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Sample records for pulsars progress problems

  1. Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stappers, Benjamin W.

    2012-04-01

    Pulsars can be considered as the ultimate time-variable source. They show variations on time-scales ranging from nanoseconds to as long as years, and they emit over almost the entire electromagnetic spectrum. The dominant modulation is associated with the rotation period, which can vary from slighty more than a millisecond to upwards of ten seconds (if we include the magnetars). Variations on time-scales shorter than the pulse period are mostly associated with emission processes and are manifested as giant pulses, microstructure and sub-pulses (to name a few). On time-scales of a rotation to a few hundred rotations are other phenomena also associated with the emission, such as nulling, moding, drifting and intermittency. By probing these and slightly longer time-scales we find that pulsars exhibit ``glitches'', which are rapid variations in spin rates. They are believed to be related to the interaction between the superfluid interior of the neutron star and the outer crust. Detailed studies of glitches can reveal much about the properties of the constituents of neutron stars-the only way to probe the physics of material at such extreme densities. Time-scales of about an hour or longer reveal that some pulsars are in binary systems, in particular the most rapidly rotating systems. Discovering and studying those binary systems provides vital clues to the evolution of massive stars, while some of the systems are also the best probes of strong-field gravity theories; the elusive pulsar-black hole binary would be the ultimate system. Pulsars are tools that allow us to probe a range of phenomena and time-scales. It is possible to measure the time of arrival of pulses from some pulsars to better than a few tens of nanoseconds over years, making them some of the most accurate clocks known. Concerning their rotation, deviations from sphericity may cause pulsars to emit gravitational waves which might then be detected by next-generation gravitational-wave detectors. Pulsars

  2. Statistics of interpulse radio pulsars: the key to solving the alignment/counter-alignment problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arzamasskiy, L. I.; Beskin, V. S.; Pirov, K. K.

    2017-04-01

    At present, there are theoretical models of radio pulsar evolution that predict both the alignment, i.e. evolution of inclination angle χ between magnetic and rotational axes to 0°, and its counter-alignment, i.e. evolution to 90°. At the same time, both models describe well the pulsar distribution on the P-dot{P} diagram. For this reason, up to now it was impossible to determine the braking mechanisms since it was rather difficult to estimate the evolution of the inclination angle based on observations. In this paper, we demonstrate that the statistics of interpulse pulsars can give us the key to solve the alignment/counter-alignment problem as the number of interpulse pulsars (having both χ ∼ 0° and χ ∼ 90°) drastically depends on the evolution of the inclination angle.

  3. Recent Progress in Studies of Pulsar Wind Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slane, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    The synchrotron-emitting nebulae formed by energetic winds from young pulsars provide information on a wide range phenomena that contribute to their structure. High resolution X-ray observations reveal jets and toroidal structures in many systems, along with knot-like structures whose emission is observed to be time-variable. Large-scale filaments seen in optical and radio images mark instability regions where the expanding nebulae interact with the surrounding ejecta, and spectral studies reveal the presence of these ejecta in the form of thermal X-ray emission. Infrared studies probe the frequency region where evolutionary and magnetic field effects conspire to change the broadband synchrotron spectrum dramatically, and studies of the innermost regions of the nebulae provide constraints on the spectra of particles entering the nebula. At the highest energies, TeV gamma-ray observations provide a probe of the spectral region that, for low magnetic fields, corresponds to particles with energies just below the X-ray-emitting regime. Here I summarize the structure of pulsar wind nebulae and review several new observations that have helped drive a recent resurgence in theoretical modeling of these systems.

  4. The Pulsar Search Collaboratory: Involving High School Students in Astronomical Research -- A Progress Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, Rachel; Heatherly, S.; McLauglin, M.; Lorimer, D.

    2010-01-01

    The National Science Foundation funded "Pulsar Search Collaboratory” project is a collaboration between the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Green Bank, WV and West Virginia University aimed at provoking interest in Science-Technology-Engineering-Math (STEM) careers and increasing scientific and information technology literacy among high-school students within the state and region. Over the initial three-year phase of this program, 60 high-school teachers at schools throughout region and over 300 students will be involved in the search for new pulsars and transient objects by analyzing over 30 TB of data collected by the Green Bank Telescope in 2007. Although training is provided to teachers and student leaders via a summer workshop, additional students may join the program, learning from their peers how to conduct the data analysis. We are now in the second year of the PSC and we present a progress report from the first year of the PSC. We will summarize our approaches to implementing this challenging project, including the use of online tools to communicate with and sustain interest among the student teams, and the development of a unique graphical database through which students access and analyze pulsar plots. We will present the student results including one astronomical discovery as well as statistics on the plots that students have analyzed, including distribution among schools, number of known pulsars found, and RFI detection. Finally we will present evaluation results and lessons learned from the first year of the PSC. These include results from pre/post testing of teachers and students that show changes in student interest in STEM careers resulting from the PSC, and statistics on student participation.

  5. European Archaeomagnetism: Progress and Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, M. E.; Hoye, G.

    2009-05-01

    Much progress has been made since the seminal work of Giuseppe Folgheraiter (1856-1913) in the late 19th century. So much so that recent advances now make it possible to draw up complete isogonic and isoclinic maps for Europe and adjacent areas spanning the last three millennia (Pavon-Carrasco et al., 2009). Results based on multiple independent studies, with high precision and good age control are crucial and should be recognized as "anchor points" (e.g. Pompeii). On the other hand, the nagging problem of outliers persists. Among the possible causes are magnetic refraction, physical distortion, and inadequate chronological control. Some examples, drawn from our own investigations over the last 30 years, will be discussed in detail. These include previously unpublished data from a detailed study (more than 100 samples) of a kiln in southern Italy, and an apparently good (but aberrant) archaeodirection from a kiln in southern Spain.

  6. Radio Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beskin, V. S.; Chernov, S. V.; Gwinn, C. R.; Tchekhovskoy, A. A.

    2015-10-01

    Almost 50 years after radio pulsars were discovered in 1967, our understanding of these objects remains incomplete. On the one hand, within a few years it became clear that neutron star rotation gives rise to the extremely stable sequence of radio pulses, that the kinetic energy of rotation provides the reservoir of energy, and that electromagnetic fields are the braking mechanism. On the other hand, no consensus regarding the mechanism of coherent radio emission or the conversion of electromagnetic energy to particle energy yet exists. In this review, we report on three aspects of pulsar structure that have seen recent progress: the self-consistent theory of the magnetosphere of an oblique magnetic rotator; the location, geometry, and optics of radio emission; and evolution of the angle between spin and magnetic axes. These allow us to take the next step in understanding the physical nature of the pulsar activity.

  7. Grassroots Excellence: Problems and Progress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Kenneth H.

    The educational "excellence" movement is hindered by inconsistencies between goals and action and by difficulties in translating national and state goals into local policy; nonetheless, progress has occurred. Examples of "voodoo excellence," in which proposed policies will likely work against their stated objectives, are…

  8. Hurricane Prediction: Progress and Problem Areas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, R. H.

    1973-01-01

    Describes progress made in recent decades in predicting the track and landfall of hurricanes. Examines the problems of detecting, tracking, and describing tropical cyclones, and the difficulties which continue to complicate the matter of warning and evacuating coastal residents. (JR)

  9. Hurricane Prediction: Progress and Problem Areas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, R. H.

    1973-01-01

    Describes progress made in recent decades in predicting the track and landfall of hurricanes. Examines the problems of detecting, tracking, and describing tropical cyclones, and the difficulties which continue to complicate the matter of warning and evacuating coastal residents. (JR)

  10. Hepatitis C: progress and problems.

    PubMed Central

    Cuthbert, J A

    1994-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV), a single-stranded RNA virus, is the major cause of posttransfusion hepatitis. HCV isolates differ in nucleotide and amino acid sequences. Nucleotide changes are concentrated in hypervariable regions and may be related to immune selection. In most immunocompetent persons, HCV infection is diagnosed serologically, using antigens from conserved regions. Amplification of RNA may be necessary to detect infection in immunosuppressed patients. Transmission by known parenteral routes is frequent; other means of spread are less common and may represent inapparent, percutaneous dissemination. Infection can lead to classical acute hepatitis, but most infected persons have no history of acute disease. Once infected, most individuals apparently remain carriers of the virus, with varying degrees of hepatocyte damage and fibrosis ensuing. Chronic hepatitis may lead to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. However, disease progression varies widely, from less than 2 years to cirrhosis in some patients to more than 30 years with only chronic hepatitis in others. Determinants important in deciding outcome are unknown. Alpha interferon, which results in sustained remission in selected patients, is the only available therapy. Long-term benefits from such therapy have not been demonstrated. Prevention of HCV infection by vaccination is likely to be challenging if ongoing viral mutation results in escape from neutralization and clearance. PMID:7834603

  11. Multi-D magnetohydrodynamic modelling of pulsar wind nebulae: recent progress and open questions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olmi, B.; Del Zanna, L.; Amato, E.; Bucciantini, N.; Mignone, A.

    2016-12-01

    In the last decade, the relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modelling of pulsar wind nebulae, and of the Crab nebula in particular, has been highly successful, with many of the observed dynamical and emission properties reproduced down to the finest detail. Here, we critically discuss the results of some of the most recent studies: namely the investigation of the origin of the radio emitting particles and the quest for the acceleration sites of particles of different energies along the termination shock, by using wisp motions as a diagnostic tool; the study of the magnetic dissipation process in high magnetization nebulae by means of new long-term three-dimensional simulations of the pulsar wind nebula evolution; the investigation of the relativistic tearing instability in thinning current sheets, leading to fast reconnection events that might be at the origin of the Crab nebula gamma-ray flares.

  12. The Amazing Pulsar Machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, Alice K.; Large Area Telescope, Fermi

    2014-01-01

    How rotation-powered pulsars accelerate particles to PeV energies and radiate pulsed emission from radio to gamma-ray wavelengths has remained a mystery for over 40 years. But in the last few years, the Fermi Large Area Telescope has revolutionized the study of pulsars and allowed us to peer deeper into the inner workings of this incredibly efficient natural accelerator. Thanks to Fermi discoveries, we now know that the high-energy emission is radiated in the outer magnetosphere, near the light cylinder, that millisecond pulsars are extremely efficient at emitting gamma-ray pulses and that the Crab nebula undergoes dramatic flaring that challenges particle acceleration theory. I will review how these discoveries, together with recent progress in global simulation of pulsar magnetospheres, are changing our models of pulsar particle acceleration, cascade pair production and high-energy emission.

  13. Pure science and the problem of progress.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Heather

    2014-06-01

    How should we understand scientific progress? Kuhn famously discussed science as its own internally driven venture, structured by paradigms. He also famously had a problem describing progress in science, as problem-solving ability failed to provide a clear rubric across paradigm change--paradigm changes tossed out problems as well as solving them. I argue here that much of Kuhn's inability to articulate a clear view of scientific progress stems from his focus on pure science and a neglect of applied science. I trace the history of the distinction between pure and applied science, showing how the distinction came about, the rhetorical uses to which the distinction has been put, and how pure science came to be both more valued by scientists and philosophers. I argue that the distinction between pure and applied science does not stand up to philosophical scrutiny, and that once we relinquish it, we can provide Kuhn with a clear sense of scientific progress. It is not one, though, that will ultimately prove acceptable. For that, societal evaluations of scientific work are needed.

  14. Pulsar Animation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Pulsars are thought to emit relatively narrow radio beams, shown as green in this animation. If these beams don't sweep toward Earth, astronomers cannot detect the radio signals. Pulsar gamma-ray e...

  15. Progress and problems in flare particle diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, J. C.

    Recent solar maxima saw major progress in remote diagnosis of flare particles at the sun via advances in ground and space instrumentation and in coordinated observing campaigns, including in situ measurements of related space plasma particles, waves, and fields. This review discusses aspects of where we stand with regard to remote particle diagnostics, emphasising recent progress and new problems. Special attention is paid to interpretation of `hard' [hard X-ray (HXR) and gamma-ray (GR)] photon data from the Ramaty High Energy Spectrometric Imager (RHESSI) and emphasising their implications for the basic physics problems of acceleration, propagation, and flare energy transport budget. In particular the following are discussed: - a) HXR SPECTRAL INVERSION Progress in numerical regularisation algorithms incorporating physical constraints Real thin and thick target and thermal model electron distribution recovery Testing/exclusion of models by application of these to RHESSI data Interpretive complications - e.g. albedo, directivity, energy dispersion b) HXR SPECTROSCOPIC IMAGE INTERPRETATION Image reconstruction algorithms - 2-D to 3-D ambiguity Source sizes and physics implications Source sizes and locations compared with TRACE, radio and other data Beam energy losses, and atmospheric density structure - e.g. coronal thick targets Evidence for and implications of complex versus simple loop structure Diffuse source (e.g. albedo patch) detection c) HXR ANISOTROPY AND POLARISATION d) GR-LINE SPECTRA AND IMAGES AND OTHER ION DIAGNOSTICS Implications for MEV ion acceleration sites, propagation, and energy budget Low energy ion diagnostics e) FLARE ENERGY BUDGET Real evidence for low energy cut-offs in particle spectra Neupert effect and status of the single loop particle heated model

  16. PREDICTING RANGES FOR PULSARS' BRAKING INDICES

    SciTech Connect

    Magalhaes, Nadja S.; Miranda, Thaysa A.; Frajuca, Carlos

    2012-08-10

    The theoretical determination of braking indices of pulsars is still an open problem. In this paper we report results of a study concerning such determination based on a modification of the canonical model, which admits that pulsars are rotating magnetic dipoles, and on data from the seven pulsars with known braking indices. In order to test the modified model, we predict ranges for the braking indices of other pulsars.

  17. Pulsars:. Gigantic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Renxin

    What is the real nature of pulsars? This is essentially a question of the fundamental strong interaction between quarks at low-energy scale and hence of the non-perturbative quantum chromo-dynamics, the solution of which would certainly be meaningful for us to understand one of the seven millennium prize problems (i.e., "Yang-Mills Theory") named by the Clay Mathematical Institute. After a historical note, it is argued here that a pulsar is very similar to an extremely big nucleus, but is a little bit different from the gigantic nucleus speculated 80 years ago by L. Landau. The paper demonstrates the similarity between pulsars and gigantic nuclei from both points of view: the different manifestations of compact stars and the general behavior of the strong interaction.

  18. Theoretical problems in accelerator physics. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    This is the second progress report submitted under the author`s current grant and covers progress made since the submission of the first progress report in August 1993. During this period the author has continued to spend approximately one half of his time at SLAC and most of the projects reported here were carried out in collaboration with individuals and groups at SLAC. Except where otherwise noted, reference numbers in the text refer to the attached list of current contract publications. Copies of the publications, numbered in agreement with the publication list, are included with this report.

  19. Progress through Problems, Not Recipes for Disaster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watts, Mike; West, Alan

    1992-01-01

    Describes using problem solving in science instruction and the advantages derived from this approach. Authors' experience suggests there are many problem-solving approaches in physics, technology, and biology but that chemists have not yet made an impact. Presents two case studies in problem solving in chemistry from the Creativity in Science and…

  20. Improving Recent Large-Scale Pulsar Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardoso, Rogerio Fernando; Ransom, S.

    2011-01-01

    Pulsars are unique in that they act as celestial laboratories for precise tests of gravity and other extreme physics (Kramer 2004). There are approximately 2000 known pulsars today, which is less than ten percent of pulsars in the Milky Way according to theoretical models (Lorimer 2004). Out of these 2000 known pulsars, approximately ten percent are known millisecond pulsars, objects used for their period stability for detailed physics tests and searches for gravitational radiation (Lorimer 2008). As the field and instrumentation progress, pulsar astronomers attempt to overcome observational biases and detect new pulsars, consequently discovering new millisecond pulsars. We attempt to improve large scale pulsar surveys by examining three recent pulsar surveys. The first, the Green Bank Telescope 350MHz Drift Scan, a low frequency isotropic survey of the northern sky, has yielded a large number of candidates that were visually inspected and identified, resulting in over 34.000 thousands candidates viewed, dozens of detections of known pulsars, and the discovery of a new low-flux pulsar, PSRJ1911+22. The second, the PALFA survey, is a high frequency survey of the galactic plane with the Arecibo telescope. We created a processing pipeline for the PALFA survey at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in Charlottesville- VA, in addition to making needed modifications upon advice from the PALFA consortium. The third survey examined is a new GBT 820MHz survey devoted to find new millisecond pulsars by observing the target-rich environment of unidentified sources in the FERMI LAT catalogue. By approaching these three pulsar surveys at different stages, we seek to improve the success rates of large scale surveys, and hence the possibility for ground-breaking work in both basic physics and astrophysics.

  1. Electrodynamics of Pulsar Magnetospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerutti, Benoît; Beloborodov, Andrei M.

    2016-12-01

    We review electrodynamics of rotating magnetized neutron stars, from the early vacuum model to recent numerical experiments with plasma-filled magnetospheres. Significant progress became possible due to the development of global particle-in-cell simulations which capture particle acceleration, emission of high-energy photons, and electron-positron pair creation. The numerical experiments show from first principles how and where electric gaps form, and promise to explain the observed pulsar activity from radio waves to gamma-rays.

  2. Electrodynamics of Pulsar Magnetospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerutti, Benoît; Beloborodov, Andrei M.

    2017-07-01

    We review electrodynamics of rotating magnetized neutron stars, from the early vacuum model to recent numerical experiments with plasma-filled magnetospheres. Significant progress became possible due to the development of global particle-in-cell simulations which capture particle acceleration, emission of high-energy photons, and electron-positron pair creation. The numerical experiments show from first principles how and where electric gaps form, and promise to explain the observed pulsar activity from radio waves to gamma-rays.

  3. Progressive wave expansions and open boundary problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagstrom, T.; Hariharan, S. I.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper we construct progressive wave expansions and asymptotic boundary conditions for wave-like equations in exterior domains, including applications to electromagnetics, compressible flows and aero-acoustics. The development of the conditions will be discussed in two parts. The first part will include derivations of asymptotic conditions based on the well-known progressive wave expansions for the two-dimensional wave equations. A key feature in the derivations is that the resulting family of boundary conditions involves a single derivative in the direction normal to the open boundary. These conditions are easy to implement and an application in electromagnetics will be presented. The second part of the paper will discuss the theory for hyperbolic systems in two dimensions. Here, the focus will be to obtain the expansions in a general way and to use them to derive a class of boundary conditions that involve only time derivatives or time and tangential derivatives. Maxwell's equations and the compressible Euler equations are used as examples. Simulations with the linearized Euler equations are presented to validate the theory.

  4. [Ecological and hygienic problems of nanotech progress].

    PubMed

    Latyshevskaia, N I; Strekalova, A S

    2012-01-01

    In article necessity of development of new directions of researches--nanoecology (ecology of nanoindustry) and nanohygiene (hygiene of nanotechnologies and nanomaterials) is proved. On the basis of the spent review key ecological and hygienic problems of nanoindustrial development are systematized and also debatable questions are allocated. The conclusion is drawn on necessity of an intensification of studying of ecological and hygienic aspects of nanotechnologies and nanomaterials.

  5. Modelling and inversion -progress, problems, and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raiche, Art

    1994-03-01

    Researchers in the field of electromagnetic modelling and inversion have taken advantage of the impressive improvements of new computer hardware to explore exciting new initiatives and solid extensions of older ideas. Finite-difference time-stepping methods have been successfully applied to full-domain 3D models. Another new method combines time-stepping with spatial frequency solutions. The 2D model 3D source (2.5D) problem is also receiving fresh attention both for continental and sea floor applications. The 3D inversion problem is being attacked by several researchers using distorted Born approximation methods. Q-domain inversions using transformation to pseudo-wave field and travel time tomography have also been successfully tested for low contrast problems. Subspace methods have been successful in dramatically reducing the computational burden of the under-determined style of inversion. Static magnetic field interpretation methods are proving useful for delineating the position of closely-spaced multiple targets. Novel (“appeals to nature”) methods are also being investigated. Neural net algorithms have been tested for determining the depth and offset of buried pipes from EM ellipticity data. Genetic algorithms and simulated annealing have been tested for extremal model construction. The failure of researchers to take adequate account of the properties of the mathematical transformation from algorithms to the number domain represented by the computing process remains a major stumbling block. Structured programming, functional languages, and other software tools and methods are presented as an essential part of the serial process leading from EM theory to geological interpretation.

  6. Pulsars Magnetospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timokhin, Andrey

    2012-01-01

    Current density determines the plasma flow regime. Cascades are non-stationary. ALWAYS. All flow regimes look different: multiple components (?) Return current regions should have particle accelerating zones in the outer magnetosphere: y-ray pulsars (?) Plasma oscillations in discharges: direct radio emission (?)

  7. Recent progress and problems in animal cloning.

    PubMed

    Tsunoda, Y; Kato, Y

    2002-01-01

    It is remarkable that mammalian somatic cell nuclei can form whole individuals if they are transferred to enucleated oocytes. Advancements in nuclear transfer technology can now be applied for genetic improvement and increase of farm animals, rescue of endangered species, and assisted reproduction and tissue engineering in humans. Since July 1998, more than 200 calves have been produced by nuclear transfer of somatic cell nuclei in Japan, but half of them were stillborn or died within several months of parturition. Morphologic abnormalities have also been observed in cloned calves and embryonic stem cell-derived mice. In this review, we discuss the present situation and problems with animal cloning and the possibility for its application to human medicine.

  8. Hurricane prediction: progress and problem areas.

    PubMed

    Simpson, R H

    1973-09-07

    The subjective approach to hurricane prediction of yesteryear has given way to the automation of many facets of prediction, leaving the forecaster with more time to reason dynamically in making the final adjustments to the official track derived from a hierarchy of computer-generated guidances. The most important task immediately ahead is to develop and apply better diagnostic procedures to help the forecaster identify the guidance sources which are most likely to contain the truth, and to help assure that his final decision will either succeed or fail safely. The ultimate prediction method for both hurricane development and movement will probably need to simulate not only the circulation of the hurricane but the interaction of the cloud clusters in its vortex with the largescale environment. Assuming that this can be effectively done, the most important further handicap will be the problem of describing the initial conditions. The development of a model which will dependably simulate the behavior of the three hurricanes in ten that turn out to be bad actors will not likely become operational in the near future. The most troubling problem in applying such a model-and it would have to be tested for years over a range of many storm types and conditions before becoming fully operational-is that the more complex the model is the more inscrutable the results are and the more difficult it becomes to identify the condition in which computational failure is probable. It would appear, therefore, that engineering approache to prediction and diagnostic procedures of evaluation will dominate the methodology of hurricane forecasting for a number of years to come.

  9. Pulsars for the Beginner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiLavore, Phillip; Wayland, James R.

    1971-01-01

    Presents the history of the discovery of pulsars, observations that have been made on pulsar radiation, and theories that have been presented for its presence and origin. Illustrations using pulsar's properties are presented in mechanics, electromagnetic radiation and thermodynamics. (DS)

  10. Pulsars for the Beginner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiLavore, Phillip; Wayland, James R.

    1971-01-01

    Presents the history of the discovery of pulsars, observations that have been made on pulsar radiation, and theories that have been presented for its presence and origin. Illustrations using pulsar's properties are presented in mechanics, electromagnetic radiation and thermodynamics. (DS)

  11. Remote sensing and vegetation stress detection - Problems and progress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duggin, M. J.; Whitehead, V.

    1983-01-01

    Although considerable progress has been made in applying remote sensing technology to vegetation monitoring, considerable problems still exist in the improvement of techniques for crop type discrimination, stress detection on a large scale, and stress quantification. In this paper, some of the problems remaining in the operational use of remote sensing technology for vegetation stress detection are discussed, and directions in which some of these problems might be solved are proposed.

  12. Pulsars - The New Celestial Clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backer, D. C.

    Pulsars A Brief History of Neutron Stars Standard Model of Pulsars Origin and Evolution of Isolated Neutron Stars Radio Astronomy Fundamentals Radiation Properties Radio Telescopes Radio Astronomy Receivers Propogation in the Interstellar Medium Search Techniques Pulsar Timing Systems Further Topics on Radio Wave Propagation Absorption Birefringence Scattering Solar Wind and Ionosphere Relativistic Delay in Solar System Potential Pulsar Timing Arrival Time Measurement Time Correction Space Correction Pulsar Parameter Estimation Rotation Noise Astrometry Binary, Millisecond and Globular Cluster Pulsars Origin and Evolution Keplerian Binary Pulsar Timing Relativistic Binary Pulsars Globular Cluster Pulsars Planets Around Pulsars Pulsar Timing Array Time Coordinate Space Coordinate Gravitational Wave Background Pulsar Timing Array Experiments References

  13. Anomalous Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malov, I. F.

    Many astrophysicists believe that Anomalous X-Ray Pulsars (AXP), Soft Gamma-Ray Repeaters (SGR), Rotational Radio Transients (RRAT), Compact Central Objects (CCO) and X-Ray Dim Isolated Neutron Stars (XDINS) belong to different classes of anomalous objects with neutron stars as the central bodies inducing all their observable peculiarities. We have shown earlier [1] that AXPs and SGRs could be described by the drift model in the framework of the preposition on usual properties of the central neutron star (rotation periods P 0.01 - 1 sec and, surface magnetic fields B ~ 10^11-10^13 G). Here we shall try to show that some differences of the sources under consideration will be explained by their geometry (particularly, by the angle β between their rotation and magnetic axes). If β <~ 100 (the aligned rotator) the drift waves at the outer layers of the neutron star magnetosphere should play a key role in the observable periodicity. For large values of β (the case of the nearly orthogonal rotator) an accretion from the surrounding medium (for example, from the relic disk) can cause some modulation and transient events in received radiation. Recently Kramer et al. [2] and Camilo et al. [3] have shown that AXPs J1810-197 and 1E 1547.0 - 5408 have both small angles β, that is these sources are nearly aligned rotators, and the drift model should be used for their description. On the other hand, Wang et al. [4] detected IR radiation from the cold disk around the isolated young X-ray pulsar 4U 0142+61. This was the first evidence of the disk-like matter around the neutron star. Probably there is the bimodality of anomalous pulsars. AXPs, SGRs and some radio transients belong to the population of aligned rotators with the angle between the rotation axis and the magnetic moment β < 200. These objects are described by the drift model, and their observed periods are connected with a periodicity of drift waves. Other sources have β ~ 900, and switching on's and switching off

  14. Progress on PRONGHORN Application to NGNP Related Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Dana A. Knoll

    2009-08-01

    We are developing a multiphysics simulation tool for Very High-Temperature gascooled Reactors (VHTR). The simulation tool, PRONGHORN, takes advantages of the Multiphysics Object-Oriented Simulation library, and is capable of solving multidimensional thermal-fluid and neutronics problems implicitly in parallel. Expensive Jacobian matrix formation is alleviated by the Jacobian-free Newton-Krylov method, and physics-based preconditioning is applied to improve the convergence. The initial development of PRONGHORN has been focused on the pebble bed corec concept. However, extensions required to simulate prismatic cores are underway. In this progress report we highlight progress on application of PRONGHORN to PBMR400 benchmark problems, extension and application of PRONGHORN to prismatic core reactors, and progress on simulations of 3-D transients.

  15. Remote Sensing And Vegetation Stress Detection: Problems And Progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duggin, M. J.; Whitehead, V.

    1983-08-01

    Although considerable progress has been made in applying Remote Sensing Technology to vegetation monitoring (e.g.1), considerable problems still exist in the improvement of techniques for crop type discrimination, stress detection on a large scale and stress quantification. In this paper, we discuss some of the problems remaining in the operational use of remote sensing technology for vegetation stress detection, and propose directions in which some of these problems might be solved. For reasons of brevity we shall be selective in those areas discussed.

  16. Towards a Realistic Pulsar Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalapotharakos, Constantinos; Kazanas, Demosthenes; Harding, Alice; Contopoulos, Ioannis

    2012-01-01

    We present the magnetic and electric field structures as well as the currents ami charge densities of pulsar magnetospberes which do not obey the ideal condition, E(raised dot) B = O. Since the acceleration of particles and the production of radiation requires the presence of an electric field component parallel to the magnetic field, E(sub ll) the structure of non-Ideal pulsar magnetospheres is intimately related to the production of pulsar radiation. Therefore, knowledge of the structure of non-Ideal pulsar maglletospheres is important because their comparison (including models for t he production of radiation) with observations will delineate the physics and the parameters underlying the pulsar radiation problem. We implement a variety of prescriptions that support nonzero values for E(sub ll) and explore their effects on the structure of the resulting magnetospheres. We produce families of solutions that span the entire range between the vacuum and the (ideal) Force-Free Electrodynamic solutions. We also compute the amount of dissipation as a fraction of the Poynting flux for pulsars of different angles between the rotation and magnetic axes and conclude that tltis is at most 20-40% (depending on t he non-ideal prescription) in the aligned rotator and 10% in the perpendicular one. We present also the limiting solutions with the property J = pc and discuss their possible implicatioll on the determination of the "on/ off" states of the intermittent pulsars. Finally, we find that solutions with values of J greater than those needed to null E(sub ll) locally produce oscillations, potentially observable in the data.

  17. TOWARD A REALISTIC PULSAR MAGNETOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Kalapotharakos, Constantinos; Kazanas, Demosthenes; Harding, Alice

    2012-04-10

    We present the magnetic and electric field structures and the currents and charge densities of pulsar magnetospheres that do not obey the ideal condition, E {center_dot} B = 0. Since the acceleration of particles and the production of radiation require the presence of an electric field component parallel to the magnetic field, E{sub ||}, the structure of non-ideal pulsar magnetospheres is intimately related to the production of pulsar radiation. Therefore, knowledge of the structure of non-ideal pulsar magnetospheres is important because their comparison (including models for the production of radiation) with observations will delineate the physics and the parameters underlying the pulsar radiation problem. We implement a variety of prescriptions that support non-zero values for E{sub ||} and explore their effects on the structure of the resulting magnetospheres. We produce families of solutions that span the entire range between the vacuum and the (ideal) force-free electrodynamic solutions. We also compute the amount of dissipation as a fraction of the Poynting flux for pulsars of different angles between the rotation and magnetic axes and conclude that this is at most 20%-40% (depending on the non-ideal prescription) in the aligned rotator and 10% in the perpendicular one. We present also the limiting solutions with the property J = {rho}c and discuss their possible implication on the determination of the 'on/off' states of the intermittent pulsars. Finally, we find that solutions with values of J greater than those needed to null E{sub ||} locally produce oscillations, potentially observable in the data.

  18. Pulsars and supernova remnants

    SciTech Connect

    Narayan, R.; Schaudt, K.J.

    1988-02-01

    With the recent discovery of the pulsar PSR 1951 + 22 in CTB 80, four pulsars are now known in supernova remnants (SNRs) of the plerion and composite classes. It is argued that this success rate of pulsar detections implies that young fast pulsars have long fan-beams that enable them to be seen from most directions. Based on calculations that use a pulsar luminosity model and allow for selection effects, it is suggested that the best SNRs for future pulsar searches are 3C 58, MSH 11-62, G24.7 + 0.6, and MSH 15-56. It is also concluded that the failure to detect pulsars in shell SNRs implies either that there are no pulsars in these SNRs or that the pulsars are unusually weak, possibly due to slow rotation or weak magnetic fields. 25 references.

  19. Ideal Magnetohydrodynamic Solution to the σ Problem in Crab-like Pulsar Winds and General Asymptotic Analysis of Magnetized Outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlahakis, Nektarios

    2004-01-01

    Using relativistic, steady, axisymmetric, ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), we analyze the super-Alfvénic regime of a pulsar wind by solving the momentum equation along the flow, as well as in the transfield direction. Employing a self-similar model, we demonstrate that ideal MHD can account for the full acceleration from high (>>1) to low (<<1) values of σ, the Poynting-to-matter energy flux ratio. The solutions also show a transition from a current-carrying to a return-current regime, partly satisfying the current-closure condition. We discuss the kind of boundary conditions near the base of the ideal MHD regime that are necessary in order to have the required transition from high to low σ in realistic distances and argue that this is a likely case for an equatorial wind. Examining the MHD asymptotics in general, we extend the analysis of Heyvaerts & Norman and Chiueh, Li, & Begelman by including two new elements: classes of quasi-conical and parabolic field line shapes that do not preclude an efficient and much faster than logarithmic acceleration, and the transition σ=σc after which the centrifugal forces (poloidal and azimuthal) are the dominant terms in the transfield force-balance equation.

  20. Binary and Millisecond Pulsars.

    PubMed

    Lorimer, Duncan R

    2008-01-01

    We review the main properties, demographics and applications of binary and millisecond radio pulsars. Our knowledge of these exciting objects has greatly increased in recent years, mainly due to successful surveys which have brought the known pulsar population to over 1800. There are now 83 binary and millisecond pulsars associated with the disk of our Galaxy, and a further 140 pulsars in 26 of the Galactic globular clusters. Recent highlights include the discovery of the young relativistic binary system PSR J1906+0746, a rejuvination in globular cluster pulsar research including growing numbers of pulsars with masses in excess of 1.5 M⊙, a precise measurement of relativistic spin precession in the double pulsar system and a Galactic millisecond pulsar in an eccentric (e = 0.44) orbit around an unevolved companion.

  1. Geodynamic Effects of Ocean Tides: Progress and Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richard, Ray

    1999-01-01

    Satellite altimetry, particularly Topex/Poseidon, has markedly improved our knowledge of global tides, thereby allowing significant progress on some longstanding problems in geodynamics. This paper reviews some of that progress. Emphasis is given to global-scale problems, particularly those falling within the mandate of the new IERS Special Bureau for Tides: angular momentum, gravitational field, geocenter motion. For this discussion I use primarily the new ocean tide solutions GOT99.2, CSR4.0, and TPXO.4 (for which G. Egbert has computed inverse-theoretic error estimates), and I concentrate on new results in angular momentum and gravity and their solid-earth implications. One example is a new estimate of the effective tidal Q at the M_2 frequency, based on combining these ocean models with tidal estimates from satellite laser ranging. Three especially intractable problems are also addressed: (1) determining long-period tides in the Arctic [large unknown effect on the inertia tensor, particularly for Mf]; (2) determining the global psi_l tide [large unknown effect on interpretations of gravimetry for the near-diurnal free wobble]; and (3) determining radiational tides [large unknown temporal variations at important frequencies]. Problems (2) and (3) are related.

  2. Three P's in Cosmology: Progress, Problems, and Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolgov, A. D.

    2014-04-01

    A review on the development of cosmology for a diverse audience is presented. The first historical part is devoted to the works done half a century ago with an emphasize to those performed in Russia (or more precisely, in the Soviet Union). Then the recent data on the cosmic microwave background raditation is discussed and the impact of these data on the neutrino mass and the number of neutrino species is considered. The latter is compared with the results obtained from the big bang nucleosynthesis. Next, a short description and history of the cosmological inflation is presented. The basics of the standard cosmological model and the problems of dark matter and dark energy are considered at the end of the fist section entitled "Progress". In the next short section, "Problems", one can find a list of the unsolved cosmological and astrophysical problems, which is by no means fully comprehensive. The last supershort section contains a few words about the perspectives of future development.

  3. Search for Millisecond Pulsars for the Pulsar Timing Array project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milia, S.

    2012-03-01

    pulsar and Earth locations, as well as anywhere along the line­of­sight from the Earth and each of the pulsars. This in turn produces a modulation in the rhythm of the TOAs of the pulses from all the pulsars, with the variation in the TOAs having a strength which is proportional to the amplitude of the GW and a periodicity related to the frequency of the GW. Of course if they are caused by a common physical phenomenon (like a passing­by GW), these variations of the TOAs are expected to be somehow correlated between the various pulsars, allowing us to disentangle this effect from other effects which could mimic the occurrence of such modulation, like intrinsic irregularities in the rotation of a pulsar, changing interstellar medium along the line of sight, error in the reference clocks used for determining the TOAs and so on.The consideration of the aforementioned possible sources of additional effects which could mask the signature of a genuine GW shows that a safe direct detection of a GW cannot involve the observation and timing of a single pulsar. Instead, it has been theoretically shown that high precision timing over a 5­10 years data­span of a network of suitable MSPs forming a so­ called Pulsar Timing Array (PTA) ­ in which the pulsars are used as the endpoints of arms of a huge cosmic GW detector ­ would allow us to overcome the previous problems and open the possibility of a direct detection of GWs. In particular such apparatus is able to detect GWs in the frequency range between 10 ­9 and 10­7 Hz, with the best sensitivity around the nanoHz. Given the frequency range of operation, the most favorable source of GWs for a PTA appears to be the cosmological background of GWs produced by the coalescence of supermassive binary black­holes in the early stages of the Universe evolution, at redshift around 1­2. In order to set up a suitable PTA it is necessary on one hand to search for new MSPs having the required clock stability and

  4. Turbulent Magnetic Relaxation in Pulsar Wind Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zrake, Jonathan; Arons, Jonathan

    2017-09-01

    We present a model for magnetic energy dissipation in a pulsar wind nebula. A better understanding of this process is required to assess the likelihood that certain astrophysical transients may be powered by the spin-down of a “millisecond magnetar.” Examples include superluminous supernovae, gamma-ray bursts, and anticipated electromagnetic counterparts to gravitational wave detections of binary neutron star coalescence. Our model leverages recent progress in the theory of turbulent magnetic relaxation to specify a dissipative closure of the stationary magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) wind equations, yielding predictions of the magnetic energy dissipation rate throughout the nebula. Synchrotron losses are self-consistently treated. To demonstrate the model’s efficacy, we show that it can reproduce many features of the Crab Nebula, including its expansion speed, radiative efficiency, peak photon energy, and mean magnetic field strength. Unlike ideal MHD models of the Crab (which lead to the so-called σ-problem), our model accounts for the transition from ultra to weakly magnetized plasma flow and for the associated heating of relativistic electrons. We discuss how the predicted heating rates may be utilized to improve upon models of particle transport and acceleration in pulsar wind nebulae. We also discuss implications for the Crab Nebula’s γ-ray flares, and point out potential modifications to models of astrophysical transients invoking the spin-down of a millisecond magnetar.

  5. Solving Large Problems Quickly: Progress in 2001-2003

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mowry, Todd C.; Colohan, Christopher B.; Brown, Angela Demke; Steffan, J. Gregory; Zhai, Antonia

    2004-01-01

    This document describes the progress we have made and the lessons we have learned in 2001 through 2003 under the NASA grant entitled "Solving Important Problems Faster". The long-term goal of this research is to accelerate large, irregular scientific applications which have enormous data sets and which are difficult to parallelize. To accomplish this goal, we are exploring two complementary techniques: (i) using compiler-inserted prefetching to automatically hide the I/O latency of accessing these large data sets from disk; and (ii) using thread-level data speculation to enable the optimistic parallelization of applications despite uncertainty as to whether data dependences exist between the resulting threads which would normally make them unsafe to execute in parallel. Overall, we made significant progress in 2001 through 2003, and the project has gone well.

  6. Ensemble Pulsar Time Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, D. S.; Gao, Y. P.; Zhao, S. H.

    2016-05-01

    Millisecond pulsars can generate another type of time scale that is totally independent of the atomic time scale, because the physical mechanisms of the pulsar time scale and the atomic time scale are quite different from each other. Usually the pulsar timing observational data are not evenly sampled, and the internals between data points range from several hours to more than half a month. What's more, these data sets are sparse. And all these make it difficult to generate an ensemble pulsar time scale. Hence, a new algorithm to calculate the ensemble pulsar time scale is proposed. Firstly, we use cubic spline interpolation to densify the data set, and make the intervals between data points even. Then, we employ the Vondrak filter to smooth the data set, and get rid of high-frequency noise, finally adopt the weighted average method to generate the ensemble pulsar time scale. The pulsar timing residuals represent clock difference between the pulsar time and atomic time, and the high precision pulsar timing data mean the clock difference measurement between the pulsar time and atomic time with a high signal to noise ratio, which is fundamental to generate pulsar time. We use the latest released NANOGRAV (North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves) 9-year data set to generate the ensemble pulsar time scale. This data set is from the newest NANOGRAV data release, which includes 9-year observational data of 37 millisecond pulsars using the 100-meter Green Bank telescope and 305-meter Arecibo telescope. We find that the algorithm used in this paper can lower the influence caused by noises in timing residuals, and improve long-term stability of pulsar time. Results show that the long-term (> 1 yr) frequency stability of the pulsar time is better than 3.4×10-15.

  7. The anomalous X-ray pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Rui; Li, Xiangdong

    2002-03-01

    In the last few years it has been recognized that a group of X-ray pulsars have peculiar properties which set them apart from the majority of accreting pulars in X-ray binaries. They are called the Anomalous X-ray Pulsars (AXP). These objects are characterized by very soft X-ray spectra with low and steady X-ray fluxes, narrow-distributed spin periods, steady spin-down, no optical/infrared counterparts. Some of them may associate with supernova remnants. The nature of AXP remains mysterious. It has been suggested that AXP are accreting neutron stars, or solitary "magnetars", neutron stars with super strong magnetic fields (≍1010-1011T). In this paper we review the recent progress in the studies of AXP, and discuss the possible implications from comparison of AXP with other neutron stars, such as radio pulsars, radio quiet X-ray pulsar candidates and soft γ-ray repeaters.

  8. Problems and progress in aeroelasticity for interdisciplinary design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yates, E. Carson, Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Some problems and progress in the development of aerodynamic and aeroelastic computational capabilities are reviewed with emphasis on needs for use in current interdisciplinary design procedures as well as for stand-alone analyses. The primary focus is on integral-equation methods which are well suited for general, accurate, efficient, and unified treatment of flow around vehicles having arbitrary shapes, motions, and deformations at subsonic, transonic, and supersonic speeds up to high angles of attack. Computational methods for potential flows and viscous flows are discussed, and some applications are shown. Calculation of steady and unsteady aeroelastic characteristics of aircraft with nonlinear aerodynamic behavior is also addressed briefly.

  9. The Future of Pulsar Timing Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stappers, B. W.

    Significant advances have been made in the sensitivity of pulsar timing arrays for the detection of gravitational waves in the last decade. This presentation looked forward to consider where the development of pulsar timing arrays might go as we head towards the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) and then beyond. I reviewed where progress needs to be made in terms of sensitivity to gravitational waves, including improvements to existing observing approaches and new telescopes such as MeerKAT and FAST and techniques like LEAP. The dramatic increase in the number of millisecond pulsars is presented and how that might affect progress towards a first detection is discussed. Developments in analytic techniques were also discussed, including the removal of interstellar medium effects, red noise and pulse profile variations. A summary of how the SKA can contribute through an increased millisecond pulsar population and pulsar timing sensitivity was presented. With the likelihood that the SKA will implement some form of Key Science Project approach, some ideas of how will this affect how the International Pulsar Timing Array effort and how it might evolve into a KSP were discussed.

  10. Binary and Millisecond Pulsars.

    PubMed

    Lorimer, Duncan R

    2005-01-01

    We review the main properties, demographics and applications of binary and millisecond radio pulsars. Our knowledge of these exciting objects has greatly increased in recent years, mainly due to successful surveys which have brought the known pulsar population to over 1700. There are now 80 binary and millisecond pulsars associated with the disk of our Galaxy, and a further 103 pulsars in 24 of the Galactic globular clusters. Recent highlights have been the discovery of the first ever double pulsar system and a recent flurry of discoveries in globular clusters, in particular Terzan 5.

  11. Pulsar time scale

    SciTech Connect

    Il'in, V.G.; Llyasov, Yu.P.; Kuz'min, A.D.; Pushkin, S.B.; Palii, G.N.; Shabanova, T.V.; Shchitov, Yu.P.

    1984-05-01

    In this article a new time scale is proposed, that of pulsar time PT which is based on the regular sequence of time intervals between pulses of a pulsar's radio emissions. In discussing variations in the arrival times of pulsar radio emissions, three kinds of variations in the radiation periods are described. PSR 0834 + 06 is used as the basic reference pulsar. Time scales are also determined for reference pulsars PSR 0905 + 08 and 1919 + 21. The initial parameters for the three reference pulsars needed for managing a PT scale are presented. The basic PT scale is defined as the continuous sequence of time intervals between radio-emission pulses of the basic reference pulsar.

  12. A Pulsar Eases Off the Brakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-10-01

    pulsar dropped suddenly by 14.5 after the outburst a change thats unprecedented both in how large and how long-lived its been.Why is this a problem? Many of the quoted properties of pulsars (like ages, magnetic fields, and luminosities) are determined based on models that envision pulsars as magnetic dipoles in a vacuum. But if this is the case, a pulsars braking index should be constant or, in more realistic scenarios, we might expect it to change slightly over the span of thousands of years. The fact that PSR 18460258 underwent such a drastic change during its outburst poses a significant challenge to these models of pulsar behavior and evolution.CitationR. F. Archibald et al 2015 ApJ 810 67. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/810/1/67

  13. Using expectations to monitor robotic progress and recover from problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurup, Unmesh; Lebiere, Christian; Stentz, Anthony; Hebert, Martial

    2013-05-01

    How does a robot know when something goes wrong? Our research answers this question by leveraging expectations - predictions about the immediate future - and using the mismatch between the expectations and the external world to monitor the robot's progress. We use the cognitive architecture ACT-R (Adaptive Control of Thought - Rational) to learn the associations between the current state of the robot and the world, the action to be performed in the world, and the future state of the world. These associations are used to generate expectations that are then matched by the architecture with the next state of the world. A significant mismatch between these expectations and the actual state of the world indicate a problem possibly resulting from unexpected consequences of the robot's actions, unforeseen changes in the environment or unanticipated actions of other agents. When a problem is detected, the recovery model can suggest a number of recovery options. If the situation is unknown, that is, the mismatch between expectations and the world is novel, the robot can use a recovery solution from a set of heuristic options. When a recovery option is successfully applied, the robot learns to associate that recovery option with the mismatch. When the same problem is encountered later, the robot can apply the learned recovery solution rather than using the heuristics or randomly exploring the space of recovery solutions. We present results from execution monitoring and recovery performed during an assessment conducted at the Combined Arms Collective Training Facility (CACTF) at Fort Indiantown Gap.

  14. Monitoring the progress of anytime problem-solving

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, E.A.; Zilberstein, S.

    1996-12-31

    Anytime algorithms offer a tradeoff between solution quality and computation time that has proved useful in applying artificial intelligence techniques to time-critical problems. To exploit this tradeoff, a system must be able to determine the best time to stop deliberation and act on the currently available solution. When the rate of improvement of solution quality is uncertain, monitoring the progress of the algorithm can improve the utility of the system. This paper introduces a technique for run-time monitoring of anytime algorithms that is sensitive to the variance of the algorithm`s performance, the time-dependent utility of a solution, the ability of the run-time monitor to estimate the quality of the currently available solution, and the cost of monitoring. The paper examines the conditions under which the technique is optimal and demonstrates its applicability.

  15. High-energy pulsar models: Developments and new questions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venter, C.; Harding, A. K.

    2014-03-01

    The past few years have seen a major advance in observational knowledge of high-energy (HE) pulsars. The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) and {AGILE} have increased the number of known γ-ray pulsars by an order of magnitude, its members being divided roughly equally among millisecond pulsars (MSPs), young radio-loud pulsars, and young radio-quiet pulsars. Many new and diverse emission characteristics are being measured, while radio and X-ray follow-up observations increase the pulsar detection rate and enrich our multiwavelength picture of these extreme sources. The wealth of new data has provided impetus for further development and improvement of existing theoretical pulsar models. Geometric light curve (LC) modelling has uncovered three broad classes into which HE pulsars fall: those where the radio profile leads, is aligned with, or lags the γ-ray profile. For example, the original MSP and original black widow system are members of the second class, requiring co-located emission regions and thereby breaking with traditional notions of radio emission origin. These models imply narrow accelerator gaps in the outer magnetosphere, indicating copious pair production even in MSP magnetospheres that were previously thought to be pair-starved. The increased quality and variety of the LCs necessitate construction of ever more sophisticated models. We will review progress in global magnetosphere solutions which specify a finite conductivity on field lines above the stellar surface, filling the gap between the standard vacuum and force-free (FF; plasma-filled) models. The possibility of deriving phase-resolved spectra for the brightest pulsars, coupled with the fact that the HE pulsar population is sizable enough to allow sampling of various pulsar geometries, will enable much more stringent testing of future radiation models. Reproduction of the observed phase-resolved behavior of this disparate group will be one of the next frontiers in pulsar science, impacting on our

  16. High-Energy Pulsar Models: Developments and New Questions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venter, C.; Harding, A. K.

    2014-01-01

    The past few years have seen a major advance in observational knowledge of high-energy (HE) pulsars. The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) and AGILE have increased the number of known gamma-ray pulsars by an order of magnitude, its members being divided roughly equally among millisecond pulsars (MSPs), young radio-loud pulsars, and young radio-quiet pulsars. Many new and diverse emission characteristics are being measured, while radio and X-ray follow-up observations increase the pulsar detection rate and enrich our multiwavelength picture of these extreme sources. The wealth of new data has provided impetus for further development and improvement of existing theoretical pulsar models. Geometric light curve (LC) modelling has uncovered three broad classes into which HE pulsars fall: those where the radio profile leads, is aligned with, or lags the gamma-ray profile. For example, the original MSP and original black widow system are members of the second class, requiring co-located emission regions and thereby breaking with traditional notions of radio emission origin. These models imply narrow accelerator gaps in the outer magnetosphere, indicating copious pair production even in MSP magnetospheres that were previously thought to be pair-starved. The increased quality and variety of the LCs necessitate construction of ever more sophisticated models. We will review progress in global magnetosphere solutions which specify a finite conductivity on field lines above the stellar surface, filling the gap between the standard vacuum and force-free (FF; plasma-filled) models. The possibility of deriving phase-resolved spectra for the brightest pulsars, coupled with the fact that the HE pulsar population is sizable enough to allow sampling of various pulsar geometries, will enable much more stringent testing of future radiation models. Reproduction of the observed phase-resolved behavior of this disparate group will be one of the next frontiers in pulsar science, impacting on

  17. Application of the Gaussian mixture model in pulsar astronomy - pulsar classification and candidates ranking for the Fermi 2FGL catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, K. J.; Guillemot, L.; Yue, Y. L.; Kramer, M.; Champion, D. J.

    2012-08-01

    Machine learning, algorithms designed to extract empirical knowledge from data, can be used to classify data, which is one of the most common tasks in observational astronomy. In this paper, we focus on Bayesian data classification algorithms using the Gaussian mixture model and show two applications in pulsar astronomy. After reviewing the Gaussian mixture model and the related expectation-maximization algorithm, we present a data classification method using the Neyman-Pearson test. To demonstrate the method, we apply the algorithm to two classification problems. First, it is applied to the well-known period-period derivative diagram, where we find that the pulsar distribution can be modelled with six Gaussian clusters, with two clusters for millisecond pulsars (recycled pulsars) and the rest for normal pulsars. From this distribution, we derive an empirical definition for millisecond pulsars as {P\\dot;}/{10-17}≤3.23({P}/{100ms})-2.34. The two millisecond pulsar clusters may have different evolutionary origins, since the companion stars to these pulsars in the two clusters show different chemical compositions. Four clusters are found for normal pulsars. Possible implications for these clusters are also discussed. Our second example is to calculate the likelihood of unidentified Fermi point sources being pulsars and rank them accordingly. In the ranked point-source list, the top 5 per cent sources contain 50 per cent known pulsars, the top 50 per cent contain 99 per cent known pulsars and no known active galaxy (the other major population) appears in the top 6 per cent. Such a ranked list can be used to help the future follow-up observations for finding pulsars in unidentified Fermi point sources.

  18. Gamma-Ray Pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice K.

    2011-01-01

    The Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has revolutionized the study of pulsar physics with the detection of over 80 gamma-ray pulsars. Several new populations have been discovered, including 24 radio quiet pulsars found through gamma-ray pulsations alone and about 20 millisecond gamma-ray pulsars. The gamma-ray pulsations from millisecond pulsars were discovered by both folding at periods of known radio millisecond pulsars or by detecting them as gamma-ray sources that are followed up by radio pulsar searches. The second method has resulted in a phenomenally successful synergy, with -35 new radio MSPs (to date) having been discovered at Fermi unidentified source locations and the gamma-ray pulsations having then been detected in a number of these using the radio timing solutions. The higher sensitivity and larger energy range of the Fermi Large Area Telescope has produced detailed energy-dependent light curves and phase-resolved spectroscopy on brighter pulsars, that have ruled out polar cap models as the major source of the emission in favor of outer magnetosphere accelerators. The large number of gamma-ray pulsars now allows for the first time meaningful population and sub-population studies that are revealing surprising properties of these fascinating sources.

  19. Revised Pulsar Spindown

    SciTech Connect

    Contopoulos, Ioannis; Spitkovsky, Anatoly; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2005-12-14

    We address the issue of electromagnetic pulsar spindown by combining our experience from the two limiting idealized cases which have been studied in great extent in the past: that of an aligned rotator where ideal MHD conditions apply, and that of a misaligned rotator in vacuum. We construct a spindown formula that takes into account the misalignment of the magnetic and rotation axes, and the magnetospheric particle acceleration gaps. We show that near the death line aligned rotators spin down much slower than orthogonal ones. In order to test this approach, we use a simple Monte Carlo method to simulate the evolution of pulsars and find a good fit to the observed pulsar distribution in the P-{dot P} diagram without invoking magnetic field decay. Our model may also account for individual pulsars spinning down with braking index n < 3, by allowing the corotating part of the magnetosphere to end inside the light cylinder. We discuss the role of magnetic reconnection in determining the pulsar braking index. We show, however, that n {approx} 3 remains a good approximation for the pulsar population as a whole. Moreover, we predict that pulsars near the death line have braking index values n > 3, and that the older pulsar population has preferentially smaller magnetic inclination angles. We discuss possible signatures of such alignment in the existing pulsar data.

  20. Construction and Identification of Profiles of Curvature Radiation of Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avdyushev, V. A.; Bordovitsyn, V. A.; Grokhovskaya, A. A.

    2017-03-01

    Parameters of the observed radiation of pulsars are identified with the help of numerical simulation within the framework of the nonlinear least squares problem. With the help of the obtained parameter values, we have constructed profiles of radiation and indicatrices of the angular distribution of the instantaneous radiated power for experimentally observed pulsars.

  1. Ensemble Pulsar Time Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong-shan, Yin; Yu-ping, Gao; Shu-hong, Zhao

    2017-07-01

    Millisecond pulsars can generate another type of time scale that is totally independent of the atomic time scale, because the physical mechanisms of the pulsar time scale and the atomic time scale are quite different from each other. Usually the pulsar timing observations are not evenly sampled, and the internals between two data points range from several hours to more than half a month. Further more, these data sets are sparse. All this makes it difficult to generate an ensemble pulsar time scale. Hence, a new algorithm to calculate the ensemble pulsar time scale is proposed. Firstly, a cubic spline interpolation is used to densify the data set, and make the intervals between data points uniform. Then, the Vondrak filter is employed to smooth the data set, and get rid of the high-frequency noises, and finally the weighted average method is adopted to generate the ensemble pulsar time scale. The newly released NANOGRAV (North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves) 9-year data set is used to generate the ensemble pulsar time scale. This data set includes the 9-year observational data of 37 millisecond pulsars observed by the 100-meter Green Bank telescope and the 305-meter Arecibo telescope. It is found that the algorithm used in this paper can reduce effectively the influence caused by the noises in pulsar timing residuals, and improve the long-term stability of the ensemble pulsar time scale. Results indicate that the long-term (> 1 yr) stability of the ensemble pulsar time scale is better than 3.4 × 10-15.

  2. Arecibo Pulsar Highlights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seymour, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Here we present some of the recent interesting pulsar research that has been conducted from the Arecibo Observatory (AO). Many of these results are only possible because of the unique capabilities of AO's 305 meter telescope. Along with this, we state several possible improvements to AO's capabilities that would aid pulsar studies in the immediate future.

  3. Observational properties of pulsars.

    PubMed

    Manchester, R N

    2004-04-23

    Pulsars are remarkable clocklike celestial sources that are believed to be rotating neutron stars formed in supernova explosions. They are valuable tools for investigations into topics such as neutron star interiors, globular cluster dynamics, the structure of the interstellar medium, and gravitational physics. Searches at radio and x-ray wavelengths over the past 5 years have resulted in a large increase in the number of known pulsars and the discovery of new populations of pulsars, posing challenges to theories of binary and stellar evolution. Recent images at radio, optical, and x-ray wavelengths have revealed structures resulting from the interaction of pulsar winds with the surrounding interstellar medium, giving new insights into the physics of pulsars.

  4. Glitches in southern pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, N.; Manchester, R. N.; Pace, R. T.; Bailes, M.; Kaspi, V. M.; Stappers, B. W.; Lyne, A. G.

    2000-10-01

    Timing observations of 40 mostly young pulsars using the ATNF Parkes radio telescope between 1990 January and 1998 December are reported. In total, 20 previously unreported glitches and 10 other glitches were detected in 11 pulsars. These included 12 glitches in PSR J1341-6220, corresponding to a glitch rate of 1.5 glitches per year. We also detected the largest known glitch, in PSR J1614-5047, with Δνgν~6.5×10-6, where ν=1/P is the pulse frequency. Glitch parameters were determined both by extrapolating timing solutions to interglitch intervals and by phase-coherent timing fits across the glitch(es). These fits also give improved positions and dispersion measures for many of the pulsars. Analysis of glitch parameters, both from this work and from previously published results, shows that most glitches have a fractional amplitude Δνgν of between 10-8 and 10-6. There is no consistent relationship between glitch amplitude and the time since the previous glitch or the time to the following glitch, either for the ensemble or for individual pulsars. As previously recognized, the largest glitch activity is seen in pulsars with ages of order 104yr, but for about 30per cent of such pulsars, no glitches were detected in the 8-year data span. There is some evidence for a new type of timing irregularity in which there is a significant increase in pulse frequency over a few days, accompanied by a decrease in the magnitude of the slow-down rate. Fits of an exponential recovery to post-glitch data show that for most older pulsars, only a small fraction of the glitch decays. In some younger pulsars a large fraction of the glitch decays, but in others there is very little decay. Apart from the Crab pulsar, there is no clear dependence of recovery time-scale on pulsar age.

  5. Nuclear DNA Amounts in Angiosperms: Progress, Problems and Prospects

    PubMed Central

    BENNETT, M. D.; LEITCH, I. J.

    2005-01-01

    CONTENTSINTRODUCTION45PROGRESS46    Improved systematic representation (species and families)46        (i) First estimates for species46        (ii) First estimates for families47PROBLEMS48    Geographical representation and distribution48    Plant life form48    Obsolescence time bomb49    Errors and inexactitudes49    Genome size, ‘complete’ genome sequencing, and, the euchromatic genome50    The completely sequenced genome50    Weeding out erroneous data52    What is the smallest reliable C-value for an angiosperm?52    What is the minimum C-value for a free-living angiosperm and other free-living organisms?53PROSPECTS FOR THE NEXT TEN YEARS54    Holistic genomics55LITERATURE CITED56APPENDIX59    Notes to the Appendix59    Original references for DNA values89 • Background The nuclear DNA amount in an unreplicated haploid chromosome complement (1C-value) is a key diversity character with many uses. Angiosperm C-values have been listed for reference purposes since 1976, and pooled in an electronic database since 1997 (http://www.kew.org/cval/homepage). Such lists are cited frequently and provide data for many comparative studies. The last compilation was published in 2000, so a further supplementary list is timely to monitor progress against targets set at the first plant genome size workshop in 1997 and to facilitate new goal setting. • Scope The present work lists DNA C-values for 804 species including first values for 628 species from 88 original sources, not included in any previous compilation, plus additional values for 176 species included in a previous compilation. • Conclusions 1998–2002 saw striking progress in our knowledge of angiosperm C-values. At least 1700 first values for species were measured (the most in any five-year period) and familial representation rose from 30 % to 50 %. The loss of many

  6. [Charles Darwin and the problem of evolutionary progress].

    PubMed

    Iordanskiĭ, N N

    2010-01-01

    According to Ch. Darwin's evolutionary theory, evolutionary progress (interpreted as morpho-physiological progress or arogenesis in recent terminology) is one of logical results of natural selection. At the same time, natural selection does not hold any factors especially promoting evolutionary progress. Darwin emphasized that the pattern of evolutionary changes depends on organism nature more than on the pattern of environment changes. Arogenesis specificity is determined by organization of rigorous biological systems - integral organisms. Onward progressive development is determined by fundamental features of living organisms: metabolism and homeostasis. The concept of social Darwinism differs fundamentally from Darwin's ideas about the most important role of social instincts in progress of mankind. Competition and selection play secondary role in socio-cultural progress of human society.

  7. Gamma ray emission from radio pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romani, Roger W.

    1994-01-01

    While the proposed research received partial funding under this grant, during the term of support substantial progress was made on the development of a new model for the emission of gamma-rays from isolated rotation-powered pulsars. In phase one of the work, we showed how a modified version of the 'outer gap' model of pulsar emission could reproduce the double peaked profiles seen in CGRO pulsar observations. This work also demonstrated the spectrum of gap radiation varies significantly with position in the magnetosphere, and produced approximate computations of the emission from outer magnetosphere gap zones, including primary curvature radiation, gamma - gamma pair production and synchrotron radiation and inverse Compton scattering by the resulting secondary particles. This work was followed in phase two by a more complete treatment of the geometry of the radiation zone, and improved connections with observations at other wavelengths.

  8. Radio efficiency of pulsars

    SciTech Connect

    Szary, Andrzej; Melikidze, George I.; Gil, Janusz; Zhang, Bing; Xu, Ren-Xin E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu

    2014-03-20

    We investigate radio emission efficiency, ξ, of pulsars and report a near-linear inverse correlation between ξ and the spin-down power, E-dot , as well as a near-linear correlation between ξ and pulsar age, τ. This is a consequence of very weak, if any, dependences of radio luminosity, L, on pulsar period, P, and the period derivative, P-dot , in contrast to X-ray or γ-ray emission luminosities. The analysis of radio fluxes suggests that these correlations are not due to a selection effect, but are intrinsic to the pulsar radio emission physics. We have found that, although with a large variance, the radio luminosity of pulsars is ≈10{sup 29} erg s{sup –1}, regardless of the position in the P-- P-dot diagram. Within such a picture, a model-independent statement can be made that the death line of radio pulsars corresponds to an upper limit in the efficiency of radio emission. If we introduce the maximum value for radio efficiency into the Monte Carlo-based population syntheses we can reproduce the observed sample using the random luminosity model. Using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test on a synthetic flux distribution reveals a high probability of reproducing the observed distribution. Our results suggest that the plasma responsible for generating radio emission is produced under similar conditions regardless of pulsar age, dipolar magnetic field strength, and spin-down rate. The magnetic fields near the pulsar surface are likely dominated by crust-anchored, magnetic anomalies, which do not significantly differ among pulsars, leading to similar conditions for generating electron-positron pairs necessary to power radio emission.

  9. Stellar evolution and pulsars.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, H.-Y.

    1972-01-01

    It has been found that pulsars are rotating magnetic neutron stars, which are created during catastrophic collapses of old stars whose nuclear fuel has long since been used up. The maximum size of pulsars, based on the fastest rotation period of 33 msec, cannot exceed 100 km. The densest star the theory predicts is the neutron star. Its diameter is only 10 km. The processes producing radiation from pulsars are discussed, giving attention to a process similar to that by which a klystron operates and to a process based on a maser mechanism.

  10. Pulsar Artist Concept

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-01-06

    This artist's concept shows a pulsar, which is like a lighthouse, as its light appears in regular pulses as it rotates. Pulsars are dense remnants of exploded stars, and are part of a class of objects called neutron stars. Magnetars are different kinds of neutron stars -- they have violent, high-energy outbursts of X-ray and gamma ray light. A mysterious object called PSR J1119-6127 has been seen behaving as both a pulsar and a magnetar, suggesting that it could be a "missing link" between these objects. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21085

  11. Pulsar Candidate in Andromeda

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-03-23

    NASA's Nuclear Spectroscope Telescope Array, or NuSTAR, has identified a candidate pulsar in Andromeda -- the nearest large galaxy to the Milky Way. This likely pulsar is brighter at high energies than the Andromeda galaxy's entire black hole population. The inset image shows the pulsar candidate in blue, as seen in X-ray light by NuSTAR. The background image of Andromeda was taken by NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer in ultraviolet light. Andromeda is a spiral galaxy like our Milky Way but larger in size. It lies 2.5 million light-years away in the Andromeda constellation. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20970

  12. Pulsar Search Results from the Arecibo Remote Command Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Alejandro; Stovall, K.; Banaszak, S. A.; Becker, A.; Biwer, C. M.; Boehler, K.; Caballero, K.; Christy, B.; Cohen, S.; Crawford, F.; Cuellar, A.; Danford, A.; Dartez, L. P.; Day, D.; Flanigan, J. D.; Gonzalez, A.; Gustavson, K.; Handzo, E.; Hinojosa, J.; Jenet, F.; Kaplan, D. L.; Kayal, K.; Lommen, A. N.; Longoria, C.; Lopez, J.; Lunsford, G.; Mahany, N.; Martinez, J.; Mata, A.; Miller, A.; Murray, J.; Pankow, C.; Ramirez, I.; Reser, J.; Rojas, P.; Rohr, M.; Rolph, K.; Rose, C.; Rudnik, P.; Siemens, X.; Tellez, A.; Tillman, N.; Walker, A.; Wells, B. L.; Zermeno, A.; Consortium, GBNCC; Consortium, PALFA; Consortium, GBTDrift; Consortium, AO327

    2014-01-01

    The Arecibo Remote Command Center (ARCC) at the University of Texas at Brownsville, in collaboration with various Universities, is currently engaged in searching through ongoing radio telescope surveys for radio pulsars. ARCC is an integrated research/education program that allows students at the high school and undergraduate level to be directly involved with the research at the Arecibo and Green Bank radio telescopes. We discuss the progress of our search effort with PRESTO pulsar search pipelines. Web based tools have been developed so that high school, undergraduate, and graduate students could rank the pulsar candidates created by PRESTO pipelines. We describe these tools and present our current discoveries.

  13. THE PECULIAR PULSAR POPULATION OF THE CENTRAL PARSEC

    SciTech Connect

    Dexter, Jason; O'Leary, Ryan M. E-mail: oleary@berkeley.edu

    2014-03-01

    Pulsars orbiting the Galactic center black hole, Sgr A*, would be potential probes of its mass, distance, and spin, and may even be used to test general relativity. Despite predictions of large populations of both ordinary and millisecond pulsars in the Galactic center, none have been detected within 25 pc by deep radio surveys. One explanation has been that hyperstrong temporal scattering prevents pulsar detections, but the recent discovery of radio pulsations from a highly magnetized neutron star (magnetar) within 0.1 pc shows that the temporal scattering is much weaker than predicted. We argue that an intrinsic deficit in the ordinary pulsar population is the most likely reason for the lack of detections to date: a ''missing pulsar problem'' in the Galactic center. In contrast, we show that the discovery of a single magnetar implies efficient magnetar formation in the region. If the massive stars in the central parsec form magnetars rather than ordinary pulsars, their short lifetimes could explain the missing pulsars. Efficient magnetar formation could be caused by strongly magnetized progenitors, or could be further evidence of a top-heavy initial mass function. Furthermore, current high-frequency surveys should already be able to detect bright millisecond pulsars, given the measured degree of temporal scattering.

  14. Pulsar glitches: the crust is not enough.

    PubMed

    Andersson, N; Glampedakis, K; Ho, W C G; Espinoza, C M

    2012-12-14

    Pulsar glitches are traditionally viewed as a manifestation of vortex dynamics associated with a neutron superfluid reservoir confined to the inner crust of the star. In this Letter we show that the nondissipative entrainment coupling between the neutron superfluid and the nuclear lattice leads to a less mobile crust superfluid, effectively reducing the moment of inertia associated with the angular momentum reservoir. Combining the latest observational data for prolific glitching pulsars with theoretical results for the crust entrainment, we find that the required superfluid reservoir exceeds that available in the crust. This challenges our understanding of the glitch phenomenon, and we discuss possible resolutions to the problem.

  15. Geriatric Pulsar Still Kicking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-02-01

    The oldest isolated pulsar ever detected in X-rays has been found with NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. This very old and exotic object turns out to be surprisingly active. The pulsar, PSR J0108-1431 (J0108 for short) is about 200 million years old. Among isolated pulsars -- ones that have not been spun-up in a binary system -- it is over 10 times older than the previous record holder with an X-ray detection. At a distance of 770 light years, it is one of the nearest pulsars known. Pulsars are born when stars that are much more massive than the Sun collapse in supernova explosions, leaving behind a small, incredibly weighty core, known as a neutron star. At birth, these neutron stars, which contain the densest material known in the Universe, are spinning rapidly, up to a hundred revolutions per second. As the rotating beams of their radiation are seen as pulses by distant observers, similar to a lighthouse beam, astronomers call them "pulsars". Astronomers observe a gradual slowing of the rotation of the pulsars as they radiate energy away. Radio observations of J0108 show it to be one of the oldest and faintest pulsars known, spinning only slightly faster than one revolution per second. The surprise came when a team of astronomers led by George Pavlov of Penn State University observed J0108 in X-rays with Chandra. They found that it glows much brighter in X-rays than was expected for a pulsar of such advanced years. People Who Read This Also Read... Chandra Data Reveal Rapidly Whirling Black Holes Milky Way’s Giant Black Hole Awoke from Slumber 300 Years Ago Erratic Black Hole Regulates Itself Celebrate the International Year of Astronomy Some of the energy that J0108 is losing as it spins more slowly is converted into X-ray radiation. The efficiency of this process for J0108 is found to be higher than for any other known pulsar. "This pulsar is pumping out high-energy radiation much more efficiently than its younger cousins," said Pavlov. "So, although it

  16. Wide Band Artificial Pulsar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, Zackary

    2017-01-01

    The Wide Band Artificial Pulsar (WBAP) is an instrument verification device designed and built by the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Green Bank, West Virgina. The site currently operates the Green Bank Ultimate Pulsar Processing Instrument (GUPPI) and the Versatile Green Bank Astronomical Spectrometer (VEGAS) digital backends for their radio telescopes. The commissioning and continued support for these sophisticated backends has demonstrated a need for a device capable of producing an accurate artificial pulsar signal. The WBAP is designed to provide a very close approximation to an actual pulsar signal. This presentation is intended to provide an overview of the current hardware and software implementations and to also share the current results from testing using the WBAP.

  17. Fermi Pulsar Analysis

    NASA Image and Video Library

    This animation illustrates how analysis of Fermi data reveals new pulsars. Fermi's LAT records the precise arrival time and approximate direction of the gamma rays it detects, but to identify a pul...

  18. Planets around pulsars - Implications for planetary formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodenheimer, Peter

    1993-01-01

    Data on planets around pulsars are summarized, and different models intended to explain the formation mechanism are described. Both theoretical and observational evidence suggest that very special circumstances are required for the formation of planetary systems around pulsars, namely, the prior presence of a millisecond pulsar with a close binary companion, probably a low mass main-sequence star. It is concluded that the discovery of two planets around PSR 1257+12 is important for better understanding the problems of dynamics and stellar evolution. The process of planetary formation should be learned through intensive studies of the properties of disks near young objects and application of techniques for detection of planets around main-sequence solar-type stars.

  19. Cosmic Ray Positrons from Pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice K.

    2010-01-01

    Pulsars are potential Galactic sources of positrons through pair cascades in their magnetospheres. There are, however, many uncertainties in establishing their contribution to the local primary positron flux. Among these are the local density of pulsars, the cascade pair multiplicities that determine the injection rate of positrons from the pulsar, the acceleration of the injected particles by the pulsar wind termination shock, their rate of escape from the pulsar wind nebula, and their propagation through the interstellar medium. I will discuss these issues in the context of what we are learning from the new Fermi pulsar detections and discoveries.

  20. Pulsar statistics and their interpretations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnett, W. D.; Lerche, I.

    1981-01-01

    It is shown that a lack of knowledge concerning interstellar electron density, the true spatial distribution of pulsars, the radio luminosity source distribution of pulsars, the real ages and real aging rates of pulsars, the beaming factor (and other unknown factors causing the known sample of about 350 pulsars to be incomplete to an unknown degree) is sufficient to cause a minimum uncertainty of a factor of 20 in any attempt to determine pulsar birth or death rates in the Galaxy. It is suggested that this uncertainty must impact on suggestions that the pulsar rates can be used to constrain possible scenarios for neutron star formation and stellar evolution in general.

  1. Observations of accreting pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prince, Thomas A.; Bildsten, Lars; Chakrabarty, Deepto; Wilson, Robert B.; Finger, Mark H.

    1994-01-01

    We discuss recent observations of accreting binary pulsars with the all-sky BATSE instrument on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory. BATSE has detected and studied nearly half of the known accreting pulsar systems. Continuous timing studies over a two-year period have yielded accurate orbital parameters for 9 of these systems, as well as new insights into long-term accretion torque histories.

  2. Pulse Portraiture: Pulsar timing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennucci, Timothy T.; Demorest, Paul B.; Ransom, Scott M.

    2016-06-01

    Pulse Portraiture is a wideband pulsar timing code written in python. It uses an extension of the FFTFIT algorithm (Taylor 1992) to simultaneously measure a phase (TOA) and dispersion measure (DM). The code includes a Gaussian-component-based portrait modeling routine. The code uses the python interface to the pulsar data analysis package PSRCHIVE (ascl:1105.014) and also requires the non-linear least-squares minimization package lmfit (ascl:1606.014).

  3. The Fermi LAT Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romani, Roger W.

    2011-08-01

    The Large Area Telescope on the Fermi satellite is an impressive pulsar discovery machine, with over 75 pulse detections and counting. The populations of radio-selected, γ-selected and millisecond pulsars are now large enough to display observational patterns in the light curves and luminosities. These patterns are starting to teach us about the physics of the emission zone, which seems dominated by open field lines near the speed of light cylinder. The sample also provides initial inferences about the pulsar population. Apparently a large fraction of neutron stars have a young energetic γ-ray emitting phase, making these objects a good probe of massive star evolution. The long-lived millisecond γ-ray pulsars are even more ubiquitous and may produce a significant fraction of the γ-ray background. In any event, it is clear that the present LAT pulsar sample is dominated by nearby objects, and there is every expectation that the number, and quality, of pulsar detections will increase in years to come.

  4. A Markov Model Analysis of Problem-Solving Progress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vendlinski, Terry

    This study used a computerized simulation and problem-solving tool along with artificial neural networks (ANN) as pattern recognizers to identify the common types of strategies high school and college undergraduate chemistry students would use to solve qualitative chemistry problems. Participants were 134 high school chemistry students who used…

  5. Optical study of pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanwal, Divas

    The Crab Pulsar emits radiation at all wavelengths from radio to extreme γ-rays including the optical. We have performed extremely high time resolution multicolor photometry of the Crab Pulsar at optical wavelengths to constrain the high energy emission models for pulsars. Our observations with 1 microsecond time resolution are a factor of 20 better than the previous best observations. We have completely resolved the peak of the main pulse of the Crab Pulsar in optical passbands. The peaks of the main pulse and the interpulse move smoothly from the rising branch to the falling branch with neither a flat top nor a cusp. We find that the peak of the Crab Pulsar main pulse in the B band arrives 140 microseconds before the peak of the radio pulse. The color of the emission changes across the phase. The maximum variation in the color ratio is about 25%. The bluest color occurs in the bridge region between the main pulse and the interpulse. The Crab Pulsar has faded by 2 +/- 2.8% since the previous observations in 1991 using the same instrument. The statistics of photon arrival times are consistent with atmospheric scintillation causing most of the variations in addition to the mean pulse variations in the shape. However, the autocorrelation function (ACF) of the Crab Pulsar light curve shows extra correlations at very short time scales. We identify two time scales, one at about 20 microseconds and another one at about 1000 microseconds at which we observe a break in the ACF. We conclude that these short timescale correlations are internal to the pulsar. We attribute the extra correlation observed in our data to microstructures. This is the first time evidence for microstructures has been observed outside the radio wavelengths. The upturn in the ACF at short time scales depends on the color. The U band shows about 10% more correlation at short time scales while the R band shows only about 3% change. We have also observed the young X-ray pulsar PSR 0656+14 at optical

  6. The Problem of Technical Progress and Mineral Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lukashev, Konstantin I.

    1974-01-01

    Examines the estimates of known potential reserves of the major raw materials, future sources therof, the geological and technological problems associated with these, the manufacture of artifical minerals, and international cooperation in this sphere. (Author/GS)

  7. The Problem of Technical Progress and Mineral Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lukashev, Konstantin I.

    1974-01-01

    Examines the estimates of known potential reserves of the major raw materials, future sources therof, the geological and technological problems associated with these, the manufacture of artifical minerals, and international cooperation in this sphere. (Author/GS)

  8. The Pulsating Pulsar Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsui, K. H.

    2015-06-01

    Following the basic principles of a charge-separated pulsar magnetosphere, we consider the magnetosphere to be stationary in space, instead of corotating, and the electric field to be uploaded from the potential distribution on the pulsar surface, set up by the unipolar induction. Consequently, the plasma of the magnetosphere undergoes guiding center drifts of the gyromotion due to the forces transverse to the magnetic field. These forces are the electric force, magnetic gradient force, and field line curvature force. Since these plasma velocities are of drift nature, there is no need to introduce an emf along the field lines, which would contradict the {{E}\\parallel }={\\boldsymbol{E}} \\cdot {\\boldsymbol{B}} =0 plasma condition. Furthermore, there is also no need to introduce the critical field line separating the electron and ion open field lines. We present a self-consistent description where the magnetosphere is described in terms of electric and magnetic fields and also in terms of plasma velocities. The fields and velocities are then connected through the space-charge densities self-consistently. We solve the pulsar equation analytically for the fields and construct the standard steady-state pulsar magnetosphere. By considering the unipolar induction inside the pulsar and the magnetosphere outside the pulsar as one coupled system, and under the condition that the unipolar pumping rate exceeds the Poynting flux in the open field lines, plasma pressure can build up in the magnetosphere, in particular, in the closed region. This could cause a periodic opening up of the closed region, leading to a pulsating magnetosphere, which could be an alternative to pulsar beacons. The closed region can also be opened periodically by the build up of toroidal magnetic field through a positive feedback cycle.

  9. Pulsar lensing geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Siqi; Pen, Ue-Li; Macquart, J.-P.; Brisken, Walter; Deller, Adam

    2016-05-01

    We test the inclined sheet pulsar scintillation model (Pen & Levin) against archival very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) data on PSR 0834+06 and show that its scintillation properties can be precisely reproduced by a model in which refraction occurs on two distinct lens planes. These data strongly favour a model in which grazing-incidence refraction instead of diffraction off turbulent structures is the primary source of pulsar scattering. This model can reproduce the parameters of the observed diffractive scintillation with an accuracy at the percent level. Comparison with new VLBI proper motion results in a direct measure of the ionized interstellar medium (ISM) screen transverse velocity. The results are consistent with ISM velocities local to the PSR 0834+06 sight-line (through the Galaxy). The simple 1-D structure of the lenses opens up the possibility of using interstellar lenses as precision probes for pulsar lens mapping, precision transverse motions in the ISM, and new opportunities for removing scattering to improve pulsar timing. We describe the parameters and observables of this double screen system. While relative screen distances can in principle be accurately determined, a global conformal distance degeneracy exists that allows a rescaling of the absolute distance scale. For PSR B0834+06, we present VLBI astrometry results that provide (for the first time) a direct measurement of the distance of the pulsar. For most of the recycled millisecond pulsars that are the targets of precision timing observations, the targets where independent distance measurements are not available. The degeneracy presented in the lens modelling could be broken if the pulsar resides in a binary system.

  10. Superfluidity in Millisecond Pulsars (Review)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pines, D.; Alpar, A.

    The authors review the evidence for superfluidity in the Vela pulsar, the Crab pulsar and PSR 0525+21, and examine the prospects for observing similar consequences of superfluidity in the already-discovered millisec pulsars. They consider, inter alia, the likelihood of observing glitches, the expected post-glitch behavior, and pulsar heating by energy dissipation due to the creep of neutron vortex lines in pinned superfluid regions of the crust.

  11. The Fermi-Pasta-Ulam problem: fifty years of progress.

    PubMed

    Berman, G P; Izrailev, F M

    2005-03-01

    A brief review of the Fermi-Pasta-Ulam (FPU) paradox is given, together with its suggested resolutions and its relation to other physical problems. We focus on the ideas and concepts that have become the core of modern nonlinear mechanics, in their historical perspective. Starting from the first numerical results of FPU, both theoretical and numerical findings are discussed in close connection with the problems of ergodicity, integrability, chaos and stability of motion. New directions related to the Bose-Einstein condensation and quantum systems of interacting Bose-particles are also considered.

  12. Volunteers to Prevent Emotional Problems in Children. Summary Progress Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Ruth

    The Counseling Service of Addison County, a community mental health clinic, began in 1966 as a four-year project under a National Institutes of Mental Health grant to determine whether emotional problems could be prevented by the early assignment of college student volunteers (from Middlebury College) to underachievers in the early grades of…

  13. A phenomenological pulsar model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michel, F. C.

    1978-01-01

    Particle injection energies and rates previously calculated for the stellar wind generation by rotating magnetized neutron stars are adopted. It is assumed that the ambient space-charge density being emitted to form this wind is bunched. These considerations immediately place the coherent radio frequency luminosity from such bunches near 10 to the 28th erg/s for typical pulsar parameters. A comparable amount of incoherent radiation is emitted for typical (1 second) pulsars. For very rapid pulsars, however, the latter component grows more rapidly than the available energy sources. The comparatively low radio luminosity of the Crab and Vela pulsars is attributed to both components being limited in the same ratio. The incoherent radiation essentially has a synchotron spectrum and extends to gamma-ray energies; consequently the small part of the total luminosity that is at optical wavelengths is unobservable. Assuming full coherence at all wavelengths short of a critical length gives a spectral index for the flux density of -8/3 at higher frequencies. The finite energy available from the injected particles would force the spectrum to roll over below about 100 MHz, although intrinsic morphological factors probably enter for any specific pulsar as well.

  14. Generative pulsar timing analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lentati, L.; Alexander, P.; Hobson, M. P.

    2015-03-01

    A new Bayesian method for the analysis of folded pulsar timing data is presented that allows for the simultaneous evaluation of evolution in the pulse profile in either frequency or time, along with the timing model and additional stochastic processes such as red spin noise, or dispersion measure variations. We model the pulse profiles using `shapelets' - a complete orthonormal set of basis functions that allow us to recreate any physical profile shape. Any evolution in the profiles can then be described as either an arbitrary number of independent profiles, or using some functional form. We perform simulations to compare this approach with established methods for pulsar timing analysis, and to demonstrate model selection between different evolutionary scenarios using the Bayesian evidence. The simplicity of our method allows for many possible extensions, such as including models for correlated noise in the pulse profile, or broadening of the pulse profiles due to scattering. As such, while it is a marked departure from standard pulsar timing analysis methods, it has clear applications for both new and current data sets, such as those from the European Pulsar Timing Array and International Pulsar Timing Array.

  15. Modelling Jets, Tori and Flares in Pulsar Wind Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porth, Oliver; Buehler, Rolf; Olmi, Barbara; Komissarov, Serguei; Lamberts, Astrid; Amato, Elena; Yuan, Yajie; Rudy, Alexander

    2017-07-01

    In this contribution we review the recent progress in the modelling of Pulsar Wind Nebulae (PWN). We start with a brief overview of the relevant physical processes in the magnetosphere, the wind-zone and the inflated nebula bubble. Radiative signatures and particle transport processes obtained from 3D simulations of PWN are discussed in the context of optical and X-ray observations. We then proceed to consider particle acceleration in PWN and elaborate on what can be learned about the particle acceleration from the dynamical structures called GwispsG observed in the Crab nebula. We also discuss recent observational and theoretical results of gamma-ray flares and the inner knot of the Crab nebula, which had been proposed as the emission site of the flares. We extend the discussion to GeV flares from binary systems in which the pulsar wind interacts with the stellar wind from a companion star. The chapter concludes with a discussion of solved and unsolved problems posed by PWN.

  16. Modelling Jets, Tori and Flares in Pulsar Wind Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porth, Oliver; Buehler, Rolf; Olmi, Barbara; Komissarov, Serguei; Lamberts, Astrid; Amato, Elena; Yuan, Yajie; Rudy, Alexander

    2017-03-01

    In this contribution we review the recent progress in the modelling of Pulsar Wind Nebulae (PWN). We start with a brief overview of the relevant physical processes in the magnetosphere, the wind-zone and the inflated nebula bubble. Radiative signatures and particle transport processes obtained from 3D simulations of PWN are discussed in the context of optical and X-ray observations. We then proceed to consider particle acceleration in PWN and elaborate on what can be learned about the particle acceleration from the dynamical structures called GwispsG observed in the Crab nebula. We also discuss recent observational and theoretical results of gamma-ray flares and the inner knot of the Crab nebula, which had been proposed as the emission site of the flares. We extend the discussion to GeV flares from binary systems in which the pulsar wind interacts with the stellar wind from a companion star. The chapter concludes with a discussion of solved and unsolved problems posed by PWN.

  17. Modelling jets, tori and flares in pulsar wind nebulae

    DOE PAGES

    Porth, Oliver; Buehler, Rolf; Olmi, Barbara; ...

    2017-03-22

    In this contribution we review the recent progress in the modelling of Pulsar Wind Nebulae (PWN). We start with a brief overview of the relevant physical processes in the magnetosphere, the wind-zone and the inflated nebula bubble. Radiative signatures and particle transport processes obtained from 3D simulations of PWN are discussed in the context of optical and X-ray observations. We then proceed to consider particle acceleration in PWN and elaborate on what can be learned about the particle acceleration from the dynamical structures called GwispsG observed in the Crab nebula. We also discuss recent observational and theoretical results of gamma-raymore » flares and the inner knot of the Crab nebula, which had been proposed as the emission site of the flares. Here, we extend the discussion to GeV flares from binary systems in which the pulsar wind interacts with the stellar wind from a companion star. The chapter concludes with a discussion of solved and unsolved problems posed by PWN.« less

  18. NANOGrav Millisecond Pulsar Observing Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nice, David J.; Nanograv

    2015-01-01

    Gravitational waves from sources such as supermassive black hole binary systems are expected to perturb times-of-flight of signals traveling from pulsars to the Earth. The NANOGrav consortium aims to measure these perturbations in high precision millisecond pulsar timing measurements and thus to directly detect gravitational waves and characterize gravitational wave sources. By observing pulsars over time spans of many years, we are most sensitive to gravitational waves at nanohertz frequencies.In this presentation we describe the NANOGrav observing program. We presently observe an array of 45 millisecond pulsars, evenly divided between the Arecibo Observatory (for pulsars with declinations between -1 and 39 degrees) and the Green Bank Telescope (for other pulsars, with two pulsars overlapping with Arecibo). Observation of a large number of pulsars allows for searches of correlated perturbations between multiple pulsar signals, which will be crucial for achieving high-significance detection of gravitational waves in the face of uncorrelated noise (from gravitational waves and rotation noise) in the individual pulsars. As new high-quality pulsars are discovered, they are added to the program.Observations of each pulsar are made with cadence of 20 to 30 days, with observations of each pulsar in two separate radio bands. Arrival times for nearly all pulsars are measured with precision better than 1 microsecond (averaged over a typical observation of 20 minutes), and in the best cases the precision is better than 100 nanoseconds.We describe the NANOGrav nine-year data release, which contains time-of-arrival measurements and high quality timing solutions from 37 pulsars observed over spans ranging between 0.7 to 9.3 years.

  19. Detectors for high energy nuclear collisions: problems, progress and promise

    SciTech Connect

    Ludlam, T.W.

    1986-01-01

    Some perspective of the main issues in high energy nuclear collision physics is offered. How to identify and measure a quark-gluon plasma is considered to still be an open question. The types of detector configurations to be used in high-energy nucleus-nucleus experiments are discussed. Particular issues covered are measurements of lepton pair spectra, tracking systems and multitrack resolution, event-rate capabilities, backgrounds and other problems close to the beam, and calorimetry. 2 refs. (LEW)

  20. Nuclear DNA amounts in angiosperms: progress, problems and prospects.

    PubMed

    Bennett, M D; Leitch, I J

    2005-01-01

    The nuclear DNA amount in an unreplicated haploid chromosome complement (1C-value) is a key diversity character with many uses. Angiosperm C-values have been listed for reference purposes since 1976, and pooled in an electronic database since 1997 (http://www.kew.org/cval/homepage). Such lists are cited frequently and provide data for many comparative studies. The last compilation was published in 2000, so a further supplementary list is timely to monitor progress against targets set at the first plant genome size workshop in 1997 and to facilitate new goal setting. The present work lists DNA C-values for 804 species including first values for 628 species from 88 original sources, not included in any previous compilation, plus additional values for 176 species included in a previous compilation. 1998-2002 saw striking progress in our knowledge of angiosperm C-values. At least 1700 first values for species were measured (the most in any five-year period) and familial representation rose from 30 % to 50 %. The loss of many densitometers used to measure DNA C-values proved less serious than feared, owing to the development of relatively inexpensive flow cytometers and computer-based image analysis systems. New uses of the term genome (e.g. in 'complete' genome sequencing) can cause confusion. The Arabidopsis Genome Initiative C-value for Arabidopsis thaliana (125 Mb) was a gross underestimate, and an exact C-value based on genome sequencing alone is unlikely to be obtained soon for any angiosperm. Lack of this expected benchmark poses a quandary as to what to use as the basal calibration standard for angiosperms. The next decade offers exciting prospects for angiosperm genome size research. The database (http://www.kew.org/cval/homepage) should become sufficiently representative of the global flora to answer most questions without needing new estimations. DNA amount variation will remain a key interest as an integrated strand of holistic genomics.

  1. Modelling pulsar glitches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haskell, Brynmor

    2016-07-01

    Pulsar glitches, i.e. sudden jumps in the spin frequency of pulsars, are thought to be due to the presence of large scale superfluid components in neutron star interiors, and offer a unique insight into the physics of matter at high densities and low temperatures. Nevertheless, more than forty years after the first observation, many open questions still exist on the nature of pulsar glitches. In this talk I will review our current theoretical understanding of glitches, of their trigger mechanisms and of the hydrodynamics of superfluid neutron stars. In particular I will focus on 'superfluid vortex avalanches' and recent advances in applying this paradigm to glitch observations, and I will discuss hydrodynamical modelling of the post-glitch recovery.

  2. Pulse structure of four pulsars.

    PubMed

    Drake, F D; Craft, H D

    1968-05-17

    The pulse structure of the four known pulsars is given. The pulse is about 38 milliseconds for the two pulsars of longest period, and within the pulsewidth three subpulses typically appear. The pulsar of next longest period typically radiates two pulses separated about 23 milliseconds in time. The one short-period pulsar emits single pulses of constant shape. The first subpulses of all pulsars have nearly the same shape. The shape of the first subpulse agrees well with the pulse shape expected from a radio-emitting sphere which is excited by a spherically expanding disturbance, and in which the radio emission, once excited, decays exponentially.

  3. Random functions via Dyson Brownian Motion: progress and problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gaoyuan; Battefeld, Thorsten

    2016-09-01

    We develope a computationally efficient extension of the Dyson Brownian Motion (DBM) algorithm to generate random function in C2 locally. We further explain that random functions generated via DBM show an unstable growth as the traversed distance increases. This feature restricts the use of such functions considerably if they are to be used to model globally defined ones. The latter is the case if one uses random functions to model landscapes in string theory. We provide a concrete example, based on a simple axionic potential often used in cosmology, to highlight this problem and also offer an ad hoc modification of DBM that suppresses this growth to some degree.

  4. Electron holography for fields in solids: problems and progress.

    PubMed

    Lichte, Hannes; Börrnert, Felix; Lenk, Andreas; Lubk, Axel; Röder, Falk; Sickmann, Jan; Sturm, Sebastian; Vogel, Karin; Wolf, Daniel

    2013-11-01

    Electron holography initially was invented by Dennis Gabor for solving the problems raised by the aberrations of electron lenses in Transmission Electron Microscopy. Nowadays, after hardware correction of aberrations allows true atomic resolution of the structure, for comprehensive understanding of solids, determination of electric and magnetic nanofields is the most challenging task. Since fields are phase objects in the TEM, electron holography is the unrivaled method of choice. After more than 40 years of experimental realization and steady improvement, holography is increasingly contributing to these highly sophisticated and essential questions in materials science, as well to the understanding of electron waves and their interaction with matter.

  5. Random functions via Dyson Brownian Motion: progress and problems

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Gaoyuan; Battefeld, Thorsten

    2016-09-05

    We develope a computationally efficient extension of the Dyson Brownian Motion (DBM) algorithm to generate random function in C{sup 2} locally. We further explain that random functions generated via DBM show an unstable growth as the traversed distance increases. This feature restricts the use of such functions considerably if they are to be used to model globally defined ones. The latter is the case if one uses random functions to model landscapes in string theory. We provide a concrete example, based on a simple axionic potential often used in cosmology, to highlight this problem and also offer an ad hoc modification of DBM that suppresses this growth to some degree.

  6. Treatment of Parkinson's disease: problems with a progressing disease.

    PubMed

    Rinne, U K

    1981-01-01

    Long-term follow-up of parkinsonian patients has shown that although levodopa treatment significantly improves the parkinsonian symptoms and the quality of life of parkinsonian patients for several years, various distressing difficulties arise during chronic levodopa treatment, such as the loss of benefit, dyskinesias, on-off phenomena, postural instability and dementia. Clinical, neuropsychological, mortality and post-mortem brain studies indicate that levodopa as a replacement therapy does not modify the progression of the underlying pathology and the natural course of the disease. It seems that levodopa has only a limited period of optimal usefulness in the treatment of Parkinson's disease. However, at present there is no better or more potent therapeutic agent available than levodopa and it is still the primary treatment of Parkinson's disease. It would be reasonable not to begin levodopa treatment in patients with mild symptoms but to withhold levodopa until the severity of symptoms really makes its use necessary. Thus it is possible to get the maximal long functional benefit. Post-mortem brain studies have shown that in Parkinson's disease there is not only a progressive loss of dopaminergic substantia nigra neurons but there are also significant changes in the striatal dopamine receptors. In some patients a denervation supersensitivity seems to develop and in some others a loss of dopamine receptors in the striatum. However, in advanced parkinsonian patients with a deteriorating response to levodopa, there seem to be still enough dopamine receptors in the striatum for drugs stimulating the dopamine receptors directly to improve the parkinsonian disability. Indeed, recent evidence indicates that dopaminergic agonists, such as bromocriptine, seem to be a significant and valuable adjuvant therapy to levodopa in parkinsonian patients with a deteriorating response and/or the on-off phenomena. Although bromocriptine is not completely satisfactory, it is a

  7. Progress with multigrid schemes for hypersonic flow problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radespiel, R.; Swanson, R. C.

    1991-01-01

    Several multigrid schemes are considered for the numerical computation of viscous hypersonic flows. For each scheme, the basic solution algorithm uses upwind spatial discretization with explicit multistage time stepping. Two level versions of the various multigrid algorithms are applied to the two dimensional advection equation, and Fourier analysis is used to determine their damping properties. The capabilities of the multigrid methods are assessed by solving three different hypersonic flow problems. Some new multigrid schemes based on semicoarsening strategies are shown to be quite effective in relieving the stiffness caused by the high aspect ratio cells required to resolve high Reynolds number flows. These schemes exhibit good convergence rates for Reynolds numbers up to 200 x 10(exp 6) and Mach numbers up to 25.

  8. Geomagnetic inverse problem and data assimilation: a progress report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, Julien; Fournier, Alexandre

    2013-04-01

    In this presentation I will present two studies recently undertaken by our group in an effort to bring the benefits of data assimilation to the study of Earth's magnetic field and the dynamics of its liquid iron core, where the geodynamo operates. In a first part I will focus on the geomagnetic inverse problem, which attempts to recover the fluid flow in the core from the temporal variation of the magnetic field (known as the secular variation). Geomagnetic data can be downward continued from the surface of the Earth down to the core-mantle boundary, but not further below, since the core is an electrical conductor. Historically, solutions to the geomagnetic inverse problem in such a sparsely observed system were thus found only for flow immediately below the core mantle boundary. We have recently shown that combining a numerical model of the geodynamo together with magnetic observations, through the use of Kalman filtering, now allows to present solutions for flow throughout the core. In a second part, I will present synthetic tests of sequential geomagnetic data assimilation aiming at evaluating the range at which the future of the geodynamo can be predicted, and our corresponding prospects to refine the current geomagnetic predictions. Fournier, Aubert, Thébault: Inference on core surface flow from observations and 3-D dynamo modelling, Geophys. J. Int. 186, 118-136, 2011, doi: 10.1111/j.1365-246X.2011.05037.x Aubert, Fournier: Inferring internal properties of Earth's core dynamics and their evolution from surface observations and a numerical geodynamo model, Nonlinear Proc. Geoph. 18, 657-674, 2011, doi:10.5194/npg-18-657-2011 Aubert: Flow throughout the Earth's core inverted from geomagnetic observations and numerical dynamo models, Geophys. J. Int., 2012, doi: 10.1093/gji/ggs051

  9. Volcanic hazards and their mitigation: Progress and problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilling, Robert I.

    1989-05-01

    At the beginning of the twentieth century, volcanology began to emerge as a modern science as a result of increased interest in eruptive phenomena following some of the worst volcanic disasters in recorded history: Krakatau (Indonesia) in 1883 and Mont Pelée (Martinique), Soufrière (St. Vincent), and Santa María (Guatemala) in 1902. Volcanology is again experiencing a period of heightened public awareness and scientific growth in the 1980s, the worst period since 1902 in terms of volcanic disasters and crises. A review of hazards mitigation approaches and techniques indicates that significant advances have been made in hazards assessment, volcano monitoring, and eruption forecasting. For example, the remarkable accuracy of the predictions of dome-building events at Mount St. Helens since June 1980 is unprecedented. Yet a predictive capability for more voluminous and explosive eruptions still has not been achieved. Studies of magma-induced seismicity and ground deformation continue to provide the most systematic and reliable data for early detection of precursors to eruptions and shallow intrusions. In addition, some other geophysical monitoring techniques and geochemical methods have been refined and are being more widely applied and tested. Comparison of the four major volcanic disasters of the 1980s (Mount St. Helens, U.S.A. (1980), El Chichón, Mexico (1982); Galunggung, Indonesia (1982); and Nevado del Ruíz, Colombia (1985) illustrates the importance of predisaster geoscience studies, volcanic hazards assessments, volcano monitoring, contingency planning, and effective communications between scientists and authorities. The death toll (>22,000) from the Ruíz catastrophe probably could have been greatly reduced; the reasons for the tragically ineffective implementation of evacuation measures are still unclear and puzzling in view of the fact that sufficient warnings were given. The most pressing problem in the mitigation of volcanic and associated hazards on

  10. Progress in research on laser damage mechanisms and contamination problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jitsuno, T.; Murakami, H.; Kato, K.; Sato, E.; Mikami, K.; Motokoshi, S.; Miyanaga, N.; Azechi, H.

    2014-09-01

    In high power laser systems, the laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) in optical coating is very important parameters for obtaining high performances. Recently, LIDT was found to have strong temperature dependences in the bulk, surface of substrates, and in coatings. These temperature dependences of LIDT were carefully measured, and the damage formation model was constructed regarding to this temperature dependence. To explain this temperature dependence of LIDT, the temperature dependences of the initial electron generation and electron multiplication in the avalanche process were taken into account. On the other hand, LIDT in optical coating is very sensitive to organic contaminations accumulated in coating layers during storage and using condition. This paper also introduces the oil-contamination problem in LFEX laser system for First Ignition scheme in the laser fusion. We have analyzed contaminants and evaluated the effects of the contamination. We also developed new cleaning methods to remove contamination from the coating, and we have succeeded to prevent the degradation in LIDT for the duration of evacuation with Silica-gel in the chamber. The quantitative analysis of contamination on LIDT was made. We have investigated the characteristics of LIDT in dielectric coatings under the controlled contamination with several materials.

  11. Scientific uses of pulsars.

    PubMed

    Counselman, C C; Shapiro, I I

    1968-10-18

    The recently discovered celestial sources of pulsed radio energy can be used to test general relativity, to study the solar corona, and to determine the earth's orbit and ephemeris time. The vector positions and transverse velocities of pulsars can be measured with radio interferometers; in combination with pulse-arrival-time data, the distance determination will yield the average interstellar electron density.

  12. The Pulsar Search Collaboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosen, R.; Heatherly, S.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Kondratiev, V. I.; Boyles, J. R.; Wilson, M.; Lorimer, D. R.; Lynch, R.; Ransom, S.

    2010-01-01

    The Pulsar Search Collaboratory (PSC) (NSF #0737641) is a joint project between the National Radio Astronomy Observatory and West Virginia University designed to interest high school students in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics related career paths by helping them to conduct authentic scientific research. The 3 year PSC program,…

  13. The Pulsar Search Collaboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosen, R.; Heatherly, S.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Kondratiev, V. I.; Boyles, J. R.; Wilson, M.; Lorimer, D. R.; Lynch, R.; Ransom, S.

    2010-01-01

    The Pulsar Search Collaboratory (PSC) (NSF #0737641) is a joint project between the National Radio Astronomy Observatory and West Virginia University designed to interest high school students in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics related career paths by helping them to conduct authentic scientific research. The 3 year PSC program,…

  14. Nulling and intermittent pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Neil

    2011-07-01

    Pulsars are extremely magnetised, rapidly rotating neutron stars which produce beams of electromagnetic radiation that sweep across the Earth. They exhibit a variety of interesting phenomena which allow us to gain insight into the physics of the emission process in these extreme magnetic fields. Intermittent pulsars are instrumental in this study due to their meta-stable configurations which result in abrupt cessation or re-activation of their radio emission. Their behaviour is believed to be tied to transient particle flow in the radio emission region. In the case of PSR B1931+24, the long-term modulation in the radio emission has been linked with the spin-down rate of the pulsar. Thus, offering a unique opportunity to study how magnetospheric changes can affect the magnetic braking of pulsars. Since the discovery of this behaviour in B1931+24, several other sources have been found to show similar radio emission modulation. Results from the analysis of the radio emission behaviour of these sources are presented, along with an update of the work carried out on observations of PSR B1931+24.

  15. Pulsars and Acceleration Sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice

    2008-01-01

    Rotation-powered pulsars are excellent laboratories for the studying particle acceleration as well as fundamental physics of strong gravity, strong magnetic fields and relativity. But even forty years after their discovery, we still do not understand their pulsed emission at any wavelength. I will review both the basic physics of pulsars as well as the latest developments in understanding their high-energy emission. Special and general relativistic effects play important roles in pulsar emission, from inertial frame-dragging near the stellar surface to aberration, time-of-flight and retardation of the magnetic field near the light cylinder. Understanding how these effects determine what we observe at different wavelengths is critical to unraveling the emission physics. Fortunately the Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), with launch in May 2008 will detect many new gamma-ray pulsars and test the predictions of these models with unprecedented sensitivity and energy resolution for gamma-rays in the range of 30 MeV to 300 GeV.

  16. Pulsars and Acceleration Sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice

    2008-01-01

    Rotation-powered pulsars are excellent laboratories for the studying particle acceleration as well as fundamental physics of strong gravity, strong magnetic fields and relativity. But even forty years after their discovery, we still do not understand their pulsed emission at any wavelength. I will review both the basic physics of pulsars as well as the latest developments in understanding their high-energy emission. Special and general relativistic effects play important roles in pulsar emission, from inertial frame-dragging near the stellar surface to aberration, time-of-flight and retardation of the magnetic field near the light cylinder. Understanding how these effects determine what we observe at different wavelengths is critical to unraveling the emission physics. Fortunately the Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), with launch in May 2008 will detect many new gamma-ray pulsars and test the predictions of these models with unprecedented sensitivity and energy resolution for gamma-rays in the range of 30 MeV to 300 GeV.

  17. Progressive Muscle Relaxation and Cognitive Restructuring: Potential Problems and Proposed Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiselica, Mark S.; Baker, Stanley B.

    1992-01-01

    Reviews common problems experienced by clients during progressive muscle relaxation training (PMRT) and summarizes pertinent solutions to those problems. Discusses difficulties and solutions related to cognitive restructuring training. Notes that cognitive restructuring is often used to enhance effectiveness of PMRT. Concludes with suggestions for…

  18. Student Discovers New Pulsar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-01-01

    A West Virginia high-school student has discovered a new pulsar, using data from the giant Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT). Shay Bloxton, 15, a participant in a project in which students analyze data from the radio telescope, spotted evidence of the pulsar on October 15. Bloxton, along with NRAO astronomers observed the object again one month later. The new observation confirmed that the object is a pulsar, a rotating, superdense neutron star. Bloxton is a sophomore at Nicholas County High School in Summersville, West Virginia. "I was very excited when I found out I had actually made a discovery," Bloxton said. She went to Green Bank in November to participate in the follow-up observation. She termed that visit "a great experience." "It also helped me learn a lot about how observations with the GBT are actually done," she added. The project in which she participated, called the Pulsar Search Collaboratory (PSC), is a joint project of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) and West Virginia University, funded by a grant from the National Science Foundation. Pulsars are known for their lighthouse-like beams of radio waves that sweep through space as the neutron star rotates, creating a pulse as the beam sweeps by the Earth. First discovered in 1967, pulsars serve as valuable natural "laboratories" for physicists studying exotic states of matter, quantum mechanics and General Relativity. The GBT, dedicated in 2000, has become one of the world's leading tools for discovering and studying pulsars. The PSC, led by NRAO Education Officer Sue Ann Heatherly and Project Director Rachel Rosen, includes training for teachers and student leaders, and provides parcels of data from the GBT to student teams. The project involves teachers and students in helping astronomers analyze data from 1500 hours of observing with the GBT. The 120 terabytes of data were produced by 70,000 individual pointings of the giant, 17-million-pound telescope. Some 300 hours of the

  19. Observations of Accreting Pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bildsten, Lars; Chakrabarty, Deepto; Chiu, John; Finger, Mark H.; Koh, Danny T.; Nelson, Robert W.; Prince, Thomas A.; Rubin, Bradley C.; Scott, D. Matthew; Stollberg, Mark; hide

    1997-01-01

    We summarize 5 years of continuous monitoring of accretion-powered pulsars with the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory. Our 20-70 keV observations have determined or refined the orbital parameters of 13 binaries, discovered five new transient accreting pulsars, measured the pulsed flux history during outbursts of 12 transients (GRO J1744-28, 4U 0115+634, GRO J1750-27, GS 0834-430, 2S 1417-624, GRO J1948+32, EXO 2030+375, GRO J1008-57, A0535+26, GRO J2058+42, 4U 1145-619, and A1118-616), and also measured the accretion torque history during outbursts of six of those transients whose orbital param- eters were also known. We have also continuously measured the pulsed flux and spin frequency for eiaht persistently accreting pulsars (Her X-1, Cen X-3, Vela X-1, OAO 1657-415, GX 301-2, 4U 1626-67, 4U 1538-52, and GX 1+4). Because of their continuity and uniformity over a long baseline, BATSE observations have provided new insights into the long-term behavior of accreting magnetic neutron stars. We have found that all accreting pulsars show stochastic variations in their spin frequencies and luminosities, including those displaying secular spin-up or spin-down on long timescales, which blurs the con- ventional distinction between disk-fed and wind-fed binaries. Pulsed flux and accretion torque are strongly correlated in outbursts of transient accreting pulsars but are uncorrelated, or even anti- correlated, in persistent sources. We describe daily folded pulse profiles, frequency, and flux measurements that are available through the Compton Observatory Science Support Center at NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center.

  20. Observations of Accreting Pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bildsten, Lars; Chakrabarty, Deepto; Chiu, John; Finger, Mark H.; Koh, Danny T.; Nelson, Robert W.; Prince, Thomas A.; Rubin, Bradley C.; Scott, D. Matthew; Stollberg, Mark; hide

    1997-01-01

    We summarize five years of continuous monitoring of accretion-powered pulsars with the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory. Our 20-70 keV observations have determined or refined the orbital parameters of 13 binaries, discovered 5 new transient accreting pulsars, measured the pulsed flux history during outbursts of 12 transients (GRO J1744-28, 4U 0115+634, GRO J1750-27, GS 0834-430, 2S 1417-624, GRO J1948+32, EXO 2030+375, GRO J1008-57, A 0535+26, GRO J2058+42, 4U 1145-619 and A 1118-616), and also measured the accretion torque history of during outbursts of 6 of those transients whose orbital parameters were also known. We have also continuously measured the pulsed flux and spin frequency for eight persistently accreting pulsars (Her X-1, Cen X-3, Vela X-1, OAO 1657-415, GX 301-2, 4U 1626-67, 4U 1538-52, and GX 1+4). Because of their continuity and uniformity over a long baseline, BATSE observations have provided new insights into the long-term behavior of accreting magnetic stars. We have found that all accreting pulsars show stochastic variations in their spin frequencies and luminosities, including those displaying secular spin-up or spin-down on long time scales, blurring the conventional distinction between disk-fed and wind-fed binaries. Pulsed flux and accretion torque are strongly correlated in outbursts of transient accreting pulsars, but uncorrelated, or even anticorrelated, in persistent sources. We describe daily folded pulse profiles, frequency, and flux measurements that are available through the Compton Observatory Science Support Center at NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center.

  1. On some electrodynamic properties of binary pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sironi, Lorenzo

    2006-07-01

    respect to the electromagnetic ones and the Lorentz force per unit volume is assumed to be zero outside the pulsar; after showing the main unsolved problems about this model, I will try to examine the origin of the leptons (positrons and electrons) which are expected to fill the pulsar magnetosphere and to continuously stream away from the star through the light cylinder (where co-rotation with the pulsar would mean traveling at the speed of light). Since even the magnetosphere of a single isolated pulsar is not well understood, my approach in considering some hitherto unexplored properties of the joint magnetosphere of a binary pulsar will mainly be qualitative, trying to understand through order-of-magnitude estimates the physical processes involved. First of all I will describe the possibility that, for binary pulsars in which the orbital separation is less than the sum of the light cylinder radii of the stars, the region at the center of the system could show a time-dependent distortion of the two co-rotating magnetospheres which could give origin to an induced electric field. I will then examine the possibility that such a field is quenched by a local production of pairs caused by the electric field itself. After showing that the electric field can not be switched-off by the pairs, I will discuss the possible observational consequences of the production of such a large number of leptons, which will be accelerated by the electric field along the magnetic field lines toward the pulsars and will then radiate their energy via curvature radiation; unfortunately, the small energy flux emitted, together with the rarity of double neutron star systems, will not likely allow us to detect the radiation emitted. Lastly, I will discuss the original idea that the strong induced electric fields could be responsible for the acceleration of cosmic rays whose energy lies between the knee and the ankle of the cosmic ray spectrum. In this case the unsolved problem is the origin for

  2. Black Widow Pulsar radiation hydrodynamics simulation using Castro: Methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrios Sazo, Maria; Zingale, Michael; Zhang, Weiqun

    2017-01-01

    A black widow pulsar (BWP) is a millisecond pulsar in a tight binary system with a low mass star. The fast rotating pulsar emits intense radiation, which injects energy and ablates the companion star. Observation of the ablation is seen as pulsar eclipses caused by a larger object than the companion star Roche lobe. This phenomenon is attributed to a cloud surrounding the evaporating star. We will present the methodology for modeling the interaction between the radiation coming from the pulsar and the companion star using the radiation hydrodynamics code Castro. Castro is an adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) code that solves the compressible hydrodynamic equations for astrophysical flows with simultaneous refinement in space and time. The code also includes self-gravity, nuclear reactions and radiation. We are employing the gray-radiation solver, which uses a mixed-frame formulation of radiation hydrodynamics under the flux-limited diffusion approximation. In our setup, we are modeling the companion star with the radiation field as a boundary condition, coming from one side of the domain. In addition to a model setup in 2-d axisymmetry, we also have a 3-d setup, which is more physical given the nature of the system considering the companion is facing the pulsar on one side. We discuss the progress of our calculations, first results, and future work.The work at Stony Brook was supported by DOE/Office of Nuclear Physics grant DE-FG02-87ER40317

  3. On the randomness of pulsar nulls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redman, Stephen L.; Rankin, Joanna M.

    2009-05-01

    Pulsar nulling is not always a random process; most pulsars, in fact, null non-randomly. The Wald-Wolfowitz statistical runs test is a simple diagnostic that pulsar astronomers can use to identify pulsars that have non-random nulls. It is not clear at this point how the dichotomy in pulsar nulling randomness is related to the underlying nulling phenomenon, but its nature suggests that there are at least two distinct reasons that pulsars null.

  4. Bayesian model-emulation of stochastic gravitational-wave spectra for probes of the final-parsec problem with pulsar-timing arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Stephen R.; Simon, Joseph; Sampson, Laura

    2017-01-01

    The final parsec of supermassive black-hole binary evolution is subject to the complex interplay of stellar loss-cone scattering, circumbinary disk accretion, and gravitational-wave emission, with binary eccentricity affected by all of these. The strain spectrum of gravitational-waves in the pulsar-timing band thus encodes rich information about the binary population's response to these various environmental mechanisms. Current spectral models have heretofore followed basic analytic prescriptions, and attempt to investigate these final-parsec mechanisms in an indirect fashion. Here we describe a new technique to directly probe the environmental properties of supermassive black-hole binaries through "Bayesian model-emulation". We perform black-hole binary population synthesis simulations at a restricted set of environmental parameter combinations, compute the strain spectra from these, then train a Gaussian process to learn the shape of the spectrum at any point in parameter space. We describe this technique, demonstrate its efficacy with a program of simulated datasets, then illustrate its power by directly constraining final-parsec physics in a Bayesian analysis of the NANOGrav 5-year dataset. The technique is fast, flexible, and robust.

  5. Bayesian model-emulation of stochastic gravitational-wave spectra for probes of the final-parsec problem with pulsar-timing arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Stephen; Simon, Joseph; Sampson, Laura

    2017-01-01

    The final parsec of supermassive black-hole binary evolution is subject to the complex interplay of stellar loss-cone scattering, circumbinary disk accretion, and gravitational-wave emission, with binary eccentricity affected by all of these. The strain spectrum of gravitational-waves in the pulsar-timing band thus encodes rich information about the binary population's response to these various environmental mechanisms. Current spectral models have heretofore followed basic analytic prescriptions, and attempt to investigate these final-parsec mechanisms in an indirect fashion. Here we describe a new technique to directly probe the environmental properties of supermassive black-hole binaries through ``Bayesian model-emulation''. We perform black-hole binary population synthesis simulations at a restricted set of environmental parameter combinations, compute the strain spectra from these, then train a Gaussian process to learn the shape of spectrum at any point in parameter space. We describe this technique, demonstrate its efficacy with a program of simulated datasets, then illustrate its power by directly constraining final-parsec physics in a Bayesian analysis of the NANOGrav 5-year dataset. The technique is fast, flexible, and robust.

  6. Braking indices of pulsars obtained in the presence of an effective force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magalhaes, N. S.; Okada, A. S.; Frajuca, C.

    2016-10-01

    Braking indices of pulsars present a scientific challenge as their theoretical calculation is still an open problem. In this paper, we report results of a study regarding such calculation which adapts the canonical model (which admits that pulsars are rotating magnetic dipoles) basically by introducing a compensating component in the energy conservation equation of the system. This component would correspond to an effective force that varies with the first power of the tangential velocity of the pulsar's crust. We test the proposed model using data available and predict braking indices values for different stars. We comment on the high braking index recently measured of the pulsar J1640-4631.

  7. The Optimization of GBT Pulsar Data for the GBNCC Pulsar Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Ashlee Nicole; Green Bank NRAO, GBNCC

    2016-01-01

    The Green Bank Telescope collects data from the Green Bank Northern Celestial Cap (GBNCC) pulsar survey in order to find new pulsars within its sensitivity and also, to confirm previously found pulsars within its sensitivity range. The collected data is then loaded into the CyberSKA website database where astronomers are tasked with rating the data sets based on its potential to be a pulsar from 0(unclassified), 1(class 1 pulsar), 2(class 2 pulsar), 3(class 3 pulsar), 4(radio frequency interference), 5(not a pulsar), 6(know pulsar), 7(harmonic of a known pulsar). This specific research done was to use previously classified pulsars to create a python script that will automatically identify the data set as a pulsar or a non-pulsar. After finding the recurring frequencies of radio frequency interference (RFI), the frequencies were then added to a pipeline to further discern pulsars from RFI.

  8. Atomic time scales and pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, G.

    2014-12-01

    I review the atomic time scales generated by the BIPM, International Atomic Time TAI and the realization of Terrestrial Time TT(BIPM). TT(BIPM) is shown to be now accurate to within a few 10..16 in relative frequency and the performances of TAI and TT(BIPM) are compared. Millisecond pulsars have a very regular period of rotation and data from several pulsars may be used to realize an ensemble pulsar timescale. It is shown that a pulsar timescale may detect past instabilities in TAI. However TT(BIPM) is much more stable than TAI and should be used as a reference in pulsar analysis. Since the beginning of regular millisecond pulsar observations in the 1980s, primary standards and atomic time have gained one order of magnitude in accuracy every ~ 12 years, and this trend should continue for some time.

  9. Why are Pulsar Planets Rare?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Rebecca G.; Livio, Mario; Palaniswamy, Divya

    2016-12-01

    Pulsar timing observations have revealed planets around only a few pulsars. We suggest that the rarity of these planets is due mainly to two effects. First, we show that the most likely formation mechanism requires the destruction of a companion star. Only pulsars with a suitable companion (with an extreme mass ratio) are able to form planets. Second, while a dead zone (a region of low turbulence) in the disk is generally thought to be essential for planet formation, it is most probably rare in disks around pulsars, because of the irradiation from the pulsar. The irradiation strongly heats the inner parts of the disk, thus pushing the inner boundary of the dead zone out. We suggest that the rarity of pulsar planets can be explained by the low probability for these two requirements to be satisfied: a very low-mass companion and a dead zone.

  10. Pulsar Astrophysics at Very High Energies in the Fermi-HAWC Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saz Parkinson, Pablo; Belfiore, A.; HAWC Collaboration; Fermi LAT Collaboration

    2013-04-01

    Pulsar astrophysics has received a major boost in recent years with the tremendous progress achieved in the gamma-ray regime. In the 0.1-100 GeV energy range, where pulsars emit a large fraction of their energy, the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) is providing an abundance of high-quality data, greatly improving our understanding of the pulsar mechanism. In addition to detecting over 120 pulsars, the improved statistics from the LAT have enabled studies of some of the brightest pulsars with exquisite detail, up to unprecedented energies (in some cases above 25 GeV), finally bridging the gap with ground-based instruments. At very high energies (VHE, > 100 GeV), recent detections by VERITAS and MAGIC of pulsations from the Crab pose a serious challenge to pulsar models. It is unclear whether the Crab is unique in this respect, or whether VHE emission is common in other pulsars. Some models predict that such emission should smoothly connect with the standard GeV emission seen by the LAT, while others point instead to a different spectral (e.g. inverse Compton) component altogether. If present in other pulsars, such a component might be found at higher energies (> 1 TeV), but its flux is highly uncertain. Further VHE observations of pulsars are crucial to distinguish between (and constrain) the competing scenarios. The High Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory (HAWC), currently under construction in Mexico, is well-suited to perform observations of pulsars above 100 GeV. The HAWC detector has a wide field of view, high duty cycle, and excellent sensitivity 15 times better than its predecessor Milagro), and its contemporaneous operation with Fermi should enable it to carry out the first comprehensive survey of northern-hemisphere gamma-ray pulsars above 100 GeV. I will discuss the motivations, goals, timeline, and sensitivity of HAWC searches for VHE emission from pulsars.

  11. SIGPROC: Pulsar Signal Processing Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorimer, D. R.

    2011-07-01

    SIGPROC is a package designed to standardize the initial analysis of the many types of fast-sampled pulsar data. Currently recognized machines are the Wide Band Arecibo Pulsar Processor (WAPP), the Penn State Pulsar Machine (PSPM), the Arecibo Observatory Fourier Transform Machine (AOFTM), the Berkeley Pulsar Processors (BPP), the Parkes/Jodrell 1-bit filterbanks (SCAMP) and the filterbank at the Ooty radio telescope (OOTY). The SIGPROC tools should help users look at their data quickly, without the need to write (yet) another routine to read data or worry about big/little endian compatibility (byte swapping is handled automatically).

  12. Gamma radiation from radio pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruderman, Malvin

    1990-01-01

    The probable magnetospheric location and source of the gamma ray emission from some young radiopulsars is discussed. The suggested evolution of this emission as a function of pulsar period gives a diminished gamma-ray luminosity for a more rapidly spinning pre-Crab pulsar. A greatly enhanced one, similar to that of unidentified Cos B sources, is predicted for a slightly slower post-Vela pulsar, followed by a relatively rapid quenching of the gamma-ray luminosity at still longer periods. Possible anomalous exo-magnetospheric pulsed MeV and TeV-PeV radiation from the Crab pulsar is considered.

  13. The Extended Pulsar Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Constantinos, Kalapotharakos; Demosthenes, Kazanas; Ioannis, Contopoulos

    2012-01-01

    We present the structure of the 3D ideal MHD pulsar magnetosphere to a radius ten times that of the light cylinder, a distance about an order of magnitude larger than any previous such numerical treatment. Its overall structure exhibits a stable, smooth, well-defined undulating current sheet which approaches the kinematic split monopole solution of Bogovalov 1999 only after a careful introduction of diffusivity even in the highest resolution simulations. It also exhibits an intriguing spiral region at the crossing of two zero charge surfaces on the current sheet, which shows a destabilizing behavior more prominent in higher resolution simulations. We discuss the possibility that this region is physically (and not numerically) unstable. Finally, we present the spiral pulsar antenna radiation pattern.

  14. ON THE GLOBAL STRUCTURE OF PULSAR FORCE-FREE MAGNETOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Petrova, S. A.

    2013-02-20

    The dipolar magnetic field structure of a neutron star is modified by the plasma originating in the pulsar magnetosphere. In the simplest case of a stationary axisymmetric force-free magnetosphere, a self-consistent description of the fields and currents is given by the well-known pulsar equation. Here we revise the commonly used boundary conditions of the problem in order to incorporate the plasma-producing gaps and to provide a framework for a truly self-consistent treatment of the pulsar magnetosphere. A generalized multipolar solution of the pulsar equation is found, which, as compared to the customary split monopole solution, is suggested to better represent the character of the dipolar force-free field at large distances. In particular, the outer gap location entirely inside the light cylinder implies that beyond the light cylinder the null and critical lines should be aligned and become parallel to the equator at a certain altitude. Our scheme of the pulsar force-free magnetosphere, which will hopefully be followed by extensive analytic and numerical studies, may have numerous implications for different fields of pulsar research.

  15. STRONG FIELD EFFECTS ON PULSAR ARRIVAL TIMES: GENERAL ORIENTATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Yan; Creighton, Teviet; Price, Richard H.; Jenet, Frederick A.

    2009-11-10

    A pulsar beam passing close to a black hole can provide a probe of very strong gravitational fields even if the pulsar itself is not in a strong field region. In the case that the spin of the hole can be ignored, we have previously shown that all strong field effects on the beam can be understood in terms of two 'universal' functions: F(phi{sub in}) and T(phi{sub in}) of the angle of beam emission phi{sub in}; these functions are universal in that they depend only on a single parameter, the pulsar/black hole distance from which the beam is emitted. Here we apply this formalism to general pulsar-hole-observer geometries, with arbitrary alignment of the pulsar spin axis and arbitrary pulsar beam direction and angular width. We show that the analysis of the observational problem has two distinct elements: (1) the computation of the location and trajectory of an observer-dependent 'keyhole' direction of emission in which a signal can be received by the observer; and (2) the determination of an annulus that represents the set of directions containing beam energy. Examples of each are given along with an example of a specific observational scenario.

  16. Pulsar extinction. [astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturrock, P. A.; Baker, K.; Turk, J. S.

    1975-01-01

    Radio emission from pulsars, attributed to an instability associated with the creation of electron-positron pairs from gamma rays was investigated. The condition for pair creation therefore lead to an extinction condition. The relevant physical processes were analyzed in the context of a mathematical model, according to which radiation originated at the polar caps and magnetic field lines changed from a closed configuration to an open configuration at the force balance or corotation radius.

  17. The pulsar spectral index distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, S. D.; Lorimer, D. R.; Verbiest, J. P. W.

    2013-05-01

    The flux-density spectra of radio pulsars are known to be steep and, to first order, described by a power-law relationship of the form Sν ∝ να, where Sν is the flux density at some frequency ν and α is the spectral index. Although measurements of α have been made over the years for several hundred pulsars, a study of the intrinsic distribution of pulsar spectra has not been carried out. From the result of pulsar surveys carried out at three different radio frequencies, we use population synthesis techniques and a likelihood analysis to deduce what underlying spectral index distribution is required to replicate the results of these surveys. We find that in general the results of the surveys can be modelled by a Gaussian distribution of spectral indices with a mean of -1.4 and unit standard deviation. We also consider the impact of the so-called gigahertz-peaked spectrum pulsars proposed by Kijak et al. The fraction of peaked-spectrum sources in the population with any significant turnover at low frequencies appears to be at most 10 per cent. We demonstrate that high-frequency (>2 GHz) surveys preferentially select flatter spectrum pulsars and the converse is true for lower frequency (<1 GHz) surveys. This implies that any correlations between α and other pulsar parameters (for example age or magnetic field) need to carefully account for selection biases in pulsar surveys. We also expect that many known pulsars which have been detected at high frequencies will have shallow, or positive, spectral indices. The majority of pulsars do not have recorded flux density measurements over a wide frequency range, making it impossible to constrain their spectral shapes. We also suggest that such measurements would allow an improved description of any populations of pulsars with `non-standard' spectra. Further refinements to this picture will soon be possible from the results of surveys with the Green Bank Telescope and LOFAR.

  18. TOWARD AN EMPIRICAL THEORY OF PULSAR EMISSION. XI. UNDERSTANDING THE ORIENTATIONS OF PULSAR RADIATION AND SUPERNOVA “KICKS”

    SciTech Connect

    Rankin, Joanna M.

    2015-05-10

    Two entwined problems have remained unresolved since pulsars were discovered nearly 50 yr ago: the orientation of their polarized emission relative to the emitting magnetic field and the direction of putative supernova “kicks” relative to their rotation axes. The rotational orientation of most pulsars can be inferred only from the (“fiducial”) polarization angle of their radiation, when their beam points directly at the Earth and the emitting polar fluxtube field is ∥ to the rotation axis. Earlier studies have been unrevealing owing to the admixture of different types of radiation (core and conal, two polarization modes), producing both ∥ or ⊥ alignments. In this paper we analyze some 50 pulsars having three characteristics: core radiation beams, reliable absolute polarimetry, and accurate proper motions (PMs). The “fiducial” polarization angle of the core emission, we then find, is usually oriented ⊥ to the PM direction on the sky. The primary core emission is polarized ⊥ to the projected magnetic field in Vela and other pulsars where X-ray imaging reveals the orientation. This shows that the PMs usually lie ∥ to the rotation axes on the sky. Two key physical consequences then follow: first, to the extent that supernova “kicks” are responsible for pulsar PMs, they are mostly ∥ to the rotation axis; and, second, most pulsar radiation is heavily processed by the magnetospheric plasma such that the lowest altitude “parent” core emission is polarized ⊥ to the emitting field, propagating as the extraordinary (X) mode.

  19. Research progress of wireless power transmission technology and the related problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianliang

    2017-03-01

    Wireless Power Transfer (WPT) has been widely used in recent years, it has the advantages of high transmission efficiency, long transmission distance, and so on. Firstly, this paper introduces the application progress of transmission technology at home and abroad. Secondly, combined with the development of the current technology, this paper puts forward the basic problems of wireless power transmission technology from four aspects. Lastly, the paper summarizes and puts forward the current hot and difficult problems.

  20. Planet formation around millisecond pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banit, Menashe; Ruderman, Malvin; Shaham, Jacob

    1993-01-01

    We present a model for the formation of planets in circular orbits around millisecond pulsars. We propose that the planets originate from a circumbinary excretion disk around a binary millisecond pulsar and show how physical conditions in such a disk lead to the eventual formation of planets.

  1. Building a Meaning Bridge: Therapeutic Progress from Problem Formulation to Understanding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brinegar, Meredith Glick; Salvi, Lisa M.; Stiles, William B.; Greenberg, Leslie S.

    2006-01-01

    Qualitative analyses of 2 clients' psychotherapies (client centered and process-experiential) investigated the developmental progression from formulating a problem to achieving an understanding of it. The results elaborated one segment in the 8-stage Assimilation of Problematic Experiences Sequence (APES), through which problematic parts of a…

  2. Building a Meaning Bridge: Therapeutic Progress from Problem Formulation to Understanding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brinegar, Meredith Glick; Salvi, Lisa M.; Stiles, William B.; Greenberg, Leslie S.

    2006-01-01

    Qualitative analyses of 2 clients' psychotherapies (client centered and process-experiential) investigated the developmental progression from formulating a problem to achieving an understanding of it. The results elaborated one segment in the 8-stage Assimilation of Problematic Experiences Sequence (APES), through which problematic parts of a…

  3. Searching for Planets Around Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-09-01

    Did you know that the very first exoplanets ever confirmed were found around a pulsar? The precise timing measurements of pulsar PSR 1257+12 were what made the discovery of its planetary companions possible. Yet surprisingly, though weve discovered thousands of exoplanets since then, only one other planet has ever been confirmed around a pulsar. Now, a team of CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science researchers are trying to figure out why.Formation ChallengesThe lack of detected pulsar planets may simply reflect the fact that getting a pulsar-planet system is challenging! There are three main pathways:The planet formed before the host star became a pulsar which means it somehow survived its star going supernova (yikes!).The planet formed elsewhere and was captured by the pulsar.The planet formed out of the debris of the supernova explosion.The first two options, if even possible, are likely to be rare occurrences but the third option shows some promise. In this scenario, after the supernova explosion, a small fraction of the material falls back toward the stellar remnant and is recaptured, forming what is known as a supernova fallback disk. According to this model, planets could potentially form out of this disk.Disk ImplicationsLed by Matthew Kerr, the CSIRO astronomers set out to systematically look for these potential planets that might have formed in situ around pulsars. They searched a sample of 151 young, energetic pulsars, scouring seven years of pulse time-of-arrival data for periodic variation that could signal the presence of planetary companions. Their methods to mitigate pulsar timing noise and model realistic orbits allowed them to have good sensitivity to low-mass planets.The results? They found no conclusive evidence that any of these pulsars have planets.This outcome carries with it some significant implications. The pulsar sample spans 2 Myr in age, in which planets should have had enough time to form in debris disks. The fact that none were detected

  4. Pulsar timing and general relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Backer, D. C.; Hellings, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    Techniques are described for accounting for relativistic effects in the analysis of pulsar signals. Design features of instrumentation used to achieve millisecond accuracy in the signal measurements are discussed. The accuracy of the data permits modeling the pulsar physical characteristics from the natural glitches in the emissions. Relativistic corrections are defined for adjusting for differences between the pulsar motion in its spacetime coordinate system relative to the terrestrial coordinate system, the earth's motion, and the gravitational potentials of solar system bodies. Modifications of the model to allow for a binary pulsar system are outlined, including treatment of the system as a point mass. Finally, a quadrupole model is presented for gravitational radiation and techniques are defined for using pulsars in the search for gravitational waves.

  5. Pulsar timing and general relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Backer, D. C.; Hellings, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    Techniques are described for accounting for relativistic effects in the analysis of pulsar signals. Design features of instrumentation used to achieve millisecond accuracy in the signal measurements are discussed. The accuracy of the data permits modeling the pulsar physical characteristics from the natural glitches in the emissions. Relativistic corrections are defined for adjusting for differences between the pulsar motion in its spacetime coordinate system relative to the terrestrial coordinate system, the earth's motion, and the gravitational potentials of solar system bodies. Modifications of the model to allow for a binary pulsar system are outlined, including treatment of the system as a point mass. Finally, a quadrupole model is presented for gravitational radiation and techniques are defined for using pulsars in the search for gravitational waves.

  6. Magnetars and white dwarf pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobato, Ronaldo V.; Malheiro, Manuel; Coelho, Jaziel G.

    2016-07-01

    The anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs) and soft gamma-ray repeaters (SGRs) are a class of pulsars understood as neutron stars (NSs) with super strong surface magnetic fields, namely B ≳ 1014G, and for that reason are known as magnetars. However, in the last years, some SGRs/AXPs with low surface magnetic fields B ˜ (1012-1013)G have been detected, challenging the magnetar description. Moreover, some fast and very magnetic white dwarfs (WDs) have also been observed, and at least one showed X-ray energy emission as an ordinary pulsar. Following this fact, an alternative model based on WDs pulsars has been proposed to explain this special class of pulsars. In this model, AXPs and SGRs as dense and magnetized WDs can have surface magnetic field B ˜ 107-1010 G and rotate very fast with frequencies Ω ˜ 1rad/s, consistent with the observed rotation periods P ˜ (2-12)s.

  7. Sensitivity of Pulsar Timing Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siemens, Xavier

    2015-08-01

    For the better part of the last decade, the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves (NANOGrav) has been using the Green Bank and Arecibo radio telescopes to monitor millisecond pulsars. NANOGrav, along with similar international collaborations, the European Pulsar Timing Array and the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array in Australia, form a consortium of consortia: the International Pulsar Timing Array (IPTA). The goal of the IPTA is to directly detect low-frequency gravitational waves which cause small changes to the times of arrival of radio pulses from millisecond pulsars. In this talk I will discuss the work of NANOGrav and the IPTA as well as our sensitivity to gravitational waves from astrophysical sources. I will show that a detection is possible by the end of the decade.

  8. Millisecond pulsars: Timekeepers of the cosmos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaspi, Victoria M.

    1995-01-01

    A brief discussion on the characteristics of pulsars is given followed by a review of millisecond pulsar discoveries including the very first, PRS B1937+21, discovered in 1982. Methods of timing millisecond pulsars and the accuracy of millisecond pulsars as clocks are discussed. Possible reasons for the pulse residuals, or differences between the observed and predicted pulse arrival times for millisecond pulsars, are given.

  9. Pulsar Bursts Coming From Beachball-Sized Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-03-01

    mystery. With the help of engineers at the NRAO, Hankins and his team designed and built specialized electronic equipment that allowed them to study the pulsar's radio pulses on extremely small time scales. They took this equipment to the National Science Foundation's giant, 1,000-foot-diameter radio telescope at Arecibo. With their equipment, they analyzed the Crab pulsar's superstrong "giant" pulses, breaking them down into tiny time segments. The researchers discovered that some of the "giant" pulses contain subpulses that last no longer than two nanoseconds. That means, they say, that the regions in which these subpulses are generated can be no larger than about two feet across -- the distance that light could travel in two nanoseconds. This fact, the researchers say, is critically important to understanding how the powerful radio emission is generated. A pulsar's magnetosphere -- the region above the neutron star's magnetic poles where the radio waves are generated -- is "the most exotic environment in the Universe," said Kern. In this environment, matter exists as a plasma, in which electrically charged particles are free to respond to the very strong electric and magnetic fields in the star's atmosphere. The very short subpulses the researchers detected could only be generated, they say, by a strange process in which density waves in the plasma interact with their own electrical field, becoming progressively denser until they reach a point at which they "collapse explosively" into superstrong bursts of radio waves. "None of the other proposed mechanisms can produce such short pulses," Eilek said. "The ability to examine these pulses on such short time scales has given us a new window through which to study pulsar radio emission," she added. The Crab pulsar is one of only three pulsars known to emit superstrong "giant" pulses. "Giant" pulses occur occasionally among the steady but much weaker "normal" pulses coming from the neutron star. Some of the brief subpulses

  10. [Pulsar perimetry. A review and new results].

    PubMed

    Gonzalez de la Rosa, M; Gonzalez-Hernandez, M

    2013-02-01

    We present a review and update on Pulsar perimetry, which combines temporal frequency, contrast and spatial frequency stimuli. The effects of age, visual acuity, and learning on results are described. Data on threshold fluctuation, signal-to-noise ratio, and the possibility of reducing noise with filtering techniques are provided. We describe its dynamic range and the possibility of compensating for profound defects. Finally, we show the results obtained in normal patients and in those with ocular hypertension or initial glaucoma, as well as an analysis of glaucoma progression.

  11. Six faint gamma-ray pulsars seen with the Fermi Large Area Telescope: Towards a sample blending into the background

    DOE PAGES

    Hou, X.; Smith, D. A.; Guillemot, L.; ...

    2014-10-14

    Context. Here, GeV gamma-ray pulsations from over 140 pulsars have been characterized using the Fermi Large Area Telescope, enabling improved understanding of the emission regions within the neutron star magnetospheres, and the contributions of pulsars to high energy electrons and diffuse gamma rays in the Milky Way. The first gamma-ray pulsars to be detected were the most intense and/or those with narrow pulses. Aims. As the Fermi mission progresses, progressively fainter objects can be studied. In addition to more distant pulsars (thus probing a larger volume of the Galaxy), or ones in high background regions (thus improving the sampling uniformitymore » across the Galactic plane), we detect pulsars with broader pulses or lower luminosity. Adding pulsars to our catalog with inclination angles that are rare in the observed sample, and/or with lower spindown power, will reduce the bias in the currently known gamma-ray pulsar population. Methods. We use rotation ephemerides derived from radio observations to phase-fold gamma rays recorded by the Fermi Large Area Telescope, to then determine the pulse profile properties. Spectral analysis provides the luminosities and, when the signal-to-noise ratio allows, the cutoff energies. We constrain the pulsar distances by different means in order to minimize the luminosity uncertainties. Results. We present six new gamma-ray pulsars with an eclectic mix of properties. Three are young, and three are recycled. They include the farthest, the lowest power, two of the highest duty-cycle pulsars seen, and only the fourth young gamma-ray pulsar with a radio interpulse. Finally, we discuss the biases existing in the current gamma-ray pulsar catalog, and steps to be taken to mitigate the bias.« less

  12. Pulsars in binary systems: probing binary stellar evolution and general relativity.

    PubMed

    Stairs, Ingrid H

    2004-04-23

    Radio pulsars in binary orbits often have short millisecond spin periods as a result of mass transfer from their companion stars. They therefore act as very precise, stable, moving clocks that allow us to investigate a large set of otherwise inaccessible astrophysical problems. The orbital parameters derived from high-precision binary pulsar timing provide constraints on binary evolution, characteristics of the binary pulsar population, and the masses of neutron stars with different mass-transfer histories. These binary systems also test gravitational theories, setting strong limits on deviations from general relativity. Surveys for new pulsars yield new binary systems that increase our understanding of all these fields and may open up whole new areas of physics, as most spectacularly evidenced by the recent discovery of an extremely relativistic double-pulsar system.

  13. FSSC Science Tools: Pulsar Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Dave

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the typical pulsar analysis, giving tips for screening of the data, the use of time series analysis, and utility tools. Specific information about analyzing Vela data is reviewed.

  14. Fermi's New Pulsar Detection Technique

    NASA Image and Video Library

    To locate a pulsar in Fermi LAT data requires knowledge of the object’s sky position, its pulse period, and how the pulse rate slows over time. Computers check many different combinations of posi...

  15. Millisecond radio pulsars in globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbunt, Frank; Lewin, Walter H. G.; van Paradijs, Jan

    1989-04-01

    It is shown that the number of millisecond radio pulsars, in globular clusters, should be larger than 100, applying the standard scenario that all the pulsars descend from low-mass X-ray binaries. Moreover, most of the pulsars are located in a small number of clusters. The prediction that Teran 5 and Liller 1 contain at least about a dozen millisecond radio pulsars each is made. The observations of millisecond radio pulsars in globular clusters to date, in particular the discovery of two millisecond radio pulsars in 47 Tuc, are in agreement with the standard scenario, in which the neutron star is spun up during the mass transfer phase.

  16. Millisecond radio pulsars in globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbunt, Frank; Lewin, Walter H. G.; van Paradijs, Jan

    1989-11-01

    It is shown that the number of millisecond radio pulsars, in globular clusters, should be larger than 100, applying the standard scenario that all the pulsars descend from low-mass X-ray binaries. Moreover, most of the pulsars are located in a small number of clusters. The prediction that Teran 5 and Liller 1 contain at least about a dozen millisecond radio pulsars each is made. The observations of millisecond radio pulsars in globular clusters to date, in particular the discovery of two millisecond radio pulsars in 47 Tuc, are in agreement with the standard scenario, in which the neutron star is spun up during the mass transfer phase.

  17. Millisecond radio pulsars in globular clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verbunt, Frank; Lewin, Walter H. G.; Vanparadijs, Jan

    1989-01-01

    It is shown that the number of millisecond radio pulsars, in globular clusters, should be larger than 100, applying the standard scenario that all the pulsars descend from low-mass X-ray binaries. Moreover, most of the pulsars are located in a small number of clusters. The prediction that Teran 5 and Liller 1 contain at least about a dozen millisecond radio pulsars each is made. The observations of millisecond radio pulsars in globular clusters to date, in particular the discovery of two millisecond radio pulsars in 47 Tuc, are in agreement with the standard scenario, in which the neutron star is spun up during the mass transfer phase.

  18. The LOFAR Pulsar Data Pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexov, A.; Hessels, J.; Mol, J. D.; Stappers, B.; van Leeuwen, J.

    2010-12-01

    The LOw Frequency ARray (LOFAR) for radio astronomy is being built in the Netherlands by ASTRON, with extensions throughout Europe. LOFAR operates at radio frequencies below 250 MHz. The project is an interferometric array of radio antennas grouped into stations that are distributed over an area of hundreds of kilometers. LOFAR will revolutionise low-frequency radio astronomy. Transient radio phenomena and pulsars are one of six LOFAR Key Science Projects (KSPs). As part of the Transients KSP, the Pulsar Working Group has been developing the LOFAR Pulsar Data Pipeline to both study known pulsars as well as search for new ones. The pipeline is being developed for the Blue Gene/P (BG/P) supercomputer and a large Linux cluster in order to utilize enormous amounts of computation capabilities (˜ 50 Tflops) and data streams of up to 23TB/hour. The LOFAR pipeline output will be using the Hierarchical Data Format 5 (HDF5) to efficiently store large amounts of numerical data, and to manage complex data encompassing a variety of data types, across distributed storage and processing architectures. We present the LOFAR Pulsar Data Pipeline overview, the pulsar beam-formed data format, the status of the pipeline processing as well as our future plans for developing additional transient pipelines.

  19. Radio pulsar disk electrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michel, F. C.

    1983-01-01

    Macroscopic physics are discussed for the case of a disk close to an isolated, magnetized, rotating neutron star that acts as a Faraday disk dynamo, while the disk acts as both a load and a neutral sheet. This sheet allows the polar cap current to return to the neutron star, splitting a dipolar field into two monopolar halves. The dominant energy loss is from the stellar wind torque, and the next contribution is dissipation in the auroral zones, where the current returns to the star in a 5 cm-thick sheet. The disk itself may be a source of visible radiation comparable to that in pulsed radio frequency emission. As the pulsar ages, the disk expands and narrows into a ring which, it is suggested, may lead to a cessation of pulsed emission at periods of a few sec.

  20. Electromagnetic cascades in pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daugherty, J. K.; Harding, A. K.

    1981-01-01

    The development of pair photon cascades initiated by high energy electrons above a pulsar polar cap is simulated numerically. The calculation uses the energy of the primary electron, the magnetic field strength, and the period of rotation as parameters and follows the curvature radiation emitted by the primary, the conversion of this radiation e(+) - e(-) pairs in the intense fields, and the quantized synchrotron radiation by the secondary pairs. A recursive technique allows the tracing of an indefinite number of generations using a Monte Carlo method. Gamma ray and pair spectra are calculated for cascades in different parts of the polar cap and with different acceleration models. It is found that synchrotron radiation from secondary pairs makes an important contribution to the gamma ray spectrum above 25 MeV, and that the final gamma ray and pair spectra are insensitive to the height of the accelerating region, as long as the acceleration of the primary electrons is not limited by radiation reaction.

  1. Radio pulsar disk electrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michel, F. C.

    1983-01-01

    Macroscopic physics are discussed for the case of a disk close to an isolated, magnetized, rotating neutron star that acts as a Faraday disk dynamo, while the disk acts as both a load and a neutral sheet. This sheet allows the polar cap current to return to the neutron star, splitting a dipolar field into two monopolar halves. The dominant energy loss is from the stellar wind torque, and the next contribution is dissipation in the auroral zones, where the current returns to the star in a 5 cm-thick sheet. The disk itself may be a source of visible radiation comparable to that in pulsed radio frequency emission. As the pulsar ages, the disk expands and narrows into a ring which, it is suggested, may lead to a cessation of pulsed emission at periods of a few sec.

  2. Ion-proton pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, P. B.

    2016-07-01

    Evidence derived with minimal assumptions from existing published observations is presented to show that an ion-proton plasma is the source of radio-frequency emission in millisecond and in normal isolated pulsars. There is no primary involvement of electron-positron pairs. This conclusion has also been reached by studies of the plasma composition based on well-established particle-physics processes in neutron stars with positive polar-cap corotational charge density. This work has been published in a series of papers which are also summarized here. It is now confirmed by simple analyses of the observed radio-frequency characteristics, and its implications for the further study of neutron stars are outlined.

  3. Pulsars In The Headlines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Puerto, C.

    1967 was the year of the so-called “war of the six days” or “third Arab Israeli war”, the year of the Che Guevara's death in Bolivia, the year of the military coup in Greece and, in medicine, the year of the first human heart transplant. Moreover, the signing of the international agreement on the use of space with peaceful means and the crash of the Russian shuttle Soyuz-1, with Cosmonaut Vladimir Kamarov on board also happened that year. Likewise, Spanish writer and professor of journalists, José Azorín, passed away. However, here we are interested in 1967 because it was the year of the detection of pulsars, which astronomers initially confused with signals from extraterrestrials or Little Green Men. Nowadays, they are still present in the headlines.

  4. a Surprise from the Pulsar in the Crab Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-11-01

    century. It thus shows many more spectral details. The analysis of the spectrum required very careful work; as would be expected, it was in particular the effective `subtraction' of the background light from the Crab Nebula that caused the greatest problem. The new, first-ever `clean', high-resolution optical spectrum of a pulsar, is a spectacular scientific result; the corresponding graph and its caption are attached to this Press Release. First of all, the overall shape of the spectrum, i.e. the dependance of the emission from the pulsar on wavelength is now defined with unprecedented accuracy. Theory predicts a straight line; this is well confirmed and the slope of the line can be determined with a precision better than 1 percent. This new measurement has a direct implication for our understanding of the acceleration of energetic particles, close to the surface of the pulsar and also of the structure and intensity of its magnetic field. A Mysterious Feature in the New Spectrum Moreover, for the first time a feature is detected in the spectrum. Close to 5900 A (590 nm), i.e. at a wavelength that corresponds to orange light, a rather wide absorption `dip' (100 A or 10 nm) is apparent in the otherwise featureless spectrum. It goes without saying that the astronomers have checked very carefully whether this feature might not, after all, have an origin outside the pulsar. But the measurements show that this dip is neither due to the Earth's atmosphere, absorption in interstellar space between the pulsar and us, nor absorption in the Crab Nebula around the pulsar. It thus appears firmly established that this feature must arise in the immediate surroundings of the neutron star. What is the cause of this mysterious dip? Unfortunately, the present measurements do not allow a firm interpretation as to its physical nature. Normally the exact wavelength of a spectral feature will indicate the origin, but the observed wavelength does not correspond to any obvious feature in

  5. Fermi Finds Youthful Pulsar Among Ancient Stars

    NASA Image and Video Library

    In three years, NASA's Fermi has detected more than 100 gamma-ray pulsars, but something new has appeared. Among a type of pulsar with ages typically numbering a billion years or more, Fermi has fo...

  6. Equilibrium spin pulsars unite neutron star populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Wynn; Klus, Helen; Coe, Malcolm; Andersson, Nils

    2015-08-01

    We compare the large number of recent torque measurements of accreting pulsars with a high-mass companion to the standard model for how accretion affects the pulsar spin period. We find that many long spin period (P > 100 s) pulsars must possess either extremely weak (B < 10^10 G) or extremely strong (B > 10^14 G) magnetic fields. We argue that the strong-field solution is more compelling, in which case these pulsars are near spin equilibrium. Our results provide evidence for a fundamental link between pulsars with the slowest spin periods and strong magnetic fields around high-mass companions and pulsars with the fastest spin periods and weak fields around low-mass companions. The strong magnetic fields also connect our pulsars to magnetars and strong-field isolated radio/X-ray pulsars. The strong field and old age of our sources suggests their magnetic field penetrates into the superconducting core of the neutron star.

  7. Millisecond pulsars - Nature's most stable clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Joseph H., Jr.

    1991-07-01

    The author describes the role pulsars might play in time and frequency technology. Millisecond pulsars are rapidly rotating neutron stars: spherical flywheels some 20 km in diameter, 1.4 times as massive as the Sun, and spinning as fast as several thousand radians per second. Radio noise generated in a pulsar's magnetosphere by a highly beamed process is detectable over interstellar distances, as a periodic sequence of pulses similar to the ticks of an excellent clock. High-precision comparisons between pulsar time and terrestrial atomic time show that over intervals of several years, some millisecond pulsars have fractional stabilities comparable to those of the best atomic clocks. The author briefly reviews the physics of pulsars, discusses the techniques of pulsar timing measurements, and summarizes the results of careful studies of pulsar stabilities.

  8. Star Cluster Buzzing With Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-01-01

    A dense globular star cluster near the center of our Milky Way Galaxy holds a buzzing beehive of rapidly-spinning millisecond pulsars, according to astronomers who discovered 21 new pulsars in the cluster using the National Science Foundation's 100-meter Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) in West Virginia. The cluster, called Terzan 5, now holds the record for pulsars, with 24, including three known before the GBT observations. Pulsar Diagram Pulsar Diagram: Click on image for more detail. "We hit the jackpot when we looked at this cluster," said Scott Ransom, an astronomer at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in Charlottesville, VA. "Not only does this cluster have a lot of pulsars -- and we still expect to find more in it -- but the pulsars in it are very interesting. They include at least 13 in binary systems, two of which are eclipsing, and the four fastest-rotating pulsars known in any globular cluster, with the fastest two rotating nearly 600 times per second, roughly as fast as a household blender," Ransom added. Ransom and his colleagues reported their findings to the American Astronomical Society's meeting in San Diego, CA, and in the online journal Science Express. The star cluster's numerous pulsars are expected to yield a bonanza of new information about not only the pulsars themselves, but also about the dense stellar environment in which they reside and probably even about nuclear physics, according to the scientists. For example, preliminary measurements indicate that two of the pulsars are more massive than some theoretical models would allow. "All these exotic pulsars will keep us busy for years to come," said Jason Hessels, a Ph.D student at McGill University in Montreal. Globular clusters are dense agglomerations of up to millions of stars, all of which formed at about the same time. Pulsars are spinning, superdense neutron stars that whirl "lighthouse beams" of radio waves or light around as they spin. A neutron star is what is

  9. A New Standard Pulsar Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Contopoulos, Ioannis; Kalapotharakos, Constantinos; Kazanas, Demosthenes

    2014-01-01

    In view of recent efforts to probe the physical conditions in the pulsar current sheet, we revisit the standard solution that describes the main elements of the ideal force-free pulsar magnetosphere. The simple physical requirement that the electric current contained in the current layer consists of the local electric charge moving outward at close to the speed of light yields a new solution for the pulsar magnetosphere everywhere that is ideal force-free except in the current layer. The main elements of the new solution are as follows: (1) the pulsar spindown rate of the aligned rotator is 23% larger than that of the orthogonal vacuum rotator; (2) only 60% of the magnetic flux that crosses the light cylinder opens up to infinity; (3) the electric current closes along the other 40%, which gradually converges to the equator; (4) this transfers 40% of the total pulsar spindown energy flux in the equatorial current sheet, which is then dissipated in the acceleration of particles and in high-energy electromagnetic radiation; and (5) there is no separatrix current layer. Our solution is a minimum free-parameter solution in that the equatorial current layer is electrostatically supported against collapse and thus does not require a thermal particle population. In this respect, it is one more step toward the development of a new standard solution. We discuss the implications for intermittent pulsars and long-duration gamma-ray bursts. We conclude that the physical conditions in the equatorial current layer determine the global structure of the pulsar magnetosphere.

  10. A new standard pulsar magnetosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Contopoulos, Ioannis; Kalapotharakos, Constantinos; Kazanas, Demosthenes

    2014-01-20

    In view of recent efforts to probe the physical conditions in the pulsar current sheet, we revisit the standard solution that describes the main elements of the ideal force-free pulsar magnetosphere. The simple physical requirement that the electric current contained in the current layer consists of the local electric charge moving outward at close to the speed of light yields a new solution for the pulsar magnetosphere everywhere that is ideal force-free except in the current layer. The main elements of the new solution are as follows: (1) the pulsar spindown rate of the aligned rotator is 23% larger than that of the orthogonal vacuum rotator; (2) only 60% of the magnetic flux that crosses the light cylinder opens up to infinity; (3) the electric current closes along the other 40%, which gradually converges to the equator; (4) this transfers 40% of the total pulsar spindown energy flux in the equatorial current sheet, which is then dissipated in the acceleration of particles and in high-energy electromagnetic radiation; and (5) there is no separatrix current layer. Our solution is a minimum free-parameter solution in that the equatorial current layer is electrostatically supported against collapse and thus does not require a thermal particle population. In this respect, it is one more step toward the development of a new standard solution. We discuss the implications for intermittent pulsars and long-duration gamma-ray bursts. We conclude that the physical conditions in the equatorial current layer determine the global structure of the pulsar magnetosphere.

  11. What brakes the Crab pulsar?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čadež, A.; Zampieri, L.; Barbieri, C.; Calvani, M.; Naletto, G.; Barbieri, M.; Ponikvar, D.

    2016-03-01

    Context. Optical observations provide convincing evidence that the optical phase of the Crab pulsar follows the radio one closely. Since optical data do not depend on dispersion measure variations, they provide a robust and independent confirmation of the radio timing solution. Aims: The aim of this paper is to find a global mathematical description of Crab pulsar's phase as a function of time for the complete set of published Jodrell Bank radio ephemerides (JBE) in the period 1988-2014. Methods: We apply the mathematical techniques developed for analyzing optical observations to the analysis of JBE. We break the whole period into a series of episodes and express the phase of the pulsar in each episode as the sum of two analytical functions. The first function is the best-fitting local braking index law, and the second function represents small residuals from this law with an amplitude of only a few turns, which rapidly relaxes to the local braking index law. Results: From our analysis, we demonstrate that the power law index undergoes "instantaneous" changes at the time of observed jumps in rotational frequency (glitches). We find that the phase evolution of the Crab pulsar is dominated by a series of constant braking law episodes, with the braking index changing abruptly after each episode in the range of values between 2.1 and 2.6. Deviations from such a regular phase description behave as oscillations triggered by glitches and amount to fewer than 40 turns during the above period, in which the pulsar has made more than 2 × 1010 turns. Conclusions: Our analysis does not favor the explanation that glitches are connected to phenomena occurring in the interior of the pulsar. On the contrary, timing irregularities and changes in slow down rate seem to point to electromagnetic interaction of the pulsar with the surrounding environment.

  12. Pulsar Timing with the Fermi LAT

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-01

    Pulsar Timing with the Fermi LAT Paul S. Ray∗, Matthew Kerr†, Damien Parent∗∗ and the Fermi PSC‡ ∗Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Ave., SW...Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375, USA ‡Fermi Pulsar Search Consortium Abstract. We present an overview of precise pulsar timing using data from the Large...unbinned photon data. In addition to determining the spindown behavior of the pulsars and detecting glitches and timing noise, such timing analyses al

  13. A Wide Bandwidth Digital Recording System for Pulsar Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenet, F. A.; Unwin, S. C.; Prince, T. A.

    1995-12-01

    We have developed a powerful and flexible data acquisition system for pulsar astronomy, based on a 50 Mbyte/s commercial instrumentation tape recorder and a custom analog-digital VLSI digitizer chip. This system converts the problem of pulsar detection from largely hardware-oriented to mostly software-oriented. We are using the 512-node Intel Paragon XPS and Touchstone Delta supercomputers at Caltech for pulsar searching and analysis. The detection of fast pulsars requires (1) rapid time sampling, and (2) the ability to correct for dispersion (frequency-dependent time delay caused by charged particles in the interstellar medium). A conventional hardware approach involves a filterbank or correlator at the telescope, then sampling and recording the detected power. Our telescope hardware is relatively simple, performing only downconversion from RF or IF to baseband, followed by Nyquist sampling and (2-bit) digitizing the voltage signal by the custom VLSI chip, then storage on ANSI D1 videocassette. One D1-L cassette allows continuous recording of two polarizations each with 50 MHz bandwidth for 32 minutes, or 25 MHz for 64 minutes. In software we can de-disperse the pulse signals by synthesizing a filterbank with an arbitrary number of frequency channels. Coherent dedispersion can be performed on the voltage (but not power) data, allowing time resolutions down to the inverse RF bandwidth to be achieved in principle. We present first results from observations in July 1995 at the 64-m telescope at Parkes Observatory, Australia Telescope National Facility. These results on known pulsars, including faint globular cluster millisecond-period pulsars, demonstrate the capabilities of our data recording and analysis system.

  14. Progression to Problem Drinking Among Mexican American and White European First-Year College Students: A Multiple Group Analysis*

    PubMed Central

    Schweizer, C. Amanda; Doran, Neal; Roesch, Scott C.; Myers, Mark G.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Problem drinking during college is a well-known phenomenon. However, predictors of progression to problematic drinking, particularly among ethnic minorities such as Mexican Americans, have received limited research attention. Method: The current study compared the rates and predictors of problem drinking progression from the first to the second year of college among four groups: Mexican American men, Mexican American women, White European men, and White European women (N = 215). At baseline, participants were all first-year college students who scored as nonproblem drinkers on the Young Adult Alcohol Problems Screening Test (YAAPST). Participants were classified as progressors or stable nondrinkers/nonproblem drinkers based on YAAPST scores 12 months later. Hypothesized predictors of progression included behavioral undercontrol, negative emotionality, alcohol use expectancies, and cultural orientation (Mexican American sample only). Differences were anticipated between gender and ethnic groups in both progression rates and predictors of progression. Results: Twenty-nine percent of the sample progressed to problematic drinking; however, no differences emerged by gender or ethnicity. For the full sample, higher behavioral undercontrol and higher negative emotionality significantly predicted progression. Differences in predictors were not found across gender and ethnic subgroups. Conclusions: The hypothesis that rates of progression to problem drinking would differ among the four gender and ethnic groups was not supported. Thus, although White European men are most often identified as at high risk for alcohol use problems, the present findings indicate that women and Mexican American students also should be targeted for prevention and/or intervention. PMID:22051211

  15. Progression to problem drinking among Mexican American and White European first-year college students: a multiple group analysis.

    PubMed

    Schweizer, C Amanda; Doran, Neal; Roesch, Scott C; Myers, Mark G

    2011-11-01

    Problem drinking during college is a well-known phenomenon. However, predictors of progression to problematic drinking, particularly among ethnic minorities such as Mexican Americans, have received limited research attention. The current study compared the rates and predictors of problem drinking progression from the first to the second year of college among four groups: Mexican American men, Mexican American women, White European men, and White European women (N = 215). At baseline, participants were all first-year college students who scored as nonproblem drinkers on the Young Adult Alcohol Problems Screening Test (YAAPST). Participants were classified as progressors or stable nondrinkers/nonproblem drinkers based on YAAPST scores 12 months later. Hypothesized predictors of progression included behavioral undercontrol, negative emotionality, alcohol use expectancies, and cultural orientation (Mexican American sample only). Differences were anticipated between gender and ethnic groups in both progression rates and predictors of progression. Twenty-nine percent of the sample progressed to problematic drinking; however, no differences emerged by gender or ethnicity. For the full sample, higher behavioral undercontrol and higher negative emotionality significantly predicted progression. Differences in predictors were not found across gender and ethnic subgroups. The hypothesis that rates of progression to problem drinking would differ among the four gender and ethnic groups was not supported. Thus, although White European men are most often identified as at high risk for alcohol use problems, the present findings indicate that women and Mexican American students also should be targeted for prevention and/or intervention.

  16. X-ray spectra of the Crab pulsar and nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pravdo, S. H.; Serlemitsos, P. J.

    1981-01-01

    The spectrum of the Crab pulsar was measued from 2 to 50 keV as a function of pulse phase and a progressive hardening and subsequent softening of the spectrum across the pulse was found. The fraction of the pulsed flux which exhibits spectral variability is 0.14 and is concentrated solely in the region between the two peaks. A model is suggested in which the pulsed X-ray emission from the Crab pulsar consists of two components: one which has no spectral dependence with pulse phase and which is physically related to the double peaked gama ray pulse and, perhaps, the radio and optical pulses; and another component which exhibits spectral variability with pulse phase is confined to and comprises the interpeak emission, and which is only seen at X-ray energies. These results and studies of the binary X-ray pulsar Hercules X-1 suggest a phenomonological similarity. If the spectrally varying component in the Crab pulsar arises from a hot, magnetized plasma near the neutron star surface then higher energy spectral observations of this phase region might reveal spectral features which can be used to determine the surface field strength.

  17. Pulsar Wind Nebulae, Space Velocities and Supernova Remnant Associations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    I am pleased to be able to report significant progress in my research relevant to my LTSA grant. This progress I believe is demonstrated by a long list of publications in 2002, as detailed below. I summarize the research results my collaborators and I obtained in 2002. First, my group announced the major discovery of soft-gamma-repeater-like X-ray bursts from the anomalous X-ray pulsars lE-1048.1$-$5937 and lE-2259+586, using the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer. This result provides an elegant and long-sought-after confirmation that this class of objects and the soft gamma repeaters share a common nature, namely that they are magnetars. Magnetars are a novel manifestation of young neutron stars, quite different from conventional Crab-like radio pulsars. This discovery was made as part of our regular monitoring program, among the goals of which was to detect such outbursts.

  18. Air pollution control by economic incentives in the U.S.: Policy, problems, and progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakhani, Hyder

    1982-01-01

    This paper deals with cost-effectiveness of the economic incentive policies of the bubble concept and offset credits relative to the policy of direct regulations of air emissions. The second section discusses single- and multi-plant bubbles, their adoption across regions and industries, the methods used to control emissions and the extent of savings in costs. We conclude that despite the delay resulting from duplication of review of state implementation plans by both the state and the Environmental Protection Agency, the required technological commands, the requirement to model air quality and the restrictions to permit bubbling only in the attainment areas, the policy is progressing successfully and should be encouraged by eliminating the restrictions. The third section analyzes the policy of emission offset credit, trading, and banking which can permit economic growth in nonattainment areas. It reviews the available literature, which deals only with aggregation of offsets across cities instead of individual offset trades. Progress by individual offset trades is analyzed in terms of the number of offsets, their acceptance across regions, the extent of reductions in emissions, and the classification of the offsets into internal and external trades. Comparison of estimated capital costs and prices of individual offsets with direct regulation costs reveals that the former are economical. We conclude that despite the problems of high tradeoff ratios, the short and uncertain life of the emission offset credits and the technological commands, the policy is progressing successfully and should be encouraged further by relaxing restrictions.

  19. Monitoring The Crab Pulsar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rots, Arnold H.; Swank, Jean (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The monitoring of the X-ray pulses from the Crab pulsar is still ongoing at the time of this writing, and we hope to be able to continue the campaign for the life of the XTE mission. We have established beyond all doubt that: (1) the X-ray main pulse leads the radio pulse by approximately 300 microseconds, (2) this phase lag is constant and not influenced by glitches, (3) this lag does not depend on X-ray energy, (4) the relative phase of the two X-ray pulses does not vary, and (5) the spectral indices of primary, secondary, and inter-pulse are distinct and constant. At this time we are investigating whether the radio timing ephemeris can be replaced by an x-ray ephemeris and whether any long-time timing ephemeris can be established. If so, it would enable use to study variations in pulse arrival times at a longer time scales. Such a study is easier in x-rays than at radio wavelengths since the dispersion measure plays no role. These results were reported at the 2000 HEAD Meeting in Honolulu, HI. Travel was paid partly out of this grant. The remainder was applied toward the acquisition of a laptop computer that allows independent and fast analysis of all monitoring observations.

  20. Progressive Transitions from Algorithmic to Conceptual Understanding in Student Ability To Solve Chemistry Problems: A Lakatosian Interpretation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niaz, Mansoor

    The main objective of this study is to construct models based on strategies students use to solve chemistry problems and to show that these models form sequences of progressive transitions similar to what Lakatos (1970) in the history of science refers to as progressive 'problemshifts' that increase the explanatory' heuristic power of the models.…

  1. Formation of Planets around Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banit, M.; Ruderman, M. A.; Shaham, J.; Applegate, J. H.

    1993-10-01

    Pulse arrival-time delays PSR 1257+ 12 suggest the existence of at least two planets in nearly circular orbits around it. In this paper we discuss different scenarios for the formation of planets in circular orbits around pulsars. Among other topics, we look in some detail at wind emission mechanisms that are particularly relevant to the process of evaporation of planets around pulsars and discuss their possible role in orbit circularization. We conclude that the formation of such planets may occur in a very late phase of low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) or binary millisecond pulsar (BMP) evolution. Evaporation of the companion star in these phases supplies matter to a circumbinary "excretion" disk in which the physical conditions, similar to those appropriate for the BMP 1957+20 system, may allow the formation of planets like those observed in PSR 1257+12.

  2. The Crab pulsar at VHE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanin, Roberta

    2017-03-01

    The last six years have witnessed major revisions of our knowledge about the Crab Pulsar. The consensus scenario for the origin of the high-energy pulsed emission has been challenged with the discovery of a very-high-energy power law tail extending up to 400 GeV, above the expected spectral cut off at a few GeV. Now, new measurements obtained by the MAGIC collaboration extend the energy spectrum of the Crab Pulsar even further, on the TeV regime. Above 400 GeV the pulsed emission comes mainly from the interpulse, which becomes more prominent with energy due to a harder spectral index. These findings require γ -ray production via inverse Compton scattering close to or beyond the light cylinder radius by an underlying particle population with Lorentz factors greater than 5 × 106. We will present those new results and discuss the implications in our current knowledge concerning pulsar environments.

  3. Gamma Ray Pulsars: Multiwavelength Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, David J.

    2004-01-01

    High-energy gamma rays are a valuable tool for studying particle acceleration and radiation in the magnetospheres of energetic pulsars. The seven or more pulsars seen by instruments on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) show that: the light curves usually have double-peak structures (suggesting a broad cone of emission); gamma rays are frequently the dominant component of the radiated power; and all the spectra show evidence of a high-energy turnover. For all the known gamma-ray pulsars, multiwavelength observations and theoretical models based on such observations offer the prospect of gaining a broad understanding of these rotating neutron stars. The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), now in planning for a launch in 2006, will provide a major advance in sensitivity, energy range, and sky coverage.

  4. PINT, a New Pulsar Timing Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Jing; Jenet, Fredrick A.; Ransom, Scott M.; Demorest, Paul; Van Haasteren, Rutger; Archibald, Anne

    2015-01-01

    We are presenting a new pulsar timing software PINT. The current pulsar timing group are heavily depending on Tempo/Tempo2, a package for analysis pulsar data. However, for a high accuracy pulsar timing related project, such as pulsar timing for gravitational waves, an alternative software is needed for the purpose of examing the results. We are developing a Tempo independent software with a different structure. Different modules is designed to be more isolated and easier to be expanded. Instead of C, we are using Python as our programming language for the advantage of flexibility and powerful docstring. Here, we are presenting the detailed design and the first result of the software.

  5. The Disturbance of a Millisecond Pulsar Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shannon, R. M.; Lentati, L. T.; Kerr, M.; Bailes, M.; Bhat, N. D. R.; Coles, W. A.; Dai, S.; Dempsey, J.; Hobbs, G.; Keith, M. J.; Lasky, P. D.; Levin, Y.; Manchester, R. N.; Osłowski, S.; Ravi, V.; Reardon, D. J.; Rosado, P. A.; Spiewak, R.; van Straten, W.; Toomey, L.; Wang, J.-B.; Wen, L.; You, X.-P.; Zhu, X.-J.

    2016-09-01

    Pulsar timing has enabled some of the strongest tests of fundamental physics. Central to the technique is the assumption that the detected radio pulses can be used to accurately measure the rotation of the pulsar. Here, we report on a broadband variation in the pulse profile of the millisecond pulsar J1643-1224. A new component of emission suddenly appears in the pulse profile, decays over four months, and results in a permanently modified pulse shape. Profile variations such as these may be the origin of timing noise observed in other millisecond pulsars. The sensitivity of pulsar-timing observations to gravitational radiation can be increased by accounting for this variability.

  6. Braking Indices of Pulsars Obtained in the Presence of an Effective Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magalhães, Nadja S.; Okada, André S.; Frajuca, Carlos

    The theoretical calculation of braking indices of pulsars is still an open problem. In this work we present a study on this issue which adapts the model that assumes that pulsars are rotating magnetic dipoles by introducing a compensating component in the energy conservation equation of the system. Such component relates to an effective force that varies with the first power of the tangential velocity of the pulsar’s crust. We tested the proposed model using data available.

  7. Galactic X-ray emission from pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, A. K.

    1981-01-01

    The contribution of pulsars to the gamma-ray flux from the galactic plane is examined using data from the most recent pulsar surveys. It is assumed that pulsar gamma-rays are produced by curvature radiation from relativistic particles above the polar cap and attenuated by pair production in the strong magnetic and electric fields. Assuming that all pulsars produce gamma-rays in this way, their luminosities can be predicted as a function of period and magnetic field strength. Using the distribution of pulsars in the galaxy as determined from data on 328 pulsars detected in three surveys, the local gamma-ray production spectrum, the longitude profile, and the latitude profile of pulsar gamma-ray flux are calculated. The largest sources of uncertainty in the size of the pulsar contribution are the value of the mean interstellar electron density, the turnover in the pulsar radio luminosity function, and the average pulsar magnetic field strength. A present estimate is that pulsars contribute from 15 to 20 % of the total flux of gamma-rays from the galactic plane.

  8. Proper Motions of High Galactic Latitude Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGary, R.; Goss, M.; Fruchter, A.; Thorsett, S.

    1997-12-01

    Although the locations of over 600 pulsars are known today, their birthplaces remain somewhat of an enigma. It has been conjectured by Narayan and Ostriker (1990) that there are two different types of pulsars in the Galaxy, one born near the Galactic plane and a second born high above the plane with large velocities. The existence of two distinct subpopulations would account for the observations by Harrison, Lyne, and Anderson (1993) of four pulsars with velocities toward the Galactic plane. Thirteen of the 31 pulsars in our group have been observed at two epochs at 20 cm at the VLA in Socorro, New Mexico. This pulsar data is unique in that it was taken at the VLA using a "matched filter." The pulsar was detected using the Princeton Mark III Timing Machine and the correlator was then gated with the correct phase so that it only gathered data when the pulsar was "on." By gating our data, we have been able to increase the signal to noise ratio of weak pulsars by a factor of six. This increased SNR enables us to accurately determined positions for pulsars as weak as 2 mJy in the ungated data. By doubling the number of pulsars high above the Galactic plane with measured proper motions, we will be able to improve our understanding of the birth and evolution of the pulsar population.

  9. Crustal entrainment and pulsar glitches.

    PubMed

    Chamel, N

    2013-01-04

    Large pulsar frequency glitches are generally interpreted as sudden transfers of angular momentum between the neutron superfluid permeating the inner crust and the rest of the star. Despite the absence of viscous drag, the neutron superfluid is strongly coupled to the crust due to nondissipative entrainment effects. These effects are shown to severely limit the maximum amount of angular momentum that can possibly be transferred during glitches. In particular, it is found that the glitches observed in the Vela pulsar require an additional reservoir of angular momentum.

  10. Centrifugal Acceleration in Pulsar Magnetospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, R. M. C.; Gangadhara, R. T.

    We present a relativistic model of pulsar radio emission by plasma accelerated along the rotating magnetic field lines projected on to a 2D plane perpendicular to the rotation axis. We have derived the expression for the trajectory of a particle, and estimated the spectrum of radio emission by the plasma bunches. We used the parameters given by Peyman &Gangadhara (2002). The analytical expressions for the Stokes parameters are obtained, and their values compared with the observed profiles. The one sense of circular polarization, observed in many pulsars, can be explained in light of our model.

  11. Sporadically Emitting Pulsars at Low Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, B. W.; Tremblay, S. E.; Bhat, N. D. R.; Shannon, R. M.

    2017-01-01

    Sporadic emission from pulsars has long been observed, however, the mechanism which causes the intermittency is still a mystery. The proposed observations of three nulling pulsars (J0659+1414, J2048-1616 and J1456-6843), two Rotating Radio Transients (J0410-31 and J1423-56) and one intermittent pulsar (J1107-5907) will provide information on pulsar emission over a variety of time scales. Studying these objects at low frequencies allows us to explore the links between the different populations and how the sporadic emission evolves with frequency. Ultimately, studying these extraordinary pulsars gives us new insight into the dynamic nature of the emission processes and pulsar magnetosphere. This information is imperative for linking models and theories regarding pulsar radio emission physics to the myriad sporadic emission phenomena we observe.

  12. Pulsar gamma rays from polar cap regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiang, James; Romani, Roger W.

    1992-01-01

    The production is studied of pulsar gamma rays by energetic electrons flowing in the open field region above pulsar polar caps. The propagation was followed of curvature radiation from primary electrons, as well as hard synchrotron radiation generated by secondary pairs, through the pulsar magnetosphere for vacuum dipole open field geometries. Using data from radio and optical observations, models were constructed for the specific geometries and viewing angles appropriate to particular pulsars. These detailed models produce normalized spectra above 10 MeV, pulse profiles, beaming fractions and phase resolved spectra appropriate for direct comparison with COS-B and GRO data. Models are given for the Crab, Vela, and other potentially detectable pulsars; general agreement with existing data is good, although perturbations to the simplified models are needed for close matches. The calculations were extended to the millisecond pulsar range, which allows the production of predictions for the flux and spectra of populations of recycled pulsars and search strategies are pointed out.

  13. From FERMI-LAT observations to the blind pulsar survey SPAN512 with the Nançay Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Octau, F.; Desvignes, G.; Cognard, I.; Champion, D.; Lazarus, P.; Smith, D.; Theureau, G.

    2016-12-01

    Since the discovery of the first pulsar in 1967, we know over 2500 pulsars today. Pulsars offer a broad range of studies: from the study of the properties of interstellar medium and of pulsar magnetospheres up to test of gravity in the strong-field regime and the characterisation of the cosmological Gravitation Wave Background. This explains why we keep searching for pulsars nowadays. Such focus was initiated at the Nançay Radio Telescope (NRT) with the observation of unidentified Fermi-LAT sources, which led to the quick discovery of three new millisecond pulsars. In 2012, a blind pulsar survey called SPAN512 (in reference to the large bandwidth of 512 MHz) was initiated and the NRT began to observe the low galactic latitude sky at 1.4 GHz. This survey is still in progress (≈90% of the observations have been made) and, up to now, it has led to the discovery of three pulsars, two of them with millisecond spin periods.

  14. YOUNG RADIO PULSARS IN GALACTIC GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Boyles, J.; Lorimer, D. R.; Turk, P. J.; Mnatsakanov, R.; Lynch, R. S.; Ransom, S. M.; Freire, P. C.; Belczynski, K.

    2011-11-20

    Currently three isolated radio pulsars and one binary radio pulsar with no evidence of any previous recycling are known in 97 surveyed Galactic globular clusters (GCs). As pointed out by Lyne et al., the presence of these pulsars cannot be explained by core-collapse supernovae, as commonly assumed for their counterparts in the Galactic disk. We apply a Bayesian analysis to the results from surveys for radio pulsars in GCs and find the number of potentially observable non-recycled radio pulsars present in all clusters to be <3600. Accounting for beaming and retention considerations, the implied birthrate for any formation scenario for all 97 clusters is <0.25 pulsars century{sup -1} assuming a Maxwellian distribution of velocities with a dispersion of 10 km s{sup -1}. The implied birthrates for higher velocity dispersions are substantially higher than inferred for such pulsars in the Galactic disk. This suggests that the velocity dispersion of young pulsars in GCs is significantly lower than those of disk pulsars. These numbers may be substantial overestimates due to the fact that the currently known sample of young pulsars is observed only in metal-rich clusters. We propose that young pulsars may only be formed in GCs with metallicities with log[Fe/H] > - 0.6. In this case, the potentially observable population of such young pulsars is 447{sup +1420}{sub -399} (the error bars give a 95% confidence interval) and their birthrate is 0.012{sup +0.037}{sub -0.010} pulsars century{sup -1}. The most likely creation scenario to explain these pulsars is the electron capture supernova of an OMgNe white dwarf.

  15. Low Frequency Interstellar Scattering and Pulsar Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cordes, James M.

    1992-01-01

    Radio astronomy at frequencies from 2 to 30 MHz challenges time tested methods for extracting usable information from observations. One fundamental reason for this is that propagation effects due to the magnetoionic ionosphere, interplanetary medium, and interstellar matter (ISM) increase strongly with wavelength. The problems associated with interstellar scattering off of small scale irregularities in the electron density are addressed. What is known about interstellar scattering is summarized on the basis of high frequency observations, including scintillation and temporal broadening of pulsars and angular broadening of various galactic and extragalactic radio sources. Then those high frequency phenomena are addressed that are important or detectable at low frequencies. The radio sky becomes much simpler at low frequencies, most pulsars will not be seen as time varying sources, intensity variations will be quenched or will occur on time scales much longer than a human lifetime, and many sources will be angularly broadened and/or absorbed into the noise. Angular broadening measurements will help delineate the galactic distribution and power spectrum of small scale electron density irregularities.

  16. A New Pulsar Data Aqcuisition System for the 140 Foot Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eimers, Marc

    2009-01-01

    MIT/Lincoln Labs in Massachusetts are currently using the 140' telescope in Green Bank, WV to study the Earth's ionoshpere. However, they are not operating the telescope around the clock, so astronomers at WVU are working with the NRAO to develop a new pulsar data acquisition system to be used when there is telescope time. For eleven weeks in the summer of 2008, we worked to develop and test this system. In mid-June, we wrote a datataking control gui for the Parkes Spectrometer (Parspec), the new pulsar backend for the telescope. We later hooked up an artificial pulsar machine to the spectrometer to try and narrow down a problem we were having in our post-folded data. Though the results of the test seem to show that the cause of the problem is not occurring in the spectrometer, further investigation points to the most likely cause being an effect from the signal digitization process. Observations of known pulsars were also carried out over the course of the summer. Once enough observations had been made, we compared the measured versus expected S/N. Our results from this comparison were likely affected due to an overall reduction in signal caused by the digitization process. Eight pulsars, including two millisecond pulsars, were successfully timed suggesting that the Parspec machine is time-tagging the data in a consistent manner. Scintillation observations were also made of the known pulsar B0329+54 in an attempt to measure the pulsar's transverse speed. Because of a problem in calculating the auto-correlation function, rough estimates of the diffractive parameters had to be made. This may have been due to less-than-ideal observation lengths and center frequencies, and radio frequency interference. Because of this, the calculated values for the transverse speed were higher than previously stated values.

  17. Six faint gamma-ray pulsars seen with the Fermi Large Area Telescope: Towards a sample blending into the background

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, X.; Smith, D. A.; Guillemot, L.; Cheung, C. C.; Cognard, I.; Craig, H. A.; Espinoza, C. M.; Johnston, S.; Kramer, M.; Reimer, O.; Reposeur, T.; Shannon, R.; Stappers, B. W.; Weltevrede, P.

    2014-10-14

    Context. Here, GeV gamma-ray pulsations from over 140 pulsars have been characterized using the Fermi Large Area Telescope, enabling improved understanding of the emission regions within the neutron star magnetospheres, and the contributions of pulsars to high energy electrons and diffuse gamma rays in the Milky Way. The first gamma-ray pulsars to be detected were the most intense and/or those with narrow pulses. Aims. As the Fermi mission progresses, progressively fainter objects can be studied. In addition to more distant pulsars (thus probing a larger volume of the Galaxy), or ones in high background regions (thus improving the sampling uniformity across the Galactic plane), we detect pulsars with broader pulses or lower luminosity. Adding pulsars to our catalog with inclination angles that are rare in the observed sample, and/or with lower spindown power, will reduce the bias in the currently known gamma-ray pulsar population. Methods. We use rotation ephemerides derived from radio observations to phase-fold gamma rays recorded by the Fermi Large Area Telescope, to then determine the pulse profile properties. Spectral analysis provides the luminosities and, when the signal-to-noise ratio allows, the cutoff energies. We constrain the pulsar distances by different means in order to minimize the luminosity uncertainties. Results. We present six new gamma-ray pulsars with an eclectic mix of properties. Three are young, and three are recycled. They include the farthest, the lowest power, two of the highest duty-cycle pulsars seen, and only the fourth young gamma-ray pulsar with a radio interpulse. Finally, we discuss the biases existing in the current gamma-ray pulsar catalog, and steps to be taken to mitigate the bias.

  18. Modeling of III-nitride light-emitting diodes: progress, problems, and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpov, Sergey Yu.

    2011-02-01

    Recent progress in III-nitride LED modeling is reviewed with the focus on physical models that provide a better understanding of such hot issues, as factors limiting the internal quantum efficiency of light emission and high-current efficiency droop, polarization doping in graded-composition III-nitride alloys and its utilization in LEDs, current crowding in LED dice and its impact on the light extraction efficiency, and optimal light conversion in white LED lamps. Specific features of III-nitride materials, their impact on the LED operation, and models accounting for these features are considered. Insufficient understanding of transport mechanisms of non-equilibrium electrons and holes and their localization in InGaN inhomogeneous active regions are discussed along with other still unsolved problems. Influence of technological factors on LED heterostructures and their operation is argued in the context of further model developments.

  19. Finite-element/progressive-lattice-sampling response surface methodology and application to benchmark probability quantification problems

    SciTech Connect

    Romero, V.J.; Bankston, S.D.

    1998-03-01

    Optimal response surface construction is being investigated as part of Sandia discretionary (LDRD) research into Analytic Nondeterministic Methods. The goal is to achieve an adequate representation of system behavior over the relevant parameter space of a problem with a minimum of computational and user effort. This is important in global optimization and in estimation of system probabilistic response, which are both made more viable by replacing large complex computer models with fast-running accurate and noiseless approximations. A Finite Element/Lattice Sampling (FE/LS) methodology for constructing progressively refined finite element response surfaces that reuse previous generations of samples is described here. Similar finite element implementations can be extended to N-dimensional problems and/or random fields and applied to other types of structured sampling paradigms, such as classical experimental design and Gauss, Lobatto, and Patterson sampling. Here the FE/LS model is applied in a ``decoupled`` Monte Carlo analysis of two sets of probability quantification test problems. The analytic test problems, spanning a large range of probabilities and very demanding failure region geometries, constitute a good testbed for comparing the performance of various nondeterministic analysis methods. In results here, FE/LS decoupled Monte Carlo analysis required orders of magnitude less computer time than direct Monte Carlo analysis, with no appreciable loss of accuracy. Thus, when arriving at probabilities or distributions by Monte Carlo, it appears to be more efficient to expend computer-model function evaluations on building a FE/LS response surface than to expend them in direct Monte Carlo sampling.

  20. Progress and problems in the biology, diagnostics, and therapeutics of prion diseases

    PubMed Central

    Aguzzi, Adriano; Heikenwalder, Mathias; Miele, Gino

    2004-01-01

    The term “prion” was introduced by Stanley Prusiner in 1982 to describe the atypical infectious agent that causes transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, a group of infectious neurodegenerative diseases that include scrapie in sheep, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans, chronic wasting disease in cervids, and bovine spongiform encephalopathy in cattle. Over the past twenty years, the word “prion” has been taken to signify various subtly different concepts. In this article, we refer to the prion as the transmissible principle underlying prion diseases, without necessarily implying any specific biochemical or structural identity. When Prusiner started his seminal work, the study of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies was undertaken by only a handful of scientists. Since that time, the “mad cow” crisis has put prion diseases on the agenda of both politicians and the media. Significant progress has been made in prion disease research, and many aspects of prion pathogenesis are now understood. And yet the diagnostic procedures available for prion diseases are not nearly as sensitive as they ought to be, and no therapeutic intervention has been shown to reliably affect the course of the diseases. This article reviews recent progress in the areas of pathogenesis of, diagnostics of, and therapy for prion diseases and highlights some conspicuous problems that remain to be addressed in each of these fields. PMID:15254579

  1. Braking Index of Isolated Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamil, Oliver; Stone, Jirina; Urbanec, Martin; Urbancova, Gabriela

    2015-04-01

    Isolated pulsars are rotating neutron stars with accurately measured angular velocities Ω, and their time derivatives which show unambiguously that the pulsars are slowing down. The exact mechanism of the spin-down is a question of debate in detail, but the commonly accepted view is that it arises through emission of magnetic dipole radiation (MDR). The energy loss by a rotating pulsar is proportional to a model dependent power of Ω. This relation leads to the power law Ω˙ = -K Ωn where n is called the braking index, equal to the ratio (ΩΩ̈)/ Ω˙2 . The simple MDR model predicts the value of n = 3, but observations of isolated pulsars provide rather precise values of n, individually accurate to a few percent or better, in the range 1 < n < 2.8, which is consistently less than the predictions of the MDR model. In this work, we study the dynamical limits of the MDR model as a function of angular velocity. The effects of variation in the rest mass, the moment of inertia, and the dependence on a realistic Equation of State of the rotating star are considered. Furthermore, we introduce a simulated superfluid effect by which the angular momentum of the core is eliminated from the calculation.

  2. RESISTIVE SOLUTIONS FOR PULSAR MAGNETOSPHERES

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jason; Spitkovsky, Anatoly; Tchekhovskoy, Alexander

    2012-02-10

    The current state of the art in the modeling of pulsar magnetospheres invokes either the vacuum or force-free limits for the magnetospheric plasma. Neither of these limits can simultaneously account for both the plasma currents and the accelerating electric fields that are needed to explain the morphology and spectra of high-energy emission from pulsars. To better understand the structure of such magnetospheres, we combine accelerating fields and force-free solutions by considering models of magnetospheres filled with resistive plasma. We formulate Ohm's law in the minimal velocity fluid frame and construct a family of resistive solutions that smoothly bridges the gap between the vacuum and the force-free magnetosphere solutions. The spin-down luminosity, open field line potential drop, and the fraction of open field lines all transition between the vacuum and force-free values as the plasma conductivity varies from zero to infinity. For fixed inclination angle, we find that the spin-down luminosity depends linearly on the open field line potential drop. We consider the implications of our resistive solutions for the spin-down of intermittent pulsars and sub-pulse drift phenomena in radio pulsars.

  3. CHANGES IN THE CRAB PULSAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Scientists are learning more about how pulsars work by studying a series of Hubble Space Telescope images of the heart of the Crab Nebula. The images, taken over a period of several months, show that the Crab is a far more dynamic object than previously understood. At the center of the nebula lies the Crab Pulsar. The pulsar is a tiny object by astronomical standards -- only about six miles across -- but has a mass greater than that of the Sun and rotates at a rate of 30 times a second. As the pulsar spins its intense magnetic field whips around, acting like a sling shot, accelerating subatomic particles and sending them hurtling them into space at close to the speed of light. The tiny pulsar and its wind are the powerhouse for the entire Crab Nebula, which is 10 light-years across -- a feat comparable to an object the size of a hydrogen atom illuminating a volume of space a kilometer across. The three pictures shown here, taken from the series of Hubble images, show dramatic changes in the appearance of the central regions of the nebula. These include wisp-like structures that move outward away from the pulsar at half the speed of light, as well as a mysterious 'halo' which remains stationary, but grows brighter then fainter over time. Also seen are the effects of two polar jets that move out along the rotation axis of the pulsar. The most dynamic feature seen -- a small knot that 'dances around' so much that astronomers have been calling it a 'sprite' -- is actually a shock front (where fast-moving material runs into slower-moving material)in one of these polar jets. The telescope captured the images with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 using a filter that passes light of wavelength around 550 nanometers, near the middle of the visible part of the spectrum. The Crab Nebula is located 7,000 light-years away in the constellation Taurus. Credit: Jeff Hester and Paul Scowen (Arizona State University), and NASA

  4. New long-term braking index measurements for glitching pulsars using a glitch-template method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinoza, C. M.; Lyne, A. G.; Stappers, B. W.

    2017-04-01

    Braking index measurements offer the opportunity to explore the processes affecting the long-term spin evolution of pulsars and possible evolutionary connections between the various pulsar populations. In most cases, such measurements are difficult because of the presence of short-term phenomena, such as glitches and timing noise, which obscure the long-term trends. In particular, recoveries from large glitches are the main obstacle to measuring the braking indices of young pulsars like the Vela and Crab pulsars. We present a new method to overcome this problem and report on braking index measurements for the Vela-like pulsars, PSR B1800-21 and PSR B1823-13, together with an updated measurement for Vela. Additionally, the use of the method is extended to six more young glitching pulsars observed at Jodrell Bank Observatory and we are able to estimate four new braking indices. Values of braking indices describe the long-term evolution of the pulsars across the P-dot{P} diagram. Despite some measurements being affected by considerable uncertainties, there is evidence for a common trend among young glitching pulsars, characterized by low braking indices n ≤ 2. Such values introduce a new variant in the evolution of young pulsars, and their relationship with other populations in the P-dot{P} diagram, and imply that these pulsars could be a few times older than indicated by standard formulae. In this context, we analyse the case of PSR B1757-24 and conclude that the pulsar could be old enough to be related to the supernova remnant G5.4-1.2. Between glitches, the short-term evolution of Vela-like pulsars is characterized by large interglitch braking indices nig > 10. We interpret both short- and long-term trends as signatures of the large glitch activity, and speculate that they are driven by short-term post-glitch re-coupling and a cumulative long-term decoupling of superfluid to the rotation of the star.

  5. European food and nutrition policies in action. Finland's food and nutrition policy: progress, problems and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Milio, N

    1998-01-01

    Some progress has clearly been made in several aspects of Finland's food and nutrition policy: access to nutrition information and education, improvements in mass catering, increased availability of healthier food products, and pricing and quality requirements favourable to a healthy diet. Finnish eating patterns have improved in relation to some recommended foods and macronutrients. The structural changes in farm and food production are largely the result of new political and economic realities both in Finland and internationally, resulting in the Government focusing on fiscal efficiency, decentralization and a more competitive, consumer-oriented market. This new environment is creating pressures to reduce surplus animal fat production and to expand markets in new foods for Finns and other Europeans who, for reasons of demography, health or working or living arrangements, demand new and sometimes healthier foods. Within this context, some health leaders have been able to make and work for proposals that are consistent both with political and economic imperatives and with health needs. Although the populations health status is improving and in some respects is exemplary, diet-related death and illness rates and risk factors (such as serum cholesterol and obesity) are high and their decline, along with some healthy changes in eating patterns, has slowed since the mid-1980s (ironically, since the adoption of the nutrition policy). The more slowly improvements occur, the higher will be the social and economic costs. Major problems in policy implementation exist. Although much has been done in research and demonstration and in the development of national guidelines (in public catering and labeling, for example) there is an apparent lag in translating such soft technology into action and monitoring its implementation in order to develop corrective measures at the operational level. This problem may increase with decentralized budget control and a less regulated market

  6. Pulsar VLBI to Measure Cosmological Rotation and Study Pulsar Emission Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwinn, C. R.

    2009-08-01

    Pulsars are useful for measuring the rotation of the universe. Also, their emission regions provide interesting laboratories for plasma physics. I describe here how VLBI of pulsars, and the VSOP-2 spacecraft, can contribute to such studies.

  7. SKA pulsar search: technological challenges and best algorithms development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baffa, C.

    2014-08-01

    One of the key scientific projects of the SKA radio telescope is a large survey for pulsars both in isolated and binary systems. The data rate of the pulsar search engine is expected to reach 0.6TeraSamples/sec. For the purposes of extracting hidden pulses from these streams, we need a complex search strategy which allows us to explore a three dimensional parameter space and it requires approximately 10PetaFlops. This problem is well suited for a parallel computing engine, but the dimensions of SKA bring this problem to a new level of complexity. An up-to-date study shows that this operation would require more than 2000 GPUs. In this report we will present possible mitigation strategies.

  8. Rotochemical heating of millisecond and classical pulsars with anisotropic and density-dependent superfluid gap models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Jiménez, Nicolás; Petrovich, Cristobal; Reisenegger, Andreas

    2015-03-01

    When a rotating neutron star loses angular momentum, the progressive reduction of the centrifugal force makes it contract. This perturbs each fluid element, raising the local pressure and originating deviations from beta equilibrium, inducing reactions that release heat (`rotochemical heating'). This effect has previously been studied by Fernández & Reisenegger for non-superfluid neutron stars and by Petrovich & Reisenegger for superfluid millisecond pulsars. Both studies found that pulsars reach a quasi-steady state in which the compression driving the matter out of beta equilibrium is balanced by the reactions trying to restore the equilibrium. We extend previous studies by considering the effect of density-dependence and anisotropy of the superfluid energy gaps, for the case in which the dominant reactions are the modified Urca processes, the protons are non-superconducting, and the neutron superfluidity is parametrized by models proposed in the literature. By comparing our predictions with the surface temperature of the millisecond pulsar PSR J0437-4715 and upper limits for 21 classical pulsars, we find the millisecond pulsar can be only explained by the models with the effectively largest energy gaps (type B models), the classical pulsars require with the gap models that vanish for some angle (type C) and two different envelope compositions. Thus, no single model for neutron superfluidity can simultaneously account for the thermal emission of all available observations of non-accreting neutron stars, possibly due to our neglect of proton superconductivity.

  9. Pulsar Timing Arrays - towards the SKA and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stappers, Ben

    2015-08-01

    I will discuss the development of pulsar timing arrays as we head towards the Square Kilometre Array and then beyond. This will address where progress needs to be made in terms of sensitivity to gravitational waves including improvements to existing observing approaches and new telescopes such as MeerKAT and FAST and techniques like LEAP. Developments in analytic techniques will also be discussed such as removal of interstellar medium effects, red noise and pulse profile variations. With the likelihood that the SKA will implement some form of Key Science Project approach, some ideas of how will this affect how the International Pulsar Timing Array effort and how it might evolve into a KSP will be presented.

  10. A Pulsar and a Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-07-01

    Recent, unusual X-ray observations from our galactic neighbor, the Small Magellanic Cloud, have led to an interesting model for SXP 214, a pulsar in a binary star system.Artists illustration of the magnetic field lines of a pulsar, a highly magnetized, rotating neutron star. [NASA]An Intriguing BinaryAn X-ray pulsar is a magnetized, rotating neutron star in a binary system with a stellar companion. Material is fed from the companion onto the neutron star, channeled by the objects magnetic fields onto a hotspot thats millions of degrees. This hotspot rotating past our line of sight is what produces the pulsations that we observe from X-ray pulsars.Located in the Small Magellanic Cloud, SXP 214 is a transient X-ray pulsar in a binary with a Be-type star. This star is spinning so quickly that material is thrown off of it to form a circumstellar disk.Recently, a team of authors led by JaeSub Hong (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics) have presented new Chandra X-ray observations of SXP 214, tracking it for 50 ks (~14 hours) in January 2013. These observations reveal some very unexpected behavior for this pulsar.X-ray PuzzleThe energy distribution of the X-ray emission from SXP 214 over time. Dark shades or blue colors indicate high counts, and light shades or yellow colors indicate low counts. Lower-energy X-ray emission appeared only later, after about 20 ks. [Hong et al. 2016]Three interesting pieces of information came from the Chandra observations:SXP 214s rotation period was measured to be 211.5 s an increase in the spin rate since the discovery measurement of a 214-second period. Pulsars usually spin down as they lose angular momentum over time so what caused this one to spin up?Its overall X-ray luminosity steadily increased over the 50 ks of observations.Its spectrum became gradually softer (lower energy) over time; in the first 20 ks, the spectrum only consisted of hard X-ray photons above 3 keV, but after 20 ks, softer X-ray photons below 2 ke

  11. Gamma-Ray Pulsar Studies With GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, D.J.; /NASA, Goddard

    2011-11-23

    Some pulsars have their maximum observable energy output in the gamma-ray band, offering the possibility of using these high-energy photons as probes of the particle acceleration and interaction processes in pulsar magnetospheres. After an extended hiatus between satellite missions, the recently-launched AGILE mission and the upcoming Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Large Area Telescope (LAT) will allow gamma-ray tests of the theoretical models developed based on past discoveries. With its greatly improved sensitivity, better angular resolution, and larger energy reach than older instruments, GLAST LAT should detect dozens to hundreds of new gamma-ray pulsars and measure luminosities, light curves, and phase-resolved spectra with unprecedented resolution. It will also have the potential to find radio-quiet pulsars like Geminga, using blind search techniques. Cooperation with radio and X-ray pulsar astronomers is an important aspect of the LAT team's planning for pulsar studies.

  12. Relativistic spin precession in the double pulsar.

    PubMed

    Breton, Rene P; Kaspi, Victoria M; Kramer, Michael; McLaughlin, Maura A; Lyutikov, Maxim; Ransom, Scott M; Stairs, Ingrid H; Ferdman, Robert D; Camilo, Fernando; Possenti, Andrea

    2008-07-04

    The double pulsar PSR J0737-3039A/B consists of two neutron stars in a highly relativistic orbit that displays a roughly 30-second eclipse when pulsar A passes behind pulsar B. Describing this eclipse of pulsar A as due to absorption occurring in the magnetosphere of pulsar B, we successfully used a simple geometric model to characterize the observed changing eclipse morphology and to measure the relativistic precession of pulsar B's spin axis around the total orbital angular momentum. This provides a test of general relativity and alternative theories of gravity in the strong-field regime. Our measured relativistic spin precession rate of 4.77 degrees (-0 degrees .65)(+0 degrees .66) per year (68% confidence level) is consistent with that predicted by general relativity within an uncertainty of 13%.

  13. Trompe L'Oeil 'binary' pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Robert W.; Finn, Lee S.; Wasserman, Ira

    1990-01-01

    A freely precessing pulsar produces pulse phase residuals which can mimic those of a pulsar in a binary orbit. In particular, discrete sets of phase residuals due to precessional motion of an isolated pulsar are sampled; it is shown that this data is well fit by residuals from a binary pulsar in a sufficiently tight orbit. Analytic and numerical relationships between the projected orbital size, a(p) sin i, and the orbital eccentricity, e, of a misidentified binary pulsar; are found the observations that would distinguish between these models are discussed. Regardless of the mechanism that causes the precession, the maximum amplitude of the phase residual is pi/2: consequently, a(p)sin i is (approximately) bounded by cP(puls)/4. The newly discovered 'binary' millisecond pulsars in the globular cluster 47 Tuc is discussed, and it is shown that the periodic frequency modulation reported cannot be explained by free precession.

  14. Birth of millisecond pulsars in globular clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grindlay, J. E.; Bailyn, C. D.

    1988-01-01

    It is argued here that accretion-induced collapse of white dwarfs in binaries can form millisecond pulsars directly without requiring a precursor low-mass X-ray binary stage. Ablation of the precollapse binary companion by the millisecond pulsar's radiation field, a process invoked to explain some of the characteristics of the recently discovered eclipsing millisecond pulsar, can then yield isolated neutron stars witout requiring an additional stellar encounter.

  15. Birth of millisecond pulsars in globular clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grindlay, J. E.; Bailyn, C. D.

    1988-01-01

    It is argued here that accretion-induced collapse of white dwarfs in binaries can form millisecond pulsars directly without requiring a precursor low-mass X-ray binary stage. Ablation of the precollapse binary companion by the millisecond pulsar's radiation field, a process invoked to explain some of the characteristics of the recently discovered eclipsing millisecond pulsar, can then yield isolated neutron stars witout requiring an additional stellar encounter.

  16. Spacecraft Navigation Using X-ray Pulsars

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    make them attractive as potential natural naviga- tion beacons and why a practical implementation looks most feasible in the X-ray band. We then...describe the history of the X-ray navigation program at NRL up through our current Defense Advanced Research Proj- ects Agency (DARPA) program. Finally, we...that produce the powerful radiation beams. These pulsars then turn off and inhabit the “pulsar graveyard.” During their lives, these pulsars make very

  17. Self-modulational formation of pulsar microstructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chian, A. C.-L.; Kennel, C. F.

    1987-01-01

    A nonlinear plasma theory for self modulation of pulsar radio pulses is discussed. A nonlinear Schroedinger equation is derived for strong electromagnetic waves propagating in an electron positron plasma. The nonlinearities arising from wave intensity induced particle mass variation may excite the modulational instability of circularly and linearly polarized pulsar radiation. The resulting wave envelopes can take the form of periodic wave trains or solitons. These nonlinear stationary waveforms may account for the formation of pulsar microstructures.

  18. ON PULSAR DISTANCE MEASUREMENTS AND THEIR UNCERTAINTIES

    SciTech Connect

    Verbiest, J. P. W.; Lee, K. J.; Weisberg, J. M.; Chael, A. A.; Lorimer, D. R.

    2012-08-10

    Accurate distances to pulsars can be used for a variety of studies of the Galaxy and its electron content. However, most distance measures to pulsars have been derived from the absorption (or lack thereof) of pulsar emission by Galactic H I gas, which typically implies that only upper or lower limits on the pulsar distance are available. We present a critical analysis of all measured H I distance limits to pulsars and other neutron stars, and translate these limits into actual distance estimates through a likelihood analysis that simultaneously corrects for statistical biases. We also apply this analysis to parallax measurements of pulsars in order to obtain accurate distance estimates and find that the parallax and H I distance measurements are biased in different ways, because of differences in the sampled populations. Parallax measurements typically underestimate a pulsar's distance because of the limited distance to which this technique works and the consequential strong effect of the Galactic pulsar distribution (i.e., the original Lutz-Kelker bias), in H I distance limits, however, the luminosity bias dominates the Lutz-Kelker effect, leading to overestimated distances because the bright pulsars on which this technique is applicable are more likely to be nearby given their brightness.

  19. The Parkes Pulsar Timing Array Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manchester, R. N.; Hobbs, G.; Bailes, M.; Coles, W. A.; van Straten, W.; Keith, M. J.; Shannon, R. M.; Bhat, N. D. R.; Brown, A.; Burke-Spolaor, S. G.; Champion, D. J.; Chaudhary, A.; Edwards, R. T.; Hampson, G.; Hotan, A. W.; Jameson, A.; Jenet, F. A.; Kesteven, M. J.; Khoo, J.; Kocz, J.; Maciesiak, K.; Oslowski, S.; Ravi, V.; Reynolds, J. R.; Sarkissian, J. M.; Verbiest, J. P. W.; Wen, Z. L.; Wilson, W. E.; Yardley, D.; Yan, W. M.; You, X. P.

    2013-01-01

    A `pulsar timing array' (PTA), in which observations of a large sample of pulsars spread across the celestial sphere are combined, allows investigation of `global' phenomena such as a background of gravitational waves or instabilities in atomic timescales that produce correlated timing residuals in the pulsars of the array. The Parkes Pulsar Timing Array (PPTA) is an implementation of the PTA concept based on observations with the Parkes 64-m radio telescope. A sample of 20 ms pulsars is being observed at three radio-frequency bands, 50 cm (~700 MHz), 20 cm (~1400 MHz), and 10 cm (~3100 MHz), with observations at intervals of two to three weeks. Regular observations commenced in early 2005. This paper describes the systems used for the PPTA observations and data processing, including calibration and timing analysis. The strategy behind the choice of pulsars, observing parameters, and analysis methods is discussed. Results are presented for PPTA data in the three bands taken between 2005 March and 2011 March. For 10 of the 20 pulsars, rms timing residuals are less than 1 μs for the best band after fitting for pulse frequency and its first time derivative. Significant `red' timing noise is detected in about half of the sample. We discuss the implications of these results on future projects including the International Pulsar Timing Array and a PTA based on the Square Kilometre Array. We also present an `extended PPTA' data set that combines PPTA data with earlier Parkes timing data for these pulsars.

  20. Optical pulsations from a transitional millisecond pulsar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrosino, F.; Papitto, A.; Stella, L.; Meddi, F.; Cretaro, P.; Burderi, L.; Di Salvo, T.; Israel, G. L.; Ghedina, A.; Di Fabrizio, L.; Riverol, L.

    2017-10-01

    Millisecond pulsars are neutron stars that attain their very fast rotation during a 108-109-yr-long phase of disk accretion of matter from a low-mass companion star1,2. They can be detected as accretion-powered millisecond X-ray pulsars if towards the end of this phase their magnetic field is strong enough to channel the in-flowing matter towards their magnetic poles3. When mass transfer is reduced or ceases altogether, pulsed emission generated by magnetospheric particle acceleration and powered by the star rotation is observed, preferentially in the radio4 and gamma-ray5 bands. A few transitional millisecond pulsars that swing between an accretion-powered X-ray pulsar regime and a rotationally powered radio pulsar regime in response to variations of the mass in-flow rate have been recently identified6,7. Here, we report the detection of optical pulsations from a transitional millisecond pulsar. The pulsations were observed when the pulsar was surrounded by an accretion disk, and originated inside the magnetosphere or within a few hundreds of kilometres from it. Energy arguments rule out reprocessing of accretion-powered X-ray emission and argue against a process related to accretion onto the pulsar polar caps; synchrotron emission of electrons in a rotation-powered pulsar magnetosphere8 seems more likely.

  1. Pulsar discovery by global volunteer computing.

    PubMed

    Knispel, B; Allen, B; Cordes, J M; Deneva, J S; Anderson, D; Aulbert, C; Bhat, N D R; Bock, O; Bogdanov, S; Brazier, A; Camilo, F; Champion, D J; Chatterjee, S; Crawford, F; Demorest, P B; Fehrmann, H; Freire, P C C; Gonzalez, M E; Hammer, D; Hessels, J W T; Jenet, F A; Kasian, L; Kaspi, V M; Kramer, M; Lazarus, P; van Leeuwen, J; Lorimer, D R; Lyne, A G; Machenschalk, B; McLaughlin, M A; Messenger, C; Nice, D J; Papa, M A; Pletsch, H J; Prix, R; Ransom, S M; Siemens, X; Stairs, I H; Stappers, B W; Stovall, K; Venkataraman, A

    2010-09-10

    Einstein@Home aggregates the computer power of hundreds of thousands of volunteers from 192 countries to mine large data sets. It has now found a 40.8-hertz isolated pulsar in radio survey data from the Arecibo Observatory taken in February 2007. Additional timing observations indicate that this pulsar is likely a disrupted recycled pulsar. PSR J2007+2722's pulse profile is remarkably wide with emission over almost the entire spin period; the pulsar likely has closely aligned magnetic and spin axes. The massive computing power provided by volunteers should enable many more such discoveries.

  2. The spin evolution of young pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinoza, Cristóbal M.

    2013-03-01

    The current understanding of the spin evolution of young pulsars is reviewed through a compilation of braking index measurements. An immediate conclusion is that the spin evolution of all pulsars with a measured braking index is not purely caused by a constant magnetic dipole. The case of PSR J1734-3333 and its upward movement towards the magnetars is used as a guide to try to understand why pulsars evolve with n < 3. Evolution between different pulsar families, driven by the emergence of a hidden internal magnetic field, appears as one possible picture.

  3. X-ray Emission from Millisecond Pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zavlin, Vyacheslav

    2006-01-01

    Isolated (solitary or non-accreting) millisecond pulsars with observed X-ray emission can be divided in two distinct groups: those emitting nonthermal (magnetospheric) radiation and pulsars with the bulk of X-rays of a thermal origin, presumably emitted from small hot spots around the magnetic poles on the neutron star surface (polar caps). I will discuss properties of X-ray emission detected with Chandra and XMM-Newton from a number of millisecond pulsars, with emphasis on those of the thermal component, and compare them with predictions of radio pulsar models.

  4. The pulsar planet production process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phinney, E. S.; Hansen, B. M. S.

    1993-01-01

    Most plausible scenarios for the formation of planets around pulsars end with a disk of gas around the pulsar. The supplicant author then points to the solar system to bolster faith in the miraculous transfiguration of gas into planets. We here investigate this process of transfiguration. We derive analytic sequences of quasi-static disks which give good approximations to exact solutions of the disk diffusion equation with realistic opacity tables. These allow quick and efficient surveys of parameter space. We discuss the outward transfer of mass in accretion disks and the resulting timescale constraints, the effects of illumination by the central source on the disk and dust within it, and the effects of the widely different elemental compositions of the disks in the various scenarios, and their extensions to globular clusters. We point out where significant uncertainties exist in the appropriate grain opacities, and in the effect of illumination and winds from the neutron star.

  5. Pair-Starved Pulsar Magnetospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muslimov, Alex G.; Harding, Alice K.

    2009-01-01

    We propose a simple analytic model for the innermost (within the light cylinder of canonical radius, approx. c/Omega) structure of open-magnetic-field lines of a rotating neutron star (NS) with relativistic outflow of charged particles (electrons/positrons) and arbitrary angle between the NS spin and magnetic axes. We present the self-consistent solution of Maxwell's equations for the magnetic field and electric current in the pair-starved regime where the density of electron-positron plasma generated above the pulsar polar cap is not sufficient to completely screen the accelerating electric field and thus establish thee E . B = 0 condition above the pair-formation front up to the very high altitudes within the light cylinder. The proposed mode1 may provide a theoretical framework for developing the refined model of the global pair-starved pulsar magnetosphere.

  6. Particle acceleration in pulsar magnetospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, K. B.

    1978-01-01

    The structure of pulsar magnetospheres and the acceleration mechanism for charged particles in the magnetosphere was studied using a pulsar model which required large acceleration of the particles near the surface of the star. A theorem was developed which showed that particle acceleration cannot be expected when the angle between the magnetic field lines and the rotation axis is constant (e.g. radial field lines). If this angle is not constant, however, acceleration must occur. The more realistic model of an axisymmetric neutron star with a strong dipole magnetic field aligned with the rotation axis was investigated. In this case, acceleration occurred at large distances from the surface of the star. The magnitude of the current can be determined using the model presented. In the case of nonaxisymmetric systems, the acceleration is expected to occur nearer to the surface of the star.

  7. The International Pulsar Timing Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manchester, R. N.; IPTA

    2013-11-01

    The International Pulsar Timing Array (IPTA) is an organization whose raison d’être is to facilitate collaboration between the three main existing PTAs (the EPTA in Europe, NANOGrav in North America and the PPTA in Australia) in order to realize the benefits of combined PTA data sets in reaching the goals of PTA projects. Currently, shared data sets for 50 pulsars are available for IPTA-based projects. Operation of the IPTA is administered by a Steering Committee consisting of six members, two from each PTA, plus the immediate past Chair in a non-voting capacity. A Constitution and several Agreements define the framework for the collaboration. Web pages provide information both to members of participating PTAs and to the general public. With support from an NSF PIRE grant, the IPTA facilitates the organization of annual Student Workshops and Science Meetings. These are very valuable both in training new students and in communicating current results from IPTA-based research.

  8. The pulsar planet production process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phinney, E. S.; Hansen, B. M. S.

    1993-01-01

    Most plausible scenarios for the formation of planets around pulsars end with a disk of gas around the pulsar. The supplicant author then points to the solar system to bolster faith in the miraculous transfiguration of gas into planets. We here investigate this process of transfiguration. We derive analytic sequences of quasi-static disks which give good approximations to exact solutions of the disk diffusion equation with realistic opacity tables. These allow quick and efficient surveys of parameter space. We discuss the outward transfer of mass in accretion disks and the resulting timescale constraints, the effects of illumination by the central source on the disk and dust within it, and the effects of the widely different elemental compositions of the disks in the various scenarios, and their extensions to globular clusters. We point out where significant uncertainties exist in the appropriate grain opacities, and in the effect of illumination and winds from the neutron star.

  9. Studies in nonlinear problems of energy. Progress report, October 1, 1993--September 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Matkowsky, B.J.

    1994-09-01

    The authors concentrate on modeling, analysis and large scale scientific computation of combustion and flame propagation phenomena, with emphasis on the transition from laminar to turbulent combustion. In the transition process a flame passed through a stages exhibiting increasingly complex spatial and temporal patterns which serve as signatures identifying each stage. Often the transitions arise via bifurcation. The authors investigate nonlinear dynamics, bifurcation and pattern formation in the successive stage of transition. They describe the stability of combustion waves, and transitions to combustion waves exhibiting progressively higher degrees of spatio-temporal complexity. One aspect of this research program is the systematic derivation of appropriate, approximate models from the original models governing combustion. The approximate models are then analyzed. The authors are particularly interested in understanding the basic mechanisms affecting combustion, which is a prerequisite to effective control of the process. They are interested in determining the effects of varying various control parameters, such as Nusselt number, Lewis number, heat release, activation energy, Damkohler number, Reynolds number, Prandtl number, Peclet number, etc. The authors have also considered a number of problems in self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS), in which combustion waves are employed to synthesize advanced materials. Efforts are directed toward understanding fundamental mechanisms. 167 refs.

  10. Environmental impact assessment in the Philippines: Progress, problems, and directions for the future

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, W.A. )

    1994-07-01

    The environmental impact statement (EIS) system of the Philippines is reviewed, identifying progress made in its effective implementation since 1986. Improvement in coverage is noted and real commitment to good environmental impact assessment (EIA) practice is found in those responsible for the EIS system. Project proponents show a modest acceptance of the system. Major problems remaining are: (1) the EIS system is seen as a bureaucratic requirement needed to obtain project approvals; (2) political interference determines the outcome of some environmental reviews; (3) questionable practices by public servants serve to discredit the system; and (4) the treatment of projects in environmentally critical areas is less than satisfactory. Based on the principle that it is essential to establish a credible process seen to work effectively by the public, politicians, the government bureaucracy, and proponents, suggestions for improvement are made. They deal with the treatment of EISs for projects already under construction, EIA training courses, and simple adjustments to the EIS system to focus it on the most important projects.

  11. Integrative Convergence in Neuroscience: Trajectories, Problems, and the Need for a Progressive Neurobioethics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordano, J.

    The advanced integrative scientific convergence (AISC) model represents a viable approach to neuroscience. Beyond simple multi-disciplinarity, the AISC model unifies constituent scientific and technological fields to foster innovation, invention and new ways of addressing seemingly intractable questions. In this way, AISC can yield novel methods and foster new trajectories of knowledge and discovery, and yield new epistemologies. As stand-alone disciplines, each and all of the constituent fields generate practical and ethical issues, and their convergence may establish a unique set of both potential benefits and problems. To effectively attend to these contingencies requires pragmatic assessment of the actual capabilities and limits of neurofocal AISC, and an openness to what new knowledge and scientific/technological achievements may be produced, and how such outcomes can affect humanity, the human condition, society and the global environment. It is proposed that a progressive neurobioethics may be needed to establish both a meta-ethical framework upon which to structure ethical decisions, and a system and method of ethics that is inclusive, convergent and innovative, and in thus aligned with and meaningful to use of an AISC model in neuroscience.

  12. Sleep problems are associated with development and progression of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS): Results from REDUCE.

    PubMed

    Branche, Brandee L; Howard, Lauren E; Moreira, Daniel M; Roehrborn, Claus; Castro-Santamaria, Ramiro; Andriole, Gerald L; Hopp, Martin L; Freedland, Stephen J

    2017-09-01

    Though LUTS and sleep problems often co-occur, whether sleep disturbances are linked with LUTS development and progression is unknown. We examined the relationship between sleep problems measured by the Medical Outcomes Study Sleep Scale (MOS-Sleep) 6-item survey and LUTS development and progression in the Reduction by Dutasteride of Prostate Cancer Events (REDUCE) study. REDUCE was a randomized trial testing prostate cancer chemoprevention with dustasteride in men with PSA 2.5-10ng/mL and a negative biopsy. At baseline, men completed MOS-Sleep; a scaled average was used to calculate sleep score. Men were followed for 4 years and the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) was obtained at baseline and every 6 months. Asymptomatic men had IPSS<8, while symptomatic men had IPSS≥8. In the placebo arm among men not taking alpha blockers or 5-alpha reductase inhibitors at baseline (n=2,588), we tested the association between sleep problems and LUTS development and progression using Cox models. During follow-up, 209/1452 (14%) asymptomatic men developed LUTS and 567/1136 (50%) men with LUTS demonstrated progression. On multivariable analysis, higher sleep scores were associated with increased LUTS development in asymptomatic men (HR quartile 4 vs 1=1.50, 95%CI 1.00-2.23, p=0.048) and LUTS progression in symptomatic men (HR per 10 points in sleep score=1.06, 95%CI 1.02-1.12, p=0.029). Among men with LUTS, worse sleep scores were associated with LUTS progression. Among asymptomatic men, worse sleep scores were associated with LUTS development. If confirmed, these data suggest sleep problems may precede LUTS. Whether treating sleep problems improves LUTS requires further testing. Copyright © 2017 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Theory of Pulsar Wind Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucciantini, N.

    2008-02-01

    Our understanding of Pulsar Wind Nebulae (PWNe), has greatly improved in the last years thanks to unprecedented high resolution images taken from the HUBBLE, CHANDRA and XMM satellites. The discovery of complex but similar inner features, with the presence of unexpected axisymmetric rings and jets, has prompted a new investigation into the dynamics of the interaction of the pulsar winds with the surrounding SNR, which, thanks to the improvement in the computational resources, has let to a better understanding of the properties of these objects. On the other hand the discovery of non-thermal emission from bow shock PWNe, and of systems with a complex interaction between pulsar and SNR, has led to the development of more reliable evolutionary models. I will review the standard theory of PWNe, their evolution, and the current status in the modeling of their emission properties, in particular I will show that our evolutionary models are able to describe the observations, and that the X-ray emission can now be reproduced with sufficient accuracy, to the point that we can use these nebulae to investigate fundamental issues as the properties of relativistic outflows and particle acceleration.

  14. Precision measurements of pulsar dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, J. A.; Wolszczan, A.

    1992-01-01

    Timing observations of eight pulsars over a frequency range from 25 MHz to 5 GHz are performed in order to investigate possible departures from the nu exp -2 dispersion law that applies to the propagation of radio waves through the tenuous interstellar plasma. Apparent deviations from a cold plasma law were found at high frequencies (2-5 GHz) for two pulsars: PSR 0525 + 21 and PSR 1237 + 25. The absence of LF deviations from a nu exp -2 dispersion law at the 1-ms level is consistent with a Kolmogorov spectrum of the interstellar plasma turbulence extending to scale sizes of about 10 exp 15 cm. Forms of the interstellar dispersion law which included nu exp -3 and nu exp -4 terms arising from clumping, magnetic fields, and temperature effects in the dispersing gas were examined. Pulsar dispersion was found to be an insensitive probe of gas temperature, even for a hot plasma. Dispersion delays varying as nu exp -4 could be detected at decameter wavelengths if the line of sight passes through a dense H II region.

  15. The Association between Conduct Problems and the Initiation and Progression of Marijuana Use during Adolescence: A Genetic Analysis across Time

    PubMed Central

    Lifford, Kate; Fowler, Tom; Rice, Frances; Neale, Mike; Harold, Gordon; Thapar, Anita; van den Bree, Marianne

    2006-01-01

    The present study used a prospective, longitudinal design to investigate genetic and environmental influences on the association between earlier conduct problems and the initiation and progression of marijuana use during adolescence. Parent- and teacher-reported conduct problems assessed at Time 1 (1996) and self-reported marijuana use assessed at Time 2 (2004) were available for 1088 adolescent twin pairs participating in the Cardiff Study of All Wales and North West of England Twins (CaStANET). Using a novel approach to the modeling of initiation and progression dimensions in substance use, findings suggested that the initiation of marijuana use in adolescence was influenced by genetic, common and unique environmental factors. The progression (or frequency) of marijuana use was influenced by genetic and unique environmental factors. Findings for conduct problems indicated that while the presence or absence of conduct problems was largely heritable, the relative severity of conduct problems appeared to be more strongly environmentally influenced. Multivariate model fitting indicated that conduct problems in childhood and early adolescence made a small but significant contribution to the risk for marijuana use 8 years later. PMID:17131199

  16. Searching for pulsars using image pattern recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, W. W.; Berndsen, A.; Madsen, E. C.; Tan, M.; Stairs, I. H.; Brazier, A.; Lazarus, P.; Lynch, R.; Scholz, P.; Stovall, K.; Cohen, S.; Dartez, L. P.; Lunsford, G.; Martinez, J. G.; Mata, A.; Ransom, S. M.; Banaszak, S.; Biwer, C. M.; Flanigan, J.; Rohr, M. E-mail: berndsen@phas.ubc.ca; and others

    2014-02-01

    In the modern era of big data, many fields of astronomy are generating huge volumes of data, the analysis of which can sometimes be the limiting factor in research. Fortunately, computer scientists have developed powerful data-mining techniques that can be applied to various fields. In this paper, we present a novel artificial intelligence (AI) program that identifies pulsars from recent surveys by using image pattern recognition with deep neural nets—the PICS (Pulsar Image-based Classification System) AI. The AI mimics human experts and distinguishes pulsars from noise and interference by looking for patterns from candidate plots. Different from other pulsar selection programs that search for expected patterns, the PICS AI is taught the salient features of different pulsars from a set of human-labeled candidates through machine learning. The training candidates are collected from the Pulsar Arecibo L-band Feed Array (PALFA) survey. The information from each pulsar candidate is synthesized in four diagnostic plots, which consist of image data with up to thousands of pixels. The AI takes these data from each candidate as its input and uses thousands of such candidates to train its ∼9000 neurons. The deep neural networks in this AI system grant it superior ability to recognize various types of pulsars as well as their harmonic signals. The trained AI's performance has been validated with a large set of candidates from a different pulsar survey, the Green Bank North Celestial Cap survey. In this completely independent test, the PICS ranked 264 out of 277 pulsar-related candidates, including all 56 previously known pulsars and 208 of their harmonics, in the top 961 (1%) of 90,008 test candidates, missing only 13 harmonics. The first non-pulsar candidate appears at rank 187, following 45 pulsars and 141 harmonics. In other words, 100% of the pulsars were ranked in the top 1% of all candidates, while 80% were ranked higher than any noise or interference. The

  17. A Search for Radio Millisecond Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayer, Ronald Winston

    1996-01-01

    We have built a data acquisition backend for radio pulsar search observations carried out at the NRAO 140 -foot telescope in Green Bank, West Virginia. Our system sampled 512 spectral channels over 40 MHz every 256 mus, reduced samples to one-bit precision, and wrote the resulting data stream onto magnetic tape for later, off-line processing. We have completed three surveys with this backend. In the first survey, we searched most of the Northern Hemisphere for millisecond radio pulsars. Previous surveys directed towards most of the region covered had not been as sensitive to pulsars with millisecond periods. We obtained high quality data for 15,876 deg^2 of sky. Eight new pulsars were discovered and 76 previously known pulsars were detected. Two of the eight new pulsars (PSR J1022+1001 and PSR J1518+4904) are millisecond pulsars in binary systems. PSR J1518+4904 is a 41 ms radio pulsar in an eccentric (e = 0.25) 8.6 day orbit with another stellar object, probably another neutron star. It is only the fifth double neutron star system known. The system's relativistic advance of periastron has been measured to be ˙omega = 0.0112 +/- 0.0002 ^circ yr^{-1}, implying that the total mass of the pair of stars is 2.65 +/-0.07Modot. We have searched for radio pulsar companions to 40 nearby OB runaway stars. No pulsar companions to OB runaways were discovered. One previously unknown pulsar, PSR J2044+4614, was discovered while observing towards target O star BD+45,3260. However, follow-up timing observations reveal that the pulsar is not associated with the target O star. Assuming standard models for the pulsar beaming fraction and luminosity function, we conclude that most OB runaways do not have pulsar companions. We have completed a survey for pulsed radio signals towards 27 gamma-ray sources detected by the EGRET instrument of the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory. No new pulsars were discovered.

  18. Searching for Pulsars Using Image Pattern Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, W. W.; Berndsen, A.; Madsen, E. C.; Tan, M.; Stairs, I. H.; Brazier, A.; Lazarus, P.; Lynch, R.; Scholz, P.; Stovall, K.; Ransom, S. M.; Banaszak, S.; Biwer, C. M.; Cohen, S.; Dartez, L. P.; Flanigan, J.; Lunsford, G.; Martinez, J. G.; Mata, A.; Rohr, M.; Walker, A.; Allen, B.; Bhat, N. D. R.; Bogdanov, S.; Camilo, F.; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J. M.; Crawford, F.; Deneva, J. S.; Desvignes, G.; Ferdman, R. D.; Freire, P. C. C.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Jenet, F. A.; Kaplan, D. L.; Kaspi, V. M.; Knispel, B.; Lee, K. J.; van Leeuwen, J.; Lyne, A. G.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Siemens, X.; Spitler, L. G.; Venkataraman, A.

    2014-02-01

    In the modern era of big data, many fields of astronomy are generating huge volumes of data, the analysis of which can sometimes be the limiting factor in research. Fortunately, computer scientists have developed powerful data-mining techniques that can be applied to various fields. In this paper, we present a novel artificial intelligence (AI) program that identifies pulsars from recent surveys by using image pattern recognition with deep neural nets—the PICS (Pulsar Image-based Classification System) AI. The AI mimics human experts and distinguishes pulsars from noise and interference by looking for patterns from candidate plots. Different from other pulsar selection programs that search for expected patterns, the PICS AI is taught the salient features of different pulsars from a set of human-labeled candidates through machine learning. The training candidates are collected from the Pulsar Arecibo L-band Feed Array (PALFA) survey. The information from each pulsar candidate is synthesized in four diagnostic plots, which consist of image data with up to thousands of pixels. The AI takes these data from each candidate as its input and uses thousands of such candidates to train its ~9000 neurons. The deep neural networks in this AI system grant it superior ability to recognize various types of pulsars as well as their harmonic signals. The trained AI's performance has been validated with a large set of candidates from a different pulsar survey, the Green Bank North Celestial Cap survey. In this completely independent test, the PICS ranked 264 out of 277 pulsar-related candidates, including all 56 previously known pulsars and 208 of their harmonics, in the top 961 (1%) of 90,008 test candidates, missing only 13 harmonics. The first non-pulsar candidate appears at rank 187, following 45 pulsars and 141 harmonics. In other words, 100% of the pulsars were ranked in the top 1% of all candidates, while 80% were ranked higher than any noise or interference. The

  19. THE TIMING OF NINE GLOBULAR CLUSTER PULSARS

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, Ryan S.; Freire, Paulo C. C.; Ransom, Scott M.; Jacoby, Bryan A. E-mail: pfreire@mpifr-bonn.mpg.de E-mail: bryan.jacoby@gmail.com

    2012-02-01

    We have used the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope to time nine previously known pulsars without published timing solutions in the globular clusters (GCs) M62, NGC 6544, and NGC 6624. We have full timing solutions that measure the spin, astrometric, and (where applicable) binary parameters for six of these pulsars. The remaining three pulsars (reported here for the first time) were not detected enough to establish solutions. We also report our timing solutions for five pulsars with previously published solutions, and find good agreement with other authors, except for PSR J1701-3006B in M62. Gas in this system is probably responsible for the discrepancy in orbital parameters, and we have been able to measure a change in the orbital period over the course of our observations. Among the pulsars with new solutions we find several binary pulsars with very low mass companions (members of the so-called 'black widow' class) and we are able to place constraints on the mass-to-light ratio in two clusters. We confirm that one of the pulsars in NGC 6624 is indeed a member of the rare class of non-recycled pulsars found in GCs. We have also measured the orbital precession and Shapiro delay for a relativistic binary in NGC 6544. If we assume that the orbital precession can be described entirely by general relativity, which is likely, we are able to measure the total system mass (2.57190(73) M{sub Sun }) and companion mass (1.2064(20) M{sub Sun }), from which we derive the orbital inclination (sin i = 0.9956(14)) and the pulsar mass (1.3655(21) M{sub Sun }), the most precise such measurement ever obtained for a millisecond pulsar. The companion is the most massive known around a fully recycled pulsar.

  20. Newest insights from MHD numerical modeling of Pulsar Wind Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olmi, B.; Del Zanna, L.; Amato, E.; Bucciantini, N.; Bandiera, R.

    2016-06-01

    Numerical MHD models are considered very successful in accounting for many of the observed properties of Pulsar Wind Nebulae (PWNe), especially those concerning the high energy emission morphology and the inner nebula dynamics. Although PWNe are known to be among the most powerful accelerators in nature, producing particles up to PeV energies, the mechanisms responsible of such an efficient acceleration are still a deep mystery. Indeed, these processes take place in one of the most hostile environment for particle acceleration: the relativistic and highly magnetized termination shock of the pulsar wind. The newest results from numerical simulations of the Crab Nebula, the PWN prototype, will be presented, with special attention to the problem of particle acceleration. In particular it will be shown how a multi-wavelengths analysis of the wisps properties can be used to constrain the particle acceleration mechanisms working at the Crab's termination shock, by identifying the particle acceleration site at the shock front.

  1. Socioeconomic Position and Health: The Differential Effects of Education versus Income on the Onset versus Progression of Health Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herd, Pamela; Goesling, Brian; House, James S.

    2007-01-01

    This article seeks to elucidate the relationship between socioeconomic position and health by showing how different facets of socioeconomic position (education and income) affect different stages (onset vs. progression) of health problems. The biomedical literature has generally treated socioeconomic position as a unitary construct. Likewise, the…

  2. Algebraically special space-time in relativity, black holes, and pulsar models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adler, R. J.; Sheffield, C.

    1973-01-01

    The entire field of astronomy is in very rapid flux, and at the center of interest are problems relating to the very dense, rotating, neutron stars observed as pulsars. the hypothesized collapsed remains of stars known as black holes, and quasars. Degenerate metric form, or Kerr-Schild metric form, was used to study several problems related to intense gravitational fields.

  3. Braking index of isolated pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamil, O.; Stone, J. R.; Urbanec, M.; Urbancová, G.

    2015-03-01

    Isolated pulsars are rotating neutron stars with accurately measured angular velocities Ω , and their time derivatives that show unambiguously that the pulsars are slowing down. Although the exact mechanism of the spin-down is a question of detailed debate, the commonly accepted view is that it arises through emission of magnetic dipole radiation (MDR) from a rotating magnetized body. Other processes, including the emission of gravitational radiation, and of relativistic particles (pulsar wind), are also being considered. The calculated energy loss by a rotating pulsar with a constant moment of inertia is assumed proportional to a model dependent power of Ω . This relation leads to the power law Ω ˙ =-K Ωn where n is called the braking index. The MDR model predicts n exactly equal to 3. Selected observations of isolated pulsars provide rather precise values of n , individually accurate to a few percent or better, in the range 1

  4. Report on a Stable New Pulsar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-01

    Figure 3). Only three 1 d pulsars are known to pulse in optical light (PSR0531+21 in the Crab Nebula , PSR0833-45 in the Vela supernova remnant, and...PSR0540-693 in t he Large Magellanic Cloud) and only one of these (the Crab Nebula pulsar) has been found ta pulse in all wavelength bands from I

  5. The Binary Pulsar: Gravity Waves Exist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Will, Clifford

    1987-01-01

    Reviews the history of pulsars generally and the 1974 discovery of the binary pulsar by Joe Taylor and Russell Hulse specifically. Details the data collection and analysis used by Taylor and Hulse. Uses this discussion as support for Albert Einstein's theory of gravitational waves. (CW)

  6. The Binary Pulsar: Gravity Waves Exist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Will, Clifford

    1987-01-01

    Reviews the history of pulsars generally and the 1974 discovery of the binary pulsar by Joe Taylor and Russell Hulse specifically. Details the data collection and analysis used by Taylor and Hulse. Uses this discussion as support for Albert Einstein's theory of gravitational waves. (CW)

  7. Neutron Stars and the Discovery of Pulsars.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenstein, George

    1985-01-01

    Part one recounted the story of the discovery of pulsars and examined the Crab Nebula, supernovae, and neutron stars. This part (experts from the book "Frozen Star") shows how an understanding of the nature of pulsars allowed astronomers to tie these together. (JN)

  8. Neutron Stars and the Discovery of Pulsars.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenstein, George

    1985-01-01

    Part one recounted the story of the discovery of pulsars and examined the Crab Nebula, supernovae, and neutron stars. This part (experts from the book "Frozen Star") shows how an understanding of the nature of pulsars allowed astronomers to tie these together. (JN)

  9. Radio-quiet Gamma-ray Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Lupin Chun-Che

    2016-09-01

    A radio-quiet γ-ray pulsar is a neutron star that has significant γ-ray pulsation but without observed radio emission or only limited emission detected by high sensitivity radio surveys. The launch of the Fermi spacecraft in 2008 opened a new epoch to study the population of these pulsars. In the 2nd Fermi Large Area Telescope catalog of γ-ray pulsars, there are 35 (30 % of the 117 pulsars in the catalog) known samples classified as radio-quiet γ-ray pulsars with radio flux density (S1400) of less than 30 μJy. Accompanying the observations obtained in various wavelengths, astronomers not only have the opportunity to study the emitting nature of radio-quiet γ-ray pulsars but also have proposed different models to explain their radiation mechanism. This article will review the history of the discovery, the emission properties, and the previous efforts to study pulsars in this population. Some particular cases known as Geminga-like pulsars (e.g., PSR J0633+1746, PSR J0007+7303, PSR J2021+4026, and so on) are also specified to discuss their common and specific features.

  10. Radio polarimetry of Galactic Centre pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnitzeler, D. H. F. M.; Eatough, R. P.; Ferrière, K.; Kramer, M.; Lee, K. J.; Noutsos, A.; Shannon, R. M.

    2016-07-01

    To study the strength and structure of the magnetic field in the Galactic Centre (GC), we measured Faraday rotation of the radio emission of pulsars which are seen towards the GC. Three of these pulsars have the largest rotation measures (RMs) observed in any Galactic object with the exception of Sgr A⋆. Their large dispersion measures, RMs and the large RM variation between these pulsars and other known objects in the GC implies that the pulsars lie in the GC and are not merely seen in projection towards the GC. The large RMs of these pulsars indicate large line-of-sight magnetic field components between ˜ 16 and 33 μG; combined with recent model predictions for the strength of the magnetic field in the GC this implies that the large-scale magnetic field has a very small inclination angle with respect to the plane of the sky (˜12°). Foreground objects like the Radio Arc or possibly an ablated, ionized halo around the molecular cloud G0.11-0.11 could contribute to the large RMs of two of the pulsars. If these pulsars lie behind the Radio Arc or G0.11-0.11 then this proves that low-scattering corridors with lengths ≳100 pc must exist in the GC. This also suggests that future, sensitive observations will be able to detect additional pulsars in the GC. Finally, we show that the GC component in our most accurate electron density model oversimplifies structure in the GC.

  11. The PROblem Gambling RESearch Study (PROGRESS) research protocol: a pragmatic randomised controlled trial of psychological interventions for problem gambling

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Shane A; Merkouris, Stephanie S; Browning, Colette J; Radermacher, Harriet; Feldman, Susan; Enticott, Joanne; Jackson, Alun C

    2015-01-01

    Introduction International prevalence rates for problem gambling are estimated at 2.3%. Problem gambling is a serious global public health concern due to adverse personal and social consequences. Previous research evaluating the effectiveness of psychological interventions for the treatment of problem gambling has been compromised by methodological limitations, including small sample sizes and the use of waitlist control groups. This article describes the study protocol for a pragmatic randomised controlled trial (RCT) evaluating the effectiveness of cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT), behaviour therapy (BT), motivational interviewing (MI) against a non-directive supportive therapy (NDST) control, in treating problem gambling. Methods and analysis This study was a mixed-methods design, with a parallel group, pragmatic RCT as the primary component, and embedded qualitative studies conducted alongside. A total of 297 participants were recruited from the community in Victoria, Australia. Individuals aged 18 years and over, could communicate in English and wished to receive treatment for a gambling problem were eligible. Participants were randomly allocated in to 1 of the 4 psychological interventions: CBT, BT, MI and NDST. Repeated measures were conducted at pretreatment and post-treatment, and 6 and 12 months post-treatment. The statistical analysis will use an intention-to-treat approach. Multilevel mixed modelling will be used to examine changes in the primary outcome measures: gambling symptom severity, using the Gambling Symptom Assessment Scale, and gambling behaviours (frequency, time and expenditure). Secondary outcomes are depression, anxiety, stress and alcohol use. Individual semistructured qualitative interviews were conducted at pretreatment and post-treatment and 12 months post-treatment for a subset of participants (n=66). Ethics and dissemination This study was approved by the Victorian Department of Justice, Monash University and the University

  12. Searching for Pulsars with the SKA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ransom, Scott

    2007-12-01

    One of the SKA Key Science Projects involves "strong field tests of gravity using pulsars and black holes". However, we currently don't know of any pulsar - black hole binaries! Another component of this key science project involves the detection of nano-Hertz gravitational waves using an ensemble of many tens or hundreds of very high-precision millisecond pulsars, many of which are also, as yet, unknown. It is clear that some of the first major pulsar projects conducted with early phases of the SKA will involve large-area surveys. Given the likely nature of the mid-frequency-range SKA (i.e. large numbers of small dishes), such surveys will be incredibly challenging, and will require extremely large data and computational rates. However, the technical issues are likely surmountable, and the resulting surveys will find thousands of new pulsars, many of which will be useful for these and other basic physics tests.

  13. SUB-LUMINOUS {gamma}-RAY PULSARS

    SciTech Connect

    Romani, R. W.; Kerr, M.; Craig, H. A.; Johnston, S.; Cognard, I.; Smith, D. A.

    2011-09-01

    Most pulsars observed by the Fermi Large Area Telescope have {gamma}-ray luminosities scaling with spin-down power E-dot as L{sub {gamma}}{approx}(E-dot x 10{sup 33} erg s{sup -1}){sup 1/2}. However, there exist one detection and several upper limits an order of magnitude or more fainter than this trend. We describe these 'sub-luminous' {gamma}-ray pulsars and discuss the case for this being an orientation effect. Of the 12 known young radio pulsars with E-dot >10{sup 34} erg s{sup -1} and d {<=} 2 kpc several are substantially sub-luminous. The limited available geometrical constraints favor aligned geometries for these pulsars, although no one case for alignment is compelling. In this scenario GeV emission detected from such sub-luminous pulsars can be due to a lower altitude, lower-power accelerator gap.

  14. Sub-luminous γ-ray pulsars

    SciTech Connect

    Romani, R. W.; Kerr, M.; Craig, H. A.; Johnston, S.; Cognard, I.; Smith, D. A.

    2011-08-17

    Here, most pulsars observed by the Fermi Large Area Telescope have γ-ray luminosities scaling with spin-down power ${\\dot{E}}$ as $L_\\gamma \\approx ({\\dot{E}}\\, \\times \\, 10^{33}\\,{\\rm erg \\,s^{-1}})^{1/2}$. However, there exist one detection and several upper limits an order of magnitude or more fainter than this trend. We describe these "sub-luminous" γ-ray pulsars and discuss the case for this being an orientation effect. Of the 12 known young radio pulsars with ${\\dot{E}}>10^{34}\\, {\\rm erg\\,s^{-1}}$ and d ≤ 2 kpc several are substantially sub-luminous. The limited available geometrical constraints favor aligned geometries for these pulsars, although no one case for alignment is compelling. In this scenario GeV emission detected from such sub-luminous pulsars can be due to a lower altitude, lower-power accelerator gap.

  15. A radio pulsar spinning at 716 Hz.

    PubMed

    Hessels, Jason W T; Ransom, Scott M; Stairs, Ingrid H; Freire, Paulo C C; Kaspi, Victoria M; Camilo, Fernando

    2006-03-31

    We have discovered a 716-hertz eclipsing binary radio pulsar in the globular cluster Terzan 5 using the Green Bank Telescope. It is the fastest spinning neutron star found to date, breaking the 24-year record held by the 642-hertz pulsar B1937+21. The difficulty in detecting this pulsar, because of its very low flux density and high eclipse fraction (approximately 40% of the orbit), suggests that even faster spinning neutron stars exist. If the pulsar has a mass less than twice the mass of the Sun, then its radius must be constrained by the spin rate to be <16 kilometers. The short period of this pulsar also constrains models that suggest that gravitational radiation, through an r-mode (Rossby wave) instability, limits the maximum spin frequency of neutron stars.

  16. Possible evidence that pulsars are quark stars

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Renxin

    2008-01-10

    It is a pity that the real state of matter in pulsar-like stars is still not determined confidently because of the uncertainty about cold matter at supranuclear density, even 40 years after the discovery of pulsar. Nuclear matter (related to neutron stars) is one of the speculations for the inner constitution of pulsars even from the Landau's time more than 70 years ago, but quark matter (related to quark stars) is an alternative due to the fact of asymptotic freedom of interaction between quarks as the standard model of particle physics develops since 1960s. Therefore, one has to focus on astrophysical observations in order to answer what the nature of pulsars is. In this presentation, I would like to summarize possible observational evidence/hints that pulsar-like stars could be quark stars, and to address achievable clear evidence for quark stars in the future experiments.

  17. Social and economic conditions in childhood and the progression of functional health problems from midlife into old age

    PubMed Central

    Agahi, Neda; Shaw, Benjamin A; Fors, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Background Childhood living conditions have been found to predict health and mortality in midlife and in old age. This study examines the associations between social and economic childhood conditions and the onset and progression of functional health problems from midlife into old age, and the extent to which potential associations are mediated by educational attainment and smoking. Methods Data from the Level of Living Survey and the Swedish Panel Study of Living Conditions of the Oldest Old were merged to create a longitudinal data set with five repeated measures from 1968 to 2004 (n=1765, aged 30–50 years and free from functional health problems at baseline). Multilevel regression models were used to analyse retrospective reports of social and economic conditions in childhood (eg, conflicts or economic problems in the family) in relation to the progression of functional health problems over the 36-year period. Results Results showed that social and economic disadvantages in childhood were associated with an earlier onset and a faster progression of functional health problems from midlife into old age. Subsequent models showed that differences in educational attainment, but not smoking, explained much of the association between childhood disadvantages and trajectories of functional health problems. Conclusions According to these results, adverse social and economic conditions in childhood affect the development of functional health problems from midlife into old age indirectly through less favourable life careers, including lower education. Creating equal opportunities for educational attainment may help reduce the long-term effects of disadvantaged childhood conditions and postpone functional health problems. PMID:24759781

  18. Social and economic conditions in childhood and the progression of functional health problems from midlife into old age.

    PubMed

    Agahi, Neda; Shaw, Benjamin A; Fors, Stefan

    2014-08-01

    Childhood living conditions have been found to predict health and mortality in midlife and in old age. This study examines the associations between social and economic childhood conditions and the onset and progression of functional health problems from midlife into old age, and the extent to which potential associations are mediated by educational attainment and smoking. Data from the Level of Living Survey and the Swedish Panel Study of Living Conditions of the Oldest Old were merged to create a longitudinal data set with five repeated measures from 1968 to 2004 (n=1765, aged 30-50 years and free from functional health problems at baseline). Multilevel regression models were used to analyse retrospective reports of social and economic conditions in childhood (eg, conflicts or economic problems in the family) in relation to the progression of functional health problems over the 36-year period. Results showed that social and economic disadvantages in childhood were associated with an earlier onset and a faster progression of functional health problems from midlife into old age. Subsequent models showed that differences in educational attainment, but not smoking, explained much of the association between childhood disadvantages and trajectories of functional health problems. According to these results, adverse social and economic conditions in childhood affect the development of functional health problems from midlife into old age indirectly through less favourable life careers, including lower education. Creating equal opportunities for educational attainment may help reduce the long-term effects of disadvantaged childhood conditions and postpone functional health problems. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  19. Phase tracking for pulsar navigation with Doppler frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xinyuan, Zhang; Ping, Shuai; Liangwei, Huang

    2016-12-01

    Doppler frequency in pulsar navigation is an effect caused by spacecraft and pulsar motion, which would worsen the pulsar navigation accuracy. To describe this influence, we establish the Doppler frequency measurement model based on pulsar timing. With this model, we describe the relationship between the phase estimation performance and the observation time when Doppler frequency exists. To reduce the pulsar navigation error due to the Doppler frequency, we designed the phase tracking loop for the pulsar navigation. The pulsar frequency can be modified before the phase estimation. As a result, the impact of the Doppler frequency could be lessened, and the observation interval lengths can be lengthened to improve the phase estimation performance.

  20. Pulsars at the Highest Energies: Questions for the GLAST and ACT's

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Dave

    2008-01-01

    The recent announcement by the MAGIC team of pulsed gamma rays from the Crab Pulsar above 25 GeV and the launch of AGILE and the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) offer the promise of major progress in understanding the most extreme emission from pulsar magnetospheres. While waiting for detailed results, we can formulate questions to be addressed, based on past measurements and theoretical modeling. This brief review will highlight promising approaches for research into high-energy pulsed radiation.

  1. Pulsars at the Highest Energies: Questions for the GLAST and ACT's

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Dave

    2008-01-01

    The recent announcement by the MAGIC team of pulsed gamma rays from the Crab Pulsar above 25 GeV and the launch of AGILE and the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) offer the promise of major progress in understanding the most extreme emission from pulsar magnetospheres. While waiting for detailed results, we can formulate questions to be addressed, based on past measurements and theoretical modeling. This brief review will highlight promising approaches for research into high-energy pulsed radiation.

  2. EINSTEIN-HOME DISCOVERY OF 24 PULSARS IN THE PARKES MULTI-BEAM PULSAR SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Knispel, B.; Kim, H.; Allen, B.; Aulbert, C.; Bock, O.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Fehrmann, H.; Machenschalk, B.; Eatough, R. P.; Keane, E. F.; Kramer, M.; Anderson, D.; Crawford, F.; Rastawicki, D.; Hammer, D.; Papa, M. A.; Siemens, X.; Lyne, A. G.; Miller, R. B.; Sarkissian, J.; and others

    2013-09-10

    We have conducted a new search for radio pulsars in compact binary systems in the Parkes multi-beam pulsar survey (PMPS) data, employing novel methods to remove the Doppler modulation from binary motion. This has yielded unparalleled sensitivity to pulsars in compact binaries. The required computation time of Almost-Equal-To 17, 000 CPU core years was provided by the distributed volunteer computing project Einstein-Home, which has a sustained computing power of about 1 PFlop s{sup -1}. We discovered 24 new pulsars in our search, 18 of which were isolated pulsars, and 6 were members of binary systems. Despite the wide filterbank channels and relatively slow sampling time of the PMPS data, we found pulsars with very large ratios of dispersion measure (DM) to spin period. Among those is PSR J1748-3009, the millisecond pulsar with the highest known DM ( Almost-Equal-To 420 pc cm{sup -3}). We also discovered PSR J1840-0643, which is in a binary system with an orbital period of 937 days, the fourth largest known. The new pulsar J1750-2536 likely belongs to the rare class of intermediate-mass binary pulsars. Three of the isolated pulsars show long-term nulling or intermittency in their emission, further increasing this growing family. Our discoveries demonstrate the value of distributed volunteer computing for data-driven astronomy and the importance of applying new analysis methods to extensively searched data.

  3. Einstein@Home Discovery of 24 Pulsars in the Parkes Multi-beam Pulsar Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knispel, B.; Eatough, R. P.; Kim, H.; Keane, E. F.; Allen, B.; Anderson, D.; Aulbert, C.; Bock, O.; Crawford, F.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Fehrmann, H.; Hammer, D.; Kramer, M.; Lyne, A. G.; Machenschalk, B.; Miller, R. B.; Papa, M. A.; Rastawicki, D.; Sarkissian, J.; Siemens, X.; Stappers, B. W.

    2013-09-01

    We have conducted a new search for radio pulsars in compact binary systems in the Parkes multi-beam pulsar survey (PMPS) data, employing novel methods to remove the Doppler modulation from binary motion. This has yielded unparalleled sensitivity to pulsars in compact binaries. The required computation time of ≈17, 000 CPU core years was provided by the distributed volunteer computing project Einstein@Home, which has a sustained computing power of about 1 PFlop s-1. We discovered 24 new pulsars in our search, 18 of which were isolated pulsars, and 6 were members of binary systems. Despite the wide filterbank channels and relatively slow sampling time of the PMPS data, we found pulsars with very large ratios of dispersion measure (DM) to spin period. Among those is PSR J1748-3009, the millisecond pulsar with the highest known DM (≈420 pc cm-3). We also discovered PSR J1840-0643, which is in a binary system with an orbital period of 937 days, the fourth largest known. The new pulsar J1750-2536 likely belongs to the rare class of intermediate-mass binary pulsars. Three of the isolated pulsars show long-term nulling or intermittency in their emission, further increasing this growing family. Our discoveries demonstrate the value of distributed volunteer computing for data-driven astronomy and the importance of applying new analysis methods to extensively searched data.

  4. The Guitar Nebula, Bow Shocks From High Velocity Pulsars, and Companions of Recycled Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundgren, S. C.; Cordes, J. M.; Romani, R. W.

    1992-12-01

    We report results of optical studies of neutron star interactions with companion objects and the surrounding medium. In Hα observations of 11 high velocity, high spindown energy pulsars we have discovered one spectacular bow shock nebula, the Guitar Nebula, produced by the motion of the pulsar, PSR 2224+65, through partially neutral gas. One other pulsar, PSR 0136+57, has a faint feature near the pulsar position with a nonstellar morphology. We discuss the possibility that this is another shock and give upper limits on shock emission for the rest of the pulsars. Further, we consider possible scaling of shock emission with pulsar spindown energy and velocity, and detectability of shocks in other pulsars. Shocks may even reveal the existence of neutron stars not detectable as pulsars due to beaming or lack of pulsed radio emission. Our observations of several binary millisecond pulsars show some intriquing counterparts in some cases and allow strong limits to be placed on the magnitude of any counterparts in others. In pulsars 1534+12 and 1953+29 optical counterparts near the pulsar position are most likely chance coincidence with foreground stars. We imaged PSR 1257+12 in the hope of seeing the remnants of the disk which resulted in formation of planets or another pulsar wind driven shock nebula. We place upper limits on optical emission from nebulosity in the vicinity of the pulsar. This work was supported by grants from NSF, NASA and the National Astronomy and Ionosphere Center which operates Arecibo Observatory under contract with the NSF.

  5. The PROblem Gambling RESearch Study (PROGRESS) research protocol: a pragmatic randomised controlled trial of psychological interventions for problem gambling.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Shane A; Merkouris, Stephanie S; Browning, Colette J; Radermacher, Harriet; Feldman, Susan; Enticott, Joanne; Jackson, Alun C

    2015-11-24

    International prevalence rates for problem gambling are estimated at 2.3%. Problem gambling is a serious global public health concern due to adverse personal and social consequences. Previous research evaluating the effectiveness of psychological interventions for the treatment of problem gambling has been compromised by methodological limitations, including small sample sizes and the use of waitlist control groups. This article describes the study protocol for a pragmatic randomised controlled trial (RCT) evaluating the effectiveness of cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT), behaviour therapy (BT), motivational interviewing (MI) against a non-directive supportive therapy (NDST) control, in treating problem gambling. This study was a mixed-methods design, with a parallel group, pragmatic RCT as the primary component, and embedded qualitative studies conducted alongside. A total of 297 participants were recruited from the community in Victoria, Australia. Individuals aged 18 years and over, could communicate in English and wished to receive treatment for a gambling problem were eligible. Participants were randomly allocated in to 1 of the 4 psychological interventions: CBT, BT, MI and NDST. Repeated measures were conducted at pretreatment and post-treatment, and 6 and 12 months post-treatment. The statistical analysis will use an intention-to-treat approach. Multilevel mixed modelling will be used to examine changes in the primary outcome measures: gambling symptom severity, using the Gambling Symptom Assessment Scale, and gambling behaviours (frequency, time and expenditure). Secondary outcomes are depression, anxiety, stress and alcohol use. Individual semistructured qualitative interviews were conducted at pretreatment and post-treatment and 12 months post-treatment for a subset of participants (n=66). This study was approved by the Victorian Department of Justice, Monash University and the University of Melbourne Human Research Ethics Committees. Findings

  6. A high-sigma model of pulsar wind nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyutikov, Maxim

    2010-07-01

    Pulsars and central engines of long gamma-ray bursts - collapsars - may produce highly magnetized (Poynting-flux-dominated) outflows expanding in dense surroundings (interstellar medium or stellar material). For certain injection conditions, the magnetic flux of the wind cannot be accommodated within the cavity. In this case, ideal (non-dissipative) magnetohydrodynamics models, similar to the Kennel & Coroniti model of the Crab nebula, break down (the so-called `sigma problem'). This is typically taken to imply that the wind should become particle-dominated on scales much smaller than the size of the cavity. The wind is then slowed down by a fluid-type (low magnetization) reverse shock. Recent Fermi results, indicating that the synchrotron spectrum of the Crab nebula extends well beyond the upper limit of the most efficient radiation-reaction-limited acceleration, contradict the presence of a low-sigma reverse shock. We propose an alternative possibility, that in nearly aligned pulsars the excessive magnetic flux is destroyed in a reconnection-like process in two regions: near the rotational axis and near the equator. We construct an example of such a highly magnetized wind having two distinct reconnection regions and suggest that these reconnection sites are observed as tori and jets in pulsar wind nebulae. The model reproduces, qualitatively, the observed morphology of the Crab nebula. In parts of the nebula dissipation occurs in a relativistically moving wind, alleviating requirements on the acceleration rate.

  7. The state of pulsar theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, F.

    With the discovery of rapidly pulsing astrophysical objects, soon to become identified as rotating neutron stars, the role of centrifugal force in the physics of pulsars came to be a central pre-occupation in theoretical interpretation. The very term "light cylinder" illustrates this bias. The Goldreich and Julian (1969) model was warmly accepted by most theorists since it attributed pulsar action to centrifugal force alone. Since this was an aligned rotator model, the pulsations per se were attributed to an inclination of the magnetic dipole from the spin axis, with the physics assumed to be "about the same." About 15 years later, Krause-Polstorff and Michel (1985) numerically solved for the aligned rotator using exactly the same physics (except for the MHD assumption) as GJ and found that such a model is not dynamic but has stationary solutions with plasma trapped in two polar domes (on sign of charge) and a torus (opposite sign). Given the surrounding vacuum, the MHD assumption was indeed inappropriate. Introducing other known physics such a pair production seems to provide no help (Smith et al., 2001), and several other authors have independently confirmed the basic KPM results. It is useful to recall that many phenomenological models such as the "Hollow Cone Model" are directly based on GJ. Another 15 years has found the situation largely returned to that 30 years earlier, with only the slightest differences distinguishing current models from GJ (typically a small "gap" is postulated along open field lines). And numerical solutions to the "pulsar equation" have been found, but those equations assume MHD everywhere. Unless the vacuum can be well approximated as being a conductor, such solutions have little relevance. A more appropriate starting point would seem to be the Deutsch fields for an inclined rotator, as recently re-examined (Michel and Li, 1999). The speaker will try to sort out some of this confusion, but is not overly optimistic.

  8. Outflows from Supersonically-Moving Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klingler, Noel; Kargaltsev, Oleg; Rangelov, Blagoy; Pavlov, George

    2015-08-01

    Pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) are sources of nonthermal X-ray emission and prominent sites of particle acceleration. Among other parameters, the PWN appearance depends on the pulsar velocity. If a pulsar moves with a supersonic speed, the ram pressure exceeds the ambient medium pressure, resulting in a bow shock PWN with a tail behind the pulsar. We report on Chandra observations of extended pulsar tails behind PSR J1509-5850 and J1747-2958 ("the Mouse"), and the discovery of a puzzling outflow (in the J1509-5850 PWN) strongly misaligned with the pulsar's direction of motion. We resolve the structures of the heads of the two PWNe and interpret them in light of pulsar wind models. We perform spatially resolved spectral measurements and find only marginal evidence of cooling in the long tail of PSR J1509-5850. The morphologies of the PWN heads and the extended tails are discussed and compared with those of other bow shock PWNe detected by Chandra. A possible unifying scheme will be discussed.

  9. Acceleration by pulsar winds in binary systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice K.; Gaisser, T. K.

    1990-01-01

    In the absence of accretion torques, a pulsar in a binary system will spin down due to electromagnetic dipole radiation and the spin-down power will drive a wind of relativistic electron-positron pairs. Winds from pulsars with short periods will prevent any subsequent accretion but may be confined by the companion star atmosphere, wind, or magnetosphere to form a standing shock. The authors investigate the possibility of particle acceleration at such a pulsar wind shock and the production of very high energy (VHE) and ultra high energy (UHE) gamma rays from interactions of accelerated protons in the companion star's wind or atmosphere. They find that in close binaries containing active pulsars, protons will be shock accelerated to a maximum energy dependent on the pulsar spin-down luminosity. If a significant fraction of the spin-down power goes into particle acceleration, these systems should be sources of VHE and possibly UHE gamma rays. The authors discuss the application of the pulsar wind model to binary sources such as Cygnus X-3, as well as the possibility of observing VHE gamma-rays from known binary radio pulsar systems.

  10. A Study of Dynamical and Emission Variabilities in Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seymour, Andrew D.

    Pulsars are rapidly rotating highly magnetized neutron stars thought to have been formed in the core-collapse supernova of massive stars. Ever since their discovery, pulsars have shown complex behaviors. This is certainly true for their emission mechanism, which is still not fully understood. This is primarily because of the abrupt changes that appear in the pulse profile. Recent discoveries have shown that these emission changes effect the spin dynamics, particularly the spin-down rate. This indicates that pulsar emissions are even more complex than previously thought. The goal of this thesis is to apply new analysis techniques to help shed light on the pulsar emission problem. Over the past decade, it has become apparent that a class of `bursting pulsars' exist with the discovery of PSR J1752+2359 and PSR J1938+2213. In these pulsars, a sharp increase in the emission intensity is observed that then tends to systematically drop-off from pulse-to-pulse. We describe the discovery of such a relationship in high-sensitivity observations of the young (characteristic age of 90; 000 yrs) 0.33 s pulsar B0611+22 at both 327 MHz and 1400 MHz with the Arecibo observatory. While it was previously shown that B0611+22 has mode-switching properties, the data presented here show that this pulsar emits bursts with characteristic time-scales of several hundred seconds. At 327 MHz, the pulsar shows steady behavior in one emission mode which is enhanced by bursting emission slightly offset in pulse phase from this steady emission. Contrastingly at 1400 MHz, the two modes appear to behave in a competing operation while still offset in phase. Using a uctuation spectrum analysis, we also investigate each mode independently for sub-pulse drifting. Neither emission mode (i.e. during bursts or persistent emission) shows the presence of the drifting sub-pulse phenomenon. While further examples of this behavior and studies at different wavelengths are required, it appears that this

  11. A Chandra Search for a Pulsar Wind Nebula around PSR B1055-52

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posselt, B.; Spence, G.; Pavlov, G. G.

    2015-10-01

    The nearby, middle-aged PSR B1055-52 has many properties in common with the Geminga pulsar. Motivated by the Geminga's enigmatic and prominent pulsar wind nebula (PWN), we searched for extended emission around PSR B1055-52 with Chandra ACIS. For an energy range 0.3-1 keV, we found a 4σ flux enhancement in a 4\\buildrel{\\prime\\prime}\\over{.} 9-20\\prime\\prime annulus around the pulsar. There is a slight asymmetry in the emission close, 1\\buildrel{\\prime\\prime}\\over{.} 5-4\\prime\\prime , to the pulsar. The excess emission has a luminosity of about 1029 erg s-1 in an energy range 0.3-8 keV for a distance of 350 pc. Overall, the faint extended emission around \\text{PSR B1055-52} is consistent with a PWN of an aligned rotator moving away from us along the line of sight with supersonic velocity, but a contribution from a dust scattering halo cannot be excluded. Comparing the properties of other nearby, middle-aged pulsars, we suggest that the geometry—the orientations of rotation axis, magnetic field axis, and the sight-line—is the deciding factor for a pulsar to show a prominent PWN. We also report on an ≳ 30% flux decrease of PSR B1055-52 between the 2000 XMM-Newton and our 2012 Chandra observation. We tentatively attribute this flux decrease to a cross-calibration problem, but further investigations of the pulsar are required to exclude actual intrinsic flux changes.

  12. Pulsar Search Using Supervised Machine Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, John M.

    2017-05-01

    Pulsars are rapidly rotating neutron stars which emit a strong beam of energy through mechanisms that are not entirely clear to physicists. These very dense stars are used by astrophysicists to study many basic physical phenomena, such as the behavior of plasmas in extremely dense environments, behavior of pulsar-black hole pairs, and tests of general relativity. Many of these tasks require a large ensemble of pulsars to provide enough statistical information to answer the scientific questions posed by physicists. In order to provide more pulsars to study, there are several large-scale pulsar surveys underway, which are generating a huge backlog of unprocessed data. Searching for pulsars is a very labor-intensive process, currently requiring skilled people to examine and interpret plots of data output by analysis programs. An automated system for screening the plots will speed up the search for pulsars by a very large factor. Research to date on using machine learning and pattern recognition has not yielded a completely satisfactory system, as systems with the desired near 100% recall have false positive rates that are higher than desired, causing more manual labor in the classification of pulsars. This work proposed to research, identify, propose and develop methods to overcome the barriers to building an improved classification system with a false positive rate of less than 1% and a recall of near 100% that will be useful for the current and next generation of large pulsar surveys. The results show that it is possible to generate classifiers that perform as needed from the available training data. While a false positive rate of 1% was not reached, recall of over 99% was achieved with a false positive rate of less than 2%. Methods of mitigating the imbalanced training and test data were explored and found to be highly effective in enhancing classification accuracy.

  13. Classical Accreting Pulsars with NICER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.

    2014-01-01

    Soft excesses are very common center dot Lx > 1038 erg/s - reprocessing by optically thick material at the inner edge of the accretion disk center dot Lx < 1036 erg/s - photoionized or collisionally heated diffuse gas or thermal emission from the NS surface center dot Lx 1037 erg/s - either or both types of emission center dot NICER observations of soft excesses in bright X-ray pulsars combined with reflection modeling will constrain the ionization state, metalicity and dynamics of the inner edge of the magnetically truncated accretion disk Reflection models of an accretion disk for a hard power law - Strong soft excess below 3 keV from hot X-ray heated disk - For weakly ionized case: strong recombination lines - Are we seeing changes in the disk ionization in 4U1626-26? 13 years of weekly monitoring with RXTE PCA center dot Revealed an unexpectedly large population of Be/X-ray binaries compared to the Milky Way center dot Plotted luminosities are typical of "normal" outbursts (once per orbit) center dot The SMC provides an excellent opportunity to study a homogenous population of HMXBs with low interstellar absorption for accretion disk studies. Monitoring with NICER will enable studies of accretion disk physics in X-ray pulsars center dot The SMC provides a potential homogeneous low-absorption population for this study center dot NICER monitoring and TOO observations will also provide measurements of spinfrequencies, QPOs, pulsed fluxes, and energy spectra.

  14. Pulsar rotation with superfluid entrainment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonelli, Marco; Pizzochero, Pierre M.

    2017-06-01

    Large pulsar glitches (like the ones detected in the Vela) are though to be a consequence of the superfluid component present in the interior of mature neutron stars: this component can rotate differentially with respect to the normal part of the star, storing the angular momentum needed to produce the observed sudden decrease of the pulsar rotational period. However strong entrainment (a non-dissipative effect that couples the superfluid component with the non-superfluid component inside the star) challenges this picture. Here we study the impact of entrainment on the angular momentum that can be exchanged between the normal component and the superfluid during a glitch by means of a consistent global model. This allows to estimate the maximum angular momentum reservoir stored into the superfluid component of the star: the essential ingredient are newly calculated mesoscopic pinning forces that block the superfluid vorticity in the crust of the neutron star. This method can also provide a quantitative test for global models of rotating neutron stars, as well as for microphysical inputs present in literature (like entrainment parameters and pinning forces).

  15. A digital pulsar backend based on FPGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Jin-Tao; Chen, Lan; Han, Jin-Lin; Esamdin, Ali; Wu, Ya-Jun; Li, Zhi-Xuan; Hao, Long-Fei; Zhang, Xiu-Zhong

    2017-01-01

    A digital pulsar backend based on a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) is developed. It is designed for incoherent de-dispersion of pulsar observations and has a maximum bandwidth of 512 MHz. The channel bandwidth is fixed to 1 MHz, and the highest time resolution is 10 {{μ }} s. Testing observations were carried out using the Urumqi 25-m telescope administered by Xinjiang Astronomical Observatory and the Kunming 40-m telescope administered by Yunnan Observatories, targeting PSR J0332+5434 in the L band and PSR J0437–4715 in the S band, respectively. The successful observation of PSR J0437–4715 demonstrates its ability to observe millisecond pulsars.

  16. Limits to the Stability of Pulsar Time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petit, Gerard

    1996-01-01

    The regularity of the rotation rate of millisecond pulsars is the underlying hypothesis for using these neutron stars as 'celestial clocks'. Given their remote location in our galaxy and to our lack of precise knowledge on the galactic environment, a number of phenomena effect the apparent rotation rate observed on Earth. This paper reviews these phenomena and estimates the order of magnitude of their effect. It concludes that an ensemble pulsar time based on a number of selected millisecond pulsars should have a fractional frequency stability close to 2 x 10(sup -15) for an averaging time of a few years.

  17. Pulsar Emission Geometry and Accelerating Field Strength

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-11-01

    ar X iv :1 11 1. 03 25 v1 [ as tr o- ph .H E ] 1 N ov 2 01 1 2011 Fermi Symposium, Roma., May. 9-12 1 Pulsar Emission Geometry and Accelerating...observations of gamma-ray pulsars have opened a new window to understanding the generation mechanisms of high-energy emission from these systems. The high...the Vela and CTA 1 pulsars with simulated high-energy light curves generated from geometrical representations of the outer gap and slot gap emission

  18. Frequency dependence of pulsar integrated profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Thorsett, S.E. )

    1991-08-01

    The dependence of component separation on observing frequency has been studied for seven pulsars that exhibit double- or multiple-component average profiles. In each case, a review of all available data shows a smooth variation of given form. No evidence is found for a 'break frequency' at which the separation behavior discretely changes. It is argued that previous reports of such a discontinuity are due to insufficiently sampled data together with a prejudice toward pure power-law functional behaviors. The absence of such a break has implications for theories of the pulsar emission mechanism and of the propagation of radio waves in the pulsar magnetosphere. 44 refs.

  19. Pulsar observations and neutron star models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boerner, G.; Cohen, J. M.

    1972-01-01

    Information about the physical parameters of neutron stars is obtained from pulsar observations. The energy balance of the Crab nebula and the Vela X remnant allows derivation of limits for the masses of the Crab and Vela pulsars. Glitch observations provide further clues on the masses of these two pulsars. The degree of confidence in the derived numbers is pointed out. The possibility of observing neutron stars in binary systems as pulsating X-ray sources is discussed. The importance of observing redshifted gamma ray lines from the surface of neutron stars, and thus directly measuring either individual or statistical properties of these objects is pointed out.

  20. Age Discrepancy Throws Pulsar Theories into Turmoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-03-01

    Astronomers using the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope have found a pulsar -- a spinning, superdense neutron star -- that apparently is considerably younger than previously thought. This finding, combined with the discovery in 2000 of a pulsar that was older than previously thought, means that many assumptions astronomers have made about how pulsars are born and age must be reexamined, according to the researchers. Supernova Remnant and Pulsar -- Click on image for larger view Infrared Image of Supernova Remnant; Dashed Line and Arrow Indicate Pulsar's Motion Detected by VLA "We are learning that each individual pulsar is a very complicated object, and we should assume nothing about it," said Bryan Gaensler, of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, MA. "Our work makes it more difficult to put pulsars into neat categories, but ultimately will yield new insights into how pulsars are born," he added. The research is reported in the March 10 edition of the Astrophysical Journal Letters. The astronomers studied a pulsar called B1951+32 and a supernova remnant called CTB 80, both nearly 8,000 light-years from Earth. The supernova remnant is the shell of debris from the explosion of a giant star. The explosion resulted from the giant star's catastrophic collapse into the superdense neutron star. By observing the pulsar and the supernova remnant from 1989 to 2000 with the VLA, the scientists were able to measure the movement of the pulsar, which, they found, is moving directly outward from the center of the shell of explosion debris. "We've always felt that, if you see a pulsar and a supernova remnant close together, the pulsar had been born in an explosion at the center of the supernova remnant, but this is the first time that actual observational measurement shows a pulsar moving away from the center of the supernova remnant. It's nice to finally have such an example," said Joshua Migliazzo of the Center for

  1. Pulsar wind model for the spin-down behavior of intermittent pulsars

    SciTech Connect

    Li, L.; Tong, H.; Yan, W. M.; Yuan, J. P.; Wang, N.; Xu, R. X.

    2014-06-10

    Intermittent pulsars are part-time radio pulsars. They have higher slow down rates in the on state (radio-loud) than in the off state (radio-quiet). This gives evidence that particle wind may play an important role in pulsar spindown. The effect of particle acceleration is included in modeling the rotational energy loss rate of the neutron star. Applying the pulsar wind model to the three intermittent pulsars (PSR B1931+24, PSR J1841–0500, and PSR J1832+0029) allows their magnetic fields and inclination angles to be calculated simultaneously. The theoretical braking indices of intermittent pulsars are also given. In the pulsar wind model, the density of the particle wind can always be the Goldreich-Julian density. This may ensure that different on states of intermittent pulsars are stable. The duty cycle of particle wind can be determined from timing observations. It is consistent with the duty cycle of the on state. Inclination angle and braking index observations of intermittent pulsars may help to test different models of particle acceleration. At present, the inverse Compton scattering induced space charge limited flow with field saturation model can be ruled out.

  2. Astronomers Discover Fastest-Spinning Pulsar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-01-01

    Astronomers using the National Science Foundation's Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope have discovered the fastest-spinning neutron star ever found, a 20-mile-diameter superdense pulsar whirling faster than the blades of a kitchen blender. Their work yields important new information about the nature of one of the most exotic forms of matter known in the Universe. Pulsar Graphic Pulsars Are Spinning Neutron Stars CREDIT: Bill Saxton, NRAO/AUI/NSF (Click on image for larger version) "We believe that the matter in neutron stars is denser than an atomic nucleus, but it is unclear by how much. Our observations of such a rapidly rotating star set a hard upper limit on its size, and hence on how dense the star can be.," said Jason Hessels, a graduate student at McGill University in Montreal. Hessels and his colleagues presented their findings to the American Astronomical Society's meeting in Washington, DC. Pulsars are spinning neutron stars that sling "lighthouse beams" of radio waves or light around as they spin. A neutron star is what is left after a massive star explodes at the end of its "normal" life. With no nuclear fuel left to produce energy to offset the stellar remnant's weight, its material is compressed to extreme densities. The pressure squeezes together most of its protons and electrons to form neutrons; hence, the name "neutron star." "Neutron stars are incredible laboratories for learning about the physics of the fundamental particles of nature, and this pulsar has given us an important new limit," explained Scott Ransom, an astronomer at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory and one of Hessels' collaborators on this work. The scientists discovered the pulsar, named PSR J1748-2446ad, in a globular cluster of stars called Terzan 5, located some 28,000 light-years from Earth in the constellation Sagittarius. The newly-discovered pulsar is spinning 716 times per second, or at 716 Hertz (Hz), readily beating the previous record of 642 Hz from a pulsar

  3. Community Ecology and Capacity: Keys to Progressing the Environmental Communication of Wicked Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caron, Rosemary M.; Serrell, Nancy

    2009-01-01

    Wicked problems are multifactorial in nature and possess no clear resolution due to numerous community stakeholder involvement. We demonstrate childhood lead poisoning as a wicked problem and illustrate how understanding a community's ecology can build community capacity to affect local environmental management by (1) forming an academic-community…

  4. Community Ecology and Capacity: Keys to Progressing the Environmental Communication of Wicked Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caron, Rosemary M.; Serrell, Nancy

    2009-01-01

    Wicked problems are multifactorial in nature and possess no clear resolution due to numerous community stakeholder involvement. We demonstrate childhood lead poisoning as a wicked problem and illustrate how understanding a community's ecology can build community capacity to affect local environmental management by (1) forming an academic-community…

  5. Neutron stars and millisecond pulsars from accretion-induced collapse in globular clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailyn, Charles D.; Grindlay, Jonathan E.

    1990-01-01

    This paper examines the limits on the number of millisecond pulsars which could be formed in globular clusters by the generally accepted scenario (in which a neutron star is created by the supernova of an initially massive star and subsequently captures a companion to form a low-mass X-ray binary which eventually becomes a millisecond pulsar). It is found that, while the number of observed low-mass X-ray binaries can be adequately explained in this way, the reasonable assumption that the pulsar luminosity function in clusters extends below the current observational limits down to the luminosity of the faintest millisecond pulsars in the field suggests a cluster population of millisecond pulsars which is substantially larger than the standard model can produce. Alleviating this problem by postulating much shorter lifetimes for the X-ray binaries requires massive star populations sufficiently large that the mass loss resulting from their evolution would be likely to unbind the cluster. It is argued that neutron star formation in globular clusters by accretion-induced collapse of white dwarfs may resolve the discrepancy in birthrates.

  6. Solving the Problem of Learning to Read: Children's Linguistic Awareness and Reading Progress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abramson, Shareen

    A study investigated suggested interrelationships of linguistic awareness, cognitive ability, and reading achievement. The extent to which differences in reading achievement were related to differences in the other areas was also explored. The Linguistic Awareness in Reading Test (LARR), the Coloured Progressive Matrices (CPM), and the Stanford…

  7. Solving the Problem of Learning to Read: Children's Linguistic Awareness and Reading Progress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abramson, Shareen

    A study investigated suggested interrelationships of linguistic awareness, cognitive ability, and reading achievement. The extent to which differences in reading achievement were related to differences in the other areas was also explored. The Linguistic Awareness in Reading Test (LARR), the Coloured Progressive Matrices (CPM), and the Stanford…

  8. e-Learning for Expanding Distance Education in Tertiary Level in Bangladesh: Problems and Progress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Masum, Md. Abdullah; Chowdhury, Saiful Islam

    2013-01-01

    E-learning has broadly become an important enabler to promote distance education (DE) and lifelong learning in most of the developed countries, but in Bangladesh it is still a new successful progressive system for the learning communities. Distance education is thought to be introduced as an effective way of educating people of all sections in…

  9. Properties of young pulsar wind nebulae: TeV detectability and pulsar properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Shuta J.; Takahara, Fumio

    2013-03-01

    Among dozens of young pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe), some have been detected in TeV γ-rays (TeV PWNe), while others have not (non-TeV PWNe). The TeV emission detectability is not correlated with either the spin-down power or the characteristic age of the central pulsars and it is an open question as to what determines the detectability. To study this problem, we investigate the spectral evolution of five young non-TeV PWNe: 3C 58, G310.6-1.6, G292.0+1.8, G11.2-0.3 and SNR B0540-69.3. We use a spectral evolution model that was developed in our previous works to be applied to young TeV PWNe. The TeV γ-ray flux upper limits of non-TeV PWNe give upper or lower limits on parameters such as the age of the PWN and the fraction of spin-down power going into magnetic energy injection (the fraction parameter). Combined with other independent observational and theoretical studies, we can guess a plausible value of the parameters for each object. For 3C 58, we prefer parameters with an age of 2.5 kyr and fraction parameter of 3.0 × 10-3, although the spectral modelling alone does not rule out a lower age and a higher fraction parameter. The fraction parameter of 3.0 × 10-3 is also consistent for other non-TeV PWNe and thus the value is regarded as common to young PWNe, including TeV PWNe. Moreover, we find that the intrinsic properties of the central pulsars are similar: 1048-50 erg for the initial rotational energy and 1042-44 erg for the magnetic energy (2 × 1012-3 × 1013 G for the dipole magnetic field strength at the surface). The TeV detectability is correlated with the total injected energy and the energy density of the interstellar radiation field around PWNe. Except for the case of G292.0+1.8, broken power-law injection of the particles reproduces the broad-band emission from non-TeV PWNe well.

  10. Observing the dynamics of supermassive black hole binaries with pulsar timing arrays.

    PubMed

    Mingarelli, C M F; Grover, K; Sidery, T; Smith, R J E; Vecchio, A

    2012-08-24

    Pulsar timing arrays are a prime tool to study unexplored astrophysical regimes with gravitational waves. Here, we show that the detection of gravitational radiation from individually resolvable supermassive black hole binary systems can yield direct information about the masses and spins of the black holes, provided that the gravitational-wave-induced timing fluctuations both at the pulsar and at Earth are detected. This in turn provides a map of the nonlinear dynamics of the gravitational field and a new avenue to tackle open problems in astrophysics connected to the formation and evolution of supermassive black holes. We discuss the potential, the challenges, and the limitations of these observations.

  11. Gamma ray pulsars. [electron-photon cascades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oegelman, H.; Ayasli, S.; Hacinliyan, A.

    1977-01-01

    Data from the SAS-2 high-energy gamma-ray experiment reveal the existence of four pulsars emitting photons above 35 MeV. An attempt is made to explain the gamma-ray emission from these pulsars in terms of an electron-photon cascade that develops in the magnetosphere of the pulsar. Although there is very little material above the surface of the pulsar, the very intense magnetic fields (10 to the 12th power gauss) correspond to many radiation lengths which cause electrons to emit photons by magnetic bremsstrahlung and which cause these photons to pair-produce. The cascade develops until the mean photon energy drops below the pair-production threshold which is in the gamma-ray range; at this stage, the photons break out from the source.

  12. Quasars, pulsars, black holes and HEAO's

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doolitte, R. F.; Moritz, K.; Whilden, R. D. C.

    1974-01-01

    Astronomical surveys are discussed by large X-ray, gamma ray, and cosmic ray instruments carried onboard high-energy astronomy observatories. Quasars, pulsars, black holes, and the ultimate benefits of the new astronomy are briefly discussed.

  13. Piccard: Pulsar timing data analysis package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Haasteren, Rutger

    2016-10-01

    Piccard is a Bayesian-inference pipeline for Pulsar Timing Array (PTA) data and interacts with Tempo2 (ascl:1210.015) through libstempo. The code is use mainly for single-pulsar analysis and gravitational-wave detection purposes of full Pulsar Timing Array datasets. Modeling of the data can include correlated signals per frequency or modeled spectrum, with uniform, dipolar, quadrupolar, or anisotropic correlations; multiple error bars and EFACs per pulsar; and white and red noise. Timing models can be numerically included, either by using the design matrix (linear timing model), or by calling libstempo for the full non-linear timing model. Many types of samplers are included. For common-mode mitigation, the signals can be reconstructed mitigating arbitrary signals simultaneously.

  14. Gamma radiation from pulsar magnetospheric gaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiang, James; Romani, Roger W.

    1992-01-01

    We investigate the production of gamma rays in two pulsar emission models: the 'polar cap' model and the 'outer cap' model. For the former, we have performed detailed simulations of energetic electrons flowing in the vacuum dipole open field line region. In the outer gap case, we generate light curves for various magnetosphere geometries. Using data from radio and optical observations, we construct models for specific viewing angles appropriate to the Crab and Vela pulsars. Phase-resolved spectra are also computed in the polar cap case and provide signatures for testing the models. The calculations have been extended to include millisecond pulsars, and we have been able to predict fluxes and spectra for populations of recycled pulsars, which are compared to COS B data for globular cluster populations.

  15. Timing of millisecond pulsars in globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Amico, Nichi; Possenti, Andrea; Manchester, Dick; Johnston, Simon; Kramer, Michael; Sarkissian, John; Lyne, Andrew; Burgay, Marta; Corongiu, Alessandro; Camilo, Fernando; Bailes, Matthew; van Straten, Willem

    2013-10-01

    Timing of the dozen pulsars discovered by us in P303 is ensuring high quality results: (a) the peculiarities (in position or projected acceleration) of all the 5 millisecond pulsars in NGC6752 suggested the presence of non thermal dynamics in the core, perhaps due to black-holes of intermediate mass; (b) the eclipsing pulsar in NGC6397 is a stereotype for studying the late evolution of exotic binaries. We propose to continue our timing project focusing mostly on NGC6752 at 20cm (in order to measure additional parameters useful to constrain the existence of a black-hole) and NGC6397 at 10cm (for studying the orbital secular evolution, the eclipse region, and the role played by the high energy photons released from the pulsar in the ejection of matter from the binary system).

  16. Timing of millisecond pulsars in globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Amico, Nichi; Possenti, Andrea; Manchester, Dick; Johnston, Simon; Kramer, Michael; Sarkissian, John; Lyne, Andrew; Burgay, Marta; Corongiu, Alessandro; Camilo, Fernando; Bailes, Matthew; van Straten, Willem

    2014-10-01

    Timing of the dozen pulsars discovered by us in P303 is ensuring high quality results: (a) the peculiarities (in position or projected acceleration) of all the 5 millisecond pulsars in NGC6752 suggested the presence of non thermal dynamics in the core, perhaps due to black-holes of intermediate mass; (b) the eclipsing pulsar in NGC6397 is a stereotype for studying the late evolution of exotic binaries. We propose to continue our timing project focusing mostly on NGC6397 at 10cm, for studying the orbital secular evolution, the eclipse region, and the role played by the high energy photons released from the pulsar in the ejection of matter from the binary system.

  17. Timing of millisecond pulsars in globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Amico, Nichi; Possenti, Andrea; Manchester, Dick; Johnston, Simon; Kramer, Michael; Sarkissian, John; Lyne, Andrew; Burgay, Marta; Corongiu, Alessandro; Camilo, Fernando; Bailes, Matthew; van Straten, Willem

    2014-04-01

    Timing of the dozen pulsars discovered by us in P303 is ensuring high quality results: (a) the peculiarities (in position or projected acceleration) of all the 5 millisecond pulsars in NGC6752 suggested the presence of non thermal dynamics in the core, perhaps due to black-holes of intermediate mass; (b) the eclipsing pulsar in NGC6397 is a stereotype for studying the late evolution of exotic binaries. We propose to continue our timing project focusing mostly on NGC6752 at 20cm (in order to measure additional parameters useful to constrain the existence of a black-hole) and NGC6397 at 10cm (for studying the orbital secular evolution, the eclipse region, and the role played by the high energy photons released from the pulsar in the ejection of matter from the binary system).

  18. The origin of the Guitar pulsar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tetzlaff, N.; Neuhäuser, R.; Hohle, M. M.

    2009-11-01

    Among a sample of 140 OB associations and clusters, we want to identify probable parent associations for the Guitar pulsar (PSR B2224+65), which would then also constrain its age. For this purpose, we are using an Euler-Cauchy technique, treating the vertical component of the Galactic potential to calculate the trajectories of the pulsar and each association into the past. To include errors, we use Monte Carlo simulations varying the initial parameters within their error intervals. The whole range of possible pulsar radial velocities is taken into account during the simulations. We find that the Guitar pulsar most probably originated from the Cygnus OB3 association ~0.8Myr ago, inferring a current radial velocity of vr ~ -30kms-1, consistent with the inclination of its bow shock.

  19. Multiwavelength Observations of Pulsar Wind Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slane, Patrick

    The extended nebulae formed as pulsar winds expand into their surroundings provide information about the composition of the winds, the injection history from the host pulsar, and the material into which the nebulae are expanding. Observations from across the electromagnetic spectrum provide constraints on the evolution of the nebulae, the density and composition of the surrounding ejecta, the geometry of the central engines, and the long-term fate of the energetic particles produced in these systems. Such observations reveal the presence of jets and wind termination shocks, time-varying compact emission structures, shocked supernova ejecta, and newly formed dust. Here I provide a broad overview of the structure of pulsar wind nebulae, with specific examples from observations extending from the radio band to very-high-energy γ-rays that demonstrate our ability to constrain the history and ultimate fate of the energy released in the spin-down of young pulsars.

  20. OSSE observations of the Crab pulsar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulmer, M. P.; Matz, S. M.; Cameron, R. A.; Grabelsky, D. A.; Grove, J. E.; Johnson, W. N.; Jung, G. V.; Kinzer, R. L.; Kurfess, J. D.; Leising, M. D.

    1992-01-01

    Preliminary results are presented of the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory Oriented Scintillation Spectrometer Experiment (OSSE) observations of the Crab pulsar. The pulsar energy spectra and light curves are in general agreement with previous observations, validating the OSSE pulsar data acquisition modes and data analysis algorithms. The data suggest that the spectrum of the pulsar varies throughout the light curve. The 'interpulse' region has a slightly flatter spectrum in the approx. 60 to 250 keV region and a slightly steeper spectrum at higher energies than the two main pulses. No evidence was found for any lines in the spectra with a typical sensitivity of about 10(exp -4) photons/sq cm/s.

  1. Interactive Database of Pulsar Flux Density Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koralewska, O.; Krzeszowski, K.; Kijak, J.; Lewandowski, W.

    2012-12-01

    The number of astronomical observations is steadily growing, giving rise to the need of cataloguing the obtained results. There are a lot of databases, created to store different types of data and serve a variety of purposes, e. g. databases providing basic data for astronomical objects (SIMBAD Astronomical Database), databases devoted to one type of astronomical object (ATNF Pulsar Database) or to a set of values of the specific parameter (Lorimer 1995 - database of flux density measurements for 280 pulsars on the frequencies up to 1606 MHz), etc. We found that creating an online database of pulsar flux measurements, provided with facilities for plotting diagrams and histograms, calculating mean values for a chosen set of data, filtering parameter values and adding new measurements by the registered users, could be useful in further studies on pulsar spectra.

  2. An Independent 1967 Discovery of Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schisler, Charles

    2008-02-01

    During a 1-year tour of duty at the Ballistic Missile Early Warning Site, Clear Air Force Station, Alaska, pulsed signals unrelated to the station radar were observed. Detection of the 4-min/day sidereal advance in the times of occurrence of the signals showed that they were of astronomical origin. At least ten distinct sources were observed and approximate celestial positions of these sources determined from the azimuth and occurrence time of the signals. The strongest source, first detected in mid-August 1967, was identified with the Crab Nebula. Following the announcement of the discovery of pulsars by the Cambridge group in 1968, it was realised that the detected sources were most likely pulsars. In particular, it is virtually certain that the Crab Nebula source was the Crab pulsar. Following the recent de-activation of the radar system, it is now possible to discuss this independent discovery of pulsars.

  3. Outlook for Detecting Gravitational Waves with Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-04-01

    Though the recent discovery of GW150914 is a thrilling success in the field of gravitational-wave astronomy, LIGO is only one tool the scientific community is using to hunt for these elusive signals. After 10 years of unsuccessful searching, how likely is it that pulsar-timing-array projects will make their own first detection soon?Frequency ranges for gravitational waves produced by different astrophysical sources. Pulsar timing arrays such as the EPTA and IPTA are used to detect low-frequency gravitational waves generated by the stochastic background and supermassive black hole binaries. [Christopher Moore, Robert Cole and Christopher Berry]Supermassive BackgroundGround-based laser interferometers like LIGO are ideal for probing ripples in space-time caused by the merger of stellar-mass black holes; these mergers cause chirps in the frequency range of tens to thousands of hertz. But how do we pick up the extremely low-frequency, nanohertz background signal caused by the orbits of pairs of supermassive black holes? For that, we need pulsar timing arrays.Pulsar timing arrays are sets of pulsars whose signals are analyzed to look for correlations in the pulse arrival time. As the space-time between us and a pulsar is stretched and then compressed by a passing gravitational wave, the pulsars pulses should arrive a little late and then a little early. Comparing these timing residuals in an array of pulsars could theoretically allow for the detection of the gravitational waves causing them.Globally, there are currently four pulsar timing array projects actively searching for this signal, with a fifth planned for the future. Now a team of scientists led by Stephen Taylor (NASA-JPL/Caltech) has estimated the likelihood that these projects will successfully detect gravitational waves in the future.Probability for SuccessExpected detection probability of the gravitational-wave background as a function of observing time, for five different pulsar timing arrays. Optimistic

  4. ENHANCED DISSIPATION RATE OF MAGNETIC FIELD IN STRIPED PULSAR WINDS BY THE EFFECT OF TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Takamoto, Makoto; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro E-mail: inouety@phys.aoyama.ac.jp

    2012-08-10

    In this paper, we report on turbulent acceleration of the dissipation of the magnetic field in the post-shock region of a Poynting flux-dominated flow, such as the Crab pulsar wind nebula. We have performed two-dimensional resistive relativistic magnetohydrodynamics simulations of subsonic turbulence driven by the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability at the shock fronts of the Poynting flux-dominated flows in pulsar winds. We find that turbulence stretches current sheets which substantially enhances the dissipation of the magnetic field, and that most of the initial magnetic field energy is dissipated within a few eddy-turnover times. We also develop a simple analytical model for turbulent dissipation of the magnetic field that agrees well with our simulations. The analytical model indicates that the dissipation rate does not depend on resistivity even in the small resistivity limit. Our findings can possibly alleviate the {sigma}-problem in the Crab pulsar wind nebulae.

  5. Chandra Observations of the Crab Pulsar as a Function of Pulse Phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Tennant, Allyn F.; Becker, Werner; Juda, Michael; Elsner, Ronald F.; Kolodziejczak, Jeffery J.; Murray, Stephen S.; Paerels, Frits; Swartz, Douglas A.; Shibazaki, Noriaki; hide

    2001-01-01

    The Chandra X-Ray Observatory was used to observe the Crab Nebula and its pulsar using the LETGS, i.e. the Low-Energy Transmission Grating (LETG) with the High Resolution Camera Spectroscopy detector (HRC-S). Data from the zeroth-order image was utilized to isolate the pulsar from the surrounding nebula and to measure the pulsar emission as a function of pulse phase. HRC timing problems were overcome by developing special techniques to process the data. For the first time, pulsed x-ray emission has been detected at all pulse phases, allowing us to set a new upper limit to the thermal emission from the surface of the neutron star.

  6. Braking Index of GEMINGA Pulsar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramanamurthy, P. V.; Mattox, J. R.; EGRET Science Team

    1993-12-01

    The pulsar Geminga, also known as 2CG195+04, IE0630+178 and the faint star G", is a remarkable object in the sense that its energy output is almost all in high energy gamma rays. The pulsar elements of this 237 ms pulsar as given by various authors are surveyed. The braking index, $ n = ftimes ddot f / (dot f)(2) as obtained from the elements given by any one group (Hermsen et al. 1992; Bertsch et al. 1992) based on their own data set appears to be too high or has a very large upper limit compared with 3, the value expected for magnetic dipole radiation. This is largely due to the uncertainty in the value of \\ddot f. It is difficult to carry the absolute phase from one set of observations to another for a variety of reasons. Rather than fitting a polynomial in elapsed time to the event phases over different data sets, we have taken a different approach to determine \\ddot f. Hermsen et al. (1992) and Mattox et al. (1993) have determined f and \\dot f from COS-B and EGRET data respectively at two widely separated epochs. Assuming that there were no glitches, we obtained \\ddot f by dividing the difference in \\dot f values at the two epochs by the time difference between the two epochs; the resulting value of \\ddot f is (4 \\pm 2) times 10^{-26} s^{-3} . Combining this with the f and \\dot f values we obtained a value of (4.5 \\pm 2.3) for the braking index. This value agrees well with the expected. With more observations of Geminga scheduled for the Compton GRO, we expect that the error in \\dot f and consequently the errors in \\ddot f and n$ will decrease further in future. \\leftline{Bertsch et al. (1992) Nature, 357, 306} \\leftline{Hermsen et al. (1992) IAU Circular # 5541} \\leftline{Mattox et al. Proc. 2nd Compton Symp., (September, 1993), College} \\leftline{\\quad Park, Md., U.S.A.}

  7. Case study method and problem-based learning: utilizing the pedagogical model of progressive complexity in nursing education.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Michelle A; Christopher, Kimberly A

    2011-08-19

    As the complexity of health care delivery continues to increase, educators are challenged to determine educational best practices to prepare BSN students for the ambiguous clinical practice setting. Integrative, active, and student-centered curricular methods are encouraged to foster student ability to use clinical judgment for problem solving and informed clinical decision making. The proposed pedagogical model of progressive complexity in nursing education suggests gradually introducing students to complex and multi-contextual clinical scenarios through the utilization of case studies and problem-based learning activities, with the intention to transition nursing students into autonomous learners and well-prepared practitioners at the culmination of a nursing program. Exemplar curricular activities are suggested to potentiate student development of a transferable problem solving skill set and a flexible knowledge base to better prepare students for practice in future novel clinical experiences, which is a mutual goal for both educators and students.

  8. Pulsar-aided SETI experimental observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidmann, J.; Biraud, F.; Tarter, J.

    1989-01-01

    The rotational frequencies of pulsars are used to select preferred radio frequencies for SETI. Pulsar rotational frequencies are converted into SETI frequencies in the 1-10 GHz Galactic radio window. Experimental observations using the frequencies are conducted for target stars closer than 25 parsecs, unknown targets in a globular cluster, and unknown targets in the Galaxy closer than 2.5 kpc. The status of these observations is discussed.

  9. OSSE Observations of the Crab Pulsar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    Crab nebula and pulsar (Leventhal, MacCallum, & Watts 1977; Ling et al. 1979; Strickman, Johnson, & Kurfess 1979; Ayre et al. 1983; Agrinier et al...emission from the Crab nebula , as well as detector background. The background portion was then subtracted from the entire light curve. The phase ranges we...detections c) References for previous upper limits d) Based on total Crab nebula plus pulsar spectrum e) Upper limits (3) f) Comments related to

  10. On the structure of pulsar magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitina, Elena

    2011-07-01

    The angle BETA between rotation and magnetic axes are calculated by two methods for 283 radio pulsars at the wavelength 10 cm, 132 ones at 20 cm and 80 objects at the wavelength near 30 cm. The common average of the angle BETA is 43.5 degrees. Some effects which can give errors in the values of BETA are discussed. There are no correlations between values of BETA and pulsar ages.

  11. Millisecond Pulsars, their Evolution and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manchester, R. N.

    2017-09-01

    Millisecond pulsars (MSPs) are short-period pulsars that are distinguished from "normal" pulsars, not only by their short period, but also by their very small spin-down rates and high probability of being in a binary system. These properties are consistent with MSPs having a different evolutionary history to normal pulsars, viz., neutron-star formation in an evolving binary system and spin-up due to accretion from the binary companion. Their very stable periods make MSPs nearly ideal probes of a wide variety of astrophysical phenomena. For example, they have been used to detect planets around pulsars, to test the accuracy of gravitational theories, to set limits on the low-frequency gravitational-wave background in the Universe, and to establish pulsar-based timescales that rival the best atomic-clock timescales in long-term stability. MSPs also provide a window into stellar and binary evolution, often suggesting exotic pathways to the observed systems. The X-ray accretion-powered MSPs, and especially those that transition between an accreting X-ray MSP and a non-accreting radio MSP, give important insight into the physics of accretion on to highly magnetized neutron stars.

  12. A novel mechanism for creating double pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sigurdsson, Steinn; Hernquist, Lars

    1992-01-01

    Simulations of encounters between pairs of hard binaries, each containing a neutron star and a main-sequence star, reveal a new formation mechanism for double pulsars in dense cores of globular clusters. In many cases, the two normal stars are disrupted to form a common envelope around the pair of neutron stars, both of which will be spun up to become millisecond pulsars. We predict that a new class of pulsars, double millisecond pulsars, will be discovered in the cores of dense globular clusters. The genesis proceeds through a short-lived double-core common envelope phase, with the envelope ejected in a fast wind. It is possible that the progenitor may also undergo a double X-ray binary phase. Any circular, short-period double pulsar found in the galaxy would necessarily come from disrupted disk clusters, unlike Hulse-Taylor class pulsars or low-mass X-ray binaries which may be ejected from clusters or formed in the galaxy.

  13. Detecting pulsars in the Galactic Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajwade, K. M.; Lorimer, D. R.; Anderson, L. D.

    2017-10-01

    Although high-sensitivity surveys have revealed a number of highly dispersed pulsars in the inner Galaxy, none have so far been found in the Galactic Centre (GC) region, which we define to be within a projected distance of 1 pc from Sgr A*. This null result is surprising given that several independent lines of evidence predict a sizable population of neutron stars in the region. Here, we present a detailed analysis of both the canonical and millisecond pulsar populations in the GC and consider free-free absorption and multipath scattering to be the two main sources of flux density mitigation. We demonstrate that the sensitivity limits of previous surveys are not sufficient to detect GC pulsar population, and investigate the optimum observing frequency for future surveys. Depending on the degree of scattering and free-free absorption in the GC, current surveys constrain the size of the potentially observable population (i.e. those beaming towards us) to be up to 52 canonical pulsars and 10 000 millisecond pulsars. We find that the optimum frequency for future surveys is in the range of 9-13 GHz. We also predict that future deeper surveys with the Square Kilometre array will probe a significant portion of the existing radio pulsar population in the GC.

  14. DETECTING GRAVITATIONAL WAVE MEMORY WITH PULSAR TIMING

    SciTech Connect

    Cordes, J. M.; Jenet, F. A. E-mail: merlyn@phys.utb.edu

    2012-06-10

    We compare the detectability of gravitational bursts passing through the solar system with those passing near each millisecond pulsar in an N-pulsar timing array. The sensitivity to Earth-passing bursts can exploit the correlation expected in pulse arrival times while pulsar-passing bursts, though uncorrelated between objects, provide an N-fold increase in overall time baseline that can compensate for the lower sensitivity. Bursts with memory from mergers of supermassive black holes produce step functions in apparent spin frequency that are the easiest to detect in pulsar timing. We show that the burst rate and amplitude distribution, while strongly dependent on inadequately known cosmological evolution, may favor detection in the pulsar terms rather than the Earth timing perturbations. Any contamination of timing data by red spin noise makes burst detection more difficult because both signals grow with the length of the time data span T. Furthermore, the different bursts that could appear in one or more data sets of length T Almost-Equal-To 10 yr also affect the detectability of the gravitational wave stochastic background that, like spin noise, has a red power spectrum. A burst with memory is a worthwhile target in the timing of multiple pulsars in a globular cluster because it should produce a correlated signal with a time delay of less than about 10 years in some cases.

  15. Pulsar observations with the MAGIC telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fidalgo, David

    2016-07-01

    The vast majority of spectra of gamma-ray pulsars exhibit an exponential cut-off at a few GeV, as seen by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board of the Fermi satellite. Due to this cut-off, current Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs) with an energy threshold as low as 30 GeV, struggle to detect pulsars. So far, emission above 50 GeV has been confirmed only for the Crab and Vela pulsars. In the case of the former, the spectrum even extends up to about 1 TeV firmly revealing a second emission component. To further understand the emission mechanism of gamma-ray pulsars, the MAGIC collaboration continues the search of pulsars above 50 GeV. In this talk we report on recent results on the Crab and Geminga Pulsar obtained with the MAGIC telescopes, including the analysis of data taken with a new trigger system lowering the energy threshold of the MAGIC telescopes.

  16. Interstellar scintillations of pulsar radiation.

    PubMed

    Lang, K R

    1969-12-12

    Time fluctuations in the intensity of pulsed radiation from CP 0834, CP 1133, AP 1237, and CP 1919 have been investigated. Power spectra, modulation indices, frequency distributions, and decorrelation frequencies are consistent with scintillation theory. If it is assumed that these scintillations are due to irregularities in the interstellar medium that travel at a velocity of 20 kilometers per second, the irregularities have a scale size on the order of 10(4) kilometers and a distance from the earth of approximately 70 parsecs. These interstellar scintillations would not have been observed if the apparent angular diameters of the pulsars were larger than 0.3 X 10(-5) second of arc, and they would cause even a point radio source to have an apparent angular diameter of approximately 10(-3) second of arc at 318 megahertz.

  17. Neutron Star Seismology with Accreting Millisecond Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strohmayer, Tod

    Neutron stars provide natural laboratories for the study of a number of important topics in fundamental physics, including the composition and equation of state (EOS) of cold matter at the highest densities achievable in nature. The physical conditions in their deep interiors cannot be replicated in terrestrial laboratories, and the nature of matter under such extreme conditions remains one of the major unsolved problems in physics. Direct measurement of the mass - radius relationship for neutron stars is very important for constraining the EOS of dense matter, however, since different phases of dense matter can have similar equations of state, mass and radius measurements alone are not very efficient in determining their interior composition. Additional, complementary observables are needed to more definitively probe the composition of neutron star cores. Asteroseismology, the measurement of the characteristic frequencies of the normal modes of oscillation of stars, can provide a powerful probe of their interiors. For example, helioseismology has provided unprecedented insights about the deep interior of the Sun. Comparable capabilities for neutron star seismology have not yet been achieved, but our recent work indicates that sensitive searches for the signatures of neutron star oscillations can be carried out using the high time resolution, pulse timing data obtained by the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE)-and in the case of a single source the XMM-Newton pn camera-from the population of accreting millisecond X-ray pulsars (AMXPs, Strohmayer & Mahmoodifar 2014a), and in some thermonuclear burst sources (Strohmayer & Mahmoodifar 2014b). It is the primary aim of this proposal to carry out the first such comprehensive search for global oscillation modes across this entire source class of neutron stars using approximately 6 M-sec of RXTE and 100 k-sec of XMMNewton archival data, and thereby significantly advance the nascent field of neutron star seismology. We will

  18. The imprint of pulsar parameters on the morphology of Pulsar Wind Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bühler, Rolf; Giomi, Matteo

    2016-11-01

    The morphology of young Pulsar Wind Nebulae (PWN) is largely determined by the properties of the wind injected by the pulsar. We have used a recent parametrization of the wind obtained from force-free electrodynamics simulations of pulsar magnetospheres to simulate nebulae for different sets of pulsar parameters. We performed axisymmetric relativistic magnetohydrodynamics simulations to test the morphology dependence of the nebula on the obliquity of the pulsar and on the magnetization of the pulsar wind. We compare these simulations to the morphology of the Vela and Crab PWN. We find that the morphology of Vela can be reproduced qualitatively if the pulsar obliquity angle is α ≈ 45° and the magnetization of the wind is high (σ0 ≈ 3.0). A morphology similar to the one of the Crab nebula is only obtained for low-magnetization simulations with α ≳ 45°. Interestingly, we find that Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities produce small-scale turbulences downstream of the reverse shock of the pulsar wind.

  19. Scaling from Jupiter to pulsars and the acceleration of cosmic ray particles by pulsars, 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fan, C. Y.

    1985-01-01

    An expression for the rate of energy generation by a pulsar an estimate of contribution from all the pulsars in our galaxy to the observed cosmic ray intensity was presented. The theory was then developed to an expanded version, and observational facts supporting the theory were cited.

  20. Exploring Radio Pulsars With New Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torne, Pablo

    2017-04-01

    Pulsars are rapidly-rotating, highly-magnetized compact neutron stars. Their strong gravitational and magnetic fields, together with the stability of their rotations and the precision with which we can measure them using radio telescopes, make pulsars unique laboratories for a wide variety of physical experiments. This thesis presents an investigation of the application of new receiver technologies and observing techniques at different radio wavelengths to the search for and study of pulsars. Discovering new pulsars always expands our capabilities to do new science. In general, the most exciting pulsars are those in binary systems because of their potential in high-precision tests of General Relativity and other gravity theories, and for constraining the Equation-of-State of ultra-dense matter. I present a search for pulsars in the Galactic Centre, where the probabilities of finding pulsar binaries, including the long-sought pulsar-black hole system, are high. The data were taken with the Effelsberg 100-m radio telescope and used high radio frequencies between 4.85 and 18.95 GHz to partially overcome the strong scattering in the direction to the centre of the Galaxy. With approximately 50 per cent of the results reviewed, no new pulsars have been discovered. We carried out a study of the sensitivity limits of the survey, finding that our sensitivity to Galactic Centre pulsars is highly reduced by the contributions to the total system noise of the Galactic Centre background and the atmosphere. We conclude that the paucity of detections in this and perhaps also previous similar surveys is likely due to insufficient sensitivity, and not a lack of pulsars in the region. In March 2013, a radio magnetar, one of the rarest types of pulsars, became suddenly visible from the Galactic Centre. I led two multifrequency observing campaigns on this source, SGR J1745-2900, in order to study its radio emission properties. Four different observatories were involved (including

  1. EGRET High-Energy gamma -Ray Pulsar Studies. II. Individual Millisecond Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fierro, J. M.; Arzoumanian, Z.; Bailes, M.; Bell, J. F.; Bertsch, D. L.; Brazier, K. T. S.; Chiang, J.; D'Amico, N.; Dingus, B. L.; Esposito, J. A.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Hunter, S. D.; Johnston, S.; Kanbach, G.; Kaspi, V. M.; Kniffen, D. A.; Lin, Y. C.; Lyne, A. G.; Manchester, R. N.; Mattox, J. R.; Mayer-Hasselwander, H. A.; Michelson, P. F.; von Montigny, C.; Nel, H. I.; Nice, D.; Nolan, P. L.; Schneid, E. J.; Shriver, S. K.; Sreekumar, P.; Taylor, J. H.; Thompson, D. J.; Willis, T. D.

    1995-07-01

    More than 2 yr of observations performed by the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) aboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) are examined for evidence of high-energy γ-ray emission from individual millisecond pulsars. Upper limits are placed on steady emission. In addition, for those millisecond pulsars for which an accurate timing solution is available, upper limits to pulsed γ-ray emission are established. The results are compared with predictions of current pulsar γ-ray emission models. In particular, the absence of a detection of γ-rays from the nearby millisecond pulsar PSR J0437-4715 severely constrains theories regarding γ-ray emission from millisecond pulsars.

  2. The Velocity Distribution of Isolated Radio Pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arzoumanian, Z.; Chernoff, D. F.; Cordes, J. M.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We infer the velocity distribution of radio pulsars based on large-scale 0.4 GHz pulsar surveys. We do so by modelling evolution of the locations, velocities, spins, and radio luminosities of pulsars; calculating pulsed flux according to a beaming model and random orientation angles of spin and beam; applying selection effects of pulsar surveys; and comparing model distributions of measurable pulsar properties with survey data using a likelihood function. The surveys analyzed have well-defined characteristics and cover approx. 95% of the sky. We maximize the likelihood in a 6-dimensional space of observables P, dot-P, DM, absolute value of b, mu, F (period, period derivative, dispersion measure, Galactic latitude, proper motion, and flux density). The models we test are described by 12 parameters that characterize a population's birth rate, luminosity, shutoff of radio emission, birth locations, and birth velocities. We infer that the radio beam luminosity (i) is comparable to the energy flux of relativistic particles in models for spin-driven magnetospheres, signifying that radio emission losses reach nearly 100% for the oldest pulsars; and (ii) scales approximately as E(exp 1/2) which, in magnetosphere models, is proportional to the voltage drop available for acceleration of particles. We find that a two-component velocity distribution with characteristic velocities of 90 km/ s and 500 km/ s is greatly preferred to any one-component distribution; this preference is largely immune to variations in other population parameters, such as the luminosity or distance scale, or the assumed spin-down law. We explore some consequences of the preferred birth velocity distribution: (1) roughly 50% of pulsars in the solar neighborhood will escape the Galaxy, while approx. 15% have velocities greater than 1000 km/ s (2) observational bias against high velocity pulsars is relatively unimportant for surveys that reach high Galactic absolute value of z distances, but is severe for

  3. ABE Phase III: Progress and Problems. September 1, 1969-April 1, 1970.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southwestern Cooperative Educational Lab., Albuquerque, NM.

    Interim information concerning the ABE III grants is provided in the three parts of this report. Part 1 (outline) describes the goals and objectives of each component; Part 2 describes accomplishments and problems to date; and Part 3 deals with coordination and supervision activities undertaken by the Lab. The components of the program are: (1)…

  4. PROGRESS IN MEETING PROBLEMS OF MIGRATORY LABOR IN MARYLAND, THIRD ANNUAL REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NYSTROM, PAUL E.; AND OTHERS

    NUMEROUS CHANGES IN MARYLAND AGRICULTURE HAD A PRONOUNCED EFFECT UPON THE LABOR MOVEMENT. AMONG THEM WERE--CROP YIELDS, CROP PRICES AND THE RESULTANT EFFECT UPON CROP ACREAGE, MECHANIZATION OF TILLAGE, THINNINGS, AND HARVEST PROCEDURES. DESPITE INCREASED MECHANIZATION, GREATER ACREAGES MIGHT DEMAND A RATHER CONSTANT SUPPLY OF LABOR. PROBLEMS IN…

  5. PROGRESS IN MEETING PROBLEMS OF MIGRATORY LABOR IN MARYLAND, THIRD ANNUAL REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NYSTROM, PAUL E.; AND OTHERS

    NUMEROUS CHANGES IN MARYLAND AGRICULTURE HAD A PRONOUNCED EFFECT UPON THE LABOR MOVEMENT. AMONG THEM WERE--CROP YIELDS, CROP PRICES AND THE RESULTANT EFFECT UPON CROP ACREAGE, MECHANIZATION OF TILLAGE, THINNINGS, AND HARVEST PROCEDURES. DESPITE INCREASED MECHANIZATION, GREATER ACREAGES MIGHT DEMAND A RATHER CONSTANT SUPPLY OF LABOR. PROBLEMS IN…

  6. Current Progress in Tissue Engineering of Heart Valves: Multiscale Problems, Multiscale Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Daniel Y; Duan, Bin; Butcher, Jonathan T.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Heart valve disease is an increasingly prevalent and clinically serious condition. There are no clinically effective biological diagnostics or treatment strategies. The only recourse available is replacement with a prosthetic valve, but the inability of these devices to grow or respond biologically to their environments necessitates multiple resizing surgeries and life-long coagulation treatment, especially in children. Tissue engineering has a unique opportunity to impact heart valve disease by providing a living valve conduit, capable of growth and biological integration. Areas covered This review will cover current tissue engineering strategies in fabricating heart valves and their progress towards the clinic, including molded scaffolds using naturally-derived or synthetic polymers, decellularization, electrospinning, 3D bioprinting, hybrid techniques, and in vivo engineering. Expert opinion While much progress has been made to create functional living heart valves, a clinically viable product is not yet realized. The next leap in engineered living heart valves will require a deeper understanding of how the natural multi-scale structural and biological heterogeneity of the tissue ensures its efficient function. Related, improved fabrication strategies must be developed that can replicate this de novo complexity, which is likely instructive for appropriate cell differentiation and remodeling whether seeded with autologous stem cells in vitro or endogenously recruited cells. PMID:26027436

  7. Pulsar-irradiated stars in dense globular clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tavani, Marco

    1992-01-01

    We discuss the properties of stars irradiated by millisecond pulsars in 'hard' binaries of dense globular clusters. Irradiation by a relativistic pulsar wind as in the case of the eclipsing millisecond pulsar PSR 1957+20 alter both the magnitude and color of the companion star. Some of the blue stragglers (BSs) recently discovered in dense globular clusters can be irradiated stars in binaries containing powerful millisecond pulsars. The discovery of pulsar-driven orbital modulations of BS brightness and color with periods of a few hours together with evidence for radio and/or gamma-ray emission from BS binaries would valuably contribute to the understanding of the evolution of collapsed stars in globular clusters. Pulsar-driven optical modulation of cluster stars might be the only observable effect of a new class of binary pulsars, i.e., hidden millisecond pulsars enshrouded in the evaporated material lifted off from the irradiated companion star.

  8. Magnetic-distortion-induced Ellipticity and Gravitational Wave Radiation of Neutron Stars: Millisecond Magnetars in Short GRBs, Galactic Pulsars, and Magnetars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, He; Cao, Zhoujian; Zhang, Bing

    2017-08-01

    Neutron stars may sustain a non-axisymmetric deformation due to magnetic distortion and are potential sources of continuous gravitational waves (GWs) for ground-based interferometric detectors. With decades of searches using available GW detectors, no evidence of a GW signal from any pulsar has been observed. Progressively stringent upper limits of ellipticity have been placed on Galactic pulsars. In this work, we use the ellipticity inferred from the putative millisecond magnetars in short gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs) to estimate their detectability by current and future GW detectors. For ∼1 ms magnetars inferred from the SGRB data, the detection horizon is ∼30 Mpc and ∼600 Mpc for the advanced LIGO (aLIGO) and Einstein Telescope (ET), respectively. Using the ellipticity of SGRB millisecond magnetars as calibration, we estimate the ellipticity and GW strain of Galactic pulsars and magnetars assuming that the ellipticity is magnetic-distortion-induced. We find that the results are consistent with the null detection results of Galactic pulsars and magnetars with the aLIGO O1. We further predict that the GW signals from these pulsars/magnetars may not be detectable by the currently designed aLIGO detector. The ET detector may be able to detect some relatively low-frequency signals (<50 Hz) from some of these pulsars. Limited by its design sensitivity, the eLISA detector seems to not be suitable for detecting the signals from Galactic pulsars and magnetars.

  9. [Micronucleus test of human oral buccal epithelium: problems, progress and prospects].

    PubMed

    Kalaev, V N; Artiukhov, V G; Nechaeva, M S

    2014-01-01

    The articles by russian and foreign authors for the period from 2000 to 2012, devoted to the problems of application, analysis and interpretation of the results of micronucleus test in human buccal epithelium has been analyzed in the review. Nuclear abnormality founding in the cells of the oral mucosa has been described. The paper summarizes works devoted to the analysis of the influence of the micronucleus test methods (painting, taking scrapings) to its results. Modern opinions about the factors of different etiology (sex, age, genotype, psycho-physiological characteristics, immune status, diseases of different etiology, man-made pollution, climatic and geographical conditions, ionizing and nonionizing radiation, chemical compounds (drugs, dietary supplements, androgenic steroids, etc.), dental fillings, occupational exposures, alcohol, using tobacco blends) inducing the estimation of nuclear aberration has been summarized as a scheme. The problems and unresolved issues related to the peculiarities of micronucleus test has been noted.

  10. Pulsed X-rays from the Vela pulsar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oegelman, H.; Finley, J. P.; Zimmerman, H. U.

    1993-01-01

    An unambiguous detection by the Rosat satellite of pulsed X-ray emission from the Vela pulsar is reported. The pulse signal is soft, appearing mainly at energies less than 1 keV. The Rosat observations resolve the two sources of emission and show that the pointlike emission centered on the pulsars is soft, whereas the emission from the compact nebula is hard. The observations show that Vela more closely resembles older pulsars that the archetypal young pulsar embedded in an SNR.

  11. Basic physics and cosmology from pulsar timing data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, J. H.

    1991-01-01

    Radio pulsars provide unparalleled opportunities for making measurements of astrophysically interesting phenomena. The author concentrates on two particular applications of high precision timing observations of pulsars: tests of relativistic gravitation theory using the binary pulsar 1913+16, and tests of cosmological models using timing data from millisecond pulsars. New upper limits are presented for the energy density of a cosmic background of low frequency gravitational radiation.

  12. Impact of screen time on mental health problems progression in youth: a 1-year follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaoyan; Tao, Shuman; Zhang, Shichen; Zhang, Yukun; Chen, Kaihua; Yang, Yajuan; Hao, Jiahu; Tao, Fangbiao

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We examined the relationships between screen time (ST) and mental health problems and also increment of ST and progression of mental health problems in a college-based sample of Chinese youth. Methods We assessed 2521 Chinese college freshmen from October 2013 to December 2014. At baseline, the mean age of participants was 18.43 years (SD 0.96 years), and 1215 (48.2%) participants reported ST >2 h/day. We estimated multivariable-adjusted ORs by using logistic regression models for the risk of developing mental health problems (anxiety, depression and psychopathological symptoms) and/or progression of these problems, according to baseline ST exposure and changes in exposure at follow-up. Results At baseline, when ST >2 h/day was compared with ST ≤2 h/day, the OR was 1.38 (95% CI 1.15 to 1.65) for anxiety, 1.55 (95% CI 1.25 to 1.93) for depression and 1.49 (95% CI 1.22 to 1.83) for psychopathological symptoms. The results remained unchanged for depressive and psychopathological symptoms but not for anxiety, after additional adjustment for sex, age, residential background, body mass index, perceived family economy, sleep quality, smoking, alcohol intake, exercise after school and physical activity. When participants who had increased their ST exposure to >2 h/day were compared with those with no change and ST ≤2 h/day, the OR was 1.78 (95% CI 1.12 to 2.83) for anxiety, 1.92 (95% CI 1.23 to 2.83) for depression and 1.93 (95% CI 1.16 to 3.21) for psychopathological symptoms. These associations also remained after additional adjustment. Conclusions The overall effects are consistent yet small for ST/ST increment on mental health problems and its progression. Given the small effect size of the current results, it remains unclear the degree to which ST is a practically significant risk factor for mental health outcomes. Future studies of high quality are necessary to further examine this association and the direction of causality. PMID:28186926

  13. The Wind Interaction Regions of the VELA Pulsar: a Pulsar Jet and Bow Shock Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markwardt, Craig Bishop

    The Vela pulsar is a nearby young pulsar actively radiating radio to γ-rays. We present evidence in this work that the Vela pulsar is also interacting with its surroundings via a relativistic wind, which manifests itself as two different nebular structures. ROSAT PSPC observations of the Vela pulsar show that a 45 arcmin long collimated X-ray feature projects from the pulsar. We favor the interpretation that the feature is a 'cocoon' of heated gas formed when a jet outflow from the Vela pulsar interacts with the interior medium of the supernova remnant. This interpretation is consistent with the observed center-filled morphology and spectrum of the cocoon structure. Combined ROSAT + ASCA observations of the 'head' of the cocoon, the point where the jet is believed to interact with the supernova remnant, demonstrate that the spectrum has a thermal peak near 1 keV, but extends to at least 7 keV. No distinct spectral lines are seen. The spectral parameters of the cocoon could be produced by a cocoon with a pulsar jet whose speed is at least 800 km s-1, depending on the angle of inclination. The mechanical power driving the jet is ≥1036 erg s-1, consistent with the Vela pulsar's rotational energy loss rate. On smaller spatial scales, it has been known that the Vela pulsar is surrounded by a 2 arcmin diameter 'compact' nebula which has power law spectral emission. Our ROSAT HRI observations of the region show that the nebula very likely a bow shock structure formed by a nearly isotropic pulsar wind interacting with the supernova remnant. The axis of the nebula is aligned with the pulsar's known proper motion vector. The high particle energies and magnetic fields near the pulsar make the bow shock an ideal environment for generating X-ray synchrotron emission. We show that a full three dimensional model of the nebula, taking into account what is known about the geometry and pulsar wind physics, is consistent with the observations.

  14. REVIEWS OF TOPICAL PROBLEMS: Experimental tests of general relativity: recent progress and future directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turyshev, S. G.

    2009-01-01

    Einstein's general theory of relativity is the standard theory of gravity, especially where the needs of astronomy, astrophysics, cosmology, and fundamental physics are concerned. As such, this theory is used for many practical purposes involving spacecraft navigation, geodesy, and time transfer. We review the foundations of general relativity, discuss recent progress in tests of relativistic gravity, and present motivations for the new generation of high-accuracy tests of new physics beyond general relativity. Space-based experiments in fundamental physics are presently capable of uniquely addressing important questions related to the fundamental laws of nature. We discuss the advances in our understanding of fundamental physics that are anticipated in the near future and evaluate the discovery potential of a number of recently proposed space-based gravitational experiments.

  15. An update on the pharmacogenomics of metformin: progress, problems and potential.

    PubMed

    Todd, Jennifer N; Florez, Jose C

    2014-03-01

    The increasing prevalence of Type 2 diabetes has emphasized the need to optimize treatment regimens. Metformin, the most widely used oral agent, is recommended as first-line drug therapy by multiple professional organizations. Response to metformin varies significantly at the individual level; this heterogeneity may be explained in part by genetic factors. Understanding these underlying factors may aid with tailoring treatment for individual patients as well as with designing improved Type 2 diabetes therapies. The past 10 years have seen substantial progress in the understanding of the pharmacogenetics of metformin response. The majority of this work has focused on genes involved in the pharmacokinetics of metformin. Owing to the uncertainty surrounding its mechanism of action, studies of pharmacodynamic genetics have been relatively few; genome-wide approaches have the potential to illuminate the molecular details of metformin response. In this review we summarize current knowledge about metformin pharmacogenetics and suggest directions for future investigation.

  16. Numerical weather prediction in China in the new century—Progress, problems and prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Jishan; Liu, Yan

    2007-11-01

    This paper summarizes the recent progress of numerical weather prediction (NWP) research since the last review was published. The new generation NWP system named GRAPES (the Global and Regional Assimilation and Prediction System), which consists of variational or sequential data assimilation and nonhydrostatic prediction model with options of configuration for either global or regional domains, is briefly introduced, with stress on their scientific design and preliminary results during pre-operational implementation. In addition to the development of GRAPES, the achievements in new methodologies of data assimilation, new improvements of model physics such as parameterization of clouds and planetary boundary layer, mesoscale ensemble prediction system and numerical prediction of air quality are presented. The scientific issues which should be emphasized for the future are discussed finally.

  17. Chandra Associates Pulsar and Historic Supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-01-01

    SAN DIEGO -- Scientists using NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory have found new evidence that a pulsar in the constellation of Sagittarius was created when a massive star exploded, witnessed by Chinese astronomers in the year 386 AD. If confirmed, this will be only the second pulsar to be clearly associated with a historic event. These results were presented today by Victoria Kaspi and Mallory Roberts of McGill University at the American Astronomical Society meeting. Also participating in the research were Gautum Vasisht from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Eric Gotthelf from Columbia University, Michael Pivovaroff from Therma-Wave, Inc., and Nobuyuki Kawai from the Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, Japan. The scientists used Chandra to locate the pulsar exactly at the geometric center of the supernova remnant known as G11.2-0.3. This location provides very strong evidence that the pulsar, a neutron star that is rotating 14 times a second, was formed in the supernova of 386 AD, and therefore has an age of 1615 years. "Determining the true ages of astronomical objects is notoriously difficult, and for this reason, historical records of supernovas are of great importance,"said Kaspi."In roughly the past 2,000 years, fewer than 10 reports of probable supernovae have been archived mostly by Asian astronomers. Of those handful, the remnant of 1054 AD, the Crab Nebula, was until now the only pulsar whose birth could be associated with a historic event - and, hence, the only neutron star that has a firm age." Between mid-April and mid-May in the year 386 AD, a young "guest star", presumably a supernova, was recorded by Chinese observers in the direction of the sky now known as the constellation of Sagittarius. In the 1970s, radio astronomers discovered an expanding nebula of gas and high-energy particles, called G11.2-0.3, that is believed to be the remnant of that explosion. In 1997, a team of X-ray astronomers used Japan’s ASCA satellite to discover a pulsar

  18. BOOK REVIEW: Rotation and Accretion Powered Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaspi, V. M.

    2008-03-01

    Pulsar astrophysics has come a long way in the 40 years since the discovery of the first pulsar by Bell and Hewish. From humble beginnings as bits of 'scruff' on the Cambridge University group's chart recorder paper, the field of pulsars has blossomed into a major area of mainstream astrophysics, with an unparalleled diversity of astrophysical applications. These range from Nobel-celebrated testing of general relativity in the strong-field regime to constraining the equation-of-state of ultradense matter; from probing the winds of massive stars to globular cluster evolution. Previous notable books on the subject of pulsars have tended to focus on some particular topic in the field. The classic text Pulsars by Manchester and Taylor (1977 San Francisco, CA: Freeman) targeted almost exclusively rotation-powered radio pulsars, while the Mészáros book High-Energy Radiation from Magnetized Neutron Stars (1992 Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press) considered both rotation- and accretion-powered neutron stars, but focused on their radiation at x-ray energies and above. The recent book Neutron Stars 1 by Haensel et al (2007 Berlin: Springer) considers only the equation of state and neutron-star structure. Into this context appears Rotation and Accretion Powered Pulsars, by Pranab Ghosh. In contrast to other books, here the author takes an encyclopedic approach and attempts to synthesize practically all of the major aspects of the two main types of neutron star. This is ambitious. The only comparable undertaking is the useful but more elementary Lyne and Graham-Smith text Pulsar Astronomy (1998 Cambridge: Cambridge University Press), or Compact Stellar X-ray Sources (eds Lewin and van der Klis, 2006 Cambridge: Cambridge University Press), an anthology of technical review articles that also includes black hole topics. Rotation and Accretion Powered Pulsars thus fills a clear void in the field, providing a readable, graduate-level book that covers nearly everything you

  19. A novel approach toward gravitational wave analyses with pulsar timing arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mingarelli, Chiara M. F.; University of Birmingham Gravitational Wave Group (A. Vecchio, K. Grover, R. Smith, T. Sidery, I. Mandel)

    2015-01-01

    My doctoral studies provide a novel approach toward gravitational wave (GW) analyses, including the generalization of nanoHertz stochastic GW background searches, strict limits on when assumptions made in GW background analyses break down, and how to extract information about the masses and spins of supermassive black hole binaries using pulsar timing arrays. A pulsar timing array is galactic-scale nanoHertz GW detector that looks for small deviations in the ultra-stable arrival time of radio pulses from millisecond pulsars to infer the presence of GWs. I show that the standard analysis for isotropic stochastic GW backgrounds can be generalized in a conceptually straightforward way to the case of generic anisotropic background radiation. If evidence for a signal is found in the data, testing the assumption of isotropy could be one of the methods to confirm its cosmological origin. However, if one expects some deviations from isotropy, which may be the case for a background created by a finite population of supermassive black hole binaries, my method can be used to extract constraints on the underlying physical population. Moreover, I assess the assumptions made when computing the correlation functions used in the stochastic GW background searches, and found that when pulsars are separated by less than 3o, correlated phase changes can occur between the pulsars which are important to model. Lastly I show that the detection of GWs from individual supermassive black hole binary systems can yield direct information about the masses and spins of the black holes, provided that the GW-induced timing fluctuations both at the pulsar and at Earth are detected. This in turn provides a map of the nonlinear dynamics of the gravitational field and a new avenue to tackle open problems in astrophysics connected to the formation and evolution of supermassive black holes.

  20. Unusual flux-distance relationship for pulsars suggested by analysis of the Australia national telescopy facility pulsar catalogue

    SciTech Connect

    Singleton, John; Perez, M R; Singleton, J; Ardavan, H; Ardavan, A

    2009-01-01

    We analyze pulsar fluxes at 1400 MHz (S(1400)) and distances d taken from the Australia National Telescope Facility (ATNF) Pulsar Catalogue. Under the assumption that pulsar populations in different parts of the Galaxy are similar, we find that either (a) pulsar fluxes diminish with distance according to a non-standard power law (we suggest S(1400){proportional_to} 1/d rather than {proportional_to} 1/d{sup 2}) or (b) that there are very significant (i.e. order of magnitude) errors in the distance estimates quoted in the ATNF Catalogue. The former conclusion (a) supports a recent model for pulsar emission that has also successfully explained the frequency spectrum of the Crab pulsar over 16 orders of magnitude of frequency, whilst alternative (b) would necessitate a radical re-evaluation of both the dispersion method for estimating pulsar distances and current ideas about the distribution of pulsars within our Galaxy.

  1. Studies in nonlinear problems of energy. Progress report, January 1, 1992--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Matkowsky, B.J.

    1992-07-01

    Emphasis has been on combustion and flame propagation. The research program was on modeling, analysis and computation of combustion phenomena, with emphasis on transition from laminar to turbulent combustion. Nonlinear dynamics and pattern formation were investigated in the transition. Stability of combustion waves, and transitions to complex waves are described. Combustion waves possess large activation energies, so that chemical reactions are significant only in thin layers, or reaction zones. In limit of infinite activation energy, the zones shrink to moving surfaces, (fronts) which must be found during the analysis, so that (moving free boundary problems). The studies are carried out for limiting case with fronts, while the numerical studies are carried out for finite, though large, activation energy. Accurate resolution of the solution in the reaction zones is essential, otherwise false predictions of dynamics are possible. Since the the reaction zones move, adaptive pseudo-spectral methods were developed. The approach is based on a synergism of analytical and computational methods. The numerical computations build on and extend the analytical information. Furthermore, analytical solutions serve as benchmarks for testing the accuracy of the computation. Finally, ideas from analysis (singular perturbation theory) have induced new approaches to computations. The computational results suggest new analysis to be considered. Among the recent interesting results, was spatio-temporal chaos in combustion. One goal is extension of the adaptive pseudo-spectral methods to adaptive domain decomposition methods. Efforts have begun to develop such methods for problems with multiple reaction zones, corresponding to problems with more complex, and more realistic chemistry. Other topics included stochastics, oscillators, Rysteretic Josephson junctions, DC SQUID, Markov jumps, laser with saturable absorber, chemical physics, Brownian movement, combustion synthesis, etc.

  2. [Genetically modified plants and the problems of plant protection: progress and estimation of potential risks].

    PubMed

    Kozub, N O; Pylypenko, L A; Sozinov, I O; Blium, Ia B; Sozinov, O O

    2012-01-01

    The review deals with advances and prospects in development of transgenic plants. At present virtually all commercial GM crops are those created for solving plant protection problems--they carry transgenes conferring resistance to herbicides, pests, viruses. Approaches employed for development of commercial GM crops with herbicide, pest and virus resistance, as well as strategies and prospects of development of commercial GM plants with resistance to fungal and bacterial diseases and nematodes, are considered. Ecological (including agronomical) and social risks associated with commercial growing of transgenic plants are briefly discussed.

  3. On tests of general relativity with binary radio pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Pozzo, W.; Vecchio, A.

    2016-10-01

    The timing of radio pulsars in binary systems provides a superb testing ground of general relativity. Here we propose a Bayesian approach to carry out these tests, and a relevant efficient numerical implementation, that has several conceptual and practical advantages with respect to traditional methods based on least-squares fit that have been used so far: (i) it accounts for the actual structure of the likelihood function - and it is not predicated on the Laplace approximation which is implicitly built in least-squares fit that can potentially bias the inference - (ii) it provides the ratio of the evidences of any two models under consideration as the statistical quantity to compare different theories, and (iii) it allows us to put joint constraints from the monitoring of multiple systems, that can be expressed in terms of ratio of evidences or probability intervals of global (thus not system-dependent) parameters of the theory, if any exists. Our proposed approach optimally exploits the progress in timing of radio pulsars and the increase in the number of observed systems. We demonstrate the power of this framework using simulated data sets that are representative of current observations.

  4. Binary Pulsar B1259-63 Spectrum Evolution and Classification of Pulsar Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dembska, M.; Kijak, J.; Lewandowski, W.

    2012-12-01

    Recently published results (Kijak et al. 2011a) indicated the evidence for a new aspect in radio pulsars spectra. We studied the radio spectrum of PSR B1259-63 in an unique binary with Be star LS 2883 and showed that this pulsar undergoes a spectrum evolution due to the orbital motion. We proposed a qualitative model which explains this evolution. We considered two mechanisms that might influence the observed radio emission: free-free absorption and cyclotron resonance. According to the published results (Kijak et al. 2011b), there were found objects with a new type of pulsar radio spectra, called gigahertz-peaked spectra (GPS) pulsars. Most of them were found to exist in very interesting environments. Therefore, it is suggested that the turnover phenomenon is associated with the environment, rather than being related intrinsically to the radio emission mechanism. Having noticed an apparent resemblance between the B1259-63 spectrum and the GPS, we suggested that the same mechanisms should be responsible for both cases. Thus, we believe that this binary system can hold the clue to the understanding of the gigahertz-peaked spectra of isolated pulsars. Using the same database we constructed spectra for chosen observing days and obtained different types of spectra. Comparing to current classification of pulsar spectra, there occurs a suggestion that the appearance of various spectra shapes, different from a simple power law which is typical for radio pulsars, is possibly caused by environmental conditions around neutron stars.

  5. Turn-over in pulsar spectra: From young pulsars to millisecond ones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kijak, J.; Lewandowski, W.; Serylak, M.

    2008-02-01

    The evidence for turn-over in young pulsar radio spectra at high frequencies is presented. The frequency at which a spectrum shows the maximum flux density is called the peak frequency. This peak frequency appears to depend on pulsar age and dispersion measure. A possible relation with pulsar age is interesting. Millisecond pulsars, which are very old objects, may show no evidence for spectral turn-over down to 100 MHz. Some studied pulsars with turn-over at high frequencies have been shown to have very interesting interstellar environments. This could suggest that the turn-over phenomenon is associated with the enviromental conditions around the neutron stars, rahter than being related intrinsically with the radio emission mechanism. Although there are no earlier reports of such a connection, a more detailed study on larger sample of pulsars is needed to address this idea more quantitatively. In this context, future observations below 200 MHz using LOFAR will allow us to investigate turn-over in radio pulsar spectra.

  6. THE PULSAR SEARCH COLLABORATORY: DISCOVERY AND TIMING OF FIVE NEW PULSARS

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, R.; Swiggum, J.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Lorimer, D. R.; Yun, M.; Boyles, J.; Heatherly, S. A.; Scoles, S.; Lynch, R.; Kondratiev, V. I.; Ransom, S. M.; Moniot, M. L.; Thompson, C.; Cottrill, A.; Raycraft, M.; Weaver, M.; Snider, A.; Dudenhoefer, J.; Allphin, L.; Thorley, J.; and others

    2013-05-01

    We present the discovery and timing solutions of five new pulsars by students involved in the Pulsar Search Collaboratory, a NSF-funded joint program between the National Radio Astronomy Observatory and West Virginia University designed to excite and engage high-school students in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) and related fields. We encourage students to pursue STEM fields by apprenticing them within a professional scientific community doing cutting edge research, specifically by teaching them to search for pulsars. The students are analyzing 300 hr of drift-scan survey data taken with the Green Bank Telescope at 350 MHz. These data cover 2876 deg{sup 2} of the sky. Over the course of five years, more than 700 students have inspected diagnostic plots through a web-based graphical interface designed for this project. The five pulsars discovered in the data have spin periods ranging from 3.1 ms to 4.8 s. Among the new discoveries are PSR J1926-1314, a long period, nulling pulsar; PSR J1821+0155, an isolated, partially recycled 33 ms pulsar; and PSR J1400-1438, a millisecond pulsar in a 9.5 day orbit whose companion is likely a white dwarf star.

  7. Detection and localization of continuous gravitational waves with pulsar timing arrays: the role of pulsar terms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, X.-J.; Wen, L.; Xiong, J.; Xu, Y.; Wang, Y.; Mohanty, S. D.; Hobbs, G.; Manchester, R. N.

    2016-09-01

    A pulsar timing array is a Galactic-scale detector of nanohertz gravitational waves (GWs). Its target signals contain two components: the `Earth term' and the `pulsar term' corresponding to GWs incident on the Earth and pulsar, respectively. In this work we present a Frequentist method for the detection and localization of continuous waves that takes into account the pulsar term and is significantly faster than existing methods. We investigate the role of pulsar terms by comparing a full-signal search with an Earth-term-only search for non-evolving black hole binaries. By applying the method to synthetic data sets, we find that (i) a full-signal search can slightly improve the detection probability (by about five per cent); (ii) sky localization is biased if only Earth terms are searched for and the inclusion of pulsar terms is critical to remove such a bias; (iii) in the case of strong detections (with signal-to-noise ratio ≳30), it may be possible to improve pulsar distance estimation through GW measurements.

  8. The Pulsar Search Collaboratory: Discovery and Timing of Five New Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, R.; Swiggum, J.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Lorimer, D. R.; Yun, M.; Heatherly, S. A.; Boyles, J.; Lynch, R.; Kondratiev, V. I.; Scoles, S.; Ransom, S. M.; Moniot, M. L.; Cottrill, A.; Weaver, M.; Snider, A.; Thompson, C.; Raycraft, M.; Dudenhoefer, J.; Allphin, L.; Thorley, J.; Meadows, B.; Marchiny, G.; Liska, A.; O'Dwyer, A. M.; Butler, B.; Bloxton, S.; Mabry, H.; Abate, H.; Boothe, J.; Pritt, S.; Alberth, J.; Green, A.; Crowley, R. J.; Agee, A.; Nagley, S.; Sargent, N.; Hinson, E.; Smith, K.; McNeely, R.; Quigley, H.; Pennington, A.; Chen, S.; Maynard, T.; Loope, L.; Bielski, N.; McGough, J. R.; Gural, J. C.; Colvin, S.; Tso, S.; Ewen, Z.; Zhang, M.; Ciccarella, N.; Bukowski, B.; Novotny, C. B.; Gore, J.; Sarver, K.; Johnson, S.; Cunningham, H.; Collins, D.; Gardner, D.; Monteleone, A.; Hall, J.; Schweinhagen, R.; Ayers, J.; Jay, S.; Uosseph, B.; Dunkum, D.; Pal, J.; Dydiw, S.; Sterling, M.; Phan, E.

    2013-05-01

    We present the discovery and timing solutions of five new pulsars by students involved in the Pulsar Search Collaboratory, a NSF-funded joint program between the National Radio Astronomy Observatory and West Virginia University designed to excite and engage high-school students in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) and related fields. We encourage students to pursue STEM fields by apprenticing them within a professional scientific community doing cutting edge research, specifically by teaching them to search for pulsars. The students are analyzing 300 hr of drift-scan survey data taken with the Green Bank Telescope at 350 MHz. These data cover 2876 deg2 of the sky. Over the course of five years, more than 700 students have inspected diagnostic plots through a web-based graphical interface designed for this project. The five pulsars discovered in the data have spin periods ranging from 3.1 ms to 4.8 s. Among the new discoveries are PSR J1926-1314, a long period, nulling pulsar; PSR J1821+0155, an isolated, partially recycled 33 ms pulsar; and PSR J1400-1438, a millisecond pulsar in a 9.5 day orbit whose companion is likely a white dwarf star.

  9. Sub-luminous γ-ray pulsars

    DOE PAGES

    Romani, R. W.; Kerr, M.; Craig, H. A.; ...

    2011-08-17

    Here, most pulsars observed by the Fermi Large Area Telescope have γ-ray luminosities scaling with spin-down powermore » $${\\dot{E}}$$ as $$L_\\gamma \\approx ({\\dot{E}}\\, \\times \\, 10^{33}\\,{\\rm erg \\,s^{-1}})^{1/2}$$. However, there exist one detection and several upper limits an order of magnitude or more fainter than this trend. We describe these "sub-luminous" γ-ray pulsars and discuss the case for this being an orientation effect. Of the 12 known young radio pulsars with $${\\dot{E}}>10^{34}\\, {\\rm erg\\,s^{-1}}$$ and d ≤ 2 kpc several are substantially sub-luminous. The limited available geometrical constraints favor aligned geometries for these pulsars, although no one case for alignment is compelling. In this scenario GeV emission detected from such sub-luminous pulsars can be due to a lower altitude, lower-power accelerator gap.« less

  10. Probing Microstructure in Interstellar Plasma with Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backer, Donald

    1999-11-01

    Pulsars provide excellent probes of small structure in the interstellar plasma. The list of observable effects includes dispersion, Faraday rotation, diffraction and refraction. Of great interest recently has been episodes of lensing and dual path propagation when the plasma perturbation has just the right focal length for the pulsar-perturber-earth geometry at a given frequency. I will discuss a recent study of the variable dispersion, refraction and diffraction of the millisecond pulsar B1937+21. This is based mainly on daily observations at 327 and 610 MHz with a pulsar monitoring telescope in Green Bank, WV. Further observations at 820 and 1395 MHz allow us to investigate the limits on dispersion measure determination set by diffraction. Length scales in the medium from 10^10 to 10^15 cm are probed. A second study focuses on a rare event in the Crab pulsar where the dispersion measure jumped by 0.1 pc cm-3 within one week and, prior to the jump, a faint and delayed ghost of the pulsed emission was observed. These phenomena can be explained in terms of a plasma wedge crossing the line of sight. The most likely location of this wedge is in the Rayleigh-Taylor unstable interface between the expanding supernova remains and the pre-supernova stellar wind debris.

  11. Pulsar Wind Bubble Blowout from a Supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blondin, John M.; Chevalier, Roger A.

    2017-08-01

    For pulsars born in supernovae, the expansion of the shocked pulsar wind nebula is initially in the freely expanding ejecta of the supernova. While the nebula is in the inner flat part of the ejecta density profile, the swept-up, accelerating shell is subject to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. We carried out two- and three-dimensional simulations showing that the instability gives rise to filamentary structure during this initial phase but does not greatly change the dynamics of the expanding shell. The flow is effectively self-similar. If the shell is powered into the outer steep part of the density profile, the shell is subject to a robust Rayleigh-Taylor instability in which the shell is fragmented and the shocked pulsar wind breaks out through the shell. The flow is not self-similar in this phase. For a wind nebula to reach this phase requires that the deposited pulsar energy be greater than the supernova energy, or that the initial pulsar period be in the ms range for a typical 1051 erg supernova. These conditions are satisfied by some magnetar models for Type I superluminous supernovae. We also consider the Crab Nebula, which may be associated with a low energy supernova for which this scenario applies.

  12. IS CALVERA A GAMMA-RAY PULSAR?

    SciTech Connect

    Halpern, J. P.

    2011-07-20

    Originally selected as a neutron star (NS) candidate in the ROSAT All-Sky Survey, 1RXS J141256.0+792204 ('Calvera') was discovered to be a 59 ms X-ray pulsar in a pair of XMM-Newton observations by Zane et al. Surprisingly, their claimed detection of this pulsar in Fermi {gamma}-ray data requires no period derivative, severely restricting its dipole magnetic field strength, spin-down luminosity, and distance to small values. This implies that the cooling age of Calvera is much younger than its characteristic spin-down age. If so, it could be a mildly recycled pulsar, or the first 'orphaned' central compact object (CCO). Here we show that the published Fermi ephemeris fails to align the pulse phases of the two X-ray observations with each other, which indicates that the Fermi detection is almost certainly spurious. Analysis of additional Fermi data also does not confirm the {gamma}-ray detection. This leaves the spin-down rate of Calvera less constrained, and its place among the families of NSs uncertain. It could still be either an ordinary pulsar, a mildly recycled pulsar, or an orphaned CCO.

  13. PULSAR WIND NEBULAE WITH THICK TOROIDAL STRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect

    Chevalier, Roger A.; Reynolds, Stephen P. E-mail: reynolds@ncsu.edu

    2011-10-10

    We investigate a class of pulsar wind nebulae that show synchrotron emission from a thick toroidal structure. The best studied such object is the small radio and X-ray nebula around the Vela pulsar, which can be interpreted as the result of interaction of a mildly supersonic inward flow with the recent pulsar wind. Such a flow near the center of a supernova remnant can be produced in a transient phase when the reverse shock reaches the center of the remnant. Other nebulae with a thick toroidal structure are G106.6+2.9 and G76.9+1.0. Their structure contrasts with young pulsar nebulae like the Crab Nebula and 3C 38, which show a more chaotic, filamentary structure in the synchrotron emission. In both situations, a torus-jet structure is present where the pulsar wind passes through a termination shock, indicating the flow is initially toroidal. We suggest that the difference is due to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability that operates when the outer boundary of the nebula is accelerating into freely expanding supernova ejecta. The instability gives rise to mixing in the Crab and related objects, but is not present in the nebulae with thick toroidal regions.

  14. Is Calvera a Gamma-Ray Pulsar?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halpern, J. P.

    2011-07-01

    Originally selected as a neutron star (NS) candidate in the ROSAT All-Sky Survey, 1RXS J141256.0+792204 ("Calvera") was discovered to be a 59 ms X-ray pulsar in a pair of XMM-Newton observations by Zane et al. Surprisingly, their claimed detection of this pulsar in Fermi γ-ray data requires no period derivative, severely restricting its dipole magnetic field strength, spin-down luminosity, and distance to small values. This implies that the cooling age of Calvera is much younger than its characteristic spin-down age. If so, it could be a mildly recycled pulsar, or the first "orphaned" central compact object (CCO). Here we show that the published Fermi ephemeris fails to align the pulse phases of the two X-ray observations with each other, which indicates that the Fermi detection is almost certainly spurious. Analysis of additional Fermi data also does not confirm the γ-ray detection. This leaves the spin-down rate of Calvera less constrained, and its place among the families of NSs uncertain. It could still be either an ordinary pulsar, a mildly recycled pulsar, or an orphaned CCO.

  15. Polarization Properties of Rotation Powered Pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding Alice K.

    2009-01-01

    Polarization measurements of rotation-powered pulsars and their nebulae have unique diagnostic potential. The polarization position angle of the pulsar wind nebula, as is know for the Crab pulsar, can tell us the orientation of the spin axis. Phase-resolved polarimetry of pulsars has had enormous diagnostic capability at radio and optical wavelengths and could also be a powerful diagnostic in the X-ray range. Measurement of the polarization properties as a function of pulse phase can therefore provide a multidimensional mapping of the pulsar emission. In the 'rotating vector' model, radiation originating near a magnetic pole is expected to show a characteristic S-shaped swing of the position angle vs. pulse phase. In this case it is possible to determine the magnetic inclination and viewing angles. Radiation originating further from the poles or further above the neutron star surface will have a more complex polarization signature, as a result of relativistic effects of aberration and time-of-flight delays and may also cause depolarization of the signal. I will discuss predicted polarization properties of pulsed emission in polar cap models, where radiation originates near the neutron star surface at the magnetic poles, and in slot gap and outer gap models, where radiation originates over a range of altitudes out to the speed-of-light cylinder.

  16. Thermal properties of three Fermi pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilenko, A.; Karpova, A.; Kirichenko, A.; Shibanov, Y.; Shternin, P.; Zharikov, S.; Zyuzin, D.

    2014-07-01

    We analysed thermal properties of the Fermi pulsars J0357+3205, J1741-2054, and J0633+0632 using data from the XMM-Newton and Chandra archives. The X-ray spectra of all three pulsars can be fitted by sum of thermal and power-law components. For J1741-2054, the thermal component is best described by a blackbody model whose normalization suggests that the thermal emission comes from the bulk of the neutron star surface. The effective temperature of 60 eV, which is rather large for a pulsar as old as J1741-2054, makes it similar to the well-studied pulsar B1055-52, one of ``the three musketeers''. The thermal components of PSRs J0357+3205 and J0633+0632 can be equally well described by blackbody or the hydrogen atmosphere models. In the former case the normalizations suggest hot polar cap as thermal emission origin and only upper limits on the neutron stars surface temperatures can be computed. For the hydrogen atmosphere models, the normalizations are in agreement with emission coming from a substantial part of neutron star surface. Thermal properties of the pulsars are confronted with similar data on other isolated neutron stars and predictions of the neutron star cooling theory.

  17. The dynamic pulsar emission over multiple frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Bhalchandra

    In this presentation, a review of single pulse emission from radio pulsars, with particular emphasis on recent simultaneous multi-frequency studies with the GMRT on PSRs B0031-07, B0809+74 and B2319+60, is carried out. After a brief description of single pulse phenomena in radio pulsar, the relationship between subpulse drifting, nulling and profile mode-changes is explored. Recent results, obtained with the GMRT, the WSRT and Effelsberg telescope, which show that all these phenomena are correlated from 325 MHz to 4.8 GHz are discussed alongwith results on other pulsars with the GMRT and the ORT. These results suggest that these phenomena are manifestations of global changes in magnetosphere. Implications for recent models, invoking such changes, are discussed after a brief description of these models, which were proposed to explain changes in spin-down of pulsars observed during the ON and OFF states of intermittent pulsars. The presentation ends with discussion of future observations and theoretical challenges in this field.

  18. Gamma-ray Pulsars: Models and Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding Alice K.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Pulsed emission from gamma-ray pulsars originates inside the magnetosphere, from radiation by charged particles accelerated near the magnetic poles or in the outer gaps. In polar cap models, the high energy spectrum is cut off by magnetic pair production above an energy that is, dependent on the local magnetic field strength. While most young pulsars with surface fields in the range B = 10(exp 12) - 10(exp 13) G are expected to have high energy cutoffs around several GeV, the gamma-ray spectra of old pulsars having lower surface fields may extend to 50 GeV. Although the gamma-ray emission of older pulsars is weaker, detecting pulsed emission at high energies from nearby sources would be an important confirmation of polar cap models. Outer gap models predict more gradual high-energy turnovers of the primary curvature emission around 10 GeV, but also predict an inverse Compton component extending to TeV energies. Detection of pulsed TeV emission, which would not survive attenuation at the polar caps, is thus an important test of outer gap models. Next-generation gamma-ray telescopes sensitive to GeV-TeV emission will provide critical tests of pulsar acceleration and emission mechanisms.

  19. LUMINOSITY EVOLUTION OF GAMMA-RAY PULSARS

    SciTech Connect

    Hirotani, Kouichi

    2013-04-01

    We investigate the electrodynamic structure of a pulsar outer-magnetospheric particle accelerator and the resulting gamma-ray emission. By considering the condition for the accelerator to be self-sustained, we derive how the trans-magnetic-field thickness of the accelerator evolves with the pulsar age. It is found that the thickness is small but increases steadily if the neutron-star envelope is contaminated by sufficient light elements. For such a light element envelope, the gamma-ray luminosity of the accelerator is kept approximately constant as a function of age in the initial 10,000 yr, forming the lower bound of the observed distribution of the gamma-ray luminosity of rotation-powered pulsars. If the envelope consists of only heavy elements, on the other hand, the thickness is greater, but it increases less rapidly than a light element envelope. For such a heavy element envelope, the gamma-ray luminosity decreases relatively rapidly, forming the upper bound of the observed distribution. The gamma-ray luminosity of a general pulsar resides between these two extreme cases, reflecting the envelope composition and the magnetic inclination angle with respect to the rotation axis. The cutoff energy of the primary curvature emission is regulated below several GeV even for young pulsars because the gap thickness, and hence the acceleration electric field, is suppressed by the polarization of the produced pairs.

  20. Cascading peer dynamics underlying the progression from problem behavior to violence in early to late adolescence.

    PubMed

    Dishion, Thomas J; Véronneau, Marie-Hélène; Myers, Michael W

    2010-08-01

    This study examined the peer dynamics linking early adolescent problem behavior, school marginalization, and low academic performance to multiple indices of late adolescent violence (arrests, parent report, and youth report) in an ethnically diverse sample of 998 males and females. A cascade model was proposed in which early adolescent risk factors assessed at age 11 to 12 predict gang involvement at age 13 to 14, which in turn, predicts deviancy training with friends at age 16 to 17, which then predicts violence by age 18 to 19. Each construct in the model was assessed with multiple measures and methods. Structural equation modeling revealed that the cascade model fit the data well, with problem behavior, school marginalization, and low academic performance significantly predicting gang involvement 2 years later. Gang involvement, in turn, predicted deviancy training with a friend, which predicted violence. The best fitting model included an indirect and direct path between early adolescent gang involvement and later violence. These findings suggest the need to carefully consider peer clustering into gangs in efforts to prevent individual and aggregate levels of violence, especially in youths who may be disengaged, marginalized, or academically unsuccessful in the public school context.

  1. Multisystemic therapy for disruptive behavior problems in youths with autism spectrum disorders: a progress report.

    PubMed

    Wagner, David V; Borduin, Charles M; Kanne, Stephen M; Mazurek, Micah O; Farmer, Janet E; Brown, Rachel M A

    2014-07-01

    Youths with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) often engage in serious disruptive behaviors that interfere with their ability to successfully manage day-to-day responsibilities and contribute to relationship problems with caregivers, peers, and teachers. Effective treatments are needed to address the factors linked with disruptive behavior problems in this population of youths. Multisystemic therapy (MST) is a comprehensive family- and community-based treatment approach that has been effective with other difficult-to-treat populations of youths and holds promise for youths with ASD. In this article, we review the broad range of factors associated with disruptive behaviors among youths with ASD and discuss how MST interventions can be adapted to address those factors. We also present a framework for our adaptation of the MST model for youths with ASD. This framework includes a recently completed pilot study as well as an ongoing efficacy trial that together have served to identify key interventions for our adaptation of the MST model. © 2012 American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy.

  2. Progression paths in children's problem solving: The influence of dynamic testing, initial variability, and working memory.

    PubMed

    Resing, Wilma C M; Bakker, Merel; Pronk, Christine M E; Elliott, Julian G

    2017-01-01

    The current study investigated developmental trajectories of analogical reasoning performance of 104 7- and 8-year-old children. We employed a microgenetic research method and multilevel analysis to examine the influence of several background variables and experimental treatment on the children's developmental trajectories. Our participants were divided into two treatment groups: repeated practice alone and repeated practice with training. Each child received an initial working memory assessment and was subsequently asked to solve figural analogies on each of several sessions. We examined children's analogical problem-solving behavior and their subsequent verbal accounts of their employed solving processes. We also investigated the influence of verbal and visual-spatial working memory capacity and initial variability in strategy use on analogical reasoning development. Results indicated that children in both treatment groups improved but that gains were greater for those who had received training. Training also reduced the influence of children's initial variability in the use of analogical strategies with the degree of improvement in reasoning largely unrelated to working memory capacity. Findings from this study demonstrate the value of a microgenetic research method and the use of multilevel analysis to examine inter- and intra-individual change in problem-solving processes.

  3. Van der Waals Perspective on Coarse-Graining: Progress toward Solving Representability and Transferability Problems.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Nicholas J H; Foley, Thomas T; Noid, William G

    2016-12-20

    Low-resolution coarse-grained (CG) models provide the necessary efficiency for simulating phenomena that are inaccessible to more detailed models. However, in order to realize their considerable promise, CG models must accurately describe the relevant physical forces and provide useful predictions. By formally integrating out the unnecessary details from an all-atom (AA) model, "bottom-up" approaches can, at least in principle, quantitatively reproduce the structural and thermodynamic properties of the AA model that are observable at the CG resolution. In practice, though, bottom-up approaches only approximate this "exact coarse-graining" procedure. The resulting models typically reproduce the intermolecular structure of AA models at a single thermodynamic state point but often describe other state points less accurately and, moreover, tend to provide a poor description of thermodynamic properties. These two limitations have been coined the "transferability" and "representability" problems, respectively. Perhaps, the simplest and most commonly discussed manifestation of the representability problem regards the tendency of structure-based CG models to dramatically overestimate the pressure. Furthermore, when these models are adjusted to reproduce the pressure, they provide a poor description of the compressibility. More generally, it is sometimes suggested that CG models are fundamentally incapable of reproducing both structural and thermodynamic properties. After all, there is no such thing as a "free lunch"; any significant gain in computational efficiency should come at the cost of significant model limitations. At least in the case of structural and thermodynamic properties, though, we optimistically propose that this may be a false dichotomy. Accordingly, we have recently re-examined the "exact coarse-graining" procedure and investigated the intrinsic consequences of representing an AA model in reduced resolution. These studies clarify the origin and inter

  4. Wide-band profile domain pulsar timing analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lentati, L.; Kerr, M.; Dai, S.; Hobson, M. P.; Shannon, R. M.; Hobbs, G.; Bailes, M.; Bhat, N. D. Ramesh; Burke-Spolaor, S.; Coles, W.; Dempsey, J.; Lasky, P. D.; Levin, Y.; Manchester, R. N.; Osłowski, S.; Ravi, V.; Reardon, D. J.; Rosado, P. A.; Spiewak, R.; van Straten, W.; Toomey, L.; Wang, J.; Wen, L.; You, X.; Zhu, X.

    2017-04-01

    We extend profile domain pulsar timing to incorporate wide-band effects such as frequency-dependent profile evolution and broad-band shape variation in the pulse profile. We also incorporate models for temporal variations in both pulse width and in the separation in phase of the main pulse and interpulse. We perform the analysis with both nested sampling and Hamiltonian Monte Carlo methods. In the latter case, we introduce a new parametrization of the posterior that is extremely efficient in the low signal-to-noise regime and can be readily applied to a wide range of scientific problems. We apply this methodology to a series of simulations, and to between seven and nine years of observations for PSRs J1713+0747, J1744-1134 and J1909-3744 with frequency coverage that spans 700-3600 Mhz. We use a smooth model for profile evolution across the full frequency range, and compare smooth and piecewise models for the temporal variations in dispersion measure (DM). We find that the profile domain framework consistently results in improved timing precision compared to the standard analysis paradigm by as much as 40 per cent for timing parameters. Incorporating smoothness in the DM variations into the model further improves timing precision by as much as 30 per cent. For PSR J1713+0747, we also detect pulse shape variation uncorrelated between epochs, which we attribute to variation intrinsic to the pulsar at a level consistent with previously published analyses. Not accounting for this shape variation biases the measured arrival times at the level of ˜30 ns, the same order of magnitude as the expected shift due to gravitational waves in the pulsar timing band.

  5. Progress and problems with the use of suicide genes for targeted cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Karjoo, Zahra; Chen, Xuguang; Hatefi, Arash

    2016-04-01

    Among various gene therapy methods for cancer, suicide gene therapy attracts a special attention because it allows selective conversion of non-toxic compounds into cytotoxic drugs inside cancer cells. As a result, therapeutic index can be increased significantly by introducing high concentrations of cytotoxic molecules to the tumor environment while minimizing impact on normal tissues. Despite significant success at the preclinical level, no cancer suicide gene therapy protocol has delivered the desirable clinical significance yet. This review gives a critical look at the six main enzyme/prodrug systems that are used in suicide gene therapy of cancer and familiarizes readers with the state-of-the-art research and practices in this field. For each enzyme/prodrug system, the mechanisms of action, protein engineering strategies to enhance enzyme stability/affinity and chemical modification techniques to increase prodrug kinetics and potency are discussed. In each category, major clinical trials that have been performed in the past decade with each enzyme/prodrug system are discussed to highlight the progress to date. Finally, shortcomings are underlined and areas that need improvement in order to produce clinical significance are delineated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. X-ray Pulsars Across the Parameter Space of Luminosity, Accretion Mode, and Spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laycock, Silas; Yang, Jun; Christodoulou, Dimitris; Coe, Malcolm; Cappallo, Rigel; Zezas, Andreas; Ho, Wynn C. G.; Hong, JaeSub; Fingerman, Samuel; Drake, Jeremy J.; Kretschmar, Peter; Antoniou, Vallia

    2017-08-01

    We present our multi-satellite library of X-ray Pulsar observations to the community, and highlight recent science results. Available at www.xraypulsars.space the library provides a range of high-level data products, including: activity histories, pulse-profiles, phased event files, and a unique pulse-profile modeling interface. The initial release (v1.0) contains some 15 years of RXTE-PCA, Chandra ACIS-I, and XMM-PN observations of the Small Magellanic Cloud, creating a valuable record of pulsar behavior. Our library is intended to enable new progress on fundamental NS parameters and accretion physics. The major motivations are (1) Assemble a large homogeneous sample to enable population statistics. This has so far been used to map the propeller transition, and explore the role of retrograde and pro-grade accretion disks. (2) Obtain pulse-profiles for the same pulsars on many different occasions, at different luminosities and states in order to break model degeneracies. This effort has led to preliminary measurements of the offsets between magnetic and spin axes. With the addition of other satellites, and Galactic pulsars, the library will cover the entire available range of luminosity, variability timescales and accretion regimes.

  7. PULSAR OBSERVATIONS USING THE FIRST STATION OF THE LONG WAVELENGTH ARRAY AND THE LWA PULSAR DATA ARCHIVE

    SciTech Connect

    Stovall, K.; Dowell, J.; Eftekhari, T.; McCrackan, M.; Schinzel, F. K.; Taylor, G. B.; Ray, P. S.; Blythe, J.; Garcia, A.; Lazio, T. J. W.

    2015-08-01

    We present initial pulsar results from the first station of the Long Wavelength Array (LWA1) obtained during the commissioning period of LWA1 and in early science results. We present detections of periodic emission from 44 previously known pulsars, including 3 millisecond pulsars. The effects of the interstellar medium (ISM) on pulsar emission are significantly enhanced at the low frequencies of the LWA1 band (10–88 MHz), making LWA1 a very sensitive instrument for characterizing changes in the dispersion measure (DM) and other effects from the ISM. Pulsars also often have significant evolution in their pulse profile at low frequency and a break in their spectral index. We report DM measurements for 44 pulsars, mean flux density measurements for 36 pulsars, and multi-frequency component spacing and widths for 15 pulsars with more than one profile component. For 27 pulsars, we report spectral index measurements within our frequency range. We also introduce the LWA1 Pulsar Data Archive, which stores reduced data products from LWA1 pulsar observations. Reduced data products for the observations presented here can be found in the archive. Reduced data products from future LWA1 pulsar observations will also be made available through the archive.

  8. PROGRESS AND PROBLEMS IN THE APPLICATION OF FOCUSED ULTRASOUND FOR BLOOD-BRAIN BARRIER DISRUPTION

    PubMed Central

    Vykhodtseva, Natalia; McDannold, Nathan; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2008-01-01

    Advances in neuroscience have resulted in the development of new diagnostic and therapeutic agents for potential use in the central nervous system (CNS). However, the ability to deliver the majority of these agents to the brain is limited by the blood–brain barrier (BBB), a specialized structure of the blood vessel wall that hampers transport and diffusion from the blood to the brain. Many CNS disorders could be treated with drugs, enzymes, genes, or large-molecule biotechnological products such as recombinant proteins, if they could cross the BBB. This article reviews the problems of the BBB presence in treating the vast majority of CNS diseases and the efforts to circumvent the BBB through the design of new drugs and the development of more sophisticated delivery methods. Recent advances in the development of noninvasive, targeted drug delivery by MRI-guided ultrasound-induced BBB disruption are also summarized. PMID:18511095

  9. Class II major histocompatibility complex tetramer staining: progress, problems, and prospects

    PubMed Central

    Vollers, Sabrina S; Stern, Lawrence J

    2008-01-01

    The use of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) tetramers in the detection and analysis of antigen-specific T cells has become more widespread since its introduction 11 years ago. Early challenges in the application of tetramer staining to CD4+ T cells centred around difficulties in the expression of various class II MHC allelic variants and the detection of low-frequency T cells in mixed populations. As many of the technical obstacles to class II MHC tetramer staining have been overcome, the focus has returned to uncertainties concerning how oligomer valency and T-cell receptor/MHC affinity affect tetramer binding. Such issues have become more important with an increase in the number of studies relying on direct ex vivo analysis of antigen-specific CD4+ T cells. In this review we discuss which problems in class II MHC tetramer staining have been solved to date, and which matters remain to be considered. PMID:18251991

  10. EVIDENCE OF AN ASTEROID ENCOUNTERING A PULSAR

    SciTech Connect

    Brook, P. R.; Karastergiou, A.; Buchner, S.; Roberts, S. J.; Keith, M. J.; Johnston, S.; Shannon, R. M.

    2014-01-10

    Debris disks and asteroid belts are expected to form around young pulsars due to fallback material from their original supernova explosions. Disk material may migrate inward and interact with a pulsar's magnetosphere, causing changes in torque and emission. Long-term monitoring of PSR J0738–4042 reveals both effects. The pulse shape changes multiple times between 1988 and 2012. The torque, inferred via the derivative of the rotational period, changes abruptly from 2005 September. This change is accompanied by an emergent radio component that drifts with respect to the rest of the pulse. No known intrinsic pulsar processes can explain these timing and radio emission signatures. The data lead us to postulate that we are witnessing an encounter with an asteroid or in-falling debris from a disk.

  11. Timing of millisecond pulsars in globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Amico, Nichi; Possenti, Andrea; Manchester, Dick; Johnston, Simon; Kramer, Michael; Sarkissian, John; Lyne, Andrew; Burgay, Marta; Corongiu, Alessandro; Camilo, Fernando; Bailes, Matthew; van Straten, Willem

    2012-04-01

    Timing of the dozen pulsars discovered by us in P303 is ensuring high quality results: (a) the peculiarities (in position or projected acceleration) of all the 5 millisecond pulsars in NGC6752 suggested the presence of non thermal dynamics in the core, perhaps due to black-holes of intermediate mass; (b) the eclipsing pulsar in NGC6397 is a stereotype for studying the late evolution of exotic binaries. We propose to continue our timing project focusing mostly on NGC6752 at 20cm (in order to measure additional parameters useful to constrain the existence of a black-hole) and NGC6397 at 10cm (for studying the orbital secular evolution, the eclipse region, and the mechanisms leading to the ejection of matter from the binary system).

  12. Timing of millisecond pulsars in globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Amico, Nichi; Possenti, Andrea; Manchester, Dick; Johnston, Simon; Kramer, Michael; Sarkissian, John; Lyne, Andrew; Burgay, Marta; Corongiu, Alessandro; Camilo, Fernando; Bailes, Matthew; van Straten, Willem

    2012-10-01

    Timing of the dozen pulsars discovered by us in P303 is ensuring high quality results: (a) the peculiarities (in position or projected acceleration) of all the 5 millisecond pulsars in NGC6752 suggested the presence of non thermal dynamics in the core, perhaps due to black-holes of intermediate mass; (b) the eclipsing pulsar in NGC6397 is a stereotype for studying the late evolution of exotic binaries. We propose to continue our timing project focusing mostly on NGC6752 at 20cm (in order to measure additional parameters useful to constrain the existence of a black-hole) and NGC6397 at 10cm (for studying the orbital secular evolution, the eclipse region, and the mechanisms leading to the ejection of matter from the binary system).

  13. Timing of millisecond pulsars in globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Amico, Nichi; Possenti, Andrea; Manchester, Dick; Johnston, Simon; Kramer, Michael; Sarkissian, John; Lyne, Andrew; Burgay, Marta; Corongiu, Alessandro; Camilo, Fernando; Bailes, Matthew; van Straten, Willem

    2010-10-01

    Timing of the dozen pulsars discovered by us in P303 is ensuring high quality results: (a) the peculiarities (in position or projected acceleration) of all the 5 millisecond pulsars in NGC6752 suggested the presence of non thermal dynamics in the core, perhaps due to black-holes of intermediate mass; (b) the eclipsing pulsar in NGC6397 is a stereotype for studying the late evolution of exotic binaries. We propose to continue our timing project focusing mostly on NGC6752 at 20cm (in order to measure additional parameters useful to constrain the existence of a black-hole) and NGC6397 at 10cm (for studying the eclipse region and the orbital secular evolution).

  14. Timing of millisecond pulsars in globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Amico, Nichi; Possenti, Andrea; Manchester, Dick; Johnston, Simon; Kramer, Michael; Sarkissian, John; Lyne, Andrew; Burgay, Marta; Corongiu, Alessandro; Camilo, Fernando; Bailes, Matthew; van Straten, Willem

    2011-10-01

    Timing of the dozen pulsars discovered by us in P303 is ensuring high quality results: (a) the peculiarities (in position or projected acceleration) of all the 5 millisecond pulsars in NGC6752 suggested the presence of non thermal dynamics in the core, perhaps due to black-holes of intermediate mass; (b) the eclipsing pulsar in NGC6397 is a stereotype for studying the late evolution of exotic binaries. We propose to continue our timing project focusing mostly on NGC6752 at 20cm (in order to measure additional parameters useful to constrain the existence of a black-hole) and NGC6397 at 10cm (for studying the orbital secular evolution, the eclipse region, and the mechanisms leading to the ejection of matter from the binary system).

  15. Timing of millisecond pulsars in globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Amico, Nichi; Possenti, Andrea; Manchester, Dick; Johnston, Simon; Kramer, Michael; Sarkissian, John; Lyne, Andrew; Burgay, Marta; Corongiu, Alessandro; Camilo, Fernando; Bailes, Matthew; van Straten, Willem

    2011-04-01

    Timing of the dozen pulsars discovered by us in P303 is ensuring high quality results: (a) the peculiarities (in position or projected acceleration) of all the 5 millisecond pulsars in NGC6752 suggested the presence of non thermal dynamics in the core, perhaps due to black-holes of intermediate mass; (b) the eclipsing pulsar in NGC6397 is a stereotype for studying the late evolution of exotic binaries. We propose to continue our timing project focusing mostly on NGC6752 at 20cm (in order to measure additional parameters useful to constrain the existence of a black-hole) and NGC6397 at 10cm (for studying the orbital secular evolution, the eclipse region, and the mechanisms leading to the ejection of matter from the binary system).

  16. Timing of millisecond pulsars in globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Amico, Nichi; Possenti, Andrea; Manchester, Dick; Johnston, Simon; Kramer, Michael; Sarkissian, John; Lyne, Andrew; Burgay, Marta; Corongiu, Alessandro; Camilo, Fernando; Bailes, Matthew; van Straten, Willem

    2013-04-01

    Timing of the dozen pulsars discovered by us in P303 is ensuring high quality results: (a) the peculiarities (in position or projected acceleration) of all the 5 millisecond pulsars in NGC6752 suggested the presence of non thermal dynamics in the core, perhaps due to black-holes of intermediate mass; (b) the eclipsing pulsar in NGC6397 is a stereotype for studying the late evolution of exotic binaries. We propose to continue our timing project focusing mostly on NGC6752 at 20cm (in order to measure additional parameters useful to constrain the existence of a black-hole) and NGC6397 at 10cm (for studying the orbital secular evolution, the eclipse region, and the mechanisms leading to the ejection of matter from the binary system).

  17. Testing gravity with pulsar scintillation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Huan; Nishizawa, Atsushi; Pen, Ue-Li

    2017-04-01

    We propose to use pulsar scintillation measurements to test predictions of alternative theories of gravity. Compared to single-path pulsar timing measurements, the scintillation measurements can achieve an accuracy of one part in a thousand within one wave period, which means picosecond scale resolution in time, due to the effect of multipath interference. Previous scintillation measurements of PSR B 0834 +06 have hours of data acquisition, making this approach sensitive to mHz gravitational waves. Therefore it has unique advantages in measuring the effect of gravity or other mechanisms on light propagation. We illustrate its application in constraining the scalar gravitational-wave background, in which case the sensitivities can be greatly improved with respect to previous limits. We expect much broader applications in testing gravity with existing and future pulsar scintillation observations.

  18. Are there two types of pulsars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contopoulos, I.

    2016-11-01

    In order to investigate the importance of dissipation in the pulsar magnetosphere, we decided to combine force-free with Aristotelian electrodynamics. We obtain solutions that are ideal (non-dissipative) everywhere except in an equatorial current sheet where Poynting flux from both hemispheres converges and is dissipated into particle acceleration and radiation. We find significant dissipative losses (up to about 50 per cent of the pulsar spin-down luminosity), similar to what is found in global Particle-In-Cell simulations in which particles are provided only on the stellar surface. We conclude that there might indeed exist two types of pulsars, strongly dissipative ones with particle injection only from the stellar surface, and ideal (weakly dissipative) ones with particle injection in the outer magnetosphere and in particular at the Y-point.

  19. CONSECUTIVE BRIGHT PULSES IN THE VELA PULSAR

    SciTech Connect

    Palfreyman, Jim L.; Dickey, John M.; Hotan, Claire E.; Hotan, Aidan W.; Young, Timothy G.

    2011-07-01

    We report on the discovery of consecutive bright radio pulses from the Vela pulsar, a new phenomenon that may lead to a greater understanding of the pulsar emission mechanism. This results from a total of 345 hr worth of observations of the Vela pulsar using the University of Tasmania's 26 m radio telescope to study the frequency and statistics of abnormally bright pulses and sub-pulses. The bright pulses show a tendency to appear consecutively. The observations found two groups of six consecutive bright pulses and many groups of two to five bright pulses in a row. The strong radio emission process that produces the six bright pulses lasts between 0.4 and 0.6 s. The numbers of bright pulses in sequence far exceed what would be expected if individual bright pulses were independent random events. Consecutive bright pulses must be generated by an emission process that is long lived relative to the rotation period of the neutron star.

  20. Polarisation properties of pulsars at optical wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignani, Roberto; Marelli, Martino; Shearer, Andrew; Slowikowska, Agnieszka

    2016-07-01

    Polarisation measurements of pulsars offer unique insights into their highly-magnetised relativistic environments and represent a primary test for neutron star magnetosphere models and radiation emission mechanisms. Besides the radio band, optical observations have been, so far, best suited to these goals, with polarisation measurements in the X-rays becoming possible in the near future thanks to missions, such as XIPE and IXPE. In this talk, we review the status of the optical polarisation measurements of pulsars and we foresee possible synergies between X-ray polarimetry observations of selected pulsars with, e.g XIPE and IXPE, and optical observations with the next generation of extremely large telescope, such as the E-ELT.

  1. Polarimetric Observation of Pulsars with Hexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, M.; Bhat, R.; Tremblay, S.; Ord, S.; Sobey, C.; Kirsten, F.

    2016-07-01

    The MWA VCS pipeline is now reliably generating high time resolution observations of radio pulsars in all four Stokes parameters. Here, we are proposing to test the polarimetric response of and our ability to calibrate the new Hex array currently under construction. These observation will provide data that will be used to study the pulsars themselves (including their emission mechanism and beam geometry), the interstellar medium and towards understanding the Galactic magnetic field. We are proposing a set of observations of three pulsars (J0034-0534, J0437-4715, and J2145-0750) at a wide range of hour angles to characterise the fidelity and stability of the polarimetric solutions with the hexes. The observation would be performed between 170-200 MHz and 140-170 MHz respectively. This project will form part of the PhD program of Mengyao Xue.

  2. Target of Opportunity Positioning of Transient X-Ray Pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakrabarty, Deepto

    2003-01-01

    Our program successfully localized three newly-identified transient X-ray pulsars. XTE J1858+034 is a 221 s pulsar (Takeshima et al. 1998, IAUC 6826), XTE J1946+274 is a 15.8 s pulsar (Takeshima and Chakrabarty 1998, IAUC 7016), and XTE J0111.2-7317 is a 31 s pulsar in the Small Magellanic Cloud (Chakrabarty et al. 1998, IAUC 7048). This last pulsar was a particularly interesting source, and our XTE observations enabled prompt follow-up observations with the ASCA mission (Yokogawa et al. 2000, ApJ. 539, 191).

  3. A Search for Pulsar Companions to OB Runaway Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaspi, V. M.

    1995-01-01

    We have searched for radio pulsar companions to 40 nearby OB runaway stars. Observations were made at 474 and 770 MHz with the NRAO 140 ft telescope. The survey was sensitive to long- period pulsars with flux densities of 1 mJy or more. One previously unknown pulsar was discovered, PSRJ2044+4614, while observing towards target O star BD+45,3260. Follow-up timing observations of the pulsar measured its position to high precision, revealing a 9' separation between the pulsar and the target star, unequivocally indicating they are not associated.

  4. LDLR-Gene therapy for familial hypercholesterolaemia: problems, progress, and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    reviews the progress made in the 18 years since the first clinical trial for gene therapy of FH, with emphasis on the development, design, performance and limitations of viral based gene transfer vectors used in studies to ameliorate the effects of LDLR deficiency. PMID:21144047

  5. A survey for Hα pulsar bow shocks

    SciTech Connect

    Brownsberger, Sasha; Romani, Roger W. E-mail: sashab@stanford.edu

    2014-04-01

    We report on a survey for Hα bow shock emission around nearby γ-detected energetic pulsars. This survey adds three Balmer-dominated neutron star bow shocks to the six previously confirmed examples. In addition to the shock around Fermi pulsar PSR J1741–2054, we now report Hα structures around two additional γ-ray pulsars, PSR J2030+4415 and PSR J1509–5850. These are the first known examples of Hα nebulae with pre-ionization halos. With new measurements, we show that a simple analytic model can account for the angular size and flux of the bow shocks' apices. The latter, in particular, provides a new pulsar probe and indicates large moments of inertia and smaller distances than previously assumed in several cases. In particular, we show that the re-measured PSR J0437–4715 shock flux implies I = (1.7 ± 0.2) × 10{sup 45}/(f {sub HI}sin i) g cm{sup 2}. We also derive a distance d ≈ 0.72 kpc for the γ-ray only pulsar PSR J2030+4415 and revised distances for PSRs J1959+2048 (1.4 kpc) and J2555+6535 (∼1 kpc), smaller than the conventional DM-estimated values. Finally, we report upper limits for 94 additional LAT pulsars. An estimate of the survey sensitivity indicates that for a warm neutral medium filling factor φ{sub WNM} ∼ 0.3 there should be a total of approximately nine Hα bow shocks in our LAT-targeted survey; given that seven such objects are now known, a much larger φ{sub WNM} seems problematic.

  6. A Survey for Hα Pulsar Bow Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brownsberger, Sasha; Romani, Roger W.

    2014-04-01

    We report on a survey for Hα bow shock emission around nearby γ-detected energetic pulsars. This survey adds three Balmer-dominated neutron star bow shocks to the six previously confirmed examples. In addition to the shock around Fermi pulsar PSR J1741-2054, we now report Hα structures around two additional γ-ray pulsars, PSR J2030+4415 and PSR J1509-5850. These are the first known examples of Hα nebulae with pre-ionization halos. With new measurements, we show that a simple analytic model can account for the angular size and flux of the bow shocks' apices. The latter, in particular, provides a new pulsar probe and indicates large moments of inertia and smaller distances than previously assumed in several cases. In particular, we show that the re-measured PSR J0437-4715 shock flux implies I = (1.7 ± 0.2) × 1045/(f H I sin i) g cm2. We also derive a distance d ≈ 0.72 kpc for the γ-ray only pulsar PSR J2030+4415 and revised distances for PSRs J1959+2048 (1.4 kpc) and J2555+6535 (~1 kpc), smaller than the conventional DM-estimated values. Finally, we report upper limits for 94 additional LAT pulsars. An estimate of the survey sensitivity indicates that for a warm neutral medium filling factor phiWNM ~ 0.3 there should be a total of approximately nine Hα bow shocks in our LAT-targeted survey; given that seven such objects are now known, a much larger phiWNM seems problematic.

  7. Progress through Predicament: How Collaborating on Tough Problems Cultivates a Successful, Supportive Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aceves, Ana; Albanna, Badr; Corbo, Joel; Quan, Gina

    2012-03-01

    How can a physics department best support its students and encourage success during their academic careers, particularly for those traditionally underrepresented in physics? A well-designed, well-taught curriculum is a necessary component, but there are important steps a department can take in addition to improving what happens in the classroom. The Compass Project at UC Berkeley is a program that focuses on supporting students in the physical sciences inside and outside the classroom. Compass's philosophy is that students can learn better if they feel like they are a part of a supportive community brought together by working on meaningful and difficult problems. For Compass, this community starts in the classroom, where students tackle real-world physics projects together. It continues to develop during their engagement with organizational decision-making, through which students take ownership over many of Compass's programs and shape them to better meet their needs. Compass is not a program done to or for students, it is a program of and by students to meet the challenges they face. Through conversations with students, survey results, and video data, our talk will demonstrate the importance of these types of experiences for supporting student success.

  8. The Charles F. Prentice Award Lecture 2005: optics of the human eye: progress and problems.

    PubMed

    Charman, W Neil

    2006-06-01

    The history of measurements of ocular aberration is briefly reviewed and recent work using much-improved aberrometers and large samples of eyes is summarized. When on-axis, higher-order, monochromatic aberrations are averaged, undercorrected, positive, fourth-order spherical aberration dominates; other Zernike wavefront aberration coefficients have average values near zero. Individually, however, many eyes show substantial amounts of third-order and other fourth-order aberrations; the value of these varies idiosyncratically about zero. Most normal eyes show only small amounts of axial monochromatic aberration for photopic pupils up to around 3 mm; the limits to retinal image quality are then usually set by diffraction, uncorrected or imperfectly corrected spherocylindrical refractive error, accommodation error, and chromatic aberration. Longitudinal chromatic aberration varies very little across the population. With larger mesopic and scotopic pupils, monochromatic aberration plays a more important optical role, but overall visual performance is increasingly dominated by neural factors. Some remaining problems in measuring and modeling the eye's optical performance are discussed.

  9. Large scale pulsar surveys, new pulsar discoveries, and the observability of pulsar beams strongly bent by the Sag. A* black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stovall, Kevin

    Pulsars are useful tools for a large range of topics including but not limited to the detection of gravitational waves; tests of theories of gravity; population studies of pulsars, neutron stars, and binary systems; and analysis of Galactic structure. In the case of detections of gravitational waves, large numbers of extremely fast pulsars with periods of a few milliseconds distributed across a large number of angular separations are needed. In the case of population and Galactic structure studies, large numbers of pulsars distributed throughout the Galaxy are necessary. In order to find pulsars in the exotic systems useful for tests of theories of gravity, large number of pulsar discoveries are necessary in order to find these rare objects. As all of these efforts require the discovery of large numbers of pulsars, a significant effort has been made over the past few years, and will continue into the foreseeable future, to detect many more new radio pulsars through large scale pulsar surveys. The surveys related to this work include the Pulsar Arecibo L-Band Feed Array, the Green Bank 350MHz Drift Scan Survey, the Arecibo 327MHz Drift Scan Survey (AO327), and the Green Bank North Celestial Cap (GBNCC) survey. Data analysis from each of these surveys has resulted or will result in millions of pulsar candidates to be combed through, in some way, in order to find new radio pulsars. Here we discuss these surveys and the data analysis pipelines for two of them (AO327 and GBNCC). We also introduce a web based software system called ARCC Explorer, which enables researchers of varying levels, including high school and undergraduate students, to assist in the discovery process. In addition, we give discovery or timing solutions for 93 new pulsars directly discovered as a result of this work. One particularly interesting, but not yet detected, pulsar system is the pulsar-black hole system. Attempts have been made (and are still ongoing) to detect pulsars orbiting the black

  10. Nature of Coherent Radio Emission from Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Dipanjan

    2017-09-01

    The pulsar radio emission originates from regions below 10% of the light cylinder radius. This requires a mechanism where coherent emission is excited in relativistic pair plasma with frequency ν _{cr} which is below the plasma frequency ν_{°} i.e. ν _{cr} < ν_{°}. A possible model for the emission mechanism is charged bunches (charged solitons) moving relativistically along the curved open dipolar magnetic field lines capable of exciting coherent curvature radio emission. In this article, we review the results from high quality observations in conjunction with theoretical models to unravel the nature of coherent curvature radio emission in pulsars.

  11. The Ages, Speeds and Offspring of Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Bradley Miles Stougaard

    1996-01-01

    We investigate the cooling of low mass white dwarfs with helium cores. We construct a detailed numerical model using the most modern input physics, including our own calculations of low temperature hydrogen opacities. We use our models to constrain the ages of binary millisecond pulsars from the optical observations of their white dwarf companions. We use this to place limits on the initial spin periods, magnetic field decay times and accretion histories of the millisecond pulsars. Our models can also be used along with observations of spectroscopic gravities and radial velocities to place interesting constraints on the neutron star equation of state. We provide grids of temperature and luminosity as a function of age for various white dwarf masses and surface compositions to facilitate future analyses. We have investigated the effect of the pulsar wind on the atmospheric composition of binary companions. The spallation of atmospheric helium to hydrogen increases the cooling age of the white dwarf. We find that all white dwarf companions in binaries with orbital period < 300 days should cool as DA (hydrogen surface layer) white dwarfs, irrespective of their original hydrogen content. We investigate the effect of various wind compositions and note that, if almost all the hydrogen on the surface of a pulsar companion is the result of spallation of an ionic wind, then the D/H ratio is large. We investigate the processes by which planets might form around a millisecond pulsar such as PSR B1257 + 12. We study the evolution of accretion disks of different mass, angular momentum and composition, corresponding to various proposed formation scenarios. We find that most formation scenarios require a high efficiency of conversion of metal-rich material into planets if they are to produce the observed parameters of the 1257 + 12 planetary system. We have studied the distribution of pulsar proper motions in the light of the recent analysis of Lyne & Lorimer (1994). Using a

  12. Limits to the Stability of Pulsar Time

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-12-01

    variations in the observed rotation rate of order 10-lo. Even a Pluto -like planet in a similar orbit would cause variations close to lo-" (Figure 1). It...encounter with a star[l21, average effect of galactic stars, white dwarfs , and giant molecular clouds[ul. As expected, the largest effect is for the pulsar...order of magnitude of the effect is proportional to the mass of the companion: For a Jupiter-like planet orbiting the pulsar in a few tens of years

  13. Interstellar scattering of the Vela pulsar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Backer, D. C.

    1974-01-01

    The frequency dependence of the parameters of interstellar scattering between 837 and 8085 MHz for the Vela pulsar are consistent with thin-screen models of strong scattering. The magnitudes of the parameters indicate an anomalous turbulence along the path when they are compared with results for other pulsars with comparable column densities of free electrons in the line of sight. This anomaly is due presumably to the Gum Nebula. The decorrelation frequency, appropriately defined, is related to the pulse broadening time by 2 pi as predicted theoretically.

  14. Meeting the Need for Child Care: Problems and Progress. Hearing before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Government Operations. House of Representatives, One Hundredth Congress, First Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U. S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Government Operations.

    A hearing was held to identify problems and assess progress in the provision of affordable, high quality child care. Testimony concerned: (1) problems working parents have had in providing care for their young children; (2) day care initiatives and needs in California; (3) ways in which San Mateo County used its housing and community development…

  15. Effect of long-term intensity variations on pulsar searches and the pulsar luminosity function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnamohan, S.

    1981-01-01

    Long-term intensity data for five pulsars are used to obtain the probability density distribution of intensities for each pulsar, and it is found that they are described satisfactorily by chi-squared distributions. Based on these distributions, the number of new pulsars expected to be found on repeatedly searching the same region of the sky with the same sensitivity is given. Nearly 25 percent more new pulsars are expected to be found on the first repeat search. It is also shown that the luminosity function deduced from either a single survey or surveys with very different sensitivities is not affected by the omission of flux density variations in the calculation of selection effects. Finally, a method is proposed for deriving the luminosity function by combining the different searches of a given area on the basis of a probabilistic approach to the evaluation of selection effects.

  16. Constraining Gamma-Ray Pulsar Gap Models with a Simulated Pulsar Population

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierbattista, Marco; Grenier, I. A.; Harding, A. K.; Gonthier, P. L.

    2012-01-01

    With the large sample of young gamma-ray pulsars discovered by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT), population synthesis has become a powerful tool for comparing their collective properties with model predictions. We synthesised a pulsar population based on a radio emission model and four gamma-ray gap models (Polar Cap, Slot Gap, Outer Gap, and One Pole Caustic). Applying gamma-ray and radio visibility criteria, we normalise the simulation to the number of detected radio pulsars by a select group of ten radio surveys. The luminosity and the wide beams from the outer gaps can easily account for the number of Fermi detections in 2 years of observations. The wide slot-gap beam requires an increase by a factor of 10 of the predicted luminosity to produce a reasonable number of gamma-ray pulsars. Such large increases in the luminosity may be accommodated by implementing offset polar caps. The narrow polar-cap beams contribute at most only a handful of LAT pulsars. Using standard distributions in birth location and pulsar spin-down power (E), we skew the initial magnetic field and period distributions in a an attempt to account for the high E Fermi pulsars. While we compromise the agreement between simulated and detected distributions of radio pulsars, the simulations fail to reproduce the LAT findings: all models under-predict the number of LAT pulsars with high E , and they cannot explain the high probability of detecting both the radio and gamma-ray beams at high E. The beaming factor remains close to 1.0 over 4 decades in E evolution for the slot gap whereas it significantly decreases with increasing age for the outer gaps. The evolution of the enhanced slot-gap luminosity with E is compatible with the large dispersion of gamma-ray luminosity seen in the LAT data. The stronger evolution predicted for the outer gap, which is linked to the polar cap heating by the return current, is apparently not supported by the LAT data. The LAT sample of gamma-ray pulsars

  17. Probing Pulsar Emission on Short Timescales: Rotating Radio Transients, Cyclic Spectroscopy, and Single-Pulse Studies of Millisecond Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palliyaguru, Nipuni Tharaka

    by multi-path scattering, with a realistic signal-to-noise ratio, with consequent improvements in timing precision. We also demonstrate that we can isolate the scattering delays from other types of delays, and show that reductions in the timing residual root-mean-square of more than a factor of two are possible through removal of time-variable scattering delays. We also show that the effect of pulse-to-pulse "jitter'' is not a serious problem for PBF reconstruction, at least for jitter levels comparable to those observed in several bright pulsars.

  18. Axially symmetric equations for differential pulsar rotation with superfluid entrainment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonelli, M.; Pizzochero, P. M.

    2017-01-01

    In this article we present an analytical two-component model for pulsar rotational dynamics. Under the assumption of axial symmetry, implemented by a paraxial array of straight vortices that thread the entire neutron superfluid, we are able to project exactly the 3D hydrodynamical problem to a 1D cylindrical one. In the presence of density-dependent entrainment the superfluid rotation is non-columnar: we circumvent this by using an auxiliary dynamical variable directly related to the areal density of vortices. The main result is a system of differential equations that take consistently into account the stratified spherical structure of the star, the dynamical effects of non-uniform entrainment, the differential rotation of the superfluid component and its coupling to the normal crust. These equations represent a mathematical framework in which to test quantitatively the macroscopic consequences of the presence of a stable vortex array, a working hypothesis widely used in glitch models. Even without solving the equations explicitly, we are able to draw some general quantitative conclusions; in particular, we show that the reservoir of angular momentum (corresponding to recent values of the pinning forces) is enough to reproduce the largest glitch observed in the Vela pulsar, provided its mass is not too large.

  19. PULSAR BINARY BIRTHRATES WITH SPIN-OPENING ANGLE CORRELATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    O'Shaughnessy, Richard; Kim, Chunglee E-mail: ckim@astro.lu.s

    2010-05-20

    One ingredient in an empirical birthrate estimate for pulsar binaries is the fraction of sky subtended by the pulsar beam: the pulsar beaming fraction. This fraction depends on both the pulsar's opening angle and the misalignment angle between its spin and magnetic axes. The current estimates for pulsar binary birthrates are based on an average value of beaming fractions for only two pulsars, i.e., PSRs B1913+16 and B1534+12. In this paper, we revisit the observed pulsar binaries to examine the sensitivity of birthrate predictions to different assumptions regarding opening angle and alignment. Based on empirical estimates for the relative likelihood of different beam half-opening angles and misalignment angles between the pulsar rotation and magnetic axes, we calculate an effective beaming correction factor, f{sub b,eff}, whose reciprocal is equivalent to the average fraction of all randomly selected pulsars that point toward us. For those pulsars without any direct beam geometry constraints, we find that f{sub b,eff} is likely to be smaller than 6, a canonically adopted value when calculating birthrates of Galactic pulsar binaries. We calculate f{sub b,eff} for PSRs J0737-3039A and J1141-6545, applying the currently available constraints for their beam geometry. As in previous estimates of the posterior probability density function P(R) for pulsar binary birthrates R, PSRs J0737-3039A and J1141-6545 still significantly contribute to, if not dominate, the Galactic birthrate of tight pulsar-neutron star (NS) and pulsar-white dwarf (WD) binaries, respectively. Our median posterior present-day birthrate predictions for tight PSR-NS binaries, wide PSR-NS binaries, and tight PSR-WD binaries given a preferred pulsar population model and beaming geometry are 89 Myr{sup -1}, 0.5 Myr{sup -1}, and 34 Myr{sup -1}, respectively. For long-lived PSR-NS binaries, these estimates include a weak (x1.6) correction for slowly decaying star formation in the galactic disk. For pulsars

  20. Chandra Examines a Quadrillion-Volt Pulsar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-09-01

    The high-voltage environment of one of the most energetic and strongly magnetized pulsars known has been surveyed by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. A team of astronomers found a powerful jet of high-energy particles extending over a distance of 20 light years and bright arcs believed to be due to particles of matter and anti-matter generated by the pulsar. The team of US, Canadian, and Japanese scientists pointed Chandra at the rapidly spinning neutron star B1509-58, located 19,000 light years away in the constellation of Circinus, for over five hours. These results were announced at the "Two Years of Science with Chandra" symposium in Washington, DC. "Jets and arcs on this vast scale have never been seen in any other pulsar," said Bryan Gaensler of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory. "The spectacular images we have obtained of this source are letting us test theories as to how pulsars unleash so much energy." The features seen with Chandra give the scientists insight into the process by which voltages of more than 7000 trillion volts are created around rotating neutron stars (the dense remnants of supernova explosions) and how these extreme voltages affect their environment. B1509-58 is of particular interest because it has a much stronger magnetic field than the Crab Nebula pulsar, which exhibits similar features on a much smaller scale. The general picture emerging from these results is that high-energy particles of matter and antimatter are streaming away from the neutron star along its poles and near its equator. The particles leaving the poles produce the jets; astronomers speculate that only one side of the jet is apparent in B1509-58, indicating that this one side is beamed in our direction, while the other is rushing away. "Until this observation, no one knew for sure whether such tremendous voltages and energy outputs were a trademark of all pulsars, or if the Crab was an oddball," said Vicky Kaspi of McGill University in Montreal. "Now thanks

  1. Pulsar Timing Array Based Search for Supermassive Black Hole Binaries in the Square Kilometer Array Era.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Mohanty, Soumya D

    2017-04-14

    The advent of next generation radio telescope facilities, such as the Square Kilometer Array (SKA), will usher in an era where a pulsar timing array (PTA) based search for gravitational waves (GWs) will be able to use hundreds of well timed millisecond pulsars rather than the few dozens in existing PTAs. A realistic assessment of the performance of such an extremely large PTA must take into account the data analysis challenge posed by an exponential increase in the parameter space volume due to the large number of so-called pulsar phase parameters. We address this problem and present such an assessment for isolated supermassive black hole binary (SMBHB) searches using a SKA era PTA containing 10^{3} pulsars. We find that an all-sky search will be able to confidently detect nonevolving sources with a redshifted chirp mass of 10^{10}  M_{⊙} out to a redshift of about 28 (corresponding to a rest-frame chirp mass of 3.4×10^{8}  M_{⊙}). We discuss the important implications that the large distance reach of a SKA era PTA has on GW observations from optically identified SMBHB candidates. If no SMBHB detections occur, a highly unlikely scenario in the light of our results, the sky-averaged upper limit on strain amplitude will be improved by about 3 orders of magnitude over existing limits.

  2. Peculiarities in the Emission of Radio-Loud and Radio-Quiet Gamma Pulsars and Gamma-Quiet Radio Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malov, I.; Timirkeeva, M.

    2017-06-01

    Comparison of three pulsar samples — radio pulsars (R), gamma pulsars (γ) and pulsars with emission in both ranges (γ+R) — has been carried out. It was shown that magnetic fields at the light cylinder are two orders of magnitude higher in gamma pulsars (=3.60 - 3.95 G) when compared with radio pulsars (=1 .75 G). Losses of rotation energy in these objects differ much more (log dE/dt=35.37 -35.53 and 32.60, correspondingly). Gamma pulsars form two groups separated in space. The conclusion is made that generation of gamma emission takes place at the light cylinder and can be caused by the synchrotron mechanism.

  3. Generation of radio waves in pulsars.

    PubMed

    Smith, F G

    1970-12-05

    Pulsars generate radio waves by an unknown process which gives the highest volume emissivity known in astrophysics. The radiation forms a beam the width and polarization of which are independent of frequency. This article assembles the observational facts which any theory of emission must explain.

  4. Observations of the Eclipsing Millisecond Pulsar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bookbinder, Jay

    1990-12-01

    FRUCHTER et al. (1988a) HAVE RECENTLY DISCOVERED a 1.6 MSEC PULSAR (PSR 1957+20) IN A 9.2 HOUR ECLIPSING BINARY SYSTEM. THE UNUSUAL BEHAVIOR OF THE DISPERSION MEASURE AS A FUNCTION OF ORBITAL PHASE, AND THE DISAPPEARANCE OF THE PULSAR SIGNAL FOR 50 MINUTES DURING EACH ORBIT, IMPLIES THAT THE ECLIPSES ARE DUE TO A PULSAR-INDUCED WIND FLOWING OFF OF THE COMPANION. THE OPTICAL COUNTERPART IS A 21ST MAGNITUDE OBJECT WHICH VARIES IN INTENSITY OVER THE BINARY PERIOD; ACCURATE GROUND-BASED OBSERVATIONS ARE PREVENTED BY THE PROXIMITY (0.7") OF A 20TH MAGNITUDE K DWARF. WE PROPOSE TO OBSERVE THE OPTICAL COUNTERPART IN A TWO-PART STUDY. FIRST, THE WF/PC WILL PROVIDE ACCURATE MULTICOLOR PHOTOMETRY, ENABLING US TO DETERMINE UNCONTAMINATED MAGNITUDES AND COLORS BOTH AT MAXIMUM (ANTI-ECLIPSE) AS WELL AS AT MINIMUM (ECLIPSE). SECOND, WE PROPOSE TO OBSERVE THE EXPECTED UV LINE EMISSION WITH FOS, ALLOWING FOR AN INTIAL DETERMINATION OF THE TEMPERATURE AND DENSITY STRUCTURE AND ABUNDANCES OF THE WIND THAT IS BEING ABLATED FROM THE COMPANION. STUDY OF THIS UNIQUE SYSTEM HOLDS ENORMOUS POTENTIAL FOR THE UNDERSTANDING OF THE RADIATION FIELD OF A MILLISECOND PULSAR AND THE EVOLUTION OF LMXRBs AND MSPs IN GENERAL. WE EXPECT THESE OBSERVATIONS TO PLACE VERY SIGNIFICANT CONTRAINTS ON MODELS OF THIS UNIQUE OBJECT.

  5. Pulsar J1823-3021A

    NASA Image and Video Library

    This video shows the on and off state of gamma rays from pulsar J1823-3021A as seen by Fermi's Large Area Telescope (LAT). The object pulses 183.8 times a second and has a spin period of 5.44 milli...

  6. Recently Discovered Pulsars and Unidentified Egret Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, Diego F.; Butt, Yousaf M.; Camilo, Fernando

    2001-10-01

    We present a correlative study between all unidentified EGRET sources at low Galactic latitudes and the newly discovered pulsars in the released portion of the Parkes multibeam radio survey. We note 14 positional coincidences: eight of these are ``Vela-like'' pulsars with relatively small periods, small characteristic ages, and high spin-down luminosities. Three of these coincidences have been investigated by D'Amico et al. and Camilo et al. Among the others, we argue that PSR J1015-5719 may plausibly generate part of the high-energy radiation observed from 3EG J1014-5705. Three additional interesting cases are 3EG J1410-6147, either of PSRs J1412-6145 or J1413-6141 if the pulsars are at the estimated distance of the coincident SNR G312.4-0.4, and 3EG J1639-4702/PSR J1637-4642. The remaining positional coincidences between the EGRET sources and the newly discovered pulsars are almost certainly spurious.

  7. Pulsars at the Center of the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majid, Walid

    2016-07-01

    Over the past few years, a number of groups using data from NASA's space-borne Fermi LAT instrument have identified excess gamma-ray flux toward the inner 1º of the Galactic Center (GC), with an even larger significant excess within 0.2º degrees. At present there are two leading candidates for this excess: dark matter annihilation and a population of unresolved millisecond pulsars (MSPs). We are currently developing dedicated instrumentation to carry out a sensitive search for the pulsars in this region of the galaxy using a newly developed front end and receiver on a Deep Space Network large diameter antenna in Australia. In this presentation, we will provide an overview of the challenges encountered with pulsar searches at the GC region and a summary of previous and ongoing efforts to survey this region with radio telescopes. We will also provide preliminary results from our recent observations of the GC region at 2 and 8 GHz and will conclude with prospects for detection of perhaps hundreds of pulsars in this region with new generations of radio telescopes now under construction.

  8. Pulsars at the Center of the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majid, Walid A.; Prince, Thomas A.

    2016-06-01

    Over the past few years, a number of groups using data from NASA’s space-borne Fermi LAT instrument have identified excess gamma-ray flux toward the inner degree of the Galactic Center (GC), with an even larger significant excess within 0.2 degrees. At present there are two leading candidates for this excess: dark matter annihilation and a population of unresolved millisecond pulsars (MSPs). We are currently developing dedicated instrumentation to carry out a sensitive search for the pulsars in this region of the galaxy using a newly developed front end and receiver on a Deep Space Network large diameter antenna in Australia. In this presentation, we will provide an overview of the challenges encountered with pulsar searches at the GC region and a summary of previous and ongoing efforts to survey this region with radio telescopes. We will also provide preliminary results from our recent observations of the GC region at 2 and 8 GHz and will conclude with prospects for detection of perhaps hundreds of pulsars in this region with new generations of radio telescopes now under construction.

  9. Pulsars at the Center of the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majid, Walid A.

    2016-04-01

    Over the past few years, a number of groups using data from NASA’s space-borne Fermi LAT instrument have identified excess gamma-ray flux toward the inner few degrees of the Galactic Center (GC), with an even larger significant excess within 1 degree of this region. At present there are two leading candidates for this excess: dark matter annihilation and a population of unresolved millisecond pulsars (MSPs). We are currently developing dedicated instrumentation to carry out a sensitive search for the pulsars in this region of the galaxy using a newly developed front end and receiver on a Deep Space Network large diameter antenna in Australia. In this presentation, we will provide an overview of the challenges encountered with pulsar searches at the GC region and a summary of previous and ongoing efforts to survey this region with radio telescopes. We will also provide preliminary results from our recent observations of the GC region at 2 and 8 GHz and will conclude with prospects for detection of perhaps hundreds of pulsars in this region with new generations of radio telescopes now under construction.

  10. Multiwavelength Studies of Pulsar Wind Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slane, Patrick O.

    2010-03-01

    The extended nebulae formed as pulsar winds expand into their surroundings provide information about the composition of the winds, the injection history from the host pulsar, and the material into which the nebulae are expanding. Observations from across the electromagnetic spectrum provide constraints on the evolution of the nebulae, the density and composition of the surrounding ejecta, the geometry of the central engines, and the long-term fate of the energetic particles produced in these systems. High-energy observations, in particular, reveal the presence of jets and wind termination shocks, time-varying compact emission structures, shocked supernova ejecta, and emission from late-phase nebulae that are extremely faint in other bands. Here I provide a broad overview of the structure of pulsar wind nebulae, with specific examples from observations extending from the radio band to very high energy gamma-rays that demonstrate our ability to constrain the history and ultimate fate of the energy released in the spin-down of young pulsars.

  11. A HIGH BRAKING INDEX FOR A PULSAR

    SciTech Connect

    Archibald, R. F.; Ferdman, R. D.; Kaspi, V. M.; Tendulkar, S. P.; Gotthelf, E. V.; Guillot, S.; Harrison, F. A.; Keane, E. F.; Pivovaroff, M. J.; Stern, D.; Tomsick, J. A.

    2016-03-01

    We present a phase-coherent timing solution for PSR J1640–4631, a young 206 ms pulsar using X-ray timing observations taken with NuSTAR. Over this timing campaign, we have measured the braking index of PSR J1640–4631 to be n = 3.15 ± 0.03. Using a series of simulations, we argue that this unusually high braking index is not due to timing noise, but is intrinsic to the pulsar's spin-down. We cannot, however, rule out contamination due to an unseen glitch recovery, although the recovery timescale would have to be longer than most yet observed. If this braking index is eventually proven to be stable, it demonstrates that pulsar braking indices greater than three are allowed in nature; hence, other physical mechanisms such as mass or magnetic quadrupoles are important in pulsar spin-down. We also present a 3σ upper limit on the pulsed flux at 1.4 GHz of 0.018 mJy.

  12. Chandra Results on Pulsars and Plerions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, G. G.

    2000-10-01

    I will overview the results of imaging, spectral and timing analysis of isolated neutron stars observed in Chandra Cycle 1, including the young Vela pulsar and its X-ray plerion, the middle-aged pulsar B1055--52, the millisecond pulsar J0437--4715, the radio-silent isolated neutron stars in the PKS 1209--51/52, Puppis A and Cas A supernova remnants. Among the results are the fine spatial structure and spectrum of the Vela compact nebula, the multicomponent light curve and spectrum of the Vela pulsar, discovery of the 424 ms period of 1E 1207--52, the phase-dependent spectrum and energy-dependent pulse profile of PSR B1055-52, the lack of X-ray emission from the bow-shock nebula of PSR J0437--4715. The work was partially supported by SAO grants GO0-1012X, GO0-1126X and GO0-1131A.

  13. High-Energy Emission From Millisecond Pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice K.; Usov, Vladimir V.; Muslimov, Alex G.

    2004-01-01

    The X-ray and gamma-ray spectrum of rotation-powered millisecond pulsars is investigated in a model for acceleration and pair cascades on open field lines above the polar caps. Although these pulsars have low surface magnetic fields, their short periods allow them to have large magnetospheric potential drops, but the majority do not produce sufficient pairs to completely screen the accelerating electric field. In these sources, the primary and secondary electrons continue to accelerate to high altitude and their Lorentz factors are limited by curvature and synchrotron radiation reaction. The accelerating particles maintain high Lorentz factors and undergo cyclotron resonant absorption of radio emission, that produces and maintains a large pitch angle, resulting in a strong synchrotron component. The resulting spectra consist of several distinct components: curvature radiation from primary electrons dominating from 1 - 100 GeV, synchrotron radiation from primary and secondary electrons dominating up to about 100 MeV, and much weaker inverse-Compton radiation from primary electrons a t 0.1 - 1 TeV. We find that the relative size of these components depends on pulsar period, period derivative, and neutron star mass and radius with the level of the synchrotron component also depending sensitively on the radio emission properties. This model is successful in describing the observed X-ray and gamma-ray spectrum of PSR J0218+4232 as synchrotron radiation, peaking around 100 MeV and extending up to a turnover around several GeV. The predicted curvature radiation components from a number of millisecond pulsars, as well as the collective emission from the millisecond pulsars in globular clusters, should be detectable with AGILE and GLAST. We also discuss a hidden population of X-ray-quiet and radio-quiet millisecond pulsars which have evolved below the pair death line, some of which may be detectable by telescopes sensitive above 1 GeV. Subject headings: pulsars: general

  14. CHANDRA PULSAR SURVEY (ChaPS)

    SciTech Connect

    Kargaltsev, Oleg; Durant, Martin; Pavlov, George G.; Garmire, Gordon

    2012-08-01

    Taking advantage of the high sensitivity of the Chandra X-ray Observatory's (CXO) Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer, we have conducted a snapshot survey of pulsars previously undetected in X-rays. We detected 12 pulsars and established deep flux limits for 11 pulsars. Using these new results, we revisit the relationship between the X-ray luminosity, L{sup psr}{sub X}, and spin-down power, E-dot . We find that the obtained limits further increase the extremely large spread in the non-thermal X-ray efficiencies, {eta}{sup psr}{sub X} = L{sup psr}{sub X}/ E-dot , with some of them being now below 10{sup -5}. Such a spread cannot be explained by poorly known distances or by beaming of pulsar radiation. We also find evidence of a break in the dependence of L{sup psr}{sub X} on E-dot , such that pulsars become more X-ray efficient at E-dot {approx}<10{sup 34}-10{sup 35} erg s{sup -1}. We examine the relationship between the {gamma}-ray luminosity, L{sup psr}{sub {gamma}}, and E-dot , which exhibits a smaller scatter compared to that in X-rays. This confirms that the very large spread in the X-ray efficiencies cannot be explained just by the beaming because the {gamma}-ray emission is generally expected to be beamed stronger than the X-ray emission. Intriguingly, there is also an indication of a break in the L{sup psr}{sub {gamma}} ( E-dot ) dependence at E-dot {approx}10{sup 35} erg s{sup -1}, with lower- E-dot pulsars becoming less {gamma}-ray efficient. We also examine the distance-independent L{sup psr}{sub {gamma}}/L{sup psr}{sub X} ratio as a function of E-dot for a sample of {gamma}-ray pulsars observed by CXO and find that it peaks at E-dot {approx}10{sup 35} erg s{sup -1}, showing that the breaks cannot originate from poorly measured distances. We discuss the implications of our findings for existing models of magnetospheric emission and venues for further exploration.

  15. DETECTING MASSIVE GRAVITONS USING PULSAR TIMING ARRAYS

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kejia; Kramer, Michael; Jenet, Fredrick A.; Price, Richard H.; Wex, Norbert

    2010-10-20

    At the limit of weak static fields, general relativity becomes Newtonian gravity with a potential field that falls off as inverse distance rather than a theory of Yukawa-type fields with a finite range. General relativity also predicts that the speed of disturbances of its waves is c, the vacuum light speed, and is non-dispersive. For these reasons, the graviton, the boson for general relativity, can be considered to be massless. Massive gravitons, however, are features of some alternatives to general relativity. This has motivated experiments and observations that, so far, have been consistent with the zero-mass graviton of general relativity, but further tests will be valuable. A basis for new tests may be the high sensitivity gravitational wave (GW) experiments that are now being performed and the higher sensitivity experiments that are being planned. In these experiments, it should be feasible to detect low levels of dispersion due to non-zero graviton mass. One of the most promising techniques for such a detection may be the pulsar timing program that is sensitive to nano-Hertz GWs. Here, we present some details of such a detection scheme. The pulsar timing response to a GW background with the massive graviton is calculated, and the algorithm to detect the massive graviton is presented. We conclude that, with 90% probability, massless gravitons can be distinguished from gravitons heavier than 3 x 10{sup -22} eV (Compton wavelength {lambda}{sub g} = 4.1 x 10{sup 12} km), if bi-weekly observation of 60 pulsars is performed for 5 years with a pulsar rms timing accuracy of 100 ns. If 60 pulsars are observed for 10 years with the same accuracy, the detectable graviton mass is reduced to 5 x 10{sup -23} eV ({lambda}{sub g} = 2.5 x 10{sup 13} km); for 5 year observations of 100 or 300 pulsars, the sensitivity is respectively 2.5 x 10{sup -22} ({lambda}{sub g} = 5.0 x 10{sup 12} km) and 10{sup -22} eV ({lambda}{sub g} = 1.2 x 10{sup 13} km). Finally, a 10 year

  16. Avalanche Dynamics of Radio Pulsar Glitches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melatos, A.; Peralta, C.; Wyithe, J. S. B.

    2008-01-01

    We test statistically the hypothesis that radio pulsar glitches result from an avalanche process, in which angular momentum is transferred erratically from the flywheel-like superfluid in the star to the slowly decelerating, solid crust via spatially connected chains of local, impulsive, threshold-activated events, so that the system fluctuates around a self-organized critical state. Analysis of the glitch population (currently 285 events from 101 pulsars) demonstrates that the size distribution in individual pulsars is consistent with being scale invariant, as expected for an avalanche process. The measured power-law exponents fall in the range -0.13 <= a<= 2.4, with a ≈ 1.2 for the youngest pulsars. The waiting-time distribution is consistent with being exponential in seven out of nine pulsars where it can be measured reliably, after adjusting for observational limits on the minimum waiting time, as for a constant-rate Poisson process. PSR J0537-6910 and PSR J0835-4510 are the exceptions; their waiting-time distributions show evidence of quasi-periodicity. In each object, stationarity requires that the rate λ equal -epsilondot nu/langleΔνrangle, where dot nu is the angular acceleration of the crust, langle Δ ν rangle is the mean glitch size, and epsilondot nu is the relative angular acceleration of the crust and superfluid. Measurements yield epsilon <= 7 × 10-5 for PSR J0358+5413 and epsilon <= 1 (trivially) for the other eight objects, which have a < 2. There is no evidence that λ changes monotonically with spin-down age. The rate distribution itself is fitted reasonably well by an exponential for λ >= 0.25 yr-1, with langle λ rangle = 1.3+ 0.7-0.6 yr-1. For λ < 0.25 yr-1 the exact form is unknown; the exponential overestimates the number of glitching pulsars observed at low λ, where the limited total observation time exercises a selection bias. In order to reproduce the aggregate waiting-time distribution of the glitch population as a whole, the

  17. Multi-frequency Scatter Broadening Evolution of Pulsars. I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnakumar, M. A.; Joshi, Bhal Chandra; Manoharan, P. K.

    2017-09-01

    We present multi-wavelength scatter broadening observations of 47 pulsars made with the Giant Metre-wave Radio Telescope (GMRT), Ooty Radio Telescope (ORT), and Long Wavelength Array (LWA). The GMRT observations were made in the phased array mode at 148, 234, and 610 MHz and the ORT observations at 327 MHz. The LWA data sets were obtained from the LWA pulsar data archive. The broadening of each pulsar as a function of observing frequency provides the frequency scaling index, α. The estimations of α have been obtained for 39 pulsars and include entirely new estimates for 31 pulsars. This study increases the total sample of pulsars available with α estimates by ∼50%. The overall distribution of α with the dispersion measure (DM) of the pulsar shows interesting variations, which are consistent with earlier studies. However, for a given value of DM, a range of α values are observed, indicating the characteristic turbulence along each line of sight. For each pulsar, the estimated level of turbulence, {C}{n{{e}}}2, has also been compared with α and DM. Additionally, we compare the distribution of α with the theoretically predicted model to infer the general characteristics of the ionized interstellar medium. Nearly 65% of the pulsars show a flatter index (i.e., α < 4.4) than that expected from the Kolmogorov turbulence model. Moreover, the group of pulsars with flatter indices is typically associated with an enhanced value of {C}{n{{e}}}2 compared to those with steeper indices.

  18. Multi-wavelength analysis of young pulsars: an overview.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maritz, J. M.; Meintjes, P. J.; Buchner, S. J.

    Young pulsars emit a broad spectrum of radiation that range from radio to gamma ray energies. These pulsars are considered as rotation powered pulsars that spin rapidly and are strongly magnetized. Following the discovery of pulsars nearly four decades ago, the population of known pulsars already reached a number of roughly two thousand. This known population of pulsars includes both millisecond and normal pulsars that were discovered by several telescopes. We analyze both HartRAO radio data and Fermi gamma ray data of the Vela pulsar. We also explore a proposed method of probing the electron column density of the instellar gas through analyzing the gamma ray diffuse data associated with the Fermi two-year observation. This paper serves as an overview of gamma ray and radio timing analysis of bright young pulsars with respect to the use of open source timing analysis tools (Tempo2, Psrchive, Enrico and the Fermi tools). We reason that the multi-wavelength picture of pulsars can help clarify questions regarding the origin of pulsed radiation emission mechanisms in several energy bands, but that radio observations will prove adequate for timing noise analysis, given the accurate and long radio data sets. The process of identifying gravitational waves in timing data, rests on gaining a deeper insight into the timing noise phenomena.

  19. OSCILLATION-DRIVEN MAGNETOSPHERIC ACTIVITY IN PULSARS

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Meng-Xiang; Xu, Ren-Xin; Zhang, Bing E-mail: r.x.xu@pku.edu.cn

    2015-02-01

    We study the magnetospheric activity in the polar cap region of pulsars under stellar oscillations. The toroidal oscillation of the star propagates into the magnetosphere, which provides additional voltage due to unipolar induction, changes Goldreich-Julian charge density from the traditional value due to rotation, and hence influences particle acceleration. We present a general solution of the effect of oscillations within the framework of the inner vacuum gap model and consider three different inner gap modes controlled by curvature radiation, inverse Compton scattering, and two-photon annihilation, respectively. With different pulsar parameters and oscillation amplitudes, one of three modes would play a dominant role in defining the gap properties. When the amplitude of oscillation exceeds a critical value, mode changing occurs. Oscillations also lead to a change of the size of the polar cap. As applications, we show the inner gap properties under oscillations in both normal pulsars and anomalous X-ray pulsars/soft gamma-ray repeaters (AXPs/SGRs). We interpret the onset of radio emission after glitches/flares in AXPs/SGRs as due to oscillation-driven magnetic activities in these objects, within the framework of both the magnetar model and the solid quark star model. Within the magnetar model, radio activation may be caused by the enlargement of the effective polar cap angle and the radio emission beam due to oscillation, whereas within the solid quark star angle, it may be caused by activation of the pulsar inner gap from below the radio emission death line due to an oscillation-induced voltage enhancement. The model can also explain the glitch-induced radio profile change observed in PSR J1119–6127.

  20. Properties and geometry of radio pulsar emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smits, Johannes Martinus

    2006-10-01

    This thesis consists of a number of studies on the radio emission of pulsars. The central topics are polarisation and multi frequency observations, which both lead to important information on the geometry of the emission. The first chapter introduces different aspects of pulsars that are related to the research that has been done in this thesis. In particular it deals with different aspects concerning the geometry of pulsar emission. Chapter 2 is about the nature of the radio emission. It shows the result of an attempt to confirm and expand on work that has been published by Jenet et al. (2001) on the detection of coherence in pulsar radiation. From an analysis of high time resolution observations, we found that the detection of coherence is consistent with the effects of interstellar scintillation. In chapter 3 a study is carried out on the orthogonal polarisation mode behaviour as a function of frequency of 18 pulsars. By making the assumption that the radiation consists of two 100% polarised completely orthogonal superposed modes, both modes could be separated In chapter 4 PSR B0031-07 is studied at two frequencies using two observations that were carried out simultaneously. It is shown that from the three known drift modes, only one drift mode is seen at high frequency. Based on this result we suggest a geometrical model in which different modes are emitted in concentric rings around the magnetic axis, with each mode having a different radius. The fifth chapter follows the suggestions made in chapter 4 to create a geometrical model of PSR B0031-07 for two of the drift modes. The results can be used to limit the possible geometries of PSR B0031-07. The final chapter consists of documentation of software that was written in C and utilised for this thesis for handling and analysing data files in the EPN format

  1. PEACE: pulsar evaluation algorithm for candidate extraction - a software package for post-analysis processing of pulsar survey candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, K. J.; Stovall, K.; Jenet, F. A.; Martinez, J.; Dartez, L. P.; Mata, A.; Lunsford, G.; Cohen, S.; Biwer, C. M.; Rohr, M.; Flanigan, J.; Walker, A.; Banaszak, S.; Allen, B.; Barr, E. D.; Bhat, N. D. R.; Bogdanov, S.; Brazier, A.; Camilo, F.; Champion, D. J.; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J.; Crawford, F.; Deneva, J.; Desvignes, G.; Ferdman, R. D.; Freire, P.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Karuppusamy, R.; Kaspi, V. M.; Knispel, B.; Kramer, M.; Lazarus, P.; Lynch, R.; Lyne, A.; McLaughlin, M.; Ransom, S.; Scholz, P.; Siemens, X.; Spitler, L.; Stairs, I.; Tan, M.; van Leeuwen, J.; Zhu, W. W.

    2013-07-01

    Modern radio pulsar surveys produce a large volume of prospective candidates, the majority of which are polluted by human-created radio frequency interference or other forms of noise. Typically, large numbers of candidates need to be visually inspected in order to determine if they are real pulsars. This process can be labour intensive. In this paper, we introduce an algorithm called Pulsar Evaluation Algorithm for Candidate Extraction (PEACE) which improves the efficiency of identifying pulsar signals. The algorithm ranks the candidates based on a score function. Unlike popular machine-learning-based algorithms, no prior training data sets are required. This algorithm has been applied to data from several large-scale radio pulsar surveys. Using the human-based ranking results generated by students in the Arecibo Remote Command Center programme, the statistical performance of PEACE was evaluated. It was found that PEACE ranked 68 per cent of the student-identified pulsars within the top 0.17 per cent of sorted candidates, 95 per cent within the top 0.34 per cent and 100 per cent within the top 3.7 per cent. This clearly demonstrates that PEACE significantly increases the pulsar identification rate by a factor of about 50 to 1000. To date, PEACE has been directly responsible for the discovery of 47 new pulsars, 5 of which are millisecond pulsars that may be useful for pulsar timing based gravitational-wave detection projects.

  2. TINY HICCUPS TO TITANIC EXPLOSIONS: Tackling Transients in Anomalous X-ray Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaspi, Victoria

    2011-09-01

    The past decade has seen major progress in neutron star astrophysics, with the discovery of magnetars in general, and the recognition that the Anomalous X-ray Pulsars (AXPs) fall in this class. AXPs have recently revealed surprising and dramatic variability behavior, which theorists have begun to show are highly constraining of physical models of magnetars, including their crusts, atmospheres, coronae and magnetospheres. In this proposal, we request Chandra/ACIS-S Target-of-Opportunity observations of one major Anomalous X-ray Pulsar (AXP) outburst in AO13, in order to study in detail the evolution of the spectrum, pulsed fraction and pulse profile, for quantitative confrontation with recently developed models for the structure and electrodynamics of magnetars.

  3. TINY HICCUPS TO TITANIC EXPLOSIONS: Tackling Transients in Anomalous X-ray Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaspi, Victoria

    2008-09-01

    The past decade has seen major progress in neutron star astrophysics, with the discovery of magnetars in general, and the recognition that the Anomalous X-ray Pulsars (AXPs) fall in this class. AXPs have recently revealed surprising and dramatic variability behavior, which theorists have begun to show are highly constraining of physical models of magnetars, including their crusts, atmospheres, coronae and magnetospheres. In this proposal, we request Chandra/ACIS-S Target-of-Opportunity observations of one major Anomalous X-ray Pulsar (AXP) outburst in A10, in order to study in detail the evolution of the spectrum, pulsed fraction and pulse profile, for quantitative confrontation with recently developed models for the structure and electrodynamics of magnetars.

  4. TINY HICCUPS TO TITANIC EXPLOSIONS: Tackling Transients in Anomalous X-ray Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaspi, Victoria

    2009-09-01

    The past decade has seen major progress in neutron star astrophysics, with the discovery of magnetars in general, and the recognition that the Anomalous X-ray Pulsars (AXPs) fall in this class. AXPs have recently revealed surprising and dramatic variability behavior, which theorists have begun to show are highly constraining of physical models of magnetars, including their crusts, atmospheres, coronae and magnetospheres. In this proposal, we request Chandra/ACIS-S Target-of-Opportunity observations of one major Anomalous X-ray Pulsar (AXP) outburst in A11, in order to study in detail the evolution of the spectrum, pulsed fraction and pulse profile, for quantitative confrontation with recently developed models for the structure and electrodynamics of magnetars.

  5. TINY HICCUPS TO TITANIC EXPLOSIONS: Tackling Transients in Anomalous X-ray Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaspi, Victoria

    2010-09-01

    The past decade has seen major progress in neutron star astrophysics, with the discovery of magnetars in general, and the recognition that the Anomalous X-ray Pulsars (AXPs) fall in this class. AXPs have recently revealed surprising and dramatic variability behavior, which theorists have begun to show are highly constraining of physical models of magnetars, including their crusts, atmospheres, coronae and magnetospheres. In this proposal, we request Chandra/ACIS-S Target-of-Opportunity observations of one major Anomalous X-ray Pulsar (AXP) outburst in AO12, in order to study in detail the evolution of the spectrum, pulsed fraction and pulse profile, for quantitative confrontation with recently developed models for the structure and electrodynamics of magnetars.

  6. Einstein@Home Finds an Elusive Pulsar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-08-01

    Since the release of the second Fermi-LAT catalog in 2012, astronomers have been hunting for 3FGL J1906.6+0720, a gamma-ray source whose association couldn't be identified. Now, personal-computer time volunteered through the Einstein@Home project has resulted in the discovery of a pulsar that has been hiding from observers for years. A Blind Search: Identifying sources detected by Fermi-LAT can be tricky: the instrument's sky resolution is limited, so the position of the source can be hard to pinpoint. The gamma-ray source 3FGL J1906.6+0720 appeared in both the second and third Fermi-LAT source catalogs, but even after years of searching, no associated radio or X-ray source had been found. A team of researchers, led by Colin Clark of the Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics, suspected that the source might be a gamma-ray pulsar. To confirm this, however, they needed to detect pulsed emission — something inherently difficult given the low photon count and the uncertain position of the source. The team conducted a blind search for pulsations coming from the general direction of the gamma-ray source. Two things were needed for this search: clever data analysis and a lot of computing power. The data analysis algorithm was designed to be adaptive: it searched a 4-dimensional parameter space that included a safety margin, allowing the algorithm to wander if the source was at the edge of the parameter space. The computing power was contributed by tens of thousands of personal computers volunteered by participants in the Einstein@Home project, making much shorter work out of a search that would have required dozens of years on a single laptop. The sky region around the newly discovered pulsar. The dotted ellipse shows the 3FGL catalog 95% confidence region for the source. The data analysis algorithm was designed to search an area 50% larger (given by the dashed ellipse), but it was allowed to “walk away” within the gray shaded region if the source seemed to

  7. A NON-RADIAL OSCILLATION MODEL FOR PULSAR STATE SWITCHING

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, R.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Thompson, S. E.

    2011-02-10

    Pulsars are unique astrophysical laboratories because of their clock-like timing precision, providing new ways to test general relativity and detect gravitational waves. One impediment to high-precision pulsar timing experiments is timing noise. Recently, Lyne et al. showed that the timing noise in a number of pulsars is due to quasi-periodic fluctuations in the pulsars' spin-down rates and that some of the pulsars have associated changes in pulse profile shapes. Here we show that a non-radial oscillation model based on asteroseismological theory can explain these quasi-periodic fluctuations. Application of this model to neutron stars will increase our knowledge of neutron star emission and neutron star interiors and may improve pulsar timing precision.

  8. The Multipupil Fiber Spectroscopy of the Crab-pulsar Neighbourhood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zharikov, S.; Shibanov, Y.; Koptsevich, A.; Afanas'ev, V.; Dodonov, S.

    2001-03-01

    We present the spatially resolved optical spectroscopy of the 12 arcsec × 24 arcsec Crab pulsar neighbourhood in the range λ λ 4600 - 5700 Å made with the Multipupil Fiber Spectrograph at the 6 m telescope of the SAO RAS. The spectra exhibit blue- and red-shifted strong [O III] and weaker Hβ and He II emission lines with the shifts and intensities varying with the position in the field. They hint the presence of a cone-like rotating structure centered at the pulsar position and oriented along the symmetry axis of the compact, torus-like pulsar nebula seen in optical continuum and soft X-rays. The kinematic structure is most likely associated with the pulsar nebula. If so, the compact nebular rotates counter-clockwise with respect to its symmetry axis, or the pulsar spin axis, and the estimated rotational velocity within cylindrical radii of several thousand AU from the pulsar is ~ 2000-3000 km/s.

  9. High Magnetic Field Pulsars and Magnetars: A Unified Picture.

    PubMed

    Zhang; Harding

    2000-05-20

    We propose a unified picture of high magnetic field radio pulsars and magnetars by arguing that they are all rotating high-field neutron stars but that their magnetic axes have different orientations with respect to their rotation axes. In strong magnetic fields where photon splitting suppresses pair creation near the surface, the high-field pulsars can have active inner accelerators while the anomalous X-ray pulsars cannot. This can account for the very different observed emission characteristics of the anomalous X-ray pulsar 1E 2259+586 and the high-field radio pulsar PSR J1814-1744. A predicted consequence of this picture is that radio pulsars having surface magnetic fields greater than about 2x1014 G should not exist.

  10. Long-Term Timing of Globular Cluster Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roi Smith, Sergio; Lynch, Ryan S.

    2017-01-01

    Pulsar timing is a powerful astrophysical tool that allows us to study both pulsars and their environment. Timing models provide information about the pulsar itself, including mass, position, and orbital parameters for pulsars in binary systems. Timing models also provide information about the pulsar’s neighborhood and about the interstellar medium (ISM) between the pulsar and the Earth. We present the results of timing two millisecond globular cluster pulsars over five years, as well as steps involved in preparing the data for use in the timing model. Data was obtained using the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) observing at 1.5 GHz between 2011 and 2015. Here, a description of the data processing procedure is given, and timing results including dispersion measure and higher order rotational period derivatives are discussed.

  11. Candidates for Pulsars with Gigahertz-Peaked Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarczewski, L.; Kijak, J.; Lewandowski, W.

    2012-12-01

    Kijak et al. (2011) provided a definite evidence for a new type of pulsar radio spectra. These spectra show the maximum flux above 1 GHz and their energy decreases below 1 GHz, producing a positive spectral index at lower frequencies. They called these objects the gigahertz-peaked spectra (GPS) pulsars. We study a spectrum of radio pulsars and try to find pulsars with the turn-over effect at high frequencies. We created a database of candidates for pulsars with GPS effect using Maron et al. (2000) and ATNF database (Manchester et al. 2005), and also using recent papers where flux measurements were published (for example Bates et al. 2011). As a result a set of 22 candidates for pulsars with GPS was found.

  12. A periodically active pulsar giving insight into magnetospheric physics.

    PubMed

    Kramer, M; Lyne, A G; O'Brien, J T; Jordan, C A; Lorimer, D R

    2006-04-28

    PSR B1931+24 (J1933+2421) behaves as an ordinary isolated radio pulsar during active phases that are 5 to 10 days long. However, when the radio emission ceases, it switches off in less than 10 seconds and remains undetectable for the next 25 to 35 days, then switches on again. This pattern repeats quasi-periodically. The origin of this behavior is unclear. Even more remarkably, the pulsar rotation slows down 50% faster when it is on than when it is off. This indicates a massive increase in magnetospheric currents when the pulsar switches on, proving that pulsar wind plays a substantial role in pulsar spin-down. This allows us, for the first time, to estimate the magnetospheric currents in a pulsar magnetosphere during the occurrence of radio emission.

  13. Switched magnetospheric regulation of pulsar spin-down.

    PubMed

    Lyne, Andrew; Hobbs, George; Kramer, Michael; Stairs, Ingrid; Stappers, Ben

    2010-07-23

    Pulsars are famed for their rotational clocklike stability and their highly repeatable pulse shapes. However, it has long been known that there are unexplained deviations (often termed timing noise) from the rate at which we predict these clocks should run. We show that timing behavior often results from two different spin-down rates. Pulsars switch abruptly between these states, often quasi-periodically, leading to the observed spin-down patterns. We show that for six pulsars the timing noise is correlated with changes in the pulse shape. Many pulsar phenomena, including mode changing, nulling, intermittency, pulse-shape variability, and timing noise, are therefore linked and are caused by changes in the pulsar's magnetosphere. We consider the possibility that high-precision monitoring of pulse profiles could lead to the formation of highly stable pulsar clocks.

  14. Pulsar braking and the P-dot{P} diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Simon; Karastergiou, A.

    2017-05-01

    The location of radio pulsars in the period-period derivative (P-\\dot{P}) plane has been a key diagnostic tool since the early days of pulsar astronomy. Of particular importance is how pulsars evolve through the P-\\dot{P} diagram with time. Here we show that the decay of the inclination angle (\\dot{α }) between the magnetic and rotation axes plays a critical role. In particular, \\dot{α } strongly impacts on the braking torque, an effect that has been largely ignored in previous work. We carry out simulations that include a negative \\dot{α } term, and show that it is possible to reproduce the observational P-\\dot{P} diagram without the need for either pulsars with long birth periods or magnetic field decay. Our best model indicates a birth rate of one radio pulsar per century and a total Galactic population of ˜20 000 pulsars beaming towards Earth.

  15. Vela-like Pulsars: A Bridge Between Young and Old

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finley, John P.

    1997-01-01

    This grant was in support of a guest observation using the ASCA satellite of the young, spin-powered pulsar PSR B1706-44. The pulsar is interesting for several reasons: 1) it is young and shares many similar characteristics with the Vela pulsar, 2) it is one of a few pulsars which has been detected by the EGRET detector aboard the CGRO satellite, and 3) it is one of the confirmed sources of TeV gamma-rays discovered with ground based telescopes. The goals of the observation were to search for pulsations in the X-ray domain and to study the near stellar environment to determine if the pulsar is embedded within a compact nebula as in the case of the Vela pulsar.

  16. Binary and Millisecond Pulsars at the New Millennium.

    PubMed

    Lorimer, Duncan R

    2001-01-01

    We review the properties and applications of binary and millisecond pulsars. Our knowledge of these exciting objects has greatly increased in recent years, mainly due to successful surveys which have brought the known pulsar population to over 1300. There are now 56 binary and millisecond pulsars in the Galactic disk and a further 47 in globular clusters. This review is concerned primarily with the results and spin-offs from these surveys which are of particular interest to the relativity community.

  17. Pulsar Polar Cap and Slot Gap Models: Confronting Fermi Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice K.

    2012-01-01

    Rotation-powered pulsars are excellent laboratories for studying particle acceleration as well as fundamental physics of strong gravity, strong magnetic fields and relativity. I will review acceleration and gamma-ray emission from the pulsar polar cap and slot gap. Predictions of these models can be tested with the data set on pulsars collected by the Large Area Telescope on the Fermi Gamma-Ray Telescope over the last four years, using both detailed light curve fitting and population synthesis.

  18. On magnetic pair production above fast pulsar polar caps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    An, S.

    1985-01-01

    Magnetic pair production is one of high-energy electromagnetic conversion processes important to the development of pair-photon cascades in pulsars. On the basis of current polar cap models, the properties of magnetic pair production in fast pulsars are discussed. Suppose there is a roughly dipole magnetic field at the stellar surface, the author estimate the effects on non-zero curvature of magnetic field lines upon curvature radiation from primary particles and pair production rate near the surface of pulsars.

  19. Limits on neutron Lorentz violation from pulsar timing

    SciTech Connect

    Altschul, Brett

    2007-01-15

    Pulsars are the most accurate naturally occurring clocks, and data about them can be used to set bounds on neutron-sector Lorentz violations. If SO(3) rotation symmetry is completely broken for neutrons, then pulsars' rotation speeds will vary periodically. Pulsar timing data limits the relevant Lorentz-violating coefficients to be smaller than 1.7x10{sup -8} at at least 90% confidence.

  20. Timing analysis for 20 millisecond pulsars in the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reardon, D. J.; Hobbs, G.; Coles, W.; Levin, Y.; Keith, M. J.; Bailes, M.; Bhat, N. D. R.; Burke-Spolaor, S.; Dai, S.; Kerr, M.; Lasky, P. D.; Manchester, R. N.; Osłowski, S.; Ravi, V.; Shannon, R. M.; van Straten, W.; Toomey, L.; Wang, J.; Wen, L.; You, X. P.; Zhu, X.-J.

    2016-01-01

    We present timing models for 20 millisecond pulsars in the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array. The precision of the parameter measurements in these models has been improved over earlier results by using longer data sets and modelling the non-stationary noise. We describe a new noise modelling procedure and demonstrate its effectiveness using simulated data. Our methodology includes the addition of annual dispersion measure (DM) variations to the timing models of some pulsars. We present the first significant parallax measurements for PSRs J1024-0719, J1045-4509, J1600-3053, J1603-7202, and J1730-2304, as well as the first significant measurements of some post-Keplerian orbital parameters in six binary pulsars, caused by kinematic effects. Improved Shapiro delay measurements have resulted in much improved pulsar mass measurements, particularly for PSRs J0437-4715 and J1909-3744 with Mp = 1.44 ± 0.07 and 1.47 ± 0.03 M⊙, respectively. The improved orbital period-derivative measurement for PSR J0437-4715 results in a derived distance measurement at the 0.16 per cent level of precision, D = 156.79 ± 0.25 pc, one of the most fractionally precise distance measurements of any star to date.

  1. Progress on The GEMS (Gravity Electro-Magnetism-Strong) Theory of Field Unification and Its Application to Space Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Brandenburg, J. E.

    2008-01-21

    Progress on the GEMS (Gravity Electro-Magnetism-Strong), theory is presented as well as its application to space problems. The GEMS theory is now validated through the Standard Model of physics. Derivation of the value of the Gravitation constant based on the observed variation of {alpha} with energy: results in the formula G congruent with ({Dirac_h}/2{pi})c/M{sub {eta}}{sub c}{sup 2} exp(-1/(1.61{alpha})), where {alpha} is the fine structure constant,({Dirac_h}/2{pi}), is Planck's constant, c, is the speed of light, and M{sub {eta}}{sub c} is the mass of the {eta}{sub cc} Charmonium meson that is shown to be identical to that derived from the GEM postulates. Covariant formulation of the GEM theory is now possible through definition of the spacetime metric tensor as a portion of the EM stress tensor normalized by its own trace: g{sub ab} = 4(F{sup c}{sub a}F{sub cb})/(F{sup ab}F{sub ab}), it is found that this results in a massless ground state vacuum and a Newtonian gravitation potential {phi} = 1/2 E{sup 2}/B{sup 2}. It is also found that a Lorentz or flat-space metric is recovered in the limit of a full spectrum ZPF.

  2. Dating of sediments from four Swiss prealpine lakes with (210)Pb determined by gamma-spectrometry: progress and problems.

    PubMed

    Putyrskaya, V; Klemt, E; Röllin, S; Astner, M; Sahli, H

    2015-07-01

    In this paper the most important problems in dating lake sediments with unsupported (210)Pb are summarized and the progress in gamma-spectrometry of the unsupported (210)Pb is discussed. The main topics of these studies concern sediment samples preparation for gamma-spectrometry, measurement techniques and data analysis, as well as understanding of accumulation and sedimentation processes in lakes. The vertical distributions of artificial ((137)Cs, (241)Am, (239)Pu) and natural radionuclides ((40)K, (210,214)Pb, (214)Bi) as well as stable trace elements (Fe, Mn, Pb) in sediment cores from four Swiss lakes were used as examples for the interpretation, inter-comparison and validation of depth-age relations established by three (210)Pb-based models (CF-CSR, CRS and SIT). The identification of turbidite layers and the influence of the turbidity flows on the accuracy of sediment dating is demonstrated. Time-dependent mass sedimentation rates in lakes Brienz, Thun, Biel and Lucerne are discussed and compared with published data.

  3. [Research progress on standards of commodity classes of Chinese materia medica and discussion on several key problems].

    PubMed

    Yang, Guang; Zeng, Yan; Guo, Lan-Ping; Huang, Lu-Qi; Jin, Yan; Zheng, Yu-Guang; Wang, Yong-Yan

    2014-05-01

    Standards of commodity classes of Chinese materia medica is an important way to solve the "Lemons Problem" of traditional Chinese medicine market. Standards of commodity classes are also helpful to rebuild market mechanisms for "high price for good quality". The previous edition of commodity classes standards of Chinese materia medica was made 30 years ago. It is no longer adapted to the market demand. This article researched progress on standards of commodity classes of Chinese materia medica. It considered that biological activity is a better choice than chemical constituents for standards of commodity classes of Chinese materia medica. It is also considered that the key point to set standards of commodity classes is finding the influencing factors between "good quality" and "bad quality". The article also discussed the range of commodity classes of Chinese materia medica, and how to coordinate standards of pharmacopoeia and commodity classes. According to different demands, diversiform standards can be used in commodity classes of Chinese materia medica, but efficacy is considered the most important index of commodity standard. Decoction pieces can be included in standards of commodity classes of Chinese materia medica. The authors also formulated the standards of commodity classes of Notoginseng Radix as an example, and hope this study can make a positive and promotion effect on traditional Chinese medicine market related research.

  4. Pulsar gamma-rays: Spectra luminosities and efficiencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, A. K.

    1980-01-01

    The general characteristics of pulsar gamma ray spectra are presented for a model where the gamma rays are produced by curvature radiation from energetic particles above the polar cap and attenuated by pair production. The shape of the spectrum is found to depend on pulsar period, magnetic field strength, and primary particle energy. By a comparison of numerically calculated spectra with the observed spectra of the Crab and Vela pulsars, it is determined that primary particles must be accelerated to energies of about 3 x 10 to the 7th power mc sq. A genaral formula for pulsar gamma ray luminosity is determined and is found to depend on period and field strength.

  5. MULTIWAVELENGTH CONSTRAINTS ON PULSAR POPULATIONS IN THE GALACTIC CENTER

    SciTech Connect

    Wharton, R. S.; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J. M.; Deneva, J. S.; Lazio, T. J. W.

    2012-07-10

    The detection of radio pulsars within the central few parsecs of the Galaxy would provide a unique probe of the gravitational and magneto-ionic environments in the Galactic center (GC) and, if close enough to Sgr A*, precise tests of general relativity in the strong-field regime. While it is difficult to find pulsars at radio wavelengths because of interstellar scattering, the payoff from detailed timing of pulsars in the GC warrants a concerted effort. To motivate pulsar surveys and help define search parameters for them, we constrain the pulsar number and spatial distribution using a wide range of multiwavelength measurements. These include the five known radio pulsars within 15' of Sgr A*, non-detections in high-frequency pulsar surveys of the central parsec, radio and gamma-ray measurements of diffuse emission, a catalog of radio point sources from an imaging survey, infrared observations of massive star populations in the central few parsecs, candidate pulsar wind nebulae in the inner 20 pc, and estimates of the core-collapse supernova rate based on X-ray measurements. We find that under current observational constraints, the inner parsec of the Galaxy could harbor as many as {approx}10{sup 3} active radio pulsars that are beamed toward Earth. Such a large population would distort the low-frequency measurements of both the intrinsic spectrum of Sgr A* and the free-free absorption along the line of sight of Sgr A*.

  6. Acoustooptical pulsar processor: application of frequency scale calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esepkina, Nelli A.; Lavrov, Aleksandr P.; Molodyakov, Sergey A.; Oreshko, Vasiliy V.

    2007-02-01

    The acoustooptical processor (AOP) is based on an acoustooptical spectrum analyzer with a CCD photodetector operating in a special pipeline operational mode (shift-and-add mode), which allows spectral components of the input signal to be added with a controlled time delay immediately in the CCD photodetector. The proposed AOP was successfully used on an RT-64 radio telescope (Kalyazin Radio Astronomy Observatory FIAN) for the observation of pulsars at 1.4 GHz in a bandwidth of 45 MHz. The frequency scale calibration allows increasing accuracy measurement of time of arrival radioemission pulsar. Experimental results of frequency scale calibration and pulsars profiles for a pulsar PSR 1937+21 are submitted.

  7. The Effects of Geometrical Factors on Pulsar Rotation Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Liang; Wang, Guang-li; Guo, Li

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents a detailed investigation of the effects of geometrical factors on pulsar rotation parameters, for examples the Earth rotation parameter, precession-nutation model, pulsar velocity and acceleration relative to the solar system barycenter (SSB), and planetary ephemeris error. The relations of these factors with the pulsar rotation parameters are derived, and the magnitudes of the effects of these factors are estimated, assuming that pulsars have typical parameter values. The effects of the Earth rotation parameter and precession-nutation model are negligible at the current accuracy level of observation. As the effect of the planetary ephemeris error on the pulsar rotation parameters is much less than the rotation parameters themselves, so it is also negligible. The effect of pulsar radial velocity relative to the SSB is 4 orders of magnitude less than the pulsar period. However, the effects of the pulsar transverse velocity and radial acceleration on the period derivative are not ignorable, especially for millisecond pulsars, where they may dominate the observed value of period derivative.

  8. Pulsar timing for the Fermi gamma-ray space telescope

    DOE PAGES

    Smith, D. A.; Guillemot, L.; Camilo, F.; ...

    2008-10-27

    Here, we describe a comprehensive pulsar monitoring campaign for the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (formerly GLAST). The detection and study of pulsars in gamma rays give insights into the populations of neutron stars and supernova rates in the Galaxy, into particle acceleration mechanisms in neutron star magnetospheres, and into the “engines” driving pulsar wind nebulae. LAT's unprecedented sensitivity between 20 MeV and 300 GeV together with its 2.4 sr field-of-view makes detection of many gamma-ray pulsars likely, justifying the monitoring of over two hundred pulsars with large spin-down powers. To search for gamma-ray pulsationsmore » from most of these pulsars requires a set of phase-connected timing solutions spanning a year or more to properly align the sparse photon arrival times. We describe the choice of pulsars and the instruments involved in the campaign. Attention is paid to verifications of the LAT pulsar software, using for example giant radio pulses from the Crab and from PSR B1937+21 recorded at Nançay, and using X-ray data on PSR J0218+4232 from XMM-Newton. We demonstrate accuracy of the pulsar phase calculations at the microsecond level.« less

  9. Observing peculiar γ-ray pulsars with AGILE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilia, M.; Pellizzoni, A.

    2011-08-01

    The AGILE γ-ray satellite provides large sky exposure levels (>=109 cm2 s per year on the Galactic Plane) with sensitivity peaking at E ~100 MeV where the bulk of pulsar energy output is typically released. Its ~1 μs absolute time tagging capability makes it perfectly suited for the study of γ-ray pulsars. AGILE collected a large number of γ-ray photons from EGRET pulsars (>=40,000 pulsed counts for Vela) in two years of observations unveiling new interesting features at sub-millisecond level in the pulsars' high-energy light-curves, γ-ray emission from pulsar glitches and Pulsar Wind Nebulae. AGILE detected about 20 nearby and energetic pulsars with good confidence through timing and/or spatial analysis. Among the newcomers we find pulsars with very high rotational energy losses, such as the remarkable PSR B1509-58 with a magnetic field in excess of 1013 Gauss, and PSR J2229+6114 providing a reliable identification for the previously unidentified EGRET source 3EG2227+6122. Moreover, the powerful millisecond pulsar B1821-24, in the globular cluster M28, is detected during a fraction of the observations.

  10. Characterization of a Precision Pulsar Timing Gravitational Wave Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Michael T.

    2017-01-01

    We aim to construct a Galactic-scale detector comprised of an array of pulsars distributed across the sky in an effort to detect low-frequency (nanohertz) gravitational waves. Even without a detection, observations of pulsar timing arrays have allowed us to begin to place impactful astrophysical constraints on dynamical processes occurring during galaxy mergers. Understanding the detector is necessary for improving our sensitivity to gravitational waves and making a detection. Therefore, our goal is to characterize the entire propagation path through the pulsar timing array detector. To do so, we must understand: what intrinsic noise processes occur at the pulsar, what effects the interstellar medium has on pulsed radio emission, and what errors we introduce when measuring the incident electromagnetic radiation at our observatories.In this work, we observed of one of the most spin-stable objects known for 24 hours to understand the fundamental limits of precision pulsar timing. We investigated the effect of non-simultaneous, multi-frequency sampling of pulsar dispersion measures on timing and analyzed the cause of deterministic and stochastic temporal variations seen in dispersion measure time series. We analyzed errors in pulse arrival times and determined the white noise budget for pulsars on the timescale of a single observation. Finally, we measured the excess noise beyond the white noise model in pulsar timing residuals and incorporated our results into a global model over all pulsar populations to improve excess noise scaling relations.

  11. Sustained magnetic fields in binary millisecond pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanmugam, G.; Brecher, K.

    1987-10-01

    It is proposed here that the magnetic fields of neutron stars do not decay either in binary millisecond pulsars (BMPs) or in general. This eliminates the severe discrepancy between the hypothesis that neutron stars in BMPs formed from the accretion-induced collapse of white dwarfs with shorter orbital periods and the observation that the fraction of pulsars which are BMPs is too large by a factor of over 100. It is also shown that, if such neutron stars are formed from the accretion-induced magnetic flux and an angular momentum-conserving collapse of white dwarfs, most of them are likely to have been born, and remain, spinning rapidly and to have weak magnetic fields, in agreement with observations of BMPs and low-mass X-ray binaries.

  12. Tackling radio polarization of energetic pulsars

    SciTech Connect

    Craig, H. A.

    2014-08-01

    The traditional, geometrical rotating vector model (RVM) has proved particularly poor at capturing the polarization sweeps of the young energetic and millisecond pulsars detected by Fermi. We augment this model by including finite altitude effects using a swept back vacuum dipole geometry. By further including the effects of orthogonal mode jumps, multiple emission altitudes, open zone growth via y-point lowering, and interstellar scattering, we show that a wide range of departures from RVM can be modeled well while retaining a geometrical picture. We illustrate these effects by fitting six Fermi-detected pulsars (J0023+0923, J1024–0719, J1744–1134, J1057–5226, J1420–6048, and J2124–3358) and we describe how such modeling can improve our understanding of their emission geometry.

  13. Gravitational wave emission from oscillating millisecond pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alford, Mark G.; Schwenzer, Kai

    2015-02-01

    Neutron stars undergoing r-mode oscillation emit gravitational radiation that might be detected on the Earth. For known millisecond pulsars the observed spin-down rate imposes an upper limit on the possible gravitational wave signal of these sources. Taking into account the physics of r-mode evolution, we show that only sources spinning at frequencies above a few hundred Hertz can be unstable to r-modes, and we derive a more stringent universal r-mode spin-down limit on their gravitational wave signal. We find that this refined bound limits the gravitational wave strain from millisecond pulsars to values below the detection sensitivity of next generation detectors. Young sources are therefore a more promising option for the detection of gravitational waves emitted by r-modes and to probe the interior composition of compact stars in the near future.

  14. PuMa, a digital Pulsar Machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voûte, J. L. L.; Kouwenhoven, M. L. A.; van Haren, P. C.; Langerak, J. J.; Stappers, B. W.; Driesens, D.; Ramachandran, R.; Beijaard, Th. D.

    2002-04-01

    We have designed and constructed PuMa, a pulsar machine that has both a baseband recording and a digital filterbank mode. Its design is based on the use of digital signal processors (DSPs). Their operation is controlled by software, which makes PuMa reconfigurable, flexible and easy to operate. The maximum number of channels in the digital filterbank mode is 32 768 over a bandwidth of 80 MHz. This makes PuMa suitable for pulsar observations at low sky frequencies. The maximum bandwidth in baseband recording mode is two times 10 MHz. The machine was installed at the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope in The Netherlands in 1998. We discuss in some detail PuMa's technical properties and capabilities. Recent observations, a sample of which are presented here, demonstrate its capabilities and that it is performing up to its specifications.

  15. Mildly Recycled Pulsars at High-Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellizzoni, A.

    2011-08-01

    Mildly recyled pulsars (MRP), conventionally defined as neutron star having spin period in the 20-100 ms range and surface magnetic field <1011 Gauss, probably rise from binary systems (disrupted or not) with an intermediate or an high mass companion. Despite their relatively low spin-down energies compared to the ``fully'' recycled millisecond pulsars (arising from common low mass X-ray binaries), nearby MRPs can be detected by deep X-ray observations and by timing analysis of the very long data span provided by gamma-ray space detectors. The discovery of peculiar timing and spectral properties, possibly transitional, of the MRPs can be of the utmost importance to link different classes of neutron stars and study their evolution.

  16. Pulsar searches in nearby dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubio-Herrera, Eduardo; Maccarone, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    We have been undertaking a comprehensive survey for pulsars and fast radio transients in the dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies of the Milky Way using the Green Bank Radio Telescope operating at a central frequency of 350 MHz. Our search pipeline allows the detection of periodical signals and single dispersed pulses and it is optimized to search for millisecond radio pulsars. Here we present preliminary results of the searches we have conducted in the Ursa Minoris, Draco and Leo I dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies. Our searches have revealed no periodic signals but a few unconfirmed millisecond single pulses at various dispersion measures, possibly related to neutron stars. Detecting neutron stars in these systems can potentially help to test the existence of haloes of dark matter surrounding these systems as predicted by Dehnen & King (2006).

  17. Pulsar braking: Time dependent moment of inertia?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbanec, Martin

    2017-08-01

    Pulsars rotate with extremely stable rotational frequency enabling one to measure its first and second time derivatives. These observed values can be combined to the so-called braking index. However observed values of braking index differ from the theoretical value of 3 corresponding to braking by magnetic dipole radiation being the dominant theoretical model. Such a difference can be explained by contribution of other mechanism like pulsar wind or quadrupole radiation, or by time dependency of magnetic field or moment of inertia. In this presentation we focus on influence of time dependent moment of inertia on the braking index. We will also discuss possible physical models for time-dependence of moment of inertia.

  18. Crab pulsar timing 1982-87

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyne, A. G.; Pritchard, R. S.; Smith, F. G.

    1988-08-01

    Observations of the arrival times of pulses from the pulsar in the Crab Nebula over a six-year interval are presented. The data are intended to permit the investigation of the interior of the neutron star through the study of glitches and timing noise and to provide an ephemeris for high-energy observations. The first and second frequency derivatives provide a value for the braking index of n = 2.509 + or - 0.001, which is consistent with previous observations. The third frequency derivative can now be determined over an 18-yr span and is as expected for this braking index. The predominant deviations from a simple slow-down model form a sinusoid with a period of 20 months, attributable to an oscillation of the bulk of the neutron superfluid in the pulsar. One conspicuous glitch occurred in August, 1986 and the subsequent recovery was studied from only one hour after the event.

  19. Geminga’s Puzzling Pulsar Wind Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posselt, B.; Pavlov, G. G.; Slane, P. O.; Romani, R.; Bucciantini, N.; Bykov, A. M.; Kargaltsev, O.; Weisskopf, M. C.; Ng, C.-Y.

    2017-01-01

    We report on six new Chandra observations of the Geminga pulsar wind nebula (PWN). The PWN consists of three distinct elongated structures—two ≈ 0.2{d}250 pc long lateral tails and a segmented axial tail of ≈ 0.05{d}250 pc length, where {d}250=d/(250 {pc}). The photon indices of the power-law spectra of the lateral tails, {{Γ }}≈ 1, are significantly harder than those of the pulsar ({{Γ }}≈ 1.5) and the axial tail ({{Γ }}≈ 1.6). There is no significant diffuse X-ray emission between the lateral tails—the ratio of the X-ray surface brightness between the south tail and this sky area is at least 12. The lateral tails apparently connect directly to the pulsar and show indications of moving footpoints. The axial tail comprises time-variable emission blobs. However, there is no evidence for constant or decelerated outward motion of these blobs. Different physical models are consistent with the observed morphology and spectra of the Geminga PWN. In one scenario, the lateral tails could represent an azimuthally asymmetric shell whose hard emission is caused by the Fermi acceleration mechanism of colliding winds. In another scenario, the lateral tails could be luminous, bent polar outflows, while the blobs in the axial tail could represent a crushed torus. In a resemblance to planetary magnetotails, the blobs of the axial tail might also represent short-lived plasmoids, which are formed by magnetic field reconnection in the relativistic plasma of the pulsar wind tail.

  20. PARTICLE TRANSPORT IN YOUNG PULSAR WIND NEBULAE

    SciTech Connect

    Tang Xiaping; Chevalier, Roger A. E-mail: rac5x@virginia.edu

    2012-06-20

    The model for pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) as a result of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) downstream flow from a shocked, relativistic pulsar wind has been successful in reproducing many features of the nebulae observed close to central pulsars. However, observations of well-studied young nebulae like the Crab Nebula, 3C 58, and G21.5-0.9 do not show the toroidal magnetic field on a larger scale that might be expected in the MHD flow model; in addition, the radial variation of spectral index due to synchrotron losses is smoother than expected in the MHD flow model. We find that pure diffusion models can reproduce the basic data on nebular size and spectral index variation for the Crab, 3C 58, and G21.5-0.9. Most of our models use an energy-independent diffusion coefficient; power-law variations of the coefficient with energy are degenerate with variation in the input particle energy distribution index in the steady state, transmitting boundary case. Energy-dependent diffusion is a possible reason for the smaller diffusion coefficient inferred for the Crab. Monte Carlo simulations of the particle transport allowing for advection and diffusion of particles suggest that diffusion dominates over much of the total nebular volume of the Crab. Advection dominates close to the pulsar and is likely to play a role in the X-ray half-light radius. The source of diffusion and mixing of particles is uncertain, but may be related to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability at the outer boundary of a young PWN or to instabilities in the toroidal magnetic field structure.

  1. Tests of general relativity using pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichley, P. E.

    1971-01-01

    The arrival times of the pulses from each pulsar are measured by a cesium clock. The observations are all made at a frequency of 2388 MHz (12.5 cm wavelength) on a 26 m dish antenna. The effect of interstellar charged particles is a random one that increases the noise level on the arrival time measurements. The variation in clock rate is shown consisting of two effects: the time dilation effect of special relativity and the red shift effect of general relativity.

  2. Fermi-LAT Search for Pulsar Wind Nebulae around gamma-ray Pulsars

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bouvier, A.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Camilo, F.; Caraveo, P. A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cecchi, C.; Çelik, Ö.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiang, J.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cognard, I.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Conrad, J.; Dermer, C. D.; de Angelis, A.; de Luca, A.; de Palma, F.; Digel, S. W.; do Couto e Silva, E.; Drell, P. S.; Dubois, R.; Dumora, D.; Favuzzi, C.; Focke, W. B.; Frailis, M.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Germani, S.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M. -H.; Grove, J. E.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Hanabata, Y.; Harding, A. K.; Hayashi, K.; Hays, E.; Hobbs, G.; Hughes, R. E.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, W. N.; Johnston, S.; Kamae, T.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Keith, M.; Kerr, M.; Knödlseder, J.; Kramer, M.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Latronico, L.; Lee, S. -H.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Lyne, A. G.; Makeev, A.; Marelli, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; Mehault, J.; Michelson, P. F.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nakamori, T.; Naumann-Godo, M.; Nolan, P. L.; Noutsos, A.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Okumura, A.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Parent, D.; Pelassa, V.; Pepe, M.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Porter, T. A.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Ransom, S. M.; Ray, P. S.; Razzano, M.; Rea, N.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reposeur, T.; Ripken, J.; Ritz, S.; Romani, R. W.; Sadrozinski, H. F. -W.; Sander, A.; Parkinson, P. M. Saz; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, D. A.; Smith, P. D.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Strickman, M. S.; Suson, D. J.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, T.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. B.; Thayer, J. G.; Theureau, G.; Thompson, D. J.; Thorsett, S. E.; Tibaldo, L.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Tramacere, A.; Uchiyama, Y.; Uehara, T.; Usher, T. L.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Van Etten, A.; Vasileiou, V.; Vilchez, N.; Vitale, V.; Waite, A. P.; Wang, P.; Weltevrede, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Yang, Z.; Ylinen, T.; Ziegler, M.

    2010-12-13

    The high sensitivity of the Fermi-LAT (Large Area Telescope) offers the first opportunity to study faint and extended GeV sources such as pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe). After one year of observation the LAT detected and identified three PWNe: the Crab Nebula, Vela-X, and the PWN inside MSH 15-52. In the meantime, the list of LAT detected pulsars increased steadily. These pulsars are characterized by high energy loss rates ($\\dot{E}$) from ~3 × 1033 erg s–1 to 5 × 1038 erg s–1 and are therefore likely to power a PWN. This paper summarizes the search for PWNe in the off-pulse windows of 54 LAT-detected pulsars using 16 months of survey observations. Ten sources show significant emission, seven of these likely being of magnetospheric origin. The detection of significant emission in the off-pulse interval offers new constraints on the γ-ray emitting regions in pulsar magnetospheres. The three other sources with significant emission are the Crab Nebula, Vela-X, and a new PWN candidate associated with the LAT pulsar PSR J1023–5746, coincident with the TeV source HESS J1023–575. Here, we further explore the association between the HESS and the Fermi source by modeling its spectral energy distribution. Lastly, flux upper limits derived for the 44 remaining sources are used to provide new constraints on famous PWNe that have been detected at keV and/or TeV energies.

  3. Fermi-LAT Search for Pulsar Wind Nebulae around gamma-ray Pulsars

    DOE PAGES

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Baldini, L.; ...

    2010-12-13

    The high sensitivity of the Fermi-LAT (Large Area Telescope) offers the first opportunity to study faint and extended GeV sources such as pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe). After one year of observation the LAT detected and identified three PWNe: the Crab Nebula, Vela-X, and the PWN inside MSH 15-52. In the meantime, the list of LAT detected pulsars increased steadily. These pulsars are characterized by high energy loss rates (more » $$\\dot{E}$$) from ~3 × 1033 erg s–1 to 5 × 1038 erg s–1 and are therefore likely to power a PWN. This paper summarizes the search for PWNe in the off-pulse windows of 54 LAT-detected pulsars using 16 months of survey observations. Ten sources show significant emission, seven of these likely being of magnetospheric origin. The detection of significant emission in the off-pulse interval offers new constraints on the γ-ray emitting regions in pulsar magnetospheres. The three other sources with significant emission are the Crab Nebula, Vela-X, and a new PWN candidate associated with the LAT pulsar PSR J1023–5746, coincident with the TeV source HESS J1023–575. Here, we further explore the association between the HESS and the Fermi source by modeling its spectral energy distribution. Lastly, flux upper limits derived for the 44 remaining sources are used to provide new constraints on famous PWNe that have been detected at keV and/or TeV energies.« less

  4. FERMI-LAT SEARCH FOR PULSAR WIND NEBULAE AROUND GAMMA-RAY PULSARS

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Bechtol, K.; Berenji, B.; Bloom, E. D.; Borgland, A. W.; Bouvier, A.; Buehler, R.; Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Ballet, J.; Bastieri, D.; Buson, S.; Bonamente, E.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.

    2011-01-01

    The high sensitivity of the Fermi-LAT (Large Area Telescope) offers the first opportunity to study faint and extended GeV sources such as pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe). After one year of observation the LAT detected and identified three PWNe: the Crab Nebula, Vela-X, and the PWN inside MSH 15-52. In the meantime, the list of LAT detected pulsars increased steadily. These pulsars are characterized by high energy loss rates ( E-dot ) from {approx}3 x 10{sup 33} erg s{sup -1} to 5 x 10{sup 38} erg s{sup -1} and are therefore likely to power a PWN. This paper summarizes the search for PWNe in the off-pulse windows of 54 LAT-detected pulsars using 16 months of survey observations. Ten sources show significant emission, seven of these likely being of magnetospheric origin. The detection of significant emission in the off-pulse interval offers new constraints on the {gamma}-ray emitting regions in pulsar magnetospheres. The three other sources with significant emission are the Crab Nebula, Vela-X, and a new PWN candidate associated with the LAT pulsar PSR J1023-5746, coincident with the TeV source HESS J1023-575. We further explore the association between the HESS and the Fermi source by modeling its spectral energy distribution. Flux upper limits derived for the 44 remaining sources are used to provide new constraints on famous PWNe that have been detected at keV and/or TeV energies.

  5. Braking index of isolated pulsars. II. A novel two-dipole model of pulsar magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamil, O.; Stone, N. J.; Stone, J. R.

    2016-09-01

    The magnetic dipole radiation model is currently the best approach we have to explain pulsar radiation. However, a most characteristic parameter of the observed radiation, the braking index nobs , shows deviations for all the eight best studied isolated pulsars, from the simple model prediction ndip=3 . The index depends upon the rotational frequency and its first and second time derivatives but also on the assumption that the magnetic dipole moment and inclination angle and the moment of inertia of the pulsar are constant in time. In a recent paper [Phys. Rev. D 91, 063007 (2015)], we showed conclusively that changes in the moment of inertia with frequency alone cannot explain the observed braking indices. Possible observational evidence for the magnetic dipole moment migrating away from the rotational axis at a rate α ˙ ˜0.6 ° per 100 years over the lifetime of the Crab pulsar has been recently suggested by Lyne et al. In this paper, we explore the magnetic dipole radiation model with constant moment of inertia and magnetic dipole moment but variable inclination angle α . We first discuss the effect of the variation of α on the observed braking indices and show they all can be understood. However, no explanation for the origin of the change in α is provided. After discussion of the possible source(s) of magnetism in pulsars, we propose a simple mechanism for the change in α based on a toy model in which the magnetic structure in pulsars consists of two interacting dipoles. We show that such a system can explain the Crab observation and the measured braking indices.

  6. Particle acceleration in axisymmetric pulsar current sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerutti, Benoît; Philippov, Alexander; Parfrey, Kyle; Spitkovsky, Anatoly

    2015-03-01

    The equatorial current sheet in pulsar magnetospheres is often regarded as an ideal site for particle acceleration via relativistic reconnection. Using 2D spherical particle-in-cell simulations, we investigate particle acceleration in the axisymmetric pulsar magnetosphere as a function of the injected plasma multiplicity and magnetization. We observe a clear transition from a highly charge-separated magnetosphere for low plasma injection with little current and spin-down power, to a nearly force-free solution for high plasma multiplicity characterized by a prominent equatorial current sheet and high spin-down power. We find significant magnetic dissipation in the current sheet, up to 30 per cent within 5 light-cylinder radii in the high-multiplicity regime. The simulations unambiguously demonstrate that the dissipated Poynting flux is efficiently channelled to the particles in the sheet, close to the Y-point within about 1-2 light-cylinder radii from the star. The mean particle energy in the sheet is given by the upstream plasma magnetization at the light cylinder. The study of particle orbits shows that all energetic particles originate from the boundary layer between the open and the closed field lines. Energetic positrons always stream outwards, while high-energy electrons precipitate back towards the star through the sheet and along the separatrices, which may result in auroral-like emission. Our results suggest that the current sheet and the separatrices may be the main source of high-energy radiation in young pulsars.

  7. LEAP: the Large European Array for Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassa, C. G.; Janssen, G. H.; Karuppusamy, R.; Kramer, M.; Lee, K. J.; Liu, K.; McKee, J.; Perrodin, D.; Purver, M.; Sanidas, S.; Smits, R.; Stappers, B. W.

    2016-02-01

    The Large European Array for Pulsars (LEAP) is an experiment that harvests the collective power of Europe's largest radio telescopes in order to increase the sensitivity of high-precision pulsar timing. As part of the ongoing effort of the European Pulsar Timing Array, LEAP aims to go beyond the sensitivity threshold needed to deliver the first direct detection of gravitational waves. The five telescopes presently included in LEAP are the Effelsberg Telescope, the Lovell Telescope at Jodrell Bank, the Nançay Radio Telescope, the Sardinia Radio Telescope and the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope. Dual polarization, Nyquist-sampled time series of the incoming radio waves are recorded and processed offline to form the coherent sum, resulting in a tied-array telescope with an effective aperture equivalent to a 195-m diameter circular dish. All observations are performed using a bandwidth of 128 MHz centred at a frequency of 1396 MHz. In this paper, we present the design of the LEAP experiment, the instrumentation, the storage and transfer of data and the processing hardware and software. In particular, we present the software pipeline that was designed to process the Nyquist-sampled time series, measure the phase and time delays between each individual telescope and a reference telescope and apply these delays to form the tied-array coherent addition. The pipeline includes polarization calibration and interference mitigation. We also present the first results from LEAP and demonstrate the resulting increase in sensitivity, which leads to an improvement in the pulse arrival times.

  8. Pulsar Magnetospheres: Beyond the Flat Spacetime Dipole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gralla, Samuel E.; Lupsasca, Alexandru; Philippov, Alexander

    2016-12-01

    Most studies of the pulsar magnetosphere have assumed a pure magnetic dipole in flat spacetime. However, recent work suggests that the effects of general relativity are in fact of vital importance and that realistic pulsar magnetic fields will have a significant nondipolar component. We introduce a general analytical method for studying the axisymmetric force-free magnetosphere of a slowly rotating star of arbitrary magnetic field, mass, radius, and moment of inertia, including all the effects of general relativity. We confirm that spacelike current is generically present in the polar caps (suggesting a pair production region), irrespective of the stellar magnetic field. We show that general relativity introduces a ∼ 60 % correction to the formula for the dipolar component of the surface magnetic field inferred from spindown. Finally, we show that the location and shape of the polar caps can be modified dramatically by even modestly strong higher moments. This can affect emission processes occurring near the star and may help explain the modified beam characteristics of millisecond pulsars.

  9. Eclipsing Pulsar Promises Clues to Crushed Matter

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-28

    NASA image release August 17, 2010 Astronomers using NASA's Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) have found the first fast X-ray pulsar to be eclipsed by its companion star. Further studies of this unique stellar system will shed light on some of the most compressed matter in the universe and test a key prediction of Einstein's relativity theory. Known as Swift J1749.4-2807 -- J1749 for short -- the system erupted with an X-ray outburst on April 10. During the event, RXTE observed three eclipses, detected X-ray pulses that identified the neutron star as a pulsar, and even recorded pulse variations that indicated the neutron star's orbital motion. To view a video of this pulsar go here: www.flickr.com/photos/gsfc/4901238111 To read more click here Credit: NASA/GSFC NASA Goddard Space Flight Center is home to the nation's largest organization of combined scientists, engineers and technologists that build spacecraft, instruments and new technology to study the Earth, the sun, our solar system, and the universe. Follow us on Twitter Join us on Facebook

  10. Multiwavelength analysis of four millisecond pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillemot, L.; Cognard, I.; Johnson, T. J.; Venter, C.; Harding, A. K.

    2011-08-01

    Radio timing observations of millisecond pulsars (MSPs) in support of Fermi LAT observations of the gamma-ray sky enhance the sensitivity of high-energy pulsation searches. With contemporaneous ephemerides we have detected gamma-ray pulsations from PSR B1937+21, the first MSP ever discovered, and B1957+20, the first known black-widow system. The two MSPs share a number of properties: they are energetic and distant compared to other gamma-ray MSPs, and both of them exhibit aligned radio and gamma-ray emission peaks, indicating co-located emission regions in the outer magnetosphere of the pulsars. However, radio observations are also crucial for revealing MSPs in Fermi unassociated sources. In a search for radio pulsations at the position of such unassociated sources, the Nançay Radio Telescope discovered two MSPs, PSRs J2017+0603 and J2302+4442, increasing the sample of known Galactic disk MSPs. Subsequent radio timing observations led to the detection of gamma-ray pulsations from these two MSPs as well. We describe multiwavelength timing and spectral analysis of these four pulsars, and the modeling of their gamma-ray light curves in the context of theoretical models.

  11. Genesis stories for the millisecond pulsar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruderman, M. A.; Shaham, J.

    1983-09-01

    Theoretical models proposed to explain the origin of the millisecond pulsar (MP) PSR 1937+214 are reviewed, examining their ability to explain its low surface dipole magnetic field (B), its low birth temperature (less than 10 to the 8th K), the absence of a companion or remnant, and its low velocity perpendicular to the Galactic plane. The models discussed are a single isolated explosion forming a rapidly spinning neutron star, spin-up of a dead pulsar by accretion from a companion, collapse of an accreting spinning white dwarf, and fusion of a tight binary composed of two old neutron stars. Although all of the models have difficulties in explaining one or more of the MP characteristics, the second model is found to be most probable in the light of present knowledge. The lack of a companion is explained by its tidal disruption after it had fed the accreting pre-pulsar for 1 Gyr or more and its mass had decreased to about 0.01 solar mass. Neutron stars accreting in this way have been observed in Galactic-bulge X-ray sources.

  12. Partial accretion regime of accreting millisecond pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eksi, Kazim

    2016-07-01

    The inner parts of the disks around neutron stars in low mass X-ray binaries may become geometrically thick due to inhibition of accretion at the disk mid-plane when the central object is rotating rapidly. In such a case matter inflowing through the disk may keep accreting onto the poles of the neutron star from the parts of the disk away from the disk mid-plane while the matter is propelled at the disk mid-plane. An important ingredient of the evolution of millisecond pulsars is then the fraction of the inflowing matter that can accrete onto the poles in the fast rotation regime depending on the fastness parameter. This ``soft'' propeller regime may be associated with the rapid decay stage observed in the light curves of several accreting millisecond pulsars. To date only a few studies considered the partial accretion regime. By using geometrical arguments we improve the existing studies and test the model by reproducing the lightcurves of millisecond X-ray pulsars via time dependent simulations of disk evolution. We also present analytical solutions that represent disks with partial accretion.

  13. Radio pulsar death lines to SGRs/AXPs and white dwarfs pulsars

    SciTech Connect

    Lobato, Ronaldo V.; Malheiro, M.; Coelho, J. G.

    2015-12-17

    Recently, an alternative model based on white dwarfs pulsars has been proposed to explain a class of pulsars known as Soft Gamma Repeaters (SGR) and Anomalus X-Ray Pulsars (AXP) [1], usually named as magnetars. In this model, the magnetized white dwarfs can have surface magnetic field B ∼ 10{sup 7} − 10{sup 10} G and rotate very fast with angular frequencies Ω ∼ 1 rad/s, allowing them to produce large electromagnetic (EM) potentials and generate electron-positron pairs. These EM potentials are comparable with the ones of neutron star pulsars with strong magnetic fields and even larger. In this study we consider two possible processes associated with the particle acceleration, both of them are common used to explain radio emission in neutron star pulsars: in the first process the pair production happens near to the star polar caps, i.e. inside of the light cylinder where magnetic field lines are closed; in the second one the creation of pair happens in the outer magnetosphere, i.e. far away of the star surface where magnetic field lines are open [2]. The analysis of the possibility of radio emission were done for 23 SGRs/AXPs of the McGill Online Magnetar Catalog [3] that contains the current information available on these sources. The results of this work show that the model where the particles production occur in the outer magnetosphere emission “o2” is the process compatible with the astronomical observations of absence of radio emission for almost all SGRs/AXPs when these sources are understood as white dwarf pulsars. Our work is a first attempted to find an explanation for the puzzle why for almost all the SGRs/AXPs was expected radio emission, but it was observed in only four of them. These four sources, as it was suggested recently [4], seem to belong to an high magnetic field neutron star pulsar category, different from all the others SGRs/AXPs that our work indicate to belong to a new class of white dwarf pulsars, very fast and magnetized.

  14. AB INITIO PULSAR MAGNETOSPHERE: THREE-DIMENSIONAL PARTICLE-IN-CELL SIMULATIONS OF AXISYMMETRIC PULSARS

    SciTech Connect

    Philippov, Alexander A.; Spitkovsky, Anatoly

    2014-04-20

    We perform ''first-principles'' relativistic particle-in-cell simulations of aligned pulsar magnetosphere. We allow free escape of particles from the surface of a neutron star and continuously populate the magnetosphere with neutral pair plasma to imitate pair production. As pair plasma supply increases, we observe the transition from a charge-separated ''electrosphere'' solution with trapped plasma and no spin-down to a solution close to the ideal force-free magnetosphere with electromagnetically dominated pulsar wind. We calculate the magnetospheric structure, current distribution, and spin-down power of the neutron star. We also discuss particle acceleration in the equatorial current sheet.

  15. Identification of the X-ray pulsar in Hercules: A new optical pulsar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidsen, A.; Henry, J. P.; Middleditch, J.; Smith, H. E.

    1972-01-01

    A series of photographic, photoelectric, and spectroscopic observations beginning June 1, 1972 has led to the optical identification of Her X-1 (2U 1705 + 34), a pulsed X-ray source in an eclipsing binary system, with the thirteenth magnitude blue variable star HZ Herculis. The detection of optical pulses at the frequency of the X-ray pulsar on three nights makes the identification conclusive and establishes HZ Her as the second known optical pulsar. The strength of the optical pulses may be correlated with the orbital phase but is not obviously related to the high or low intensity states of the X-ray source.

  16. Radio pulsar death lines to SGRs/AXPs and white dwarfs pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobato, Ronaldo V.; Coelho, J. G.; Malheiro, M.

    2015-12-01

    Recently, an alternative model based on white dwarfs pulsars has been proposed to explain a class of pulsars known as Soft Gamma Repeaters (SGR) and Anomalus X-Ray Pulsars (AXP) [1], usually named as magnetars. In this model, the magnetized white dwarfs can have surface magnetic field B ˜ 107 - 1010 G and rotate very fast with angular frequencies Ω ˜ 1 rad/s, allowing them to produce large electromagnetic (EM) potentials and generate electron-positron pairs. These EM potentials are comparable with the ones of neutron star pulsars with strong magnetic fields and even larger. In this study we consider two possible processes associated with the particle acceleration, both of them are common used to explain radio emission in neutron star pulsars: in the first process the pair production happens near to the star polar caps, i.e. inside of the light cylinder where magnetic field lines are closed; in the second one the creation of pair happens in the outer magnetosphere, i.e. far away of the star surface where magnetic field lines are open [2]. The analysis of the possibility of radio emission were done for 23 SGRs/AXPs of the McGill Online Magnetar Catalog [3] that contains the current information available on these sources. The results of this work show that the model where the particles production occur in the outer magnetosphere emission "o2" is the process compatible with the astronomical observations of absence of radio emission for almost all SGRs/AXPs when these sources are understood as white dwarf pulsars. Our work is a first attempted to find an explanation for the puzzle why for almost all the SGRs/AXPs was expected radio emission, but it was observed in only four of them. These four sources, as it was suggested recently [4], seem to belong to an high magnetic field neutron star pulsar category, different from all the others SGRs/AXPs that our work indicate to belong to a new class of white dwarf pulsars, very fast and magnetized.

  17. OBSERVABILITY OF PULSAR BEAM BENDING BY THE Sgr A* BLACK HOLE

    SciTech Connect

    Stovall, Kevin; Creighton, Teviet; Price, Richard H.; Jenet, Fredrick A.

    2012-01-10

    According to some models, there may be a significant population of radio pulsars in the Galactic center. In principle, a beam from one of these pulsars could pass close to the supermassive black hole (SMBH) at the center, be deflected, and be detected by Earth telescopes. Such a configuration would be an unprecedented probe of the properties of spacetime in the moderate- to strong-field regime of the SMBH. We present here background on the problem, and approximations for the probability of detection of such beams. We conclude that detection is marginally possible with current telescopes, but that telescopes that will be operating in the near future, with an appropriate multiyear observational program, will have a reasonable chance of detecting a beam deflected by the SMBH.

  18. Homozygous SLC6A17 mutations cause autosomal-recessive intellectual disability with progressive tremor, speech impairment, and behavioral problems.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Zafar; Willemsen, Marjolein H; Papon, Marie-Amélie; Musante, Luciana; Benevento, Marco; Hu, Hao; Venselaar, Hanka; Wissink-Lindhout, Willemijn M; Vulto-van Silfhout, Anneke T; Vissers, Lisenka E L M; de Brouwer, Arjan P M; Marouillat, Sylviane; Wienker, Thomas F; Ropers, Hans Hilger; Kahrizi, Kimia; Nadif Kasri, Nael; Najmabadi, Hossein; Laumonnier, Frédéric; Kleefstra, Tjitske; van Bokhoven, Hans

    2015-03-05

    We report on Dutch and Iranian families with affected individuals who present with moderate to severe intellectual disability and additional phenotypes including progressive tremor, speech impairment, and behavioral problems in certain individuals. A combination of exome sequencing and homozygosity mapping revealed homozygous mutations c.484G>A (p.Gly162Arg) and c.1898C>G (p.Pro633Arg) in SLC6A17. SLC6A17 is predominantly expressed in the brain, encodes a synaptic vesicular transporter of neutral amino acids and glutamate, and plays an important role in the regulation of glutamatergic synapses. Prediction programs and 3D modeling suggest that the identified mutations are deleterious to protein function. To directly test the functional consequences, we investigated the neuronal subcellular localization of overexpressed wild-type and mutant variants in mouse primary hippocampal neuronal cells. Wild-type protein was present in soma, axons, dendrites, and dendritic spines. p.Pro633Arg altered SLC6A17 was found in soma and proximal dendrites but did not reach spines. p.Gly162Arg altered SLC6A17 showed a normal subcellular distribution but was associated with an abnormal neuronal morphology mainly characterized by the loss of dendritic spines. In summary, our genetic findings implicate homozygous SLC6A17 mutations in autosomal-recessive intellectual disability, and their pathogenic role is strengthened by genetic evidence and in silico and in vitro functional analyses. Copyright © 2015 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. SEXTANT X-Ray Pulsar Navigation Demonstration: Flight System and Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winternitz, Luke; Mitchell, Jason W.; Hassouneh, Munther A.; Valdez, Jennifer E.; Price, Samuel R.; Semper, Sean R.; Yu, Wayne H.; Ray, Paul S.; Wood, Kent S.; Arzoumanian, Zaven; hide

    2016-01-01

    The Station Explorer for X-ray Timing and Navigation Technology (SEXTANT) is a technology demonstration enhancement to the Neutron-star Interior Composition Explorer (NICER) mission. NICER is a NASA Explorer Mission of Opportunity that will be hosted on the International Space Station (ISS). SEXTANT will, for the first time, demonstrate real-time, on-board X-ray Pulsar Navigation (XNAV), a significant milestone in the quest to establish a GPS-like navigation capability available throughout our Solar System and beyond. This paper gives an overview of the SEXTANT system architecture and describes progress prior to environmental testing of the NICER flight instrument. It provides descriptions and development status of the SEXTANT flight software and ground system, as well as detailed description and results from the flight software functional and performance testing within the high-fidelity Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) X-ray Navigation Laboratory Testbed (GXLT) software and hardware simulation environment. Hardware-in-the-loop simulation results are presented, using the engineering model of the NICER timing electronics and the GXLT pulsar simulator-the GXLT precisely controls NASA GSFC's unique Modulated X-ray Source to produce X-rays that make the NICER detector electronics appear as if they were aboard the ISS viewing a sequence of millisecond pulsars

  20. SEXTANT X-Ray Pulsar Navigation Demonstration: Flight System and Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winternitz, Luke M. B.; Mitchell, Jason W.; Hassouneh, Munther A.; Valdez, Jennifer E.; Price, Samuel R.; Semper, Sean R.; Yu, Wayne H.; Ray, Paul S.; Wood, Kent S.; Arzoumanian, Zaven; hide

    2016-01-01

    The Station Explorer for X-ray Timing and Navigation Technology (SEXTANT) is a technology demonstration enhancement to the Neutron-star Interior Composition Explorer (NICER) mission. NICER is a NASA Explorer Mission of Opportunity that will be hosted on the International Space Station (ISS). SEXTANT will, for the first time, demonstrate real-time, on-board X-ray Pulsar Navigation (XNAV), a significant milestone in the quest to establish a GPS-like navigation capability available throughout our Solar System and beyond. This paper gives an overview of the SEXTANT system architecture and describes progress prior to environmental testing of the NICER flight instrument. It provides descriptions and development status of the SEXTANT flight software and ground system, as well as detailed description and results from the flight software functional and performance testing within the highfidelity Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) X-ray Navigation Laboratory Testbed (GXLT) software and hardware simulation environment. Hardware-in-the-loop simulation results are presented, using the engineering model of the NICER timing electronics and the GXLT pulsar simulator-the GXLT precisely controls NASA GSFC's unique Modulated X-ray Source to produce X-rays that make the NICER detector electronics appear as if they were aboard the ISS viewing a sequence of millisecond pulsars.

  1. High-School Teams Joining Massive Pulsar Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-09-01

    High school students and teachers will join astronomers on the cutting edge of science under a program to be operated by the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) and West Virginia University (WVU), and funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF). The program, called the Pulsar Search Collaboratory, will engage West Virginia students and teachers in a massive search for new pulsars using data from the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT). Sue Ann Heatherly Sue Ann Heatherly, NRAO Education Officer CREDIT: Bill Saxton, NRAO/AUI/NSF (Click on image for larger version) The NSF announced a $892,838 grant to NRAO and WVU to conduct the three-year program. The project will involve 60 teachers and some 600 students in helping astronomers analyze data from 1500 hours of observing time on the GBT. The 120 terabytes of data produced by some 70,000 individual pointings of the giant, 17-million-pound telescope is expected to reveal dozens of previously-unknown pulsars. "The students in this program will be partners in frontier research, discovering new pulsars and measuring changes in pulsars already known," said Sue Ann Heatherly, the NRAO Education Officer in Green Bank and Principal Investigator in the project. Pulsars are superdense neutron stars, the corpses of massive stars that have exploded as supernovae. As the neutron star spins, lighthouse-like beams of radio waves, streaming from the poles of its powerful magnetic field, sweep through space. When one of these beams sweeps across the Earth, radio telescopes can capture the pulse of radio waves. Pulsars serve as exotic laboratories for studying the physics of extreme conditions. Scientists can learn valuable new information about the physics of subatomic particles, electromagnetics, and General Relativity by observing pulsars and the changes they undergo over time. The Pulsar Search Collaboratory (PSC) combines the capabilities of NRAO and WVU to provide a unique opportunity for teachers and students

  2. Fifty Years of Pulsar Candidate Selection: From simple filters to a new principled real-time classification approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyon, R. J.; Stappers, B. W.; Cooper, S.; Brooke, J. M.; Knowles, J. D.

    2016-06-01

    Improving survey specifications are causing an exponential rise in pulsar candidate numbers and data volumes. We study the candidate filters used to mitigate these problems during the past fifty years. We find that some existing methods such as applying constraints on the total number of candidates collected per observation, may have detrimental effects on the success of pulsar searches. Those methods immune to such effects are found to be ill-equipped to deal with the problems associated with increasing data volumes and candidate numbers, motivating the development of new approaches. We therefore present a new method designed for on-line operation. It selects promising candidates using a purpose-built tree-based machine learning classifier, the Gaussian Hellinger Very Fast Decision Tree (GH-VFDT), and a new set of features for describing candidates. The features have been chosen so as to i) maximise the separation between candidates arising from noise and those of probable astrophysical origin, and ii) be as survey-independent as possible. Using these features our new approach can process millions of candidates in seconds (˜1 million every 15 seconds), with high levels of pulsar recall (90%+). This technique is therefore applicable to the large volumes of data expected to be produced by the Square Kilometre Array (SKA). Use of this approach has assisted in the discovery of 20 new pulsars in data obtained during the LOFAR Tied-Array All-Sky Survey (LOTAAS).

  3. The Mechanism of Radiation in Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardavan, H.

    1994-05-01

    The radiation from an electric current distribution, the cylindrical components of whose density depend on the azimuthal angle φ and time t in only the combination φ-ωt (with a constant angular frequency ω), is considered. It is shown that in cases where such a current also flows outside the light cylinder r = c/ω, and so has a rotating distribution pattern that attains superluminal linear phase speeds, a broadband coherent radiation is emitted that is, in all its salient features, similar to the radiation received from pulsars (r and c stand for the cylindrical radius and the speed of light in vacuo, respectively). The emitted radiation is beamed into a finite solid angle that depends on the extent of the source distribution and that points in a direction normal to the axis of rotation. At any given observation point within this solid angle, the electromagnetic field arises almost exclusively from those volume elements of the source whose positions at the retarded time match the positions of the set of rigidly rotating points that approach the observer with the wave speed and zero acceleration in the radiation direction. These are the points - collectively forming a space curve - at which the Green function for the problem is most singular. Because the signals received at two neighbouring instants in time thus arise from distinct filamentary parts of the source which have both different extents and different strengths, the resulting overall waveform in the far zone consists of the superposition of a (continuous) set of narrow micropulses with uneven amplitudes. Each micropulse embodies a caustic and hence has an amplitude that does not obey the spherical spreading law: its flux density falls off like R-1p, rather than like R-2p, with distance Rp from the source. That this is not incompatible with the conservation of energy is mainly due to the fact that the micropulses are narrower the larger the distance at which they are observed. The radiation therefore

  4. Detecting dark matter with imploding pulsars in the galactic center.

    PubMed

    Bramante, Joseph; Linden, Tim

    2014-11-07

    The paucity of old millisecond pulsars observed at the galactic center of the Milky Way could be the result of dark matter accumulating in and destroying neutron stars. In regions of high dark matter density, dark matter clumped in a pulsar can exceed the Schwarzschild limit and collapse into a natal black hole which destroys the pulsar. We examine what dark matter models are consistent with this hypothesis and find regions of parameter space where dark matter accumulation can significantly degrade the neutron star population within the galactic center while remaining consistent with observations of old millisecond pulsars in globular clusters and near the solar position. We identify what dark matter couplings and masses might cause a young pulsar at the galactic center to unexpectedly extinguish. Finally, we find that pulsar collapse age scales inversely with the dark matter density and linearly with the dark matter velocity dispersion. This implies that maximum pulsar age is spatially dependent on position within the dark matter halo of the Milky Way. In turn, this pulsar age spatial dependence will be dark matter model dependent.

  5. Parameters of radio pulsars in binary systems and globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loginov, A. A.; Malov, I. F.

    2017-02-01

    The parameters of radio pulsars in binary systems and globular clusters are investigated. It is shown that such pulsars tend to have short periods (of the order of several milliseconds). Themagnetic fields of most of the pulsars considered are weak (surface fields of the order of 108-109 G). This corresponds to the generally accepted view that short-period neutron stars are spun up by angular momentum associated with the stellar wind from a companion. However, the fields at the light cylinders in these objects are two to three orders of magnitude higher than for the main population of single neutron stars. The dependence of the pulse width on the period does not differ from the corresponding dependences for single pulsars, assuming the emission is generated inside the polar cap, at moderate distances from the surface or near the light cylinder. The radio luminosities of pulsars in binary systems do not show the correlation with the rate of loss of rotational energy that is characteristic for single pulsars, probably due to the influence of accreting matter from a companion. Moreover, accretion apparently decreases the power of the emergent radiation, and can explain the observed systematic excess of the radio luminosity of single pulsars compared to pulsars in binary systems. The distributions and dependences presented in the article support generally accepted concepts concerning the processes occurring in binary systems containing neutron stars.

  6. Prospects for Pulsar Studies with the GLAST Large Area Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice K.

    2007-01-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), due to launch in November 2007, will have unprecedented sensitivity and energy resolution for gamma-rays in the range of 30 MeV to 200 GeV. GLAST is therefore expected to provide major advances in the understanding of high-energy emission from rotation-powered pulsars. As the only presently known galactic GeV source class; pulsars will be one of the most important sources for study with GLAST. The main science goals of the LAT for pulsar studies include an increase in the number of detected radio-loud and radio-quiet gamma-ray pulsars, including millisecond pulsars, giving much better statistics for elucidating population characteristics, measurement of the high-energy spectrum and the shape of spectral cutoffs and determining pulse profiles for a variety of pulsars of different age. Further, measurement of phase-resolved spectra and energy dependent pulse profiles of the brighter pulsars should allow detailed tests of magnetospheric particle acceleration and radiation mechanisms, by comparing data with theoretical models that have been developed. Additionally, the LAT will have the sensitivity to allow blind pulsation searches of nearly all unidentified EGRET sources, to possibly uncover more radio-quiet Geminga-like pulsars.

  7. Prospects for Pulsar Studies with the GLAST Large Area Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice K.

    2006-01-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) will have unprecedented sensitivity and energy resolution for gamma-rays in the range of 30 MeV to 200 GeV. GLAST is therefore expected to provide major advances in the understanding of high-energy emission from rotation-powered pulsars. As the only presently known galactic GeV source class, pulsars will be one of the most important sources for study with GLAST. The main science goals of the LAT for pulsar studies include an increase in the number of detected radio-loud and radio-quiet gamma ray pulsars, including millisecond pulsars, giving much better statistics for elucidating population characteristics, measurement of the high-energy spectrum and the shape of spectral cutoffs and determining pulse profiles for a variety of pulsars of different age. Further, measurement of phase-resolved spectra and energy dependent pulse profiles of the brighter pulsars should allow detailed tests of magnetospheric particle acceleration and radiation mechanisms, by comparing data with theoretical models that have been developed. Additionally, the LAT will have the sensitivity to allow blind pulsation searches of nearly all unidentified EGRET sources, to possibly uncover more radio-quiet Geminga-like pulsars.

  8. Pulsar simulations for the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    DOE PAGES

    Razzano, M.; Harding, Alice K.; Baldini, L.; ...

    2009-05-21

    Pulsars are among the prime targets for the Large Area Telescope (LAT) aboard the recently launched Fermi observatory. The LAT will study the gamma-ray Universe between 20 MeV and 300 GeV with unprecedented detail. Increasing numbers of gamma-ray pulsars are being firmly identified, yet their emission mechanisms are far from being understood. To better investigate and exploit the LAT capabilities for pulsar science, a set of new detailed pulsar simulation tools have been developed within the LAT collaboration. The structure of the pulsar simulator package (PulsarSpectrum) is presented here. Starting from photon distributions in energy and phase obtained from theoreticalmore » calculations or phenomenological considerations, gamma-rays are generated and their arrival times at the spacecraft are determined by taking into account effects such as barycentric effects and timing noise. Pulsars in binary systems also can be simulated given orbital parameters. As a result, we present how simulations can be used for generating a realistic set of gamma-rays as observed by the LAT, focusing on some case studies that show the performance of the LAT for pulsar observations.« less

  9. Pulsar Simulations for the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Razzano, M.; Harding, A. K.; Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J.; Burnett, T.; Chiang, J.; Digel, S. W.; Dubois, R.; Kuss, M. W.; hide

    2009-01-01

    Pulsars are among the prime targets for the Large Area Telescope (LAT) aboard the recently launched Fermi observatory. The LAT will study the gamma-ray Universe between 20 MeV and 300 GeV with unprecedented detail. Increasing numbers of gamma-ray pulsars are being firmly identified, yet their emission mechanisms are far from being understood. To better investigate and exploit the tAT capabilities for pulsar science. a set of new detailed pulsar simulation tools have been developed within the LAT collaboration. The structure of the pulsar simulator package (PulsarSpeccrum) is presented here. Starting from photon distributions in energy and phase obtained from theoretical calculations or phenomenological considerations, gamma-rays are generated and their arrival times at the spacecraft are determined by taking Into account effects such as barycentric effects and timing noise. Pulsars in binary systems also can be simulated given orbital parameters. We present how simulations can be used for generating a realistic set of gamma rays as observed by the LAT, focusing on some case studies that show the performance of the LAT for pulsar observations.

  10. Electromagnetic tornado in the vacuum gap of a pulsar

    SciTech Connect

    Kontorovich, V. M.

    2010-06-15

    The solution for an electromagnetic tornado that describes the motion in the discharge filament of breakdown in the vacuum gap of a pulsar has been obtained. This solution can serve as an explanation of the observed circular polarization of giant radiation pulses from pulsars.

  11. X-ray studies of three binary millisecond pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, N. A.; Olive, J.-F.; Barret, D.

    2005-10-01

    It is thought that millisecond pulsars with white dwarf companions are born from X-ray binaries. The majority of known systems have been studied uniquely in the radio domain, which limits our understanding of such systems. We present here the X-ray observations of the millisecond pulsar PSR J0218+4232 and the two faint millisecond pulsars PSR J0751+1807 and PSR J1012+5307, which we discuss in conjunction with radio observations. We confirm the previously detected X-ray pulsations of PSR J0218+4232 and we show that its folded lightcurve is strongly dependent on energy. We present evidence to suggest that the broad band X-ray spectrum for this pulsar may not be a simple power law, but that there is some evidence for an excess of soft thermal emission over the power law spectrum, in particular from the strongest pulse, in support of a heated polar cap model for this pulsar. We also present the X-ray spectra of the two faint millisecond pulsars as well as some evidence to suggest that both of these millisecond pulsars show pulsations in the X-ray band. We then discuss the implied nature of the magnetic field configuration as a means of discriminating between competing magnetic field evolution theories in millisecond pulsars.

  12. Rapidly rotating pulsar radiation in vacuum nonlinear electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denisov, V. I.; Denisova, I. P.; Pimenov, A. B.; Sokolov, V. A.

    2016-11-01

    In this paper we investigate the corrections of vacuum nonlinear electrodynamics on rapidly rotating pulsar radiation and spin-down in the perturbative QED approach (post-Maxwellian approximation). An analytical expression for the pulsar's radiation intensity has been obtained and analyzed.

  13. The Use of X-Ray Pulsars for Aiding GPS Satellite Orbit Determination

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    pulsar used was PSR B0531+21 (Crab Pulsar) which is a very well known bright pulsar in the Crab Nebula [28]. Feasibly, if GPS x-ray detectors were 4...Variations Within the Pulse Profile Peaks of the Crab Nebula Pulsar,” The Astrophysical Journal , 467 (1996). 18. Halsell, Charles A. Orbit

  14. Magnetic field structure and torque in accretion discs around millisecond pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naso, L.; Kluźniak, W.; Miller, J. C.

    2013-11-01

    Millisecond pulsars are rather weakly magnetized neutron stars which are thought to have been spun up by disc accretion, with magnetic linkage between the star and the disc playing a key role. Their spin history depends sensitively on details of the magnetic field structure, but idealized models from the 1980s and 1990s are still commonly used for calculating the magnetic field components. This paper is the third in a series presenting results from a step-by-step analysis which we are making of the problem, starting with very simple models and then progressively including additional features one at a time, with the aim of gaining new insights into the mechanisms involved. In our first two papers, the magnetic field structure in the disc was calculated for a standard Shakura and Sunyaev model, by solving the magnetic induction equation numerically in the stationary limit within the kinematic approximation; here, we consider a more general velocity field in the disc, including backflow. We find that the profiles of the poloidal and toroidal components of the magnetic field are fairly similar in the two cases but that they can be very different from those in the models mentioned above, giving important consequences for the torque exerted on the central object. In particular, we find that, contrary to what is usually thought, some regions of the disc outwards of the corotation point (rotating more slowly than the neutron star) may nevertheless contribute to spinning up the neutron star on account of the detailed structure of the magnetic field in those parts of disc.

  15. Binary Millisecond Pulsar Discovery via Gamma-Ray Pulsations

    SciTech Connect

    Pletsch, H. J.; Guillemot, L.; Fehrmann, H.; Allen, B.; Kramer, M.; Aulbert, C.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; de Angelis, A.; Atwood, W. B.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Borgland, A. W.; Bottacini, E.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cecchi, C.; Celik, O.; Charles, E.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiang, J.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; Dermer, C. D.; Digel, S. W.; Drell, P. S.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Dubois, R.; Dumora, D.; Favuzzi, C.; Ferrara, E. C.; Franckowiak, A.; Fukazawa, Y.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M. -. H.; Grove, J. E.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Hanabata, Y.; Harding, A. K.; den Hartog, P. R.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Hill, A. B.; Hou, X.; Hughes, R. E.; Johannesson, G.; Jackson, M. S.; Jogler, T.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, W. N.; Kataoka, J.; Kerr, M.; Knodlseder, J.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Massaro, F.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; Mehault, J.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nakamori, T.; Nemmen, R.; Nuss, E.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; de Palma, F.; Paneque, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Raino, S.; Rando, R.; Ray, P. S.; Razzano, M.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reposeur, T.; Ritz, S.; Romani, R. W.; Romoli, C.; Sanchez, D. A.; Parkinson, P. M. S.; Schulz, A.; Sgro, C.; do Couto e Silva, E.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, D. A.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Suson, D. J.; Takahashi, H.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. B.; Thayer, J. G.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Tinivella, M.; Troja, E.; Usher, T. L.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Vasileiou, V.; Vianello, G.; Vitale, V.; Waite, A. P.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.; Yang, Z.; Zimmer, S.

    2012-12-07

    We present that millisecond pulsars, old neutron stars spun up by accreting matter from a companion star, can reach high rotation rates of hundreds of revolutions per second. Until now, all such “recycled” rotation-powered pulsars have been detected by their spin-modulated radio emission. In a computing-intensive blind search of gamma-ray data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (with partial constraints from optical data), we detected a 2.5-millisecond pulsar, PSR J1311-3430. This unambiguously explains a formerly unidentified gamma-ray source that had been a decade-long enigma, confirming previous conjectures. Lastly, the pulsar is in a circular orbit with an orbital period of only 93 minutes, the shortest of any spin-powered pulsar binary ever found.

  16. Binary Millisecond Pulsar Discovery via Gamma-Ray Pulsations

    DOE PAGES

    Pletsch, H. J.; Guillemot, L.; Fehrmann, H.; ...

    2012-12-07

    We present that millisecond pulsars, old neutron stars spun up by accreting matter from a companion star, can reach high rotation rates of hundreds of revolutions per second. Until now, all such “recycled” rotation-powered pulsars have been detected by their spin-modulated radio emission. In a computing-intensive blind search of gamma-ray data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (with partial constraints from optical data), we detected a 2.5-millisecond pulsar, PSR J1311-3430. This unambiguously explains a formerly unidentified gamma-ray source that had been a decade-long enigma, confirming previous conjectures. Lastly, the pulsar is in a circular orbit with an orbital period ofmore » only 93 minutes, the shortest of any spin-powered pulsar binary ever found.« less

  17. Pulsar Search Results from the Arecibo Remote Command Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Miguel; Stovall, Kevin; Banaszak, Shawn A.; Becker, Alison; Biwer, Christopher M.; Boehler, Keith; Caballero, Keeisi; Christy, Brian; Cohen, Stephanie; Crawford, Fronefield; Cuellar, Andres; Danford, Andrew; Percy Dartez, Louis; Day, David; Flanigan, Joseph D.; Fonrouge, Aldo; Gonzalez, Adolfo; Gustavson, Kathy; Handzo, Emma; Hinojosa, Jesus; Jenet, Fredrick A.; Kaplan, David L. A.; Lommen, Andrea N.; Longoria, Chasity; Lopez, Janine; Lunsford, Grady; Mahany, Nicolas; Martinez, Jose; Mata, Alberto; Miller, Andy; Murray, James; Pankow, Chris; Ramirez, Ivan; Reser, Jackie; Rojas, Pablo; Rohr, Matthew; Rolph, Kristina; Rose, Caitlin; Rudnik, Philip; Siemens, Xavier; Tellez, Andrea; Tillman, Nicholas; Walker, Arielle; Wells, Bradley L.; Zaldivar, Jonathan; Zermeno, Adrienne; Gbncc Consortium, Palfa Consortium, Gbtdrift Consortium, Ao327 Consortium

    2015-01-01

    This poster presents the pulsar discoveries made by students in the Arecibo Remote Command Center (ARCC) program. The ARCC program was started at the University of Texas - Brownsville (UTB) within the Center for Advanced Radio Astronomy (CARA) as a group of scientists, faculty, graduate, undergraduate, and high school students interested in astrophysics. It has since expanded to form other ARCC programs at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee (UWM) and Franklin and Marshall College (F&M). The students in the ARCC group control the world's largest radio telescopes to search and discover pulsars. Pulsars are exotic neutron stars that emit beams of electromagnetic radiation. ARCC students use a web application to view and rate the images of radio pulsar candidates based on their signal characteristics. To date, ARCC students have searched through thousands of candidates and have discovered 61 pulsars to date.

  18. PROPAGATION AND STABILITY OF SUPERLUMINAL WAVES IN PULSAR WINDS

    SciTech Connect

    Mochol, Iwona; Kirk, John G. E-mail: john.kirk@mpi-hd.mpg.de

    2013-07-01

    Nonlinear electromagnetic waves with superluminal phase velocity can propagate in the winds around isolated pulsars, and around some pulsars in binary systems. Using a short-wavelength approximation, we find and analyze an integrable system of equations that govern their evolution in spherical geometry. A confined mode is identified that stagnates to finite pressure at large radius and can form a precursor to the termination shock. Using a simplified criterion, we find this mode is stable for most isolated pulsars, but may be unstable if the external pressure is high, such as in the pulsar wind nebulae in starburst galaxies and in W44. Pulsar winds in eccentric binary systems, such as PSR 1259-63, may go through phases with stable and unstable electromagnetic precursors, as well as phases in which the density is too high for these modes to propagate.

  19. Binary millisecond pulsar discovery via gamma-ray pulsations.

    PubMed

    Pletsch, H J; Guillemot, L; Fehrmann, H; Allen, B; Kramer, M; Aulbert, C; Ackermann, M; Ajello, M; de Angelis, A; Atwood, W B; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Bastieri, D; Bechtol, K; Bellazzini, R; Borgland, A W; Bottacini, E; Brandt, T J; Bregeon, J; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Buehler, R; Buson, S; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Casandjian, J M; Cecchi, C; Çelik, Ö; Charles, E; Chaves, R C G; Cheung, C C; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Conrad, J; Cutini, S; D'Ammando, F; Dermer, C D; Digel, S W; Drell, P S; Drlica-Wagner, A; Dubois, R; Dumora, D; Favuzzi, C; Ferrara, E C; Franckowiak, A; Fukazawa, Y; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gehrels, N; Germani, S; Giglietto, N; Giordano, F; Giroletti, M; Godfrey, G; Grenier, I A; Grondin, M-H; Grove, J E; Guiriec, S; Hadasch, D; Hanabata, Y; Harding, A K; den Hartog, P R; Hayashida, M; Hays, E; Hill, A B; Hou, X; Hughes, R E; Jóhannesson, G; Jackson, M S; Jogler, T; Johnson, A S; Johnson, W N; Kataoka, J; Kerr, M; Knödlseder, J; Kuss, M; Lande, J; Larsson, S; Latronico, L; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Massaro, F; Mayer, M; Mazziotta, M N; McEnery, J E; Mehault, J; Michelson, P F; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Nakamori, T; Nemmen, R; Nuss, E; Ohno, M; Ohsugi, T; Omodei, N; Orienti, M; Orlando, E; de Palma, F; Paneque, D; Perkins, J S; Piron, F; Pivato, G; Porter, T A; Rainò, S; Rando, R; Ray, P S; Razzano, M; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Reposeur, T; Ritz, S; Romani, R W; Romoli, C; Sanchez, D A; Saz Parkinson, P M; Schulz, A; Sgrò, C; do Couto e Silva, E; Siskind, E J; Smith, D A; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Suson, D J; Takahashi, H; Tanaka, T; Thayer, J B; Thayer, J G; Thompson, D J; Tibaldo, L; Tinivella, M; Troja, E; Usher, T L; Vandenbroucke, J; Vasileiou, V; Vianello, G; Vitale, V; Waite, A P; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Wood, M; Yang, Z; Zimmer, S

    2012-12-07

    Millisecond pulsars, old neutron stars spun up by accreting matter from a companion star, can reach high rotation rates of hundreds of revolutions per second. Until now, all such "recycled" rotation-powered pulsars have been detected by their spin-modulated radio emission. In a computing-intensive blind search of gamma-ray data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (with partial constraints from optical data), we detected a 2.5-millisecond pulsar, PSR J1311-3430. This unambiguously explains a formerly unidentified gamma-ray source that had been a decade-long enigma, confirming previous conjectures. The pulsar is in a circular orbit with an orbital period of only 93 minutes, the shortest of any spin-powered pulsar binary ever found.

  20. Pulsar rotation and dispersion measures and the galactic magnetic field.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manchester, R. N.

    1972-01-01

    Use of observations of pulsar polarization and pulse time of arrival at frequencies between 250 and 500 MHz to determine rotation and dispersion measures for 19 and 21 pulsars, respectively. These measurements have been used to calculate mean line-of-sight components of the magnetic field in the path to the pulsars. These and other observations show that there is probably no contribution to the observed rotation measure from the pulsar itself. Low-latitude, low-dispersion pulsars are observed to have strong field components, and a strong dependence of rotation-measure sign on galactic longitude has been found. The observations are consistent with a relatively uniform field of about 3.5 microgauss directed toward about l = 90 deg in the local region, but appear to be inconsistent with the helical model for the local field.