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Sample records for pulsatile luteinizing hormone

  1. Endogenous opiates modulate the pulsatile secretion of biologically active luteinizing hormone in man.

    PubMed

    Veldhuis, J D; Rogol, A D; Johnson, M L

    1983-12-01

    We studied the secretion of physiological pools of immunoreactive and biologically active luteinizing hormone in response to endogenous pulses of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GNRH) in eugonadal men. Concentrations of immunoactive and bioactive luteinizing hormone (LH) were determined in blood drawn at 20-min intervals for 8 h in eight normal men under two conditions: (a) after placebo, in order to evaluate spontaneous LH pulsations in the basal state, and (b) after administration of the opiate-receptor antagonist, naltrexone, which is believed to amplify the pulsatile release of endogenous GNRH. Spontaneous and naltrexone-stimulated secretion of LH occurred in pulses of high biological activity, as measured in the RICT (rat interstitial cell testosterone bioassay), i.e., bioactive:immunoactive LH ratios within both spontaneous and naltrexone-stimulated LH pulses were higher than corresponding interpulse ratios (P less than 0.001). Quantitative characterization of the pulsatile release of bioactive LH revealed the following specific effects of opiate-receptor blockade: increased 8-h mean and integrated serum concentrations of bioactive LH (P less than 0.002), enhanced pulse frequency of bioactive LH release (P less than 0.001), and augmented peak amplitude of bio-LH pulses (P less than 0.01). Moreover, this increase in episodic secretion of bioactive LH was associated with increased 8-h mean and integrated serum testosterone concentrations in these men (P less than 0.05). We conclude the following: (a) LH is normally released in spontaneous pulses of high biological activity in men; (b) when the endogenous GNRH signal is amplified by opiate-receptor blockade, the pituitary gland releases more frequent bioactive LH pulses, which are of high amplitude and contain a high bioactive:immunoactive LH ratio. This increase in pulsatile release of bioactive LH quantitated in the RICT assay in vitro is reflected by acutely increased serum testosterone concentrations in vivo

  2. Stimulation of luteinizing hormone subunit gene expression by pulsatile intracerebroventricular microinjection of galanin in female rats.

    PubMed

    Gajewska, A; Zwierzchowski, L; Kochman, K

    2004-06-01

    Although galanin, which exerts its effects both at the hypothalamic and pituitary level, has been implicated as an important neuroendocrine regulator of hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis activity, there is a lack of data concerning its involvement in the regulation of gonadotropin subunit gene expression. To elucidate whether galanin can influence luteinizing hormone (LH) subunit mRNA content, as well as affect gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor activity, a model based on pulsatile (one pulse per hour over 5 h) galanin (1 nM) microinjections directly into the third cerebral ventricle of ovariectomized (OVX) and/or oestrogen/progesterone-pretreated rats was used. Furthermore, to determine galanin effects on GnRH-induced LH subunit mRNA synthesis, a cocktail of 1 nM GnRH and 1 nM galanin was coadministered in a pulsatile manner to OVX/steroid primed rats. Subsequently, to obtain data concerning the role of galanin receptors in the regulation of pituitary alpha (common to LH, follicle-stimulating hormone, thyroid-stimulating hormone) and LHbeta subunit gene expression, OVX/oestrogen/progesterone rats received microinjections of 1 nM of the receptor antagonist galantide and 1 nM of galanin. In this case, both substances were administered separately, with a 30 min lag, according to which each galantide pulse always preceded a galanin pulse. Northern-blot analysis revealed that intracerebroventricular pulsatile galanin injections were effective in stimulation of both alpha and LHbeta subunit mRNA levels and that this effect was apparently steroid-dependent. Moreover, galanin also up-regulated GnRH receptor functional parameters (affinity and maximum binding capacity) but was ineffective in potentiating GnRH-induced accumulation of both subunit mRNAs. The results from the study also indicate that galanin acts through its own receptor(s) because a receptor antagonist, galantide, significantly reduced the stimulatory effect exerted by galanin on the expression

  3. Selective optogenetic activation of arcuate kisspeptin neurons generates pulsatile luteinizing hormone secretion.

    PubMed

    Han, Su Young; McLennan, Timothy; Czieselsky, Katja; Herbison, Allan E

    2015-10-20

    Normal reproductive functioning in mammals depends upon gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons generating a pulsatile pattern of gonadotropin secretion. The neural mechanism underlying the episodic release of GnRH is not known, although recent studies have suggested that the kisspeptin neurons located in the arcuate nucleus (ARN) may be involved. In the present experiments we expressed channelrhodopsin (ChR2) in the ARN kisspeptin population to test directly whether synchronous activation of these neurons would generate pulsatile luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion in vivo. Characterization studies showed that this strategy targeted ChR2 to 70% of all ARN kisspeptin neurons and that, in vitro, these neurons were activated by 473-nm blue light with high fidelity up to 30 Hz. In vivo, the optogenetic activation of ARN kisspeptin neurons at 10 and 20 Hz evoked high amplitude, pulse-like increments in LH secretion in anesthetized male mice. Stimulation at 10 Hz for 2 min was sufficient to generate repetitive LH pulses. In diestrous female mice, only 20-Hz activation generated significant increments in LH secretion. In ovariectomized mice, 5-, 10-, and 20-Hz activation of ARN kisspeptin neurons were all found to evoke LH pulses. Part of the sex difference, but not the gonadal steroid dependence, resulted from differential pituitary sensitivity to GnRH. Experiments in kisspeptin receptor-null mice, showed that kisspeptin was the critical neuropeptide underlying the ability of ARN kisspeptin neurons to generate LH pulses. Together these data demonstrate that synchronized activation of the ARN kisspeptin neuronal population generates pulses of LH. PMID:26443858

  4. Selective optogenetic activation of arcuate kisspeptin neurons generates pulsatile luteinizing hormone secretion.

    PubMed

    Han, Su Young; McLennan, Timothy; Czieselsky, Katja; Herbison, Allan E

    2015-10-20

    Normal reproductive functioning in mammals depends upon gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons generating a pulsatile pattern of gonadotropin secretion. The neural mechanism underlying the episodic release of GnRH is not known, although recent studies have suggested that the kisspeptin neurons located in the arcuate nucleus (ARN) may be involved. In the present experiments we expressed channelrhodopsin (ChR2) in the ARN kisspeptin population to test directly whether synchronous activation of these neurons would generate pulsatile luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion in vivo. Characterization studies showed that this strategy targeted ChR2 to 70% of all ARN kisspeptin neurons and that, in vitro, these neurons were activated by 473-nm blue light with high fidelity up to 30 Hz. In vivo, the optogenetic activation of ARN kisspeptin neurons at 10 and 20 Hz evoked high amplitude, pulse-like increments in LH secretion in anesthetized male mice. Stimulation at 10 Hz for 2 min was sufficient to generate repetitive LH pulses. In diestrous female mice, only 20-Hz activation generated significant increments in LH secretion. In ovariectomized mice, 5-, 10-, and 20-Hz activation of ARN kisspeptin neurons were all found to evoke LH pulses. Part of the sex difference, but not the gonadal steroid dependence, resulted from differential pituitary sensitivity to GnRH. Experiments in kisspeptin receptor-null mice, showed that kisspeptin was the critical neuropeptide underlying the ability of ARN kisspeptin neurons to generate LH pulses. Together these data demonstrate that synchronized activation of the ARN kisspeptin neuronal population generates pulses of LH.

  5. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone pulsatile administration restores luteinizing hormone pulsatility and normal testosterone levels in males with hyperprolactinemia.

    PubMed

    Bouchard, P; Lagoguey, M; Brailly, S; Schaison, G

    1985-02-01

    Hyperprolactinemia in men is frequently associated with hypogonadism. Normalization of serum PRL levels is generally associated with an increase in serum testosterone (T) to normal. To determine the mechanism of the inhibitory effect of hyperprolactinemia on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, we studied the effect of intermittent pulsatile GnRH administration on LH pulsatility and T levels in four men with prolactinomas. All patients had high PRL values (100-3000 ng/ml), low LH (mean +/- SEM, 2.2 +/- 0.1 mIU/ml), and low T values (2.3 +/- 0.3 ng/ml), with no other apparent abnormality of pituitary function. GnRH was administered iv using a pump delivering a bolus dose of 10 micrograms every 90 min for 12 days. No LH pulses were detected before treatment. Pulsatile GnRH administration resulted in a significant increase in basal LH levels (6.7 +/- 0.6 mIU/ml; P less than 0.001) and restored LH pulsatility. In addition, T levels increased significantly to normal values in all patients (7.8 +/- 0.4 ng/ml; P less than 0.001) and were normal or supranormal as long as the pump was in use, although PRL levels remained elevated. These data, therefore, suggest that hyperprolactinemia produces hypogonadism primarily by interfering with pulsatile GnRH release.

  6. Pulsatile and sexually dimorphic secretion of luteinizing hormone in the human infant on the day of birth.

    PubMed

    de Zegher, F; Devlieger, H; Veldhuis, J D

    1992-11-01

    Experimental evidence indicates that the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis is operational and sexually dimorphic in the mammalian fetus and newborn. We examined the dynamics of human luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion in five male and three female infants on the day of birth, after 34-41 wk of gestation. The infants were polycythemic, and blood samples were obtained every 20 min for 160 to 360 min during a therapeutic, standardized, isovolumetric, partial exchange transfusion. Serum LH was measured by an immunoradiometric assay that does not cross-react with human chorionic gonadotropin. The serum profiles of LH presented a striking sex dimorphism with elevated LH levels in male compared with female newborns. Deconvolution analysis of all male LH profiles was consistent with a high-frequency, pulsatile secretory pattern. Testosterone, measured in a pooled serum sample of each infant, was 10-fold higher in male than in female newborns. These results document pulsatile and sexually dimorphic secretion of LH in the human infant as early as the first day of postnatal life. It is possible that the augmented LH secretion in the male newborn participates in the neonatal rise of the serum testosterone concentration.

  7. The effect of nalmefene on pulsatile secretion of luteinizing hormone and prolactin in men.

    PubMed

    Graves, G R; Kennedy, T G; Weick, R F; Casper, R F

    1993-10-01

    Luteinizing hormone (LH) and prolactin are released in pulses which are relatively synchronous in the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle in women. The concordance of LH and prolactin pulses in normal men has not been reported. The objectives of this study were firstly to determine whether LH and prolactin pulses are synchronous in men, and secondly to examine the effects of naloxone and a new orally active opiate antagonist, nalmefene, on LH and prolactin release in men. Three groups of normal male subjects received saline infusion (control n = 5), naloxone infusion (2 mg/h; n = 5) or nalmefene (10 mg p.o.; n = 6). Blood samples were collected every 15 min for 2 h before and 6 h after study medication for determination of LH, prolactin and testosterone by radioimmunoassay. Both naloxone and nalmefene resulted in a significant increase in LH pulse frequency and in mean serum LH and testosterone concentrations with no change in LH pulse amplitude, prolactin pulse frequency or amplitude. In controls, 61% of LH pulses were synchronous with prolactin pulses. There was a decrease in concomitance of LH and prolactin pulses with naloxone (48%) and nalmefene (24%; P < 0.025) administration. In contrast, 52% of prolactin pulses were concomitant with LH pulses in controls, while naloxone (100%) but not nalmefene (67%) resulted in a significant (P < 0.01) increase in pulse synchrony. The difference observed between naloxone and nalmefene on prolactin--LH pulse synchrony is probably due to differential opioid receptor activity at the pituitary and hypothalamic level.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8300813

  8. Interleukin 1. alpha. inhibits prostaglandin E sub 2 release to suppress pulsatile release of luteinizing hormone but not follicle-stimulating hormone

    SciTech Connect

    Rettori, V.; McCann, S.M. ); Gimeno, M.F. ); Karara, A. ); Gonzalez, M.C. )

    1991-04-01

    Interleukin 1{alpha} (IL-1{alpha}), a powerful endogenous pyrogen released from monocytes and macrophages by bacterial endotoxin, stimulates corticotropin, prolactin, and somatotropin release and inhibits thyrotropin release by hypothalamic action. The authors injected recombinant human IL-1{alpha} into the third cerebral ventricle, to study its effect on the pulsatile release of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) in conscious, freely moving, ovariectomized rats. Intraventricular injection of 0.25 pmol of IL-1{alpha} caused an almost immediate reduction of plasma LH concentration. To determine the mechanism of the suppression of LH release, mediobasal hypothalamic fragments were incubated in vitro with IL-1{alpha} (10 pM) and the release of LH-releasing hormone (LHRH) and prostaglandin E{sub 2} into the medium was measured by RIA in the presence or absence of nonrepinephrine. 1{alpha} reduced basal LHRH release and blocked LHRH release induced by nonrepinephrine. In conclusion, IL-1{alpha} suppresses LH but not FSH release by an almost complete cessation of pulsatile release of LH in the castrated rat. The mechanism of this effect appears to be by inhibition of prostaglandin E{sub 2}-mediated release of LHRH.

  9. Atrazine inhibits pulsatile luteinizing hormone release without altering pituitary sensitivity to a gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor agonist in female Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Foradori, Chad D; Hinds, Laura R; Hanneman, William H; Legare, Marie E; Clay, Colin M; Handa, Robert J

    2009-07-01

    Atrazine [2-chloro-4-(ethylamino)-6-(isopropylamino)-s-tri-azine] is one of the most commonly used herbicides in the United States. Atrazine has been shown to suppress luteinizing hormone (LH) release and can lead to a prolongation of the estrous cycle in the rat. The objectives of this study were to examine the effects of atrazine on normal tonic release of LH and to elucidate the site of action of atrazine in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Episodic release of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and the corresponding release of LH from the anterior pituitary gland are required for normal reproductive function. To determine if atrazine affects pulsatile LH release, ovariectomized adult female Wistar rats were administered atrazine (50, 100, or 200 mg/kg of body weight daily by gavage) or vehicle control for 4 days. On the final day of atrazine treatment, blood samples were obtained using an indwelling right atrial cannula. In the group receiving 200 mg/kg, there was a significant reduction in LH pulse frequency and a concomitant increase in pulse amplitude. To determine if the effects of atrazine on LH release were due to changes at the level of the pituitary, animals were passively immunized against endogenous GnRH, treated with atrazine, and challenged with a GnRH receptor agonist. Atrazine failed to alter pituitary sensitivity to the GnRH receptor agonist at any dose used. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that high doses of atrazine affect the GnRH pulse generator in the brain and not at the level of gonadotrophs in the pituitary.

  10. Role of endogenous opiates in the expression of negative feedback actions of androgen and estrogen on pulsatile properties of luteinizing hormone secretion in man.

    PubMed

    Veldhuis, J D; Rogol, A D; Samojlik, E; Ertel, N H

    1984-07-01

    We have tested the participation of endogenous opiate pathways in the negative feedback actions of gonadal steroids on pulsatile properties of luteinizing (LH) hormone release in normal men. To this end, sex steroid hormones were infused intravenously at dosages that under steady state conditions selectively suppressed either the frequency or the amplitude of the pulsatile LH signal. The properties of pulsatile LH secretion were assessed quantitatively by computerized analysis of LH series derived from serial blood sampling over 12 h of observation. When the pure (nonaromatizable) androgen, 5-alpha-dihydrotestosterone, was infused continuously for 108 h at the blood production rate of testosterone, we were able to achieve selective inhibition of LH pulse frequency akin to that observed in experimental animals after low-dosage androgen replacement. Under these conditions, serum concentrations of testosterone and estradiol-17 beta did not change significantly, but serum 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone concentrations increased approximately two- to threefold, with a corresponding increase in levels of its major metabolite, 5 alpha-androstan-3 alpha, 17 beta-diol. In separate experiments, the infusion of estradiol-17 beta at its blood production rate over a 4.5-d interval selectively suppressed LH pulse amplitude without influencing LH pulse frequency. Estrogen infusion increased serum estradiol-17 beta levels approximately twofold without significantly altering blood androgen concentrations. We then used these schedules of selective androgen or estrogen infusion to investigate the participation of endogenous opiates in the individual inhibitory feedback actions of pure androgen or estrogen on pulsatile LH release by administering a potent and specific opiate-receptor antagonist, naltrexone, during the infusions. Our observations indicate that, despite the continuous infusion of a dosage of 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone that significantly suppresses LH pulse frequency, co

  11. Effects of alcohol on pulsatile luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) secretion in the adult male rat

    SciTech Connect

    Badger, T.M.; Abdallah, M.M.; Hayden, J.B. )

    1989-02-09

    To determine possible hypothalamic actions of alcohol on hormone secretion, the effects of acute intragastric alcohol on plasma LH and FSH pulsations were studied. One jugular and one intragastric cannula were surgically implanted into adult male Sprague Dawley rats. Eight days later, rats were bilaterally castrated at 1400 h and infused intragastrically with either saline or 3 g/kg ethanol between 0700 h 0800 h the next days. Blood samples (300 microliters) were collected every 5 min for 3 h (starting at 0800 h), centrifuged and the plasma was frozen for LH and FSH radioimmunoassay. The blood cells were resuspended in saline and returned to the animal immediately following the next sample collection. While the mean plasma LH or FSH concentration did not vary significantly between the alcohol-treated and saline-treated rats, the mean LH (but not FSH) pulse frequency was lower in ethanol-treated rats (3.3 {plus minus} 0.25 pulses/3 h) than saline-treated controls (7.2 {plus minus} 0.3 pulses/3 h). In addition, mean area under the OH pulses were significantly greater in ethanol-treated than saline controls. These data suggest that: (1) ethanol acts to reduce the frequency of LHRH release for the hypothalamus and increase the area under each LH pulse; and (2) LH and FSH secretion are differentially regulated.

  12. Different effects of subnormal levels of progesterone on the pulsatile and surge mode secretion of luteinizing hormone in ovariectomized goats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seungjoon; Tanaka, Tomomi; Kamomae, Hideo

    2003-07-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that endocrinological threshold levels of progesterone that induce negative feedback effects on the pulsatile and surge modes of LH secretion are different. Our approach was to examine the effects of subnormal progesterone concentrations on LH secretion. Long-term ovariectomized Shiba goats that had received implants of silastic capsules containing estradiol were divided into three groups. The high progesterone (high P) group received a subcutaneous implant of a silastic packet (50 x 70 mm) containing progesterone, and the low progesterone (low P) group received a similar implant of a small packet (25 x 40 mm) containing progesterone. The control (non-P) group received no treatment with exogenous progesterone. Blood samples were collected daily throughout the experiment for the analysis of gonadal steroid hormone levels and at 10-min intervals for 8 h on Days 0, 3, and 7 (Day 0: just before progesterone treatment) for analysis of the pulsatile frequency of LH secretion. Then estradiol was infused into the jugular vein of all animals at a rate of 3 microg/h for 16 h on Day 8 to determine whether an LH surge was induced. Blood samples were collected every 2 h from 4 h before the start of the estradiol infusion until 48 h after the start of the infusion. In each group, the mean +/- SEM concentration after progesterone implant treatment was 3.3 +/- 0.1 ng/ml for the high P group, 1.1 +/- 0.1 ng/ml for the low P group, and <0.1 ng/ml for the non-P group, concentrations similar to the luteal levels, subluteal levels, and follicular phase levels of the normal estrous cycle, respectively. The estradiol concentration ranged from 4 to 8 pg/ml after estradiol capsule implants in all groups. The LH pulse frequency was significantly (P < 0.05) suppressed on Day 3 (6.2 +/- 0.5 pulses/8 h) and on Day 7 (2.6 +/- 0.9 pulses/8 h) relative to Day 0 (9.0 +/- 0.5 pulses/8 h) in the high P group. In both the low P and non-P groups, however, the changes

  13. Fasting suppresses pulsatile luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion and enhances orderliness of LH release in young but not older men.

    PubMed

    Bergendahl, M; Aloi, J A; Iranmanesh, A; Mulligan, T M; Veldhuis, J D

    1998-06-01

    Pulsatile gonadotropin secretion and sex-steroid concentrations are suppressed reversibly in young fasted or malnourished human subjects. In this study, we investigated the impact of age on the dynamic neuroendocrine mechanisms underlying this stress response in healthy young (age, 28 +/- 3 yr, n = 8) vs. older (age 67 +/- 2 yr, n = 8) men with similar body mass indices (mean, 26 +/- 0.6 vs. 26 +/- 1.3 kg/m2, respectively). Serum LH concentrations were measured by immunoradiometric assay (IRMA) in blood collected at 10-min intervals over 27 h on a control (fed) day and on the third day of a 3.5-day fast (water only) assigned in randomized order. After 24 h of basal sampling, GnRH (10 micrograms i.v. bolus) was administered to test gonadotrope responsiveness. Cortisol, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, androstenedione, testosterone, FSH, GH, and PRL were measured in 24-h pooled serum as positive and negative control hormones. Approximate entropy was used to quantitate the orderliness of LH release over 24 h, and a multiple-parameter deconvolution method was applied to quantify pulsatile LH secretion and LH half-life. In the fed state, older men exhibited elevated mean (24-h pooled) serum FSH and cortisol concentrations compared with young controls but equivalent serum LH concentrations and reduced serum GH, free testosterone, androstenedione, and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate concentrations. Fed older men also manifested a lower frequency and amplitude of 24-h pulsatile LH secretion, and, by approximate entropy calculations, a more disorderly pattern of basal LH release than younger individuals. Three- and one-half days of fasting evoked 40% and 47% increases in mean (24-h) serum cortisol concentrations in young and older men, respectively (P < 0.01 vs. fed, but P = not significant for percentage rise in older vs. young men). Concurrently, fasting induced a 2.1-fold fall in the 24-h endogenous LH production rate in young men (fed 36 +/- 9.7 vs. fasted 17 +/- 2.0 IU

  14. Luteinizing hormone (LH) blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ICSH - blood test; Luteinizing hormone - blood test; Interstitial cell stimulating hormone - blood test ... to temporarily stop medicines that may affect the test results. Be sure to tell your provider about ...

  15. Effect of pulse frequency and amplitude of D-Trp6-luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone on the pulsatile secretion of prolactin and LH.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, T; Bordiu, E; Rubio, J A; Duran, A; Charro, A L

    1993-09-01

    This work analyzes the effect of the pulse amplitude and frequency of a potent LHRH analog, D-Trp6-LHRH, in a perfusion system of isolated rat pituitary cells. To this purpose, we studied the LH and PRL secretion in different conditions: basal secretion, secretion after increasing concentrations of D-Trp6-LHRL (0.001, 0.01, 0.1 and 1 nM) secretion in function of the pulses frequency (2,3, and 4 pulses per h) and amplitude (0.1, 1 and 10 nM). The principal findings were: 1. The basal LH and PRL secretions was pulsatile; 2. The stimulation of LH by the analog was not dose-dependent; 3. When more than 2 pulses per h were administered, a rapid desensitization of gonadotroph to release LH (at 20-30 min) occurred; 4. There was a loss of pulsatility of PRL secretion with an increase in the pulse frequency and amplitude of the D-Trp6-LHRH, which was produced parallelly to the desensitization of the gonadotroph to release LH. In summary, these findings suggest that a rapid loss of pulsatility of the PRL when the D-Trp6-LHRH pulse frequency and amplitude is increased might be due to the early desensitization of the gonadotroph to the analog.

  16. Sexual differentiation of the mechanism controlling pulsatile secretion of luteinizing hormone contributes to sexual differences in the timing of puberty in sheep.

    PubMed

    Claypool, L E; Foster, D L

    1990-02-01

    Sexual differences in the regulation of tonic luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion were examined in immature female and male sheep (eight each, including six pairs of female/male twins). After gonadectomy of lambs at 2 weeks of age, Silastic capsules filled with estradiol, a primary central feedback steroid in both females and males, were implanted every 3 weeks for 3 days, and then removed, so that the pattern of LH secretion could be repeatedly determined in the same individuals both with and without steroid feedback. Implanted capsules yielded circulating steroid levels of 2-5 pg/ml. Circulating LH concentrations were determined by radioimmunoassay in blood samples collected at 12-min intervals for 4 h immediately before estradiol was implanted, and again, immediately before it was removed 3 days later. In male lambs, a decrease in responsiveness of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis to inhibition by estradiol began at 8-11 weeks, as evidenced by the progressive increase in mean LH concentrations and frequency of LH pulses. This correlated temporally with the onset of spermatogenesis in intact male controls (n = 8). In females, a similar decrease in responsiveness did not occur until 26-29 weeks of age, corresponding to the onset of ovulatory cycles in intact female controls (n = 6). In the absence of estradiol implants, LH pulse frequencies were higher in male lambs than in female lambs between 5 and 35 weeks of age. There was no further increase in LH pulse frequency in the absence of the gonads in either sex during the pubertal period. These findings suggest that the mechanism regulating tonic LH secretion in developing lambs is sexually differentiated in its responsiveness to inhibition by estradiol. This differentiation also occurs at a more fundamental steroid-independent level, but any causal relationship between the higher steroid-independent LH pulse frequency and the lower responsiveness to estradiol negative feedback in males is not evident. We hypothesize

  17. 21 CFR 862.1485 - Luteinizing hormone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Luteinizing hormone test system. 862.1485 Section... Systems § 862.1485 Luteinizing hormone test system. (a) Identification. A luteinizing hormone test system is a device intended to measure luteinizing hormone in serum and urine. Luteinizing...

  18. 21 CFR 862.1485 - Luteinizing hormone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Luteinizing hormone test system. 862.1485 Section... Systems § 862.1485 Luteinizing hormone test system. (a) Identification. A luteinizing hormone test system is a device intended to measure luteinizing hormone in serum and urine. Luteinizing...

  19. 21 CFR 862.1485 - Luteinizing hormone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Luteinizing hormone test system. 862.1485 Section... Systems § 862.1485 Luteinizing hormone test system. (a) Identification. A luteinizing hormone test system is a device intended to measure luteinizing hormone in serum and urine. Luteinizing...

  20. 21 CFR 862.1485 - Luteinizing hormone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Luteinizing hormone test system. 862.1485 Section... Systems § 862.1485 Luteinizing hormone test system. (a) Identification. A luteinizing hormone test system is a device intended to measure luteinizing hormone in serum and urine. Luteinizing...

  1. 21 CFR 862.1485 - Luteinizing hormone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Luteinizing hormone test system. 862.1485 Section... Systems § 862.1485 Luteinizing hormone test system. (a) Identification. A luteinizing hormone test system is a device intended to measure luteinizing hormone in serum and urine. Luteinizing...

  2. Diurnal pattern of pulsatile luteinizing hormone and testosterone secretion in adult male rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta): influence of the timing of daily meal intake.

    PubMed

    Mattern, L G; Helmreich, D L; Cameron, J L

    1993-03-01

    Adult male rhesus monkeys have a diurnal pattern of reproductive hormone secretion that is characterized by significantly elevated LH and testosterone secretion in the evening hours and a nadir in secretion of these hormones in the morning. To test the hypothesis that the daily pattern of food intake may play a role in regulating the diurnal pattern of reproductive hormone secretion we performed three studies. First, to determine the relationship between the timing of the diurnal rise in LH secretion and meal consumption, blood samples were collected from 13 adult male rhesus monkeys via chronically indwelling venous catheters (samples every 15-20 min from 0800-0800 h) while monkeys were maintained on the standard feeding regimen in our colony (one meal of Purina monkey chow fed between 1100 and 1200 h). On a day of normal feeding there was a significant diurnal rhythm in mean LH concentrations with elevated levels at night (nadir: 13.41 +/- 0.82 ng/ml from 0800-1100 h; peak: 21.34 +/- 1.56 ng/ml from 2000-2300 h, P < or = 0.05). The rising phase of the diurnal rhythm in LH secretion was apparent starting in the early afternoon, shortly after the daily meal, at 1400 h (5 h before lights went off at 1900 h), and the diurnal rise in LH secretion was no longer apparent by 0500 h (several hours before the lights went on at 0700 h). Second, we examined the influence of missing the daily meal on the diurnal pattern of LH and testosterone secretion. Blood samples were collected for a 24-h period on a day of fasting from 9 monkeys. On a day of fasting there was no diurnal rise in plasma LH or testosterone concentrations; plasma concentrations of these hormones remained at the low morning levels throughout the day. Third, we examined the diurnal pattern of LH and testosterone secretion after adapting 5 monkeys (for 6-8 weeks) to a new meal time that was 6 h later in the day than the standard meal time (i.e. at 1700 h). After adaptation to this later feeding time monkeys

  3. Simultaneous radioimmunoassay for luteinizing hormone and prolactin

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, M.K.; Deschepper, C.F.

    1985-05-01

    A combined radioimmunoassay (RIA) for the measurement of the anterior pituitary proteins luteinizing hormone (LH) and prolactin (PRL) is described and compared with individual RIAs for these hormones. The standard curves and the sample values for LH and PRL were identical when determined in a combined or in an individual RIA. This technique may prove useful to a number of laboratories where it is desirable to determine levels of more than one hormone in limited sample volumes.

  4. Episodic leptin release is independent of luteinizing hormone secretion.

    PubMed

    Sir-Petermann, T; Maliqueo, M; Palomino, A; Vantman, D; Recabarren, S E; Wildt, L

    1999-11-01

    Several studies suggest that leptin modulates hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis functions. Leptin may stimulate release of gonadotrophin releasing hormone (GnRH) from the hypothalamus and of gonadotrophins from the pituitary. A synchronicity of luteinizing hormone (LH) and leptin pulses has been described in healthy women and in patients with polycystic ovarian syndrome, suggesting that leptin may modulate the episodic secretion of LH. However, it has not been established whether LH regulates the episodic secretion of leptin. To further examine LH-leptin interactions, we studied the episodic fluctuations of circulating LH and leptin in two patients with Kallmann's syndrome (KS) before and on day 7 of pulsatile GnRH administration, and compared these with those observed in the early follicular phase of 10 regularly menstruating women divided into two control groups according to the body mass index of each patient. To assess episodic hormone secretion, blood samples were collected at 10 min intervals for 6 h, before and on day 7 of GnRH administration in KS patients, and during days 3-7 of the follicular phase in normally cycling women. LH and leptin concentrations were measured in all samples. For pulse analysis, the cluster algorithm was used. Before treatment, an apulsatile pattern with no endogenous LH pulsations was observed in both KS patients. However, leptin pulses were assessed in both women. During GnRH administration, pulsatile LH activity was achieved in both patients with pulse characteristics similar to those of the respective control group. Serum leptin concentrations and leptin pulsatile patterns were not modified. These results suggest that circulating leptin is probably not modulated by pulsatile GnRH-LH secretion.

  5. 21 CFR 522.1820 - Pituitary luteinizing hormone for injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pituitary luteinizing hormone for injection. 522... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1820 Pituitary luteinizing hormone for injection. (a) Specifications. The drug is a... standard pituitary luteinizing hormone and is reconstituted for use by addition of 5 milliliters of...

  6. 21 CFR 522.1820 - Pituitary luteinizing hormone for injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pituitary luteinizing hormone for injection. 522... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1820 Pituitary luteinizing hormone for injection. (a) Specifications. The drug is a... standard pituitary luteinizing hormone and is reconstituted for use by addition of 5 milliliters of...

  7. 21 CFR 522.1820 - Pituitary luteinizing hormone for injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pituitary luteinizing hormone for injection. 522... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1820 Pituitary luteinizing hormone for injection. (a) Specifications. The drug is a... standard pituitary luteinizing hormone and is reconstituted for use by addition of 5 milliliters of...

  8. 21 CFR 522.1820 - Pituitary luteinizing hormone for injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pituitary luteinizing hormone for injection. 522... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1820 Pituitary luteinizing hormone for injection. (a) Specifications. The drug is a... standard pituitary luteinizing hormone and is reconstituted for use by addition of 5 milliliters of...

  9. Active acromegaly enhances spontaneous parathyroid hormone pulsatility.

    PubMed

    Mazziotti, Gherardo; Cimino, Vincenzo; De Menis, Ernesto; Bonadonna, Stefania; Bugari, Giovanna; De Marinis, Laura; Veldhuis, Johannes D; Giustina, Andrea

    2006-06-01

    In healthy subjects, parathyroid hormone (PTH) is secreted in a dual fashion, with low-amplitude and high-frequency pulses superimposed on tonic secretion. These 2 components of PTH secretion seem to have different effects on target organs. The aim of our study was to evaluate whether growth hormone excess in acromegaly may modify the spontaneous pulsatility of PTH. Five male patients with newly diagnosed active acromegaly and 8 healthy subjects were evaluated by 3-minute blood sampling for 6 hours. Plasma PTH concentrations were evaluated by multiparameter deconvolution analysis. Plasma PTH release profiles were also subjected to an approximate entropy (ApEn) estimate, which provides an ensemble measure of the serial regularity or orderliness of the release process. In acromegalic patients, baseline serum PTH values were not significantly different from those measured in the healthy subjects, as well as tonic PTH secretion rate, number of bursts, fractional pulsatile PTH secretion, and ApEn ratio. Conversely, PTH pulse half-duration was significantly longer in acromegalic patients vs healthy subjects (11.8+/-0.95 vs 6.9+/-1.6 minutes; P=.05), whereas PTH pulse mass showed a tendency (P=.06) to be significantly greater in acromegalic patients. These preliminary data suggest that growth hormone excess may affect PTH secretory dynamics in patients with acromegaly. Potentially negative bone effects of the modifications of PTH secretory pattern in acromegaly should be investigated.

  10. Characterization of cDNA for precursor of human luteinizing hormone releasing hormone.

    PubMed

    Seeburg, P H; Adelman, J P

    Human reproduction is controlled by the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis laid down early in fetal development. Luteinizing hormone releasing hormone (LHRH), also termed gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH), is a decapeptide and is a key molecule in this control circuit. It is produced by hypothalamic neurones, secreted in a pulsatile manner into the capillary plexus of the median eminence and effects the release of luteinizing hormone and follicle stimulating hormone from gonadotropic cells in the anterior pituitary. The peptide may have further functions, including behavioural ones, as LHRH or LHRH-like immunoreactivity has been found in gonadal tissue, placenta and the central nervous system, and exogenously administered LHRH is shown to affect behaviour. To investigate the biosynthesis of LHRH, we have now isolated cloned genomic and cDNA sequences encoding the precursor form of LHRH, the existence of which had been suggested from chromatographic studies of hypothalamic and placental extracts. These DNA sequences code for a protein of 92 amino acids in which the LHRH decapeptide is preceded by a signal peptide of 23 amino acids and followed by a Gly-Lys-Arg sequence, as expected for enzymatic cleavage of the decapeptide from its precursor and amidation of the carboxy-terminal of LHRH.

  11. Sociosexual stimuli and gonadotropin-releasing hormone/luteinizing hormone secretion in sheep and goats.

    PubMed

    Hawken, P A R; Martin, G B

    2012-08-01

    Sociosexual stimuli have a profound effect on the physiology of all species. Sheep and goats provide an ideal model to study the impact of sociosexual stimuli on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis because we can use the robust changes in the pulsatile secretion of luteinizing hormone as a bioassay of gonadotropin-releasing hormone secretion. We can also correlate these changes with neural activity using the immediate early gene c-fos and in real time using changes in electrical activity in the mediobasal hypothalamus of female goats. In this review, we will update our current understanding of the proven and potential mechanisms and mode of action of the male effect in sheep and goats and then briefly compare our understanding of sociosexual stimuli in ungulate species with the "traditional" definition of a pheromone.

  12. Encoding and decoding mechanisms of pulsatile hormone secretion.

    PubMed

    Walker, J J; Terry, J R; Tsaneva-Atanasova, K; Armstrong, S P; McArdle, C A; Lightman, S L

    2010-12-01

    Ultradian pulsatile hormone secretion underlies the activity of most neuroendocrine systems, including the hypothalamic-pituitary adrenal (HPA) and gonadal (HPG) axes, and this pulsatile mode of signalling permits the encoding of information through both amplitude and frequency modulation. In the HPA axis, glucocorticoid pulse amplitude increases in anticipation of waking, and, in the HPG axis, changing gonadotrophin-releasing hormone pulse frequency is the primary means by which the body alters its reproductive status during development (i.e. puberty). The prevalence of hormone pulsatility raises two crucial questions: how are ultradian pulses encoded (or generated) by these systems, and how are these pulses decoded (or interpreted) at their target sites? We have looked at mechanisms within the HPA axis responsible for encoding the pulsatile mode of glucocorticoid signalling that we observe in vivo. We review evidence regarding the 'hypothalamic pulse generator' hypothesis, and describe an alternative model for pulse generation, which involves steroid feedback-dependent endogenous rhythmic activity throughout the HPA axis. We consider the decoding of hormone pulsatility by taking the HPG axis as a model system and focussing on molecular mechanisms of frequency decoding by pituitary gonadotrophs.

  13. Nonlinear analysis and prediction of pulsatile hormone secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Prank, K. |; Kloppstech, M.; Nowlan, S.J.; Harms, H.M.; Brabant, G.; Hesch, R.; Sejnowski, T.J.

    1996-06-01

    Pulsatile hormone secretion is observed in almost every hormonal system. The frequency of episodic hormone release ranges from approximately 10 to 100 pulses in 24 hours. This temporal mode of secretion is an important feature of intercellular information transfer in addition to a dose-response dependent regulation. It has been demonstrated in a number of experiments that changes in the temporal pattern of pulsatile hormone secretion specifically regulate cellular and organ function and structure. Recent evidence links osteoporosis, a disease characterized by loss of bone mass and structure, to changes in the dynamics of pulsatile parathyroid hormone (PTH) secretion. In our study we applied nonlinear and linear time series prediction to characterize the secretory dynamics of PTH in both healthy human subjects and patients with osteoporosis. Osteoporotic patients appear to lack periods of high predictability found in normal humans. In contrast to patients with osteoporosis patients with hyperparathyroidism, a condition which despite sometimes reduced bone mass has a preserved bone architecture, show periods of high predictability of PTH secretion. Using stochastic surrogate data sets which match certain statistical properties of the original time series significant nonlinear determinism could be found for the PTH time series of a group of healthy subjects. Using classical nonlinear analytical techniques we could demonstrate that the irregular pattern of pulsatile PTH secretion in healthy men exhibits characteristics of deterministic chaos. Pulsatile secretion of PTH in healthy subjects seems to be a first example of nonlinear determinism in an apparently irregular hormonal rhythm in human physiology. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. Association of the genetic variants of luteinizing hormone, luteinizing hormone receptor and polycystic ovary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background High circulating luteinizing hormone (LH) level is a typical biochemical feature of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) whose pathophysiology is still unclear. Certain mutations of LH and LH receptor (LHR) may lead to changes in bioactivity of these hormones. The aim of this study was determine the role of the LH and LHR polymorphisms in the pathogenesis of PCOS using a genetic approach. Methods 315 PCOS women and 212 controls were screened for the gene variants of LH G1052A and LHR rs61996318 polymorphisms by polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). Results PCOS patients had significantly more A allele frequency of LH G1052A mutations than controls (p=0.001). Within PCOS group, carriers of LH 1052A allele had lower LH (p=0.05) and higher fasting glucose levels (p=0.04). No subjects were identified with LHR rs61996318 polymorphisms. A new LHR single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was found without clear association with PCOS. Conclusions Results suggested LH G1052A mutation might influence PCOS susceptibility and phenotypes. PMID:22546001

  15. 21 CFR 522.1820 - Pituitary luteinizing hormone powder for injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pituitary luteinizing hormone powder for injection... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1820 Pituitary luteinizing hormone powder for injection. (a) Specifications. The drug... milligrams of standard pituitary luteinizing hormone and is reconstituted for use by addition of...

  16. Influence of antiopioids on luteinizing hormone pulsatility in aging men.

    PubMed

    Vermeulen, A; Deslypere, J P; Kaufman, J M

    1989-01-01

    To investigate whether changes in opioid tone play a role in the age-associated changes in LH release in men, the influence of an antiopioid, naltrexone, on plasma LH levels and LH pulses was studied in a group of young and elderly normal men. The young and elderly men had similar basal LH pulse frequencies, but the frequency of high amplitude (greater than 2 IU/L) LH pulses, mean LH pulse amplitude, maximal LH pulse amplitude and pulse area, were lower in the elderly men. Naltrexone administration (40 mg at 0630 and 2200 h the day before blood sampling and at 0630 h, 30 min before starting frequent blood sampling at 10-min intervals for 12 h) to young men (n = 8) induced a significant increase in individual mean baseline plasma LH levels, LH pulse frequency, and the sum of LH pulse amplitudes. In elderly men (n = 11) only a borderline significant increase in baseline plasma LH levels occurred, and neither LH pulse frequency nor the sum of the amplitudes of LH pulses increased. We suggest that in elderly men either opioid tone or the response of the gonadotrophs to endogenous LHRH is decreased. PMID:2909555

  17. Frequency-Dependent Regulation of Follicle-Stimulating Hormone β by Pulsatile Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Is Mediated by Functional Antagonism of bZIP Transcription Factors ▿

    PubMed Central

    Ciccone, Nick A.; Xu, Shuyun; Lacza, Charlemagne T.; Carroll, Rona S.; Kaiser, Ursula B.

    2010-01-01

    Oscillatory synthesis and secretion of the gonadotropins, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH), under the control of pulsatile hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), is essential for normal reproductive development and fertility. The molecular mechanisms by which various patterns of pulsatile GnRH regulate gonadotrope responsiveness remain poorly understood. In contrast to the α and LHβ subunit genes, FSHβ subunit transcription is preferentially stimulated at low rather than high frequencies of pulsatile GnRH. In this study, mutation of a cyclic AMP response element (CRE) within the FSHβ promoter resulted in the loss of preferential GnRH stimulation at low pulse frequencies. We hypothesized that high GnRH pulse frequencies might stimulate a transcriptional repressor(s) to attenuate the action of CRE binding protein (CREB) and show that inducible cAMP early repressor (ICER) fulfills such a role. ICER was not detected under basal conditions, but pulsatile GnRH stimulated ICER to a greater extent at high than at low pulse frequencies. ICER binds to the FSHβ CRE site to reduce CREB occupation and abrogates both maximal GnRH stimulation and GnRH pulse frequency-dependent effects on FSHβ transcription. These data suggest that ICER production antagonizes the stimulatory action of CREB to attenuate FSHβ transcription at high GnRH pulse frequencies, thereby playing a critical role in regulating cyclic reproductive function. PMID:20008557

  18. Luteinizing hormone release and androgen production of avian hybrids in response to luteinizing hormone releasing hormone injection.

    PubMed

    Mathis, G F; Burke, W H; McDougald, L R

    1983-04-01

    The levels of luteinizing hormone (LH) and androgens were measured in sterile avian hybrids. Guinea fowl-chicken and peafowl-guinea fowl hybrids were bled before and after injection with LH- releasing hormone (LHRH). The preinjection LH levels for the guinea fowl-chicken hybrids were below or at the very lower limit of the assay sensitivity and the peafowl-guinea fowl hybrids averaged 1.3 ng/ml. Within 10 min after LHRH injection, LH had increased dramatically in both hybrids and then began to slowly decline. Androgen levels in the guinea fowl-chicken hybrids increased from 16.2 pg/ml to 95.2 pg/ml and continued to increase, reaching 287 pg/ml at the last bleeding 60 min after injection.

  19. Luteinizing hormone release and androgen production of avian hybrids in response to luteinizing hormone releasing hormone injection.

    PubMed

    Mathis, G F; Burke, W H; McDougald, L R

    1983-04-01

    The levels of luteinizing hormone (LH) and androgens were measured in sterile avian hybrids. Guinea fowl-chicken and peafowl-guinea fowl hybrids were bled before and after injection with LH- releasing hormone (LHRH). The preinjection LH levels for the guinea fowl-chicken hybrids were below or at the very lower limit of the assay sensitivity and the peafowl-guinea fowl hybrids averaged 1.3 ng/ml. Within 10 min after LHRH injection, LH had increased dramatically in both hybrids and then began to slowly decline. Androgen levels in the guinea fowl-chicken hybrids increased from 16.2 pg/ml to 95.2 pg/ml and continued to increase, reaching 287 pg/ml at the last bleeding 60 min after injection. PMID:6346309

  20. Antifertility effects of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) agonists.

    PubMed

    Labrie, F; Bélanger, A; Kelly, P A; Séguin, C; Cusan, L; Lefebvre, F A; Reeves, J J; Lemay, A; Faure, N; Gourdeau, Y; Raynaud, J P

    1981-01-01

    This paper reviews the mechanisms responsible for the antifertility effects of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) agonists. Large doses of the LHRH agonist LHRH-EA lead to a marked reduction of testicular and secondary sex organ weight, LH receptor levels, and plasma testosterone concentration. A marked inhibition of basal testicular and testosterone concentrations is obtained after daily administration of the LHRH agonists at doses greater than 10 ng. Treatment with low doses of the LHRH agonist can lead to an increased steroidogenic response to LH. Treatment with low doses of LHRH agonists could stimulate Leydig cell function while high doses are history. A study of the effects of longterm treatment with an LHRH agonsist on spermatogenesis revelaed that testis, prostate, and seminal vesicle weight decreased and plasma LH and FSH levels increased over 12 weeks. Comparison of the effects of increasing doses of LHRH agonist on testicular and ovarian gonadotropin receptors and steroidogenesis in male rats indicates that single or repeated administration of LHRH agonists can lead to loss of testicular LH receptors in the absence of the pituitary gland. The loss of ovarian gonadotropin receptors in female rats is also investigated. Antifertility effects of LHRH ethylamide are accompanied by a marked loss of LH/hCG and FSH receptors in ovarian tissue. The injection of 1,3, or 10 ng LHRH-EA in intact rats has no significant effect on ovarian LH receptor levels. A study of the direct action of LHRH agonists at the ovarian level demonstrates a close relationship between the binding activity of a large series of LHRH agonists and antagonists in the anterior pituitary gland and the ovary. Inhibition of testicular steroidogenesis in man by treatment with a potent LHRH agonist is also demonstrated. Intranasal administration of LHRH ethylamide has luteolytic effects in normal women. Daily administration of LHRH-EA inhibited ovulation in all but 2 of 89 treatment

  1. Analogues of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone containing cytotoxic groups.

    PubMed Central

    Janáky, T; Juhász, A; Bajusz, S; Csernus, V; Srkalovic, G; Bokser, L; Milovanovic, S; Redding, T W; Rékási, Z; Nagy, A

    1992-01-01

    In an attempt to produce better cytotoxic analogues, chemotherapeutic antineoplastic radicals including an alkylating nitrogen mustard derivative of D-phenylalanine (D-melphalan), reactive cyclopropane, anthraquinone derivatives [2-(hydroxymethyl)anthraquinone and the anticancer antibiotic doxorubicin], and an antimetabolite (methotrexate) were coupled to suitably modified agonists and antagonists of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LH-RH). Analogues with D-lysine6 and D-ornithine6 or N epsilon-(2,3-diaminopropionyl)-D-lysine and N delta-(2,3-diaminopropionyl)-D-ornithine were used as carriers for one or two cytotoxic moieties. The enhanced biological activities produced by the incorporation of D amino acids into position 6 of the agonistic analogues were further increased by the attachment of hydrophobic cytotoxic groups, resulting in compounds with 10-50 times higher activity than LH-RH. Most of the monosubstituted agonistic analogues showed high affinities for the membrane receptors of human breast cancer cells, while the receptor binding affinities of peptides containing two cytotoxic side chains were lower. Antagonistic carriers [Ac-D-Nal(2)1,D-Phe(4Cl)2,D-Trp3,Arg5,D-Lys6,D-Ala10] LH-RH [where Nal(2) is 3-(2-naphthyl)alanine], [Ac-D-Nal(2)1,D-Phe(4Cl)2,D-Trp3,Arg5,N epsilon-(2,3-diaminopropionyl)-D-Lys6,D-Ala10]LH-RH, and their D-Pal(3)3 homologs [Pal(3) is 3-(3-pyridyl)alanine] as well as [Ac-D-Nal(2)1,D-Phe(4Cl)2,D-Pal(3)3,Tyr5,N epsilon-(2,3-diamino-propionyl)-D-Lys6,D-Ala10]LH-RH were linked to cytotoxic compounds. The hybrid molecules inhibited ovulation in rats at doses of 10 micrograms and suppressed LH release in vitro. The receptor binding of cytotoxic analogues was decreased compared to the precursor peptides, although analogues with 2-(hydroxymethyl)anthraquinone hemiglutarate had high affinities. All of the cytotoxic analogues tested inhibited [3H]thymidine incorporation into DNA in cultures of human breast and prostate cancer cell lines

  2. Luteinizing hormone pulse frequency and in vitro bioactivity in male idiopathic infertility.

    PubMed

    Bennet, A; Bujan, L; Plantavid, M; Barbe, P; Caron, P; Louvet, J P

    1991-03-01

    We investigated 51 patients with idiopathic oligospermia and 10 control subjects. Blood samples were collected every 20 minutes from 10 P.M. to 10 A.M. and luteinizing hormone (LH) pulsatility was analyzed. A pool of all samples obtained from each subject was used to measure bioactive LH in an in vitro mouse Leydig cell bioassay and immunoactive LH in an immunoradiometric assay. Mean immunoactive LH pulse frequency was higher and mean bioactive to immunoactive LH ratio was lower in infertile men than in controls. There was a significant negative correlation between bioactive LH to immunoreactive LH ratio and LH pulse frequency. These data indicate that the defect in the gonadal axis in oligospermic men resides not in the hypothalamic-pituitary function but rather in the testis itself.

  3. Sex steroids modulate luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone secretion in a cholinergic cell line from the basal forebrain.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Morales, J R; López-Coviella, I; Hernández-Jiménez, J G; Reyes, R; Bello, A R; Hernández, G; Blusztajn, J K; Alonso, R

    2001-01-01

    The function of a particular neuronal population is in part determined by its neurotransmitter phenotype. We have found that a neuronal-derived septal cell line (SN56), known for its cholinergic properties, also synthesizes and releases luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone. In addition, these cells express the messenger RNAs encoding estrogen and progesterone receptors. The activation of these receptors by their respective ligands cooperatively modulates the depolarization-induced release of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone in these cells. We have also found that a number of septal neurons in postnatal (1-week-old) mice are immunoreactive to both choline acetyltransferase and luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone. These results indicate that both neurotransmitters, acetylcholine and luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone, may co-exist in septal neurons of the CNS and that they could be modulated by gonadal hormones, and suggest that luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone could be involved in some of the actions of sex steroids on cholinergic neurotransmission.

  4. Changes in plasma growth hormone (GH) and secretion patterns of GH and luteinizing hormone in buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) during growth.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Mohan; Prakash, B S

    2004-08-01

    To assess the changes of plasma growth hormone (GH) and secretion patterns of GH and luteinizing hormone (LH) during growth in buffaloes, six growing female Murrah buffalo calves (mean age 6+/-0.9 months and body weight 66+/-6 kg) were selected. Plasma samples were collected twice a week for 52 weeks for GH and LH assay. To examine for pulsatile secretion samples were collected at 15 minutes interval for 9 hr at weeks 6 and 42 for GH and LH measurements. Plasma progesterone was also estimated in twice-a-week samples to assess whether any of the buffalo had begun ovarian cyclicity. The body weight of all animals was recorded at weekly interval. Plasma GH concentration decreased (P < 0.01) only up to week 29 and showed an increasing trend (P < 0.01) thereafter. The ratio of plasma GH to body weight declined (P < 0.01) throughout the entire experimental period. Plasma GH showed a declining trend only up to when the animals attained 155 kg body weight and thereafter showed an increasing trend (P < 0.01). Plasma GH revealed distinct pulsatile patterns of release, with a mean of 6 and 5 pulses in the 6-week and 42-week samples, respectively. The plasma LH concentrations around the 42-week time period were significantly higher (P < 0.01) than at the 6-week time period, and they exhibited pulsatility. No animal reached puberty until the end of the experiment. In summary, plasma GH levels have a definite pattern of change during growth and patterns of secretion of plasma GH and LH also have a relation with body weight in this species of animal. PMID:15554346

  5. A priming effect of gonadotrophin releasing hormone on luteinizing hormone secretion in the boar.

    PubMed Central

    Liptrap, R M; Doble, E

    1982-01-01

    The possibility that gonadotrophin releasing hormone (GnRH) can prime the anterior pituitary to a second dose of GnRH resulting in a greatly enhanced secretion of luteinizing hormone was examined in three adult boars. Four experiments were conducted: saline injection followed one hour later by a second saline injection (control); 1 microgram of synthetic GnRH injection followed one hour later by saline injection; saline injection followed one hour later by GnRH injection; GnRH injection followed one hour later by a second GnRH injection. Immunoassayable levels of plasma luteinizing hormone resulting from GnRH plus GnRH treatment were significantly greater than the sum obtained when values from GnRH plus saline and saline plus GnRH were added. Testosterone values in plasma reached maximal concentrations about 60 minutes after peak values of luteinizing hormone were achieved. The results suggest that the first dose of GnRH, in addition to stimulating release of luteinizing hormone can also sensitize the gonadotrophs to a second dose of GnRH causing a significantly greater release of luteinizing hormone. PMID:6751507

  6. Central injection of ketone body suppresses luteinizing hormone release via the catecholaminergic pathway in female rats.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Kinuyo; Kinoshita, Mika; Susaki, Naoki; Uenoyama, Yoshihisa; Tsukamura, Hiroko; Maeda, Kei-ichiro

    2011-06-01

    Ketosis is found in various pathophysiological conditions, including diabetes and starvation, that are accompanied by suppression of gonadal activity. The aim of the present study was to determine the role of ketone body in the brain in regulating pulsatile luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion in female rats. Injection of 3-hydroxybutyrate (3HB), a ketone body, into the fourth cerebroventricle (4V) induced suppression of pulsatile LH secretion in a dose-dependent manner in ovariectomized (OVX) rats with an estradiol (E2) implant producing diestrus plasma E2 levels. Plasma glucose and corticosterone levels increased immediately after the 4V 3HB injection, suggesting that the treatment caused a hunger response. The 3HB-induced suppression of LH pulses might be mediated by noradrenergic inputs to the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) because a local injection of α-methyl- p-tyrosine, a catecholamine synthesis inhibitor, into the PVN blocked 3HB-induced suppression of LH pulses and PVN noradrenaline release was increased by 4V 3HB injection in E2-primed OVX rats. These results suggest that ketone body sensed by a central energy sensor in the hindbrain may suppress gonadotropin release via noradrenergic inputs to the PVN under ketosis.

  7. A comparison of methods for analyzing time series of pulsatile hormone data.

    PubMed

    Carlson, N E; Horton, K W; Grunwald, G K

    2013-11-20

    Many endocrine systems are regulated by pulsatile hormones - hormones that are secreted intermittently in boluses rather than continuously over time. To study pulsatile secretion, blood is drawn every few minutes for an extended period. The result is a time series of hormone concentrations for each individual. The goal is to estimate pulsatile hormone secretion features such as frequency, location, duration, and amount of pulsatile and non-pulsatile secretion and compare these features between groups. Various statistical approaches to analyzing these data have been proposed, but validation has generally focused on one hormone. Thus, we lack a broad understanding of each method's performance. By using simulated data with features seen in reproductive and stress hormones, we investigated the performance of three recently developed statistical approaches for analyzing pulsatile hormone data and compared them to a frequently used deconvolution approach. We found that methods incorporating a changing baseline modeled both constant and changing baseline shapes well; however, the added model flexibility resulted in a slight increase in bias in other model parameters. When pulses were well defined and baseline constant, Bayesian approaches performed similar to the existing deconvolution method. The increase in computation time of Bayesian approaches offered improved estimation and more accurate quantification of estimation variation in situations where pulse locations were not clearly identifiable. Within the class of deconvolution models for fitting pulsatile hormone data, the Bayesian approach with a changing baseline offered adequate results over the widest range of data.

  8. Luteinizing hormone: Evidence for direct action in the CNS.

    PubMed

    Blair, Jeffrey A; Bhatta, Sabina; McGee, Henry; Casadesus, Gemma

    2015-11-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue "SBN 2014". Hormonal dysfunction due to aging, especially during menopause, plays a substantial role in cognitive decline as well as the progression and development of neurodegenerative diseases. The hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis has long been implicated in changes in behavior and neuronal morphology. Most notably, estrogens have proven beneficial in the healthy brain through a host of different mechanisms. Recently, luteinizing hormone (LH) has emerged as a candidate for further investigation for its role in the CNS. The basis of this is that both LH and the LH receptor are expressed in the brain, and serum levels of LH correlate with cognitive deficits and Alzheimer's disease (AD) incidence. The study of LH in cognition and AD primarily focuses on evaluating the effects of downregulation of this peptide. This literature has shown that decreasing peripheral LH, through a variety of pharmacological interventions, reduces cognitive deficits in ovariectomy and AD models. However, few studies have researched the direct actions of LH on neurons and glial cells. Here we summarize the role of luteinizing hormone in modulating cognition, and we propose a mechanism that underlies a role for brain LH in this process.

  9. Genetic Models for the Study of Luteinizing Hormone Receptor Function

    PubMed Central

    Narayan, Prema

    2015-01-01

    The luteinizing hormone/chorionic gonadotropin receptor (LHCGR) is essential for fertility in men and women. LHCGR binds luteinizing hormone (LH) as well as the highly homologous chorionic gonadotropin. Signaling from LHCGR is required for steroidogenesis and gametogenesis in males and females and for sexual differentiation in the male. The importance of LHCGR in reproductive physiology is underscored by the large number of naturally occurring inactivating and activating mutations in the receptor that result in reproductive disorders. Consequently, several genetically modified mouse models have been developed for the study of LHCGR function. They include targeted deletion of LH and LHCGR that mimic inactivating mutations in hormone and receptor, expression of a constitutively active mutant in LHCGR that mimics activating mutations associated with familial male-limited precocious puberty and transgenic models of LH and hCG overexpression. This review summarizes the salient findings from these models and their utility in understanding the physiological and pathological consequences of loss and gain of function in LHCGR signaling. PMID:26483755

  10. Luteinizing hormone and human chorionic gonadotropin: origins of difference.

    PubMed

    Choi, Janet; Smitz, Johan

    2014-03-01

    Luteinizing hormone (LH) and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) are widely recognized for their roles in ovulation and the support of early pregnancy. Aside from the timing of expression, however, the differences between LH and hCG have largely been overlooked in the clinical realm because of their similar molecular structures and shared receptor. With technologic advancements, including the development of highly purified and recombinant gonadotropins, researchers now appreciate that these hormones are not as interchangeable as once believed. Although they bind to a common receptor, emerging evidence suggests that LH and hCG have disparate effects on downstream signaling cascades. Increased understanding of the inherent differences between LH and hCG will foster more effective diagnostic and prognostic assays for use in a variety of clinical contexts and support the individualization of treatment strategies for conditions such as infertility.

  11. Induction of ovulation with subcutaneous pulsatile gonadotropin-releasing hormone: correlation with body weight and other parameters.

    PubMed

    Thomas, A K; Mander, J; Hale, J; Walstab, J; Forrest, M S

    1989-05-01

    We treated 21 anovulatory infertile patients with subcutaneous pulsatile gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) administered via a syringe pump. Response to treatment was assessed by urinary estrogen excretion and ultrasound measurement of follicular growth. Ten patients ovulated and 8 subsequently conceived, for a total of 10 pregnancies. Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) was not administered routinely, but two patients required hCG to induce follicular rupture. The majority of the patients who conceived had a body mass index (BMI) of less than 21 and a luteinizing hormone (LH)/follicle-stimulating hormone ratio of less than 1. Conversely, those patients with either elevated BMI or LH or both generally failed to respond satisfactorily to this treatment. It is suggested that pulsatile GnRH is most likely to succeed in inducing ovulation if the BMI is less than 21 and the LH is normal, but is unlikely to be successful if there is both an elevated LH and a BMI of greater than 25. Between these two extremes, the response is variable and a therapeutic trial may be appropriate. PMID:2495993

  12. Active immunization to luteinizing hormone releasing hormone to inhibit the induction of mammary tumors in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Ravdin, P.M.; Jordan, V.C.

    1988-01-01

    Immunization of female rats with a bovine serum albumin-luteinizing hormone releasing hormone conjugate results in suppression of dimethylbenzanthracene mammary tumor incidence. Tumor incidence was 1.3, and 1.29 tumors per rat in bovine serum albumin alone (n = 10) and unimmunized (n = 18) control groups, but no tumors were found in the bovine serum albumin-luteinizing hormone releasing hormone conjugate immunized animals (n = 10). In a second experiment immunization with bovine serum albumin-luteinizing hormone releasing hormone conjugates reduced tumor incidence to 0.3 tumors per rat (n = 10) from the 1.2 tumors per animal seen in the control animals (n = 10) immunized with bovine serum albumin alone. Bovine serum albumin-luteinizing hormone immunization caused the production of anti-LHRH antibodies, an interruption of estrous cycles, lowered serum estradiol and progesterone levels, and atrophy of the ovaries and uteri. Immunization BSA-hormone conjugates is a novel anti-tumor strategy.

  13. Luteinizing Hormone-Releasing Hormone Distribution in the Anterior Hypothalamus of the Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Castañeyra-Ruiz, Leandro; González-Marrero, Ibrahim; Castañeyra-Ruiz, Agustín; González-Toledo, Juan M.; Castañeyra-Ruiz, María; de Paz-Carmona, Héctor; Castañeyra-Perdomo, Agustín; Carmona-Calero, Emilia M.

    2013-01-01

    Luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) neurons and fibers are located in the anteroventral hypothalamus, specifically in the preoptic medial area and the organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis. Most luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone neurons project to the median eminence where they are secreted in the pituitary portal system in order to control the release of gonadotropin. The aim of this study is to provide, using immunohistochemistry and female brain rats, a new description of the luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone fibers and neuron localization in the anterior hypothalamus. The greatest amount of the LHRH immunoreactive material was found in the organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis that is located around the anterior region of the third ventricle. The intensity of the reaction of LHRH immunoreactive material decreases from cephalic to caudal localization; therefore, the greatest immunoreaction is in the organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis, followed by the dorsomedial preoptic area, the ventromedial preoptic area, and finally the ventrolateral medial preoptic area, and in fibers surrounding the suprachiasmatic nucleus and subependymal layer on the floor of the third ventricle where the least amount immunoreactive material is found. PMID:25938107

  14. NMDA receptors in the medial zona incerta stimulate luteinizing hormone and prolactin release.

    PubMed

    Bregonzio, Claudia; Moreno, Griselda N; Cabrera, Ricardo J; Donoso, Alfredo O

    2004-06-01

    1. The aim of the present work is to demonstrate the interaction between the glutamatergic/NMDA and dopaminergic systems in the medial zona incerta on the control of luteinizing hormone and prolactin secretion and the influence of reproductive hormones. 2. Proestrus and ovariectomized rats were primed with estrogen and progesterone to induce high or low levels of luteinizing hormone and prolactin. 2-Amino-7-phosphonoheptanoic acid, an NMDA receptor antagonist, and dopamine were injected in the medial zona incerta. Blood samples were withdrawn every hour between 1,600 and 2,000 hours or 2,200 hours via intracardiac catheter from conscious rats. Additional groups of animals injected with the NMDA receptor antagonist were killed 1 or 4 h after injection. Dopamine and its metabolite 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid were measured in different hypothalamic regions. 3. 2-Amino-7-phosphonoheptanoic acid blocked the ovulatory luteinizing hormone surge in proestrus rats. 2-Amino-7-phosphonoheptanoic acid also blocked the increase in luteinizing hormone induced by ovarian hormones in ovariectomized rats, an effect that was partially reversed by dopamine injection. Conversely, the increased release of luteinizing hormone and prolactin induced by dopamine was prevented by 2-amino-7-phosphonoheptanoic acid. We found that the NMDA antagonist injection decreased the dopaminergic activity--as evaluated by the 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid/dopamine ratio--in the medio basal hypothalamus and increased in the preoptic area. 4. Our results show an stimulatory role of NMDA receptors on the ovulatory luteinizing hormone release and on luteinizing hormone release induced by sexual hormones and demonstrate that the stimulatory effect of dopamine on luteinizing hormone and prolactin is mediated by the NMDA receptors. These results suggest a close interaction between the glutamatergic and dopaminergic incertohypothalamic systems on the control of luteinizing hormone and prolactin release

  15. Role of luteinizing hormone in luteotropic complex of pregnant hamster

    SciTech Connect

    Tamura, H.; Greenwald, G.S.

    1987-04-01

    Hamsters were hypophysectomized on day 4 of pregnancy and injected subcutaneously on days 4-7 with various combinations of 200 ..mu..g prolactin (Prl), 10 ..mu..g follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), and 20 ..mu..g luteinizing hormone (LH) in polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) to decrease its rate of absorption or in saline. End points for luteal function on day 8 were maintenance of pregnancy, serum progesterone (P/sub 4/), luteal weight, and luteal binding for human chorionic gonadotropin, FSH, and Prl. After hypophysectomy, a drastic decline occurred in all parameters including an 89% decrease in luteal weight. Injection of Prl did not maintain pregnancy nor serum P/sub 4/ but partially maintained luteal weight and human chorionic gonadotropin binding sites per corpus luteum. The minimal luteotropic complex of Prl and FSH was effective in maintaining pregnancy and significantly increased serum P/sub 4/ and Prl and FSH receptors but not to control levels. Thus, the luteotropic activity of LH was only demonstrable when it was injected in a long-acting form; when delivered as a bolus, LH (saline) was luteolytic. P/sub 4/ and estradiol were measured by radioimmunoassay. Radioiodinated gonadotropins were prepared. The percentage of tracer reacting with an excess of receptor were 51% of /sup 125/I-FSH and 45.9% of /sup 125/I-hCG using whole homogenates of hamster ovaries.

  16. Radioiodination of chicken luteinizing hormone without affecting receptor binding potency

    SciTech Connect

    Kikuchi, M.; Ishii, S. )

    1989-12-01

    By improving the currently used lactoperoxidase method, we were able to obtain radioiodinated chicken luteinizing hormone (LH) that shows high specific binding and low nonspecific binding to a crude plasma membrane fraction of testicular cells of the domestic fowl and the Japanese quail, and to the ovarian granulosa cells of the Japanese quail. The change we made from the original method consisted of (1) using chicken LH for radioiodination that was not only highly purified but also retained a high receptor binding potency; (2) controlling the level of incorporation of radioiodine into chicken LH molecules by employing a short reaction time and low temperature; and (3) fractionating radioiodinated chicken LH further by gel filtration using high-performance liquid chromatography. Specific radioactivity of the final {sup 125}I-labeled chicken LH preparation was 14 microCi/micrograms. When specific binding was 12-16%, nonspecific binding was as low as 2-4% in the gonadal receptors. {sup 125}I-Labeled chicken LH was displaced by chicken LH and ovine LH but not by chicken follicle-stimulating hormone. The equilibrium association constant of quail testicular receptor was 3.6 x 10(9) M-1. We concluded that chicken LH radioiodinated by the present method is useful for studies of avian LH receptors.

  17. Luteinizing hormone/human chorionic gonadotropin receptors in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Meduri, G; Charnaux, N; Loosfelt, H; Jolivet, A; Spyratos, F; Brailly, S; Milgrom, E

    1997-03-01

    Recent studies have suggested that human choriogonadotropin (hCG), in addition to its function in regulating steroidogenesis, may also play a role as a growth factor. Immunocytochemistry using two different monoclonal antibodies (LHR29 and LHR1055) raised against the human luteinizing hormone/human chorionic gonadotropin (LH/hCG) receptor allowed us to detect this receptor in breast cancer cell lines (T47D, MCF7, and ZR75) in individual cancer biopsies and in benign breast lesions. The receptor was also present in epithelial cells of normal human and sow breast. In the latter, its concentration increased after ovulation. The presence of LH/hCG receptor mRNA was confirmed by reverse transcription-PCR using primers extending over exons 2-4, 5-11, and 9-11. The proportion of LH/hCG-receptor positive cells and the intensity of the immunolabeling varied in individual biopsies, but there was no obvious correlation with the histological type of the cancer. These results are compatible with previous studies suggesting that during pregnancy, hCG is involved in the differentiation of breast glandular epithelium and that this hormone may play an inhibitory role in mammary carcinogenesis and in the growth of breast tumors. PMID:9041186

  18. Luteinizing hormone and human chorionic gonadotropin: distinguishing unique physiologic roles.

    PubMed

    Choi, Janet; Smitz, Johan

    2014-03-01

    Luteinizing hormone (LH) and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) are integral components of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, which controls sexual maturation and functionality. In the absence of signaling through their shared receptor, fetal sexual differentiation and post-natal development cannot proceed normally. Although they share a high degree of homology, the physiologic roles of these hormones are unique, governed by differences in expression pattern, biopotency and regulation. Whereas LH is a key regulator of gonadal steroidogenesis and ovulation, hCG is predominantly active in pregnancy and fetal development. Emerging evidence has revealed endogenous functions not previously ascribed to hCG, including participation in ovulation and fertilization, implantation, placentation and other activities in support of successful pregnancy. Spontaneous and induced mutations in LH, hCG and their mutual receptor have contributed substantially to our understanding of reproductive development and function. The lack of naturally occurring, functionally significant mutations in the β-subunit of hCG reinforce its putative role in establishment of pregnancy. Rescue of reproductive abnormalities resulting from aberrant gonadotropin signaling is possible in certain clinical contexts, depending on the nature of the underlying defect. By understanding the physiologic roles of LH and hCG in normal and pathologic states, we may better harness their diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic potential.

  19. Regional differences in the pituitary distribution of luteinizing hormone in the gonadectomized and proestrous female rat

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous data have shown regional differences in the presence of anterior pituitary luteinizing hormone (LH) that generally correlate with comparable disparities in the distribution of gonadotropes throughout the gland. In female rats, the differences are apparent over the estro...

  20. Luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone induces thyroxine release together with testosterone in the neotenic axolotl Ambystoma mexicanum.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, G F; Kühn, E R

    1988-09-01

    In male neotenic axolotls Ambystoma mexicanum plasma concentrations of thyroxine (T4) and testosterone were increased following intravenous injection of 10 micrograms luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone. A dose of 50 micrograms influenced only plasma T4 levels. This observation suggests for the first time that a hypothalamic hormone is capable of stimulating the thyroidal axis in the neotenic axolotl.

  1. Responses of ram lambs to active immunization against testosterone and luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone.

    PubMed

    Schanbacher, B D

    1982-03-01

    Active immunization of young ram lambs against testosterone and luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) was shown to block the growth attributes characteristic of intact ram lambs. Testosterone and LHRH-immunized lambs grew at a slower rate and converted feed to live weight gain less efficiently than albumin-immunized controls. Lambs immunized against testosterone and LHRH had high antibody titers for their respective antigens. Moreover, testosterone-immunized lambs had high serum concentrations of luteinizing hormone (LH) and testosterone, whereas LHRH-immunized lambs had low to nondetectable serum concentrations of these hormones. Release of LH and testosterone following the intravenous administration of LHRH (250 ng) was absent in LHRH-immunized lambs, but quantitatively similar for intact and albumin-immunized control lambs. Testosterone-immunized lambs responded as did conventional castrates with a large LH release, but testosterone concentrations were unchanged. These findings are discussed relative to the integrity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular endocrine axis and the importance of gonadotropin support for normal testicular development. These data show that LHRH immunoneutralization effectively retards testicular development and produces a castration effect in young ram lambs.

  2. Using a classic paper by I. E. Lawton and N. B. Schwartz to consider the array of factors that control luteinizing hormone production.

    PubMed

    Bauer-Dantoin, Angela C; Hanke, Craig J

    2007-12-01

    Two significant benefits derived from reading and discussing classic scientific papers in undergraduate biology courses are 1) providing students with the realistic perspective that science is an ongoing process (rather than a set of inarguable facts) and 2) deepening the students' understanding of physiological processes. A classic paper that is useful in both of these regards is by I. E. Lawton and N. B. Schwartz (A circadian rhythm of luteinizing hormone secretion in ovariectomized rats. Am J Physiol 214: 213-217, 1968). The primary objective of the study is to determine whether tonic (pulsatile) secretion of luteinizing hormone (LH) from the pituitary gland exhibits a circadian rhythm. While this hypothesis seems relatively straightforward, its in vivo investigation necessitates an awareness of the multitude of factors, in addition to the circadian clock, that can influence plasma LH levels (and a consideration of how to control for these factors in the experimental design). Furthermore, discussion of the historical context in which the study was conducted (i.e., before the pulsatile nature of LH secretion had been discovered) provides students with the realistic perspective that science is not a set of facts but rather a systematic series of attempts by scientists to understand reality (a perspective that is difficult to convey using a traditional textbook alone). A review of the historical context in which the study was conducted, and a series of discovery learning questions are included to facilitate classroom discussions and to help deepen students' understanding of the complex nature of pituitary hormone regulation. PMID:18057402

  3. Highly potent antagonists of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone free of edematogenic effects.

    PubMed Central

    Bajusz, S; Kovacs, M; Gazdag, M; Bokser, L; Karashima, T; Csernus, V J; Janaky, T; Guoth, J; Schally, A V

    1988-01-01

    To eliminate the undesirable edematogenic effect of the luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LH-RH) antagonists containing basic D amino acids at position 6, exemplified by [Ac-D-Phe(pCl)1,2,D-Trp3,D-Arg6,D-Ala10]LH-RH [Phe(pCl) indicates 4-chlorophenylalanine], analogs with D-ureidoalkyl amino acids such as D-citrulline (D-Cit) or D-homocitrulline (D-Hci) at position 6 were synthesized and tested in several systems in vitro and in vivo. HPLC analysis revealed that the overall hydrophobicity of the D-Cit/D-Hci6 analogs was similar to that of the basic D-Arg6 antagonists. In vitro, most of the analogs completely inhibited LH-RH-mediated luteinizing hormone release in perfused rat pituitary cell systems at an antagonist to LH-RH molar ratio of 5:1. In vivo, the most active peptides, [Ac-D-Nal(2)1,D-Phe(pCl)2,D-Trp3,D-Cit6,D-Ala10]LH-RH [Nal(2) indicates 3-(2-naphthyl)alanine] and its D-Hci6 analog, caused 100% inhibition of ovulation in cycling rats in doses of 3 micrograms and suppressed the luteinizing hormone level in ovariectomized female rats for 47 hr when administered at doses of 25 micrograms. Characteristically, these peptides did not exert any edematogenic effects even at 1.5 mg/kg. These properties of the D-Cit/D-Hci6 antagonists may make them useful clinically. PMID:3278323

  4. Luteinizing hormone releasing factor activity in peripheral blood from women during the midcycle luteinizing hormone ovulatory surge.

    PubMed

    Malacara, J M; Seyler Le, J; Reichlin, S

    1972-01-01

    Luteinizing hormone (LH) releasing activity was measured in the plas ma of normal women at different stages of menstrual cycle. For the bioassay in rats, 40 ml of plasma were serially extracted with increasing concentrations of methanol. The supernatants were dried and assayed for LH releasing factor (LRF) activity in ovariectomized-estroge n-progesterone-thyroxine treated rats, the end point being the increase in radioimmunoassayable rat LH. 15 samples obtained during the pre- or postovulatory period had low but detectable releasing effects when compared to saline controls (p less than .025). 6 out of 36 specimens obtained between Days 12-16 revealed LRF activity which exceeded the mean of nonovulatory responses by more than 3 standard deviations (SDs) (p less than .01). 4 of the 6 samples with high LRF activity had LH elevations greater than 3 SDs in the same specimens. Plasma LH was a function of plasma LRF as determined by Pearson's coefficient of correlation (r = .419, p less than .004). These results support the view that in the human, the ovulatory LH surge is triggered by estrogen stimulation of hypothlamic LRF release.

  5. The luteinizing hormone response to luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone, prostaglandin E2 and naloxone is modulated by divergent sensitivity to testosterone feedback.

    PubMed

    Schweiger, U; Pirke, K M

    1985-11-01

    Testosterone (T) levels necessary to suppress LH secretion are reduced in starvation, and increased feedback sensitivity to T is therefore postulated. The luteinizing hormone (LH) response to naloxone (Nal) is more easily suppressed by starvation than is its response to prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and to luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LRH). If the divergent suppressibility is due to altered feedback sensitivity in starvation, it should be feasible to reproduce this phenomenon in normally nourished rats by increasing T levels. Adult male Wistar rats were castrated and implanted with silicone capsules (0-2.6 cm) filled with T. Indwelling jugular cannulae were implanted. On days 4 to 8 post operation rats were injected iv with LRH (25-400 ng/kg body weight), PGE2 (0.05-1.0 mg/kg body weight) or Nal (0.5-50 mg/kg body weight). Blood samples were drawn before and 10, 20 and 30 min after injection. Results show that the response to Nal was already suppressed at medium T levels. The LH response to PGE2 was diminished to a greater extent than the response to LRH but was never completely suppressed by increasing steroid levels. These data are compatible with the hypothesis that steroid feedback sensitivity augments with increasing levels of regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis.

  6. Use of recombinant luteinizing hormone for controlled ovarian hyperstimulation in infertile patients.

    PubMed

    Maia, Mônica C S; Approbato, Mário S; da Silva, Tatiana M; Fleury, Eliamar A B; Sanchez, Eliane G M; Sasaki, Reinaldo S A

    2016-01-01

    Controlled ovarian stimulation has become an integral part of a high complexity infertility treatment. Treatment options with recombinant gonadotrophins add more to knowledge on folliculogenesis and ovarian steroidogenesis. Therefore, a literature search was conducted in the following data bases: Medline, Scielo and PubMed. The descriptors/ key words used were ovarian stimulation, in vitro fertilization, recombinant luteinizing hormone, supplementation LH. The aim of this study was to review the available literature and to assess the benefits of using recombinant luteinizing hormone associated with recombinant follicle stimulating hormone in different populations who have undergone assisted reproduction procedures. PMID:27244766

  7. Pulsatile gonadotropin-releasing hormone therapy for ovulatory disorders.

    PubMed

    Santoro, N; Elzahr, D

    1993-09-01

    Pulsatile GnRH remains a physiologic method of inducing ovulation that is effective and safer than other parenteral preparations. Its lower rate of acceptance in the United States stands in curious contrast to its widespread usage in other countries as a second-line (postclomiphene) technique of choice for ovulation induction. In a high-technology era such as ours, women who may benefit from pulsatile GnRH therapy should not be forgotten. By far the most favorable results are obtained in women with primary or secondary hypothalamic amenorrhea. In such women, pregnancy rates appear comparable to those achieved with exogenous gonadotropins with a much lower risk of multiple pregnancy and ovarian hyperstimulation. These positive aspects, combined with the decreased need for clinical monitoring and the increased sense of control imparted to the patient, lead to the conclusion that women with uncomplicated hypothalamic-pituitary disorders are the ideal patient group to consider for therapy. The application of pulsatile GnRH therapy to other groups of women relies on limited data. By all means, women with polycystic ovarian syndrome who have not ovulated or conceived after other forms of treatment should be considered because reasonable pregnancy salvage can be obtained. We have noted a first-cycle successful pregnancy after failure of exogenous gonadotropins, with or without a superimposed GnRH agonist, and even in vitro fertilization with multiple embryo transfers. Before such invasive, high-technology procedures are entertained, it would appear prudent to consider this simple alternative in women with an overactive hypothalamic-pituitary axis, as seen in polycystic ovarian syndrome. Other ovulatory defects also may be amenable to treatment with pulsatile GnRH, but their practical usefulness will await further clinical study.

  8. Precocious puberty associated with neurofibromatosis and optic gliomas. Treatment with luteinizing hormone releasing hormone analogue.

    PubMed

    Laue, L; Comite, F; Hench, K; Loriaux, D L; Cutler, G B; Pescovitz, O H

    1985-11-01

    Seven children with central precocious puberty and either neurofibromatosis and/or optic gliomas were referred to the National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Md, for evaluation and treatment with the long-acting luteinizing hormone releasing hormone analogue (LHRHa) D-Trp6-Pro9-NEt-LHRH. Only six of the seven children chose to receive treatment. Four children presented with neurofibromatosis, three of whom also had optic gliomas; the remaining three children had isolated optic gliomas, without other neurocutaneous stigmas. All had central precocious puberty mediated by activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Six months of LHRHa therapy caused suppression of gonadotropin and sex steroid levels, stabilization or regression of secondary sexual characteristics, and decreases in growth velocity and the rate of bone age maturation. We conclude that LHRHa therapy is effective in the treatment of central precocious puberty secondary to neurofibromatosis and/or optic gliomas.

  9. Luteinizing hormone modulates cognition and amyloid-beta deposition in Alzheimer APP transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Casadesus, Gemma; Webber, Kate M; Atwood, Craig S; Pappolla, Miguel A; Perry, George; Bowen, Richard L; Smith, Mark A

    2006-04-01

    Until recently, the study of hormonal influences in Alzheimer disease was limited to the role of sex steroids. Despite numerous epidemiological studies supporting a protective role for estrogen in Alzheimer disease, recent studies show that estrogen administration in elderly women increases the risk of disease. Reconciling these contradictory reports, we previously hypothesized that other hormones of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, such as luteinizing hormone, may be involved in the onset and development of the disease. In this regard, luteinizing hormone is elevated in Alzheimer disease and is known to modulate amyloidogenic processing of amyloid-beta protein precursor. Therefore, in this study, to evaluate the therapeutic potential of luteinizing hormone ablation, we administered a gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogue, leuprolide acetate, to an aged transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer disease (Tg 2576) and measured cognitive Y-maze performance and amyloid-beta deposition after 3 months of treatment. Our data indicate that luteinizing hormone ablation significantly attenuated cognitive decline and decreased amyloid-beta deposition as compared to placebo-treated animals. Importantly, leuprolide acetate-mediated reduction of amyloid-beta correlated with improved cognition. Since both cognitive loss and amyloid-beta deposition are features of Alzheimer disease, leuprolide acetate treatment may prove to be a useful therapeutic strategy for this disease.

  10. The role of testicular hormones and luteinizing hormone in spatial memory in adult male rats.

    PubMed

    McConnell, Sarah E A; Alla, Juliet; Wheat, Elizabeth; Romeo, Russell D; McEwen, Bruce; Thornton, Janice E

    2012-04-01

    Attempts to determine the influence of testicular hormones on learning and memory in males have yielded contradictory results. The present studies examined whether testicular hormones are important for maximal levels of spatial memory in young adult male rats. To minimize any effect of stress, we used the Object Location Task which is a spatial working memory task that does not involve food or water deprivation or aversive stimuli for motivation. In Experiment 1 sham gonadectomized male rats demonstrated robust spatial memory, but gonadectomized males showed diminished spatial memory. In Experiment 2 subcutaneous testosterone (T) capsules restored spatial memory performance in gonadectomized male rats, while rats with blank capsules demonstrated compromised spatial memory. In Experiment 3, gonadectomized male rats implanted with blank capsules again showed compromised spatial memory, while those with T, dihydrotestosterone (DHT), or estradiol (E) capsules demonstrated robust spatial memory, indicating that T's effects may be mediated by its conversion to E or to DHT. Gonadectomized male rats injected with Antide, a gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor antagonist which lowers luteinizing hormone levels, also demonstrated spatial memory, comparable to that shown by T-, E-, or DHT-treated males. These data indicate that testicular androgens are important for maximal levels of spatial working memory in male rats, that testosterone may be converted to E and/or DHT to exert its effects, and that some of the effects of these steroid hormones may occur via negative feedback effects on LH.

  11. Luteinizing hormone and follicle stimulating hormone-releasing hormone test in patients with hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Mortimer, C H; Besser, G M; McNeilly, A S; Marshall, J C; Harsoulis, P; Tunbridge, W M; Gomez-Pan, A; Hall, R

    1973-10-13

    A standard intravenous 100 mug luteinizing hormone/follicle stimulating hormone-releasing hormone (LH/FSH-RH) test was used to assess the pituitary gonadotrophin responses in 155 patients with a variety of diseases of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. In all but nine patients there was an increase in circulating levels of either LH or FSH in response to the releasing hormone though 137 (88%) were clinically hypogonadal. It was not possible with this test to distinguish between hypothalamic and pituitary causes of hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism, since a variety of LH and FSH responses emerged within the disease groups. However, primary gonadal failure characteristically resulted in exaggerated gonadotrophin response. The potential therapeutic use of the gonadotrophin releasing decapeptide is suggested in certain patients with hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism.

  12. Luteinizing hormone as a key player in the cognitive decline of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Burnham, Veronica L; Thornton, Janice E

    2015-11-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue "SBN 2014". Alzheimer's disease is one of the most prevalent and costly neurological diseases in the world. Although decades of research have focused on understanding Alzheimer's disease pathology and progression, there is still a great lack of clinical treatments for those who suffer from it. One of the factors most commonly associated with the onset of Alzheimer's disease is a decrease in levels of gonadal hormones, such as estrogens and androgens. Despite the correlational and experimental data which support the role of these hormones in the etiology of Alzheimer's disease, clinical trials involving their reintroduction through hormone therapy have had varied results and these gonadal hormones often have accompanying health risks. More recently, investigation has turned toward other hormones in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis that are disrupted by age-related decreases in gonadal hormones. Specifically, luteinizing hormone, which is increased with age in both men and women (in response to removal of negative feedback), has surfaced as a potentially powerful player in the risk and onset of Alzheimer's disease. Mounting evidence in basic research and epidemiological studies supports the role of elevated luteinizing hormone in exacerbating age-related cognitive decline in both males and females. This review summarizes the recent developments involving luteinizing hormone in increasing the cognitive deficits and molecular pathology characteristic of Alzheimer's disease.

  13. Nonlinear dynamics in pulsatile secretion of parathyroid hormone in normal human subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prank, Klaus; Harms, Heio; Brabant, Georg; Hesch, Rolf-Dieter; Dämmig, Matthias; Mitschke, Fedor

    1995-03-01

    In many biological systems, information is transferred by hormonal ligands, and it is assumed that these hormonal signals encode developmental and regulatory programs in mammalian organisms. In contrast to the dogma of endocrine homeostasis, it could be shown that the biological information in hormonal networks is not only present as a constant hormone concentration in the circulation pool. Recently, it has become apparent that hormone pulses contribute to this hormonal pool, which modulates the responsiveness of receptors within the cell membrane by regulation of the receptor synthesis, movement within the membrane layer, coupling to signal transduction proteins and internalization. Phase space analysis of dynamic parathyroid hormone (PTH) secretion allowed the definition of a (in comparison to normal subjects) relatively quiet ``low dynamic'' secretory pattern in osteoporosis, and a ``high dynamic'' state in hyperparathyroidism. We now investigate whether this pulsatile secretion of PTH in healthy men exhibits characteristics of nonlinear determinism. Our findings suggest that this is conceivable, although on the basis of presently available data and techniques, no proof can be established. Nevertheless, pulsatile secretion of PTH might be a first example of nonlinear deterministic dynamics in an apparently irregular hormonal rhythm in human physiology.

  14. In vivo pharmacological evaluation of a lactose-conjugated luteinizing hormone releasing hormone analogue.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Shayli Varasteh; Varamini, Pegah; Steyn, Frederik; Toth, Istvan

    2015-11-10

    In the current study, the efficacy and pharmacokinetic profile of lactose-conjugated luteinizing hormone releasing hormone (LHRH) was examined following oral administration in male rats. A rapid and sensitive liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry technique was developed and applied for measuring the concentration of lactose[Q(1)][w(6)]LHRH (compound 1) in rat plasma in order to allow measurement of pharmacokinetic parameters. LH release was evaluated using a sandwich ELISA. Maximum serum concentration (Cmax = 0.11 μg/ml) was reached at 2h (Tmax) following oral administration of the compound at 10mg/kg. The half-life was determined to be 2.6h. The absolute bioavailability of the orally administered compound was found to be 14%, which was a remarkable improvement compared to zero-to-low oral bioavailability of the native peptide. Compound 1 was effective in stimulating LH release at 20mg/kg after oral administration. The method was validated at a linear range of 0.01-20.0 μg/ml and a correlation coefficient of r(2) ≥ 0.999. The accuracy and precision values showed the reliability and reproducibility of the method for evaluation of the pharmacokinetic parameters. These findings showed that the lactose derivative of LHRH has a therapeutic potential to be further developed as an orally active therapeutics for the treatment of hormone-dependent diseases.

  15. PREGNANCY LOSS IN THE F344 RAT CAUSED BY BROMODICHLOROMETHANE: EFFECTS ON SERUM LUTEINIZING HORMONE LEVELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    PREGNANCY LOSS IN THE F344 RAT CAUSED BY BROMODICHLOROMETHANE: EFFECTS ON SERUM LUTEINIZING HORMONE LEVELS
    Bielmeier1, S.R., D.S. Best2, and M.G. Narotsky2; 1University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Curriculum in Toxicology, 2Reproductive Toxicology Division, U.S. Enviro...

  16. Luteinizing hormone secretion as influenced by age and estradiol in the prepubertal gilt

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim of this study was to determine if there is an age related reduction in the sensitivity of the negative feedback action of estradiol on luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion in the prepubertal gilt. Ovariectomized gilts at 90 (n = 12), 150 (n = 11) or 210 (n = 12) days of age received estradiol ...

  17. Annual cycle of plasma luteinizing hormone and sex hormones in male and female mallards (Anas platyrhynchos)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Donham, R.S.

    1979-01-01

    Comparisons between 'wild'and 'game farm' mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) were made to assess the differences in the temporal changes of plasma hormones. Seasonal variation in the levels of immunoreactive luteinizing hormone (LH), testosterone, 5 -dihydrotestosterone (DHT), estrone, estradiol-17i?? and progesterone were measured in male and female mallards. In all birds there was a vernal increase in the concentrations of LH and testosterone in plasma which were correlated with the development of the testes and ovaries prior to and during the nesting season. The concentrations of estrogens in the plasma of the females were, in general, slightly higher during the nesting season but were much lower than the levels of testosterone. The highest levels of LH and testosterone in the females coincided precisely with the period of egg laying which occurred approximately one month earlier in game farm females than in wild females. The concentrations of LH and testosterone in the plasma of females decreased rapidly during incubation. In wild males, the decline in levels of these hormones temporally coincided with that of females. In contrast, plasma levels of LH and testosterone of males of the game farm stock remained elevated after the beginning of incubation in females to which they were paired. On the basis of these results and an examination of the literature, it appears that domestication results in: 1) increased reproductive potential through earlier initiation of nesting and by delay of the termination of reproduction until later in the summer; and 2) a decrease in the synchronization of the hormonal events supporting reproduction between the male and female of a pair. Testicular weights and plasma levels of testosterone become higher in game farm and domestic males than in the wild stock but levels of LH are similar.

  18. Pregnancy following combined growth hormone--pulsatile GnRH treatment in a patient with hypothalamic amenorrhoea.

    PubMed

    Volpe, A; Coukos, G; Artini, P G; Silferi, M; Petraglia, F; Boghen, M; D'Ambrogio, G D; Genazzani, A R

    1990-04-01

    A patient with hypothalamic amenorrhoea and a poor response in terms of pituitary growth hormone (GH) to acute administration of growth hormone-releasing factor has been treated with pulsatile gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) combined with GH to induce ovulation. GH was administered daily until signs of ovulation were detected. The luteal phase was supported by pulsatile GnRH only. Combined treatment gave an improved follicular recruitment, higher plasma levels of 17 beta-oestradiol and an earlier ovulation, compared to the previous cycle with pulsatile GnRH only. The result was a twin pregnancy which ended with the birth of two healthy male babies. The role of GH in potentiating the ovarian response to gonadotrophins, as well as the GH secretion abnormalities associated with dysfunctions of the hypothalamic - pituitary - gonadal axis, might provide a rationale for combined GH and pulsatile GnRH treatment in such patients.

  19. Pituitary responsiveness to luteinizing-hormone-releasing hormone in different reproductive disorders. A review.

    PubMed

    Vasquez, J M; Greenblatt, R B

    1985-08-01

    As a result of the use of synthetic luteinizing-hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) (and its analogs), significant advances in modern clinical practice are being realized. We studied the use of LHRH as a test for pituitary reserve for gonadotropin secretion in different reproductive disorders. Synthetic LHRH was used as a diagnostic test for discriminating pituitary from hypothalamic disorders. After appropriate LHRH priming of the pituitary, LHRH was used to document hypothalamic dysfunction in patients with Kallmann's syndrome who had normal gonadotropin responsiveness to LHRH. The gonadotropin responsiveness to 100 micrograms of LHRH was impaired or absent in patients with panhypopituitarism, craniopharyngiomas, hemochromatosis and acromegaly accompanied by abnormal lactation. In women with gonadal dysgenesis, the absence of gonadal steroid feedback exacerbated the pituitary responsiveness to LHRH. Women with hyperprolactinemia are also known to have a blunted gonadotropin response to endogenous and exogenous LHRH. An experimental rat model was developed in our laboratory to study the site of prolactin action on gonadotropin secretion. LHRH challenge tests during perphenazine-induced hyperprolactinemia in rats indicated that prolactin may decrease pituitary sensitivity to LHRH. Additional experiments indicated that the increased progesterone produced in these hyperprolactinemic (pseudopregnant) rats was probably responsible for the decreased pituitary responsiveness to LHRH. Further studies will be necessary to determine whether prolactin, which can alter ovarian steroidogenesis in vitro, interferes with ovulation directly in addition to affecting the hypothalamic-pituitary axis.

  20. Daily variations in urinary excretion of luteinizing hormone and follicle stimulating hormone in idiopathic isosexual precocity.

    PubMed

    Penny, R; Olambiwonnu, N O; Frasier, S D

    1977-01-01

    The 24-hour urinary excretion of luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) was determined for 30 days in an 8.3-year-old girl with isosexual precocity and for 25 days in a normal 11.9-year-old girl. The pattern of daily variation in urinary LH and FSH excretion observed in the girl with sexual precocity was similar to that of the normal menstrual cycle. The LH and FSH midcycle peaks were 132.5 IU/24 hours and 26.3 IU/24 hours, respectively. Excluding the midcycle peak, the daily excretion of LH was 28.4 +/- 9.3 (SD) IU/24 hours, and the excretion of FSH was 8.9 +/- 1.9 (SD) IU/24 hours, values comparable to those of normal adult females. In contrast, the daily excretion of LH in the normal 11.9-year-old girl was 6.9 +/- 1.1 (SD) IU/24 hours and FSH excretion was 3.9 +/- 0.9 (SD) IU/24 hours. No LH or FSH surge was observed. The data are consistent with early maturation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in idiopathic isosexual precocity.

  1. Biosynthesis and the conjugation of magnetite nanoparticles with luteinizing hormone releasing hormone (LHRH).

    PubMed

    Obayemi, J D; Dozie-Nwachukwu, S; Danyuo, Y; Odusanya, O S; Anuku, N; Malatesta, K; Soboyejo, W O

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental study of the biosynthesis of magnetite nanoparticles (BMNPs) with particle sizes between 10 nm and 60 nm. The biocompatible magnetic nanoparticles are produced from Magnetospirillum magneticum (M.M.) bacteria that respond to magnetic fields. M.M. bacteria were cultured and used to synthesize magnetite nanoparticles. This was done in an enriched magnetic spirillum growth medium (EMSGM) at different pH levels. The nanoparticle concentrations were characterized with UV-Visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy, while the particle shapes were elucidated via transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The structure of the particles was studied using X-ray diffraction (XRD), while the hydrodynamic radii, particle size distributions and polydispersity of the nanoparticles were characterized using dynamic light scattering (DLS). Carbodiimide reduction was also used to functionalize the BMNPs with a molecular recognition unit (luteinizing hormone releasing hormone, LHRH) that attaches specifically to receptors that are over-expressed on the surfaces of most breast cancer cell types. The resulting nanoparticles were examined using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and quantitative image analysis. The implications of the results are then discussed for the potential development of magnetic nanoparticles for the specific targeting and treatment of breast cancer.

  2. Suppression of meiosis of male germ cells by an antagonist of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone.

    PubMed Central

    Szende, B; Redding, T W; Schally, A V

    1990-01-01

    Male nude mice were implanted with osmotic minipumps releasing 50 micrograms of a potent antagonist of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LH-RH) per day [N-Ac-[D-Nal(2)1,D-Phe(pCl)2,D-Pal(3)3,D-Cit6,D-Ala10]LH-RH] (SB-75) [Nal(2), 3-(2-naphthyl)alanine; Phe(pCl), 4-chlorophenylalanine; Pal(3), 3-(3-pyridyl)alanine; Cit, citrulline], or they were treated with s.c. injections of SB-75 (25 micrograms twice a day). Another group of nude mice received an injection of microcapsules of the agonist [D-Trp6]LH-RH liberating 25 micrograms/day. One month after the initiation of treatment, the testicular weights were significantly reduced and the blood testosterone values were at castration levels in all treated groups. Histologically, only the testicles of the mice treated with SB-75 released from minipumps showed a significant decrease of meiosis. The most advanced forms of germ cells were spermatogonia in 26%, spermatocytes in 17%, and round spermatids in 35% of the seminiferous tubules. Only 22% of the tubules contained elongated spermatids. The suppression of meiotic activity by this modern LH-RH antagonist can possibly be used for the development of methods for male contraception and for the protection of germ cells against the damage caused by cytotoxic drugs and x-radiation. Images PMID:2405399

  3. Corpus luteum derived copper, zinc-superoxide dismutase serves as a luteinizing hormone-release inhibiting factor in sheep.

    PubMed

    Al-Gubory, Kaïs H; Huet, Jean-Claude; Pernollet, Jean-Claude; Martal, Jacques; Locatelli, Alain

    2003-01-31

    In the present study, we report the purification and characterization of a polypeptide from the sheep corpus luteum of pregnancy with a potent luteinizing hormone-release inhibiting factor (LH-RIF) bioactivity that stained as a single band in SDS-PAGE with an apparent molecular mass of 16000 Da. The amino acid sequences obtained after sequence analysis of peptides derived from the trypsin digestion of LH-RIF were subjected to a protein data bank search and were found to be identical with regions of sheep copper, zinc-superoxide dismutase (Cu,Zn-SOD). The measured mass of LH-RIF (15604.2+/-1.9 Da) was found to be similar to the theoretical mass of sheep Cu,Zn-SOD (15603.5 Da), with a disulfide bond and N acetylated alanine at the N-terminus. The inhibitory action of Cu,Zn-SOD on pulsatile LH secretion would suggest that this antioxidant may play an important role, either independently or in concert with some neurotransmitters, in the neuroendocrine regulation of sheep female reproductive function.

  4. Synchronicity of frequently sampled, 24-h concentrations of circulating leptin, luteinizing hormone, and estradiol in healthy women.

    PubMed

    Licinio, J; Negrão, A B; Mantzoros, C; Kaklamani, V; Wong, M L; Bongiorno, P B; Mulla, A; Cearnal, L; Veldhuis, J D; Flier, J S; McCann, S M; Gold, P W

    1998-03-01

    Leptin, an adipocyte hormone, is a trophic factor for the reproductive system; however, it is still unknown whether there is a dynamic relation between fluctuations in circulating leptin and hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian (HPO) axis hormones. To test the hypothesis that fluctuations in plasma leptin concentrations are related to the levels of luteinizing hormone (LH) and estradiol, we sampled plasma from six healthy women every 7 min for 24 h during days 8-11 of the menstrual cycle. Cross-correlation analysis throughout the 24-h cycle revealed a relation between release patterns of leptin and LH, with a lag of 42-84 min but no significant cross-correlation between LH and estradiol. The ultradian fluctuations in leptin levels showed pattern synchrony with those of both LH and estradiol as determined by cross-approximate entropy (cross-ApEn). At night, as leptin levels rose to their peak, the pulsatility profiles of LH changed significantly and became synchronous with those of leptin. LH pulses were fewer, of longer duration, higher amplitude, and larger area than during the day. Moreover, the synchronicity of LH and leptin occurred late at night, at which time estradiol and leptin also exhibited significantly stronger pattern coupling than during the day. We propose that leptin may regulate the minute-to-minute oscillations in the levels of LH and estradiol, and that the nocturnal rise in leptin may determine the change in nocturnal LH profile in the mid-to-late follicular phase that precedes ovulation. This may explain the disruption of hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian function that is characteristic of states of low leptin release, such as anorexia nervosa and cachexia.

  5. Substantial expression of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) receptor type I in human uveal melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Schally, Andrew V.; Block, Norman L; Dezso, Balazs; Olah, Gabor; Rozsa, Bernadett; Fodor, Klara; Buglyo, Armin; Gardi, Janos; Berta, Andras; Halmos, Gabor

    2013-01-01

    Uveal melanoma is the most common primary intraocular malignancy in adults, with a very high mortality rate due to frequent liver metastases. Consequently, the therapy of uveal melanoma remains a major clinical challenge and new treatment approaches are needed. For improving diagnosis and designing a rational and effective therapy, it is essential to elucidate molecular characteristics of this malignancy. The aim of this study therefore was to evaluate as a potential therapeutic target the expression of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) receptor in human uveal melanoma. The expression of LHRH ligand and LHRH receptor transcript forms was studied in 39 human uveal melanoma specimens by RT-PCR using gene specific primers. The binding charachteristics of receptors for LHRH on 10 samples were determined by ligand competition assays. The presence of LHRH receptor protein was further evaluated by immunohistochemistry. The expression of mRNA for type I LHRH receptor was detected in 18 of 39 (46%) of tissue specimens. mRNA for LHRH-I ligand could be detected in 27 of 39 (69%) of the samples. Seven of 10 samples investigated showed high affinity LHRH-I receptors. The specific presence of full length LHRH receptor protein was further confirmed by immunohistochemistry. A high percentage of uveal melanomas express mRNA and protein for type-I LHRH receptors. Our results support the merit of further investigation of LHRH receptors in human ophthalmological tumors. Since diverse analogs of LHRH are in clinical trials or are already used for the treatment of various cancers, these analogs could be considered for the LHRH receptor-based treatment of uveal melanoma. PMID:24077773

  6. Effects of aging on pituitary and testicular luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone receptors in the rat.

    PubMed

    Limonta, P; Dondi, D; Maggi, R; Martini, L; Piva, F

    1988-01-01

    Aging exerts profound influences on the function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular-axis. This work has been performed in order to verify whether, in male rats, the decreased secretion of LH and testosterone (T) occurring in old animals is reflected by modifications of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) receptors at the level of the anterior pituitary and of the testes. To this purpose, the affinity constant (Ka) and the maximal binding capacity (Bmax) for the LHRH analog [D-Ser(tBu)6]des-Gly10-LHRH-N-ethylamide were evaluated, by means of a receptor binding assay, in membrane preparations derived from the anterior pituitary and testicular Leydig cells of male rats of 3 and 19 months of age. Serum levels of LH and T were measured by specific RIAs. The results obtained show that, in aged male rats, the concentration of pituitary LHRH receptors is significantly lower than that found in young animals. On the other hand, the concentration of LHRH binding sites is significantly increased on the membranes of Leydig cells of old rats. In no instance the Ka for the LHRH analog is significantly affected. Serum levels of LH and T are significantly lower in old than in young male rats. In conclusion, these results suggest that the reduced secretion of LH in old male rats may be linked, at least partially, to a decrease of the number of pituitary LHRH receptors. The impaired production of testosterone occurring in aged rats is accompanied by a significant increase of the number of testicular LHRH receptors, indicating that also the intratesticular mechanisms controlling testosterone release undergo significant alterations with aging.

  7. Adrenarche and skeletal maturation during luteinizing hormone releasing hormone analogue suppression of gonadarche.

    PubMed Central

    Wierman, M E; Beardsworth, D E; Crawford, J D; Crigler, J F; Mansfield, M J; Bode, H H; Boepple, P A; Kushner, D C; Crowley, W F

    1986-01-01

    During puberty the effects of adrenal androgens upon skeletal maturation are obscured by the influence of gonadal steroids. Suppression of gonadarche with an analogue of luteinizing hormone releasing hormone (LHRHa) affords an opportunity to examine the onset and progression of adrenarche in the absence of pubertal levels of gonadal steroids in a controlled fashion and to explore the relationship between adrenal androgens and the rate of epiphyseal maturation. In 29 children with central precocious puberty, gonadarche was suppressed with LHRHa administration for 1-4 yr. During LHRHa exposure, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHAS) levels, as an index of adrenal maturation, were constant or increased in an age-expected manner. The change in bone age for change in chronologic age decreased from 1.7 +/- 0.1 to 0.49 +/- 0.05 (P = 0.00005), indicating that the LHRHa-induced return to a prepubertal gonadal steroid environment was associated with a slowing of skeletal maturation. DHAS levels were correlated with the rate of skeletal advancement before (r = 0.57, P = 0.001) and during 12 to 48 mo of exposure to LHRHa (r = 0.52, P = 0.003). A negative correlation of DHAS values with subsequent increases in predicted mature height was observed (r = -0.49, P = 0.007). Thus, in children with central precocious puberty, adrenarche progressed normally during LHRHa suppression of gonadarche. In children with the onset of progression of adrenarche during maintenance of a prepubertal gonadal steroid milieu, there was less evidence than in preadrenarchal children of a restraint upon skeletal maturation. These data suggest that adrenal androgens contribute importantly to epiphyseal advancement during childhood. PMID:2935557

  8. Hypothalamic hamartoma: a source of luteinizing-hormone-releasing factor in precocious puberty.

    PubMed

    Judge, D M; Kulin, H E; Page, R; Santen, R; Trapukdi, S

    1977-01-01

    The presence of a hypothalamic hamartoma and precocious puberty in a 19-month-old boy provided an opportunity to study their relation. Excised tissue had the ultrastructural characteristics of an independent neuroendocrine unit -- i.e., neurons containing neurosecretory granules and blood vessels with fenestrated endothelium and double basement membranes. Immunofluorescence studies using specific antibody to luteinizing-hormone-releasing factor showed antigenicity to the factor in the hamartoma. The testicular-hypothalamic-pituitary axis was tested. Clomiphene unresponsiveness suggested a lack of maturation of central-nervous-system events characteristic of normal puberty. The negative feedback system between gonad and brain was intact but partially resistant to steroid suppression. These studies suggest that hypothalamic hamartomas may cause precocious puberty by autonomous production and release of luteinizing-hormone-releasing factor into vessels that communicate with the pituitary portal blood system.

  9. Effects of exposure to male goat hair extracts on luteinizing hormone secretion and neuronal activation in seasonally anestrous ewes.

    PubMed

    Ohara, Hiromi; Mogi, Kazutaka; Ichimaru, Toru; Ohkura, Satoshi; Takeuchi, Yukari; Mori, Yuji; Okamura, Hiroaki

    2014-10-01

    In sheep and goats, exposure of seasonally anestrous females to males or their fleece/hair activates the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) pulse generator leading to pulsatile luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion. Pheromones emitted by sexually mature males are thought to play a prominent role in this male effect. In the present study, we first aimed to clarify whether the male goat pheromone is effective in ewes. Seasonally anestrous St. Croix ewes were exposed to hair extracts derived from either intact or castrated (control) male Shiba goats. The male goat-hair extract significantly increased LH secretion compared to the control, suggesting that an interspecies action of the male pheromone occurs between sheep and goats. Using the male goat-hair extract as the pheromone source, we then aimed to clarify the neural pathway involved in the signal transduction of the male pheromone. Ewes were exposed to either the goat-hair extract or the control and sacrificed 2 hr after the exposure. Expression of c-Fos, a marker of neuronal activation, was immunohistochemically examined. The male goat-hair extract significantly increased the c-Fos expression compared to the control in regions of the vomeronasal system, such as the accessory olfactory bulb and medial amygdala, and the arcuate nucleus. The main olfactory bulb did not exhibit any significant increase in the c-Fos expression by the male goat-hair extract. This result suggests that the neural signal of the male pheromone is conveyed to the GnRH pulse generator through the activated regions in ewes.

  10. Kisspeptin signaling is required for the luteinizing hormone response in anestrous ewes following the introduction of males.

    PubMed

    De Bond, Julie-Ann P; Li, Qun; Millar, Robert P; Clarke, Iain J; Smith, Jeremy T

    2013-01-01

    The introduction of a novel male stimulates the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis of female sheep during seasonal anestrus, leading to the resumption of follicle maturation and ovulation. How this pheromone cue activates pulsatile secretion of gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH)/luteinizing hormone (LH) is unknown. We hypothesised that pheromones activate kisspeptin neurons, the product of which is critical for the stimulation of GnRH neurons and fertility. During the non-breeding season, female sheep were exposed to novel males and blood samples collected for analysis of plasma LH profiles. Females without exposure to males served as controls. In addition, one hour before male exposure, a kisspeptin antagonist (P-271) or vehicle was infused into the lateral ventricle and continued for the entire period of male exposure. Introduction of a male led to elevated mean LH levels, due to increased LH pulse amplitude and pulse frequency in females, when compared to females not exposed to a male. Infusion of P-271 abolished this effect of male exposure. Brains were collected after the male effect stimulus and we observed an increase in the percentage of kisspeptin neurons co-expressing Fos, by immunohistochemistry. In addition, the per-cell expression of Kiss1 mRNA was increased in the rostral and mid (but not the caudal) arcuate nucleus (ARC) after male exposure in both aCSF and P-271 treated ewes, but the per-cell content of neurokinin B mRNA was decreased. There was also a generalized increase in Fos positive cells in the rostral and mid ARC as well as the ventromedial hypothalamus of females exposed to males. We conclude that introduction of male sheep to seasonally anestrous female sheep activates kisspeptin neurons and other cells in the hypothalamus, leading to increased GnRH/LH secretion.

  11. Developmental changes in hypothalamic Kiss1 expression during activation of the pulsatile release of luteinising hormone in maturing ewe lambs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Onset of puberty is characterized by a marked increase in the frequency of release of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and luteinizing hormone (LH). The KISS1 gene plays a critical role in pubertal development and its product, kisspeptin, stimulates GnRH and LH release. In the study reported h...

  12. Responses of luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone, and prolactin to prolonged administration of the dopamine antagonist in normal women and women with low-weight amenorrhea.

    PubMed

    Larsen, S

    1981-06-01

    The responses of luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone, and prolactin to prolonged administration of the dopamine receptor antagonist metoclopramide (5 mg twice daily) were investigated in six normal women and six women with low-weight amenorrhea (LWA). In contrast to the normal group, the LWA group showed no significant changes in the mean basal prolactin level or the mean prolactin response to stimulation with thyrotropin-releasing hormone, but there was an significant elevation of the mean net increase in luteinizing hormone after stimulation with gonadotropin-releasing hormone. On the basis of these data, the possibility of increased central dopaminergic activity in women with LWA is discussed. PMID:6788608

  13. Biological time series analysis using a context free language: applicability to pulsatile hormone data.

    PubMed

    Dean, Dennis A; Adler, Gail K; Nguyen, David P; Klerman, Elizabeth B

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel approach for analyzing biological time-series data using a context-free language (CFL) representation that allows the extraction and quantification of important features from the time-series. This representation results in Hierarchically AdaPtive (HAP) analysis, a suite of multiple complementary techniques that enable rapid analysis of data and does not require the user to set parameters. HAP analysis generates hierarchically organized parameter distributions that allow multi-scale components of the time-series to be quantified and includes a data analysis pipeline that applies recursive analyses to generate hierarchically organized results that extend traditional outcome measures such as pharmacokinetics and inter-pulse interval. Pulsicons, a novel text-based time-series representation also derived from the CFL approach, are introduced as an objective qualitative comparison nomenclature. We apply HAP to the analysis of 24 hours of frequently sampled pulsatile cortisol hormone data, which has known analysis challenges, from 14 healthy women. HAP analysis generated results in seconds and produced dozens of figures for each participant. The results quantify the observed qualitative features of cortisol data as a series of pulse clusters, each consisting of one or more embedded pulses, and identify two ultradian phenotypes in this dataset. HAP analysis is designed to be robust to individual differences and to missing data and may be applied to other pulsatile hormones. Future work can extend HAP analysis to other time-series data types, including oscillatory and other periodic physiological signals.

  14. Pituitary and testicular response to luteinizing hormone releasing hormone in normal and sulpiride-induced hyperprolactinaemic men.

    PubMed

    Nakano, R; Yagi, S; Nishi, T

    1988-05-01

    Pituitary and testicular response to an intravenous infusion of 480 micrograms luteinizing hormone releasing hormone (LHRH) for 8 hours (1 microgram/min) was investigated in 8 male volunteers in normal and hyperprolactinaemic state. Eight normal men were given 150 mg of sulpiride daily for 14 days. Serum prolactin (PRL) levels were elevated significantly, but basal serum levels of luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) did not change following daily oral administration of sulpiride in 8 normal men. Eight men showed biphasic LH response to LHRH infusion in both normal and hyperprolactinaemic state, and there was a rather exaggerated response in serum LH concentration in hyperprolactinaemic state. Serum FSH response to LHRH was similar in normal and hyperprolactinaemic state. Although slight increase in serum testosterone concentration was observed during LHRH infusion in normal and hyperprolactinaemic state, the statistical difference was not significant. The result of the present study suggests that the function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis, as measured by serum gonadotrophin and testosterone responses, is well reserved.

  15. Glucagon-like peptide-1 stimulates luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone secretion in a rodent hypothalamic neuronal cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Beak, S A; Heath, M M; Small, C J; Morgan, D G; Ghatei, M A; Taylor, A D; Buckingham, J C; Bloom, S R; Smith, D M

    1998-01-01

    To examine the influence of the putative satiety factor (GLP-1) on the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis, we used GT1-7 cells as a model of neuronal luteinizing hormone- releasing hormone (LHRH) release. GLP-1 caused a concentration-dependent increase in LHRH release from GT1-7 cells. Specific, saturable GLP-1 binding sites were demonstrated on these cells. The binding of [125I]GLP-1 was time-dependent and consistent with a single binding site (Kd = 0.07+/-0.016 nM; binding capacity = 160+/-11 fmol/mg protein). The specific GLP-1 receptor agonists, exendin-3 and exendin-4, also showed high affinity (Ki = 0.3+/-0.05 and 0.32+/-0.06 nM, respectively) as did the antagonist exendin-(9-39) (Ki = 0.98+/-0.24 nM). At concentrations that increased LHRH release, GLP-1 (0.5-10 nM) also caused an increase in intracellular cAMP in GT1-7 cells (10 nM GLP-1: 7.66+/-0.4 vs. control: 0.23+/-0.02 nmol/mg protein; P < 0.001). Intracerebroventricular injection of GLP-1 at a single concentration (10 microg) produced a prompt increase in the plasma luteinizing hormone concentration in male rats (GLP-1: 1.09+/-0.11 vs. saline: 0.69+/-0.06 ng/ml; P < 0.005). GLP-1 levels in the hypothalami of 48-h-fasted male rats showed a decrease, indicating a possible association of the satiety factor with the low luteinizing hormone levels in animals with a negative energy balance. PMID:9502775

  16. cDNA cloning of luteinizing hormone subunits from brushtail possum and red kangaroo.

    PubMed

    Harrison, G A; Deane, E M; Cooper, D W

    1998-08-01

    Luteinizing hormone (LH) plays an important role in the reproductive cycles of all mammals. There is a large amount of both nucleotide and amino acid sequence data available for LH from eutherian mammals, but little is known about the primary structure of LH in marsupials. We have used consensus PCR primers to generate specific probes for screening pituitary cDNA libraries and report the cloning of the cDNAs encoding the alpha-subunit of LH (also shared by a number of other glycoprotein hormones) and the LH-specific beta-subunit, from the common brushtail possum, Trichosurus vulpecula, and the red kangaroo, Macropus rufus. Southern blotting experiments indicated that both genes are probably present as single copies. Comparison of the deduced marsupial protein sequences with homologous sequences from other vertebrates revealed a high degree of conservation, especially for the alpha-subunit. These sequences represent the first complete primary structures for a marsupial glycoprotein hormone to have been elucidated.

  17. Stress and the timing of breeding: glucocorticoid-luteinizing hormones relationships in an arctic seabird.

    PubMed

    Goutte, Aurélie; Angelier, Frédéric; Chastel, Céline Clément; Trouvé, Colette; Moe, Børge; Bech, Claus; Gabrielsen, Geir W; Chastel, Olivier

    2010-10-01

    In birds, stressful environmental conditions delay the timing of breeding but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. The stress hormone corticosterone appears to be a good candidate for mediating the decision to breed and when to start egg-laying, via a possible inhibition of luteinizing hormone (LH) and sex-steroids production. We used luteinizing hormone releasing hormone (LHRH) challenge in pre-laying male and female Black-legged kittiwakes (Rissa tridactyla) to test whether LH and testosterone secretion were depressed by elevated corticosterone levels. Females bearing high baseline corticosterone levels showed reduced baseline LH levels and a low ability to release LH, following LHRH challenge. Further, females bearing low baseline LH levels and elevated baseline corticosterone levels were more likely to skip breeding. However, non-breeding females were physiologically primed for breeding, since they mounted high LHRH-induced LH release. Egg-laying date was advanced in good body condition females but was unaffected by hormones secretion. In males, corticosterone levels had no effect on LH and/or testosterone secretion and did not affect their decision to breed. Interestingly, males with high LHRH-induced testosterone release bred early. Our study highlights clear sex-differences in the HPG sensitivity to stress hormones in pre-laying kittiwakes. Because females have to store body reserves and to build up the clutch, they would be more sensitive to stress than males. Moreover, intrasexual competition could force male kittiwakes to acquire reproductive readiness earlier in the season than females and to better resist environmental perturbations. We suggest that high testosterone releasing ability would mediate behavioural adjustments such as courtship feeding, which would stimulate early egg-laying in females.

  18. Leap of Faith: Does serum luteinizing hormone always accurately reflect central reproductive neuroendocrine activity?

    PubMed Central

    Moenter, Suzanne M.

    2015-01-01

    Function of the central aspects of the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis has been assessed in a number of ways including direct measurements of hypothalamic output and indirect measures using gonadotropin release from the pituitary as a bioassay for reproductive neuroendocrine activity. Here, methods for monitoring these various parameters are briefly reviewed and then examples presented of both concordance and discrepancy between central and peripheral measurements, with a focus on situations in which elevated GnRH neurosecretion is not reflected accurately by pituitary luteinizing hormone release. Implications for interpretation of gonadotropin data are discussed. PMID:26278916

  19. Organophosphorus insecticide induced decrease in plasma luteinizing hormone concentration in white-footed mice

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rattner, B.A.; Michael, S.D.

    1985-01-01

    Oral intubation of 50 and 100 mg/kg acephate inhibited brain acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity by 45% and 56%, and reduced basal luteinizing hormone (LH) concentration by 29% and 25% after 4 h in white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus noveboracensis). Dietary exposure to 25, 100, and 400 ppm acephate for 5 days substantially inhibited brain AChE activity, but did not affect plasma LH concentration. These preliminary findings suggest that acute exposure to organophosphorus insecticides may affect LH secretion and possibly reproductive function.

  20. Endocrine profile following stimulation with recombinant follicle stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone versus highly purified human menopausal gonadotropin

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Luteinizing hormone (LH) activity in human menopausal gonadotropin (hMG) preparations is derived from human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) rather than LH. Therefore, we aimed to determine whether there are similarities in the endocrine and follicular profiles of serum and follicular fluid from controlled ovarian stimulation with the recombinant gonadotropins follicle-stimulating hormone plus luteinizing hormone (rFSH + rLH) or highly purified human menopausal gonadotropin (HP-hMG). Methods We performed a prospective observational study with 50 oocyte donors that received either a combination of recombinant gonadotropins (rFSH + rLH) or a mixture of urinary gonadotropins (HP-hMG) plus purified urinary FSH (uFSH). Results were analyzed using Student’s t-test to compare continuous variables and the chi-squared test to compare proportions. P-values < 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results Although more oocytes were retrieved after treatment with recombinant than urinary gonadotropins (16.5 vs. 11.8; P = 0.049), a higher proportion of metaphase II ova (71.2% vs. 80.6%; P = 0.003) were obtained using urinary gonadotropins. On day 6 and on the day of triggering, serum steroid hormone levels were slightly but not significantly elevated in the recombinant group compared with the urinary group. In follicular fluid, no statistical differences were observed for intra-follicular levels of steroid hormones between the two protocols; ongoing pregnancy rates were similar (46.1% vs. 46.1%). Conclusions Our data suggest that endocrinological and follicular profiles do not differ between rFSH + rLH and HP-hMG stimulation. PMID:24476504

  1. Failure of ethanol metabolites to alter gonadotropin secretion or luteinizing hormone synthesis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Uddin, S; Kirsteins, L; LaPaglia, N; Emanuele, N V; Lawrence, A M; Kelley, M R; Emanuele, M A

    1995-08-01

    The impact of ethanol on the male reproductive axis are multiple and varied, with both gonadal and control hypothalamic-pituitary pertubations being reported. There appears to be a discrepancy, however, between the in vivo and in vitro effects of ethanol on hypothalamic luteinizing hormones releasing hormone (LHRH) and the pituitary gonadotropins luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH). While in vivo data suggests a decrease in LHRH release after EtOH, in vitro studies find no effect on secretion. Similarly, in vivo acute EtOH profoundly diminishes LH synthesis and secretion, while in vitro impaired release with no alteration in the transcription of beta LH has been found. A potential exploration for these discrept results could be the in vivo metabolism of EtOH into acetaldehyde and acetate, or the subsequent formation of salsolinol, a product of acetate combining with dopamine. To test this possibility, a series of in vitro experiments were conducted exposing dispensed anterior pituitary cells from male rats to different doses of acetaldehyde, acetate or salsolinol for varying amounts of time for which gonadotropin secretion and beta LH mRNA levels were assessed. The results demonstrated no effect of either acetaldehyde or acetate on basal or LHRH stimulated LH release, FSH release or steady-state beta LH mRNA levels. These data suggest that the metabolites of EtOH, which occur in vivo but not in vitro, are not responsible for the discrepant gonadotropin changes reported between the in vivo and in vitro setting. Other potential mechanisms to explain this phenomenon include differences in the molarity of EtOH, hyperprolactinemia and suprapituitary influences including hypothalamic LHRH, catecholamines, excitatory amino acids, substance P and beta endorphin.

  2. Controlled release of a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone analogue from poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) microspheres.

    PubMed

    Sanders, L M; Kent, J S; McRae, G I; Vickery, B H; Tice, T R; Lewis, D H

    1984-09-01

    The performance in vivo of nafarelin acetate, a potent analogue of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone, microencapsulated in poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide), was evaluated. The influence of polymer composition and molecular weight on the estrus-suppressing activity of the microspheres in female rats was determined. Compound release was shown to be effected by polymer erosion rather than by diffusion. A triphasic release of compound was observed, which was adjusted by altering the critical parameters of the polymer. A mechanism for the release of the compound was proposed. The primary release phase was compound loss by diffusion from the surface of the microspheres. The secondary phase of subeffective rates of release occurred concomitantly with polymer hydrolysis and a decrease in its molecular weight, although it remained insoluble. Dissolution of low-molecular weight fragments and erosion of the bulk of the polymer then initiated the tertiary phase of release of compound. PMID:6238157

  3. Luteinizing hormone and follicle stimulating hormone synergy: A review of role in controlled ovarian hyper-stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Raju, Gottumukkala Achyuta Rama; Chavan, Rahul; Deenadayal, Mamata; Gunasheela, Devika; Gutgutia, Rohit; Haripriya, Geetha; Govindarajan, Mirudhubashini; Patel, Nayana Hitesh; Patki, Ameet Shashikant

    2013-01-01

    Luteinizing hormone (LH) in synergy with follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) stimulates normal follicular growth and ovulation. FSH is frequently used in assisted reproductive technology (ART). Recent studies have facilitated better understanding on the complementary role of the LH to FSH in regulation of the follicle; however, role of LH in stimulation of follicle, optimal dosage of LH in stimulation and its importance in advanced aged patients has been a topic of discussion among medical fraternity. Though the administration of exogenous LH with FSH is obligatory for controlled ovarian stimulation in patients with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, there is still a paucity of information of its usage in other patient population. In this review we looked in to the multiple roles that LH plays complementary to FSH to better understand the LH requirement in patients undergoing ART. PMID:24672160

  4. Gender differences in Alzheimer disease: the role of luteinizing hormone in disease pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Webber, Kate M; Casadesus, Gemma; Perry, George; Atwood, Craig S; Bowen, Richard; Smith, Mark A

    2005-01-01

    Epidemiological data reporting the predisposition of women to Alzheimer disease has provided researchers with an important clue as to the identity of the driving pathogenic force and lead many to question the potential role of sex steroids, namely estrogen, in disease pathogenesis. However, while estrogen has become the primary focus of research in the field, inconclusive data regarding estrogen replacement therapy has lead some researchers to begin investigating the effects of the other hormones of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis on the aging brain. Certain hormones of the HPG axis, namely the gonadotropins (luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone), are not only involved in regulating reproductive function via a complex feedback loop but are also known to cross the blood-brain barrier. Recently, we proposed that an increase in gonadotropin concentrations, not the decrease in steroid hormone (eg, estrogen) production following menopause/andropause, is a potentially primary causative factor for the development of Alzheimer disease. In this review, we examine how the gonadotropins may play a central and determining role in modulating the susceptibility to, and progression of, Alzheimer disease. Based on this, we suggest that therapeutic interventions targeted at gonadotropins may both prevent disease in those patients currently asymptomatic or may halt, and even reverse, disease in those currently afflicted.

  5. Analysis of androgen receptor and anti-Müllerian hormone pathways in human granulosa cells under luteinizing hormone treatment

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to determine the gene expression profiles of the androgen/androgen receptor (AR) and anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH)/ Sry-related high-mobility group box 9 (SOX9) pathways in granulosa-luteal cells from patients undergoing standard in vitro fertilization (IVF) with or without recombinant luteinizing hormone (rLH) therapy. Methods Levels of reproductive hormones in the pre-ovulatory follicular fluid and the expression levels of LHR (luteinizing hormone receptor), AR, SOX9, AMH, AR-associated protein 54(ARA54)and ARA70 were determined in granulosa-luteal cells by real-time reverse-transcription PCR. The effects of androgen and rLH treatments on AR and AMH expression levels were also tested in vitro using HO23 cells. Results We collected 35 an 70 granulosa cell samples from patients cycled with and without rLH supplementation, respectively. The clinical outcomes were similar in patients who received rLH therapy and those who did not, though the pre-ovulatory follicular fluid levels of androstenedione, testosterone, and estradiol were significantly higher and progesterone was lower in the rLH supplementation group. Moreover, granulosa-luteal cell mRNA levels of LHR, AR, AMH, and SOX9 were significantly higher in the rLH supplementation group relative to the group that did not receive rLH supplementation. In addition, we observed significant correlations between LHR and AR mRNA expression and among AR, AMH, and SOX9 mRNA expression in granulosa-luteal cells from patients undergoing standard IVF treatment. Conclusions Increased expression of LHR, AR, AMH, and SOX9 is characteristic of granulosa-luteal cells from IVF/ intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) patients receiving rLH supplementation. PMID:23433069

  6. Gender, neuroendocrine-immune interactions and neuron-glial plasticity. Role of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH).

    PubMed

    Marchetti, B; Gallo, F; Farinella, Z; Tirolo, C; Testa, N; Caniglia, S; Morale, M C

    2000-01-01

    Signals generated by the hypothalamic-pitutary-gonadal (HPG) axis powerfully modulate immune system function. This article summarizes some aspects of the impact of gender in neuroendocrine immunomodulation. Emphasis is given to the astroglial cell compartment, defined as a key actor in neuroendocrine immune communications. In the brain, the principal hormones of the HPG axis directly interact with astroglial cells. Thus, luteinizing hormone releasing hormone, LHRH, influences hypothalamic astrocyte development and growth, and hypothalamic astrocytes direct LHRH neuron differentiation. Hormonally induced changes in neuron-glial plasticity may dictate major changes in CNS output, and thus actively participate in sex dimorphic immune responses. The impact of gender in neuroimmunomodulation is further underlined by the sex dimorphism in the expression of genes encoding for neuroendocrine hormones and their receptors within the thymus, and by the potent modulation exerted by circulating sex steroids during development and immunization. The central role of glucocorticoids in the interactive communication between neuroendocrine and immune systems, and the impact of gender on hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis modulation is underscored in transgenic mice expressing a glucocorticoid receptor antisense RNA.

  7. Luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone analogues--the rationale for adjuvant use in premenopausal women with early breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Jonat, W

    1998-09-01

    Current standard adjuvant therapies for early breast cancer include tamoxifen and chemotherapy, depending on the disease prognosis and menopausal status. Luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) analogues offer a different approach to the management of early breast cancer in pre- and perimenopausal women. The most widely studied LHRH analogue is goserelin. It acts on the hypothalamic-pituitary axis to suppress ovarian function, decreasing luteinizing hormone and oestradiol levels to post-menopausal values. Pooled data from 228 premenopausal and perimenopausal patients with advanced breast cancer enrolled in 29 studies worldwide demonstrated an objective response rate for goserelin, 3.6 mg, of 36.4%, with a median duration of response of 44 weeks. These results fall well within the ranges of reported response rates for ovarian ablation and for tamoxifen in similar patient populations. By virtue of its mode of action, goserelin does not stimulate the ovaries and is unlikely to have detrimental effects on the endometrium. In addition, given that goserelin has no oestrogen agonist-like effects, unlike tamoxifen, there is no potential for tumour stimulation in those patients becoming resistant to treatment. Goserelin is generally well tolerated, and the main side-effects are related to ovarian suppression, which is potentially reversible. Preliminary results in premenopausal women with early breast cancer indicate that endocrine treatment with goserelin plus tamoxifen may be as effective as standard combination chemotherapy (cyclophosphamide-methotrexate-5-fluorouracil), but has significantly less acute toxicity. A number of large, randomized trials are now in progress to assess the potential role of goserelin as adjuvant therapy for early breast cancer.

  8. Serum levels of luteinizing hormone, prolactin, estradiol and progesterone in laying and nonlaying mallards (Anas platyrhynchos).

    PubMed

    Bluhm, C K; Phillips, R E; Burke, W H

    1983-03-01

    Temporal changes of circulating serum hormones were measured to compare the reproductive endocrinology of laying and nonlaying mallards. In this study all sixteen control mallards left with their mates laid eggs, while only one of sixteen mallards stressed by daily movement into new pens, laid eggs. Serum levels of luteinizing hormone (LH), prolactin, estradiol, and progesterone were significantly lower (P less than 0.05) in stressed nonlaying mallards than in laying mallards over the 7-week period. Within 1 week of the rotation treatment, LH concentrations in stressed mallards averaged (means +/- SEM) 2.72 +/- 0.19 ng/ml and were significantly lower (P less than 0.05) than LH levels in the controls (3.62 +/- 0.18 ng/ml). After 7 weeks, injections of luteinizing hormone releasing hormone (LHRH) induced a greater change in circulating LH levels in stressed mallards (2.1 +/- 0.3 ng/ml) than in breeding control mallards (0.9 +/- 0.2 ng/ml). These data demonstrate that the lack of reproduction in stressed mallards was associated with LHRH-sensitive pituitary pools of LH, despite their low concentrations of serum LH. These data suggest that the block in reproduction is a failure of the hypothalamus to produce or release releasing hormones. The serum hormone levels of the control mallards varied temporally with stages in the nesting cycle. LH levels increased with the onset of nesting activity, and showed marked fluctuations during the laying period. LH levels fell at the onset of incubation but increased after loss of clutch. Estradiol levels were highest prior to the laying of the first egg and their peak coincided with the initial nest building behavior of the females. Progesterone levels increased sharply with the laying of the 2nd-4th eggs, decreased sharply with the laying of the 6th egg, and then increased slightly at the end of the nesting cycle. Prolactin levels were initially low but gradually increased with laying and incubation activity, declined with loss of

  9. Pharmacodynamics of aqueous leuprolide acetate stimulation testing in girls: correlation between clinical diagnosis and time of peak luteinizing hormone level.

    PubMed

    Chi, Carolyn H; Durham, Eileen; Neely, E Kirk

    2012-10-01

    We assessed the pharmacodynamics of a 3-hour leuprolide stimulation test in 11 girls with precocious puberty to determine an optimal single sampling time. Luteinizing hormone level following leuprolide stimulation was near maximum by 30 minutes in girls with central precocious puberty, whereas it continued to rise slowly in girls with nonprogressive puberty.

  10. Effect of naloxone treatment on luteinizing hormone and testosterone concentrations in boars with high and low libido

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective was to determine the effects of naloxone, an opioid peptide receptor antagonist on circulating concentrations of luteinizing hormone (LH) and testosterone in boars characterized as having high (n = 8) or low libido (n = 8) based on the willingness to mount an artificial sow and allow s...

  11. Intra-pituitary relationship of follicle stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone during pubertal development in Atlantic bluefin tuna (Thunnus thynnus).

    PubMed

    Berkovich, Nadia; Corriero, Aldo; Santamaria, Nicoletta; Mylonas, Constantinos C; Vassallo-Aguis, Robert; de la Gándara, Fernando; Meiri-Ashkenazi, Iris; Zlatnikov, Vered; Gordin, Hillel; Bridges, Christopher R; Rosenfeld, Hanna

    2013-12-01

    As part of the endeavor aiming at the domestication of Atlantic bluefin tuna (BFT; Thunnus thynnus), first sexual maturity in captivity was studied by documenting its occurrence and by characterizing the key hormones of the reproductive axis: follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH). The full length sequence encoding for the related hormone β-subunits, bftFSHβ and bftLHβ, were determined, revealing two bftFSHβ mRNA variants, differing in their 5' untranslated region. A quantitative immuno-dot-blot assay to measure pituitary FSH content in BFT was developed and validated enabling, for the first time in this species, data sets for both LH and FSH to be compared. The expression and accumulation patterns of LH in the pituitary showed a steady increase of this hormone, concomitant with fish age, reaching higher levels in adult females compared to males of the same age class. Conversely, the pituitary FSH levels were elevated only in 2Y and adult fish. The pituitary FSH to LH ratio was consistently higher (>1) in immature than in maturing or pubertal fish, resembling the situation in mammals. Nevertheless, the results suggest that a rise in the LH storage level above a minimum threshold may be an indicator of the onset of puberty in BFT females. The higher pituitary LH levels in adult females over males may further support this notion. In contrast three year-old (3Y) males were pubertal while cognate females were still immature. However, it is not yet clear whether the advanced puberty in the 3Y males was a general feature typifying wild BFT populations or was induced by the culture conditions. Future studies testing the effects of captivity and hormonal treatments on precocious maturity may allow for improved handling of this species in a controlled environment which would lead to more cost-efficient farming.

  12. Luteinizing hormone releasing factor in rat hypophysial portal blood collected during electrical stimulation of the hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Harris, G. W.; Ruf, K. B.

    1970-01-01

    1. Ovulation was induced in Nembutal-blocked pro-oestrous rats by electrical stimulation of the hypothalamus. 2. The same type of electrical stimulation was applied during the collection of hypophysial portal blood. 3. Pooled hypophysial portal plasma from donors in pro-oestrus, oestrus and met-oestrus was assayed for ovarian ascorbic acid depleting (OAAD) activity. 4. Electrical stimulation of the hypothalamus increased the OAAD activity, believed to be due to luteinizing hormone releasing factor (LRF), in pro-oestrus and met-oestrus, but not in oestrus. 5. It is concluded that the hypothalamic nerve fibres responsible for releasing LRF into the hypophysial portal vessels are depleted of their store of this releasing factor, or are refractory to electrical stimulation, during oestrus. PMID:5499765

  13. Luteinizing hormone receptors in human ovarian follicles and corpora lutea during the menstrual cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Yamoto, M.; Nakano, R.; Iwasaki, M.; Ikoma, H.; Furukawa, K.

    1986-08-01

    The binding of /sup 125/I-labeled human luteinizing hormone (hLH) to the 2000-g fraction of human ovarian follicles and corpora lutea during the entire menstrual cycle was examined. Specific high affinity, low capacity receptors for hLH were demonstrated in the 2000-g fraction of both follicles and corpora lutea. Specific binding of /sup 125/I-labeled hLH to follicular tissue increased from the early follicular phase to the ovulatory phase. Specific binding of /sup 125/I-labeled hLH to luteal tissue increased from the early luteal phase to the midluteal phase and decreased towards the late luteal phase. The results of the present study indicate that the increase and decrease in receptors for hLH during the menstrual cycle might play an important role in the regulation of the ovarian cycle.

  14. Depression of plasma luteinizing hormone concentration in quail by the anticholinesterase insecticide parathion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rattner, B.A.; Clarke, R.N.; Ottinger, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    To examine the effects of parathion on basal plasma luteinizing hormone (LH) concentration, male Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) were orally intubated with 0, 5 or 10 mg/kg parathion and sacrificed after 4, 8 and 24 hr. At the 5 mg/kg dose, plasma LH levels were reduced at 4 and 8 hr, but returned to control values by 24 hr. Brain acetylcholinesterase activity was substantially reduced by 10 mg/kg parathion (52, 75 and 37% inhibition at 4, 8 and 24 hr, respectively) and plasma LH concentration remained depressed through the 24-hr period. These findings suggest that the organophosphorus insecticide parathion may alter plasma LH concentration in a manner which might impair reproductive activity, and provide indirect evidence for a cholinergic component in the regulation of LH secretion in quail.

  15. Low luteinizing hormone enhances spatial memory and has protective effects on memory loss in rats.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Shira G; Thornton, Janice E

    2010-11-01

    Though several studies have suggested that estradiol improves hippocampal-dependent spatial memory, the effects of other hormones in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis on memory have largely been ignored. Estradiol and luteinizing hormone (LH) are generally inversely related and LH may significantly affect spatial memory. Ovariectomized (ovx) rats treated with Antide (a gonadotropin releasing hormone receptor antagonist) had low LH levels and showed enhanced spatial memory, comparable to treatment with estradiol. Antide-treated ovx females retained spatial memory longer than estradiol-treated ovx females. Deficits in spatial memory are a primary symptom of neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Treatment with Antide prevented spatial memory deficits in a neurotoxin-induced model typical of early AD. These data suggest that memory impairments seen in female rats after ovariectomy or women after menopause may be due to high LH levels and that a reduction in LH enhances memory. These results also implicate an LH lowering agent as a potential preventative therapy for AD.

  16. Role of prolactin and luteinizing hormone in regulating timing of implantation in the spotted skunk.

    PubMed

    Berria, M; Joseph, M M; Mead, R A

    1989-02-01

    The western spotted skunk exhibits an obligate delay of implantation lasting 200-220 days. The pituitary is essential for luteal activation. The corpora lutea, in turn, secrete the hormones necessary for blastocyst implantation. Two experiments were designed to determine which pituitary hormones are responsible for increasing luteal activity and induction of implantation. Forty-two pregnant skunks with delayed implanting blastocysts were treated as follows: 13 served as untreated controls, 6 received 0.5 mg prolactin (PRL) daily, and 5 received diluent beginning in January. Four received 1.5 mg bromocriptine (CB-154) daily, 3 received both CB-154 and PRL, 3 received diluent, 5 received a gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRHa) dispensed from osmotic minipumps, and 3 received diluent dispensed from osmotic minipumps starting in April. The skunks were subjected to a natural photoperiod. Duration of preimplantation and blood levels of progesterone and luteinizing hormone were measured. PRL significantly (p less than 0.05) shortened and CB-154 significantly (p less than 0.05) prolonged the duration of preimplantation when compared to controls (148 +/- 33.6 vs. 251 +/- 3.2 vs. 199 +/- 5.1 days, respectively). PRL was able to reverse the inhibitory effect of CB-154 when both were administered simultaneously (195 +/- 4.0 vs. 251 +/- 3.2 days). GnRHa had no significant (p greater than 0.05) effect on duration of preimplantation (199 +/- 5.1 days) when compared to controls (203 +/- 3.2 days). These results indicate that PRL is the primary pituitary hormone responsible for increased luteal activity and subsequent blastocyst implantation in the spotted skunk.

  17. Structural and functional plasticity of the luteinizing hormone/choriogonadotrophin receptor.

    PubMed

    Troppmann, Britta; Kleinau, Gunnar; Krause, Gerd; Gromoll, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND In recent years it became evident that several types of the luteinizing hormone/choriogonadotrophin receptor (LHCGR) exist. In addition to the classical receptor type known in rodents, an LHCGR type containing an additional exon is present in primates and humans. This specific exon 6A introduces a hitherto unknown regulatory pathway of the LHCGR at the transcriptional level which can lead to the expression of an alternative protein covering the extracellular part only. Furthermore, an LHCGR type lacking exon 10 at the mRNA and protein levels has been described in the New World primate lineage, giving rise to an additional receptor type in which amino acids of the extracellular hinge region connecting the leucine-rich repeat domain and transmembrane domain are missing. METHODS Topic-related information was retrieved by systematic searches using Medline/PubMed. Structural homology models were retrieved from a glycoprotein hormone receptors web application and from recent publications. RESULTS In a novel approach, we combine functional aspects with three-dimensional properties of the LHCGR and the different receptor types to deduce causative relationships between these two parameters. On this basis, the physiological impact and patho-physiological consequences of the different LHCGR types are inferred. CONCLUSIONS The complex system of different LHCGR types and two corresponding hormones (LH and CG) represents a major challenge for future studies on selective hormone binding, signal transduction and receptor regulation. The presence of these naturally occurring LHCGR types requires re-examining of our present view on receptor function, experimental set-ups and data interpretation, but also offers new clinical approaches to interfere with LH/CG action in humans.

  18. Highly potent analogues of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone containing D-phenylalanine nitrogen mustard in position 6

    SciTech Connect

    Bajusz, S.; Janaky, T.; Csernus, V.J.; Bokser, L.; Fekete, M.; Srkalovic, G.; Redding, T.W.; Schally, A.V. )

    1989-08-01

    The nitrogen mustard derivatives of 4-phenylbutyric acid and L-phenylalanine, called chlorambucil (Chl) and melphalan (Mel), respectively, have been incorporated into several peptide hormones, including luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LH-RH). The alkylating analogues of LH-RH were prepared by linking Chl, as an N-acyl moiety, to the complete amino acid sequence of agonistic and antagonistic analogues. These compounds, in particular the antagonistic analogues, showed much lower potency than their congeners carrying other acyl groups. To obtain highly potent alkylating analogues of LH-RH, the D enantiomer of Mel was incorporated into position 6 of the native hormone and some of its antagonistic analogues. Of the peptides prepared, (D-Mel{sup 6})LH-RH (SB-05) and (Ac-D-Nal(2){sup 1},D-Phe(pCl){sup 2},D-Pal(3){sup 3},Arg{sup 5},D-Mel{sup 6},D-Ala{sup 10})LH-RH (SB-86, where Nal(2) is 3-(2-naphthyl)alanine and Pal(3) is 3-(3-pyridyl)alanine) possessed the expected high agonistic and antagonistic activities, respectively, and also showed high affinities for the membrane receptors of rat pituitary cells, human breast cancer cells, human prostate cancer cells, and rat Dunning R-3327 prostate tumor cells. These two analogues exerted cytotoxic effects on human and rat mammary cancer cells in vitro. Thus these two D-Mel{sup 6} analogues seem to be particularly suitable for the study of how alkylating analogues of LH-RH could interfere with intracellular events in certain cancer cells.

  19. Role of Serum Follicle Stimulating Hormone, Luteinizing Hormone, Testosterone and Prolactin Levels in Azoospermic Male Partner of Subfertile Couple.

    PubMed

    Begum, N; Anwary, S A; Alfazzaman, M; Mahzabin, Z; Nahar, K; Rahman, M M; Mostafa, M A

    2016-04-01

    This cross sectional study was carried out in the Infertility Unit, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU) from January 2011 and June 2013. Eighty one (81) consecutive azoospermic male partner of married couple, aged 20-50 years with at least two years of subfertility and no known endocrinopathy and ejaculatory dysfunction were included in this study to find out their abnormal hormonal pattern. None of them had received any form of treatment within the last 3 months prior to hormonal evaluation. Men with hypertension, recent fever, chemo or radiation exposure were excluded from the study. Eight weeks interval two semen analyses were done in the Andrology Laboratory of above department following standard WHO guideline, 2004. Using standard ELISA technique, serum levels of follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), testosterone and prolactin were measured/assayed/estimated. The results of this study demonstrated that 40 (49.4%) men had normal endocrine pattern against 51 (50.6%) with endocrinopathy. The former may be related to obstructive azoospermia, which needs further analyses. Both the increased FSH (>11.1mIU/ml) and LH (>7.6mIU/ml) were observed in 25 (30.9%) men, only elevated FSH (>11.1mIU/ml) in 9(11.1%), and only elevated LH (>7.6mIU/ml) in 7(8.6%). Low testosterone level (<270ng/dl) was observed in 11(13.6%), low TSH (<0.4μIU/ml) in 1(1.2%) and low prolactin (<2.5ng/dl) in 5(6.2%).

  20. Luteinizing hormone levels are positively correlated with plasma amyloid-beta protein levels in elderly men.

    PubMed

    Verdile, Giuseppe; Yeap, Bu B; Clarnette, Roger M; Dhaliwal, Satvinder; Burkhardt, Melanie S; Chubb, S A Paul; De Ruyck, Karl; Rodrigues, Mark; Mehta, Pankaj D; Foster, Jonathan K; Bruce, David G; Martins, Ralph N

    2008-06-01

    Dysregulation of the hypothalamic pituitary gonadal (HPG) axis during aging has been associated with increased risk of cognitive decline and developing dementia. Compared to controls, men with Alzheimer's disease (AD) have been shown to have lower serum testosterone levels and higher serum luteinizing hormone (LH) levels. As serum free testosterone concentration is negatively correlated with LH in older men, the independent contributions of these hormones to the pathogenesis of AD warrants further clarification. To explore this notion, we measured plasma amyloid-beta (Abeta), serum testosterone, serum LH and other biochemical parameters in 40 cognitively normal elderly men. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that serum LH concentration is the only parameter that significantly correlates with plasma Abeta levels in these men (r=0.5, p=0.041). These results suggest that increased serum LH concentration, rather than lower serum free testosterone, is associated with the accumulation of Abeta in plasma. Larger, longitudinal human studies are needed to determine the significance of LH in the pathogenesis of AD.

  1. Luteinizing hormone secretion in hemidecorticate female rats under several experimental conditions.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, G A; Antunes-Rodrigues, J; Covian, M R

    1978-01-01

    Luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion by the anterior pituitary gland was investigated in hemidecorticate (HD) rats under several conditions. Higher plasma and lower pituitary LH levels were observed in HD rats in the afternoon of proestrus, after unilateral ovariectomy, and at the 7th and 14th days after bilateral castration. The ovarian hypertrophy observed in HD rats did not differ from control. When hormonal substitutive therapy was started 3 days after bilateral ovariectomy, larger doses of estradiol benzoate (EB) were required to reduce plasma LH levels in control than in HD animals. The increase in pituitary weight was, however, significantly higher in the HD castrated group. When substitutive therapy started at the 7th and 14th days after castration no significant differences between the 2 experimental groups were observed. The results of substitutive therapy suggest that hemidecortication induces an increase in the sensitivity of hypothalamic-pituitary axis to estrogen negative feedback. This change in sensitivity is clearly seen in HD rats during the first few days after castration. These results suggest that hemidecortication may release the hypothalamus from inhibitory influences coming from rhinencephalic or cortical structures, thus rendering the preoptic-suprachiasmatic complex (POA-SCH) more sensitive to LH-releasing mechanisms.

  2. Exogenous action of 5-lipoxygenase by its metabolites on luteinizing hormone release in rat pituitary cells.

    PubMed

    Przylipiak, A; Kiesel, L; Habenicht, A J; Przylipiak, M; Runnebaum, B

    1990-02-12

    The stimulatory effect of exogenously administered potato 5-lipoxygenase (0.1-0.3 U/2 ml) on luteinizing hormone (LH) release was demonstrated in rat anterior pituitary cells in a superfusion system. Nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), an inhibitor of 5-lipoxygenase, abolished the effect of the enzyme on LH secretion. The secretory effect on LH after 5-lipoxygenase administration was biphasic and dependent on Ca2+ indicating that 5-lipoxygenase affects LH release through its oxygenation reaction. Another series of experiments demonstrated that activation of 5-lipoxygenase, expressed as production of leukotriene (LT) B4 and C4 (728 +/- 127 pg/10(6) cells and 178 +/- 23 pg/10(6) cells, respectively) occurs in rat pituitary cells after addition of Ca2+ ionophore A23187. However, LTB4 and LTC4 were not formed by pituitary cells that had previously been desensitized by gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), the physiological ligand of LH release. These results are consistent with a role of 5-lipoxygenase metabolites in the mechanism of GnRH-induced LH secretion. PMID:2157615

  3. Thecal cell sensitivity to luteinizing hormone and insulin in polycystic ovarian syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cadagan, David; Khan, Raheela; Amer, Saad

    2016-03-01

    This study examined whether a defect of steroid synthesis in ovarian theca cells may lead to the development of PCOS, through contributions to excess androgen secretion. Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is one of the leading causes of infertility worldwide affecting around 1 in 10 of women of a reproductive age. One of the fundamental abnormalities in this syndrome is the presence of hormonal irregularities, including hyperandrogenemia, hyperinsulinemia and hypersecretion of luteinizing hormone (LH). Studies suggest that insulin treatment increases progesterone and androstenedione secretion in PCOS theca cells when compared to insulin treated normal theca cells. Furthermore the augmented effects of LH and insulin have been seen to increase ovarian androgen synthesis in non-PCOS theca cultures whilst also increasing the expression of steroidogenic enzymes specific to the PI3-K pathway. Our examination of primary thecal cultures showed an increase in both the expression of the steroidogenic enzyme CYP17 and androgen secretion in PCOS theca cells under basal conditions, when compared to non-PCOS cells. This was increased significantly under treatments of LH and insulin combined. Our results support the previous reported hypothesis that a dysfunction may exist within the PI3-K pathway. Specifically, that sensitivity exists to physiological symptoms including hyperinsulinemia and hyper secretion of LH found in PCOS through co-stimulation. The impact of these findings may allow the development of a therapeutic target in PCOS. PMID:26952754

  4. A novel neuropeptide in suppressing luteinizing hormone release in goldfish, Carassius auratus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yun; Li, Shuisheng; Qi, Xing; Zhou, Wenyi; Liu, Xiaochun; Lin, Haoran; Zhang, Yong; Cheng, Christopher H K

    2013-07-15

    The fish reproductive axis is regulated by many neuroendocrine factors. However, factors involved in the suppression of this axis are largely uncharacterized. In this study, we describe a novel neuropeptide derived from the spexin precursor acting as a negative factor to suppress the reproductive axis in teleost. The cDNA sequences of the spexin precursors have been cloned from both zebrafish and goldfish. A 14-aa mature peptide with the C-terminal amidated (spexin-14a: NWTPQAMLYLKGTQ-NH2) is conceivably generated by processing of the spexin precursors in both species. Spexin is mainly expressed in the brain and ovary of zebrafish and spexin-14a-ir cells are located in several brain regions of goldfish. Functionally, goldfish spexin-14a could significantly suppress luteinizing hormone (LH) release in cultured goldfish pituitary cells. Moreover, intraperitoneal injection of spexin-14a could effectively suppress serum LH level. The mRNA expression of spexin is lower in the breeding season and hypothalamic expression of spexin is regulated by gonadal hormones. These results constitute the first report on the novel role of spexin in the negative regulation of the reproductive axis in teleost.

  5. Serotonin directly stimulates luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone release from GT1 cells via 5-HT7 receptors.

    PubMed

    Héry, M; François-Bellan, A M; Héry, F; Deprez, P; Becquet, D

    1997-10-01

    Luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH release, which serves as the primary drive to the hypothalamic-pituitary gonadal axis, is controlled by many neuromediators. Serotonin has been implicated in this regulation. However, it is unclear whether the central effect of serotonin on LHRH secretion is exerted directly on LHRH neurosecretory neurons or indirectly via multisynaptic pathways. The present studies were undertaken in order to examine whether LHRH secretion from immortalized LHRH cell lines is directly regulated by serotonin and, if so, to identify the receptor subtype involved. 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin (8-OH-DPAT), a 5-HT1A/7 receptor agonist, stimulated LHRH release from GT1-1 cells. This effect was blocked by ritanserin, a 5-HT2/7 receptor antagonist, but not by SDZ-216-525, a 5-HT1A antagonist. Basal LHRH release was not affected by the 5-HT2 agonist DOI. Reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction technique (RT-PCR) was used in order to identify 5-HT1A and 5-HT7 receptor mRNA in immortalized LHRH cell lines. GT1-1 cells express mRNA for the 5-HT7, but not the 5-HT1A receptor subtypes. These results demonstrate a direct stimulatory effect of serotonin on LHRH release via 5-HT7 receptor.

  6. Acute Effect of Manganese on Hypothalamic Luteinizing Hormone Releasing Hormone Secretion in Adult Male Rats: Involvement of Specific Neurotransmitter Systems

    PubMed Central

    Prestifilippo, Juan Pablo; Fernández-Solari, Javier; De Laurentiis, Andrea; Mohn, Claudia Ester; de la Cal, Carolina; Reynoso, Roxana; Dees, W. Les; Rettori, Valeria

    2008-01-01

    Manganese chloride (MnCl2) is capable of stimulating luteinizing hormone releasing hormone (LHRH) secretion in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats through the activation of the hypothalamic nitric oxide/cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)/protein kinase G pathway. The present study aimed to determine the involvement of specific neurotransmitters involved in this action. Our results indicate that dopamine, but not glutamic acid and prostaglandinds, mediates the MnCl2 stimulated secretion of LHRH from medial basal hypothalami in vitro, as well as increases the activity of nitric oxide synthase. Furthermore, a biphasic response was observed in that gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) release was also increased, which acts to attenuate the MnCl2 action to stimulate LHRH secretion. Although it is clear that manganese (Mn+2) can acutely induce LHRH secretion in adult males, we suggest that the additional action of MnCl2 to release GABA, a LHRH inhibitor, may ultimately contribute to suppressed reproductive function observed in adult animals following exposure to high chromic levels of Mn+2. PMID:18603625

  7. Administration of Luteinizing Hormone Releasing Hormone Agonist for Synchronization of Estrus and Generation of Pseudopregnancy for Embryo Transfer in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Borjeson, Tiffany M; Pang, Jassia; Fox, James G; García, Alexis

    2014-01-01

    In the past decade, the use of genetically engineered rats has increased exponentially; therefore, the ability to perform embryo transfer (ET) in rats to rederive, reanimate, or create mutant rat lines is increasingly important. However, the successful generation of pseudopregnant female rats for ET represents a limiting factor. We here evaluated the subcutaneous administration of 40 µg luteinizing hormone releasing hormone agonist (LHRHa) for estrus synchronization during the development and implementation of a rat ET program. Our first experiment assessed endogenous estrus cycling patterns by examining vaginal cytology without administration of LHRHa in 5-wk-old peripubertal Sprague–Dawley female rats. These rats then received LHRHa at approximately 7 wk of age; 57% of the rats were synchronized in proestrus or estrus as assessed by vaginal cytology 96 h later. In a second experiment, 8-wk-old virgin, unmanipulated Sprague–Dawley female rats received LHRHa; 55% were synchronized in proestrus or estrus 96 h later. Copulatory plugs were confirmed in 28% and 82% of the rats that had been synchronized in the first and second experiments, respectively, and mated with vasectomized male rats. Embryo transfer surgery was performed, and live pups were born from both fresh and cryopreserved transgenic rat embryos. Our results indicate that subcutaneous administration of 40 µg LHRHa followed by examination of vaginal cytology 96 h later is an effective technique to generate multiple pseudopregnant recipient rats for use in an ET program. PMID:24827564

  8. Distribution of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone in the upper brainstem and diencephalon of the cat: an immunocytochemical study.

    PubMed

    Belda, M; Coveñas, R; Narváez, J A; Aguirre, J A; Tramu, G

    2000-03-01

    The distribution of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LH-RH)-immunostained cell bodies and fibres was studied in the brainstem and diencephalon of the cat using an indirect immunoperoxidase technique. The brainstem and the thalamus were devoid of immunostained cell bodies, whereas in the hypothalamus immunopositive perikarya were observed in the supraoptic nucleus, the anterior hypothalamus, the preoptic region and in the arcuate nucleus. Our findings also showed that the hypothalamus is richer in immunostained fibres, and that in this region such fibres are more widely distributed than in the thalamus and upper brainstem. No immunopositive fibres were observed in the lower brainstem. Our results point to a more widespread distribution of LH-RH-immunostained perikarya in the cat hypothalamus than that previously reported in the cat; a similar distribution to that found in the rat, and a more restricted distribution than in primates. Additionally, our study shows a more widespread distribution of immunostained fibres in the cat brainstem and diencephalon than that previously described for other mammals. In this context, our results describe for the first time in the mammals central nervous system fibres containing LH-RH located in the stria medullaris of the thalamus, the supramammillary decussation, the laterodorsal and lateroposterior thalamic nuclei, the nucleus reuniens, the supraoptic nucleus, and the optic chiasm. Thus, our findings reveal that LH-RH-immunostained structures are widely distributed in the upper brainstem and in the diencephalon of the cat, suggesting that the peptide may be involved in several physiological functions.

  9. Is radiation-induced ovarian failure in rhesus monkeys preventable by luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonists?: Preliminary observations

    SciTech Connect

    Ataya, K.; Pydyn, E.; Ramahi-Ataya

    1995-03-01

    With the advent of cancer therapy, increasing numbers of cancer patients are achieving long term survival. Impaired ovarian function after radiation therapy has been reported in several studies. Some investigators have suggested that luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonists (LHRHa) can prevent radiation-induced ovarian injury in rodents. Adult female rhesus monkeys were given either vehicle or Leuprolide acetate before, during, and after radiation. Radiation was given in a dose of 200 rads/day for a total of 4000 rads to the ovaries. Frequent serum samples were assayed for estradiol (E{sub 2}) and FSH. Ovariectomy was performed later. Ovaries were processed and serially sectioned. Follicle count and size distribution were determined. Shortly after radiation started, E{sub 2} dropped to low levels, at which it remained, whereas serum FSH level, which was low before radiation, rose soon after starting radiation. In monkeys treated with a combination of LHRHa and radiation, FSH started rising soon after the LHRHa-loaded minipump was removed (after the end of radiation). Serum E{sub 2} increased after the end of LHRHa treatment in the non-irradiated monkey, but not in the irradiated monkey. Follicle counts were not preserved in the LHRHa-treated monkeys that received radiation. The data demonstrated no protective effect of LHRHa treatment against radiation-induced ovarian injury in this rhesus monkey model. 58 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Administration of luteinizing hormone releasing hormone agonist for synchronization of estrus and generation of pseudopregnancy for embryo transfer in rats.

    PubMed

    Borjeson, Tiffany M; Pang, Jassia; Fox, James G; García, Alexis

    2014-05-01

    In the past decade, the use of genetically engineered rats has increased exponentially; therefore, the ability to perform embryo transfer (ET) in rats to rederive, reanimate, or create mutant rat lines is increasingly important. However, the successful generation of pseudopregnant female rats for ET represents a limiting factor. We here evaluated the subcutaneous administration of 40 μg luteinizing hormone releasing hormone agonist (LHRHa) for estrus synchronization during the development and implementation of a rat ET program. Our first experiment assessed endogenous estrus cycling patterns by examining vaginal cytology without administration of LHRHa in 5-wk-old peripubertal Sprague-Dawley female rats. These rats then received LHRHa at approximately 7 wk of age; 57% of the rats were synchronized in proestrus or estrus as assessed by vaginal cytology 96 h later. In a second experiment, 8-wk-old virgin, unmanipulated Sprague-Dawley female rats received LHRHa; 55% were synchronized in proestrus or estrus 96 h later. Copulatory plugs were confirmed in 28% and 82% of the rats that had been synchronized in the first and second experiments, respectively, and mated with vasectomized male rats. Embryo transfer surgery was performed, and live pups were born from both fresh and cryopreserved transgenic rat embryos. Our results indicate that subcutaneous administration of 40 μg LHRHa followed by examination of vaginal cytology 96 h later is an effective technique to generate multiple pseudopregnant recipient rats for use in an ET program.

  11. Luteinizing hormone/human chorionic gonadotrophin receptors in various epidermal structures.

    PubMed

    Venencie, P Y; Méduri, G; Pissard, S; Jolivet, A; Loosfelt, H; Milgrom, E; Misrahi, M

    1999-09-01

    Two different monoclonal antibodies recognizing different epitopes were used to study the localization of luteinizing hormone/human chorionic gonadotrophin (LH/hCG) receptors in human skin. Immunolabelling was observed only in the epidermis and derived structures but not in the dermis. The basal, spinal and granular layers were stained, whereas no receptors were detected in the non-nucleated horny cells. In the growing (anagen) hair, immunostaining was found in the inner root sheath below the level of the sebaceous glands and in the outer root sheath above this level. In the resting (telogen) hair, only the latter staining was observed. In the sebaceous glands, only the thin cells close to the walls of the ducts were immunolabelled. In the eccrine sweat glands, the external clear cells were stained in the secretory portion of the gland, whereas only the cells close to the lumen were labelled in the ducts. The distribution of LH/hCG receptors was compared with that of steroidogenic enzymes (side chain cleavage cytochrome P450, adrenodoxin, 3-beta-hydroxy-5-ene steroid dehydrogenase Delta5-Delta4 isomerase, 17-hydroxylase cytochrome P450 and cytochrome P450 aromatase). Only partial overlaps were observed. The presence of LH receptor mRNA in the skin was confirmed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Monoclonal antibodies raised against the human follicle-stimulating hormone receptor failed to detect the latter in the epidermal structures and in the dermis. The role of LH and hCG in skin modifications occurring during pregnancy and after the menopause is unknown. These hormones may possibly act by regulating steroidogenic enzymes or by modulating cell growth and differentiation. PMID:10583046

  12. Ghrelin suppresses nocturnal secretion of luteinizing hormone (LH) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) in patients with major depression.

    PubMed

    Kluge, Michael; Schmidt, Doreen; Uhr, Manfred; Steiger, Axel

    2013-09-01

    Major depression is associated with various endocrine disturbances. Apart from the well-known hyperactivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, also the function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis and of the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis may be altered compared to healthy subjects. The orexigenic hormone ghrelin is involved in mood regulation and may have antidepressant effects. In addition, it has been shown to suppress secretion of luteinizing hormone (LH) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) in healthy subjects. Aim of this study was therefore to test the effect of ghrelin on the activity of the HPG and HPT axis in patients with major depression. Therefore, secretion profiles of LH and TSH were determined in 14 unmedicated patients with major depression (7 women) twice, receiving 50 μg ghrelin or placebo at 2200, 2300, 0000, and 0100 h. LH secretion after ghrelin injection as assessed by the AUC (4.05 ± 1.18 mlIU min/ml) was significantly (P = 0.049) lower than after placebo injection (4.75 ± 1.33 mlIU min/ml) during the predefined intervention period (2220-0200 h). In addition, LH pulses occurred significantly (P = 0.045) less frequently after ghrelin injection (3.2 ± 1.4) than after placebo injection (3.9 ± 1.7). Mean TSH plasma levels were significantly lower at 0240 h and from 0320 until 0420 h after ghrelin injection than after placebo injection. In conclusion, ghrelin suppressed nocturnal secretion of LH and TSH in patients with major depression. However, these effects were weaker than previously shown in healthy subjects.

  13. Relative roles of follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone in the control of inhibin secretion in normal men.

    PubMed Central

    McLachlan, R I; Matsumoto, A M; Burger, H G; de Kretser, D M; Bremner, W J

    1988-01-01

    The glycoprotein hormone inhibin is produced by the Sertoli cells of the testis under the influence of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and is postulated in turn to inhibit FSH secretion. Luteinizing hormone (LH) is not recognized to have an important role in the control of inhibin secretion in any species. To determine the relative roles of FSH and LH in the control of inhibin secretion in man, we examined the effects of selective FSH and LH replacement on serum inhibin levels in normal men whose endogenous gonadotropins were suppressed by testosterone (T). After a 3-mo control period, nine men received 200 mg T enanthate i.m. weekly for 3-9 mo. During T treatment, serum LH and FSH levels were markedly suppressed and serum inhibin levels fell to 40% of control values. While continuing T, 3-5 mo of treatment with purified hFSH (n = 4) or hLH (n = 4) increased the respective serum gonadotropin level into the upper normal range and significantly increased inhibin levels back to 64 and 55% of control values, respectively. Supraphysiological LH replacement with high doses of human chorionic gonadotropin (n = 3) returned serum inhibin levels to 63% of control values. In no case did inhibin levels return fully to control levels. In conclusion, serum inhibin levels fell during gonadotropin suppression and were partially and approximately equally restored by either FSH or LH treatment. FSH presumably acts directly on the Sertoli cell to increase inhibin secretion whereas LH may act via increases in intratesticular T levels and/or other factor(s). Images PMID:3138288

  14. Response to luteinizing releasing hormone, thyrotrophic releasing hormone, and human chorionic gonadotropin administration in healthy men at different risks for prostatic cancer and in prostatic cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Hill, P; Wynder, E L; Garbaczewski, L; Garnes, H; Walker, A R

    1982-05-01

    A comparative study of the pituitary and testicular response to luteinizing releasing hormone (LHRH), thyrotrophic releasing hormone (TRH), and human chorionic gonadotrophin (HCG) administration was carried out in (a) low-risk young South African black men and high-risk North American black men for prostatic cancer and (b) healthy elderly South African men and South African black men with prostatic cancer. A comparable HCG response occurred in young South African and North American black men, while a greater release of prolactin, but a lesser release of luteinizing hormone in response to LHRH:TRH occurred in South African black men. The response to HCG was comparable in elderly and young South African black men, although the prolactin release in response to TRH was greater in elderly men. A more prolonged release of luteinizing hormone was evident in men with prostatic cancer. Higher estradiol and estrone but lower androstenedione levels occurred in men with prostatic cancer. Data suggest that, in the elderly South African black men with prostatic cancer, estrogen metabolism is modified and that either the estrogen level or the higher estrogen:androgen levels modify the pituitary response to LHRH:TRH. A Western diet enhanced the changes in hormone profiles evident in black South African men with prostatic cancer. PMID:6802486

  15. Stress increases putative gonadotropin inhibitory hormone and decreases luteinizing hormone in male rats.

    PubMed

    Kirby, Elizabeth D; Geraghty, Anna C; Ubuka, Takayoshi; Bentley, George E; Kaufer, Daniela

    2009-07-01

    The subjective experience of stress leads to reproductive dysfunction in many species, including rodents and humans. Stress effects on reproduction result from multilevel interactions between the hormonal stress response system, i.e., the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, and the hormonal reproductive system, i.e., the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. A novel negative regulator of the HPG axis known as gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) was recently discovered in quail, and orthologous neuropeptides known as RFamide-related peptides (RFRPs) have also been identified in rodents and primates. It is currently unknown, however, whether GnIH/RFRPs influence HPG axis activity in response to stress. We show here that both acute and chronic immobilization stress lead to an up-regulation of RFRP expression in the dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH) of adult male rats and that this increase in RFRP is associated with inhibition of downstream HPG activity. We also show that adrenalectomy blocks the stress-induced increase in RFRP expression. Immunohistochemistry revealed that 53% of RFRP cells express receptors for glucocorticoids (GCs), indicating that adrenal GCs can mediate the stress effect through direct action on RFRP cells. It is thought that stress effects on central control of reproduction are largely mediated by direct or indirect effects on GnRH-secreting neurons. Our data show that stress-induced increases in adrenal GCs cause an increase in RFRP that contributes to hypothalamic suppression of reproductive function. This novel insight into HPA-HPG interaction provides a paradigm shift for work on stress-related reproductive dysfunction and infertility, and indicates that future work on stress and reproductive system interactions must include investigation of the role of GnIH/RFRP.

  16. Abnormal luteinizing hormone response patterns to synthetic gonadotrophin releasing hormone in patients with polycystic ovarian syndrome.

    PubMed

    Katz, M; Carr, P J

    1976-08-01

    Basal gonadotrophin and sex steroid levels and responses to an intravenous injection of 100 mug gonadotrophin releasing hormone (Gn-RH) have been studied in 15 patients with polycystic ovaries. Mean basal LH concentration was raised and an excessive, exaggerated and prolonged response was observed after Gn-RH treatment, but patients could further be subdivided into two functional groups on the basis of their basal LH values and LH response patterns. Evidence was also produced which suggested a breakdown in the negative feedback mechanism in these patients.

  17. Reevaluation of the relative activities of the pituitary glycoprotein hormones (follicle-stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, and thyrotrophin) from the green sea turtle, Chelonia mydas.

    PubMed

    Licht, P; Papkoff, H

    1985-06-01

    The discovery that the follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) previously prepared from the green sea turtle, Chelonia mydas, contained a major neurohypophysial contaminant prompted a repurification and characterization of the glycoprotein hormones in this turtle. Results reaffirmed the physicochemical distinctiveness of the three hormones. Minimal cross-contamination between hormones (less than 2%) was achieved by ion-exchange chromatography, subunit dissociation (of contaminating luteinizing hormone (LH], gel filtration, and immuno-affinity chromatography. New preparations of FSH and thyrotrophin (TSH) derived from adult pituitaries proved to be more potent than those described previously (the degree depending on the nature of the assay); FSH showed the expected increase in activity based on estimated contamination of previous preparations. LH was similar to original preparations except for enhanced activity in FSH radioreceptor assays. Binding assays (in heterologous and homologous systems) again demonstrated the general absence of an FSH-specific receptor in the reptilian (chelonian and squamate) testes. In an in vivo bioassay in the lizard Anolis, the turtle FSH was orders of magnitude more potent than LH in stimulating both testis growth and androgen secretion, but in vitro LH was considerably more potent than FSH in stimulating androgen secretion in squamate and chelonian testes. Thus, the possibility exists that androgen secretion in some chelonian systems may exhibit a high degree of LH specificity like that of mammals and birds.

  18. Cerebral white matter in early puberty is associated with luteinizing hormone concentrations.

    PubMed

    Peper, Jiska S; Brouwer, Rachel M; Schnack, Hugo G; van Baal, G Caroline M; van Leeuwen, Marieke; van den Berg, Stéphanie M; Delemarre-Van de Waal, Henriëtte A; Janke, Andrew L; Collins, D Louis; Evans, Alan C; Boomsma, Dorret I; Kahn, René S; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E

    2008-08-01

    Puberty is a period in which cerebral white matter grows considerably, whereas gray matter decreases. The first endocrinological marker of puberty in both boys and girls is an increased secretion of luteinizing hormone (LH). Here we investigated the phenotypic association between LH, global and focal gray and white matter in 104 healthy nine-year-old monozygotic and dizygotic twins. Volumetric MRI and voxel-based morphometry were applied to measure global gray and white matter and to estimate relative concentrations of regional cerebral gray and white matter, respectively. A possible common genetic origin of this association (genetic correlation) was examined. Results showed that higher LH levels are associated with a larger global white matter proportion and with higher regional white matter density. Areas of increased white matter density included the cingulum, middle temporal gyrus and splenium of the corpus callosum. No association between LH and global gray matter proportion or regional gray matter density was found. Our data indicate that a common genetic factor underlies the association between LH level and regional white matter density. We suggest that the increase of white matter growth during puberty reported earlier might be directly or indirectly mediated by LH production. In addition, genes involved in LH production may be promising candidate genes in neuropsychiatric illnesses with an onset in early adolescence.

  19. Uncoupling clutch size, prolactin, and luteinizing hormone using experimental egg removal.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Calen P; Dawson, Alistair; Sharp, Peter J; Williams, Tony D

    2015-03-01

    Clutch size is a key avian fitness and life history trait. A physiological model for clutch size determination (CSD), involving an anti-gonadal effect of prolactin (PRL) via suppression of luteinizing hormone (LH), was proposed over 20 years ago, but has received scant experimental attention since. The few studies looking at a PRL-based mechanistic hypothesis for CSD have been equivocal, but recent experiments utilizing a pharmacological agent to manipulate PRL in the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata) found no support for a role of this hormone in clutch size determination. Here, we take a complementary approach by manipulating clutch size through egg removal, examining co-variation in PRL and LH between two breeding attempts, as well as through experimentally-extended laying. Clutch size increased for egg removal females, but not controls, but this was not correlated with changes in PRL or LH. There were also no differences in PRL between egg removal females and controls, nor did PRL levels during early, mid- or late-laying of supra-normal clutches predict clutch size. By uncoupling PRL, LH and clutch size in our study, several key predictions of the PRL-based mechanistic model for CSD were not supported. However, a positive correlation between PRL levels late in laying and days relative to the last egg (clutch completion) provides an alternative explanation for the equivocal results surrounding the conventional PRL-based physiological model for CSD. We suggest that females coordinate PRL-mediated incubation onset with clutch completion to minimize hatching asynchrony and sibling hierarchy, a behavior that is amplified in females laying larger clutches.

  20. Modulation of ovarian function in female dogs immunized with bovine luteinizing hormone receptor.

    PubMed

    Saxena, B B; Clavio, A; Singh, M; Rathnam, P; Bukharovich, Y; Reimers, T; Saxena, A; Perkins, Scott

    2002-02-01

    Adult female dogs were immunized with 0.5 mg bovine luteinizing hormone receptor (LH-R) encapsulated in a silastic subdermal implant and subsequently with four intramuscular booster injections of 0.1 mg LH-R each. Circulating LH-R antibody was detected in the sera 3 weeks post-implant. The appearance of LH-R antibody was associated with a decline in the serum progesterone concentrations to a range of 0-0.5 ng/ml until day 365 in the immunized dogs in comparison with a range of 5-10 ng in the control animals, suggesting a lack of ovulation and corpus luteum function in immunized dogs. The immunized dogs did not show signs of 'standing heat' and failed to ovulate when induced by LH-RH challenge. Serum oestradiol levels, however, remained in the range of 30-40 pg/ml in both the immunized and the control dogs. With the decline in the antibody titres, the hormonal profile and vaginal cytology returned to a fertile state and the dogs exhibited signs of 'standing heat', as well as vaginal bleeding. Dogs immunized with LH-R did not show any serious metabolic, local or systemic adverse effects. The hypothalamic--pituitary gonadal axis remained intact as indicated by little difference in pituitary LH levels between control and immunized animals, and by the release of LH by LH-RH challenge. These studies demonstrate that active immunization of female dogs with LH-R could immunomodulate ovarian function to cause a reversible state of infertility. It may be postulated that, due to extensive interspecies homology, a recombinant LH receptor-based immunocontraceptive vaccine may also be effective in other vertebrates.

  1. Effect of supplemental light on growth, prolactin, progesterone and luteinizing hormone in water buffalo ( Bubalus bubalis)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perera, K. S.; Gwazdauskas, F. C.; Akers, R. M.; McGilliard, M. L.

    1989-06-01

    Fifty non-pregnant Surti buffalo heifers aged between 17 and 42 months ( n=24, <24 months; n=26, >24 months) were randomly assigned to groups subject to either natural daylight +4h supplemental light ( n=25) or natural day light ( n=25), to study changes in growth, serum prolactin (Prl), progesterone (P4) and luteinizing hormone (LH) to supplemental lighting. Ambient temperatures (T) and relative humidity (RH) generally were >27° C and <70% during the day-time, respectively. Light-supplemented heifers had 16.2 kg net body weight (BW) gain at 9 weeks compared to 20.8 kg for controls, but higher mean Prl after 6.5 weeks ( P<0.01), and higher P4 (0.41 vs 0.19 ng/ml; P<0.06) than control heifers. Older heifers had 39.7% greater BW ( P<0.01), but a net 4.3% BW gain compared to a 10.1% gain for younger heifers at 10 weeks. Older, light-supplemented heifers had higher mean P4 (0.63 vs 0.19 ng/ml; P<0.07) than the other groups. These weight and hormonal changes suggest that 4 h supplemental light can alter growth and endocrine function in buffaloes under similar planes of nutrition. While light supplementation did not have a positive effect on body wieght during the 10 week study, body weight and endocrine changes due to supplemental light may be important factors for initiation of reproductive cyclicity.

  2. Effect of supplemental light on growth, prolactin, progesterone and luteinizing hormone in water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Perera, K S; Gwazdauskas, F C; Akers, R M; McGilliard, M L

    1989-06-01

    Fifty non-pregnant Surti buffalo heifers aged between 17 and 42 months (n = 24, less than 24 months; n = 26, greater than 24 months) were randomly assigned to groups subject to either natural daylight +4 h supplemental light (n = 25) or natural day light (n = 25), to study changes in growth, serum prolactin (Prl), progesterone (P4) and luteinizing hormone (LH) to supplemental lighting. Ambient temperatures (T) and relative humidity (RH) generally were greater than 27 degrees C and less than 70% during the daytime, respectively. Light-supplemented heifers had 16.2 kg net body weight (BW) gain at 9 weeks compared to 20.8 kg for controls, but higher mean Prl after 6.5 weeks (P less than 0.01), and higher P4 (0.41 vs 0.19 ng/ml; P less than 0.06) than control heifers. Older heifers had 39.7% greater BW (P less than 0.01), but a net 4.3% BW gain compared to a 10.1% gain for younger heifers at 10 weeks. Older, light-supplemented heifers had higher mean P4 (0.63 vs 0.19 ng/ml; P less than 0.07) than the other groups. These weight and hormonal changes suggest that 4 h supplemental light can alter growth and endocrine function in buffaloes under similar planes of nutrition. While light supplementation did not have a positive effect on body weight during the 10 week study, body weight and endocrine changes due to supplemental light may be important factors for initiation of reproductive cyclicity. PMID:2759726

  3. Relationship between luteinizing hormone and decidual luteotropin in the maintenance of luteal steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Jayatilak, P G; Glaser, L A; Warshaw, M L; Herz, Z; Gruber, J R; Gibori, G

    1984-10-01

    Between Days 6-11 of pregnancy or pseudopregnancy, the decidual tissue of the rat produces a prolactin-like hormone, decidual luteotropin, which can sustain luteal progesterone production when prolactin is suppressed. However, this effect is dependent upon the presence of the pituitary. The present investigation was undertaken to determine whether decidual luteotropin and luteinizing hormone (LH) act together to sustain luteal steroidogenesis and if so, to find out whether the need for LH is due to the inability of the decidual tissue to produce LH-like material and/or whether LH affects decidual luteotropin production. Pseudopregnant rats with or without decidual tissue were hypophysectomized on Day 8 and treated with either 1.5 IU human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG)/day or with vehicle. Within 24 h, serum progesterone dropped in both vehicle-treated groups and decidual luteotropin levels declined by 80% in the decidual tissue. Human CG administration had no effect on progesterone production in the control group. Yet in rats with decidual tissue, hCG stimulated progesterone production for at least 48 h and maintained the decidual tissue content of decidual luteotropin. Progesterone, but not hCG treatment, maintained decidual luteotropin concentrations in ovariectomized rats. To compare the luteotropic activity of the decidual tissue with that of the placenta, pregnant or pseudopregnant rats with decidual tissue were hypophysectomized on Day 8 and treated with 1.5 IU hCG. Control groups had decidual tissue or placentas removed and were similarly treated. Human CG stimulated progesterone production only in rats with placental or decidual tissue.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Effect of supplemental light on growth, prolactin, progesterone and luteinizing hormone in water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Perera, K S; Gwazdauskas, F C; Akers, R M; McGilliard, M L

    1989-06-01

    Fifty non-pregnant Surti buffalo heifers aged between 17 and 42 months (n = 24, less than 24 months; n = 26, greater than 24 months) were randomly assigned to groups subject to either natural daylight +4 h supplemental light (n = 25) or natural day light (n = 25), to study changes in growth, serum prolactin (Prl), progesterone (P4) and luteinizing hormone (LH) to supplemental lighting. Ambient temperatures (T) and relative humidity (RH) generally were greater than 27 degrees C and less than 70% during the daytime, respectively. Light-supplemented heifers had 16.2 kg net body weight (BW) gain at 9 weeks compared to 20.8 kg for controls, but higher mean Prl after 6.5 weeks (P less than 0.01), and higher P4 (0.41 vs 0.19 ng/ml; P less than 0.06) than control heifers. Older heifers had 39.7% greater BW (P less than 0.01), but a net 4.3% BW gain compared to a 10.1% gain for younger heifers at 10 weeks. Older, light-supplemented heifers had higher mean P4 (0.63 vs 0.19 ng/ml; P less than 0.07) than the other groups. These weight and hormonal changes suggest that 4 h supplemental light can alter growth and endocrine function in buffaloes under similar planes of nutrition. While light supplementation did not have a positive effect on body weight during the 10 week study, body weight and endocrine changes due to supplemental light may be important factors for initiation of reproductive cyclicity.

  5. Are circulating leptin and luteinizing hormone synchronized in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome?

    PubMed

    Sir-Petermann, T; Piwonka, V; Pérez, F; Maliqueo, M; Recabarren, S E; Wildt, L

    1999-06-01

    Animal and human studies suggest that leptin modulates hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis functions. Leptin may stimulate gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) release from the hypothalamus and luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) secretion from the pituitary. A synchronicity of LH and leptin pulses has been described in healthy women, suggesting that leptin probably also regulates the episodic secretion of LH. In some pathological conditions, such as polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), LH-leptin interactions are not known. The aim of the present investigation was to assess the episodic fluctuations of circulating LH and leptin in PCOS patients compared to regularly menstruating women. Six PCOS patients and six normal cycling (NC) women of similar age and body mass index (BMI) were studied. To assess episodic hormone secretion, blood samples were collected at 10-min intervals for 6 h. LH and leptin concentrations were measured in all samples. For pulse analysis the cluster algorithm was used. To detect an interaction between LH and leptin pulses, an analysis of copulsatility was employed. LH concentrations were significantly higher in the PCOS group in comparison to NC women, however serum leptin concentrations and leptin pulse characteristics for PCOS patients did not differ from NC women. A strong synchronicity between LH and leptin pulses was observed in NC women; 11 coincident leptin pulses were counted with a phase shift of 0 min (P = 0.027), 18 pulses with a phase shift of -1 (P = 0.025) and 24 pulses with a phase shift of -2 (P = 0.028). PCOS patients also exhibited a synchronicity between LH and leptin pulses but weaker (only 20 of 39 pulses) and with a phase shift greater than in normal women, leptin pulses preceding LH pulses by 20 min (P = 0.0163). These results demonstrate that circulating leptin and LH are synchronized in normal women and patients with PCOS. The real significance of the apparent copulsatility between LH and

  6. Ethanol-induced alterations in the posttranslational processing, but not secretion of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone in vitro.

    PubMed

    Uddin, S; Wilson, T; Emanuele, M A; Williams, D; Kelley, M R; Emanuele, N

    1996-05-01

    The effects of ethanol (EtOH) on the male hypothalamic pituitary reproductive axis are multiple and varied. Although direct gonadal toxicity has been reported, hypothalamic-pituitary perturbations have also been noted. The difficulty of sampling the hypothalamus has made direct investigation of EtOH-induced alterations on luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) fraught with interpretation problems. To circumvent this, we have conducted a series of experiments exploring the effect of 200 mg% EtOH in vitro on GT1-7 cells, a newly developed LHRH secreting neural cell line. Cell lines were treated with EtOH-containing or EtOH-free media for 2, 6, 24, or 48 hr. EtOH caused no significant change in LHRH secretion at any time point, although there was a trend to increased secretion after 2 hr EtOH exposure when compared with control. Significantly increased total (i.e., cellular plus secreted) pro-LHRH coupled with significantly reduced cellular LHRH after 6 hr only of EtOH exposure suggested that EtOH caused a transient decrease in processing from bioinactive pro-LHRH to bioactive LHRH. However, even at this time point, LHRH secretion from these EtOH-exposed cells was no different than from control cells. Steady-state LHRH mRNA levels were not changed by EtOH at any time point. These findings are concordant with previous in vitro data using hypothalamic tissue that has similarly demonstrated no effect of EtOH on LHRH secretion. Taken together with the in vivo demonstration that EtOH reduces hypothalamic-pituitary portal blood levels of LHRH, these data indicate that EtOH exerts its effect either at an extrahypothalamic locus and/or on non-LHRH-producing cells within the hypothalamus.

  7. Potentiation of the gonadotoxicity of Cytoxan in the dog by adjuvant treatment with a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist.

    PubMed

    Goodpasture, J C; Bergstrom, K; Vickery, B H

    1988-04-15

    This study evaluates the effect on spermatogenesis of coadministration of Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide) and nafarelin, a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist. Nafarelin causes complete aspermatogenesis in dogs by interrupting the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, which might protect against the testicular cytotoxicity associated with cyclophosphamide. The four treatment groups, each consisting of 2 mature male beagle dogs, were (a) no drug; (b) cyclophosphamide (p.o. 3x weekly for 43 and 48 wk for a total dose of 582 and 709 mg/kg, with dose varying according to weekly hematological profile); (c) nafarelin (2 micrograms/kg s.c. daily for 48 and 52 wk); and (d) cyclophosphamide plus nafarelin [same schedule as above with cyclophosphamide (570 and 698 mg/kg total dose) starting 7 wk after beginning nafarelin]. Plasma testosterone, spermatogenesis, and ejaculate volume were completely suppressed by nafarelin prior to starting cyclophosphamide. By 2 wk after cessation of treatment (posttreatment, PT), plasma testosterone reached normal levels, and at 5 wk PT ejaculates appeared which reached normal volumes 2 to 3 wk later. Normally motile ejaculated spermatozoa were noted at 6 to 8 wk PT in nafarelin-only-treated animals; normal sperm numbers were reached at 14 wk PT. The animals receiving cyclophosphamide plus nafarelin were azoospermic for the entire 65-wk PT period, and at 65 wk PT no germinal cells were found upon evaluation of testicular histology. Sperm numbers in cyclophosphamide-only-treated animals began to rise 10-11 wk PT and reached 150 x 10(6) sperm/ejaculate at approximately 65 wk PT (contemporaneous control dogs had sperm numbers of approximately 300-600 x 10(6)/ejaculate). Spermatogenesis in these cyclophosphamide-only-treated animals was normal in most seminiferous tubules at this time. The addition of nafarelin to cyclophosphamide treatment thus exacerbated the deleterious effects of cyclophosphamide on the testes, suggesting caution for use

  8. Treatment of nitrosamine-induced pancreatic tumors in hamsters with analogs of somatostatin and luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone

    SciTech Connect

    Paz-Bouza, J.I.; Redding, T.W.; Schally, A.V.

    1987-02-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma was induced in female Syrian golden hamsters by injecting N-nitrosobis(2-oxopropyl)amine (BOP) once a week at a dose of 10 mg per kg of body weight for 18 weeks. Hamsters were then treated with somatostatin analog (RC-160) or with (6-D-tryptophan)luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone ((D-Trp/sup 6/)LH-RH) delayed delivery systems. After 18 weeks of BOP administration, the hamsters were divided into three groups of 10-20 animals each. Group I consisted of untreated controls, group II was injected with RC-160, and group III was injected with (D-Trp/sub 2/)LH-RH. A striking decrease in tumor weight and volume was obtained in animals treated with (D-Trp/sup 6/)LH-RH or with the somatostatin analog RC-160. After 45 days of treatment with either analog, the survival rate was significantly higher in groups II and III (70%), as compared with the control group (35%). The studies, done by light microscopy, high-resolution microscopy, and electron microscopy, showed a decrease in the total number of cancer cells and changes in the epithelium, connective tissue, and cellular organelles in groups II and III treated with the hypothalamic analogs as compared to controls. These results in female hamsters with induced ductal pancreatic tumors confirm and extend the authors findings, obtained in male animals with transplanted tumors, that (D-Trp/sub 6/)LH-RH and somatostatin analogs inhibit the growth of pancreatic cancers.

  9. Effects of ionizing radiation and pretreatment with (D-Leu6,des-Gly10) luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone ethylamide on developing rat ovarian follicles

    SciTech Connect

    Jarrell, J.; YoungLai, E.V.; McMahon, A.; Barr, R.; O'Connell, G.; Belbeck, L.

    1987-10-01

    To assess the effects of a gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist, (D-Leu6,des-Gly10) luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone ethylamide, in ameliorating the damage caused by ionizing radiation, gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist was administered to rats from day 22 to 37 of age in doses of 0.1, 0.4, and 1.0 microgram/day or vehicle and the rats were sacrificed on day 44 of age. There were no effects on estradiol, progesterone, luteinizing, or follicle-stimulating hormone, nor an effect on ovarian follicle numbers or development. In separate experiments, rats treated with gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist in doses of 0.04, 0.1, 0.4, or 1.0 microgram/day were either irradiated or sham irradiated on day 30 and all groups sacrificed on day 44 of age. Irradiation produced a reduction in ovarian weight and an increase in ovarian follicular atresia. Pretreatment with the agonist prevented the reduction in ovarian weight and numbers of primordial and preantral follicles but not healthy or atretic antral follicles. Such putative radioprotection should be tested on actual reproductive performance.

  10. Episodic variations of prolactin, thyroid-stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, melatonin and cortisol in infertile women with subclinical hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Bals-Pratsch, M; De Geyter, C; Müller, T; Frieling, U; Lerchl, A; Pirke, K M; Hanker, J P; Becker-Carus, C; Nieschlag, E

    1997-05-01

    Preliminary data have suggested that female infertility due to corpus luteum insufficiency may be caused by subclinical hypothyroidism [exaggerated thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) response to thyrotrophin-releasing hormone (TRH) stimulation]. L-Thyroxine supplementation has been recommended to achieve pregnancies in subclinical hypothyroid women. This controlled study was carried out in order to investigate the biochemical diagnosis of subclinical hypothyroidism as a possible infertility factor. Five infertile patients (aged 25-36 years) with subclinical hypothyroidism (n = 4, stimulated TSH >20 microU/ml) or primary hypothyroidism (n = 1) and five healthy controls (aged 22-39 years) with normal thyroid function (stimulated TSH <15 microU/ml), regular cycles and no history of infertility were studied in the early follicular phase. In the pre-study evaluation, eight of 23 volunteers (34.8%) had to be excluded because of subclinical hypothyroidism with stimulated TSH values (TSHs) >15 microU/ml. Cycle function of patients and controls was compared by the method of LH pulse pattern analysis. Therefore blood samples were drawn every 10 min during a 24 h period. Sleep was recorded from midnight to 7 a.m. Repetition of the TRH tests at the end of the 24 h blood sampling period confirmed the difference in stimulated TSH values of the two study groups. Pulse analysis for luteinizing hormone (LH), TSH and prolactin showed no differences between patients and controls for pulse frequency, amplitude, height, length, area under curve (AUC) and the 24 h mean. Even the hypothyroid patient had a normal LH pulse pattern. Additional measurement of melatonin in pooled sera every 30 min gave the well-documented diurnal profiles during day and night for both groups. Patients had significantly higher melatonin values at seven time points during the night. Peaks for LH, TSH, prolactin and cortisol were correlated with the sleep stages wake, rapid eye movement, 1 + 2 and 3 + 4. We

  11. Radioimmunoassay for Luteinizing Hormone in Human plasma Or Serum: Physiological Studies*

    PubMed Central

    Odell, W. D.; Ross, G. T.; Rayford, P. L.

    1967-01-01

    It is not practical to quantitate gonadotropin in the blood of normal men and women by utilizing bioassays. We have developed a method for sensitive, precise, and specific radioimmunoassay of luteinizing hormone (LH) in human serum or plasma. Antisera were developed against human chorionic gonadotropin, and one of these was selected for extensive cross-reaction with human LH. Highly purified LH was radioiodinated by the method of Greenwood, Hunter, and Glover. Separation of antibody-bound from free LH-131I was accomplished by a double antibody technique. Dose-response curves for the purifed LH, an impure urinary LH preparation, pituitary powder, and LH in plasma were all identical. Immunoassay and bioassay of impure urinary and pituitary gonadotropin preparations in terms of a common standard resulted in an index of discrimination of close to unity. LH levels in plasma from 32 adult men and 30 women outside the midcycle ranged from 0.6 to 3.2 mμg per ml (1 mμg of our laboratory LH standard is equivalent to 8 mU of the Second International Reference Preparation of Human Menopausal Gonadotropin). Levels were remarkably constant in men from day to day and in women except at midcycle, when a sharp peak occurred lasting less than 24 hours. In all women studied who had a midcycle LH peak, mean plasma LH levels during the follicular phase of the menstrual cycle were higher than mean values obtained during the luteal phase. Prepubertal children had detectable plasma LH, and mean values were only slightly less than in adults. Plasma from castrate men or women or postmenopausal women contained 4.5 to 10.5 mμg per ml. Clomiphene treatment of four men resulted in a doubling of plasma LH in 5 days. PMID:6018762

  12. Obesity in transgenic female mice with constitutively elevated luteinizing hormone secretion.

    PubMed

    Kero, Jukka T; Savontaus, Eriika; Mikola, Maarit; Pesonen, Ullamari; Koulu, Markku; Keri, Ruth A; Nilson, John H; Poutanen, Matti; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo T

    2003-10-01

    Transgenic (TG) female mice, expressing a chimeric bovine luteinizing hormone (LH) beta-subunit/human chorionic gonadotropin beta-subunit COOH-terminal extension (bLHbeta-CTP) gene, produce high levels of circulating LH and serve as a model for functional ovarian hyperandrogenism and follicular cysts. We report here that obesity is a typical feature of these female mice. The mean body weight of the bLHbeta-CTP females was significantly higher than in controls at, and beyond 5 wk of age, and at 5 mo, it was 32% increased. At this age, the amount of white adipose tissue in the bLHbeta-CTP females was significantly increased, as reflected by the weight difference of the retroperitoneal fat pad. In addition, the expression of leptin mRNA in white adipose tissue of the TG females was elevated about twofold. Serum leptin and insulin levels, and food intake, were also increased significantly in the TG females. Brown adipose tissue (BAT) thermogenic activity, as measured by GDP binding to BAT mitochondria, was reduced (P < 0.05). Ovariectomy at the age of 3 wk totally prevented the development of obesity. In summary, the present results show that intact female bLHbeta-CTP mice are obese, have increased food consumption, and reduced BAT thermogenic activity. The weight gain can be explained partly by elevated androgens but is probably also contributed to the increased adrenal steroidogenesis. Hence, the bLHbeta-CTP mice provide a useful model for studying obesity related to elevated LH secretion, with consequent alterations in ovarian and adrenal function.

  13. Augmentation of Metastin/Kisspeptin mRNA Expression by the Proestrous Luteinizing Hormone Surge in Granulosa Cells of Rats: Implications for Luteinization.

    PubMed

    Laoharatchatathanin, Titaree; Terashima, Ryota; Yonezawa, Tomohiro; Kurusu, Shiro; Kawaminami, Mitsumori

    2015-07-01

    Variations in mRNA levels and sources of metastin/kisspeptin, neurokinin B (NKB), dynorphin, and kisspeptin receptor GPR54 were examined in the ovaries of cycling rats. Kisspeptin and dynorphin mRNAs dramatically increased at 2000 h of the proestrous day. NKB mRNA also increased, but the peak was delayed by 6 h. GPR54 mRNA declined inversely with kisspeptin. Whole-ovary expressions of kisspeptin and dynorphin mRNAs, but not of NKB mRNA, were augmented by the administration of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). By means of laser-capture microdissection, kisspeptin mRNA was shown mostly in follicles at 2000 h of proestrus, whereas NKB and dynorphin were expressed mainly in interstitial tissues. GPR54 mRNA was detected equally in follicles, corpora lutea, and interstitial tissues. The hCG stimulated the follicular expression of kisspeptin and interstitial tissue expression of dynorphin mRNA. In primary cultures of granulosa cells prepared from equine chorionic gonadotropin-pretreated immature rats, hCG stimulated the expression of kisspeptin, dynorphin, and NKB mRNAs. Distortion of the corpus luteum and surrounding tissue borders was sometimes seen after intra-ovarian bursa administration of kisspeptin antagonist p234 for 3 days from proestrus. Progesterone production stimulated by hCG in granulosa cell culture was suppressed by p234. These data demonstrate that significant amounts of kisspeptin are synthesized in granulosa cells and dynorphin in interstitial tissues, in response to the proestrous luteinizing hormone surge, whereas granulosa cells also contain dynorphin and NKB, suggesting at least a role for kisspeptin in the luteinization of granulosa cells. PMID:25995272

  14. Peripheral patterns of growth hormone, luteinizing hormone, and progesterone before, at, and after puberty in buffalo heifer.

    PubMed

    Haldar, A; Prakash, B S

    2005-01-01

    Buffalo, the premier dairy animal in India, suffers from slow growth rate, delayed puberty, and silent heat. It is not known whether the delay in puberty in such animals is due to the delay in expression of hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal functions. To determine the changes in growth hormone (GH), luteinizing hormone (LH), and progesterone before, at, and after puberty of Murrah buffalo heifers, six Murrah buffalo heifers (21.92 +/- 1.09 months of age, 269.67 +/- 7.97 kg body weight) were assigned to well-ventilated individual pens and fed a roughage-concentrate diet to provide weight gain of 0.4 kg/day. Blood samples were collected at 3-day intervals during a period of 12 months, and plasma harvested from blood samples was assayed for progesterone, LH, and GH. The day that plasma progesterone was greater than 1 ng/mL for three consecutive sampling days was defined as the day of puberty. Heifers attained puberty at an average age of 31.53 +/- 0.88 months with a body weight of 380.67 +/- 6.42 kg. Progesterone levels were very low (0.20 to 0.30 ng/mL) during the pre-pubertal period. There were two distinct elevations before the day of puberty onset. Plasma LH and GH concentrations increased (P < 0.05) during the months preceding puberty and were highest during the month before puberty. GH and LH were positively correlated (P < 0.05) prior to (r = +0.59) as well as after puberty (r = +0.42). A positive correlation (P < 0.05)between LH and body weight during the pre-pubertal period (r = +0.61) and thereafter, negative correlation (P < 0.05) during post-pubertal period (r = -0.64) was noted. GH and body weight showed positive correlation both before puberty (r = +0.92, P < 0.01) and after puberty (r = +0.32, P < 0.05). Results suggest that both GH and LH are equally important and vital cues in inducing onset of ovarian functions in buffalo heifers. PMID:16433249

  15. Supression of the steroid-primed luteinizing hormone surge in the female rat by sodium dimethyldithiocarbamate: Relationship to hypothalamic catecholamines and GnRH neuronal activation

    EPA Science Inventory

    In female rodents, hypothalamic norepinephrine (NE) has a role in stimulating the secretion of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) that triggers the ovulatory surge of luteinizing hormone (LH). NE synthesis from dopamine requires the presence of dopamine--hydroxylase (DH) an...

  16. Y chromosome haplogroup D2a1 is significantly associated with high levels of luteinizing hormone in Japanese men.

    PubMed

    Sato, Y; Shinka, T; Nozawa, S; Yoshiike, M; Koh, E; Kanaya, J; Namiki, M; Matsumiya, K; Tsujimura, A; Komatsu, K; Itoh, N; Eguchi, J; Yamauchi, A; Iwamoto, T; Nakahori, Y

    2015-05-01

    The association between the Y chromosome haplogroup D2 and risk of azoospermia and low sperm motility has been previously studied, and it was indicated that haplogroups DE (YAP lineage) are associated with prostate cancer risk in Japanese males. Our assumption had been that Y chromosome haplogroups may be associated with sex hormone levels, because sex hormones have been deemed responsible for spermatogenesis and carcinogenesis. In this study, we assessed the association between Y chromosome haplogroups and sex hormone levels, including those of testosterone, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), inhibin-B, and calculated free testosterone (cFT), in 901 young men from the general Japanese population (cohort 1) and 786 Japanese men of proven fertility (cohort 2). We found that the haplogroup D2a1 was significantly associated with high LH levels in a combined analysis involving two cohorts (β = 0.068, SE = 0.025, p = 0.0075), following correction for multiple testing. To date, this result is the first evidence that implicates Y chromosome haplogroups in an association with sex hormone levels.

  17. Identification, cDNA Cloning, and Characterization of Luteinizing Hormone Beta Subunit (lhb) Gene in Catla catla.

    PubMed

    Rather, Mohd Ashraf; Bhat, Irfan Ahmad; Sharma, Rupam

    2016-01-01

    Reproductive hormones play a significant role in the gonadal development and gametogenesis process of animals. In the present study luteinizing hormone beta, (lhb) subunit gene was cloned and characterized from the brain of Catla catla. The lhb full-length of cDNA sequence is 629 bp which consists of 43bp 5'-UTR (untranslated region) 447bp, ORF(open reading frame) and 139 bp of 3'-UTR respectively. The coding region of lhb gene encoded a peptide of 148 amino acids. The coding sequence of lhb gene consist of a single N-linked glycosylation site (NET) and 12 cysteine knot residues. Phylogenetic analysis of C. catla Lhβ deduced amino acid sequence showed high similarity with Carassius auratus followed by Gobiocypris rarus. 3D structure Lhβ protein comprises of five β-sheets and six coils/loops. The qPCR results revealed lhb mRNA is mainly expressed in the pituitary, ovary while moderate expression was observed in brain and testis. To best our knowledge, this is the first report on the identification, molecular characterization and structural information regarding luteinizing hormone in Indian major carp. PMID:26980432

  18. Indirect assessment of pulsatile gonadotropin-releasing hormone release in agonadal prepubertal rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Suter, K J; Pohl, C R; Plant, T M

    1999-01-01

    The major purpose of this study was to characterize the open-loop frequency of pulsatile GnRH release in the female rhesus monkey at an age (15-20 months) when the prepubertal restraint on the hypothalamic-pituitary axis is maximally imposed. Additionally, evidence for pulsatile GnRH release in agonadal males of comparable age was also sought. Episodic LH secretion from the pituitary was used as an indirect index of GnRH discharges. In order to maximize the sensitivity of this in situ bioassay, the responsiveness of the pituitary gonadotrophs was usually first heightened by an i.v. intermittent infusion of the synthetic peptide. Monkeys (five females, three males) were castrated between 9 and 14 months of age, implanted with indwelling venous catheters, fitted with nylon jackets and housed in specialized cages that permitted remote access to the venous circulation with minimal restraint and without interruption of the light-darkness cycle. In females, LH secretion was generally assessed at 20-day intervals during alternate nighttime (1900-0200 h) and daytime (0700-1400 h) windows. In males, LH was assessed less frequently and only at night. The mean frequency of pulsatile LH release in agonadal prepubertal females was 4 pulses/7 h during the night and 2 pulses/7 h during the day. These findings indicate that, prior to puberty in the female monkey, the GnRH pulse generator operates at a relatively slow frequency and is subjected to diurnal modulation. In males, evidence for robust pulsatile GnRH release was not observed. The striking difference in activity of the GnRH pulse generator in agonadal prepubertal male and female monkeys reinforces the view that the ontogeny of the hypothalamic drive to the pituitary-gonadal axis in higher primates, including man, is sexually differentiated.

  19. Luteinizing hormone and progesterone concentrations and induction of estrus after use of norgestomet ear implants or constant infusion of gonadotropin-releasing hormone in anestrous, nonlactating dairy goats.

    PubMed

    Bretzlaff, K N; Nuti, L C; Scarfe, A D; Elmore, R G; Capehart, J; Varner, D D; Weston, P G

    1991-09-01

    Plasma luteinizing hormone and progesterone concentrations, time to onset of estrus, and pregnancy rates were determined in nonlactating anestrous does given 1 of 4 treatments: subcutaneous ear implants containing 3 mg of norgestomet for 9 days (NOR; n = 6); subcutaneous administration, using osmotic minipumps, of 250 ng of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)/h for 48 hours (GnRH; n = 6); 3 mg of NOR for 9 days, followed immediately by 250 ng of GnRH/h for 48 hours (NOR + GnRH; n = 6); or no treatment (control; n = 6). During the 72-hour period after removal of NOR or insertion of GnRH pumps, 6 of 6, 0 of 6, 6 of 6, and 3 of 6 does were observed in estrus at a mean (+/- 13.8) hours in groups NOR, GnRH, NOR + GnRH, and control, respectively. Time from end of treatment to peak concentrations of luteinizing hormone were 56 +/- 4.0, 28 +/- 4.7, 34 +/- 4.3, and 41 +/- 9.7 hours (mean +/- SE) for NOR, GnRH, NOR +/- GnRH, and control, respectively. Peak concentrations of luteinizing hormone were significantly greater and occurred significantly later in does given NOR. Progesterone concentrations in does that became pregnant increased to concentrations greater than or equal to 1.0 ng/ml 3 to 5 days after breeding and remained high. Functional corpora lutea (CL) was found in 6 does that did not become pregnant, 1 CL was associated with pseudopregnancy and 1 CL was associated with ovulation prior to placement of the GnRH pumps. Functional CL failed to form in 10 of the 12 doses in groups GnRH and control.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1952326

  20. Oncostatin-M inhibits luteinizing hormone stimulated Leydig cell progenitor formation in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Teerds, Katja J; van Dissel-Emiliani, Federica MF; De Miguel, Maria P; de Boer-Brouwer, Mieke; Körting, Lina M; Rijntjes, Eddy

    2007-01-01

    Background The initial steps of stem Leydig cell differentiation into steroid producing progenitor cells are thought to take place independent of luteinizing hormone (LH), under the influence of locally produced factors such as leukaemia inhibitory factor (LIF), platelet derived growth factor A and stem cell factor. For the formation of a normal sized Leydig cell population in the adult testis, the presence of LH appears to be essential. Oncostatin M (OSM) is a multifunctional cytokine and member of the interleukin (IL)-6 family that also includes other cytokines such as LIF. In the rat OSM is highly expressed in the late fetal and neonatal testis, and may thus be a candidate factor involved in Leydig cell progenitor formation. Methods Interstitial cells were isolated from 13-day-old rat testes and cultured for 1, 3 or 8 days in the presence of different doses of OSM (range: 0.01 to 10 ng/ml) alone or in combination with LH (1 ng/ml). The effects of OSM and LH on cell proliferation were determined by incubating the cultures with [3H]thymidine or bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU). Developing progenitor cells were identified histochemically by the presence of the marker enzyme 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3beta-HSD). Results OSM, when added at a dose of 10 ng/ml, caused a nearly 2-fold increase in the percentage of Leydig cell progenitors after 8 days of culture. Immunohistochemical double labelling experiments with 3beta-HSD and BrdU antibodies showed that this increase was the result of differentiation of stem Leydig cells/precursor cells and not caused by proliferation of progenitor cells themselves. The addition of LH to the cultures consistently resulted in an increase in progenitor formation throughout the culture period. Surprisingly, when OSM and LH were added together, the LH induced rise in progenitor cells was significantly inhibited after 3 and 8 days of culture. Conclusion Taken together, the results of the present study suggest that locally produced OSM

  1. Disruption of endocrine rhythms in sleeping sickness with preserved relationship between hormonal pulsatility and the REM-NREM sleep cycles.

    PubMed

    Brandenberger, G; Buguet, A; Spiegel, K; Stanghellini, A; Muanga, G; Bogui, P; Dumas, M

    1996-09-01

    In human African trypanosomiasis (sleeping sickness), sleep and wake episodes are sporadically distributed throughout the day and the night. To determine whether these sleep disturbances affect the 24-h hormone profiles and the normal relationships between hormone pulsatility and sleep stages, polygraphic sleep recordings and concomitant hormone profiles were obtained in 6 African patients with sleeping sickness and in 5 healthy African subjects selected from Abidjan on the Ivory Coast. Polysomnographic recordings were continuous, and blood was taken every 10 min throughout the 24-h period. Plasma was analyzed for cortisol, prolactin, and plasma renin activity (PRA). The 24-h rhythm of cortisol, considered to be an endogenous circadian rhythm, was attenuated in all of the patients except one. However, as in normal subjects, slow wave sleep (SWS) remained associated with the declining phases of the cortisol secretory episodes. Prolactin and PRA profiles, which are strongly influenced by the sleep-wake cycle, did not manifest the nocturnal increase normally associated with the sleep period; instead, they reflected a sporadic distribution of the sleep and wake episodes throughout the 24-h period. In patients with sleeping sickness as in normal subjects, rapid eye movement (REM) sleep began during the descending phases of prolactin pulses. In both groups, PRA reflected the sleep stage distribution with non REM (NREM) sleep occurring during the ascending phases and REM sleep during the descending phases of the PRA oscillations. However, in sleeping sickness patients, the marked sleep fragmentation often did not allow sufficient time for PRA to increase significantly, as is normally the case in subjects with regular NREM-REM sleep cycles. These results demonstrate that, together with the disruption of the sleep-wake cycle, there are profound differences in the temporal organization of the 24-h hormone profiles in humans with African trypanosomiasis. However, the

  2. Developmental changes in hypothalamic Kiss1 expression during activation of the pulsatile release of luteinising hormone in maturing ewe lambs.

    PubMed

    Redmond, J S; Baez-Sandoval, G M; Spell, K M; Spencer, T E; Lents, C A; Williams, G L; Amstalden, M

    2011-09-01

    Onset of puberty is characterised by a marked increase in the frequency of release of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and luteinising hormone (LH). The Kiss1 gene plays a critical role in pubertal development, and its product, kisspeptin, stimulates GnRH and LH release. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that Kiss1 gene expression in the preoptic area (POA) and hypothalamus increases during maturation of the reproductive neuroendocrine axis in association with increased LH pulsatility. Ovariectomised, oestradiol-replaced lambs were euthanised at 25, 30 and 35 weeks of age. Blood samples were collected before euthanasia to characterise the pattern of LH release. Kiss1 mRNA was detected in coronal sections of the POA and hypothalamus and Kiss1-expressing cells were identified on the basis of silver grain density. The mean number of Kiss1-expressing cells in the POA/periventricular (PeV) areas increased from 25 to 30 weeks of age. No further increase at 35 weeks of age was observed, and the changes in Kiss1 expression in the POA/PeV were independent of changes in LH pulse frequency. The mean number of Kiss1-expressing cells in the arcuate (ARC) nucleus did not differ among age groups, although it was greater in the middle ARC of lambs exhibiting increased frequency of LH release. The density of silver grains per cell did not differ among groups in any of the areas studied. The results obtained indicate that the Kiss1 gene is activated in the POA/PeV and ARC of ewe lambs during juvenile development, and that kisspeptin neurones in the middle ARC, in particular, are involved in the acceleration of pulsatile LH release during maturation of the reproductive neuroendocrine axis in ewe lambs.

  3. Peripheral serum progesterone and luteinizing hormone concentrations of goats during synchronization of estrus and ovulation with prostaglandin F2 alpha.

    PubMed

    Ott, R S; Nelson, D R; Hixon, J E

    1980-09-01

    Prostaglandin F2 alpha (PGF2 alpha) (2 doses, 11 days apart) was given to 20 mixed-breed dairy does to synchronize estrus and ovulation. The dose of PGF2 alpha used was the free-acid equivalent of 8 mg which was divided between 2 injections at 0800 and 1200 hours. At the initiation of treatments, does were from day 0 (estrus) to day 18 of the estrous cycle. Seventeen of the doses exhibited estrus within a mean (+/- SE) interval of 53 +/- 2 hours after the first 0800-hour injection. Peripheral progesterone concentrations determined at daily intervals indicated that PGF2 alpha was luteolytic as early as day 4 of the cycle. Does were in the 8th to 12th days of the cycle at the time of the 2nd treatments with PGF2 alpha. Estrus was observed in all 20 does at 50 +/- 1 hour after the 0800-hour injections. Serum progesterone concentrations confirmed that luteolysis occurred in all of the does. In 19 does, concentrations of luteinizing hormone characteristic of a preovulatory peak were observed 55 +/- 2 hours after the 2nd 0800-hour injection. One doe did not demonstrate a luteinizing hormone peak within the 72-hour period. Laparotomies were performed 6 days after estrus, and ovaries were examined for corpora lutea. The mean number of corpora lutea was 2.0 +/- 1.0. PMID:7192524

  4. Narcotics and the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axix: acute effects on luteinizing hormone, testosterone and androgen-dependent systems.

    PubMed

    Cicero, T J; Bell, R D; Meyer, E R; Schweitzer, J

    1977-04-01

    The effects of narcotics on several aspects of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis were examined in the male rat. Our results indicate that a large number of narcotics acutely depress serum luteinizing hormone levels and that these reduced gonadotropin levels lead to a subsequent fall (1-2 hours later) in serum testosterone levels. The luteinizing hormone-depleting effect of the narcotics appears to represent a specific narcotic action since the (-)-isomers of the narcotics were much more effective than the ()-isomers, naloxone antagonized their effects and tolerance rapidly developed. Further, our studies indicate that the impairment of the functional and structural integrity of the secondary sex organs produced by chronic narcotic administration is not due to a direct effect of these drugs since they have no effect on the uptake of subcellular distribution of testosterone in the secondary sex organs or on the androgen-dependent accumulation of myo-inositol. Consequently, it appears that the testosterone depletion produced by the narcotics is solely responsible for their adverse effect on the secondary sex organs. The results of these studies suggest that the effects of the narcotics on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis are confined to either the hypthalamus or the pituitary gland.

  5. Leucine-enkephalin-like immunoreactivity is localized in luteinizing hormone-producing cells in the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) pituitary.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hirohumi; Yamamoto, Toshiharu

    2014-02-01

    In this study, we used immunohistochemical techniques to determine the cell type of leucine-enkephalin (Leu-ENK)-immunoreactive cells in the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) pituitary. Immunoreactive cells were scattered throughout the pars distalis except for the dorso-caudal portion. These cells were immuno-positive for luteinizing hormone (LH), but they were immuno-negative for adrenocorticotrophic, growth, and thyroid-stimulating hormones, as well as prolactin. Immunoelectron microscopy demonstrated that Leu-ENK-like substance and LH co-localized within the same secretory granules. Leu-ENK secreted from gonadotrophs may participate in LH secretion in an autocrine fashion, and/or may participate in the release of sex steroids together with LH.

  6. Leucine-enkephalin-like immunoreactivity is localized in luteinizing hormone-producing cells in the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) pituitary.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hirohumi; Yamamoto, Toshiharu

    2014-02-01

    In this study, we used immunohistochemical techniques to determine the cell type of leucine-enkephalin (Leu-ENK)-immunoreactive cells in the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) pituitary. Immunoreactive cells were scattered throughout the pars distalis except for the dorso-caudal portion. These cells were immuno-positive for luteinizing hormone (LH), but they were immuno-negative for adrenocorticotrophic, growth, and thyroid-stimulating hormones, as well as prolactin. Immunoelectron microscopy demonstrated that Leu-ENK-like substance and LH co-localized within the same secretory granules. Leu-ENK secreted from gonadotrophs may participate in LH secretion in an autocrine fashion, and/or may participate in the release of sex steroids together with LH. PMID:24034715

  7. Stimulation of cholesterol side-chain cleavage by a luteinizing-hormone-releasing hormone (luliberin) agonist (ICI 118630) in rat Leydig cells.

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, M H; Cooke, B A

    1983-01-01

    The action of a luliberin (luteinizing-hormone-releasing hormone) agonist (ICI 118630) and lutropin (luteinizing hormone) on the activity of the cytochrome P-450 cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme in rat Leydig cells has been investigated. This has been carried out by studying the metabolism of exogenous (22R)-22- and 25-hydroxycholesterol to testosterone. It was found that both hydroxycholesterols increased testosterone production to higher levels than achieved by lutropin alone. Addition of luliberin agonist but not lutropin was found to increase further the metabolism of the hydroxycholesterol to testosterone; this occurred in the presence of saturating and subsaturating levels of the hydroxycholesterols. This effect of luliberin agonist was potentiated in the presence of lutropin. The protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide, inhibited the luliberin agonist-induced stimulation of the hydroxycholesterol metabolism. At low calcium levels (1.1 microM), testosterone production was increased by addition of (22R)-22-hydroxycholesterol but the luliberin agonist effect was negated. The calmodulin inhibitor trifluoperazine inhibited (22R)-22-hydroxycholesterol-stimulated steroidogenesis and negated the luliberin agonist effect. These results indicate that luliberin agonist specifically increases the synthesis of the cytochrome P-450 cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme in rat testis Leydig cells. PMID:6230077

  8. Hypothalamic Prolactin Regulation of Luteinizing Hormone Secretion in the Female Rat.

    PubMed

    Grachev, Pasha; Li, Xiao Feng; Goffin, Vincent; O'Byrne, Kevin T

    2015-08-01

    Prolactin (PRL) levels increase in response to long-term antipsychotic treatment that disrupts reproductive function. Recent evidence suggests that activation of central PRL receptors (PRLR) inhibits LH secretion and in ovariectomized rats. However, the mechanisms involved, the mode of LH secretion affected and relevance to hyperprolactinemia remain unknown. We therefore investigated the contribution of central PRL/PRLR signaling to the control of estradiol-induced surges of LH and PRL and pulsatile LH secretion under basal and hyperprolactinemic conditions. First, by subjecting ovariectomized estradiol-primed rats intracerebroventricularly administered with PRL to frequent blood sampling, we demonstrated that acute activation of hypothalamic PRLR disrupts pulsatile LH secretion. Pretreatment (intracerebroventricularly) with the pure PRLR antagonist, Δ1-9-G129R-hPRL, or the γ-aminobutyric acid receptor type A antagonist, bicuculline, blocked this effect. Next, we revealed that sustained blockade of hypothalamic PRLR using Δ1-9-G129R-hPRL augmented the magnitude of LH surges induced by estradiol benzoate and progesterone treatment and suppressed the concomitant surges of PRL. Finally, we determined that acute antagonism of central PRLR is insufficient to normalize the duration of the LH pulse interval prolonged as a result of hyperprolactinemia induced by chronic exposure to the atypical antipsychotic sulpiride. These data serve as the first evidence to suggest that PRL signaling through hypothalamic PRLR inhibits pulsatile secretion of LH in a γ-aminobutyric acid receptor type A-dependent fashion and tonically restrains the magnitude of the LH surge. Furthermore, our results indicate that transient blockade of hypothalamic PRL/PRLR signaling is not an effective strategy for restoring LH pulsatility perturbed by chronic hyperprolactinemia.

  9. First attempt to monitor luteinizing hormone and reproductive steroids in urine samples of the Amazonian manatee (Trichechus inunguis).

    PubMed

    Amaral, Rodrigo S; Rosas, Fernando C W; Graham, Laura H; da Silva, Vera M F; Oliveira, Claudio A

    2014-12-01

    The aims of this study were to validate an enzyme immunoassay (EIA) for the measurement of luteinizing hormone (LH) in urine samples of Amazonian manatees (Trichechus inunguis; Mammalia: Sirenia) and to monitor urinary LH and reproductive steroids during the ovarian cycle in this species. Urine samples were collected from two captive males following a hormonal challenge with a gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analogue. The urinary LH results from hormonal challenge were compared with urinary androgens for the purpose of EIA validation. Furthermore, urine samples were collected daily, over a 12-wk period, from two captive adult females, for 2 consecutive yr. The urinary LH pattern from females was compared with the patterns of urinary progestagens and estrogen conjugates throughout the ovarian cycle. An LH peak was observed in both male Amazonian manatees after the hormonal challenge, occurring prior to or together with peak androgen levels. In the females, the ovarian cycle ranged from 40 to 48 days (mean of 43.7 days). Two distinct peaks of estrogen conjugates were observed across all cycles analyzed, and the urinary LH peaks observed were accompanied by peaks of urinary estrogen conjugates. The EIA was validated as a method for the quantification of urinary LH from Amazonian manatees, as it was able to detect variations in the levels of LH in urine samples. These results suggest that T. inunguis exhibits a peculiar hormonal pattern during the ovarian cycle. Therefore, further studies are desirable and necessary to clarify the relationship between this hormonal pattern and morphological changes, as well as mating behavior, in Amazonian manatee.

  10. First attempt to monitor luteinizing hormone and reproductive steroids in urine samples of the Amazonian manatee (Trichechus inunguis).

    PubMed

    Amaral, Rodrigo S; Rosas, Fernando C W; Graham, Laura H; da Silva, Vera M F; Oliveira, Claudio A

    2014-12-01

    The aims of this study were to validate an enzyme immunoassay (EIA) for the measurement of luteinizing hormone (LH) in urine samples of Amazonian manatees (Trichechus inunguis; Mammalia: Sirenia) and to monitor urinary LH and reproductive steroids during the ovarian cycle in this species. Urine samples were collected from two captive males following a hormonal challenge with a gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analogue. The urinary LH results from hormonal challenge were compared with urinary androgens for the purpose of EIA validation. Furthermore, urine samples were collected daily, over a 12-wk period, from two captive adult females, for 2 consecutive yr. The urinary LH pattern from females was compared with the patterns of urinary progestagens and estrogen conjugates throughout the ovarian cycle. An LH peak was observed in both male Amazonian manatees after the hormonal challenge, occurring prior to or together with peak androgen levels. In the females, the ovarian cycle ranged from 40 to 48 days (mean of 43.7 days). Two distinct peaks of estrogen conjugates were observed across all cycles analyzed, and the urinary LH peaks observed were accompanied by peaks of urinary estrogen conjugates. The EIA was validated as a method for the quantification of urinary LH from Amazonian manatees, as it was able to detect variations in the levels of LH in urine samples. These results suggest that T. inunguis exhibits a peculiar hormonal pattern during the ovarian cycle. Therefore, further studies are desirable and necessary to clarify the relationship between this hormonal pattern and morphological changes, as well as mating behavior, in Amazonian manatee. PMID:25632672

  11. Effect of Deletion of Ghrelin-O-Acyltransferase on the Pulsatile Release of Growth Hormone in Mice.

    PubMed

    Xie, T Y; Ngo, S T; Veldhuis, J D; Jeffery, P L; Chopin, L K; Tschöp, M; Waters, M J; Tolle, V; Epelbaum, J; Chen, C; Steyn, F J

    2015-12-01

    Ghrelin, a gut hormone originating from the post-translational cleavage of preproghrelin, is the endogenous ligand of growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a (GHS-R1a). Within the growth hormone (GH) axis, the biological activity of ghrelin requires octanoylation by ghrelin-O-acyltransferase (GOAT), conferring selective binding to the GHS-R1a receptor via acylated ghrelin. Complete loss of preproghrelin-derived signalling (through deletion of the Ghrl gene) contributes to a decline in peak GH release; however, the selective contribution of endogenous acyl-ghrelin to pulsatile GH release remains to be established. We assessed the pulsatile release of GH in ad lib. fed male germline goat(-/-) mice, extending measures to include mRNA for key hypothalamic regulators of GH release, and peripheral factors that are modulated relative to GH release. The amount of GH released was reduced in young goat(-/-) mice compared to age-matched wild-type mice, whereas pulse frequency and irregularity increased. Altered GH release did not coincide with alterations in hypothalamic Ghrh, Srif, Npy or Ghsr mRNA expression, or pituitary GH content, suggesting that loss of Goat does not compromise canonical mechanisms that contribute to pituitary GH production and release. Although loss of Goat resulted in an irregular pattern of GH release (characterised by an increase in the number of GH pulses observed during extended secretory events), this did not contribute to a change in the expression of sexually dimorphic GH-dependent liver genes. Of interest, circulating levels of insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 were elevated in goat(-/-) mice. This rise in circulating levels of IGF-1 was correlated with an increase in GH pulse frequency, suggesting that sustained or increased IGF-1 release in goat(-/-) mice may occur in response to altered GH release patterning. Our observations demonstrate that germline loss of Goat alters GH release and patterning. Although the biological relevance of

  12. [Effects of castration and testosterone-replacement on hypothalamic and plasma luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone levels in the aged male rat].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z J; Ren, H M; Hu, H T; Ling, F D

    1992-06-01

    Hypothalamic and plasma luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) levels following orchidectomy (ORDX) and testosterone (T)-replacement were compared between young (2-3 months old) and aged (24-26 months old) male rats by radioimmunoassay. Plasma T level and hypothalamic LHRH content are markedly decreased in the aged rat as compared to those of the young rat, whereas plasma LHRH levels are similar in the two groups. Following ORDX and ORDX plus T-replacement, plasma T levels in both groups are about the same, whereas the rates of variation of hypothalamic and plasma LHRH levels in the aged rat are significantly lower than those in the young rat. These results suggest that the negative feedback mechanism of the hypothalamic LHRHergic system is impaired in the aged rat, which may be one of the important reasons causing age-dependent deterioration of the functional control of hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis.

  13. Characterization of recombinant DNA derived-human luteinizing hormone in vitro and in vivo. Efficacy in ovulation induction and corpus luteum support.

    PubMed

    Simon, J A; Danforth, D R; Hutchison, J S; Hodgen, G D

    1988-06-10

    The present data are the first, to our knowledge, to demonstrate the production feasibility of a commercially available medication of pure human luteinizing hormone from recombinant DNA technology (rechLH). The rechLH preparation achieved ovulation induction and corpus luteum support in the primate menstrual cycle. The observations described herein indicate the opportunity for significant improvement in the treatment of infertile women and men who require gonadal stimulation. Recombinant DNA-derived gonadotropin products, rechLH in this case, will have several therapeutic advantages compared with current medications extracted from urine. These advantages include (1) better reliability of an available supply of hormone and (2) improved treatment flexibility in determining the optimal dose ratio of follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone or avoidance of the long-acting effects of human chorionic gonadotropin, as the needs of individual patients may dictate.

  14. Characterization of recombinant DNA derived-human luteinizing hormone in vitro and in vivo: efficacy in ovulation induction and corpus luteum support

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, J.A.; Danforth, D.R.; Hutchison, J.S.; Hodgen, G.D.

    1988-06-10

    The present data are the first, to the authors knowledge, to demonstrate the production feasibility of a commercially available medication of pure human luteinizing hormone from recombinant DNA technology (rechLH). The rechLH preparation achieved ovulation induction and corpus luteum support in the primate menstrual cycle. The observations described herein indicate the opportunity for significant improvement in the treatment of infertile women and men who require gonadal stimulation. Recombinant DNA-derived gonadotropin products, rechLH in this case, will have several therapeutic advantages compared with current medications extracted from urine. These advantages include (1) better reliability of an available supply of hormone and (2) improved treatment flexibility in determining the optimal dose ratio of follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone or avoidance of the long-acting effects of human chorionic gonadotropin, as the needs of individual patients may dictate.

  15. Luteinizing hormone (LH)-releasing hormone agonist reduces serum adrenal androgen levels in prostate cancer patients: implications for the effect of LH on the adrenal glands.

    PubMed

    Nishii, Masahiro; Nomura, Masashi; Sekine, Yoshitaka; Koike, Hidekazu; Matsui, Hiroshi; Shibata, Yasuhiro; Ito, Kazuto; Oyama, Tetsunari; Suzuki, Kazuhiro

    2012-01-01

    Recently, adrenal androgens have been targeted as key hormones for the development of castration-resistant prostate cancer therapeutics. Although circulating adrenal androgens originate mainly from the adrenal glands, the testes also supply about 10%. Although widely used in androgen deprivation medical castration therapy, the effect of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LH-RH) agonist on adrenal androgens has not been fully studied. In this study, changes in testicular and adrenal androgen levels were measured and compared to adrenocorticotropic hormone levels. To assess the possible role of LH in the adrenal glands, immunohistochemical studies of the LH receptor in normal adrenal glands were performed. Forty-seven patients with localized or locally progressive prostate cancer were treated with LH-RH agonist with radiotherapy. Six months after initiation of treatment, testosterone, dihydrotestosterone, and estradiol levels were decreased by 90%-95%, and dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate, dehydroepiandrosterone, and androstenedione levels were significantly decreased by 26%-40%. The suppressive effect of LH-RH agonist at 12 months was maintained. Adrenocorticotropic hormone levels showed an increasing trend at 6 months and a significant increase at 12 months. LH receptors were positively stained in the cortex cells of the reticular layer of the adrenal glands. The long-term LH-RH agonist treatment reduced adrenal-originated adrenal androgens. LH receptors in the adrenal cortex cells of the reticular layer might account for the underlying mechanism of reduced adrenal androgens.

  16. [Role of estrogen-sensitive neurons in the arcuate region of the hypothalamus in the mechanism of luteinizing hormone release].

    PubMed

    Babichev, V N; Ignatkov, V Ia

    1978-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on rats; estradiol brought to the arcuate region of the hypothalamus by means of microionophoresis led to the increase of the region of the hypothalamus by means of microionophoresis led to the increase of the blood luteinizing hormone (LH) level during the following stages of the estral cycle-diestrus 1, diestrus 2, and the first half day of the proestrus; as to the second half of the proestrus day--estradiol decreased its level. Changes in the LH level in the hypophysis under the influence of the microionophoretic introduction of estradiol into the arcuate region occurred during the second half of the day of diestrus 2 (reduction), and during the estrus (elevation). In the majority of cases a rise of the blood level was combined with the neuron activation in the arcuate region under the influence of estradiol.

  17. Role of luteinizing hormone β-subunit gene variants among South Indian women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Shilpi; Sirisha, P V S; Neelaveni, K; Anuradha, K; Sudhakar, G; Reddy, B Mohan

    2012-02-15

    Abnormal luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion and action are known to affect ovarian steroidogenesis and thus playing a crucial role in manifestation of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). This study is first of its kind to study association of LH β-subunit gene variants with PCOS among South-Indian women. 250 PCOS cases and 299 controls were recruited for the study. All the exons of LH β gene were screened. Allele and genotype frequencies of the SNPs were compared between the cases and controls. We identified seven SNPs in the LH β gene; one SNP in exon 3 (rs#1056917) exhibited significant difference in the allele frequency between the PCOS cases and controls (p=0.015). Although, the LH β variants that are found to be more frequent among PCOS cases are silent in nature and not of any functional significance, they might influence other significant functional polymorphisms in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis which needs to be explored.

  18. The differential effects of exposure to tobacco smoke on the secretion of luteinizing hormone and prolactin in the proestrous rat.

    PubMed

    McLean, B K; Rubel, A; Nikitovitch-Winer, M B

    1977-06-01

    The acute effects of tobacco smoke inhalation on the spontaneous proestrous rise in serum luteinizing hormone and prolactin have been investigated in the female Wistar rat. It was found that the surge of LH normally seen throughout the afternoon of proestrus was delayed by inhalation of tobacco smoke and that the delay was dose-related to the nicotine content of the cigarettes used in the experiment. In the case of prolactin neither the timing nor the magnitude of the surge was altered when compared with controls. These results suggest that under certain well-defined conditions inhalation of tobacco smoke of known nicotine content is capable of exerting profound influences on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis.

  19. Hypokalemia decreases testosterone production in male mice by altering luteinizing hormone secretion.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Capelo, A; Castells, M T; Cremades, A; Peñafiel, R

    1996-09-01

    Potassium deficiency produced by feeding mice a low potassium diet caused a marked decrease in plasma and testicular testosterone concentrations and a concomitant fall in the weight of seminal vesicles and in renal ornithine decarboxylase activity. All of these parameters were rapidly restored when potassium supply was normalized. Immunocytochemical analysis of gonadotropes and plasma LH values suggested that the pulsatile liberation of LH by the pituitary was impaired in the potassium-deficient male mice. Because the synthesis of testosterone in the potassium-deficient mice was stimulated by exogenous LH, hCG, or GnRH, one can conclude that alteration of the transcellular potassium gradient could affect the regulation of the hypothalamo-hypophyseal-testicular axis by affecting the pulsatile release of GnRH. Our results showing that the stimulation of LH secretion after castration was similar in control and potassium-deficient male mice suggest that a testicular factor(s) different from testosterone could be implicated in the abnormal regulation of LH secretion in potassium-deficient mice. We conclude that plasma potassium concentration is an important factor in the regulation of gonadotropin secretion and testicular functions. PMID:8756540

  20. Ablation of GalNAc-4-sulfotransferase-1 enhances reproduction by altering the carbohydrate structures of luteinizing hormone in mice.

    PubMed

    Mi, Yiling; Fiete, Dorothy; Baenziger, Jacques U

    2008-05-01

    Luteinizing hormone (LH), produced in the anterior lobe of the pituitary, is a member of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonad axis that is required for production of the sex hormones estradiol, progesterone, and testosterone. Perturbations in levels of hormones associated with this axis can result in defects in sexual development and maturity. LH bears unique N-linked carbohydrate units that terminate with a sulfated N-acetylgalactosamine structure (GalNAc-4-SO(4)) that mediates its clearance from the blood. To determine the significance of this terminal structure, we ablated the gene encoding the sulfotransferase responsible for sulfate addition to GalNAc on LH, GalNAc-4-sulfotransferase-1 (GalNAc-4-ST1) in mice. Mice lacking GalNAc-4-ST1 exhibited increased levels of circulating LH. In male mice, this resulted in elevated levels of testosterone and precocious maturation of testis and seminal vesicles. Female mice lacking GalNAc-4-ST1 demonstrated elevated estrogen levels and exhibited precocious sexual maturation and increased fecundity. Female mice remained in estrus for prolonged periods and produced almost 50% more litters per mouse than wild-type mice over the same period of time. Thus, sulfate modification of the terminal glycosylation of LH plays a central role in regulating the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonad axis in vivo.

  1. Radioimmunoassay for 6-D-tryptophan analog of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone: measurement of serum levels after administration of long-acting microcapsule formulations

    SciTech Connect

    Mason-Garcia, M.; Vigh, S.; Comaru-Schally, A.M.; Redding, T.W.; Somogyvari-Vigh, A.; Horvath, J.; Schally, A.V.

    1985-03-01

    A sensitive and specific radioimmunoassay for (6-D-tryptophan)luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone ((D-Trp/sup 6/)LH-RH) was developed and used for following the rate of liberation of (D-Trp/sup 6/)LH-RH from a long-acting delivery systems based on a microcapsule formulation. Rabbit antibodies were generated against (D-Trp/sup 6/)LH-RH conjugated to bovine serum albumin with glutaraldehyde. Crossreactivity with LH-RH was less than 1%; there was no significant cross-reactivity with other peptides. The minimal detectable dose of (D-Trp/sup 6/)LH-RH was 2 pg per tube. In tra- and interassay coefficients of variation were 8% and 10%, respectively. The radioimmunoassay was suitable for direct determination of (D-Trp/sup 6/)LH-RH in serum, permitting the study of blood levels of the analog after single injections into normal men and after one-a-month administration of microcapsules to rats. In men, 90 min after subcutaneous injection of 250 ..mu..g of the peptide, serum (D-Trp/sup 6/)LH-RH rose to 6-12 ng/ml. Luteinizing hormone was increased 90 min and 24 hr after the administration of the analog. Several batches of microcapsules were tested in rats and the rate of release of (D-Trp/sup 6/)LH-RH was followed. The improved batch of microcapsules of (D-Trp/sup 6/)LH-RH increased serum concentrations of the analog for 30 days or longer after intramuscular injection.

  2. Luteinizing hormone downregulation but not estrogen replacement improves ovariectomy-associated cognition and spine density loss independently of treatment onset timing.

    PubMed

    Blair, Jeffrey A; Palm, Russell; Chang, Jaewon; McGee, Henry; Zhu, Xiongwei; Wang, Xinglong; Casadesus, Gemma

    2016-02-01

    Age-related changes in reproductive hormone levels are a well-known risk factor for the development of cognitive dysfunction and dementia in women. We and others have shown an important contribution of gonadotropins in this process. Lowering serum gonadotropin levels is able to rescue cognitive function in Alzheimer's disease and menopause models, but whether this is time-dependent and the exact mechanism through which gonadotropins regulate cognitive function is unknown. We show that pharmacologically lowering serum levels of luteinizing hormone lead to cognitive improvement immediately after ovariectomy and with a 4month interval after ovariectomy, when the benefits of 17β-estradiol are known to disappear in rodents. Importantly, we show that these improvements are associated with spine density changes at both time points. These findings suggest a role of luteinizing hormone in learning and memory and neuroplasticity processes as well as provide an alternative therapeutic strategy of menopause associated cognitive loss.

  3. Luteinizing hormone downregulation but not estrogen replacement improves ovariectomy-associated cognition and spine density loss independently of treatment onset timing.

    PubMed

    Blair, Jeffrey A; Palm, Russell; Chang, Jaewon; McGee, Henry; Zhu, Xiongwei; Wang, Xinglong; Casadesus, Gemma

    2016-02-01

    Age-related changes in reproductive hormone levels are a well-known risk factor for the development of cognitive dysfunction and dementia in women. We and others have shown an important contribution of gonadotropins in this process. Lowering serum gonadotropin levels is able to rescue cognitive function in Alzheimer's disease and menopause models, but whether this is time-dependent and the exact mechanism through which gonadotropins regulate cognitive function is unknown. We show that pharmacologically lowering serum levels of luteinizing hormone lead to cognitive improvement immediately after ovariectomy and with a 4month interval after ovariectomy, when the benefits of 17β-estradiol are known to disappear in rodents. Importantly, we show that these improvements are associated with spine density changes at both time points. These findings suggest a role of luteinizing hormone in learning and memory and neuroplasticity processes as well as provide an alternative therapeutic strategy of menopause associated cognitive loss. PMID:26497249

  4. Negative energy balance in a male songbird, the Abert's towhee, constrains the testicular endocrine response to luteinizing hormone stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Scott; Gao, Sisi; Valle, Shelley; Bittner, Stephanie; Hutton, Pierce; Meddle, Simone L.; Deviche, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Energy deficiency can suppress reproductive function in vertebrates. As the orchestrator of reproductive function, endocrine activity of the hypothalamo-pituitary–gonadal (HPG) axis is potentially an important mechanism mediating such effects. Previous experiments in wild-caught birds found inconsistent relationships between energy deficiency and seasonal reproductive function, but these experiments focused on baseline HPG axis activity and none have investigated the responsiveness of this axis to endocrine stimulation. Here, we present data from an experiment in Abert's towhees, Melozone aberti, using gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) challenges to investigate whether energy deficiency modulates the plasma testosterone responsiveness of the HPG axis. Wild-caught birds were either ad libitum fed or energetically constrained via chronic food restriction during photoinduced reproductive development. Energy deficiency did not significantly affect the development of reproductive morphology, the baseline endocrine activity of the HPG axis, or the plasma testosterone response to GnRH challenge. Energy deficiency did, however, decrease the plasma testosterone responsiveness to LH challenge. Collectively, these observations suggest that energy deficiency has direct gonadal effects consisting of a decreased responsiveness to LH stimulation. Our study, therefore, reveals a mechanism by which energy deficiency modulates reproductive function in wild birds in the absence of detectable effects on baseline HPG axis activity. PMID:26333925

  5. Naloxone does not reverse the inhibitory effect of morphine on luteinizing hormone secretion in prepubescent male rats.

    PubMed

    Cicero, T J; Nock, B; O'Connor, L

    1993-01-01

    Morphine and naloxone exert age-dependent effects on secretion of luteinizing hormone (LH) in the male rat. Morphine suppresses LH secretion at very early stages of development, well before puberty, whereas naloxone does not increase LH until after puberty. The mechanisms underlying these age-dependent effects of opiates on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in pre- and postpubertal rats are poorly understood at the present time. The purpose of the present studies was to examine one plausible explanation of these effects: that morphine and naloxone act through different receptors in the pubescent male rat than they do in adults to influence LH secretion. Specifically, we examined whether naloxone blocks the effects of morphine on LH in prepubescent and adult rats which would be anticipated if both drugs were exerting their effects on LH via the same opiate receptor. Surprisingly, we found that naloxone did not reverse the effects of morphine on serum LH levels in the prepubescent animal, although it fully reversed this effect in adults. This non-naloxone-reversible effect of morphine appeared to be specific to LH, since naloxone antagonized morphine's effects on several other hormones (e.g., prolactin and corticosterone) and completely attenuated morphine's antinociceptive activity in prepubescent rats. Additionally, naloxone precipitated a withdrawal syndrome in the prepubescent morphine-dependent animal that was quantitatively and qualitatively the same as in adults.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. CREB binding protein (CBP) activation is required for luteinizing hormone beta expression and normal fertility in mice.

    PubMed

    Miller, Ryan S; Wolfe, Andrew; He, Ling; Radovick, Sally; Wondisford, Fredric E

    2012-07-01

    Normal function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis is dependent on gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GNRH)-stimulated synthesis and secretion of luteinizing hormone (LH) from the pituitary gonadotroph. While the transcriptional coactivator CREB binding protein (CBP) is known to interact with Egr-1, the major mediator of GNRH action on the Lhb gene, the role of CBP in Lhb gene expression has yet to be characterized. We show that in the LβT2 gonadotroph cell line, overexpression of CBP augmented the response to GNRH and that knockdown of CBP eliminated GNRH responsiveness. While GNRH-mediated phosphorylation of CBP at Ser436 increased the interaction with Egr-1 on the Lhb promoter, loss of this phosphorylation site eliminated GNRH-mediated Lhb expression in LβT2 cells. In vivo, loss of CBP phosphorylation at Ser436 rendered female mice subfertile. S436A knock-in mice had disrupted estrous cyclicity and reduced responsiveness to GNRH. Our results show that GNRH-mediated phosphorylation of CBP at Ser436 is required for Egr-1 to activate Lhb expression and is a requirement for normal fertility in female mice. As CBP can be phosphorylated by other factors, such as insulin, our studies suggest that CBP may act as a key regulator of Lhb expression in the gonadotroph by integrating homeostatic information with GNRH signaling.

  7. Adrenocortical Production Is Associated with Higher Levels of Luteinizing Hormone in Nonobese Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Carneiro, Gláucia; Pereira, Andrea Z.; Tufik, Sérgio; Zanella, Maria Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Insulin resistance (IR) and ovarian and adrenal hyperandrogenism are a common finding in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). The aim of the present study was to access possible differences in insulin resistance, gonadotropins, and androgens production in obese and nonobese PCOS women. Study Design. We studied 37 PCOS women (16 nonobese and 21 obese) and 18 nonobese controls. Fasting glucose, insulin, androgens, and gonadotropins levels were determined. Salivary cortisol was measured basal and in the morning after dexamethasone (DEX) 0.25 mg. Results. Nonobese PCOS women showed higher basal salivary cortisol and serum dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate and luteinizing hormone (LH) levels than controls and obese PCOS. These hormones levels did not differ between the obese and control groups. After DEX administration no differences were found between the three groups. In PCOS women, salivary cortisol levels showed negative correlation with BMI (r = −0.52; P = 0.001) and insulin (r = −0.47; P = 0.003) and positive correlation with LH (r = 0.40; P = 0.016). Conclusion. Our results show an increased adrenocortical production in nonobese PCOS women, not related to IR and associated with a normal hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal suppression. Higher LH levels might be involved in this event. PMID:24895496

  8. Candidate genes associated with testicular development, sperm quality, and hormone levels of inhibin, luteinizing hormone, and insulin-like growth factor 1 in Brahman bulls.

    PubMed

    Fortes, Marina R S; Reverter, Antonio; Hawken, Rachel J; Bolormaa, Sunduimijid; Lehnert, Sigrid A

    2012-09-01

    Bull fertility is an important target for genetic improvement, and early prediction using genetic markers is therefore a goal for livestock breeding. We performed genome-wide association studies to identify genes associated with fertility traits measured in young bulls. Data from 1118 Brahman bulls were collected for six traits: blood hormone levels of inhibin (IN) at 4 mo, luteinizing hormone (LH) following a gonadotropin-releasing hormone challenge at 4 mo, and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) at 6 mo, scrotal circumference (SC) at 12 mo, ability to produce sperm (Sperm) at 18 mo, and percentage of normal sperm (PNS) at 24 mo. All the bulls were genotyped with the BovineSNP50 chip. Sires and dams of the bull population (n = 304) were genotyped with the high-density chip (∼800 000 polymorphisms) to allow for imputation, thereby contributing detail on genome regions of interest. Polymorphism associations were discovered for all traits, except for Sperm. Chromosome 2 harbored polymorphisms associated with IN. For LH, associated polymorphisms were located in five different chromosomes. A region of chromosome 14 contained polymorphisms associated with IGF1 and SC. Regions of the X chromosome showed associations with SC and PNS. Associated polymorphisms yielded candidate genes in chromosomes 2, 14, and X. These findings will contribute to the development of genetic markers to help select cattle with improved fertility and will lead to better annotation of gene function in the context of reproductive biology.

  9. Decrease in the AgNOR number in Dunning R3327 prostate cancers after treatment with an agonist and antagonist of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone.

    PubMed Central

    Szepeshazi, K.; Korkut, E.; Schally, A. V.

    1991-01-01

    The argyrophilic staining of the nucleolar organizer region (AgNOR) in cells of Dunning R3327 rat prostate tumors was studied and the effect of hormonal treatments on their appearance was analyzed. The nuclei of the control tumor cells contained 4.1 +/- 0.17 AgNOR granules. Treatment of rats for 8 weeks with luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LH-RH) agonist (D-Trp-6-LH-RH) and antagonist SB-75 induced a marked inhibition of tumor growth and decreased significantly (P less than 0.01) the number of Ag-NORs in the tumors to 2.89 +/- 0.10 AgNOR granules/cell in the group given the agonist and to 2.82 +/- 0.10 after therapy with the highest dose of the antagonist. A reduced AgNOR number (3.14 +/- 0.16) also was found after 3 days of treatment with SB-75 (P less than 0.05), but the AgNORs returned to near control values 1 week after the short-term therapy, showing the reversibility of these changes. These results suggest that the AgNOR method, which was widely tested on human tumors in the past few years, can be a valuable technique in experimental tumor pathology and useful in the evaluation of the effects of various treatments. Images Figure 1 PMID:1827237

  10. Molecular and biological interaction between major histocompatibility complex class I antigens and luteinizing hormone receptors or beta-adrenergic receptors triggers cellular response in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Solano, A R; Cremaschi, G; Sánchez, M L; Borda, E; Sterin-Borda, L; Podestá, E J

    1988-01-01

    Purified IgG from BALB/c mouse anti-C3H serum exerts positive inotropic and chronotropic effects in C3H mouse atria and induces testosterone synthesis in C3H mouse Leydig cells. The effect depends on IgG concentration and can be abolished by beta-adrenergic-receptor and luteinizing hormone-receptor antagonists. IgG interferes with the binding of dihydroalprenolol and luteinizing hormone. Monoclonal antibodies against major histocompatibility complex class I antigens were active on the Leydig cells of C3H and BALB/c mice. There was a parallelism between the effect of each individual monoclonal antibody with specificity for a particular haplotype and the response of the target cell from the strains carrying such haplotypes. These antibodies could precipitate the soluble luteinizing hormone-receptor complex. The results suggested that bound hormone triggers the association of major histocompatibility class I antigen with the receptor, thereby activating the respective target cells. PMID:2839829

  11. Effects of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone and arginine-vasotocin on the sperm-release response of Günther's Toadlet, Pseudophryne guentheri

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) is an exogenous hormone commonly used to induce spermiation in anuran amphibians. Over the past few decades, the LHRH dose administered to individuals and the frequency of injection has been highly variable. The sperm-release responses reported have been correspondingly diverse, highlighting a need to quantify dose-response relationships on a species-specific basis. This study on the Australian anuran Pseudophryne guentheri first evaluated the spermiation response of males administered one of five LHRHa doses, and second, determined whether AVT administered in combination with the optimal LHRHa dose improved sperm-release. Methods Male toadlets were administered a single dose of 0, 1, 2, 4 or 8 micrograms/g body weight of LHRHa. A 4 micrograms/g dose of AVT was administered alone or in combination with 2 micrograms/g LHRHa. Spermiation responses were evaluated at 3, 7 and 12 h post hormone administration (PA), and sperm number and viability were quantified using fluorescent microscopy. Results LHRHa administration was highly effective at inducing spermiation in P. guentheri, with 100% of hormone-treated males producing sperm during the experimental period. The number of sperm released in response to 2 micrograms/g LHRHa was greater than all other doses administered and sperm viability was highest in the 1 microgram/g treatment. The administration of AVT alone or in combination with LHRHa resulted in the release of significantly lower sperm numbers. Conclusion Overall, results from this study suggest that in P. guentheri, LHRHa is effective at inducing spermiation, but that AVT inhibits sperm-release. PMID:21059269

  12. Circulating nitric oxide in women affected by weight loss amenorrhea during pulsatile gonadotropin-releasing hormone therapy.

    PubMed

    Valenti, S; Cavallero, D; Fazzuoli, L; Minuto, F; Giusti, M

    2005-10-01

    No specific markers of the severity or prognosis of hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis disturbances associated with weight loss amenorrhea (WLA) are currently available. Circulating nitric oxide (NO), which is involved in the control of the reproductive function in women and is correlated with body mass index (BMI), at least in over-weight and obese subjects, might be a marker of the severity and/or progression of WLA. To test this hypothesis, we studied circulating NO levels in 11 women (age 27.1 +/- 1.59 yr) affected by WLA for 5.1 +/- 1.0 yr; in all patients hormonal therapy had been discontinued 10.0 +/- 3.15 months earlier. NO, determined by measuring its stable catabolite nitrite/nitrates (NOx), was compared with some clinical parameters and sex hormone levels. Subsequently, changes in NOx during pulsatile GnRH therapy (120 ng/kg bw sc every 120 min) were compared with the clinical and hormonal data. Fifteen normal women (27.3 +/- 1.6 yr) served as a control group. NOx was significantly lower (p<0.01) in WLA (8.8 +/- 2.0 micromol/l) than in control (18.7 +/- 2.5 micromol/l) subjects. No correlation between NOx and clinical parameters was noted in either WLA or control subjects. As a result of GnRH therapy, ovulatory cycles reappeared in 91% of WLA women. During the 1st cycle, periovulatory 17beta-estradiol levels were 110% higher than those noted in controls. During the 2nd cycle, NOx showed a slight increase in the follicular phase (+12% vs 1st cycle) followed by a drop during the luteal phase (-40% from the follicular phase); indeed, at that time, NOx correlated negatively with progesterone in both WLA (rS -0.32, p<0.05) and control (rS -0.48, p<0.05) subjects. NOx correlated with BMI at the time of the 2nd cycle (rS 0.71, p<0.05). In conclusion, this study shows that in WLA patients: 1) NO is low, as in other conditions of chronic anovulation; 2) it does not correlate with clinical data; 3) it takes longer than sex steroids to increase and show normal

  13. Control of luteinizing hormone and testosterone secretion in a flexibly breeding male passerine, the Rufous-winged Sparrow, Aimophila carpalis.

    PubMed

    Deviche, Pierre; Small, Thomas; Sharp, Peter; Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi

    2006-12-01

    Rufous-winged Sparrows, Aimophila carpalis, reside in the Sonoran desert and although testicular development is initiated in the spring under the influence of increasing day length, breeding occurs opportunistically in summer in association with heavy rainfall or "monsoon". The aim of this study in free-living male Rufous-winged Sparrows was to establish the relationship between concentrations of plasma luteinizing hormone (LH) and testosterone (T), and breeding associated with heavy rainfall, and to investigate whether breeding is mediated by changes in pituitary gland sensitivity to gonadotropin releasing hormone-I (GnRH) and the recently discovered avian gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH). Concentrations of plasma LH and T were relatively low until mid-summer, but increased rapidly and transiently immediately prior to the monsoon which occurred after the summer solstice, when day lengths were decreasing. At this time the birds came into full breeding condition. An injection of chicken GnRH (10 ng) increased plasma LH within 2 min when given before or during the monsoon. An injection of GnIH (1 microg) did not affect plasma LH within 2 min during the monsoon and did not decrease GnRH-elicited LH secretion before or during the monsoon. No experimental treatment affected plasma T concentrations. The data suggest in male Rufous-winged Sparrows that the seasonal increase in plasma LH associated with summer monsoon results from increased stimulation of the pituitary gland by GnRH, rather than from a change in the responsiveness of the gland to GnRH, and that GnIH does not play an acute role in this mechanism. However, a possible chronic role for GnIH in the seasonal control of LH synthesis and secretion through an inhibitory effect on the hypothalamic GnRH system remains to be investigated.

  14. Purification, characterization, and amino-terminal sequence of rat ovarian receptor for luteinizing hormone/human choriogonadotropin.

    PubMed

    Roche, P C; Ryan, R J

    1989-03-15

    The luteinizing hormone (LH)/human choriogonadotropin (hCG) receptor of rat ovary was solubilized with Lubrol PX in the presence of 20% glycerol and protease inhibitors, and purified by one-step affinity chromatography. Purified receptor had a specific hCG binding capacity of 4900 pmol/mg protein, and displayed a single class of high affinity binding sites (Ka = 6.20 X 10(9) M-1). An 11,200-fold purification over the starting crude homogenate was achieved. The purified LH/hCG receptor was identified by sodium dodecyl sulfate-gel electrophoresis and silver staining as a single protein of 92 kDa. The ability of the purified 92-kDa protein to specifically bind hormone was demonstrated by electroblotting onto Immobilon P membrane, incubation with 125I-labeled hCG, and autoradiography of the blot. In addition to a 92-kDa band, ligand blotting also yielded a 170-kDa band representing receptor dimer. Covalent cross-linking of hCG, with isotope in either the alpha- or beta-subunit, to membrane-bound receptor produced complexes that contained a single receptor component of approximately 92 kDa. The cross-linking studies indicated that both subunits interact with receptor and also suggested receptor dimer formation. Following sodium dodecyl sulfate-electrophoresis, purified receptor was electroblotted onto polyethylenimine-treated glass fiber filters for direct microsequencing in a gas-phase sequenator. Eleven cycles of sequence analysis yielded the unique sequence: NH2-Arg-Glu-Leu-Ser-Gly-Ser-Leu-XXX-Pro-Glu-Pro-COOH. These results indicate that the rat ovarian LH/hCG receptor is a protein of 92 kDa which can be easily purified in microgram amounts. This study also describes a relatively simple technique for electroblotting and microsequencing that should be applicable to other membrane-bound hormone receptors. PMID:2925659

  15. Age-Related Mercury Contamination and Relationship with Luteinizing Hormone in a Long-Lived Antarctic Bird

    PubMed Central

    Tartu, Sabrina; Bustamante, Paco; Goutte, Aurélie; Cherel, Yves; Weimerskirch, Henri; Bustnes, Jan Ove; Chastel, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Seabirds, as long-lived top predators, accumulate contaminants such as mercury (Hg), an established endocrine disruptor. In long lived species hormonal secretion varies with age; therefore, Hg-induced endocrine disruption may be exacerbated in some age classes. Here we investigated relationships between blood total Hg and luteinizing hormone (LH, a key pituitary hormone for the onset of breeding), in pre-laying known-age (11–45 years old) snow petrels (Pagodroma nivea) from Adélie Land, Antarctica. We predicted that 1) blood Hg would increase with advancing age as a consequence of bio-accumulation; and that 2) increasing blood Hg would be related to decreased concentrations of LH in the most Hg-contaminated individuals. Hg concentrations were higher in females than in males (p<0.001), and contrary to our prediction, decreased with advancing age in males (p = 0.009) and tended to do so in females (p = 0.06). The analysis of stable isotopes (δ13C and δ15N) suggested that this unexpected pattern could originate from age and sex-related variations in trophic niche, and hence Hg exposure. Regarding LH, our prediction was only supported in young birds (≤23 years) where baseline LH was inversely correlated with Hg concentrations (p = 0.04). Hg burden did not predict baseline LH or GnRH-induced LH in birds that were more than 23 years old. These results show that age and contaminants may interfere with major endocrine mechanisms and, together with other recent studies, support the view that Hg could be connected to LH secretion and could then impair the fitness of long-lived birds. PMID:25072936

  16. Inhibin B, follicle stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone and testosterone during childhood and puberty in males: changes in serum concentrations in relation to age and stage of puberty.

    PubMed

    Chada, M; Průsa, R; Bronský, J; Kotaska, K; Sídlová, K; Pechová, M; Lisá, L

    2003-01-01

    Inhibin B is a gonadal dimeric polypeptide hormone that regulates synthesis and secretion of follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) in a negative feedback loop. The aim of the present study was to determine changes in serum inhibin B, gonadotropins and testosterone concentrations during childhood and puberty in males. We studied the relationship between circulating inhibin B, gonadotropins and testosterone in serum of healthy boys during the first two years of life and then in pubertal development. Using a recently developed two-side enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), inhibin B levels were measured in the serum of 78 healthy boys divided into eleven age groups from birth to the end of pubertal development. In addition, serum levels of gonadotropins and testosterone were measured. Serum inhibin B, gonadotropins and testosterone increased during the first months of postnatal life. A peak in serum inhibin B and gonadotropins concentrations was observed around 3-4 months of age. There was a significant positive correlation between serum inhibin B and gonadotropins and testosterone levels during the first 2 years of life. After this early increase, serum inhibin B, gonadotropins and testosterone levels decreased significantly and remained low until puberty followed by an increase beginning with the onset of puberty. Serum levels of inhibin B reached a peak at stage G3 of puberty. Around midpuberty, inhibin B lost its positive correlation with luteinizing hormone (LH) and testosterone from early puberty, and developed a strong negative correlation with FSH, which persisted into adulthood. We conclude that inhibin B plays a key role in the regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal hormonal axis during male childhood and pubertal development. Inhibin B is a direct marker of the presence and function of Sertoli cells and appears to reflect testicular function in boys.

  17. Ultrastructural changes in granulosa cells and plasma steroid levels after administration of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone in the Western painted turtle, Chrysemys picta.

    PubMed

    Al-Kindi, A Y; Mahmoud, Y; Woller, M J

    2001-08-01

    In this study we investigated the effects of treatment by luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) on the morphology and steroid release of ovarian tissues in the Western painted turtle, (Chrysemys picta). In Experiment I, four adult female turtles were injected with synthetic mammalian LHRH (i.p., 500 pg/g bodyweight) and four with saline 2-3 weeks prior to ovulation. Granulosa cells from LHRH-treated turtles vs controls contained both preovulatory follicles (16-20 mm in diameter) and small follicles (0.5-1.00mm in diameter) with increased RER, free ribosomes and mitochondria with swollen cristae. An increase in the amount of cytoskeletal material (microfilaments) was observed in granulosa cells of the experimental turtles compared to the controls. Cytoplasmic extensions of the oocyte and granulosa cells were longer in the small follicles of treated animals, accounting for the observed increase in the thickness of the zona pellucida (ZP) over the controls. In Experiment II, administration of LHRH (i.p.) to 10 turtles during the same period triggered a substantial increase in plasma progesterone and estradiol-17beta levels over the 10 saline-injected controls. This supports the idea that in this species, as in mammals, steroidogenic activity in the ovarian follicles are under the control of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis. The ultrastructure and hormonal levels of the experimental animals were typical of untreated turtles just prior to ovulation. In this species the development of follicles and steroidogenesis can be stimulated prematurely by a releasing hormone from a nonreptilian origin.

  18. Inhibition of serum androgen levels by chronic intranasal and subcutaneous administration of a potent luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LH-RH) agonist in adult men.

    PubMed

    Faure, N; Labrie, F; Lemay, A; Bélanger, A; Gourdeau, Y; Laroche, B; Robert, G

    1982-03-01

    The effect of chronic treatment with the luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LH-RH) agonist Buserelin (Hoechst AG, Frankfurt/Main, West Germany) ([D-Ser(TBU)6,des-Gly-NH2(10)]LH-RH ethylamide) administrered by nasal spray (200 or 500 micrograms, twice daily) or subcutaneously (50 micrograms daily) for periods of 1 to 8 months was studied on serum sex steroids and LH levels in 18 patients with cancer of the prostate. Basal serum testosterone concentration decreases to 71.1 +/- 18.3 (NS) and 28.6 +/- 9.3%, (P less than 0.01) of control in patients receiving the 200-micrograms and 500-micrograms dose by nasal spray, respectively. In patients treated subcutaneously, a more rapid inhibition of serum testosterone levels to 19.6 +/- 6.4% of control (P less than 0.01) is observed. The finding of decreased levels of 17-OH-progesterone, testosterone, and dihydrotestosterone in the presence of unchanged pregnenolone concentration indicates that the decrease in androgen biosynthesis induced by Buserelin treatment is due to a blockage at the level of 17-hydroxylase and 17,20-desmolase activities. The present data indicate that chronic administration of Buserelin could be a safe and effective means of reducing serum androgens in patients with cancer of the prostate.

  19. Profile of follitropin alpha/lutropin alpha combination for the stimulation of follicular development in women with severe luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Rinaldi, Leonardo; Selman, Helmy

    2016-01-01

    A severe gonadotropin deficiency together with chronic estradiol deficiency leading to amenorrhea characterizes patients suffering from hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Administration of both follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) to these patients has been shown to be essential in achieving successful stimulation of follicular development, ovulation, and rescue of fertility. In recent years, the availability of both recombinant FSH (rFSH) and recombinant LH (rLH) has provided a new therapeutic option for the stimulation of follicular growth in hypopituitary–hypogonadotropic women (World Health Organization Group I). In this article, we review the data reported in the literature to highlight the role and the efficacy of using recombinant gonadotropins, rFSH and rLH, in the treatment of women with severe LH/FSH deficiency. Although the studies on this issue are limited and the experiences available in the literature are few due to the small number of such patients, it is clearly evident that the recombinant gonadotropins rFSH and rLH are efficient in treating patients affected by hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. The results observed in the studies reported in this review suggest that recombinant gonadotropins are able to induce proper follicular growth, oocyte maturation, and eventually pregnancy in this group of women. Moreover, the clinical use of recombinant gonadotropins in this type of patients has given more insight into some endocrinological aspects of ovarian function that have not yet been fully understood. PMID:27307766

  20. Endocrine response and ovum transport in women treated with D-Trp6-luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone in the postovulatory period.

    PubMed

    Guiloff, E; Salvatierra, A M; Ortiz, M E; Croxatto, H B

    1982-01-15

    Possible alterations in ovum transport during increased activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis were investigated in women. D-Trp6-luteinizing hormone (LH)-releasing hormone, a synthetic peptide with potent gonadotropin-releasing activity, was used to induce a gonadotropin surge and stimulate ovarian steroid secretion in the postovulatory phase. The compound was administered intramuscularly or intravenously 24, 48, or 72 hours following the maximum preovulatory LH level in plasma in seven women. An immediate and pronounced gonadotropin surge accompanied by a moderate increase in the estradiol and progesterone level was obtained in all cases. Ova were recovered from the fallopian tubes in four of the seven women 24 hours following treatment. The rate of recovery and the location of ova within the genital tract indicate that the treatment and the resulting endocrine changes failed to accelerate migration of the ova toward the uterus. This observation, taken together with other negative findings previously reported, suggests that in comparison with other mammals transport of the ovum in the woman is relatively insensitive to endocrine changes occurring in the postovulatory phase.

  1. Paradoxical effects of D-Trp6-luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in immature female rats.

    PubMed

    Vilchez-Martinez, J A; Pedroza, E; Arimura, A; Schally, A V

    1979-06-01

    The effect of administration of a superactive and long-acting analog of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LH-RH), D-Trp6-LH-RH, in doses of 0.05 or 1 microgram/day for 10 days on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis was studied in immature female rats. Treatment with a 0.05-microgram dose of analog produced few changes as compared with the control group. Treatment with 1 microgram of D-Trp6-LH-RH did not affect the body weight or the pituitary weight, but increased ovarian weight and decreased uterine weight; elevated serum gonadotropin levels; and lowered the pituitary LH content. This depletion of pituitary LH content was associated with a low pituitary responsiveness to LH-RH. Serum estradiol levels were not modified, suggesting that decreased uterine weight reflects a direct and extrapituitary effect of this analog. The hypothalamic LH-RH content was higher, indicating a possible inhibition of the release of endogenous LH-RH. A delay in vaginal opening was also observed. This indicates that large doses of D-Trp6-LH-RH may interfere with the process of puberty in rats. These findings extend other reports about the paradoxical antifertility effects of large doses of stimulatory analogs of LH-RH.

  2. Identification of major urinary metabolites of nafarelin acetate, a potent agonist of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone, in the rhesus monkey

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, R.L.; Chaplin, M.D.

    1985-09-01

    Nafarelin acetate (less than Glu-His-Trp-Ser-Tyr-3-(2-naphthyl)-D-Ala-Leu-Arg-Pro-Gly-NH2) is a potent agonistic analogue of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone. After a single iv administration of nafarelin acetate (with UC label at C-3 of 3-(2-naphthyl)-D-Ala) to female rhesus monkeys, about 80% of the radioactivity was eliminated in urine. Five major radioactive urinary metabolites were isolated and purified by reversed phase HPLC. Four of these metabolites, identified by amino acid analysis, were short peptides: the 5-10-hexapeptide amide, the 6-10-pentapeptide amide, the 5-7-tripeptide, and the 6-7-dipeptide. The fifth metabolite, which accounted for about 15% of the radioactivity administered, was shown by NMR and mass spectrometry to be 2-naphthylacetic acid. A possible pathway of its formation is by oxidative deamination of 3-(2-napthyl)-D-Ala to give the corresponding alpha-keto acid, followed by oxidative decarboxylation of the alpha-keto acid. These five metabolites together accounted for about 70% of the radioactivity recovered in the urine of rhesus monkeys, or more than half of the radioactivity in the administered dose. Nafarelin acetate was also present in small amounts. Several of these metabolites were also present in plasma of the rhesus monkey.

  3. Luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) attenuates morphine-induced inhibition of cyclic AMP (cAMP) in opioid-responsive SK-N-SH cells.

    PubMed

    Ratka, A; Simpkins, J W

    1997-04-01

    SK-N-SH cells were used to assess the effects of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) on opioid receptor-mediated changes in cyclic AMP (cAMP). Prostaglandin E1 (PGE1, 1 microM) caused a dramatic increase in cAMP levels. Treatment with 10 microM morphine (MOR) significantly inhibited the stimulatory effect of PGE1, LHRH (0.8 microM) caused an increase in the basal level of intracellular cAMP and potentiated the stimulatory effect of PGE1 on cAMP accumulation. In cells pretreated with LHRH the inhibitory effect of MOR on cAMP accumulation was significantly attenuated. An LHRH antagonist had no effect on cAMP. The involvement of pertussis toxin (PTX)-sensitive G proteins in the actions of LHRH was studied. PTX increased the stimulatory effect of PGE1 on cAMP and attenuated the inhibitory effect of MOR. However, PTX pretreatment prevented the effects of LHRH on the intracellular actions of PGE1 but exerted an additive effect with LHRH in blocking the MOR-induced decrease in cAMP levels. We conclude that LHRH attenuates the inhibitory, opioid receptor-mediated effect of MOR on intracellular cAMP accumulation in SK-N-SH cells, and that the G protein-independent mechanism may be involved in LHRH-induced attenuation of the inhibitory effect of MOR on neuronal cAMP.

  4. Luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone targeted poly(methyl vinyl ether maleic acid) nanoparticles for doxorubicin delivery to MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Varshosaz, Jaleh; Jahanian-Najafabadi, Ali; Ghazzavi, Jila

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to design a targeted anti-cancer drug delivery system for breast cancer. Therefore, doxorubicin (DOX) loaded poly(methyl vinyl ether maleic acid) nanoparticles (NPs) were prepared by ionic cross-linking method using Zn(2+) ions. To optimise the effect of DOX/polymer ratio, Zn/polymer ratio, and stirrer rate a full factorial design was used and their effects on particle size, zeta potential, loading efficiency (LE, %), and release efficiency in 72 h (RE72, %) were studied. Targeted NPs were prepared by chemical coating of tiptorelin/polyallylamin conjugate on the surface of NPs by using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carboiimid HCl as cross-linking agent. Conjugation efficiency was measured by Bradford assay. Conjugated triptorelin and targeted NPs were studied by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The cytotoxicity of DOX loaded in targeted NPs and non-targeted ones were studied on MCF-7 cells which overexpress luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) receptors and SKOV3 cells as negative LHRH receptors using Thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide assay. The best results obtained from NPs prepared by DOX/polymer ratio of 5%, Zn/polymer ratio of 50%, and stirrer rate of 960 rpm. FTIR spectrum confirmed successful conjugation of triptorelin to NPs. The conjugation efficiency was about 70%. The targeted NPs showed significantly less IC50 for MCF-7 cells compared to free DOX and non-targeted NPs. PMID:27463791

  5. Enhanced Anti-Tumoral Activity of Methotrexate-Human Serum Albumin Conjugated Nanoparticles by Targeting with Luteinizing Hormone-Releasing Hormone (LHRH) Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Taheri, Azade; Dinarvand, Rassoul; Atyabi, Fatemeh; Ahadi, Fatemeh; Nouri, Farank Salman; Ghahremani, Mohammad Hossein; Ostad, Seyed Nasser; Borougeni, Atefeh Taheri; Mansoori, Pooria

    2011-01-01

    Active targeting could increase the efficacy of anticancer drugs. Methotrexate-human serum albumin (MTX-HSA) conjugates, functionalized by luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) as targeting moieties, with the aim of specifically targeting the cancer cells, were prepared. Owing to the high expression of LHRH receptors in many cancer cells as compared to normal cells, LHRH was used as the targeting ligand in this study. LHRH was conjugated to MTX-HSA nanoparticles via a cross-linker. Three types of LHRH targeted nanoparticles with a mean particle size between 120–138 nm were prepared. The cytotoxicity of LHRH targeted and non-targeted nanoparticles were determined on the LHRH positive and negative cell lines. The internalization of the targeted and non-targeted nanoparticles in LHRH receptor positive and negative cells was investigated using flow cytometry analysis and fluorescence microscopy. The cytotoxicity of the LHRH targeted nanoparticles on the LHRH receptor positive cells were significantly more than non-targeted nanoparticles. LHRH targeted nanoparticles were also internalized by LHRH receptor positive cells significantly more than non-targeted nanoparticles. There were no significant differences between the uptake of targeted and non-targeted nanoparticles to the LHRH receptor negative cells. The active targeting procedure using LHRH targeted MTX-HSA nanoparticles could increase the anti-tumoral activity of MTX. PMID:21845098

  6. Acute central stimulation of luteinizing hormone by parenterally administered N-methyl-D,L-aspartic acid in the male rat.

    PubMed

    Schainker, B A; Cicero, T J

    1980-02-24

    N-methyl-D,L-aspartic acid (NMA), a potent neuroexcitatory and neurotoxic glutamic acid analogue, acutely elevated serum luteinizing hormone (LH) in male rats when given subcutaneously in doses below those that cause morphologically detectable hypothalamic neurotoxicity. NMA treatment in doses known to be subtoxic by morphological criteria fails to induce any permanent neuroendocrine dysfunction as assessed by several physiological parameters, including NMA responsiveness after multiple consecutive dosees spaced at 24 h intervals, subsequent basal LH levels and subsequent postcastration LH elevations. Like naloxone, NMA elevates serum LH by reversibly stimulating a central labile pool. Neither has a direct stimulatory effect on the pituitary in vitro. Treatment with either attenuates naloxone-induced LH stimulation 2 h, but not 14 days, later while pituitary responsiveness to LHRH in vivo remains unaltered. Neither NMA nor naloxone is dependent upon testosterone for its LH stimulatory action and both increase serum LH through physiological mechanisms responsive to testosterone inhibition. It is concluded that subtoxic LH stimulating doses of NMA provide a useful tool in discerning neurotransmitter systems involved in central control of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis.

  7. Luteinizing hormone/chorionic gonadotrophin receptor overexpressed in granulosa cells from polycystic ovary syndrome ovaries is functionally active.

    PubMed

    Kanamarlapudi, Venkateswarlu; Gordon, Uma D; López Bernal, Andrés

    2016-06-01

    Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is associated with anovulatory infertility. Luteinizing hormone/chorionic gonadotrophin receptor (LHCGR), which is critical for ovulation, has been suggested to be expressed prematurely in the ovarian follicles of women with PCOS. This study aimed to analyse the expression and activity of LHCGR in ovarian granulosa cells from PCOS patients and the involvement of ARF6 small GTPase in LHCGR internalization. Granulosa cells (GC) isolated from follicular fluid collected during oocyte retrieval from normal women (n = 19) and women with PCOS (n = 17) were used to study differences in LHCGR protein expression and activity between normal and PCOS patients. LHCGR expression is up-regulated in GC from PCOS women. LHCGR in PCOS GC is functionally active, as shown by increased cAMP production upon human gonadotrophin (HCG)-stimulation. Moreover, ARF6 is highly expressed in GC from PCOS patients and HCG-stimulation increases the concentrations of active ARF6. The inhibition of ARF6 activation attenuates HCG-induced LHCGR internalization in both normal and PCOS GC, indicating that there are no alterations in LHCGR internalisation in GC from PCOS. In conclusion, the expression and activation of LHCGR and ARF6 are up-regulated in GC from PCOS women but the mechanism of agonist-induced LHCGR internalization is unaltered. PMID:27061682

  8. Prenatal melatonin exposure affects luteinizing hormone and hypothalamic and striatal neuropeptide Y in the male rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Díaz, E; Debeljuk, L; Arce, A; Esquifino, A; Díaz, B

    2000-10-13

    The present study examines the influence of prenatal melatonin on the hypothalamic and striatal neuropeptide Y (NPY) concentrations as well as on luteinizing hormone (LH) levels. Male rat offspring of control and melatonin treated mother rats were studied at different ages of the sexual development: infantile, prepubertal, pubertal and adult ages. Hypothalamic NPY levels were much higher during the juvenile than throughout the infantile period. After prenatal melatonin treatment significantly higher values since day 15 up to 35, also at 60 days of age were found, as compared with controls. Striatal NPY levels were lower than in hypothalamus. Again, NPY in the striatum from offspring of melatonin treated mother rats showed significantly higher values than the respective controls at most of the ages studied. However, prenatal melatonin exerted an inhibitory influence upon LH secretion pattern, since decreased concentrations up to 25 days of age and delayed peak values at pubertal age were observed. The present study also suggest that the effect of NPY upon LH secretion is related to sexual development, since NPY exerted opposite effect in infantile than in pubertal period and melatonin administration during intrauterine life prevented this effect.

  9. A new variant in signal peptide of the human luteinizing hormone receptor (LHCGR) affects receptor biogenesis causing leydig cell hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Vezzoli, Valeria; Duminuco, Paolo; Vottero, Alessandra; Kleinau, Gunnar; Schülein, Ralf; Minari, Roberta; Bassi, Ivan; Bernasconi, Sergio; Persani, Luca; Bonomi, Marco

    2015-11-01

    The human luteinizing hormone/chorionic gonadotropin receptor (LHCGR) plays a fundamental role in male and female reproduction. In males, loss-of-function mutations in LHCGR have been associated with distinct degrees of impairment in pre- and postnatal testosterone secretion resulting in a variable phenotypic spectrum, classified as Leydig cell hypoplasia (LCH) type 1 (complete LH resistance and disorder of sex differentiation) and type 2 (partial LH resistance with impaired masculinization and fertility). Here, we report the case of an adolescent who came to the pediatric endocrinologist at the age of 12 years old for micropenis and cryptorchidism. Testis biopsy showed profound LCH and absent germinal line elements (Sertoli-only syndrome). The sequence analysis of the LHCGR gene showed the presence of a compound heterozygosity, being one variation, c.1847C>A p.S616Y, already described in association to Hypergonadotropic Hypogonadism, and the other, c.29 C>T p.L10P, a new identified variant in the putative signal peptide (SP) of LHCGR. Functional and structural studies provide first evidence that LHCGR have a functional and cleavable SP required for receptor biogenesis. Moreover, we demonstrate the pathogenic role of the novel p.L10P allelic variant, which has to be considered a loss-of-function mutation significantly contributing, in compound heterozygosity with p.S616Y, to the LCH type 2 observed in our patient.

  10. Direct evidence of estrogen modulation of pituitary sensitivity to luteinizing hormone-releasing factor during the menstrual cycle.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, C F; Yen, S S

    1975-01-01

    To delineate the role of estradiol in the augmented pituitary gonadotropin responsiveness to synthetic luteinizing hormone releasing factor (LRF) seen during high-estrogen phases of the ovulatory cycles (late follicular and midluteal phases), the anti-estrogenic effect of clomiphene citrate (Clomid) on pituitary response to LRF was evaluated during different phases of the ovulatory cycle. Clomid administration (100 mg/day times 5 days) completely negates the augmented gonadotropin responses to LRF (150 mug) during late follicular and midluteal phases observed during the control studies. Thus, a quantitatively and qualitatively similar pituitary sensitivity to LRF during three distinct phases of the menstrual cycle was induced by Clomid treatment that resembles the LRF responsiveness of themale pituitary. The present study demonstrates the pituitary component of the estrogen-induced changes in the sensitivity to LRF. From this and previous data, we conclude that the increases of estradiol secretion associated with the follicular maturation and corpus luteum formation represent a major component of the feedback signal in the modulation of cyclic gonadotropin release occasioned in a large measure by the augmented pituitary sensitivity to LRF. PMID:1088908

  11. Luteinizing hormone, a reproductive regulator that modulates the processing of amyloid-beta precursor protein and amyloid-beta deposition.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Richard L; Verdile, Giuseppe; Liu, Tianbing; Parlow, Albert F; Perry, George; Smith, Mark A; Martins, Ralph N; Atwood, Craig S

    2004-05-01

    Hormonal changes associated with the dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis following menopause/andropause have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Experimental support for this has come from studies demonstrating an increase in amyloid-beta (Abeta) deposition following ovariectomy/castration. Because sex steroids and gonadotropins are both part of the HPG feedback loop, any loss in sex steroids results in a proportionate increase in gonadotropins. To assess whether Abeta generation was due to the loss of serum 17beta-estradiol or to the up-regulation of serum gonadotropins, we treated C57Bl/6J mice with the anti-gonadotropin leuprolide acetate, which suppresses both sex steroids and gonadotropins. Leuprolide acetate treatment resulted in a 3.5-fold (p < 0.0001) and a 1.5-fold (p < 0.024) reduction in total brain Abeta1-42 and Abeta1-40 concentrations, respectively, after 8 weeks of treatment. To further explore the role of gonadotropins in promoting amyloidogenesis, M17 neuroblastoma cells were treated with the gonadotropin luteinizing hormone (LH) at concentrations equivalent to early adulthood (10 mIU/ml) or post-menopause/andropause (30 mIU/ml). LH did not alter amyloid-beta precursor protein (AbetaPP) expression but did alter AbetaPP processing toward the amyloidogenic pathway as evidenced by increased secretion and insolubility of Abeta, decreased alphaAbetaPP secretion, and increased AbetaPP-C99 levels. These results suggest the marked increases in serum LH following menopause/andropause as a physiologically relevant signal that could promote Abeta secretion and deposition in the aging brain. Suppression of the age-related increase in serum gonadotropins using anti-gonadotropin agents may represent a novel therapeutic strategy for AD.

  12. Structure of the human luteinizing hormone-choriogonadotropin receptor gene: unusual promoter and 5' non-coding regions.

    PubMed

    Atger, M; Misrahi, M; Sar, S; Le Flem, L; Dessen, P; Milgrom, E

    1995-06-01

    The complete organization of the human luteinizing hormone-choriogonadotropin (LH/CG) receptor (LH/CGR) gene and the structure of 1591 bp of its 5' flanking region have been determined. This gene spans over 70 kbp and contains 11 exons. The first ten exons and part of the last exon encode the extracellular domain of the receptor while the transmembrane and intracellular domains are encoded by the remaining part of the last exon. The gene encodes a 701 amino acids long preprotein, contrary to a previous report of 699 amino acids. Primer extension experiments and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) mapping allowed definition of the transcription initiation site, which is located 1085 bp upstream from the initiation codon. The 5' non-coding region is thus unusually long. The promoter region which is different from the murine LH/CG receptor promoter, contains two putative TATA boxes at positions -34 and -47 and a CAAT box consensus sequence at position -89. A consensus sequence corresponding to a cAMP responsive element is found at position -697. Seven API consensus sequences are also found in the 5' flanking region of the gene. Southern blot experiments demonstrated an informative biallelic polymorphism within the human LH/CG receptor gene locus using BglII endonuclease. The cloning of the human LH/CGR gene and the determination of the organization and structure of its 5' flanking region allow the study of its hormonal, developmental and tissue-specific regulation. Primers and PCR conditions are described for the direct genomic sequencing of all the exons of the gene. This information should facilitate the study of pathological mutations of the receptor.

  13. Actions of NPY, and its Y1 and Y2 receptors on pulsatile growth hormone secretion during the fed and fasted state.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lili; Tan, Hwee Y; Fogarty, Matthew J; Andrews, Zane B; Veldhuis, Johannes D; Herzog, Herbert; Steyn, Frederik J; Chen, Chen

    2014-12-01

    The hypothalamic NPY system plays an important role in regulating food intake and energy expenditure. Different biological actions of NPY are assigned to NPY receptor subtypes. Recent studies demonstrated a close relationship between food intake and growth hormone (GH) secretion; however, the mechanism through which endogenous NPY modulates GH release remains unknown. Moreover, conclusive evidence demonstrating a role for NPY and Y-receptors in regulating the endogenous pulsatile release of GH does not exist. We used genetically modified mice (germline Npy, Y1, and Y2 receptor knock-out mice) to assess pulsatile GH secretion under both fed and fasting conditions. Deletion of NPY did not impact fed GH release; however, it reversed the fasting-induced suppression of pulsatile GH secretion. The recovery of GH secretion was associated with a reduction in hypothalamic somatotropin release inhibiting factor (Srif; somatostatin) mRNA expression. Moreover, observations revealed a differential role for Y1 and Y2 receptors, wherein the postsynaptic Y1 receptor suppresses GH secretion in fasting. In contrast, the presynaptic Y2 receptor maintains normal GH output under long-term ad libitum-fed conditions. These data demonstrate an integrated neural circuit that modulates GH release relative to food intake, and provide essential information to address the differential roles of Y1 and Y2 receptors in regulating the release of GH under fed and fasting states.

  14. A comparison of human chorionic gonadotropin and luteinizing hormone releasing hormone on the induction of spermiation and amplexus in the American toad (Anaxyrus americanus)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Captive breeding programs for endangered amphibian species often utilize exogenous hormones for species that are difficult to breed. The purpose of our study was to compare the efficacy of two different hormones at various concentrations on sperm production, quantity and quality over time in order to optimize assisted breeding. Methods Male American toads (Anaxyrus americanus) were divided into three separate treatment groups, with animals in each group rotated through different concentrations of luteinizing hormone releasing hormone analog (LHRH; 0.1, 1.0, 4.0 and 32 micrograms/toad), human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG; 50, 100, 200, and 300 IU), or the control over 24 hours. We evaluated the number of males that respond by producing spermic urine, the sperm concentration, percent motility, and quality of forward progression. We also evaluated the effects of hCG and LHRH on reproductive behavior as assessed by amplexus. Data were analyzed using the Generalized Estimating Equations incorporating repeated measures over time and including the main effects of treatment and time, and the treatment by time interaction. Results The hormone hCG was significantly more effective at stimulating spermiation in male Anaxyrus americanus than LHRH and showed a dose-dependent response in the number of animals producing sperm. At the most effective hCG dose (300 IU), 100% of the male toads produced sperm, compared to only 35% for the best LHRH dose tested (4.0 micrograms). In addition to having a greater number of responders (P < 0.05), the 300 IU hCG treatment group had a much higher average sperm concentration (P < 0.05) than the treatment group receiving 4.0 micrograms LHRH. In contrast, these two treatments did not result in significant differences in sperm motility or quality of forward progressive motility. However, more males went into amplexus when treated with LHRH vs. hCG (90% vs. 75%) by nine hours post-administration. Conclusion There is a clear

  15. New insights on the role of luteinizing hormone releasing hormone agonists in premenopausal early breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Del Mastro, Lucia; Rossi, Giovanni; Lambertini, Matteo; Poggio, Francesca; Pronzato, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Luteinising hormone releasing hormone agonists (LH-RHa) are effective in the treatment of advanced endocrine-sensitive breast cancer in premenopausal patients, but their role in the adjuvant setting has remained controversial for a long time. Tamoxifen for 5 years has been traditionally considered the standard endocrine therapy for premenopausal patients and this is still valid for many patients. However, the recently reported SOFT trial has suggested that adding ovarian function suppression (OFS) to tamoxifen could improve DFS in women at sufficient risk to warrant adjuvant chemotherapy and who remained premenopausal after this therapy. The administration of an aromatase inhibitor plus OFS represents an additional therapeutic option for hormone-receptor positive premenopausal breast cancer patients, according to the combined analysis of the SOFT and TEXT trials. Temporary ovarian suppression induced by LH-RHa has been recognized as an effective strategy to preserve ovarian function from the toxic effects of chemotherapy and is now recommended in young breast cancer patients with endocrine-insensitive tumors. In this review, we discuss recent data on the role of LH-RHa in combination with tamoxifen or with an aromatase inhibitor, and we comment on its role as a strategy to preserve ovarian function in young patients candidates for adjuvant or neo-adjuvant chemotherapy.

  16. Inhibition of growth of OV-1063 human epithelial ovarian cancer xenografts in nude mice by treatment with luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone antagonist SB-75.

    PubMed Central

    Yano, T; Pinski, J; Halmos, G; Szepeshazi, K; Groot, K; Schally, A V

    1994-01-01

    Female athymic nude mice bearing xenografts of OV-1063 human epithelial ovarian cancer cell line were treated with potent luteinizing hormone (LH)-releasing hormone (LH-RH) antagonist SB-75 (Cetrorelix; [Ac-D-Nal(2)1, D-Phe(4 CI)2, D-Pal(3)3, D-Cit6, D-Ala10]LH-RH in which Ac-D-Nal(2) = N-acetyl-3-(2-naphthyl)-D-alanine, D-Phe(4CI) = 4-chloro-D-phenylalanine, D-Pal(3) = 3-(3-pyridyl)-D-alanine, and D-Cit = D-Citrulline) or with the agonist [D-Trp6]LH-RH. In the first experiment, SB-75 and [D-Trp6]LH-RH were administered in the form of microcapsules releasing 60 and 25 micrograms/day, respectively. In the second study, the analogs were given by daily s.c. injections in doses of 100 micrograms/day. In both experiments, tumor growth, as measured by reduction in tumor volume, percentage change in tumor volume, tumor burden, and increase in tumor doubling time, was significantly inhibited by treatment with SB-75 but not with [D-Trp6]LH-RH. Uterine and ovarian weights were reduced and serum LH levels decreased by administration of either analog. Chronic treatment with SB-75 greatly reduced the concentration of receptors for epidermal growth factor and insulin-like growth factor I in tumor cell membranes, a phenomenon that might be related to tumor growth inhibition. It is possible that the antitumoral effects of SB-75 on OV-1063 ovarian cancers are exerted not only through the suppression of the pituitary-gonadal axis, but also directly. In view of its strong inhibitory effect on the growth of OV-1063 ovarian cancers in vivo, the potent LH-RH antagonist SB-75 might be considered for possible hormonal therapy of advanced epithelial ovarian carcinoma. PMID:7518926

  17. Effects of female pheromones on gonadotropin-releasing hormone gene expression and luteinizing hormone release in male wild-type and oestrogen receptor-alpha knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Gore, A C; Wersinger, S R; Rissman, E F

    2000-12-01

    Pheromones are an important class of environmental cues that affect the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in a variety of vertebrate species, including humans. When male mice contact female-soiled bedding, or urine, they display a reflexive luteinizing hormone (LH) surge within 30 min. Aside from the requirement that males have gonads to show this response, the physiological mechanisms that underlie this pituitary response are unknown. In this experiment, we asked if female pheromones acted at the level of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) gene expression to affect this hormone response. In addition, we also examined the contribution of one of the oestrogen receptors (ERalpha) by studying this neuroendocrine reflex in wild-type and oestrogen receptor-alpha knockout (ERalphaKO) males. Both ERalphaKO and wild-type males showed the expected LH surge, 45 and 90 min after contact with female pheromones. Males housed in clean bedding or bedding soiled by another adult male did not display the LH elevation. Interestingly, this dramatic change in LH concentrations was not accompanied by any alterations in GnRH mRNA expression or levels of primary transcript in the preoptic area-anterior hypothalamus. The one exception to this was a significant increase in GnRH mRNA expression in tissue collected from wild-type males exposed to bedding from another male. This is particularly intriguing since LH was not elevated in these males. These data replicate and extend our previous finding that ERalphaKO males do exhibit an LH surge in response to female pheromones. Thus, this neuroendocrine response is regulated by a steroid receptor other than ERalpha and does not require alterations in GnRH mRNA expression.

  18. Total Androgen Blockade Versus a Luteinizing Hormone-Releasing Hormone Agonist Alone in Men With High-Risk Prostate Cancer Treated With Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Nanda, Akash; Moran, Brian J.; Braccioforte, Michelle H.; Dosoretz, Daniel; Salenius, Sharon; Katin, Michael; Ross, Rudi; D'Amico, Anthony V.

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To assess whether short-course total androgen blockade vs. a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) agonist alone affects the risk of prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM) in men with localized but high-risk disease treated with radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The study cohort comprised 628 men with T1-T4, N0, M0 prostate cancer with high-risk disease (prostate-specific antigen level >20 ng/mL, Gleason score >=8, or clinical category >=T3) treated with 45 Gy of external beam radiotherapy followed by a brachytherapy boost in addition to receiving a median of 4.3 (interquartile range [IQR], 3.6-6.4) months of hormonal blockade with an LHRH agonist plus an antiandrogen or monotherapy with an LHRH agonist. Fine and Gray's multivariable regression analysis was used to determine whether combination androgen suppression therapy (AST) vs. monotherapy affected the risk of PCSM, adjusting for treatment year, duration of AST, age, and known prognostic factors. Results: After a median follow-up of 4.9 (IQR, 3.5-6.5) years, men receiving combination AST had a lower risk of PCSM than those treated with monotherapy (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR], 0.18; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.04-0.90; p = 0.04). An increasing prostate-specific antigen level (AHR, 2.70; 95% CI, 1.64-4.45; p < 0.001) and clinical category T3/4 disease (AHR, 29.6; 95% CI, 2.88-303.5; p = 0.004) were also associated with an increased risk of PCSM. Conclusions: In men with localized but high-risk prostate cancer treated with external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy, short-course AST with an LHRH agonist plus an antiandrogen is associated with a decreased risk of PCSM when compared with monotherapy with an LHRH agonist.

  19. Physiological role of somatostatin-mediated autofeedback regulation for growth hormone: importance of growth hormone in triggering somatostatin release during a trough period of pulsatile growth hormone release in conscious male rats.

    PubMed

    Sato, M; Chihara, K; Kita, T; Kashio, Y; Okimura, Y; Kitajima, N; Fujita, T

    1989-08-01

    In mammals including human, it is generally accepted that growth hormone (GH) can regulate its own secretion through an autofeedback mechanism in which somatostatin (SRIF) may be involved. To explore a physiological role of SRIF-mediated GH autoregulation, the effect of exogenous human GH administration on plasma rat GH response to [D-Ala2, Nle27]-human GH-releasing hormone-(1-28)-agmatine (hGHRH-analog), which does not crossreact with anti-rat GH-releasing hormone gamma-globulin (GHRH-Ab), was examined in conscious male rats treated with GHRH-Ab in the absence and presence of anti-SRIF gamma-globulin (SRIF-Ab). Enhanced SRIF release during a trough period of natural pulsatile GH secretion, suggested by the blunted GH response to exogenous hGHRH-analog, no longer occurred when major GH secretory bursts were abolished by GHRH-Ab treatment. On the other hand, when hGH was administered in GHRH-Ab-treated rats so as to simulate the quantity and dynamic change of GH in hypophysial portal circulation in rats exhibiting pulsatile GH secretion, hGHRH-analog-induced GH rises were significantly suppressed during the period corresponding to a GH trough. This suppression was completely prevented by simultaneous treatment with SRIF-Ab. Furthermore, administration of bovine GH, but not ovine prolactin, resulted in significant suppression of hGHRH-analog-provoked GH rises. These findings suggest that enhanced SRIF release during a trough period of spontaneous GH secretory rhythm is induced by the preceding GH secretory burst, and also suggest a possible role for SRIF-mediated GH autoregulation in a physiological state.

  20. Combination of a long-acting delivery system for luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist with Novantrone chemotherapy: increased efficacy in the rat prostate cancer model.

    PubMed Central

    Schally, A V; Kook, A I; Monje, E; Redding, T W; Paz-Bouza, J I

    1986-01-01

    The combination of hormonal treatment based on a long-acting delivery system for the agonist [6-D-tryptophan]luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone ([D-Trp6]-LH-RH) with the chemotherapeutic agent Novantrone (mitoxantrone dihydrochloride) was studied in the Dunning R3327H rat prostate cancer model. Microcapsules of [D-Trp6]-LH-RH formulated from poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide) and calculated to release a controlled dose of 25 micrograms/day were injected intramuscularly once a month. Novantrone (0.25 mg/kg) was injected intravenously once every 3 weeks. Three separate experiments were carried out. When the therapy was started 45 days after transplantation and continued for 70 days, tumor volume in the presence of the microcapsules (966 +/- 219 mm3) or Novantrone (3606 +/- 785 mm3) given alone was significantly decreased compared to controls (14,476 +/- 3045 mm3). However, the combination of microcapsules and Novantrone caused a greater inhibition of tumor growth (189 +/- 31 mm3) than the single agents. Similar effects were seen when the percent increase in tumor volume was examined. Tumor volume increased 10,527 +/- 1803% for the control group. The inhibition of growth caused by the [D-Trp6]LH-RH microcapsules alone (672 +/- 153% increase in volume) was again greater than that caused by Novantrone alone (2722 +/- 421% increase). The combination of the two agents was again the most effective, resulting in an increase in tumor volume of only 105 +/- 29%. Control tumors weighed 30.0 +/- 6.5 g. Tumor weights were much less in the groups treated with either microcapsules (3.28 +/- 0.69 g) or Novantrone (19.53 +/- 3.3 g) alone. The lowest tumor weights after 70 days of treatment were obtained in the group that received the combination of [D-Trp6]LH-RH microcapsules and Novantrone (1.02 +/- 0.2 g). Testes and ventral prostate weights were significantly diminished by the administration of microcapsules of [D-Trp6]LH-RH alone or in combination with Novantrone. In both of these

  1. Variation in levels of luteinizing hormone and reproductive photoresponsiveness in a population of white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus).

    PubMed

    Heideman, Paul D; Pittman, Julian T; Schubert, Kristin A; Dubois, Christen M R; Bowles, Jennifer; Lowe, Sean M; Price, Matthew R

    2010-06-01

    Natural genetic variation in reproduction and life history strategies is a manifestation of variation in underlying regulatory neuronal and endocrine systems. A test of the hypothesis that genetic variation in luteinizing hormone (LH) level could be related to a life history trait, seasonal reproduction, was conducted on artificial selection lines from a wild-source population of white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus). Variation exists in the degree of suppression of reproduction by winter short-day photoperiods (SD) in wild-source individuals and in the laboratory population. In this population, most individuals from a photoperiod-responsive (R) artificial selection line are strongly suppressed reproductively in SD, while most individuals from a photoperiod-nonresponsive (NR) artificial selection line are only weakly reproductively suppressed in SD. We assayed levels of LH to test for genetic variation between lines that could contribute to variation in reproductive status in SD. Females from both lines were raised in long-day photoperiods (LD) or SD, ovariectomized under isoflurane anesthesia, and given estradiol implants. Levels of LH were significantly higher in the NR line than in the R line, indicating genetic variation for levels of LH. Levels of LH were higher in LD than in SD, indicating that levels of LH were sensitive to photoperiod treatment even with a controlled level of estradiol negative feedback. The results indicate that there is genetic variation in levels of LH that could be functionally important both in the laboratory in SD and in the wild population in winter. Thus genetic variation in levels of LH is a plausible causal factor determining winter reproductive phenotype in the wild population. PMID:20357020

  2. The naturally occurring luteinizing hormone surge is diminished in mice lacking estrogen receptor Beta in the ovary.

    PubMed

    Jayes, Friederike L; Burns, Katherine A; Rodriguez, Karina F; Kissling, Grace E; Korach, Kenneth S

    2014-02-01

    Female ESR2-null mice (betaERKO) display defects in ovarian function and are subfertile. Follicular maturation is impaired and explains smaller litters, but betaERKO also produce fewer litters, which may be partially due to inadequate ovulatory signals. To test this, the amplitude and timing of the naturally occurring luteinizing hormone (LH) surge was measured in individual intact betaERKO and wild-type (WT) mice. Vaginal cytology was evaluated daily, and blood samples were taken from mice in proestrus. The amplitude of the LH surge was severely blunted in betaERKO mice compared to WT, but pituitary LH levels revealed no differences. The betaERKO mice did not produce a preovulatory estradiol surge. To determine if the smaller LH surges and the reduced number of litters in betaERKO were due to the lack of ESR2 in the hypothalamic-pituitary axis or due to the absence of ESR2 in the ovary, ovaries were transplanted from WT into betaERKO mice and vice versa. The size of the LH surge was reduced only in mice lacking ESR2 within the ovary, and these mice had fewer litters. Fertility and size of the LH surge were rescued in betaERKO mice receiving a WT ovary. These data provide the first experimental evidence that the LH surge is impaired in betaERKO females and may contribute to their reduced fertility. ESR2 is not necessary within the pituitary and hypothalamus for the generation of a normal LH surge and for normal fertility, but ESR2 is essential within the ovary to provide proper signals.

  3. Variation in levels of luteinizing hormone and reproductive photoresponsiveness in a population of white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus).

    PubMed

    Heideman, Paul D; Pittman, Julian T; Schubert, Kristin A; Dubois, Christen M R; Bowles, Jennifer; Lowe, Sean M; Price, Matthew R

    2010-06-01

    Natural genetic variation in reproduction and life history strategies is a manifestation of variation in underlying regulatory neuronal and endocrine systems. A test of the hypothesis that genetic variation in luteinizing hormone (LH) level could be related to a life history trait, seasonal reproduction, was conducted on artificial selection lines from a wild-source population of white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus). Variation exists in the degree of suppression of reproduction by winter short-day photoperiods (SD) in wild-source individuals and in the laboratory population. In this population, most individuals from a photoperiod-responsive (R) artificial selection line are strongly suppressed reproductively in SD, while most individuals from a photoperiod-nonresponsive (NR) artificial selection line are only weakly reproductively suppressed in SD. We assayed levels of LH to test for genetic variation between lines that could contribute to variation in reproductive status in SD. Females from both lines were raised in long-day photoperiods (LD) or SD, ovariectomized under isoflurane anesthesia, and given estradiol implants. Levels of LH were significantly higher in the NR line than in the R line, indicating genetic variation for levels of LH. Levels of LH were higher in LD than in SD, indicating that levels of LH were sensitive to photoperiod treatment even with a controlled level of estradiol negative feedback. The results indicate that there is genetic variation in levels of LH that could be functionally important both in the laboratory in SD and in the wild population in winter. Thus genetic variation in levels of LH is a plausible causal factor determining winter reproductive phenotype in the wild population.

  4. Human chorionic gonadotropin (a luteinizing hormone homologue) decreases spatial memory and increases brain amyloid-β levels in female rats

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Anne S.; Tomidokoro, Yasushi; Ghiso, Jorge; Thornton, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Numerous studies have suggested that estradiol (E) improves spatial memory as female rats with E perform better than those without E. However there is an inverse relationship between E and luteinizing hormone (LH) levels and LH could play a role. We examined whether treatment with the LH homologue human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), would impair spatial memory of adult E-treated female rats. In the Object Location Memory Task, ovariectomized (ovxed) rats treated with E and either a single high dose (400IU/kg) or a lower repeated dose of hCG (75 IU/kg hourly for 8 hours) showed spatial memory disruption compared to ovxed rats treated with estradiol alone. Impairment was attributed to memory disruption as performance improved with shortened delay between task exposure and testing. Tests on another spatial memory task, the Barnes maze, confirmed that hCG (400IU/kg) can impair memory: although E + veh treated animals made significantly fewer hole errors across time, E + hCG treated did not. In humans, high LH levels have been correlated with Alzheimer’s Disease (AD). Because brain amyloid-beta (Aβ) species have been implicated as a toxic factor thought to cause memory loss in AD, we analyzed whether hCG-treated animals had increased Aβ levels. Levels of Aβ from whole brains or hippocampi were assessed by Western Blot. hCG treatment to E-implanted females significantly increased soluble Aβ40 and Aβ42 levels. These results indicate that high levels of LH/hCG can impair spatial memory, and an increase in brain Aβ species may account for the memory impairment in hCG-treated rats. PMID:18413150

  5. Luteinizing Hormone-Induced RUNX1 Regulates the Expression of Genes in Granulosa Cells of Rat Periovulatory Follicles

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Misung; Curry, Thomas E.

    2006-01-01

    The LH surge induces specific transcription factors that regulate the expression of a myriad of genes in periovulatory follicles to bring about ovulation and luteinization. The present study determined 1) the localization of RUNX1, a nuclear transcription factor, 2) regulation of Runx1 mRNA expression, and 3) its potential function in rat ovaries. Up-regulation of mRNA and protein for RUNX1 is detected in preovulatory follicles after human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) injection in gonadotropin-treated immature rats as well as after the LH surge in cycling animals by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemical and Western blot analyses. The regulation of Runx1 mRNA expression was investigated in vitro using granulosa cells from rat pre-ovulatory ovaries. Treatments with hCG, forskolin, or phorbol 12 myristate 13-acetate stimulated Runx1 mRNA expression. The effects of hCG were reduced by inhibitors of protein kinase A, MAPK kinase, or p38 kinase, indicating that Runx1 expression is regulated by the LH-initiated activation of these signaling mediators. In addition, hCG-induced Runx1 mRNA expression was inhibited by a progesterone receptor antagonist and an epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, whereas amphiregulin stimulated Runx1 mRNA expression, demonstrating that the expression is mediated by the activation of the progesterone receptor and epidermal growth factor receptor. Finally, knockdown of Runx1 mRNA by small interfering RNA decreased progesterone secretion and reduced levels of mRNA for Cyp11a1, Hapln1, Mt1a, and Rgc32. The hormonally regulated expression of Runx1 in periovulatory follicles, its involvement in progesterone production, and regulation of preovulatory gene expression suggest important roles of RUNX1 in the periovulatory process. PMID:16675540

  6. A ligand-specific action of chelated copper on hypothalamic neurons: stimulation of the release of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone from median eminence explants.

    PubMed Central

    Barnea, A; Colombani-Vidal, M

    1984-01-01

    We have previously shown that chelated copper stimulates the release of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) from isolated hypothalamic granules. In this study, we wished to ascertain if chelated copper acts on hypothalamic neurons to stimulate LHRH release and, if so, what is the ligand specificity of this interaction. An in vitro system of explants of the median eminence area (MEA) was established and characterized. MEA explants were exposed for 15 min to 50 microM copper, and then they were incubated for 75 min in copper-free medium. Copper led to a transient increase in the rate of LHRH release; the maximal rate was attained 15 min after transfer of the MEA to copper-free medium. In addition, we found that copper complexed to histidine (Cu-His), but not ionic copper, stimulated LHRH release, the magnitude of which was dependent on the dose of Cu-His. The chelator specificity for Cu complex action was such that Cu-His stimulated LHRH release 4.9-fold and Cu-Cys stimulated release 2.5-fold, whereas neither Cu-Thr, Cu-Gly-His-Lys, Cu-bovine serum albumin, nor ceruloplasmin stimulated LHRH release. Based on these results and those of others indicating that the concentration of copper in hypothalamic axonal terminals is 1-2 orders of magnitude greater than plasma, we propose that copper released in the vicinity of the LHRH neurons interacts with specific sites on the LHRH axonal terminals, which leads to release of the peptide. PMID:6390443

  7. The effect of dietary monensin on th luteinizing hormone response of prepuberal heifers given a multiple gonadotropin-releasing hormone challenge.

    PubMed

    Randel, R D; Rhodes, R C

    1980-10-01

    Ten prepuberal Simmental X Brahman-Hereford heifers (average weight 208 +/- 4 kg) were randomly assigned to receive either 2.7 kg/head/day of ground milo containing 0 mg monensin sodium (C) or 2.7 kg/head/day of ground milo containing 200 mg monensin sodium (M). Both groups of animals (n = 5) received Coastal bermudagrass hay ad libitum throughout the trial. On day 21 of the feeding period all heifers were fitted with jugular cannulas. Immediately after cannulation, the heifers were injected IM with 100 microgram of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and blood was collected every 10 min for 4 hours. Four hours after the first GnRH challenge, a second 100-microgram GnRH injection was administered, and blood samples were collected at 10-min intervals for an additional 5 hours. Serum was stored at -20 C until radioimmunoassayed for luteinizing hormone (LH). The amount of LH released after each GnRH injection was greater in the heifers fed M than in the controls (P less than .05). Peak LH after the first GnRH challenge was greater (P less than .05) in heifers fed M than in controls. The area under th first GnRH induced LH curve tended (P less than .20) to be greater for the M group than for the controls. Peak LH concentration was greater in heifers fed M than in control heifers, as the duration (P less than .05) and area under the second GnRH-induced LH curve. In prepuberal heifers, dietary monensin appears to increase hypophyseal capability of releasing LH after a first and second GnRH challenge. PMID:7007307

  8. Effect of alcohol on the proestrous surge of luteinizing hormone (LH) and the activation of LH-releasing hormone (LHRH) neurons in the female rat.

    PubMed

    Ogilvie, K M; Rivier, C

    1997-04-01

    Reproduction is adversely affected by alcohol abuse in humans and laboratory animals. In rats, alcohol exposure suppresses both luteinizing hormone (LH) and sex steroid secretion, although consensus is lacking as to which level of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis is primarily affected. We tested the hypothesis that acute alcohol treatment inhibits the HPG axis by blunting release of LH-releasing hormone (LHRH) in female rats, by examining the effect of this drug on the central reproductive endocrine event; i.e., the proestrous surge of gonadotropins, which triggers ovulation. In a first series of experiments, we injected alcohol at 8 A.M. and 12 P.M. on proestrus and measured plasma levels of LH, estradiol (E2), and progesterone during the afternoons of proestrus and estrus. Alcohol administration blocked the proestrous surge of LH and ovulation. In subsequent experiments, alcohol inhibited the surge of LHRH (measured by push-pull cannulation) and LHRH neuronal activation (measured by Fos labeling in LHRH neurons). Because alcohol also decreased E2 levels, we reasoned that it might have prevented positive feedback; however, alcohol retained its ability to inhibit the LH surge evoked by E2 implantation in ovariectomized females, disproving this hypothesis. Additionally, alcohol does not act via increased corticosteroid secretion, because alcohol also blocked the proestrous surge in adrenalectomized females. Last, exogenous administration of LHRH to alcohol-blocked animals evoked LH secretion and ovulation, indicating that pituitary and/or ovarian function could be restored by mimicking the hypothalamic signal. Collectively, these data indicate that in female rats, alcohol inhibits the gonadotropin surge primarily by decreasing LHRH secretion.

  9. Polymorphisms in luteinizing hormone receptor and hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone genes and their effects on sperm quality traits in Chinese Holstein bulls.

    PubMed

    Sun, Li-Ping; Du, Qing-Zhi; Song, Ya-Pan; Yu, Jun-Na; Wang, Shu-Juan; Sang, Lei; Song, Luo-Wen; Yue, Yao-Min; Lian, Yu-Ze; Zhang, Sheng-Li; Hua, Guo-Hua; Zhang, Shu-Jun; Yang, Li-Guo

    2012-06-01

    Genes of hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis play a key role in male reproductive performance. This study evaluated the polymorphisms of luteinizing hormone receptor (LHR) and hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) genes and their effects on sperm quality traits including semen volume per ejaculate (VOL), sperm density (SD), fresh sperm motility (FSM), thawed sperm motility (TSM), acrosome integrity rate (AIR), and abnormal sperm rate (ASR) collected from 205 Chinese Hostein bulls. The study bulls consisted of 205 mature Chinese Holstein, 27 Simmental, 28 Charolais, and 14 German yellow cattle. One single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) (A883G) in exon 2 of GnRH and two SNPs (A51703G and G51656T) in intron 9 of LHR were identified in 274 bulls. Analysis of variance in 205 Chinese Holstein bulls showed that age had significant effect on both SD and FSM (P < 0.01), and ASR (P < 0.05). With regards to genotype and its interaction with age, only the SNP of G51656T in LHR gene had significant effect on SD (P < 0.05, P < 0.01; respectively). The association result showed that bulls with AG genotype had higher FSM than bulls with AA and GG genotype in LHR at 51,703 locus (P < 0.10), and bulls with GG genotype had higher SD than bulls with TT genotype in LHR at G51656T locus (P < 0.10). Phenotypic correlation among the traits revealed that significant negative correlations were observed between ASR and AIR (r = -0.736, P < 0.01), ASR and AIR (r = -0.500, P < 0.01). There were moderate positive correlations between VOL and SD (r = 0.422, P < 0.01), as well as FSM (r = 0.411, P < 0.01). In conclusion, LHR may be a potential marker for sperm quality of SD and FSM.

  10. Early spring sex differences in luteinizing hormone response to gonadotropin releasing hormone in co-occurring resident and migrant dark-eyed juncos (Junco hyemalis).

    PubMed

    Greives, Timothy J; Fudickar, Adam M; Atwell, Jonathan W; Meddle, Simone L; Ketterson, Ellen D

    2016-09-15

    To optimally time reproduction, animals must coordinate changes in the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. The extent of intra-species variation in seasonal timing of reproductive function is considerable, both within and among populations. Dark-eyed junco (Junco hyemalis) populations are known to differ in their reproductive timing response to cues experienced in the same habitat in late winter/early spring. Specifically in juncos cohabitating on shared wintering grounds, residents initiate breeding and reproductive activity but migrants delay reproductive development and prepare to migrate before breeding. Here, we test the hypothesis that the pituitary gland acts as a 'control point' to modulate differential HPG axis activity across populations. We sampled free-living resident and migrant juncos on their shared over-wintering grounds in March, thus all individuals were experiencing the same environmental cues, including photoperiod. We predicted that during this critical time of transition, residents would more readily respond to repeated gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) stimulation with increases in luteinizing hormone (LH), in contrast to migrants, which should delay full reproductive activity. Our data indicate that migrant females, while still on the overwintering grounds, have a reduced LH response to repeated GnRH injections compared to resident females. Male migrant and resident birds did not differ in their responsiveness to repeated GnRH. Our results suggest a sex difference in the costs of mistimed activation of the HPG axis, with female migrants being less responsive than residents females and males to repeated stimulation. Further, our data implicate a key role for the pituitary in regulating appropriate reproductive timing responses. PMID:27374492

  11. The effect of dietary monensin on th luteinizing hormone response of prepuberal heifers given a multiple gonadotropin-releasing hormone challenge.

    PubMed

    Randel, R D; Rhodes, R C

    1980-10-01

    Ten prepuberal Simmental X Brahman-Hereford heifers (average weight 208 +/- 4 kg) were randomly assigned to receive either 2.7 kg/head/day of ground milo containing 0 mg monensin sodium (C) or 2.7 kg/head/day of ground milo containing 200 mg monensin sodium (M). Both groups of animals (n = 5) received Coastal bermudagrass hay ad libitum throughout the trial. On day 21 of the feeding period all heifers were fitted with jugular cannulas. Immediately after cannulation, the heifers were injected IM with 100 microgram of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and blood was collected every 10 min for 4 hours. Four hours after the first GnRH challenge, a second 100-microgram GnRH injection was administered, and blood samples were collected at 10-min intervals for an additional 5 hours. Serum was stored at -20 C until radioimmunoassayed for luteinizing hormone (LH). The amount of LH released after each GnRH injection was greater in the heifers fed M than in the controls (P less than .05). Peak LH after the first GnRH challenge was greater (P less than .05) in heifers fed M than in controls. The area under th first GnRH induced LH curve tended (P less than .20) to be greater for the M group than for the controls. Peak LH concentration was greater in heifers fed M than in control heifers, as the duration (P less than .05) and area under the second GnRH-induced LH curve. In prepuberal heifers, dietary monensin appears to increase hypophyseal capability of releasing LH after a first and second GnRH challenge.

  12. Five-day pulsatile gonadotropin-releasing hormone administration unveils combined hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal defects underlying profound hypoandrogenism in men with prolonged critical illness.

    PubMed

    van den Berghe, G; Weekers, F; Baxter, R C; Wouters, P; Iranmanesh, A; Bouillon, R; Veldhuis, J D

    2001-07-01

    Central hyposomatotropism and hypothyroidism have been inferred in long-stay intensive care patients. Pronounced hypoandrogenism presumably also contributes to the catabolic state of critical illness. Accordingly, the present study appraises the mechanism(s) of failure of the gonadotropic axis in prolonged critically ill men by assessing the effects of pulsatile GnRH treatment in this unique clinical context. To this end, 15 critically ill men (mean +/- SD age, 67 +/- 12 yr; intensive care unit stay, 25 +/- 9 days) participated, with baseline values compared with those of 50 age- and BMI-matched healthy men. Subjects were randomly allocated to 5 days of placebo or pulsatile iv GnRH administration (0.1 microg/kg every 90 min). LH, GH, and TSH secretion was quantified by deconvolution analysis of serum hormone concentration-time series obtained by sampling every 20 min from 2100-0600 h at baseline and on nights 1 and 5 of treatment. Serum concentrations of gonadal and adrenal steroids, T(4), T(3), insulin-like growth factor I (IGF), and IGF-binding proteins as well as circulating levels of cytokines and selected metabolic markers were measured. During prolonged critical illness, pulsatile LH secretion and mean LH concentrations (1.8 +/- 2.2 vs. 6.0 +/- 2.2 IU/L) were low in the face of extremely low circulating total testosterone (0.27 +/- 0.18 vs. 12.7 +/- 4.07 nmol/L; P < 0.0001) and relatively low estradiol (E(2); 58.3 +/- 51.9 vs. 85.7 +/- 18.6 pmol/L; P = 0.009) and sex hormone-binding globulin (39.1 +/- 11.7 vs. 48.6 +/- 27.8 nmol/L; P = 0.01). The molar ratio of E(2)/T was elevated 37-fold in ill men (P < 0.0001) and correlated negatively with the mean serum LH concentrations (r = -0.82; P = 0.0002). Pulsatile GH and TSH secretion were suppressed (P < or = 0.0004), as were mean serum IGF-I, IGF-binding protein-3, and acid-labile subunit concentrations; thyroid hormone levels; and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate. Morning cortisol was within the normal range

  13. Topography and associations of leu-enkephalin and luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone neuronal systems in the human diencephalon.

    PubMed

    Dudás, Bertalan; Merchenthaler, István

    2003-04-01

    Although several studies indicated that leu-enkephalin controls gonadal function, the morphological substrate of this modulation is unknown. To reveal potential interaction sites between leu-enkephalin and LH-releasing hormone (LHRH) in the hypothalamus, the distribution and connections of leu-enkephalin-immunoreactive (IR) and LHRH-IR systems were examined in the human diencephalon using double-label immunohistochemistry. First the leu-enkephalin-IR and LHRH-IR neural elements were mapped, then the maps of the two different neurotransmitter systems were superimposed unveiling the overlapping areas. The putative juxtapositions between leu-enkephalin-IR and LHRH-IR structures were revealed with double label immunocytochemistry. Close contacts were detected in the medial preoptic area and in the infundibulum/median eminence. In these areas, diaminobenzidine-silver-intensified, black leu-enkephalin-IR fibers abutted fusiform, brown, diaminobenzidine-labeled LHRH neurons often forming multiple contacts. Examination of semithin sections of these close associations with the aid of oil immersion revealed no cleft between the contacting LHRH-IR and leu-enkephalin-IR elements. Our findings indicate that the juxtapositions between LHRH-IR and leu enkephalin-IR neurons may be functional synapses forming the morphological substrate of the leu-enkephalin-modulated LHRH secretion in the human diencephalon. Moreover, the wide distribution of leu-enkephalin-IR elements suggests leu-enkephalin control of other diencephalic functions as well.

  14. N-methyl-D-aspartate treatment increases circulating adrenocorticotropin and luteinizing hormone in the rat.

    PubMed

    Farah, J M; Rao, T S; Mick, S J; Coyne, K E; Iyengar, S

    1991-04-01

    Excitatory amino acids have been known to increase pituitary secretion of LH in vivo and are probably involved in the neuroendocrine regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. We have found that systemic administration of the excitatory amino acid agonist N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) evokes a transient and profound increase in circulating levels of ACTH as well. Treatment of adult male Long-Evans rats with NMDA (30 mg/kg, sc) maximally increased plasma ACTH and immunoreactive beta-endorphin from 7-15 min after injection, and levels of both remained significantly elevated until 60 min into the time course. Corresponding increases in corticosterone were observed 15 and 30 min after treatment, while LH, similar to other pituitary hormones, was increased from 7-30 min after NMDA. Stimulation of the pituitary-adrenal and pituitary-gonadal neuroendocrine axes by NMDA was monitored in subsequent studies by plasma ACTH and LH, respectively; both were increased in a dose-related manner after the administration of 3-60 mg/kg NMDA, although stimulation of ACTH (800%) was more pronounced than that of LH (200%). The increases in ACTH and LH due to NMDA were inhibited by pretreatment with the competitive NMDA antagonist (+/-)3-(2-carboxypiperazin-4- yl)propyl-1-phosphonic acid, CPP (6 and 10 mg/kg, ip, for 21 min); by contrast, dexamethasone pretreatment (50 micrograms/kg, ip, for 4 h) blocked only the NMDA-evoked increase in circulating ACTH. These findings indicate that an NMDA receptor mechanism might be involved in the acute activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in the rat.

  15. Comparison between lactating and non-lactating dairy cows on follicular growth and corpus luteum development, and endocrine patterns of ovarian steroids and luteinizing hormone in the estrous cycles.

    PubMed

    Endo, Natsumi; Nagai, Kiyosuke; Tanaka, Tomomi; Kamomae, Hideo

    2012-10-01

    The dynamics of ovarian follicle, corpus luteum (CL), and peripheral plasma ovarian steroids were compared between lactating and non-lactating cows, and a possible association of pulsatile luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion with the dynamics was examined. Lactating (n=5) and non-lactating (n=5) cows were monitored daily for follicle and CL throughout two consecutive estrous cycles (Day 0: day of ovulation). Blood samples were collected daily and at 15 min intervals for 8h on Days 2, 4, 6, 8, and 14 of the second cycle. Lactating cows had larger CL (25.4 ± 1.8mm vs. 23.5 ± 1.5mm, P<0.01) and greater progesterone concentrations (4.6 ± 1.0ng/ml vs. 3.9 ± 0.9 ng/ml, P<0.01) during mid-luteal phase compared with non-lactating cows. Maximal diameters of the first wave dominant follicle (17.2 ± 1.8mm vs. 15.5 ± 0.8mm) and the ovulatory follicle (17.9 ± 1.2mm vs. 15.2 ± 0.8mm) were greater (P<0.05) in lactating cows than in non-lactating cows during the estrous cycles with two follicular waves, but no significant differences were detected between the groups during the estrous cycles with three follicular waves. Plasma estradiol concentrations did not differ between the groups throughout the experiment. Lactating cows had more LH pulses from Days 2 to 14 than non-lactating cows. These results imply that differences in ovarian dynamics may exist between lactating and non-lactating cows, for which the increased number of LH pulses observed in lactating cows may have responsibility.

  16. Association between genes encoding components of the Leutinizing hormone/Luteinizing hormone-choriogonadotrophin receptor pathway and polycystic ovary syndrome in Egyptian women.

    PubMed

    El-Shal, Amal S; Zidan, Haidy E; Rashad, Nearmeen M; Abdelaziz, Ahmed M; Harira, Mervat M

    2016-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is one of the most common endocrine-metabolic disorders; however, its pathophysiology is still unclear. Certain polymorphisms of luteinizing hormone beta-subunit (LHβ) and LH/choriogonadotrophin receptor (LHCGR) genes may lead to changes in the bioactivity of this hormone. We aimed to investigate possible associations between polymorphisms in the LHβ and LHCGR genes and PCOS among Egyptian women. We also aimed to shed light on the impact of these polymorphisms on LH level, hormonal, and metabolic features of PCOS. A case-control study included unrelated 210 patients with PCOS and 200 healthy controls, and they were stratified according to their body mass index into two subgroups: lean and obese. Polymorphisms of LHβ G1502A and LHCGR [G935A, and ins18LQ] genes were genotyped using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. Our results revealed that LHβ G1052A GA genotype and A allele, LHCGR G935A GA, AA genotypes, or A allele were significantly associated with PCOS risk, while the LHCGR ins18LQ polymorphism was not. Additionally, there is a synergism between LHβ G1052A minor A and minor A allele of LHCGR G935A or minor ins allele of LHCGR ins18LQ and susceptibility to PCOS. When we stratified PCOS women or controls into obese and lean subjects, we found that LHβ G1502A GA genotype and A allele being more frequent in the obese group when compared with lean patients with PCOS [The odds ratio and 95% confidence interval were 5.6 (1.30-24.56) and 5.15 (1.21-21.90), respectively, P = 0.01, for each group.] These results suggested that LHβ G1052A and LHCGR G935A genes polymorphisms are associated with increased risk of PCOS in Egyptian women especially in obese cases. There was a synergism between LHβ G1052A minor A allele and of LHCGR G935A minor A or minor ins alleles of LHCGR ins18LQ and PCOS risk. © 2015 IUBMB Life, 68(1):23-36, 2016. PMID:26662070

  17. Inhibin B, follicle stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, and estradiol and their relationship to the regulation of follicle development in girls during childhood and puberty.

    PubMed

    Chada, M; Průsa, R; Bronský, J; Pechová, M; Kotaska, K; Lisá, L

    2003-01-01

    Inhibin B, produced by granulosa cells in the ovary, is a heterodimeric glycoprotein suppressing synthesis and secretion of the follicle stimulating hormone (FSH). The aim of the present study was to determine hormone profiles of inhibin B, FSH, luteinizing hormone (LH), and estradiol in girls during childhood and puberty and to evaluate whether inhibin B is a marker of follicle development. We examined the correlation between inhibin B and gonadotropins and estradiol during the first two years and across the pubertal development. Using a specific two-side enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), inhibin B levels were measured in the serum of 53 healthy girls divided into 8 groups according to age. In addition, serum FSH, LH, and estradiol were measured by chemiluminescent immunoassay in all serum samples. A rise in serum levels of inhibin B (55.2+/-7.3 ng/l, mean +/- S.E.M.) and FSH (1.78+/-0.26 UI/l), concomitant with a moderate increment of serum LH (0.36+/-0.09 UI/l) and estradiol (45.8+/-12.2 pmol/l) concentrations was observed during the first three months of life and declined to prepubertal concentrations thereafter. A strong positive correlation between inhibin B and FSH (r = 0.48, p<0.05), LH (r = 0.68, p<0.001) and estradiol (r = 0.59, p<0.01) was demonstrated during the first 2 years of life. A rise in serum levels of inhibin B, FSH, LH, and estradiol was found throughout puberty. Inhibin B had a strong positive correlation with FSH (stage I of puberty: r = 0.64, p<0.05; stage II of puberty: r = 0.86, p<0.01), LH (I: r = 0.61, p<0.05; II: r = 0.67, p<0.05), and estradiol (II: r = 0.62, p<0.05) in early puberty. From pubertal stage II, inhibin B lost this relationship to gonadotropins and estradiol. Serum inhibin B and FSH levels increased significantly during pubertal development, with the highest peak found in stage III of puberty (133.5+/-14.3 ng/l), and decreased thereafter. In conclusion, inhibin B is produced in a specific pattern in response to

  18. Combination of long-acting microcapsules of the D-tryptophan-6 analog of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone with chemotherapy: investigation in the rat prostate cancer model.

    PubMed Central

    Schally, A V; Redding, T W

    1985-01-01

    The effect of combining hormonal treatment consisting of long-acting microcapsules of the agonist [D-Trp6]LH-RH (the D-tryptophan-6 analog of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone) with the chemotherapeutic agent cyclophosphamide was investigated in the Dunning R-3327H rat prostate cancer model. Microcapsules of [D-Trp6]LH-RH formulated from poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide) and calculated to release a controlled dose of 25 micrograms/day were injected intramuscularly once a month. Cyclophosphamide (Cytoxan) (5 mg/kg of body weight) was injected intraperitoneally twice a week. When the therapy was started 90 days after tumor transplantation--at the time that the cancers were well developed-and was continued for 2 months, tumor volume was significantly reduced by the microcapsules or Cytoxan given alone. The combination of these two agents similarly inhibited tumor growth but did not show a synergistic effect. In another study, the treatment was started 2 months after transplantation, when the developing tumors measured 60-70 mm3. Throughout the treatment period of 100 days, the microcapsules of [D-Trp6]LH-RH reduced tumor volume more than Cytoxan did, and the combination of the two drugs appeared to completely arrest tumor growth. Tumor weights also were diminished significantly in all experimental groups, the decrease in weight being smaller in the Cytoxan-treated group than in rats that received the microcapsules. The combination of Cytoxan plus the microcapsules was 10-100 times more effective than the single agents in reducing tumor weights. In both experiments, testes and ventral prostate weights were significantly diminished, serum testosterone was suppressed to undetectable levels, and prolactin values were reduced by administration of microcapsules of [D-Trp6]LH-RH alone or in combination with Cytoxan. These results in rats suggest that combined administration of long acting microcapsules of [D-Trp6]LH-RH with a chemotherapeutic agent, started soon after the

  19. Reference Ranges and Association of Age and Lifestyle Characteristics with Testosterone, Sex Hormone Binding Globulin, and Luteinizing Hormone among 1166 Western Chinese Men

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xubo; Wang, Ruifeng; Yu, Na; Shi, Yongjun; Li, Honggang; Xiong, Chengliang; Li, Yan; Zhou, Yuanzhong

    2016-01-01

    Decreased total testosterone (TT) is the recommended metric to identify age-related hypogonadism. However, average TT and the extent to which it varies by age, can vary substantially among different populations. Population-specific reference ranges are needed to understand normal versus abnormal TT levels. Therefore, the goal for this study was to describe androgen concentrations and their correlates among Western Chinese men. We completed a population-based, cross-sectional study including 227 young adults (YA) (20–39 years) and 939 older adults (OA) (40–89 years). We measured TT, sex-hormone binding globulin (SHBG), luteinizing hormone (LH), testosterone secreting index (TSI), and calculated free testosterone (cFT). Reference ranges for this population were determined using average YA concentrations. Multivariable regression models were used to predict hormone concentrations adjusting for age, waist-to-height ratio (WHR), marital status, education, occupation, smoking, alcohol, blood glucose, and blood pressure. Among OA, 3.8% had low TT, 15.2% had low cFT, 26.3% had low TSI, 21.6% had high SHBG, and 6.1% had high LH. Average cFT was significantly lower in OA (0.30 nmol/L; standard deviation (SD): 0.09) versus YA (0.37; SD: 0.11) but TT was not different in OA (16.82 nmol/L; SD: 4.80) versus YA (16.88; SD: 5.29). In adjusted models increasing age was significantly associated with increased SHBG or LH, and decreased cFT or TSI; however, TT was not significantly associated with age (β = 0.02 nmol/L; 95% confidence interval (CI): -0.01, 0.04). Higher WHR was associated with significantly decreased TT, SHBG, TSI, and LH. The only variable significantly related to cFT was age (β = -0.0033; 95% CI:-0.0037, -0.0028); suggesting that cFT measurements would not be confounded by other lifestyle factors. In conclusion, cFT, but not TT, varies with age in this population, suggesting cFT may be a better potential marker for age-related androgen deficiency than TT among

  20. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor activation in lactotropes and gonadotropes interferes with estradiol-dependent and -independent preprolactin, glycoprotein alpha and luteinizing hormone beta gene expression.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jinyan; Patisaul, Heather B; Petersen, Sandra L

    2011-02-20

    Arylhydrocarbon receptor (Ahr) activation by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlordibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) interferes with female reproductive functions, but there is little information on the specific targets of TCDD in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. In these studies, we found that TCDD upregulated known AhR target genes, cytochrome p450 1a1 (Cyp1a1), Cyp1a2 and Cyp1b1 in the rat pituitary gland. Moreover, 75% of pituitary lactotropes and 45% of gonadotropes contained Ahr mRNA, and most Ahr-containing cells were estrogen receptor 1 (Esr1)-positive. TCDD abrogated estradiol (E(2))-induced prolactin (Prl) expression in vivo and in vitro; conversely, E(2) blocked TCDD upregulation of luteinizing hormone beta (Lhb) and glycoprotein hormone alpha polypeptide (Cga) expression. TCDD had no effect on levels of Ahr mRNA, but upregulated Esr1 mRNA. E(2) independently repressed Ahr and Esr1 expression and blocked TCDD upregulation of Esr1. Thus, complex interactions between Ahr and Esr alter Prl and luteinizing hormone (LH) synthesis by direct actions in lactotropes and gonadotropes. These findings provide important insights into how TCDD disrupts female reproductive functions.

  1. Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Activation in Lactotropes and Gonadotropes Interferes with Estradiol-Dependent and -Independent Preprolactin, Glycoprotein Alpha and Luteinizing Hormone Beta Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Cao, JinYan; Patisaul, Heather B.; Petersen, Sandra L.

    2011-01-01

    Arylhydrocarbon receptor (Ahr) activation by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlordibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) interferes with female reproductive functions, but there is little information on the specific targets of TCDD in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. In these studies, we found that TCDD upregulated known AhR target genes, cytochrome p450 1a1 (Cyp1a1), Cyp1a2 and Cyp1b1 in the rat pituitary gland. Moreover, 75% of pituitary lactotropes and 45% of gonadotropes contained Ahr mRNA, and most Ahr-containing cells were estrogen receptor 1 (Esr1)-positive. TCDD abrogated estradiol (E2)-induced prolactin (Prl) expression in vivo and in vitro; conversely, E2 blocked TCDD upregulation of luteinizing hormone beta (Lhb) and glycoprotein hormone alpha polypeptide (Cga) expression. TCDD had no effect on levels of Ahr mRNA, but upregulated Esr1 mRNA. E2 independently repressed Ahr and Esr1 expression and blocked TCDD upregulation of Esr1. Thus, complex interactions between Ahr and Esr alter Prl and luteinizing hormone (LH) synthesis by direct actions in lactotropes and gonadotropes. These findings provide important insights into how TCDD disrupts female reproductive functions. PMID:21187122

  2. Short-term fasting affects luteinizing hormone secretory dynamics but not reproductive function in normal-weight sedentary women.

    PubMed

    Olson, B R; Cartledge, T; Sebring, N; Defensor, R; Nieman, L

    1995-04-01

    Acute food withdrawal reversibly inhibits the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in men and in rhesus monkeys, and it produces defects in LH pulsatility in normal-weight women. However, the clinical effect of short-term nutritional deprivation on the reproductive axis of normally cycling women has not been evaluated. Thus we studied the effect of a 3-day fast during the midfollicular phase on menstrual cycle length, gonadotropin secretory patterns, follicular development, and ovulation. After a baseline ovulatory cycle, 12 women within 15% of ideal body weight were randomized to be fed (n = 7) or fasted (n = 10) on cycle days 7 to 9. Five of the women repeated the study and received the alternate diet. Endocrine and metabolic parameters of fasting and reproductive physiology were measured on cycle days 6 to 12. Fasted physiology was demonstrated by characteristic alterations in growth hormone, insulin-like growth factor I, TSH, and T3 levels. During fed cycles, the number of LH pulses remained constant on cycle days 6, 9 and 11, whereas mean LH levels, LH area under the curve, and LH pulse amplitude increased significantly over this time (all P < 0.05). In contrast, fasted cycles were marked by a significant decrease in the number of LH pulses on the last day of the fast (cycle day 9, P < 0.05) and by a lack of increase over time of mean LH values, LH area under the curve, and LH pulse amplitude. Follicle development, as assessed by daily ultrasound examination and estradiol measurements, was similar in all cycles and was followed by ovulation in all women; follicular and luteal phase lengths of fasted and fed cycles were similar. We conclude that the alterations in LH secretory dynamics that occur during a 3-day fast are not sufficient to perturb follicle development and cycle lengths in normal-weight sedentary women. The resilience of the reproductive axis in these healthy women contrasts with the sensitivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis to acute

  3. Lead (Pb) alters the norepinephrine-induced secretion of luteinizing hormone releasing hormone from the median eminence of adult male rats in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Bratton, G.R.; Hiney, J.K.; Dees, W.L. )

    1994-01-01

    In the present study, the authors evaluated the in vitro effects of lead (Pb) on basal and stimulated luteinizing hormone releasing hormone (LHRH) and Prostaglandin E[sub 2] (PGE[sub 2]) secretion. Median eminences (ME) were removed from brains of adult male rats and preincubated for 15 minutes in Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate glucose buffer in an atmosphere of 95% O[sub 2]-5% CO[sub 2]. These media were discarded and all MEs were subjected to one of the following experiments. In Experiment 1, all MEs were incubated for 30 minutes in medium only. These media were collected and replaced with medium only (controls) or with medium containing Pb doses ranging from 5 to 20 [mu]M. After this 60-minute incubation, media were collected, then replaced with new medium containing 60 [mu]M norepinephrine (NE), or NE plus each dose of Pb, then incubated for a final 30-minute period. Experiment 2 was conducted as above, except PGE[sub 2] (2.8 [mu]M) replaced the NE. In both experiments, the amounts of LHRH released was measured by RIA. In experiment 3, NE was again used for the challenge; however, this time, the amount of PGE[sub 2] released was measured by RIA. Results indicate that Pb did not alter basal LHRH release, but compared with controls, significantly blocked NE-induced LHRH release in a dose-related manner. Conversely, Pb had no effect on the PGE[sub 2]-induced release of LHRH. Additionally, Pb did not alter basal PGE[sub 2] release; however, it significantly blocked the NE-induced release of PGE[sub 2]. Since NE-induced LHRH release is mediated by PGE[sub 2], these results support the hypothesis that Pb is capable of altering the hypothalamus and suggest that this effect is due, at least in part, to the diminished PGE[sub 2] synthesis/release within the ME, resulting in diminished LHRH secretion.

  4. LH (Luteinizing Hormone) Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... LH and FSH may be ordered when a boy or girl does not appear to be entering puberty at ... pubic hair Growth of testicles and penis in boys Beginning of menstruation in girls ^ Back to top What does the test result ...

  5. Non-steroidal antiandrogen monotherapy compared with luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonists or surgical castration monotherapy for advanced prostate cancer: a Cochrane systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kunath, Frank; Grobe, Henrik R; Rücker, Gerta; Motschall, Edith; Antes, Gerd; Dahm, Philipp; Wullich, Bernd; Meerpohl, Joerg J

    2015-07-01

    To assess the effects of non-steroidal antiandrogen monotherapy compared with luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonists or surgical castration monotherapy for treating advanced hormone-sensitive stages of prostate cancer. We searched the Cochrane Prostatic Diseases and Urologic Cancers Group Specialized Register (PROSTATE), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science with Conference Proceedings, three trial registries and abstracts from three major conferences to 23 December 2013, together with reference lists, and contacted selected experts in the field and manufacturers. We included randomized controlled trials comparing non-steroidal antiandrogen monotherapy with medical or surgical castration monotherapy for men in advanced hormone-sensitive stages of prostate cancer. Two review authors independently examined full-text reports, identified relevant studies, assessed the eligibility of studies for inclusion, extracted data and assessed risk of bias as well as quality of evidence according to the GRADE working group guidelines. We used Review Manager 5.2 for data synthesis and the fixed-effect model as primary analysis (when heterogeneity was low with I(2) < 50%); we used a random-effects model when confronted with substantial or considerable heterogeneity (when I(2) ≥50%). A total of 11 studies involving 3060 randomly assigned participants were included in the present review. Use of non-steroidal antiandrogens resulted in lower overall survival times (hazard ratio [HR] 1.24, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.05-1.48, six studies, 2712 participants) and greater clinical progression (1 year: risk ratio [RR] 1.25, 95% CI 1.08-1.45, five studies, 2067 participants; 70 weeks: RR 1.26, 95% CI 1.08-1.45, six studies, 2373 participants; 2 years: RR 1.14, 95% CI 1.04-1.25, three studies, 1336 participants), as well as treatment failure (1 year: RR 1.19, 95% CI 1.02-1.38, four studies, 1539 participants; 70 weeks: RR 1

  6. Effects of STX, a novel estrogen membrane receptor agonist, on GnRH-induced luteinizing hormone secretion from cultured bovine anterior pituitary cells.

    PubMed

    Rudolf, Faidiban Oktofianus; Kadokawa, Hiroya

    2014-12-01

    STX is an agonist for a recently characterized membrane estrogen receptor whose structure has not been identified. We evaluated whether STX suppresses gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-induced luteinizing hormone (LH) release from bovine anterior pituitary (AP) cells. We cultured AP cells (n=12) for 3 days in steroid-free conditions, followed by increasing concentrations (0.001, 0.01, 0.1, 1 and 10 nM) of 17β-estradiol or STX for 5 min before GnRH stimulation until the end of the experiment. Estradiol (0.001 to 0.1 nM) significantly suppressed GnRH-stimulated LH secretion, whereas STX did not affect GnRH-stimulated LH secretion at any of the tested concentrations. In conclusion, STX, unlike estradiol, possesses no suppressive effect on GnRH-induced LH release from bovine AP cells.

  7. Testosterone selectively increases serum follicle-stimulating hormonal (FSH) but not luteinizing hormone (LH) in gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist-treated male rats: evidence for differential regulation of LH and FSH secretion.

    PubMed

    Bhasin, S; Fielder, T J; Swerdloff, R S

    1987-08-01

    Both testosterone (T) and gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-antagonist (GnRH-A) when given alone lower serum luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) in intact and castrated rats. However, when graded doses of testosterone enanthate (T.E.) were given to GnRH-A-treated intact male rats, a paradoxical dose-dependent increase in serum FSH occurred; whereas serum LH remained suppressed. This surprising finding led us to ask whether the paradoxical increase in serum FSH in GnRH-A-suppressed animals was a direct stimulatory effect of T on the hypothalamic-pituitary axis or the result of a T effect on a testicular regulator of FSH. To test these hypotheses, we treated adult male castrated rats with GnRH-A and graded doses of T.E. In both intact and castrated rats, serum LH remained undetectable in GnRH-A-treated rats with or without T.E. However, addition of T.E. to GnRH-A led to a dose-dependent increase in serum FSH in castrated animals as well, thus pointing against mediation by a selective testicular regulator of FSH. These data provide evidence that pituitary LH and FSH responses may be differentially regulated under certain conditions. When the action of GnRH is blocked (such as in GnRH-A-treated animals), T directly and selectively increases pituitary FSH secretion.

  8. Calcitonin gene-related peptide-induced suppression of luteinizing hormone pulses in the rat: the role of endogenous opioid peptides

    PubMed Central

    Bowe, JE; Li, XF; Kinsey-Jones, JS; Paterson, S; Brain, SD; Lightman, SL; O'Byrne, KT

    2005-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is involved in a variety of stress responses in the rat. Central administration of CGRP activates the hypothalamo–pituitary–adrenal axis resulting in increased corticosterone secretion. We have previously shown that central CGRP suppresses the gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) pulse generator, specifically LH pulses. Endogenous opioid peptides (EOPs) have been shown to play an important role in stress-induced suppression of the reproductive axis. The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that EOPs mediate CGRP-induced suppression of pulsatile LH secretion. Ovariectomized rats were implanted with intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) and i.v. cannulae. Intravenous administration of the opioid antagonist naloxone (250 μg) completely blocked the suppression of LH pulses induced by 1.5 μg i.c.v. CGRP and significantly attenuated the suppression of pulsatile LH secretion induced by 5 μg i.c.v. CGRP. Furthermore, intravenous administration of naloxone was found to immediately restore normal LH pulse frequency in animals treated 90 min earlier with 1.5 μg i.c.v. CGRP. Co-administration (i.c.v.) of CGRP (1.5 μg) with the μ and κ opioid receptor-specific antagonists naloxone (10 μg) and norbinaltorphimine (5 μg), respectively, blocked the CGRP-induced suppression of LH pulses, whilst i.c.v. co-administration of CGRP (1.5 μg) with the δ opioid receptor-specific antagonist naltrindole (5 μg) did not. These data provide evidence that EOPs play a pivotal role in mediating the inhibitory effects of CGRP on pulsatile LH secretion in the rat. They also suggest that the μ and κ, but not the δ, opioid receptors may be responsible for mediating the effects of CGRP on LH pulses. PMID:15905218

  9. Clinical Effect of Switching from a Luteinizing Hormone-Releasing Hormone Agonist to an Antagonist in Patients with Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer and Serum Testosterone Level ≥ 20 ng/dl

    PubMed Central

    Soga, Norihito; Kageyama, Takumi; Ogura, Yuji; Yamada, Tomomi; Hayashi, Norio

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The efficacy of conversion from a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist to an antagonist was evaluated prospectively in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer. Materials and Methods From October 2012 to December 2014, 8 cases with a serum testosterone level ≥ 20 ng/dl during following androgen deprivation therapy were enrolled and received degarelix monthly. The primary end-pointgoal was to determine the effective prostate-specific antigen response rate. The secondary end-pointgoal was to assess the proportion of cases with a decrease in serum testosterone level to < 20 ng/ml. Results One patient achieved a complete response, with a prostate-specific antigen level of 0.02 ng/ml at the nadirend of the study. The effective response rate was 25.0% (2/8), and the proportion of cases with prostate-specific antigen decline was 62.5% (5/8). In 5/8 cases (5/8, 62.5%), serum testosterone levels declined to < 20 ng/dl. Conclusion Switching to a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone antagonist in patients with testosterone levels ≥ 20 ng/dl may be an option in sequential androgen deprivation therapy for some patients. PMID:26989369

  10. Circadian rhythm disruption by a novel running wheel: roles of exercise and arousal in blockade of the luteinizing hormone surge.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Marilyn J; Franklin, Kathleen M; Peng, Xiaoli; Yun, Christopher; Legan, Sandra J

    2014-05-28

    Exposure of proestrous Syrian hamsters to a new room, cage, and novel running wheel blocks the luteinizing hormone (LH) surge until the next day in ~75% of hamsters [1]. The studies described here tested the hypotheses that 1) exercise and/or 2) orexinergic neurotransmission mediate novel wheel blockade of the LH surge and circadian phase advances. Female hamsters were exposed to a 14L:10D photoperiod and activity rhythms were monitored with infra-red detectors. In Expt. 1, to test the effect of exercise, hamsters received jugular cannulae and on the next day, proestrus (Day 1), shortly before zeitgeber time 5 (ZT 5, 7h before lights-off) the hamsters were transported to the laboratory. After obtaining a blood sample at ZT 5, the hamsters were transferred to a new cage with a novel wheel that was either freely rotating (unlocked), or locked until ZT 9, and exposed to constant darkness (DD). Blood samples were collected hourly for 2days from ZT 5-11 under red light for determination of plasma LH levels by radioimmunoassay. Running rhythms were monitored continuously for the next 10-14days. The locked wheels were as effective as unlocked wheels in blocking LH surges (no Day 1 LH surge in 6/9 versus 8/8 hamsters, P>0.05) and phase advances in the activity rhythms did not differ between the groups (P=0.28), suggesting that intense exercise is not essential for novel wheel blockade and phase advance of the proestrous LH surge. Expt. 2 tested whether orexin neurotransmission is essential for these effects. Hamsters were treated the same as those in Expt. 1 except that they were injected (i.p.) at ZT 4.5 and 5 with either the orexin 1 receptor antagonist SB334867 (15mg/kg per injection) or vehicle (25% DMSO in 2-hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin (HCD)). SB-334867 inhibited novel wheel blockade of the LH surge (surges blocked in 2/6 SB334867-injected animals versus 16/18 vehicle-injected animals, P<0.02) and also inhibited wheel running and circadian phase shifts, indicating

  11. The Luteinizing Hormone-Testosterone Pathway Regulates Mouse Spermatogonial Stem Cell Self-Renewal by Suppressing WNT5A Expression in Sertoli Cells.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Takashi; Kanatsu-Shinohara, Mito; Lei, Zhenmin; Rao, C V; Shinohara, Takashi

    2016-08-01

    Spermatogenesis originates from self-renewal of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs). Previous studies have reported conflicting roles of gonadotropic pituitary hormones in SSC self-renewal. Here, we explored the role of hormonal regulation of SSCs using Fshb and Lhcgr knockout (KO) mice. Although follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) is thought to promote self-renewal by glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), no abnormalities were found in SSCs and their microenvironment. In contrast, SSCs were enriched in Lhcgr-deficient mice. Moreover, wild-type SSCs transplanted into Lhcgr-deficient mice showed enhanced self-renewal. Microarray analysis revealed that Lhcgr-deficient testes have enhanced WNT5A expression in Sertoli cells, which showed an immature phenotype. Since WNT5A was upregulated by anti-androgen treatment, testosterone produced by luteinizing hormone (LH) is required for Sertoli cell maturation. WNT5A promoted SSC activity both in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, FSH is not responsible for GDNF regulation, while LH negatively regulates SSC self-renewal by suppressing WNT5A via testosterone. PMID:27509137

  12. Effects of ghrelin on Kisspeptin mRNA expression in the hypothalamic medial preoptic area and pulsatile luteinising hormone secretion in the female rat.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Sarah; Li, Xiao Feng; Kinsey-Jones, James; O'Byrne, Kevin

    2009-08-28

    The orexigenic gut peptide ghrelin negatively modulates the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. Hyperghrelinaemia results during negative energy balance, a state often associated with delayed puberty and disrupted fertility, whilst exogenous ghrelin suppresses pulsatile luteinising hormone (LH) secretion. The recent identification of kisspeptin (Kiss1) and its G protein-coupled receptor (GPR)54 (Kiss1r) as an essential component of the HPG axis controlling gonadotrophin secretion raises the possibility that kisspeptin-Kiss1r signalling may play a critical role in the transduction of ghrelin-induced suppression of LH. Ovariectomised oestrogen-replaced rats were implanted with intravenous catheters and blood samples collected for detection of LH pulses prior to and after intravenous administration of ghrelin (3nM/250 microl) or saline (250 microl) during ad libitum feeding or after overnight fasting. Quantitative RT-PCR was used to determine Kiss1 and Kiss1r mRNA levels in brain punches of the key hypothalamic sites regulating gonadotrophin secretion, the medial preoptic area (mPOA) and arcuate nucleus (ARC), collected 6h following administration of ghrelin. Ghrelin significantly lowered LH pulse frequency in fed rats, an effect significantly enhanced by food deprivation. Fasting, ghrelin or their combination down-regulated Kiss1, without affecting Kiss1r, expression in the mPOA, and affected the expression of neither in the ARC. Considering the pivotal role for kisspeptin signalling in the activation of the HPG axis, the ability of ghrelin to down-regulate Kiss1 expression in mPOA may be a contributing factor in ghrelin-related suppression of pulsatile LH secretion.

  13. Effects of long-term growth hormone-releasing factor administration on plasma growth hormone, luteinizing hormone and progesterone profiles in growing female buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Mondal, M; Prakash, B S

    2004-10-01

    To investigate the effects of long-term growth hormone-releasing factor (GRF) administration on plasma growth hormone (GH), LH and progesterone and body weight gain in growing buffalo calves, 12 female Murrah buffaloes within the age group of 6-8 months of age were divided into two groups (treatment and control groups) of six each in such a way so that average body weights between the groups did not differ (p > 0.05). Control buffaloes were not given any hormonal treatment and treatment group buffaloes were treated with synthetic bovine GRF [bGRF (1-44)-NH(2)] at the rate of 10 microg/100 kg body weight intravenously at an interval of 15 days from week 6 (5-week pre-treatment period) till 18 injections were completed (week 6-42 treatment period) and thereafter, effect of exogenous GRF were observed for 10-week post-treatment period. Jugular blood samples were drawn twice a week at 3-4-day intervals for plasma GH, LH and progesterone quantification. Body weight of all animals was recorded twice a week. During pre-treatment period, mean plasma GH, LH and progesterone did not differ (p > 0.05) between the groups. But during treatment as well as post-treatment period, mean plasma GH levels were found to be significantly (p < 0.01) higher in treatment than control group of buffaloes. Administration of GRF for longer term sustained a higher level of plasma GH even after cessation of treatment. GRF-treated buffaloes attained higher (p < 0.01) body weight than the controls. Repeated GRF administration for long-term significantly (p < 0.01) increased plasma LH and progesterone. In conclusion, repeated long-term exogenous GRF administration induces and even enhances GH release without any sign of refractoriness. GRF may, therefore, be used to induce daily GH release without loss of responsiveness over an extended period of time in young growing female buffaloes and it may assist these animals to grow faster. PMID:15367266

  14. MAPK3/1 is conducive to luteinizing hormone-mediated C-type natriuretic peptide decrease in bovine granulosa cells

    PubMed Central

    YANG, Lei; WEI, Qiang; GE, Junbang; ZHAO, Xiaoe; MA, Baohua

    2015-01-01

    C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) plays a role as an oocyte maturation inhibitor (OMI) in many species, including the bovine. However, the effects of luteinizing hormone (LH) on CNP expression and its potential mechanisms have not reported in the bovine. In the present study, we aimed to study the effects of LH on CNP expression and to illuminate the potential molecular mechanism in this process. Our results showed that LH induced epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) phosphorylation, mitogen-activated protein kinase3/1 (MAPK3/1) activation and CNP mRNA decrease in cultured bovine granulosa cells. Further study revealed that LH suppressed CNP expression via the MAPK3/1 signaling pathway, which was activated by the EGFR pathway. In conclusion, our research suggested that MAPK3/1 is involved in LH-mediated decrease of CNP and that this process is related to the EGFR and MAPK3/1 signal pathways. PMID:26655567

  15. The postweaning rise of tonic luteinizing hormone secretion in anestrous cows is not prevented by chronic milking or the physical presence of the calf.

    PubMed

    Williams, G L; Koziorowski, M; Osborn, R G; Kirsch, J D; Slanger, W D

    1987-06-01

    The objective of the following study was to examine the ability of frequent milking, the physical presence of the calf, and their combination to prevent a postweaning rise in tonic luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion, estrus, and ovulation. Thirty Hereford cows were allowed to suckle their calves ad libitum until 17-21 days post partum and confirmed as anestrus. They were then assigned alternately by order of calving to 1 of 5 treatment groups: (1) Suckled (S) ad libitum; (2) Nonsuckled (NS)--calf removed for 102 h; (3) Nonsuckled--calf present (NSC)--calf remained with cow, but muzzled to prevent suckling for 102 h; (4) Nonsuckled--milked 8 times a day (NSM)--calf removed for 102 h and cow hand-milked for 10 min every 2 h from 0700 to 2100 h; (5) Nonsuckled--calf present--milked 8 times a day (NSMC)--combination of 3 and 4. Luteinizing hormone secretion patterns, estrous activity, and ovulation were monitored throughout the experiment. Prior to treatment (Day 0), mean pulse frequency (pulses/6 h), mean concentrations (ng/ml), and median concentrations (ng/ml) of LH did not differ (p greater than 0.45) between groups, and were 0.7 +/- 0.15, 2.8 +/- 0.14, and 2.6 +/- 0.11, respectively. Marked rises (p less than 0.01--p less than 0.03) in LH pulse frequency were observed in all groups except S between 48 and 54 h after onset of treatment. Mean and median concentrations of LH were lower (p less than 0.02) in S cows than in all other groups at 48-54 h.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. The role of sexual steroid hormones in the direct stimulation by Kisspeptin-10 of the secretion of luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone and prolactin from bovine anterior pituitary cells.

    PubMed

    Ezzat, A Ahmed; Saito, H; Sawada, T; Yaegashi, T; Goto, Y; Nakajima, Y; Jin, J; Yamashita, T; Sawai, K; Hashizume, T

    2010-09-01

    The aims of the present study were to clarify the effect of Kisspeptin-10 (Kp10) on the secretion of luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and prolactin (PRL) from bovine anterior pituitary (AP) cells and evaluate the ability of sex steroids to enhance the sensitivity of gonadotropic and lactotropic cells to Kp10. AP cells prepared from 7-week-old male calves were incubated for 12h with estradiol (E(2); 10(-8)M), progesterone (P(4); 10(-8)M), testosterone (T; 10(-8)M), or vehicle only (control), and then for 2h with Kp10 (10(-6)M). The amounts of LH, FSH and PRL released into the culture medium after the 2-h incubation period were examined. Kp10 significantly stimulated the secretion of LH from the AP cells treated with E(2) and T (P<0.05), but not from the P(4)-treated cells. In contrast, Kp10 had no effect on the secretion of FSH regardless of the steroid treatment. Kp10 significantly stimulated the secretion of PRL (P<0.05), the sexual steroid hormones having no effect. The LH- or FSH-releasing response to gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH; 10(-8)M) and PRL-releasing response to thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH; 10(-8)M) were significantly greater than those to Kp10 (P<0.05). The present results suggest that E(2) and T, but not P(4), enhance the sensitivity of gonadotropic cells to the secretion of LH in response to Kp10. However, Kp10 had no stimulatory effect on the secretion of FSH regardless of the effect of sex steroids. Kp10 directly stimulates the secretion of PRL from the pituitary cells, and sex steroids do not enhance the sensitivity of lactotropic cells to Kp10. Furthermore, the LH- and FSH-releasing effect and the PRL-releasing effect of Kp10 are less potent than that of GnRH and TRH, respectively.

  17. Significance of the carbohydrate moiety of the rat ovarian luteinizing-hormone/chorionic-gonadotropin receptor for ligand-binding specificity and signal transduction.

    PubMed Central

    Petäjä-Repo, U E; Merz, W E; Rajaniemi, H J

    1993-01-01

    The contribution of the carbohydrate moiety of the rat ovarian luteinizing-hormone (LH)/chorionic-gonadotropin (CG) receptor to ligand-binding specificity and signal transduction was investigated by using glycosidases. Purified membranes from pseudo-pregnant rat ovaries were treated with neuraminidase or peptide N-glycosidase F, to remove terminal sialic acids and N-linked oligosaccharides of the receptor, respectively. Ligand blotting and densitometric scanning of the autoradiograms showed that 90-95% of the receptors were deglycosylated, and that desialylation was virtually complete. Neither the desialylated nor the deglycosylated receptors were able to bind human follicle-stimulating hormone or bovine thyroid-stimulating hormone, as revealed by competition binding experiments. The 50% effective dose of hCG for adenylate cyclase activation, as determined by measuring the formation of cyclic [32P]AMP from [alpha-32P]ATP for 15 min at 30 degrees C, was similar in the control and deglycosylated membranes: 10.2 +/- 3.3 nM and 12.2 +/- 3.8 nM respectively. The same was true for the time course of the basal, hCG- and forskolin-stimulated enzyme activity. In addition, removal of oligosaccharides from the receptor did not restore the ability of desialylated hCG, nor of the deglycosylated hormone, to stimulate adenylate cyclase. In conclusion, the carbohydrate moiety of the native membrane-inserted rat ovarian LH/CG receptor does not contribute to the ligand-binding specificity, and it is not required for the functional coupling of the occupied receptor and the adenylate cyclase system. These functions are associated with the polypeptide portion of the receptor. Images Figure 1 PMID:8318013

  18. Episodic hormone secretion: a comparison of the basis of pulsatile secretion of insulin and GnRH

    PubMed Central

    Satin, Leslie S.

    2015-01-01

    Rhythms govern many endocrine functions. Examples of such rhythmic systems include the insulin-secreting pancreatic beta-cell, which regulates blood glucose, and the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neuron, which governs reproductive function. Although serving very different functions within the body, these cell types share many important features. Both GnRH neurons and beta-cells, for instance, are hypothesized to generate at least two rhythms endogenously: (1) a burst firing electrical rhythm and (2) a slower rhythm involving metabolic or other intracellular processes. This review discusses the importance of hormone rhythms to both physiology and disease and compares and contrasts the rhythms generated by each system. PMID:24610206

  19. Evaluation of the effects of testosterone and luteinizing hormone on regulation of β-amyloid in male 3xTg-AD mice.

    PubMed

    Rosario, Emily R; Carroll, Jenna C; Pike, Christian J

    2012-07-23

    During normal aging, men experience a significant decline in testosterone levels and a compensatory elevation in levels of gonadotropin luteinizing hormone (LH). Both low testosterone and elevated LH have been identified as significant risk factors for the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD) in men. It is unclear whether changes in testosterone or LH primarily underlie the relationship with AD, and therefore may be a more suitable therapeutic target. To examine this issue, we compared levels of β-amyloid (Aβ) immunoreactivity in male 3xTg-AD mice under varying experimental conditions associated with relatively low or high levels of testosterone and/or LH. In gonadally intact mice, Aβ accumulation increased after treatment with the gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist leuprolide, which inhibits the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis and reduces both testosterone and LH levels. In gonadectomized (GDX) mice with low testosterone and high LH, we also observed increased Aβ levels. Treatment of GDX mice with testosterone significantly reduced Aβ levels. In contrast, leuprolide did not significantly decrease Aβ levels and moreover, inhibited the Aβ-lowering effect of testosterone. Evaluation of hippocampal-dependent behavior revealed parallel findings, with performance in GDX mice improved by testosterone but not leuprolide. These data suggest that Aβ-lowering actions of testosterone are mediated directly by androgen pathways rather than indirectly via regulation of LH and the HPG axis. These findings support the clinical evaluation of androgen therapy in the prevention and perhaps treatment of AD in hypogonadal men.

  20. Estradiol regulation of luteinizing hormone secretion in heifers of two breed types that reach puberty at different ages.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, H D; Kinder, J E; Fitzpatrick, L A

    2002-03-01

    The working hypothesis was that 17 beta-estradiol (E(2)) negative feedback on the hypothalamic-pituitary axis in regulation of LH secretion decreases during peripuberty in heifers of 2 different genotypes. We investigated whether Bos indicus heifers had a period postpuberty, as compared with prepuberty, of greater E(2) inhibition of LH secretion at a time when heifers of this genotype have been reported to have a period of anestrus. Prepubertal heifers 9 mo of age of 2 genotypes (B. indicus and B. taurus) were assigned to 3 groups (6 animals/group) to either remain intact (control), be ovariectomized, or be ovariectomized and implanted with E(2). Variables evaluated from 10 to 28 mo of age were circulating concentrations of progesterone (P(4)), presence of corpora lutea, and pulsatile pattern of LH release. Results confirmed that B. taurus heifers attained puberty at younger ages (P < 0.001) and at lower live weights (P = 0.015) than did B. indicus heifers (507 +/- 37 days of age vs. 678 +/- 7 days of age; 259 +/- 14 kg vs. 312 +/- 11 kg; respectively). There was cessation of E(2) inhibition of LH pulses coincident with the onset of puberty in heifers of both breed types but at a much younger age in B. taurus heifers. There was no evidence of enhanced negative feedback of E(2) on LH secretion subsequent to puberty in B. indicus heifers nor was there cessation of estrous cycles in control heifers of either breed type after puberty.

  1. The Inhibitory Effects of RFamide-Related Peptide 3 on Luteinizing Hormone Release Involves an Estradiol-Dependent Manner in Prepubertal but Not in Adult Female Mice.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Wei; Zhang, Baoyun; Lv, Fenglin; Ma, Yunxia; Chen, Hang; Chen, Long; Yang, Fang; Wang, Pingqing; Chu, Mingxing

    2015-08-01

    The mammalian gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) ortholog, RFamide-related peptide (RFRP), is considered to act on gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons and the pituitary to inhibit gonadotropin synthesis and release. However, there is little evidence documenting whether RFamide-related peptide 3 (RFRP-3) plays a primary role in inhibition of the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis prior to the onset of puberty. The present study aimed to understand the functional significance of the neuropeptide on pubertal development. The developmental changes in reproductive-related gene expression at the mRNA level were investigated in the hypothalamus of female mice. The results indicated that RFRP-3 may be an endogenous inhibitory factor for the activation of the HPG axis prior to the onset of puberty. In addition, centrally administered RFRP-3 significantly suppressed plasma luteinizing hormone (LH) levels in prepubertal female mice. Surprisingly, centrally administered RFRP-3 had no effects on plasma LH levels in ovariectomized (OVX) prepubescent female mice. In contrast, RFRP-3 also inhibited plasma LH levels in OVX prepubescent female mice that were treated with 17beta-estradiol replacement. Our study also examined the effects of RFRP-3 on plasma LH release in adult female mice that were ovariectomized at dioestrus, with or without estradiol (E2). Our results showed that the inhibitory effects of RFRP-3 were independent of E2 status. Quantitative real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry analyses showed that RFRP-3 inhibited GnRH expression at both the mRNA and protein levels in the hypothalamus. These data demonstrated that RFRP-3 could effectively suppress pituitary LH release, via the inhibition of GnRH transcription and translation in prepubescent female mice, which is associated with estrogen signaling pathway and developmental stages.

  2. Prazosin blocks the glutamatergic effects of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid on lordosis behavior and luteinizing hormone secretion in the estrogen-primed female rat.

    PubMed

    Landa, A I; Cabrera, R J; Gargiulo, P A

    2006-03-01

    We have observed that intracerebroventricular (icv) injection of selective N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA)-type glutamatergic receptor antagonists inhibits lordosis in ovariectomized (OVX), estrogen-primed rats receiving progesterone or luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH). When NMDA was injected into OVX estrogen-primed rats, it induced a significant increase in lordosis. The interaction between LHRH and glutamate was previously explored by us and another groups. The noradrenergic systems have a functional role in the regulation of LHRH release. The purpose of the present study was to explore the interaction between glutamatergic and noradrenergic transmission. The action of prazosin, an alpha1- and alpha2b-noradrenergic antagonist, was studied here by injecting it icv (1.75 and 3.5 microg/6 microL) prior to NMDA administration (1 microg/2 microL) in OVX estrogen-primed Sprague-Dawley rats (240-270 g). Rats manually restrained were injected over a period of 2 min, and tested 1.5 h later. The enhancing effect induced by NMDA on the lordosis/mount ratio at high doses (67.06 +/- 3.28, N = 28) when compared to saline controls (6 and 2 microL, 16.59 +/- 3.20, N = 27) was abolished by prazosin administration (17.04 +/- 5.52, N = 17, and 9.33 +/- 3.21, N = 20, P < 0.001 for both doses). Plasma LH levels decreased significantly only with the higher dose of prazosin (1.99 +/- 0.24 ng/mL, N = 18, compared to saline-NMDA effect, 5.96 +/- 2.01 ng/mL, N = 13, P < 0.05). Behavioral effects seem to be more sensitive to the alpha-blockade than hormonal effects. These findings strongly suggest that the facilitatory effects of NMDA on both lordosis and LH secretion in this model are mediated by alpha-noradrenergic transmission.

  3. The CRH-R₁ receptor mediates luteinizing hormone, prolactin, corticosterone and progesterone secretion induced by restraint stress in estrogen-primed rats.

    PubMed

    Traslaviña, Guillermo A Ariza; Franci, Celso Rodrigues

    2011-11-01

    Acute stress has been shown to modify hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis activity. Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), the principal regulator of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, has been implicated as a mediator of stress-induced effects on the reproductive axis. The role of the specific CRH receptor subtypes in this response is not completely understood. In the current study, we investigated the role of the CRH-R(1) receptor on luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), prolactin (PRL), progesterone (P) and corticosterone (CT) secretion in stress-induced responses under the influence of estrogen (E(2)). Estrogen-primed ovariectomized rats (estradiol cypionate, 10 μg sc) received an i.v. administration of antalarmin (0.1 or 1mg/kg), a selective CRH-R(1) antagonist, or vehicle before restraint stress for 40 min. Seven blood samples were collected from two experimental groups (one from 10:00 h to 14:00 h and the other from 10:00 h to 18:00 h). An increase of plasma LH induced by restraint acute-stress was followed by alteration of the secretion pattern in the estrogen-induced afternoon surge. In a similar manner, we observed a suppression of the afternoon surge in plasma FSH, a delay of E(2)-induced PRL secretion, and an increase in plasma P and CT. Antalarmin attenuated stress-induce LH increase, decreased CT and P secretion and blocked the stress effects on PRL secretion. These findings suggest that CRH-R(1) mediates, at least in part, the restraint stress effects on the HPA, PRL, and reproductive axes.

  4. The NK3 Receptor Antagonist ESN364 Interrupts Pulsatile LH Secretion and Moderates Levels of Ovarian Hormones Throughout the Menstrual Cycle.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Graeme L; Hoveyda, Hamid R; Clarke, Iain J; Ramaswamy, Suresh; Plant, Tony M; Rose, Claudia; Millar, Robert P

    2015-11-01

    Women's health disorders such as uterine fibroids and endometriosis are currently treated by GnRH modulators that effectively suppress the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. The neurokinin-3 receptor (NK3R) is an alternative target with an important role in the modulation of this axis. In this report, we demonstrate that systemic administration of an NK3R antagonist (ESN364) prolongs the LH interpulse interval in ovarectomized ewes and significantly lowers plasma LH and FSH concentrations in castrated nonhuman primates (Macaca fascicularis). Moreover, daily oral dosing of ESN364 throughout the menstrual cycle in M fascicularis lowered plasma estradiol levels in a dose-dependent manner, although nadir levels of estradiol were maintained well above menopausal levels. Nevertheless, estradiol levels during the follicular phase were sufficiently inhibited at all doses to preclude the triggering of ovulation as evidenced by the absence of the LH surge and failure of a subsequent luteal phase rise in plasma progesterone concentrations, consistent with the absence of normal cycle changes in the uterus. Apart from the point at surge, FSH levels were not altered over the course of the menstrual cycle. These effects of ESN364 were reversible upon cessation of drug treatment. Together these data support the proposed role of neurokinin B-NK3R signaling in the control of pulsatile GnRH secretion. Furthermore, in contrast to GnRH antagonists, NK3R antagonists induce a partial suppression of estradiol and thereby offer a viable therapeutic approach to the treatment of ovarian sex hormone disorders with a mitigated risk of menopausal-like adverse events in response to long-term drug exposure.

  5. The NK3 Receptor Antagonist ESN364 Interrupts Pulsatile LH Secretion and Moderates Levels of Ovarian Hormones Throughout the Menstrual Cycle.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Graeme L; Hoveyda, Hamid R; Clarke, Iain J; Ramaswamy, Suresh; Plant, Tony M; Rose, Claudia; Millar, Robert P

    2015-11-01

    Women's health disorders such as uterine fibroids and endometriosis are currently treated by GnRH modulators that effectively suppress the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. The neurokinin-3 receptor (NK3R) is an alternative target with an important role in the modulation of this axis. In this report, we demonstrate that systemic administration of an NK3R antagonist (ESN364) prolongs the LH interpulse interval in ovarectomized ewes and significantly lowers plasma LH and FSH concentrations in castrated nonhuman primates (Macaca fascicularis). Moreover, daily oral dosing of ESN364 throughout the menstrual cycle in M fascicularis lowered plasma estradiol levels in a dose-dependent manner, although nadir levels of estradiol were maintained well above menopausal levels. Nevertheless, estradiol levels during the follicular phase were sufficiently inhibited at all doses to preclude the triggering of ovulation as evidenced by the absence of the LH surge and failure of a subsequent luteal phase rise in plasma progesterone concentrations, consistent with the absence of normal cycle changes in the uterus. Apart from the point at surge, FSH levels were not altered over the course of the menstrual cycle. These effects of ESN364 were reversible upon cessation of drug treatment. Together these data support the proposed role of neurokinin B-NK3R signaling in the control of pulsatile GnRH secretion. Furthermore, in contrast to GnRH antagonists, NK3R antagonists induce a partial suppression of estradiol and thereby offer a viable therapeutic approach to the treatment of ovarian sex hormone disorders with a mitigated risk of menopausal-like adverse events in response to long-term drug exposure. PMID:26305889

  6. Advanced seasonal reproductive development in a male urban bird is reflected in earlier plasma luteinizing hormone rise but not energetic status.

    PubMed

    Davies, Scott; Behbahaninia, Hirbod; Giraudeau, Mathieu; Meddle, Simone L; Waites, Kyle; Deviche, Pierre

    2015-12-01

    Urban animals inhabit an environment considerably different than do their non-urban conspecifics, and to persist urban animals must adjust to these novel environments. The timing of seasonal reproductive development (i.e., growth of gonads and secondary sex organs) is a fundamental determinant of the breeding period and is frequently advanced in urban bird populations. However, the underlying mechanism(s) by which birds adjust the timing of reproductive development to urban areas remain(s) largely unknown. Here, we compared the timing of vernal reproductive development in free-ranging urban and non-urban male Abert's Towhees, Melozone aberti, in Phoenix, Arizona, USA, and tested the non-mutually exclusive hypotheses that earlier reproductive development is due to improved energetic status and/or earlier increase in endocrine activity of the reproductive system. We found that urban birds initiated testicular development earlier than non-urban birds, but this disparity was not associated with differences in body condition, fat stores, or innate immune performance. These results provide no support for the hypothesis that energetic constraints are responsible for delayed reproductive development of non-urban relative to urban male Abert's Towhees. Urban birds did, however, increase their plasma luteinizing hormone, but not plasma testosterone, earlier than non-urban birds. These findings suggest that adjustment to urban areas by Abert's Towhees involves increases in the endocrine activity of the anterior pituitary gland and/or hypothalamus earlier than non-urban towhees.

  7. /sup 125/I-luteinizing hormone (LH) binding to soluble receptors from the primate (Macaca mulatta) corpus luteum: effects of ethanol exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Danforth, D.R.; Stouffer, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    In the current study, we compared the effects of ethanol on gonadotropin receptors solubilized from macaque luteal membranes to those on receptors associated with the lipid bilayer. Treatment with 1% Triton X-100 for 30 min at 4C, followed by precipitation with polyethylene glycol, resulted in recovery of 50% more binding sites for /sup 125/I-human luteinizing hormone (hLH) than were available in particulate preparations. However, the soluble receptors displayed a 3-fold lower affinity for /sup 125/I-hLH. Conditions which enhanced LH binding to particulates, i.e., 1-8% ethanol at 25C, decreased specific /sup 125/I-hLH binding to soluble receptors. Steady-state LH binding to soluble receptors during incubation at 4C was half of that observed at 25C. The presence of 8% ethanol at 4C restored LH binding to levels observed in the absence of ethanol at 25C. Thus, LH binding sites in the primate corpus luteum can be effectively solubilized with Triton X-100. The different binding characteristics of particulate and soluble receptors, including the response to ethanol exposure, suggest that the lipid environment in the luteal membrane modulates the availability and affinity of gonadotropin receptors.

  8. Plasma luteinizing hormone and progesterone concentrations in goats with estrous cycles of normal or short duration after prostaglandin F2 alpha administration during diestrus or pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Bretzlaff, K N; Weston, P G; Hixon, J E; Ott, R S

    1988-06-01

    Plasma luteinizing hormone (LH) and progesterone concentrations were compared in does experiencing short-duration estrous cycles and in does with estrous cycles of normal duration. The short-duration estrous cycles were observed immediately after induction of abortion in pregnant does by use of prostaglandin (PG) F2 alpha. Intramuscular administration of 5 mg of PGF2 alpha was accomplished in 8 does that were 52 to 63 days into gestation and in 9 cycling does at 7 to 10 days after estrus. In both groups, the mean plasma concentration of progesterone decreased from a luteal phase concentration immediately before to less than 1 ng/ml by 24 hours after PGF2 alpha administration. Of the 8 does that aborted, 6 experienced short-duration estrous cycles, and 4 of these 6 had an LH surge during the time of blood sample collection. The mean time from PGF2 alpha administration to the LH surge was significantly (P less than 0.05) longer in does with short-duration estrous cycles (71 hours) than that in does with estrous cycles of normal duration (58 hours). The mean area under the LH concentration curve was significantly (P less than 0.005) less for does with short-duration estrous cycles. Short-duration estrous cycles were associated with delayed preovulatory LH surges of reduced magnitude. PMID:3165252

  9. A randomized prospective study to assess the effect of the use of home urinary luteinizing hormone detection on the efficiency of donor insemination.

    PubMed

    Robinson, J N; Lockwood, G M; Dalton, J D; Franklin, P A; Farr, M M; Barlow, D H

    1992-01-01

    A study was carried out to establish whether the use of home urinary luteinizing hormone (LH) detection to predict ovulation could decrease the number of clinic visits required for the management of a donor insemination (DI) cycle, and thus optimize use of clinic resources without adversely affecting pregnancy rates. This was a randomized prospective study carried out at a donor insemination clinic in Oxford, England. Fifty-six patients participated in the trial; 27 used home urinary ovulation detection for a total of 111 cycles and 29 had a total of 123 DI cycles managed by routine clinical methods. There was a significant reduction in the number of visits per cycle (P less than 0.001) if home kits for detection of ovulation were used. There was no significant difference in the monthly fecundity or cumulative conception rates. We conclude that the use of home urinary LH detection in donor insemination can reduce patient attendance at the clinic and optimize the use of medical resources without adversely affecting pregnancy rates.

  10. Luteinizing Hormone Reduces the Activity of the NPR2 Guanylyl Cyclase in Mouse Ovarian Follicles, Contributing to the Cyclic GMP Decrease that Promotes Resumption of Meiosis in Oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Jerid W.; Zhang, Meijia; Shuhaibar, Leia C.; Norris, Rachael P.; Geerts, Andreas; Wunder, Frank; Eppig, John J.; Potter, Lincoln R.; Jaffe, Laurinda A.

    2012-01-01

    In preovulatory ovarian follicles of mice, meiotic prophase arrest in the oocyte is maintained by cyclic GMP from the surrounding granulosa cells that diffuses into the oocyte through gap junctions. The cGMP is synthesized in the granulosa cells by the transmembrane guanylyl cyclase natriuretic peptide receptor 2 (NPR2) in response to the agonist C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP). In response to luteinizing hormone (LH), cGMP in the granulosa cells decreases, and as a consequence, oocyte cGMP decreases and meiosis resumes. Here we report that within 20 minutes, LH treatment results in decreased guanylyl cyclase activity of NPR2, as determined in the presence of a maximally activating concentration of CNP. This occurs by a process that does not reduce the amount of NPR2 protein. We also show that by a slower process, first detected at 2 hours, LH decreases the amount of CNP available to bind to the receptor. Both of these LH actions contribute to decreasing cGMP in the follicle, thus signaling meiotic resumption in the oocyte. PMID:22546688

  11. The expression of the urinary forms of human luteinizing hormone beta fragment in various populations as assessed by a specific immunoradiometric assay.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, J F; Kovalevskaya, G; Birken, S; Schlatterer, J P; Schechter, D; McMahon, D J; Canfield, R E

    1998-04-01

    Human gonadotrophins undergo metabolic transformations which result in the presence of several smaller, structurally and immunologically related forms of gonadotrophins in the urine. For luteinizing hormone (LH), a beta core fragment (LHbeta cf) has been isolated from the pituitary and characterized. The corresponding urinary fragment is inferred from mass spectral and immunochemical analysis of chromatographically separated urinary forms. Physicochemical characteristics, primarily mass spectral and chromatographic, indicate that the pituitary and urinary forms of LHbeta cf have a different structure, probably in the carbohydrate moieties. This communication characterizes the expression of LHbeta cf in the urine of both reproductive and post-reproductive age women and in men, employing assays highly specific for the pituitary form of the fragment. It was found that LHbeta cf is the predominant LH associated molecular form in the urine during peri-ovulatory period, peaking 1-3 days later than intact LH and reaching a concentration of approximately 600 fmol/mg creatinine, 7-fold higher than either LH or LH free beta subunit. Corresponding concentrations of human chorionic gonadotrophin (HCG) beta cf were <1% that of LHbeta cf. LHbeta cf cross-reaction with some LH or LHbeta monoclonal antibodies may well interfere with the accurate estimation of the day of the LH surge when urinary tests are utilized. PMID:9619532

  12. Editing of the Luteinizing Hormone Gene to Sterilize Channel Catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, Using a Modified Zinc Finger Nuclease Technology with Electroporation.

    PubMed

    Qin, Zhenkui; Li, Yun; Su, Baofeng; Cheng, Qi; Ye, Zhi; Perera, Dayan A; Fobes, Michael; Shang, Mei; Dunham, Rex A

    2016-04-01

    Channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) is the most important freshwater aquaculture species in the USA. Genetically enhanced fish that are sterile could both profit the catfish industry and reduce potential environmental and ecological risks. As the first step to generate sterile channel catfish, three sets of zinc finger nuclease (ZFN) plasmids targeting the luteinizing hormone (LH) gene were designed and electroporated into one-cell embryos, different concentrations were introduced, and the Cel-I assay was conducted to detect mutations. Channel catfish carrying the mutated LH gene were sterile, as confirmed by DNA sequencing and mating experiments. The overall mutation rate was 19.7 % for 66 channel catfish, and the best treatment was ZFN set 1 at the concentration 25 μg/ml. To our knowledge, this is the first instance of gene editing of fish via plasmid introduction instead of mRNA microinjection. The introduction of the ZFN plasmids may have reduced mosaicism, as mutated individuals were gene edited in every tissue evaluated. Apparently, the plasmids were eventually degraded without integration, as they were not detectable in mutated individuals using PCR. Carp pituitary extract failed to induce spawning and restoration of fertility, indicating the need for developing other hormone therapies to achieve reversal of sterility upon demand. This is the first sterilization achieved using ZFN technology in an aquaculture species and the first successful gene editing of channel catfish. Our results will help understand the roles of the LH gene, purposeful sterilization of teleost fishes, and is a step towards control of domestic, hybrid, exotic, invasive, and transgenic fishes. PMID:26846523

  13. Female pheromones stimulate release of luteinizing hormone and testosterone without altering GnRH mRNA in adult male Syrian hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus).

    PubMed

    Richardson, Heather N; Nelson, Aaron L A; Ahmed, Eman I; Parfitt, David B; Romeo, Russell D; Sisk, Cheryl L

    2004-09-15

    In many species chemosensory stimuli function as important signals that influence reproductive status. Neurons synthesizing the peptide gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) are critical mediators of reproductive function via their regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis, and they are thought to be responsive to chemosensory information. In the present study, we sought to elucidate the effects of female chemosensory stimuli on the HPG axis in sexually naive adult male Syrian hamsters. In Experiment 1, serial blood samples were collected from catheterized male hamsters following exposure to female pheromones in order to characterize the luteinizing hormone (LH) response to this chemosensory stimulus. In Experiment 2, brains and terminal blood samples were collected from animals 0, 60, and 120 min following pheromone exposure. GnRH mRNA was measured in brain tissue sections using in situ hybridization, and plasma concentrations of LH and testosterone were measured using radioimmunoassay. Data from Experiment 1 indicated that female pheromones elicited a rapid rise in plasma LH that peaked at 15 min and returned to baseline 45 min after exposure. In Experiment 2, testosterone was elevated in terminal blood samples obtained 60 min, but not 120 min, after exposure to pheromones. LH levels were unaffected at both of these time points. The chemosensory-induced increases in LH and testosterone release were not accompanied by subsequent changes in GnRH mRNA over the time course studied. These data suggest that while activation of the male HPG axis by female pheromones involves release of GnRH, it does not involve increases in GnRH mRNA 1-2 h after pheromonal stimulation as a mechanism for replenishment of released peptide.

  14. Expression of receptors for luteinizing hormone, gastric-inhibitory polypeptide, and vasopressin in normal adrenal glands and cortisol-secreting adrenocortical tumors in dogs.

    PubMed

    Galac, S; Kars, V J; Klarenbeek, S; Teerds, K J; Mol, J A; Kooistra, H S

    2010-07-01

    Hypercortisolism caused by an adrenocortical tumor (AT) results from adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-independent hypersecretion of glucocorticoids. Studies in humans demonstrate that steroidogenesis in ATs may be stimulated by ectopic or overexpressed eutopic G protein-coupled receptors. We report on a screening of 23 surgically removed, cortisol-secreting ATs for the expression of receptors for luteinizing hormone (LH), gastric-inhibitory polypeptide (GIP), and vasopressin (V(1a), V(1b), and V(2)). Normal adrenal glands served as control tissues. Abundance of mRNA for these receptors was quantified using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR), and the presence and localization of these receptors were determined by immunohistochemistry. In both normal adrenal glands and ATs, mRNA encoding for all receptors was present, although the expression abundance of the V(1b) receptor was very low. The mRNA expression abundance for GIP and V(2) receptors in ATs were significantly lower (0.03 and 0.01, respectively) than in normal adrenal glands. The zona fasciculata of normal adrenal glands stained immunonegative for the GIP receptor. In contrast, islands of GIP receptor-immunopositive cells were detected in about half of the ATs. The zona fasciculata of both normal adrenal glands and AT tissue were immunopositive for LH receptor; in ATs in a homogenous or heterogenous pattern. In normal adrenal glands, no immunolabeling for V(1b)R and V(2) receptor was present, but in ATs, V(2) receptor-immunopositive cells were detected. In conclusion, QPCR analysis did not reveal overexpression of LH, GIP, V(1a), V(1b), or V(2) receptors in the ATs. However, the ectopic expression of GIP and V(2) receptor proteins in tumorous zona fasciculata tissue may play a role in the pathogenesis of canine cortisol-secreting ATs.

  15. Plasma levels of follicle-stimulating and luteinizing hormones during the reproductive cycle of wild and cultured Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis).

    PubMed

    Chauvigné, François; Fatsini, Elvira; Duncan, Neil; Ollé, Judith; Zanuy, Silvia; Gómez, Ana; Cerdà, Joan

    2016-01-01

    The intensive culture of the Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis) is hampered by the low or null fertilization rates exhibited by the first generation (F1) of reared males. To investigate the regulation of the reproductive processes in this species by the pituitary gonadotropins follicle-stimulating and luteinizing hormones (Fsh and Lh, respectively), we developed a highly sensitive and specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for Lh measurements. Quantification of the Fsh and Lh plasma levels in cultured sole using the Lh ELISA developed here, and a previously developed ELISA for Fsh, indicated that in both males and females circulating Fsh steadily increased during autumn and winter and prior to the major spawning in spring, whereas an Lh surge occurred specifically during spawning. The increase in Fsh was associated with a rise of plasma levels of the steroid hormones testosterone (T), 11-ketotestosterone (11-KT) and estradiol-17β (E2), but that of Lh was concomitant with a strong decline of the levels of E2 in females and of 11-KT in males, possibly reflecting a rapid steroidogenic shift promoting the final maturation of gametes. Comparison of the plasma levels of gonadotropins and steroids between wild and F1 fish during autumn and spring revealed that F1 males showed significantly lower plasma Lh titres compared to wild males, whereas the levels of T and 11-KT were similar or more elevated in the F1 fish. These data suggest that an impaired Lh secretion during spawning, and perhaps altered Lh-mediated mechanisms in the testis, may be underlying causes for the low reproductive performance of Senegalese sole F1 males. PMID:26419696

  16. A missense mutation in the second transmembrane segment of the luteinizing hormone receptor causes familial male-limited precocious puberty

    SciTech Connect

    Kraaij, R.; Post, M.; Grootegoed, J.A.

    1995-10-01

    Patients with familial male-limited precocious puberty present with early onset of puberty. Several missense mutations in the LH receptor gene that cause amino acid substitutions in the sixth transmembrane segment of the receptor protein have been shown to be a cause of the disorder. We have identified a novel LH receptor gene mutation in a patient with familial male-limited precocious puberty that results in a threonine for methionine substitution at position 398 in the second transmembrane segment of the receptor protein. In vitro expression in human embryonic kidney 293 cells of this LH receptor mutant and two previously described LH receptor mutants showed that cAMP production in the absence of hormone was elevated up to 25-fold compared to the basal level of the wild-type receptor. The ED{sub 50} values of hormone-induced cAMP production was relatively low for mutant receptors. We also produced receptors containing amino acid substitutions in both the second and sixth transmembrane segments. For these double mutants, basal receptor activities were similar to the basal activities observed in single mutants, whereas hormone-induced receptor activation was almost completely abolished. 31 refs., 2 figs.

  17. In vitro effect of. Delta. sup 9 -tetrahydrocannabinol to stimulate somatostatin release and block that of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone by suppression of the release of prostaglandin E sub 2

    SciTech Connect

    Rettori, V.; Aguila, M.C.; McCann, S.M. ); Gimeno, M.F.; Franchi, A.M. )

    1990-12-01

    Previous in vivo studies have shown that {Delta}{sup 9}-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the principal active ingredient in marijuana, can suppress both luteinizing hormone (LH) and growth hormone (GH) secretion after its injection into the third ventricle of conscious male rats. The present studies were deigned to determine the mechanism of these effects. Various doses of THC were incubated with either stalk median eminence fragments (MEs) or mediobasal hypothalamic (MBH) fragments in vitro. Although THC (10 nM) did not alter basal release of LH-releasing hormone (LHRH) from MEs in vitro, it completely blocked the stimulatory action of dopamine or nonrepinephrine on LHRH release. The effective doses to block LHRH release were associated with a blockade of synthesis and release of prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}) from MBH in vitro. In contrast to the suppressive effect of THC on LHRH release, somatostatin release from MEs was enhanced in a dose-related manner with a minimal effective dose of 1 nM. Since PGE{sub 2} suppresses somatostatin release, this enhancement may also be related to the suppressive effect of THC on PGE{sub 2} synthesis and release. The authors speculate that these actions are mediated by the recently discovered THC receptors in the tissue. The results indicate that the suppressive effect of THC on LH release is mediated by a blockade of LHRH release, whereas the suppressive effect of the compound on growth hormone release is mediated, at least in part, by a stimulation of somatostatin release.

  18. In-vitro/in-vivo studies of the biodegradable poly-(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) microspheres of a novel luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone antagonist for prostate cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Du, Lina; Mei, Xingguo; Wang, Chenyun; Li, Xin; Zhang, Fucheng; Jin, Yiguang

    2011-03-01

    The introduction of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) analogs and their antagonists is revolutionizing the treatment of prostate cancer. In this study, poly(D,L-lactideco-glycolide) (PLGA) microspheres containing a highly potent LHRH antagonist (LXT-101) of interest in the indication of prostate cancer were evaluated on release mechanisms in vitro and biological performance in vivo. LXT-101 microspheres were prepared by the water/oil/water double emulsion method and the solid/oil/oil method. The results showed that the mechanism of LXT-101 releasing from PLGA 14,000 microspheres was the cooperation of drug diffusion and polymer degradation. This clarified the relationship between the microsphere characterization and hormone level in vivo. The larger microspheres (33 μm) could inhibit the testosterone level to castration for a longer time (35 days) than the smaller microspheres (15 μm, 14 days). The formulation containing the hydrophilic additive (polyethylene glycol 6000) could suppress the testosterone level to castration for a longer time (> 35 days) than the formulation without polyethylene glycol (14 days). The appearance of testis, vesicular seminalis, and prostates changed after treatment. The weights of sexual organs decreased significantly. The in-vivo release of the LXT-101 PLGA 14,000 microspheres curve showed that in-vivo release started immediately after day 1 (22.7%) and was rapid during the first 5 days (40.2% release). The LXT-101 microspheres could be a promising drug delivery system candidate to treat sex hormone-dependent tumors and other related disorders. PMID:21360849

  19. Relative effectiveness of carp pituitary extract, luteinizing hormone releasing hormone analog LHRHa injections and LHRHa implants for producing hybrid catfish fry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adoption of the hybrid catfish (channel catfish, Ictalruus punctatus, female x blue catfish, I. furcatus, male) is increasing in the catfish industry. The most effective way to produce fry is hormone induced spawning of females coupled with hand stripping and in vitro fertilization. The success of...

  20. Infertility in Female Mice with a Gain-of-Function Mutation in the Luteinizing Hormone Receptor Is Due to Irregular Estrous Cyclicity, Anovulation, Hormonal Alterations, and Polycystic Ovaries1

    PubMed Central

    Hai, Lan; McGee, Stacey R.; Rabideau, Amanda C.; Paquet, Marilène; Narayan, Prema

    2015-01-01

    The luteinizing hormone receptor, LHCGR, is essential for fertility in males and females, and genetic mutations in the receptor have been identified that result in developmental and reproductive defects. We have previously generated and characterized a mouse model (KiLHRD582G) for familial male-limited precocious puberty caused by an activating mutation in the receptor. We demonstrated that the phenotype of the KiLHRD582G male mice is an accurate phenocopy of male patients with activating LHCGR mutations. In this study, we observed that unlike women with activating LHCGR mutations who are normal, female KiLHRD582G mice are infertile. Mice exhibit irregular estrous cyclicity, anovulation, and precocious puberty. A temporal study from 2–24 wk of age indicated elevated levels of progesterone, androstenedione, testosterone, and estradiol and upregulation of several steroidogenic enzyme genes. Ovaries of KiLHRD582G mice exhibited significant pathology with the development of large hemorrhagic cysts as early as 3 wk of age, extensive stromal cell hyperplasia and hypertrophy with luteinization, numerous atretic follicles, and granulosa cell tumors. Ovulation could not be rescued by the addition of exogenous gonadotropins. The body weights of the KiLHRD582G mice were higher than wild-type counterparts, but there was no increase in the body fat composition or metabolic abnormalities such as impaired glucose tolerance and insulin resistance. These studies demonstrate that activating LHCGR mutations do not produce the same phenotype in female mice as in humans and clearly illustrate species differences in the expression and regulation of LHCGR in the ovary, but not in the testis. PMID:26040673

  1. Dephosphorylation of juxtamembrane serines and threonines of the NPR2 guanylyl cyclase is required for rapid resumption of oocyte meiosis in response to luteinizing hormone

    PubMed Central

    Shuhaibar, Leia C.; Egbert, Jeremy R.; Edmund, Aaron B.; Uliasz, Tracy F.; Dickey, Deborah M.; Yee, Siu-Pok; Potter, Lincoln R.; Jaffe, Laurinda A.

    2016-01-01

    The meiotic cell cycle of mammalian oocytes starts during embryogenesis and then pauses until luteinizing hormone (LH) acts on the granulosa cells of the follicle surrounding the oocyte to restart the cell cycle. An essential event in this process is a decrease in cyclic GMP in the granulosa cells, and part of the cGMP decrease results from dephosphorylation and inactivation of the natriuretic peptide receptor 2 (NPR2) guanylyl cyclase, also known as guanylyl cyclase B. However, it is unknown whether NPR2 dephosphorylation is essential for LH-induced meiotic resumption. Here, we prevented NPR2 dephosphorylation by generating a mouse line in which the seven regulatory serines and threonines of NPR2 were changed to the phosphomimetic amino acid glutamate (Npr2–7E). Npr2–7E/7E follicles failed to show a decrease in enzyme activity in response to LH, and the cGMP decrease was attenuated; correspondingly, LH-induced meiotic resumption was delayed. Meiotic resumption in response to EGF receptor activation was likewise delayed, indicating that NPR2 dephosphorylation is a component of the pathway by which EGF receptor activation mediates LH signaling. We also found that most of the NPR2 protein in the follicle was present in the mural granulosa cells. These findings indicate that NPR2 dephosphorylation in the mural granulosa cells is essential for the normal progression of meiosis in response to LH and EGF receptor activation. In addition, these studies provide the first demonstration that a change in phosphorylation of a transmembrane guanylyl cyclase regulates a physiological process, a mechanism that may also control other developmental events. PMID:26522847

  2. Effect of Age, Duration of Exposure, and Dose of Atrazine on Sexual Maturation and the Luteinizing Hormone Surge in the Female Sprague–Dawley Rat

    PubMed Central

    Breckenridge, Charles B.; Coder, Pragati Sawhney; Tisdel, Merrill O.; Simpkins, James W.; Yi, Kun Don; Foradori, Chad D.; Handa, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Atrazine (ATZ) was administered daily by gavage to pregnant female Sprague Dawley rats at doses of 0, 6.25, 25 or 50 mg/kg/day, either during gestation, lactation and post-weaning (G/L/PW cohort) to F1 generation female offspring or only from postnatal day (PND 21) until five days after sexual maturation (vaginal opening) when the estrogen-primed, luteinizing hormone (LH) surge was evaluated (PW cohort). Additional subgroups of F1 females received the vehicle or ATZ from PND 21–133 or from PND 120–133. Slight reductions in fertility and the percentage of F1 generation pups surviving to PND 21 in the gestationally exposed 50 mg/kg dose group were accompanied by decreased food intake and body weight of dams and F1 generation offspring. The onset of puberty was delayed in of the F1 generation G/L/PW females at doses of 25 and 50 mg/kg/day. F1 generation females in the PW high-dose ATZ group also experienced a delay in the onset of puberty. ATZ had no effect on peak LH or LH AUC in ovariectomized rats 5 days after sexual maturation, irrespective of whether the F1 generation females were treated from gestation onward or only peripubertally. There was no effect of ATZ treatment on the estrous cycle, peak LH or LH AUC of F1 generation females exposed from gestation through to PND 133 or only for two weeks from PND 120–133. These results indicate that developing females exposed to ATZ are not more sensitive compared to animals exposed to ATZ as young adults. PMID:26439775

  3. Dephosphorylation of juxtamembrane serines and threonines of the NPR2 guanylyl cyclase is required for rapid resumption of oocyte meiosis in response to luteinizing hormone.

    PubMed

    Shuhaibar, Leia C; Egbert, Jeremy R; Edmund, Aaron B; Uliasz, Tracy F; Dickey, Deborah M; Yee, Siu-Pok; Potter, Lincoln R; Jaffe, Laurinda A

    2016-01-01

    The meiotic cell cycle of mammalian oocytes starts during embryogenesis and then pauses until luteinizing hormone (LH) acts on the granulosa cells of the follicle surrounding the oocyte to restart the cell cycle. An essential event in this process is a decrease in cyclic GMP in the granulosa cells, and part of the cGMP decrease results from dephosphorylation and inactivation of the natriuretic peptide receptor 2 (NPR2) guanylyl cyclase, also known as guanylyl cyclase B. However, it is unknown whether NPR2 dephosphorylation is essential for LH-induced meiotic resumption. Here, we prevented NPR2 dephosphorylation by generating a mouse line in which the seven regulatory serines and threonines of NPR2 were changed to the phosphomimetic amino acid glutamate (Npr2-7E). Npr2-7E/7E follicles failed to show a decrease in enzyme activity in response to LH, and the cGMP decrease was attenuated; correspondingly, LH-induced meiotic resumption was delayed. Meiotic resumption in response to EGF receptor activation was likewise delayed, indicating that NPR2 dephosphorylation is a component of the pathway by which EGF receptor activation mediates LH signaling. We also found that most of the NPR2 protein in the follicle was present in the mural granulosa cells. These findings indicate that NPR2 dephosphorylation in the mural granulosa cells is essential for the normal progression of meiosis in response to LH and EGF receptor activation. In addition, these studies provide the first demonstration that a change in phosphorylation of a transmembrane guanylyl cyclase regulates a physiological process, a mechanism that may also control other developmental events.

  4. Development of tolerance to the effects of morphine on luteinizing hormone secretion as a function of castration in the male rat.

    PubMed

    Cicero, T J; Meyer, E R; Schmoeker, P F

    1982-12-01

    The effects of morphine on the secretion of luteinizing hormone (LH) were examined in male rats at intervals after castration. We found that morphine was extremely effective in suppressing serum LH levels in animals that had been castrated for periods of less than 7 days, but was considerably less potent in long-term castrates (13 + days). For example, the dose of morphine producing the half-maximal suppression of serum LH levels in 3-day castrates was 1.5 mg/kg, whereas in 31-day castrates the ED50 was 13.8 mg/kg. This insensitivity to morphine satisfied the two pharmacological criteria for tolerance: a parallel shift to the right in the morphine dose-response curve and a reduced effect of the drug at the same brain concentration. Hence, castration appeared to render male rats, never exposed to opiates, tolerant to the effects of morphine. Corresponding to the development of tolerance to morphine, 31-day castrates were also less responsive to the LH-depressing effects of testosterone than were 3-day castrates or sham-operated controls. In marked contrast to these results, castration did not significantly affect naloxone-induced increases in serum LH levels. The tolerance observed to morphine in the long-term castrated rat was selective to LH secretion because long- and short-term castrates and sham-operated controls were equally responsive to the antinociceptive effects of morphine (in fact, at a dose of 8 mg/kg long-term castrates were more sensitive to morphine than short-term castrates or sham-operated controls) and there was no apparent shift in the LD50. The mechanisms underlying the development of tolerance to morphine in castrated male rats are not clear at the present time. PMID:7143239

  5. Effect of Age, Duration of Exposure, and Dose of Atrazine on Sexual Maturation and the Luteinizing Hormone Surge in the Female Sprague-Dawley Rat.

    PubMed

    Breckenridge, Charles B; Sawhney Coder, Pragati; Tisdel, Merrill O; Simpkins, James W; Yi, Kun Don; Foradori, Chad D; Handa, Robert J

    2015-10-01

    Atrazine (ATZ) was administered daily by gavage to pregnant female Sprague Dawley rats at doses of 0, 6.25, 25 or 50 mg/kg/day, either during gestation, lactation and post-weaning (G/L/PW cohort) to F1 generation female offspring or only from postnatal day (PND 21) until five days after sexual maturation (vaginal opening) when the estrogen-primed, luteinizing hormone (LH) surge was evaluated (PW cohort). Additional subgroups of F1 females received the vehicle or ATZ from PND 21-133 or from PND 120-133. Slight reductions in fertility and the percentage of F1 generation pups surviving to PND 21 in the gestationally exposed 50 mg/kg dose group were accompanied by decreased food intake and body weight of dams and F1 generation offspring. The onset of puberty was delayed in of the F1 generation G/L/PW females at doses of 25 and 50 mg/kg/day. F1 generation females in the PW high-dose ATZ group also experienced a delay in the onset of puberty. ATZ had no effect on peak LH or LH AUC in ovariectomized rats 5 days after sexual maturation, irrespective of whether the F1 generation females were treated from gestation onward or only peripubertally. There was no effect of ATZ treatment on the estrous cycle, peak LH or LH AUC of F1 generation females exposed from gestation through to PND 133 or only for two weeks from PND 120-133. These results indicate that developing females exposed to ATZ are not more sensitive compared to animals exposed to ATZ as young adults.

  6. Relationship among follicular growth, oestrus, time of ovulation, endogenous estradiol 17beta and luteinizing hormone in Bos indicus cows after a synchronization program.

    PubMed

    Maquivar, M; Verduzco, A; Galina, C S; Pulido, A; Rojas, S; Forster, K; Van der Laan, G; Arnoni, R

    2007-12-01

    To determine the pattern of follicular growth during oestrus and the relationship with estradiol and luteinizing hormone in ovulating and non-ovulating cows, three groups of (n = 10), thirty cyclic, Bos indicus cows were synchronized with CIDR, consecutively at 9-day intervals. Twenty-four hours after implant withdrawal, all cows synchronized in the same group with other cows displaying estrous behaviour after implant withdrawal were subjected to an intensive period of ultrasonographic observations (every 6 h for 120 h). Blood samples were taken to evaluate LH surge and 17-beta estradiol. No differences were observed in follicular growth, ovulatory diameter and growth average in the three groups of synchronized cows. Cows ovulating (CO) had a better growth average in comparison with the group of cows not ovulating (CNO) (1.4 +/- 0.7 mm vs 0.7 +/- 0.5 mm, p < 0.06). The average time from estradiol release to LH surge was 39.3 +/- 24.6 h. Differences were also observed between CO and CNO with respect to both the first concentration (27.7 +/- 5.2 vs 58.6 +/- 31.9, p < 0.004) and last concentration (79.3 +/- 23.3 vs 99.2 +/- 27.3, p < 0.05) of estradiol above 5 pg/ml. The average time from overt signs of oestrus to LH release was 8.4 +/- 7.7 h. In the CNO, the increase in LH concentration was never above two SD from the basal average. In conclusion, there is a wide variability in follicular growth and ovulatory diameter between CO and CNO, which can affect the intervals of LH release, estradiol peak and ovulation. Yet, LH surge might be a good marker for timing ovulation in Zebu cows.

  7. Effects of hypophysectomy and administration of pituitary hormones on luteal function and uptake of high density lipoproteins by luteinized ovaries and adrenals of the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, B.D.; Rajkumar, K.; McKibbin, P.E.; Macdonald, G.J.; Buhr, M.M.; Grinwich, D.L.

    1985-04-01

    The role of plasma lipoproteins and hypophyseal hormones in the maintenance of progesterone secretion by the rat corpus luteum was investigated. In the first experiment, rats were treated daily from days 1-6 of pregnancy with 5 mg/kg 4-aminopyrozolopyramidine (4APP), a blocker of hepatic lipoprotein secretion, or with 5 mg/kg 4APP and 1 or 2 mg ovine PRL or 0.1 ml 0.5% phosphoric acid (4APP vehicle). The administration of 4APP reduced serum cholesterol and progesterone levels on days 2-6 of pregnancy and ovarian progesterone on day 6. The reduced progesterone secretion had no effect on embryo implantation. PRL, in the doses used, was incapable of abrogating the effects of 4APP on circulating or ovarian progesterone levels. Ovaries and adrenals, but not kidneys, of pseudopregnant rats exhibited specific and saturable uptake of porcine high density lipoprotein (HDL). Time-course studies indicated that the uptake of HDL was rapid in ovaries compared to that in adrenals. Ovaries from rats not only exhibited uptake of porcine HDL, but also were capable of using it for progesterone synthesis. Treatment with 4APP increased the adrenal uptake of HDL, but ovarian uptake was not different from that in the control group. Hypophysectomy reduced both adrenal and ovarian uptake of HDL. In adrenals only ACTH at the dose employed ameliorated reduction of HDL uptake induced by hypophysectomy, while in the ovaries, both PRL and LH reversed the effect of hypophysectomy. The effect of PRL on uptake was specific to (/sup 125/I)HDL and did not alter (/sup 125/I)albumin uptake. It is concluded that: 1) hypophysectomy reduces HDL uptake in the luteinized rat ovary; and 2) PRL and LH replacement therapy maintain ovarian uptake of HDL, suggesting a direct effect of these luteotropins on lipoprotein uptake.

  8. Effects of prenatal treatment with antiandrogens on luteinizing hormone secretion and sex steroid concentrations in adult spotted hyenas, Crocuta crocuta.

    PubMed

    Place, Ned J; Holekamp, Kay E; Sisk, Cheryl L; Weldele, Mary L; Coscia, Elizabeth M; Drea, Christine M; Glickman, Stephen E

    2002-11-01

    Prenatal androgen treatment can alter LH secretion in female offspring, often with adverse effects on ovulatory function. However, female spotted hyenas (Crocuta crocuta), renowned for their highly masculinized genitalia, are naturally exposed to high androgen levels in utero. To determine whether LH secretion in spotted hyenas is affected by prenatal androgens, we treated pregnant hyenas with antiandrogens (flutamide and finasteride). Later, adult offspring of the antiandrogen-treated (AA) mothers underwent a GnRH challenge to identify sex differences in the LH response and to assess the effects of prenatal antiandrogen treatment. We further considered the effects of blocking prenatal androgens on plasma sex steroid concentrations. To account for potential differences in the reproductive state of females, we suppressed endogenous hormone levels with a long-acting GnRH agonist (GnRHa) and then measured plasma androgens after an hCG challenge. Plasma concentrations of LH were sexually dimorphic in spotted hyenas, with females displaying higher levels than males. Prenatal antiandrogen treatment also significantly altered the LH response to GnRH. Plasma estradiol concentration was higher in AA-females, whereas testosterone and androstenedione levels tended to be lower. This trend toward lower androgen levels disappeared after GnRHa suppression and hCG challenge. In males, prenatal antiandrogen treatment had long-lasting effects on circulating androgens: AA-males had lower T levels than control males. The sex differences and effects of prenatal antiandrogens on LH secretion suggest that the anterior pituitary gland of the female spotted hyena is partially masculinized by the high androgen levels that normally occur during development, without adverse effects on ovulatory function.

  9. Sex steroid levels, oocyte maturation and spawning performance in Waigieu seaperch (Psammoperca waigiensis) exposed to thyroxin, human chorionic gonadotropin, luteinizing hormone releasing hormone and carp pituitary extract.

    PubMed

    Pham, Hung Quoc; Nguyen, Anh Tuong; Nguyen, Mao Dinh; Arukwe, Augustine

    2010-02-01

    In the present study, we have investigated the sex steroid hormone levels, oocyte maturation and spawning performance in Waigieu seaperch (Psammoperca waigiensis) exposed to different doses (0, (control), 0.05, 0.25 and 0.5 mg/kg fish) of thyroxin (T(4)) both through diet (continuously) and injection (single injection). In addition, we also studied plasma steroid hormone levels and spawning performances in female fish injected with a single dose of D-Ala(6), Pro(9)-Net-mGnRH (LHRHa: 50 microg/kg), human chronic gonadotropin (HCG: 1,500 IU/kg) and carp pituitary extract (CPE: 10 mg/kg). In all experiments, samples were collected at 0, 6, 12, 24 and 48 h after exposure. T4 exposure via dietary route produced differential and enhanced effects, compared with when the compound was injected to the broodstock. A significant association between exposure to dietary T4, elevated plasma steroid hormone levels, maturation-, spawning-, fertilization- and hatching rate, egg diameter, embryogenesis and larval growth were observed. Interestingly, we observed that broodstock groups fed with T4 doses spawned 20 days earlier than the control group. Thus, we propose that these differences may be attributed to higher systemic availability of T4 due to dietary exposure that is easily transferable to eggs and embryos, as opposed to injection that require absorption to increase bioavailability. Furthermore, our results show that LHRHa, CPE and HCG produced significant increase in spawning rate, but significantly reduced fertilization- and hatching rates. Waigieu seaperch is a new candidate for marine aquaculture in Vietnam and relatively little is known about the reproductive biology and endocrinology of this species. Therefore, the present study forms an integral basis for understanding the reproductive endocrinology of a tropical marine finfish with increasing aquaculture prospects and may also contribute in the development of sustainable aquaculture of this species in a developing

  10. Serum copper, follicular stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, prolactin, spermatic count, viability, progression and seminal zinc correlations in a human (male) infertility study

    SciTech Connect

    Sella, G.E.; Cunnane, S.C.; McInnes, R.A.

    1981-06-01

    The role of copper and its correlations to other parameters has been investigated in a male-fertility pilot study at a University infertility clinic in Montreal. Serum and semen Cu concentrations were determined in 100 men (age 25 to 54 years) referred to the clinic for infertility evaluation. The results of the significant correlations between serum Cu concentrations and male fertility parameters such as (1) the serum concentrations of the hormones FSH, LH and prolactin; (2) spermatozoal count, viability and progression and (3) seminal zinc concentrations are reported.

  11. Delta opioid receptors are involved in morphine-induced inhibition of luteinizing hormone releasing hormone in SK-N-SH cells.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Lunawati; Ratka, Anna

    2003-10-01

    Opioids play an important role in the regulation of lutenizing hormone releasing hormone (LHRH). In the present study, we attempted to find out the subtype of opioid receptors involved in the inhibitory effect of morphine on LHRH. Experiments were conducted on SK-N-SH neuroblastoma cells that express both micro and delta opioid receptors, LHRH mRNA, and release the LHRH peptide. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was employed to measure the levels of LHRH. LHRH level was decreased by 1000 microM of morphine regardless of the duration of exposure or differentiation status of the SK-N-SH cells and was not reversed by naloxone. Selective antagonism of micro opioid receptors, but not delta opioid receptors, allowed lower concentrations (1-100 microM) of morphine to inhibit LHRH. The results of this study imply that (1) delta opioid receptors may mediate the inhibitory effect of lower concentrations of morphine on LHRH levels in SK-N-SH cells, and (2) inhibition of LHRH level by high concentrations of morphine may involve systems other than opioid receptors.

  12. Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Increases Pulsatile Growth Hormone Secretion and Circulating Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 in a Time-Dependent Manner in Men With Obstructive Sleep Apnea: A Randomized Sham-Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Hoyos, Camilla M.; Killick, Roo; Keenan, Daniel M.; Baxter, Robert C.; Veldhuis, Johannes D.; Liu, Peter Y.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: To assess the time-dependent effect of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), on insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), IGF binding proteins (IGFBPs) and pulsatile growth hormone (GH) secretion. Design: A randomized, double-blind, sham-controlled, parallel group study. Participants: Sixty-five middle-aged men with moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea. Intervention: Active (n = 34) or sham (n = 31) CPAP for 12 weeks, followed by 12 weeks of active CPAP (n = 65). Measurements and Results: Fasting morning IGF-1, IGFBP-3, and IGFBP-1 blood levels at 0, 6, 12, and 24 weeks. Overnight GH secretion was calculated by mathematical deconvolution of serial GH measurements from serum samples collected every 10 min (22:00-06:00) during simultaneous polysomnography in a subset of 18 men (active n = 11, sham n = 7) at week 12. Active, compared with sham, CPAP increased IGF-1 at 12 weeks (P = 0.006), but not at 6 weeks (P = 0.44). Changes in IGFBP-3 and IGFBP-1 were not different between groups at 6 or 12 weeks (all P ≥ 0.15). At week 24, there was a further increase in IGF-1 and a decrease in IGFBP-1 in the pooled group (P = 0.0001 and 0.046, respectively). In the subset, total (P = 0.001) and pulsatile (P = 0.002) GH secretion, mean GH concentration (P = 0.002), mass of GH secreted per pulse (P = 0.01) and pulse frequency (P = 0.04) were all higher after 12 weeks of CPAP compared with sham. Basal secretion, interpulse regularity, and GH regularity were not different between groups (all P > 0.11). Conclusions: Twelve weeks, but not 6 weeks, of CPAP increases IGF-1, with a further increase after 24 weeks. Total and pulsatile GH secretion, secretory burst mass and pulse frequency are also increased by 12 weeks. CPAP improves specific elements of the GH/IGF-1 axis in a time-dependent manner. Clinical Trials Registration: Australia New Zealand Clinical Trials Network, www.anzctr.org.au, number ACTRN12608000301369. Citation: Hoyos CM; Killick R; Keenan DM

  13. Relationships between Serum Luteinizing Hormone Level, Endometrial Thickness and Body Mass Index in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Patients with and without Endometrial Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Ramezanali, Fariba; Khalili, Gholamreza; Arabipoor, Arezoo; Bagheri Lankarani, Narges; Moini, Ashraf

    2016-01-01

    Background The endometrial hyperplasia measured by ultrasound in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) women is strongly related to pathologic endometrial thickness, but there is no consensus on the relation between serum luteinizing hormone (LH) and either of these factors: pathologic endometrial hyperplasia and body mass index (BMI). Materials and Methods In this observational cross-sectional study, three hundred fifty infertile PCOS women were involved in this research. An endometrial biopsy was taken by using a pipelle instrument, regardless of menstrual cycle’s day and all samples were reported by the same pathologist. Basal serum LH level was compared between two subgroups (hyperplasia and non-hyperplasia). The intended population was divided into three groups according to BMI and basal serum LH, later on the comparison was made in three groups. Chi-square test was applied to compare nominal variables between groups. Mann-Whitney U, and one way ANOVA tests were used to compare means on the basis of the result of normality test. Results The frequency of endometrial hyperplasia was 2.6%. Endometrial thickness in the patients with endometrial hyperplasia was significantly higher than that of a normal endometrium (10.78 ± 3.70 vs. 7.90 ± 2.86 respectively, P=0.020). There was no relation between endometrial hyperplasia and serum LH (P=0.600). The ANOVA test showed serum LH levels were not the same among three BMI groups (P=0.007). Post hoc test was also performed. It showed that the LH level in normal BMI group was significantly higher than those of other groups (P=0.005 and P=0.004), but there was no statistical difference between overweight and obese groups (P=0.8). We found no relationship between BMI and endometrial thickness in PCOS patients (P=0.6). Conclusion Sonographic endometrial stripe thickness is predictive for endometrial hyperplasia in PCOS women. We could not find out any relationship between serum LH level and BMI with endometrial thickness in

  14. Utrogestan as an Effective Oral Alternative for Preventing Premature Luteinizing Hormone Surges in Women Undergoing Controlled Ovarian Hyperstimulation for In Vitro Fertilization

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiuxian; Zhang, Xiaole; Fu, Yonglun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A major cause of cycle cancellation during controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH) in women undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF) is the occurrence of premature luteinizing hormone (LH) surges. Steroidal preparations can modulate the secretion of gonadotropins (Gn); however, few studies using progesterone to inhibit the premature LH surges in COH have been published. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the oral delivery of progesterone soft capsules (Utrogestan) to prevent LH surges from the follicular phase and to compare cycle characteristics as well as to evaluate pregnancy outcomes in subsequent frozen-thawed embryo transfer (FET) cycles. A total of 374 patients were enrolled in this retrospective study, among which 187 patients were simultaneously administered Utrogestan and human menopausal gonadotrophin (hMG) from cycle day 3 until the trigger day. A short protocol including 187 controls with comparable age, body mass index (BMI), infertility duration, and antral follicle count was also used. GnRH agonist (0.1 mg) or hCG (3000 IU) was used for a trigger when the dominant follicles matured. Viable embryos were cryopreserved for later transfer in both groups. The primary outcome was the number of oocytes retrieved. The secondary outcomes included the number of mature oocytes, incidence of premature LH surge, and clinical pregnancy outcomes from FET cycles. Consistent LH suppression was achieved during COH, with a range of 0.07 to 8.9 IU/L, and no premature LH surge was detected. The number of oocytes retrieved in the Utrogestan and hMG protocol was comparable with that in the short protocol (10.92 ± 5.74 vs 10.6 ± 6.22, P > 0.05), and the dose of hMG was higher than that used in the short protocol (1884.22 ± 439.47 IU vs 1446.26 ± 550.48 IU, P < 0.05). No significant between-group difference was observed in the mature oocyte rate (88.88% vs 90.12%), cleavage rate (96.58% vs 96.58%), clinical pregnancy rate

  15. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogs: Understanding advantages and limitations.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pratap; Sharma, Alok

    2014-07-01

    Pituitary stimulation with pulsatile gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analogs induces both follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH). Pituitary gonadotropin secretions are blocked upon desensitization when a continuous GnRH stimulus is provided by means of an agonist or when the pituitary receptors are occupied with a competitive antagonist. GnRH antagonists were not available originally; therefore, prolonged daily injections of agonist with its desensitizing effect were used. Today, single- and multiple-dose injectable antagonists are also available to block the LH surge and thus to cause desensitization. This review provides an overview of the use of GnRH analogs which is potent therapeutic agents that are considerably useful in a variety of clinical indications from the past to the future with some limitations. These indications include management of endometriosis, uterine leiomyomas, hirsutism, dysfunctional uterine bleeding, premenstrual syndrome, assisted reproduction, and some hormone-dependent tumours, other than ovulation induction.

  16. Serum inhibin B in healthy pubertal and adolescent boys: relation to age, stage of puberty, and follicle-stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, testosterone, and estradiol levels.

    PubMed

    Andersson, A M; Juul, A; Petersen, J H; Müller, J; Groome, N P; Skakkebaek, N E

    1997-12-01

    Inhibin B levels were measured in serum from 400 healthy Danish prepubertal, pubertal, and adolescent males, aged 6-20 yr, in a cross-sectional study using a recently developed immunoassay that is specific for inhibin B, the physiologically important inhibin form in men. In addition, serum levels of FSH, LH, testosterone, and estradiol levels were measured. Serum levels of inhibin B, FSH, LH, testosterone, and estradiol all increased significantly between stages I and II of puberty. From stage II of puberty the inhibin B level was relatively constant, whereas the FSH level continued to increase between stages II and III. From stage III of puberty the FSH level was also relatively constant, although there was a nonsignificant trend of slightly decreased FSH levels at pubertal stage V compared to stage IV. The levels of serum LH, testosterone, and estradiol increased progressively throughout puberty. In prepubertal boys younger than 9 yr, there were no correlation between inhibin B and the other three hormones. In prepubertal boys older than 9 yr, a significant positive correlation was observed between inhibin B and FSH, LH, and testosterone. However, at this pubertal stage, each hormone correlated strongly with age, and when the effect of age was taken into account, only the partial correlation between inhibin B and LH/testosterone remained statistically significant. At stage II of puberty, the positive partial correlation between inhibin B and LH/testosterone was still present. At stage III of puberty, an negative partial correlation between inhibin B and FSH, LH, and estradiol was present, whereas no correlation between inhibin B and testosterone could be observed from stage III onward. The negative correlation between inhibin B and FSH persisted from stage III of puberty onward, whereas the correlation between inhibin B and LH and between inhibin B and estradiol was nonsignificant at stages IV and V of puberty. In conclusion, in boys, serum inhibin B levels

  17. Recombinant human follicle-stimulating hormone (r-hFSH) plus recombinant luteinizing hormone versus r-hFSH alone for ovarian stimulation during assisted reproductive technology: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The potential benefit of adding recombinant human luteinizing hormone (r-hLH) to recombinant human follicle-stimulating hormone (r-hFSH) during ovarian stimulation is a subject of debate, although there is evidence that it may benefit certain subpopulations, e.g. poor responders. Methods A systematic review and a meta-analysis were performed. Three databases (MEDLINE, Embase and CENTRAL) were searched (from 1990 to 2011). Prospective, parallel-, comparative-group randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in women aged 18–45 years undergoing in vitro fertilization, intracytoplasmic sperm injection or both, treated with gonadotrophin-releasing hormone analogues and r-hFSH plus r-hLH or r-hFSH alone were included. The co-primary endpoints were number of oocytes retrieved and clinical pregnancy rate. Analyses were conducted for the overall population and for prospectively identified patient subgroups, including patients with poor ovarian response (POR). Results In total, 40 RCTs (6443 patients) were included in the analysis. Data on the number of oocytes retrieved were reported in 41 studies and imputed in two studies. Therefore, data were available from 43 studies (r-hFSH plus r-hLH, n = 3113; r-hFSH, n = 3228) in the intention-to-treat (ITT) population (all randomly allocated patients, including imputed data). Overall, no significant difference in the number of oocytes retrieved was found between the r-hFSH plus r-hLH and r-hFSH groups (weighted mean difference −0.03; 95% confidence interval [CI] −0.41 to 0.34). However, in poor responders, significantly more oocytes were retrieved with r-hFSH plus r-hLH versus r-hFSH alone (n = 1077; weighted mean difference +0.75 oocytes; 95% CI 0.14–1.36). Significantly higher clinical pregnancy rates were observed with r-hFSH plus r-hLH versus r-hFSH alone in the overall population analysed in this review (risk ratio [RR] 1.09; 95% CI 1.01–1.18) and in poor responders (n = 1179; RR 1.30; 95% CI 1

  18. Objective pulsatile tinnitus.

    PubMed

    Yacovino, Dario A; Casas, Pablo

    2015-12-01

    Tinnitus is the usually unwanted perception of sound, in most cases there is no genuine physical source of sound. Less than 10% of tinnitus patients suffer from pulsatile tinnitus. Objective Pulsatile tinnitus can also be the first indication of dural arteriovenous fistula, so examination for such vascular origin must be performed. PMID:26733223

  19. Objective pulsatile tinnitus.

    PubMed

    Yacovino, Dario A; Casas, Pablo

    2015-12-01

    Tinnitus is the usually unwanted perception of sound, in most cases there is no genuine physical source of sound. Less than 10% of tinnitus patients suffer from pulsatile tinnitus. Objective Pulsatile tinnitus can also be the first indication of dural arteriovenous fistula, so examination for such vascular origin must be performed.

  20. Pulse sensitivity of the luteinizing hormone beta promoter is determined by a negative feedback loop Involving early growth response-1 and Ngfi-A binding protein 1 and 2.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Mark A; Tsutsumi, Rie; Zhang, Hao; Talukdar, Indrani; Butler, Brian K; Santos, Sharon J; Mellon, Pamela L; Webster, Nicholas J G

    2007-05-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal endocrine axis regulates reproduction through estrous phase-dependent release of the heterodimeric gonadotropic glycoprotein hormones, LH and FSH, from the gonadotropes of the anterior pituitary. Gonadotropin synthesis and release is dependent upon pulsatile stimulation by the hypothalamic neuropeptide GnRH. Alterations in pulse frequency and amplitude alter the relative levels of gonadotropin synthesis and release. The mechanism of interpretation of GnRH pulse frequency and amplitude by gonadotropes is not understood. We have examined gene expression in LbetaT2 gonadotropes under various pulse regimes in a cell perifusion system by microarray and identified 1127 genes activated by tonic or pulsatile GnRH. Distinct patterns of expression are associated with each pulse frequency, but the greatest changes occur at a 60-min or less interpulse interval. The immediate early gene mRNAs encoding early growth response (Egr)1 and Egr2, which activate the gonadotropin LH beta-subunit gene promoter, are stably induced at high pulse frequency. In contrast, mRNAs for the Egr corepressor genes Ngfi-A binding protein Nab1 and Nab2 are stably induced at low pulse frequency. We show that Ngfi-A binding protein members inhibit Egr-mediated frequency-dependent induction of the LH beta-subunit promoter. This pattern of expression suggests a model of pulse frequency detection that acts by suppressing activation by Egr family members at low frequency and allowing activation at sustained high-frequency pulses.

  1. Influence of season and nutritional status on the direct effects of leptin, orexin-A and ghrelin on luteinizing hormone and growth hormone secretion in the ovine pituitary explant model.

    PubMed

    Kirsz, K; Szczesna, M; Dudek, K; Bartlewski, P M; Zieba, D A

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether leptin (anorexigenic peptide), orexin-A, and ghrelin (orexigenic peptides) could directly (ie, independently of hypothalamic influences) affect the secretion of luteinizing hormone (LH) and growth hormone (GH) by adenohypophyseal (AP) explants obtained from normally fed or fasted (48 h) ewes during the breeding and nonbreeding seasons. In addition, a specific ovine super leptin antagonist (SLAN-3) was used to assess the interactions between leptin and ghrelin and/or orexin-A. Pituitary glands from 16 ovariectomized Polish Longwool ewes that had received estradiol-releasing subcutaneous implants were collected in the breeding (November; n = 8) and nonbreeding (May; n = 8) seasons. The AP explants were incubated for 240 min in a gas-liquid interface and treated with leptin (50 ng/mL), ghrelin (100 ng/mL), orexin-A (100 ng/mL), and SLAN-3 (500 ng/mL) with orexin-A or ghrelin. Treatments with leptin and SLAN-3 + orexin-A increased (P < 0.05) LH concentrations in the cultures of AP explants from fasted animals in the breeding season. Orexin-A increased (P < 0.05) LH secretion by AP explants from both fasted and fed animals in the breeding season. Ghrelin stimulated (P < 0.05) GH secretion by AP explants collected from fasted animals in nonbreeding season and from normally fed ewes in both seasons. Leptin decreased (P < 0.05) GH secretion by AP explants collected from fasted ewes in both seasons and from nonfasted ewes in the breeding season. However, the treatment with SLAN-3 + ghrelin resulted in greater (P < 0.05) GH concentrations compared with leptin treatment of AP explants from fasted ewes in the breeding season and from normally fed ewes in nonbreeding season. In summary, leptin, orexin-A, and ghrelin exerted direct effects on AP secretory function in an ex situ model and both the reproductive season and nutritional status of the animals impinged on the direct effects of the peptides on LH and GH release

  2. The effects of a continuous infusion of hexarelin on pulsatile growth hormone release, growth axis and galanin gene expression and on the response of the growth axis to growth hormone-releasing hormone.

    PubMed

    Conley, L K; Brogan, R S; Giustina, A; Wehrenberg, W B

    2000-05-01

    The effect of a 6 hour continuous infusion of Hexarelin (100 micrograms/hour) on GH peak frequency, amplitude and duration, GH trough concentrations, the interval between successive peaks and the pituitary responsiveness to GHRH, as well as GH axis and galanin mRNA contents, were examined in conscious adult male rats. Plasma GH concentrations peaked within 15 minutes after the initiation of Hexarelin infusion, but returned to baseline levels by 60 minutes. No significant differences between Hexarelin and saline infused rats were noted for any of the parameters of pulsatile GH release analyzed. However, following a 6 hour infusion, rats treated with Hexarelin demonstrated a greater GH responsiveness to GHRH (delta GH: 57 +/- 16 ng/ml for Hexarelin infused; 21 +/- 7 ng/ml for saline infused; p < 0.05). Furthermore, the rats infused with Hexarelin demonstrated decreased GHRH and increased hypothalamic galanin mRNA contents as compared to the saline infused rats, while hypothalamic somatostatin and pituitary GH mRNA contents appeared unchanged. Rats infused with Hexarelin had lower pituitary galanin mRNA content than did the rats which were infused with saline. Collectively, these results suggest that Hexarelin may not act via alteration of somatostatin synthesis and that suppression of somatostatin's action at the pituitary can not be excluded. The current study also suggests that other hypothalamic pathways aside from those currently defined for the growth axis may be involved in the mechanism by which Hexarelin and the other GH-releasing peptides elicit GH release.

  3. Lutein and Brain Function

    PubMed Central

    Erdman, John W.; Smith, Joshua W.; Kuchan, Matthew J.; Mohn, Emily S.; Johnson, Elizabeth J.; Rubakhin, Stanislav S.; Wang, Lin; Sweedler, Jonathan V.; Neuringer, Martha

    2015-01-01

    Lutein is one of the most prevalent carotenoids in nature and in the human diet. Together with zeaxanthin, it is highly concentrated as macular pigment in the foveal retina of primates, attenuating blue light exposure, providing protection from photo-oxidation and enhancing visual performance. Recently, interest in lutein has expanded beyond the retina to its possible contributions to brain development and function. Only primates accumulate lutein within the brain, but little is known about its distribution or physiological role. Our team has begun to utilize the rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) model to study the uptake and bio-localization of lutein in the brain. Our overall goal has been to assess the association of lutein localization with brain function. In this review, we will first cover the evolution of the non-human primate model for lutein and brain studies, discuss prior association studies of lutein with retina and brain function, and review approaches that can be used to localize brain lutein. We also describe our approach to the biosynthesis of 13C-lutein, which will allow investigation of lutein flux, localization, metabolism and pharmacokinetics. Lastly, we describe potential future research opportunities. PMID:26566524

  4. Circannual changes in progesterone secretion in intact ewes, luteinizing hormone secretion in ovariectomized estradiol-implanted ewes, and prolactin secretion in three sheep breeds anticipated to differ in seasonality of reproduction.

    PubMed

    Goff, Katherine J; Knight, James W; Pelzer, Kevin D; Akers, R Michael; Notter, David R

    2013-05-01

    Changes in progesterone secretion in intact ewes (7 or 9 per breed) and luteinizing hormone secretion in ovariectomized, estradiol-implanted ewes (9 or 10 per breed) were monitored for 12 mo in Suffolk, tropically adapted St. Croix, and OOS ewes. The OOS line is a composite population of 50% Dorset, 25% Rambouillet, and 25% Finnish Landrace breeding that was selected for 10 yr for ability to lamb in October and early November. Ewes were isolated from rams, and blood samples were collected twice weekly. Circulating prolactin concentrations were also determined from blood samples collected near the summer and winter solstice and vernal and autumnal equinox. Intact OOS ewes entered anestrus later, began the subsequent breeding season sooner, and had a shorter seasonal anestrus than Suffolk and St. Croix ewes (P ≤ 0.005). St. Croix ewes did not differ from Suffolk ewes in date of onset or cessation of breeding or duration of anestrus (P ≥ 0.06). Breed differences in duration of luteinizing hormone inhibition in ovariectomized ewes were essentially identical to those observed for duration of anestrous. Prolactin concentrations varied during the year: annual changes were larger in relatively seasonal Suffolk ewes than in tropically-derived St. Croix ewes (P<0.01), and OOS ewes were intermediate to, and tended to differ from (P<0.10), the other two breeds. We conclude that OOS ewes developed by selection for fertility in spring matings had an abbreviated seasonal anestrus that is one of the shortest ever reported for temperate breeds, and that tropical St. Croix sheep did not have a shorter seasonal anestrus than Suffolk sheep under temperate conditions and ram isolation. PMID:23528712

  5. [New achievements in the development and study of the mechanisms of action of the low molecular weight agonists of receptors of the thyroid-stimulating and the luteinizing hormones].

    PubMed

    Shpakov, A O

    2015-01-01

    Pituitary glycoprotein hormones, luteinizing (LH) and thyroid-stimulating (TSH), exert their regulatory effects on cells through the G protein-coupled receptors, specifically binding to their extracellular domain. There is an alternative way of activation of LH and TSH receptors, when low molecular weight organic molecules bind to an allosteric site of the receptors which is localized within their transmembrane channel. Low molecular weight agonists have many advantages over glycoprotein hormones, among them a high efficiency not only in the case of the parenteral but also in the oral administration, low immunogenicity, chemical stability, and a low cost. Unlike pituitary glycoprotein hormones with the agonistic activity, low molecular weight compounds may be either agonists or inverse agonists and neutral antagonists. Recently it was shown that low molecular weight agonists of LH receptor are able to stimulate its mutant forms by restoring the processing of receptor in a cell, and by increasing its sensitivity to LH, which is important for the treatment of reproductive dysfunctions caused by mutations in the LH receptor. This review summarizes the recent achievements that are linked with the development of low molecular weight regulators of TSH and LH receptors and the study of their mechanisms of action. It also presents the author' data concerning the creation of new low molecular weight agonists of LH receptor based on the thienopyrimidine structure, which are effective both in vitro, and in vivo in different ways of administration.

  6. Hormonal interrelationships between hypothalamus, pituitary and testis of rams and bulls.

    PubMed

    Schanbacher, B D

    1982-01-01

    This mini-review aims to summarize some of our recent findings relating to testicular function and feedback control of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis by testicular steroids in rams and bulls. Testosterone secretion in intact males is not tonic, but is characterized by episodic pulses. This pattern of secretion is dictated by inputs of the central nervous system via secretions of the hypothalamus (luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone; LHRH) and anterior pituitary (luteinizing hormone; LH). A temporal relationship exists between concentrations of LH and testosterone in serum and evidence is presented that strongly suggests that their episodic secretion is dependent on discrete episodes of LHRH discharge from the hypothalamus. Based on data from experiments with rams and bulls, I suggest that acutely castrated males (but not chronic castrates) remain susceptible to the negative feedback effects of testosterone, i.e., LH concentrations remain suppressed in serum of animals given testosterone replacement therapy immediately following castration. Estradiol-17 beta, on the other hand, abolishes pulsatile LH release and suppresses mean LH concentrations in both acute and chronic castrates. Therefore, testosterone feedback on LH secretion may, in part, involve extragonadal conversion to estradiol-17 beta to block pulsatile LHRH release. The potent inhibitory effects of estradiol on LH secretion provide an experimental probe for future investigations relating to mechanisms controlling male reproduction.

  7. Variation in levels of serum inhibin B, testosterone, estradiol, luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone, and sex hormone-binding globulin in monthly samples from healthy men during a 17-month period: possible effects of seasons.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Anna-Maria; Carlsen, Elisabeth; Petersen, Jørgen Holm; Skakkebaek, Niels Erik

    2003-02-01

    To obtain information on the scale of the intraindividual variation in testicular hormone, blood samples for inhibin B determination were collected monthly in 27 healthy male volunteers during a 17-month period. In addition, the traditional reproductive hormones FSH, LH, testosterone, estradiol, and SHBG were measured. The intraindividual variation in inhibin B over the study period was, on the average, 10%, corresponding to the assay variation of the inhibin B assay, indicating that most of the observed day to day variation in inhibin B levels in men could be explained by assay variation. A seasonal variation was observed in LH and testosterone levels, but not in the levels of the other hormones. The seasonal variation in testosterone levels could be explained by the variation in LH levels. The seasonal variation in LH levels seemed to be related to the mean air temperature during the month before blood sampling, but not to the length of daylight or the hours of sunshine. In conclusion, our data showed that day to day levels of inhibin B are relatively constant in men and do not seem to be influenced by seasonal factors. In contrast, we found a seasonal variation in LH and testosterone levels in men. The peak levels of both LH and testosterone were observed during June-July, with minimum levels present during winter-early spring. Air temperature, rather than light exposure, seems to be a possible climatic variable explaining the seasonal variation in LH levels.

  8. Plasma insulin-like peptide 3 concentrations are acutely regulated by luteinizing hormone in pubertal Japanese Black beef bulls.

    PubMed

    Hannan, M A; Fukami, Y; Kawate, N; Sakase, M; Fukushima, M; Pathirana, I N; Büllesbach, E E; Inaba, T; Tamada, H

    2015-12-01

    Insulin-like peptide 3 (INSL3) is a major secretory product of testicular Leydig cells. The mechanism of acute regulation of INSL3 secretion is still unknown. The present study was undertaken in pubertal beef bulls to (1) determine the temporal relationship of pulsatile secretion among LH, INSL3, and testosterone and (2) monitor acute regulation of INSL3 secretion by LH using GnRH analogue and hCG. Blood samples were collected from Japanese Black beef bulls (N = 6) at 15-minute intervals for 8 hours. Moreover, blood samples were collected at -0.5, 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 hours after GnRH treatment and -0.5, 0, 2, 4, and 8 hours on the day of treatment (Day 0), and Days 1, 2, 4, 8, and 12 after hCG treatment. Concentrations of LH, INSL3, and testosterone determined by EIAs indicated that secretion in the general circulation was pulsatile. The frequency of LH, INSL3, and testosterone pulses was 4.7 ± 0.9, 3.8 ± 0.2, and 1.0 ± 0.0, respectively, during the 8-hour period. Seventy percent of these INSL3 pulses peaked within 1 hour after a peak of an LH pulse had occurred. The mean increase (peak per basal concentration) of testosterone pulses was higher (P < 0.001) than that of INSL3 pulses. After GnRH treatment, LH concentrations increased (P < 0.01) dramatically 1 hour after treatment and remained high (P < 0.05) until the end of sampling, whereas an elevated (P < 0.05) INSL3 concentration occurred at 1, 2, 5, and 6 hours after treatment. Testosterone concentrations increased (P < 0.01) 1 hour after the treatment and remained high until the end of sampling. After hCG treatment, an increase of INSL3 concentration occurred at 2 and 4 hours, and Days 2, 4, and 8 after treatment (P < 0.05), whereas in case of testosterone, concentrations remained high (P < 0.01) until Day 8 after treatment. The increase (maximum per pretreatment concentration) of INSL3 concentrations after injecting GnRH or hCG was much lower (P < 0.001) than that of

  9. Gonadal and pituitary responsiveness of stallions is not down-regulated by prolonged pulsatile administration of GnRH.

    PubMed

    Brinsko, S P; Squires, E L; Pickett, B W; Nett, T M

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if prolonged pulsatile administration of homologous gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) at therapeutic or 5x therapeutic doses would cause down-regulation of the stallion's hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis. Fifteen stallions were randomly assigned to three treatment groups (n=5/group) and received a 0.5 ml subcutaneous dose of saline (group 1), 50 microg GnRH (group 2), or 250 microg GnRH (group 3) every 2 hours for 75 days. Weekly evaluations of follicle stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, and testosterone and monthly evaluations of daily sperm output and spermatozoal motility failed to demonstrate any decreased pituitary or gonadal responsiveness within or among treatment groups (P > 0.1) as a result of treatment with GnRH. Results of this study demonstrate that the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicularaxis of the stallion, unlike that of other domestic species, is remarkably refractory to GnRH-induced down-regulation.

  10. Appraising the instantaneous secretory rates of luteinizing hormone and testosterone in response to selective mu opiate receptor blockade in late pubertal boys.

    PubMed

    Mauras, N; Rogol, A D; Veldhuis, J D

    1987-01-01

    The pulsatile properties of gonadotropin and testosterone release were examined before and after chronic mu opiate receptor blockade with naltrexone, 50 mg every other day, in four normal boys in late puberty (ages 14 8/12 to 15 1/12 years). The nature of spontaneous secretory events was appraised for immunoactive LH and testosterone in blood withdrawn every 20 minutes for 24 hours, using a novel, discrete deconvolution algorithm to estimate apparent instantaneous secretory rates. The application of this methodology revealed that the frequency of discrete LH instantaneous secretory rates increased after mu opiate receptor blockade (P = 0.011). More strikingly, all parameters of testosterone secretory events responded significantly to mu opiate receptor blockade, including increases in mean estimated secretory rate (+47%, P = 0.02), testosterone pulse frequency (+ 64%, P less than 0.001) and amplitude (+ 20%, P = 0.027). Correspondingly, decreases in testosterone interpulse secretory intervals (-35%, P = 0.001), secretory pulse duration (-19%, P = 0.042) and interpulse valley duration (-35%, P = 0.006) also were noted. There was a prominent diurnal rhythm in testosterone secretion with maximal values in the morning and late evening, and marked reductions in the afternoon, sometimes to prepubertal levels. This variation in the testosterone secretory profile paralleled that of LH. In response to naltrexone, the FSH concentration series showed a significant increase in the mean FSH concentration (+ 18%) P = 0.003) and mean peak amplitude (+ 15%, P = 0.002). These data provide indirect evidence of functional coupling of the opiate system with the hypothalamic GnRH pulse generator.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3040654

  11. A high response to controlled ovarian stimulation induces premature luteinization with a negative impact on pregnancy outcomes in a gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist cycle

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Hwa Seon; Cha, Sun Hwa; Kim, Hye Ok; Song, In Ok; Min, Eung Gi; Yang, Kwang Moon

    2015-01-01

    Objective The goal of this study was to investigate the relationship between serum progesterone (P4) levels on the day of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) administration and the pregnancy rate among women undergoing controlled ovarian stimulation for in vitro fertilization (IVF) or intracytoplasmic sperm injection-embryo transfer (ICSI-ET) using a flexible antagonist protocol. Methods This prospective study included 200 IVF and ICSI-ET cycles in which a flexible antagonist protocol was used. The patients were divided into five distinct groups according to their serum P4 levels at the time of hCG administration (0.80, 0.85, 0.90, 0.95, and 1.00 ng/mL). The clinical pregnancy rate (CPR) was calculated for each P4 interval. Statistically significant differences were observed at a serum P4 level of 0.9 ng/mL. These data suggest that a serum P4 concentration of 0.9 ng/mL may represent the optimal threshold level for defining premature luteinization (PL) based on the presence of a significant negative impact on the CPR. Results The CPR for each round of ET was significantly lower in the PL group defined using this threshold (25.8% vs. 41.8%; p=0.019), and the number of oocytes retrieved was significantly higher than in the non-PL group (17.3±7.2 vs. 11.0±7.2; p=0.001). Elevated serum P4 levels on the day of hCG administration were associated with a reduced CPR, despite the retrieval of many oocytes. Conclusion Measuring serum P4 values at the time of hCG administration is necessary in order to determine the optimal strategy for embryo transfer. PMID:26816874

  12. Luteinizing hormone secretion and corticotropin-releasing factor gene expression in the paraventricular nucleus of rhesus monkeys following cortisol synthesis inhibition.

    PubMed

    Van Vugt, D A; Piercy, J; Farley, A E; Reid, R L; Rivest, S

    1997-06-01

    Corticotropin-releasing Factor (CRF) is an important inhibitory neuromodulator of GnRH/LH secretion, and mediates in part the inhibitory effects of stress on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. The purpose of the present study was to further investigate CRF's role in regulating LH secretion in primates. This was accomplished by examining LH secretion in ovariectomized rhesus monkeys (n = 7) following cortisol synthesis inhibition with metyrapone. Infusion of metyrapone (5 mg/kg per h) for 4 h decreased cortisol levels to less than 20% of controls while increasing ACTH approximately 10-fold. LH concentrations were not affected by this acute activation of the hypothalamic-corticotroph axis. In a second experiment, metyrapone was infused for 10 h before collecting serial blood samples every 15 min for 6 h. Although this protocol produced a sustained increase in ACTH, no apparent effect on pulsatile LH secretion compared with saline controls was observed. Mean LH (+/- SEM) levels calculated for consecutive 2-h increments were 87.6 +/- 9.2 (0-2 h) 82.1 +/- 5.5 (2-4 h), and 80.7 +/- 4.8 (4-6 h) ng/ml in saline pretreated animals compared with 83.6 +/- 4.9, 79.8 +/- 5.8, and 72.5 +/- 6.2 ng/ml, respectively, in metyrapone pretreated monkeys. The same regimen of metyrapone infusion increased CRF messenger RNA levels in the paraventricular nucleus by approximately 33% (P < 0.0002). In a final experiment designed to examine the potential synergy between CRF and cortisol, the LH response to insulin-induced hypoglycemia was contrasted in saline and metyrapone pretreated monkeys. LH concentrations were reduced to approximately 40% of basal levels following insulin in both metyrapone and saline pretreated monkeys. Therefore, even though inhibition of cortisol synthesis leads to an increase in CRF messenger RNA in the paraventricular nucleus and a robust increase in ACTH secretion in rhesus monkeys, presumably due in part to increased neuroendocrine CRF secretion, LH

  13. Stability of lutein in wholegrain bakery products naturally high in lutein or fortified with free lutein.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Aal, El-Sayed M; Young, J Christopher; Akhtar, Humayoun; Rabalski, Iwona

    2010-09-22

    Lutein is a yellow pigment found in common foods that promotes the health of eyes and skin and is associated with reduced risk of age-related macular degeneration and cataracts. In the present study, selected high-lutein wheat and corn were milled into wholegrain flours by two mills to improve flour uniformity. The high-lutein and lutein-fortified wholegrain flours were processed into breads, cookies, and muffins to study lutein stability during baking and subsequent storage. Lutein and its isomers were separated, identified, and quantified by LC-UV/vis and LC-MS following extraction with water-saturated 1-butanol. Baking resulted in a significant reduction in all-trans-lutein and the formation of cis-lutein and cis-zeaxanthin isomers. Subsequent storage at ambient temperature had a slight impact on the content of all-trans-lutein. Effects of processing were more pronounced in lutein-fortified products, and the degradation rate of lutein was influenced by concentration and baking recipe. Fortified cookies and muffins showed greater lutein reduction compared with bread. Despite the significant reduction in lutein, the fortified bakery products still possessed reasonable amounts per serving that would enhance daily intake and consumption of wholegrain foods.

  14. Pulsatile administration of gonadotropin-releasing hormone does not alter the follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) isoform distribution pattern of pituitary or circulating FSH in nutritionally growth-restricted ovariectomized lambs.

    PubMed

    Hassing, J M; Kletter, G B; I'Anson, H; Wood, R I; Beitins, I Z; Foster, D L; Padmanabhan, V

    1993-04-01

    The experimental induction of puberty by GnRH administration to prepubertal lambs increases serum bioactive FSH (B-FSH) as measured in the rat Sertoli cell aromatase induction bioassay. Serum immunoreactive FSH (I-FSH) levels are unchanged. The increase in serum B-FSH is associated with an increase in the proportion of less acidic and more biopotent FSH serum isoforms. However, it is unknown if this effect of GnRH on serum FSH microheterogeneity is direct or mediated by gonadal factors. We have used the nutritionally growth-restricted ovariectomized lamb as a model of the neuroendocrine regulation of FSH isoform microheterogeneity. With this model, the hypothalamic-pituitary component of the neuroendocrine axis may be isolated from gonadal factors. In the present study, using the nutritionally growth-restricted ovariectomized lamb as a model, we investigated the role of GnRH on the regulation of FSH microheterogeneity. Specifically, we tested the hypothesis that GnRH increases the proportion of the less acidic (more biopotent) serum FSH isoforms. As an in vitro correlate, we investigated the effect of GnRH on gonadotropin secretion and FSH isoform distribution in ovine pituitary explant cultures. Seven ovariectomized nutritionally restricted lambs were administered GnRH (i.v., 2 ng/kg) for 36 h (at 2-h intervals for 24 h, then hourly for the final 12 h). Six others served as controls. Blood samples were withdrawn at 12-min intervals during the last 4 h for the measurement of serum immunoactive LH (I-LH) and I-FSH. Pituitary homogenates and serum from four animals from each group were individually chromatofocused, and the FSH isoform distribution patterns were determined. Pulsatile administration of GnRH to nutritionally growth-restricted lambs increased circulating I-LH concentrations from 0.6 +/- 1.0 to 5.9 +/- 3.1 ng/ml (P < 0.01), but did not significantly change circulating I-FSH (4.9 +/- 1.8 vs. 11.5 +/- 4.2 ng/ml) nor B-FSH concentrations (3.9 +/- 1.2 vs. 5

  15. Lutein and brain function

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lutein is one of the most prevalent carotenoids in nature and in the human diet. Together with zeaxanthin, it is highly concentrated in macular pigment in the foveal retina of primates, attenuating blue light exposure, providing protection from photo-oxidation and enhancing visual performance. Rece...

  16. A single luteinizing hormone determination 2 hours after depot leuprolide is useful for therapy monitoring of gonadotropin-dependent precocious puberty in girls.

    PubMed

    Brito, Vinicius N; Latronico, Ana C; Arnhold, Ivo J P; Mendonca, Berenice B

    2004-09-01

    Long-acting GnRH analogs represent the standard treatment for gonadotropin-dependent precocious puberty. The aim of this study was to determine the hormonal parameters for monitoring the adequacy of depot leuprolide acetate treatment in girls with clinical and hormonal diagnosis of gonadotropin-dependent precocious puberty. Eighteen girls were treated monthly with 3.75 mg depot leuprolide acetate. Adequate hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis suppression during treatment was achieved in 16 of the 18 girls according to the clinical parameters and prepubertal LH levels. In these 16 well-controlled girls, the LH peak after a classical GnRH test was compared with a single LH measurement obtained 2 h after depot leuprolide acetate administration before and during GnRH analog treatment. Before therapy, the mean +/- sd LH peak after a classical GnRH test was 18.4 +/- 11.2 IU/liter (ranging from 7-41.5 IU/liter), and it was 22.6 +/- 8.3 IU/liter 2 h after the first depot leuprolide dose (ranging from 10-35.3 IU/liter). During therapy, the mean +/- sd of LH peak after classical GnRH test was 1.4 +/- 0.6 IU/liter (ranging from <0.6 to 2.3 IU/liter), and it was 2.7 +/- 1.9 IU/liter (ranging from 0.7-6.6 IU/liter) 2 h after depot leuprolide. The LH peak after a classical GnRH test and that 2 h after depot leuprolide administration correlate significantly before and during treatment. In conclusion, we established the LH cut-off values for an adequate depot leuprolide therapy as an LH peak below 2.3 IU/liter after a classical GnRH test or below 6.6 IU/liter 2 h after depot leuprolide. The latter measurement may replace the classical GnRH test as a reliable and convenient tool for monitoring therapy in female gonadotropin-dependent precocious puberty.

  17. Luteinizing Hormone Causes Phosphorylation and Activation of the cGMP Phosphodiesterase PDE5 in Rat Ovarian Follicles, Contributing, Together with PDE1 Activity, to the Resumption of Meiosis.

    PubMed

    Egbert, Jeremy R; Uliasz, Tracy F; Shuhaibar, Leia C; Geerts, Andreas; Wunder, Frank; Kleiman, Robin J; Humphrey, John M; Lampe, Paul D; Artemyev, Nikolai O; Rybalkin, Sergei D; Beavo, Joseph A; Movsesian, Matthew A; Jaffe, Laurinda A

    2016-05-01

    The meiotic cell cycle of mammalian oocytes in preovulatory follicles is held in prophase arrest by diffusion of cGMP from the surrounding granulosa cells into the oocyte. Luteinizing hormone (LH) then releases meiotic arrest by lowering cGMP in the granulosa cells. The LH-induced reduction of cGMP is caused in part by a decrease in guanylyl cyclase activity, but the observation that the cGMP phosphodiesterase PDE5 is phosphorylated during LH signaling suggests that an increase in PDE5 activity could also contribute. To investigate this idea, we measured cGMP-hydrolytic activity in rat ovarian follicles. Basal activity was due primarily to PDE1A and PDE5, and LH increased PDE5 activity. The increase in PDE5 activity was accompanied by phosphorylation of PDE5 at serine 92, a protein kinase A/G consensus site. Both the phosphorylation and the increase in activity were promoted by elevating cAMP and opposed by inhibiting protein kinase A, supporting the hypothesis that LH activates PDE5 by stimulating its phosphorylation by protein kinase A. Inhibition of PDE5 activity partially suppressed LH-induced meiotic resumption as indicated by nuclear envelope breakdown, but inhibition of both PDE5 and PDE1 activities was needed to completely inhibit this response. These results show that activities of both PDE5 and PDE1 contribute to the LH-induced resumption of meiosis in rat oocytes, and that phosphorylation and activation of PDE5 is a regulatory mechanism.

  18. Relationships between the appearances and changes of estrous signs and the estradiol-17β peak, luteinizing hormone surge and ovulation during the periovulatory period in lactating dairy cows kept in tie-stalls.

    PubMed

    Sumiyoshi, Toshiaki; Tanaka, Tomomi; Kamomae, Hideo

    2014-04-24

    Lactating Holstein-Friesian cows kept in tie-stall barn were used as subjects in this study. Rectal examination, ultrasonography and blood sampling were conducted every other day and then daily after the day on which diameter of the corpus luteum decreased. After the luteal diameter decreased for 2 consecutive days, rectal and ultrasound examinations, blood sampling, and observation of estrous signs were conducted at 6-h intervals. Most of the estrous signs became obvious with the increase in estradiol-17β (E2) and became most remarkable 24 to 30 hours before ovulation, at which point the E2 peak and luteinizing hormone (LH) surge were achieved, and then weakened which progression to ovulation. The correlation between the intensity of four estrous signs (hyperemia and swelling of the intravaginal part of the uterus, opening of the external uterine orifice and viscosity of the cervical mucus) and the plasma E2 concentration was higher than that of three estrous signs (swelling of the vulva, contraction of the uterus, diameter of uterine horn) and the plasma E2 concentration. The relaxation of the intravaginal part of the uterus showed a unique change compared with the other estrous signs, and it became most obvious 6, 12 and 18 h before ovulation; this obviously relaxed period was consistent with the generally accepted theoretical optimal time for artificial insemination (AI), i.e., 6 to 24 h after initiation of estrus. These results suggest that observation of estrous signs by vaginoscopic examination gave useful information for detection of the optimal timing of AI in the periovulatory period in lactating dairy cows kept in a tie-stall barn.

  19. Circadian Clock genes Per2 and clock regulate steroid production, cell proliferation, and luteinizing hormone receptor transcription in ovarian granulosa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Shimizu, Takashi; Hirai, Yuko; Murayama, Chiaki; Miyamoto, Akio; Miyazaki, Hitoshi; Miyazaki, Koyomi

    2011-08-19

    Highlights: {yields} Treatment with Per2 and Clock siRNAs decreased the number of granulosa cells and LHr expression. {yields}Per2 siRNA treatment did not stimulate the production of estradiol and expression of P450arom. {yields} Clock siRNA treatment inhibited the production of estradiol and expression of P450arom mRNA. {yields}Per2 and Clock siRNA treatment increased and unchanged, respectively, progesterone production in FSH-treated granulosa cells. {yields} The expression of StAR mRNA was increased by Per2 siRNA and unchanged by Clock siRNA. -- Abstract: Circadian Clock genes are associated with the estrous cycle in female animals. Treatment with Per2 and Clock siRNAs decreased the number of granulosa cells and LHr expression in follicle-stimulating hormone FSH-treated granulosa cells. Per2 siRNA treatment did not stimulate the production of estradiol and expression of P450arom, whereas Clock siRNA treatment inhibited the production of estradiol and expression of P450arom mRNA. Per2 and Clock siRNA treatment increased and unchanged, respectively, progesterone production in FSH-treated granulosa cells. Similarly, expression of StAR mRNA was increased by Per2 siRNA and unchanged by Clock siRNA. Our data provide a new insight that Per2 and Clock have different action on ovarian granulosa cell functions.

  20. Hormones

    MedlinePlus

    Hormones are your body's chemical messengers. They travel in your bloodstream to tissues or organs. They work ... glands, which are special groups of cells, make hormones. The major endocrine glands are the pituitary, pineal, ...

  1. Pulsatile LHRH therapy in patients with oligozoospermia and disturbed LH pulsatility.

    PubMed

    Aulitzky, W; Frick, J; Hadziselimovic, F

    1989-08-01

    Pulsatile administration of LHRH can drive the pituitary to secrete LH and FSH in a pattern that closely mimics the physiological pattern of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. As there is evidence that infertility in some men is due to dysfunction of this axis, 14 men with reported infertility of more than 2 years duration were treated by long-term pulsatile LHRH therapy. They were 24-42 years of age, with variable degrees of oligozoospermia, elevated FSH levels but normal LH and testosterone levels. The number of endogenous LH pulses/24 h was less than eight in all 14 subjects. The degree of testicular damage was assessed semi-thin sections prepared from biopsies of both testes. Scores for spermatogonia per seminiferous tubule (SPT) were calculated from the actual number of Ad-spermatogonia/tubule. Patients were grouped according to sperm density and SPT score (groups I-III). Pulsatile LHRH therapy was administered by means of a portable infusion pump; 4 micrograms LHRH were administered subcutaneously every 120 min for a period of 6 months. This treatment restored the normal pattern of LH secretion to 12 LH pulses/24 h in all patients. A statistically significant decrease of mean FSH levels to normal, and an increase of mean LH levels was observed in most of the 14 patients. Testosterone values did not change in any group. Marked improvement of the sperm count was observed in eight out of 14 patients (groups I and II) and three pregnancies were reported during the treatment periods. These results suggest that some states of male infertility are due to hormonal dysregulation and that these patients may benefit from pulsatile LHRH therapy.

  2. Expression of the full-length and alternatively spliced equine luteinizing hormone/chorionic gonadotropin receptor mRNAs in the primary corpus luteum and fetal gonads during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Saint-Dizier, Marie; Chopineau, Maryse; Dupont, Joëlle; Combarnous, Yves

    2004-08-01

    The full-length equine luteinizing hormone/chorionic gonadotropin (LH/CG) receptor (eLH/CG-RA) cDNA and two alternatively spliced isoforms (eLH/CG-RB,C) were isolated from luteal tissue and characterized using a combination of reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and 5'-rapid amplification of cDNA ends. The 680-amino acid full sequence of eLH/CG-RA displayed 87-92% homology with other mammalian LH/CG-Rs. The eLH/CG-RB and eLH/CG-RC cDNA isoforms were truncated from the 3'-end of exon X: eLH/CG-RB spliced out of frame into the last exon whereas eLH/CG-RC contained an in-frame stop codon within a divergent sequence. Consequently, both eLH/CG-RB and eLH/CG-RC cDNA isoforms encoded putative proteins without transmembrane and intracellular domains. In order to study the responsiveness of the primary corpus luteum (CL) and fetal gonads to eCG, the expression of eLH/CG-R mRNAs was examined by RT-PCR and Northern blot analysis during early and mid-pregnancy. All three eLH/CG-R cDNA isoforms (eLH/CG-RA,B,C) were expressed from day 14 to day 83 of pregnancy in the primary CL and from day 44 to day 222 in fetal gonads. Interestingly, the primary CL at days 89 and 151 expressed only truncated eLH/CG-R cDNA isoforms. The relative values of Northern hybridized major 7, 5.7, 3.9 and 1.8 kb eLH/CG-R mRNA transcripts tended to decrease in the primary CL whereas the unique major 1.8 kb eLH/CG-R mRNA was steadily expressed in fetal gonads during pregnancy. These results show that the expression of eLH/CG-R mRNAs occurs in the fetal gonads before ceasing in the primary CL and suggest that eCG may be involved in the gradual transition from a luteal to a feto-placental output of steroids during equine pregnancy. PMID:15280561

  3. Effect of recombinant human follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone on in vitro maturation of porcine oocytes evaluated by the subsequent in vitro development of embryos obtained by in vitro fertilization, intracytoplasmic sperm injection, or parthenogenetic activation.

    PubMed

    Silvestre, M A; Alfonso, J; García-Mengual, E; Salvador, I; Duque, C C; Molina, I

    2007-05-01

    The aim of this work was to study the effect of recombinant human (rh) FSH and LH on in vitro maturation of pig oocytes compared with a conventional hormonal supplement based on equine (PMSG) and human chorionic gonadotropins (hCG), as evaluated by the developmental ability of 3 types of pig embryos obtained by in vitro fertilization (IVF), intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), or artificial activation (ATA). In Exp. 1, one cumulus-oocyte complex group (A group) was supplemented with rh-FSH and rh-LH (0.1 IU/mL each), and the other group (B group) was supplemented with PMSG and hCG (10 IU/mL each). No differences in nuclear maturation between the A and B groups were observed (68.5 vs. 71.4%, respectively). No differences were detected between hormonal treatments in the rates of cleavage or blastocyst formation of ATA, IVF, and ICSI embryos. Total cell number of the embryos was not significantly different in any experimental group (A: 31.1, 28.5, and 19.8 vs. B: 25.2, 25.5, and 20.6 for ATA, IVF, and ICSI embryos, respectively). In Exp. 2, the effects of different concentrations of rh-FSH and rh-LH (0.5, 0.1, or 0.05 IU/mL) in maturation medium on nuclear maturation and in vitro development of embryos obtained by IVF were studied. No effect of different hormonal concentrations on blastocyst formation rates was observed (8.5, 13.0, and 5.7%, respectively). Blastocyst cell number was not different in any experimental group. In conclusion, the results obtained here permit us to substitute PMSG and hCG with rh-FSH and rh-LH and to produce pig embryos obtained by IVF, ICSI, or ATA.

  4. Bioavailability and biodistribution of nanodelivered lutein

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the ability of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NP) to enhance lutein bioavailability. The bioavailability of free lutein and PLGA-NP lutein in rats was assessed by determining plasma pharmacokinetics and deposition in selected tissues. Lutein ...

  5. Long-term treatment of central precocious puberty with a long-acting analogue of luteinizing hormone release hormone (D-Tryp6-GnRH) in monthly injections. Its possible use in normal puberty.

    PubMed

    Marcondes, J A; Abujamra, A C; Minanni, S L; Mendonca, B B; Nery, M; Lerario, A C; Pereira, M A; Abelin, N; Wajchenberg, B L

    1993-02-01

    The gonadotropin-releasing-hormone-like agonist D-Tryp6-GnRH (GnRHa) has been shown to induce reversible suppression of gonadotropins and gonadal steroids in patients with central precocious puberty. We examined the effect of a long-acting preparation of GnRHa in biodegradable microcapsules. D-Tryptophane6-GnRH, administered intramuscularly at 1 month intervals, for 12 consecutive months, on growth and skeletal maturation in 3 girls and 4 boys with neurogenic or idiopathic precocious puberty. Suppression of gonadotropin release after GnRH stimulation and gonadal steroids was maintained in all subjects. Growth velocity fell from a mean rate (+/- SEM) or 8.60 +/- 0.75 cm/year before treatment to 5.81 +/- 0.60 cm/year (p < 0.005) after 1 year. Bone age advanced a mean of 8.0 +/- 0.45 months during treatment, suggesting an increase in predicted height from the ratio delta bone age/delta chronological age. Two subjects, one of them with compensated Bartter's syndrome with normal hypothalamic pituitary-gonadal-axis, received the analogue to delay pubertal growth with the hope to improve final height. In the first one, the growth velocity fell from 9.9 cm/year to 8 cm/year and delta bone age/delta chronological age decreased from 1.28 to 1.0 and in the other subject, the growth velocity fell from 12 cm/year to 6.0 cm/year in the last year of treatment and delta bone age/delta chronological age fell from 3.2 to 0.75, indicating an improvement in predicted height.

  6. Effects of acute feed restriction combined with targeted use of increasing luteinizing hormone content of follicle-stimulating hormone preparations on ovarian superstimulation, fertilization, and embryo quality in lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Bender, R W; Hackbart, K S; Dresch, A R; Carvalho, P D; Vieira, L M; Crump, P M; Guenther, J N; Fricke, P M; Shaver, R D; Combs, D K; Wiltbank, M C

    2014-02-01

    Multiple metabolic and hormonal factors can affect the success of protocols for ovarian superstimulation. In this study, the effect of acute feed restriction and increased LH content in the superstimulatory FSH preparation on numbers of ovulations, fertilization, and embryo quality in lactating dairy cows was evaluated. Two experiments were performed using a Latin square design with treatments arranged as a 2 × 2 factorial: feed restriction (FR; 25% reduction in dry matter intake) compared with ad libitum (AL) feeding, combined with high (H) versus low (L) LH in the last 4 injections of the superstimulatory protocol. As expected, FR decreased circulating insulin concentrations (26.7 vs. 46.0 μU/mL). Two analyses were performed: one that evaluated the complete Latin square in experiment 2 and a second that evaluated only the first periods of experiments 1 and 2. For both analyses, follicle numbers, ovulation rates, and corpora lutea on d 7 were not different. In the first period analysis of experiments 1 and 2, we observed an interaction between feed allowance and amount of LH on fertilization rates, percentage of embryos or oocytes that were quality 1 and 2 embryos, and number of embryos or oocytes that were degenerate. Fertilization rates were greater for the AL-L (89.4%) and FR-H (80.1%) treatments compared with the AL-H (47.9%) and FR-L (59.9%) treatments. Similarly, the proportion of total embryos or oocytes designated as quality 1 and 2 embryos was greater for AL-L (76.7%) and FR-H (73.4%) treatments compared with AL-H (35.6%) and FR-L (47.3%) treatments. In addition, the number of degenerate embryos was decreased for AL-L (1.3) and FR-H (0.4) treatments compared with the AL-H (2.6) and FR-L (2.3) treatments. Thus, cows with either too low (FR-L) or too high (AL-H) insulin and LH stimulation had lesser embryo production after superstimulation because of reduced fertilization rate and increased percentage of degenerate embryos. Therefore, interaction of the

  7. Blockade of central and peripheral luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) receptors in neonatal rats with a potent LHRH-antagonist inhibits the morphofunctional development of the thymus and maturation of the cell-mediated and humoral immune responses.

    PubMed

    Morale, M C; Batticane, N; Bartoloni, G; Guarcello, V; Farinella, Z; Galasso, M G; Marchetti, B

    1991-02-01

    The development of the thymus and the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis are linked by bidirectional hormonally mediated relationships. In the present study, the direct involvement of the neuropeptide LHRH in the maturation of the thymus and development of the cell-mediated and humoral immune responses were assessed after treatment of neonatal (from post-natal day 1-day 5) female rats with a potent LHRH-antagonist (LHRH-anta, p-Glu-D-Phe 2.6,Pro3-LHRH, 50 micrograms/rat), and the effects compared to those resulting from neonatal castration. Whereas in control animals the maturation of mitogenic potential in thymocyte cultures showed a progressive and age-dependent increase, reaching a maximal activity at 30 days of age and then decreasing after puberty onset, in LHRH-anta-treated rats, the thymocyte's proliferative response was completely blocked at 7 days of age and remained very low at each time interval studied, until 3 months of age. A similar effect of the LHRH-anta treatment on splenocyte cultures was measured. Moreover, a reduced percentage of the T-helper lymphocyte subpopulation followed LHRH-anta administration. By contrast, in neonatally castrated rats, blastogenic activity was significantly higher, compared to control cultures, at each stage studied. Treatment with LHRH-anta produced a significant decrease in thymus wt, an alteration of the maturational pattern characterized by a cellular monomorphism, reduced thymocyte volume, reduction of the cortical area, and depauperation of the epithelial microenvironment. Moreover, a morphometric analysis revealed a selective decrease in the large lymphoid cell population of the subcapsular cortex at 7 and 15 days. On the other hand, neonatal castration produced an opposite effect, leading to a marked hypertrophy of the cortical area, and counteracted the post-puberal thymus atrophy. When LHRH-anta-treated adult (3-month-old) rats were challenged with an antigenic stimulus (multiple sc injections of complete

  8. Hormone Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... agonists , which are sometimes called LHRH analogs, are synthetic proteins that are structurally similar to LHRH and ... gland to stop producing luteinizing hormone, which prevents testosterone from being produced. Treatment with an LHRH agonist ...

  9. Induction of follicular luteinization by equine chorionic gonadotropin in cyclic guinea pigs*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun-rong; Wang, Wei; Shi, Fang-xiong

    2015-01-01

    The effects of equine chorionic gonadotropin (eCG) on follicular development and ovulation in cyclic guinea pigs were investigated by histological and immunohistochemical analyses. Three groups of guinea pigs (n=12) were administrated subcutaneously with saline, 20 or 50 IU of eCG, respectively, on cyclic Day 12 (Day 1=vaginal openings). Ovaries were collected at 4 and 8 d after administration (6 animals per group each time). The eCG administration induced significant and distinct morphological changes in the ovaries, as it promoted the luteinization of granulosa cells, but not follicular development. In addition, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) were immunolocalized specifically in luteinized follicles. Our experiments together indicate that eCG administration can induce follicular luteinization but not superovulation in guinea pigs. The eCG in cyclic guinea pigs functions similar to that of luteinizing hormone (LH), but not follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH). PMID:26642181

  10. Effect of Chlorotriazine Pesticides on Gonadotrophin Releasing Hormone in the Neuronal GT1-7 Cell Line and Hypothalamic Explants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gonadotrophin releasing hormone (GnRH) stimulates the release of pituitary luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle stimulating hormone. These pituitary hormones are necessary for normal reproductive function in both males and females. It is well recognized that disruption of nor...

  11. Biochemical and functional aspects of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone and gonadotrophins.

    PubMed

    Ulloa-Aguirre, A; Timossi, C

    2000-01-01

    Reproductive function in mammals is governed by the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, which conforms a functional unit. Sexual maturation and the subsequent development of reproductive competence depend on the precise and coordinated function of this axis. The components of the reproductive axis communicate each other through endocrine signals. The hypothalamus synthesizes gonadotrophin-releasing hormone or GnRH, which in turn stimulates synthesis and secretion of the pituitary gonadotrophins, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH). The ovarian follicles and the interstitial and Sertoli cells of the testis are the targets for these pituitary signals. Under gonadotrophic stimulation, the gonads produce and secrete several steroid and non-steroid (polypeptide) factors, which in turn regulate in different ways the function of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis. An episodic and pulsatile mode of secretion of hormonal signals characterize (as in other endocrine systems) the function of the reproductive axis, particularly that of the hypothalamic-pituitary unit. The target cell response, and consequently the harmonic function of the corresponding gland, will depend on the adequate dynamics of this pulsatile secretion. The function of each component of the reproductive axis is strongly influenced by locally-produced signals acting either in a paracrine or autocrine manner; these particular signals represent fine-tuning regulation systems that eventually amplify or restrain the magnitude of response to a particular endocrine signal, providing additional mechanisms for tissue homeostasis and a better functional plasticity of the target gland. The design and rational use of novel therapeutic strategies for an optimal exogenously-controlled reproductive function largely depend on the detailed knowledge of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis function and the structure and mechanism of action of those factors and signals involved in its regulation.

  12. Bioavailability and biodistribution of nanodelivered lutein.

    PubMed

    Kamil, Alison; Smith, Donald E; Blumberg, Jeffrey B; Astete, Carlos; Sabliov, Cristina; Oliver Chen, C-Y

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the ability of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NP) to enhance lutein bioavailability. The bioavailability of free lutein and PLGA-NP lutein in rats was assessed by determining plasma pharmacokinetics and deposition in selected tissues. Lutein uptake and secretion was also assessed in Caco-2 cells. Compared to free lutein, PLGA-NP increased the maximal plasma concentration (Cmax) and area under the time-concentration curve in rats by 54.5- and 77.6-fold, respectively, while promoting tissue accumulation in the mesenteric fat and spleen. In comparison with micellized lutein, PLGA-NP lutein improved the Cmax in rat plasma by 15.6-fold and in selected tissues by ⩾ 3.8-fold. In contrast, PLGA-NP lutein had a lower uptake and secretion of lutein in Caco-2 cells by 10.0- and 50.5-fold, respectively, compared to micellized lutein. In conclusion, delivery of lutein with polymeric NP may be an approach to improve the bioavailability of lutein in vivo.

  13. Characterization of milk proteins-lutein complexes and the impact on lutein chemical stability.

    PubMed

    Yi, Jiang; Fan, Yuting; Yokoyama, Wallace; Zhang, Yuzhu; Zhao, Liqing

    2016-06-01

    In this study, the interaction of WPI (whey protein isolate) and SC (sodium caseinate) with hydrophobic lutein was investigated through UV-vis spectroscopy and circular dichroism (CD) as well as fluorescence. The effects on lutein's chemical stability were also examined. The decrease of turbidity of lutein suggested that lutein's aqueous solubility was improved after binding with milk proteins. CD analysis indicated lutein had little impact on the secondary structures of both proteins. Different preparation methods have significant impacts on the binding constant. Fluorescence results indicated that WPI and SC interact with lutein by hydrophobic contacts. Milk proteins have protective effects on lutein against oxidation and decomposition, and SC showed better capability in protecting lutein from oxidation than WPI during 16 days storage. The lutein's chemical stability was increased with increasing of proteins concentration. The results indicated that milk proteins may act as effective carriers for lipophilic nutraceuticals.

  14. Hypothyroidism affects pulsatile LH secretion in pubertal orchiectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Maia, A L; Favaretto, A L; Carvaho, T L; Rodrigues, J A; Iazigi, N

    1995-08-01

    The present study evaluated the effect of hypothyroidism on the pituitary-testicular axis in rats rendered hypothyroid on the beginning of puberty. Rats were treated with propylthiouracil for 8 weeks and killed for determination of hormonal status and body parameters. For determination of pulsatile LH secretion other animals were orchiectomized two weeks before sampling. Analysis of the results led us to conclude that although the absolute weight of sex organs tended to decrease in hypothyroid animals, the relative weights were equal or higher than control, suggesting that the development of these organs were not affected by hypothyroidism; the androgenic activity of hypothyroid rat testes were preserved; basal plasma levels of pituitary hormones were similar in control and hypothyroid groups; the pulsatile LH secretion showed a decrease in the number of pulses, nadir mean and total LH secretion in hypothyroid animals. Our results demonstrate that although hypothalamic-pituitary axis of hypothyroid pubertal rats displays an abnormal pulsation LH release, no evidences of abnormalities in the reproductive system functions were found.

  15. Hormonal changes in humans during spaceflight.

    PubMed

    Strollo, F

    1999-01-01

    Readers of this review may feel that there is much more that we do not know about space endocrinology than what we know. Several reasons for this state of affairs have been given: 1. the complexity of the field of endocrinology with its still increasing number of known hormones, releasing factors and precursors, and of the interactions between them through various feedback mechanisms 2. the difficulty in separating the microgravity effects from the effects of stress from launch, isolation and confinement during flight, reentry, and postflight re-adaptation 3. the experimental limitations during flight, such as limited number of subjects, limited number of samples, impossibility of collecting triple samples for pulsatile hormones like growth hormone 4. the disturbing effects of countermeasures used by astronauts 5. the inadequacy of postflight samples for conclusions about inflight values 6. limitations of conclusions from animal experiments and space simulation studies The endocrinology field is divided in to nine systems or axes, which are successively reviewed: 1. Rapid bone demineralization in the early phase of spaceflight that, when unopposed, leads to catastrophic effects after three months but that slows down later. The endocrine mechanism, apart from the effect of exercise as a countermeasure, is not yet understood. 2. The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis is involved in stress reactions, which complicate our understanding and makes postflight analysis dubious. 3. In the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, pulsatility poses a problem for obtaining representative values (e.g., for luteinizing hormone). Reproduction of rats in space is possible, but much more needs to be known about this aspect, particularly in women, before the advent of space colonies, but also in males because some evidence for reversible testicular dysfunction in space has been found. 4. The hypothalamic-pituitary-somato-mammotrophic axis involves prolactin and growth hormone. The

  16. 21 CFR 870.4320 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator... Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator is an electrically and pneumatically operated device used to create pulsatile blood flow....

  17. 21 CFR 870.4320 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator... Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator is an electrically and pneumatically operated device used to create pulsatile blood flow....

  18. 21 CFR 870.4320 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator... Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator is an electrically and pneumatically operated device used to create pulsatile blood flow....

  19. 21 CFR 870.4320 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator... Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator is an electrically and pneumatically operated device used to create pulsatile blood flow....

  20. 21 CFR 870.4320 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator... Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator is an electrically and pneumatically operated device used to create pulsatile blood flow....

  1. Altered pulsatile gonadotropin signaling in nutritional deficiency in the male.

    PubMed

    Bergendahl, M; Veldhuis, J D

    1995-07-01

    Reproduction cannot occur without adequate nutrition. Diets that are nutritionally inadequate delay and disrupt the pubertal development of the reproductive processes of immature experimental animals and humans, and impair the function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in adults. Although there is a general understanding of the linkages between nutrition and reproduction, there is a lack of detailed knowledge of the exact mechanisms that couple these two systems. The major effects of malnutrition on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis reported in the literature are, for the most part, manifested as reduced gonadotropin secretion. Malnutrition results in decreased circulating gonadotropin concentrations. These changes in the reproductive system are associated with impaired gonadal function and subsequent secondary sex organ atrophy and lead, ultimately, to poor reproduction. Decreased hypothalamic release of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) has been proposed as the most important etiologic factor for the fasting-induced suppression of pituitary-testicular function. In the human, hypogonadism and infertility develop in both sexes during chronic malnutrition. Most studies on the effects of malnutrition on the reproductive hormones have been performed in women, perhaps because malnutrition in women is promptly accompanied by amenorrhea, whereas in men hypogonadism develops gradually and becomes clinically evident only during more severe malnutrition. With the advent of sensitive assays for measuring reproductive hormones and of modern computerized methods for analyzing the pulsatile secretion of these hormones, however, the function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis has been scrutinized and it has, indeed, been observed that this system is disturbed even during acute malnutrition. Here, we review the effects of malnutrition on reproductive function, especially on the pulsatile pattern of LH secretion, in humans and in experimental animals.

  2. Gosling's Doppler pulsatility index revisited.

    PubMed

    Michel, E; Zernikow, B

    1998-05-01

    In Doppler sonography, the physiological meaning of Gosling's pulsatility index (PI) as a measure of downstream resistance is still under dispute. We deliver the theoretical derivation of its physiological significance. We present a mathematical model based on the linked theories of critical closing pressure (CCP) and cerebrovascular impedance, verified in preterm neonates. Mathematical transformation results in a series of equations interrelating several physiological parameters. Instead of indicating cerebrovascular resistance, PI is linked to the ratio of cerebrovascular impedances at the heart rate and at zero frequency. Next to arterial blood pressure, CCP is the principal determinant of PI. PI is identical to the ratio of the alternate and the direct component of the effective driving force. Thus, PI has no distinctive physiological meaning by itself. At present, our model is confined to physiological conditions where the lowest velocity is the end diastolic, and always more than zero.

  3. [Hematologic and endocrinologic effects of pulsatile cardiopulmonary bypass using a centrifugal pump].

    PubMed

    Komoda, T; Maeta, H; Imawaki, S; Shiraishi, Y; Tanaka, S

    1992-06-01

    The effects of pulsatile and nonpulsatile flow during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) with of centrifugal pump (Sarns) and membrane oxygenator, on blood cells, hemodynamics, and hormonal response were studied. In the pulsatile group (group P) in which pulsatile flow was generated by centrifugal pump and a 20 Fr arterial cannula was used, hemolysis and reduction of platelet count during CPB were more marked than in the nonpulsatile group (group NP), in which the same type of circuit was used. When the 20 Fr arterial cannula was replaced with a 24 Fr cannula (group Pc), the rate of hemolysis during CPB was significantly reduced compared with that in group P (p less than 0.05). The rate of rise in plasma free hemoglobin from 10 to 70 minutes CPB in group Pc was 15.0 mg/dl/hr, this value did not exceed that in either group NP or in group Pr, in which a roller pump rather than centrifugal pump was used to generate pulsatile flow. These findings show that pulsatile CPB with a centrifugal pump produces no deleterious hematologic effect in clinical use. The rise in the level of angiotensin II in group P was significantly smaller than that in group NP (p less than 0.05), and the rise in plasma renin activity and levels of angiotensin I, adrenalin and noradrenaline were smaller than those in group NP, although these differences were no significance. These findings indicate that the centrifugal pump generates pulsatile flow effectively, although not so effectively as to prevent the rise in peripheral vascular resistance. During CPB, there was no change in levels of thyroid hormones, including free T3, free T4 and reverse T3, in either pulsatile groups P and Pc or nonpulsatile group. TSH level in group Pc was significantly elevated in contrast with that in the nonpulsatile group (p less than 0.05), in which no change in TSH level was seen. It is suggested that pulsatile perfusion using a centrifugal pump might maintain sufficient hypothalamic-pituitary function to permit

  4. The Tissue Distribution of Lutein in Laying Hens Fed Lutein Fortified Chlorella and Production of Chicken Eggs Enriched with Lutein

    PubMed Central

    An, Byoung-Ki; Jeon, Jin-Young; Kang, Chang-Won; Kim, Jin-Man

    2014-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to investigate the dietary effects of conventional or lutein fortified chlorella on lutein absorptions, the tissue distributions and the changes in lutein content of eggs in laying hens. In Exp 1, a total of one hundred and fifty, 70 wk-old Hy-Line brown layers were divided into three groups with five replicates and fed with each experiment diet (control diet, diet with 1% conventional chlorella or lutein fortified chlorella) for 2 wk, respectively. The egg production in groups fed diets containing both chlorella powders were higher than that of the control group (p<0.01). With chlorella supplementations, the yolk color significantly increased, although there were no significant differences in the eggshell qualities. The lutein contents of serum, liver and growing oocytes were greatly increased by feeding conventional or lutein fortified chlorella (p<0.01). In Exp. 2, a total of ninety 60 wk-old Hy-Line brown layers were assigned into three groups with three replicates per group (10 birds per replicate). The birds were fed with one of three experimental diets (0, 0.1 or 0.2% lutein fortified chlorella) for 2 wk, respectively. The egg production was not affected by dietary treatments. The egg weight in the group fed with diet containing 0.2% of lutein fortified chlorella was higher than that of the control (p<0.05). As the dietary chlorella levels increased, the daily egg mass linearly increased, although not significantly. The yolk colors in groups fed diets containing lutein fortified chlorella were dramatically increased as compared to the control (p<0.001). The lutein in chicken eggs significantly increased when fed with 0.2% of lutein fortified chlorella (p<0.01). These results suggested that the dietary lutein derived from chlorella was readily absorbed into the serum and absorbed by the liver with growing oocyte for commercial laying hens. Particularly, the lutein fortified chlorella was a valuable natural source for the

  5. Study on the effect of steady, simple pulsatile and physiological pulsatile flows through a stenosed artery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, P.; Mandal, D. K.; Manna, N. K.; Chakrabarti, S.

    2014-10-01

    In the present paper, the comparison of steady, simple pulsatile flow and physiological pulsatile flow on flow reversal zone and hemodynamic wall parameters [wall shear stress (WSS) and oscillatory shear index (OSI)] for the progression of the disease, atherosclerosis has been investigated numerically. The governing equations have been solved by finite volume method. For the numerical analysis, Womersley number, Reynolds number and percentage of restriction are taken as 10, 100 and 50 % respectively. From this study it is revealed that the separated flow from the stenosis strongly depends on inlet flow situations, the maximum chance of deposition of plaque material due to streamline contour is higher at time step t* = 0.75 for simple pulsatile flow and at time step t* = 0 for physiological pulsatile flow and this chance is lower in case of steady flow. The effect of WSS on the disease is higher in physiological pulsatile flow compared to steady as well as simple pulsatile flow. The maximum possibility of initiation as well as progression for atherosclerosis in arterial wall due to high WSS takes place at t* = 0.25 for physiological pulsatile flow. OSI indicates same length of separation for two cases of transient flow, but the rate of cyclic departure of WSS is higher in case of physiological pulsatile flow.

  6. Absorption and ocular deposition of dietary lutein in marine mammals.

    PubMed

    Koutsos, Elizabeth A; Schmitt, Todd; Colitz, Carmen M H; Mazzaro, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Cataracts and ocular disease are common lesions of marine mammals in zoological collections. Lutein, an oxygenated carotenoid, may have therapeutic or prophylactic effects on ocular disorder. Therefore, this study examined the ability of marine mammals to absorb dietary lutein. Two preliminary trials examined lutein in two forms (beadlet or ester) in a small sample size of marine mammals representing pinnipeds and cetaceans. Lutein was fed daily in tablets providing 0.89-3.6 mg lutein/kg body weight(0.75) per day for 15 days to 2 years. A third study was conducted using lutein beadlet fed at 3.6 mg lutein/kg body weight(0.75) per day for 15-21 days. Blood was analyzed for lutein pre- and postsupplementation. In the preliminary trials, lutein beadlet was observed to result in greater blood lutein levels than lutein esters, and cetaceans had more noticeable responses than pinnipeds. In Study 3, serum lutein and zeaxanthin increased postsupplementation in beluga whales (P < 0.05), and serum lutein tended to increase postsupplementation in dolphins (P < 0.10), but little change was seen in serum lutein in pinnipeds or manatee. Opportunistic retinal samples demonstrated some detectable lutein in the retina of a dolphin and several harp seals. The lutein levels in dolphins after supplementation are similar to those reported in free-ranging animals. Ocular lutein in harp seals demonstrates that ocular deposition occurs despite low circulating lutein levels. PMID:22753123

  7. Lutein

    MedlinePlus

    ... when used in the amounts found in food. Cystic fibrosis: People with cystic fibrosis might not absorb some carotenoids from food very ... supplementation might also be decreased in people with cystic fibrosis.

  8. Hippocampal Fast Glutamatergic Transmission Is Transiently Regulated by Corticosterone Pulsatility.

    PubMed

    Sarabdjitsingh, R Angela; Pasricha, Natasha; Smeets, Johanna A S; Kerkhofs, Amber; Mikasova, Lenka; Karst, Henk; Groc, Laurent; Joëls, Marian

    2016-01-01

    In recent years it has become clear that corticosteroid hormones (such as corticosterone) are released in ultradian pulses as a natural consequence of pituitary-adrenal interactions. All organs, including the brain, are thus exposed to pulsatile changes in corticosteroid hormone level, important to ensure full genomic responsiveness to stress-induced surges. However, corticosterone also changes neuronal excitability through rapid non-genomic pathways, particularly in the hippocampus. Potentially, background excitability of hippocampal neurons could thus be changed by pulsatile exposure to corticosteroids. It is currently unknown, though, how neuronal activity alters during a sequence of corticosterone pulses. To test this, hippocampal cells were exposed in vitro to four consecutive corticosterone pulses with a 60 min inter-pulse interval. During the pulses we examined four features of hippocampal signal transfer by the main excitatory transmitter glutamate-i.e., postsynaptic responses to spontaneous release of presynaptic vesicles, postsynaptic GluA2-AMPA receptor dynamics, basal (evoked) field responses, and synaptic plasticity, using a set of high resolution imaging and electrophysiological approaches. We show that the first pulse of corticosterone causes a transient increase in miniature EPSC frequency, AMPA receptor trafficking and synaptic plasticity, while basal evoked field responses are unaffected. This pattern is not maintained during subsequent applications: responses become more variable, attenuate or even reverse over time, albeit with different kinetics for the various experimental endpoints. This may indicate that the beneficial effect of ultradian pulses on transcriptional regulation in the hippocampus is not consistently accompanied by short-term perturbations in background excitability. In general, this could be interpreted as a means to keep hippocampal neurons responsive to incoming signals related to environmental challenges. PMID:26741493

  9. Lutein extends the lifespan of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zesheng; Han, Shunkai; Wang, Hao; Wang, Tingting

    2014-01-01

    Lutein is one of the major carotenoids in most fruits and vegetables. The effect of lutein on the lifespan of Drosophila melanogaster was investigated. Results revealed that 0.1mg lutein/ml diet could prolong their mean lifespan from 49.0 to 54.6 days. This was consistent with a significant reduction in malonyldialdehyde (MDA) level and increase in antioxidant enzyme activities of the flies fed with lutein-treated diet compared with those fed with basal diet. Paraquat (PQ) and H2O2 treatment tests demonstrated that lutein could prolong the survival time of the flies. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis indicated the gene expression of superoxide dismutase (SOD; SOD1 and SOD2), and catalase (CAT) in the lutein-treated group was up-regulated relative to that of the control group. It was concluded that the lifespan-prolonging activity of lutein was partially by up-regulation of endogenous antioxidant enzymes.

  10. MULTIPLE STABLE PERIODIC SOLUTIONS IN A MODEL FOR THE HORMONAL REGULATION OF THE MENSTRUAL CYCLE

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT

    The pituitary hormones, luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), and the ovarian hormones, estradiol (E2), progesterone (P4), and inhibin (Ih), are five hormones important for the regulation and maintenance of the human menstrual cycle. The...

  11. Pituitary and placental hormone levels in pseudocyesis.

    PubMed

    Osotimehin, B O; Ladipo, O A; Adejuwon, C A; Otolorin, E O

    1981-10-01

    Twelve patients with clinical features of pseudocyesis were divided into two groups according to the presence or absence of galactorrhea. The mean serum prolactin level of patients with galactorrhea was significantly higher than the normal values of the patients without galactorrhea. The mean serum levels of luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone were markedly elevated in patients without galactorrhea. This was especially true of luteinizing hormone. Serum levels of human chorionic gonadotropin were undetectable in all patients. The significance of these observations is discussed.

  12. Acute and subacute toxicity assessment of lutein in lutein-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Nidhi, Bhatiwada; Baskaran, Vallikannan

    2013-10-01

    Dietary lutein consumption is lower than the actual recommended allowances to prevent macular degeneration; thus dietary lutein supplements have been recommended. This study aimed to investigate potential adverse effect of lutein from Tagetes erecta in lutein-deficient (LD) male mice. Preliminary acute toxicity study revealed that the LD50 exceeded the highest dose of 10000 mg/kg BW. In a subacute study, male mice were gavaged with 0, 100, 1000 mg/kg BW/day for a period of 4 wk. Plasma lutein levels increased dose dependently (P < 0.01) after acute and subacute feeding of lutein in LD mice. Compared to the control (peanut oil without lutein) group, no treatment-related toxicologically significant effects of lutein were prominent in clinical observation, ophthalmic examinations, body, and organ weights. Further, no toxicologically significant findings were eminent in hematological, histopathological, and other clinical chemistry parameters. In the oral subacute toxicity study, the no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) for lutein in LD mice was determined as 1000 mg/kg/day, the highest dose tested.

  13. Toxicity profile of lutein and lutein ester isolated from marigold flowers (Tagetes erecta).

    PubMed

    Harikumar, Kuzhuvelil Bhaskarannair; Nimita, Chittikappil Venugopal; Preethi, Korengath Chandran; Kuttan, Ramadasan; Shankaranarayana, Madapura Lingappiah; Deshpande, Jayant

    2008-01-01

    Lutein is a carotenoid with antioxidant properties and is commonly present in many fruits, vegetables, and egg yolk. Lutein affords protection against the development of the two common eye diseases of aging: cataract and macular degeneration. As the dietary lutein concentration is much lower compared to the actual requirement to reduce macular degeneration, supplementation of lutein is under consideration. There are very few data on the toxicity of lutein. In the present study, the authors have evaluated the short-term and long-term toxicity profile of lutein and its esterified form isolated from marigold flowers (Tagetes erecta) in young adult male and female Wistar rats. Lutein and its ester form administered orally at doses of 4, 40, and 400 mg/kg body weight for 4 weeks for short-term toxicity study and 13 weeks for a subchronic toxicity study did not produced any mortality, change in body weight, food consumption pattern, organ weight, and other adverse side reactions. Administration of lutein and ester form did not alter the hepatic and renal function, and did not produce any change in the hematological parameters and in lipid profile. Histopathological analysis of the organs supported the nontoxicity of lutein and its ester form. PMID:18293208

  14. Pulsatile neck mass: A rare cause

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Dattatreya P. V.; Ananthakrishna, Rajiv; Nanjappa, Manjunath C.

    2013-01-01

    A 20-year-old female presented with a pulsatile neck mass. On evaluation, she was found to have right cervical aortic arch, which is a rare anomaly. We highlight the conventional and Computed tomography angiography features of this vascular anomaly. PMID:23626449

  15. Effects of the pulsatile flow settings on pulsatile waveforms and hemodynamic energy in a PediVAS centrifugal pump.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shigang; Rider, Alan R; Kunselman, Allen R; Richardson, J Scott; Dasse, Kurt A; Undar, Akif

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to test different pulsatile flow settings of the PediVAS centrifugal pump to seek an optimum setting for pulsatile flow to achieve better pulsatile energy and minimal backflow. The PediVAS centrifugal pump and the conventional pediatric clinical circuit, including a pediatric membrane oxygenator, arterial filter, arterial cannula, and 1/4 in circuit tubing were used. The circuit was primed with 40% glycerin water mixture. Postcannula pressure was maintained at 40 mm Hg by a Hoffman clamp. The experiment was conducted at 800 ml/min of pump flow with a modified pulsatile flow setting at room temperature. Pump flow and pressure readings at preoxygenator and precannula sites were simultaneously recorded by a data acquisition system. The results showed that backflows appeared at flow rates of 200-800 ml/min (200 ml/min increments) with the default pulsatile flow setting and only at 200 ml/min with the modified pulsatile flow setting. With an increased rotational speed difference ratio and a decreased pulsatile width, the pulsatility increased in terms of surplus hemodynamic energy and total hemodynamic energy at preoxygenator and precannula sites. Backflows seemed at preoxygenator and precannula sites at a 70% of rotational speed difference ratio. The modified pulsatile flow setting was better than the default pulsatile flow setting in respect to pulsatile energy and backflow. The pulsatile width and the rotational speed difference ratio significantly affected pulsatility. The parameter of the rotational speed difference ratio can automatically increase pulsatility with increased rotational speeds. Further studies will be conducted to optimize the pulsatile flow setting of the centrifugal pump.

  16. The aging male hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis: pulsatility and feedback.

    PubMed

    Veldhuis, Johannes D; Keenan, Daniel M; Liu, Peter Y; Iranmanesh, Ali; Takahashi, Paul Y; Nehra, Ajay X

    2009-02-01

    Aging results in insidious decremental changes in hypothalamic, pituitary and gonadal function. The foregoing three main anatomic loci of control are regulated by intermittent time-delayed signal exchange, principally via gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), luteinizing hormone (LH) and testosterone/estradiol (Te/E(2)). A mathematical framework is required to embody these dynamics. The present review highlights integrative adaptations in the aging male hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, as assessed by recent objective ensemble models of the axis as a whole.

  17. The Aging Male Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Gonadal Axis: pulsatility and feedback

    PubMed Central

    Veldhuis, Johannes D.; Keenan, Daniel M.; Liu, Peter Y.; Iranmanesh, Ali; Takahashi, Paul Y.; Nehra, Ajay X.

    2009-01-01

    Aging results in insidious decremental changes in hypothalamic, pituitary and gonadal function. The foregoing three main anatomic loci of control are regulated by intermittent time-delayed signal exchange, principally via gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), luteinizing hormone (LH) and testosterone/estradiol (Te/E2). A mathematical framework is required to embody these dynamics. The present review highlights integrative adaptations in the aging male hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, as assessed by recent objective ensemble models of the axis as a whole. PMID:18838102

  18. Nanoscaffold matrices for size-controlled, pulsatile transdermal testosterone delivery: nanosize effects on the time dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, Ritu; Tondwal, Shailesh; Venkatesh, K. S.; Misra, Amit

    2008-10-01

    Pulsatile transdermal testosterone (T) has applications in hormone supplementation and male contraception. Pulsatile T delivery was achieved by assembling crystalline and nanoparticulate T in nucleation-inhibiting polymer matrices of controlled porosity. Different interference patterns observed from various polymeric films containing T were due to the various particle sizes of T present in the polymer matrices. Scanning electron microscopy was used to determine the size and shape of T crystals. Skin-adherent films containing T nanoparticles of any size between 10-500 nm could be prepared using pharmaceutically acceptable vinylic polymers. Drug release and skin permeation profiles were studied. The dissolution-diffusion behavior of nanoparticles differed from crystalline and molecular states. Nanosize may thus be used to engineer chronopharmacologically relevant drug delivery.

  19. Lutein production from biomass: marigold flowers versus microalgae.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jian-Hao; Lee, Duu-Jong; Chang, Jo-Shu

    2015-05-01

    Microalgae have faster growth rates and more free lutein than marigold flowers, the current source of lutein. However, no commercial lutein production uses microalgae. This review compares lutein content, cultivation, harvesting, cell disruption, and extraction stages of lutein production using marigold flowers and those using microalgae as feedstock. The lutein production rate of microalgae is 3-6 times higher than that of marigold flowers. To produce 1 kg of pure lutein, marigolds need more land and water, but require less nutrients (N, P, K) and less energy than microalgae. Since lutein is tightly bound in microalgae and microalgae are small, cell disruption and subsequent extraction stages consume a considerable amount of energy. Research and development of affordable lutein production from microalgae are discussed.

  20. Lutein production from biomass: marigold flowers versus microalgae.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jian-Hao; Lee, Duu-Jong; Chang, Jo-Shu

    2015-05-01

    Microalgae have faster growth rates and more free lutein than marigold flowers, the current source of lutein. However, no commercial lutein production uses microalgae. This review compares lutein content, cultivation, harvesting, cell disruption, and extraction stages of lutein production using marigold flowers and those using microalgae as feedstock. The lutein production rate of microalgae is 3-6 times higher than that of marigold flowers. To produce 1 kg of pure lutein, marigolds need more land and water, but require less nutrients (N, P, K) and less energy than microalgae. Since lutein is tightly bound in microalgae and microalgae are small, cell disruption and subsequent extraction stages consume a considerable amount of energy. Research and development of affordable lutein production from microalgae are discussed. PMID:25446782

  1. Macular lutein and zeaxanthin are related to brain lutein and zeaxanthin in primates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The xanthophyll pigments lutein and zeaxanthin cross the blood-retina barrier to preferentially accumulate in the macular region of the neural retina. There they form macular pigment, protecting the retina from blue light damage and oxidative stress. Lutein and zeaxanthin also accumulate in brain t...

  2. DynPeak: An Algorithm for Pulse Detection and Frequency Analysis in Hormonal Time Series

    PubMed Central

    Vidal, Alexandre; Zhang, Qinghua; Médigue, Claire; Fabre, Stéphane; Clément, Frédérique

    2012-01-01

    The endocrine control of the reproductive function is often studied from the analysis of luteinizing hormone (LH) pulsatile secretion by the pituitary gland. Whereas measurements in the cavernous sinus cumulate anatomical and technical difficulties, LH levels can be easily assessed from jugular blood. However, plasma levels result from a convolution process due to clearance effects when LH enters the general circulation. Simultaneous measurements comparing LH levels in the cavernous sinus and jugular blood have revealed clear differences in the pulse shape, the amplitude and the baseline. Besides, experimental sampling occurs at a relatively low frequency (typically every 10 min) with respect to LH highest frequency release (one pulse per hour) and the resulting LH measurements are noised by both experimental and assay errors. As a result, the pattern of plasma LH may be not so clearly pulsatile. Yet, reliable information on the InterPulse Intervals (IPI) is a prerequisite to study precisely the steroid feedback exerted on the pituitary level. Hence, there is a real need for robust IPI detection algorithms. In this article, we present an algorithm for the monitoring of LH pulse frequency, basing ourselves both on the available endocrinological knowledge on LH pulse (shape and duration with respect to the frequency regime) and synthetic LH data generated by a simple model. We make use of synthetic data to make clear some basic notions underlying our algorithmic choices. We focus on explaining how the process of sampling affects drastically the original pattern of secretion, and especially the amplitude of the detectable pulses. We then describe the algorithm in details and perform it on different sets of both synthetic and experimental LH time series. We further comment on how to diagnose possible outliers from the series of IPIs which is the main output of the algorithm. PMID:22802933

  3. Defining pulsatility during continuous-flow ventricular assist device support.

    PubMed

    Soucy, Kevin G; Koenig, Steven C; Giridharan, Guruprasad A; Sobieski, Michael A; Slaughter, Mark S

    2013-06-01

    Continuous-flow ventricular assist devices (CVADs) have gained widespread use as an effective clinical therapy for patients with advanced-stage heart failure. Axial and centrifugal CVADs have been successfully used as bridge-to-transplant and destination therapy. CVADs are smaller, more reliable, and less complex than the first-generation pulsatile-flow ventricular assist devices. Despite their recent clinical success, arteriovenous malformations, gastrointestinal bleeding, hemorrhagic strokes, aortic valve insufficiency, and valve fusion have been reported in heart failure patients supported by CVADs. It has been hypothesized that diminished arterial pressure and flow pulsatility delivered by CVAD may be a contributing factor to these adverse events. Subsequently, the clinical significance of vascular pulsatility continues to be highly debated. Studies comparing pulsatile-flow and continuous-flow support have presented conflicting findings, largely due to variations in device operation, support duration, and the criteria used to quantify pulsatility. Traditional measurements of pulse pressure and pulsatility index are less effective at quantifying pulsatility for mechanically derived flows, particularly with the growing trend of CVAD speed modulation to achieve various pulsatile flow patterns. Kinetic measurements of energy equivalent pressure and surplus hemodynamic energy can better quantify pulsatile energies, yet technologic and conceptual challenges are impeding their clinical adaption. A review of methods for quantifying vascular pulsatility and their application as a research tool for investigating physiologic responses to CVAD support are presented. PMID:23540401

  4. Biotechnological production of lutein and its applications.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Sevilla, José M; Acién Fernández, F G; Molina Grima, E

    2010-03-01

    Lutein is an antioxidant that has gathered increasing attention due to its potential role in preventing or ameliorating age-related macular degeneration. Currently, it is produced from marigold oleoresin, but continuous reports of lutein-producing microalgae pose the question if those microorganisms can become an alternative source. Several microalgae have higher lutein contents than most marigold cultivars and have been shown to yield productivities hundreds of times higher than marigold crops on a per square meter basis. Microalgae and marigold are opposite alternatives in the use of resources such as land and labor and the prevalence of one or the other could change in the future as the lutein demand rises and if labor or land becomes more restricted or expensive in the producing countries. The potential of microalgae as a lutein source is analyzed and compared to marigold. It is suggested that, in the current state of the art, microalgae could compete with marigold even without counting on any of the improvements in microalgal technology that can be expected in the near future. PMID:20091305

  5. Arterial tree asymmetry reduces cerebral pulsatility.

    PubMed

    Vrselja, Zvonimir; Brkic, Hrvoje; Curic, Goran

    2015-11-01

    With each heartbeat, pressure wave (PW) propagates from aorta toward periphery. In cerebral circulation, at the level of circle of Willis (CW), four arteries and four PWs converge. Since the interference is an elemental property of the wave, PWs interfere at the level of CW. We hypothesize that the asymmetry of brain-supplying arteries (that join to form CW) creates phase difference between the four PWs that interfere at the level of CW and reduce downstream cerebral pulsatility. To best of our knowledge, the data about the sequence of PWs' arrival into the cerebral circulation is lacking. Evident imperfect bilateral symmetry of the vessels results with different path length of brain-supplying arteries, hence, PWs should arrive into the head at different times. The probabilistic calculation shows that asynchronous arrival is more probable than synchronous. The importance of PWs for the cerebral circulation is highlighted by the observation that barotrauma protection mechanisms are more influenced by the crest of PW (pulse pressure) than by the mean arterial pressure. In addition, an increased arterial pulsatility is associated with several brain pathologies. We created simple computational models of four converging arteries and found that asynchronous arrival of the PWs results with lower maximum pressure, slower rate of pressure amplification and lower downstream pulsatility. In analogy, the asynchronous arrival of the pressure waves into the cerebral circulation should decrease blood flow pulsatility and lower transmission of kinetic energy on arterial wall. We conclude that asynchronous arrival of PWs into the cerebral circulation influences cerebral hemodynamics and represents a physiological necessity.

  6. Recent technologies in pulsatile drug delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Deepika; Raturi, Richa; Jain, Vikas; Bansal, Praveen; Singh, Ranjit

    2011-01-01

    Pulsatile drug delivery systems (PDDS) have attracted attraction because of their multiple benefits over conventional dosage forms. They deliver the drug at the right time, at the right site of action and in the right amount, which provides more benefit than conventional dosages and increased patient compliance. These systems are designed according to the circadian rhythm of the body, and the drug is released rapidly and completely as a pulse after a lag time. These products follow the sigmoid release profile characterized by a time period. These systems are beneficial for drugs with chronopharmacological behavior, where nocturnal dosing is required, and for drugs that show the first-pass effect. This review covers methods and marketed technologies that have been developed to achieve pulsatile delivery. Marketed technologies, such as PulsincapTM, Diffucaps®, CODAS®, OROS® and PULSYSTM, follow the above mechanism to render a sigmoidal drug release profile. Diseases wherein PDDS are promising include asthma, peptic ulcers, cardiovascular ailments, arthritis and attention deficit syndrome in children and hypercholesterolemia. Pulsatile drug delivery systems have the potential to bring new developments in the therapy of many diseases. PMID:23507727

  7. GnRH Pulsatility, the Pituitary Response and Reproductive Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Tsutsumi, Rie; Webster, Nicholas J.G.

    2015-01-01

    GnRH plays an essential role in neuroendocrine control of reproductive function. In mammals, the pattern of gonadotropin secretion includes both pulse and surge phases, which are regulated independently. The pulsatile release of GnRH and LH plays an important role in the development of sexual function and in the normal regulation of the menstrual cycle. The importance of GnRH pulsatility was established in a series of classic studies. Fertility is impaired when GnRH pulsatility is inhibited by chronic malnutrition, excessive caloric expenditure, or aging. A number of reproductive disorders in women with including hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, hypothlamic amenorrhea, hyperprolactinemia and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) are also associated with disruption of the normal pulsatile GnRH secretion. Despite these findings, the molecular mechanisms of this pulsatile GnRH regulation are not well understood. Here, we review recent studies about GnRH pulsatility, signaling and transcriptional response, and its implications for disease. PMID:19609045

  8. Kisspeptin directly stimulates gonadotropin-releasing hormone release via G protein-coupled receptor 54.

    PubMed

    Messager, Sophie; Chatzidaki, Emmanouella E; Ma, Dan; Hendrick, Alan G; Zahn, Dirk; Dixon, John; Thresher, Rosemary R; Malinge, Isabelle; Lomet, Didier; Carlton, Mark B L; Colledge, William H; Caraty, Alain; Aparicio, Samuel A J R

    2005-02-01

    We have recently described a molecular gatekeeper of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis with the observation that G protein-coupled receptor 54 (GPR54) is required in mice and men for the pubertal onset of pulsatile luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) secretion to occur. In the present study, we investigate the possible central mode of action of GPR54 and kisspeptin ligand. First, we show that GPR54 transcripts are colocalized with gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons in the mouse hypothalamus, suggesting that kisspeptin, the GPR54 ligand, may act directly on these neurons. Next, we show that GnRH neurons seem anatomically normal in gpr54-/- mice, and that they show projections to the median eminence, which demonstrates that the hypogonadism in gpr54-/- mice is not due to an abnormal migration of GnRH neurons (as occurs with KAL1 mutations), but that it is more likely due to a lack of GnRH release or absence of GnRH neuron stimulation. We also show that levels of kisspeptin injected i.p., which stimulate robust LH and FSH release in wild-type mice, have no effect in gpr54-/- mice, and therefore that kisspeptin acts directly and uniquely by means of GPR54 signaling for this function. Finally, we demonstrate by direct measurement, that the central administration of kisspeptin intracerebroventricularly in sheep produces a dramatic release of GnRH into the cerebrospinal fluid, with a parallel rise in serum LH, demonstrating that a key action of kisspeptin on the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis occurs directly at the level of GnRH release. The localization and GnRH release effects of kisspeptin thus define GPR54 as a major control point in the reproductive axis and suggest kisspeptin to be a neurohormonal effector.

  9. The Impact of Polymeric Nanoencapsulation on the Bioavailability of Lutein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamil, Alison

    Lutein, a fat-soluble xanthophyll, contributes partially to the health benefits from consuming plant foods. Like all dietary carotenoids, lutein has a low bioavailability. In addition to increasing the intake of lutein-rich foods to enhance lutein status, delivery of lutein in polymeric nanoparticles (NP) presents a novel approach to enhancing lutein bioavailability. The overall research objective of this project was to investigate, in rats, the impact of nanoencapsulation using poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) on the pharmacokinetics of lutein. We also used an in vitro cell culture approach utilizing human epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma (Caco-2) cells grown in both conventional (CONV) and permeable support (PS) systems to investigate the impact of PLGA-NP on the absorption of lutein in intestinal cells. In chapter one, we compared the efficacy of lutein absorption in vitro using Caco-2 cells grown in both CONV and PS systems. We further examined the role of the micelle, the physiological vehicle for lutein within the small intestine, on its intestinal absorption in vitro compared to an organic solvent, ethanol, which is safe and consumed by humans. The finding from this study demonstrated that the CONV system displayed a larger efficacy of lutein uptake by Caco-2 cells. Further, in the PS system, micelle components appeared to facilitate more effective intestinal secretion of lutein. These findings suggest that lutein uptake by Caco-2 cells is subject to the influence of culturing system (CONV vs. PS) and delivery vehicle (ethanol vs. micelle). Chapter two examined the impact of PLGA-NP in rats on lutein pharmacokinetics in plasma and distribution in selected tissues as compared to free lutein. We also investigated the effect of nanoencapsulation on the absorption of lutein in intestinal cells compared to a more physiological vehicle, the micelle, using the PS method. In addition, we explored the need of additional micelles for the ultimate absorption of

  10. In vitro scleral lutein distribution by cyclodextrin containing nanoemulsions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chi-Hsien; Lai, Kuan-Yu; Wu, Wei-Chi; Chen, Yu-Jui; Lee, Wei-Shiou; Hsu, Ching-Yun

    2015-01-01

    Lutein is a macular pigment that contributes to maintaining eye health. The development of lutein-laden nanocarriers for ocular delivery would have the advantages of user friendliness and cost-effectiveness. Nano-scaled vehicles such as cyclodextrin (CD) and nanoemulsion could overcome the barriers caused by the scleral structure. This study focused on the development of hybrid nanocarriers containing nanoemulsion and CD for scleral lutein accumulation. In the presence of the nanoemulsion, CD forms such as βCD and hydroxyethyl (HE) βCD increased the partition of lutein into the porcine sclera. A combination of nanoemulsion and 2% HEβCD enhanced lutein accumulation to 119±6 µg g(-1) h(-1), which was 9.2-fold higher than that with lutein suspension alone. We explored the dose effect of CD in nanoemulsion on scleral lutein and found that the scleral accumulation of lutein was enhanced by increasing the CD content. The novel nanoemulsion had 95% drug-loading efficiency and low cytotoxicity in retinal cells. The CD-modified nanoemulsion not only improved the stability and entrapment efficacy of lutein in the aqueous system but also enhanced scleral lutein accumulation. An increase in the partition coefficient of lutein in porcine sclera when using the CD-modified nanoemulsion was also confirmed.

  11. [Advances in the researches of lutein and alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Xu, Xianrong; Lin, Xiaoming

    2015-05-01

    Lutein, a kind of oxycarotenoid, can pass the blood brain barrier and preferentially accumulate in the human brain, which is the most abundant carotenoid in human brain. Evidence from multiple studies suggested that lutein was closely related to age-related cognitive decline and risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD) in human. Dietary, plasma and brain concentrations of lutein were negatively associated with age-related cognitive decline. Lutein concentrations in plasma and brain were significantly lower in AD patients than those of health control. In human brain, lutein was the sole carotenoid which consistently associated with a range of cognitive function measures. In elderly women, lutein supplement can improve the cognitive function. In this article, we systematically reviewed the literature on the role of lutein in age-related cognitive decline and alzheimer's disease and its possible mechanisms. It may prove some benefit information for the advanced research and prevention of AD.

  12. Detection and measurement of retinal blood vessel pulsatile motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Di; Frost, Shaun; Vignarajan, Janardhan; An, Dong; Tay-Kearney, Mei-Ling; Kanagasingam, Yogi

    2016-03-01

    Retinal photography is a non-invasive and well-accepted clinical diagnosis of ocular diseases. Qualitative and quantitative assessment of retinal images is crucial in ocular diseases related clinical application. Pulsatile properties caused by cardiac rhythm, such as spontaneous venous pulsation (SVP) and pulsatile motion of small arterioles, can be visualized by dynamic retinal imaging techniques and provide clinical significance. In this paper, we aim at vessel pulsatile motion detection and measurement. We proposed a novel approach for pulsatile motion measurement of retinal blood vessels by applying retinal image registration, blood vessel detection and blood vessel motion detection and measurement on infrared retinal image sequences. The performance of the proposed methods was evaluated on 8 image sequences with 240 images. A preliminary result has demonstrated the good performance of the method for blood vessel pulsatile motion observation and measurement.

  13. Pulsatile dynamics in the yeast proteome.

    PubMed

    Dalal, Chiraj K; Cai, Long; Lin, Yihan; Rahbar, Kasra; Elowitz, Michael B

    2014-09-22

    The activation of transcription factors in response to environmental conditions is fundamental to cellular regulation. Recent work has revealed that some transcription factors are activated in stochastic pulses of nuclear localization, rather than at a constant level, even in a constant environment [1-12]. In such cases, signals control the mean activity of the transcription factor by modulating the frequency, duration, or amplitude of these pulses. Although specific pulsatile transcription factors have been identified in diverse cell types, it has remained unclear how prevalent pulsing is within the cell, how variable pulsing behaviors are between genes, and whether pulsing is specific to transcriptional regulators or is employed more broadly. To address these issues, we performed a proteome-wide movie-based screen to systematically identify localization-based pulsing behaviors in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The screen examined all genes in a previously developed fluorescent protein fusion library of 4,159 strains [13] in multiple media conditions. This approach revealed stochastic pulsing in ten proteins, all transcription factors. In each case, pulse dynamics were heterogeneous and unsynchronized among cells in clonal populations. Pulsing is the only dynamic localization behavior that we observed, and it tends to occur in pairs of paralogous and redundant proteins. Taken together, these results suggest that pulsatile dynamics play a pervasive role in yeast and may be similarly prevalent in other eukaryotic species.

  14. Fractality of pulsatile flow in speckle images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemati, M.; Kenjeres, S.; Urbach, H. P.; Bhattacharya, N.

    2016-05-01

    The scattering of coherent light from a system with underlying flow can be used to yield essential information about dynamics of the process. In the case of pulsatile flow, there is a rapid change in the properties of the speckle images. This can be studied using the standard laser speckle contrast and also the fractality of images. In this paper, we report the results of experiments performed to study pulsatile flow with speckle images, under different experimental configurations to verify the robustness of the techniques for applications. In order to study flow under various levels of complexity, the measurements were done for three in-vitro phantoms and two in-vivo situations. The pumping mechanisms were varied ranging from mechanical pumps to the human heart for the in vivo case. The speckle images were analyzed using the techniques of fractal dimension and speckle contrast analysis. The results of these techniques for the various experimental scenarios were compared. The fractal dimension is a more sensitive measure to capture the complexity of the signal though it was observed that it is also extremely sensitive to the properties of the scattering medium and cannot recover the signal for thicker diffusers in comparison to speckle contrast.

  15. Macular lutein and zeaxanthin are related to brain lutein and zeaxanthin in primates

    PubMed Central

    Vishwanathan, Rohini; Neuringer, Martha; Snodderly, D. Max; Schalch, Wolfgang; Johnson, Elizabeth J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Xanthophyll pigments lutein and zeaxanthin cross the blood-retina barrier to preferentially accumulate in the macular region of the neural retina. There they form macular pigment, protecting the retina from blue light damage and oxidative stress. Lutein and zeaxanthin also accumulate in brain tissue. The objective of the study was to evaluate the relationship between retinal and brain levels of these xanthophylls in non-human primates. Methods Study animals included rhesus monkeys reared on diets devoid of xanthophylls that were subsequently fed pure lutein or pure zeaxanthin (both at 3.9 μmol/kg*d, n=6/group) and normal rhesus monkeys fed a stock diet (0.26 μmol/kg*d lutein and 0.24 μmol/kg*d zeaxanthin, n=5). Retina (4 mm macular punch, 4-8 mm annulus and periphery) and brain tissue (cerebellum, frontal cortex, occipital cortex and pons) from the same animals were analyzed by reverse phase HPLC. Results Lutein in the macula and annulus were significantly related to lutein levels in the cerebellum, occipital cortex and pons, both in bivariate analysis and after adjusting for age, sex and n–3 fatty acid status. In the frontal cortex the relationship was marginally significant. Macular zeaxanthin was significantly related to zeaxanthin in the cerebellum and frontal cortex, while the relationship was marginally significant in the occipital cortex and pons in a bivariate model. Discussion An integrated measure of total macular pigment optical density, which can be measured noninvasively, has the potential to be used as a biomarker to assess brain lutein and zeaxanthin status. PMID:22780947

  16. Effects of continuous and pulsatile PTH treatments on rat bone marrow stromal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Chiming; Frei, Hanspeter Burt, Helen M.; Rossi, Fabio

    2009-03-20

    Bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs) differentiation and proliferation are controlled by numerous growth factors and hormones. Continuous parathyroid hormone (PTH) treatment has been shown to decrease osteoblast differentiation, whereas pulsatile PTH increases osteoblast differentiation. However, the effects of PTH treatments on MSCs have not been investigated. This study showed continuous PTH treatment in the presence of dexamethasone (DEX) promoted osteogenic differentiation of rat MSCs in vitro, as demonstrated by increased alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, number of ALP expressing cells, and up-regulation of PTH receptor-1, ALP, and osteocalcin mRNA expressions. In contrast, pulsatile PTH treatment was found to suppress osteogenesis of rat MSCs, possibly by promoting the maintenance of undifferentiated cells. Additionally, the observed effects of PTH were strongly dependent on the presence of DEX. MSC proliferation however was not influenced by PTH independent of treatment regimen and presence or absence of DEX. Furthermore, our work raised the possibility that PTH treatment may modulate stem/progenitor cell activity within MSC cultures.

  17. Luteinized fat in Krukenberg tumor: MR findings.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Yong Yeon; Kang, Heoung Keun; Seo, Jeong Jin; Nam, Jong Hee

    2002-12-01

    To our knowledge, there is no description of the fat-containing Krukenberg tumor. We report on a case of Krukenberg tumor associated with luteinized fat, which showed hyperintensity on T1-weighted MR image. The diagnosis was surgically confirmed. Hyperintense portion of the Krukenberg tumor on T1-weighted image showed diminished signal intensity on fat-saturated, T1-weighted images. Krukenberg tumor should be considered in the differential diagnosis of ovarian masses when fat signal is seen.

  18. Somatosensory Pulsatile Tinnitus Syndrome: Somatic Testing Identifies a Pulsatile Tinnitus Subtype That Implicates the Somatosensory System

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Robert Aaron; Nam, Eui-Cheol; Melcher, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    A new tinnitus syndrome is described: high-pitched, cardiac-synchronous tinnitus, whose pulsations are suppressed by strong contractions or compressions of the neck and jaw muscles (somatic testing). 14 cases, 6 non-lateralized and 8 unilateral, are reported. In the non-lateralized cases, onset was bilateral. In the one intermittent case, while her tinnitus was absent her pulsatile tinnitus could be induced by somatic testing. No etiology was found from physical examination, imaging, or ancillary testing. Because these cases of pulsatile tinnitus can be both induced and suppressed by activation of the somatosensory system of the head or upper lateral neck, we propose that this syndrome is occurring from (a) cardiac synchronous somatosensory activation of the central auditory pathway or (b) failure of the somatosensory-auditory central nervous system interactions to suppress cardiac somatosounds. PMID:18632767

  19. A novel rotary pulsatile flow pump for cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Teman, Nicholas R; Mazur, Daniel E; Toomasian, John; Jahangir, Emilia; Alghanem, Fares; Goudie, Marcus; Rojas-Peña, Alvaro; Haft, Jonathan W

    2014-01-01

    It has been suggested that pulsatile blood flow is superior to continuous flow (CF) in cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). However, adoption of pulsatile flow (PF) technology has been limited because of practicality and complexity of creating a consistent physiologic pulse. A pediatric pulsatile rotary ventricular pump (PRVP) was designed to address this problem. We evaluated the PRVP in an animal model and determined its ability to generate PF during CPB. The PRVP (modified peristaltic pump, with tapering of the outlet of the pump chamber) was tested in four piglets (10-12 kg). Cannulation was performed with right atrial and aortic cannulae, and pressure sensors were inserted into the femoral arteries. Pressure curves were obtained at different levels of flow and compared with both the animal's baseline physiologic function and a CF roller pump. Pressure and flow waveforms demonstrated significant pulsatility in the PRVP setup compared with CF at all tested conditions. Measurement of hemodynamic energy data, including the percentage pulsatile energy and the surplus hydraulic energy, also revealed a significant increase in pulsatility with the PRVP (p < 0.001). The PRVP creates physiologically significant PF, similar to the pulsatility of a native heart, and has the potential to be easily implemented in pediatric CPB.

  20. Growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Bidlingmaier, Martin; Strasburger, Christian J

    2010-01-01

    Human growth hormone (hGH) is a proteohormone secreted by the pituitary gland. It acts through binding to the hGH receptor, inducing either direct effects or initiating the production of insulin-like growth-factor I (IGF-I), the most important mediator of hGH effects. Growth hormone is primarily known to promote longitudinal growth in children and adolescents, but has also various important metabolic functions throughout adult life. Effects of hGH on the adult organism are well established from studies with recombinant growth hormone (rhGH) therapy in growth hormone deficient subjects. In this particular group of patients, replacement of hGH leads to increased lipolysis and lean body mass, decreased fat mass, improvements in VO(2max), and maximal power output. Although extrapolation from these findings to the situation in well trained healthy subjects is impossible, and controlled studies in healthy subjects are scarce, abuse of hGH seems to be popular among athletes trying to enhance physical performance. Detection of the application of rhGH is difficult, especially because the amino acid sequence of rhGH is identical to the major 22,000 Da isoform of hGH normally secreted by the pituitary. Furthermore, some physiological properties of hGH secretion also hindered the development of a doping test: secreted in a pulsatile manner, it has a very short half-life in circulation, which leads to highly variable serum levels. Concentration alone therefore cannot prove the exogenous administration of hGH.Two approaches have independently been developed for the detection of hGH doping: The so-called "marker approach" investigates changes in hGH-dependent parameters like IGF-I or components of bone and collagen metabolism, which are increased after hGH injection. In contrast, the so-called "isoform approach" directly analyses the spectrum of molecular isoforms in circulation: the pituitary gland secretes a spectrum of homo- and heterodimers and - multimers of a variable

  1. Breeding success and lutein availability in great tit ( Parus major)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sillanpää, Saila; Salminen, Juha-Pekka; Eeva, Tapio

    2009-11-01

    The relationship among temporal variation in the availability of carotenoid-rich food, tissue carotenoid levels and breeding success are poorly known. We studied how diet quality and quantity affect the carotenoid profile and fledging success of great tit ( Parus major) nestlings along a pollution gradient. We found declining seasonal trend in lutein concentration of caterpillars, which may be the explanation for the declining trend in nestlings' lutein concentration of plasma with season, despite the increase in caterpillar biomass. This may be because the biomass of most lutein-rich caterpillars (autumnal moths) decreased and less lutein-rich caterpillars (sawflies) increased during the breeding season. The temporal difference in occurrence of different caterpillar species means that peak lutein availability does not coincide with peak caterpillar abundance. However the positive association between total larval biomass and the number of great tit fledglings may suggest that fledging success depends more on total caterpillar availability than on lutein concentration of caterpillars.

  2. [TREATMENT OF SHORT STATURE PATIENTS WITH NOPMAL GROWTH HORMONE SECRETION OF HYPOPHIS].

    PubMed

    Sprinchuk, N A; Samson, O J; Bol'shova, E V

    2014-12-01

    The article presents the treatment outcome in 86 children with short stature associated with different endocrine pathology and saved growth hormone secretion (congenital adrenal hyperplasia chondrodystrophy, Turner syndrome, idiopathic short stature, syndrome biologically inactive growth hormone and other genetically determined pathology). This study extends prior knowledge about the outcomes of the treatment with recombinant growth hormone and luteinizing hormone--releasing hormone analogue (alone or in combination) in short patients with poor prognosis of final height. PMID:26638471

  3. Suppressive effects of long-term exposure to P-nitrophenol on gonadal development, hormonal profile with disruption of tissue integrity, and activation of caspase-3 in male Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica).

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Eman; Nagaoka, Kentaro; Fayez, Mostafa; Abdel-Daim, Mohamed M; Samir, Haney; Watanabe, Gen

    2015-07-01

    P-Nitrophenol (PNP) is considered to be one of nitrophenol derivatives of diesel exhaust particles. PNP is a major metabolite of some organophosphorus compounds. PNP is a persistent organic pollutant as well as one of endocrine-disrupting compounds. Consequently, bioaccumulation of PNP potentiates toxicity. The objectives of the current study were to assess in vivo adverse effects of long-term low doses of PNP exposure on reproductive system during development stage. Twenty-eight-day-old male Japanese quails were orally administered different doses of PNP (0, 0.01, 0.1, 1 mg/kg body weight) daily for 2.5 months. Testicular histopathology, hormones, caspase-3 (CASP3), and claudin-1 (CLDN1) tight junction protein, as well as plasma hormones were analyzed. The results revealed that long-term PNP exposure caused testicular histopathological changes such as vacuolation of spermatogenic cell and spermatocyte with significant testicular and cloacal gland atrophy. PNP activated CASP3 enzyme that is an apoptosis-related cysteine peptidase. Besides, it disrupted the expression of CLDN1. Furthermore, a substantial decrease in plasma concentrations of luteinizing hormone (LH) and testosterone was observed after 2 and 2.5 months in the PNP-treated groups. Meanwhile, the pituitary LH did not significantly change. Site of action of PNP may be peripheral on testicular development and/or centrally on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis through reduction of pulsatile secretion of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone. Consequently, it may reduce the sensitivity of the anterior pituitary gland to secrete LH. In conclusion, PNP induced profound endocrine disruption in the form of hormonal imbalance, induction of CASP3, and disruption of CLDN1 expression in the testis. Hence, it may hinder the reproductive processes.

  4. Hormonal changes in headache patients.

    PubMed

    Elwan, O; Abdella, M; el Bayad, A B; Hamdy, S

    1991-11-01

    Seventy-three patients with headache underwent serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) radioimmunoassays of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), cortisol and prolactin. Serum FSH showed significant increases in all headache patients while serum LH increased only in females. Such a rise of serum FSH and LH is attributed to disturbances of the sleep-wake cycle. On the other hand, serum cortisol was significantly decreased in the male headache patients, probably due to altered circadian rhythm. Serum prolactin remained within normal limits. CSF prolactin, FSH and LH showed detectable levels in all headache sufferers compared to undetectable levels in control subjects, while CSF cortisol was significantly reduced.

  5. Optimum Heart Rate to Minimize Pulsatile External Cardiac Power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahlevan, Niema; Gharib, Morteza

    2011-11-01

    The workload on the left ventricle is composed of steady and pulsatile components. Clinical investigations have confirmed that an abnormal pulsatile load plays an important role in the pathogenesis of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) and progression of LVH to congestive heart failure (CHF). The pulsatile load is the result of the complex dynamics of wave propagation and reflection in the compliant arterial vasculature. We hypothesize that aortic waves can be optimized to reduce the left ventricular (LV) pulsatile load. We used an in-vitro experimental approach to investigate our hypothesis. A unique hydraulic model was used for in-vitro experiments. This model has physical and dynamical properties similar to the heart-aorta system. Different compliant models of the artificial aorta were used to test the hypothesis under various aortic rigidities. Our results indicate that: i) there is an optimum heart rate that minimizes LV pulsatile power (this is in agreement with our previous computational study); ii) introducing an extra reflection site at the specific location along the aorta creates constructive wave conditions that reduce the LV pulsatile power.

  6. Effect of echo artifacts on characterization of pulsatile tissues in neonatal cranial ultrasonic movies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuzawa, Masayuki; Takahashi, Kazuki; Tabata, Yuki; Kitsunezuka, Yoshiki

    2016-04-01

    Effect of echo artifacts on characterization of pulsatile tissues has been examined in neonatal cranial ultrasonic movies by characterizing pulsatile intensities with different regions of interest (ROIs). The pulsatile tissue, which is a key point in pediatric diagnosis of brain tissue, was detected from a heartbeat-frequency component in Fourier transform of a time-variation of 64 samples of echo intensity at each pixel in a movie fragment. The averages of pulsatile intensity and power were evaluated in two ROIs: common fan-shape and individual cranial-shape. The area of pulsatile region was also evaluated as the number of pixels where the pulsatile intensity exceeds a proper threshold. The extracranial pulsatile region was found mainly in the sections where mirror image was dominant echo artifact. There was significant difference of pulsatile area between two ROIs especially in the specific sections where mirror image was included, suggesting the suitability of cranial-shape ROI for statistical study on pulsatile tissues in brain. The normalized average of pulsatile power in the cranial-shape ROI exhibited most similar tendency to the normalized pulsatile area which was treated as a conventional measure in spite of its requirement of thresholding. It suggests the potential of pulsatile power as an alternative measure for pulsatile area in further statistical study of pulsatile tissues because it was neither affected by echo artifacts nor threshold.

  7. Novel Lutein Loaded Lipid Nanoparticles on Porcine Corneal Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chi-Hsien; Chiu, Hao-Che; Wu, Wei-Chi; Sahoo, Soubhagya Laxmi; Hsu, Ching-Yun

    2014-01-01

    Topical delivery has the advantages including being user friendly and cost effective. Development of topical delivery carriers for lutein is becoming an important issue for the ocular drug delivery. Quantification of the partition coefficient of drug in the ocular tissue is the first step for the evaluation of delivery efficacy. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effects of lipid nanoparticles and cyclodextrin (CD) on the corneal lutein accumulation and to measure the partition coefficients in the porcine cornea. Lipid nanoparticles combined with 2% HPβCD could enhance lutein accumulation up to 209.2 ± 18 (μg/g) which is 4.9-fold higher than that of the nanoparticles. CD combined nanoparticles have 68% of drug loading efficiency and lower cytotoxicity in the bovine cornea cells. From the confocal images, this improvement is due to the increased partitioning of lutein to the corneal epithelium by CD in the lipid nanoparticles. The novel lipid nanoparticles could not only improve the stability and entrapment efficacy of lutein but also enhance the lutein accumulation and partition in the cornea. Additionally the corneal accumulation of lutein was further enhanced by increasing the lutein payload in the vehicles. PMID:25101172

  8. Oxidative stability of yogurt with added lutein dye.

    PubMed

    Domingos, L D; Xavier, A A O; Mercadante, A Z; Petenate, A J; Jorge, R A; Viotto, W H

    2014-02-01

    This study evaluated the effect of adding lutein dye on the oxidative stability of yogurt during 35 d of refrigerated storage, in the presence and absence of light. Yogurts manufactured without and with the equivalent of 1.5mg of lutein in 120 g of the final product were characterized for their total carotenoid and riboflavin contents, and the behaviors of both riboflavin and lutein were monitored during storage. A decrease in riboflavin content occurred, with concurrent appearance of its derived-oxidation products in the yogurts without added lutein and exposed to light during storage. The yogurts with added lutein dye showed constant lutein and riboflavin contents throughout storage both for the samples stored under light and for those stored in the dark. Yogurts (120 g) with the addition of 0.5, 1.5, and 2.5mg of lutein dye were evaluated for their sensory acceptance, and the statistical analysis showed no differences between the samples for the attributes of aroma and flavor. These results indicate that the added lutein remained stable throughout the storage period and conferred protection for the riboflavin against photooxidation, preserving the quality of the yogurts.

  9. A new method of providing pulsatile flow in a centrifugal pump: assessment of pulsatility using a mock circulatory system.

    PubMed

    Herreros, Jesús; Berjano, Enrique J; Sales-Nebot, Laura; Más, Pedro; Calvo, Irene; Mastrobuoni, Stefano; Mercé, Salvador

    2008-06-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the potential advantages of pulsatile flow as compared with continuous flow. However, to date, physiologic pumps have been technically complex and their application has therefore remained in the experimental field. We have developed a new type of centrifugal pump, which can provide pulsatile as well as continuous flow. The inner wall of a centrifugal pump is pulsed by means of a flexible membrane, which can be accurately controlled by means of either a hydraulic or pneumatic driver. The aim of this study was to assess the hydraulic behavior of the new pump in terms of surplus hemodynamic energy (SHE). We conducted experiments using a mock circulatory system including a membrane oxygenator. No differences were found in the pressure-flow characteristics between the new pump and a conventional centrifugal pump, suggesting that the inclusion of the flexible membrane does not alter hydraulic performance. The value of SHE rose when systolic volume was increased. However, SHE dropped when the percentage of ejection time was reduced and also when the continuous flow (programmed by the centrifugal console) increased. Mean flow matched well with the continuous flow set by the centrifugal console, that is, the pulsatile component of the flow was exclusively controlled by the pulsatile console, and was therefore independent of the continuous flow programmed by the centrifugal console. The pulsatility of the new pump was approximately 25% of that created with a truly pulsatile pump.

  10. Pulsatile blood flow in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salsac, Anne-Virginie; Lasheras, Juan C.; Singel, Soeren; Varga, Chris

    2001-11-01

    We discuss the results of combined in-vitro laboratory measurements and clinical observations aimed at determining the effect that the unsteady wall shear stresses and the pressure may have on the growth and eventual rupturing of an Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA), a permanent bulging-like dilatation occurring near the aortic bifurcation. In recent years, new non-invasive techniques, such as stenting, have been used to treat these AAAs. However, the development of these implants, aimed at stopping the growth of the aneurysm, has been hampered by the lack of understanding of the effect that the hemodynamic forces have on the growth mechanism. Since current in-vivo measuring techniques lack the precision and the necessary resolution, we have performed measurements of the pressure and shear stresses in laboratory models. The models of the AAA were obtained from high resolution three-dimensional CAT/SCANS performed in patients at early stages of the disease. Preliminary DPIV measurements show that the pulsatile blood flow discharging into the cavity of the aneurysm leads to large spikes of pressure and wall shear stresses near and around its distal end, indicating a possible correlation between the regions of high wall shear stresses and the observed location of the growth of the aneurysm.

  11. Measuring pulsatile forces on the human cranium.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Cory S; Antonyshyn, Oleh; Midha, Rajiv; Fialkov, Jeffrey A

    2005-01-01

    The cyclic stresses in the cranium caused by pulsation of the brain play an important role in the design of materials for cranioplasty, as well as craniofacial development. However, these stresses have never been quantified. In this study, the force in the epidural space against the cranium was measured intraoperatively in 10 patients using a miniature force probe. Heart and ventilatory rates computed from the force tracing correlated closely with the corresponding measured values in the patients, confirming that the forces measured were indeed a result of brain pulsation. The mean outward systolic normal and tangential stresses were 54.2 kilo-Pascals (kPa) and 345.4 kPa, respectively. The systolic shear stress was 199.8 kPa. Through mechanotransduction, these stresses play a role in cranial development. The calculated yield stress of a cranioplasty repair was 0.4 MPa, which is within one order of magnitude of the known strength of common calcium-phosphate cements. This indicates a possible relation of these pulsatile forces and occult failure of calcium-phosphate cement cranioplasties through material fatigue.

  12. Is Lutein a Physiologically Important Ligand for Transthyretin in Humans?

    SciTech Connect

    Liwei Chen

    2003-05-31

    Lutein and zeaxanthin are the only carotenoids accumulated in the macula of the human retina and are known as the macular pigments (MP). These pigments account for the yellow color of the macula and appear to play an important role in protecting against age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The uptake of lutein and zeaxanthin in human eyes is remarkably specific. It is likely that specific transport or binding proteins are involved. The objective is to determine whether transthyretin (TTR) is a transport protein in human plasma and could thus deliver lutein from the blood to the retina. In this study, they used a biosynthetic {sup 13}C-lutein tracer and gas chromatography-combustion interfaced-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GCC-IRMS) to gain the requisite sensitivity to detect the minute amounts of lutein expected as a physiological ligand for human transthyretin. The biosynthetic {sup 13}C-labeled lutein tracer was purified from algae. Healthy women (n = 4) each ingested 1 mg of {sup 13}C-labeled lutein daily for 3 days and a blood sample was collected 24 hours after the final dose. Plasma TTR was isolated by retinol-binding protein (RBP)-sepharose affinity chromatography and extracted with chloroform. The {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C ratio in the TTR extract was measured by GCC-IRMS. There was no {sup 13}C-lutein enrichment in the pure TTR extract. This result indicated that lutein is not associated with TTR in human plasma after ingestion in physiological amounts. Some hydrophobic compounds with yellow color may bind to human TTR in the plasma. However, this association needs to be further proved by showing specificity. The study provides a new approach for carotenoid-binding protein studies using a stable isotope tracer method combined with the high precision of GCC-IRMS. The mechanism of selective transport, uptake, and accumulation of lutein in human macula remain to be determined.

  13. Bioavailability of lutein from a lutein-enriched egg-yolk beverage and its dried re-suspended versions.

    PubMed

    Bunger, Meike; Quataert, Miriam; Kamps, Lisette; Versloot, Pieter; Hulshof, Paul J M; Togtema, Arnoud; van Amerongen, Aart; Mensink, Marco

    2014-11-01

    Drying a fresh lutein-enriched egg-yolk beverage would extend its shelf life, however, functional properties should not be affected. It was investigated whether consumption of a dried beverage containing lutein-enriched egg-yolk significantly increases serum lutein. One-hundred healthy young subjects participated in this 6-weeks randomized controlled study. Subjects consumed either a "plain" control beverage (n = 26), a fresh lutein-enriched egg-yolk beverage (n = 25), a dried version of this beverage (n = 25), or a beverage composed of the dried individual components of the drink (n = 24). The fresh and both dried versions of the lutein-enriched egg-yolk beverage were able to increase serum lutein levels after 6 weeks of consumption (lutein change: -38 ± 47 nmol/L, +304 ± 113 nmol/L, +148 ± 79 nmol/L and +178 ± 83 nmol/L for control, fresh, dried and combined dried group respectively; p < 0.001). No significant change in serum cholesterol level was seen in the beverages containing lutein-enriched egg-yolk compared to the control drink.

  14. Collapse in High-Grade Stenosis during Pulsatile Flow Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Shunichi; Tang, Dalin; Ku, David N.

    It has been hypothesized that blood flow through high grade stenotic arteries may produce conditions in which elastic flow choking may occur. The development of atherosclerotic plaque fracture may be exacerbated by the compressive stresses during collapse. This study explored the effects of pulsatile flow on stenotic flow collapse. Pulsatile flow was produced using a gear pump controlled by a digitized physiologic waveform. Upstream and downstream mean pressures and pulsatile flow rates were measured and digitized. An improved model of arterial stenosis was created using an elastomer with an incremental modulus of elasticity matched to a bovine carotid artery in the relevant range of collapse. Additionally, the model retained a very thick wall in the stenotic region similar to arterial disease. Flow choking was observed for pulsatile pressure drops close to those previously reported for steady flow. The phase difference between flow rate and pressure between upstream and downstream of the stenosis occurred by the compliance of tube and stenosis resistance. For 80% nominal stenosis by diameter and 100+/-30mmHg upstream pressure, collapse occurred for average pulsatile pressure drops of 93mmHg. Pulsatile flow experiments in this model revealed the range of conditions for the flow choking and the paradoxical collapse of the stenosis during systole with expansion during diastole. The stenosis severity was dynamic through the pulse cycle and was significantly greater under flow than the nominal severity. The results indicate that flow choking and stenotic compression may be significant in thick-walled arterial stenoses subjected to pulsatile flow.

  15. Reproductive hormones and bone.

    PubMed

    Nicks, Kristy M; Fowler, Tristan W; Gaddy, Dana

    2010-06-01

    Hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) stimulates secretion of pituitary luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), which directly regulate ovarian function. Pituitary FSH can modulate osteoclast development, and thereby influence bone turnover. Pituitary oxytocin and prolactin effects on the skeleton are not merely limited to pregnancy and lactation; oxytocin stimulates osteoblastogenesis and bone formation, whereas prolactin exerts skeletal effects in an age-dependent manner. Cyclic levels of inhibins and estrogen suppress FSH and LH, respectively, and also suppress bone turnover via their suppressive effects on osteoblast and osteoclast differentiation. However, continuous exposure to inhibins or estrogen/androgens is anabolic for the skeleton in intact animals and protects against gonadectomy-induced bone loss. Alterations of one hormone in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis influence other bone-active hormones in the entire feedback loop in the axis. Thus, we propose that the action of the HPG axis should be extended to include its combined effects on the skeleton, thus creating the HPG skeletal (HPGS) axis.

  16. Changes in Macular Pigment Optical Density and Serum Lutein Concentration in Japanese Subjects Taking Two Different Lutein Supplements

    PubMed Central

    Okazaki, Shigetoshi; Gellermann, Werner; Bernstein, Paul S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate macular pigment optical density (MPOD) and serum concentration changes of lutein in Japanese subjects participating in a clinical trial in which two formulations of lutein and zeaxanthin supplements with different physiochemical properties are used. Methods Thirty-six healthy volunteers were recruited into this prospective, randomized, parallel-group, double-masked comparative study at a single institute. Two products were used, FloraGLO® (Kemin Japan) and XanMax® (Katra Phytochem). The lutein particle size and zeaxanthin concentrations differed between the formulations. The subjects consumed one of the two supplements for a duration of up to 6 months. MPOD levels were measured by resonance Raman spectrometry at baseline and once a month until the end of the study. Serum lutein concentration was measured at baseline, month 3, and month 6. The subjects were also tested for contrast sensitivity, glare sensitivity, visual acuity, and in addition had a focal electroretinogram measured. Results The mean serum lutein concentrations increased significantly after the first three months, but the mean MPOD levels in either supplement group did not show any statistically significant increase. A detailed analysis, however, revealed three response patterns in both groups for the increase of MPOD levels and serum lutein concentration, i.e. “retinal responders”, who had an increase of both MPOD levels and serum lutein concentrations (n = 13), “retinal non-responders”, who had only increased serum concentrations and no change in MPOD levels (n = 20), and “retinal and serum non-responders”, who had neither MPOD level nor plasma concentration increases (n = 3). The subjects with low MPOD levels at baseline appeared to show increased MPOD levels at the 6 month time point upon lutein supplementation (r = -0.4090, p = 0.0133). Glare sensitivity improved in retinal responders in both supplement groups, while there were no remarkable changes in

  17. [Hormonal activity of the hypophysis-gonadal system in male hamadryas baboons in relationship to their hierarchical position].

    PubMed

    Taranov, A G; Shashk-ogly, L K; Goncharov, N P

    1986-03-01

    Hierarchic status-dependent hormonal activity of pituitary-gonadal system was studied in an isolated group of hamadryas baboons. Testosterone level was higher in dominating males. The level of sex hormone was higher in aged animals with great muscle mass. No correlation was observed between hierarchic status of hamadryas baboon males and the blood level of luteinizing hormone.

  18. Hormone levels

    MedlinePlus

    Blood or urine tests can determine the levels of various hormones in the body. This includes reproductive hormones, thyroid hormones, adrenal hormones, pituitary hormones, and many others. For more information, see: ...

  19. Effects of non-pulsatile flow on thrombogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metcalfe, Ralph; Harting, Matthew; Delgado, Reynolds; Frazier, O. Howard

    2002-11-01

    Congestive heart failure afflicts 4.5 million people in the US alone, with an average 5-year mortality of more than 50%. Among the most promising treatments for this condition are VADs (ventricular assist devices). While conventional pulsatile flow VADs are large and introduce some significant complications such as thrombosis, non-pulsatile axial flow VADs have potentially significant advantages in being smaller, with smaller thrombogenic surfaces. However, the long term effects of non-pulsatile flow on the vascular system are not well understood. We have investigated the effects of pulsatility of blood flow in the stenotic human carotid artery using unsteady, three-dimensional computational fluid dynamic simulations. We have found that permanent, low shear stagnation zones can develop distal to stenoses with non-pulsatile flow, potentially leading to thrombus formation. In contrast, systolic peak flow tends to flush out such stagnation zones. These results are consistent with observed thrombus formation in two patients who underwent implantation of a Jarvik 2000 LVAD.

  20. Rotary pumps and diminished pulsatility: do we need a pulse?

    PubMed

    Soucy, Kevin G; Koenig, Steven C; Giridharan, Guruprasad A; Sobieski, Michael A; Slaughter, Mark S

    2013-01-01

    Ventricular assist devices (VADs) have been successfully used as a bridge to heart transplant and destination therapy (DT) for congestive heart failure (HF) patients. Recently, continuous flow VAD (CVAD) has emerged as an attractive clinical option for long-term mechanical support of HF patients, with bridge-to-transplant outcomes comparable with pulsatile flow VAD (PVAD). Continuous flow VADs are smaller, more reliable, and less complex than the first-generation PVAD. Despite the widespread clinical use, CVAD support has been associated with gastrointestinal bleeding, hemorrhagic strokes, and aortic valve insufficiency. Speculation that diminished arterial pressure pulsatility associated with continuous flow devices may be contributing to these complications has sparked much debate over CVAD support. Studies comparing pulsatile flow and continuous flow (CF) support have presented conflicting findings, and the relevance to CVAD as DT is uncertain due to variations in device operation, support duration, and the criteria used to quantify pulsatility. Currently, there is interest in developing control algorithms for CVAD to increase the delivered pulsatility as a strategy to mitigate adverse event risks associated with CVAD therapy. There may also be the added benefit of specific control strategies for managing CVAD therapy, potentially improving the rate of myocardial recovery and successful weaning of mechanical circulatory support. PMID:23820272

  1. Comparison of lutein bioavailability from vegetables and supplement.

    PubMed

    Riso, Patrizia; Brusamolino, Antonella; Ciappellano, Salvatore; Porrini, Marisa

    2003-05-01

    Lutein is a carotenoid present in dark green leafy vegetables and it may be involved in the prevention of several diseases related to oxidative stress. The aim of this study was to evaluate bioavailability of lutein from different food sources (150 g spinach and 200 g broccoli) and a supplement in oil (300 mg VEGEX), all providing about 9 mg lutein. Eight healthy females were instructed to eat a low-carotenoid diet for the period of experimentation. On three different occasions, three weeks apart, volunteers ate the lutein sources together with 10 g olive oil and 40 g bread. Blood samples were collected just before eating, every two hours for 12 hours, and at 24, 32, 56, 80 and 104 hours. Lutein concentration increased significantly after six to eight hours and peaked after 10-12 hours, with the highest concentration reached after VEGEX intake. Lutein concentration remained significantly elevated for up to 80 hours (VEGEX and spinach). On the whole, our results suggest that the intake of one single dose of lutein from different sources is able to bring about a significant plasma response in the short term.

  2. Microalgae as a source of lutein: chemistry, biosynthesis, and carotenogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zheng; Li, Tao; Zhou, Zhi-gang; Jiang, Yue

    2016-01-01

    Microalgae represent a sustainable source of natural products, and over 15,000 novel compounds originated from algal biomass have been identified. This chapter focuses on algae-derived lutein, a group of high-value products. Lutein belongs to carotenoids which have extensive applications in feed, food, nutraceutical, and pharmaceutical industries. The production of carotenoids has been one of the most successful activities in microalgal biotechnology. This chapter gives a mini review of microalgae-based lutein, where emphasis is placed on the biosynthetic pathway and the regulation of carotenogenesis.

  3. The effects of pulmonary circulation pulsatility on the impedance cardiogram.

    PubMed

    Saito, Y; Goto, T; Terasaki, H; Hayashida, Y; Morioka, T

    1983-11-01

    To study the effects of pulmonary blood flow on the impedance cardiogram, the pattern of pulmonary blood flow was alternated from pulsatile to non pulsatile, or the reverse, using our extracorporeal bypass-method on anaesthetized dogs. The thoracic impedance cardiogram was recorded from band electrodes placed around the neck and upper abdomen. During nonpulsatile pulmonary blood flow, the height of the diastolic phase of the delta Z wave was lower than that during pulsatile pulmonary blood flow. The area under the impedance curve decreased during nonpulsatile pulmonary blood flow. This appeared to be more obvious as the pulmonary arterial flow was reduced. The results suggest that the pulmonary blood flow might have substantial effects on the impedance cardiogram.

  4. True precocious puberty complicating congenital adrenal hyperplasia: treatment with a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone analog.

    PubMed

    Pescovitz, O H; Comite, F; Cassorla, F; Dwyer, A J; Poth, M A; Sperling, M A; Hench, K; McNemar, A; Skerda, M; Loriaux, D L

    1984-05-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is a recognized cause of precocious pseudopuberty. Some children with CAH also develop true precocious puberty with early maturation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. We have seen four such children (three boys and one girl) who had the diagnosis of CAH made between the ages of 3 and 6 yr. These patients were treated with standard doses of hydrocortisone and fludrocortisone. A diagnosis of true precocious puberty was made because of testicular enlargement in the boys, breast development in the girl, progressive pubic hair development, rapid growth, and rapid bone age maturation. Plasma steroid levels were elevated for age, and gonadotropin levels were within the normal pubertal range, both basally and in response to LHRH stimulation. We treated these children with daily sc injections of a LHRH analog (LHRHa) for 6-18 months in addition to the standard hydrocortisone and fludrocortisone therapy for CAH. LHRHa significantly decreased basal plasma LH and FSH, peak LH and FSH responses to native LHRH, and testosterone levels. Testis size decreased in the males, and breast development regressed in the female. LHRHa therapy led to significant decreases in linear growth rate, ulnar growth rate, and rate of bone age advancement. These results suggest that LHRHa is an effective adjunct to hydrocortisone and fludrocortisone in the treatment of true precocious puberty complicating CAH.

  5. Luteinizing hormone-releasing immunization alters pituitary hormone synthesis and storage in bulls and steers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objectives of this study were (1) to determine if trenbolone acetate (TBA) co-administered with LHRH immunization would suppress reproductive function in beef bulls and (2) to examine the effects of LHRH immunization and TBA treatment on pituitary function. To address these objectives 44 Angus x He...

  6. Seasonal changes in circulating levels of luteinizing hormone and growth hormone in the migratory Canada goose.

    PubMed

    John, T M; George, J C; Scanes, C G

    1983-07-01

    Seasonal changes in plasma levels of LH and GH in the Canada goose (Branta canadensis interior) have been studied. The population examined breeds in the Canadian subarctic region (Fort Churchill, Manitoba) and winters in the southern United States (Swan Lake Refuge, Missouri). Peak levels of LH were observed during spring postmigratory (nestbuilding, early May) and nesting (incubating, early June) periods, while no significant differences were observed during the other periods studied. The highest levels of GH were observed during molting (late July) and the immediately following fall premigratory (early September) period.

  7. Porcine ovarian inhibin preparations sensitize cultured ovine gonadotrophs to luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone.

    PubMed

    Huang, E S; Miller, W L

    1984-08-01

    Treatment of ovine pituitary cell cultures with an acetone powder of porcine follicular fluid (APPFF; 50 micrograms/ml) decreased FSH secretion 60%, did not alter basal LH secretion, but increased by 2- to 3-fold the effectiveness of LHRH or D-Lys6-LHRH (10(-8) M) in releasing LH. Chromatography of APPFF on Matrex Gel Red A (MGRA) yielded a protein fraction (MGRA-IV) in which both FSH-inhibiting and LHRH-enhancing activities were enriched 8-fold. Both activities were destroyed by trypsin, but both were highly resistant to heat. The apparent mol wt of the active substance(s) was greater than 10,000. The LHRH-enhancing effect of MGRA-IV was reversible and declined, with an apparent half-life of 7 h, when MGRA-IV treatment was discontinued. There was too little estrogen in either APPFF or MGRA-IV to account for any of the activities. These results demonstrate that porcine follicular fluid contains LHRH-enhancing activity along with classical inhibin activity and that both activities may be linked in one molecule. These dual activities may be important in a number of species.

  8. Localization of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone in rat hypothalamus using radioimmunoassay.

    PubMed Central

    King, J C; Williams, T H; Arimura, A A

    1975-01-01

    Radioimmunoassays for LH-RH were performed on frozen rat brain sections cut serially in coronal, parasagittal and horizontal planes. In some of the assays, samples were pooled from corresponding areas in different animals. A clear pattern of distribution of LH-RH rich regions emerged. Two prominent components - a caudal high curve and a rostral smaller hump - were observed, and their variable characteristics discussed. The high curve represents the arcuate-medium eminence (ME) region. Our data suggest that this region is not homogeneous, and three different subdivisions of this arcuate-ME region can be distinguished on the basis of LH-RH content. High values were obtained consistently in the arcuate-ME region, except for females in the late afternoon of dioestrus day 2, at which stage the levels in this region dropped until they were little more than base line. The rostral hump of high LH-RH activity varies both in position and amplitude. These variations are associated with (1) the sex of the animal and (2) the stage of the female cycle. In males this hump appeared in the region of the suprachiasmatic nucleus, while in dioestrous females it appeared in the medial preoptic area, rostral to the male location. Some changes in LH-RH levels are thought to be related to the stage in the female sex cycle. During the afternoon of dioestrus, the caudal high curve representing the arcuate-ME region shrank, whereas the rostral smaller hump (preoptic region) showed much higher levels. Some feed-back take-off may occur from the LH-RH released by the arcuate-ME region. Instead of synthesizing its own LH-RH, the preoptic area may concentrate some of the LH-RH released from the arcuate-ME region, thereafter initiating sexual behaviour as suggested by Moss & McCann (1973). PMID:1104548

  9. Role of calcium in gonadotropin releasing hormone-induced luteinizing hormone secretion from the bovine pituitary

    SciTech Connect

    Kile, J.P.

    1986-01-01

    The hypothesis was tested that GnRH acts to release LH by increasing calcium uptake by gonadotroph which in turn stimulates calcium-calmodulin activity and results in LH release from bovine pituitary cells as it does in the rat. Pituitary glands of calves (4-10 months of age) were enzymatically dispersed (0.2% collagenase) and grown for 5 days to confluency in multiwell plates (3 x 10/sup 5//well). Cells treated with GnRH Ca/sup + +/ ionophore A23187, and ouabain all produced significant releases of LH release in a pronounced all or none fashion, while thorough washing of the cells with 0.5 mM EGTA in Ca/sup + +/-free media prevented the action of GnRH. GnRH caused a rapid efflux of /sup 45/Ca/sup + +/. Both GnRH-stimulated /sup 45/Ca efflux and LH release could be partially blocked by verapamil GnRH-induced LH release could also be blocked by nifedipine and tetrodotoxin, although these agents did not affect /sup 45/Ca efflux. The calmodulin antagonists calmidazolium and W7 were found to block GnRH induced LH release, as well as LH release induced by theophylline, KC PGE/sub 2/ and estradiol. These data indicated that: (1) calcium is required for GnRH action, but extracellular Ca/sup + +/ does not regulate LH release; (2) GnRH elevates intracellular Ca/sup + +/ by opening both voltage sensitive and receptor mediated Ca/sup + +/ channels; (3) activation of calmodulin is one mechanism involved in GnRH-induced LH release.

  10. Stimulation of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone release from perifused hypothalamic fragments by phospholipase A2.

    PubMed

    Nava, L E; Malacara, J M

    1987-10-01

    LHRH release is dependent on the availability of calcium, and prostaglandin E2 is a potent releaser of LHRH. Therefore, we investigated the role of phospholipase A2 (PLA2) on the release of LHRH from the hypothalamus. Four rat hypothalami were perifused with Krebs-Ringer buffer, and after a 60-min preincubation period, PLA2 was applied during 10 min. The LHRH response was determined by RIA of 10-min fractions collected for the next 60 min. PLA2 induced LHRH release in a dose-related manner at amounts of 2, 10, and 50 U. Omission of Ca++ from the medium using EGTA eliminated the PLA2 effect. Indomethacin treatment increased rather than diminished the PLA2 stimulation. Perifusion with melittin, an activator of PLA2, also increased LHRH release. These results are interpreted as a demonstration that PLA2 has a role in the release of LHRH and that a different route of the cyclooxygenase may be involved besides the well known mediation of prostaglandin E2.

  11. Lutein and lutein esters in whole grain flours made from 75 genotypes of 5 triticum species grown at multiple sites.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Jochen U; Wahl, Sabine; Würschum, Tobias; Longin, C Friedrich H; Carle, Reinhold; Schweiggert, Ralf M

    2015-05-27

    Concentrations of lutein and lutein esters were determined in an ample collection of 75 wheat genotypes comprising bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), durum (Triticum durum Desf.), spelt (Triticum spelta L.), emmer (Triticum dicoccum Schrank), and einkorn (Triticum monococcum L.) grown in five different environments. Einkorn genotypes showed the highest total amounts of lutein (4.5-7.8 μg/g dry matter), followed by durum (2.0-4.6 μg/g), spelt (0.9-2.0 μg/g), emmer (0.8-1.9 μg/g), and bread wheat (0.7-2.0 μg/g). Due to the observed highly significant genetic variance and high heritability, lutein contents of wheat genotypes may be increased by future plant breeding. Detailed HPLC-DAD-APCI(±)-MS(n) data allowing the identification of six lutein monoesters and nine diesters are presented. Linoleic, palmitic, and oleic acids were the most abundant fatty acids in both the lutein esters and total free lipid fractions. Lutein esters were virtually absent in the tetraploid durum and emmer species, whereas their concentrations considerably differed among the genotypes belonging to the other species.

  12. A FEEDBACK MODEL FOR TESTICULAR-PITUITARY AXIS HORMONE KINETICS AND THEIR EFFECTS ON THE REGULATION OF THE PROSTATE IN ADULT MALE RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The testicular-hypothalamic-pituitary axis regulates male reproductive system functions. A model describing the kinetics and dynamics of testosterone (T), dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and luteinizing hormone (LH) was developed based on a model by Barton and Anderson (1997). The mode...

  13. Lutein nanocrystals as antioxidant formulation for oral and dermal delivery.

    PubMed

    Mitri, Khalil; Shegokar, Ranjita; Gohla, Sven; Anselmi, Cecilia; Müller, Rainer H

    2011-11-25

    Lutein is a well known antioxidant and anti-free radical used in cosmetic, nutraceutical industry with potential application in pharmaceutics as supportive antioxidant in treatments. As lipophilic molecule it is poorly soluble in water and has a low bioavailability. Lutein nanosuspension was prepared to enhance dissolution velocity, saturation solubility (C(s)), which are major factors determining oral bioavailability and penetration into the skin. High pressure homogenization (HPH) was used to prepare lutein nanosuspension. Particle size was determined by photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS) and laser diffractometry (LD). The lowest PCS diameter obtained was about 429 nm, the LD diameter 90% of 1.2 μm. The zeta potential was about -40 mV in water and -17 mV in the original dispersion medium. The 3 month storage study at different temperatures (4°C, 25°C, 40°C) confirmed physical stability despite the low zeta potential of -17 mV in original surfactant solution. A pronounced increase in saturation solubility by 26.3 fold was obtained for lutein nanocrystals compared to coarse powder. The lutein nanosuspension was converted into pellets and filled into hard gelatin capsules for nutraceutical use, showed a superior in vitro release (factor of 3-4). Lyophilized nanosuspension was prepared for subsequent incorporation into creams and gels. The lyophilized nanosuspension was very well re-dispersible (435 nm). Using cellulose nitrate membranes as in vitro model, permeation through this barrier was 14× higher for lutein nanocrystals compared to coarse powder. However, pig ear skin did not allow lutein to permeate but supported localization of the lutein in the skin where it should act anti-oxidatively.

  14. Lutein protects against ischemia/reperfusion injury in rat kidneys.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen-Guo; Qi, Zong-Cai; Liu, Wei-Liang; Wang, Wei-Zhi

    2015-03-01

    Ischemia‑reperfusion (I/R) injury has a major impact on renal dysfunction during transplantation. The present study investigated the role of lutein against I/R injury‑induced oxidative stress in rat kidneys. Biochemical analysis and oxidative stress parameters demonstrated that lutein protected the rat kidney significantly from I/R injury. Pretreatment with lutein significantly increased the total antioxidant capacity with a concomitant decline in the total oxidant status. Rats with I/R injury showed a significant increase in oxidative stress. The results revealed significant increases in the levels of lipid peroxidation and protein carbonyl content with concomitant decreases in enzymic and non‑enzymic antioxidants. The activity of these enzymes was reversed and demonstrated a significant increase following lutein pre‑treatment compared with the rats subjected to I/R injury alone. Furthermore, lutein protected the renal tissue from I/R injury by maintaining normal kidney architecture and led to a reduction in the levels of the renal markers urea and creatinine in the serum. These results demonstrated clear evidence that lutein offered a significant protective effect against I/R injury by enhancing antioxidant defense mechanisms.

  15. [Is lutein supplementation inefficacious? Consideration of the scientific opinion on lutein and maintenance of vision and legal classification].

    PubMed

    Jakobs, S; Skarupinski, P

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this article is the detailed consideration of the scientific opinion on the substantiation of health claims related to lutein and maintenance of vision, which was published by European Food Safety Authority (EFSA). The findings regarding the efficacy of lutein are important for the legal product classification. Thus, the second part of this paper will focus on products containing lutein regarding the demarcation between foodstuffs and drugs. These products are often used in ophthalmology and therefore the assessment of the legal product classification is also important to know for the attending ophthalmologists. Summing up, it is stated that the national and European law for placing products containing lutein on the market will be harmonised for reasons of clarity, transparency and legal certainty but also providing tighter admission requirements for these kinds of products.

  16. Lutein inhibits the migration of retinal pigment epithelial cells via cytosolic and mitochondrial Akt pathways (lutein inhibits RPE cells migration).

    PubMed

    Su, Ching-Chieh; Chan, Chi-Ming; Chen, Han-Min; Wu, Chia-Chun; Hsiao, Chien-Yu; Lee, Pei-Lan; Lin, Victor Chia-Hsiang; Hung, Chi-Feng

    2014-08-08

    During the course of proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR), the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells will de-differentiate, proliferate, and migrate onto the surfaces of the sensory retina. Several studies have shown that platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) can induce migration of RPE cells via an Akt-related pathway. In this study, the effect of lutein on PDGF-BB-induced RPE cells migration was examined using transwell migration assays and Western blot analyses. We found that both phosphorylation of Akt and mitochondrial translocation of Akt in RPE cells induced by PDGF-BB stimulation were suppressed by lutein. Furthermore, the increased migration observed in RPE cells with overexpressed mitochondrial Akt could also be suppressed by lutein. Our results demonstrate that lutein can inhibit PDGF-BB induced RPE cells migration through the inhibition of both cytoplasmic and mitochondrial Akt activation.

  17. A case of Takayasu's arteritis with pulsatile neck mass

    PubMed Central

    Karimifar, Mansoor; Karimifar, Mozhgan; Salimi, Fereshteh; Behjati, Mohaddeseh

    2011-01-01

    Takayasu's arteritis (TA), also known as pulseless disease or occlusive thromboaortopathy, is a form of vasculitis of unknown cause that chiefly affects the aorta and its major branches, most frequently in young women. We describe an 18-year-old female with a soft and pulsatile mass in the left side of her neck. PMID:22973373

  18. Case of a non-pulsatile groin swelling.

    PubMed

    Razif, M A Mohamed; Rajasingam, V; Abdullah, B J J

    2002-12-01

    We report a case of a non-pulsatile groin swelling in a 38 years old male drug addict without the typical clinical signs of an aneurysm. Ultrasound revealed a left femoral artery pseudo-aneurysm. He was surgically treated and the vessels were ligated without revascularisation.

  19. A Meta-Analysis of Renal Function After Adult Cardiac Surgery With Pulsatile Perfusion.

    PubMed

    Nam, Myung Ji; Lim, Choon Hak; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Kim, Yong Hwi; Choi, Hyuk; Son, Ho Sung; Lim, Hae Ja; Sun, Kyung

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this meta-analysis was to determine whether pulsatile perfusion during cardiac surgery has a lesser effect on renal dysfunction than nonpulsatile perfusion after cardiac surgery in randomized controlled trials. MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were used to identify available articles published before April 25, 2014. Meta-analysis was conducted to determine the effects of pulsatile perfusion on postoperative renal functions, as determined by creatinine clearance (CrCl), serum creatinine (Cr), urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), and the incidences of acute renal insufficiency (ARI) and acute renal failure (ARF). Nine studies involving 674 patients that received pulsatile perfusion and 698 patients that received nonpulsatile perfusion during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) were considered in the meta-analysis. Stratified analysis was performed according to effective pulsatility or unclear pulsatility of the pulsatile perfusion method in the presence of heterogeneity. NGAL levels were not significantly different between the pulsatile and nonpulsatile groups. However, patients in the pulsatile group had a significantly higher CrCl and lower Cr levels when the analysis was restricted to studies on effective pulsatile flow (P < 0.00001, respectively). The incidence of ARI was significantly lower in the pulsatile group (P < 0.00001), but incidences of ARF were similar. In conclusion, the meta-analysis suggests that the use of pulsatile flow during CPB results in better postoperative renal function.

  20. Hormonal Perturbations in Occupationally Exposed Nickel Workers

    PubMed Central

    Beshir, Safia; Ibrahim, Khadiga Salah; Shaheen, Weam; Shahy, Eman M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nickel exposure is recognized as an endocrine disruptor because of its adverse effects on reproduction. AIM: This study was designed to investigate the possible testiculo-hormonal perturbations on workers occupationally exposed to nickel and to assess its effects on human male sexual function. METHODS: Cross-sectional comparative study, comprising 105 electroplating male non-smoker, non-alcoholic workers exposed to soluble nickel and 60 controls was done. Serum luteinizing hormone, follicle stimulating hormone, testosterone levels and urinary nickel concentrations were determined for the studied groups. RESULTS: Serum luteinizing hormone, follicle stimulating hormone, urinary nickel and the simultaneous incidence of more than one sexual disorder were significantly higher in the exposed workers compared to controls. The occurrence of various types of sexual disorders (decreased libido, impotence and premature ejaculation) in the exposed workers was 9.5, 5.1 and 4.4 folds respectively than the controls. CONCLUSIONS: Exposure to nickel produces possible testiculo-hormonal perturbations in those exposed workers. PMID:27335607

  1. Composition of Lutein Ester Regioisomers in Marigold Flower, Dietary Supplement, and Herbal Tea.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Aal, El-Sayed M; Rabalski, Iwona

    2015-11-11

    Characterization of lutein and its esters in a health product is necessary for its efficacy. In the current study lutein ester regioisomers were quantified and identified in several dietary supplements and herbal teas in comparison with marigold flower, the commercial source of lutein. The products were extracted with three solvents and separated on a C30 column. The separated esters were identified/confirmed with LC-MS in APCI+ve mode with the use of synthetic lutein esters. The total content of lutein esters substantially varied among marigold flowers (167-5752 μg/g), supplements (88,000-110,700 μg/g), and herbal teas (12.4-91.3 μg/g). Lutein supplement had a lutein profile similar to that of marigold flower, whereas herbal tea showed an extremely different profile. Lutein dipalmitate was the dominant compound in supplements and marigold flowers followed by lutein 3'-O-myristate-3-O-palmitate and lutein 3'-O-palmitate-3-O-myristate. Lutein was the major compound in marigold herbal tea with small amounts of lutein mono- and diesters. Differences in the concentration and composition of lutein compounds among marigold products could indicate distinct product quality and lutein bioavailability. PMID:26496496

  2. Composition of Lutein Ester Regioisomers in Marigold Flower, Dietary Supplement, and Herbal Tea.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Aal, El-Sayed M; Rabalski, Iwona

    2015-11-11

    Characterization of lutein and its esters in a health product is necessary for its efficacy. In the current study lutein ester regioisomers were quantified and identified in several dietary supplements and herbal teas in comparison with marigold flower, the commercial source of lutein. The products were extracted with three solvents and separated on a C30 column. The separated esters were identified/confirmed with LC-MS in APCI+ve mode with the use of synthetic lutein esters. The total content of lutein esters substantially varied among marigold flowers (167-5752 μg/g), supplements (88,000-110,700 μg/g), and herbal teas (12.4-91.3 μg/g). Lutein supplement had a lutein profile similar to that of marigold flower, whereas herbal tea showed an extremely different profile. Lutein dipalmitate was the dominant compound in supplements and marigold flowers followed by lutein 3'-O-myristate-3-O-palmitate and lutein 3'-O-palmitate-3-O-myristate. Lutein was the major compound in marigold herbal tea with small amounts of lutein mono- and diesters. Differences in the concentration and composition of lutein compounds among marigold products could indicate distinct product quality and lutein bioavailability.

  3. Induction of chemokines and prostaglandin synthesis pathways in luteinized human granulosa cells: potential role of luteotropin withdrawal and prostaglandin F2α in regression of the human corpus luteum.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wenxiang; Salih, Sana M; Bormann, Charles L; Wiltbank, Milo C

    2015-12-01

    Our objective was to determine the effects of prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α) and withdrawal of luteotropic stimulants (forskolin or hCG) on expression of chemokines and prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (PTGS2) in luteinized human granulosa cells. Human granulosa cells were collected from 12 women undergoing oocyte retrieval and were luteinized in vitro with forskolin or hCG. In first experiment, granulosa-lutein cells were treated with PGF2α, the primary luteolytic hormone in most species. In second experiment, granulosa cells that had been luteinized for 8 d had luteotropins withdrawn for 1, 2, or 3 d. Treatment with PGF2α induced mRNA for chemokine (c-x-c motif) ligand 2 (CXCL2) and CXC ligand 8 (CXCL8; also known as interleukin-8) in granulosa cells luteinized for 8 d but not in cells that were only luteinized for 2 d. Similarly, luteinization of human granulosa cells for 8 d with forskolin or hCG followed by withdrawal of luteotropic stimulants, not only decreased P4 production, but also increased mRNA concentrations for CXCL8, CXCL-2 (after forskolin withdrawal), and PTGS2. These results provide evidence for two key steps in differentiation of luteolytic capability in human granulosa cells. During 8 d of luteinization, granulosa cells acquire the ability to respond to luteolytic factors, such as PGF2α, with induction of genes involved in immune function and PG synthesis. Finally, a decline in luteotropic stimuli triggers similar pathways leading to induction of PTGS2 and possibly intraluteal PGF2α production, chemokine expression, leukocyte infiltration and activation, and ultimately luteal regression. PMID:26679166

  4. Lutein derived fragments exhibit higher antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties than lutein in lipopolysaccharide induced inflammation in rats.

    PubMed

    Nidhi, Bhatiwada; Sharavana, Gurunathan; Ramaprasad, Talahalli R; Vallikannan, Baskaran

    2015-02-01

    In the present study, we appraise the anti-inflammatory efficacy of lutein oxidative degradation derivatives mediated through UV-irradiation over lutein in counteracting the inflammation induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in rats (n = 5 per group). UV-irradiated lutein fragments were identified as anhydrolutein (B, C40H54O), 2,6,6-trimethylcyclohexa-1,4-dienylium (M1, C9H13), (2E,4E,6E,8E)-9-(4-hydroxy-2,6,6-trimethylcyclohex-1-1en-1-yl)-3,7-dimethylnona-2,4,6,8-tetraen-1-ylium (M2, C20H29O), 4-[(1E,3E,5E,7E)-3,7,-dimethyldeca-1,3,5,7-tetraen-1-yl]-3,5,5-methylcyclohex-3-en-1-ol (M3, C21H30O) and zeaxanthin (M4, C40H56O) and its isomers as 13'-Z zeaxanthin, 13'-Z lutein, all-trans zeaxanthin, and 9-Z lutein. Induction of inflammation by LPS significantly increased the production of nitrites (3.3 fold in the serum and 2.6 fold in the liver), prostaglandin E2 (26 fold in the serum), and pro-inflammatory cytokines like tumor necrosis factor-α (6.6 fold in the serum), and interleukin-6 (4.8 fold in the serum). Oxidative derivatives of lutein, especially M1, M2 and M3, ameliorated acute inflammation in rats by inhibiting the production of nitrites, malondialdehyde (MDA), PGE2, TNF-α, and IL-6 cytokines more efficiently than lutein in rats. The anti-inflammatory mechanism of derivatives might be related to the decrease of inflammatory cytokines and the increase of antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione S transferase, glutathione reductase), which would result in the reduction of iNOS, COX-2 and MDA and subsequently inflammatory responses.

  5. Results of a study to correlate serum prostate specific antigen and reproductive hormone levels in patients with localized prostate cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakumar, S.; Quadri, S. F.; Dong, L.; Ignacio, L.; Kathuria, I. N.; Sutton, H.; Halpern, H.

    1995-01-01

    This cross-sectional study was undertaken to determine whether serum hormones (free testosterone, androstenedione, luteinizing hormone, or prolactin) have any influence on serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels in patients with stage A-C prostate cancer. Blood samples were collected prior to any treatment in 36 patients; in 19 (group 1), three blood samples were collected 10 minutes apart between 9:00 AM and 9:30 AM for each patient and pooled together to avoid diurnal and episodic variation in serum testosterone values. In the remaining patients, only one sample could be collected (group 2). Free testosterone, androstenedione, luteinizing hormone, prolactin, and PSA levels were determined with appropriate radioimmunoassay techniques. Statistical analyses were performed separately for groups 1 and 2, and then with pooled data. None of the hormones in any of the analyses showed any association to serum PSA values except for prolactin for the pooled data and for group 2. This statistical significance for prolactin disappeared on multivariate analysis. There were 21 African-American men and 15 whites in the study; no racial differences in hormonal levels were found except for lower luteinizing hormone levels in African Americans in group 2 and pooled data. No differences were found between group 1 and group 2 in the mean serum prolactin and luteinizing hormone values. Serum free testosterone, androstenedione, and luteinizing hormone appeared to have no influence on serum PSA values in nonmetastatic cancer patients. Serum prolactin values were inversely associated with PSA values in univariate analysis for the pooled data; this disappeared in multivariate analysis. Unlike other studies that found higher serum testosterone levels in African-American college students than whites, no such differences were seen in this age group. Luteinizing hormone was lower in African-American men than in whites in the pooled study population. Further studies are needed to clarify

  6. Lutein supplementation increases breast milk and plasma lutein concentrations in lactating women and infant plasma concentrations but does not affect other carotenoids.

    PubMed

    Sherry, Christina L; Oliver, Jeffery S; Renzi, Lisa M; Marriage, Barbara J

    2014-08-01

    Lutein is a carotenoid that varies in breast milk depending on maternal intake. Data are lacking with regard to the effect of dietary lutein supplementation on breast milk lutein concentration during lactation and subsequent plasma lutein concentration in breast-fed infants. This study was conducted to determine the impact of lutein supplementation in the breast milk and plasma of lactating women and in the plasma of breast-fed infants 2-3 mo postpartum. Lutein is the dominant carotenoid in the infant brain and the major carotenoid found in the retina of the eye. Eighty-nine lactating women 4-6 wk postpartum were randomly assigned to be administered either 0 mg/d of lutein (placebo), 6 mg/d of lutein (low-dose), or 12 mg/d of lutein (high-dose). The supplements were consumed for 6 wk while mothers followed their usual diets. Breast milk carotenoids were measured weekly by HPLC, and maternal plasma carotenoid concentrations were measured at the beginning and end of the study. Infant plasma carotenoid concentrations were assessed at the end of the study. No significant differences were found between dietary lutein + zeaxanthin intake and carotenoid concentrations in breast milk and plasma or body mass index at baseline. Total lutein + zeaxanthin concentrations were greater in the low- and high-dose-supplemented groups than in the placebo group in breast milk (140% and 250%, respectively; P < 0.0001), maternal plasma (170% and 250%, respectively; P < 0.0001), and infant plasma (180% and 330%, respectively; P < 0.05). Lutein supplementation did not affect other carotenoids in lactating women or their infants. Lactating women are highly responsive to lutein supplementation, which affects plasma lutein concentrations in the infant. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01747668.

  7. Role of lutein and zeaxanthin in visual and cognitive function throughout the lifespan.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Elizabeth J

    2014-09-01

    The relationship between lutein and zeaxanthin and visual and cognitive health throughout the lifespan is compelling. There is a variety of evidence to support a role for lutein and zeaxanthin in vision. Lutein's role in cognition has only recently been considered. Lutein and its isomer, zeaxanthin, are taken up selectively into eye tissue. Lutein is the predominant carotenoid in human brain tissue. Lutein and zeaxanthin in neural tissue may have biological effects that include antioxidation, anti-inflammation, and structural actions. In addition, lutein and zeaxanthin may be protective against eye disease because they absorb damaging blue light that enters the eye. In pediatric brains, the relative contribution of lutein to the total carotenoids is twice that found in adults, accounting for more than half the concentration of total carotenoids. The greater proportion of lutein in the pediatric brain suggests a need for lutein during neural development as well. In adults, higher lutein status is related to better cognitive performance, and lutein supplementation improves cognition. The evidence to date warrants further investigation into the role of lutein and zeaxanthin in visual and cognitive health throughout the lifespan.

  8. Role of lutein and zeaxanthin in visual and cognitive function throughout the lifespan.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Elizabeth J

    2014-09-01

    The relationship between lutein and zeaxanthin and visual and cognitive health throughout the lifespan is compelling. There is a variety of evidence to support a role for lutein and zeaxanthin in vision. Lutein's role in cognition has only recently been considered. Lutein and its isomer, zeaxanthin, are taken up selectively into eye tissue. Lutein is the predominant carotenoid in human brain tissue. Lutein and zeaxanthin in neural tissue may have biological effects that include antioxidation, anti-inflammation, and structural actions. In addition, lutein and zeaxanthin may be protective against eye disease because they absorb damaging blue light that enters the eye. In pediatric brains, the relative contribution of lutein to the total carotenoids is twice that found in adults, accounting for more than half the concentration of total carotenoids. The greater proportion of lutein in the pediatric brain suggests a need for lutein during neural development as well. In adults, higher lutein status is related to better cognitive performance, and lutein supplementation improves cognition. The evidence to date warrants further investigation into the role of lutein and zeaxanthin in visual and cognitive health throughout the lifespan. PMID:25109868

  9. Interactions of growth hormone secretagogues and growth hormone-releasing hormone/somatostatin.

    PubMed

    Tannenbaum, G S; Bowers, C Y

    2001-02-01

    The class of novel synthetic compounds termed growth hormone secretagogues (GHSs) act in the hypothalamus through, as yet, unknown pathways. We performed physiologic and histochemical studies to further understand how the GHS system interacts with the well-established somatostatin (SRIF)/growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) neuroendocrine system for regulating pulsatile GH secretion. Comparison of the GH-releasing activities of the hexapeptide growth hormone-releasing peptide-6 (GHRP-6) and GHRH administered intravenously to conscious adult male rats showed that the pattern of GH responsiveness to GHRP-6 was markedly time-dependent, similar to that observed with GHRH. Immunoneutralization of endogenous SRIF reversed the blunted GH response to GHRP-6 at trough times, suggesting that GHRP-6 neither disrupts nor inhibits the cyclical release of endogenous hypothalamic SRIF. By striking contrast, passive immunization with anti-GHRH serum virtually obliterated the GH responses to GHRP-6, irrespective of the time of administration. These findings suggest that the GHSs do not act by altering SRIF release but, rather, stimulate GH release via GHRH-dependent pathways. Our dual chromogenic and autoradiographic in situ hybridization experiments revealed that a subpopulation of GHRH mRNA-containing neurons in the arcuate (Arc) nucleus and ventromedial nucleus (VMN) of the hypothalamus expressed the GHS receptor (GHS-R) gene. These results provide strong anatomic evidence that GHSs may directly stimulate GHRH release into hypophyseal portal blood, and thereby influence GH secretion, through interaction with the GHS-R on GHRH- containing neurons. Altogether, these findings support the notion that an additional neuroendocrine pathway may exist to regulate pulsatile GH secretion, possibly through the influence of the newly discovered GHS natural peptide, ghrelin. PMID:11322498

  10. Tissue Pulsatility Imaging of Cerebral Vasoreactivity during Hyperventilation

    PubMed Central

    Kucewicz, John C.; Dunmire, Barbrina; Giardino, Nicholas D.; Leotta, Daniel F.; Paun, Marla; Dager, Stephen R.; Beach, Kirk W.

    2008-01-01

    Tissue Pulsatility Imaging (TPI) is an ultrasonic technique that is being developed at the University of Washington to measure tissue displacement or strain due to blood flow over the cardiac and respiratory cycles. This technique is based in principle on plethysmography, an older non-ultrasound technology for measuring expansion of a whole limb or body part due to perfusion. TPI adapts tissue Doppler signal processing methods to measure the “plethysmographic” signal from hundreds or thousands of sample volumes in an ultrasound image plane. This paper presents a feasibility study to determine if TPI can be used to assess cerebral vasoreactivity. Ultrasound data were collected transcranially through the temporal acoustic window from four subjects before, during, and after voluntary hyperventilation. In each subject, decreases in tissue pulsatility during hyperventilation were observed that were statistically correlated with the subject’s end-tidal CO2 measurements. PMID:18336991

  11. CFD modeling of pulsatile hemodynamics in the total cavopulmonary connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zobaer, S. M. Tareq; Hasan, A. B. M. Toufique

    2016-07-01

    Total cavopulmonary connection is a blood flow pathway which is created surgically by an operation known as Fontan procedure, performed on children with single ventricle heart defects. Recent studies have shown that the hemodynamics in the connection can be strongly influenced by the presence of pulsatile flow. The aim of this paper is model the pulsatile flow patterns, and to calculate the vorticity field and power losses in an idealized 1.5D offset model of Total Cavopulmonary Connection. A three-dimensional polyhedral mesh was constructed for the numerical simulation. The rheological properties of blood were considered as Newtonian, and flow in the connection was assumed to be laminar. The results demonstrated complex flow patterns in the connection. The outcomes of the simulation showed reasonable agreement with the results available in the literature for a similar model.

  12. The dynamics of pulsatile flow in distensible model arteries.

    PubMed

    Liepsch, D W; Zimmer, R

    1995-12-01

    Deposits and blockages are often found in the carotid, coronary, renal and femoral arteries. This paper deals with laser-Doppler velocity measurements in models of bifurcations of the human femoral arteries. Several models were prepared for the studies: a simplified 35 degrees glass model, two elastic-silicone-rubber models with a wall thickness of 1 mm and 2 mm, and true-to-scale rigid and elastic models. These measurements give a clearer picture of how hemodynamics influences the formation of atherosclerotic plaques where there is a hardening of the arterial walls and a loss of elasticity. In addition to the effects of elasticity, the influence of the flow's pulsatility were studied. The measurements were done in steady and pulsatile flow. From the velocity measurements the shear stresses were calculated.

  13. Lutein and Zeaxanthin Isomers in Eye Health and Disease.

    PubMed

    Mares, Julie

    2016-07-17

    Current evidence suggests lutein and its isomers play important roles in ocular development in utero and throughout the life span, in vision performance in young and later adulthood, and in lowering risk for the development of common age-related eye diseases in older age. These xanthophyll (oxygen-containing) carotenoids are found in a wide variety of vegetables and fruits, and they are present in especially high concentrations in leafy green vegetables. Additionally, egg yolks and human milk appear to be bioavailable sources. The prevalence of lutein, zeaxanthin, and meso-zeaxanthin in supplements is increasing. Setting optimal and safe ranges of intake requires additional research, particularly in pregnant and lactating women. Accumulating evidence about variable interindividual response to dietary intake of these carotenoids, based on genetic or metabolic influences, suggests that there may be subgroups that benefit from higher levels of intake and/or alternate strategies to improve lutein and zeaxanthin status. PMID:27431371

  14. The Photobiology of Lutein and Zeaxanthin in the Eye

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Joan E.; Dennison, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    Lutein and zeaxanthin are antioxidants found in the human retina and macula. Recent clinical trials have determined that age- and diet-related loss of lutein and zeaxanthin enhances phototoxic damage to the human eye and that supplementation of these carotenoids has a protective effect against photoinduced damage to the lens and the retina. Two of the major mechanisms of protection offered by lutein and zeaxanthin against age-related blue light damage are the quenching of singlet oxygen and other reactive oxygen species and the absorption of blue light. Determining the specific reactive intermediate(s) produced by a particular phototoxic ocular chromophore not only defines the mechanism of toxicity but can also later be used as a tool to prevent damage. PMID:26798505

  15. Pulsatile blood flow, shear force, energy dissipation and Murray's Law

    PubMed Central

    Painter, Page R; Edén, Patrik; Bengtsson, Hans-Uno

    2006-01-01

    Background Murray's Law states that, when a parent blood vessel branches into daughter vessels, the cube of the radius of the parent vessel is equal to the sum of the cubes of the radii of daughter blood vessels. Murray derived this law by defining a cost function that is the sum of the energy cost of the blood in a vessel and the energy cost of pumping blood through the vessel. The cost is minimized when vessel radii are consistent with Murray's Law. This law has also been derived from the hypothesis that the shear force of moving blood on the inner walls of vessels is constant throughout the vascular system. However, this derivation, like Murray's earlier derivation, is based on the assumption of constant blood flow. Methods To determine the implications of the constant shear force hypothesis and to extend Murray's energy cost minimization to the pulsatile arterial system, a model of pulsatile flow in an elastic tube is analyzed. A new and exact solution for flow velocity, blood flow rate and shear force is derived. Results For medium and small arteries with pulsatile flow, Murray's energy minimization leads to Murray's Law. Furthermore, the hypothesis that the maximum shear force during the cycle of pulsatile flow is constant throughout the arterial system implies that Murray's Law is approximately true. The approximation is good for all but the largest vessels (aorta and its major branches) of the arterial system. Conclusion A cellular mechanism that senses shear force at the inner wall of a blood vessel and triggers remodeling that increases the circumference of the wall when a shear force threshold is exceeded would result in the observed scaling of vessel radii described by Murray's Law. PMID:16923189

  16. Visualization of pulsatile flow for magnetic nanoparticle based therapies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wentzel, Andrew; Yecko, Philip

    2015-11-01

    Pulsatile flow of blood through branched, curved, stenosed, dilated or otherwise perturbed vessels is more complex than flow through a straight, uniform and rigid tube. In some magnetic hyperthermia and magnetic chemo-therapies, localized regions of magnetic nanoparticle laden fluid are deliberately formed in blood vessels and held in place by magnetic fields. The effect of localized magnetic fluid regions on blood flow and the effect of the pulsatile blood flow on such magnetic fluid regions are poorly understood and difficult to examine in vivo or by numerical simulation. We present a laboratory model that facilitates both dye tracer and particle imaging velocimetry (PIV) studies of pulsatile flow of water through semi-flexible tubes in the presence of localized magnetic fluid regions. Results on the visualization of flows over a range of Reynolds and Womersley numbers and for several different (water-based) ferrofluids are compared for straight and curved vessels and for different magnetic localization strategies. These results can guide the design of improved magnetic cancer therapies. Support from the William H. Sandholm Program of Cooper Union's Kanbar Center for Biomedical Engineering is gratefully acknowledged.

  17. Numerical modeling of hemodynamics with pulsatile impeller pump support.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yubing; Lawford, Patricia V; Hose, D Rodney

    2010-08-01

    There is significant interest in the development and application of variable speed impeller-pump type ventricular assist devices designed to generate pulsatile blood flow. However, no study has so far been carried out to investigate the systemic cardiovascular response to various aspects of pump motion. In this article, a numerical model is constructed for the simulation of the cardiovascular response in the heart failure condition under representative cases of pulsatile impeller pump support. The native cardiovascular model is based on a previously validated model, and the impeller pump is modeled by directly fitting the pressure-flow curves that describe the pump characteristics. The model developed is applied to study circulatory dynamics under different degrees of phase shift and pulsation ratio in the pump motion profile. The characteristic variables are discussed as criteria for the evaluation of system response for comparison of the pulsatile flows. Simulation results show that a constant pump speed is the most efficient work mode for the rotary pump, and with the application of either a phase shift of 75% and a pulsation ratio of 0.5, or a phase shift of 42% and a pulsation ratio of 0.55, it is possible to generate arterial pulse pressure with the maximal magnitude of about 28 mmHg. However, this is achieved at the cost of reduced cardiac output and pump efficiency.

  18. CCAP and FMRFamide-like peptides accelerate the contraction rate of the antennal accessory pulsatile organs (auxiliary hearts) of mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Suggs, Julia M; Jones, Talitha H; Murphree, Steven C; Hillyer, Julián F

    2016-08-01

    Insects rely on specialized accessory pulsatile organs (APOs), also known as auxiliary hearts, to propel hemolymph into their antennae. In most insects, this is accomplished via the pulsations of a pair of ampulla located in the head, each of which propels hemolymph across an antenna via an antennal vessel. Once at the distal end of the appendage, hemolymph returns to the head via the antennal hemocoel. Although the structure of the antennal hearts has been elucidated in various insect orders, their hormonal modulation has only been studied in cockroaches and other hemimetabolous insects within the superorder Polyneoptera, where proctolin and FMRFamide-like peptides accelerate the contraction rate of these auxiliary hearts. Here, we assessed the hormonal modulation of the antennal APOs of mosquitoes, a group of holometabolous (Endopterygota) insects within the order Diptera. We show that crustacean cardioactive peptide (CCAP), FMRFamide and SALDKNFMRFamide increase the contraction rate of the antennal APOs and the heart of Anopheles gambiae Both antennal hearts are synchronously responsive to these neuropeptides, but their contractions are asynchronous with the contraction of the heart. Furthermore, we show that these neuropeptides increase the velocity and maximum acceleration of hemolymph within the antennal space, suggesting that each contraction is also more forceful. To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating that hormones of a holometabolous insect modulate the contraction dynamics of an auxiliary heart, and the first report that shows that the hormones of any insect accelerate the velocity of hemolymph in the antennal space.

  19. Changes in Bone Mineral Density and Metabolic Parameters after Pulsatile Gonadorelin Treatment in Young Men with Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chen-Xi; Tang, Song-Tao; Zhang, Qiu

    2015-01-01

    To assess the prevalence of osteoporosis in young men with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH) and to investigate the changes of BMD and metabolic parameters, a total of 22 young male patients with HH and 20 healthy controls were enrolled in the study. BMD, biochemical, and hormonal parameters were measured in two groups. Osteoporosis was more prevalent in HH patients (45.45%) than the control subjects (10.00%) (P < 0.001). The patients with HH had lower BMD in lumbar spine 2–4, femoral neck, and total hip (P < 0.001, for all) and higher fasting insulin (P = 0.001), HOMA-IR (P = 0.002), and SHBG (P < 0.001) compared to the controls. After 6 months of pulsatile gonadorelin treatment, BMI (P = 0.021) and BMD in lumbar spine 2–4, femoral neck, and total hip (P = 0.002, P = 0.003, and P = 0.003, resp.) increased dramatically and total cholesterol (P = 0.034), fasting insulin (P = 0.025), HOMA-IR (P = 0.021), and SHBG (P = 0.001) decreased significantly in HH patients. The study shows a higher prevalence of osteoporosis in young men with HH. Long-term pulsatile gonadorelin treatment indicates a positive effect on BMD and metabolic parameters of HH patients. PMID:26417369

  20. Obesity, growth hormone and exercise.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Gwendolyn A; Kraemer, William J; Comstock, Brett A; Dunn-Lewis, Courtenay; Maresh, Carl M; Volek, Jeff S

    2013-09-01

    Growth hormone (GH) is regulated, suppressed and stimulated by numerous physiological stimuli. However, it is believed that obesity disrupts the physiological and pathological factors that regulate, suppress or stimulate GH release. Pulsatile GH has been potently stimulated in healthy subjects by both aerobic and resistance exercise of the right intensity and duration. GH modulates fuel metabolism, reduces total fat mass and abdominal fat mass, and could be a potent stimulus of lipolysis when administered to obese individuals exogenously. Only pulsatile GH has been shown to augment adipose tissue lipolysis and, therefore, increasing pulsatile GH response may be a therapeutic target. This review discusses the factors that cause secretion of GH, how obesity may alter GH secretion and how both aerobic and resistance exercise stimulates GH, as well as how exercise of a specific intensity may be used as a stimulus for GH release in individuals who are obese. Only five prior studies have investigated exercise as a stimulus of endogenous GH in individuals who are obese. Based on prior literature, resistance exercise may provide a therapeutic target for releasing endogenous GH in individuals who are obese if specific exercise programme variables are utilized. Biological activity of GH indicates that this may be an important precursor to beneficial changes in body fat and lean tissue mass in obese individuals. However, additional research is needed including what molecular GH variants are acutely released and involved at target tissues as a result of different exercise stimuli and what specific exercise programme variables may serve to stimulate GH in individuals who are obese.

  1. Vitreoscilla hemoglobin gene ( vgb) improves lutein production in Chlorella vulgaris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ruijuan; Lin, Xiangzhi

    2014-03-01

    Vitreoscilla hemoglobin is an oxygen-binding protein that promotes oxygen delivery and reduces oxygen consumption under low oxygen conditions to increase the efficiency of cell respiration and metabolism. In this study, we introduced a Vitreoscilla hemoglobin gene ( vgb) into Chlorella vulgaris by Agrobacterium tumefaciens -mediated transformation (ATMT). PCR analysis confirmed that the vgb gene was successfully integrated into the Chlorella vulgaris genome. Analysis of biomass obtained in shake flasks revealed transformant biomass concentrations as high as 3.28 g/L, which was 38.81% higher than that of the wild-type strain. Lutein content of transformants also increased slightly. Further experiments recovered a maximum lutein yield of 2.91 mg/L from the transformants, which was 36.77% higher than that of the wild-type strain. The above results suggest that integrated expression of the vgb gene may improve cell growth and lutein yield in Chlorella vulgaris, with applications to lutein production from Chlorella during fermentation.

  2. Antioxidant activity of carotenoid lutein in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Sindhu, Edakkadath R; Preethi, Korengath C; Kuttan, Ramadasan

    2010-08-01

    Carotenoid lutein was evaluated for its antioxidant potential both in vitro and in vivo. Lutein was found to scavenge superoxide radicals, hydroxyl radicals and inhibited in vitro lipid peroxidation. Concentrations needed for 50% inhibition (IC50) were 21, 1.75 and 2.2 microg/mL respectively. It scavenged 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl hydrazyl (IC50 35 microg/mL) and nitric oxide radicals (IC50 3.8 microg/mL) while 2,2-azobis-3-ethylbenzthiozoline-6-sulfonic acid radicals were inhibited at higher concentration. Ferric reducing power (50%) of lutein was found to be equal 0.3 micromols/mL of FeSO4.7H2O. Its oral administration inhibited superoxide generation in macrophages in vivo by 34.18, 64.32 and 70.22% at doses of 50, 100 and 250 mg/kg body weight. The oral administration of lutein in mice for 1 month significantly increased the activity of catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione reductase and glutathione in blood and liver while the activity of glutathione peroxidase and glutathione-S-transferase were found to be increased in the liver tissue. Implication of these results in terms of its role in reducing degenerative diseases is discussed. PMID:21341544

  3. Effect of Flow Pulsatility on Modeling the Hemodynamics in the Total Cavopulmonary Connection

    PubMed Central

    khiabani, Reza H.; Restrepo, Maria; Tang, Elaine; De Zélicourt, Diane; Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Fogel, Mark; Yoganathan, Ajit P.

    2012-01-01

    Total Cavopulmonary Connection is the result of a series of palliative surgical repairs performed on patients with single ventricle heart defects. The resulting anatomy has complex and unsteady hemodynamics characterized by flow mixing and flow separation. Although varying degrees of flow pulsatility have been observed in vivo, non-pulsatile (time-averaged) boundary conditions have traditionally been assumed in hemodynamic modeling, and only recently have pulsatile conditions been incorporated without completely characterizing their effect or importance. In this study, 3D numerical simulations with both pulsatile and non-pulsatile boundary conditions were performed for 24 patients with different anatomies and flow boundary conditions from Georgia Tech database. Flow structures, energy dissipation rates and pressure drops were compared under rest and simulated exercise conditions. It was found that flow pulsatility is the primary factor in determining the appropriate choice of boundary conditions, whereas the anatomic configuration and cardiac output had secondary effects. Results show that the hemodynamics can be strongly influenced by the presence of pulsatile flow. However, there was a minimum pulsatility threshold, identified by defining a weighted pulsatility index (wPI), above which the influence was significant. It was shown that when wPI < 30%, the relative error in hemodynamic predictions using time-averaged boundary conditions was less than 10% compared to pulsatile simulations. In addition, when wPI <50, the relative error was less than 20%. A correlation was introduced to relate wPI to the relative error in predicting the flow metrics with non-pulsatile flow conditions. PMID:22841650

  4. Endogenous opioids participate in the regulation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-luteinizing hormone axis and testosterone's negative feedback control of luteinizing hormone.

    PubMed

    Cicero, T J; Schainker, B A; Meyer, E R

    1979-05-01

    Two narcotic antagonists, naloxone and naltrexone, significantly elevated serum LH levels in male rats within minutes after their sc injection. The peak increase in serum LH occurred 20 min after the injection. Naloxone increased LH levels up to a dose of 1 mg/kg, after which no further increases were found. A dose of 0.35 mg/kg produced a half-maximal response. The exogenous opioid morphine blocked the increase in LH produced by naloxone in a dose-dependent fashion, suggesting that the specific receptor-blocking effects of the antagonist could account for its enhancement of serum LH levels. The locus of action of naloxone within the hypothalamic-pituitary-LH axis appeared to be at the level of the hypothalamus since the drug had no effect on LHRH-stimulated release of LH by the anterior pituitary and did not block dihydrotestosterone's suppression of pituitary LH release in vitro. Naloxone also prevented testosterone's negative feedback inhibition of serum LH in the castrated male rat. The results of these studies suggest that endogenous opioids exist in brain tissue which normally inhibit activity in the hypothalamic-pituitary-LH axis and participate in the androgen-dependent feedback control of LH elaboration by this axis. PMID:374068

  5. Effect of ultrasonic waves on the stability of all-trans lutein and its degradation kinetics.

    PubMed

    Song, Jiang-Feng; Li, Da-Jing; Pang, Hui-Li; Liu, Chun-Quan

    2015-11-01

    Ultrasound treatment has been widely applied in the extraction of biologically active compounds including carotenoids. However, there are few reports on their effects on the stability of these compounds. In the present study, the stability of all-trans lutein, one of the carotenoids, was investigated under the action of ultrasound. Results showed that ultrasound induced the isomerization of all-trans lutein to its isomers, namely to 13-cis lutein, 13'-cis lutein, 9-cis lutein and 9'-cis lutein as analyzed by HPLC coupled with DAD and LC-MS; and the percentage of the isomerization increased with increasing both ultrasonic frequency and power. The stability of all-trans lutein in dichloromethane was worst among multiple kinds of solvents. Interestingly, the retention rate of all-trans lutein improved as the temperature increased, which runs counter to the Arrhenius law. Under ultrasound irradiation, the degradation mechanism might be different with various temperatures, the degradation of all-trans lutein followed first-order kinetics at 20°C, while second-order kinetics was followed at 30-50°C. As the ultrasonic reaction time prolonged, lutein epoxidation nearly occurred. Those results presented here emphasized that UAE techniques should be carefully used in the extraction of all-trans lutein.

  6. Biocompatible lutein-polymer-lipid nanocapsules: Acute and subacute toxicity and bioavailability in mice.

    PubMed

    Ranganathan, Arunkumar; Hindupur, Ravi; Vallikannan, Baskaran

    2016-12-01

    Lutein-poly-(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA)-phospholipid (PL) nanocapsules were prepared (henceforth referred as lutein nanocapsules) and studied for acute, subacute oral toxicity and bioavailability of lutein in mice. Prior to examining the safety of lutein nanocapsules, particle size, zeta potential, surface morphology and interaction between lutein, PLGA and PL were studied. In acute study, mice were gavaged with a single dose of lutein nanocapsules at 0.1, 1, 10 and 100mg/kg body weight (BW) and examined for 2weeks, while in subacute study, daily mice were gavaged with a dose of 1 and 10mg/kg BW for 4weeks. Results revealed that mean size and zeta value of lutein nanocapsules were 140nm and -44mV, respectively. Acute and subacute toxicity studies did not show any mortality or treatment related adverse effect in clinical observations, ophthalmic examinations, body and organ weights. No toxicity related findings were observed in hematology, histopathology and other blood and tissue clinical chemistry parameters. In subacute study, no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) of lutein nanocapsules was found to be at a dose of 10mg/kg BW. Feeding lutein nanocapsules resulted in a significant (p<0.01) increase in lutein level in plasma and tissue compared to the control group. Lutein nanocapsules did not cause toxicity in mice. However, human trials are warranted. PMID:27612832

  7. Isolation and purification of lutein from the microalga Chlorella vulgaris by extraction after saponification.

    PubMed

    Li, Hua-Bin; Jiang, Yue; Chen, Feng

    2002-02-27

    A simple and efficient method for the isolation and purification of lutein from the microalga Chlorella vulgaris was developed. Crude lutein was obtained by extraction with dichloromethane from the microalga after saponification. Partition values of lutein in the two-phase system of ethanol-water-dichloromethane at different ratios were measured by HPLC so as to assist the determination of an appropriate condition for washing water-soluble impurities in the crude lutein. Partition values of lutein in another two-phase system of ethanol-water-hexane at different ratios were also measured by HPLC for determining the condition for removing fat-soluble impurities. The water-soluble impurities in the crude lutein were removed by washing with 30% aqueous ethanol, and the fat-soluble impurities were removed by extraction with hexane. The final purity of lutein obtained was 90-98%, and the yield was 85-91%.

  8. Incorporation of lutein and docosahexaenoic acid from dietary microalgae into the retina in quail.

    PubMed

    Schnebelen-Berthier, Coralie; Acar, Niyazi; Pouillart, Philippe; Thabuis, Clementine; Rodriguez, Bertrand; Depeint, Flore; Clerc, Elise; Mathiaud, Adeline; Bourdillon, Anne; Baert, Blandine; Bretillon, Lionel; Lecerf, Jean-Michel

    2015-03-01

    Lutein and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) are associated with the prevention of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Since microalgae are potent natural sources of these nutrients, their nutritional value should be evaluated based on the bioavailability of lutein and DHA for the retina via the plasmatic compartment. In this study, quail were fed for 5 months either with a diet supplemented or deprived with microalgae rich in lutein and DHA. In the microalgae-fed group, the retinal concentrations of lutein and zeaxanthin gradually increased whereas in plasma, these compounds started to increase from the first month of supplementation. We also observed a significant increase in retinal and plasmatic levels of DHA in the microalgae-fed group. In conclusion, the plasmatic and retinal contents of lutein and DHA were significantly increased in quail fed with lutein- and DHA-rich microalgae. Food fortification with microalgae may be an innovative way to increase lutein and DHA consumption in humans.

  9. Multiple hormone deficiencies in children with hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Oerter, K E; Kamp, G A; Munson, P J; Nienhuis, A W; Cassorla, F G; Manasco, P K

    1993-02-01

    Patients with thalassemia major require multiple blood transfusions leading to hemochromatosis. These patients often have pubertal delay and growth failure, the etiology of which has not been fully elucidated. We performed an extensive endocrine evaluation which included measurements of spontaneous and stimulated levels of gonadotropins, GH, thyroid hormone, and adrenal hormones in 17 patients between the ages of 12 and 18 yr with hemochromatosis receiving desferoxamine therapy. All of the 17 patients had at least one endocrine abnormality, and 12 had more than one abnormality. Abnormalities of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis were the most common. Six patients had clinical evidence of delayed puberty with spontaneous and stimulated gonadotropin and sex steroid levels appropriate for their delayed pubertal stage. All 14 children in puberty LH pulsatility index below the mean for pubertal stage compared to normal children. Six of the 14 had LH pulsatility index more than 2 SD below the mean for pubertal stage. This may be an indicator of abnormal pituitary function. Six patients failed either the provocative GH tests (peak GH < 7 micrograms/L) or had a mean spontaneous GH less than 1 microgram/L. The 4 patients who failed provocative tests had growth velocities more than 2 SD below the mean for bone age. Three patients had evidence of primary hypothyroidism. We conclude that all patients with hemochromatosis need periodic careful endocrine evaluations because the incidence of endocrine dysfunction is substantial and they may benefit from hormonal therapy.

  10. An optimization formulation for characterization of pulsatile cortisol secretion

    PubMed Central

    Faghih, Rose T.; Dahleh, Munther A.; Brown, Emery N.

    2015-01-01

    Cortisol is released to relay information to cells to regulate metabolism and reaction to stress and inflammation. In particular, cortisol is released in the form of pulsatile signals. This low-energy method of signaling seems to be more efficient than continuous signaling. We hypothesize that there is a controller in the anterior pituitary that leads to pulsatile release of cortisol, and propose a mathematical formulation for such controller, which leads to impulse control as opposed to continuous control. We postulate that this controller is minimizing the number of secretory events that result in cortisol secretion, which is a way of minimizing the energy required for cortisol secretion; this controller maintains the blood cortisol levels within a specific circadian range while complying with the first order dynamics underlying cortisol secretion. We use an ℓ0-norm cost function for this controller, and solve a reweighed ℓ1-norm minimization algorithm for obtaining the solution to this optimization problem. We use four examples to illustrate the performance of this approach: (i) a toy problem that achieves impulse control, (ii) two examples that achieve physiologically plausible pulsatile cortisol release, (iii) an example where the number of pulses is not within the physiologically plausible range for healthy subjects while the cortisol levels are within the desired range. This novel approach results in impulse control where the impulses and the obtained blood cortisol levels have a circadian rhythm and an ultradian rhythm that are in agreement with the known physiology of cortisol secretion. The proposed formulation is a first step in developing intermittent controllers for curing cortisol deficiency. This type of bio-inspired pulse controllers can be employed for designing non-continuous controllers in brain-machine interface design for neuroscience applications. PMID:26321898

  11. An optimization formulation for characterization of pulsatile cortisol secretion.

    PubMed

    Faghih, Rose T; Dahleh, Munther A; Brown, Emery N

    2015-01-01

    Cortisol is released to relay information to cells to regulate metabolism and reaction to stress and inflammation. In particular, cortisol is released in the form of pulsatile signals. This low-energy method of signaling seems to be more efficient than continuous signaling. We hypothesize that there is a controller in the anterior pituitary that leads to pulsatile release of cortisol, and propose a mathematical formulation for such controller, which leads to impulse control as opposed to continuous control. We postulate that this controller is minimizing the number of secretory events that result in cortisol secretion, which is a way of minimizing the energy required for cortisol secretion; this controller maintains the blood cortisol levels within a specific circadian range while complying with the first order dynamics underlying cortisol secretion. We use an ℓ0-norm cost function for this controller, and solve a reweighed ℓ1-norm minimization algorithm for obtaining the solution to this optimization problem. We use four examples to illustrate the performance of this approach: (i) a toy problem that achieves impulse control, (ii) two examples that achieve physiologically plausible pulsatile cortisol release, (iii) an example where the number of pulses is not within the physiologically plausible range for healthy subjects while the cortisol levels are within the desired range. This novel approach results in impulse control where the impulses and the obtained blood cortisol levels have a circadian rhythm and an ultradian rhythm that are in agreement with the known physiology of cortisol secretion. The proposed formulation is a first step in developing intermittent controllers for curing cortisol deficiency. This type of bio-inspired pulse controllers can be employed for designing non-continuous controllers in brain-machine interface design for neuroscience applications. PMID:26321898

  12. Defects in pulsatile LH release in normally menstruating runners.

    PubMed

    Cumming, D C; Vickovic, M M; Wall, S R; Fluker, M R

    1985-04-01

    Intense physical exercise has been associated with reproductive dysfunction and menstrual cycles may be abnormal in a majority of women with a heavy training load. To determine whether training influenced pulsatile LH release, we measured LH pulse frequency, LH pulse amplitude and area under the curve over six hours during the early follicular phase of the menstrual cycle in four sedentary women and six eumenorrheic women runners with a training volume of at least 32 km per week. All three LH variables were significantly lower in runners than in controls. These data suggest that there is a central inhibition of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in eumenorrheic runners.

  13. Fluid-structure interaction for nonlinear response of shells conveying pulsatile flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tubaldi, Eleonora; Amabili, Marco; Païdoussis, Michael P.

    2016-06-01

    Circular cylindrical shells with flexible boundary conditions conveying pulsatile flow and subjected to pulsatile pressure are investigated. The equations of motion are obtained based on the nonlinear Novozhilov shell theory via Lagrangian approach. The flow is set in motion by a pulsatile pressure gradient. The fluid is modeled as a Newtonian pulsatile flow and it is formulated using a hybrid model that contains the unsteady effects obtained from the linear potential flow theory and the pulsatile viscous effects obtained from the unsteady time-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. A numerical bifurcation analysis employs a refined reduced order model to investigate the dynamic behavior. The case of shells containing quiescent fluid subjected to the action of a pulsatile transmural pressure is also addressed. Geometrically nonlinear vibration response to pulsatile flow and transmural pressure are here presented via frequency-response curves and time histories. The vibrations involving both a driven mode and a companion mode, which appear due to the axial symmetry, are also investigated. This theoretical framework represents a pioneering study that could be of great interest for biomedical applications. In particular, in the future, a more refined model of the one here presented will possibly be applied to reproduce the dynamic behavior of vascular prostheses used for repairing and replacing damaged and diseased thoracic aorta in cases of aneurysm, dissection or coarctation. For this purpose, a pulsatile time-dependent blood flow model is here considered by applying physiological waveforms of velocity and pressure during the heart beating period. This study provides, for the first time in literature, a fully coupled fluid-structure interaction model with deep insights in the nonlinear vibrations of circular cylindrical shells subjected to pulsatile pressure and pulsatile flow.

  14. In vitro heart valve testing: steady versus pulsatile flow.

    PubMed

    Black, M M; Hose, D R; Lamb, C J; Lawford, P V; Ralph, S J

    1994-03-01

    The design of artificial heart valves has traditionally been based on the development of a prototype device which was then subjected to extensive laboratory testing in order to confirm its suitability for clinical use. In the past the in vitro assessment of a valve's performance was based principally on the measurement of parameters such as pressure difference, regurgitation and, more recently, energy losses. Such measurements can be defined as being at the 'macro' level and rarely show any clinically significant differences amongst currently available prostheses. The analytical approach to flow through heart valves has previously been hampered by difficulties experienced in solving the relevant equations of flow particularly in the case of pulsatile conditions. Computational techniques are now available which enable appropriate solutions to be obtained for these problems and consequently provide an opportunity for detailed examination of the 'micro' level of flow disturbances exhibited by the different valves. This present preliminary study is designed to illustrate the use of such an analytical approach to the flow through prosthetic valves. A single topic has been selected for this purpose which is the comparative value of steady versus pulsatile flow testing. A bileaflet valve was chosen for the analysis and a mathematical model of this valve in the aortic position of the Sheffield Pulse Duplicator was created. The theoretical analysis was carried out using a commercially available Computational Fluid Dynamics package, namely, FIDAP, on a SUN MICROSYSTEMS 10-30 workstation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Cinematics and sticking of heart valves in pulsatile flow test.

    PubMed

    Köhler, J; Wirtz, R

    1991-05-01

    The aim of the project was to develop laboratory test devices for studies of the cinematics and sticking behaviour of technical valve protheses. The second step includes testing technical valves of different types and sizes under static and dynamic conditions. A force-deflection balance was developed in order to load valve rims by static radial forces until sticking or loss of a disc (sticking- and clamping-mould point) with computer-controlled force deflection curves. A second deflection device was developed and used for prosthetic valves in the aortic position of a pulsatile mock circulation loop with simultaneous video-cinematography. The stiffness of technical valve rims varied between 0.20 (St. Jude) and about 1.0 N/micron (metal rim valves). The stiffness decreased significantly with increasing valve size. Sticking under pulsatile flow conditions was in good agreement with the static deflection measurements. Hence, valve sticking with increasing danger of thrombus formation is more likely with a less stiff valve rim. In the case of forces acting perpendicularly to the pendulum axis, the clamping mould-point of the valve can be reached, followed by disc dislodgement. PMID:1864654

  16. Prediction and control of neural responses to pulsatile electrical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Luke J.; Sly, David James; O'Leary, Stephen John

    2012-04-01

    This paper aims to predict and control the probability of firing of a neuron in response to pulsatile electrical stimulation of the type delivered by neural prostheses such as the cochlear implant, bionic eye or in deep brain stimulation. Using the cochlear implant as a model, we developed an efficient computational model that predicts the responses of auditory nerve fibers to electrical stimulation and evaluated the model's accuracy by comparing the model output with pooled responses from a group of guinea pig auditory nerve fibers. It was found that the model accurately predicted the changes in neural firing probability over time to constant and variable amplitude electrical pulse trains, including speech-derived signals, delivered at rates up to 889 pulses s-1. A simplified version of the model that did not incorporate adaptation was used to adaptively predict, within its limitations, the pulsatile electrical stimulus required to cause a desired response from neurons up to 250 pulses s-1. Future stimulation strategies for cochlear implants and other neural prostheses may be enhanced using similar models that account for the way that neural responses are altered by previous stimulation.

  17. Expression of the putative gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone receptor, NPFFR1, in the anterior pituitary gland of the gilt is affected by age and sexual maturation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) purportedly suppresses secretion of luteinizing hormone (LH) by acting through a G-protein coupled receptor (NPFFR1) in the anterior pituitary gland and hypothalamus. The objective of these studies was to determine if expression of mRNA for NPFFR1 in the reprod...

  18. Antioxidant activity, mutagenicity/anti-mutagenicity, and clastogenicity/anti-clastogenicity of lutein from marigold flowers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mingchen; Tsao, Rong; Zhang, Shanfeng; Dong, Ziming; Yang, Raymond; Gong, Jianhua; Pei, Yingxin

    2006-09-01

    High dietary intake of lutein has been associated with risk reduction of many chronic diseases, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD), cancer, and cardiovascular diseases. Lutein in food is generally regarded as safe. However, information on the toxicological and beneficial effect of lutein at higher doses is limited. In this study, large amount of lutein was extracted and purified from marigold flower (Tagetes erecta L.). The antioxidant activity of lutein was examined by using the photochemiluminescence (PCL) assay and the beta-carotene-linoleic acid model system (beta-CLAMS). Lutein showed a greater antioxidant activity than the other two common carotenoids, beta-carotene and lycopene. The mutagenicity and anti-mutagenicity of lutein at 334, 668 and 1335 microg/plate were examined using the standard Ames test in the presence and absence of S9 mix. Lutein was not only found to be non-mutagenic at all doses, but it showed an anti-mutagenic effect in a dose-dependent manner. Similar results were found in a chromosome aberration test using Chinese hamster ovary cells for the evaluation of clastogenicity and anti-clastogenicity of lutein at 66.8, 133.5 and 267.0 mg/L. Our findings provided scientific evidence for the safe use and health beneficial effects of lutein. PMID:16757077

  19. In vitro bioaccessibility and monolayer uptake of lutein from wholegrain baked foods.

    PubMed

    Read, Andrew; Wright, Amanda; Abdel-Aal, El-Sayed M

    2015-05-01

    Lutein-enriched foods would contribute towards promoting the consumption of this important carotenoid. In the current study cookies, muffins, and flatbreads were produced at three enrichment levels (0.5, 1.0 and 2.0mg lutein per serving) to investigate lutein bioavailability in vitro. Foods were subjected to in vitro simulation of human upper gastrointestinal digestion coupled with a Caco-2 monolayer absorption assay. Digestive conditions representative of the fed state conditions associated with significantly higher lutein bioaccessibility compared with the fasted state (p < 0.001). Lutein bioaccessibility of cookies and muffins was higher than flatbreads due to their elevated fat content, measured under either fed or fasted conditions. Lutein concentration in the aqueous phase was the most important factor in determining apical cell uptake of lutein, with cookies and muffins exhibiting a higher lutein uptake than flatbreads (p < 0.05). As commonly consumed foods, lutein-enriched cookies, muffins, and flatbreads have the potential to improve lutein intake.

  20. Use of serum lutenizing hormone in the clinical management of short-term amenorrhea.

    PubMed

    Bloch, S K

    1975-04-15

    Serum luteinizing hormone (LH) values determined by radioimmunoassay can be of aid in evaluating patients with short-term amenorrhea. These values have proved useful in ruling out pregnancy in cases of hypothalamic amenorrhea and amenorrhea occuring during treatment with contraceptive pills and also in diagnosing early pregnancy after clomiphene therapy. PMID:1119495

  1. Novel therapeutic strategies for Alzheimer's disease based on the forgotten reproductive hormones.

    PubMed

    Gregory, C W; Bowen, R L

    2005-02-01

    The relationship between hormones and Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been intensely researched. While the majority of this work has focused on the sex steroids, estrogens, and more recently androgens, a serendipitous patient encounter led one of us (R.L.B.) to question whether other hormones of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis might play a role in the pathogenesis of AD. The age-related decline in reproductive function results in a dramatic decrease in serum estrogen and testosterone concentrations and an equally dramatic compensatory increase in serum gonadotropin concentrations. Indeed, there is growing evidence that the gonadotropin luteinizing hormone, which regulates serum estrogen and testosterone concentrations, is an important causative factor in the development of AD. This review provides information supporting the 'gonadotropin hypothesis'. We put forth a novel mechanism of how changes in serum luteinizing hormone concentrations could contribute to the pathogenesis of AD and discusses potential therapeutic anti-gonadotropin compounds.

  2. Molecular control of ovulation and luteinization in the primate follicle.

    PubMed

    Stouffer, Richard L; Xu, Fuhua; Duffy, Diane M

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, significant progress was made, particularly through the use of the macaque monkey, in identifying three types of local factors that are induced by the midcycle LH surge and play a critical role in ovulation and/or luteinization of the primate follicle. The ovulatory gonadotropin surge increases prostaglandin (PTG, typically abbreviated PG) levels in follicles prior to rupture; although considerable attention has focused on LH stimulation of the "inducible" form of PG G/H synthase (PTGS2), other aspects of PG synthesis (notably a phospholipase A2, cPLA2, and a PGE synthase, PTGES) and metabolism (15-hydroxy PG dehydrogenase, HPGD) also appear LH-regulated and may control the timing of the PG rise in the ovulatory follicle. Local (intrafollicular) ablation and replacement of PGs suggests that PGE2 is essential for release of the oocyte; but not necessarily for follicle rupture, and not for luteinization. Novel PGE-regulated genes are being identified in macaque granulosa cells, including adipose differentiation-related protein (ADFP). Similar types of studies indicate that the rise in progesterone (P) synthesis, as well as the induction of the genomic P receptor in granulosa cells, is essential for both ovulation and luteinization of the primate follicle. Limited data suggest that P action controls cell cycle activity (via cyclin B1 and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27), cholesterol uptake and utilization (e.g., low density lipoprotein or LDL receptor), proteases and their inhibitors (matrix metalloproteinase or MMP1; tissue inhibitor of MMP or TIMP1) and cell health in the granulosa cell layer. Finally, members of two classes of angiogenic factors, originally proposed as important for embryonic and pathologic (tumorigenic) vasculogenesis, appear induced in the granulosa layer of the preovulatory follicle, i.e., vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and angiopoietin (ANGPT). Local injection of antagonists to VEGF (soluble VEGF receptor) and

  3. Determination of Lutein from Fruit and Vegetables Through an Alkaline Hydrolysis Extraction Method and HPLC Analysis.

    PubMed

    Fratianni, Alessandra; Mignogna, Rossella; Niro, Serena; Panfili, Gianfranco

    2015-12-01

    A simple and rapid analytical method for the determination of lutein content, successfully used for cereal matrices, was evaluated in fruit and vegetables. The method involved the determination of lutein after an alkaline hydrolysis of the sample matrix, followed by extraction with solvents and analysis by normal phase HPLC. The optimized method was simple, precise, and accurate and it was characterized by few steps that could prevent loss of lutein and its degradation. The optimized method was used to evaluate the lutein amounts in several fruit and vegetables. Rich sources of lutein were confirmed to be green vegetables such as parsley, spinach, chicory, chard, broccoli, courgette, and peas, even if in a range of variability. Taking into account the suggested reference values these vegetables can be stated as good sources of lutein. PMID:26540023

  4. Dietary lutein modulates growth and survival genes in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Rafi, Mohamed M; Kanakasabai, Saravanan; Gokarn, Sarita V; Krueger, Eric G; Bright, John J

    2015-02-01

    Lutein is a carotenoid pigment present in fruits and vegetables that has anti-inflammatory and antitumor properties. In this study, we examined the effect of lutein on proliferation and survival-associated genes in prostate cancer (PC-3) cells. We found that in vitro culture of PC-3 cells with lutein induced mild decrease in proliferation that improved in combination treatment with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) agonists and other chemotherapeutic agents. Flow cytometry analyses showed that lutein improved drug-induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in prostate cancer. Gene array and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analyses showed that lutein altered the expression of growth and apoptosis-associated biomarker genes in PC-3 cells. These findings highlight that lutein modulates the expression of growth and survival-associated genes in prostate cancer cells.

  5. Determination of Lutein from Fruit and Vegetables Through an Alkaline Hydrolysis Extraction Method and HPLC Analysis.

    PubMed

    Fratianni, Alessandra; Mignogna, Rossella; Niro, Serena; Panfili, Gianfranco

    2015-12-01

    A simple and rapid analytical method for the determination of lutein content, successfully used for cereal matrices, was evaluated in fruit and vegetables. The method involved the determination of lutein after an alkaline hydrolysis of the sample matrix, followed by extraction with solvents and analysis by normal phase HPLC. The optimized method was simple, precise, and accurate and it was characterized by few steps that could prevent loss of lutein and its degradation. The optimized method was used to evaluate the lutein amounts in several fruit and vegetables. Rich sources of lutein were confirmed to be green vegetables such as parsley, spinach, chicory, chard, broccoli, courgette, and peas, even if in a range of variability. Taking into account the suggested reference values these vegetables can be stated as good sources of lutein.

  6. Early detection of microstructural white matter changes associated with arterial pulsatility.

    PubMed

    Jolly, Todd A D; Bateman, Grant A; Levi, Christopher R; Parsons, Mark W; Michie, Patricia T; Karayanidis, Frini

    2013-01-01

    Increased cerebral blood flow pulsatility is common in vascular dementia and is associated with macrostructural damage to cerebral white matter or leukoaraiosis (LA). In this study, we examine whether cerebral blood flow pulsatility is associated with macrostructural and microstructural changes in cerebral white matter in older adults with no or mild LA and no evidence of dementia. Diffusion Tensor Imaging was used to measure fractional anisotropy (FA), an index of the microstructural integrity of white matter, and radial diffusivity (RaD), a measure sensitive to the integrity of myelin. When controlling for age, increased arterial pulsation was associated with deterioration in both measures of white matter microstructure but not LA severity. A stepwise multiple linear regression model revealed that arterial pulsatility index was the strongest predictor of FA (R = 0.483, adjusted R (2) = 0.220), followed by LA severity, but not age. These findings suggest that arterial pulsatility may provide insight into age-related reduction in white matter FA. Specifically, increased arterial pulsatility may increase perivascular shear stress and lead to accumulation of damage to perivascular oligodendrocytes, resulting in microstructural changes in white matter and contributing to proliferation of LA over time. Changes in cerebral blood flow pulsatility may therefore provide a sensitive index of white matter health that could facilitate the early detection of risk for perivascular white matter damage and the assessment of the effectiveness of preventative treatment targeted at reducing pulsatility.

  7. Hemodialysis: evidence of enhanced molecular clearance and ultrafiltration volume by using pulsatile flow.

    PubMed

    Runge, T M; Briceño, J C; Sheller, M E; Moritz, C E; Sloan, L; Bohls, F O; Ottmers, S E

    1993-09-01

    We describe several in vitro experiments showing evidence that pulsatile flow hemodialysis enhances ultrafiltration volume and molecular clearance as compared with steady flow hemodialysis. A new pulsatile pump and a conventional roller pump were compared using different hollow fiber dialyzers and a simulated blood solution containing urea, aspartame and vitamin B-12 at different flow rates and configurations. Ultrafiltration volume and concentration of urea, aspartame and B-12 were measured and molecular clearance (K) calculated. Ultrafiltration volume markedly increased with pulsatile flow. After 10 min K for urea with pulsatile flow was higher in all experiments even when ultrafiltration was prevented. Clearance of aspartame and B-12 also increased with pulsatile flow. We propose three mechanisms by which pulsatile flow is more efficient than steady flow hemodialysis: greater fluid energy, avoidance of molecular channeling and avoidance of membrane layering. We hypothesize that using pulsatile flow in hemodialysis can significantly shorten the duration of dialysis sessions for most of the patients, and consequently reduce the duration of the procedure and its cost.

  8. Hormone changes triggered by aggression in a natural population of blackbirds.

    PubMed

    Harding, C F; Follett, B K

    1979-03-01

    The concentrations of hormones in the plasma of male red-winged blackbirds caught at the height of an aggressive encounter are significantly different from those in males that have not recently engaged in aggressive behavior. Concentrations of luteinizing hormone in the plasma are decreased in the aggressive males, whereas androgen concentrations are affected in a more complex manner. Concentrations of corticoids do not appear to be affected by aggressive behavior.

  9. Measurement of pulsatile motion with millisecond resolution by MRI.

    PubMed

    Souchon, Rémi; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Salomir, Rares; Chapelon, Jean-Yves; Rouvière, Olivier

    2012-06-01

    We investigated a technique based on phase-contrast cine MRI combined with deconvolution of the phase shift waveforms to measure rapidly varying pulsatile motion waveforms. The technique does not require steady-state displacement during motion encoding. Simulations and experiments were performed in porcine liver samples in view of a specific application, namely the observation of transient displacements induced by acoustic radiation force. Simulations illustrate the advantages and shortcomings of the methods. For experimental validation, the waveforms were acquired with an ultrafast ultrasound scanner (Supersonic Imagine Aixplorer), and the rates of decay of the waveforms (relaxation time) were compared. With bipolar motion-encoding gradient of 8.4 ms, the method was able to measure displacement waveforms with a temporal resolution of 1 ms over a time course of 40 ms. Reasonable agreement was found between the rate of decay of the waveforms measured in ultrasound (2.8 ms) and in MRI (2.7-3.3 ms).

  10. Phase II enzyme induction by a carotenoid, lutein, in a PC12D neuronal cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Miyake, Seiji; Kobayashi, Saori; Tsubota, Kazuo; Ozawa, Yoko

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: • Lutein reduced ROS levels in a PC12D neuronal cell line. • Lutein induced mRNAs of phase II antioxidative enzymes in PC12D neuronal cells. • Lutein increased protein levels of HO-1, SOD2, and NQO-1 in PC12D neuronal cells. • Lutein had no effect on intranuclear Nrf2 levels in PC12D neuronal cells. • Lutein did not activate potential upstream Nrf2 nuclear translocation pathways. - Abstract: The mechanism by which lutein, a carotenoid, acts as an antioxidant in retinal cells is still not fully understood. Here, lutein treatment of a neuronal cell line (PC12D) immediately resulted in reduced intracellular ROS levels, implying that it has a direct role in ROS scavenging. Significantly, lutein treatment also induced phase II antioxidative enzyme expression, probably via a nuclear factor-like 2 (Nrf2) independent pathway. This latter mechanism could explain why lutein acts diversely to protect against oxidative/cytotoxic stress, and why it is physiologically involved in the human neural tissue, such as the retina.

  11. Lutein Has a Protective Effect on Hepatotoxicity Induced by Arsenic via Nrf2 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shugang; Ding, Yusong; Niu, Qiang; Xu, Shangzhi; Pang, Lijuan; Ma, Rulin; Jing, Mingxia; Feng, Gangling; Tang, Jing Xia; Zhang, Qian; Ma, Xiaomei; Yan, Yizhong; Wang, Hai Xia; Li, Feng; Guo, Shuxia

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic produces liver disease through the oxidative stress. While lutein can alleviate cytotoxic and oxidative injury, nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) pathway plays a critical role in defending oxidative species. However, the mechanisms by which lutein protects the liver against the effect of arsenic are not known. Therefore, this study aims to investigate the mechanisms involved in the action of lutein using mice model in which hepatotoxicity was induced by arsenic. We found that mice treatment with lutein could reverse changes in morphological and liver indexes and result in a significant improvement in hepatic function comparing with arsenic trioxide group. Lutein treatment improved the activities of antioxidant enzymes and attenuated increasing of ROS and MDA induced by arsenic trioxide. Lutein could increase the mRNA and protein expression of Nrf2 signaling related genes (Nrf2, Nqo1, Ho-1, and Gst). These findings provide additional evidence that lutein may be useful for reducing reproductive injury associated with oxidative stress by the activation of Nrf2 signaling. Our findings suggest a possible mechanism of antioxidant lutein in preventing the hepatotoxicity, which implicate that a dietary lutein may be a potential treatment for liver diseases, especially for arsenicosis therapy. PMID:25815309

  12. Lutein has a protective effect on hepatotoxicity induced by arsenic via Nrf2 signaling.

    PubMed

    Li, Shugang; Ding, Yusong; Niu, Qiang; Xu, Shangzhi; Pang, Lijuan; Ma, Rulin; Jing, Mingxia; Feng, Gangling; Tang, Jing Xia; Zhang, Qian; Ma, Xiaomei; Yan, Yizhong; Zhang, Jingyu; Wei, Meng; Wang, Hai Xia; Li, Feng; Guo, Shuxia

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic produces liver disease through the oxidative stress. While lutein can alleviate cytotoxic and oxidative injury, nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) pathway plays a critical role in defending oxidative species. However, the mechanisms by which lutein protects the liver against the effect of arsenic are not known. Therefore, this study aims to investigate the mechanisms involved in the action of lutein using mice model in which hepatotoxicity was induced by arsenic. We found that mice treatment with lutein could reverse changes in morphological and liver indexes and result in a significant improvement in hepatic function comparing with arsenic trioxide group. Lutein treatment improved the activities of antioxidant enzymes and attenuated increasing of ROS and MDA induced by arsenic trioxide. Lutein could increase the mRNA and protein expression of Nrf2 signaling related genes (Nrf2, Nqo1, Ho-1, and Gst). These findings provide additional evidence that lutein may be useful for reducing reproductive injury associated with oxidative stress by the activation of Nrf2 signaling. Our findings suggest a possible mechanism of antioxidant lutein in preventing the hepatotoxicity, which implicate that a dietary lutein may be a potential treatment for liver diseases, especially for arsenicosis therapy.

  13. Phase II enzyme induction by a carotenoid, lutein, in a PC12D neuronal cell line.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Seiji; Kobayashi, Saori; Tsubota, Kazuo; Ozawa, Yoko

    2014-04-01

    The mechanism by which lutein, a carotenoid, acts as an antioxidant in retinal cells is still not fully understood. Here, lutein treatment of a neuronal cell line (PC12D) immediately resulted in reduced intracellular ROS levels, implying that it has a direct role in ROS scavenging. Significantly, lutein treatment also induced phase II antioxidative enzyme expression, probably via a nuclear factor-like 2 (Nrf2) independent pathway. This latter mechanism could explain why lutein acts diversely to protect against oxidative/cytotoxic stress, and why it is physiologically involved in the human neural tissue, such as the retina.

  14. Dietary effects of lutein-fortified chlorella on milk components of Holstein cows.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jin-Young; Park, Keun-Kyu; Lee, Kyung-Woo; Jang, Seung-Wan; Moon, Byung-Hern; An, Byoung-Ki

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the dietary effect of conventional or lutein-fortified chlorella on milk production and lutein incorporation in milk. Fifteen Holstein cows in mid-lactation were used in a 3 × 3 Latin square design each with a 21-day period. Cows were top-dressed daily with 30 g of conventional or lutein-fortified chlorella for 3 weeks. Cows without chlorella served as the control. The feed intake and milk yield were not affected by dietary treatments. The concentrations of milk protein and solids non-fat in groups fed diets containing both conventional and lutein-fortified chlorella were significantly higher than those of the control group (P < 0.001). There was no significant difference in content of milk fat among groups. The levels of plasma glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase, glutamic pyruvic transaminase, interferon-gamma and interleukin-2 were not influenced by the dietary treatments. Lutein content in milk was significantly increased in groups fed lutein-fortified chlorella as compared with those of conventional chlorella and control, respectively (P < 0.01). These results imply that conventional and lutein-fortified chlorella has positive effects on milk components and the use of lutein-fortified chlorella in a dairy diet is effective in the production of milk enriched with lutein. PMID:27386352

  15. Quantifying Pituitary-Adrenal Dynamics and Deconvolution of Concurrent Cortisol and Adrenocorticotropic Hormone Data by Compressed Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Faghih, Rose T.; Dahleh, Munther A.; Adler, Gail K.; Klerman, Elizabeth B.; Brown, Emery N.

    2015-01-01

    Pulsatile release of cortisol from the adrenal glands is governed by pulsatile release of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) from the anterior pituitary. In return, cortisol has a negative feedback effect on ACTH release. Simultaneous recording of ACTH and cortisol is not typical, and determining the number, timing, and amplitudes of pulsatile events from simultaneously recorded data is challenging because of several factors: (I) stimulator ACTH pulse activity, (II) kinematics of ACTH and cortisol, (III) the sampling interval, and (IV) the measurement error. We model ACTH and cortisol secretion simultaneously using a linear differential equations model with Gaussian errors and sparse pulsatile events as inputs to the model. We propose a novel framework for recovering pulses and parameters underlying the interactions between ACTH and cortisol. We recover the timing and amplitudes of pulses using compressed sensing, and employ generalized cross validation for determining the number of pulses. We analyze serum ACTH and cortisol levels sampled at 10-minute intervals over 24 hours from 10 healthy women. We recover physiologically plausible timing and amplitudes for these pulses and model the feedback effect of cortisol. We recover 15 to 18 pulses over 24 hours, which is highly consistent with the results of another cortisol data analysis approach. Modeling the interactions between ACTH and cortisol allows for accurate quantification of pulsatile events, and normal and pathological states. This could lay the basis for a more physiologically-based approach for administering cortisol therapeutically. The proposed approach can be adapted to deconvolve other pairs of hormones with similar interactions. PMID:25935025

  16. Microprocessor-controlled pulsatile flow loop for hemodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Lynch, T G; Hobson, R W; Pawel, H E

    1986-03-01

    Validation of spectral analytic techniques in the clinical assessment and quantitation of vascular stenoses has been aided by use of in vitro flow loops. We have used a recently developed microprocessor-controlled pulsatile flow model to examine the influence of varying stenoses on Doppler-shifted peak systolic frequencies. A nonaxisymmetric, vertically oriented stenosis was produced by extrinsic compression of latex rubber tubing 12 mm in diameter, reducing the cross-sectional area (CSA) by 25, 40, 50, 60, 70, 85, and 97%. A rolling diaphragm pump, driven through a slider-crank mechanism by a microprocessor-controlled stepper motor, generated characteristic arterial pulse waves at a rate of 75 cycles per minute. Using an 8 MHz, continuous-wave, directional Doppler velocimeter, the Doppler-shifted frequencies were recorded at the stenosis. Four sets of observations were made at each of the stenoses, and the peak systolic frequency (PSF) was determined using a spectrum analyzer. The PSF in the absence of an obstructing stenosis was 2.56 +/- 0.03 (KHz +/- SEM). This increased significantly (P less than 0.05) to 4.80 +/- 0.09 when the CSA was reduced by 50%, to 5.90 +/- 0.37 when the CSA was reduced by 60% (P less than 0.05), to 8.40 +/- 0.10 when the CSA was reduced by 70% (P less than 0.05), and to 17.84 +/- 0.89 when the CSA was reduced by 85% (P less than 0.05). These data establish the utility of this pulsatile flow model, confirming the direct relationship between the Doppler-shifted PSF and the percentage reduction in CSA.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3951221

  17. Hormonal regulation of female reproduction.

    PubMed

    Christensen, A; Bentley, G E; Cabrera, R; Ortega, H H; Perfito, N; Wu, T J; Micevych, P

    2012-07-01

    Reproduction is an event that requires the coordination of peripheral organs with the nervous system to ensure that the internal and external environments are optimal for successful procreation of the species. This is accomplished by the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis that coordinates reproductive behavior with ovulation. The primary signal from the central nervous system is gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), which modulates the activity of anterior pituitary gonadotropes regulating follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) release. As ovarian follicles develop they release estradiol, which negatively regulates further release of GnRH and FSH. As estradiol concentrations peak they trigger the surge release of GnRH, which leads to LH release inducing ovulation. Release of GnRH within the central nervous system helps modulate reproductive behaviors providing a node at which control of reproduction is regulated. To address these issues, this review fo