidity, or mortality.

  9. Co-existing Pulmonary Tuberculosis and Bronchogenic Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Holden, Helen M.; Quinlan, J. J.; Hiltz, J. E.

    1965-01-01

    Eighty patients with carcinoma of the lung have been treated at the Nova Scotia Sanatorium since 1940; in 15, coexisting active pulmonary tuberculosis was present. No characteristic clinical or roentgenological findings indicated that the tuberculous individual also had lung cancer. In four cases cancer was not diagnosed until the lung was examined by the pathologist. In the others a considerable interval elapsed before carcinoma was suspected. Only four patients with known cancer were considered suitable for thoracotomy. In three, an attempt at curative resection was made. One survived over seven years before accidental death; one is alive less than one year after operation; the third died as a result of the surgery. Bronchogenic carcinoma should be suspected in every tuberculous patient over the age of 50; diagnostic investigations should include bronchoscopy and cytological studies of bronchial secretion and sputum. Suspicion of carcinoma in any such patient constitutes an indication for early resection of the tuberculous disease. PMID:5843871

  10. Pulmonary Function Tests

    PubMed Central

    Ranu, Harpreet; Wilde, Michael; Madden, Brendan

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary function tests are valuable investigations in the management of patients with suspected or previously diagnosed respiratory disease. They aid diagnosis, help monitor response to treatment and can guide decisions regarding further treatment and intervention. The interpretation of pulmonary functions tests requires knowledge of respiratory physiology. In this review we describe investigations routinely used and discuss their clinical implications. PMID:22347750

  11. Ion transport by pulmonary epithelia.

    PubMed

    Hollenhorst, Monika I; Richter, Katrin; Fronius, Martin

    2011-01-01

    The lung surface of air-breathing vertebrates is formed by a continuous epithelium that is covered by a fluid layer. In the airways, this epithelium is largely pseudostratified consisting of diverse cell types such as ciliated cells, goblet cells, and undifferentiated basal cells, whereas the alveolar epithelium consists of alveolar type I and alveolar type II cells. Regulation and maintenance of the volume and viscosity of the fluid layer covering the epithelium is one of the most important functions of the epithelial barrier that forms the outer surface area of the lungs. Therefore, the epithelial cells are equipped with a wide variety of ion transport proteins, among which Na⁺, Cl⁻, and K⁺ channels have been identified to play a role in the regulation of the fluid layer. Malfunctions of pulmonary epithelial ion transport processes and, thus, impairment of the liquid balance in our lungs is associated with severe diseases, such as cystic fibrosis and pulmonary oedema. Due to the important role of pulmonary epithelial ion transport processes for proper lung function, the present paper summarizes the recent findings about composition, function, and ion transport properties of the airway epithelium as well as of the alveolar epithelium.

  12. Liver resection using a water jet.

    PubMed

    Une, Y; Uchino, J; Horie, T; Sato, Y; Ogasawara, K; Kakita, A; Sano, F

    1989-01-01

    The water-jet method has been used during hepatic resection. The instrument cuts the hepatic tissue with the high pressure of the fine water flow, while the exposed elastic intrahepatic vessels are spared injury. A comparative study on the water-jet method with the previously employed conventional methods was undertaken. Hepatic resections were performed on 35 patients using the water-jet method. Cirrhosis of the liver was associated with 10 of the 24 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. An ordinary saline solution was used as the jet, which was projected at a pressure of between 12 kg/cm2 and 20 kg/cm2 through a 0.15/mm-diameter nozzle. A higher jet pressure was needed to cut the fibrotic hepatic parenchyma. In the case of normal liver, the intrahepatic vessels of more than 0.2 mm were well preserved. In most of the cases, the loss of blood when cutting the hepatic parenchyma can be easily reduced with a jet pressure of 15-16 kg/cm2, thus preserving the fine vessels more than 0.2 mm in diameter without injury. When the same pressure was applied in the cutting of a cirrhotic liver, it took much longer time compared to that of a non-cirrhotic normal liver parenchyma. The cut surface was smooth compared to that after using CUSA, although its disadvantages lie in the formation of air bubbles, which obscure the operative field. The controlled projection of a jet of water under optimal pressure may ensure a safe hepatic resection of both normal and cirrhotic livers. Furthermore, because of its uncomplicated form, a wide range of applications can be expected, while the lower cost will also expedite its large-scale use for economic reasons.

  13. Conversion of laparoscopic colorectal resection for cancer: What is the impact on short-term outcomes and survival?

    PubMed Central

    Allaix, Marco E; Furnée, Edgar J B; Mistrangelo, Massimiliano; Arezzo, Alberto; Morino, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Laparoscopic resection for colon and rectal cancer is associated with quicker return of bowel function, reduced postoperative morbidity rates and shorter length of hospital stay compared to open surgery, with no differences in long-term survival. Conversion to open surgery is reported in up to 30% of patients enrolled in randomized control trials comparing open and laparoscopic colorectal resection for cancer. In this review, reasons for conversion are anatomical-related factors, disease-related-factors and surgeon-related factors. Body mass index, local tumour extension and co-morbidities are independent predictors of conversion. The current evidence has shown that patients with converted resection for colon cancer have similar outcomes compared to patients undergoing a laparoscopic completed or open resection. The few studies that have assessed the outcomes after conversion of laparoscopic rectal resection reported significantly higher rates of complications and longer length of hospital stay in converted patients compared to laparoscopically treated patients. No definitive conclusions can be drawn when converted and open rectal resections are compared. Early and pre-emptive conversion appears to have more favourable outcomes than reactive conversion; however, further large studies are needed to better define the optimal timing of conversion. With regard to long-term oncologic outcome, overall and disease-free survival in the case of conversion in laparoscopic colorectal cancer surgery seems to be worse than those achieved in patients in whom resection was successfully completed by laparoscopy. Although a worse long-term oncologic outcome has been suggested, it remains difficult to draw a proper conclusion due to the heterogeneity of the long-term outcomes as well as the inclusion of both colon and rectal cancer patients in most of the studies. Therefore, we discuss the currently available evidence of the impact of conversion in laparoscopic resection for colon

  14. Pulmonary arterovenous malformation causing hemothorax in a pregnant woman without Osler-Weber-Rendu syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Di Crescenzo, Vincenzo; Napolitano, Filomena; Vatrella, Alessandro; Zeppa, Pio; Laperuta, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs), although most commonly congenital, are usually detected later in life. Case report: We present a case of a 19-year-old woman with no previous history of AVM or telangiectasia, who presented dyspnea and hypoxia by massive left hemothorax in the 34th week of gestation. After emergent cesarean delivery, a chest computed tomography (CT) with i.v. contrast showed a likely 3 cm area of active contrast in left lower lung. Chest tube placement revealed about 2 liters of blood. The patient was subsequently found to have pulmonary AVM. A successful embolisation of AVM followed by lung atipic resection involving AVM and decortication for lung re-expansion were the treatments provided. Conclusions: Women with known pulmonary AVM should be maximally treated prior to becoming pregnant, and the physician should be alert to complications of pulmonary AVM during pregnancy. PMID:28352753

  15. Complex osteotomies vertebral column resection and decancellation.

    PubMed

    Obeid, Ibrahim; Bourghli, Anouar; Boissière, Louis; Vital, Jean-Marc; Barrey, Cédric

    2014-07-01

    Pedicle subtraction osteotomy (PSO) is nowadays widely used to treat sagittal imbalance. Some complex malalignment cases cannot be treated by a PSO, whereas the imbalance is coronal or mixed or the sagittal imbalance is major and cannot be treated by a single PSO. The aim of this article was to review these complex situations--coronal imbalance, mixed imbalance, two-level PSO, vertebral column resection, and vertebral column decancellation, and to focus on their specificities. It wills also to evoke the utility of navigation in these complex cases.

  16. Harlequin Syndrome Following Resection of Mediastinal Ganglioneuroma

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Yeong Jeong; Son, Jongbae; Cho, Jong Ho

    2017-01-01

    Harlequin syndrome is a rare disorder of the sympathetic nervous system characterized by unilateral facial flushing and sweating. Although its etiology is unknown, this syndrome appears to be a dysfunction of the autonomic nervous system. To the best of our knowledge, thus far, very few reports on perioperative Harlequin syndrome after thoracic surgery have been published in the thoracic surgical literature. Here, we present the case of a 6-year-old patient who developed this unusual syndrome following the resection of a posterior mediastinal mass. PMID:28382275

  17. Retrosigmoid approach for resection of petroclival meningioma.

    PubMed

    Nanda, Anil; Ambekar, Sudheer

    2014-01-01

    This video describes the classic retrosigmoid approach for the resection of petroclival lesions. In this procedure, a careful dissection of the tumor within the arachnoid plane from the neurovascular structures is described. The key steps in the procedure are outlined, and include positioning, tumor devascularization, decompression, dissection from lower cranial nerves, IV, V cranial nerves and the VII-VIII complex and from the brainstem and closure of the dura, bone flap and the incision. The video can be found here: http://youtu.be/DmutL7dBOxI .

  18. Melanotic Schwannoma of the Cervical Spine Progressing With Pulmonary Metastasis: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Faria, Mário Henrique Girão; Dória-Netto, Ricardo Henrique; Osugue, Gustavo Jun; Queiroz, Luciano de Souza; Chaddad-Neto, Feres Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Melanotic schwannoma (MS) is an unusual variant of nerve sheath neoplasm. Only 10% of these tumors will undergo malignant degeneration, with exceedingly rare reported metastasis. We present a 32-year-old woman with a 6-month history of cervical pain and left arm progressive weakness. Neurological examination showed a left upper limb radicular pain, with pyramidal syndrome at C5 level. The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study highlighted an intradural extramedullary heterogeneous mass along the spinal cord at the C4–C5 level, slightly hyperintense with T1 and hypointense with T2-weighted sequences, invading the left neural foramen. The patient underwent C3–C5 laminectomy with total resection of a black tumor. In the postoperative period, a patent deficit of shoulder abduction ensued related to the nervous section. Microscopically, compactly fascicles of spindle-shaped cells with pleomorphic and hypercromatic nuclei, dark brown intracellular pigments, as well as some mitotic figures were seen. Immunohistochemical stains for S-100, Human Melanoma Black-45 (HMB-45), and vimentin were positive, with Ki-67 labelling index (LI) of 15% compatible with MS. Six months after radiotherapy she presents local recurrence and lung metastatic dissemination of the MS. She underwent left pulmonary segmentectomy, followed by chemotherapy and radiosurgery. The patient developed a febrile neutropenia and worsening of general status, and died after 3 months due to respiratory complications. MS are rare tumors with potential for local recurrence and distal metastasis. Complete surgical resection remains as the treatment of choice, once the uncommon cases with malignant progression shows low response to chemo and radiotherapy. PMID:24077273

  19. Computational Simulation of the Pulmonary Arteries and its Role in the Study of Pediatric Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Kendall S.; Feinstein, Jeffrey A.; Ivy, D. Dunbar; Shandas, Robin

    2010-01-01

    The hemodynamic state of the pulmonary arteries is challenging to routinely measure in children due to the vascular circuit's position in the lungs. The resulting relative scarcity of quantitative clinical diagnostic and prognostic information impairs management of diseases such as pulmonary hypertension, or high blood pressure of the pulmonary circuit, and invites new techniques of measurement. Here we examine recent applications of macro-scale computational mechanics methods for fluids and solids – traditionally used by engineers in the design and virtual testing of complex metal and composite structures – applied to study the pulmonary vasculature, both in healthy and diseased states. In four subject areas, we briefly outline advances in computational methodology and provide examples of clinical relevance. PMID:21499523

  20. Signs and Symptoms for Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS)

    MedlinePlus

    ... CDC.gov . Hantavirus Share Compartir Signs & Symptoms for Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS) Due to the small number ... Pathogens Branch 1600 Clifton Rd Atlanta, GA 30333 Hantavirus Hotline (877) 232-3322 (404) 639-1510 800- ...

  1. [On the recurrence risk with partial larynx resections (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Flach, M

    1978-06-01

    28 cases of recurrences after 127 vertical and horizontal partial larynx resections (22 per cent) were analysed. Unfavourable preconditions for partial resections are the affliction of the ary cartilage and arrest of vocal chord movility. The hemiresections according to Hautant have the heighest recidivation percentage (40 per cent) judging from the observations available. Radical operations after failured partial resections are uncertain as to their prognoses.

  2. Pulmonary metastasis as sole manifestation of relapse in previously treated localised prostate cancer: three exceptional case reports

    PubMed Central

    Gago, Joaquim Peres; Câmara, Gabriela; Dionísio, Jorge; Opinião, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic prostate cancer recurrence after definitive local therapy can occur in any tissue. Usually, the first affected site is the bone. Lung metastases without bone or lymph node involvement are extremely rare in patients with prostate cancer, and only a handful of cases are reported in the literature. In several other malignancies, such as breast cancer, sarcomas, colorectal cancer, and renal cell carcinoma, long-term disease-free survival has been reported after resection of solitary pulmonary metastases. We present three unusual cases of isolated pulmonary recurrence of prostate cancer after initial definitive local therapy. One of the patients underwent resection of the lung metastasis, resulting in a long-term disease-free survival. Both surgical excision of solitary and oligometastatic lung secondary lesions and systemic therapy can play an important role in long-term disease control. Surgery should be considered for selected and well-informed patients with pulmonary metastasis after primary localised treatment for prostate cancer. PMID:27350790

  3. EGFR mutation of adenocarcinoma in congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation/congenital pulmonary airway malformation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Mizue; Sakai, Fumikazu; Arimura, Ken; Katsura, Hideki; Koh, Eitetsu; Sekine, Yasuo; Hiroshima, Kenzo

    2014-03-01

    An 80-year-old man underwent right upper lobectomy for the resection of multiple cysts accompanied by a nodule. The pathological diagnosis was adenocarcinoma with surrounding atypical epithelial cell proliferation in a Type 1 congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation/congenital pulmonary airway malformation. There was epidermal growth factor receptor mutation in the adenocarcinoma and surrounding atypical epithelial cells that had proliferated. Malignant transformation of congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation/congenital pulmonary airway malformation may be related to the epidermal growth factor receptor pathway in this case, with atypical epithelial cell proliferation as a precursor. We emphasize the importance of complete resection of congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation/congenital pulmonary airway malformation and the possibility of treatment with epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors in epidermal growth factor receptor-mutated cases.

  4. Local resection of the stomach for gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Kinami, Shinichi; Funaki, Hiroshi; Fujita, Hideto; Nakano, Yasuharu; Ueda, Nobuhiko; Kosaka, Takeo

    2016-06-24

    The local resection of the stomach is an ideal method for preventing postoperative symptoms. There are various procedures for performing local resection, such as the laparoscopic lesion lifting method, non-touch lesion lifting method, endoscopic full-thickness resection, and laparoscopic endoscopic cooperative surgery. After the invention and widespread use of endoscopic submucosal dissection, local resection has become outdated as a curative surgical technique for gastric cancer. Nevertheless, local resection of the stomach in the treatment of gastric cancer in now expected to make a comeback with the clinical use of sentinel node navigation surgery. However, there are many issues associated with local resection for gastric cancer, other than the normal indications. These include gastric deformation, functional impairment, ensuring a safe surgical margin, the possibility of inducing peritoneal dissemination, and the associated increase in the risk of metachronous gastric cancer. In view of these issues, there is a tendency to regard local resection as an investigative treatment, to be applied only in carefully selected cases. The ideal model for local resection of the stomach for gastric cancer would be a combination of endoscopic full-thickness resection of the stomach using an ESD device and hand sutured closure using a laparoscope or a surgical robot, for achieving both oncological safety and preserved functions.

  5. Neuroendoscopic Resection of Intraventricular Tumors: A Systematic Outcomes Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Barber, Sean M.; Baskin, David

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Though traditional microsurgical techniques are the gold standard for intraventricular tumor resection, the morbidity and invasiveness of microsurgical approaches to the ventricular system have galvanized interest in neuroendoscopic resection. We present a systematic review of the literature to provide a better understanding of the virtues and limitations of endoscopic tumor resection. Materials and Methods. 40 articles describing 668 endoscopic tumor resections were selected from the Pubmed database and reviewed. Results. Complete or near-complete resection was achieved in 75.0% of the patients. 9.9% of resected tumors recurred during the follow-up period, and procedure-related complications occurred in 20.8% of the procedures. Tumor size ≤ 2cm (P = 0.00146), the presence of a cystic tumor component (P < 0.0001), and the use of navigation or stereotactic tools during the procedure (P = 0.0003) were each independently associated with a greater likelihood of complete or near-complete tumor resection. Additionally, the complication rate was significantly higher for noncystic masses than for cystic ones (P < 0.0001). Discussion. Neuroendoscopic outcomes for intraventricular tumor resection are significantly better when performed on small, cystic tumors and when neural navigation or stereotaxy is used. Conclusion. Neuroendoscopic resection appears to be a safe and reliable treatment option for patients with intraventricular tumors of a particular morphology. PMID:24191196

  6. Double triangular resection for a widely prolapsed posterior mitral leaflet†

    PubMed Central

    Sawazaki, Masaru; Tomari, Shiro; Tsunekawa, Tomohiro; Izawa, Naoto

    2013-01-01

    A wide and redundant prolapse of the posterior mitral leaflet in active infective endocarditis cannot be easily repaired. A sliding plasty can be attempted, but the range of annular plication is often too large. Chordal replacement is another option, but is prone to long-term degeneration because the redundant leaflet still exists. Here, we describe a simple resection technique that utilizes only two small triangular resections. The resections are sutured with no need to shorten the annulus. The leaflet tissue between the two triangular resections must be preserved to make an appropriately shaped posterior leaflet. PMID:23223672

  7. Treatment of Intravenous Leiomyomatosis with Cardiac Extension following Incomplete Resection

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Mathew P.; Li, Annette; Villanueva, Claudia I.; Peeceeyen, Sheen C. S.; Cooper, Michael G.; Hanel, Kevin C.; Fermanis, Gary G.; Robertson, Greg

    2015-01-01

    Aim. Intravenous leiomyomatosis (IVL) with cardiac extension (CE) is a rare variant of benign uterine leiomyoma. Incomplete resection has a recurrence rate of over 30%. Different hormonal treatments have been described following incomplete resection; however no standard therapy currently exists. We review the literature for medical treatments options following incomplete resection of IVL with CE. Methods. Electronic databases were searched for all studies reporting IVL with CE. These studies were then searched for reports of patients with inoperable or incomplete resection and any further medical treatments. Our database was searched for patients with medical therapy following incomplete resection of IVL with CE and their results were included. Results. All studies were either case reports or case series. Five literature reviews confirm that surgery is the only treatment to achieve cure. The uses of progesterone, estrogen modulation, gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonism, and aromatase inhibition have been described following incomplete resection. Currently no studies have reviewed the outcomes of these treatments. Conclusions. Complete surgical resection is the only means of cure for IVL with CE, while multiple hormonal therapies have been used with varying results following incomplete resection. Aromatase inhibitors are the only reported treatment to prevent tumor progression or recurrence in patients with incompletely resected IVL with CE. PMID:26783463

  8. CT-guided microcoil VATS resection of lung nodules: a single-centre experience and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Elsie T.; Chung, Tae-Bong; Kha, Lan-Chau; Cypel, Marcelo; Darling, Gail E.; de Perrot, Marc; Keshavjee, Shaf; Pierre, Andrew F.; Waddell, Thomas K.; Yasufuku, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Background Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) is standard of care for small lung resections at many centres. Computed tomography (CT)-guided insertion of microcoils can aid surgeons in performing VATS resections for non-palpable lung nodules deep to the lung surface. Methods Retrospective analysis of CT-guided microcoil insertions prior to VATS lung resection at a single institution from October 2008 to January 2014. Results A total of 63 patients were included (37% male, mean age 61.6±11.4 years). Forty-two patients (67%) had a history of smoking, with 10 current smokers. Sixty one (97%) patients underwent wedge resection and 3 (5%) patients had segmentectomy. Three (5%) patients required intra-operative staple line re-resection for positive or close margins. Eleven (17%) patients had a completion lobectomy, 5 of which were during the same anaesthetic. The average time between the CT-guided insertion and start of operation was 136.6±89.0 min, and average operative time was 84.0±53.3 min. The intra-operative complication rate was 5% (n=3), including 1 episode of hemoptysis, and 2 conversions to thoracotomy. The post-operative complication rate was 8% (5 patients), and included 2 air leaks, 1 hemothorax (drop in hemoglobin), 1 post chest tube removal pneumothorax, and one venous infarction of the lingula after lingula-sparing lobectomy requiring completion lobectomy. . Average post-operative length of stay was 2.2 days. A diagnosis was made for all patients. Conclusions CT-guided microcoil insertion followed by VATS lobectomy is safe, with short operative times, short length of stay and 100% diagnosis of small pulmonary nodules. This technique will become more important in the future with increasing numbers of small nodules detected on CT as part of lung cancer screening programs. PMID:27621851

  9. Neoadjuvant treatment for resectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wong, John; Solomon, Naveenraj L; Hsueh, Chung-Tsen

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is the fourth leading cause of cancer mortality in the United States in both men and women, with a 5-year survival rate of less than 5%. Surgical resection remains the only curative treatment, but most patients develop systemic recurrence within 2 years of surgery. Adjuvant treatment with chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy has been shown to improve overall survival, but the delivery of treatment remains problematic with up to 50% of patients not receiving postoperative treatment. Neoadjuvant therapy can provide benefits of eradication of micrometastasis and improved delivery of intended treatment. We have reviewed the findings from completed neoadjuvant clinical trials, and discussed the ongoing studies. Combinational cytotoxic chemotherapy such as fluorouracil, leucovorin, irinotecan, and oxaliplatin and gemcitabine plus nanoparticle albumin-bound (nab)-paclitaxel, active in the metastatic setting, are being studied in the neoadjuvant setting. In addition, novel targeted agents such as inhibitor of immune checkpoint are incorporated with cytotoxic chemotherapy in early-phase clinical trial. Furthermore we have explored the utility of biomarkers which can personalize treatment and select patients for target-driven therapy to improve treatment outcome. The treatment of resectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma requires multidisciplinary approach and novel strategies including innovative trials to make progress. PMID:26862486

  10. Surgical Resectability of Skull Base Meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    GOTO, Takeo; OHATA, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    With recent advances in surgical technology such as preoperative imaging, neuro-monitoring, and surgical instruments, the surgical resectability of intracranial meningiomas has increased over the last two decades. This study reviewed clinical articles regarding the surgical treatment of meningiomas to clarify the role of surgical excision, with a focus on skull base meningiomas. We sub-classified clinical articles about skull base meningiomas into two categories (anterior and middle fossa meningiomas; and posterior fossa meningiomas) and reviewed papers in each category. In cases with anterior and middle fossa meningiomas, surgical resectability has reached a sufficient level to maximize functional preservation. In cases of posterior fossa meningioma, however, surgical respectability remains insufficient even with full use of recent surgical modalities. Continuous refining of operative procedures is required to obtain more satisfactory outcomes, especially for posterior fossa meningioma. In addition, recent long-term outcomes of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) were acceptable for controlling the skull base meningiomas. Therefore, combination with surgical excision and SRS should be considered in complicated skull base meningiomas. PMID:27076382

  11. Hysteroscopic Transcervical Resection of Uterine Septum

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xiaoyan; Hua, Xiangdong; Gu, Xiaoyan; Yang, Dazhen

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To explore the method of diagnosis for uterine septum and the clinical effect of hysteroscopic transcervical resection of the septum. Methods: One-hundred ninety cases of patients with uterine septum who were diagnosed and treated at our hospital during 2007–2011 were selected, and their general information, perioperative status, postoperative recovery treatment, and postoperative pregnancy rates were statistically analyzed. Results: All 190 patients were cured with one surgery, with an average hysteroscopic operating time of 22.60 ± 10.67 minutes and intraoperative blood loss of 15.74 ± 9.64 mL. There were no complications such as uterine perforation, water intoxication, infection, or heavy bleeding. Among the 115 patients that we followed up, 86 became pregnant and delivered infants, 81 of which were born at term and 5 that were born premature. Conclusion: The combination of hysteroscopy and laparoscopy is still the most reliable method for the diagnosis of uterine septum. With a shorter operative time, less blood loss, a significantly increased postoperative pregnancy rate and live birth rate, and a significantly lower spontaneous abortion rate, transcervical resection of the septum was the preferred method for the treatment of uterine septum, and surgical instruments and skills were critical to the prognosis of uterine septum. PMID:24398191

  12. Liver transplantation versus surgical resection for HCC meeting the Milan criteria

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jun-Yi; Li, Chuan; Wen, Tian-Fu; Yan, Lv-Nan; Li, Bo; Wang, Wen-Tao; Yang, Jia-Yin; Xu, Ming-Qing; Nazar Highness, Tholakkara

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The optimal treatment (liver transplantation [LT] vs surgical resection [SR]) for early-stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains controversial. A total of 209 SR patients and 129 LT patients were identified at our institution. After eliminating 27 patients with Child–Pugh C, the data from 209 SR patients and 102 LT patients were analyzed using a propensity score matching (PSM) model. Forty-six pairs were generated. A subgroup analysis was conducted based on the alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) level or platelet count (PLT). A survival analysis was performed using the Kaplan–Meier method. Gender, satellite lesions, and the treatment method were predictors of HCC recurrence. The Ishak score and treatment methods were associated with long-term survival after surgery. Before PSM, LT patients had a better prognosis than those treated by SR. Among HCC patients with childhood A/B cirrhosis, after PSM, SR achieved similar overall survival outcomes compared with LT. LT and SR resulted in comparable long-term survival for patients with or without thrombocytopenia. Patients with an AFP ≥ 400 ng/mL might achieve more survival benefits from LT. Our propensity score model provided evidence that, compared with transplantation, surgical resection could result in comparable long-term survival for resectable early-stage HCC patients, except for the AFP ≥ 400 ng/mL HCC subgroup. Surgical resection might not be a contraindication for early-stage HCC patients with thrombocytopenia due to their similar prognosis after transplantation. PMID:28033289

  13. Human Infections Due to Mycobacterium lentiflavum

    PubMed Central

    Tortoli, Enrico; Bartoloni, Alessandro; Erba, Maria Luigia; Levrè, Egle; Lombardi, Natalia; Mantella, Antonia; Mecocci, Lorenzo

    2002-01-01

    Three cases of human disease due to Mycobacterium lentiflavum are reported. In the first, the mycobacterium was responsible for chronic pulmonary disease in an elderly woman; in the second, it gave rise to cervical lymphadenitis in a child; and in the third, it caused a liver abscess in a young AIDS patient. PMID:11826009

  14. Resection of endobronchial hamartoma causing recurrent hemoptysis by electrocautery and cryotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ucar, N; Akpinar, S; Aktas, Z; Sipit, T; Ozaydin, E

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pulmonary hamartomas are rare benign tumors of the lung with an incidence of 0.025%-0.32%. Endobronchial benign lesions can cause bronchial obstruction and recurrent respiratory infections or obstructive pneumonia and recurrent hemopthysis. Case report: A 66-year-old male with recurrent hemoptysis and pneumonias for a year, was referred to our department for an endoscopic resection of an endobronchial hamartoma. Initially he refused any intervention but, as he suffered additional episodes of hemoptysis and chest infections during a year on follow up, he finally underwent interventional bronchoscopy and the lesion was cauterized using snare electrocautery probe and removed with cryoextraction. The patient has been followed for two years in our outpatient clinic, with no further problems. Conclusion: Endoscopic treatment with flexible bronchoscope, electrocautery and cryotherapy provides an excellent outcome. Surgical therapy, should be reserved for the hamartomas that cannot be approached through endoscopy. Hippokratia 2014; 18 (4): 355-356. PMID:26052204

  15. [Long-term survival following resection of primary rectal cancer metachronous metastases and salvage surgeries for relapsed lesions after stereotactic body radiotherapy for lung metastases - a case report].

    PubMed

    Yokosuka, Tetsuya; Nakajima, Yasushi; Kobayashi, Toshiko; Takeda, Atsuya; Yasuno, Masamichi

    2014-11-01

    A 66-year-old man underwent abdominoperineal resection for rectal cancer in 2003, followed by liver resection for a solitary liver metastasis in 2005. In 2006, the patient underwent abdominal para-aortic lymph node dissection, which was performed concurrently with partial resections of 3 metastases in the right lung. New metastatic lesions were subsequently diagnosed in S8 of the right lung and S1+2 of the left lung. The patient underwent stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for both lesions. However, the lesions relapsed and salvage surgeries were subsequently performed. These included a partial resection in 2009 for the lesion in the right lung and an upper division segmentectomy in 2010 for the lesion in the left lung. Currently, 11 years after resection of the primary rectal cancer, the patient is asymptomatic, without any signs of recurrence. In this report, we describe the use of SBRT for the treatment of colorectal cancer pulmonary metastases, and the use of salvage surgery for relapsed lesions.

  16. [Pulmonary artery sarcoma. A rare cause of syncope].

    PubMed

    Neves, Paulo; Guerra, Miguel; Mâncio, Jennifer; Ponce, Paulo; Vouga, Luís

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary artery sarcomas (PAS) are extremely rare and the prognosis of patients seems to be very poor. Their clinical appearance is highly nonspecific and variable, rendering the diagnosis difficult. Surgery remains the mainstay of treatment for PAS since early radical resection could offer the only chance of a potential cure. We describe the case of a 88-year old man who was admitted in the emergency department with syncope. The diagnostic study revealed a mass in the main pulmonary artery, extending into the right and left branches and occupying almost the whole of its size. The patient was successfully submitted to complete surgical excision of the mass, which revealed to be a malignant sarcoma.

  17. [Fatal pulmonary mycosis in a diabetic and cirrhotic patient].

    PubMed

    Ayadi-Kaddour, Aïda; Braham, Emna; Marghli, Adel; Ismail, Olfa; Helal, Imen; Mlika, Mona; Kilani, Tarak; El Mezni, Faouzi

    2015-04-01

    Pulmonary mucormycosis is a rare, devastating, opportunistic fungal infection, caused by the ubiquitous filamentous fungi of the Mucorales order of the class of Zygomycetes. This infection occurs principally in some particular conditions, specially in diabetic patients and immunocompromised host, and rarely in cirrhotic patients. The diagnosis of mucormycosis can only be confirmed by pathological and mycological examination of biopsy specimens. We report a case of pulmonary mucormycosis in a 68-year-old woman with underlying liver cirrhosis and diabetes mellitus. Endoscopic and radiologic findings supported the diagnosis of hydatid cyst of the lung. The patient underwent surgical resection and was started on amphotericin B, after pathological examination. Unfortunately, she succumbed to the infection within one month of surgery.

  18. Surgical treatment for primary lung cancer combined with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Atsushi; Miyajima, Masayoshi; Mishina, Taijiro; Nakazawa, Junji; Harada, Ryo; Kawaharada, Nobuyoshi; Higami, Tetsuya

    2013-05-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is defined as a specific form of chronic, progressive fibrosing interstitial pneumonia of unknown cause. IPF is associated with an increased risk of lung cancer, and lung cancer patients with IPF undergoing pulmonary resection for non-small cell lung cancer have increased postoperative morbidity and mortality. Especially, postoperative acute exacerbation of IPF (AEIPF) causes fatal status and long-term outcomes are worse than for patients without IPF, although certain subgroups have a good long-term outcome. A comprehensive review of the current literature pertaining to AEIPF and the late phase outcome after the context of a surgical intervention was performed.

  19. Ruptured Mycotic Pulmonary Artery Pseudoaneurysm in an Infant: Transcatheter Embolization and CT Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Deshmukh, Hemant; Rathod, Krantikumar; Garg, Ashwin Sheth, Rahul

    2003-09-15

    Mycotic pseudoaneurysm of the pulmonary artery that ruptures during necrotizing pneumonia is a rare entity that is often fatal. Traditionally it has been treated with open thoracotomy and resection of both the aneurysm and the lobe in which the aneurysm is located. In this report, we describe the radiological findings and transcatheter coil embolization of a mycotic pulmonary pseudoaneurysm in a 6-month-old female infant. We also describe the subsequent morphologic changes observed on follow-up computed tomography after 9 months of embolization.

  20. Asymptomatic Cavitary Pneumonitis Due to Amiodarone Pulmonary Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Schechter, Charles J.; O'Neill, Gearoid; Schweppe, H. Irving; Klima, Tomas; Treistman, Bernardo

    1985-01-01

    A 52-year-old woman presented with ventricular tachycardia after receiving amiodarone for the previous 18 months. The chest roentgenogram revealed evidence of multiple pleural-based cavitary nodules despite the absence of respiratory disease on clinical examination. The nodules were attributed to amiodarone because of histologic changes noted at open-lung biopsy. The cavitating nodules cleared with the discontinuation of amiodarone. Images PMID:15226998