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Sample records for pulsating da white

  1. Outbursts in Two New Cool Pulsating DA White Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Keaton J.; Hermes, J. J.; Montgomery, M. H.; Gentile Fusillo, N. P.; Raddi, R.; Gänsicke, B. T.; Winget, D. E.; Dennihy, E.; Gianninas, A.; Tremblay, P.-E.; Chote, P.; Winget, K. I.

    2016-10-01

    The unprecedented extent of coverage provided by Kepler observations recently revealed outbursts in two hydrogen-atmosphere pulsating white dwarfs (DAVs) that cause hours-long increases in the overall mean flux of up to 14%. We have identified two new outbursting pulsating white dwarfs in K2, bringing the total number of known outbursting white dwarfs to four. EPIC 211629697, with {T}{eff} = 10,780 ± 140 K and {log} g = 7.94 ± 0.08, shows outbursts recurring on average every 5.0 days, increasing the overall flux by up to 15%. EPIC 229227292, with {T}{eff} = 11,190 ± 170 K and {log} g = 8.02 ± 0.05, has outbursts that recur roughly every 2.4 days with amplitudes up to 9%. We establish that only the coolest pulsating white dwarfs within a small temperature range near the cool, red edge of the DAV instability strip exhibit these outbursts.

  2. A NEW TIMESCALE FOR PERIOD CHANGE IN THE PULSATING DA WHITE DWARF WD 0111+0018

    SciTech Connect

    Hermes, J. J.; Montgomery, M. H.; Winget, D. E.; Mullally, Fergal; Bischoff-Kim, A.

    2013-03-20

    We report the most rapid rate of period change measured to date for a pulsating DA (hydrogen atmosphere) white dwarf (WD), observed in the 292.9 s mode of WD 0111+0018. The observed period change, faster than 10{sup -12} s s{sup -1}, exceeds by more than two orders of magnitude the expected rate from cooling alone for this class of slow and simply evolving pulsating WDs. This result indicates the presence of an additional timescale for period evolution in these pulsating objects. We also measure the rates of period change of nonlinear combination frequencies and show that they share the evolutionary characteristics of their parent modes, confirming that these combination frequencies are not independent modes but rather artifacts of some nonlinear distortion in the outer layers of the star.

  3. The pulsation index, effective temperature, and thickness of the hydrogen layer in the pulsating DA white dwarf G117-B15A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, E. L.; Mailloux, T. M.; Zhang, E.; Koester, D.; Stiening, R. F.; Bless, R. C.; Percival, J. W.; Taylor, M. J.; Van Citters, G. W.

    1995-01-01

    We have measured the amplitude of the 215 s pulsation of the pulsating DA white dwarf, or ZZ Ceti star, G117-B15A in six passbands with effective wavelengths from 1570 to 6730 A. We find that the index of the pulsation is l = 1 with a high degree of confidence, the first unambiguous determination of l for a pulsation of a ZZ Ceti star. We also find that log g and T(sub eff) are tightly correlated for model atmospheres that fit the data, such that at log g = 7.5 the temperature is 11,750 K and at log g = 8.0 the temperature is 12,375 K. Adopting log g = 7.97 +/- 0.06 from published observations of the optical spectrum of G117-B15A, the correlation yields T(sub eff) = 12,375 +/- 125 K. This temperature is free of flux calibration errors and should be substantially more reliable than temperatures derived for IUE spectra. Since G117-B15A is thought to lie close to the blue edge of the ZZ Ceti instability strip, this low temperature also implies a low temperature for the blue edge. Using pulsation models calculated by Fontaine et al. (1992) and Bradley (1994), we find that the mass of the hydrogen layer in G117-B15A lies between 1.0 x 10(exp -6) solar mass (for k = 1) and 8 x 10(exp -5) solar mass (for k = 2). This range of masses is (barely) consistent with the masses predicted by recent models for the ejection of planetary nebulae, (8-13) x 10(exp -5) solar mass. The mass is too large to be consistent with models invoking thin hydrogen layers to explain the spectral evolution of white dwarfs.

  4. Nonlinear Analysis of Pulsating White Dwarf Lightcurves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provencal, J. L.; Montgomery, M. H.; Shipman, H.; WET TEam

    2015-06-01

    Convection remains one of the largest sources of theoretical uncertainty in our understanding of stellar physics. For example, Bergeron (1995) show that basic parameters such as flux, line profiles, energy distribution, color indices, and equivalent widths are extremely sensitive to the assumed convective parameterization. This is compelling, since we use our knowledge of these basic parameters to calibrate white dwarf cooling sequences, provide detailed estimates for the ages of individual white dwarfs, and determine the age of the Galactic disk. The Whole Earth Telescope (WET) is engaged in a long term project to empirically calibrate the physical properties of convection in pulsating white dwarfs by combining asteroseismology and analysis of nonlinear light curves. Nonsinusoidal distortions, in the form of narrow peaks and wider valleys, are observed in many pulsating white dwarf light curves. These are a reflection of the local depth of the convection zone, a value which varies during a pulsation cycle. Applying asteroseismology and convective light curve fitting to a wide sample of pulsating white dwarfs provides an empirical map of how the convective response time (the convection zone “depth”) varies as a function of effective temperature, and this can be compared with theoretical models, both MLT and hydrodynamic. This project has resulted in a large database of white dwarf lightcurves and pulsation frequencies. We present current results for DA and DB pulsators, and provide a few examples of interesting pulsation behavior seen along the way.

  5. Characterizing Accreting White Dwarf Pulsators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szkody, Paula; Mukadam, Anjum

    2014-02-01

    Understanding the population, mass distribution, and evolution of accreting white dwarfs impacts the entire realm of binary interaction, including the creation of Type Ia supernovae. We are concentrating on accreting white dwarf pulsators, as the pulsation properties allow us a view of how the accretion affects the interior of the star. Our ground- based photometry on 11 accreting pulsators with corresponding temperatures from HST UV spectra suggest a broad instability strip in the range of 10500 to 16000K. Additionally, tracking a post-outburst heated white dwarf as it cools and crosses the blue edge and resumes pulsation provides an independent method to locate the empirical instability strip. Determining a post-outburst cooling curve yields an estimate of the amount of heating and the accreted mass during the outburst. We request additional photometry of 2 objects that present unique properties: GW Lib which has not yet returned to its pre-outburst pulsation spectrum after 6 yrs, and EQ Lyn which returned to its pre- outburst pulsation after 3 yrs but is now turning on and off without ongoing outbursts. Following the pulsation spectrum changes over stretches of several nights in a row will provide specific knowledge of the stability of the observed modes.

  6. Two new extremely hot pulsating white dwarfs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, H. E.; Grauer, A. D.; Green, R. F.; Liebert, J. W.

    1984-01-01

    High speed photometry of the extremely hot, nearly degenerate stars PG 1707 + 427 and PG 2131 + 066 reveals that they are low-amplitude pulsating variables. Power spectral analysis shows both to be multiperiodic, with dominant periods of 7.5 and 6.4-6.9 minutes, respectively. Together with the known pulsators PG 1159 - 035 and the central star of the planetary nebula Kohoutek 1-16, these objects define a new pulsational instability strip at the hot edge of the H-R diagram. The variations of these objects closely resemble those of the much cooler pulsating ZZ Ceti DA white dwarfs; both groups are probably nonradial g-mode pulsators. Evolutionary contraction of the PG 1159 - 035 variables may lead to period changes that would be detectable in as little as 1 year. The optical and IUE spectra of the PG 1159 - 035 variables are characterized by absorption lines of C IV and other CNO ions, indicating radiative levitation of species heavier than helium. He II is also present in the spectra, but the hydrogen Balmer lines are absent. Effective temperatures near 100,000 K are required, and the He II 4686 A profiles indicate log g greater than 6. These helium-rich pulsators form the hottest known subgroup of the DO white dwarfs.

  7. Pulsating Helium Atmosphere White Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provencal, Judith; Montgomery, Michael H.; Bischoff-Kim, Agnes; Shipman, Harry; Nitta, Atsuko; Whole Earth Telescope Collaboration

    2015-08-01

    The overwhelming majority of all stars currently on the main sequence as well as those from earlier generations will or have ended their stellar lives as white dwarf stars. White dwarfs are rich forensic laboratories linking the history and future evolution of our Galaxy. Their structure and atmospheric composition provide evidence of how the progenitors lived, how they evolved, and how they died. This information reveals details of processes governing the behavior of contemporary main sequence stars. Combined with their distribution in luminosity/temperature, white dwarfs strongly constrain models of galactic and cosmological evolution.GD358 is among the brightest (mv =13.7) and best studied of the pulsating white dwarfs. This helium atmoshere pulsator (DBV) has an extensive photometric database spanning 30 years, including nine multisite Whole Earth Telescope campaigns. GD358 exhibits a range of behaviors, from drastic changes in excited pulsation modes to variable multiplet splittings. We use GD358 as a template for an examination of the DBV class, combining photometric results with recent COS spectroscopy. The results present new questions concerning DB formation and evolution.

  8. Pulsating White Dwarf Star GD99

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chynoweth, K. M.; Thompson, S.; Mullally, F.; Yeates, C.

    2004-12-01

    We present 15 hours of time-series photometry of the variable white dwarf star GD99. These data were obtained at the McDonald Observatory 2.1m Otto Struve Telescope in January 2003, using the Argos CCD photometer. We achieved a noise level as low as 0.07 %, as measured from the power spectrum of our first night. Our observations confirm that GD99 is a unique pulsating white dwarf whose modes show characteristics of both the hot and cold type of DA variable stars. Additionally, GD99 has a large number of modes, making it a good candidate for asteroseismological study. Our preliminary results indicate that this star merits further study to decipher its abundant set of unusual modes. With such a rich period structure, longer continuous data sets will be required to fully resolve the pulsation spectrum.

  9. An asteroseismic constraint on the mass of the axion from the period drift of the pulsating DA white dwarf star L19-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Córsico, Alejandro H.; Romero, Alejandra D.; Althaus, Leandro G.; García-Berro, Enrique; Isern, Jordi; Kepler, S. O.; Miller Bertolami, Marcelo M.; Sullivan, Denis J.; Chote, Paul

    2016-07-01

    We employ an asteroseismic model of L19-2, a relatively massive (Mstar ~ 0.75 Msolar) and hot (Teff ~ 12 100 K) pulsating DA (H-rich atmosphere) white dwarf star (DAV or ZZ Ceti variable), and use the observed values of the temporal rates of period change of its dominant pulsation modes (Π ~ 113 s and Π ~ 192 s), to derive a new constraint on the mass of the axion, the hypothetical non-barionic particle considered as a possible component of the dark matter of the Universe. If the asteroseismic model employed is an accurate representation of L19-2, then our results indicate hints of extra cooling in this star, compatible with emission of axions of mass ma cos2β lesssim 25 meV or an axion-electron coupling constant of gae lesssim 7 × 10-13.

  10. An asteroseismic constraint on the mass of the axion from the period drift of the pulsating DA white dwarf star L19-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Córsico, Alejandro H.; Romero, Alejandra D.; Althaus, Leandro G.; García-Berro, Enrique; Isern, Jordi; Kepler, S. O.; Miller Bertolami, Marcelo M.; Sullivan, Denis J.; Chote, Paul

    2016-07-01

    We employ an asteroseismic model of L19-2, a relatively massive (Mstar ~ 0.75 Msolar) and hot (Teff ~ 12 100 K) pulsating DA (H-rich atmosphere) white dwarf star (DAV or ZZ Ceti variable), and use the observed values of the temporal rates of period change of its dominant pulsation modes (Π ~ 113 s and Π ~ 192 s), to derive a new constraint on the mass of the axion, the hypothetical non-barionic particle considered as a possible component of the dark matter of the Universe. If the asteroseismic model employed is an accurate representation of L19-2, then our results indicate hints of extra cooling in this star, compatible with emission of axions of mass ma cos2β lesssim 25 meV or an axion-electron coupling constant of gae lesssim 7 × 10‑13.

  11. a Search for Radial Pulsations in White Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaler, Steven

    1991-07-01

    Several classes of NONRADIALLY pulsating white dwarfs are known, with pulsation periods of several minutes. Theoretical work predicts that DB and DA white dwarfs that are slightly hotter than the known nonradial instability strips should be unstable to RADIAL pulsations with periods of about 0.1--1 second. However, ground-based observations have failed to reveal such periodicities. We propose to use HST's High Speed Photometer to search for the predicted radial pulsations in DB and DA white dwarfs. UV high-speed photometry offers the advantages of larger stellar fluxes (the effective temperatures of our three targets are 13,000--30,000 K) and significantly larger pulsation amplitudes (factors of 2 to 3) compared to ground-based photometry, along with freedom from atmospheric scintillation, giving HST a distinct gain over any ground-based facility. The presence (or absence) of the predicted rapid oscillations will provide significant new information for (or challenges to) the theory of white-dwarf pulsations, structure, and evolution.

  12. HST spectrophotometry of accreting white dwarf pulsators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukadam, Anjum S.; Szkody, Paula; Gaensicke, Boris T.

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of non-radial pulsations in cataclysmic variables has opened a new venue of opportunity to probe the stellar parameters of accreting variable white dwarfs using asteroseismic techniques. A unique model fit to the observed periods of the variable white dwarf can reveal information about the stellar mass, core composition, age, rotation rate, magnetic field strength, and distance. Mode identification is an essential step in determining an unambiguous model fit, that could be achieved by determining optical and ultra-violet pulsation amplitudes. We will be presenting our results on ultra-violet HST observations acquired with contemporaneous ground based optical data for several cataclysmic variables. The HST spectrophotometry also yields the effective temperatures of the accreting white dwarfs, allowing us to improve our present determination of the instability strip for accreting pulsators. We thank NASA for the grant HST-GO12870 that has supported this research.

  13. Radial and Nonradial Pulsations in Hot White Dwarfs -- Cycle 3 Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaler, Steven

    1992-06-01

    We propose to use the High Speed Photometer to search for the previously unobserved phenomenon of RADIAL pulsations in white dwarfs. Three classes of NONRADIALLY pulsating white dwarfs are known, with pulsation periods ranging from several minutes to half an hour. Theory predicts that stars slightly hotter than the nonradial instability strips for DA, DB, and PG 1159-type white dwarfs should be unstable to radial pulsations, with periods between 0.1 and 10 seconds. We have received Cycle 2 HSP time to search several DA and DB candidates for these predicted rapid pulsations. In Cycle 3 we propose to use HSP to search for the predicted radial pulsations in 3 members of the PG 1159 class. High-speed UV photometry is free from atmospheric scintillation, and takes advantage of the larger stellar fluxes and larger pulsation amplitudes for these extremely hot (above 125,000 K) stars. Our targets are three known nonradial pulsators (two are central stars in planetary nebulae), so that the observations will also provide information on the wavelength dependence of the nonradial pulsation amplitudes. The presence (or absence) of radial pulsations will provide significant new information for (or challenges to) our understanding of white-dwarf pulsations, structure, and evolution.

  14. White Dwarf Period Tables I. Pulsators with hydrogen-dominated atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bognar, Zs.; Sodor, A.

    2016-09-01

    We aimed at collecting all known white dwarf pulsators with hydrogen-dominated atmospheres and list their main photometric and atmospheric parameters together with their pulsation periods and amplitudes observed at different epochs. For this purpose, we explored the pulsating white dwarf related literature with the systematic use of the SIMBAD and the NASA's Astrophysics Data System (ADS) databases. We summarized our results in four tables listing seven ZZ Ceti stars in detached white dwarf plus main-sequence binaries, seven extremely low-mass DA pulsators, three hot DAVs and 180 ZZ Ceti stars.

  15. DISCOVERY OF AN ULTRAMASSIVE PULSATING WHITE DWARF

    SciTech Connect

    Hermes, J. J.; Castanheira, Barbara G.; Winget, D. E.; Montgomery, M. H.; Harrold, Samuel T.; Kepler, S. O.; Gianninas, A.; Brown, Warren R.

    2013-07-01

    We announce the discovery of the most massive pulsating hydrogen-atmosphere white dwarf (WD) ever discovered, GD 518. Model atmosphere fits to the optical spectrum of this star show it is a 12, 030 {+-} 210 K WD with a log g =9.08 {+-} 0.06, which corresponds to a mass of 1.20 {+-} 0.03 M{sub Sun }. Stellar evolution models indicate that the progenitor of such a high-mass WD endured a stable carbon-burning phase, producing an oxygen-neon-core WD. The discovery of pulsations in GD 518 thus offers the first opportunity to probe the interior of a WD with a possible oxygen-neon core. Such a massive WD should also be significantly crystallized at this temperature. The star exhibits multi-periodic luminosity variations at timescales ranging from roughly 425 to 595 s and amplitudes up to 0.7%, consistent in period and amplitude with the observed variability of typical ZZ Ceti stars, which exhibit non-radial g-mode pulsations driven by a hydrogen partial ionization zone. Successfully unraveling both the total mass and core composition of GD 518 provides a unique opportunity to investigate intermediate-mass stellar evolution, and can possibly place an upper limit to the mass of a carbon-oxygen-core WD, which in turn constrains Type Ia supernovae progenitor systems.

  16. White dwarf evolution - Cradle-to-grave constraints via pulsation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawaler, Steven D.

    1990-01-01

    White dwarf evolution, particularly in the early phases, is not very strongly constrained by observation. Fortunately, white dwarfs undergo nonradial pulsation in three distinct regions of the H-R diagram. These pulsations provide accurate masses, surface compositional structure and rotation velocities, and help constrain other important physical properties. We demonstrate the application of the tools of stellar seismology to white dwarf evolution using the hot white dwarf star PG 1159-035 and the cool DAV (or ZZ Ceti) stars as examples. From pulsation studies, significant challenges to the theory of white dwarf evolution emerge.

  17. GW Lib: a Unique Laboratory for White Dwarf Pulsations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toloza, Odette; Gänsicke, Boris T.; Hermes, JJ; Townsley, Dean M.; Szkody, Paula; Beuermann, K.; Bildsten, Lars; de Martino, D.; Godon, Patrick; Henden, Arne A.; Hubeny, Ivan; Knigge, Christian; Long, Knox S.; Marsh, T. R.; Patterson, Joseph; Schreiber, M. R.; Sion, Edward M.; Zorotovic, Monica

    2015-06-01

    Non-radial pulsations have been identified in a number of accreting white dwarfs in cataclysmic variables. These stars offer insight into the excitation of pulsation modes in mixed H/He/Z atmospheres, and the response of these modes to changes in the white dwarf temperature. Among all pulsating cataclysmic variable white dwarfs, GW Lib stands out by having a well-established observational record of three independent pulsation modes that were wiped out during its 2007 outburst. We have obtained new HST ultraviolet observations in May 2013 that show an unexpected behaviour: besides some activity near the ˜280 s period that has been observed in the past, the white dwarf underwent a large-amplitude brightening. We demonstrate that the brightening is related to an increase of the photospheric temperature, argue against an accretion episode as explanation, and discuss this event in the context of non-radial pulsations on a rapidly rotating star.

  18. Adiabatic properties of pulsating DA white dwarfs. I - The treatment of the Brunt-Vaisala frequency and the region of period formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brassard, P.; Fontaine, G.; Wesemael, F.; Kawaler, S. D.; Tassoul, M.

    1991-01-01

    The fundamental issue of the region of period formaton in a degenerate star is examined, with special attention given to the treatment of the Brunt-Vaisala frequency. It is shown that, in order to obtain reliable numerical results in degenerate stellar models, the Brunt-Vaisala frequency must be appropriately transformed, because it is defined in terms of a difference between two numbers which become nearly equal in highly degenerate matter, causing serious numerical problems and systematic errors. An alternative expression is derived, which is valid for multicomponent nonideal partially degenerate and partially ionized plasmas such as those encountered in white dwarf envelopes. This expression is used to compute the period structure of the same white dwarf considered by Pesnell (1987). It is shown that the implicit numerical differencing used in the Lagrangian pulsation code of Pesnell leads to very serious difficulties when used with models of degenerate stars.

  19. DA White Dwarfs in the Kepler Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, T. F.; Howell, S. B.; Petit, V.; Lépine, S.

    2016-10-01

    We present 16 new, and confirm 7 previously identified, DA white dwarfs in the Kepler field through ground-based spectroscopy with the Hale 200″, Kitt Peak 4-meter, and Bok 2.3-meter telescopes. Using atmospheric models we determine their effective temperatures and surface gravities to constrain their position with respect to the ZZ Ceti (DA pulsator) instability strip, and look for the presence or absence of pulsation with Kepler's unprecedented photometry. Our results are as follows: i) From our measurements of temperature and surface gravity, 12 of the 23 DA white dwarfs from this work fall well outside of the instability strip. The Kepler photometry available for 11 of these WDs allows us to confirm that none are pulsating. One of these eleven happens to be a presumed binary, KIC 11604781, with a period of ˜5 days. ii) The remaining 11 DA white dwarfs are instability strip candidates, potentially falling within the current, empirical instability strip, after accounting for uncertainties. These WDs will help constrain the strip's location further, as eight are near the blue edge and three are near the red edge of the instability strip. Four of these WDs do not have Kepler photometry, so ground-based photometry is needed to determine the pulsation nature of these white dwarfs. The remaining seven have Kepler photometry available, but do not show any periodicity on typical WD pulsation timescales.

  20. Peculiar variations of white dwarf pulsation frequencies and maestro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalessio, James Ruland

    In Part I we report on variations of the normal mode frequencies of the pulsating DB white dwarfs EC 20058-5234 and KIC 8626021 and the pulsating DA white dwarf GD 66. The observations of EC 20058-5234 and KIC 8626021 were motivated by the possibility of measuring the plasmon neutrino production rate of a white dwarf, while the observations of GD 66 were part of a white dwarf pulsation timing based planet search. We announce the discovery of periodic and quasi-periodic variations of multiple normal mode frequencies that cannot be due to the presence of planetary companions. We note the possible signature of a planetary companion to EC 20058-5234 and show that GD 66 cannot have a planet in a several AU orbit down to half a Jupiter mass. We also announce the discovery of secular variations of the normal mode frequencies of all three stars that are inconsistent with cooling alone. Importantly, the rates of period change of several modes of KIC 8626021 are consistent with evolutionary cooling, but are not yet statistically significant. These modes offer the best possibility of measuring the neutrino production rate in a white dwarf. We also observe periodic and secular variations in the frequency of a combination mode that exactly matches the variations predicted by the parent modes, strong observational evidence that combination modes are created by the convection zone and are not normal modes. Periodic variations in the amplitudes of many of these modes is also noted. We hypothesize that these frequency variations are caused by complex variations of the magnetic field strength and geometry, analogous to behavior observed in the Sun. In Part II we describe the MAESTRO software framework and the MAESTRO REDUCE algorithm. MAESTRO is a collection of astronomy specific MatLab software developed by the Whole Earth Telescope. REDUCE is an an algorithm that can extract the brightness of stars on a set of CCD images with minimal configuration and human interaction. The key to

  1. An Update on the Quirks of Pulsating, Accreting White Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szkody, Paula; Mukadam, Anjum S.; Gänsicke, Boris T.; Hermes, J. J.; Toloza, Odette

    2015-06-01

    At the 18th European White Dwarf Workshop, we reported results for several dwarf novae containing pulsating white dwarfs that had undergone an outburst in 2006-2007. HST and optical data on the white dwarfs in GW Lib, EQ Lyn and V455 And all showed different behaviors in the years following their outbursts. We continued to follow these objects for the last 2 years, providing timescales of 6-7 years past outburst. All three reached their optical quiescent values within 4 years but pulsational stability has not returned. EQ Lyn showed its pre-outburst pulsation period after 3 years, but it continues to show photometric variability that alternates between pulsation and disk superhump periods while remaining at quiescence. V455 And has almost reached its pre-outburst pulsation period, while GW Lib still remains heated and with a different pulsation spectrum than at quiescence. These results indicate that asteroseismology provides a unique picture of the effects of outburst heating on the white dwarf.

  2. New Insights on Pulsating White Dwarfs from 3D Radiation-Hydrodynamical Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblay, Pier-Emmanuel; Fontaine, Gilles; Ludwig, Hans-Günter

    2015-08-01

    We have recently computed a grid of 3D radiation-hydrodynamical simulations for the atmosphere of 70 pure-hydrogen DA white dwarfs in the range 7.0 < log g < 9.0. This includes the full ZZ Ceti instability strip where DA white dwarfs are pulsating, by far the most common type of degenerate pulsators. We have significantly improved the theoretical framework to study these objects by removing the free parameters of 1D convection, which were previously a major modeling hurdle. We will compare our new models with the observed sample of ZZ Ceti stars and highlight the improved derived properties of these objects. In particular, the new spectroscopically determined 3D atmospheric parameters allow for an improved definition of instability strip edges. We have also made new predictions for the size of convection zones, which significantly impact the position where the pulsations are driven, and the region of the HR diagram where white dwarfs are expected to pulsate. Finally, we will present new results from non-adiabatic pulsation calculations.

  3. Constraining the neutrino magnetic dipole moment from white dwarf pulsations

    SciTech Connect

    Córsico, A.H.; Althaus, L.G.; García-Berro, E. E-mail: althaus@fcaglp.unlp.edu.ar E-mail: kepler@if.ufrgs.br

    2014-08-01

    Pulsating white dwarf stars can be used as astrophysical laboratories to constrain the properties of weakly interacting particles. Comparing the cooling rates of these stars with the expected values from theoretical models allows us to search for additional sources of cooling due to the emission of axions, neutralinos, or neutrinos with magnetic dipole moment. In this work, we derive an upper bound to the neutrino magnetic dipole moment (μ{sub ν}) using an estimate of the rate of period change of the pulsating DB white dwarf star PG 1351+489. We employ state-of-the-art evolutionary and pulsational codes which allow us to perform a detailed asteroseismological period fit based on fully DB white dwarf evolutionary sequences. Plasmon neutrino emission is the dominant cooling mechanism for this class of hot pulsating white dwarfs, and so it is the main contributor to the rate of change of period with time (Pidot) for the DBV class. Thus, the inclusion of an anomalous neutrino emission through a non-vanishing magnetic dipole moment in these sequences notably influences the evolutionary timescales, and also the expected pulsational properties of the DBV stars. By comparing the theoretical Pidot value with the rate of change of period with time of PG 1351+489, we assess the possible existence of additional cooling by neutrinos with magnetic dipole moment. Our models suggest the existence of some additional cooling in this pulsating DB white dwarf, consistent with a non-zero magnetic dipole moment with an upper limit of μ{sub ν} ∼< 10{sup -11} μ{sub B}. This bound is somewhat less restrictive than, but still compatible with, other limits inferred from the white dwarf luminosity function or from the color-magnitude diagram of the Globular cluster M5. Further improvements of the measurement of the rate of period change of the dominant pulsation mode of PG 1351+489 will be necessary to confirm our bound.

  4. Discovery of Three Pulsating, Mixed-atmosphere, Extremely Low-mass White Dwarf Precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gianninas, A.; Curd, Brandon; Fontaine, G.; Brown, Warren R.; Kilic, Mukremin

    2016-05-01

    We report the discovery of pulsations in three mixed-atmosphere, extremely low-mass white dwarf (ELM WD, M ≤slant 0.3 M ⊙) precursors. Following the recent discoveries of pulsations in both ELM and pre-ELM WDs, we targeted pre-ELM WDs with mixed H/He atmospheres with high-speed photometry. We find significant optical variability in all three observed targets with periods in the range 320–590 s, consistent in timescale with theoretical predictions of p-mode pulsations in mixed-atmosphere ≈0.18 M ⊙ He-core pre-ELM WDs. This represents the first empirical evidence that pulsations in pre-ELM WDs can only occur if a significant amount of He is present in the atmosphere. Future, more extensive, timeseries photometry of the brightest of the three new pulsators offers an excellent opportunity to constrain the thickness of the surface H layer, which regulates the cooling timescales for ELM WDs. Based on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (United States), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación Productiva (Argentina), and Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia e Inovação (Brazil).

  5. Discovery of Three Pulsating, Mixed-atmosphere, Extremely Low-mass White Dwarf Precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gianninas, A.; Curd, Brandon; Fontaine, G.; Brown, Warren R.; Kilic, Mukremin

    2016-05-01

    We report the discovery of pulsations in three mixed-atmosphere, extremely low-mass white dwarf (ELM WD, M ≤slant 0.3 M ⊙) precursors. Following the recent discoveries of pulsations in both ELM and pre-ELM WDs, we targeted pre-ELM WDs with mixed H/He atmospheres with high-speed photometry. We find significant optical variability in all three observed targets with periods in the range 320-590 s, consistent in timescale with theoretical predictions of p-mode pulsations in mixed-atmosphere ≈0.18 M ⊙ He-core pre-ELM WDs. This represents the first empirical evidence that pulsations in pre-ELM WDs can only occur if a significant amount of He is present in the atmosphere. Future, more extensive, timeseries photometry of the brightest of the three new pulsators offers an excellent opportunity to constrain the thickness of the surface H layer, which regulates the cooling timescales for ELM WDs. Based on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (United States), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación Productiva (Argentina), and Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia e Inovação (Brazil).

  6. Pulsations powered by hydrogen shell burning in white dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camisassa, M. E.; Córsico, A. H.; Althaus, L. G.; Shibahashi, H.

    2016-10-01

    Context. In the absence of a third dredge-up episode during the asymptotic giant-branch phase, white dwarf models evolved from low-metallicity progenitors have a thick hydrogen envelope, which makes hydrogen shell burning be the most important energy source. Aims: We investigate the pulsational stability of white dwarf models with thick envelopes to see whether nonradial g-mode pulsations are triggered by hydrogen burning, with the aim of placing constraints on hydrogen shell burning in cool white dwarfs and on a third dredge-up during the asymptotic giant-branch evolution of their progenitor stars. Methods: We construct white-dwarf sequences from low-metallicity progenitors by means of full evolutionary calculations that take into account the entire history of progenitor stars, including the thermally pulsing and the post-asymptotic giant-branch phases, and analyze their pulsation stability by solving the linear, nonadiabatic, nonradial pulsation equations for the models in the range of effective temperatures Teff 15 000-8000 K. Results: We demonstrate that, for white dwarf models with masses M⋆ ≲ 0.71 M⊙ and effective temperatures 8500 ≲ Teff ≲ 11 600 K that evolved from low-metallicity progenitors (Z = 0.0001, 0.0005, and 0.001), the dipole (ℓ = 1) and quadrupole (ℓ = 2) g1-modes are excited mostly as a result of the hydrogen-burning shell through the ɛ-mechanism, in addition to other g-modes driven by either the κ - γ or the convective driving mechanism. However, the ɛ mechanism is insufficient to drive these modes in white dwarfs evolved from solar-metallicity progenitors. Conclusions: We suggest that efforts should be made to observe the dipole g1-mode in white dwarfs associated with low-metallicity environments, such as globular clusters and/or the galactic halo, to place constraints on hydrogen shell burning in cool white dwarfs and the third dredge-up episode during the preceding asymptotic giant-branch phase.

  7. Periodic Variations in the O - C Diagrams of Five Pulsation Frequencies of the DB White Dwarf EC 20058-5234

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalessio, J.; Sullivan, D. J.; Provencal, J. L.; Shipman, H. L.; Sullivan, T.; Kilkenny, D.; Fraga, L.; Sefako, R.

    2013-03-01

    Variations in the pulsation arrival time of five independent pulsation frequencies of the DB white dwarf EC 20058-5234 individually imitate the effects of reflex motion induced by a planet or companion but are inconsistent when considered in unison. The pulsation frequencies vary periodically in a 12.9 year cycle and undergo secular changes that are inconsistent with simple neutrino plus photon-cooling models. The magnitude of the periodic and secular variations increases with the period of the pulsations, possibly hinting that the corresponding physical mechanism is located near the surface of the star. The phase of the periodic variations appears coupled to the sign of the secular variations. The standards for pulsation-timing-based detection of planetary companions around pulsating white dwarfs, and possibly other variables such as subdwarf B stars, should be re-evaluated. The physical mechanism responsible for this surprising result may involve a redistribution of angular momentum or a magnetic cycle. Additionally, variations in a supposed combination frequency are shown to match the sum of the variations of the parent frequencies to remarkable precision, an expected but unprecedented confirmation of theoretical predictions. Based on observations obtained at the Southern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) telescope, which is a joint project of the Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia, e Inovação (MCTI) da República Federativa do Brasil, the US National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO), the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC), and Michigan State University (MSU).

  8. HST observations of the pulsating white dwarf GD 358

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castanheira, B. G.; Nitta, A.; Kepler, S. O.; Winget, D. E.; Koester, D.

    2005-03-01

    We used time-resolved ultraviolet spectroscopy obtained with the FOS and STIS spectrographs of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), together with archival IUE observations to measure the effective temperature (Teff), surface gravity (log g) and distance (d) of the pulsating DB white dwarf GD 358 with unprecedented accuracy, and to show that the temperature did not change during the 1996 sforzando, when the star changed basically to a single mode pulsator. We also measured for the first time for a DBV the spherical harmonic degree (ℓ) for two modes, with k=8 and k=9, which was only possible because the stellar light curve was dominated by a single mode in 1996. The independent spectra provide the following values: Teff=24 100± 400 K, log g=7.91±0.26 and d=42.7±2.5 pc. The ultraviolet spectroscopic distance is in better agreement with the seismological value, than the one derived by parallax.

  9. SEISMOLOGY OF A MASSIVE PULSATING HYDROGEN ATMOSPHERE WHITE DWARF

    SciTech Connect

    Kepler, S. O.; Pelisoli, Ingrid; Pecanha, Viviane; Costa, J. E. S.; Fraga, Luciano; Hermes, J. J.; Winget, D. E.; Castanheira, Barbara; Corsico, A. H.; Romero, A. D.; Althaus, Leandro; Kleinman, S. J.; Nitta, A.; Koester, D.; Kuelebi, Baybars; Kanaan, Antonio

    2012-10-01

    We report our observations of the new pulsating hydrogen atmosphere white dwarf SDSS J132350.28+010304.22. We discovered periodic photometric variations in frequency and amplitude that are commensurate with nonradial g-mode pulsations in ZZ Ceti stars. This, along with estimates for the star's temperature and gravity, establishes it as a massive ZZ Ceti star. We used time-series photometric observations with the 4.1 m SOAR Telescope, complemented by contemporary McDonald Observatory 2.1 m data, to discover the photometric variability. The light curve of SDSS J132350.28+010304.22 shows at least nine detectable frequencies. We used these frequencies to make an asteroseismic determination of the total mass and effective temperature of the star: M{sub *} = 0.88 {+-} 0.02 M{sub Sun} and T{sub eff} = 12, 100 {+-} 140 K. These values are consistent with those derived from the optical spectra and photometric colors.

  10. HST Observations of the Pulsating White Dwarf GD 358

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castanheira, B. G.; Kepler, S. O.; Nitta, A.; Winget, D. E.; Koester, D.

    2005-07-01

    We used time-resolved ultraviolet spectroscopy obtained with the FOS and STIS spectrographs of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), together with archival IUE observations to measure the effective temperature (Teff}), surface gravity (log g) and distance (d) of the pulsating DB white dwarf GD 358 with unprecedented accuracy, and to show the temperature did not change during the 1996 sforzando, when the star changed basically to a single mode pulsator. We also measured, for the first time for a DBV, the spherical harmonic degree (ℓ) for two modes, with k=8 and k=9, which was only possible because the stellar light curve was dominated by a single mode in 1996. In addition, we constrain ℓ to be 1 or 2 for the main pulsations in the normal multiperiodic state. The spectra are best fit for Teff}=24 100± 400 K, log g=7.91±0.26 and d=42.7±2.5 pc. The ultraviolet spectroscopic distance is in better agreement with the seismological value, than the one derived by parallax.

  11. Two-phase ultraviolet spectrophotometry of the pulsating white dwarf ZZ Piscium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, H. E.; Kemper, E.; Grauer, A. D.; Holm, A. V.; Panek, R. J.; Schiffer, F. H., III

    1985-01-01

    Spectra of the pulsating white dwarf ZZ Psc (= G29-38) were obtained using the International Ultraviolet Explorer. By using a multiple-exposure technique in conjunction with simultaneous ground-based exposure-metering photometry, it was possible to obtain mean on-pulse and off-pulse spectra in the 1950-1310 A wavelength range. The ratio of the time-averaged on-pulse to off-pulse spectra is best fitted by a temperature variation that is in phase with the optical light variation. This result is consistent with the hypothesis that the observed variation is due to a high-order nonradial pulsation. Conventional ultraviolet spectra of ZZ Psc showed broad absorption features at 1390 and 1600 A. These features are also found in the spectra of the cool DA-type white dwarfs G226-29 and G67-23, and appear to increase in strength with decreasing temperature. A possible explanation for the 1600 A feature is absorption by the satellite band of resonance-broadened hydrogen Ly-alpha. Such absorption would also help explain a discrepancy between the observed pulsation amplitude shortward of 1650 A and the predicted amplitudes based on model atmospheres.

  12. GW Librae: a unique laboratory for pulsations in an accreting white dwarf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toloza, O.; Gänsicke, B. T.; Hermes, J. J.; Townsley, D. M.; Schreiber, M. R.; Szkody, P.; Pala, A.; Beuermann, K.; Bildsten, L.; Breedt, E.; Cook, M.; Godon, P.; Henden, A. A.; Hubeny, I.; Knigge, C.; Long, K. S.; Marsh, T. R.; de Martino, D.; Mukadam, A. S.; Myers, G.; Nelson, P.; Oksanen, A.; Patterson, J.; Sion, E. M.; Zorotovic, M.

    2016-07-01

    Non-radial pulsations have been identified in a number of accreting white dwarfs in cataclysmic variables. These stars offer insight into the excitation of pulsation modes in atmospheres with mixed compositions of hydrogen, helium, and metals, and the response of these modes to changes in the white dwarf temperature. Among all pulsating cataclysmic variable white dwarfs, GW Librae stands out by having a well-established observational record of three independent pulsation modes that disappeared when the white dwarf temperature rose dramatically following its 2007 accretion outburst. Our analysis of Hubble Space Telescope (HST) ultraviolet spectroscopy taken in 2002, 2010, and 2011, showed that pulsations produce variations in the white dwarf effective temperature as predicted by theory. Additionally in 2013 May, we obtained new HST/Cosmic Origin Spectrograph ultraviolet observations that displayed unexpected behaviour: besides showing variability at ≃275 s, which is close to the post-outburst pulsations detected with HST in 2010 and 2011, the white dwarf exhibits high-amplitude variability on an ≃4.4 h time-scale. We demonstrate that this variability is produced by an increase of the temperature of a region on white dwarf covering up to ≃30 per cent of the visible white dwarf surface. We argue against a short-lived accretion episode as the explanation of such heating, and discuss this event in the context of non-radial pulsations on a rapidly rotating star.

  13. SDSS J184037.78+642312.3: THE FIRST PULSATING EXTREMELY LOW MASS WHITE DWARF

    SciTech Connect

    Hermes, J. J.; Montgomery, M. H.; Winget, D. E.; Brown, Warren R.; Kenyon, Scott J.; Kilic, Mukremin

    2012-05-10

    We report the discovery of the first pulsating extremely low mass (ELM) white dwarf (WD), SDSS J184037.78+642312.3 (hereafter J1840). This DA (hydrogen-atmosphere) WD is by far the coolest and the lowest-mass pulsating WD, with T{sub eff} = 9100 {+-} 170 K and log g = 6.22 {+-} 0.06, which corresponds to a mass of {approx}0.17 M{sub Sun }. This low-mass pulsating WD greatly extends the DAV (or ZZ Ceti) instability strip, effectively bridging the log g gap between WDs and main-sequence stars. We detect high-amplitude variability in J1840 on timescales exceeding 4000 s, with a non-sinusoidal pulse shape. Our observations also suggest that the variability is multi-periodic. The star is in a 4.6 hr binary with another compact object, most likely another WD. Future, more extensive time-series photometry of this ELM WD offers the first opportunity to probe the interior of a low-mass, presumably He-core WD using the tools of asteroseismology.

  14. First axion bounds from a pulsating helium-rich white dwarf star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battich, T.; Córsico, A. H.; Althaus, L. G.; Miller Bertolami, M. M.

    2016-08-01

    The Peccei-Quinn mechanism proposed to solve the CP problem of Quantum Chromodynamics has as consequence the existence of axions, hypothetical weakly interacting particles whose mass is constrained to be on the sub-eV range. If these particles exist and interact with electrons, they would be emitted from the dense interior of white dwarfs, becoming an important energy sink for the star. Due to their well known physics, white dwarfs are good laboratories to study the properties of fundamental particles such as the axions. We study the general effect of axion emission on the evolution of helium-rich white dwarfs and on their pulsational properties. To this aim, we calculate evolutionary helium-rich white dwarf models with axion emission, and assess the pulsational properties of this models. Our results indicate that the rates of change of pulsation periods are significantly affected by the existence of axions. We are able for the first time to independently constrain the mass of the axion from the study of pulsating helium-rich white dwarfs. To do this, we use an estimation of the rate of change of period of the pulsating white dwarf PG 1351+489 corresponding to the dominant pulsation period. From an asteroseismological model of PG 1351+489 we obtain gae < 3.3 × 10‑13 for the axion-electron coupling constant, or macos2β lesssim 11.5 meV for the axion mass. This constraint is relaxed to gae < 5.5 × 10‑13 (macos2β lesssim 19.5 meV), when no detailed asteroseismological model is adopted for the comparison with observations.

  15. First axion bounds from a pulsating helium-rich white dwarf star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battich, T.; Córsico, A. H.; Althaus, L. G.; Miller Bertolami, M. M.

    2016-08-01

    The Peccei-Quinn mechanism proposed to solve the CP problem of Quantum Chromodynamics has as consequence the existence of axions, hypothetical weakly interacting particles whose mass is constrained to be on the sub-eV range. If these particles exist and interact with electrons, they would be emitted from the dense interior of white dwarfs, becoming an important energy sink for the star. Due to their well known physics, white dwarfs are good laboratories to study the properties of fundamental particles such as the axions. We study the general effect of axion emission on the evolution of helium-rich white dwarfs and on their pulsational properties. To this aim, we calculate evolutionary helium-rich white dwarf models with axion emission, and assess the pulsational properties of this models. Our results indicate that the rates of change of pulsation periods are significantly affected by the existence of axions. We are able for the first time to independently constrain the mass of the axion from the study of pulsating helium-rich white dwarfs. To do this, we use an estimation of the rate of change of period of the pulsating white dwarf PG 1351+489 corresponding to the dominant pulsation period. From an asteroseismological model of PG 1351+489 we obtain gae < 3.3 × 10-13 for the axion-electron coupling constant, or macos2β lesssim 11.5 meV for the axion mass. This constraint is relaxed to gae < 5.5 × 10-13 (macos2β lesssim 19.5 meV), when no detailed asteroseismological model is adopted for the comparison with observations.

  16. Gravitational waves, pulsations, and more : high-speed photometry of low-mass, He-core white dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermes, J. J.

    2013-08-01

    This dissertation is an observational exploration of the exciting physics that can be enabled by high-speed photometric monitoring of extremely low-mass (< 0.25 Msun) white dwarf stars, which are found in some of the most compact binaries known. It includes the cleanest indirect detection of gravitational waves at visible wavelengths, the discovery of pulsations in He-core WDs, the strongest evidence for excited p-mode pulsations in a WD, the discovery of the first tidally distorted WDs and their use to constrain the low-end of the WD mass-radius relationship, and the strongest cases of Doppler beaming observed in a binary system. It is the result of the more than 220 nights spent at McDonald Observatory doing high-speed photometry with the Argos instrument on the 2.1 m Otto Struve telescope, which has led to a number of additional exciting results, including the discovery of an intermediate timescale in the evolution of cooling DA WDs and the discovery of the most massive pulsating WD, which should have an ONe-core and should be highly crystallized.

  17. Amplitude Variability as Evidence of Crystallization in GD 518 and Other Massive Pulsating White Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermes, J. J.; Kepler, S. O.; Montgomery, M. H.; Gianninas, A.; Castanheira, Barbara G.; Winget, D. E.

    2015-06-01

    In 2013 March we discovered pulsations in the most massive pulsating hydrogen-atmosphere white dwarf to date, GD 518. Model atmosphere fits to the optical spectrum of this star show it is a Teff = 12,030±210 K, log g = 9.08±0.06 white dwarf, which corresponds to a mass of 1.20±0.03 M⊙. Such a massive WD should also be significantly crystallized at this temperature, and may possibly contain an oxygen-neon core. The star exhibits multi-periodic luminosity variations at timescales ranging from roughly 425 to 595 s and amplitudes up to 0.7% in a given night, consistent in period and amplitude with the observed variability of typical ZZ Ceti stars, although the pulsation amplitudes change drastically over the 33 days of our discovery observations. We investigate the possibility that these amplitude variations are a consequence of the pulsation modes sampling only the non-crystallized outer mass fraction of the white dwarf (perhaps <0.05 M⊙ of material), and thus have very low mode inertia. Amplitude variability could be an observational consequence of a significantly crystallized stellar interior.

  18. A search for p-mode pulsations in white dwarf stars using the Berkeley Visible Imaging Tube detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilkenny, D.; Welsh, B. Y.; Koen, C.; Gulbis, A. A. S.; Kotze, M. M.

    2014-01-01

    We present high-speed photometry (resolution 0.1 s) obtained during the commissioning of the Berkely Visible Imaging Tube system on the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT). The observations were an attempt to search for very rapid p-mode oscillations in white dwarf stars and included three DA stars known to be g-mode pulsators (ZZ Cet, HK Cet and AF Pic), one other DA star (WD 1056-384) not known to be variable and one AM Cvn star (HP Lib). No evidence was found for any variations greater than about 1 mmag in amplitude (˜0.1 per cent) at frequencies in excess of 60 mHz (periods <17 s) in any of the target stars, though several previously known g-mode frequencies were recovered.

  19. High-Speed Hubble Space Telescope Ultraviolet photometry of two DB white dwarfs: Nonradial and radial pulsations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawaler, Steven D.; Bond, Howard E.; Sherbert, Lisa E.; Watson, Todd K.

    1994-01-01

    We observed two DB white dwarf stars with the High Speed Photometer aboard the Hubble Space Telescope. The two targets, the nonradial pulsator GD 358, and PG 0112+104, a non-pulsating white dwarf with similar temperature, were each observed for 1800 s with a time resolution of 10 ms. We used the F140LP configuration, which gives a broadband response in the UV between 1400 and 3000 A. The data clearly show the long period (about 700 s) pulsations in GD 358. Comparison with optical observations obtained two weeks earlier shows that the amplitude of the pulsations in the UV is approximately 1.4 times higher, consistent with nonradial pulsations due solely to temperature changes at constant radius. The high time resolution of these observations allows us to search for high-frequency pulsations (such as p modes or high overtone radial modes). No firm evidencefor high-frequency pulsations was seen in either object between 1 and 12 Hz. Correlation analysis of GD 358 shows no clear signal of multifrequency high overtone radial pulsations at the 0.00075 mag level, with no individual modes above the 0.0016 mag level. Upper limits for PG 0112+104 are approximately 2 times higher than for GD 358. Implications of this study for the theory of white dwarf pulsations are discussed.

  20. Pulsations of the white dwarf component in V471 tauri-like binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Stanghellini, L. ); Cox, A.N. ); Starrfield, S.G. . Dept. of Physics and Astronomy Los Alamos National Lab., NM )

    1990-01-01

    The eclipsing spectroscopic binary V471 Tau has a compact DA component that has been observed to pulsate with multimode, low amplitude oscillations. We test three models with different masses (M/M{sub {circle dot}} = 0.6, 0.8, 1.0) against nonradial instability. Our models are derived from an evolutionary track calculated by Iben. The results confirm that the pulsations are driven by the {kappa} and {gamma} mechanisms operating in the ionization zones of carbon and oxygen. 18 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  1. Two new pulsating low-mass pre-white dwarfs or SX Phoenicis stars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corti, M. A.; Kanaan, A.; Córsico, A. H.; Kepler, S. O.; Althaus, L. G.; Koester, D.; Sánchez Arias, J. P.

    2016-03-01

    Context. The discovery of pulsations in low-mass stars opens an opportunity to probe their interiors and determine their evolution by employing the tools of asteroseismology. Aims: We aim to analyse high-speed photometry of SDSS J145847.02+070754.46 and SDSS J173001.94+070600.25 and discover brightness variabilities. In order to locate these stars in the Teff - log g diagram, we fit optical spectra (SDSS) with synthetic non-magnetic spectra derived from model atmospheres. Methods: To carry out this study, we used the photometric data we obtained for these stars with the 2.15 m telescope at CASLEO, Argentina. We analysed their light curves and applied the discrete Fourier transform (FT) to determine the pulsation frequencies. Finally, we compare both stars in the Teff - log g diagram, with two known pre-white dwarfs and seven pulsating pre-ELM white dwarf stars, δ Scuti, and SX Phe stars Results: We report the discovery of pulsations in SDSS J145847.02+070754.46 and SDSS J173001.94+070600.25. We determine their effective temperature and surface gravity to be Teff = 7972 ± 200 K, log g = 4.25 ± 0.5 and Teff = 7925 ± 200 K, log g = 4.25 ± 0.5, respectively. With these parameters, these new pulsating low-mass stars can be identified with either ELM white dwarfs (with ~0.17 M⊙) or more massive SX Phe stars. We identified pulsation periods of 3278.7 and 1633.9 s for SDSS J145847.02+070754.46 and a pulsation period of 3367.1 s for SDSS J173001.94+070600.25. These two new objects, together with those of Maxted et al. (2013, 2014), indicate the possible existence of a new instability domain towards the late stages of evolution of low-mass white dwarf stars, although their identification with SX Phe stars cannot be discarded. Visiting Astronomer, Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito operated under agreement between the Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas de la República Argentina and the National Universities of La Plata, Córdoba, and San Juan.

  2. Limits from the Ongoing Search for Planets Around White Dwarf Stars Using Pulsation Timings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winget, D. E.; Hermes, J. J.; Mullally, Fergal; Bell, K. J.; Montgomery, M. H.; Williams, S. G.; Harrold, S. T.; Kepler, S. O.; Castanheira, B.; Chandler, D. W.; Winget, K. I.; Mukadam, A. S.; Nather, R. E.

    2015-06-01

    Evidence from searches of stars in our galaxy for exoplanet companions suggests that most lower main sequence stars likely have one or more planets; the vast majority of these planet-hosting stars will evolve into white dwarf stars. Some planets may survive this process and new ones may form in a sort of second generation from the cast-off material. If we combine this argument with evidence of a substantial population of metal polluted white dwarf stars, we may plausibly expect that planets may be common around white dwarf stars. Empirically, however, little is known about the presence of planets, new or old around white dwarf stars. Our search is small (˜15 white dwarf stars), but sensitive. Using pulsation arrival times we reach a large search volume around each star: we are sensitive to 1 MJupiter planets at distances ranging from 1- 100AU. In this context, our tightening constraints from pulsation timings become increasingly important to the broader study of planet formation, dynamical evolution, and ultimate survival.

  3. A connection between the instability strips of ZZ Ceti and V777 Herculis white dwarfs. Pulsating accreting GW Lib white dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Grootel, V.; Fontaine, G.; Brassard, P.; Dupret, M.-A.

    2015-03-01

    Aims: We aim to determine the theoretical instability strips of white dwarfs with diverse H and He content in their atmospheres, from a solar composition to a H-depleted atmosphere. Pulsators with mixed H-He atmospheres are indeed known to exist, and these are the white dwarfs in cataclysmic accreting systems of the GW Lib type. We thus also aim to determine the range of periods of excited pulsation modes, and to qualitatively compare these to the observed periods in GW Lib white dwarf pulsators. Methods: In the first full nonadiabatic stability analysis of pulsators of this kind, we applied a time-dependent convection treatment and an energy leakage argument to compute, for cooling models of white dwarfs with various masses and envelope compositions, the location of the blue and the red edges, as well as the properties of pulsation modes. Results: We find that our derived instability strips form a true continuum in the log g-Teff plane and that their individual location depends uniquely on the assumed atmospheric composition, from the solar composition models at low effective temperatures to the H-depleted models at much higher temperatures. Taking into account our previous results from the ZZ Ceti (pure H atmosphere) and V777 Her (pure He atmosphere) white dwarf pulsators, this implies that all of these instability domains are connected via the same fundamental driving mechanism. Applying our results to the case of white dwarf pulsators of the GW Lib type, we find that our theoretical instability strips can qualitatively account for all of the known cases. The computed range of periods of excited modes also compares qualitatively very well to the observed ones. Conclusions: The GW Lib pulsators are very similar in nature to ZZ Ceti and V777 Her white dwarfs. It is the diverse chemical compositions in their atmosphere and envelope that defines their specific pulsation properties. Beyond GW Lib pulsators, white dwarfs can sometimes exhibit mixed H-He atmospheres

  4. Pulsations of Post-AGB Pre-White Dwarfs with Hydrogen-dominated Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Kazuhiro; Shibahashi, Hiromoto

    2015-09-01

    It is shown by a fully non adiabatic analysis that pre-white dwarfs with hydrogen-dominated atmospheres in the range of Teff = 40 000 K - 300 000 K are pul-sationally unstable due to nuclear reactions in the hydrogen burning-shell against low-degree g-modes in the period range of about 40-200 s. It is also shown that the amount of hydrogen has a significant influence on the instability domain of such pre-white dwarfs in the Hertzsprung-Russel (H-R) diagram. Hence, the thickness of hydrogen-dominated envelopes may be well constrained by observing the presence of the g-mode oscillations.

  5. PERIODIC VARIATIONS IN THE O - C DIAGRAMS OF FIVE PULSATION FREQUENCIES OF THE DB WHITE DWARF EC 20058-5234

    SciTech Connect

    Dalessio, J.; Provencal, J. L.; Shipman, H. L.; Sullivan, D. J.; Sullivan, T.; Kilkenny, D.; Fraga, L.; Sefako, R.

    2013-03-01

    Variations in the pulsation arrival time of five independent pulsation frequencies of the DB white dwarf EC 20058-5234 individually imitate the effects of reflex motion induced by a planet or companion but are inconsistent when considered in unison. The pulsation frequencies vary periodically in a 12.9 year cycle and undergo secular changes that are inconsistent with simple neutrino plus photon-cooling models. The magnitude of the periodic and secular variations increases with the period of the pulsations, possibly hinting that the corresponding physical mechanism is located near the surface of the star. The phase of the periodic variations appears coupled to the sign of the secular variations. The standards for pulsation-timing-based detection of planetary companions around pulsating white dwarfs, and possibly other variables such as subdwarf B stars, should be re-evaluated. The physical mechanism responsible for this surprising result may involve a redistribution of angular momentum or a magnetic cycle. Additionally, variations in a supposed combination frequency are shown to match the sum of the variations of the parent frequencies to remarkable precision, an expected but unprecedented confirmation of theoretical predictions.

  6. Precision asteroseismology of the pulsating white dwarf GD 1212 using a two-wheel-controlled Kepler spacecraft

    SciTech Connect

    Hermes, J. J.; Charpinet, S.; Barclay, Thomas; Mullally, Fergal; Huber, Daniel; Still, Martin; Howell, Steve B.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Haas, Michael R.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Pakštienė, E.; Kawaler, Steven D.; Bloemen, S.; Castanheira, Barbara G.; Winget, D. E.; Montgomery, M. H.; Van Grootel, V.

    2014-07-01

    We present a preliminary analysis of the cool pulsating white dwarf (WD) GD 1212, enabled by more than 11.5 days of space-based photometry obtained during an engineering test of the two-reaction-wheel-controlled Kepler spacecraft. We detect at least 19 independent pulsation modes, ranging from 828.2-1220.8 s, and at least 17 nonlinear combination frequencies of those independent pulsations. Our longest uninterrupted light curve, 9.0 days in length, evidences coherent difference frequencies at periods inaccessible from the ground, up to 14.5 hr, the longest-period signals ever detected in a pulsating WD. These results mark some of the first science to come from a two-wheel-controlled Kepler spacecraft, proving the capability for unprecedented discoveries afforded by extending Kepler observations to the ecliptic.

  7. Enigmatic Recurrent Pulsational Variability of the Accreting White Dwarf EQ Lyn (SDSS J074531.92+453829.6)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukadam, Anjum S.; Townsley, D. M.; Szkody, Paula; Gänsicke, B. T.; Southworth, J.; Brockett, T.; Parsons, S.; Hermes, J. J.; Montgomery, M. H.; Winget, D. E.; Harrold, S.; Tovmassian, G.; Zharikov, S.; Drake, A. J.; Henden, A.; Rodriguez-Gil, P.; Sion, E. M.; Zola, S.; Szymanski, T.; Pavlenko, E.; Aungwerojwit, A.; Qian, S.-B.

    2013-09-01

    Photometric observations of the cataclysmic variable EQ Lyn (SDSS J074531.92+453829.6), acquired from 2005 October to 2006 January, revealed high-amplitude variability in the range 1166-1290 s. This accreting white dwarf underwent an outburst in 2006 October, during which its brightness increased by at least five magnitudes, and it started exhibiting superhumps in its light curve. Upon cooling to quiescence, the superhumps disappeared and it displayed the same periods in 2010 February as prior to the outburst within the uncertainties of a couple of seconds. This behavior suggests that the observed variability is likely due to nonradial pulsations in the white dwarf star, whose core structure has not been significantly affected by the outburst. The enigmatic observations begin with an absence of pulsational variability during a multi-site campaign conducted in 2011 January-February without any evidence of a new outburst; the light curve is instead dominated by superhumps with periods in the range of 83-87 minutes. Ultraviolet Hubble Space Telescope time-series spectroscopy acquired in 2011 March reveals an effective temperature of 15,400 K, placing EQ Lyn within the broad instability strip of 10,500-16,000 K for accreting pulsators. The ultraviolet light curve with 90% flux from the white dwarf shows no evidence of any pulsations. Optical photometry acquired during 2011 and Spring 2012 continues to reflect the presence of superhumps and an absence of pulsations. Subsequent observations acquired in 2012 December and 2013 January finally indicate the disappearance of superhumps and the return of pulsational variability with similar periods as previous data. However, our most recent data from 2013 March to May reveal superhumps yet again with no sign of pulsations. We speculate that this enigmatic post-outburst behavior of the frequent disappearance of pulsational variability in EQ Lyn is caused either by heating the white dwarf beyond the instability strip due to an

  8. ENIGMATIC RECURRENT PULSATIONAL VARIABILITY OF THE ACCRETING WHITE DWARF EQ LYN (SDSS J074531.92+453829.6)

    SciTech Connect

    Mukadam, Anjum S.; Szkody, Paula; Townsley, D. M.; Brockett, T.; Gaensicke, B. T.; Parsons, S.; Southworth, J.; Hermes, J. J.; Montgomery, M. H.; Winget, D. E.; Harrold, S.; Tovmassian, G.; Zharikov, S.; Drake, A. J.; Henden, A.; Rodriguez-Gil, P.; Sion, E. M.; Zola, S.; Szymanski, T.; Pavlenko, E.; and others

    2013-09-15

    Photometric observations of the cataclysmic variable EQ Lyn (SDSS J074531.92+453829.6), acquired from 2005 October to 2006 January, revealed high-amplitude variability in the range 1166-1290 s. This accreting white dwarf underwent an outburst in 2006 October, during which its brightness increased by at least five magnitudes, and it started exhibiting superhumps in its light curve. Upon cooling to quiescence, the superhumps disappeared and it displayed the same periods in 2010 February as prior to the outburst within the uncertainties of a couple of seconds. This behavior suggests that the observed variability is likely due to nonradial pulsations in the white dwarf star, whose core structure has not been significantly affected by the outburst. The enigmatic observations begin with an absence of pulsational variability during a multi-site campaign conducted in 2011 January-February without any evidence of a new outburst; the light curve is instead dominated by superhumps with periods in the range of 83-87 minutes. Ultraviolet Hubble Space Telescope time-series spectroscopy acquired in 2011 March reveals an effective temperature of 15,400 K, placing EQ Lyn within the broad instability strip of 10,500-16,000 K for accreting pulsators. The ultraviolet light curve with 90% flux from the white dwarf shows no evidence of any pulsations. Optical photometry acquired during 2011 and Spring 2012 continues to reflect the presence of superhumps and an absence of pulsations. Subsequent observations acquired in 2012 December and 2013 January finally indicate the disappearance of superhumps and the return of pulsational variability with similar periods as previous data. However, our most recent data from 2013 March to May reveal superhumps yet again with no sign of pulsations. We speculate that this enigmatic post-outburst behavior of the frequent disappearance of pulsational variability in EQ Lyn is caused either by heating the white dwarf beyond the instability strip due to an

  9. SHORT-PERIOD g-MODE PULSATIONS IN LOW-MASS WHITE DWARFS TRIGGERED BY H-SHELL BURNING

    SciTech Connect

    Córsico, A. H.; Althaus, L. G.

    2014-09-20

    The detection of pulsations in white dwarfs with low mass offers the possibility of probing their internal structures through asteroseismology and placing constraints on the binary evolutionary processes involved in their formation. In this Letter, we assess the impact of stable H burning on the pulsational stability properties of low-mass He-core white dwarf models resulting from binary star evolutionary calculations. We found that besides a dense spectrum of unstable radial modes and nonradial g and p modes driven by the κ mechanism due to the partial ionization of H in the stellar envelope, some unstable g modes with short pulsation periods are also powered by H burning via the ε mechanism of mode driving. This is the first time that ε destabilized modes are found in models representative of cool white dwarf stars. The short periods recently detected in the pulsating low-mass white dwarf SDSS J111215.82+111745.0 could constitute the first evidence of the existence of stable H burning in these stars, in particular in the so-called extremely low-mass white dwarfs.

  10. Precise atmospheric parameters for the shortest-period binary white dwarfs: gravitational waves, metals, and pulsations

    SciTech Connect

    Gianninas, A.; Kilic, Mukremin; Dufour, P.; Bergeron, P.; Brown, Warren R.; Hermes, J. J.

    2014-10-10

    We present a detailed spectroscopic analysis of 61 low-mass white dwarfs and provide precise atmospheric parameters, masses, and updated binary system parameters based on our new model atmosphere grids and the most recent evolutionary model calculations. For the first time, we measure systematic abundances of He, Ca, and Mg for metal-rich, extremely low mass white dwarfs and examine the distribution of these abundances as a function of effective temperature and mass. Based on our preliminary results, we discuss the possibility that shell flashes may be responsible for the presence of the observed He and metals. We compare stellar radii derived from our spectroscopic analysis to model-independent measurements and find good agreement except for white dwarfs with T {sub eff} ≲ 10,000 K. We also calculate the expected gravitational wave strain for each system and discuss their significance to the eLISA space-borne gravitational wave observatory. Finally, we provide an update on the instability strip of extremely low mass white dwarf pulsators.

  11. Pulsating low-mass white dwarfs in the frame of new evolutionary sequences. III. The pre-ELM white dwarf instability strip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Córsico, A. H.; Althaus, L. G.; Serenelli, A. M.; Kepler, S. O.; Jeffery, C. S.; Corti, M. A.

    2016-04-01

    Context. Many low-mass (M⋆/M⊙ ≲ 0.45) and extremely low-mass (ELM, M⋆/M⊙ ≲ 0.18-0.20) white-dwarf stars are currently being found in the field of the Milky Way. Some of these stars exhibit long-period gravity-mode (g-mode) pulsations, and constitute the class of pulsating white dwarfs called ELMV stars. In addition, two low-mass pre-white dwarfs, which could be precursors of ELM white dwarfs, have been observed to show multiperiodic photometric variations. They could constitute a new class of pulsating low-mass pre-white dwarf stars. Aims: Motivated by this finding, we present a detailed nonadiabatic pulsation study of such stars, employing full evolutionary sequences of low-mass He-core pre-white dwarf models. Methods: Our pulsation stability analysis is based on a set of low-mass He-core pre-white dwarf models with masses ranging from 0.1554 to 0.2724 M⊙, which were derived by computing the nonconservative evolution of a binary system consisting of an initially 1 M⊙ ZAMS star and a 1.4 M⊙ neutron star companion. We have considered models in which element diffusion is accounted for and also models in which it is neglected. Results: We confirm and explore in detail a new instability strip in the domain of low gravities and low effective temperatures of the Teff - log g diagram, where low-mass pre-white dwarfs are currently found. The destabilized modes are radial and nonradial p and g modes excited by the κ - γ mechanism acting mainly at the zone of the second partial ionization of He, with non-negligible contributions from the region of the first partial ionization of He and the partial ionization of H. The computations with element diffusion are unable to explain the pulsations observed in the two known pulsating pre-white dwarfs, suggesting that element diffusion might be inhibited at these stages of the pre-white dwarf evolution. Our nonadiabatic models without diffusion, on the other hand, naturally explain the existence and range of

  12. An independent constraint on the secular rate of variation of the gravitational constant from pulsating white dwarfs

    SciTech Connect

    Córsico, Alejandro H.; Althaus, Leandro G.

    2013-06-01

    A secular variation of the gravitational constant modifies the structure and evolutionary time scales of white dwarfs. Using an state-of-the-art stellar evolutionary code and an up-to-date pulsational code we compute the effects of a secularly varying G on the pulsational properties of variable white dwarfs. Comparing the the theoretical results obtained taking into account the effects of a running G with the observed periods and measured rates of change of the periods of two well studied pulsating white dwarfs, G117-B15A and R548, we place constraints on the rate of variation of Newton's constant. We derive an upper bound Ġ/G ∼ −1.8 × 10{sup −10} yr{sup −1} using the variable white dwarf G117-B15A, and Ġ/G ∼ −1.3 × 10{sup −10} yr{sup −1} using R548. Although these upper limits are currently less restrictive than those obtained using other techniques, they can be improved in a future measuring the rate of change of the period of massive white dwarfs.

  13. The Effect of 22NE Diffusion in the Evolution and Pulsational Properties of White Dwarfs with Solar Metallicity Progenitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camisassa, María E.; Althaus, Leandro G.; Córsico, Alejandro H.; Vinyoles, Núria; Serenelli, Aldo M.; Isern, Jordi; Miller Bertolami, Marcelo M.; García–Berro, Enrique

    2016-06-01

    Because of the large neutron excess of 22Ne, sedimentation of this isotope occurs rapidly in the interior of white dwarfs. This process releases an additional amount of energy, thus delaying the cooling times of the white dwarf. This influences the ages of different stellar populations derived using white dwarf cosmochronology. Furthermore, the overabundance of 22Ne in the inner regions of the star modifies the Brunt-Väisälä frequency, thus altering the pulsational properties of these stars. In this work we discuss the impact of 22Ne sedimentation in white dwarfs resulting from solar metallicity progenitors (Z = 0.02). We performed evolutionary calculations of white dwarfs with masses of 0.528, 0.576, 0.657, and 0.833 {M}⊙ derived from full evolutionary computations of their progenitor stars, starting at the zero-age main sequence all the way through the central hydrogen and helium burning, the thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch (AGB), and post-AGB phases. Our computations show that at low luminosities ({log}(L/{L}⊙ )≲ -4.25), 22Ne sedimentation delays the cooling of white dwarfs with solar metallicity progenitors by about 1 Gyr. Additionally, we studied the consequences of 22Ne sedimentation on the pulsational properties of ZZ Ceti white dwarfs. We find that 22Ne sedimentation induces differences in the periods of these stars larger than the present observational uncertainties, particularly in more massive white dwarfs.

  14. A First Look at the Nonadiabatic Properties of Pulsating Accreting White Dwarfs of the GW Lib Type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Grootel, V.; Fontaine, G.; Brassard, P.; Dupret, M.-A.

    2015-06-01

    We present results of a detailed stability survey of the pulsation properties of accreting white dwarfs of the GW Lib type. This is based on several state-of-the-art white dwarf evolutionary sequences with varying envelope compositions, from pure hydrogen to pure helium. Using the same tools as in Van Grootel et al. (2013), where we have presented the first consistent view of the ZZ Ceti instability strip, we have mapped the GW Lib instability strip over the effective temperature-surface gravity plane, and as a function of envelope composition. We find that the location of the GW Lib instability domain is a strong and continuous function of the assumed envelope composition. We can accomodate all of the known GW Lib pulsators in various strips according to their atmospheric compositions.

  15. Panel 1: A pulsating red giant star and a compact, hot white dwarf star orbit each other.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Panel 1: A pulsating red giant star and a compact, hot white dwarf star orbit each other. Panel 2: The red giant sheds much of its outer layers in a stellar wind. The white dwarf helps concentrate the wind along a thin equatorial plane. The white dwarf accretes some of this escaping gas forming a disk around the itself. Panel 3: When enough gas accumulates on the white dwarf's surface it explodes as a nova outburst. Most of the hot gas forms a pair of expanding bubbles above and below the equatorial disk. Panel 4: A few thousand years after the bubbles expand into space, the white dwarf goes through another nova outburst and makes another pair of bubbles, which form a distinctive hourglass shape.

  16. The discovery of non-radially pulsating white dwarfs in cataclysmic variables from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woudt, P. A.; Warner, B.; Pretorius, M. L.; Dale, D.

    2005-08-01

    The group of known non-radially pulsating white dwarfs in cataclysmic variables (CVs) has quintupled in the last year. These are all systems of low mass-transfer rate in which the central white dwarf is located in the ZZ Ceti instability strip (Teff ˜ 11,000 - 12,500 K). Due to the low mass-transfer rate, these systems are intrinsically faint and it is only due to surveys such as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) that this population of CV/ZZ hybrids is being uncovered in a systematic way. It is estimated that among the ˜ 400 CVs expected in the SDSS, about ˜ 32 systems will be CV/ZZ stars. Within such a sample undoubtedly some (low amplitude ZZ Ceti pulsators) will exist that are suitable for detailed analysis and identification of pulsation modes in order to study the influence of accretion on the internal structure of white dwarfs. Here we present results from our ongoing high-speed photometric survey (using the UCT CCD) of the newly identified SDSS CV/ZZ stars, including two CV/ZZ candidates.

  17. Statistical properties of quasi-periodic pulsations in white-light flares observed with Kepler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugh, C. E.; Armstrong, D. J.; Nakariakov, V. M.; Broomhall, A.-M.

    2016-07-01

    We embark on a study of quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) in the decay phase of white-light stellar flares observed by Kepler. Out of the 1439 flares on 216 different stars detected in the short-cadence data using an automated search, 56 flares are found to have pronounced QPP-like signatures in the light curve, of which 11 have stable decaying oscillations. No correlation is found between the QPP period and the stellar temperature, radius, rotation period and surface gravity, suggesting that the QPPs are independent of global stellar parameters. Hence they are likely to be the result of processes occurring in the local environment. There is also no significant correlation between the QPP period and flare energy, however there is evidence that the period scales with the QPP decay time for the Gaussian damping scenario, but not to a significant degree for the exponentially damped case. This same scaling has been observed for MHD oscillations on the Sun, suggesting that they could be the cause of the QPPs in those flares. Scaling laws of the flare energy are also investigated, supporting previous reports of a strong correlation between the flare energy and stellar temperature/radius. A negative correlation between the flare energy and stellar surface gravity is also found.

  18. FIRST UNAMBIGUOUS DETECTION OF THE RETURN OF PULSATIONS IN THE ACCRETING WHITE DWARF SDSS J074531.92+453829.6 AFTER AN OUTBURST

    SciTech Connect

    Mukadam, Anjum S.; Szkody, P.; Townsley, D. M.; Gaensicke, B. T.; Winget, D. E.; Hermes, J. J.; Howell, Steve B.; Teske, J.; Patterson, Joseph; Armstrong, Eve; Kemp, Jonathan

    2011-02-20

    The primary white dwarf of the cataclysmic variable SDSS J074531.92+453829.6 was discovered to exhibit non-radial pulsations in 2006 January. This accreting white dwarf underwent its first recorded dwarf nova outburst in 2006 October, during which its brightness increased by more than 5 mag. A Hubble Space Telescope (HST) ultraviolet spectrum, obtained one year after the outburst, revealed a white dwarf temperature of 16,500 K, hotter than all other known accreting white dwarf pulsators. This implies that the accreting primary white dwarf of SDSS J074531.92+453829.6 was heated to temperatures beyond the instability strip during the outburst. Optical observations acquired a year after the outburst did not reveal any evidence of pulsations, suggesting that the white dwarf had not cooled to quiescence by then. We recently acquired optical high-speed time-series photometry on this cataclysmic variable SDSS J074531.92+453829.6 more than three years after its outburst to find that pulsations have now returned to the primary white dwarf. Moreover, the observed pulsation periods agree with pre-outburst periods within the uncertainties of a few seconds. This discovery is significant because it indicates that the outburst did not affect the interior stellar structure, which governs the observed pulsation frequencies. It also suggests that the surface of the white dwarf has now cooled to quiescence. Using this discovery in addition to the prior HST temperature measurement of 16,500 K, we have been able to constrain the matter accreted during the 2006 outburst. This is the first time an accreting white dwarf was unambiguously observed to resume pulsating after an outburst.

  19. Metal Lines in DA White Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuckerman, B.; Koester, D.; Reid, I. N.; Hünsch, M.

    2003-10-01

    We report Keck telescope HIRES echelle observations of DA white dwarfs in a continuation of an extensive search for metals. These spectra are supplemented with new JHK magnitudes that are used to determine improved atmospheric parameters. Of the DA white dwarfs not in binary or common proper motion systems, about 25% show Ca II lines. For these, Ca abundances are determined from comparison with theoretical equivalent widths from model atmosphere calculations; in a few cases we also obtain Mg, Fe, Si, and Al abundances. If Ca is not observed, we generally determine very stringent upper limits. We compare the data to predictions of previously published models involving the accretion/diffusion of interstellar matter and of comets. The derived abundances are not obviously compatible with the predictions of either model, which up to now could only be tested with traces of metals in helium-rich white dwarfs. By modifying certain assumptions in the published interstellar accretion model we are able to match the distribution of the elements in the white dwarf atmospheres, but, even so, tests of other expectations from this scenario are less successful. Because comet accretion appears unlikely to be the primary cause of the DAZ phenomenon, the data suggest that no more than about 20% of F-type main-sequence stars are accompanied by Oort-like comet clouds. This represents the first observational estimate of this fraction. A plausible alternative to the accretion of cometary or interstellar matter is disruption and accretion of asteroidal material, a model first suggested in 1990 to explain excess near-infrared emission from the DAZ G29-38. An asteroidal debris model to account for the general DAZ phenomenon does not presently disagree with the HIRES data, but neither is there any compelling evidence in support of such a model. The HIRES data indicate that in close red dwarf/white dwarf binaries not known to be cataclysmic variables there is, nonetheless, significant mass

  20. Origin of the DA and non-DA white dwarf stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shipman, Harry L.

    1989-01-01

    Various proposals for the bifurcation of the white dwarf cooling sequence are reviewed. 'Primordial' theories, in which the basic bifurcation of the white dwarf sequence is rooted in events predating the white dwarf stage of stellar evolution, are discussed, along with the competing 'mixing' theories in which processes occurring during the white dwarf stage are responsible for the existence of DA or non-DA stars. A new proposal is suggested, representing a two-channel scenario. In the DA channel, some process reduces the hydrogen layer mass to the value of less than 10 to the -7th. The non-DA channel is similar to that in the primordial scenario. These considerations suggest that some mechanism operates in both channels to reduce the thickness of the outermost layer of the white dwarf. It is also noted that accretion from the interstellar medium has little to do with whether a particular white dwarf becomes a DA or a non-DA star.

  1. EVOLUTION OF THE SYMBIOTIC NOVA PU VUL-OUTBURSTING WHITE DWARF, NEBULAE, AND PULSATING RED GIANT COMPANION

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Mariko; Mikolajewska, Joanna; Hachisu, Izumi

    2012-05-01

    We present a composite light-curve model of the symbiotic nova PU Vul (Nova Vulpeculae 1979) that shows a long-lasting flat optical peak followed by a slow decline. Our model light curve consists of three components of emission, i.e., an outbursting white dwarf (WD), its M-giant companion, and the nebulae. The WD component dominates in the flat peak while the nebulae dominate after the photospheric temperature of the WD rises to log T (K) {approx}> 4.5, suggesting its WD origin. We analyze the 1980 and 1994 eclipses to be total eclipses of the WD occulted by the pulsating M-giant companion with two sources of the nebular emission; one is an unocculted nebula of the M-giant's cool-wind origin and the other is a partially occulted nebula associated to the WD. We confirmed our theoretical outburst model of PU Vul by new observational estimates, which spanned 32 yr, of the temperature and radius. Also our eclipse analysis confirmed that the WD photosphere decreased by two orders of magnitude between the 1980 and 1994 eclipses. We obtain the reddening E(B - V) {approx} 0.3 and distance to PU Vul d {approx} 4.7 kpc. We interpret the recent recovery of brightness in terms of eclipse of the hot nebula surrounding the WD, suggesting that hydrogen burning is ongoing. To detect supersoft X-rays, we recommend X-ray observations around 2014 June when absorption by neutral hydrogen is minimum.

  2. Pulsating Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catelan, M.; Smith, H. A.

    2015-03-01

    This book surveys our understanding of stars which change in brightness because they pulsate. Pulsating variable stars are keys to distance scales inside and beyond the Milky Way galaxy. They test our understanding not only of stellar pulsation theory but also of stellar structure and evolution theory. Moreover, pulsating stars are important probes of the formation and evolution of our own and neighboring galaxies. Our understanding of pulsating stars has greatly increased in recent years as large-scale surveys of pulsating stars in the Milky Way and other Local Group galaxies have provided a wealth of new observations and as space-based instruments have studied particular pulsating stars in unprecedented detail.

  3. A detection of the evolutionary time scale of the DA white dwarf G117 - B15A with the Whole Earth Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kepler, S. O.; Fontaine, G.; Bergeron, P.; Winget, D. E.; Nather, R. E.; Bradley, P. A.; Claver, C. F.; Grauer, A. D.; Vauclair, G.; Marar, T. M. K.

    1991-01-01

    The time rate of change for the main pulsation period of the 13,000 K DA white dwarf G117 - B15A has been detected using the Whole Earth Telescope (WET). The observed rate of period change, P(dot) = (12.0 + or - 3.5) x 10 to the -15th s/s, is somewhat larger than the published theoretical calculations of the rate of period change due to cooling, based on carbon core white dwarf models. Other effects that could contribute to the observed rate of period change are discussed.

  4. Electrodynamic pulsator

    SciTech Connect

    Myslinski, A.; Semeniuk, B.; Kasprzycka-Guttman, T. . Dept. of Chemistry)

    1993-11-01

    An electrodynamic pulsator, designed for the reciprocation of liquids in an pulsed extractor, is described. Application of the pulsator is illustrated by its performance in connection with a laboratory packed column used for extraction of citric acid from aqueous solutions by cyclohexanone. A schematic of the pulsator is shown. This pulsator was designed to avoid the indirect, stepwise, mechanical regulation systems used in pulsed extractors which employ an external device such as a piston pump.

  5. Amplitude and frequency variations of oscillation modes in the pulsating DB white dwarf star KIC 08626021. The likely signature of nonlinear resonant mode coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zong, W.; Charpinet, S.; Vauclair, G.; Giammichele, N.; Van Grootel, V.

    2016-01-01

    Context. The signatures of nonlinear effects affecting stellar oscillations are difficult to observe from ground observatories because of the lack of continuous high-precision photometric data spanning extended enough time baselines. The unprecedented photometric quality and coverage provided by the Kepler spacecraft offers new opportunities to search for these phenomena. Aims: We use the Kepler data accumulated on the pulsating DB white dwarf KIC 08626021 to explore in detail the stability of its oscillation modes, searching, in particular, for evidence of nonlinear behaviors. Methods: We analyze nearly two years of uninterrupted short-cadence data, concentrating on identified triplets that are caused by stellar rotation and that show intriguing behaviors during the course of the observations. Results: We find clear signatures of nonlinear effects that could be attributed to resonant mode coupling mechanisms. These couplings occur between the components of the triplets and can induce different types of behaviors. We first notice that a structure at 3681 μHz, identified as a triplet in previous published studies, is in fact forming a doublet, with the third component being an independent mode. We find that a triplet at 4310 μHz and this doublet at 3681 μHz (most likely the two visible components of an incomplete triplet) have clear periodic frequency and amplitude modulations, which are typical of the so-called intermediate regime of the resonance, with timescales consistent with theoretical expectations. Another triplet at 5073 μHz is likely in a narrow transitory regime in which the amplitudes are modulated while the frequencies are locked. Using nonadiabatic pulsation calculations, based on a model representative of KIC 08626021 to evaluate the linear growth rates of the modes in the triplets, we also provide quantitative information that could be useful for future comparisons with numerical solutions of the amplitude equations. Conclusions: The observed

  6. High Resolution EUV & FUV Spectroscopy of DA White Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barstow, M. A.; Good, S. A.; Bannister, N. P.; Burleigh, M. R.; Holberg, J. B.; Bruhweiler, F. C.; Napiwotzki, R.; Cruddace, R. G.; Kowalski, M. P.

    We report on recent results from a high-resolution spectroscopic survey of hot DA white dwarfs, based on IUE, FUSE and HST observations. For the first time, we address the measurement of element abundances in a completely objective manner with a spectroscopic model fitting technique, which allows us to consider formally the limits that can be placed on abundances in stars where no heavy elements are detected. We also include our latest analysis of the high resolution EUV spectrum of G191-B2B recorded by J-PEX.

  7. DA WHITE DWARFS OBSERVED IN THE LAMOST PILOT SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yueyang; Deng Licai; Liu Chao; Carrell, Kenneth; Yang Fan; Gao Shuang; Xu Yan; Li Jing; Zhang Haotong; Zhao Yongheng; Luo Ali; Bai Zhongrui; Yuan Hailong; Lepine, Sebastien; Newberg, Heidi Jo; Carlin, Jeffrey L.; Jin Ge

    2013-08-01

    A total of {approx}640, 000 objects from the LAMOST pilot survey have been publicly released. In this work, we present a catalog of DA white dwarfs (DAWDs) from the entire pilot survey. We outline a new algorithm for the selection of white dwarfs (WDs) by fitting Sersic profiles to the Balmer H{beta}, H{gamma}, and H{delta} lines of the spectra, and calculating the equivalent width of the Ca II K line. Two thousand nine hundred sixty-four candidates are selected by constraining the fitting parameters and the equivalent width of the Ca II K line. All the spectra of candidates are visually inspected. We identify 230 DAWDs (59 of which are already included in the Villanova and SDSS WD catalogs), 20 of which are DAWDs with non-degenerate companions. In addition, 128 candidates are classified as DAWDs/subdwarfs, which means the classifications are ambiguous. The result is consistent with the expected DAWD number estimated based on the LEGUE target selection algorithm.

  8. Near-UV absorption in very cool DA white dwarfs

    SciTech Connect

    Saumon, D.; Holberg, J. B.; Kowalski, P. M. E-mail: holberg@argus.lpl.arizona.edu

    2014-07-20

    The atmospheres of very cool, hydrogen-rich white dwarfs (WDs) (T{sub eff} < 6000 K) are challenging to model because of the increased complexity of the equation of state, chemical equilibrium, and opacity sources in a low-temperature, weakly ionized dense gas. In particular, many models that assume relatively simple models for the broadening of atomic levels and mostly ideal gas physics overestimate the flux in the blue part of their spectra. A solution to this problem that has met with some success is that additional opacity at short wavelengths comes for the extreme broadening of the Lyman α line of atomic H by collisions primarily with H{sub 2}. For the purpose of validating this model more rigorously, we acquired Hubble Space Telescope STIS spectra of eight very cool WDs (five DA and three DC stars). Combined with their known parallaxes, BVRIJHK, and Spitzer IRAC photometry, we analyze their entire spectral energy distribution (from 0.24 to 9.3 μm) with a large grid of model atmospheres and synthetic spectra. We find that the red wing of the Lyman α line reproduces the rapidly decreasing near-UV flux of these very cool stars very well. We determine better constrained values of T{sub eff} and gravity as well as upper limits to the helium abundance in their atmospheres.

  9. THE SPECTRAL EVOLUTION OF CONVECTIVE MIXING WHITE DWARFS, THE NON-DA GAP, AND WHITE DWARF COSMOCHRONOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Eugene Y.; Hansen, Brad M. S. E-mail: hansen@astro.ucla.edu

    2012-07-01

    The spectral distribution of field white dwarfs shows a feature called the 'non-DA gap'. As defined by Bergeron et al., this is a temperature range (5100-6100 K) where relatively few non-DA stars are found, even though such stars are abundant on either side of the gap. It is usually viewed as an indication that a significant fraction of white dwarfs switch their atmospheric compositions back and forth between hydrogen-rich and helium-rich as they cool. In this Letter, we present a Monte Carlo model of the Galactic disk white dwarf population, based on the spectral evolution model of Chen and Hansen. We find that the non-DA gap emerges naturally, even though our model only allows white dwarf atmospheres to evolve monotonically from hydrogen-rich to helium-rich through convective mixing. We conclude by discussing the effects of convective mixing on the white dwarf luminosity function and the use thereof for Cosmochronology.

  10. Detection of trace helium in G104 - 27, a 26,000 K DA white dwarf

    SciTech Connect

    Holberg, J.B.; Kidder, K.M.; Wesemael, F. Montreal Universite, Montreal )

    1990-12-01

    The detection of the He I 4471 A feature in the moderately hot DA white dwarf G104 - 27 places this star within the rather sparse class of DAB white dwarfs. It does not appear possible, on the basis of the present data, to distinguish between a stratified and a homogeneously mixed atmosphere. While a stratified structure would be natural for a DA white dwarf, G104 - 27 resides near the red edge of the DB gap, in a region where DA stars could transform into DB stars through convective mixing in the underlying He envelope and thereby destroy envelope stratification. Both atmospheres are consistent with the existing soft X-ray flux limit for this star. 37 refs.

  11. Detection of trace helium in G104 - 27, a 26,000 K DA white dwarf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holberg, J. B.; Kidder, K. M.; Wesemael, F.

    1990-01-01

    The detection of the He I 4471 A feature in the moderately hot DA white dwarf G104 - 27 places this star within the rather sparse class of DAB white dwarfs. It does not appear possible, on the basis of the present data, to distinguish between a stratified and a homogeneously mixed atmosphere. While a stratified structure would be natural for a DA white dwarf, G104 - 27 resides near the red edge of the DB gap, in a region where DA stars could transform into DB stars through convective mixing in the underlying He envelope and thereby destroy envelope stratification. Both atmospheres are consistent with the existing soft X-ray flux limit for this star.

  12. On the interpretation of the Exosat photometry of two hot DA white dwarfs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vennes, Stephane; Shipman, Harry L.; Petre, Robert

    1990-01-01

    Exosat photometric observations of the hot DA white dwarfs GD 2 and EG 70 are presented and analyzed using model atmosphere and synthetic spectrum calculations. The numerical accuracy of the calculations and their impact on the reliability of the results are addressed. The optimum atmospheric parameters that explain the complete spectral coverage are derived. The consequences of these conjectures for the spectral evolution theory of white dwarf stars are considered.

  13. The binary Feige 24 - The mass, radius, and gravitational redshift of the DA white dwarf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vennes, Stephane; Shipman, Harry L.; Thorstensen, John R.; Thejll, Peter

    1991-01-01

    Observations are reported which refine the binary ephemeris of the Feige 24 system, which contains a peculiar hot DA white dwarf and an M dwarf with an atmosphere illuminated by extreme ultraviolet radiation from the white dwarf. With the new ephemeris and a set of IUE high-dispersion spectra, showing phase-dependent redshifted C IV, N V, and Si IV resonance lines, the orbital velocity, and hence the mass (0.54 + or - 0.20 solar masses), and the gravitational redshift of the white dwarf (14.1 + or - 5.2 km/s) are determined independently. It is shown that the measured Einstein redshift is consistent with an estimated radius for the white dwarf obtained from a model atmosphere solid angle and a parallax measurement. This radius is twice the Hamada-Salpeter radius for the given mass and offers a prospect to investigate the presence of a massive hydrogen envelope in that white dwarf star.

  14. Two new color-selected magnetic DA white dwarfs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebert, J.; Schmidt, G. D.; Sion, E. M.; Starrfield, S. G.; Green, R. F.; Boroson, T. A.

    1985-01-01

    The discovery of two magnetic white dwarfs culled from blue star surveys is reported. The surveys were carried out with the Mount Lemnon 1.5-meter reflecting telescope attached to a two-holer polarimeter/photometer. Spectral observations of the objects, (PG 1533 - 057, and K813 - 14), indicate the presence of hydrogen and Zeeman components. On the basis of dipolar field simulations, it is shown that PG 1533 - 057 has a polar field strength of 31 megagauss (MG) while K813 - 14 has a polar field strength of 29 MG. A third known white dwarf has a polar field strength of 18 MG. All the dwarfs had temperatures in the 11,000-20,000 K range. The possibility that a significant fraction of isolated magnetic degenerate stars could be the progeny of magnetic accreting binary systems is considered.

  15. Iron abundance in the hot DA white dwarfs Feige 24 and G191 B2B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vennes, Stephane; Chayer, Pierre; Thorstensen, John R.; Bowyer, Stuart; Shipman, Harry L.

    1992-01-01

    Attention is given to model calculations of the far- and extreme-UV line spectra of highly ionized Fe species (Fe IV, Fe V, and Fe VI) for hot high-gravity H-rich stars. A spectral analysis of 31 hr of exposure of the DA white dwarf Feige 24 with IUE in the echelle mode reveals the presence of Fe with an abundance relative to H by number of (5-10) x 10 exp -6 with an uncertainty dominated by the determination of stellar parameters. An analysis of IUE data from the white dwarf G191 B2B results in a similar Fe abundance if this star shares similar atmospheric parameters (Teff, g) with Feige 24. Fe is thus the second most abundant photospheric element in hot DA white dwarfs.

  16. The coolest DA white dwarfs detected at soft X-ray wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kidder, K. M.; Holberg, J. B.; Barstow, M. A.; Tweedy, R. W.; Wesemael, F.

    1992-01-01

    New soft X-ray/EUV photometric observations of the DA white dwarfs KPD 0631 + 1043 = WD 0631 + 107 and PG 1113 + 413 = WD 1113 + 413 are analyzed. Previously reported soft X-ray detections of three other DAs and the failure to detect a fourth DA in deep Exosat observations are investigated. New ground-based spectra are presented for all of the objects, with IUE Ly-alpha spectra for some. These data are used to constrain the effective temperatures and surface gravities. The improved estimates of these parameters are employed to refer a photospheric He abundance for the hotter objects and to elucidate an effective observational low-temperature threshold for the detection of pure hydrogen DA white dwarfs at soft X-ray wavelengths.

  17. THE KEPLER LIGHT CURVE OF THE UNIQUE DA WHITE DWARF BOKS 53856

    SciTech Connect

    Holberg, J. B.; Howell, Steve B. E-mail: howell@noao.edu

    2011-08-15

    The faint (g = 16.9) hot white dwarf BOKS 53856 was observed by the Kepler Mission in short cadence mode during mid-2009. Analysis of these observations reveals a highly stable modulation with a period of 6.1375 hr and a 2.46% half-amplitude. The folded light curve has an unusual shape that is difficult to explain in terms of a binary system containing an unseen companion more luminous than an L0 brown dwarf. Optical spectra of BOKS 53856 show a T{sub eff} = 34,000 K, log g = 8.0 DA white dwarf. There are few, if any, known white dwarfs in this temperature range exhibiting photometric variations similar to those we describe. A magnetic spin-modulated white dwarf model can in principle explain the light curve, an interpretation supported by spectral observations of the H{alpha} line showing evidence of Zeeman splitting.

  18. Asteroseismology of White Dwarf Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Carl J.

    1997-01-01

    The primary purpose of this investigation has been to study various aspects of multimode pulsations in variable white dwarfs. In particular, nonlinear interactions among pulsation modes in white dwarfs (and, to some extent, in other variable stars), analysis of recent observations where such interactions are important, and preliminary work on the effects of crystallization in cool white dwarfs are reported.

  19. Spectroscopy of the DA white dwarfs - Automatic atmospheric parameterization and mass distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmahan, Robert K.

    1989-01-01

    A method for the automatic calculation of the atmospheric parameters (Teff and log g) of hydrogen-rich degenerate stars from low-resolution spectra is described, and then applied to the spectra of 53 DA white dwarfs. A value for the width of the DA mass distribution of sigma M/solar-M not greater than +0.10 is obtained using the proposed approach. The data indicate that the distribution is asymmetrically skewed to low masses; however, there is also evidence of a high-mass non-Gaussian tail.

  20. Radial pulsation stability as a function of hydrogen abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffery, Simon; Saio, Hideyuki

    2015-08-01

    Following the discovery of pulsation in an extremely low-mass pre-white dwarf by Maxted et al. (2011, 2013), Jeffery & Saio (2013) showed that pulsations in such stars would be excited in high radial overtones provided that the driving zone was sufficiently depleted in hydrogen. Following previous work which shows that pulsations are more easily excited in stars where the damping effects of hydrogen are somehow reduced (Jeffery & Saio 2006), we have completed a survey of radial pulsation stability across a substantially larger parameter space. The object is to identify new regions of the HR diagram where stars should be unstable to radial pulsations, or where closely related p-modes might be excited. These would enable targeted surveys for new classes of pulsating variable. This poster reports the survey results and the identification of new instability regions.

  1. Toward a Network of Faint DA White Dwarfs as High-precision Spectrophotometric Standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayan, G.; Axelrod, T.; Holberg, J. B.; Matheson, T.; Saha, A.; Olszewski, E.; Claver, J.; Stubbs, C. W.; Bohlin, R. C.; Deustua, S.; Rest, A.

    2016-05-01

    We present the initial results from a program aimed at establishing a network of hot DA white dwarfs to serve as spectrophotometric standards for present and future wide-field surveys. These stars span the equatorial zone and are faint enough to be conveniently observed throughout the year with large-aperture telescopes. The spectra of these white dwarfs are analyzed in order to generate a non-local-thermodynamic-equilibrium model atmosphere normalized to Hubble Space Telescope colors, including adjustments for wavelength-dependent interstellar extinction. Once established, this standard star network will serve ground-based observatories in both hemispheres as well as space-based instrumentation from the UV to the near IR. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this concept and show how two different approaches to the problem using somewhat different assumptions produce equivalent results. We discuss the lessons learned and the resulting corrective actions applied to our program.

  2. Wave energy in white dwarf atmospheres. I - Magnetohydrodynamic energy spectra for homogeneous DB and layered DA stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musielak, Zdzislaw E.

    1987-01-01

    The radiative damping of acoustic and MHD waves that propagate through white dwarf photospheric layers is studied, and other damping processes that may be important for the propagation of the MHD waves are calculated. The amount of energy remaining after the damping processes have occurred in different types of waves is estimated. The results show that lower acoustic fluxes should be expected in layered DA and homogeneous DB white dwarfs than had previously been estimated. Acoustic emission manifests itself in an enhancement of the quadrupole term, but this term may become comparable to or even lower than the dipole term for cool white dwarfs. Energy carried by the acoustic waves is significantly dissipated in deep photospheric layers, mainly because of radiative damping. Acoustically heated corona cannot exist around DA and DB white dwarfs in a range T(eff) = 10,000-30,000 K and for log g = 7 and 8. However, relatively hot and massive white dwarfs could be exceptions.

  3. Is the DA white dwarf 1910 + 047 a soft X-ray source?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vennes, Stephane

    1990-01-01

    The possibility that the recently discovered DA white dwarf WD 1910 + 047 might be an Einstein soft X-ray source is studied, applying a complete model atmosphere analyis to both the optical and the soft X-ray data. It is found that the X-ray source in question is at least one order of magnitude too strong to be compatible with the estimated atmospheric parameters of the possible optical counterpart. The spatial coincidence between the two, however, remains extremely intriguing and has left us with the dilemma of accepting the relatively improbable coincidence of two unrelated objects or rejoicing over the discovery of a highly unusual one.

  4. The discontinuity near 1600 A in the spectra of DA white dwarfs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wegner, G.

    1984-01-01

    Ultraviolet spectroscopic observations of two relatively cool DA white dwarfs, L481 - 60 (= WD 1544 - 37) and BPM 1266 ( = WD 2105 - 82), with the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) satellite show a strong drop in their spectral energy distributions below 1600 A. Published model atmospheres and thier visual spectra suggest that these two stars have effective temperatures in the vicinity of 9,000-10,000 K, and it is proposed that the 1600 A feature could be due to the 342(1S) 3s2(1S) photoionization edge of Mg I.

  5. Return of Pulsations in SDSS 0745+4538

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukadam, Anjum S.; Townsley, D. M.; Szkody, P.; Gänsicke, B. T.; Winget, D. E.; Hermes, J. J.; Howell, Steve B.; Teske, J.; Patterson, Joseph; Kemp, Jonathan; Armstrong, Eve

    2010-11-01

    Nonradial pulsations had ceased in the accreting white dwarf SDSS J074531.92+453829.6 subsequent to its October 2006 outburst. We recently acquired optical high-speed time-series photometry on this cataclysmic variable more than three years after its outburst to find that pulsations have now returned to the primary white dwarf. Moreover, the observed pulsation periods agree with pre-outburst periods within the uncertainties of 1-2 s. This discovery is both remarkable and significant because it indicates that the outburst did not affect the interior stellar structure, which dictates the observed pulsation frequencies. Using this discovery in addition to an HST ultra-violet temperature measurement obtained one year after outburst, we have also been able to constrain the matter accreted during the 2006 outburst.

  6. Evidence for an external origin of heavy elements in hot DA white dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barstow, M. A.; Barstow, J. K.; Casewell, S. L.; Holberg, J. B.; Hubeny, I.

    2014-05-01

    We present a series of systematic abundance measurements for 89 hydrogen atmosphere (DA-type) white dwarfs with temperatures spanning 16 000-77 000 K drawn from the FUSE spectral archive. This is the largest study to date of white dwarfs where radiative forces are significant, exceeding our earlier work, based mainly on International Ultraviolet Explorer and Hubble Space Telescope data, by a factor 3. Using heavy element blanketed non-local thermodynamic equilibrium stellar atmosphere calculations, we have addressed the heavy element abundance patterns making completely objective measurements of abundance values and their error ranges using a χ2 fitting technique. We are able to establish the broad range of abundances seen in a given temperature range and establish the incidence of stars which appear, in the optical, to be atmospherically devoid of any material other than H. We compare the observed abundances to predictions of radiative levitation calculations, revealing little agreement. We propose that the supply of heavy elements is accreted from external sources rather than being intrinsic to the star. These elements are then retained in the white dwarf atmospheres by radiative levitation, a model that can explain both the diversity of measured abundances for stars of similar temperature and gravity, including cases with apparently pure H envelopes, and the presence of photospheric metals at temperatures where radiative levitation is no longer effective.

  7. Characteristics of Pulsating Aurora

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humberset, B. K.; Gjerloev, J. W.; Mann, I. R.; Samara, M.; Michell, R.

    2013-12-01

    We have investigated the spatiotemporal characteristics of pulsating auroral patches observed with an all-sky imager located at Poker Flat, Alaska. Pulsating aurora often covers the entire sky with intermixed large and small-scale patches that vary in intensity or disappear and reappear on different time scales and timings. The broad definition of pulsating aurora covers patches and bands from tens to several tens of km which have a quasi-periodic temporal variation from 1 s to tens of seconds. In this paper we examine >15 patches from different events. We analyze all-sky movies (557.7 nm, 3.31 Hz) with a simple, yet robust, technique that allows us to determine the scale size dependent variability of the >15 individual patches. A spatial 2D Fourier Transform is used to separate the aurora into different horizontal scale sizes, and by correlating each patch for all image separations and available scale sizes smaller than the patch itself, we reveal what scale sizes are pulsating and their variability. The patches are found to be persistent, meaning that we can follow them for typically 5 minutes. The period of the pulsations is often remarkably variable and it seems that only certain scale sizes pulsate (typically the size of the patch). The patches drift with the background ExB plasma drift indicating that the magnetospheric source mechanism drifts with the field lines.

  8. L151-81A/B - A unique white dwarf binary with DB and DA components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oswalt, Terry D.; Hintzen, Paul M.; Liebert, James W.; Sion, Edward M.

    1988-01-01

    Spectroscopic observations of the wide binary L151-81A/B reveal that both components are white dwarfs with spectral types DB3 and DA4, the first such binary identified in a comprehensive survey of Luyten and Giclas common proper motion pairs. Assuming log g = 8, measurements of the helium line profiles in the DB primary yield Teff = 16,000 + or - 2,000, while the hydrogen profiles for the DA companion yield Teff =12,000 + or - 2,000. The existence of a helium-rich/hydrogen-rich degenerate pair offers several interesting tests of theoretical white dwarf formation channels and surface abundance evolution.

  9. DA white dwarf effective temperatures determined from IUE Lyman-alpha profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holberg, J. B.; Basile, J.; Wesemael, F.

    1986-01-01

    The Lyman-alpha profiles of 12 DA white dwarfs have been obtained with the International Ultraviolet Explorer Satellite. Analysis of these profiles provides an improved, uniform, and relatively bias-free measure of effective temperature for these stars over the range 20,000-60,000 K. Simultaneous estimates of surface gravity yield a mean gravity of log g = 7.96 for the entire sample, with the hottest stars tending to have the lowest gravities. A significant exception to this trend occurs in the case of the gravitation of HZ 43. An important by-product of this work has been the determination of a correction to IUE fluxes over the 1150-1350 A range.

  10. Formation and Asteroseismology of Extremely Low-mass White Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Meng; Arras, Phil

    2016-01-01

    A handful of extremely low-mass white dwarfs (ELM WD, M<0.2M⊙) have been discovered recently to exhibit g-mode pulsations, extending the classic DA instability strip to much smaller mass. One particular ELM WD (SDSS J111215.82+111745.0) has been observed to pulsate at periods so short that the pulsations may be p-modes, making this star unique among all WD pulsators. Since the ELM WDs are thought to be formed only through binary, and not single star evolution, the observed periods give the opportunity to constrain the interiors of these post-common-envelope or post-Roche-lobe-overflow WD through asteroseismology. I will discuss our recent efforts to construct models of these these ELM WD pulsators using the MESA stellar evolution code to carry out binary evolution. The relative size of the solar-composition envelope to helium core is expected to vary significantly with stellar mass and orbital period. This variation in structure is reflected in the oscillation mode periods for the models. Lastly, I will discuss constraints on the interior structure of J1112 from seismology.

  11. High-resolution UVES/VLT spectra of white dwarfs observed for the ESO SN Ia Progenitor Survey. III. DA white dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koester, D.; Voss, B.; Napiwotzki, R.; Christlieb, N.; Homeier, D.; Lisker, T.; Reimers, D.; Heber, U.

    2009-10-01

    Context: The ESO Supernova Ia Progenitor Survey (SPY) took high-resolution spectra of more than 1000 white dwarfs and pre-white dwarfs. About two thirds of the stars observed are hydrogen-dominated DA white dwarfs. Here we present a catalog and detailed spectroscopic analysis of the DA stars in the SPY. Aims: Atmospheric parameters effective temperature and surface gravity are determined for normal DAs. Double-degenerate binaries, DAs with magnetic fields or dM companions, are classified and discussed. Methods: The spectra are compared with theoretical model atmospheres using a χ2 fitting technique. Results: Our final sample contains 615 DAs, which show only hydrogen features in their spectra, although some are double-degenerate binaries. 187 are new detections or classifications. We also find 10 magnetic DAs (4 new) and 46 DA+dM pairs (10 new). Based on data obtained at the Paranal Observatory of the European Southern Observatory for programmes 165.H-0588 and 167.D-0407.

  12. Why DA and DB white dwarfs do not show coronal activity and p-mode oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Musielak, Z.E.; Fontenla, J.M. )

    1989-11-01

    The problems of nonradiative heating of outer atmospheric layers and p-mode oscillations in white dwarfs caused by acoustic waves generated in convective zones are discussed. These effects have been studied by calculating the cutoff periods for adiabatic and isothermal waves propagating in atmospheres of DA and DB stars with Teff greater than or equal 20,000 K and log g = 6-9. The obtained cutoff periods are approximately bounded by 0.01 and 40 sec for high- and low-gravity white dwarfs, respectively. Expected amplitudes of p-mode oscillations corresponding to trapped acoustic waves with small angular wave numbers are estimated, indicating that the amplitudes could be observed as Doppler shifts of spectral lines which might be detectable if adequate spectral resolution were available. The luminosity variations corresponding to these amplitudes are unlikely to be observable when all damping processes are accounted for. Results also indicate that the present theory of convection predicts some irregularities in the behavior of physical parameters. 34 refs.

  13. Why DA and DB white dwarfs do not show coronal activity and p-mode oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musielak, Z. E.; Fontenla, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    The problems of nonradiative heating of outer atmospheric layers and p-mode oscillations in white dwarfs caused by acoustic waves generated in convective zones are discussed. These effects have been studied by calculating the cutoff periods for adiabatic and isothermal waves propagating in atmospheres of DA and DB stars with Teff greater than or equal 20,000 K and log g = 6-9. The obtained cutoff periods are approximately bounded by 0.01 and 40 sec for high- and low-gravity white dwarfs, respectively. Expected amplitudes of p-mode oscillations corresponding to trapped acoustic waves with small angular wave numbers are estimated, indicating that the amplitudes could be observed as Doppler shifts of spectral lines which might be detectable if adequate spectral resolution were available. The luminosity variations corresponding to these amplitudes are unlikely to be observable when all damping processes are accounted for. Results also indicate that the present theory of convection predicts some irregularities in the behavior of physical parameters.

  14. Le couplage pulsation-convection.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poyet, J.-P.

    Contents: Quelques problèmes Boussinesq bien definis. Les théories de couplage pulsation radiale-convection. Quelques pas dans le domaine du couplage des pulsations non radiales avec la convection. Conclusion.

  15. Stellar Pulsation: an Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtz, D. W.

    2006-04-01

    Twenty-five hundred years ago the Pythagorean Brotherhood invented the idea of the Music of the Spheres. That idea languished in scientific thought from the time of Kepler 400 years ago, until the 1970s when real sounds were found and recognised in the sun and stars. Stars pulsate both with sound waves in pressure modes and in gravity modes with buoyancy as the restoring force. Those pulsations allow us literally to see inside the stars to know their interiors. Oscillations in 1-D and 2-D are introduced here, leading to 3-D descriptions of the changing shapes of pulsating star. Some properties of pressure modes and gravity modes are explained, and a simple explanation of asteroseismology is given. Some selected cases illustrate amazing discoveries from our new ability to see inside the stars.

  16. Stellar pulsation: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtz, D. W.

    2006-01-01

    Twenty-five hundred years ago the Pythagorean Brotherhood invented the idea of the Music of the Spheres. That idea languished in scientific thought from the time of Kepler 400 years ago, until the 1970s when real sounds were found and recognised in the sun and stars. Stars pulsate both with sound waves in pressure modes and in gravity modes with buoyancy as the restoring force. Those pulsations allow us literally to see inside the stars to know their interiors. Oscillations in 1-D and 2-D are introduced here, leading to 3-D descriptions of the changing shapes of pulsating star. Some properties of pressure modes and gravity modes are explained, and a simple explanation of asteroseismology is given. Some selected cases illustrate amazing discoveries from our new ability to see inside the stars.

  17. The circumstellar nature of the metallic features in a hot DA white dwarf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holberg, J. B.; Bruhweiler, F. C.; Andersen, J.

    1995-01-01

    A new co-added IUE echelle spectrum of the bright DA white dwarf CD -38 deg 10980, together with a newly determined radial velocity for this star, indicate that the sharp lined Si and C absorption features seen in the UV are clearly circumstellar in origin. Absorption in both excited and ground state transitions occurs at a velocity displaced by -12.1 +/- 2.0 km.s with respect to the photospheric velocity. Weak features due to the Si IV doublet are seen at a velocity intermediate between that of the circumstellar features and the photosphere. First time estimates of column densities for excited and ground states of C II, Si II, and Si III are derived. These quantities are used with electron density estimates derived from these species to determine the location and physical conditions of the circumstellar gas in the vicinity of CD -38 deg 10980. If collisional excitation alone is responsible for the excited levels of Si III observed in CD -38 deg 10980, then electron densities in the circumstellar gas must exceed 10(exp 9)/cu cm. Substantially lower electron densities are possible if the circumstellar gas is located near enough to the star so that photoexcitation is the dominant process responsible for the excited lines seen in the UV. Strong limits are placed on the photospheric abundance of Si and C in the star itself. These limits are in sharp contrast to the theoretical predictions of radiative levitation in which Si, but not C, is expected in the photosphere of a white dwarf such as CD -38 deg 10980. The interstellar line of sight to CD -38 deg 10980 is also investigated.

  18. Hot DA white dwarfs seen with Einstein, an ultrahot H- and He-poor white dwarf, and Zanstra temperatures of planetary nebula nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shipman, Harry L.

    1987-01-01

    Einstein observations of hot DA white dwarfs are analyzed using model atmospheres. It is found that, for a relatively limited sample of stars, that hot He-poor stars like HZ 43 are indeed the exception, and that there is an apparent correlation between He/H ratio and increasing temperature. The seventh brightest soft X-ray source in the HEAO-A1 catalog, H1504+65, turns out to be an ultrahot white dwarf star, with a temperature of approximately 160,000 K, showing spectral features of the Zanstra method for determining the temperatures of central stars of planetary nebulae demonstrates that the H I Zanstra temperatures are indeed reliable and suggests that a substantial fraction of these central stars have He/H ratios which are considerably less than the solar value.

  19. X-ray spectroscopy of hot white dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczak, Jens

    2010-10-01

    X-ray spectra of two hot white dwarfs observed by the Chandra satellite have been analyzed. The first is a white dwarf of spectral class DA with an almost pure hydrogen atmosphere. Contrary to that, the atmosphere of the second object, a PG 1159 star, is basically hydrogen free. The reason for the different composition can be found in the differing evolution of these objects. Some DA white dwarfs show much smaller metallicities than predicted by the mechanism of radiative levitation. Many spectral lines of the heavy elements that are the key to the explanation to the unusual metal poorness are located in the X-ray wavelength range. Some PG 1159 stars are non-radial g-mode pulsators. The pulsations depend amongst others on the abundances of the elements in the atmosphere, log g, and T eff. The soft X-ray range is particularly temperature sensitive and allows to constrain the temperature of a non-pulsating PG 1159 star with respect to its pulsating spectroscopic twin. Detailed analysis of X-ray spectra of single white dwarfs do not yet exist. The aim of this thesis was to analyze spectra of the DA white dwarfs LB 1919 and GD 246 in different wavelength ranges in order to find out if the metals in the atmospheres of these objects are homogeneously mixed or chemically stratified. This helps to identify or exclude possible unexpected mechanisms that might disturb the equilibrium between gravitational and radiative forces in the atmosphere. For LB 1919 an additional aim was to identify photospheric features of several elements and determine their abundances for the first time. It was further intended to determine the temperature of the non-pulsating PG 1159 star PG 1520+525 precisely. The spectra of LB 1919 and GD 246 ranging from X-ray to optical wavelengths were analyzed with advanced homogeneous and stratified Non-LTE model atmospheres. The Chandra spectrum of the PG 1159 star PG 1520+525 was analyzed with homogeneous Non-LTE model atmospheres only since no

  20. A Gravitational Redshift Determination of the Mean Mass of White Dwarfs. DA Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcon, Ross E.; Winget, D. E.; Montgomery, M. H.; Williams, Kurtis A.

    2010-03-01

    We measure apparent velocities (v app) of the Hα and Hβ Balmer line cores for 449 non-binary thin disk normal DA white dwarfs (WDs) using optical spectra taken for the European Southern Observatory SN Ia progenitor survey (SPY). Assuming these WDs are nearby and comoving, we correct our velocities to the local standard of rest so that the remaining stellar motions are random. By averaging over the sample, we are left with the mean gravitational redshift, [vg]: we find [vg] = [vapp] = 32.57 ± 1.17 km s-1. Using the mass-radius relation from evolutionary models, this translates to a mean mass of 0.647+0.013 -0.014 Msun. We interpret this as the mean mass for all DAs. Our results are in agreement with previous gravitational redshift studies but are significantly higher than all previous spectroscopic determinations except the recent findings of Tremblay & Bergeron. Since the gravitational redshift method is independent of surface gravity from atmosphere models, we investigate the mean mass of DAs with spectroscopic T eff both above and below 12,000 K fits to line profiles give a rapid increase in the mean mass with decreasing Teff. Our results are consistent with no significant change in mean mass: [M]hot = 0.640 ± 0.014 M⊙ and [M]cool = 0.686+0.035 -0.039 M⊙.

  1. Leonardo da Vinci's drapery studies: characterization of lead white pigments by µ-XRD and 2D scanning XRF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Victor; Calligaro, Thomas; Pichon, Laurent; Wallez, Gilles; Mottin, Bruno

    2015-11-01

    This work focuses on the composition and microstructure of the lead white pigment employed in a set of paintworks, using a combination of µ-XRD and 2D scanning XRF, directly applied on five drapery studies attributed to Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519) and conserved in the Département des Arts Graphiques, Musée du Louvre and in the Musée des Beaux- Arts de Rennes. Trace elements present in the composition as well as in the lead white highlights were imaged by 2D scanning XRF. Mineral phases were determined in a fully noninvasive way using a special µ-XRD diffractometer. Phase proportions were estimated by Rietveld refinement. The analytical results obtained will contribute to differentiate lead white qualities and to highlight the artist's technique.

  2. A GRAVITATIONAL REDSHIFT DETERMINATION OF THE MEAN MASS OF WHITE DWARFS. DA STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Falcon, Ross E.; Winget, D. E.; Montgomery, M. H.; Williams, Kurtis A. E-mail: dew@astro.as.utexas.ed E-mail: kurtis@astro.as.utexas.ed

    2010-03-20

    We measure apparent velocities (v{sub app}) of the Halpha and Hbeta Balmer line cores for 449 non-binary thin disk normal DA white dwarfs (WDs) using optical spectra taken for the European Southern Observatory SN Ia progenitor survey (SPY). Assuming these WDs are nearby and comoving, we correct our velocities to the local standard of rest so that the remaining stellar motions are random. By averaging over the sample, we are left with the mean gravitational redshift, (v{sub g}): we find (v{sub g}) = (v{sub app}) = 32.57 +- 1.17 km s{sup -1}. Using the mass-radius relation from evolutionary models, this translates to a mean mass of 0.647{sup +0.013}{sub -0.014} M{sub sun}. We interpret this as the mean mass for all DAs. Our results are in agreement with previous gravitational redshift studies but are significantly higher than all previous spectroscopic determinations except the recent findings of Tremblay and Bergeron. Since the gravitational redshift method is independent of surface gravity from atmosphere models, we investigate the mean mass of DAs with spectroscopic T{sub eff} both above and below 12,000 K; fits to line profiles give a rapid increase in the mean mass with decreasing T{sub eff}. Our results are consistent with no significant change in mean mass: (M){sup hot} = 0.640 +- 0.014 M{sub sun} and (M){sup cool} = 0.686{sup +0.035}{sub -0.039} M{sub sun}.

  3. Search for optical pulsations in PSR J0337+1715

    DOE PAGES

    Strader, M. J.; Archibald, A. M.; Meeker, S. R.; Szypryt, P.; Walter, A. B.; van Eyken, J. C.; Ulbricht, G.; Stoughton, C.; Bumble, B.; Kaplan, D. L.; et al

    2016-03-20

    In this study, we report on a search for optical pulsations from PSR J0337+1715 at its observed radio pulse period. PSR J0337+1715 is a millisecond pulsar (2.7 ms spin period) in a triple hierarchical system with two white dwarfs, and has a known optical counterpart with g-band magnitude 18. The observations were done with the Array Camera for Optical to Near-IR Spectrophotometry (ARCONS) at the 200" Hale telescope at Palomar Observatory. No significant pulsations were found in the range 4000-11000 angstroms, and we can limit pulsed emission in g-band to be fainter than 25 mag.

  4. Computational astrophysics: Pulsating stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, C. G.

    The field of computational astrophysics in pulsating star studies has grown considerably since the advent of the computer. Initially calculations were done on the IBM 704 with 32K of memory and now we use the CRAY YMP computers with considerably more memory. Our early studies were for models of pulsating stars using a 1D Lagrangian hydrodynamic code (SPEC) with radiation diffusion. The radiative transfer was treated in the equilibrium diffusion approximation and the hydrodynamics was done utilizing the approximation of artificial viscosity. The early calculations took many hours of 704 CPU time. Early in 1965 we decided to improve on the usual treatment of the radiative transfer used in our codes by utilizing the method of moments, the so-called variable Eddington approximation. In this approximation the material energy field is uncoupled from the radiation energy field and the angular dependence is introduced through the Eddington factor. A multigroup frequency dependent method may also be applied. The Eddington factor is determined by snapshots of the stars structure utilizing a y-line approximation. The full radiative transfer approximation appears necessary in order to understand the light curves for W Virginia stars and may be important for the light curves of RR Lyrae stars. A detailed radiative transfer method does not appear to be necessary for the understanding of Cepheid light curves. A recent improvement to our models for pulsating stars is in the use of an adaptive mesh scheme to resolve the sharp features in the nonlinear hydrodynamic structure. From these improved structures, better analysis of the radius, velocity, and light curves could be obtained.

  5. Nonperiodic eddy pulsations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rubin, David M.; McDonald, Richard R.

    1995-01-01

    Recirculating flow in lateral separation eddies is typically weaker than main stem flow and provides an effective environment for trapping sediment. Observations of recirculating flow and sedimentary structures demonstrate that eddies pulsate in size and in flow velocity even when main stem flow is steady. Time series measurements of flow velocity and location of the reattachment point indicate that these pulsations are nonperiodic. Nonperiodic flow in the lee of a channel margin constriction is grossly different from the periodic flow in the lee of a cylinder that is isolated in a flow. Our experiments demonstrate that placing a flow-parallel plate adjacent to a cylinder is sufficient to cause the leeside flow to change from a periodic sequence of vortices to a nonperiodically pulsating lateral separation eddy, even if flow conditions are otherwise unchanged. Two processes cause the leeside flow to become nonperiodic when the plate is added. First, vortices that are shed from the cylinder deform and become irregular as they impact the plate or interfere with remnants of other vortices near the reattachment point. Second, these deformed vortices and other flow structures are recirculated in the lateral separation eddy, thereby influencing the future state (pressure and momentum distribution) of the recirculating flow. The vortex deformation process was confirmed experimentally by documenting spatial differences in leeside flow; vortex shedding that is evident near the separation point is undetectable near the reattachment point. Nonlinear forecasting techniques were used in an attempt to distinguish among several possible kinds of nonperiodic flows. The computational techniques were unable to demonstrate that any of the nonperiodic flows result from low-dimensional nonlinear processes.

  6. OGLE and pulsating stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udalski, A.

    2016-05-01

    OGLE-IV is currently one of the largest sky variability surveys worldwide, focused on the densest stellar regions of the sky. The survey covers over 3000 square degrees and monitors regularly over a billion sources. The main targets include the inner Galactic bulge and the Magellanic System. Supplementary shallower Galaxy Variability Survey covers the extended Galactic bulge and 2/3 of the whole Galactic disk. The current status, prospects, and the latest results of the OGLE-IV survey focused on pulsating stars, in particular RR Lyrae variables, are presented.

  7. Pulsation driving and convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoci, Victoria

    2015-08-01

    Convection in stellar envelopes affects not only the stellar structure, but has a strong impact on different astrophysical processes, such as dynamo-generated magnetic fields, stellar activity and transport of angular momentum. Solar and stellar observations from ground and space have shown that the turbulent convective motion can also drive global oscillations in many type of stars, allowing to study stellar interiors at different evolutionary stages. In this talk I will concentrate on the influence of convection on the driving of stochastic and coherent pulsations across the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram and give an overview of recent studies.

  8. The Fraction of DA White Dwarfs with Kilo--Gauss Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, S.; Aznar Cuadrado, R.; Napiwotzki, R.; Schmid, H. M.; Solanki, S. K.

    2007-09-01

    Current estimates for white dwarfs with fields in excess of 1 MG are about 10%; according to our first high-precision circular-polarimetric study of 12 bright white dwarfs with the VLT tep{p26_Aznar-etal:04} this number increases up to about 25%\\ in the kG regime. With our new sample of ten white dwarf observations (plus one sdO star) we wanted to improve the sample statistics to determine the incident of kG magnetic fields in white dwarfs. In one of our objects (LTT 7987) we detected a statistically significant (97% confidence level) longitudinal magnetic field varying between (-1± 0.5) kG and (+1± 0.5) kG. This would be the weakest magnetic field ever found in a white dwarf, but at this level of accuracy, systematic errors cannot completely be ruled out. Together with previous investigations, the fraction of kG magnetic fields in white dwarfs amounts to about 11-15% , which is close to current estimates for highly magnetic white dwarfs (>1 MG).

  9. An investigation into pulsating aurora

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, John Denis

    2002-01-01

    On March 13, 1997 a sounding rocket equipped to study pulsating aurora was launched into the recovery phase of a small magnetic substorm. The launch originated from Poker Flat, Alaska and moved northward, reaching a apogee of 385 km and crossing field lines from L = 5.6 to L = 8. This sounding rocket was the first to have instruments designed to measure the upgoing and downgoing electron precipitation in the region over a pulsating auroral event. Nine pulsations were observed during the course of the 10 minute flight. This dissertation discusses the design, fabrication and calibration of the particle detection instruments, which include solid state telescopes (SST's) and an electrostatic analyzer (ESA). Observations led to an inferred parallel electric field above the rocket, the first time such a field had been associated with pulsating aurora. The data showed that there were no pulsations for electrons with energies less than 5 keV for pitch-angles between 22° and 90° but pulsations were seen for electrons from 5 keV down to 1 keV for field aligned precipitating electrons and for all upgoing electrons. Furthermore, the greatest change between background and pulsation occurred for electrons between 10 and 20 keV with pitch-angles between 50° and 90°. Observations also showed anomolous pitch-angle distributions, with larger than expected fluxes of high energy electrons leaving the ionosphere. Also missing from the data is evidence of either velocity dispersed arrival of electrons or 3 Hz oscillations. The data analysis of the measurements provided many new insights into pulsating aurora and has raised questions about the source of the pulsating mechanism and the mechanism itself. The data are compared to three current theoretical models and we find that they cannot adequately describe the observations. Other models are discussed and also discarded as being unable to explain all of the observations.

  10. Pulsating incinerator hearth

    SciTech Connect

    Basic, J.N. Sr.

    1984-10-09

    A pulsating hearth for an incinerator wherein the hearth is suspended on a fixed frame for movement in a limited short arc to urge random size particles burning in a pile on the hearth in a predetermined path intermittently across the surface of the heart. Movement is imparted to the hearth in periodic pulses preferably by inflating sets of air bags mounted on the frame, which stroke the hearth to move it a short distance from an initial position and jar it against the frame, thus impelling the burning particles a short distance by inertia and concurrently stoking the burning pile upon each stroke, and then returning the hearth to its initial position. The hearth may also have a plurality of nozzles connected to a source of air for delivering gently flowing air to the burning pile on the hearth.

  11. A determination of the space density and birth rate of hydrogen-line (DA) white dwarfs in the Galactic plane, based on the UVEX survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbeek, Kars; Groot, Paul J.; Nelemans, Gijs; Scaringi, Simone; Napiwotzki, Ralf; Drew, Janet E.; Steeghs, Danny; Casares, Jorge; Corral-Santana, Jesus M.; Gänsicke, Boris T.; González-Solares, Eduardo; Greimel, Robert; Heber, Ulrich; Irwin, Mike J.; Knigge, Christian; Wright, Nicholas J.; Zijlstra, Albert A.

    2013-10-01

    We present a determination of the average space density and birth rate of hydrogen-line (DA) white dwarfs within a radius of 1 kpc around the Sun, based on an observational sample of 360 candidate white dwarfs with g < 19.5 and (g - r) < 0.4, selected from the UV-Excess (UVEX) survey of the northern Galactic plane, in combination with a theoretical white dwarf population that has been constructed to simulate the observations, including the effects of reddening and observational selection effects. The main uncertainty in the derivation of the white dwarf space density and current birth rate lies in the absolute photometric calibration and the photometric scatter of the observational data, which influences the classification method on colours, the completeness and the pollution. Corrections for these effects are applied. We derive an average space density of DA white dwarfs with Teff > 10 000 K (MV < 12.2) of (3.8 ± 1.1) × 10-4 pc-3, and an average DA white dwarf birth rate over the last 7×107 yr of (5.4 ± 1.5) × 10-13 pc-3 yr-1. Additionally, we show that many estimates of the white dwarf space density from different studies are consistent with each other, and with our determination here.

  12. Ground Observations of ULF Pulsations During Pulsating Aurora

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H.; Lessard, M.; Jones, S.; Engebretson, M.

    2008-12-01

    The ROPA (Rocket Observations of Pulsating Aurora) sounding rocket was launched northward from Poker Flat, crossing the poleward boundary of a region of pulsating aurora. In association with ground support (incoherent scatter radar, ULF search-coil magnetometer, fluxgate magnetometer, and all sky imager), pulsating auroral signatures have been observed on the ground and in space. During or before the periods of pulsating aurora, the observations of ULF waves revealed two signatures. A narrow band signal, which exhibits an abrupt onset and a rising tone from 0.1 to 0.3 Hz over the course of an hour or two, precedes the pulsating aurora in 4 of 5 events studied but is not observed in the 5th event. Following the narrow band signature, or possibly beginning while the narrow band signal is still observed, broad band waves (characterized by noisy spectral structure) are observed that are strongly modulated (in all of the events) with a period on the order of 10 15 minutes. In this presentation, we discuss the nature of these waves such as polarization (predominantly right handed). Some of the events show double band spectral signatures where the upper ones rise and lower ones fall with periodic spectral signatures (4 - 5 min) and harmonic structures. It is also discussed how they are generated and what role they might play in pulsating aurora.

  13. Comparison of atmospheric parameters determined from spectroscopy and photometry for DA white dwarfs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Genest-Beaulieu, C.; Bergeron, P. E-mail: bergeron@astro.umontreal.ca

    2014-12-01

    We present a comparative analysis of atmospheric parameters obtained with the so-called photometric and spectroscopic techniques. Photometric and spectroscopic data for 1360 DA white dwarfs from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) are used, as well as spectroscopic data from the Villanova White Dwarf Catalog. We first test the calibration of the ugriz photometric system by using model atmosphere fits to observed data. Our photometric analysis indicates that the ugriz photometry appears well calibrated when the SDSS to AB{sub 95} zeropoint corrections are applied. The spectroscopic analysis of the same data set reveals that the so-called high-log g problem can be solved by applying published correction functions that take into account three-dimensional hydrodynamical effects. However, a comparison between the SDSS and the White Dwarf Catalog spectra also suggests that the SDSS spectra still suffer from a small calibration problem. We then compare the atmospheric parameters obtained from both fitting techniques and show that the photometric temperatures are systematically lower than those obtained from spectroscopic data. This systematic offset may be linked to the hydrogen line profiles used in the model atmospheres. We finally present the results of an analysis aimed at measuring surface gravities using photometric data only.

  14. Chandra grating spectroscopy of three hot white dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczak, J.; Werner, K.; Rauch, T.; Schuh, S.; Drake, J. J.; Kruk, J. W.

    2012-10-01

    Context. High-resolution soft X-ray spectroscopic observations of single hot white dwarfs are scarce. With the Chandra Low-Energy Transmission Grating, we have observed two white dwarfs, one is of spectral type DA (LB 1919) and the other is a non-DA of spectral type PG 1159 (PG 1520+525). The spectra of both stars are analyzed, together with an archival Chandra spectrum of another DA white dwarf (GD 246). Aims: The soft X-ray spectra of the two DA white dwarfs are investigated in order to study the effect of gravitational settling and radiative levitation of metals in their photospheres. LB 1919 is of interest because it has a significantly lower metallicity than DAs with otherwise similar atmospheric parameters. GD 246 is the only white dwarf known that shows identifiable individual iron lines in the soft X-ray range. For the PG 1159 star, a precise effective temperature determination is performed in order to confine the position of the blue edge of the GW Vir instability region in the HRD. Methods: The Chandra spectra are analyzed with chemically homogeneous as well as stratified NLTE model atmospheres that assume equilibrium between gravitational settling and radiative acceleration of chemical elements. Archival EUV and UV spectra obtained with EUVE, FUSE, and HST are utilized to support the analysis. Results: No metals could be identified in LB 1919. All observations are compatible with a pure hydrogen atmosphere. This is in stark contrast to the vast majority of hot DA white dwarfs that exhibit light and heavy metals and to the stratified models that predict significant metal abundances in the atmosphere. For GD 246 we find that neither stratified nor homogeneous models can fit the Chandra spectrum. The Chandra spectrum of PG 1520+525 constrains the effective temperature to Teff = 150 000 ± 10 000 K. Therefore, this nonpulsating star together with the pulsating prototype of the GW Vir class (PG 1159 - 035) defines the location of the blue edge of the GW Vir

  15. Chandra Grating Spectroscopy of Three Hot White Dwarfs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamczak, J.; Werner, K.; Rauch, T.; Schuh, S.; Drake, J. J.; Kruk, J. W.

    2013-01-01

    High-resolution soft X-ray spectroscopic observations of single hot white dwarfs are scarce. With the Chandra Low-Energy Transmission Grating, we have observed two white dwarfs, one is of spectral type DA (LB1919) and the other is a non-DA of spectral type PG1159 (PG1520+525). The spectra of both stars are analyzed, together with an archival Chandra spectrum of another DA white dwarf (GD246). Aims. The soft X-ray spectra of the two DA white dwarfs are investigated in order to study the effect of gravitational settling and radiative levitation of metals in their photospheres. LB1919 is of interest because it has a significantly lower metallicity than DAs with otherwise similar atmospheric parameters. GD246 is the only white dwarf known that shows identifiable individual iron lines in the soft X-ray range. For the PG1159 star, a precise effective temperature determination is performed in order to confine the position of the blue edge of the GW Vir instability region in the HRD. Methods. The Chandra spectra are analyzed with chemically homogeneous as well as stratified NLTE model atmospheres that assume equilibrium between gravitational settling and radiative acceleration of chemical elements. Archival EUV and UV spectra obtained with EUVE, FUSE, and HST are utilized to support the analysis. Results. No metals could be identified in LB1919. All observations are compatible with a pure hydrogen atmosphere. This is in stark contrast to the vast majority of hot DA white dwarfs that exhibit light and heavy metals and to the stratified models that predict significant metal abundances in the atmosphere. For GD246 we find that neither stratified nor homogeneous models can fit the Chandra spectrum. The Chandra spectrum of PG1520+525 constrains the effective temperature to T(sub eff) = 150 000 +/- 10 000 K. Therefore, this nonpulsating star together with the pulsating prototype of the GWVir class (PG1159-035) defines the location of the blue edge of the GWVir instability region

  16. On the Role of Resonances in Nonradial Pulsators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchler, J. R.; Goupil, M. J.; Hansen, C. J.

    1997-01-01

    Resonances or near resonances are ubiquitous among the excited nonradial pulsation modes of variable stars and they must play an important role in determining their pulsational behavior. Here in a first step at nonlinear asteroseismology, we explore some of the consequences of resonances by means of the amplitude equation formalism. We show how parity and angular momentum constraints can be used to eliminate many of the possible nonlinear resonant couplings between modes (and multiplets of modes), and how the amplitude equations can thus be simplified. Even when we may not be able, nor wish, to make an ab initio computation of the values of the coupling coefficients, it is still possible to obtain constraints on the nature of the excited modes if a resonance between observed frequencies can be identified. Resonances can cause nonlinear frequency locking of modes. This means that the observed frequencies appear in exact resonance even though the linear frequencies are only approximately in resonance. The nonlinear frequency lock, when it occurs, it does so over a range of departures from linear resonance, and it is accompanied by constant pulsation amplitudes. The locked, nonlinear frequencies can differ noticeably from their nonresonant counterparts which are usually used in seismology. This is particularly true for multiplets of modes split by rotation. Beyond the regime of the frequency lock, amplitude and frequency modulations can appear in the pulsations. Far from the resonance condition one recovers the regime of steady pulsations with nonresonant frequencies for which the seismological studies, as they are presently carried out, are justified (provided furthermore, of course, that nonlinear frequency shifts are negligible). Success in identifying a resonance in an observed power spectrum depends on the quality of the data. While keeping this limitation in mind, ew discuss the possible existence of peculiar resonances the pulsations specific variable white

  17. A Search for Metal Lines in the Spectra of DA White Dwarfs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wegner, G. A.

    1986-01-01

    A theoretical analysis was carried out in order to interpret the ultraviolet spectra of DB white dwarfs obtained earlier with the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) satellite. Here the results of the IUE ultraviolet spectroscopy combined with visual data and model atmospheres of DB white dwarfs are reported. In particular, a search for spectra lines due to the element carbon using the ultraviolet was made. In no case is there a positive detection of carbon and from these data, and upper limits for carbon by number relative to helium are derived in the range of C: He 10 to the minus 5 power to 10 to the minus 7 power for the 16 DB stars with ultraviolet spectra in the temperature range 11400 K T sub EFF less than 2300 K. The low carbon abundances found in the atmospheres of the DB stars agree well with the hypothesis that the atmospheric carbon observed in the cooler DQ members of the helium-rich white dwarf sequence is produced by a convective dredging mechanism.

  18. Pulsating Star Mystery Solved

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-11-01

    By discovering the first double star where a pulsating Cepheid variable and another star pass in front of one another, an international team of astronomers has solved a decades-old mystery. The rare alignment of the orbits of the two stars in the double star system has allowed a measurement of the Cepheid mass with unprecedented accuracy. Up to now astronomers had two incompatible theoretical predictions of Cepheid masses. The new result shows that the prediction from stellar pulsation theory is spot on, while the prediction from stellar evolution theory is at odds with the new observations. The new results, from a team led by Grzegorz Pietrzyński (Universidad de Concepción, Chile, Obserwatorium Astronomiczne Uniwersytetu Warszawskiego, Poland), appear in the 25 November 2010 edition of the journal Nature. Grzegorz Pietrzyński introduces this remarkable result: "By using the HARPS instrument on the 3.6-metre telescope at ESO's La Silla Observatory in Chile, along with other telescopes, we have measured the mass of a Cepheid with an accuracy far greater than any earlier estimates. This new result allows us to immediately see which of the two competing theories predicting the masses of Cepheids is correct." Classical Cepheid Variables, usually called just Cepheids, are unstable stars that are larger and much brighter than the Sun [1]. They expand and contract in a regular way, taking anything from a few days to months to complete the cycle. The time taken to brighten and grow fainter again is longer for stars that are more luminous and shorter for the dimmer ones. This remarkably precise relationship makes the study of Cepheids one of the most effective ways to measure the distances to nearby galaxies and from there to map out the scale of the whole Universe [2]. Unfortunately, despite their importance, Cepheids are not fully understood. Predictions of their masses derived from the theory of pulsating stars are 20-30% less than predictions from the theory of the

  19. High latitude pulsating aurorae revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Q.; Rosenberg, T.J. )

    1992-01-03

    Dayside auroral pulsations (10-40 s periods) have been studied for different levels of geomagnetic disturbance with N{sub 2}{sup +} 427.8 nm emission data obtained at South Pole station, Antarctica ({minus}74.2{degree} MLAT). The occurrence distribution exhibits a single peak at magnetic noon under geomagnetically quiet conditions (0 {le} Kp < 1). With increased Kp, the distribution shifts to earlier times, the peak occurring at 1000-1030 MLT for 1 {le} Kp < 4. At these higher Kp levels a secondary occurrence peak is evident in the afternoon sector between 1400 and 1600 MLT, occurring earlier as Kp increases. These results are compared with those obtained separately for pre-noon pulsations observed at Ny Alesund and post-noon pulsations observed at Ny Alesund and post-noon pulsations observed at Davis, northern and southern hemisphere sites at approximately the same magnetic latitude as South Pole. South Pole and Ny Alesund observe morning peaks at the same time and with a similar lack of Kp dependence; South Pole and Davis observe afternoon peaks with similar Kp dependence, though the peak occurs earlier at Davis. In contrast to the results from the earlier studies, the South Pole observations show larger pulsation amplitudes in the morning sector and significantly higher occurrence rates overall.

  20. [Bachelard and the mathematical pulsation].

    PubMed

    Guitart, René

    2015-01-01

    The working mathematician knows a specific gesture named « mathematical pulsation », a necessary creative moving in diagrams of thoughts and interpretations of mathematical writings. In this perspective the fact of being an object is definitely undecided, and related to the game of relations. The purpose of this paper today is to construct this pulsation, starting from the epistemology of Bachelard, concerning mathematics as well as mathematical physics. On the way, we recover links between ideas of Bachelard and more recent specific propositions by Gilles Ch-let, Charles Alunni, or René Guitart. Also are used authors like Jacques Lacan, Arthur Koestler, Alfred N. Whitehead, Charles S. Peirce. We conclude that the mathematical work consists with pulsative moving in the space of diagrams; we claim that this view is well compatible with the Bachelard's analysis of scientific knowledge: the intellectual or formal mathematical data preceeds the empirical objects, and in some sense these objects result from the pulsative gestures of the thinkers. So we finish with a categorical scheme of the pulsation.

  1. [Bachelard and the mathematical pulsation].

    PubMed

    Guitart, René

    2015-01-01

    The working mathematician knows a specific gesture named « mathematical pulsation », a necessary creative moving in diagrams of thoughts and interpretations of mathematical writings. In this perspective the fact of being an object is definitely undecided, and related to the game of relations. The purpose of this paper today is to construct this pulsation, starting from the epistemology of Bachelard, concerning mathematics as well as mathematical physics. On the way, we recover links between ideas of Bachelard and more recent specific propositions by Gilles Ch-let, Charles Alunni, or René Guitart. Also are used authors like Jacques Lacan, Arthur Koestler, Alfred N. Whitehead, Charles S. Peirce. We conclude that the mathematical work consists with pulsative moving in the space of diagrams; we claim that this view is well compatible with the Bachelard's analysis of scientific knowledge: the intellectual or formal mathematical data preceeds the empirical objects, and in some sense these objects result from the pulsative gestures of the thinkers. So we finish with a categorical scheme of the pulsation. PMID:26223414

  2. Discovery of X-ray pulsations from a massive star.

    PubMed

    Oskinova, Lidia M; Nazé, Yael; Todt, Helge; Huenemoerder, David P; Ignace, Richard; Hubrig, Swetlana; Hamann, Wolf-Rainer

    2014-01-01

    X-ray emission from stars much more massive than the Sun was discovered only 35 years ago. Such stars drive fast stellar winds where shocks can develop, and it is commonly assumed that the X-rays emerge from the shock-heated plasma. Many massive stars additionally pulsate. However, hitherto it was neither theoretically predicted nor observed that these pulsations would affect their X-ray emission. All X-ray pulsars known so far are associated with degenerate objects, either neutron stars or white dwarfs. Here we report the discovery of pulsating X-rays from a non-degenerate object, the massive B-type star ξ(1) CMa. This star is a variable of β Cep-type and has a strong magnetic field. Our observations with the X-ray Multi-Mirror (XMM-Newton) telescope reveal X-ray pulsations with the same period as the fundamental stellar oscillations. This discovery challenges our understanding of stellar winds from massive stars, their X-ray emission and their magnetism. PMID:24892504

  3. Discovery of X-ray pulsations from a massive star.

    PubMed

    Oskinova, Lidia M; Nazé, Yael; Todt, Helge; Huenemoerder, David P; Ignace, Richard; Hubrig, Swetlana; Hamann, Wolf-Rainer

    2014-06-03

    X-ray emission from stars much more massive than the Sun was discovered only 35 years ago. Such stars drive fast stellar winds where shocks can develop, and it is commonly assumed that the X-rays emerge from the shock-heated plasma. Many massive stars additionally pulsate. However, hitherto it was neither theoretically predicted nor observed that these pulsations would affect their X-ray emission. All X-ray pulsars known so far are associated with degenerate objects, either neutron stars or white dwarfs. Here we report the discovery of pulsating X-rays from a non-degenerate object, the massive B-type star ξ(1) CMa. This star is a variable of β Cep-type and has a strong magnetic field. Our observations with the X-ray Multi-Mirror (XMM-Newton) telescope reveal X-ray pulsations with the same period as the fundamental stellar oscillations. This discovery challenges our understanding of stellar winds from massive stars, their X-ray emission and their magnetism.

  4. Pulsating aurora: The importance of the ionosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Stenbaek-Nielsen, H.C.

    1980-05-01

    A number of different, but mainly optical, observations made in pulsating auroras are presented. These observations indicate that active ionospheric processes are likely to play an important role in causing and/or modifying pulsating aurora.

  5. SPECTROSCOPIC ANALYSIS OF THE WHITE DWARF KUV 02196+2816: A NEW UNRESOLVED DA+DB DEGENERATE BINARY

    SciTech Connect

    Limoges, M.-M.; Bergeron, P.; Dufour, Pierre E-mail: bergeron@astro.umontreal.ca

    2009-05-10

    A spectroscopic analysis of the DBA (or DAB) white dwarf KUV 02196+2816 is presented. The observed hydrogen- and helium-line profiles are shown to be incompatible with model spectra calculated under the assumption of a homogeneous hydrogen and helium chemical composition. In contrast, an excellent fit to the optical spectrum of KUV 02196+2816 can be achieved if the object is interpreted as an unresolved double degenerate composed of a hydrogen-line DA star and a helium-line DB star. The atmospheric parameters obtained from the best fit are T {sub eff} = 27170 K and log g = 8.09 for the DA star, T {sub eff} = 36340 K and log g = 8.09 for the DB star, which implies that the total mass of the system (M {approx} 1.4 M {sub sun}) is very close to the Chandrasekhar limit. Moreover, the effective temperature of the DB stars lies well within the so-called DB gap where very few bright DB stars are found. The implications of this discovery with respect to the DAB and DBA spectral classes and to the evolution of double-degenerate binaries are discussed.

  6. Spectroscopic Analysis of the White Dwarf KUV 02196+2816: A New Unresolved DA+DB Degenerate Binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limoges, M.-M.; Bergeron, P.; Dufour, Pierre

    2009-05-01

    A spectroscopic analysis of the DBA (or DAB) white dwarf KUV 02196+2816 is presented. The observed hydrogen- and helium-line profiles are shown to be incompatible with model spectra calculated under the assumption of a homogeneous hydrogen and helium chemical composition. In contrast, an excellent fit to the optical spectrum of KUV 02196+2816 can be achieved if the object is interpreted as an unresolved double degenerate composed of a hydrogen-line DA star and a helium-line DB star. The atmospheric parameters obtained from the best fit are T eff = 27170 K and log g = 8.09 for the DA star, T eff = 36340 K and log g = 8.09 for the DB star, which implies that the total mass of the system (M ~ 1.4 M sun) is very close to the Chandrasekhar limit. Moreover, the effective temperature of the DB stars lies well within the so-called DB gap where very few bright DB stars are found. The implications of this discovery with respect to the DAB and DBA spectral classes and to the evolution of double-degenerate binaries are discussed.

  7. IUE spectrophotometry of the DA4 primary in the short-period white dwarf-red dwarf spectroscopic binary Case 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sion, E. M.; Guinan, E. F.; Wesemael, F.

    1984-01-01

    Low-resolution ultraviolet International Ultraviolet Explorer spectra of the DA white dwarf Case 1 are presented. The spectra show the presence of the 1400 A feature, already discovered in several other DA stars, and of a shallower trough in the 1550-1700 A range. A model atmosphere analysis of the ultraviolet energy distribution of the Ly-alpha red wing yields T(e) = 13,000 + or - 500 K. Possible interpretations of the 1400 A feature are reviewed. Case 1 is the coolest white dwarf found in a short-period, detached white dwarf-red dwarf binary, and its cooling time is consistent with estimates of the efficiency of angular momentum removal mechanisms in the phases subsequent to common envelope binary evolution.

  8. Pulsation effects on orifice measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Doelling, C. )

    1992-02-01

    The natural gas transmission industry has historically relied on the orifice as the contractual standard for custody transfer. The simplicity, reliability, low maintenance, rangeability (afforded by changing plate beta ratios) and repeatability of the orifice, together with reliable secondary systems, has dispelled flow measurement replacement attempts. While an influx of other meter types has occurred in recent years, the dominance of orifice meters dictate that any serious attempt at improved gas measurement accuracy must emphasize all phases of orifice meter installation. This paper reports on unsteady flow (pulsation) which can compromise orifice system accuracy. Instruments and error calculations for pulsation are reviewed.

  9. Type Ia supernovae: Pulsating delayed detonation models, IR light curves, and the formation of molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoflich, Peter; Khokhlov, A.; Wheeler, C.

    1995-01-01

    We computed optical and infrared light curves of the pulsating class of delayed detonation models for Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). It is demonstrated that observations of the IR light curves can be used to identify subluminous SNe Ia by testing whether secondary maxima occur in the IR. Our pulsating delayed detonation models are in agreement with current observations both for subluminous and normal bright SN Ia, namely SN1991bg, SN1992bo, and SN1992bc. Observations of molecular bands provide a test to distinguish whether strongly subluminous supernovae are a consequence of the pulsating mechanism occurring in a high-mass white dwarf (WD) or, alternatively, are formed by the helium detonation in a low-mass WD as was suggested by Woosley. In the latter case, no carbon is left after the explosion of low-mass WDs whereas a log of C/O-rich material is present in pulsating delayed detonation models.

  10. Effective Temperatures and Surface Gravities for DA White Dwarfs in Wide Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, M. M.; Oswalt, T. D.

    1993-12-01

    Using a novel multiple-dimensional cubic splines interpolation program devised by Penton (1990; M.S. thesis, Fl.Tech.) and an extensive grid of atmospheric models supplied by Koester (1990; priv. comm.) we have estimated effective temperatures and surface gravities for a sample of new spectroscopically identified white dwarfs (WDs) with hydrogen-rich atmospheres. Most of these WDs are members of common proper motion binary systems discovered during the Luyten and Giclas proper motion surveys. The observational data consists of Balmer line equivalent width measurements derived from low-resolution digital spectra obtained at the KPNO and CTIO 4-m telescopes between January 1988 and November 1990. Uncertainties for the derived effective temperatures and surface gravities were determined directly from the signal-to-noise ratio of the spectra. Since most of these objects have no previous spectroscopic observations, a comparison of our results with previously published values is restricted to a smaller subset of the sample and to WDs that were used as flux standards. From this comparison we have determined that the effective temperatures and spectral subclasses we derived for the WDs agree with the available literature values quite well. However the estimated surface gravities seem to be consistently higher than the literature values. Details of the method and its limitations will be presented. This research was supported by NSF grant AST9016284 to Florida Institute of Technology.

  11. White Dwarf Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kepler, S. O.

    2014-10-01

    WDs, causing an overestimated surface gravity, and ultimately determine if these magnetic fields are likely developed through the star's own surface convection zone, or inherited from massive Ap/Bp progenitors. We discovered around 20 000 spectroscopic white dwarfs with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), with a corresponding increase in relatively rare varieties of white dwarfs, including the massive ones (Kleinman et al. 2013, ApJS, 204, 5, Kepler et al. 2013, MNRAS, 439, 2934). The mass distributions of the hydrogen-rich (DA) measured from fitting the spectra with model atmospheres calculated using unidimensinal mixing lenght-theory (MLT) shows the average mass (as measured by the surface gravity) increases apparently below 13 000K for DAs (e.g. Bergeron et al. 1991, ApJ, 367, 253; Tremblay et al. 2011, ApJ, 730, 128; Kleinman et al. 2013). Only with the tridimensional (3D) convection calculations of Tremblay et al. 2011 (A&A, 531, L19) and 2013 (A&A, 552, 13; A&A, 557, 7; arXiv 1309.0886) the problem has finally been solved, but the effects of magnetic fields are not included yet in the mass determinations. Pulsating white dwarf stars are used to measure their interior and envelope properties through seismology, and together with the luminosity function of white dwarf stars in clusters and around the Sun are valuable tools for the study of high density physics, and the history of stellar formation.

  12. Chaotic pulsations in stellar models

    SciTech Connect

    Buchler, J.R. )

    1990-12-01

    The irregular behavior of large-amplitude pulsating stars undergoing radial oscillations is examined theoretically, with a focus on hydrodynamic simulations of the W Virginis population II Cepheids (stars which show both regular and RV Tau characteristics). Sequences of models are constructed as one-parameter families (with luminosity, mass, and composition fixed and Teff as the control parameter) and analyzed to derive a systematic map of the bifurcation set; i.e., of the possible types of pulsations. The results are presented graphically, and it is shown that both cascades of period doubling (via destabilization of an overtone through a half-integer-type resonance) and tangent bifurcation are possible routes to chaos in these systems, depending on the stellar parameters. The general robustness of the chaotic behavior and the existence of a 'chaotic blue edge' in stellar-parameter space are demonstrated. 55 refs.

  13. Auroral pulsations from ionospheric winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakada, M. P.

    1989-01-01

    The possibility that auroral pulsations are due to oscillatory electrical circuits in the ionosphere that are driven by the negative resistance of jet stream winds is examined. For the condenser plates, the highly conducting surfaces above the edges of the jet stream are postulated. The dielectric constant of the plasma between the plates is quite large. The current that is driven perpendicular to and by the jet stream closes along the plates and through Pedersen currents in the F region above the stream. This closed loop gives the inductance and resistance for the circuit. Periods of oscillation for this circuit appear to be in the range of Pc 1 to Pc 3. In accord with observations, this circuit appears to be able to limit the brightness of pulsations.

  14. Pulsating bead-based assay.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Jason A; Bau, Haim H

    2011-04-15

    In recent years, there has been a growing interest in using porous microbeads such as agarose beads as solid supports to bind target molecules from complex fluid samples. Porous beads have large surface area to volume ratios and high receptor concentrations, and they facilitate relatively high sensitivity detection and multiplexing. Unfortunately, to take full advantage of the porous beads' attributes, long incubation times are needed due to the relatively slow mass transfer of target molecules from the exterior solution into the beads' interior. To accelerate the mass transfer process, we propose a novel assay in which functionalized porous beads are periodically compressed and expanded. Preliminary experiments were carried out to compare the performance of the pulsating beads with that of conventional, nonpulsating beads. These experiments indicate that the pulsating beads significantly accelerate binding rates with minimal increase in nonspecific binding. Thus, pulsing has the potential of significantly reducing assay time.

  15. A NEW ANALYSIS OF THE TWO CLASSICAL ZZ CETI WHITE DWARFS GD 165 AND ROSS 548. I. PHOTOMETRY AND SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    Giammichele, N.; Fontaine, G.; Bergeron, P.; Brassard, P.; Charpinet, S.; Vauclair, G.; Pfeiffer, B.

    2015-12-10

    We present the first of a two-part seismic analysis of the two bright hot ZZ Ceti stars GD 165 and Ross 548. In this first part, we report the results of frequency extraction exercises based on time-series data sets of exceptional quality. We uncovered up to 13 independent pulsation modes in GD 165, regrouped into six main frequency multiplets. These include 9 secure (signal-to-noise ratio, S/N > 4) detections and 4 possible ones (4 ≥ S/N ≥ 3). Likewise, we isolated 11 independent modes in Ross 548 (9 secure and 2 possible detections), also regrouped into 6 multiplets. The multiplet structure is likely caused by rotational splitting. We also provide updated estimates of the time-averaged atmospheric properties of these two pulsators in the light of recent developments on the front of atmospheric modeling for DA white dwarfs.

  16. A New Analysis of the Two Classical ZZ Ceti White Dwarfs GD 165 and Ross 548. I. Photometry and Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giammichele, N.; Fontaine, G.; Bergeron, P.; Brassard, P.; Charpinet, S.; Pfeiffer, B.; Vauclair, G.

    2015-12-01

    We present the first of a two-part seismic analysis of the two bright hot ZZ Ceti stars GD 165 and Ross 548. In this first part, we report the results of frequency extraction exercises based on time-series data sets of exceptional quality. We uncovered up to 13 independent pulsation modes in GD 165, regrouped into six main frequency multiplets. These include 9 secure (signal-to-noise ratio, S/N > 4) detections and 4 possible ones (4 ≥ S/N ≥ 3). Likewise, we isolated 11 independent modes in Ross 548 (9 secure and 2 possible detections), also regrouped into 6 multiplets. The multiplet structure is likely caused by rotational splitting. We also provide updated estimates of the time-averaged atmospheric properties of these two pulsators in the light of recent developments on the front of atmospheric modeling for DA white dwarfs.

  17. Pulsating Hot Subdwarfs in Omega Centauri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randall, S. K.; Calamida, A.; Fontaine, G.; Monelli, M.; Bono, G.; Alonso, M. L.; Van Grootel, V.; Brassard, P.; Chayer, P.; Catelan, M.; Littlefair, S.; Dhillon, V. S.; Marsh, T. R.

    2016-06-01

    We recently discovered the first globular cluster hot subdwarf pulsators in Omega Centauri (ω Cen). These stars were initially thought to belong to the class of rapidly pulsating subdwarf B stars, which are well established among the field star population and have become showcases for asteroseismology. However, our spectroscopic analysis revealed the ω Cen variables to be significantly hotter than expected, indicating that they form a new class of subdwarf O pulsators clustered around 50 000 K, not known among the field star population. Non-adiabatic pulsation modelling suggests that the driver for the pulsations occurs via the same iron opacity mechanism that is at work in the rapidly pulsating subdwarf B stars.

  18. The morphology of displays of pulsating auroras.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cresswell, G. R.

    1972-01-01

    An auroral substorm generates displays of pulsating auroras in ways which show a dependence upon both local time and latitude relative to the auroral oval. For several hours after midnight pulsating auroras can be observed in the wake of poleward expansions or within equatorward spreading diffuse envelopes of meridional extent of several hundred kilometers. As the dawn meridian is approached the displays of pulsating auroras tend increasingly to be comprised of distinct eastward drifting patches easily recorded by all-sky cameras.

  19. Discovery of a new PG 1159 (GW Vir) pulsator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kepler, S. O.; Fraga, Luciano; Winget, Don Earl; Bell, Keaton; Córsico, Alejandro H.; Werner, Klaus

    2014-08-01

    We report the discovery of pulsations in the spectroscopic PG 1159 type pre-white dwarf SDSS J075415.12 + 085232.18. Analysis of the spectrum by Werner et al. indicated Teff = 120 000 ± 10 000 K, log g = 7.0 ± 0.3, mass {M}=0.52 ± 0.02 M_{⊙}, C/He = 0.33 by number. We obtained time series images with the SOAR 4.1 m telescope and 2.1 m Otto Struve telescope at McDonald Observatory and show the star is also a variable PG 1159 type star, with dominant period of 525 s.

  20. Ultraviolet Spectra of Two Magnetic White Dwarfs and Ultraviolet Spectra of Subluminous Objects Found in the Kiso Schmidt Survey and Ultraviolet Absorptions in the Spectra of DA White Dwarfds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wegner, Gary A.

    1988-01-01

    Research under NASA Grant NAG5-287 has carried out a number of projects in conjunction with the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) satellite. These include: (1) studies of the UV spectra of DA white dwarfs which show quasi-molecular bands of H2 and H2(+); (2) the peculiar star HR6560; (3) the UV spectra of two magnetic white dwarfs that also show the quasi-molecular features; (4) investigations of the UV spectra of subluminous stars, primarily identified from visual wavelength spectroscopy in the Kiso survey of UV excess stars, some of which show interesting metal lines in their UV spectra; and (5) completion of studies of UV spectra of DB stars. The main result of this research has been to further knowledge of the structure and compositions of subluminous stars which helps cast light on their formation and evolution.

  1. Transition to turbulence in pulsating pipe flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Duo; Warnecke, Sascha; Hof, Bjoern; Avila, Marc

    2014-11-01

    We report an experimental investigation of the transition to turbulence in a pulsating pipe flow. This flow is a prototype of various pulsating flows in both nature and engineering, such as in the cardiovascular system where the onset of turbulence is often possibly related to various diseases (e.g., the formation of aneurysms). The experiments are carried out in a straight rigid pipe using water with a sinusoidal modulation of the flow rate. The governing parameters, Reynolds number, Womersley number α (dimensionless pulsating frequency) and the pulsating amplitude A, cover a wide range 3 < α < 23 and 0 < A < 1 . To characterize the transition to turbulence, we determine how the characteristic lifetime of turbulent spots (/puffs) are affected by the pulsation. While at high pulsation frequencies (α > 12) lifetimes of turbulent spots are entirely unaffected by the pulsation, at lower frequencies they are substantially affected. With decreasing frequency much larger Reynolds numbers are needed to obtain spots of the same characteristic lifetime. Hence at low frequency transition is delayed significantly. In addition the effect of the pulsation amplitude on the transition delay is quantified. Duo Xu would like to acknowledge the support from Humboldt Foundation.

  2. The discovery of Ni V in the photospheres of the hot DA white dwarfs RE 2214-492 and G191-B2B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holberg, J. B.; Hubeny, I.; Barstow, M. A.; Lanz, T.; Sion, E. M.; Tweedy, R. W.

    1994-01-01

    We have co-added six recently obtained International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) echelle spectra of the hot DA white dwarf RE 2214-492 and 10 existing archive spectra of the well-known hot DA, G191-B2B. We find that both stars contain numerous weak features due to Ni V. Nickel is thus the second iron-group element to be found in the spectra of the very hottest DA white dwarfs. In addition to Ni V, we also observe Al III in both stars and present evidence for the possible presence of Ni IV and Fe IV in RE 2214-492. The presence of Ni and Al, together with previously reported elements, will contribute significantly to both the EUV opacity and to the apparent complexity of the UV spectra of these stars. Using Non-Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (NLTE) model atmospheres we estimate the Ni abundances in RE 2214-492 the G191-B2B to be log(Ni/H) = -5.5 +/- 0.3 and -6.0 +/- 0.3, respectively.

  3. PULSATING REVERSE DETONATION MODELS OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE. II. EXPLOSION

    SciTech Connect

    Bravo, Eduardo; Garcia-Senz, Domingo; Cabezon, Ruben M.; DomInguez, Inmaculada E-mail: domingo.garcia@upc.edu E-mail: inma@ugr.es

    2009-04-20

    Observational evidences point to a common explosion mechanism of Type Ia supernovae based on a delayed detonation of a white dwarf (WD). However, all attempts to find a convincing ignition mechanism based on a delayed detonation in a destabilized, expanding, white dwarf have been elusive so far. One of the possibilities that has been invoked is that an inefficient deflagration leads to pulsation of a Chandrasekhar-mass WD, followed by formation of an accretion shock that confines a carbon-oxygen rich core, while transforming the kinetic energy of the collapsing halo into thermal energy of the core, until an inward moving detonation is formed. This chain of events has been termed Pulsating Reverse Detonation (PRD). In this work, we present three-dimensional numerical simulations of PRD models from the time of detonation initiation up to homologous expansion. Different models characterized by the amount of mass burned during the deflagration phase, M {sub defl}, give explosions spanning a range of kinetic energies, K {approx} (1.0-1.2) x 10{sup 51} erg, and {sup 56}Ni masses, M({sup 56}Ni) {approx} 0.6-0.8 M {sub sun}, which are compatible with what is expected for typical Type Ia supernovae. Spectra and light curves of angle-averaged spherically symmetric versions of the PRD models are discussed. Type Ia supernova spectra pose the most stringent requirements on PRD models.

  4. Models of cylindrical bubble pulsation

    PubMed Central

    Ilinskii, Yurii A.; Zabolotskaya, Evgenia A.; Hay, Todd A.; Hamilton, Mark F.

    2012-01-01

    Three models are considered for describing the dynamics of a pulsating cylindrical bubble. A linear solution is derived for a cylindrical bubble in an infinite compressible liquid. The solution accounts for losses due to viscosity, heat conduction, and acoustic radiation. It reveals that radiation is the dominant loss mechanism, and that it is 22 times greater than for a spherical bubble of the same radius. The predicted resonance frequency provides a basis of comparison for limiting forms of other models. The second model considered is a commonly used equation in Rayleigh-Plesset form that requires an incompressible liquid to be finite in extent in order for bubble pulsation to occur. The radial extent of the liquid becomes a fitting parameter, and it is found that considerably different values of the parameter are required for modeling inertial motion versus acoustical oscillations. The third model was developed by V. K. Kedrinskii [Hydrodynamics of Explosion (Springer, New York, 2005), pp. 23–26] in the form of the Gilmore equation for compressible liquids of infinite extent. While the correct resonance frequency and loss factor are not recovered from this model in the linear approximation, it provides reasonable agreement with observations of inertial motion. PMID:22978863

  5. A Planet Found by Pulsations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-10-01

    Searching for planets around very hot stars is much more challenging than looking around cool stars. For this reason, the recent discovery of a planet around a main-sequence A star is an important find both because of its unique position near the stars habitable zone, and because of the way in which the planet was discovered.Challenges in VariabilityIn the past three decades, weve discovered thousands of exoplanets yet most of them have been found around cool stars (like M dwarfs) or moderate stars (like G stars like our Sun). Very few of the planets that weve found orbit hot stars; in fact, weve only discovered ~20 planets orbiting the very hot, main-sequence A stars.The instability strip, indicated on an H-R diagram. Stellar classification types are listed across the bottom of the diagram. Many main-sequence A stars reside in the instability strip. [Rursus]Why is this? We dont expect that main-sequence A stars host fewer planets than cooler stars. Instead, its primarily because the two main techniques that we use to find planets namely, transits and radial velocity cant be used as effectively on the main-sequence A stars that are most likely to host planets, because the luminosities of these stars are often variable.These stars can lie on whats known as the classical instability strip in the Herzsprung-Russell diagram. Such variable stars pulsate due to changes in the ionization state of atoms deep in their interiors, which causes the stars to puff up and then collapse back inward. For variable main-sequence A stars, the periods for these pulsations can be several to several tens of times per day.These very pulsations that make transits and radial-velocity measurements so difficult, however, can potentially be used to detect planets in a different way. Led by Simon Murphy (University of Sydney, Australia and Aarhus University, Denmark), a team of scientists has recently detected the first planet ever to be discovered around a main-sequence A star from the timing

  6. A Study of the Ultraviolet Absorptions in the Spectra of DA White Dwarfs and Ultraviolet Spectra of the Star HR6560

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wegner, Gary A.

    1986-01-01

    Two projects in conjunction with the International Ultraviolet Explorer Satellite are discussed. These projects were to: (1) study the properties of the H2 and H2+ quasi-molecular absorption features at lambda lambda 1600 and 1400 in the ultraviolet spectra of the hydrogen-rich DA white dwarfs and to search for additional spectroscopic features in the spectra of these stars; and (2) use the ultraviolet portion of the spectrum of the peculiar rare earth-rich late F type star, HR6560 (HD159870), to establish whether or not the element abundance anomalies are produced in conjunction with its having a white dwarf binary companion. The data show that HR6560 is probably not associated with any hot subluminous or degenerate star.

  7. A study of the pulsation driving mechanism in pulsating combustors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, Y.; Timnat, Y. M.

    Experiments performed in a facility consisting of a Schmidt-type pulsating combustor, in which high-speed photographs were taken and pressure, temperature and gas composition measured, showed that the air supply conditions at the inlet and the volume of the combustor strongly influence the oscillation frequency. From the measurements, the existence of two separate regions, one containing cold air and the other containing fuel-rich gas, was found, and a pressure-volume diagram was drawn, showing the effect of chemical energy release and heat supply during the compression stroke and differentiating it from the expansion. A model of the interaction between the cyclic combustion process and the acoustic oscillations of the gas volume within the chamber and the tail-pipe is presented. The conditions for chemical energy release that result in high-pressure amplitude are described.

  8. CHARACTERIZING PULSATING MIXING OF SLURRIES

    SciTech Connect

    Bamberger, Judith A.; Meyer, Perry A.

    2007-12-01

    This paper describes the physical properties for defining the operation of a pulse jet mixing system. Pulse jet mixing operates with no moving parts located in the vessel to be mixed. Pulse tubes submerged in the vessel provide a pulsating flow due to a controlled combination of applied pressure to expel the fluid from the pulse tube nozzle followed by suction to refill the pulse tube through the same nozzle. For mixing slurries nondimensional parameters to define mixing operation include slurry properties, geometric properties and operational parameters. Primary parameters include jet Reynolds number and Froude number; alternate parameters may include particle Galileo number, particle Reynolds number, settling velocity ratio, and hindered settling velocity ratio. Rating metrics for system performance include just suspended velocity, concentration distribution as a function of elevation, and blend time.

  9. Multi-periodic pulsations of a stripped red-giant star in an eclipsing binary system.

    PubMed

    Maxted, Pierre F L; Serenelli, Aldo M; Miglio, Andrea; Marsh, Thomas R; Heber, Ulrich; Dhillon, Vikram S; Littlefair, Stuart; Copperwheat, Chris; Smalley, Barry; Breedt, Elmé; Schaffenroth, Veronika

    2013-06-27

    Low-mass white-dwarf stars are the remnants of disrupted red-giant stars in binary millisecond pulsars and other exotic binary star systems. Some low-mass white dwarfs cool rapidly, whereas others stay bright for millions of years because of stable fusion in thick surface hydrogen layers. This dichotomy is not well understood, so the potential use of low-mass white dwarfs as independent clocks with which to test the spin-down ages of pulsars or as probes of the extreme environments in which low-mass white dwarfs form cannot fully be exploited. Here we report precise mass and radius measurements for the precursor to a low-mass white dwarf. We find that only models in which this disrupted red-giant star has a thick hydrogen envelope can match the strong constraints provided by our data. Very cool low-mass white dwarfs must therefore have lost their thick hydrogen envelopes by irradiation from pulsar companions or by episodes of unstable hydrogen fusion (shell flashes). We also find that this low-mass white-dwarf precursor is a type of pulsating star not hitherto seen. The observed pulsation frequencies are sensitive to internal processes that determine whether this star will undergo shell flashes. PMID:23803845

  10. Multi-periodic pulsations of a stripped red-giant star in an eclipsing binary system.

    PubMed

    Maxted, Pierre F L; Serenelli, Aldo M; Miglio, Andrea; Marsh, Thomas R; Heber, Ulrich; Dhillon, Vikram S; Littlefair, Stuart; Copperwheat, Chris; Smalley, Barry; Breedt, Elmé; Schaffenroth, Veronika

    2013-06-27

    Low-mass white-dwarf stars are the remnants of disrupted red-giant stars in binary millisecond pulsars and other exotic binary star systems. Some low-mass white dwarfs cool rapidly, whereas others stay bright for millions of years because of stable fusion in thick surface hydrogen layers. This dichotomy is not well understood, so the potential use of low-mass white dwarfs as independent clocks with which to test the spin-down ages of pulsars or as probes of the extreme environments in which low-mass white dwarfs form cannot fully be exploited. Here we report precise mass and radius measurements for the precursor to a low-mass white dwarf. We find that only models in which this disrupted red-giant star has a thick hydrogen envelope can match the strong constraints provided by our data. Very cool low-mass white dwarfs must therefore have lost their thick hydrogen envelopes by irradiation from pulsar companions or by episodes of unstable hydrogen fusion (shell flashes). We also find that this low-mass white-dwarf precursor is a type of pulsating star not hitherto seen. The observed pulsation frequencies are sensitive to internal processes that determine whether this star will undergo shell flashes.

  11. A Dark Spot on a Massive White Dwarf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilic, Mukremin; Gianninas, Alexandros; Bell, Keaton J.; Curd, Brandon; Brown, Warren R.; Hermes, J. J.; Dufour, Patrick; Wisniewski, John P.; Winget, D. E.; Winget, K. I.

    2015-12-01

    We present the serendipitous discovery of eclipse-like events around the massive white dwarf SDSS J152934.98+292801.9 (hereafter J1529+2928). We selected J1529+2928 for time-series photometry based on its spectroscopic temperature and surface gravity, which place it near the ZZ Ceti instability strip. Instead of pulsations, we detect photometric dips from this white dwarf every 38 minutes. Follow-up optical spectroscopy observations with Gemini reveal no significant radial velocity variations, ruling out stellar and brown dwarf companions. A disintegrating planet around this white dwarf cannot explain the observed light curves in different filters. Given the short period, the source of the photometric dips must be a dark spot that comes into view every 38 minutes due to the rotation of the white dwarf. Our optical spectroscopy does not show any evidence of Zeeman splitting of the Balmer lines, limiting the magnetic field strength to B < 70 kG. Since up to 15% of white dwarfs display kG magnetic fields, such eclipse-like events should be common around white dwarfs. We discuss the potential implications of this discovery on transient surveys targeting white dwarfs, like the K2 mission and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope. This work is based on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, McDonald Observatory, and the Apache Point Observatory 3.5-m telescope. The latter is owned and operated by the Astrophysical Research Consortium. Gemini Observatory is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (United States), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), the Australian Research Council (Australia), Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia e Inovação (Brazil) and Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación Productiva (Argentina).

  12. Solar wind controlled pulsations: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Odera, T.J.

    1986-02-01

    Studies of the solar wind controlled Pc 3, 4 pulsations by early and recent researchers are highlighted. The review focuses on the recent observations, which cover the time during the International Magnetospheric Study (IMS). Results from early and recent observations agree on one point, that is, that the Pc 3, 4 pulsations are influenced by three main solar wind parameters, namely, the solar wind velocity V/sub 5w/, the IMF orientation theta/sub x/B, and magnitude B. The results can be interpreted, preferably, in terms of an external origin for Pc 3, 4 pulsations. This implies, essentially, the signal model, which means that the pulsations originate in the upstream waves (in the interplanetary medium) and are transported by convection to the magnetopause, where they couple to oscillations of the magnetospheric field lines.

  13. Small-scale Features in Pulsating Aurora

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, S.; Jaynes, A. N.; Knudsen, D. J.; Trondsen, T.; Lessard, M.

    2011-12-01

    A field study was conducted from March 12-16, 2002 using a narrow-field intensified CCD camera installed at Churchill, Manitoba. The camera was oriented along the local magnetic zenith where small-scale black auroral forms are often visible. This analysis focuses on such forms occurring within a region of pulsating aurora. The observations show black forms with irregular shape and nonuniform drift with respect to the relatively stationary pulsating patches. The pulsating patches occur within a diffuse auroral background as a modulation of the auroral brightness in a localized region. The images analyzed show a decrease in the brightness of the diffuse background in the region of the pulsating patch at the beginning of the 'off' phase of the modulation. Throughout the off phase the brightness of the diffuse aurora gradually increases back to the average intensity. The time constant for this increase is measured as the first step toward determining the physical process.

  14. A motion picture presentation of magnetic pulsations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suzuki, A.; Kim, J. S.; Sugura, M.; Nagano, H.

    1981-01-01

    Using the data obtained from the IMS North American magnetometer network stations at high latitudes, a motion picture was made by a computer technique, describing time changes of Pc5 and Pi3 magnetic pulsation vectors. Examples of pulsation characteristics derived from this presentation are regional polarization changes including shifts of polarization demarcation lines, changes in the extent of an active region and its movement with time.

  15. The White Mountain Apache Child Protection Service Training Curriculum. Nohwii Chaghashe Baa da gontzaa (Protect Our Apache Children).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez-Santin, Edwin, Comp.

    This curriculum manual provides 8 days of training for child protective services (CPS) personnel (social workers and administrators) working in the White Mountain Apache tribal community. Each of the first seven units in the manual contains a brief description of contents, course objectives, time required, key concepts, possible discussion topics,…

  16. EX-111 Thermal Emission from Hot White Dwarfs: The Suggested He Abundance-Temperature Correlation. EX-112: The Unique Emission Line White Dwarf Star GD 356

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shipman, H. L.

    1986-01-01

    Progress in the EXOSAT data analysis program is reported. EXOSAT observations for four white dwarfs (WD1031-115, WD0004+330, WD1615-154, and WD0109-264) were obtained. Counting rates were unexpectedly low, indicating that these objects have a substantial amount of x-ray absorbing matter in their photosheres. In addition, soft x-ray pulsations characterized by a 9.25 minute cycle were discovered in the DA white dwarf V471 Tauri. A residual x-ray flux from the K dwarf companion can be seen during the white dwarf eclipse at orbital phase 0.0. Pronounced dips in the soft x-ray light curve occur at orbital phases 0.15, 0.18, and 0.85. The dips may be correlated with the triangular Lagrangian points of the binary orbit. Smaller dips at phases near the eclipse may be associated with cool loops in the K star corona. Data for the white dwarf H1504+65 was also analyzed. This object is particularly unusual in that its photoshere is devoid of hydrogen and helium. Finally, existing data on the white dwarf Sirius B were analyzed to see what constraints from other data can be placed on the properties of this star. Interrelationships between radius, rotational velocity, and effective temperature were derived.

  17. Modeling of pulsating heat pipes.

    SciTech Connect

    Givler, Richard C.; Martinez, Mario J.

    2009-08-01

    This report summarizes the results of a computer model that describes the behavior of pulsating heat pipes (PHP). The purpose of the project was to develop a highly efficient (as compared to the heat transfer capability of solid copper) thermal groundplane (TGP) using silicon carbide (SiC) as the substrate material and water as the working fluid. The objective of this project is to develop a multi-physics model for this complex phenomenon to assist with an understanding of how PHPs operate and to be able to understand how various parameters (geometry, fill ratio, materials, working fluid, etc.) affect its performance. The physical processes describing a PHP are highly coupled. Understanding its operation is further complicated by the non-equilibrium nature of the interplay between evaporation/condensation, bubble growth and collapse or coalescence, and the coupled response of the multiphase fluid dynamics among the different channels. A comprehensive theory of operation and design tools for PHPs is still an unrealized task. In the following we first analyze, in some detail, a simple model that has been proposed to describe PHP behavior. Although it includes fundamental features of a PHP, it also makes some assumptions to keep the model tractable. In an effort to improve on current modeling practice, we constructed a model for a PHP using some unique features available in FLOW-3D, version 9.2-3 (Flow Science, 2007). We believe that this flow modeling software retains more of the salient features of a PHP and thus, provides a closer representation of its behavior.

  18. AT LAST-A V777 HER PULSATOR IN THE KEPLER FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Oestensen, R. H.; Bloemen, S.; Vuckovic, M.; Aerts, C.; Oreiro, R.; Kinemuchi, K.; Still, M.

    2011-08-01

    We present the discovery of the first-and so far the only-pulsating white dwarf star located in the field of view of the Kepler spacecraft. During our ongoing effort to search for compact pulsator candidates that can benefit from the near-continuous coverage of Kepler, we recently identified a faint DB star from spectroscopy obtained with the William Herschel Telescope. After establishing its physical parameters to be T{sub eff} = 24,950 K and log g = 7.91 dex, placing it right in the middle of the V777 Her instability strip, we immediately submitted the target for follow-up space observations. The Kepler light curve reveals a pulsation spectrum consisting of five modes that follow a sequence roughly equally spaced in period with a mean spacing of 37 s. The three strongest modes show a triplet structure with a mean splitting of 3.3 {mu}Hz. We conclude that this object is a V777 Her pulsator with a mass of {approx}0.56 M{sub sun}, and very similar to the class prototype.

  19. Transition to turbulence in pulsating pipe flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hof, Bjorn; Warnecke, Sascha; Xu, Duo

    2013-11-01

    We report an experimental study of the transition to turbulence in a pulsating pipe flow the most important example of pulsating flows is the cardiovascular system where the onset of fluctuations and turbulence can be a possible cause for various diseases such as the formation of aneurysms. The present study is limited to a straight rigid pipe, sinusoidal modulation of the flow rate and a Newtonian fluid. The dimensionless parameters (Womersley and Reynolds numbers) were chosen to include the parameter range encountered in larger arteries. We observe that at large frequencies the critical point for the onset of turbulence remains completely unaffected by pulsation for all amplitudes investigated (up to 40%). However for smaller frequencies (Womersley numbers below 10) the critical point considerably increases. Furthermore we investigate how the transition scenario is affected for a fixed frequency and increasing amplitudes (approaching oscillatory flow).

  20. Benefit of pulsation in soft corals.

    PubMed

    Kremien, Maya; Shavit, Uri; Mass, Tali; Genin, Amatzia

    2013-05-28

    Soft corals of the family Xeniidae exhibit a unique, rhythmic pulsation of their tentacles (Movie S1), first noted by Lamarck nearly 200 y ago. However, the adaptive benefit of this perpetual, energetically costly motion is poorly understood. Using in situ underwater particle image velocimetry, we found that the pulsation motions thrust water upward and enhance mixing across the coral-water boundary layer. The induced upward motion effectively prevents refiltration of water by neighboring polyps, while the intensification of mixing, together with the upward flow, greatly enhances the coral's photosynthesis. A series of controlled laboratory experiments with the common xeniid coral Heteroxenia fuscescens showed that the net photosynthesis rate during pulsation was up to an order of magnitude higher than during the coral's resting, nonpulsating state. This enhancement diminished when the concentration of oxygen in the ambient water was artificially raised, indicating that the enhancement of photosynthesis was due to a greater efflux of oxygen from the coral tissues. By lowering the internal oxygen concentration, pulsation alleviates the problem of reduced affinity of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase oxygenase (RuBisCO) to CO2 under conditions of high oxygen concentrations. The photosynthesis-respiration ratio of the pulsating H. fuscescens was markedly higher than the ratios reported for nonpulsating soft and stony corals. Although pulsation is commonly used for locomotion and filtration in marine mobile animals, its occurrence in sessile (bottom-attached) species is limited to members of the ancient phylum Cnidaria, where it is used to accelerate water and enhance physiological processes.

  1. Benefit of pulsation in soft corals

    PubMed Central

    Kremien, Maya; Shavit, Uri; Mass, Tali; Genin, Amatzia

    2013-01-01

    Soft corals of the family Xeniidae exhibit a unique, rhythmic pulsation of their tentacles (Movie S1), first noted by Lamarck nearly 200 y ago. However, the adaptive benefit of this perpetual, energetically costly motion is poorly understood. Using in situ underwater particle image velocimetry, we found that the pulsation motions thrust water upward and enhance mixing across the coral–water boundary layer. The induced upward motion effectively prevents refiltration of water by neighboring polyps, while the intensification of mixing, together with the upward flow, greatly enhances the coral’s photosynthesis. A series of controlled laboratory experiments with the common xeniid coral Heteroxenia fuscescens showed that the net photosynthesis rate during pulsation was up to an order of magnitude higher than during the coral’s resting, nonpulsating state. This enhancement diminished when the concentration of oxygen in the ambient water was artificially raised, indicating that the enhancement of photosynthesis was due to a greater efflux of oxygen from the coral tissues. By lowering the internal oxygen concentration, pulsation alleviates the problem of reduced affinity of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase oxygenase (RuBisCO) to CO2 under conditions of high oxygen concentrations. The photosynthesis–respiration ratio of the pulsating H. fuscescens was markedly higher than the ratios reported for nonpulsating soft and stony corals. Although pulsation is commonly used for locomotion and filtration in marine mobile animals, its occurrence in sessile (bottom-attached) species is limited to members of the ancient phylum Cnidaria, where it is used to accelerate water and enhance physiological processes. PMID:23610420

  2. Major isoform of zebrafish P0 is a 23.5 kDa myelin glycoprotein expressed in selected white matter tracts of the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Bai, Qing; Sun, Ming; Stolz, Donna B; Burton, Edward A

    2011-06-01

    The zebrafish mpz gene, encoding the ortholog of mammalian myelin protein zero, is expressed in oligodendrocytes of the zebrafish central nervous system (CNS). The putative gene product, P0, has been implicated in promoting axonal regeneration in addition to its proposed structural functions in compact myelin. We raised novel zebrafish P0-specific antibodies and established that P0 is a 23.5 kDa glycoprotein containing a 3 kDa N-linked carbohydrate moiety. P0 was localized to myelin sheaths surrounding axons, but was not detected in the cell bodies or proximal processes of oligodendrocytes. Many white matter tracts in the adult zebrafish CNS were robustly immunoreactive for P0, including afferent visual and olfactory pathways, commissural and longitudinal tracts of the brain, and selected ascending and descending tracts of the spinal cord. P0 was first detected during development in premyelinating oligodendrocytes of the ventral hindbrain at 48 hours postfertilization (hpf). By 72 hpf, short segments of longitudinally oriented P0-immunoreactive myelinating axons were seen in the hindbrain; expression in the spinal cord, optic pathways, hindbrain commissures, midbrain, and peripheral nervous system followed. The mpz transcript was found to be alternatively spliced, giving rise to P0 isoforms with alternative C-termini. The 23.5 kDa isoform was most abundant in the CNS, but other isoforms predominated in the myelin sheath surrounding the Mauthner axon. These data provide a detailed account of P0 expression and demonstrate novel P0 isoforms, which may have discrete functional properties. The restriction of P0 immunoreactivity to myelin sheaths indicates that the protein is subject to stringent intracellular compartmentalization, which likely occurs through posttranslational mechanisms.

  3. Linear nonradial pulsation theory. Lecture 7

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, A.N.

    1983-03-14

    Many of the upper main-sequence stars pulsate in spheroidal nonradial modes. We know this to be true in numerous cases, as we have tabulated for the ..beta.. Cephei and delta Scuti variables in previous lectures. However, we cannot identify the actual mode for any star except for the low-order pressure p and f modes of our sun. It remains a great challenge to clearly state what really is occurring, in the process we learn more about how stars evolve and pulsate.

  4. Detection of the 1400 A absorption in the ultraviolet spectrum of the DA white dwarf LB 3303

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wegner, G.

    1982-01-01

    Low-resolution ultraviolet International Ultraviolet Explorer spectra of the southern white dwarf LB 3303 show the presence of the wavelength 1400 absorption feature reported by Greenstein in the spectrum of 40 Eri B. The equivalent width is 5.7 A, and the measured wavelength is 1394 A. A comparison of the ultraviolet fluxes with model atmospheres confirms that LB 3303 has an effective temperature near 16,000 K, as found earlier from visual wavelength data. There are still problems with the identification of this line. The star is not hot enough to explain the presence of Si IV, and the agreement with the spectrum of the H2 molecule is not convincing.

  5. Large Variety of New Pulsating Stars in the OGLE-III Galactic Disk Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietrukowicz, P.; Dziembowski, W. A.; Mróz, P.; Soszyński, I.; Udalski, A.; Poleski, R.; Szymański, M. K.; Kubiak, M.; Pietrzyński, G.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Ulaczyk, K.; Kozłowski, S.; Skowron, J.

    2013-12-01

    We present the results of a search for pulsating stars in the 7.12 deg2 OGLE-III Galactic disk area in the direction tangent to the Centaurus Arm. We report the identification of 20 Classical Cepheids, 45 RR Lyr type stars, 31 Long-Period Variables, such as Miras and Semi-Regular Variables, one pulsating white dwarf, and 58 very likely δ Sct type stars. Based on asteroseismic models constructed for one quadruple-mode and six triple-mode δ Sct type pulsators, we estimated masses, metallicities, ages, and distance moduli to these objects. The modeled stars have masses in the range 0.9-2.5 MSun and are located at distances between 2.5 kpc and 6.2 kpc. Two triple-mode and one double-mode pulsators seem to be Population II stars of the SX Phe type, probably from the Galactic halo. Our sample also includes candidates for Type II Cepheids and unclassified short-period (P<0.23 d) multi-mode stars which could be either δ Sct or β Cep type stars. One of the detected variables is a very likely δ Sct star with an exceptionally high peak-to-peak I-band amplitude of 0.35 mag at the very short period of 0.0196 d. All reported pulsating variable stars but one object are new discoveries. They are included in the OGLE-III Catalog of Variable Stars. Finally, we introduce the on-going OGLE-IV Galactic Disk Survey, which covers more than half of the Galactic plane. For the purposes of future works on the spiral structure and star formation history of the Milky Way, we have already compiled a list of known Galactic Classical Cepheids.

  6. X-ray Pulsation Searches with NICER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Paul S.; Arzoumanian, Zaven

    2016-04-01

    The Neutron Star Interior Composition Explorer (NICER) is an X-ray telescope with capabilities optimized for the study of the structure, dynamics, and energetics of neutron stars through high-precision timing of rotation- and accretion-powered pulsars in the 0.2-12 keV band. It has large collecting area (twice that of the XMM-Newton EPIC-pn camera), CCD-quality spectral resolution, and high-precision photon time tagging referenced to UTC through an onboard GPS receiver. NICER will begin its 18-month prime mission as an attached payload on the International Space Station around the end of 2016. I will describe the science planning for the pulsation search science working group, which is charged with searching for pulsations and studying flux modulation properties of pulsars and other neutron stars. A primary goal of our observations is to detect pulsations from new millisecond pulsars that will contribute to NICER’s studies of the neutron star equation of state through pulse profile modeling. Beyond that, our working group will search for pulsations in a range of source categories, including LMXBs, new X-ray transients that might be accreting millisecond pulsars, X-ray counterparts to unassociated Fermi LAT sources, gamma-ray binaries, isolated neutron stars, and ultra-luminous X-ray sources. I will survey our science plans and give an overview of our planned observations during NICER’s prime mission.

  7. Blackworms, Blood Vessel Pulsations and Drug Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lesiuk, Nalena M.; Drewes, Charles D.

    1999-01-01

    Introduces the freshwater oligochaete worm, lumbriculus variegatus (common name: blackworms), an organism that is well suited for classroom study because of its closed circulatory system. Describes a set of simple, fast, noninvasive, and inexpensive methods for observing pulsations of the worm's dorsal blood vessels under baseline conditions, and…

  8. VOLUME COMPENSATING MEANS FOR PULSATING PUMPS

    DOEpatents

    Weaver, D.L.W.; MacCormack, R.S. Jr.

    1959-12-01

    A double diaphragm, two-liquid pulsating pump for remote control use, having as an improvement an apparatus for maintaining constant the volume of the liquid such as kerosene between the two diaphragms is described. Phase difficulties encountered in the operation of such pumps when the volume of the liquid is altered by changes in temperature are avoided.

  9. Occupational rhinoconjunctivitis from white pepper.

    PubMed

    Arias Irigoyen, J; Talavera Fabuel, A; Maranon Lizana, F

    2003-01-01

    A 44-year-old subject developed rhinoconjunctivitis symptoms when she was exposed to white pepper while working in the food industry. A positive skin prick test for white and black pepper extracts (1:10 w/v) were obtained. Specific IgE antibodies to white and black pepper were demonstrated by ELISA. The immunoblot analysis showed two IgE-reactive protein bands able to bind to IgE from white pepper extract of 11.8 kDa and 13.6 kDa and one band from black pepper extract of 11.8 kDa. IgE binding to blotted white and black pepper extract were inhibited by preincubation of patient serum with black pepper extract. A conjunctival provocation test was positive with a white pepper extract dilution of 1:100 w/v. We describe a patient with occupational rhinoconjunctivitis caused by hypersensitivity to white pepper.

  10. Pulsating instability and self-acceleration of fast turbulent flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poludnenko, Alexei Y.

    2015-01-01

    A series of three-dimensional numerical simulations is used to study the intrinsic stability of high-speed turbulent flames. Calculations model the interaction of a fully resolved premixed flame with a highly subsonic, statistically steady, homogeneous, isotropic turbulence. The computational domain is unconfined to prevent the onset of thermoacoustic instabilities. We consider a wide range of turbulent intensities and system sizes, corresponding to the Damköhler numbers Da = 0.1 - 6.0. These calculations show that turbulent flames in the regimes considered are intrinsically unstable. In particular, we find three effects. (1) Turbulent flame speed, ST, develops pulsations with the observed peak-to-peak amplitude ST max / ST min > 10 and a characteristic time scale close to a large-scale eddy turnover time. Such variability is caused by the interplay between turbulence, which continuously creates the flame surface, and highly intermittent flame collisions, which consume the flame surface. (2) Unstable burning results in the periodic pressure build-up and the formation of pressure waves or shocks, when ST approaches or exceeds the speed of a Chapman-Jouguet deflagration. (3) Coupling of pressure gradients formed during pulsations with density gradients across the flame leads to the anisotropic amplification of turbulence inside the flame volume and flame acceleration. Such process, which is driven by the baroclinic term in the vorticity transport equation, is a reacting-flow analog of the mechanism underlying the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability. With the increase in turbulent intensity, the limit-cycle instability discussed here transitions to the regime described in our previous work, in which the growth of ST becomes unbounded and produces a detonation.

  11. Evaluation of hydro-mechanical pulsation for rocket injector research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Matthew B.

    The Propulsion Research Center at the University of Alabama in Huntsville has designed and built a hydro-mechanical pulsator to simulate the pressure fluctuations created by high frequency combustion instability. The pressure response characteristics were evaluated in an atmospheric test rig using filtered de-ionized water as the working fluid. The outlet of the pulsator was connected to a swirl injector post to provide downstream flow resistance. Previous low pressure and mass flow experimental data revealed a complex relationship between the control parameters and the pulsation response. For each test, the average mass flow rates of the waste water, water lost through the seals, and injector mass flow rates are measured. A dynamic pressure transducer at the pulsator exit measures and records the pressure waveform. Pulsation magnitude, reliability, repeatability, pulsation effects, and detailed variable control are examined. The data shows the pulsator is capable of generating 30% pulsation at 1575 Hz input. The repeatability of the pulsator is questionable because the standard deviations exceeded 40% of the average. The detailed data obtained during this research provides is sufficient to develop a pulsator tuning procedure for future applications.

  12. PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF THE CURRENT CENSUS OF NORTHERN WHITE DWARFS WITHIN 40 pc OF THE SUN

    SciTech Connect

    Limoges, M.-M.; Bergeron, P.; Lépine, S. E-mail: bergeron@astro.umontreal.ca

    2015-08-15

    We present a detailed description of the physical properties of our current census of white dwarfs within 40 pc of the Sun, based on an exhaustive spectroscopic survey of northern hemisphere candidates from the SUPERBLINK proper motion database. Our method for selecting white dwarf candidates is based on a combination of theoretical color–magnitude relations and reduced proper motion diagrams. We reported in an earlier publication the discovery of nearly 200 new white dwarfs, and we present here the discovery of an additional 133 new white dwarfs, among which we identify 96 DA, 3 DB, 24 DC, 3 DQ, and 7 DZ stars. We further identify 178 white dwarfs that lie within 40 pc of the Sun, representing a 40% increase of the current census, which now includes 492 objects. We estimate the completeness of our survey at between 66% and 78%, allowing for uncertainties in the distance estimates. We also perform a homogeneous model atmosphere analysis of this 40 pc sample and find a large fraction of massive white dwarfs, indicating that we are successfully recovering the more massive, and less luminous objects often missed in other surveys. We also show that the 40 pc sample is dominated by cool and old white dwarfs, which populate the faint end of the luminosity function, although trigonometric parallaxes will be needed to shape this part of the luminosity function more accurately. Finally, we identify 4 probable members of the 20 pc sample, 4 suspected double degenerate binaries, and we also report the discovery of two new ZZ Ceti pulsators.

  13. Flow induced pulsations in pipe systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruggeman, Jan Cornelis

    1987-12-01

    The aeroacoustic behavior of a low Mach number, high Reynolds number flow through a pipe with closed side branches was investigated. Sound is generated by coherent structures of concentrated vorticity formed periodically in the separated flow in the T-shaped junctions of side branches and the main pipe. The case of moderate pulsation amplitudes was investigated. It appears that the vortical flow in a T-joint is an aeroacoustic source of constant strength when acoustic energy losses due to radiation and friction are small but not negligible. When acoustic energy losses due to radiation and friction are negligible, the nonlinear character of vortex damping is the amplitude limiting mechanism. It is stressed that aeroacoustic sources should not be neglected in studies of the response of a piping lay-out with flow to, e.g., the pulsating output of a compressor.

  14. Location of Decimetric Pulsations in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benz, Arnold O.; Battaglia, Marina; Vilmer, Nicole

    This work investigates the spatial relation between coronal X-ray sources and coherent radio emissions, both generally thought to be signatures of particle acceleration. Two limb events were selected during which the radio emission was well correlated in time with hard X-rays. The radio emissions were of the type of decimetric pulsations as determined from the spectrogram observed by Phoenix-2 of ETH Zurich. The radio positions were measured from observations with the Nançay Radioheliograph between 236 and 432 MHz and compared to the position of the coronal X-ray source imaged with RHESSI. The radio pulsations originated at least 30 - 240 Mm above the coronal hard X-ray source. The altitude of the radio emission increases generally with lower frequency. The average positions at different frequencies are on a line pointing approximately to the coronal hard X-ray source. Thus, the pulsations cannot be caused by electrons trapped in the flare loops, but are consistent with emission from a current sheet above the coronal source.

  15. Location of Decimetric Pulsations in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benz, Arnold O.; Battaglia, Marina; Vilmer, Nicole

    2011-11-01

    This work investigates the spatial relation between coronal X-ray sources and coherent radio emissions, both generally thought to be signatures of particle acceleration. Two limb events were selected during which the radio emission was well correlated in time with hard X-rays. The radio emissions were of the type of decimetric pulsations as determined from the spectrogram observed by Phoenix-2 of ETH Zurich. The radio positions were measured from observations with the Nançay Radioheliograph between 236 and 432 MHz and compared to the position of the coronal X-ray source imaged with RHESSI. The radio pulsations originated at least 30 - 240 Mm above the coronal hard X-ray source. The altitude of the radio emission increases generally with lower frequency. The average positions at different frequencies are on a line pointing approximately to the coronal hard X-ray source. Thus, the pulsations cannot be caused by electrons trapped in the flare loops, but are consistent with emission from a current sheet above the coronal source.

  16. Pulsations driven by the ɛ-mechanism in post-merger remnants: First results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller Bertolami, M. M.; Córsico, A. H.; Zhang, X.; Althaus, L. G.; Jeffery, C. S.

    2013-03-01

    Helium-rich subdwarfs are a rare subclass of hot subdwarf stars which constitute a small and inhomogeneous group showing varying degrees of helium enrichment. Only one star, LS IV °14 116 has been found to show multiperiodic luminosity variations. The variability of LS IV °14 116 has been explained as the consequence of nonradial g-mode oscillations, whose excitation is difficult to understand within the frame of the standard κ-mechanism driving pulsations in sdBV stars. In a recent study, we have proposed that the pulsations of LS IV °14 116 might be driven through the ɛ-mechanism acting in unstable He-burning zones in the interior of the star, that appear before the quiescent He-burning phase. One of the few accepted scenarios for the formation of He-rich subdwarfs is the merger of two He-core white dwarfs. As part of this project, we present a study of the ɛ-mechanism in post-merger remnants, and discuss the results in the light of the pulsations exhibited by LS IV °14 116.

  17. On the pulsation and evolutionary properties of helium burning radially pulsating variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bono, G.; Pietrinferni, A.; Marconi, M.; Braga, V. F.; Fiorentino, G.; Stetson, P. B.; Buonanno, R.; Castellani, M.; Dall'Ora, M.; Fabrizio, M.; Ferraro, I.; Giuffrida, G.; Iannicola, G.; Marengo, M.; Magurno, D.; Martinez-Vazquez, C. E.; Matsunaga, N.; Monelli, M.; Neeley, J.; Rastello, S.; Salaris, M.; Short, L.; Stellingwerf, R. F.

    2016-05-01

    We discuss pulsation and evolutionary properties of low- (RR Lyrae, Type II Cepheids) and intermediate-mass (Anomalous Cepheids) radial variables. We focus our attention on the topology of the instability strip and the distribution of the quoted variables in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. We discuss their evolutionary status and the dependence on the metallicity. Moreover, we address the diagnostics (period derivative, difference in luminosity, stellar mass) that can provide solid constraints on their progenitors and on the role that binarity and environment have in shaping their current pulsation characteristics. Finally, we briefly outline their use as standard candles.

  18. Large-Scale Aspects and Temporal Evolution of Pulsating Aurora

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, S. L.; Lessard, M. R.; Rychert, K.; Spanswick, E.; Donovan, E.

    2010-01-01

    Pulsating aurora is a common phenomenon generally believed to occur mainly in the aftermath of a, substorm, where dim long-period pulsating patches appear. The study determines the temporal and spatial evolution of pulsating events using two THEN IIIS ASI stations, at Gillam (66.18 mlat, 332.78 mlon, magnetic midnight at 0634 UT) and Fort Smith, (67.38 mlat, 306.64 mlon, magnetic midnight at, 0806 UT) along roughly the same invariant latitude. Parameters have been calculated from a database of 74 pulsating aurora events from 119 days of good optical data within the period from September 2007 through March 2008 as identified with the Gillam camera. It is shown that the source region of pulsating aurora drifts or expands eastward, away from magnetic midnight, for pre-midnight onsets and that the spatial evolution is more complicated for post midnight onsets, which has implications for the source mechanism. The most probable duration of a pulsating aurora event is roughly 1.5 hours while the distribution of possible event durations includes many long (several hours) events. This may suggest that pulsating aurora is not strictly a substorm recovery phase phenomenon but rather a persistent, long-lived phenomenon that may be temporarily disrupted by auroral substorms. Observations from the Gillam station show that in fact, pulsating aurora is quite common with the occurrence rate increasing to around 60% for morning hours, with 6910 of pulsating aurora onsets occurring after substorm breakup.

  19. DRIVING G-MODE PULSATIONS IN GAMMA DORADUS VARIABLES

    SciTech Connect

    J. GUZIK; A. KAYE; ET AL

    2000-10-10

    The {gamma} Doradus stars are a newly-discovered class of gravity-mode pulsators which lie just at or beyond the red edge of the {delta} Scuti instability strip. We present the results of calculations which predict pulsation instability of high-order g-modes with periods between 0.4 and 3 days, as observed in these stars. The pulsations are driven by the modulation of radiative flux by convection at the base of a deep envelope convection zone. Pulsation instability is predicted only for models with temperatures at the convection zone base between {approximately}200,000 and {approximately}480,000 K. The estimated shear dissipation due to turbulent viscosity within the convection zone, or in an overshoot region below the convection zone, can be comparable to or even exceed the predicted driving, and is likely to reduce the number of unstable modes, or possibly to quench the instability. Additional refinements in the pulsation modeling are required to determine the outcome. A few Doradus stars have been observed that also pulsate in {delta} Scuti-type p-modes, and at least two others have been identified as chemically peculiar. Since our calculated driving region is relatively deep, Doradus pulsations are not necessarily incompatible with surface abundance peculiarities or with {delta} Scuti p-mode pulsations driven by the H and He-ionization {kappa} effect. Such stars will provide useful observational constraints on the proposed Doradus pulsation mechanism.

  20. Study on blood flow pulsation using laser speckle contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Shuai; Chen, Yu; Preza, Chrysanthe; Tang, Cha-Min

    2011-03-01

    Laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) is becoming an established method for full-field imaging of blood flow dynamics in animal models. Blood flow pulsation originated from heart beat affects blood flow measurement results of LSCI and it is considered as major physiology noise source for most biomedical applications. But in some biomedical applications, the details of the pulsation process might provide useful information for disease diagnostics. In this study, we investigated the ability as well as the limitation of LSCI in monitoring flow pulsation in phantom study. Both intralipid (2% - 5%) and human whole blood samples are used in phantom study. A syringe pump is controlled by a computer-programmable motor controller and liquid phantom is pushed through a 400 μm ID capillary tube by the pump at different pulsation patterns, varied in frequency (1-7 Hz), valley-to-peak ratio (10%-50%), acceleration/deceleration rate, etc. Speckle contrast images are acquired at 15-30 frames-per-seconds. Our results show: (1) it is very hard for LSCI to pick up signals from high frequency pulsation (5-7 Hz), which is close to the heart back frequency of rats. This might be caused by the nature of fluid dynamics of blood during pulsation. LSCI might not work well for animal models in detecting pulsation. (2) With low frequency pulsation (1 Hz, close to human normal pulsation rate), our experimental results shows from most pulsation patterns, LSCI could catch the fine details of the blood flow change in a cycle. LSCI might be used for studying human blood flow pulsation.

  1. Convective heat transfer characteristics of laminar pulsating pipe air flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habib, M. A.; Attya, A. M.; Eid, A. I.; Aly, A. Z.

    Heat transfer characteristics to laminar pulsating pipe flow under different conditions of Reynolds number and pulsation frequency were experimentally investigated. The tube wall of uniform heat flux condition was considered. Reynolds number was varied from 780 to 1987 while the frequency of pulsation ranged from 1 to 29.5Hz. The results showed that the relative mean Nusselt number is strongly affected by pulsation frequency while it is slightly affected by Reynolds number. The results showed enhancements in the relative mean Nusselt number. In the frequency range of 1-4Hz, an enhancement up to 30% (at Reynolds number of 1366 and pulsation frequency of 1.4Hz) was obtained. In the frequency range of 17-25Hz, an enhancement up to 9% (at Reynolds number of 1366 and pulsation frequency of 17.5Hz) was indicated. The rate of enhancement of the relative mean Nusselt number decreased as pulsation frequency increased or as Reynolds number increased. A reduction in relative mean Nusselt number occurred outside these ranges of pulsation frequencies. A reduction in relative mean Nusselt number up to 40% for pulsation frequency range of 4.1-17Hz and a reduction up to 20% for pulsation frequency range of 25-29.5Hz for Reynolds numbers range of 780-1987 were considered. This reduction is directly proportional to the pulsation frequency. Empirical dimensionless equations have been developed for the relative mean Nusselt number that related to Reynolds number (750

  2. White dwarfs in Be star binary systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Apparao, K. M. V.

    1991-01-01

    An evaluation is made of possible reasons for the persistent inability to identify white dwarf stars in the Be binary systems. It is noted that many Be stars exhibiting large optical enhancements may be Be + WD and Be + He systems, and that observations of pulsations in the H-alpha emission, as well as observation of time delays between enhancements of optical line and continuum, can identify such systems.

  3. Design of a Hydrogen Pulsating Heat Pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yumeng; Deng, Haoren; Pfotenhauer, John; Gan, Zhihua

    In order to enhance the application of a cryocooler that provides cooling capacity at the cold head location, and effectively spread that cooling over an extended region, one requires an efficient heat transfer method. The pulsating heat pipe affords a highly effective heat transfer component that has been extensively researched at room temperature, but is recently being investigated for cryogenic applications. This paper describes the design. The experimental setup is designed to characterize the thermal performance of the PHP as a function of the applied heat, number of turns, filling ratio, inclination angle, and length of adiabatic section.

  4. Construction of Database for Pulsating Variable Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, B. Q.; Yang, M.; Jiang, B. W.

    2011-07-01

    A database for the pulsating variable stars is constructed for Chinese astronomers to study the variable stars conveniently. The database includes about 230000 variable stars in the Galactic bulge, LMC and SMC observed by the MACHO (MAssive Compact Halo Objects) and OGLE (Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment) projects at present. The software used for the construction is LAMP, i.e., Linux+Apache+MySQL+PHP. A web page is provided to search the photometric data and the light curve in the database through the right ascension and declination of the object. More data will be incorporated into the database.

  5. Ultraviolet Pulsations from X-Ray Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bless, Robert

    1991-07-01

    We propose to obtain high-speed photometry at ultraviolet wavelengths of all the pulsing X-ray heated stellar atmospheres of the companion stars to the neutron stars in the binaries and to create list of X-ray pulsars with optical pulsations that can be further observed for such purposes as determining the mass ratios of the binary system. Revision History: Prepared for future cycles submission-- BJW 4/24/92; Cycle 3 to cycle 2; PRISM to SINGLE-- BJW 8/27/92;

  6. Optical multichannel sensing of skin blood pulsations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spigulis, Janis; Erts, Renars; Kukulis, Indulis; Ozols, Maris; Prieditis, Karlis

    2004-09-01

    Time resolved detection and analysis of the skin back-scattered optical signals (reflection photoplethysmography or PPG) provide information on skin blood volume pulsations and can serve for cardiovascular assessment. The multi-channel PPG concept has been developed and clinically verified in this study. Portable two- and four-channel PPG monitoring devices have been designed for real-time data acquisition and processing. The multi-channel devices were successfully applied for cardiovascular fitness tests and for early detection of arterial occlusions in extremities. The optically measured heartbeat pulse wave propagation made possible to estimate relative arterial resistances for numerous patients and healthy volunteers.

  7. Heat transfer characteristics of pulsated turbulent pipe flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habib, M. A.; Said, S. A. M.; Al-Farayedhi, A. A.; Al-Dini, S. A.; Asghar, A.; Gbadebo, S. A.

    Heat Transfer characteristics of pulsated turbulent pipe flow under different conditions of pulsation frequency, amplitude and Reynolds number were experimentally investigated. The pipe wall was kept at uniform heat flux. Reynolds number was varied from 5000 to 29 000 while frequency of pulsation ranged from 1 to 8 Hz. The results show an enhancement in the local Nusselt number at the entrance region. The rate of enhancement decreased as Re increased. Reduction of heat transfer coefficient was observed at higher frequencies and the effect of pulsation is found to be significant at high Reynolds number. It can be concluded that the effect of pulsation on the mean Nusselt numbers is insignificant at low values of Reynolds number.

  8. Chandra Discovers Eruption and Pulsation in Nova Outburst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-09-01

    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has discovered a giant outburst of X-rays and unusual cyclical pulsing from a white dwarf star that is closely orbiting another star -- the first time either of these phenomena has been seen in X-rays. The observations are helping scientists better understand the thermonuclear explosions that occur in certain binary star systems. The observations of Nova Aquilae were reported today at the "Two Years of Science with Chandra" symposium by an international team led by Sumner Starrfield of Arizona State University. "We found two important results in our Chandra observations. The first was an underlying pulsation every 40 minutes in the X-ray brightness, which we believe comes from the cyclical expansion and contraction of the outer layers of the white dwarf," said Starrfield. "The other result was an enormous flare of X-rays that lasted for 15 minutes. Nothing like this has been seen before from a nova, and we don't know how to explain it." Novas occur on a white dwarf (a star which used up all its nuclear fuel and shrank to roughly the size of the Earth) that is orbiting a normal size star. Strong gravity tides drag hydrogen gas off the normal star and onto the white dwarf, where it can take more than 100,000 years for enough hydrogen to accumulate to ignite nuclear fusion reactions. Gradually, these reactions intensify until a cosmic-sized hydrogen bomb blast results. The outer layers of the white dwarf are then blown away, producing a nova outburst that can be observed for a period of months to years as the material expands into space. "Chandra has allowed us to see deep into the gases ejected by this giant explosion and extract unparalleled information on the evolution of the white dwarf whose surface is exploding," said Jeremy Drake of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. The brightening of Nova Aquilae was first detected by optical astronomers in December 1999. "Although this star is at a distance of more than 6

  9. Statistical properties of geomagnetic pulsations at the Observatory of Fuerstenfeldbruck determined with the aid of pulsation indices. Part 2: Periodicity in the occurrence of pulsations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strestik, J.

    The records of the Furstenfeldbrock observatory (FRG) for the years of 1960-1971 were processed using the method of pulsation indices, based on the mean diurnal amplitude of the pulsations in the frequency ranges Pc2, Pc3, Pc4 and Pc5. The variation in the occurrence of pulsations in the course of the solar cycle, the seasonal variational variation and the periods associated with the Sun's rotation were studied for pulsations in all frequency ranges and in both horizontal components. Long-term variations were determined for calm as well as disturbed days. The changes of periodicities in the course of the solar cycle were investigated. The ratio of the intensities of the annual and the semi-annual variations, as well as the ratio of the intensities of the 27-day variation and of variations with shorter periods were studied. The periodicities were determined with the aid of power spectra and expressed graphically.

  10. Computational model of miniature pulsating heat pipes.

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, Mario J.; Givler, Richard C.

    2013-01-01

    The modeling work described herein represents Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) portion of a collaborative three-year project with Northrop Grumman Electronic Systems (NGES) and the University of Missouri to develop an advanced, thermal ground-plane (TGP), which is a device, of planar configuration, that delivers heat from a source to an ambient environment with high efficiency. Work at all three institutions was funded by DARPA/MTO; Sandia was funded under DARPA/MTO project number 015070924. This is the final report on this project for SNL. This report presents a numerical model of a pulsating heat pipe, a device employing a two phase (liquid and its vapor) working fluid confined in a closed loop channel etched/milled into a serpentine configuration in a solid metal plate. The device delivers heat from an evaporator (hot zone) to a condenser (cold zone). This new model includes key physical processes important to the operation of flat plate pulsating heat pipes (e.g. dynamic bubble nucleation, evaporation and condensation), together with conjugate heat transfer with the solid portion of the device. The model qualitatively and quantitatively predicts performance characteristics and metrics, which was demonstrated by favorable comparisons with experimental results on similar configurations. Application of the model also corroborated many previous performance observations with respect to key parameters such as heat load, fill ratio and orientation.

  11. Determination of discharge during pulsating flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, T.H.

    1968-01-01

    Pulsating flow in an open channel is a manifestation of unstable-flow conditions in which a series of translatory waves of perceptible magnitude develops and moves rapidly downstream. Pulsating flow is a matter of concern in the design and operation of steep-gradient channels. If it should occur at high stages in a channel designed for stable flow, the capacity of the channel may be inadequate at a discharge that is much smaller than that for which the channel was designed. If the overriding translatory wave carries an appreciable part of the total flow, conventional stream-gaging procedures cannot be used to determine the discharge; neither the conventional instrumentation nor conventional methodology is adequate. A method of determining the discharge during pulsating flow was tested in the Santa Anita Wash flood control channel in Arcadia, Calif., April 16, 1965. Observations of the dimensions and velocities of translatory waves were made during a period of controlled reservoir releases of about 100, 200, and 300 cfs (cubic feet per second). The method of computing discharge was based on (1) computation of the discharge in the overriding waves and (2) computation of the discharge in the shallow-depth, or overrun, part of the flow. Satisfactory results were obtained by this method. However, the procedure used-separating the flow into two components and then treating the shallow-depth component as though it were steady--has no theoretical basis. It is simply an expedient for use until laboratory investigation can provide a satisfactory analytical solution to the problem of computing discharge during pulsating flow. Sixteen months prior to the test in Santa Anita Wash, a robot camera had been designed .and programmed to obtain the data needed to compute discharge by the method described above. The photographic equipment had been installed in Haines Creek flood control channel in Los Angeles, Calif., but it had not been completely tested because of the infrequency of

  12. Pulsational Modes of Mira Variables Examined through IR Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creech-Eakman, M. J.; Thompson, R. R.; van Belle, G. T.

    1999-12-01

    We have undertaken a program with the Palomar Testbed Interferometer (PTI) to measure the angular size variations, with respect to pulsational phase, of a group of about 20 mainly O-rich Mira variables. While previous groups have attempted to measure angular size with phase (van Belle et al. 1996, 1997; Tej et al. 1999) these are the first dedicated, spatially-resolved K band observations designed to detect size variations in a large sample of Miras at regular intervals over their pulsation periods. Our first goal has been the unambiguous detection of the mira pulsational cycle with phase, already shown in previous work to be as much as 35% of the radial size over the course of a pulsational period (van Belle et al. 1996; Burns et al. 1997; Tuthill et al. 1995; Perrin et al. 1999 ). We will ultimately use these data, along with the best estimates of stellar distance and effective temperatures for these sources, to determine the mode of pulsation. There has long been a debate as to whether Mira variables pulsate in their fundamental or first-overtone mode (Barthes 1999; Feast 1998; Wood and Sebo 1996). Determination of the pulsation behavior of Mira variables may eventually render them suitable as standard candles for distance determination.

  13. There and Back Again?: The Disappearing Pulsations of CS 1246

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasquez Soto, Alan; Barlow, Brad

    2016-01-01

    Hot subdwarf stars were once main sequence stars, like the sun, that deviated from normal stellar evolution due to binary interactions and evolved into extreme horizontal branch stars. Several of these stars exhibit rapid pulsations driven by iron opacity instabilities. CS 1246 is a rapidly pulsating hot subdwarf discovered in 2009 that is dominated by a single 371 second pulsation. At the time of its discovery, the pulsational amplitude was one of the largest known, making CS 1246 an ideal candidate for follow up studies. Observations in 2013 implied that the pulsational amplitude had decreased significantly. Since then we have continued monitoring the star using the robotic SKYNET telescopes in Chile, in order to further characterize any changes. Our recent observations show that the pulsational amplitude has gone down by a factor of six: CS 1246 is barely a pulsator anymore. The decay in amplitude over time is reminiscent of a damped harmonic oscillator. Here we present six years of photometry for CS 1246 and discuss possible scenarios that might explain its interesting behavior.

  14. New pulsating casing collar to improve cementing quality

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, P.; He, K.; Wu, J.

    1998-12-31

    This paper presents the design and test results of a new pulsating casing collar which improves cementing quality. The new pulsating casing collar (PCC) is designed according to the Helmholtz oscillator to generate a pulsating jet flow by self-excitation in the cementing process. By placing this new pulsating casing collar at the bottom of casing string, the generated pulsating jet flow transmits vibrating pressure waves up through the annulus and helps remove drilling mud in the annulus. It can therefore improve cementing quality, especially when eccentric annulus exists due to casing eccentricity where the mud is difficult to remove. The new pulsating casing collar consists of a top nozzle, a resonant chamber, and a bottom nozzle. It can be manufactured easily and is easy to use in the field. It has been tested in Jianghan oil-field, P.R. China. The field-test results support the theoretical analysis and laboratory test, and the cementing quality is shown greatly improved by using the new pulsating casing collar.

  15. A Novel Approach to Solve Linearized Stellar Pulsation Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bard, Christopher; Teitler, S.

    2011-01-01

    We present a new approach to modeling linearized, non-radial pulsations in differentially rotating, massive stars. As a first step in this direction, we consider adiabatic pulsations and adopt the Cowling approximation that perturbations of the gravitational potential and its radial derivative are negligible. The angular dependence of the pulsation modes is expressed as a series expansion of associated Legendre polynomials; the resulting coupled system of differential equations is then solved by finding the eigenfrequencies at which the determinant of a characteristic matrix vanishes. Our method improves on previous treatments by removing the requirement that an arbitrary normalization be applied to the eigenfunctions; this brings the benefit of improved numerical robustness.

  16. Heat transfer coefficients for drying in pulsating flows

    SciTech Connect

    Fraenkel, S.L.

    1998-05-01

    Pulsating flows generated by a Rijke type combustor are studied for drying of grains and food particles. It is assumed that the velocity fluctuations are the main factor in the enhancement of the drying process. The heat transfer coefficients for drying in vibrating beds are utilized to estimate the heat transfer coefficients of fixed beds in pulsating and permeating flows and are compared to the steady flow heat transfer coefficients obtained for solid porous bodies, after perturbing the main flow. The cases considered are compared to the convective heat transfer coefficients employed in non-pulsating drying.

  17. Optical noninvasive monitoring of skin blood pulsations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spigulis, Janis

    2005-04-01

    Time-resolved detection and analysis of skin backscattered optical signals (remission photoplethysmography or PPG) provide rich information on skin blood volume pulsations and can serve for reliable cardiovascular assessment. Single- and multiple-channel PPG concepts are discussed. Simultaneous data flow from several locations on the human body allows us to study heartbeat pulse-wave propagation in real time and to evaluate vascular resistance. Portable single-, dual-, and four-channel PPG monitoring devices with special software have been designed for real-time data acquisition and processing. The prototype devices have been clinically studied, and their potential for monitoring heart arrhythmias, drug-efficiency tests, steady-state cardiovascular assessment, body fitness control, and express diagnostics of the arterial occlusions has been confirmed.

  18. Total pressure averaging in pulsating flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, L. N.; Dudzinski, T. J.; Johnson, R. C.

    1972-01-01

    A number of total-pressure tubes were tested in a non-steady flow generator in which the fraction of period that pressure is a maximum is approximately 0.8, thereby simulating turbomachine-type flow conditions. Most of the tubes indicated a pressure which was higher than the true average. Organ-pipe resonance which further increased the indicated pressure was encountered within the tubes at discrete frequencies. There was no obvious combination of tube diameter, length, and/or geometry variation used in the tests which resulted in negligible averaging error. A pneumatic-type probe was found to measure true average pressure, and is suggested as a comparison instrument to determine whether nonlinear averaging effects are serious in unknown pulsation profiles. The experiments were performed at a pressure level of 1 bar, for Mach number up to near 1, and frequencies up to 3 kHz.

  19. THE PULSATION MODE OF THE CEPHEID POLARIS

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, D. G.; Kovtyukh, V. V.; Usenko, I. A.; Gorlova, N. I.

    2013-01-01

    A previously derived photometric parallax of 10.10 {+-} 0.20 mas, d = 99 {+-} 2 pc, is confirmed for Polaris by a spectroscopic parallax derived using line ratios in high dispersion spectra for the Cepheid. The resulting estimates for the mean luminosity of (M{sub V} ) = -3.07 {+-} 0.01 s.e., average effective temperature of (T{sub eff}) = 6025 {+-} 1 K s.e., and intrinsic color of ((B) - (V)){sub 0} = +0.56 {+-} 0.01 s.e., which match values obtained previously from the photometric parallax for a space reddening of E{sub B-V} = 0.02 {+-} 0.01, are consistent with fundamental mode pulsation for Polaris and a first crossing of the instability strip, as also argued by its rapid rate of period increase. The systematically smaller Hipparcos parallax for Polaris appears discrepant by comparison.

  20. Photometric study of the pulsating, eclipsing binary OO DRA

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X. B.; Deng, L. C.; Tian, J. F.; Wang, K.; Yan, Z. Z.; Luo, C. Q.; Sun, J. J.; Liu, Q. L.; Xin, H. Q.; Zhou, Q.; Luo, Z. Q.

    2014-12-01

    We present a comprehensive photometric study of the pulsating, eclipsing binary OO Dra. Simultaneous B- and V-band photometry of the star was carried out on 14 nights. A revised orbital period and a new ephemeris were derived from the data. The first photometric solution of the binary system and the physical parameters of the component stars are determined. They reveal that OO Dra could be a detached system with a less-massive secondary component nearly filling its Roche lobe. By subtracting the eclipsing light changes from the data, we obtained the intrinsic pulsating light curves of the hotter, massive primary component. A frequency analysis of the residual light yields two confident pulsation modes in both B- and V-band data with the dominant frequency detected at 41.865 c/d. A brief discussion concerning the evolutionary status and the pulsation nature of the binary system is finally given.

  1. Unilateral Loss of Spontaneous Venous Pulsations in an Astronaut

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mader, Thomas H.; Gibson, C. Robert; Lee, Andrew G.; Patel, Nimesh; Hart, Steven; Pettit, Donald R.

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous venous pulsations seen on the optic nerve head (optic disc) are presumed to be caused by fluctuations in the pressure gradient between the intraocular and retrolaminar venous systems. The disappearance of previously documented spontaneous venous pulsations is a well-recognized clinical sign usually associated with a rise in intracranial pressure and a concomitant bilateral elevation of pressure in the subarachnoid space surrounding the optic nerves. In this correspondence we report the unilateral loss of spontaneous venous pulsations in an astronaut 5 months into a long duration space flight. We documented a normal lumbar puncture opening pressure 8 days post mission. The spontaneous venous pulsations were also documented to be absent 21 months following return to Earth.. We hypothesize that these changes may have resulted from a chronic unilateral rise in optic nerve sheath pressure caused by a microgravity-induced optic nerve sheath compartment syndrome.

  2. Pulsations of B stars: A review of observations and theories

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, A.N.

    1986-01-01

    The observational and theoretical status are discussed for several classes of variable B stars. The older classes now seem to be better understood in terms of those stars that probably have at least one radial mode and those that have only nonradial modes. The former are the ..beta.. Cephei variables, and the latter are the slowly rotating 53 Persei and the rapidly rotating zeta Ophiuchi variables. It seems that in this last class there are also some Be stars that show nonradial pulsations from the variations of the line shapes and their light. Among the nonradial pulsators, we must also include the supergiants which show pulsations with very short lifetimes. A review of the present observational and theoretical problems is given. The most persistent problem of the cause for the pulsations is briefly discussed, and many proposed mechanisms plus some new thoughts are presented. 57 refs., 4 figs.

  3. Report of geomagnetic pulsation indices for space weather applications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xu, Z.; Gannon, Jennifer L.; Rigler, Erin J.

    2013-01-01

    The phenomenon of ultra-low frequency geomagnetic pulsations was first observed in the ground-based measurements of the 1859 Carrington Event and has been studied for over 100 years. Pulsation frequency is considered to be “ultra” low when it is lower than the natural frequencies of the plasma, such as the ion gyrofrequency. Ultra-low frequency pulsations are considered a source of noise in some geophysical analysis techniques, such as aeromagnetic surveys and transient electromagnetics, so it is critical to develop near real-time space weather products to monitor these geomagnetic pulsations. The proper spectral analysis of magnetometer data, such as using wavelet analysis techniques, can also be important to Geomagnetically Induced Current risk assessment.

  4. Canards in a rheodynamic model of cardiac pressure pulsations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Feng; Chen, Xian-Feng

    2007-09-01

    This paper reports on the canard phenomenon occurring in a rheodynamic model of cardiac pressure pulsations. By singular perturbation techniques the corresponding parameter value at which canards exist is obtained. The physiological significance of canards in this model is given.

  5. Atomic diffusion and observations of pulsating A stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtz, D. W.

    2013-12-01

    Atomic diffusion - important in many contexts in stellar astrophysics and an important thread running through this meeting - is most spectacularly observable in the atmospheres of some A stars. The magnetic Ap stars and the non-magnetic Am stars show directly abundance anomalies caused by gravitational settling and radiative levitation. Over the last decade spectroscopic studies have begun to provide maps of abundance distributions in the magnetic Ap stars in three dimensions. Interestingly, high radial overtone p-mode pulsations in roAp stars have also given three-dimensional views of the stellar atmospheres with studies of rotational and line profile variations of pulsation amplitudes and phases. These detailed looks at the effects of microscopic atmospheric changes in the strongly non-LTE and magnetic upper atmospheric layers of Ap stars provide perhaps the most exciting challenge to atomic diffusion theory in terms of detailed explanation and prediction. Am stars were at one time thought not to pulsate because of gravitational settling of He from the He ii ionization zone that provides the κ-mechanism driving for δ Sct pulsations in A stars. In the last few years we have found with SuperWASP and Kepler observations that many Am stars do pulsate. More than half of all A stars pulsate at Kepler micromagnitude precision, yet there is a subset of A stars that truly do not pulsate at that level. Are these Am stars with the strongest signature of atomic diffusion? Is atomic diffusion the reason for the pulsational stability of these stars? The answers are not yet known.

  6. Pulsation-Driven Mass Loss in Luminous Blue Variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzik, J. A.; Cox, A. N.; Despain, K. M.

    2005-09-01

    We use a nonlinear hydrodynamics code (Cox & Ostlie 1993) that includes a nonlocal time-dependent convection treatment to explore the pulsation of massive star models (Mo=50 and 80 M⊙) (see also Guzik et al. 1997, 1998, 1999). We find that for high-mass models near the Humphreys-Davidson limit, pulsations can grow to large amplitudes, exceeding 100 km/sec in radial velocity. The pulsations are similar to those of the LBV microvariations, with periods of 5 to 50 days, and light curve variations of about 0.1 mag. Ionization of Fe-group elements is occurring in the envelope at 200,000-500,000 K, producing a convective region that transports a varying amount of the emergent luminosity during the pulsation cycle. Because convection takes some time to turn on and off during a pulsation cycle, the outgoing radiation is periodically dammed up, and the Eddington limit is exceeded locally for that part of the pulsation cycle. The impulse imparted to the outer layers causes a large abrupt increase in their outward motion, which may be the beginning of an LBV `outburst'. Rotation (not included in these models) will also lower the effective gravitational binding of the outer layers. Since the envelopes of these stars contain only ˜10-4 M⊙, this mechanism perhaps could initiate mass loss of at most a few times x 10-4 M⊙/yr, in agreement with observed mass loss rates of LBV stars during an outburst. It is likely that the mass loss rate would be variable, modulated by the build-up of pulsation amplitude, requiring several pulsation cycles to accelerate, and would occur in shells or clumps. We suggest that this mechanism is responsible for the winds and outbursts of `normal' LBV stars such as S Dor or AG Car (Humphreys & Davidson 1994).

  7. 3D Convection-pulsation Simulations with the HERACLES Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felix, S.; Audit, E.; Dintrans, B.

    2015-10-01

    We present 3D simulations of the coupling between surface convection and pulsations due to the κ-mechanism in classical Cepheids of the red edge of Hertzsprung-Russell diagram's instability strip. We show that 3D convection is less powerful than 2D convection and does not quench the radiative pulsations, leading to an efficient 3D κ-mechanism. Thus, the 3D instability strip is closer to the observed one than the 1D or 2D were.

  8. Non-Invasive Measurement of Intracranial Pressure Pulsation using Ultrasound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ueno, Toshiaki; Ballard, R. E.; Yost, W. T.; Hargens, A. R.

    1997-01-01

    Exposure to microgravity causes a cephalad fluid shift which may elevate intracranial pressure (ICP). Elevation in ICP may affect cerebral hemodynamics in astronauts during space flight. ICP is, however, a difficult parameter to measure due to the invasiveness of currently available techniques. We already reported our development of a non-invasive ultrasound device for measurement of ICP. We recently modified the device so that we might reproducibly estimate ICP changes in association with cardiac cycles. In the first experiment, we measured changes in cranial distance with the ultrasound device in cadavera while changing ICP by infusing saline into the lateral ventricle. In the second experiment, we measured changes in cranial distance in five healthy volunteers while placing them in 60 deg, 30 deg head-up tilt, supine, and 10 deg head-down tilt position. In the cadaver study, fast Fourier transformation revealed that cranial pulsation is clearly associated with ICP pulsation. The ratio of cranial distance and ICP pulsation is 1.3microns/mmHg. In the tilting study, the magnitudes of cranial pulsation are linearly correlated to tilt angles (r=0.87). The ultrasound device has sufficient sensitivity to detect cranial pulsation in association with cardiac cycles. By analyzing the magnitude of cranial pulsation, estimates of ICP during space flight are possible.

  9. Influence of pulsation on start-up of UASB reactors.

    PubMed

    Franco, A; Gresia, G; Roca, E; Rozzi, A; Lema, J M

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this work is to study the influence of pulsation on the start-up of lab-scale UASB reactors. Pulsation was produced by an Elastic Membrane Pulsator (EMP). The application of this device in previous works improved the performance of continuous fixed-bed fermentors and reduced the formation of preferential pathways, the retention of gas metabolites within the bed and the resistance to mass transfer. These characteristics seem to be suitable for feeding UASB reactors. In this work, the influence of pulsation frequency was studied in two pulsed UASB reactors operated in parallel with a non-pulsed one. One of them (P1) operated at high frequencies (periods of 50 and 200 s between each pulsation) and the other (P2) at low frequencies (periods of 3600 and 900 s between each pulsation). An important improvement of the removal efficiency for pulsed reactors with respect to the non-pulsed one was obtained. The structure of the biomass was observed at the end of the process by scanning electron microscopy. In general, granulation of biomass was improved when operating in pulsing form.

  10. The stellar seismology of hot white dwarfs and planetary nebula nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawaler, Steven D.

    1987-01-01

    The pulsation properties of hot white dwarfs make it possible to determine their mass, surface composition, rotation, and rate of evolution, and provide constraints on their internal structure. Period spacings are sensitive measures of stellar mass and indicate surface layer structure. Measurement of the rate of period change for these stars provide a way to determine their cooling rates. Attention is also given to how well (or poorly) models of excitation of the pulsations fit within current models of planetary nebula nuclei and hot white dwarfs.

  11. PULSATION FREQUENCIES AND MODES OF GIANT EXOPLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Le Bihan, Bastien; Burrows, Adam E-mail: burrows@astro.princeton.edu

    2013-02-10

    We calculate the eigenfrequencies and eigenfunctions of the acoustic oscillations of giant exoplanets and explore the dependence of the characteristic frequency {nu}{sub 0} and the eigenfrequencies on several parameters: the planet mass, the planet radius, the core mass, and the heavy element mass fraction in the envelope. We provide the eigenvalues for degree l up to 8 and radial order n up to 12. For the selected values of l and n, we find that the pulsation eigenfrequencies depend strongly on the planet mass and radius, especially at high frequency. We quantify this dependence through the calculation of the characteristic frequency {nu}{sub 0} which gives us an estimate of the scale of the eigenvalue spectrum at high frequency. For the mass range 0.5 M{sub J} {<=} M{sub P} {<=} 15 M{sub J} , and fixing the planet radius to the Jovian value, we find that {nu}{sub 0} {approx} 164.0 Multiplication-Sign (M{sub P} /M{sub J} ){sup 0.48}{mu}Hz, where M{sub P} is the planet mass and M{sub J} is Jupiter's mass. For the radius range from 0.9 to 2.0 R{sub J} , and fixing the planet's mass to the Jovian value, we find that {nu}{sub 0} {approx} 164.0 Multiplication-Sign (R{sub P} /R{sub J} ){sup -2.09}{mu}Hz, where R{sub P} is the planet radius and R{sub J} is Jupiter's radius. We explore the influence of the presence of a dense core on the pulsation frequencies and on the characteristic frequency of giant exoplanets. We find that the presence of heavy elements in the envelope affects the eigenvalue distribution in ways similar to the presence of a dense core. Additionally, we apply our formalism to Jupiter and Saturn and find results consistent with both the observational data of Gaulme et al. and previous theoretical work.

  12. A novel and sensitive method for measuring very weak magnetic fields of DA white dwarfs. A search for a magnetic field at the 250 G level in 40 Eridani B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landstreet, J. D.; Bagnulo, S.; Valyavin, G. G.; Gadelshin, D.; Martin, A. J.; Galazutdinov, G.; Semenko, E.

    2015-08-01

    Context. Searches for magnetic fields in white dwarfs have clarified both the frequency of occurrence and the global structure of the fields found down to field strengths of the order of 500 kG. Below this level, the situation is still very unclear. Aims: We are engaged in a project to find and study the weakest magnetic fields that are detectable in white dwarfs, in order to empirically determine how the frequency of occurrence and the structure of fields present changes with field strength. In this paper we report the successful testing of a very sensitive method of longitudinal field detection in DA white dwarfs. We use this method to carry out an extremely sensitive search for magnetism in the bright white dwarf 40 Eri B. Methods: The method of field measurement we use is to measure, at high spectral resolution, the polarisation signal V/I of the narrow non-LTE line core in Hα in DA stars. This small feature provides a much higher amplitude polarisation signal than the broad Balmer line wings. We test the usefulness of this technique by searching for a weak magnetic field in 40 Eri B. Results: One hour of observation of I and V Stokes components of the white dwarf 40 Eri B using ESPaDOnS at the CFHT is found to provide a standard error of measurement of the mean longitudinal magnetic field ⟨ Bz ⟩ of about 85 G. This is the smallest standard error of field measurement ever obtained for a white dwarf. The non-detections obtained are generally consistent with slightly less accurate measurements of 40 Eri B obtained with ISIS at the WHT and the Main Stellar Spectrograph at SAO, in order to provide comparison standards for the new method. These further measurements allow us to make a quantitative comparison of the relative efficiencies of low-resolution spectropolarimetery (using most or all of the Balmer lines) with the new method (using only the core of Hα). Conclusions: The new method of field detection reaches the level of sensitivity that was expected. It

  13. Some simple properties of stellar pulsation modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolff, C. L.

    1979-01-01

    Except for the lowest harmonics, small-amplitude stellar pulsation modes possess many simple properties whose evaluation does not require numerical integration of the fourth-order equations of motion. All antinodes tend to have the same total kinetic energy except for those lying near physical or geometric boundaries. However, when kinetic energy per unit volume is considered, order-of-magnitude enhancements are seen in antinodes lying near the center of the star, and factor-of-2 enhancements occur near the polar axis. The nodes are distributed very regularly along the radius. They follow an exponential law in g-regions, and their separation is proportional to the sound travel time in p-regions. A simple graphical procedure is described for surveying the oscillation frequencies of a new stellar model. A precise condition is derived giving the division of energy between radial and angular motion. Another condition gives the fractional contribution to the velocity field of its two sources, the divergence and the curl. Certain simplifying results of weak coupling among the linear modes are briefly described.

  14. Sher 25: pulsating but apparently alone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, William D.; Evans, Christopher J.; Simón-Díaz, Sergio; Sana, Hugues; Langer, Norbert; Smith, Nathan; Smartt, Stephen J.

    2014-08-01

    The blue supergiant Sher 25 is surrounded by an asymmetric, hourglass-shaped circumstellar nebula, which shows similarities to the triple-ring structure seen around SN 1987A. From optical spectroscopy over six consecutive nights, we detect periodic radial velocity variations in the stellar spectrum of Sher 25 with a peak-to-peak amplitude of ˜12 km s-1 on a time-scale of about 6 d, confirming the tentative detection of similar variations by Hendry et al. From consideration of the amplitude and time-scale of the signal, coupled with observed line profile variations, we propose that the physical origin of these variations is related to pulsations in the stellar atmosphere, rejecting the previous hypothesis of a massive, short-period binary companion. The radial velocities of two other blue supergiants with similar bipolar nebulae, SBW1 and HD 168625, were also monitored over the course of six nights, but these did not display any significant radial velocity variations.

  15. Characterization of ULF Pulsations by THEMIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarris, T. E.; Liu, W.; Kabin, K.; Li, X.; Elkington, S.; Ergun, R.; Rankin, R.; Angelopoulos, V.; Bonnel, J.; Glassmeier, K.; Auster, U.

    2008-12-01

    This paper reports the first use of THEMIS to determine the polarization properties of ULF waves in a non- dipolar magnetic topology: The instrumentation and the alignment at close distances (less than 1 RE) among some of the THEMIS probes (particularly in the first period of its mission) provides unique opportunities to characterize ULF pulsations in the magnetosphere and enables us to validate and parameterize existing models. In the case study presented, electric and magnetic field fluctuations are identified as field line resonances and their modes of oscillation are compared to model estimates. Out of the various modes predicted by the model, the second fundamental mode, or toroidal mode, appears to have most similarities to the measured polarizations. Furthermore, phase-difference calculations using the probes' small separations allow estimates of mode number and propagation characteristics. It is shown that these observations give an excellent source for the verification of model estimates of frequency and polarization of the various modes of field line resonances in the magnetosphere.

  16. The Virtual Observatory Service TheoSSA: Establishing a Database of Synthetic Stellar Flux Standards I. NLTE Spectral Analysis of the DA-Type White Dwarf G191-B2B *,**,***,****

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauch, T.; Werner, K.; Bohlin, R.; Kruk, J. W.

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen-rich, DA-type white dwarfs are particularly suited as primary standard stars for flux calibration. State-of-the-art NLTE models consider opacities of species up to trans-iron elements and provide reliable synthetic stellar-atmosphere spectra to compare with observations. Aims. We will establish a database of theoretical spectra of stellar flux standards that are easily accessible via a web interface. Methods. In the framework of the Virtual Observatory, the German Astrophysical Virtual Observatory developed the registered service TheoSSA. It provides easy access to stellar spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and is intended to ingest SEDs calculated by any model-atmosphere code. In case of the DA white dwarf G191-B2B, we demonstrate that the model reproduces not only its overall continuum shape but also the numerous metal lines exhibited in its ultraviolet spectrum. Results. TheoSSA is in operation and contains presently a variety of SEDs for DA-type white dwarfs. It will be extended in the near future and can host SEDs of all primary and secondary flux standards. The spectral analysis of G191-B2B has shown that our hydrostatic models reproduce the observations best at Teff =60 000 +/- 2000K and log g=7.60 +/- 0.05.We newly identified Fe vi, Ni vi, and Zn iv lines. For the first time, we determined the photospheric zinc abundance with a logarithmic mass fraction of -4.89 (7.5 × solar). The abundances of He (upper limit), C, N, O, Al, Si, O, P, S, Fe, Ni, Ge, and Sn were precisely determined. Upper abundance limits of about 10% solar were derived for Ti, Cr, Mn, and Co. Conclusions. The TheoSSA database of theoretical SEDs of stellar flux standards guarantees that the flux calibration of all astronomical data and cross-calibration between different instruments can be based on the same models and SEDs calculated with different model-atmosphere codes and are easy to compare.

  17. White dwarfs in cataclysmic variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaensicke, Boris

    2016-07-01

    Cataclysmic variables (CVs) provide excellent laboratories to study the effect that the accretion of matter, energy and angular momentum has on the structure of white dwarfs, with important implications on the evolution of these compact binaries, the ignition of thermonuclear surface burning, and potentially their explosion as SNIa. I will provide an overview of our current understanding of CV white dwarfs, with a particular emphasis on the results of a recent large HST program. I will review our knowledge regarding the mass distribution of CV white dwarfs, as well as the secular mean accretion rates that can be inferred from their effective temperatures, and compare those statistics with predictions from CV population models. I will also discuss a sub-set of CVs which underwent thermal-time scale mass transfer, one of the channels that is often discussed as a pathway to SN Ia, and I will illustrate how the study of these "failed SNIa" can contribute to the discussion of SNIa progenitors. Finally, I will discuss the occurrence of non-radial pulsations in white dwarfs, both in CVs and their detached progenitors.

  18. Ionospheric signatures of cusp latitude Pc 3 pulsations

    SciTech Connect

    Engebretson, M.J.; Anderson, B.J. ); Cahill, L.J. Jr. ); Arnoldy, R.L. ); Rosenberg, T.J. ); Carpenter, D.L. ); Gail, W.B. ); Eather, R.H. )

    1990-03-01

    The authors have compared search coil magnetometer, riometer, photometer, and ELF-VLF receiver data obtained at South Pole Station and McMurdo, Antarctica, during selected days in March and April 1986. Narrow-band magnetic pulsations in the Pc 3 period range are observed simultaneously at both stations in the dayside sector during times of low interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) cone angle, but are considerably stronger at South Pole, which is located at a latitude near the nominal foot point of the daysie cusp/cleft region. Pulsations in auroral light a 427.8 nm wavelength are often observed with magnetic pulsations at South Pole, but such optical pulsations are not observed at McMurdo. When Pc 3 pulsations are present, they exhibit nearly identical frequencies, proportional to the magnitude of the IMF, in magnetometer, photometer, and ELF-VLF receiver signals at South Pole Station and in magnetometer signals at McMurdo. Singals from the 30-MHz riometer at South Pole are modulated in concert with the magnetic and optical variations during periods of broadband pulsation activity, but no riometer variations are noted during periods of narrow-band activity. Because riometers are sensitive to electrons of auroral energies (several keV and above), while the 427.8-nm photometer is sensitive to precipitation with much lower energies, they interpret these observatons as showing that precipitating magnetosheathlike electrons (with energies {le} 1 keV) at nominal dayside cleft latitudes are at times modulated with frequencies similar to those of upstream waves. They suggest that these particles may play an important role, via modification of ionospheric currents and conductivities, in the transmission of upstream wave signals into the magnetosphere and in the generation of dayside high-latitude Pc 3 pulsations.

  19. Nonlinear convective pulsation models of type II Cepheids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolec, Radoslaw

    2015-08-01

    We present a grid of nonlinear convective pulsation models of type-II Cepheids: BL Her stars, W Vir stars and RV Tau stars. The models cover a wide range of masses, luminosities, effective temperatures and chemical compositions. The most interesting result is detection of deterministic chaos in the models. Different routes to chaos are detected (period doubling, intermittent route) as well as variety of phenomena intrinsic to chaotic dynamics (periodic islands within chaotic bands, crisis bifurcation, type-I and type-III intermittency). Some of the phenomena (period doubling in BL Her and in RV Tau stars, irregular pulsation of RV Tau stars) are well known in the pulsation of type-II Cepheids. Prospects of discovering the other are briefly discussed. Transition from BL Her type pulsation through W Vir type till RV Tau type is analysed. In the most luminous models a dynamical instability is detected, which indicates that pulsation driven mass loss is important process occurring in type-II Cepheids.

  20. Structure of Black Aurora Associated With Pulsating Aurora

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenward, D. R.; Fritz, B.; Lessard, M.; Fernandes, P. A.; Blandin, M.

    2015-12-01

    Morphological behavior of black aurora as it relates to pulsating aurora is investigated by examining a collection of ground-based observations from January 2007 in support of the ROPA rocket campaign. Images were sampled from video recorded by a Xybion intensified camera (30 fps) at Poker Flat Research Range, AK. The primary observations of black aurora were observed during the substorm recovery phase and separate patches of pulsating aurora as well as pulsating aurora from diffuse aurora. In these observations the black aurora forms an apparent firm boundary between the auroral forms in a new behavior that is in contrast with previously reported observations. Also presented for the first time are black curls in conjunction with pulsating aurora. Curl structures that indicate shear plasma flows in the ionosphere may be used as a proxy for converging/diverging electric fields in and above the ionosphere. This new subset of black auroral behavior may provide visual evidence of black aurora as an ionospheric feedback mechanism as related to pulsating aurora.

  1. THE DISCOVERY OF PULSATING HOT SUBDWARFS IN NGC 2808

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Thomas M.; Landsman, Wayne B.; Randall, Suzanna K.; Sweigart, Allen V.; Lanz, Thierry E-mail: Wayne.Landsman@nasa.gov E-mail: allen.sweigart@gmail.com

    2013-11-10

    We present the results of a Hubble Space Telescope program to search for pulsating hot subdwarfs in the core of NGC 2808. These observations were motivated by the recent discovery of such stars in the outskirts of ω Cen. Both NGC 2808 and ω Cen are massive globular clusters exhibiting complex stellar populations and large numbers of extreme horizontal branch stars. Our far-UV photometric monitoring of over 100 hot evolved stars has revealed six pulsating subdwarfs with periods ranging from 85 to 149 s and UV amplitudes of 2.0%-6.8%. In the UV color-magnitude diagram of NGC 2808, all six of these stars lie immediately below the canonical horizontal branch, a region populated by the subluminous 'blue-hook' stars. For three of these six pulsators, we also have low-resolution far-UV spectroscopy that is sufficient to broadly constrain their atmospheric abundances and effective temperatures. Curiously, and in contrast to the ω Cen pulsators, the NGC 2808 pulsators do not exhibit the spectroscopic or photometric uniformity one might expect from a well-defined instability strip, although they all fall within a narrow band (0.2 mag) of far-UV luminosity.

  2. The Discovery of Pulsating Hot Subdwarfs in NGC 2808

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Thomas M.; Landsman, Wayne B.; Randall, Suzanna K.; Sweigert, Allen V.; Lanz, Thierry

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of a Hubble Space Telescope program to search for pulsating hot subdwarfs in the core of NGC 2808. These observations were motivated by the recent discovery of such stars in the outskirts of Omega Cen. Both NGC 2808 and ? Cen are massive globular clusters exhibiting complex stellar populations and large numbers of extreme horizontal branch stars. Our far-UV photometric monitoring of over 100 hot evolved stars has revealed six pulsating subdwarfs with periods ranging from 85 to 149 s and UV amplitudes of 2.0%-6.8%. In the UV color-magnitude diagram of NGC 2808, all six of these stars lie immediately below the canonical horizontal branch, a region populated by the subluminous "blue-hook" stars. For three of these six pulsators, we also have low-resolution far-UV spectroscopy that is sufficient to broadly constrain their atmospheric abundances and effective temperatures. Curiously, and in contrast to the ? Cen pulsators, the NGC 2808 pulsators do not exhibit the spectroscopic or photometric uniformity one might expect from a well-defined instability strip, although they all fall within a narrow band (0.2 mag) of far-UV luminosity.

  3. The Effects of Pulsating Flow on Eruption Column Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, T.; Dufek, J.; Benage, M. C.

    2015-12-01

    Pulsating flow, at frequencies ranging from 10-2 to 101 Hz, has been recorded in explosive eruptions through video, thermal imagery, and infrasonic and seismic data. Such pulsating flow can be generated from instabilities in bubbly magma, and from granular instabilities in post-fragmentation conduit flow. Variable fluxes of gas and particles at the vent can alter entrainment conditions, and consequently affect eruption column stability. However, volcanic eruption models typically assume steady flow from the vent, and regime diagrams of eruption column stability are based on such steady flow assumptions. Using Eulerian-Eulerian multiphase numerical simulations of eruption columns with both steady and pulsating sources, we compared the relative behavior of steady and pulsed columns across a range of pulse frequencies and mass fluxes at the vent (mass flux is time-averaged for pulsating cases). Preliminary results suggest that pulsating flow increases air entrainment into the column relative to steady flow for otherwise constant eruption conditions, and that entrainment increases with decreasing pulse frequency. Increased entrainment at low frequency implies that low-frequency pulsed columns are more buoyant and potentially more stable than their steady counterparts, for a given mass flux. This effect disrupts the steady flow-based understanding of eruption column stability regimes and may be a factor to consider for future assessment of volcanic hazards and interpreting mass flux conditions from deposits.

  4. Non-adiabatic pulsations in %delta; Scuti stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moya, A.; Garrido, R.; Dupret, M. A.

    2004-01-01

    For δ Scuti stars, phase differences and amplitude ratios between the relative effective temperature variation and the relative radial displacement can be derived from multicolor photometric observations. The same quantities can be also calculated from theoretical non-adiabatic pulsation models. We present here these theoretical results, which indicate that non-adiabatic quantities depend on the mixing length parameter α used to treat the convection in the standard Mixing Length Theory (MLT). This dependence can be used to test and to constrain, through multicolor observations, the way MLT describes convection in the outermost layers of the star. We will use the equilibrium models provided by the CESAM evolutionary code. The pulsational observables are calculated by using a non-adiabatic pulsation code developed by R. Garridon and A. Moya. In the evolutionary and pulsation codes, a complete reconstruction of the non-grey atmosphere (Kurucz models) is included. The interaction between pulsation and atmosphere, as described by Dupret et al. (2002), is also included in the code.

  5. Lattice melting and rotation in perpetually pulsating equilibria

    SciTech Connect

    Pichon, C.; Lynden-Bell, D.; Pichon, J.; Lynden-Bell, R.

    2007-01-15

    Systems whose potential energies consists of pieces that scale as r{sup -2} together with pieces that scale as r{sup 2}, show no violent relaxation to Virial equilibrium but may pulsate at considerable amplitude forever. Despite this pulsation these systems form lattices when the nonpulsational ''energy'' is low, and these disintegrate as that energy is increased. The ''specific heats'' show the expected halving as the ''solid'' is gradually replaced by the ''fluid'' of independent particles. The forms of the lattices are described here for N{<=}18 and they become hexagonal close packed for large N. In the larger N limit, a shell structure is formed. Their large N behavior is analogous to a {gamma}=5/3 polytropic fluid with a quasigravity such that every element of fluid attracts every other in proportion to their separation. For such a fluid, we study the ''rotating pulsating equilibria'' and their relaxation back to uniform but pulsating rotation. We also compare the rotating pulsating fluid to its discrete counterpart, and study the rate at which the rotating crystal redistributes angular momentum and mixes as a function of extra heat content.

  6. Epsilon Aur monitoring during predicted pulsation phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.; Templeton, Matthew R.

    2014-09-01

    Dr. Robert Stencel (University of Denver Astronomy Program) has requested that AAVSO observers monitor epsilon Aurigae from now through the end of the observing season. "Studies of the long-term, out-of-eclipse photometry of this enigmatic binary suggest that intervals of coherent pulsation occur at roughly 1/3 of the 27.1-year orbital period. Kloppenborg, et al. noted that stable variation patterns develop at 3,200-day intervals' implying that 'the next span of dates when such events might happen are circa JD ~2457000 (2014 December)'. "These out-of-eclipse light variations often have amplitudes of ~0.1 magnitude in U, and ~0.05 in V, with characteristic timescales of 60-100 days. The AAVSO light curve data to the present may indicate that this coherent phenomenon has begun, but we encourage renewed efforts by observers...to help deduce whether these events are internal to the F star, or externally-driven by tidal interaction with the companion star." Nightly observations or one observation every few days (CCD/PEP/DSLR, VUBR (amplitude too small for visual)) are requested. Finder charts with sequence may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plotter (http://www.aavso.org/vsp). Observations should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database. Epsilon Aur was the subject of major international campaigns and the AAVSO's Citizen Sky project as it went through its 27.1-year eclipse in 2009-2011. Over 700 observers worldwide submitted over 20,000 multicolor observations to the AAVSO International Database for this project. Much information on eps Aur is available from the AAVSO, including material on the Citizen Sky website (http://www.aavso.org/epsilon-aurigae and http://www.citizensky.org/content/star-our-project). The Journal of the AAVSO, Volume 40, No. 2 (2012) was devoted to discussion of and research results from this event. See full Alert Notice for more details and observations.

  7. Detection of Multiple Budding Yeast Cells and a Partial Sequence of 43-kDa Glycoprotein Coding Gene of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis from a Case of Lacaziosis in a Female Pacific White-Sided Dolphin (Lagenorhynchus obliquidens).

    PubMed

    Minakawa, Tomoko; Ueda, Keiichi; Tanaka, Miyuu; Tanaka, Natsuki; Kuwamura, Mitsuru; Izawa, Takeshi; Konno, Toshihiro; Yamate, Jyoji; Itano, Eiko Nakagawa; Sano, Ayako; Wada, Shinpei

    2016-08-01

    Lacaziosis, formerly called as lobomycosis, is a zoonotic mycosis, caused by Lacazia loboi, found in humans and dolphins, and is endemic in the countries on the Atlantic Ocean, Indian Ocean and Pacific Ocean of Japanese coast. Susceptible Cetacean species include the bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus), the Indian Ocean bottlenose dolphin (T. aduncus), and the estuarine dolphin (Sotalia guianensis); however, no cases have been recorded in other Cetacean species. We diagnosed a case of Lacaziosis in a Pacific white-sided dolphin (Lagenorhynchus obliquidens) nursing in an aquarium in Japan. The dolphin was a female estimated to be more than 14 years old at the end of June 2015 and was captured in a coast of Japan Sea in 2001. Multiple, lobose, and solid granulomatous lesions with or without ulcers appeared on her jaw, back, flipper and fluke skin, in July 2014. The granulomatous skin lesions from the present case were similar to those of our previous cases. Multiple budding and chains of round yeast cells were detected in the biopsied samples. The partial sequence of 43-kDa glycoprotein coding gene confirmed by a nested PCR and sequencing, which revealed a different genotype from both Amazonian and Japanese lacaziosis in bottlenose dolphins, and was 99 % identical to those derived from Paracoccidioides brasiliensis; a sister fungal species to L. loboi. This is the first case of lacaziosis in Pacific white-sided dolphin.

  8. Detection of Multiple Budding Yeast Cells and a Partial Sequence of 43-kDa Glycoprotein Coding Gene of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis from a Case of Lacaziosis in a Female Pacific White-Sided Dolphin (Lagenorhynchus obliquidens).

    PubMed

    Minakawa, Tomoko; Ueda, Keiichi; Tanaka, Miyuu; Tanaka, Natsuki; Kuwamura, Mitsuru; Izawa, Takeshi; Konno, Toshihiro; Yamate, Jyoji; Itano, Eiko Nakagawa; Sano, Ayako; Wada, Shinpei

    2016-08-01

    Lacaziosis, formerly called as lobomycosis, is a zoonotic mycosis, caused by Lacazia loboi, found in humans and dolphins, and is endemic in the countries on the Atlantic Ocean, Indian Ocean and Pacific Ocean of Japanese coast. Susceptible Cetacean species include the bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus), the Indian Ocean bottlenose dolphin (T. aduncus), and the estuarine dolphin (Sotalia guianensis); however, no cases have been recorded in other Cetacean species. We diagnosed a case of Lacaziosis in a Pacific white-sided dolphin (Lagenorhynchus obliquidens) nursing in an aquarium in Japan. The dolphin was a female estimated to be more than 14 years old at the end of June 2015 and was captured in a coast of Japan Sea in 2001. Multiple, lobose, and solid granulomatous lesions with or without ulcers appeared on her jaw, back, flipper and fluke skin, in July 2014. The granulomatous skin lesions from the present case were similar to those of our previous cases. Multiple budding and chains of round yeast cells were detected in the biopsied samples. The partial sequence of 43-kDa glycoprotein coding gene confirmed by a nested PCR and sequencing, which revealed a different genotype from both Amazonian and Japanese lacaziosis in bottlenose dolphins, and was 99 % identical to those derived from Paracoccidioides brasiliensis; a sister fungal species to L. loboi. This is the first case of lacaziosis in Pacific white-sided dolphin. PMID:26883513

  9. Long periods (1 -10 mHz) geomagnetic pulsations variation with solar cycle in South Atlantic Magnetic Anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigon Silva, Willian; Schuch, Nelson Jorge; Guimarães Dutra, Severino Luiz; Babulal Trivedi, Nalin; Claudir da Silva, Andirlei; Souza Savian, Fernando; Ronan Coelho Stekel, Tardelli; de Siqueira, Josemar; Espindola Antunes, Cassio

    The occurrence and intensity of the geomagnetic pulsations Pc-5 (2-7 mHz) and its relationship with the solar cycle in the South Atlantic Magnetic Anomaly -SAMA is presented. The study of geomagnetic pulsations is important to help the understanding of the physical processes that occurs in the magnetosphere region and help to predict geomagnetic storms. The fluxgate mag-netometers H, D and Z, three axis geomagnetic field data from the Southern Space Observatory -SSO/CRS/INPE -MCT, São Martinho da Serra (29.42° S, 53.87° W, 480m a.s.l.), RS, Brasil, a were analyzed and correlated with the solar wind parameters (speed, density and temperature) from the ACE and SOHO satellites. A digital filtering to enhance the 2-7 mHz geomagnetic pulsations was used. Five quiet days and five perturbed days in the solar minimum and in the solar maximum were selected for this analysis. The days were chosen based on the IAGA definition and on the Bartels Musical Diagrams (Kp index) for 2001 (solar maximum) and 2008 (solar minimum). The biggest Pc-5 amplitude averages differences between the H-component is 78,35 nT for the perturbed days and 1,60nT for the quiet days during the solar maximum. For perturbed days the average amplitude during the solar minimum is 8,32 nT, confirming a direct solar cycle influence in the geomagnetic pulsations intensity for long periods.

  10. Time-resolved spectroscopy of the pulsating CV GW Lib

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Spaandonk, L.; Steeghs, D.; Marsh, T. R.; Torres, M. A. P.

    2010-01-01

    We present time-resolved optical spectroscopy of the dwarf nova GW Librae during its rare 2007 April superoutburst and compare these with quiescent epochs. The data provide the first opportunity to track the evolution of the principal spectral features. In the early stages of the outburst, the optically thick disc dominates the optical and the line components show clear orbital radial velocity excursions. In the course of several weeks, optically thin regions become more prominent as strong emission lines replace the broad disc absorption. Post-outburst spectroscopy covering the I band illustrates the advantages of CaII relative to the commonly used Balmer lines when attempting to constrain binary parameters. Due to the lower ionization energy combined with smaller thermal and shear broadening of these lines, a sharp emission component is seen to be moving in between the accretion disc peaks in the CaII line. No such component is visible in the Balmer lines. We interpret this as an emission component originating on the hitherto unseen mass donor star. This emission component has a mean velocity of ~ -15 +/- 5 kms-1 which is associated with the systemic velocity γ, and a velocity semi-amplitude of Kem = 82.2 +/- 4.9 kms-1. Doppler tomography reveals an asymmetric accretion disc, with the S-wave mapping to a sharp spot in the tomogram with a velocity consistent to what is obtained with line profile fitting. A centre of symmetry analysis of the disc component suggests a very small value for the WD orbital velocity K1 as is also inferred from double Gaussian fits to the spectral lines. While our conservative dynamical limits place a hard upper limit on the binary mass ratio of q < 0.23, we favour a significantly lower value near q ~ 0.06. Pulsation modelling suggests a white dwarf mass ~1Msolar. This, paired with a low-mass donor, near the empirical sequence of an evolved cataclysmic variable close to the period bounce, appears to be consistent with all the

  11. Exhaust pressure pulsation observation from turbocharger instantaneous speed measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macián, V.; Luján, J. M.; Bermúdez, V.; Guardiola, C.

    2004-06-01

    In internal combustion engines, instantaneous exhaust pressure measurements are difficult to perform in a production environment. The high temperature of the exhaust manifold and its pulsating character make its application to exhaust gas recirculation control algorithms impossible. In this paper an alternative method for estimating the exhaust pressure pulsation is presented. A numerical model is built which enables the exhaust pressure pulses to be predicted from instantaneous turbocharger speed measurements. Although the model is data based, a theoretical description of the process is also provided. This combined approach makes it possible to export the model for different engine operating points. Also, compressor contribution in the turbocharger speed pulsation is discussed extensively. The compressor contribution is initially neglected, and effects of this simplified approach are analysed.

  12. Ultra-low-frequency magnetic pulsations in the earth's magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Brian J.

    1990-01-01

    Spacecraft observations have shown that geomagnetic pulsations originating in magnetospheric processes, in spite of their small amplitude on the ground, have amplitudes in space relative to the local magnetic field of 5-10 percent and occasionally up to about 50 percent. It is noted that by studying geomagnetic pulsations, a detailed comparison can be made between plasma physics theory and observations that are not possible in laboratory experiments. Also geomagnetic pulsations play a role in magnetospheric dynamics and energy transport, and their study forms an integral part of enhancing the knowledge of the magnetosphere. The importance of spacecraft observations are discussed and attention is given to such topics as waves in the magnetosphere, field-line resonances, the quantitative analysis of a dipole field, plasma instabilities, and energy flow.

  13. Ground magnetic field fluctuations associated with pulsating aurora

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michell, R. G.; Samara, M.

    2015-10-01

    A case study of an intense pulsating auroral event is presented where the large-scale (100-200 km) optical intensity variations are anticorrelated with fluctuations in the ground magnetometer data at a frequency of 0.1 Hz. The auroral event occurred over Poker Flat, Alaska, on 1 March 2012 and was imaged optically with several different fields of view and filters. The fluctuations in the magnetometer data were most prominent in the D component and had magnitudes of 1 to 5 nT. The auroral intensity variations had amplitudes of 200 to 400 R, comprising 25% to 50% of the total auroral luminosity at 427.8 nm. The direction of the magnetometer deflections is consistent with a south-to-north ionospheric current present when each pulsation is on, thus providing closure for the field-aligned currents associated with each of the pulsating patches.

  14. On the Stenbaek-Nielsen and Hallinan pulsating auroras

    SciTech Connect

    D'Angelo, N. )

    1991-02-01

    Stenbaek-Nielsen and Hallinan (1979) argued that if the pulsating auroras are caused by precipitating electrons, the data suggest that noncollisional interactions, localized in the lower E region (90-107 km), where most of the pulsations are observed, may play a dominant role in thermalizing the particles. They also stated that one type of process that comes to mind is a wave-particle interaction in the ionosphere. If, through one or more instabilities, waves grow at the expense of beam energy and, in turn, energize ambient electrons, the energized ambient electrons could ionize the background gas and, in process, produce luminosity. The exceptionally thin pulsating auroral patches observed by Stenbaek-Nielsen and Hallinan (1979) may be caused by an ionization instability occurring at the end of the range of precipitating electrons. A comparison is made to laboratory results reported by Johnson et al. (1990).

  15. White Dwarf Pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Joseph

    1999-01-01

    This proposal was designed to study pulse and orbital modulations in candidate DQ Herculis stars. Data on 5 stars were obtained. The best results were obtained on YY Draconis, which exhibited a strongly pulsed hard X-ray flux, and even suggested a transition between one-pole and two-pole emission during the course of the observation. This result is being readied for inclusion in a comprehensive study of YY Draconis. A strong pulsation appeared to be present also in H0857-242, but with a period of about 50 minutes, confusion with the first harmonic of the satellite's orbital frequency is possible. So that result is uncertain. A negative result was obtained on 4UO608-49 (V347 Pup), suggesting either that the X-ray identification is incorrect, or that the source is very transient. Finally, data was obtained on V1432 Aql and WZ Sge, respectively the slowest and fastest of these stars. Combined with the Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA) data, the high-energy data demonstrates the latter to contain a white dwarf rotating with P = 27.87 s. Optical photometry contemporaneous with the X-ray data was obtained of V1432 Aql, in order to study the variations in the eclipse waveform. As anticipated, the width and centroid of the eclipse appeared to vary with the 50-day "supercycle". A paper reporting this study is now in preparation.

  16. Generation of traveling atmospheric disturbances during pulsating geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Larry; Schunk, Robert

    Traveling Atmospheric Disturbances (TADs) are effective in transporting momentum and en-ergy deposited at high latitudes to the mid and low latitude regions of the thermosphere. They also act to transport momentum and energy from the lower thermosphere into the upper ther-mosphere. Previously, model studies have been conducted to determine the characteristics of isolated, single-pulse TADs, but the generation of multiple TADs excited during pulsating storms have not been considered before. Here, a high-resolution global thermosphere-ionosphere model was used to study the basic characteristic of multiple TADs excited during pulsating storms, including idealized weak and strong pulsating storms, and an approximation of the May 4, 1998 pulsating storm. For all three pulsating storm simulations, multiple TADs were excited that propagated away form the auroral oval both toward the poles and toward the equator at all longitudes, with the maximum amplitudes between midnight and dawn. The TAD amplitudes were a maximum near the poles, diminished towards the equator and were larger on the nightside than on the dayside. The TADs propagated at a slight upward angle to the horizontal, with the result that the lower boundary of the TADs increased with decreas-ing latitude. The TADs crossed the equator and propagated to mid-latitudes in the opposite hemisphere, where wave interference occurred for the strong pulsating storm cases. The TAD wavelengths vary from 2500-3000 km and the phase speeds from 800-1000 m/s. The maximum TAD perturbations are 20% for the mass density 14% for the neutral temperature and 100 m/s for the winds.

  17. Generation of traveling atmospheric disturbances during pulsating geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, L. C.; Schunk, R. W.

    2010-08-01

    Traveling atmospheric disturbances (TADs) are effective in transporting momentum and energy deposited at high latitudes to the midlatitude and low-latitude regions of the thermosphere. They also act to transport momentum and energy from the lower thermosphere into the upper thermosphere. Previously, model studies have been conducted to determine the characteristics of isolated, single-pulse TADs, but the generation of multiple TADs excited during pulsating storms have not been considered before. Here a high-resolution global thermosphere-ionosphere model was used to study the basic characteristics of multiple TADs excited during pulsating storms, including idealized weak and strong pulsating storms, and an approximation of the 4 May 1998 pulsating storm. For all three pulsating storm simulations, multiple TADs that propagated away from the auroral oval toward both the poles and the equator at all longitudes, with the maximum amplitudes between midnight and dawn, were excited. The TAD amplitudes were at maximum near the poles and diminished toward the equator and were larger on the nightside than on the dayside. The TADs propagated at a slightly upward angle to the horizontal, with the result that the lower boundary of the TADs increased with decreasing latitude. The TADs crossed the equator and propagated to midlatitudes in the opposite hemisphere, where wave interference occurred for the strong pulsating storm cases. The TAD wavelengths vary from 2500 to 3000 km and the phase speeds vary from 800 to 1000 m/s. The maximum TAD perturbations are 20% for the mass density, 14% for the neutral temperature, and 100 m/s for the winds.

  18. MOST photometry of the enigmatic PMS pulsator HD 142666

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwintz, K.; Kallinger, T.; Guenther, D. B.; Gruberbauer, M.; Huber, D.; Rowe, J.; Kuschnig, R.; Weiss, W. W.; Matthews, J. M.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Rucinski, S. M.; Sasselov, D.; Walker, G. A. H.; Casey, M. P.

    2009-02-01

    Context: Modeling of pre-main sequence (PMS) stars through asteroseismology of PMS p-mode pulsators has only recently become possible, and spacebased photometry is one of the important sources of data for these efforts. We present precise photometry of the pulsating Herbig Ae star HD 142666 obtained in two consecutive years with the MOST (Microvariability & Oscilations of STars) satellite. Aims: Previously, only a single pulsation period was known for HD 142666. The MOST photometry reveals that HD 142666 is multi-periodic. However, the unique identification of pulsation frequencies is complicated by the presence of irregular variability caused by the star's circumstellar dust disk. The two light curves obtained with MOST in 2006 and 2007 provided data of unprecedented quality to study the pulsations in HD 142666 and also to monitor the circumstellar variability. Methods: Frequency analysis was performed using the routine sigspec and the results from the 2006 and 2007 campaigns were then compared to each other with the software cinderella to identify frequencies common to both light curves. The correlated frequencies were then submitted to an asteroseismic analysis. Results: We attribute 12 frequencies to pulsation. Model fits to the three frequencies with the highest amplitudes lie well outside the uncertainty box for the star's position in the HR diagram based on published values. Some of the frequencies appear to be rotationally split modes. Conclusions: The models suggest that either (1) the published estimate of the luminosity of HD 142666, based on a relation between circumstellar disk radius and stellar luminosity, is too high and/or (2) additional physics such as mass accretion may be needed in our models to accurately fit both the observed frequencies and HD 142666's position in the HR diagram. Based on data from the MOST satellite, a Canadian Space Agency mission, jointly operated by Dynacon Inc., the University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies

  19. Analysis of pulsating spray flames propagating in lean two-phase mixtures with unity Lewis number

    SciTech Connect

    Nicoli, C.; Haldenwang, P.; Suard, S.

    2005-11-01

    Pulsating (or oscillatory) spray flames have recently been observed in experiments on two-phase combustion. Numerical studies have pointed out that such front oscillations can be obtained even with very simple models of homogeneous two-phase mixtures, including elementary vaporization schemes. The paper presents an analytical approach within the simple framework of the thermal-diffusive model, which is complemented by a vaporization rate independent of gas temperature, as soon as the latter reaches a certain thermal threshold ({theta}{sub v} in reduced form). The study involves the Damkoehler number (Da), the ratio of chemical reaction rate to vaporization rate, and the Zeldovich number (Ze) as essential parameters. We use the standard asymptotic method based on matched expansions in terms of 1/Ze. Linear analysis of two-phase flame stability is performed by studying, in the absence of differential diffusive effects (unity Lewis number), the linear growth rate of 2-D perturbations added to steady plane solutions and characterized by wavenumber k in the direction transverse to spreading. A domain of existence is found for the pulsating regime. It corresponds to mixture characteristics often met in air-fuel two-phase systems: low boiling temperature ({theta}{sub v} << 1), reaction rate not higher than vaporization rate (Da < 1, i.e., small droplets), and activation temperature assumed to be high compared with flame temperature (Ze {>=} 10). Satisfactory comparison with numerical simulations confirms the validity of the analytical approach; in particular, positive growth rates have been found for planar perturbations (k = 0) and for wrinkled fronts (k {ne} 0). Finally, comparison between predicted frequencies and experimental measurements is discussed.

  20. White Dwarf Pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Joseph

    1998-01-01

    Work on NAG5-3288 ("White Dwarf Pulsars") has been fully integrated with the identically titled project NAG5-4734. The final report below is the same, since the data analysis and interpretative work are integrated, as are the resulting (previous and in-pipeline) publications. The proposal was designed to study pulse and orbital modulations in candidate DQ Herculis stars. Data on 5 stars were obtained. The best results were obtained on YY Draconis, which exhibited a strongly pulsed hard X-ray flux, and even suggested a transition between one-pole and two-pole emission during the course of the observation. This result is being readied for inclusion in a comprehensive study of YY Draconis. A strong pulsation appeared to be present also in H0857-242, but with a period of - 50 minutes, confusion with the first harmonic of the satellite's orbital frequency is possible. So that result is uncertain and is "on ice". A negative result was obtained on 4UO608-49 (V347 Pup), suggesting either that the X-ray identification is incorrect, or that the source is very transient. Finally, data was obtained on V1432 Aql and WZ Sge, respectively the slowest and fastest of these stars. Combined with the ASCA data, the high-energy data demonstrates the latter to contain a white dwarf rotating with P = 27.87 s (Patterson et al. 1998, PASP, 110, 403). Optical photometry contemporaneous with the X-ray data was obtained of V1432 Aql, in order to study the variations in the eclipse waveform. As anticipated, the width and centroid of the eclipse appeared to vary with the 50-day "supercycle".

  1. Spectral peculiarities of turbulent pulsations of submerged water jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Znamenskaya, I. A.; Koroteeva, E. Yu.; Novinskaya, A. M.; Sysoev, N. N.

    2016-07-01

    The spectra of turbulent jet temperature pulsations at 1-40 Hz frequencies have been experimentally studied based on high-speed thermography of the water boundary layer: the region where an impact jet interacts with a surface transparent to IR radiation, as well as the near-wall region where two submerged jets interact in a disc-shaped tee-joint. It has been indicated that the slopes of the spectra of impact submerged jet turbulent pulsations are close to-5/3 and a double inertial interval exists in a quasi-2D turbulent flow that is formed when two jets mix.

  2. Latitude distribution of nonradial pulsations in rapidly rotating B stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jankov, S.; Mathias, P.; Domiciano de Souza, A., Jr.; Uytterhoeven, K.; Aerts, C.

    2004-05-01

    We present a method for the analysis of latitude distribution associated with temperature and/or velocity perturbations of the stellar surface due to non-radial pulsation (NRP) modes in rapidly rotating B stars. The technique is applied together with Fourier Doppler Imaging (FDI) to high resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio spectroscopic observations of ɛ Per. The main advantage of this approach is that it decomposed complex multi-periodic line profile variations into single components, allowing the detailed analysis of each mode seperately. We study the 10.6-d-1 frequency that is particularly important for modal analysis of non-radial pulsations in the star.

  3. Cycles of self-pulsations in a photonic integrated circuit.

    PubMed

    Karsaklian Dal Bosco, Andreas; Kanno, Kazutaka; Uchida, Atsushi; Sciamanna, Marc; Harayama, Takahisa; Yoshimura, Kazuyuki

    2015-12-01

    We report experimentally on the bifurcation cascade leading to the appearance of self-pulsation in a photonic integrated circuit in which a laser diode is subjected to delayed optical feedback. We study the evolution of the self-pulsing frequency with the increase of both the feedback strength and the injection current. Experimental observations show good qualitative accordance with numerical results carried out with the Lang-Kobayashi rate equation model. We explain the mechanism underlying the self-pulsations by a phenomenon of beating between successive pairs of external cavity modes and antimodes.

  4. Resonant self-pulsations in coupled nonlinear microcavities

    SciTech Connect

    Grigoriev, Victor; Biancalana, Fabio

    2011-04-15

    A different point of view on the phenomenon of self-pulsations is presented, which shows that they are a balanced state formed by two counteracting processes: beating of modes and bistable switching. A structure based on two coupled nonlinear microcavities provides a generic example of a system with enhanced ability to support this phenomenon. The specific design of such a structure in the form of multilayered media is proposed, and the coupled-mode theory is applied to describe its dynamical properties. It is emphasized that the frequency of self-pulsations is related to the frequency splitting between resonant modes and can be adjusted over a broad range.

  5. Mode identification from spectroscopy of gravity-mode pulsators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollard, K. R.; Brunsden, E.; Cottrell, P. L.; Davie, M.; Greenwood, A.; Wright, D. J.; De Cat, P.

    2014-02-01

    The gravity modes present in γ Doradus stars probe the deep stellar interiors and are thus of particular interest in asteroseismology. For the MUSICIAN programme at the University of Canterbury, we obtain extensive high-resolution echelle spectra of γ Dor stars from the Mt John University Observatory in New Zealand. We analyze these to obtain the pulsational frequencies and identify these with the multiple pulsational modes excited in the star. A summary of recent results from our spectroscopic mode-identification programme is given.

  6. The first detection of ionized helium in the local ISM - EUVE and IUE spectroscopy of the hot DA white dwarf GD 246

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vennes, Stephane; Dupuis, Jean; Rumph, Todd; Drake, Jeremy; Bowyer, Stuart; Chayer, Pierre; Fontaine, Gilles

    1993-01-01

    We report observations of the extreme ultraviolet spectrum of the hot degenerate star GD 246 obtained with the EUVE. Our initial attempt at modeling the photospheric emission from the white dwarf reveals a relatively uncontaminated pure H spectrum in the range above 200 A, allowing a study of interstellar continuum absorption features in the line of sight of GD 246. Modeling of the He I autoionization transition discussed by Rumph et al. (1993), and the EUV continuum using the white dwarf as a source of background radiation provides measurements of both neutral and, for the first time, singly ionized He column densities in the local ISM (LISM). We estimate the He ionization fraction He II/(He I + He II) at roughly 25 percent with a total He column of 1.40-1.65 x 10 exp 18/sq cm. We have measured and compared H I column densities from the saturated Ly-alpha ISM absorption in IUE high-dispersion spectroscopy and from EUV continuum absorption: the two measurements are in good agreement with a total H column of 1.2-1.6 x 10 exp 19/sq cm. We discuss some implications for the nature of the LISM, particularly in the context of current models of the EUV radiation field.

  7. Detection of Anisotropic Pulsating Flow and Its Velocity-Fluctuation Rate in Fertilized Bird Eggs by NMR Microimaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Görke, U.; Kimmich, R.; Weis, J.

    1996-06-01

    Coherent and incoherent flows in fertilized quail and bantam eggs have been studied with the aid of NMR microimaging techniques in the course of incubation until the end of the sixth day. The methods employed were multiplane tagging NMR imaging and a NMR gradient-echo imaging pulse sequence supplemented by bipolar gradient pulses in the coherence-evolution interval. The latter technique is suited for recording of velocity maps as well as for localizing of regions with enhanced echo attenuation by incoherent motions. Slight coherent displacements in the middle of the upper part of the egg white were found after the fourth day of incubation with the aid of both pulse schemes. The maximum velocity was estimated to be 1 mm/s. More pronounced effects revealed themselves in the examination of incoherent motions. After the same time of incubation and in a somewhat more restricted area of the upper part of the egg white, distinct motions could be localized consistently with either technique. It is shown that these motions are directed to and from the yolk. Furthermore, the analysis of the time fluctuations of the local signals with the aid of a Fourier transformation showed that the flow is largely of a pulsating nature. The pulsation frequency was found to be 0.4 Hz.

  8. An asteroseismic test of diffusion theory in white dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metcalfe, T. S.; Nather, R. E.; Watson, T. K.; Kim, S.-L.; Park, B.-G.; Handler, G.

    2005-05-01

    The helium-atmosphere (DB) white dwarfs are commonly thought to be the descendants of the hotter PG 1159 stars, which initially have uniform He/C/O atmospheres. In this evolutionary scenario, diffusion builds a pure He surface layer which gradually thickens as the star cools. In the temperature range of the pulsating DB white dwarfs (T_eff ˜ 25 000 K) this transformation is still taking place, allowing asteroseismic tests of the theory. We have obtained dual-site observations of the pulsating DB star CBS 114, to complement existing observations of the slightly cooler star GD 358. We recover the 7 independent pulsation modes that were previously known, and we discover 4 new ones to provide additional constraints on the models. We perform objective global fitting of our updated double-layered envelope models to both sets of observations, leading to determinations of the envelope masses and pure He surface layers that qualitatively agree with the expectations of diffusion theory. These results provide new asteroseismic evidence supporting one of the central assumptions of spectral evolution theory, linking the DB white dwarfs to PG 1159 stars.

  9. CALIBRATION OF THE MIXING-LENGTH THEORY FOR CONVECTIVE WHITE DWARF ENVELOPES

    SciTech Connect

    Tremblay, P.-E.; Ludwig, H.-G.; Freytag, B.; Fontaine, G.; Brassard, P.; Steffen, M.

    2015-02-01

    A calibration of the mixing-length parameter in the local mixing-length theory (MLT) is presented for the lower part of the convection zone in pure-hydrogen-atmosphere white dwarfs. The parameterization is performed from a comparison of three-dimensional (3D) CO5BOLD simulations with a grid of one-dimensional (1D) envelopes with a varying mixing-length parameter. In many instances, the 3D simulations are restricted to the upper part of the convection zone. The hydrodynamical calculations suggest, in those cases, that the entropy of the upflows does not change significantly from the bottom of the convection zone to regions immediately below the photosphere. We rely on this asymptotic entropy value, characteristic of the deep and adiabatically stratified layers, to calibrate 1D envelopes. The calibration encompasses the convective hydrogen-line (DA) white dwarfs in the effective temperature range 6000 ≤ T {sub eff} (K) ≤15, 000 and the surface gravity range 7.0 ≤ log g ≤ 9.0. It is established that the local MLT is unable to reproduce simultaneously the thermodynamical, flux, and dynamical properties of the 3D simulations. We therefore propose three different parameterizations for these quantities. The resulting calibration can be applied to structure and envelope calculations, in particular for pulsation, chemical diffusion, and convective mixing studies. On the other hand, convection has no effect on the white dwarf cooling rates until there is a convective coupling with the degenerate core below T {sub eff} ∼ 5000 K. In this regime, the 1D structures are insensitive to the MLT parameterization and converge to the mean 3D results, hence they remain fully appropriate for age determinations.

  10. Low-altitude satellite measurements of pulsating auroral electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samara, M.; Michell, R. G.; Redmon, R. J.

    2015-09-01

    We present observations from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program and Reimei satellites, where common-volume high-resolution ground-based auroral imaging data are available. These satellite overpasses of ground-based all-sky imagers reveal the specific features of the electron populations responsible for different types of pulsating aurora modulations. The energies causing the pulsating aurora mostly range from 3 keV to 20 keV but can at times extend up to 30 keV. The secondary, low-energy electrons (<1 keV) are diminished from the precipitating distribution when there are strong temporal variations in auroral intensity. There are often persistent spatial structures present inside regions of pulsating aurora, and in these regions there are secondary electrons in the precipitating populations. The reduction of secondary electrons is consistent with the strongly temporally varying pulsating aurora being associated with field-aligned currents and hence parallel potential drops of up to 1 kV.

  11. Constraints on pre-main-sequence evolution from stellar pulsations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casey, M. P.; Zwintz, K.; Guenther, D. B.

    2014-02-01

    Pulsating pre-main-sequence (PMS) stars afford the earliest opportunity in the lifetime of a star to which the concepts of asteroseismology can be applied. PMS stars should be structurally simpler than their evolved counterparts, thus (hopefully!) making any asteroseismic analysis relatively easier. Unfortunately, this isn't necessarily the case. The majority of these stars (around 80) are δ Scuti pulsators, with a couple of γ Doradus, γ Doradus - δ Scuti hybrids, and slowly pulsating B stars thrown into the mix. The majority of these stars have only been discovered within the last ten years, with the community still uncovering the richness of phenomena associated with these stars, many of which defy traditional asteroseismic analysis. A systematic asteroseismic analysis of all of the δ Scuti PMS stars was performed in order to get a better handle on the properties of these stars as a group. Some strange results have been found, including one star pulsating up to the theoretical acoustic cut-off frequency of the star, and a number of stars in which the most basic asteroseismic analysis suggests problems with the stars' positions in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. From this we get an idea of the\\break constraints - or lack thereof - that these results can put on PMS stellar evolution.

  12. Large-scale coordinated observations of Pc5 pulsation events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mtumela, Zolile; Walker, Anthony D. M.; Stephenson, Judy A. E.; Kosch, Michael J.

    2016-09-01

    HF (high-frequency) radars belonging to SuperDARN (Super Dual Auroral Radar Network) receive backscatter over substantial fields of view which, when combined, allow for simultaneous returns over extensive regions of the polar caps and midlatitudes. This makes them ideal instruments for the observation of pulsations in the Pc5 (1-5 mHz) frequency band. Relatively few pulsation events observed by multiple radars have been reported in the literature. Here we describe observations of three such events which extend over more than 120° of magnetic longitude in the Northern Hemisphere and one of which is also detected in the Southern Hemisphere. All three events show characteristics of field line resonances. In one case the pulsation has also been observed by magnetometers under or near the radar fields of view. The extensive longitudinal coverage allows accurate determination of azimuthal wave numbers. These are at the upper end of the lower values associated with external sources such as those in the solar wind. Such sources imply antisunward flow. However, the azimuthal wave number is negative, implying westward propagation at magnetic local times on both sides of noon, as would be expected from drift-bounce resonance with positive particles. Quiet conditions and a very low ring current during the events argue against this. The identification of the source of pulsations from a number of different mechanisms remains a problem of interest.

  13. Electron precipitation response to geomagnetic pulsations: Riometer revelation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honary, Farideh; Kavanagh, Andrew

    Electron precipitation modulations by geomagnetic pulsation have been observed in cosmic noise absorption (CNA) as early as 1965 by widebeam riometers (Barcus and Rosenberg, 1965). The first observation of pulsation with high m-number was reported by Kikuchi et al.(1988) em-ploying a scanning narrow-beam riometer to investigate the spatial structure in one dimension with a high resolution. However, the advances in high spatial resolution imaging riometers has provided the ability to observe pulsating cosmic noise absorption with azimuthal wave numbers as high as 380 as well as providing the capability of mapping their structures. These waves are commonly observed during the morning and early afternoon and exhibit eastward propagation. In this presentation a complete generating mechanism for these high m-number waves is dis-cussed as a five step process, beginning with the solar wind as a source for the excitation of dayside magnetospheric cavity modes, mode conversion, energisation of drift-bounce protons by Landau damping, followed by inverse Landau damping as a driving mechanism for the high m number secondary waves that ultimately modulate the electron precipitation. This modulation is observed as pulsations in cosmic noise absorption.

  14. A statistical method for draft tube pressure pulsation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doerfler, P. K.; Ruchonnet, N.

    2012-11-01

    Draft tube pressure pulsation (DTPP) in Francis turbines is composed of various components originating from different physical phenomena. These components may be separated because they differ by their spatial relationships and by their propagation mechanism. The first step for such an analysis was to distinguish between so-called synchronous and asynchronous pulsations; only approximately periodic phenomena could be described in this manner. However, less regular pulsations are always present, and these become important when turbines have to operate in the far off-design range, in particular at very low load. The statistical method described here permits to separate the stochastic (random) component from the two traditional 'regular' components. It works in connection with the standard technique of model testing with several pressure signals measured in draft tube cone. The difference between the individual signals and the averaged pressure signal, together with the coherence between the individual pressure signals is used for analysis. An example reveals that a generalized, non-periodic version of the asynchronous pulsation is important at low load.

  15. On multifractality and synchronization of nonlinear stellar pulsators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatraju, Naveen K.; Das, M. K.

    2014-07-01

    Simple models of nonlinear stellar pulsation, whose temporal behavior may reproduce some of the observed features of different classes of variable stars, have been studied. The temporal behavior of dynamical variables of these models exhibits a cascade of period doubling chaos, depending on the specific values of the various control parameters. A multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MFDFA) method is further used to identify the scaling behavior of such synthetic time series. The MFDFA of the considered time series, for various models of nonlinear stellar pulsation, shows that the observed multifractal nature is due to long-range correlations. The pulsating star with increased nonadiabaticity and the star with increased convective luminosity, as represented by the simulated data, is shown to possess a strange attractor with noninteger correlation dimension that lies between 2-3. Also the problem of synchronization in coupled nonlinear pulsation models has been investigated using permutation entropy—a complexity measure of the system. The computed order parameter, Γ, representing the correlation of computed permutation entropy for different segments of the simulated time series of displacement of two nonidentical oscillators, has been further used to find the critical coupling parameter for general synchronization of the oscillators.

  16. EMPIRICAL DETERMINATION OF CONVECTION PARAMETERS IN WHITE DWARFS. I. WHOLE EARTH TELESCOPE OBSERVATIONS OF EC14012-1446

    SciTech Connect

    Provencal, J. L.; Thompson, S. E.; Dalessio, J.; Shipman, H. L.; and others

    2012-06-01

    We report on an analysis of 308.3 hr of high-speed photometry targeting the pulsating DA white dwarf EC14012-1446. The data were acquired with the Whole Earth Telescope during the 2008 international observing run XCOV26. The Fourier transform of the light curve contains 19 independent frequencies and numerous combination frequencies. The dominant peaks are 1633.907, 1887.404, and 2504.897 {mu}Hz. Our analysis of the combination amplitudes reveals that the parent frequencies are consistent with modes of spherical degree l = 1. The combination amplitudes also provide m identifications for the largest amplitude parent frequencies. Our seismology analysis, which includes 2004-2007 archival data, confirms these identifications, provides constraints on additional frequencies, and finds an average period spacing of 41 s. Building on this foundation, we present nonlinear fits to high signal-to-noise light curves from the SOAR 4.1 m, McDonald 2.1 m, and KPNO 2 m telescopes. The fits indicate a time-averaged convective response timescale of {tau}{sub 0} = 99.4 {+-} 17 s, a temperature exponent N = 85 {+-} 6.2, and an inclination angle of {theta}{sub i} = 32.{sup 0}9 {+-} 3.{sup 0}2. We present our current empirical map of the convective response timescale across the DA instability strip.

  17. Poloidal monochromatic pulsations in Pc4-5 range observed in the Earth magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belakhovsky, Vladimir

    Poloidal monochromatic pulsations in Pc4-5 range observed in the Earth magnetosphere Belakhovsky V.B.1, Pilipenko V.A.2 1 - Polar Geophysical Institute, Apatity, Russia 2 - Institute of Physics of the Earth, Moscow, Russia Monochromatic geomagnetic pulsations in the Pc4-5 frequency range in the morning sector for some events in 2007-2008 years were studied using GOES, THEMIS, and ETS spacecrafts. The satellite observations showed that these pulsations are a poloidal-type fundamental mode of Alfven field line oscillations with the dominant radial and field-aligned magnetic components. The observed pulsations are small-scale in azimuthal direction; it excited during the low geomagnetic activity and are quite similar to Pg type pulsations. Contrary to typical Pg, these pulsations practically cannot be seen on the CARISMA magnetometers. The observed magnetic pulsations were accompanied by the simultaneous pulsations in the fluxes of energetic electrons and protons, as seen by LANL satellites with a great modulation depth. A strong increase of the electron density in the magnetosphere was found before the onset of the geomagnetic pulsations. As seen by THEMIS satellites these pulsations propagate in sunward direction, i.e. in the direction of electron drift in the morning sector. We suppose that the injection of energetic electrons may be responsible for the excitation of the poloidal Pc4-5 pulsations at the morning flank of the magnetosphere, though specific excitation mechanism is still unknown.

  18. The virtual observatory service TheoSSA: Establishing a database of synthetic stellar flux standards. I. NLTE spectral analysis of the DA-type white dwarf G191-B2B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauch, T.; Werner, K.; Bohlin, R.; Kruk, J. W.

    2013-12-01

    Context. Hydrogen-rich, DA-type white dwarfs are particularly suited as primary standard stars for flux calibration. State-of-the-art NLTE models consider opacities of species up to trans-iron elements and provide reliable synthetic stellar-atmosphere spectra to compare with observations. Aims: We will establish a database of theoretical spectra of stellar flux standards that are easily accessible via a web interface. Methods: In the framework of the Virtual Observatory, the German Astrophysical Virtual Observatory developed the registered service TheoSSA. It provides easy access to stellar spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and is intended to ingest SEDs calculated by any model-atmosphere code. In case of the DA white dwarf G191-B2B, we demonstrate that the model reproduces not only its overall continuum shape but also the numerous metal lines exhibited in its ultraviolet spectrum. Results: TheoSSA is in operation and contains presently a variety of SEDs for DA-type white dwarfs. It will be extended in the near future and can host SEDs of all primary and secondary flux standards. The spectral analysis of G191-B2B has shown that our hydrostatic models reproduce the observations best at and log g = 7.60 ± 0.05. We newly identified Fe vi, Ni vi, and Zn iv lines. For the first time, we determined the photospheric zinc abundance with a logarithmic mass fraction of -4.89 (7.5 × solar). The abundances of He (upper limit), C, N, O, Al, Si, O, P, S, Fe, Ni, Ge, and Sn were precisely determined. Upper abundance limits of about 10% solar were derived for Ti, Cr, Mn, and Co. Conclusions: The TheoSSA database of theoretical SEDs of stellar flux standards guarantees that the flux calibration of all astronomical data and cross-calibration between different instruments can be based on the same models and SEDs calculated with different model-atmosphere codes and are easy to compare. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope

  19. On the Polarization Properties of Magnetar Giant Flare Pulsating Tails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yuan-Pei; Zhang, Bing

    2015-12-01

    Three giant flares have been detected so far from soft gamma-ray repeaters, each characterized by an initial short hard spike and a pulsating tail. The observed pulsating tails are characterized by a duration of ˜100 s, an isotropic energy of ˜1044 erg, and a pulse period of a few seconds. The pulsating tail emission likely originates from the residual energy after the intense energy release during the initial spike, which forms a trapped fireball composed of a photon-pair plasma in a closed-field-line region of the magnetars. Observationally the spectra of pulsating tails can be fitted by the superposition of a thermal component and a power-law component, with the thermal component dominating the emission in the early and late stages of the pulsating-tail observations. In this paper, assuming that the trapped fireball is from a closed-field-line region in the magnetosphere, we calculate the atmospheric structure of the optically thick trapped fireball and the polarization properties of the trapped fireball. By properly treating the photon propagation in a hot, highly magnetized, electron-positron pair plasma, we tally photons in two modes (O mode and E mode) at a certain observational angle through Monte Carlo simulations. Our results suggest that the polarization degree depends on the viewing angle with respect to the magnetic axis of the magnetar, and can be as high as Π ≃ 30% in the 1-30 keV band, and Π ≃ 10% in the 30-100 keV band, if the line of sight is perpendicular to the magnetic axis.

  20. Kappa effect pulsational instability for hot extreme helium stars

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, A.N.

    1990-01-01

    A long standing problem for the hydrogen deficient stars has been the mechanism for the pulsation instability for the hottest members of this class. The usual {kappa} mechanism works well for stars that are in the hydrogen and helium ionization instability strip, and this strip extends to perhaps 20,000K at high luminosity. However, several stars are definitely hotter. Investigations for another ionization instability strip, such as for carbon, have always shown that there is not enough carbon to produce a rapid enough increase of opacity with temperature to give the well-known {kappa} effect. This is so even though these hydrogen deficient stars do show enhanced carbon in their spectra. A strong stellar wind can produce the observed hydrogen deficiency. Another popular mechanism is mass loss in a binary system through the Roche lobe. It now is possible that the missing pulsational instability mechanism is the rapid increase of iron lines absorption as the temperature increases above about 150,000K in the low density envelopes of these luminous stars. Recent calculations shows that the n = 3 to n = 3 transitions in iron that were assumed unimportant in the earlier Los Alamos calculations can double or triple the opacity suddenly as the iron lines appear in a very sensitive part of the spectrum of the diffusing photons. It has been proposed that these iron lines also cause the many varieties of normal B star pulsations, and the hydrogen deficient stars are merely another example of this new {kappa} effect for pulsating stars. The extreme helium star V2076 Oph at 31,900K, and 38,900 L{sub {circle dot}} for a mass of 1.4 M{sub {circle dot}} pulsates in the radial fundamental model at about 1 day period with a very large linear growth rate when the iron lines more than double the opacity, but is stable otherwise.

  1. ON THE POLARIZATION PROPERTIES OF MAGNETAR GIANT FLARE PULSATING TAILS

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yuan-Pei; Zhang, Bing E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu

    2015-12-10

    Three giant flares have been detected so far from soft gamma-ray repeaters, each characterized by an initial short hard spike and a pulsating tail. The observed pulsating tails are characterized by a duration of ∼100 s, an isotropic energy of ∼10{sup 44} erg, and a pulse period of a few seconds. The pulsating tail emission likely originates from the residual energy after the intense energy release during the initial spike, which forms a trapped fireball composed of a photon-pair plasma in a closed-field-line region of the magnetars. Observationally the spectra of pulsating tails can be fitted by the superposition of a thermal component and a power-law component, with the thermal component dominating the emission in the early and late stages of the pulsating-tail observations. In this paper, assuming that the trapped fireball is from a closed-field-line region in the magnetosphere, we calculate the atmospheric structure of the optically thick trapped fireball and the polarization properties of the trapped fireball. By properly treating the photon propagation in a hot, highly magnetized, electron–positron pair plasma, we tally photons in two modes (O mode and E mode) at a certain observational angle through Monte Carlo simulations. Our results suggest that the polarization degree depends on the viewing angle with respect to the magnetic axis of the magnetar, and can be as high as Π ≃ 30% in the 1–30 keV band, and Π ≃ 10% in the 30–100 keV band, if the line of sight is perpendicular to the magnetic axis.

  2. Radial Stellar Pulsation and Three-dimensional Convection. II. Two-dimensional Convection in Full Amplitude Radial Pulsation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geroux, Chris M.; Deupree, Robert G.

    2013-07-01

    We have developed a three-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics code to simulate the interaction of convection and radial pulsation in classical variable stars. One key goal is the ability to carry these simulations to full amplitude in order to compare them with observed light curves. Previous multi-dimensional calculations were prevented from reaching full amplitude because of drift in the radial coordinate system, due to the algorithm defining radial movement of the coordinate system during the pulsation cycle. We have removed this difficulty by defining our radial coordinate flow algorithm to require that the mass in a spherical shell remain constant for every time step throughout the pulsation cycle. We have used our new code to perform two-dimensional (2D) simulations of the interaction of radial pulsation and convection. We have made comparisons between light curves from our 2D convective simulations with observed light curves and find that our 2D simulated light curves are better able to match the observed light curve shape near the red edge of the RR Lyrae instability strip than light curves from previous one-dimensional time-dependent convective models.

  3. Fast modulations of pulsating proton aurora related to subpacket structures of Pc1 geomagnetic pulsations at subauroral latitudes

    DOE PAGES

    Ozaki, M.; Shiokawa, K.; Miyoshi, Y.; Kataoka, R.; Yagitani, S.; Inoue, T.; Ebihara, Y.; Jun, C. -W; Nomura, R.; Sakaguchi, K.; et al

    2016-08-14

    To understand the role of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves in determining the temporal features of pulsating proton aurora (PPA) via wave-particle interactions at subauroral latitudes, high-time-resolution (1/8 s) images of proton-induced N2>+ emissions were recorded using a new electron multiplying charge-coupled device camera, along with related Pc1 pulsations on the ground. The observed Pc1 pulsations consisted of successive rising-tone elements with a spacing for each element of 100 s and subpacket structures, which manifest as amplitude modulations with a period of a few tens of seconds. In accordance with the temporal features of the Pc1 pulsations, the auroral intensitymore » showed a similar repetition period of 100 s and an unpredicted fast modulation of a few tens of seconds. Furthermore, these results indicate that PPA is generated by pitch angle scattering, nonlinearly interacting with Pc1/EMIC waves at the magnetic equator.« less

  4. RADIAL STELLAR PULSATION AND THREE-DIMENSIONAL CONVECTION. II. TWO-DIMENSIONAL CONVECTION IN FULL AMPLITUDE RADIAL PULSATION

    SciTech Connect

    Geroux, Chris M.; Deupree, Robert G.

    2013-07-10

    We have developed a three-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics code to simulate the interaction of convection and radial pulsation in classical variable stars. One key goal is the ability to carry these simulations to full amplitude in order to compare them with observed light curves. Previous multi-dimensional calculations were prevented from reaching full amplitude because of drift in the radial coordinate system, due to the algorithm defining radial movement of the coordinate system during the pulsation cycle. We have removed this difficulty by defining our radial coordinate flow algorithm to require that the mass in a spherical shell remain constant for every time step throughout the pulsation cycle. We have used our new code to perform two-dimensional (2D) simulations of the interaction of radial pulsation and convection. We have made comparisons between light curves from our 2D convective simulations with observed light curves and find that our 2D simulated light curves are better able to match the observed light curve shape near the red edge of the RR Lyrae instability strip than light curves from previous one-dimensional time-dependent convective models.

  5. Effects of self-pulsation on the spray characteristics of gas-liquid swirl coaxial injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Zhongtao; Li, Qinglian; Cheng, Peng; Zhang, Xinqiao; Wang, Zhen-guo

    2016-10-01

    To understand the influence of self-pulsation on the spray characteristics of gas-liquid swirl coaxial injector, a back-lighting photography technique has been employed to capture the instantaneous self-pulsated spray and stable spray images with a high speed camera. The diameter and velocity of the droplets in the spray have been characterized with a Dantec Phase Doppler Anemometry (PDA) system. The effects of self-pulsation on the spray pattern, primary breakup, spray angle, diameter and velocity distribution and mass flow rate distribution are analyzed and discussed. The results show that the spray morphology is greatly influenced by self-pulsation. The stable spray has a cone shape, while the self-pulsated spray looks like a Christmas tree. The main difference of these two sprays is the primary breakup. The liquid film of stable spray keeps stable while that of self-pulsated spray oscillates periodically. The film width of self-pulsated spray varies in a large range with 'neck' and 'shoulder' features existing. The liquid film of self-pulsated spray breaks up at the second neck, and then the second shoulder begins to breakup into ligaments. The self-pulsated spray produces droplet clusters periodically, varies horizontal spray width and mass flux periodically. From the point of spatial distribution, self-pulsation is good for the spray, it uniformizes the mass flux along radius and increases the spray angle. However, when self-pulsation occurs, the SMD distribution varies from an inverted V shape to a hollow cone shape, and SMD increases at all the measuring points. Namely, from the point of atomization performance, self-pulsation has negative effects even when the breakup length is smaller. The effects of self-pulsation on the diameter and velocity distributions of the spray are mainly in the center part of the spray. The periphery of stable and self-pulsated spray has similar diameter and velocity distribution.

  6. HD 314884: a slowly pulsating B star in a close binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Christopher B.; Hynes, R. I.; Maccarone, T.; Britt, C. T.; Davis, H.; Jonker, P. G.; Torres, M. A. P.; Steeghs, D.; Greiss, S.; Nelemans, G.

    2014-10-01

    We present the results of a spectroscopic and photometric analysis of HD 314884, a slowly pulsating B star (SPB) in a binary system with detected soft-X-ray emission. We spectrally classify the B star as a B5V-B6V star with Teff = 15 490 ± 310 K, log g = 3.75 ± 0.25 dex, and a photometric period of P0 = 0.889 521(12) d. A spectroscopic period search reveals an orbital period for the system of Porb = 1.3654(11) d. The discrepancy in the two periods and the identification of a second and third distinct frequency in the photometric Fourier transform at P1 = 3.1347(56) and P2 = 1.517(28) d provides evidence that HD 314884 is an SPB with at least three oscillation frequencies. These frequencies appear to originate from higher order, non-linear tidal pulsations. Using the dynamical parameters obtained from the radial-velocity curve, we find the most probable companion mass to be M1 = ˜0.8 M⊙ assuming a typical mass for the B star and most probable inclination. We conclude that the X-ray source companion to HD 314884 is most likely a coronally active G-type star or a white dwarf, with no apparent emission lines in the optical spectrum. The mass probability distribution of the companion star mass spans 0.6-2.3 M⊙ at 99 per cent confidence which allows the possibility of a neutron star companion. The X-ray source is unlikely to be a black hole unless it is of a very low mass or low binary inclination.

  7. PULSATING REVERSE DETONATION MODELS OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE. I. DETONATION IGNITION

    SciTech Connect

    Bravo, Eduardo; GarcIa-Senz, Domingo E-mail: domingo.garcia@upc.edu

    2009-04-20

    Observational evidences point to a common explosion mechanism of Type Ia supernovae based on a delayed detonation of a white dwarf (WD). Although several scenarios have been proposed and explored by means of one, two, and three-dimensional simulations, the key point still is the understanding of the conditions under which a stable detonation can form in a destabilized WD. One of the possibilities that have been invoked is that an inefficient deflagration leads to the pulsation of a Chandrasekhar-mass WD, followed by formation of an accretion shock around a carbon-oxygen rich core. The accretion shock confines the core and transforms kinetic energy from the collapsing halo into thermal energy of the core, until an inward moving detonation is formed. This chain of events has been termed Pulsating Reverse Detonation (PRD). In this work we explore the robustness of the detonation ignition for different PRD models characterized by the amount of mass burned during the deflagration phase, M {sub defl}. The evolution of the WD up to the formation of the accretion shock has been followed with a three-dimensional hydrodynamical code with nuclear reactions turned off. We found that detonation conditions are achieved for a wide range of M {sub defl}. However, if the nuclear energy released during the deflagration phase is close to the WD binding energy ({approx}0.46 x 10{sup 51} erg {yields} M {sub defl} {approx} 0.30 M {sub sun}) the accretion shock cannot heat and confine the core efficiently and detonation conditions are not robustly achieved.

  8. Multiperiodicity of the Pulsating Component in the Algol-type Binary System CT Her

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampens, Patricia J.; et al.

    2007-08-01

    The primary component of CT Her, a semi-detached eclipsing binary, is a Delta Scuti-type variable star with a period of about 27 min and a peak-to-peak amplitude of at most 0.03 mag. The light curves also show modulation, implying multiperiodicity. During the summer of 2005, a dedicated multi-site campaign was organised for this interesting target among the known mass-accreting pulsating components in Algol-type binary systems (oEA stars, Mkrtichian et al. 2004): it has a short orbital period of 1.7864 days and one of the highest ratios P_orb/P_puls (~95) among the ~20 oEA stars known to-date. We collected more than 1000 photometric data in the (Johnson) V filter and more than 4000 in the (Johnson) B filter using various observatories located in three different continents, mostly in the years 2005 and 2006. Using approximate photometric and absolute elements as starting parameters to describe the system and its two components, we fitted the combined V- and B-light curves with a well-matching semi-detached binary model using the code PHOEBE, following the principles of the Wilson-Devinney method. After subtraction of this improved binary model, the out-of-primary-eclipse V- and B-residual data were subsequently analysed using standard Fourier techniques. The frequency searches revealed four, possibly five significant pulsation frequencies in the frequency range 45-53 c/d with semi-amplitudes of a few mmag, of which three are well-identified (not affected by the aliasing phenomenon). The remaining standard deviation of the B-residuals spread over 3 years is 3.7 mmag, in some cases the residual light curves show clear systematic deviations still too large to be caused by white noise only.

  9. INTRODUCING CAFein, A NEW COMPUTATIONAL TOOL FOR STELLAR PULSATIONS AND DYNAMIC TIDES

    SciTech Connect

    Valsecchi, F.; Farr, W. M.; Willems, B.; Rasio, F. A.; Kalogera, V.

    2013-08-10

    Here we present CAFein, a new computational tool for investigating radiative dissipation of dynamic tides in close binaries and of non-adiabatic, non-radial stellar oscillations in isolated stars in the linear regime. For the latter, CAFein computes the non-adiabatic eigenfrequencies and eigenfunctions of detailed stellar models. The code is based on the so-called Riccati method, a numerical algorithm that has been successfully applied to a variety of stellar pulsators, and which does not suffer from the major drawbacks of commonly used shooting and relaxation schemes. Here we present an extension of the Riccati method to investigate dynamic tides in close binaries. We demonstrate CAFein's capabilities as a stellar pulsation code both in the adiabatic and non-adiabatic regimes, by reproducing previously published eigenfrequencies of a polytrope, and by successfully identifying the unstable modes of a stellar model in the {beta} Cephei/SPB region of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. Finally, we verify CAFein's behavior in the dynamic tides regime by investigating the effects of dynamic tides on the eigenfunctions and orbital and spin evolution of massive main sequence stars in eccentric binaries, and of hot Jupiter host stars. The plethora of asteroseismic data provided by NASA's Kepler satellite, some of which include the direct detection of tidally excited stellar oscillations, make CAFein quite timely. Furthermore, the increasing number of observed short-period detached double white dwarfs (WDs) and the observed orbital decay in the tightest of such binaries open up a new possibility of investigating WD interiors through the effects of tides on their orbital evolution.

  10. Calibration of the Mixing-Length Free Parameter for White Dwarf Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblay, P.-E.; Ludwig, H.-G.; Freytag, B.; Fontaine, G.; Steffen, M.; Brassard, P.

    2015-06-01

    We present a comparison of our grid of 3D radiation-hydrodynamical simulations for 70 pure-hydrogen DA white dwarfs, in the surface gravity range 7.0 ≤log g≤ 9.0, with 1D envelope models based on the mixing-length theory (MLT) for convection. We perform a calibration of the mixing-length parameter for the lower part of the convection zone. The 3D simulations are often restricted to the upper convective layers, and in those cases, we rely on the asymptotic entropy value of the adiabatic 3D upflows to calibrate 1D envelopes. Our results can be applied to 1D structure calculations, and in particular for pulsation and convective mixing studies. We demonstrate that while the 1D MLT only provides a bottom boundary of the convection zone based on the Schwarzschild criterion, the 3D stratifications are more complex. There is a large overshoot region below the convective layers that is likely critical for chemical diffusion applications.

  11. Empirical Determination of Convection Parameters in White Dwarfs. I. Whole Earth Telescope Observations of EC14012-1446

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provencal, J. L.; Montgomery, M. H.; Kanaan, A.; Thompson, S. E.; Dalessio, J.; Shipman, H. L.; Childers, D.; Clemens, J. C.; Rosen, R.; Henrique, P.; Bischoff-Kim, A.; Strickland, W.; Chandler, D.; Walter, B.; Watson, T. K.; Castanheira, B.; Wang, S.; Handler, G.; Wood, M.; Vennes, S.; Nemeth, P.; Kepler, S. O.; Reed, M.; Nitta, A.; Kleinman, S. J.; Brown, T.; Kim, S.-L.; Sullivan, D.; Chen, W. P.; Yang, M.; Shih, C. Y.; Jiang, X. J.; Sergeev, A. V.; Maksim, A.; Janulis, R.; Baliyan, K. S.; Vats, H. O.; Zola, S.; Baran, A.; Winiarski, M.; Ogloza, W.; Paparo, M.; Bognar, Z.; Papics, P.; Kilkenny, D.; Sefako, R.; Buckley, D.; Loaring, N.; Kniazev, A.; Silvotti, R.; Galleti, S.; Nagel, T.; Vauclair, G.; Dolez, N.; Fremy, J. R.; Perez, J.; Almenara, J. M.; Fraga, L.

    2012-06-01

    We report on an analysis of 308.3 hr of high-speed photometry targeting the pulsating DA white dwarf EC14012-1446. The data were acquired with the Whole Earth Telescope during the 2008 international observing run XCOV26. The Fourier transform of the light curve contains 19 independent frequencies and numerous combination frequencies. The dominant peaks are 1633.907, 1887.404, and 2504.897 μHz. Our analysis of the combination amplitudes reveals that the parent frequencies are consistent with modes of spherical degree l = 1. The combination amplitudes also provide m identifications for the largest amplitude parent frequencies. Our seismology analysis, which includes 2004-2007 archival data, confirms these identifications, provides constraints on additional frequencies, and finds an average period spacing of 41 s. Building on this foundation, we present nonlinear fits to high signal-to-noise light curves from the SOAR 4.1 m, McDonald 2.1 m, and KPNO 2 m telescopes. The fits indicate a time-averaged convective response timescale of τ0 = 99.4 ± 17 s, a temperature exponent N = 85 ± 6.2, and an inclination angle of θ i = 32fdg9 ± 3fdg2. We present our current empirical map of the convective response timescale across the DA instability strip. Based on observations obtained at the Southern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) telescope, which is a joint project of the Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia, e Inovação (MCTI) da República Federativa do Brasil, the U.S. National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO), the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC), and Michigan State University (MSU).

  12. Features of Pc5 pulsations in the geomagnetic field, auroral luminosity, and Riometer absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belakhovsky, V. B.; Pilipenko, V. A.; Samsonov, S. N.; Lorentsen, D.

    2016-01-01

    Simultaneous morning Pc5 pulsations ( f ~ 3-5 mHz) in the geomagnetic field, aurora intensities (in the 557.7 and 630.0 nm oxygen emissions and the 471.0 nm nitrogen emission), and riometer absorption, were studied based on the CARISMA, CANMOS, and NORSTAR network data for the event of January 1, 2000. According to the GOES-8 satellite observations, these Pc5 geomagnetic pulsations are observed as incompressible Alfvén waves with toroidal polarization in the magnetosphere. Although the Pc5 pulsation frequencies in auroras, the geomagnetic field, and riometer absorption are close to one another, stable phase relationships are not observed between them. Far from all trains of geomagnetic Pc5 pulsations are accompanied by corresponding auroral pulsations; consequently, geomagnetic pulsations are primary with respect to auroral pulsations. Both geomagnetic and auroral pulsations propagate poleward, and the frequency decreases with increasing geomagnetic latitude. When auroral Pc5 pulsations appear, the ratio of the 557.7/630.0 nm emission intensity sharply increases, which indicates that auroral pulsations result from not simply modulated particle precipitation but also an additional periodic acceleration of auroral electrons by the wave field. A high correlation is not observed between Pc5 pulsations in auroras and the riometer absorption, which indicates that these pulsations have a common source but different generation mechanisms. Auroral luminosity modulation is supposedly related to the interaction between Alfvén waves and the region with the field-aligned potential drop above the auroral ionosphere, and riometer absorption modulation is caused by the scattering of energetic electrons by VLF noise pulsations.

  13. Red-Line (630nm) Pulsating Auroras And Their Possible Magnetospheric Driver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, J.; Donovan, E.; Zhang, X.; Spanswick, E.; Gillies, M.; Jackel, B. J.

    2015-12-01

    Pulsating auroras are usually known to be led by the precipitation of energetic electrons from the central plasma sheet, and are thus often displayed in blue-line and/or green-line auroral emission lines. In this study we report the observations of 630nm oxygen red-line auroras by REGO imager, and explore their possible underlying mechanisms. Upon inspecting the temporal/spatial pattern of the red-line pulsating auroras and comparing with concurrent/collocated observations from THEMIS and RAINBOW imagers, we distinguish two types of red-line pulsating auroras. In one type of red-line pulsating aurora, the emission is weak in intensity, but its pulsation is synchronous with that of the collocated green-line pulsating aurora. The other type of red-line pulsating aurora is fairly strong in intensity, but its temporal pattern contains much longer-period components as compared to the green-line pulsating aurora. In both types of pulsating auroras, the spatial dimension and motion speed of the red- and green-line auroral patches are rather comparable. We suggest that the first type of red-line pulsating aurora is caused by secondary electrons and/or a cascading excitation of O(1D) as the byproduct of the primary electron precipitation (and the resulting green-line emission), while the second type of red-line pulsating aurora is directly led by the low-energy part (hundreds of eV) of the electron precipitation in the lower F-region ionosphere. In the latter regard, we present in-situ RBSP observations conjugate to the pulsating auroral patches in a few events, and explore a potential relationship between the red-line pulsating aurora and the electron cyclotron harmonic (ECH) wave, which is capable of scattering the low-energy electrons into the loss-cone in the inner magnetosphere.

  14. The occurrence of non-pulsating stars in the γ Dor and δ Sct pulsation instability regions: Results from Kepler quarter 14–17 data

    DOE PAGES

    Guzik, J. A.; Bradley, P. A.; Jackiewicz, J.; Molenda-Zakowicz, J.; Uytterhoeven, K.; Kinemuchi, K.

    2015-04-21

    In this study, the high precision long time-series photometry of the NASA Kepler spacecraft provides an excellent means to discover and characterize variability in main-sequence stars, and to make progress in interpreting the pulsations to derive stellar interior structure and test stellar models. For stars of spectral types A–F, the Kepler data revealed a number of surprises, such as more hybrid pulsating Sct and Dor pulsators than expected, pulsators lying outside of the instability regions predicted by theory, and stars that were expected to pulsate, but showed no variability. In our 2013 Astronomical Review article, we discussed the statistics ofmore » variability for 633 faint (Kepler magnitude 14–16) spectral type A–F stars observed by Kepler during Quarters 6–13 (June 2010–June 2012).« less

  15. The occurrence of non-pulsating stars in the γ Dor and δ Sct pulsation instability regions: Results from Kepler quarter 14–17 data

    SciTech Connect

    Guzik, J. A.; Bradley, P. A.; Jackiewicz, J.; Molenda-Zakowicz, J.; Uytterhoeven, K.; Kinemuchi, K.

    2015-04-21

    In this study, the high precision long time-series photometry of the NASA Kepler spacecraft provides an excellent means to discover and characterize variability in main-sequence stars, and to make progress in interpreting the pulsations to derive stellar interior structure and test stellar models. For stars of spectral types A–F, the Kepler data revealed a number of surprises, such as more hybrid pulsating Sct and Dor pulsators than expected, pulsators lying outside of the instability regions predicted by theory, and stars that were expected to pulsate, but showed no variability. In our 2013 Astronomical Review article, we discussed the statistics of variability for 633 faint (Kepler magnitude 14–16) spectral type A–F stars observed by Kepler during Quarters 6–13 (June 2010–June 2012).

  16. Experimental investigation on a pulsating heat pipe with hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, H. R.; Liu, Y. M.; Ma, R. F.; Han, D. Y.; Gan, Z. H.; Pfotenhauer, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    The pulsating heat pipe (PHP) has been increasingly studied in cryogenic application, for its high transfer coefficient and quick response. Compared with Nb3Sn and NbTi, MgB2 whose critical transformation temperature is 39 K, is expected to replace some high-temperature superconducting materials at 25 K. In order to cool MgB2, this paper designs a Hydrogen Pulsating Heat Pipe, which allows a study of applied heat, filling ratio, turn number, inclination angle and length of adiabatic section on the thermal performance of the PHP. The thermal performance of the hydrogen PHP is investigated for filling ratios of 35%, 51%, 70% at different heat inputs, and provides information regarding the starting process is received at three filling ratios.

  17. Comparative pulsation calculations with OP and OPAL opacities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanbur, Shashi M.; Simon, Norman R.

    1994-01-01

    Comparative linear nonadiabatic pulsation calculations are presented using the OPAL and Opacity Project opacities. The two sets of opacities include effects due to intermediate coupling and fine structure as well as new abundances. We used two mass luminosity (M-L) relations, one standard (BIT), and one employing substantial convective core overshoot (COV). The two sets of opacities cannot be differentiated on the basis of the stellar pulsation calculations presented here. The BIT relation can model the beat and bump Cepheids with masses between 4 and 7 solar mass, while if the overshoot relation is used, masses between 2 and 6 solar mass are required. In the RR Lyrae regime, we find the inferred masses of globular cluster RRd stars to be little influenced by the choice of OPAL or OP. Finally, the limited modeling we have done is not able to constrain the Cepheid M-L relation based upon period ratios observed in the beat and bump stars.

  18. Experimental research on heat transfer of pulsating heat pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jia; Yan, Li

    2008-06-01

    Experimental research was conducted to understand heat transfer characteristic of pulsating heat pipe in this paper, and the PHP is made of high quality glass capillary tube. Under different fill ratio, heat transfer rate and many other influence factors, the flow patterns were observed in the start-up, transition and stable stage. The effects of heating position on heat transfer were discussed. The experimental results indicate that no annular flow appears in top heating condition. Under different fill ratios and heat transfer rate, the flow pattern in PHP is transferred from bulk flow to semi-annular flow and annular flow, and the performance of heat transfer is improved for down heating case. The experimental results indicate that the total heat resistant of PHP is increased with fill ratio, and heat transfer rate achieves optimum at filling rate 50%. But for pulsating heat pipe with changing diameters the thermal resistance is higher than that with uniform diameters.

  19. The unique dynamical system underlying RR Lyrae pulsations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollath, Z.

    2016-05-01

    Hydrodynamic models of RR Lyrae pulsation display a very rich behaviour. Contrary to earlier expectations, high order resonances play a crucial role in the nonlinear dynamics representing the interacting modes. Chaotic attractors can be found at different time scales: both in the pulsation itself and in the amplitude equations shaping the possible modulation of the oscillations. Although there is no one-to-one connection between the nonlinear features found in the numerical models and the observed behaviour, the richness of the found phenomena suggests that the interaction of modes should be taken seriously in the study of the still unsolved puzzle of Blazhko effect. One of the main lessons of this complex system is that we should rethink the simple interpretation of the observed effect of resonances.

  20. Are two-fluid effects relevant to ULF pulsations?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Andrew N.; Allan, W.

    1996-11-01

    It has been suggested recently that the traditional single-fluid MHD description of ULF pulsations is wrong and that a two-fluid model (which includes electron inertia) is required [Bellan, 1994]. If this claim is correct, it suggests most previous studies are inadequate and of questionable value. We have examined the appropriate equations and find that two-fluid effects are not important for typical ULF pulsations. Specifically, the time taken to develop spatial scales similar to the electron inertia length far exceeds the lifetime of the waves. We argue that the singular normal modes of single-fluid MHD are important properties of the magnetospheric system that should be studied. They may be employed to calculate the evolution of waves and are also a useful mathematical limit of the more realistic dissipative normal modes.

  1. Quantitative results of stellar evolution and pulsation theories.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fricke, K.; Stobie, R. S.; Strittmatter, P. A.

    1971-01-01

    The discrepancy between the masses of Cepheid variables deduced from evolution theory and pulsation theory is examined. The effect of input physics on evolutionary tracks is first discussed; in particular, changes in the opacity are considered. The sensitivity of pulsation masses to opacity changes and to the ascribed values of luminosity and effective temperature are then analyzed. The Cepheid mass discrepancy is discussed in the light of the results already obtained. Other astronomical evidence, including the mass-luminosity relation for main sequence stars, the solar neutrino flux, and cluster ages are also considered in an attempt to determine the most likely source of error in the event that substantial mass loss has not occurred.

  2. Pulsating aurora induced by upper atmospheric barium releases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deehr, C.; Romick, G.

    1977-01-01

    The paper reports the apparent generation of pulsating aurora by explosive releases of barium vapor near 250 km altitude. This effect occurred only when the explosions were in the path of precipitating electrons associated with the visible aurora. Each explosive charge was a standard 1.5 kg thermite mixture of Ba and CuO with an excess of Ba metal which was vaporized and dispersed by the thermite explosion. Traces of Sr, Na, and Li were added to some of the charges, and monitoring was achieved by ground-based spectrophotometric observations. On March 28, 1976, an increase in emission at 5577 A and at 4278 A was observed in association with the first two bursts, these emissions pulsating with roughly a 10 sec period for approximately 60 to 100 sec after the burst.

  3. A Study of Short-term White Dwarf Variability Using gPhoton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, Michael; Fleming, Scott W.; Caton, Daniel B.; Million, Chase; Shiao, Bernie

    2016-01-01

    The Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) was a UV space telescope that operated from 2003 until 2013. A new project at MAST, gPhoton takes advantage of the microchannel-plate photon detector aboard GALEX, which catalogued and time-stamped every photon event by putting the one trillion photon events into a database. Utilizing associated open-source software, gPhoton can create coadd images, movies and light curves at user-defined spatial and temporal scales. As part of early science investigations with gPhoton, 364 white dwarf stars from the McCook-Sion catalog with ample GALEX coverage were photometrically inspected for inter-visit variations during an REU program at STScI. Out of the 364 white dwarfs that were studied, three previously documented pulsating white dwarf stars were confirmed in the UV and (at least) three new pulsating white dwarf stars were discovered. Follow-up observations are conducted at Appalachian State University using optical telescopes at the Dark Sky Observatory. We compare optical and UV light curves of these new white dwarf pulsators and show a selection of other variables found with gPhoton.

  4. Self-Sustained Ultrafast Pulsation in Coupled VCSELs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ning, Cun-Zheng

    2001-01-01

    High frequency, narrow-band self-pulsating operation is demonstrated in two coupled vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs). The coupled VCSELs provide an ideal source for high-repetition rate (over 40 GHz), sinusoidal-like modulated laser source with Gaussian-like near- and far-field profiles. We also show that the frequency of the modulation can be tuned by the inter-VCSEL separation or by DC-bias level.

  5. Mapping correlated membrane pulsations and fluctuations in human cells.

    PubMed

    Pelling, Andrew E; Veraitch, Farlan S; Pui-Kei Chu, Carol; Nicholls, Brian M; Hemsley, Alexandra L; Mason, Chris; Horton, Michael A

    2007-01-01

    The cell membrane and cytoskeleton are dynamic structures that are strongly influenced by the thermo-mechanical background in addition to biologically driven mechanical processes. We used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to measure the local membrane motion of human foreskin fibroblasts (HFFs) which were found to be governed by random and non-random correlated mechanical processes. Interphase cells displayed distinct membrane pulsations in which the membrane was observed to slowly contract upwards followed by a recovery to its initial position. These pulsations occurred one to three times per minute with variable amplitudes (20-100 pN) separated by periods of random baseline fluctuations with amplitudes of <20 pN. Cells were exposed to actin and microtubule (MT) destabilizing drugs and induced into early apoptosis. Mechanical pulsations (20-80 pN) were not prevented by actin or MT depolymerization but were prevented in early apoptotic cells which only displayed small amplitude baseline fluctuations (<20 pN). Correlation analysis revealed that the cell membrane motion is largely random; however several non-random processes, with time constants varying between approximately 2 and 35 s are present. Results were compared to measured cardiomyocyte motion which was well defined and highly correlated. Employing automated positioning of the AFM tip, interphase HFF correlation time constants were also mapped over a 10 microm2 area above the nucleus providing some insights into the spatial variability of membrane correlations. Here, we are able to show that membrane pulsations and fluctuations can be linked to physiological state and cytoskeletal dynamics through distinct sets of correlation time constants in human cells.

  6. White Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 19 April 2002) The Science 'White Rock' is the unofficial name for this unusual landform which was first observed during the Mariner 9 mission in the early 1970's. As later analysis of additional data sets would show, White Rock is neither white nor dense rock. Its apparent brightness arises from the fact that the material surrounding it is so dark. Images from the Mars Global Surveyor MOC camera revealed dark sand dunes surrounding White Rock and on the floor of the troughs within it. Some of these dunes are just apparent in the THEMIS image. Although there was speculation that the material composing White Rock could be salts from an ancient dry lakebed, spectral data from the MGS TES instrument did not support this claim. Instead, the White Rock deposit may be the erosional remnant of a previously more continuous occurrence of air fall sediments, either volcanic ash or windblown dust. The THEMIS image offers new evidence for the idea that the original deposit covered a larger area. Approximately 10 kilometers to the southeast of the main deposit are some tiny knobs of similarly bright material preserved on the floor of a small crater. Given that the eolian erosion of the main White Rock deposit has produced isolated knobs at its edges, it is reasonable to suspect that the more distant outliers are the remnants of a once continuous deposit that stretched at least to this location. The fact that so little remains of the larger deposit suggests that the material is very easily eroded and simply blows away. The Story Fingers of hard, white rock seem to jut out like icy daggers across a moody Martian surface, but appearances can be deceiving. These bright, jagged features are neither white, nor icy, nor even hard and rocky! So what are they, and why are they so different from the surrounding terrain? Scientists know that you can't always trust what your eyes see alone. You have to use other kinds of science instruments to measure things that our eyes can

  7. The pulsating laminar flow in a rectangular channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valueva, E. P.; Purdin, M. S.

    2015-11-01

    The finite difference method is used to solve the task of the developed pulsating laminar flow in a rectangular channel. The optimum of the difference scheme parameters was determined. Data on the amplitude and phase of the longitudinal velocity oscillations, the hydraulic and friction drag coefficients, the shear stress on the wall have been obtained. Using the dimensionless value of the frequency pulsations two characteristic regimes — the quasisteady-state regime and the high-frequency regime have been identified. In the quasi-steady-state regime, the values of all hydrodynamic quantities at each instant of time correspond to the velocity value averaged over the cross section at a given moment of time. It is shown that in the high-frequency regime, the dependences on the dimensionless oscillation frequency of oscillating components of hydrodynamic quantities are identical for rectilinear channels with a different cross-sectional form (round pipe, flat and a rectangular channels). The effect of the aspect ratio of the rectangular channel sides channel on the pulsating flow dynamics has been analyzed.

  8. Pulsating proton aurora caused by rising tone Pc1 waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, R.; Shiokawa, K.; Omura, Y.; Ebihara, Y.; Miyoshi, Y.; Sakaguchi, K.; Otsuka, Y.; Connors, M.

    2016-02-01

    We found rising tone emissions with a dispersion of ˜1 Hz per several tens of seconds in the dynamic spectrum of a Pc1 geomagnetic pulsation (Pc1) observed on the ground. These Pc1 rising tones were successively observed over ˜30 min from 0250 UT on 14 October 2006 by an induction magnetometer at Athabasca, Canada (54.7°N, 246.7°E, magnetic latitude 61.7°N). Simultaneously, a Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms panchromatic (THEMIS) all-sky camera detected pulsations of an isolated proton aurora with a period of several tens of seconds, ˜10% variations in intensity, and fine structures of 3° in magnetic longitudes. The pulsations of the proton aurora close to the zenith of ATH have one-to-one correspondences with the Pc1 rising tones. This suggests that these rising tones scatter magnetospheric protons intermittently at the equatorial region. The radial motion of the magnetospheric source, of which the isolated proton aurora is a projection, can explain the central frequency increase of Pc1, but not the shorter period (tens of seconds) frequency increase of ˜1 Hz in Pc1 rising tones. We suggest that EMIC-triggered emissions generate the frequency increase of Pc1 rising tones on the ground and that they also cause the Pc1 pearl structure, which has a similar characteristic time.

  9. Are dayside long-period pulsations related to the cusp?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilipenko, V.; Belakhovsky, V.; Engebretson, M. J.; Kozlovsky, A.; Yeoman, T.

    2015-03-01

    We compare simultaneous observations of long-period ultra-low-frequency (ULF) wave activity from a Svalbard/IMAGE fluxgate magnetometer latitudinal profile covering the expected cusp geomagnetic latitudes. Irregular Pulsations at Cusp Latitudes (IPCL) and narrowband Pc5 waves are found to be a ubiquitous element of ULF activity in the dayside high-latitude region. To identify the ionospheric projections of the cusp, we use the width of return signal of the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN) radar covering the Svalbard archipelago, predictions of empirical cusp models, augmented whenever possible by Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) identification of magnetospheric boundary domains. The meridional spatial structure of broadband dayside Pc5-6 pulsation spectral power has been found to have a localized latitudinal peak, not under the cusp proper as was previously thought, but several degrees southward from the equatorward cusp boundary. The earlier claims of the dayside monochromatic Pc5 wave association with the open-closed boundary also seems doubtful. Transient currents producing broadband Pc5-6 probably originate at the low-latitude boundary layer/central plasma sheet (LLBL/CPS) interface, though such identification with available DMSP data is not very precise. The occurrence of broadband Pc5-6 pulsations in the dayside boundary layers is a challenge to modelers because so far their mechanism has not been firmly identified.

  10. Temporal characteristics and energy deposition of pulsating auroral patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humberset, B. K.; Gjerloev, J. W.; Samara, M.; Michell, R. G.; Mann, I. R.

    2016-07-01

    We present a careful statistical analysis of pulsating aurora (PA) using all-sky green line (557.7 nm) images obtained at 3.3 Hz. Six well-defined individual PA patches are identified and extracted using a contouring technique. Quantitative parameters such as the patch duration (on-time and off-time), peak intensity, and integrated intensity are determined for each patch and each pulsation. The resulting characteristics serve as strict observational constraints that any of the many competing theories attempting to explain PA must predict. The purpose of this paper is to determine the characteristics of PA patches in order to provide better observational constraints on the suggested mechanisms. All aspects of the temporal behavior of the individual patches appear to be erratic. Historically, PA has been defined very loosely and we argue that the use of the term "pulsating" is inappropriate since our findings and other published results are not regularly periodic and thus a more appropriate term may be fluctuating aurora. Further, we find that the observational constraints do not fit well with the flow cyclotron maser theory, which in particular is suggested to create PA patches. There is no clear candidate of the suggested mechanisms and drivers to explain the observational constraints set by the PA patches in a satisfactory manner.

  11. Dark Stars: Improved Models and First Pulsation Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rindler-Daller, T.; Montgomery, M. H.; Freese, K.; Winget, D. E.; Paxton, B.

    2015-02-01

    We use the stellar evolution code MESA to study dark stars (DSs). DSs, which are powered by dark matter (DM) self-annihilation rather than by nuclear fusion, may be the first stars to form in the universe. We compute stellar models for accreting DSs with masses up to 106 M ⊙. The heating due to DM annihilation is self-consistently included, assuming extended adiabatic contraction of DM within the minihalos in which DSs form. We find remarkably good overall agreement with previous models, which assumed polytropic interiors. There are some differences in the details, with positive implications for observability. We found that, in the mass range of 104-105 M ⊙, our DSs are hotter by a factor of 1.5 than those in Freese et al., are smaller in radius by a factor of 0.6, denser by a factor of three to four, and more luminous by a factor of two. Our models also confirm previous results, according to which supermassive DSs are very well approximated by (n = 3)-polytropes. We also perform a first study of DS pulsations. Our DS models have pulsation modes with timescales ranging from less than a day to more than two years in their rest frames, at z ~ 15, depending on DM particle mass and overtone number. Such pulsations may someday be used to identify bright, cool objects uniquely as DSs; if properly calibrated, they might, in principle, also supply novel standard candles for cosmological studies.

  12. Russian Pulsating Mixer Pump. Innovative Technology Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    2002-03-01

    This sludge mixing/mobilization system was developed in Russia. A prototype system was evaluated by the Tanks Focus Area (TFA) and Industry and University Programs (INDP). The Russian Pulsating Mixer Pump showed promise for mixing highly viscous sludges. This project is to refine the system design (especially the control subsystem) and manufacture the system in Russia in accordance with quality standards required for deployment in radioactive waste storage tanks. Specifications and requirements are being developed by the TFA and INDP. The requirements may call for two or three of the sludge mixing systems to be delivered to Oak Ridge. DOE-Oak Ridge and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory will deploy the pulsating mixing pump system in their Gunite Tanks. These tanks are being emptied and cleaned prior to closure. Oak Ridge has deployed a number of innovative technologies in these efforts. If successful at Oak Ridge, the pulsating mixing pump system has potential application at several other DOE sites, including Savannah River, Hanford, and Idaho.

  13. Mass-spring model of a self-pulsating drop.

    PubMed

    Antoine, Charles; Pimienta, Véronique

    2013-12-01

    Self-pulsating sessile drops are a striking example of the richness of far-from-equilibrium liquid/liquid systems. The complex dynamics of such systems is still not fully understood, and simple models are required to grasp the mechanisms at stake. In this article, we present a simple mass-spring mechanical model of the highly regular drop pulsations observed in Pimienta, V.; Brost, M.; Kovalchuk, N.; Bresch, S.; Steinbock, O. Complex shapes and dynamics of dissolving drops of dichloromethane. Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. 2011, 50, 10728-10731. We introduce an effective time-dependent spreading coefficient that sums up all of the forces (due to evaporation, solubilization, surfactant transfer, coffee ring effect, solutal and thermal Marangoni flows, drop elasticity, etc.) that pull or push the edge of a dichloromethane liquid lens, and we show how to account for the periodic rim breakup. The model is examined and compared against experimental observations. The spreading parts of the pulsations are very rapid and cannot be explained by a constant positive spreading coefficient or superspreading.

  14. THE PULSATION MODE AND DISTANCE OF THE CEPHEID FF AQUILAE

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, D. G.; Kovtyukh, V. V.; Luck, R. E.; Berdnikov, L. N. E-mail: val@deneb1.odessa.ua E-mail: leonid.berdnikov@gmail.com

    2013-07-20

    The determination of pulsation mode and distance for field Cepheids is a complicated problem best resolved by a luminosity estimate. For illustration a technique based on spectroscopic luminosity discrimination is applied to the 4.47 day s-Cepheid FF Aql. Line ratios in high dispersion spectra of the variable yield values of (M{sub V} ) = -3.40 {+-} 0.02 s.e. ({+-}0.04 s.d.), average effective temperature T{sub eff} = 6195 {+-} 24 K, and intrinsic color ((B) - (V)){sub 0} = +0.506 {+-} 0.007, corresponding to a reddening of E{sub B-V} = 0.25 {+-} 0.01, or E{sub B-V}(B0) = 0.26 {+-} 0.01. The skewed light curve, intrinsic color, and luminosity of FF Aql are consistent with fundamental mode pulsation for a small-amplitude classical Cepheid on the blue side of the instability strip, not a sinusoidal pulsator. A distance of 413 {+-} 14 pc is estimated from the Cepheid's angular diameter in conjunction with a mean radius of (R) = 39.0 {+-} 0.7 R{sub Sun} inferred from its luminosity and effective temperature. The dust extinction toward FF Aql is described by a ratio of total-to-selective extinction of R{sub V} = A{sub V} /E(B - V) = 3.16 {+-} 0.34 according to the star's apparent distance modulus.

  15. An Observational Study of Pulsations in Proto-Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrivnak, Bruce J.; Lu, Wenxian; Henson, Gary D.; Hillwig, Todd C.

    2016-01-01

    We have been carrying out a long-term monitoring program to study the light variability in proto-planetary nebulae (PPNe). PPNe are post-Asymptotic Giant Branch objects in transition between the AGB and PN phases in the evolution of low and intermediate-mass stars. As such, it is not surprising that they display pulsational variability. We have been carrying out photometric monitoring of 30 of these at the Valparaiso University campus observatory over the last 20 years, with the assistance of undergraduate students. The sample size has been enlarged over the past six years by observations made using telescopes in the SARA consortium at KPNO and CTIO. Periods have been determined for those of F-G spectral types. We have also enlarged the sample with PPNe from outside the Milky Way by determining periods of eight PPNe in the lower metalicity environment of the Magellanic Clouds. Periods for the entire sample range from 35 to 160 days. Some clear patterns have emerged, with those of higher temperature possessing shorter periods and smaller amplitudes, indicating a reduction in period and pulsation amplitude as the objects evolve. Radial velocity monitoring of several of the brightest of these has allowed us to document their changes in brightness, color, and size during a pulsation cycle. The results of this study will be presented. This research is supported by grants from the National Science Foundation (most recently AST 1413660), with additional student support from the Indiana Space Grant Consortium.

  16. Stellar Pulsations Excited by Planetary Tides in WASP-33

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, Andrew; Guenther, E.; Matthews, J. M.; Amado, P. J.; McDonald, I.; Shkolnik, E.; Smith, A. M. S.; Telting, J.; Walker, G. A. H.; MOST Science Team

    2011-09-01

    The bright, rapidly-rotating A5 star HD 15082 (= WASP-33) has a transiting gas-giant planet in a 1.22-day retrograde orbit, only 5.5 stellar radii from the stellar photosphere (Collier Cameron et al 2010, MNRAS 407, 507). Time-resolved spectra of the system during several transits revealed a complex pattern of non-radial pulsations of the gamma Dor and/or delta Scuti type. The extreme proximity of the planet to the host star raises the possibility that some of these pulsation modes could be excited by planetary tides (Herrero et al 2011 A&A 526, L10). The system was observed continuously by the MOST satellite(*) from 2010 October 07.0 to October 31.0. The MOST data establish the frequency spectrum of the stellar pulsations, providing a direct test of theories of planetary tidal evolution via excitation of inertial waves in the host star. The ellipsoidal variation of the host star places limits on the mass of the planet. During the MOST run, a ground-based support campaign of time-resolved echelle spectroscopy yielded tomographic data sets suitable for mode identification and precise determination of the orientation of the planet's orbit. (*) MOST is a Canadian Space Agency mission, operated by Microsat Systems Canada Inc. (formerly the space division of Dynacon Inc.), the University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies and the University of British Columbia, with support from the University of Vienna.

  17. Mass-spring model of a self-pulsating drop.

    PubMed

    Antoine, Charles; Pimienta, Véronique

    2013-12-01

    Self-pulsating sessile drops are a striking example of the richness of far-from-equilibrium liquid/liquid systems. The complex dynamics of such systems is still not fully understood, and simple models are required to grasp the mechanisms at stake. In this article, we present a simple mass-spring mechanical model of the highly regular drop pulsations observed in Pimienta, V.; Brost, M.; Kovalchuk, N.; Bresch, S.; Steinbock, O. Complex shapes and dynamics of dissolving drops of dichloromethane. Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. 2011, 50, 10728-10731. We introduce an effective time-dependent spreading coefficient that sums up all of the forces (due to evaporation, solubilization, surfactant transfer, coffee ring effect, solutal and thermal Marangoni flows, drop elasticity, etc.) that pull or push the edge of a dichloromethane liquid lens, and we show how to account for the periodic rim breakup. The model is examined and compared against experimental observations. The spreading parts of the pulsations are very rapid and cannot be explained by a constant positive spreading coefficient or superspreading. PMID:24200165

  18. Investigations on the Aerodynamic Characteristics and Blade Excitations of the Radial Turbine with Pulsating Inlet Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yixiong; Yang, Ce; Yang, Dengfeng; Zhang, Rui

    2016-04-01

    The aerodynamic performance, detailed unsteady flow and time-based excitations acting on blade surfaces of a radial flow turbine have been investigated with pulsation flow condition. The results show that the turbine instantaneous performance under pulsation flow condition deviates from the quasi-steady value significantly and forms obvious hysteretic loops around the quasi-steady conditions. The detailed analysis of unsteady flow shows that the characteristic of pulsation flow field in radial turbine is highly influenced by the pulsation inlet condition. The blade torque, power and loading fluctuate with the inlet pulsation wave in a pulse period. For the blade excitations, the maximum and the minimum blade excitations conform to the wave crest and wave trough of the inlet pulsation, respectively, in time-based scale. And toward blade chord direction, the maximum loading distributes along the blade leading edge until 20% chord position and decreases from the leading to trailing edge.

  19. Some spectral and pulsation characteristics of the horizontal flow of a gas-liquid suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krokovnyi, P. M.

    1980-02-01

    In the experiments described, the turbulence characteristics of a two-phase gas-liquid pipe flow were studied, using a 6 m long, 19-mm-diam tube. The inlet temperature of the suspension was maintained at 25 C. The friction energy spectra and the relative intensity of the friction pulsations were measured. The spectral and pulsation characteristics were obtained by an electrodiffusion technique which provided reliable data on the pulsations of the wall shear stress.

  20. Some spectral and pulsation characteristics of a horizontal gas-liquid stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krokovnyi, P. M.

    1980-07-01

    In the experiments described, the turbulence characteristics of a two-phase gas-liquid pipe flow were studied, using a 6 m long, 19-mm-diam tube. The inlet temperature of the suspension was maintained at 25 C. The friction energy spectra and the relative intensity of the friction pulsations were measured. The spectral and pulsation characteristics were obtained by an electrodiffusion technique which provided reliable data on the pulsations of the wall shear stress.

  1. An experimental investigation of heat transfer to pulsating pipe air flow with different amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zohir, A. E.; Habib, M. A.; Attya, A. M.; Eid, A. I.

    2006-05-01

    Heat transfer characteristics to both laminar and turbulent pulsating pipe flows under different conditions of Reynolds number, pulsation frequency, pulsator location and tube diameter were experimentally investigated. The tube wall of uniform heat flux condition was considered for both cases. Reynolds number varied from 750 to 12,320 while the frequency of pulsation ranged from 1 to 10 Hz. With locating the pulsator upstream of the inlet of the test section tube, results showed an increase in heat transfer rate due to pulsation by as much as 30% with flow Reynolds number of 1,643 and pulsation frequency of 1 Hz, depending on the upstream location of the pulsator valve. Closer the valve to the tested section inlet, the better improvement in the heat transfer coefficient is achieved. Upon comparing the heat transfer results of the upstream and the downstream pulsation, at Reynolds number of 1,366 and 1,643, low values of the relative mean Nusselt number were obtained with the upstream pulsation. Comparing the heat transfer results of the two studied test sections tubes for Reynolds number range from 8,000 to 12,000 and pulsation frequency range from 1.0 to 10 Hz showed that more improvement in heat transfer rate was observed with a larger tube diameter. For Reynolds number ranging from 8,000 to 12,000 and pulsation frequency of 10 Hz, an improvement in the relative mean Nusselt number of about 50% was obtained at Reynolds number of 8,000 for the large test section diameter of 50 mm. While, for the small test section diameter of 15 mm, at same conditions of Reynolds number and frequency, a reduction in the relative mean Nusselt number of up to 10% was obtained.

  2. Substructures with luminosity modulation and horizontal oscillation in pulsating patch: Principal component analysis application to pulsating aurora

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Takanori; Miyoshi, Yoshizumi; Katoh, Yuto; Sakanoi, Takeshi; Kataoka, Ryuho; Okano, Shoichi

    2016-03-01

    We observed a mesoscale aurora (100 km × 100 km) with patchy structure and equatorward propagation at Poker Flat Research Range on 1 December 2011. Fast Fourier transform (FFT) analysis revealed that this pulsating patch clearly exhibited temporal variations that can be categorized into two types: on-off pulsation (7.8-10 s) with large amplitudes and luminosity modulations excited during on phase with a frequency of about 3.0 Hz. In addition, we applied principal component analysis (PCA) to time series image data of the pulsating aurora for the first time. Time coefficients were estimated by PCA for the whole patch and the substructures were consistent with those obtained from the FFT analysis, and therefore, we concluded that PCA is capable of decomposing several structures that have different coherent spatiotemporal characteristics. Another new insight in this study is that the rapid variations were highly localized; they were excited in only the substructures embedded in the whole structure. Moreover, the whole patch propagated equatorward because of E × B drift of cold plasma, while the substructures did not show such systematic propagation but rather forward-backward oscillations. The horizontal scale of the substructures was estimated to be no smaller than 410 km at the magnetic equator, which is comparable to that of the wave packet structure of a whistler mode chorus perpendicular to the field line. We suggest that the apparent horizontal oscillation of the substructures is associated with field-aligned propagations of the whistler mode chorus in a duct.

  3. White phosphorus

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    White phosphorus ; CASRN 7723 - 14 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic

  4. Energies of precipitating electrons during pulsating aurora events derived from ionosonde observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDougall, J. W.; Hofstee, J.; Koehler, J. A.

    1981-08-01

    The time-history of particle energies and fluxes associated with pulsating auroras in the morning sector is derived using ionosonde measurements. All the pulsating auroras studied show a similar history with the pulsations occurring during a time interval of the order of an hour during which the average auroral Maxwellian characteristic energy stays relatively constant but the energy flux decreases progressively during the event. A possible explanation for this behavior is suggested in terms of an injection of particles into a magnetospheric 'bottle' near the midnight meridian and the progressive precipitation out of the bottle during the pulsating event.

  5. Observations of candidate oscillating eclipsing binaries and two newly discovered pulsating variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liakos, A.; Niarchos, P.

    2009-03-01

    CCD observations of 24 eclipsing binary systems with spectral types ranging between A0-F0, candidate for containing pulsating components, were obtained. Appropriate exposure times in one or more photometric filters were used so that short-periodic pulsations could be detected. Their light curves were analyzed using the Period04 software in order to search for pulsational behaviour. Two new variable stars, namely GSC 2673-1583 and GSC 3641-0359, were discov- ered as by-product during the observations of eclipsing variables. The Fourier analysis of the observations of each star, the dominant pulsation frequencies and the derived frequency spectra are also presented.

  6. First Satellite Imaging of Auroral Pulsations by the Fast Auroral Imager on e-POP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lui, A.; Cogger, L.; Howarth, A. D.; Yau, A. W.

    2015-12-01

    We report the first satellite imaging of auroral pulsations by the Fast Auroral Imager (FAI) onboard the Enhanced Polar Outflow Probe (e-POP) satellite. The near-infrared camera of FAI is capable of providing up to two auroral images per second, ideal for investigation of pulsating auroras. The auroral pulsations were observed within the auroral bulge formed during a substorm interval on 2014 February 19. This first satellite view of these pulsations from FAI reveals that (1) several pulsating auroral channels (PACs) occur within the auroral bulge, (2) periods of the intensity pulsations span over one decade within the auroral bulge, and (3) there is no apparent trend of longer pulsation periods associated with higher latitudes for these PACs. Although PACs resemble in some respect stable pulsating auroras reported previously but they have several important differences in characteristics.PACs are not embedded in or emerging from omega bands or torches and are located at significant distances from the equatorward boundary of the auroral oval, unlike the characteristics of stable pulsating auroras.

  7. Cepheids in Magellanic Cloud star clusters - Fundamental and overtone pulsators in NGC 2157

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mateo, Mario; Olszewski, Edward W.; Madore, Barry F.

    1990-01-01

    CCD survey data are employed to examine Cepheids in young Magellanic Cloud star clusters. The properties of three Cepheids observed in NGC 2157 are described. It is detected that the two short-period (3 days) Cepheids have photometric properties that correspond to overtone pulsators and the long-period (7.7 days) Cepheid pulses in the fundamental mode. The pulsational masses for the three Cepheids are calculated to be about 5 solar masses. This mass value does not correlate with the average pulsational mass for Cepheids of 3.0 + or - 0.4 solar masses. The potential cause of this deviation in evolutionary/pulsational mass is investigated.

  8. Optical pulsations from the anomalous X-ray pulsar 4U0142+61.

    PubMed

    Kern, B; Martin, C

    2002-05-30

    Anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs) differ from ordinary radio pulsars in that their X-ray luminosity is orders of magnitude greater than their rate of rotational energy loss, and so they require an additional energy source. One possibility is that AXPs are highly magnetized neuron stars or 'magnetars' having surface magnetic fields greater than 10(14) G. This would make them similar to the soft gamma-ray repeaters (SGRs), but alternative models that do not require extreme magnetic fields also exist. An optical counterpart to the AXP 4U0142+61 was recently discovered, consistent with emission from a magnetar, but also from a magnetized hot white dwarf, or an accreting isolated neutron star. Here we report the detection of optical pulsations from 4U0142+61. The pulsed fraction of optical light (27 per cent) is five to ten times greater than that of soft X-rays, from which we conclude that 4U0142+61 is a magnetar. Although this establishes a direct relationship between AXPs and the soft gamma-ray repeaters, the evolutionary connection between AXPs, SGRs and radio pulsars remains controversial. PMID:12037561

  9. Optical pulsations from the anomalous X-ray pulsar 4U0142+61.

    PubMed

    Kern, B; Martin, C

    2002-05-30

    Anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs) differ from ordinary radio pulsars in that their X-ray luminosity is orders of magnitude greater than their rate of rotational energy loss, and so they require an additional energy source. One possibility is that AXPs are highly magnetized neuron stars or 'magnetars' having surface magnetic fields greater than 10(14) G. This would make them similar to the soft gamma-ray repeaters (SGRs), but alternative models that do not require extreme magnetic fields also exist. An optical counterpart to the AXP 4U0142+61 was recently discovered, consistent with emission from a magnetar, but also from a magnetized hot white dwarf, or an accreting isolated neutron star. Here we report the detection of optical pulsations from 4U0142+61. The pulsed fraction of optical light (27 per cent) is five to ten times greater than that of soft X-rays, from which we conclude that 4U0142+61 is a magnetar. Although this establishes a direct relationship between AXPs and the soft gamma-ray repeaters, the evolutionary connection between AXPs, SGRs and radio pulsars remains controversial.

  10. White Blood Cell Count

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? White Blood Cell Count Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also ... Leukocyte Count; White Count Formal name: White Blood Cell Count Related tests: Complete Blood Count , Blood Smear , White ...

  11. THE DETONATION MECHANISM OF THE PULSATIONALLY ASSISTED GRAVITATIONALLY CONFINED DETONATION MODEL OF Type Ia SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, G. C. IV; Graziani, C.; Weide, K.; Norris, J.; Hudson, R.; Lamb, D. Q.; Fisher, R. T.; Townsley, D. M.; Meakin, C.; Reid, L. B.

    2012-11-01

    We describe the detonation mechanism composing the 'pulsationally assisted' gravitationally confined detonation (GCD) model of Type Ia supernovae. This model is analogous to the previous GCD model reported in Jordan et al.; however, the chosen initial conditions produce a substantively different detonation mechanism, resulting from a larger energy release during the deflagration phase. The resulting final kinetic energy and {sup 56}Ni yields conform better to observational values than is the case for the 'classical' GCD models. In the present class of models, the ignition of a deflagration phase leads to a rising, burning plume of ash. The ash breaks out of the surface of the white dwarf, flows laterally around the star, and converges on the collision region at the antipodal point from where it broke out. The amount of energy released during the deflagration phase is enough to cause the star to rapidly expand, so that when the ash reaches the antipodal point, the surface density is too low to initiate a detonation. Instead, as the ash flows into the collision region (while mixing with surface fuel), the star reaches its maximally expanded state and then contracts. The stellar contraction acts to increase the density of the star, including the density in the collision region. This both raises the temperature and density of the fuel-ash mixture in the collision region and ultimately leads to thermodynamic conditions that are necessary for the Zel'dovich gradient mechanism to produce a detonation. We demonstrate feasibility of this scenario with three three-dimensional (3D), full star simulations of this model using the FLASH code. We characterized the simulations by the energy released during the deflagration phase, which ranged from 38% to 78% of the white dwarf's binding energy. We show that the necessary conditions for detonation are achieved in all three of the models.

  12. The Detonation Mechanism of the Pulsationally Assisted Gravitationally Confined Detonation Model of Type Ia Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, G. C., IV; Graziani, C.; Fisher, R. T.; Townsley, D. M.; Meakin, C.; Weide, K.; Reid, L. B.; Norris, J.; Hudson, R.; Lamb, D. Q.

    2012-11-01

    We describe the detonation mechanism composing the "pulsationally assisted" gravitationally confined detonation (GCD) model of Type Ia supernovae. This model is analogous to the previous GCD model reported in Jordan et al.; however, the chosen initial conditions produce a substantively different detonation mechanism, resulting from a larger energy release during the deflagration phase. The resulting final kinetic energy and 56Ni yields conform better to observational values than is the case for the "classical" GCD models. In the present class of models, the ignition of a deflagration phase leads to a rising, burning plume of ash. The ash breaks out of the surface of the white dwarf, flows laterally around the star, and converges on the collision region at the antipodal point from where it broke out. The amount of energy released during the deflagration phase is enough to cause the star to rapidly expand, so that when the ash reaches the antipodal point, the surface density is too low to initiate a detonation. Instead, as the ash flows into the collision region (while mixing with surface fuel), the star reaches its maximally expanded state and then contracts. The stellar contraction acts to increase the density of the star, including the density in the collision region. This both raises the temperature and density of the fuel-ash mixture in the collision region and ultimately leads to thermodynamic conditions that are necessary for the Zel'dovich gradient mechanism to produce a detonation. We demonstrate feasibility of this scenario with three three-dimensional (3D), full star simulations of this model using the FLASH code. We characterized the simulations by the energy released during the deflagration phase, which ranged from 38% to 78% of the white dwarf's binding energy. We show that the necessary conditions for detonation are achieved in all three of the models.

  13. The Domains of Instability for the Pulsating PG 1159 Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quirion, P.-O.; Fontaine, G.; Brassard, P.; Herwig, F.

    2005-07-01

    The fact that we find pulsating and nonpulsating stars mixed together in the PG 1159 region of the log g-Teff diagram has been a long standing puzzle. The poor understanding of the driving mechanism in those stars has been the reason why it has taken so long to address properly this problem. Following the work of Saio (1996) and Gautchy (1997) based on the OPAL opacities, Quirion et al. (2004) recently showed that we are now able to understand and reproduce the ranges of observed periods in the pulsating PG 1159 stars in terms of the original κ-mechanism associated with the partial ionization of the K-shell electrons of C and O which, along with He, make up the composition of the envelope of those stars. Contrary to others, those three studies agree in that no composition gradients are needed between the atmospheric layers and the driving region. Furthermore, the cohabitation of pulsating and nonpulsating PG 1159 stars is naturally explained in terms of a dispersion in atmospheric parameters and in terms of a variation in surface composition from star to star. In particular, the most He-rich stars tend to be stable. We go beyond the findings discussed by Quirion et al. (2004) in this paper, and present the results of additional calculations aimed at describing better the role of the chemical composition (in particular the role of metallicity) as well as that of the stellar mass on the boundaries of the instability domain in the log g-Teff plane.

  14. 9 Aurigae: strong evidence for non-radial pulsations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krisciunas, K.; Griffin, R. F.; Guinan, E. F.; Luedeke, K. D.; McCook, G. P.

    1995-04-01

    We present further photometric observations of the unusual F0 V star 9 Aurigae and present evidence that this star's radial velocity, spectroscopic line widths and line depths are also variable with the same frequencies as the photometric data (f_1~=0.795 and f_2~=0.345 d^-1). The phases of these sinusoids are stable over time-scales of longer than one year, though the amplitudes can vary, making the prediction of photometric behaviour impossible. Given that a variety of other explanations have already been discounted (e.g. interactions with a close companion, the existence of a lumpy, orbiting ring of dust, or star spots) and that these variations occur on time-scales an order of magnitude slower than the fundamental radial pulsation period, we have very strong evidence that 9 Aurigae exhibits non-radial g-mode pulsations. Since the power spectrum of the radial velocity data shows frequency f_2 but does not clearly show f_1, the present data suggest that f_2 is associated with a low-degree spherical harmonic L=1 or 2), while f_1 is associated with a higher degree harmonic. 9 Aurigae, along with such stars as gamma Doradus, HD 224638, HD 224945, and HD 164615, appears to constitute a new class of pulsating variables. These stars are to be found at or beyond the cool edge of the Cepheid instability strip in the HR Diagram. Prior to this, only much hotter stars have been shown to exhibit non-radial g-modes.

  15. The domains of instability for the pulsating PG1159 stars.

    SciTech Connect

    Quirion, P.-O.; Fontaine, Gilles.; Brassard, Pierre; Herwig, F. H.

    2004-01-01

    The fact that we find pulsating and nonpulsating stars mixed together in the PG 1159 region of the log g - T{sub eff} diagram has been a long standing puzzle. The poor understanding of the driving mechanism in those stars has been the reason why it has taken so long to address properly this problem. Following the work of Saio (1996) and Gautschy (1997) based on the OPAL opacities, Quirion, Fontaine, & Brassard (2004) recently showed that we are now able to understand and reproduce the ranges of observed periods in the pulsating PG 1159 stars in terms of the original {kappa}-mechanism associated with the partial ionization of the K-shell electrons of C and O which, along with He, make up the composition of the envelope of those stars. Contrary to others, those three studies agree in that no composition gradients are needed between the atmospheric layers and the driving region. Furthermore, the cohabitation of pulsating and nonpulsating PG 1159 stars is naturally explained in terms of a dispersion in atmospheric parameters and in terms of a variation in surface composition from star to star. In particular, the most He-rich stars tend to be stable. We go beyond the findings discussed by Quirion et al. (2004) in this paper, and present the results of additional calculations aimed at describing better the role of the chemical composition (in particular the role of metallicity) as well as that of the stellar mass on the boundaries of the instability domain in the log g - T{sub eff} plane.

  16. DETECTION OF A WHITE DWARF COMPANION TO THE WHITE DWARF SDSSJ125733.63+542850.5

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, T. R.; Gaensicke, B. T.; Steeghs, D.; Southworth, J.; Koester, D.; Harris, V.; Merry, L.

    2011-08-01

    SDSSJ125733.63+542850.5 (hereafter SDSSJ1257+5428) is a compact white dwarf binary from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey that exhibits high-amplitude radial velocity variations on a period of 4.56 hr. While an initial analysis suggested the presence of a neutron star or black hole binary companion, a follow-up study concluded that the spectrum was better understood as a combination of two white dwarfs. Here we present optical spectroscopy and ultraviolet fluxes which directly reveal the presence of the second white dwarf in the system. SDSSJ1257+5428's spectrum is a composite, dominated by the narrow-lined spectrum from a cool, low-gravity white dwarf (T{sub eff} {approx_equal} 6300 K, log g = 5-6.6) with broad wings from a hotter, high-mass white dwarf companion (11, 000-14, 000 K; {approx}1 M{sub sun}). The high-mass white dwarf has unusual line profiles which lack the narrow central core to H{alpha} that is usually seen in white dwarfs. This is consistent with rapid rotation with vsin i = 500-1750 km s{sup -1}, although other broadening mechanisms such as magnetic fields, pulsations, or a helium-rich atmosphere could also be contributory factors. The cool component is a puzzle since no evolutionary model matches its combination of low gravity and temperature. Within the constraints set by our data, SDSSJ1257+5428 could have a total mass greater than the Chandrasekhar limit and thus be a potential Type Ia supernova progenitor. However, SDSSJ1257+5428's unusually low-mass ratio q {approx} 0.2 suggests that it is more likely that it will evolve into an accreting double white dwarf (AM CVn star).

  17. Electrodynamic response of the middle atmosphere to auroral pulsations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, R. A.; Croskey, C. L.; Hale, L. C.; Mitchell, J. D.; Barcus, J. R.

    1990-01-01

    The MAC/EPSILON observational campaign encompassed the use of two Nike Orion rocket payloads which studied the effects of auroral energetics on the middle atmosphere. While one payload was launched during the recovery phase of a moderate magnetic substorm, during fairly stable auroral conditions, the other was launched during highly active postbreakup conditions during which Pc5 pulsations were in progress. The energetic radiation of the first event was composed almost entirely of relativistic electrons below 200 keV, while that of the second was dominated by much softer electrons whose high X-ray fluxes exceeded the cosmic ray background as an ionizing source down to below 30 km.

  18. Optical multichannel monitoring of skin blood pulsations for cardiovascular assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spigulis, Janis; Erts, Renars; Ozols, Maris

    2004-07-01

    Time resolved detection and analysis of the skin back-scattered optical signals (reflection photoplethysmography or PPG) provide rich information on skin blood volume pulsations and can serve for cardiovascular assessment. The multichannel PPG concept has been developed and clinically verified in this work. Simultaneous data flow from several body locations allows to study the heartbeat pulse wave propagation in real time and to evaluate the vascular resistance. Portable two- and four-channel PPG monitoring devices and special software have been designed for real-time data acquisition and processing. The multi-channel devices were successfully applied for cardiovascular fitness tests and for early detection of arterial occlusions.

  19. Dissipative double-well potential: Nonlinear stationary and pulsating modes

    SciTech Connect

    Zezyulin, Dmitry A.; Konotop, Vladimir V.; Alfimov, Georgy L.

    2010-11-15

    The analysis of nonlinear modes in a complex absorbing double-well potential supported by linear gain is presented. Families of the nonlinear modes and their bifurcations are found numerically by means of the properly modified 'shooting' method. Linear stability and dynamics of the modes are studied. It is shown that no stable modes exist in the case of attractive nonlinearity, while stable modes, including nonsymmetric ones, are found when the nonlinearity is repulsive. Varying a control parameter (e.g., the height of barrier between the wells) results in switching from one mode to another. Apart from stationary modes we have found pulsating solutions emergent from unstable modes.

  20. Correlated pulsations in auroral light intensity and VLF hiss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duthie, D. D.; Rash, J. P. S.; Scourfield, M. W. J.

    1985-12-01

    Observations at Sanae, Antarctica of a pulsating aurora with a low light level TV system have been combined with simultaneous recordings of VLF hiss on a broad band receiver. Both auroral light and hiss intensities display a significant peak at 1.3 Hz in the power spectrum. The peaks in the auroral light intensity variations lead those in the VLF hiss by times between zero and 0.2 s, as revealed by cross-spectral analysis. These results are explained in terms of cyclotron resonance in the equatorial plane between the auroral electrons and echoing VLF hiss.

  1. Stellar Pulsations and Stellar Evolution: Conflict, Cohabitation, or Symbiosis?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Achim

    While the analysis of stellar pulsations allows the determination of current properties of a star, stellar evolution models connect it with its previous history. In many cases results from both methods do not agree. In this review some classical and current cases of disagreement are presented. In some cases these conflicts led to an improvement of the theory of stellar evolution, while in others they still remain unsolved. Some well-known problems of stellar physics are pointed out as well, for which it is hoped that seismology—or in general the analysis of stellar pulsations—will help to resolve them. The limits of this symbiosis will be discussed as well.

  2. PREFACE: 16th European White Dwarfs Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Berro, Enrique; Hernanz, Margarita; Isern, Jordi; Torres, Santiago

    2009-07-01

    The 16th European Workshop on White Dwarfs was held in Barcelona, Spain, from 30 June to 4 July 2008 at the premises of the UPC. Almost 120 participants from Europe (France, Germany, United Kingdom, Italy, and several others), America (USA, Canada, Argentina, Brazil, and Chile), and other continents (Australia, South Africa, . . . ) attended the workshop. Among these participants were the most relevant specialists in the field. The topics covered by the conference were: White dwarf structure and evolution Progenitors and Planetary Nebulae White dwarfs in binaries: cataclysmic variables, double degenerates and other binaries White dwarfs, dust disks and planetary systems Atmospheres, chemical composition, magnetic fields Variable white dwarfs White dwarfs in stellar clusters and the halo White Dwarfs as SNIa progenitors The programme included 54 talks, and 45 posters. The oral presentations were distributed into the following sessions: Luminosity function, mass function and populations White dwarf structure and evolution White dwarf ages White dwarf catalogs and surveys Central stars of planetary nebulae Supernovae progenitors White dwarfs in novae and CVs Physical processes in white dwarfs and magnetic white dwarfs Disks, dust and planets around white dwarfs Pulsating white dwarfs Additionally we had a special open session about Spitzer and white dwarfs. The Proceedings of the 16th European Workshop on White Dwarfs are representative of the current state-of-the-art of the research field and include new and exciting results. We acknowledge the very positive attitude of the attendants to the workshop, which stimulated very fruitful discussions that took place in all the sessions and after the official schedule. Also, the meeting allowed new collaborations tp start that will undoubtedly result in significant advances in the research field. We also acknowledge the willingness of the participants to deliver their contributions before the final deadline. We sincerely

  3. White dwarf stars with some hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Eugene Yu-Yu

    This dissertation focuses on white dwarf stars with some hydrogen, that possess a mass of surface hydrogen from 1 x 10--11 M⊙ to 1 x 10--7 M⊙ . The chemical structure of such white dwarfs is mainly controlled by convection and has never been studied in a fully proper manner. We present the first comprehensive study of such objects, including: (1) The relation between surface chemical composition and stellar structure. (2) The cooling curve and curve of surface chemical evolution. (3) The "Teff function" of the galactic disc derived from such cooling curves. The study enables us to: (1) Infer physical quantities such as total hydrogen mass (mH) and core temperature ( Tcore) from spectroscopy. (2) Understand the correlation between the non-DA to DA abundance ratio and Teff, such as the "non-DA gap" proposed by Bergeron, Ruiz, & Leggett (1997). (3) Better understand the cosmo-chronological meaning of the white dwarf luminosity function.

  4. Detection of pulsation effects on turbine meters by pulse period modulation measurements

    SciTech Connect

    McKee, R.J.

    1995-12-31

    The objective of the research described in this paper is to evaluate the pulse period modulation method as a potential approach for meeting the gas industries needs for detection of pulsation effects on turbine meters at field installations. Research has been conducted as part of the Gas Research Institute Metering Research Program in response to knowledge that pulsation causes over registration of flow in some cases while not causing any errors in other apparently similar pulsating conditions. Operators need to be able to detect when pulsation is causing significant errors. Methods of detection based on existing theory rely on measuring velocity modulation which is not practical at typical natural gas metering sites. The proposed new method replaces velocity modulation measurements with a monitoring of pulse period modulations that are related to rotor speed changes that result from pulsating flow. Test results indicate that for the tested turbine meters there is an approximate relationship between period modulation and velocity modulation in which period modulation increases as pulsation induced error increases. There are unavoidable uncertainties in quantifying pulse period modulation such that an accurate determination of pulsation effects from period modulation can not be made. However, the presence of a significant error due to pulsation can be detected as a change in the pulse period modulation level.

  5. Time series and correlation of pulsations observed simultaneously by two aircraft

    SciTech Connect

    Ochadlick, A.R. Jr.

    1990-10-01

    Geomagnetic pulsations are an interesting and ubiquitous component of the geomagnetic field and they have been studied extensively for several decades. Numerous comparisons have been made of pulsations at a variety of sites for various objectives. However, conductivity anomalies introduce a number of complexities into the interpretations of pulsations at ground sites through the action of the primary fields on the electrical properties of the local geologic structure. To avoid the difficulties associated with conductivity irregularities, Ochadlick et al. (1985) described an aeromagnetic approach using two aircraft for studying the relationship between pulsations observed over a deep ocean area. Relative to land regions, a deep sea is presumably a more uniform conductor. Using the dual aeromagnetic results, Ochadlick found that the correlation coefficient of pulsations remained relatively constant for observation points spaced apart from a few to about 150 km. Beyond 150 km the correlation coefficient was found to decrease. This letter summarizes the time series records of pulsations, totaling about 9 h, acquired during several dual aircraft flights performed between 20 May and 15 Aug 1985 and presents the associated correlation coefficient between the dual aircraft data sets. Apparently, those measurements show for the first time that a strong similarity of pulsations weakens quickly at a distance of {approximately}150 km which is remarkably close to the ionospheric height and is thus suggestive of a strong ionospheric control on the spatial coherence of pulsations.

  6. Radial stellar pulsation and three-dimensional convection. III. Comparison of two-dimensional and three-dimensional convection effects on radial pulsation

    SciTech Connect

    Geroux, Christopher M.; Deupree, Robert G.

    2014-03-10

    We have developed a multi-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics code to simulate the interaction of radial stellar pulsation and convection for full-amplitude pulsating models. Convection is computed using large eddy simulations. Here, we perform three-dimensional (3D) simulations of RR Lyrae stars for comparison with previously reported 2D simulations. We find that the time-dependent behavior of the peak convective flux on pulsation phase is very similar in both the 2D and 3D calculations. The growth rates of the pulsation in the 2D calculations are about 0.1% higher than in the 3D calculations. The amplitude of the light curve for a 6500 K RR Lyrae model is essentially the same for our 2D and 3D calculations, as is the rising light curve. There are differences in the slope at various times during falling light.

  7. Radial Stellar Pulsation and Three-dimensional Convection. I. Numerical Methods and Adiabatic Test Cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geroux, Chris M.; Deupree, Robert G.

    2011-04-01

    We are developing a three-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics code to simulate the interaction of convection and pulsation in classical variable stars. One key goal is the ability to carry these simulations to full amplitude in order to compare them with observed light and velocity curves. Previous two-dimensional calculations were prevented from doing this because of drift in the radial coordinate system, due to the algorithm defining radial movement of the coordinate system during the pulsation cycle. We remove this difficulty by defining our coordinate system flow algorithm to require that the mass in a spherical shell remains constant throughout the pulsation cycle. We perform adiabatic test calculations to show that large amplitude solutions repeat over more than 150 pulsation periods. We also verify that the computational method conserves the peak kinetic energy per period, as must be true for adiabatic pulsation models.

  8. Lattice Boltzmann Simulation of One Particle Migrating in a Pulsating Flow in Microvessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Bing; Tan, Hui-Li; Li, Hua-Bing

    2011-10-01

    A lattice Boltzmann model of two dimensions is used to simulate the movement of a single rigid particle suspended in a pulsating flow in micro vessel. The particle is as big as a red blood cell, and the micro vessel is four times as wide as the diameter of the particle. It is found that Segré—Silberberg effect will not respond to the pulsation of the flow when the Reynolds number is relatively high. However, when the Reynolds number is low enough, Segré—Silberberg effect disappears. In the steady flow, different initial position leads to different equilibrium positions. In a pulsating flow, different frequencies of pulsation also cause different equilibrium positions. Particularly, when the frequency of pulsation is closed to the human heart rate, Segré—Silberberg effect presents again. The evolutions of velocity, rotation, and trajectory of the particle are investigated to find the dynamics of such abnormal phenomenon.

  9. Field and thermal plasma observations of ULF pulsations during a magnetically disturbed interval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, N.; Engebretson, M. J.; Reinleitner, L. A.; Olson, J. V.; Gallagher, D. L.; Cahill, L. J., Jr.; Slavin, J. A.; Persoon, A. M.

    1992-01-01

    A ULF pulsation event is discussed on the basis of experimental observations of electric and magnetic field measurements as well as particle measurements from the DE 1 spacecraft. The observations were made near the magnetic equator in a space covering a large range of L shells and magnetic latitudes, and comparisons are made to ground observations. Azimuthal oscillations are observed following gradually decaying long-period compressional waves. Weak interaction between magnetic shells indicates that the source is probably weak, and ground data on magnetic pulsations showed strong signals that did not necessarily correspond to the quasisinusoidal pulsations observed in space. Azimuthal pulsations observed by the spacecraft indicate that there was a plasma density gradient beyond the plasmapause. The ULF pulsations were probably affected by changes in the magnetic field and solar-wind dynamic pressure, and their periods are found to be linked to geomagnetic latitude.

  10. Results mixed from pulsating flow tests of orifice-plate meters

    SciTech Connect

    Arasi, J.A. )

    1992-10-05

    This paper reports that laboratory tests on several commercially available orifice-plate meters for use in pulsating flow indicate that none yields acceptable accuracy. These tests suggested, however, that if the objective of monitoring pulsating flow is to indicate or quantify pulsation magnitudes for comparisons, then at least two instruments are acceptable. Use of such meters, particularly in low flow rate gathering systems, can be a viable alternative to attempting to reduce the intensity (amplitude and frequency) of pulsation by expensive installation and maintenance of chokes and bottles. Phillips Petroleum Co. set out to find a meter that would be sensitive enough to measure pulsating hydrocarbon flows with acceptable accuracy using the orifice plate. Several orifice measurement systems were simultaneously investigated at the Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio (SwRI).

  11. RADIAL STELLAR PULSATION AND THREE-DIMENSIONAL CONVECTION. I. NUMERICAL METHODS AND ADIABATIC TEST CASES

    SciTech Connect

    Geroux, Chris M.; Deupree, Robert G.

    2011-04-10

    We are developing a three-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics code to simulate the interaction of convection and pulsation in classical variable stars. One key goal is the ability to carry these simulations to full amplitude in order to compare them with observed light and velocity curves. Previous two-dimensional calculations were prevented from doing this because of drift in the radial coordinate system, due to the algorithm defining radial movement of the coordinate system during the pulsation cycle. We remove this difficulty by defining our coordinate system flow algorithm to require that the mass in a spherical shell remains constant throughout the pulsation cycle. We perform adiabatic test calculations to show that large amplitude solutions repeat over more than 150 pulsation periods. We also verify that the computational method conserves the peak kinetic energy per period, as must be true for adiabatic pulsation models.

  12. V2653 Ophiuchii with a pulsating component and Ppuls - Porb, Ppuls - g correlations for γ Dor type pulsators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çakırlı, Ö.; Ibanoglu, C.

    2016-05-01

    We present new spectroscopic observations of the double-lined eclipsing binary V2653 Ophiuchii. The photometric observations obtained by ASAS were analyzed and combined with the analysis of radial velocities for deriving the absolute parameters of the components. Masses and radii were determined for the first time as Mp = 1.537 ± 0.021 M⊙ and Rp = 2.215 ± 0.055 R⊙, Ms = 1.273 ± 0.019 M⊙ and Rs = 2.000 ± 0.056 R⊙ for the components of V2653 Oph. We estimate an interstellar reddening of 0.15 ± 0.08 mag and a distance of 300 ± 50 pc for the system, both supporting the membership of the open cluster Collinder 359. Using the out-of-eclipse photometric data we have made frequency analysis and detected a periodic signal at 1.0029 ± 0.0019 c/d. This frequency and the location of the more massive star on the HR diagram lead to classification of a γ Dor type variable. Up to date only eleven γ Dor type pulsators in the eclipsing binaries have been discovered. For six out of 11 systems, the physical parameters were determined. Although a small sample, we find empirical relations that Ppuls ∝ Porb0.43 and Ppuls ∝ g-0.83. While the pulsation periods increase with longer orbital periods, they decrease with increasing surface gravities of pulsating components and gravitational pull exerted by the companions. We present, briefly, the underlying physics behind the correlations we derived.

  13. A DARK SPOT ON A MASSIVE WHITE DWARF

    SciTech Connect

    Kilic, Mukremin; Gianninas, Alexandros; Curd, Brandon; Wisniewski, John P.; Bell, Keaton J.; Winget, D. E.; Winget, K. I.; Brown, Warren R.; Hermes, J. J.; Dufour, Patrick

    2015-12-01

    We present the serendipitous discovery of eclipse-like events around the massive white dwarf SDSS J152934.98+292801.9 (hereafter J1529+2928). We selected J1529+2928 for time-series photometry based on its spectroscopic temperature and surface gravity, which place it near the ZZ Ceti instability strip. Instead of pulsations, we detect photometric dips from this white dwarf every 38 minutes. Follow-up optical spectroscopy observations with Gemini reveal no significant radial velocity variations, ruling out stellar and brown dwarf companions. A disintegrating planet around this white dwarf cannot explain the observed light curves in different filters. Given the short period, the source of the photometric dips must be a dark spot that comes into view every 38 minutes due to the rotation of the white dwarf. Our optical spectroscopy does not show any evidence of Zeeman splitting of the Balmer lines, limiting the magnetic field strength to B < 70 kG. Since up to 15% of white dwarfs display kG magnetic fields, such eclipse-like events should be common around white dwarfs. We discuss the potential implications of this discovery on transient surveys targeting white dwarfs, like the K2 mission and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope.

  14. Ventricular dilation and elevated aqueductal pulsations in a new experimental model of communicating hydrocephalus

    SciTech Connect

    Wagshul, M.; Smith, S.; Wagshul, M.; McAllister, J.P.; Rashid, S.; Li, J.; Egnor, M.R.; Walker, M.L.; Yu, M.; Smith, S.D.; Zhang, G.; Chen, J.J.; Beneveniste, H.

    2009-03-01

    In communicating hydrocephalus (CH), explanations for the symptoms and clear-cut effective treatments remain elusive. Pulsatile flow through the cerebral aqueduct is often significantly elevated, but a clear link between abnormal pulsations and ventriculomegaly has yet to be identified. We sought to demonstrate measurement of pulsatile aqueductal flow of CSF in the rat, and to characterize the temporal changes in CSF pulsations in a new model of CH. Hydrocephalus was induced by injection of kaolin into the basal cisterns of adult rats (n = 18). Ventricular volume and aqueductal pulsations were measured on a 9.4 T MRI over a one month period. Half of the animals developed ventricular dilation, with increased ventricular volume and pulsations as early as one day post-induction, and marked chronic elevations compared to intact controls (volume: 130.15 {+-} 83.21 {mu}l vs. 15.52 {+-} 2.00 {mu}l; pulsations: 114.51 nl {+-} 106.29 vs. 0.72 {+-} 0.13 nl). Similar to the clinical presentation, the relationship between ventricular size and pulsations was quite variable. However, the pulsation time-course revealed two distinct sub-types of hydrocephalic animals: those with markedly elevated pulsations which persisted over time, and those with mildly elevated pulsations which returned to near normal levels after one week. These groups were associated with severe and mild ventriculomegaly respectively. Thus, aqueductal flow can be measured in the rat using high-field MRI and basal cistern-induced CH is associated with an immediate change in CSF pulsatility. At the same time, our results highlight the complex nature of aqueductal pulsation and its relationship to ventricular dilation.

  15. Characterization of ultra low frequency (ULF) pulsations and the investigation of their possible source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mthembu, S. H.; Malinga, S. B.; Walker, A. D. M.; Magnus, L.

    2009-08-01

    In this paper we present the results from the observation of ultra low frequency (ULF) pulsations in the Doppler velocity data from SuperDARN HF radar located at Goose Bay (61.94° N, 23.02° E, geomagnetic). Fourier spectral techniques were used to determine the spectral content of the data and the results show Pc 5 ULF pulsations (with a frequency range of 1 to 4 mHz) where the magnetic field lines were oscillating at discrete frequencies of about 1.3 and 1.9 mHz. These pulsations are classified as field lines resonance (FLR) since the 1.9 mHz component exhibited an enhancement in amplitude with an associated phase change of approximately 180° across a resonance latitude of 71.3°. The spatial and temporal structure of the ULF pulsations was examined by investigating their instantaneous amplitude which was calculated as the amplitude of the analytic signal. The results presented a full field of view which exhibit pulsations activity simultaneously from all beams. This representation shows that the peak amplitude of the 1.9 mHz component was observed over the longitudinal range of 13°. The temporal structure of the pulsations was investigated from the evolution of the 1.9 mHz component and the results showed that the ULF pulsations had a duration of about 1 h. Wavelet analysis was used to investigate solar wind as a probable source of the observed ULF pulsations. The time delay compared well with the solar wind travel time estimates and the results suggest a possible link between the solar wind and the observed pulsations. The sudden change in dynamic pressure also proved to be a possible source of the observed ULF pulsations.

  16. Mystery of a Dimming White Dwarf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-12-01

    In the wake of the recent media attention over an enigmatic, dimming star, another intriguing object has been discovered: J1529+2928, a white dwarf that periodically dims. This mystery, however, may have a simple solution with interesting consequences for future surveys of white dwarfs.Unexpected VariabilityJ1529+2928 is an isolated white dwarf that appears to have a mass of slightly more than the Sun. But rather than radiating steadily, J1529+2928 dims once every 38 minutes almost as though it were being eclipsed.The team that discovered these variations, led by Mukremin Kilic (University of Oklahoma), used telescopes at the Apache Point Observatory and the McDonald Observatory to obtain follow-up photometric data of J1529+2928 spread across 66 days. The team also took spectra of the white dwarf with the Gemini North telescope.Kilic and collaborators then began, one by one, to rule out possible causes of this objects variability.Eliminating OptionsThe period of the variability is too long for J1529+2928 to be a pulsating white dwarf with luminosity variation caused by gravity-wave pulsations.The variability cant be due to an eclipse by a stellar or brown-dwarf companion, because there isnt any variation in J1529+2928s radial velocity.Its not due to the orbit of a solid-body planetary object; such a transit would be too short to explain observations.It cant be due to the orbit of a disintegrated planet; this wouldnt explain the light curves observed in different filters plus the light curve doesnt change over the 66-day span.Spotty SurfaceTop and middle two panels: light curves from three different nights observing J1529+2928s periodic dimming. Bottom panel: The Fourier transform shows a peak at 37.7 cycles/day (and another, smaller peak at its first harmonic). [Kilic et al. 2015]So what explanation is left? The authors suggest that J1529+2928s variability is likely caused by a starspot on the white dwarfs surface that rotates into and out of our view. Estimates

  17. Pressure pulsation in roller pumps: a validated lumped parameter model.

    PubMed

    Moscato, Francesco; Colacino, Francesco M; Arabia, Maurizio; Danieli, Guido A

    2008-11-01

    During open-heart surgery roller pumps are often used to keep the circulation of blood through the patient body. They present numerous key features, but they suffer from several limitations: (a) they normally deliver uncontrolled pulsatile inlet and outlet pressure; (b) blood damage appears to be more than that encountered with centrifugal pumps. A lumped parameter mathematical model of a roller pump (Sarns 7000, Terumo CVS, Ann Arbor, MI, USA) was developed to dynamically simulate pressures at the pump inlet and outlet in order to clarify the uncontrolled pulsation mechanism. Inlet and outlet pressures obtained by the mathematical model have been compared with those measured in various operating conditions: different rollers' rotating speed, different tube occlusion rates, and different clamping degree at the pump inlet and outlet. Model results agree with measured pressure waveforms, whose oscillations are generated by the tube compression/release mechanism during the rollers' engaging and disengaging phases. Average Euclidean Error (AEE) was 20mmHg and 33mmHg for inlet and outlet pressure estimates, respectively. The normalized AEE never exceeded 0.16. The developed model can be exploited for designing roller pumps with improved performances aimed at reducing the undesired pressure pulsation.

  18. Numerical simulation of pressure pulsations in Francis turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnoli, M. V.; Schilling, R.

    2012-11-01

    In the last decades, hydraulic turbines have experienced the increase of their power density and the extension of their operating range, leading the fluid and mechanical dynamic effects to become significantly more pronounced. The understanding of the transient fluid flow and of the associated unsteady effects is essential for the reduction of the pressure pulsation level and improvement of the machine dynamic behaviour. In this study, the instationary fluid flow through the complete turbine was numerically calculated for an existing Francis machine with high specific speed. The hybrid turbulence models DES (detached eddy simulation) and SAS (scale adaptive simulation) allowed the accurate simulation of complex dynamic flow effects, such as the rotor-stator-interaction and the draft tube instabilities. Different operating conditions, as full load, part load, higher part load and deep part load, were successfully simulated and showed very tight agreement with the experimental results from the model tests. The transient pressure field history, obtained from the CFD (computational fluid dynamics) simulation and stored for each time step, was used as input for the full instationary FEA (finite element analysis) of turbine components. The assessment of the machine dynamic motion also offered the possibility to contribute to the understanding of the pressure pulsation effects and to further increase the turbine stability. This research project was developed at the Institute of Fluid Mechanics of the TU München.

  19. Pulsations of rapidly rotating stars with compositional discontinuities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reese, Daniel R.; Lara, Francisco Espinosa; Rieutord, Michel

    2014-02-01

    Recent observations of rapidly rotating stars have revealed the presence of regular patterns in their pulsation spectra. This has raised the question as to their physical origin, and, in particular, whether they can be explained by an asymptotic frequency formula for low-degree acoustic modes, as recently discovered through numerical calculations and theoretical considerations. In this context, a key question is whether compositional/density gradients can adversely affect such patterns to the point of hindering their identification. To answer this question, we calculate frequency spectra using two-dimensional ESTER stellar models. These models use a multi-domain spectral approach, allowing us to easily insert a compositional discontinuity while retaining a high numerical accuracy. We analyse the effects of such discontinuities on both the frequencies and eigenfunctions of pulsation modes in the asymptotic regime. We find that although there is more scatter around the asymptotic frequency formula, the semi-large frequency separation can still be clearly identified in a spectrum of low-degree acoustic modes.

  20. Fundamental parameters of pulsating stars from atmospheric models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barcza, S.

    2006-12-01

    A purely photometric method is reviewed to determine distance, mass, equilibrium temperature, and luminosity of pulsating stars by using model atmospheres and hydrodynamics. T Sex is given as an example: on the basis of Kurucz atmospheric models and UBVRI (in both Johnson and Kron-Cousins systems) data, variation of angular diameter, effective temperature, and surface gravity is derived as a function of phase, mass M=(0.76± 0.09) M⊙, distance d=530± 67 pc, Rmax=2.99R⊙, Rmin=2.87R⊙, magnitude averaged visual absolute brightness < MVmag>=1.17± 0.26 mag are found. During a pulsation cycle four standstills of the atmosphere are pointed out indicating the occurrence of two shocks in the atmosphere. The derived equilibrium temperature Teq=7781 K and luminosity (28.3± 8.8)L⊙ locate T Sex on the blue edge of the instability strip in a theoretical Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. The differences of the physical parameters from this study and Liu & Janes (1990) are discussed.

  1. Relativistic-electron precipitations in a pulsating aurora

    SciTech Connect

    Hudnut, K.D.

    1987-01-01

    Data from scintillation and solid-state detectors flown on rockets in Norway in October, 1980 are used to examine the temporal and energetic characteristics of relativistic electrons precipitated during a pulsating post-breakup aurora in the morning sector. Electron bursts with mildly relativistic energies (up to 600 keV) discovered from the data are described in detail. Temporal features of these bursts showing periodic components on a time scale of 10 ms are described. These observations constitute a new regime of time and energy for electrons in morningside aurorae. A region within approximately 1 earth radius above the ionosphere on the L = 6.6 magnetic field line is determined as the point of acceleration of the electrons. These temporal, energetic, and spatial characteristics are compared to the electron-cyclotron resonance theory which has been proposed to explain pulsating electron precipitation in a morningside aurora. The theoretical model is shown to adequately explain some but not all of the observations. Suggestions for further theoretical and experimental treatments of this problem are made.

  2. Pulsation Properties of Carbon and Oxygen Red Giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Percy, J. R.; Huang, D. J.

    2015-07-01

    We have used up to 12 decades of AAVSO visual observations, and the AAVSO VSTAR software package to determine new and/or improved periods of 5 pulsating biperiodic carbon (C-type) red giants, and 12 pulsating biperiodic oxygen (M-type) red giants. We have also determined improved periods for 43 additional C-type red giants, in part to search for more biperiodic C-type stars, and also for 46 M-type red giants. For a small sample of the biperiodic C-type and M-type stars, we have used wavelet analysis to determine the time scales of the cycles of amplitude increase and decrease. The C-type and M-type stars do not differ significantly in their period ratios (first overtone to fundamental). There is a marginal difference in the lengths of their amplitude cycles. The most important result of this study is that, because of the semiregularity of these stars, and the presence of alias, harmonic, and spurious periods, the periods which we and others derive for these stars—especially the smaller-amplitude ones—must be determined and interpreted with great care and caution. For instance: spurious periods of a year can produce an apparent excess of stars, at that period, in the period distribution.

  3. Radial pulsation as a function of hydrogen abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffery, C. S.; Saio, H.

    2016-05-01

    Using linear non-adiabatic pulsation analysis, we explore the radial-mode (p-mode) stability of stars across a wide range of mass (0.2 ≤ M ≤ 50{ M_{{⊙}}}), composition (0 ≤ X ≤ 0.7, Z = 0.001, 0.02), effective temperature (3000 ≤ Teff ≤ 40 000 K), and luminosity (0.01 ≤ L/M ≤ 100 000 solar units). We identify the instability boundaries associated with low- to high-order radial oscillations (0 ≤ n ≤ 16). The instability boundaries are a strong function of both composition and radial order (n). With decreasing hydrogen abundance we find that (i) the classical blue edge of the Cepheid instability strip shifts to higher effective temperature and luminosity, and (ii) high-order modes are more easily excited and small islands of high radial-order instability develop, some of which correspond with real stars. Driving in all cases is by the classical κ-mechanism and/or strange modes. We identify regions of parameter space where new classes of pulsating variable may, in future, be discovered. The majority of these are associated with reduced hydrogen abundance in the envelope; one has not been identified previously.

  4. Flow Visualization Study of a Pulsating Respiratory Assist Catheter

    PubMed Central

    Budilarto, Stephanus G.; Frankowski, Brian J.; Hattler, Brack G.; Federspiel, William J.

    2007-01-01

    Our group is currently developing an intravenous respiratory assist device that uses a centrally located pulsatile balloon within a hollow fiber bundle to enhance gas exchange rate via active mixing mechanism. We tested the hypothesis that the nonsymmetric inflation and deflation of the balloon lead to both nonuniform balloon‐generated secondary flow and nonuniform gas exchange rate in the fiber bundle. The respiratory catheter was placed in a 1‐in. internal diameter rigid test section of an in vitro flow loop (3 L/min deionized water). Particle image velocimetry (PIV), which was used to map the velocity vector field in the lateral cross‐section, showed that the balloon pulsation generated a nonuniform fluid flow surrounding the respiratory assist catheter. PIV was also used to characterize the fiber bundle movement, which was induced by the balloon pulsation. Gas permeability coefficient of the device was evaluated by using both the fluid velocity and the relative velocity between the fluid and the fiber bundle. The highest difference in the gas permeability coefficient predicted by using the relative velocity was about 17% to 23% (angular direction), which was more uniform than the 49% to 59% variation predicted by using the fluid velocity. The movement of the fiber bundle was responsible for reducing the variation in the fluid velocity passing through the bundle and for minimizing the nonuniformity of the gas permeability coefficient of the respiratory assist catheter. PMID:16340349

  5. SDSS DR7 WHITE DWARF CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinman, S. J.; Nitta, A.; Kepler, S. O.; Pelisoli, Ingrid; Pecanha, Viviane; Costa, J. E. S.; Koester, D.; Krzesinski, J.; Dufour, P.; Lachapelle, F.-R.; Bergeron, P.; Yip, Ching-Wa; Harris, Hugh C.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Althaus, L.; Corsico, A.

    2013-01-15

    We present a new catalog of spectroscopically confirmed white dwarf stars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7 spectroscopic catalog. We find 20,407 white dwarf spectra, representing 19,712 stars, and provide atmospheric model fits to 14,120 DA and 1011 DB white dwarf spectra from 12,843 and 923 stars, respectively. These numbers represent more than a factor of two increase in the total number of white dwarf stars from the previous SDSS white dwarf catalogs based on DR4 data. Our distribution of subtypes varies from previous catalogs due to our more conservative, manual classifications of each star in our catalog, supplementing our automatic fits. In particular, we find a large number of magnetic white dwarf stars whose small Zeeman splittings mimic increased Stark broadening that would otherwise result in an overestimated log g if fit as a non-magnetic white dwarf. We calculate mean DA and DB masses for our clean, non-magnetic sample and find the DB mean mass is statistically larger than that for the DAs.

  6. Fundus pulsation measurement by laser interferometry: a noninvasive technique for the assessment of hemodynamic drug effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmetterer, Leopold F.; Wolzt, M.; Lexer, Franz; Unfried, Christian J.; Fassolt, A.; Fercher, Adolf F.; Eichler, Hans-Georg

    1995-05-01

    The pulse-synchronous pulsations of the eye fundus are measured by laser interferometry. The eye is illuminated by the beam of a single mode laser diode. The light is reflected at the front side of the cornea and the retina. The two remitted waves product interference fringes, from which the distance changes between cornea and retina can be determined. The interferometer is coupled to a fundus camera, so that fundus pulsations can be measured at preselected points on the retina with high transversal resolution. This technique was used to study the influence of phenylephrine (a peripherally vasoconstricting drug), isoproterenol (a predominantly positive inotropic drug), sodium nitroprusside (a peripherally vasocilating drug) on fundus pulsations in healthy volunteers. The effect of isoproterenol to increase pulse pressure amplitude was detectable even at low doses. Neither sodium nitroprusside nor phenylephrine had a significant influence on ocular fundus pulsations. These results show that measurement of fundus pulsations in the macula estimates the pressure pulse amplitude in choroidal vessels. Measurements of fundus pulsations at preselected points of the retina, show that fundus pulsations in the macular region are larger than in peripheral parts of the retina but smaller than in the optic disc region under baseline conditions.

  7. Coupled pulsating and cellular structure in the propagation of globally planar detonations in free space

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Wenhu; Gao, Yang; Wang, Cheng; Law, Chung K.

    2015-10-15

    The globally planar detonation in free space is numerically simulated, with particular interest to understand and quantify the emergence and evolution of the one-dimensional pulsating instability and the two-dimensional cellular structure which is inherently also affected by pulsating instability. It is found that the pulsation includes three stages: rapid decay of the overdrive, approach to the Chapman-Jouguet state and emergence of weak pulsations, and the formation of strong pulsations; while evolution of the cellular structure also exhibits distinct behavior at these three stages: no cell formation, formation of small-scale, irregular cells, and formation of regular cells of a larger scale. Furthermore, the average shock pressure in the detonation front consists of fine-scale oscillations reflecting the collision dynamics of the triple-shock structure and large-scale oscillations affected by the global pulsation. The common stages of evolution between the cellular structure and the pulsating behavior, as well as the existence of shock-front pressure oscillation, suggest highly correlated mechanisms between them. Detonations with period doubling, period quadrupling, and chaotic amplitudes were also observed and studied for progressively increasing activation energies.

  8. Ultra-fast magnetic resonance encephalography of physiological brain activity - Glymphatic pulsation mechanisms?

    PubMed

    Kiviniemi, Vesa; Wang, Xindi; Korhonen, Vesa; Keinänen, Tuija; Tuovinen, Timo; Autio, Joonas; LeVan, Pierre; Keilholz, Shella; Zang, Yu-Feng; Hennig, Jürgen; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2016-06-01

    The theory on the glymphatic convection mechanism of cerebrospinal fluid holds that cardiac pulsations in part pump cerebrospinal fluid from the peri-arterial spaces through the extracellular tissue into the peri-venous spaces facilitated by aquaporin water channels. Since cardiac pulses cannot be the sole mechanism of glymphatic propulsion, we searched for additional cerebrospinal fluid pulsations in the human brain with ultra-fast magnetic resonance encephalography. We detected three types of physiological mechanisms affecting cerebral cerebrospinal fluid pulsations: cardiac, respiratory, and very low frequency pulsations. The cardiac pulsations induce a negative magnetic resonance encephalography signal change in peri-arterial regions that extends centrifugally and covers the brain in ≈1 Hz cycles. The respiratory ≈0.3 Hz pulsations are centripetal periodical pulses that occur dominantly in peri-venous areas. The third type of pulsation was very low frequency (VLF 0.001-0.023 Hz) and low frequency (LF 0.023-0.73 Hz) waves that both propagate with unique spatiotemporal patterns. Our findings using critically sampled magnetic resonance encephalography open a new view into cerebral fluid dynamics. Since glymphatic system failure may precede protein accumulations in diseases such as Alzheimer's dementia, this methodological advance offers a novel approach to image brain fluid dynamics that potentially can enable early detection and intervention in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26690495

  9. Low-latitude Pi2 pulsations during intervals of quiet geomagnetic conditions (Kp≤1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, H.-J.; Kim, K.-H.; Jun, C.-W.; Takahashi, K.; Lee, D.-H.; Lee, E.; Jin, H.; Seon, J.; Park, Y.-D.; Hwang, J.

    2013-10-01

    It has been reported that Pi2 pulsations can be excited under extremely quiet geomagnetic conditions (Kp=0). However, there have been few comprehensive reports of Pi2 pulsations in such a near ground state magnetosphere. To understand the characteristics of quiet-time Pi2 pulsations, we statistically examined Pi2 events observed on the nightside between 1800 and 0600 local time at the low-latitude Bohyun (BOH, L = 1.35) station in South Korea. We chose year 2008 for analysis because geomagnetic activity was unusually low in that year. A total of 982 Pi2 events were identified when Kp≤1. About 80% of the Pi2 pulsations had a period between 110 and 300 s, which significantly differs from the conventional Pi2 period from 40 to 150 s. Comparing Pi2 periods and solar wind conditions, we found that Pi2 periods decrease with increasing solar wind speed, consistent with the result of Troitskaya (1967). The observed wave properties are discussed in terms of plasmaspheric resonance, which has been proposed for Pi2 pulsations in the inner magnetosphere. We also found that Pi2 pulsations occur quasi-periodically with a repetition period of ˜23-38 min. We will discuss what determines such a recurrence time of Pi2 pulsations under quiet geomagnetic conditions.

  10. Coupled pulsating and cellular structure in the propagation of globally planar detonations in free space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Wenhu; Gao, Yang; Wang, Cheng; Law, Chung K.

    2015-10-01

    The globally planar detonation in free space is numerically simulated, with particular interest to understand and quantify the emergence and evolution of the one-dimensional pulsating instability and the two-dimensional cellular structure which is inherently also affected by pulsating instability. It is found that the pulsation includes three stages: rapid decay of the overdrive, approach to the Chapman-Jouguet state and emergence of weak pulsations, and the formation of strong pulsations; while evolution of the cellular structure also exhibits distinct behavior at these three stages: no cell formation, formation of small-scale, irregular cells, and formation of regular cells of a larger scale. Furthermore, the average shock pressure in the detonation front consists of fine-scale oscillations reflecting the collision dynamics of the triple-shock structure and large-scale oscillations affected by the global pulsation. The common stages of evolution between the cellular structure and the pulsating behavior, as well as the existence of shock-front pressure oscillation, suggest highly correlated mechanisms between them. Detonations with period doubling, period quadrupling, and chaotic amplitudes were also observed and studied for progressively increasing activation energies.

  11. Soft X-Ray Pulsations in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simões, P. J. A.; Hudson, H. S.; Fletcher, L.

    2015-12-01

    The soft X-ray emissions ( hν>1.5 keV) of solar flares mainly come from the bright coronal loops at the highest temperatures normally achieved in the flare process. Their ubiquity has led to their use as a standard measure of flare occurrence and energy, although the overwhelming bulk of the total flare energy goes elsewhere. Recently Dolla et al. ( Astrophys. J. Lett. 749, L16, 2012) noted quasi-periodic pulsations (QPP) in the soft X-ray signature of the X-class flare SOL2011-02-15, as observed by the standard photometric data from the GOES ( Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite) spacecraft. In this article we analyse the suitability of the GOES data for this type of analysis and find them to be generally valuable after September, 2010 (GOES-15). We then extend the result of Dolla et al. to a complete list of X-class flares from Cycle 24 and show that most of them (80 %) display QPPs in the impulsive phase. The pulsations show up cleanly in both channels of the GOES data, making use of time-series of irradiance differences (the digital time derivative on the 2-s sampling). We deploy different techniques to characterise the periodicity of GOES pulsations, considering the red-noise properties of the flare signals, finding a range of characteristic time scales of the QPPs for each event, but usually with no strong signature of a single period dominating in the power spectrum. The QPP may also appear on somewhat longer time scales during the later gradual phase, possibly with a greater tendency towards coherence, but the sampling noise in GOES difference data for high irradiance values (X-class flares) makes these more uncertain. We show that there is minimal phase difference between the differenced GOES energy channels, or between them and the hard X-ray variations on short time scales. During the impulsive phase, the footpoints of the newly forming flare loops may also contribute to the observed soft X-ray variations.

  12. The irregular Pi3 geomagnetic pulsations and its connection with the energetic particles in the magnetosphere and ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belakhovsky, Vladimir; Pilipenko, Vjacheslav

    2015-04-01

    In this study we investigate the nighttime irregular Pi3 type geomagnetic pulsations generated as during strong single substorms as during sawtooth events using modern satellite (GOES, THEMIS) and ground-based observations (CARISMA, THEMIS, NORSTAR). These pulsations developed during all substorm period but not only during substorm growth phase as ordinary Pi2 pulsations. The maximum intensity of these pulsations lies in auroral zone (~66° CGL). It is seen a good correspondence between Pi3 geomagnetic pulsations on the ground-based magnetometers of the CARISMA network and on the GOES geostationary spacecraft, THEMIS spacecrafts which located at ~10 Re in the magnetosphere tail. It is seen strong increase of the fluxes of the electrons on GOES, THEMIS spacecrafts, increase of CNA on the NORSTAR riometers, increase of the aurora intensity on the THEMIS all-sky imagers during the beginning of the substrom. The considered irregular Pi3 pulsations strongly modulate the fluxes of the electrons in the magnetosphere at GOES, THEMIS spacecrafts and CNA, aurora intensity. But there is no close phase correspondence between the Pi3 pulsations in the geomagnetic field and fluxes of the trapped and precipitated electrons. At the same time there is no simultaneous geomagnetic pulsations in the same frequency rage was observed on the dayside (IMAGE network). We suppose that these Pi3 pulsations have another physical nature than dayside Pc5 pulsations. The Pi3 geomagnetic pulsations may be generated due to proper geomagnetic tail oscillations during substorm development.

  13. A radio-pulsing white dwarf binary star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, T. R.; Gänsicke, B. T.; Hümmerich, S.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Bernhard, K.; Lloyd, C.; Breedt, E.; Stanway, E. R.; Steeghs, D. T.; Parsons, S. G.; Toloza, O.; Schreiber, M. R.; Jonker, P. G.; van Roestel, J.; Kupfer, T.; Pala, A. F.; Dhillon, V. S.; Hardy, L. K.; Littlefair, S. P.; Aungwerojwit, A.; Arjyotha, S.; Koester, D.; Bochinski, J. J.; Haswell, C. A.; Frank, P.; Wheatley, P. J.

    2016-09-01

    White dwarfs are compact stars, similar in size to Earth but approximately 200,000 times more massive. Isolated white dwarfs emit most of their power from ultraviolet to near-infrared wavelengths, but when in close orbits with less dense stars, white dwarfs can strip material from their companions and the resulting mass transfer can generate atomic line and X-ray emission, as well as near- and mid-infrared radiation if the white dwarf is magnetic. However, even in binaries, white dwarfs are rarely detected at far-infrared or radio frequencies. Here we report the discovery of a white dwarf/cool star binary that emits from X-ray to radio wavelengths. The star, AR Scorpii (henceforth AR Sco), was classified in the early 1970s as a δ-Scuti star, a common variety of periodic variable star. Our observations reveal instead a 3.56-hour period close binary, pulsing in brightness on a period of 1.97 minutes. The pulses are so intense that AR Sco’s optical flux can increase by a factor of four within 30 seconds, and they are also detectable at radio frequencies. They reflect the spin of a magnetic white dwarf, which we find to be slowing down on a 107-year timescale. The spin-down power is an order of magnitude larger than that seen in electromagnetic radiation, which, together with an absence of obvious signs of accretion, suggests that AR Sco is primarily spin-powered. Although the pulsations are driven by the white dwarf’s spin, they mainly originate from the cool star. AR Sco’s broadband spectrum is characteristic of synchrotron radiation, requiring relativistic electrons. These must either originate from near the white dwarf or be generated in situ at the M star through direct interaction with the white dwarf’s magnetosphere.

  14. KIC 6220497: a new Algol-type eclipsing binary with multiperiodic pulsations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae Woo; Hong, Kyeongsoo; Kim, Seung-Lee; Koo, Jae-Rim

    2016-08-01

    We present both binarity and pulsation of KIC 6220497 from the Kepler observations. The light curve synthesis shows that the eclipsing system is a semidetached Algol with parameters of q = 0.243 ± 0.001, i = 77.3 ± 0.3 deg, and ΔT = 3372 ± 58 K, in which the detached primary component fills its Roche lobe by ˜87 per cent. A multiple frequency analysis of the eclipse-subtracted light residuals reveals 33 frequencies in the range of 0.75-20.22 d-1 with amplitudes between 0.27 and 4.56 mmag. Among these, four are pulsation frequencies in fundamental (f1, f5) and p (f2, f7) modes, and six are orbital frequency (f8, f31) and its harmonics (f6, f11, f20, f24), which can be attributed to tidally excited modes. For the pulsation frequencies, the pulsation constants of 0.16-0.33 d and the period ratios of Ppul/Porb = 0.042-0.089 indicate that the primary component is a δ Sct pulsating star and, thus, KIC 6220497 is an oscillating eclipsing Algol (oEA) star. The dominant pulsation period of 0.117 4051 ± 0.000 0004 d is significantly longer than that expected from empirical relations that link the pulsation period with the orbital period. The surface gravity of log g1 = 3.78 ± 0.03 is clearly smaller than those of the other oEA stars with similar orbital periods. The pulsation period and the surface gravity of the pulsating primary demonstrate that KIC 6220497 would be the more evolved eclipsing binary, compared with normal oEA stars.

  15. Doubled-lined eclipsing binary system KIC~2306740 with pulsating component discovered from Kepler space photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakut, Kadri

    2015-08-01

    We present a detailed study of KIC 2306740, an eccentric double-lined eclipsing binary system with a pulsating component.Archive Kepler satellite data were combined with newly obtained spectroscopic data with 4.2\\,m William Herschel Telescope(WHT). This allowed us to determine rather precise orbital and physical parameters of this long period, slightly eccentric, pulsating binary system. Duplicity effects are extracted from the light curve in order to estimate pulsation frequencies from the residuals.We modelled the detached binary system assuming non-conservative evolution models with the Cambridge STARS(TWIN) code.

  16. A Novel Pre-cooling System for a Cryogenic Pulsating Heat Pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Dong; Liu, Huiming; Gong, Linghui; Xu, Xiangdong; Li, Laifeng

    To reduce the influence of the pipe material on the measurement of effective thermal conductivity, the pipe of a cryogenic pulsating heat pipe is generally made of stainless steel. Because of the low thermal conductivity of stainless steel, the pre-cooling of the evaporator in cryogenic pulsating heat pipe using helium as working fluid at 4.2 K is a problem. We designed a mechanical-thermal switch between the cryocooler and the evaporator, which was on during the pre-cooling process and off during the test process. By using the pre-cooling system, the cool down time of the cryogenic pulsating heat pipe was reduced significantly.

  17. Theoretical study of γ Doradus pulsations in pre-main sequence stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouabid, M.-P.; Montalbán, J.; Miglio, A.; Dupret, M.-A.; Grigahcène, A.; Noels, A.

    2010-12-01

    The question of the existence of the pre-main sequence (PMS) γ Doradus (γ Dor) pulsators has been raised by observations of young clusters such as NGC 884 hosting γ Dor members. We have explored the properties of γ Dor-type pulsations with a grid of PMS models covering the mass range {1.2 < M_*/M_⊙ < 2.5} and we derive the theoretical instability strip (IS) for the PMS γ Dor pulsators. We explore the possibility of distinguishing between PMS and MS γ Dor by the behaviour of the period spacing of their high order gravity modes (g-modes).

  18. Observations of intense ULF pulsation activity near the geomagnetic equator during quiet times

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engebretson, M. J.; Zanetti, L. J.; Potemra, T. A.; Klumpar, D. M.; Strangeway, R. J.; Acuna, M. H.

    1988-01-01

    This paper analyzes observations, made by particle and field instruments on the AMPTE CCE satellite, of intense ULF pulsations in the earth's magnetosphere near the geomagnetic equator. These pulsations were observed during magnetically quiet periods in regions characterized by intense fluxes of warm strongly trapped light ions, predominantly H(+), and often with streaming low-energy plasma. The strong latitudinal localization of these pulsations is interpreted to be due to equatorial mass loading or to partial reflection of Alfven wave energy by latitudinal gradients in plasma density. Possible sources of wave energy for these events are discussed.

  19. Pulsating pre-main sequence stars as possible Eddington targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwintz, K.; Weiss, W. W.

    2004-01-01

    PMS stars lie between the birthline and the zero-age main sequence (ZAMS) in the Hertzsprung-Russell (HR) diagram. They show photometric and spectroscopic variability on time scales of minutes to years, indicating that photospheric activity begins in the earliest phases of stellar evolution. The fact that they move across the instability region during their evolution to the main sequence suggests that at least part of their activity is due to stellar pulsations. δ Scuti-like PMS stars are ideal targets for the Eddington mission. First, their location in open clusters provides the simultaneous observations of numerous objects as a photometric reference. Second, the PMS variables lie in a magnitude range between V = 8 and V = 15, which meets the requirements of the mission. Third, the analysis of these stars by means of asteroseismological methods provides the unique chance to distinguish between young and evolved stars and hence leads to a better fundamental understanding of stellar structure and evolution.

  20. Construction of the Database for Pulsating Variable Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bing-Qiu; Yang, Ming; Jiang, Bi-Wei

    2012-01-01

    A database for pulsating variable stars is constructed to favor the study of variable stars in China. The database includes about 230,000 variable stars in the Galactic bulge, LMC and SMC observed in an about 10 yr period by the MACHO(MAssive Compact Halo Objects) and OGLE(Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment) projects. The software used for the construction is LAMP, i.e., Linux+Apache+MySQL+PHP. A web page is provided for searching the photometric data and light curves in the database through the right ascension and declination of an object. Because of the flexibility of this database, more up-to-date data of variable stars can be incorporated into the database conveniently.

  1. Total-pressure-tube averaging in pulsating flows.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, L. N.

    1973-01-01

    A number of total-pressure tubes were tested in a nonsteady flow generator in which the fraction of period that pressure is a maximum is approximately 0.8, thereby simulating turbomachine-type flow conditions. The tests were performed at a pressure level of 1 bar, for Mach numbers up to near 1, and frequencies up to 3 kHz. Most of the tubes indicated a pressure which was higher than the true average. Organ-pipe resonances which further increased the indicated pressure were encountered within the tubes at discrete frequencies. There was no obvious combination of tube diameter, length, and/or geometry variation used in the tests which resulted in negligible averaging error. A pneumatic-type probe was found to measure true average pressure, and is suggested as a comparison instrument to determine whether nonlinear averaging effects are serious in unknown pulsation profiles.

  2. Optical non-invasive monitoring of skin blood pulsations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spīgulis, Jānis

    2005-08-01

    Time resolved detection and analysis of the skin backscattered optical signals (remission photoplethysmography or PPG) provide rich information on skin blood volume pulsations and can serve for reliable cardiovascular assessment. The single- and multi-channel PPG concepts are discussed in this work. Simultaneous data flow from several body locations allows one to study the heartbeat pulse wave propagation in real time and evaluate the vascular resistance. Portable single-, dual- and four-channel PPG monitoring devices with special software have been designed for real-time data acquisition and processing. The clinical studies confirmed their potential in the monitoring of heart arrhythmias, drug tests, steady-state cardiovascular assessment, body fitness control, and express diagnostics of the arterial occlusions.

  3. An application of Bayesian inference for solar-like pulsators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benomar, O.

    2008-12-01

    As the amount of data collected by space-borne asteroseismic instruments (such as CoRoT and Kepler) increases drastically, it will be useful to have automated processes to extract a maximum of information from these data. The use of a Bayesian approach could be very help- ful for this goal. Only a few attempts have been made in this way (e.g. Brewer et al. 2007). We propose to use Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulations (MCMC) with Metropolis-Hasting (MH) based algorithms to infer the main stellar oscillation parameters from the power spec- trum, in the case of solar-like pulsators. Given a number of modes to be fitted, the algorithm is able to give the best set of parameters (frequency, linewidth, amplitude, rotational split- ting) corresponding to a chosen input model. We illustrate this algorithm with one of the first CoRoT targets: HD 49933.

  4. Microphysical development of a pulsating cumulus tower - A case study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, V. W.; Sax, R. I.

    1981-01-01

    In-cloud microphysical data collected within a 22-minute period during seven consecutive passes at the -13 C sampling level of a deep (base +22 C) convective cloud provide observational evidence for a secondary ice production mechanism at work in the Florida environment. The observed microphysical characteristics of the convective tower, particularly the spatial distribution and habit of the ice phase relative to the updraft, are consistent with a rime-splintering hypothesis for secondary ice production. It is shown that the cloud's updraft structure is critically important in governing the timing of the ice production by controlling the flux of graupel particles through the critical temperature zone (-3 C to -8 C). The importance of the cloud's pulsation growth dynamics on the microphysics is emphasized, particularly as it relates to rapidly glaciating cumuli.

  5. Airfoil in sinusoidal motion in a pulsating stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, J Mayo

    1947-01-01

    The forces and moments on a two-dimensional airfoil executing harmonic motions in a pulsating stream are derived on the basis of non-stationary incompressible potential flow theory, with the inclusion of the effect of the continuous sheet of vortices shed from the trailing edge. An assumption as to the form of the wake is made with a certain degree of approximation. A comparison with previous work applicable only to the special case of a stationary airfoil is made by means of a numerical example, and the excellent agreement obtained shows that the wake approximation is quite sufficient. The results obtained are expected to be useful in considerations of forced vibrations and flutter of rotary wing aircraft.

  6. Detection of high-degree nonradial pulsations in Gamma Bootis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennelly, E. J.; Yang, S.; Walker, G. A. H.; Hubeny, I.

    1992-01-01

    The line-profile variations of the rapidly rotating Delta-Scuti star Gamma Bootis can be explained by high-degree nonradial pulsations (NRPs) with an apparent period approximately equal to 0.047 days. This same period was derived from two data sets taken three months apart wherein the amplitude increased by 30 percent. Such high-degree NRP cannot explain the apparent reversals previously observed by Auvergne at al. (1979) for this star in the cores of the hydrogen Balmer lines and Ca-II K line. The present radial-velocity variations can be reconciled with their 0.25-day spectroscopic period if an amplitude of about 1 km/s is adopted, an order of magnitude less than previous measurements. The presence of line-profile variations from high-degree modes probably limits the accuracy of radial-velocity measurents and can appear as bumps in the radial-velocity curve.

  7. Nonradial Pulsation and Mass Loss in Early B Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penrod, G. D.; Smith, M.

    1985-01-01

    It has been firmly established that nonradial pulsation (NRP) probably occurs in nearly all sharp-lined early B stars near the main sequence. A recent breakthrough occurred with the discovery of quasi emission/absorption bumps moving across the line profiles of the rapid rotators zeta Oph and alpha Vir. It was found that an intermediate-1 (1=8) NRP mode is responsible for these features in zeta Oph. Some 20 Be and Bn stars were monitored and convincing evidence for NRP in 13 of them was found. Line profile variations suggestive of NRP in the other 7 were also discovered. A search for line profile variables among moderate rotators has turned up NRP in epsilon and eta Lep, with v sin i's of 140 and 70 km/sec, respectively. It now seems that NRP can be present at all rotational velocities with equal frequency (near 100%! . However, at most 20% of these stars exhibit detectable photometric variations.

  8. Pulsating jet-like structures in magnetized plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharov, V. P.; Pavlov, V. I.

    2016-08-01

    The formation of pulsating jet-like structures has been studied in the scope of the nonhydrostatic model of a magnetized plasma with horizontally nonuniform density. We discuss two mechanisms which are capable of stopping the gravitational spreading appearing to grace the Rayleigh-Taylor instability and to lead to the formation of stationary or oscillating localized structures. One of them is caused by the Coriolis effect in the rotating frames, and another is connected with the Lorentz effect for magnetized fluids. Magnetized jets/drops with a positive buoyancy must oscillate in transversal size and can manifest themselves as "radio pulsars." The estimates of their frequencies are made for conditions typical for the neutron star's ocean.

  9. The RCB star RY Sagittarii as a pulsating star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd Evans, T.

    1986-03-01

    Measurements of CN and C2 bandstrengths in the spectrum of RY Sagittarii in 1969 and 1970, when it was on the latter part of its return to maximum and during its subsequent stay at maximum light after the deep minimum of 1967-68, show that the bands vary in strength in the 38.6-day pulsation period. The variations follow the phasing of the B-V and U-B color curves rather than the V light curve, and must be determined largely by the photospheric temperature as in the case of the carbon-rich Cepheid V553 Centauri. This is supported by a comparison of the ranges in color and in bandstrength, though the bands are stronger at a given color than in typical class Ib supergiants.

  10. Pulsation, Mass Loss and the Upper Mass Limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klapp, J.; Corona-Galindo, M. G.

    1990-11-01

    RESUMEN. La existencia de estrellas con masas en exceso de 100 M0 ha sido cuestionada por mucho tiempo. Lfmites superiores para la masa de 100 M0 han sido obtenidos de teorfas de pulsaci6n y formaci6n estelar. En este trabajo nosotros primero investigamos la estabilidad radial de estrellas masivas utilizando la aproximaci6n clasica cuasiadiabatica de Ledoux, la aproximaci6n cuasiadiabatica de Castor y un calculo completamente no-adiabatico. Hemos encontrado que los tres metodos de calculo dan resultados similares siempre y cuando una pequefia regi6n de las capas externas de la estrella sea despreciada para la aproximaci6n clasica. La masa crftica para estabilidad de estrellas masivas ha sido encontrada en acuerdo a trabajos anteriores. Explicamos Ia discrepancia entre este y trabajos anteriores por uno de los autores. Discunmos calculos no-lineales y perdida de masa con respecto a) lfmite superior de masa. The existence of stars with masses in excess of 100 M0 has been questioned for a very long time. Upper mass limits of 100 Me have been obtained from pulsation and star formation theories. In this work we first investigate the radial stability of massive stars using the classical Ledoux's quasiadiabatic approximation. the Castor quasiadiabatic approximation and a fully nonadiabatic calculation. We have found that the three methods of calculation give similar results provided that a small region in outer layers of the star be neglected for the classical approximation. The critical mass for stability of massive stars is found to be in agreement with previous work. We explain the reason for the discrepancy between this and previous work by one of the authors. We discuss non-linear calculations and mass loss with regard to the upper mass limit. Key words: STARS-MASS FUNCTION - STARS-MASS LOSS - STARS-PULSATION

  11. Flow and mixing characteristics of an elevated pulsating transverse jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Rong F.; Hsu, Ching M.

    2012-01-01

    Flow-evolution processes as well as the penetration, spread, and dispersion characteristics of elevated pulsating transverse jets were studied experimentally in a wind tunnel. Jet pulsations were induced by means of acoustic excitation. Streak pictures of the smoke-flow patterns, illuminated by a laser-light sheet in the median plane, were recorded by a high-speed digital camera. A hot-wire anemometer was used to digitize instantaneous velocities of instabilities in the flow. Penetration height and spread width were obtained through a binary edge identification technique. Tracer-gas concentrations were measured to provide information on jet dispersions and trajectories. Three characteristic flow modes (synchronized flapping jet, transition, and synchronized shear-layer vortices) were identified in the domain of the jet-to-crossflow momentum-flux ratio and the excitation Strouhal number. At low excitation Strouhal numbers, the jet column near the tube exit flapped back-and-forth periodically at the excitation frequency and induced large up-down motions of the deflected jet. The penetration, spread, and dispersion of the jet increased drastically compared with the non-excited jet because the up-down oscillating motions of the deflected jet transformed the axial momentum into oscillating lateral momentum. Forcing the jet into the transition and synchronized shear-layer vortices regimes caused the vortices to appear along the upwind shear layer of the deflected jet. Under these conditions, the penetration, spread, and dispersion of the jet presented insignificant increases because the entrainment effect induced by the shear-layer vortices was not as large as that produced by the jet oscillating motions in the synchronized flapping jet regime.

  12. Classical Cepheid Pulsation Models. X. The Period-Age Relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bono, G.; Marconi, M.; Cassisi, S.; Caputo, F.; Gieren, W.; Pietrzynski, G.

    2005-03-01

    We present new period-age (PA) and period-age-color (PAC) relations for fundamental and first-overtone classical Cepheids. Current predictions rely on homogeneous sets of evolutionary and pulsation models covering a broad range of stellar masses and chemical compositions. We found that PA and PAC relations present a mild dependence on metal content. Moreover, the use of different PA and PAC relations for fundamental and first-overtone Cepheids improves the accuracy of age estimates in the short-period (logP<1) range (old Cepheids), because they present smaller intrinsic dispersions. At the same time, the use of the PAC relations improves the accuracy in the long-period (logP>=1) range (young Cepheids), since they account for the position of individual objects inside the instability strip. We performed a detailed comparison between evolutionary and pulsation ages for a sizable sample of LMC (15) and SMC (12) clusters which host at least two Cepheids. In order to avoid deceptive uncertainties in the photometric absolute zero point, we adopted the homogeneous set of B, V, and I data for clusters and Cepheids collected by OGLE. We also adopted the same reddening scale. The different age estimates agree at the level of 20% for LMC clusters and of 10% for SMC clusters. We also performed the same comparison for two Galactic clusters (NGC 6067, NGC 7790), and the difference in age is smaller than 20%. These findings support the use of PA and PAC relations to supply accurate estimates of individual stellar ages in the Galaxy and in external Galaxies. The main advantage of this approach is its independence from the distance.

  13. MODULES FOR EXPERIMENTS IN STELLAR ASTROPHYSICS (MESA): BINARIES, PULSATIONS, AND EXPLOSIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Paxton, Bill; Bildsten, Lars; Cantiello, Matteo; Marchant, Pablo; Langer, N.; Schwab, Josiah; Bauer, Evan B.; Dessart, Luc; Farmer, R.; Timmes, F. X.; Hu, H.; Townsend, R. H. D.; Townsley, Dean M.

    2015-09-15

    We substantially update the capabilities of the open-source software instrument Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics (MESA). MESA can now simultaneously evolve an interacting pair of differentially rotating stars undergoing transfer and loss of mass and angular momentum, greatly enhancing the prior ability to model binary evolution. New MESA capabilities in fully coupled calculation of nuclear networks with hundreds of isotopes now allow MESA to accurately simulate the advanced burning stages needed to construct supernova progenitor models. Implicit hydrodynamics with shocks can now be treated with MESA, enabling modeling of the entire massive star lifecycle, from pre-main-sequence evolution to the onset of core collapse and nucleosynthesis from the resulting explosion. Coupling of the GYRE non-adiabatic pulsation instrument with MESA allows for new explorations of the instability strips for massive stars while also accelerating the astrophysical use of asteroseismology data. We improve the treatment of mass accretion, giving more accurate and robust near-surface profiles. A new MESA capability to calculate weak reaction rates “on-the-fly” from input nuclear data allows better simulation of accretion induced collapse of massive white dwarfs and the fate of some massive stars. We discuss the ongoing challenge of chemical diffusion in the strongly coupled plasma regime, and exhibit improvements in MESA that now allow for the simulation of radiative levitation of heavy elements in hot stars. We close by noting that the MESA software infrastructure provides bit-for-bit consistency for all results across all the supported platforms, a profound enabling capability for accelerating MESA's development.

  14. Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics (MESA): Binaries, Pulsations, and Explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paxton, Bill; Marchant, Pablo; Schwab, Josiah; Bauer, Evan B.; Bildsten, Lars; Cantiello, Matteo; Dessart, Luc; Farmer, R.; Hu, H.; Langer, N.; Townsend, R. H. D.; Townsley, Dean M.; Timmes, F. X.

    2015-09-01

    We substantially update the capabilities of the open-source software instrument Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics (MESA). MESA can now simultaneously evolve an interacting pair of differentially rotating stars undergoing transfer and loss of mass and angular momentum, greatly enhancing the prior ability to model binary evolution. New MESA capabilities in fully coupled calculation of nuclear networks with hundreds of isotopes now allow MESA to accurately simulate the advanced burning stages needed to construct supernova progenitor models. Implicit hydrodynamics with shocks can now be treated with MESA, enabling modeling of the entire massive star lifecycle, from pre-main-sequence evolution to the onset of core collapse and nucleosynthesis from the resulting explosion. Coupling of the GYRE non-adiabatic pulsation instrument with MESA allows for new explorations of the instability strips for massive stars while also accelerating the astrophysical use of asteroseismology data. We improve the treatment of mass accretion, giving more accurate and robust near-surface profiles. A new MESA capability to calculate weak reaction rates “on-the-fly” from input nuclear data allows better simulation of accretion induced collapse of massive white dwarfs and the fate of some massive stars. We discuss the ongoing challenge of chemical diffusion in the strongly coupled plasma regime, and exhibit improvements in MESA that now allow for the simulation of radiative levitation of heavy elements in hot stars. We close by noting that the MESA software infrastructure provides bit-for-bit consistency for all results across all the supported platforms, a profound enabling capability for accelerating MESA's development.

  15. Multi-mode quasi-periodic pulsations in a solar flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolotkov, D. Y.; Nakariakov, V. M.; Kupriyanova, E. G.; Ratcliffe, H.; Shibasaki, K.

    2015-02-01

    Context. Quasi-periodic pulsations (QPP) of the electromagnetic radiation emitted in solar and stellar flares are often detected in microwave, white light, X-ray, and gamma-ray bands. Mechanisms for QPP are intensively debated in the literature. Previous studies revealed that QPP may manifest non-linear, non-stationary and, perhaps, multi-modal processes operating in flares. Aims: We study QPP of the microwave emission generated in an X3.2-class solar flare on 14 May, 2013, observed with the Nobeyama Radioheliograph (NoRH), aiming to reveal signatures of the non-linear, non-stationary, and multi-modal processes in the signal. Methods: The NoRH correlation signal obtained at the 17 GHz intensity has a clear QPP pattern. The signal was analysed with the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT) that allows one to determine its instant amplitude and frequency, and their time variation. Results: It was established that the QPP consists of at least three well-defined intrinsic modes, with the mean periods of 15, 45, and 100 s. All the modes have quasi-harmonic behaviour with different modulation patterns. The 100 s intrinsic mode is a decaying oscillation, with the decay time of 250 s. The 15 s intrinsic mode shows a similar behaviour, with the decay time of 90 s. The 45 s mode has a wave-train behaviour. Conclusions: Dynamical properties of detected intrinsic modes indicate that the 100 s and 15 s modes are likely to be associated with fundamental kink and sausage modes of the flaring loop, respectively. The 100 s oscillation could also be caused by the fundamental longitudinal mode, while this interpretation requires the plasma temperature of about 30 million K and hence is not likely. The 45 s mode could be the second standing harmonics of the kink mode.

  16. The sign of four: a new class of cool non-radially pulsating stars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krisciunas, K.

    The author discusses four early F-type stars whose periods are an order of magnitude slower than known pulsators of comparable luminosity. They cannot be stars undergoing simple radial pulsations. For most of these stars, one can discount the possibility that the variability is due to rotational modulation of star spots, interactions with (or tidal distortions by) a close companion, or obscuration by a rotating lumpy ring of dust orbiting the star. They are certainly not eclipsing binaries. The only possibility left seems to be non-radial pulsations, though this explanation involves difficulties of its own. If they are indeed pulsating stars exhibiting non-radial gravity modes, they would be the first stars on the cool side of the Cepheid instability strip in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram to be so identified.

  17. The development of early pulsation theory, or, how Cepheids are like steam engines"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, Matthew

    2011-05-01

    The pulsation theory of Cepheid variable stars was a major breakthrough of early twentieth-century astrophysics. At the beginning of that century, the basic physics of normal stars was very poorly understood, and variable stars were even more mysterious. Breaking with accepted explanations in terms of eclipsing binaries, Harlow Shapley and A.S. Eddington pioneered novel theories that considered Cepheids as pulsating spheres of gas. These theoretical models relied on highly speculative physics, but nonetheless returned very impressive results despite attacks from figures such as James Jeans. Surprisingly, the pulsation theory not only depended on developments in stellar physics, but also drove many of those developments. In particular, models of stars in radiative balance and theories of stellar energy were heavily inspired and shaped by ideas about variable stars. Further, the success of the pulsation theory helped justify the new approaches to astrophysics being developed before World War II.

  18. The Development of Early Pulsation Theory, or, How Cepheids Are Like Steam Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, M.

    2012-06-01

    The pulsation theory of Cepheid variable stars was a major breakthrough of early twentieth-century astrophysics. At the beginning of that century, the basic physics of normal stars was very poorly understood, and variable stars were even more mysterious. Breaking with accepted explanations in terms of eclipsing binaries, Harlow Shapley and A. S. Eddington pioneered novel theories that considered Cepheids as pulsating spheres of gas. Surprisingly, the pulsation theory not only depended on novel developments in stellar physics, but the theory also drove many of those developments. In particular, models of stars in radiative balance and theories of stellar energy were heavily inspired and shaped by ideas about variable stars. Further, the success of the pulsation theory helped justify the new approaches to astrophysics being developed before World War II.

  19. Celebration of the contributions of Art Cox to stellar pulsation interpretations

    SciTech Connect

    Castor, J.I.

    1997-10-02

    A roughly chronological account is given of Arthur N. Coxs published work of 1953-1996 in, mostly, stellar pulsation theory, with a digression into stellar opacity. When possible, his work is placed in the context of the contemporary efforts.

  20. Pressure levels and pulsation frequencies can be varied on high pressure/frequency testing device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Routson, J. W.

    1967-01-01

    Hydraulic system components test device obtains a pulsating pressure from a hydraulic actuator that is being driven by a vibration exciter of sufficient force and displacement. Input to the exciter controls the frequency of pressure variation.

  1. CFD simulation of pulsation noise in a small centrifugal compressor with volute and resonance tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakaki, Daich; Sakuka, Yuta; Inokuchi, Yuzo; Ueda, Kosuke; Yamasaki, Nobuhiko; Yamagata, Akihiro

    2015-02-01

    The rotational frequency tone noise emitted from the automobile turbocharger is called the pulsation noise. The cause of the pulsation noise is not fully understood, but is considered to be due to some manufacturing errors, which is called the mistuning. The effects of the mistuning of the impeller blade on the noise field inside the flow passage of the compressor are numerically investigated. Here, the flow passage includes the volute and duct located downstream of the compressor impeller. Our numerical approach is found to successfully capture the wavelength of the pulsation noise at given rotational speeds by the comparison with the experiments. One of the significant findings is that the noise field of the pulsation noise in the duct is highly one-dimensional although the flow fields are highly three-dimensional.

  2. An experimental investigation of heat transfer in a spiral-coil tube with pulsating turbulent water flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharvani, H. Ramezani; Doshmanziari, F. Ilami; Zohir, A. E.; Jalali-Vahid, D.

    2015-10-01

    In this study, in order to increase the heat transfer rate in a spiral-coil tube by an active method, a rotating ball valve was mounted downstream/upstream of the spiral-coil tube and used as a pulse generator. Influence of pulsation on heat transfer in the spiral-coil tube was experimentally investigated. Cold water was used as a working fluid inside the spiral-coil that was immersed horizontally in a hot water reservoir tank. The Average temperature of the hot water bath was kept constant at 60 °C to establish a uniform temperature. All experiments for both pulsator locations (upstream and downstream pulsation) were performed at fixed pulsation amplitude. Reynolds number was ranged from 6220 to 16,300 while pulsation frequency was varied from 0 to 20 Hz. It can be clearly observed from heat transfer results that the overall average heat transfer coefficient was enhanced up to 26 % for pulsating flow compared to steady flow without pulsation at all pulsation frequencies. It is also clear that the relative overall average heat transfer coefficient is strongly affected by Reynolds number. Finally, it was obtained that the upstream pulsation heat transfer coefficient has better heat transfer results than the corresponding ones of downstream pulsation in the studied range of Reynolds number.

  3. An experimental investigation of heat transfer in a spiral-coil tube with pulsating turbulent water flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharvani, H. Ramezani; Doshmanziari, F. Ilami; Zohir, A. E.; Jalali-Vahid, D.

    2016-09-01

    In this study, in order to increase the heat transfer rate in a spiral-coil tube by an active method, a rotating ball valve was mounted downstream/upstream of the spiral-coil tube and used as a pulse generator. Influence of pulsation on heat transfer in the spiral-coil tube was experimentally investigated. Cold water was used as a working fluid inside the spiral-coil that was immersed horizontally in a hot water reservoir tank. The Average temperature of the hot water bath was kept constant at 60 °C to establish a uniform temperature. All experiments for both pulsator locations (upstream and downstream pulsation) were performed at fixed pulsation amplitude. Reynolds number was ranged from 6220 to 16,300 while pulsation frequency was varied from 0 to 20 Hz. It can be clearly observed from heat transfer results that the overall average heat transfer coefficient was enhanced up to 26 % for pulsating flow compared to steady flow without pulsation at all pulsation frequencies. It is also clear that the relative overall average heat transfer coefficient is strongly affected by Reynolds number. Finally, it was obtained that the upstream pulsation heat transfer coefficient has better heat transfer results than the corresponding ones of downstream pulsation in the studied range of Reynolds number.

  4. Spatio-temporal Dynamics of Sources of Hard X-Ray Pulsations in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, S. A.; Zimovets, I. V.; Morgachev, A. S.; Struminsky, A. B.

    2016-09-01

    We present a systematic analysis of the spatio-temporal evolution of sources of hard X-ray (HXR) pulsations in solar flares. We concentrate on disk flares whose impulsive phases are accompanied by a series of more than three successive peaks (pulsations) of HXR emission detected in the RHESSI 50 - 100 keV energy channel with a four-second time cadence. Twenty-nine such flares observed from February 2002 to June 2015 with characteristic time differences between successive peaks P ≈8 - 270 s are studied. The main observational result of the analysis is that sources of HXR pulsations in all flares are not stationary, they demonstrate apparent movements or displacements in the parent active regions from pulsation to pulsation. The flares can be subdivided into two main groups depending on the character of the dynamics of the HXR sources. Group 1 consists of 16 flares ( 55~%) that show systematic dynamics of the HXR sources from pulsation to pulsation with respect to a magnetic polarity inversion line (MPIL), which has a simple extended trace on the photosphere. Group 2 consists of 13 flares ( 45~%) that show more chaotic displacements of the HXR sources with respect to an MPIL with a more complex structure, and sometimes several MPILs are present in the parent active regions of such flares. Based on the observations, we conclude that the mechanism of the flare HXR pulsations (at least with time differences of the considered range) is related to successive triggering of the flare energy release process in different magnetic loops (or bundles of loops) of the parent active regions. Group 1 flare regions consist of loops stacked into magnetic arcades that are extended along MPILs. Group 2 flare regions have more complex magnetic structures, and the loops are arranged more chaotically and randomly there. We also found that at least 14 ( 88~%) group 1 flares and 11 ( 85~%) group 2 flares are accompanied by coronal mass ejections (CMEs), i.e. the absolute majority of the

  5. The Mass Distribution of White Dwarfs: An Unwavering Obsession

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeron, P.; Gianninas, A.; Boudreault, S.

    2007-09-01

    We discuss some of our current knowledge of the mass distribution of DA and non-DA stars using various methods for measuring white dwarf masses including spectroscopic, trigonometric parallax, and gravitational redshift measurements, with a particular emphasis on the problems encountered at the low end of the cooling sequence where energy transport by convection becomes important.

  6. A1540-53, an eclipsing X-ray binary pulsator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, R. H.; Swank, J. H.; Boldt, E. A.; Holt, S. S.; Pravdo, S. H.; Saba, J. R.; Serlemitsos, P. J.

    1977-01-01

    An eclipsing X-ray binary pulsator consistent with the location of A1540-53 was observed. The source pulse period was 528.93 plus or minus 0.10 seconds. The binary nature is confirmed by a Doppler curve for the pulsation period. The eclipse angle of 30.5 deg plus or minus 3 deg and the 4 h transition to and from eclipse suggest an early type, giant or supergiant, primary star.

  7. PG 1346+082 - An interacting binary white dwarf system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, M. A.; Winget, D. E.; Nather, R. E.; Liebert, James; Wesemael, F.

    1987-01-01

    PG 1346+082 is both a photometric and a spectroscopic variable, spanning the B-magnitude range 13.6-17.2. High-speed photometric data reveal rapid flickering in the low-state light curve. The system also shows spectroscopic variations, displaying broad shallow He I absorption lines at maximum light and a weak emission feature at He I (4471 A) at minimum light. Hydrogen lines are conspicuous by their absence. Is is concluded that PG 1346+082 is an interacting binary white dwarf system. Furthermore, because continuum fits to IUE high-state data suggest temperatures consistent with membership in the DB white dwarf instability strip, it is suggested that some of the photometric variations may arise from pulsations.

  8. Pneumatic pulsator design as an example of numerical simulations in engineering applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wołosz, Krzysztof; Wernik, Jacek

    2012-03-01

    The paper presents the part of the investigation that has been carried out in order to develop the pneumatic pulsator which is to be employed as an unblocking device at lose material silo outlets. The part of numerical simulation is reported. The fluid dynamics issues have been outlined which are present during supersonic airflow thought the head of the pulsator. These issues describe the pneumatic impact phenomenon onto the loose material bed present in the silo to which walls the pulsator is assembled. The investigation presented in the paper are industrial applicable and the result is the working prototype of the industrial pneumatic pulsator. The numerical simulation has led to change the piston shape which is moving inside the head of the pulsator, and therefore, to reduce the pressure losses during the airflow. A stress analysis of the pulsator controller body has been carried out while the numerical simulation investigation part of the whole project. The analysis has made possible the change of the controller body material from cast iron to aluminium alloy.

  9. Time course and topographic distribution of ocular fundus pulsation measured by low-coherence tissue interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragostinoff, Nikolaus; Werkmeister, René M.; Klaizer, József; Gröschl, Martin; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2013-12-01

    Low-coherence tissue interferometry is a technique for the depth-resolved measurement of ocular fundus pulsations. Whereas fundus pulsation amplitudes at preselected axial positions can readily be assessed by this method, coupling of the interferometer with a pulse oximeter additionally allows for the reconstruction of the time course of ocular fundus pulsation with respect to the cardiac cycle of the subject. For this purpose, the interferogram resulting from the superposition of waves reflected at the cornea and the ocular fundus is recorded synchronously with the plethysmogram. A new method for evaluating the time course of synthetic interferograms in combination with plethysmograms based on averaging several pulse periods has been developed. This technique allows for the analysis of amplitudes, time courses, and phase differences of fundus pulsations at preselected axial and transversal positions and for creating fundus pulsation movies. Measurements are performed in three healthy emmetropic subjects at angles from 0 deg to 18 deg to the axis of vision. Considerably different time courses, amplitudes, and phases with respect to the cardiac cycle are found at different angles. Data on ocular fundus pulsation obtained with this technique can-among other applications-be used to verify and to improve biomechanical models of the eye.

  10. Response of dayside Pc 5 pulsations to substorm activity in the nighttime magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samson, J. C.; Rostoker, G.

    1981-02-01

    The possibility of using ULF (1-20 mHz) waves to diagnose the structure of the magnetosphere has recently given new impetus to the study of Pc 4,5 magnetic pulsations. In this paper it is demonstrated that the frequency spectrum of dayside Pc 4,5 pulsations near noon may be significantly altered in association with the onset of a magnetospheric substorm near midnight. The response time for the dayside Pc pulsations to a substorm onset can be as short as 2-3 min, suggesting information transfer across the magnetosphere at velocities of the order of the Alfven speed. The characteristic response of the dayside pulsations is a marked increase in the dominant frequency at stations inside the dayside auroral oval. The results taken together with the observations of dayside auroras by Eather et al. (1979) suggest that substorm onsets are accompanied by a sudden inward motion of the center of the partial ring current. It is proposed that this ring current motion causes changes in the magnetic field in the equatorial plane of the magnetosphere that result in changes in the Alfven velocity on field lines where the magnetic pulsations are observed. Possible mechanisms for the generation of Pc 4,5 pulsations are discussed in the light of the observations reported.

  11. Response of dayside Pc 5 pulsations to substorm activity in the nighttime magnetosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Samson, J.C.; Rostoker, G.

    1981-02-01

    The possibility of using ULF (1-20 mHz) waves to diagnose the structure of the magnetosphere has recently given new impetus to the study of Pc 4,5 magnetic pulsations. In this paper we demonstrate that the frequency spectrum of dayside Pc 4,5 pulsations near noon may be significantly altered in association with the onset of a magnetospheric substorm near midnight. The response time for the dayside Pc pulsations to a substorm onset can be as short as 2-3 min, suggesting information transfer across the magnetosphere at velocities of the order of the Alfven speed. The characteristic response of the dayside pulsations is a marked increase in the dominant frequency at stations inside the dayside auroral oval. Our results taken together with the observations of dayside auroras by Eather et al. (1979) suggest that substorm onsets are accompanied by a sudden inward motion of the center of the partial ring current. We propose that this ring current motion causes changes in the magnetic field in the equatorial plane of the magnetosphere that result in changes in the Alfven velocity on field lines where the magnetic pulsations are observed. Possible mechanisms for the generation of Pc 4,5 pulsations are discussed in the light of the observations reported in this paper.

  12. Heat transfer from a fully-developed pulsating flow in a curved pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Jae Hwa; Hyun, Jae Min

    1994-01-01

    Numerical studies are made of the flow and heat transfer characteristics of a fully-developed pulsating flow in a strongly curved pipe. Emphasis is placed on delineating the effects of the Reynolds number, and pulsation amplitude and frequency. By using a toroidal coordinate system, the complete, time-dependent incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are formulated. The peripherally-uniform temperature condition is imposed on the pipe wall. Particular attention is given to heat transfer properties over substantially extended parameter ranges of the Reynolds number Re and the Womersley number Wo. Use is made of a well-established numerical solution procedure, with minor amendments. The computed results on the flow field are in close agreement with the existing data in the overlapping parameter ranges. The spatial distributions of axial and secondary flows are depicted. The time variations of flow structure are displayed. The numerical results on the spatial and temporal variations of the thermal field are presented. The circumferential profiles of local Nusselt number are plotted at selected instants. When Wo is small, the time- and space-averaged Nusselt numbers, bar-Nu(sub w), is lower for a pulsating flow than for a corresponding non-pulsating flow. At moderate and high Wo, however, the difference in bar-Nu(sub w) between a pulsating and a non-pulsating flow is insignificant.

  13. Hilbert-Huang transform and S-transform of geomagnetic pulsations at auroral expansion onset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kataoka, R.; Miyoshi, Y.; Morioka, A.

    2009-12-01

    The waveform of geomagnetic pulsations at auroral expansion onset looks irregular and is hardly resolved by Fourier transform. Here we perform a novel analysis of the Hilbert-Huang Transform (HHT) to address this problem, focusing on the event investigated in detail by Morioka et al. [2008], in which the AKR (auroral kilometric radiation) breakup was clearly identified. From the HHT analysis of high-latitude search-coil ground magnetometer data, Pi1, Pc3, and Pi2 pulsations are extracted as the first, second, and third intrinsic mode functions, respectively. Amplification of the Pi1 and Pc3 pulsations is first detected as a clear precursor to the AKR breakup. The Pi1 and Pc3 pulsations show sudden enhancement at the AKR breakup. We suggest that the HHT is capable of automatically extracting the Pi1, Pi2, and Pc3 from the irregular high-latitude geomagnetic pulsations, providing a new type of diagnostic tools for understanding the onset mechanism of auroral substorms. A comprehensive time-frequency spectral view is obtained from the instantaneous frequency, especially when complemented with the S-transform, and the instantaneous frequency provides a new objective criterion to identify the type of geomagnetic pulsations such as Pi and Pc. It would be useful to apply the HHT to all the available both ground- and space-based magnetic datasets across all local times and latitudes for diagnosing the wave activities and underlying physics associated with the substorm onset.

  14. Theoretical and experimental investigations of flow pulsation effects in Coriolis mass flowmeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svete, A.; Kutin, J.; Bobovnik, G.; Bajsić, I.

    2015-09-01

    An understanding of the effects of flow pulsations on the dynamic behavior of Coriolis flowmeters is very important for their further development. In order to determine the phase difference between the vibrational signals, which represents the basic measurement effect of Coriolis flowmeters, there are many methods that include the proper filtering of all the signal components, except those with frequencies close to the drive frequency. Therefore, an understanding of the phenomenon of exciting the meter at its first natural frequency is very important. The results of a simple, linear, two-degree-of-freedom, lumped-parameter, dynamic model of a flowmeter show that the flow pulsations can degrade the accuracy of such a flowmeter as a result of indirect excitations of the measuring tube at the first natural frequency through the second-order perturbations by means of the Coriolis forces induced in pulsating flow conditions. In order to experimentally investigate these flow pulsation effects, a prototype of a straight-tube Coriolis mass flowmeter was developed to enable the processing of the response signals logged directly from the flow tube's sensors with the dual quadrature demodulation method, and therefore to provide the information available within the phase-difference data. The experimental results show that the flow pulsations upset the meter at its first natural frequency indirectly, as well as directly at the frequency of the pulsations due to the geometric imperfections of the measuring tube.

  15. The dependence of pulsating auroral events on energetic electrons and cold plasma near the equatorial plane

    SciTech Connect

    Nemzek, R.J.; Belian, R.D.; McComas, D.J.; Thomsen, M.F. ); Nakamura, R.; Baker, D.N. . Goddard Space Flight Center); Yamamoto, T. )

    1992-01-01

    Pulsating auroras are a substorm recovery phase phenomenon, occurring shortly after an auroral breakup. The current theory of the pulsating aurora involves a relaxation oscillator'' mechanism requiring a population of high-energy (10's of keV) electrons and a low-energy plasma number density on the order of a few particles per cm{sup 3}. We investigated this relationship by comparing energetic electron and plasma data from a geosynchronous satellite to pulsating auroras recorded by an all-sky video camera which contained the satellite's ionospheric conjugate point in its field of view. Pulsating auroral events were generally closely connected to substorm injections on the satellite, but there was no clear correlation with changes in plasma density. During all of the events the density was in an acceptable range for the relaxation oscillator mechanism to function. The relationship to substorm injections impiles that the pulsating aurora can be used to map the substorm injection region down to the ionosphere. An unusual diminishing of the pulsating aurora during the growth phase of a subsequent substorm was also discovered.

  16. The dependence of pulsating auroral events on energetic electrons and cold plasma near the equatorial plane

    SciTech Connect

    Nemzek, R.J.; Belian, R.D.; McComas, D.J.; Thomsen, M.F.; Nakamura, R.; Baker, D.N.; Yamamoto, T.

    1992-10-01

    Pulsating auroras are a substorm recovery phase phenomenon, occurring shortly after an auroral breakup. The current theory of the pulsating aurora involves a ``relaxation oscillator`` mechanism requiring a population of high-energy (10`s of keV) electrons and a low-energy plasma number density on the order of a few particles per cm{sup 3}. We investigated this relationship by comparing energetic electron and plasma data from a geosynchronous satellite to pulsating auroras recorded by an all-sky video camera which contained the satellite`s ionospheric conjugate point in its field of view. Pulsating auroral events were generally closely connected to substorm injections on the satellite, but there was no clear correlation with changes in plasma density. During all of the events the density was in an acceptable range for the relaxation oscillator mechanism to function. The relationship to substorm injections impiles that the pulsating aurora can be used to map the substorm injection region down to the ionosphere. An unusual diminishing of the pulsating aurora during the growth phase of a subsequent substorm was also discovered.

  17. Multi-instrument overview of the 1-hour pulsations in Saturn's magnetosphere and auroral emissions (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmaerts, Benjamin; Roussos, Elias; Radioti, Aikaterini; Krupp, Norbert; Grodent, Denis; Kurth, William S.; Yates, Japheth N.

    2016-04-01

    The in-situ exploration of the magnetospheres of Jupiter and Saturn has revealed different periodic processes which differ from the rotation period. In particular, in the Saturnian magnetosphere, several studies have reported pulsations in the outer magnetosphere with a periodicity of about 1 hour in the measurements of charged particle fluxes, plasma wave, magnetic field strength and auroral emission brightness. We made a 10-year survey of the quasi-periodic 1-hour energetic electron injections observed in the Saturn's outer magnetosphere by the Low-Energy Magnetospheric Imaging Instrument (MIMI/LEMMS) on board Cassini. The signature of these injections is pulsations in the electron fluxes at energies between a hundred keV up to several MeV. We investigated the topology and the morphology of these pulsations, as well as the signatures of the electron injections in the radio emissions and the magnetic field, respectively, measured by the Radio and Plasma Wave Science (RPWS) instrument and the magnetometer (MAG) on board Cassini. The morphology of the pulsations (interpulse period, number of pulsations per event, growth and decay time) shows a weak local time dependence, which suggests a high-latitude source for the pulsed energetic electrons. This suggestion is reinforced by the observation of strong radio bursts in the auroral hiss coincident with the electron pulsations and by the higher growth rate and decay rate magnitudes at high latitudes. Moreover, since the morphological properties of the pulsations are similar at the various locations where the electron injections are observed, the acceleration mechanism of the electrons is likely common for all the events and may be directly or indirectly involving magnetic reconnection. The auroral emissions, which display the ionospheric response to magnetospheric dynamics, exhibit some quasi-periodic 1-hour pulsations as well. Some pulsed auroral brightenings are observed while Cassini detects several electron

  18. Experimental and Theoretical Studies of Pulsating Turbulent Flow. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kingston, G. C.

    1975-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to study the effects of small amplitude sinusoidal pulsations on fully developed turbulent flow in a tube from both experimental and theoretical viewpoints. Theoretical models for the macroscopic behavior of pulsating turbulent tube flow were developed for the two cases of very low and very high pulsation frequencies. The models are based on assumptions of quasi-steady and frozen eddy viscosity flow behavior, respectively. The models successfully predict unsteady velocity profiles, thereby supporting the currently proposed definitions of frequency regimes in pulsating turbulent flow. Experimental measurements were made of the time-dependent pressure drop and velocity profiles over the range of frequency-to-Reynolds number ratios from 0.0095 to 0.24. The two macroscopic models developed in this study predict unsteady velocity profiles which are in moderately good agreement with the experiments in their respective frequency regimes, and a previously developed quasi-steady model is found to predict experimental velocity profiles well in both the quasisteady and the frozen eddy viscosity frequency regimes. The effect of flow pulsations on the dissipation of turbulence energy in the vicinity of the wall was measured in the lower transition frequency regime. The long-time averaged dissipation was observed to be unchanged from the steady flow dissipation, within the accuracy of the experiment. A theoretical model of the periodic viscous sublayer was also developed and applied to pulsating flow in a tube, in order to investigate the effects of flow pulsations on the rate of production of turbulence in the region of the wall. The periodic viscous sublayer model predicts sublayer growth periods in steady flow which agree with the published experimental data. When the model is applied to pulsating flow, the response of the sublayer growth period falls into three frequency regimes, the parameters of which are in approximate agreement

  19. Heat transfer mechanisms in pulsating heat-pipes with nanofluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Miguel; Kelly, Brian; Hayashi, Yoshikazu; Kim, Yoon Jo

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the effect of silver nanofluid on a pulsating heat-pipe (PHP) thermal performance was experimentally investigated to figure out how nanofluid works with PHP. A closed loop PHP was built with 3 mm diameter tubes. Thermocouples and pressure transducers were installed for fluid and surface temperature and pressure measurements. The operating temperature of the PHP varied from 30-100 °C, with power rates of 61 W and 119 W. The fill ratio of 30%, 50%, and 70% were tested. The results showed that the evaporator heat transfer performance was degraded by the addition of nanoparticles due to increased viscosity at high power rate, while the positive effects of high thermal conductivity and enhanced nucleate boiling worked better at low power rate. In the condenser section, owing to the relatively high liquid content, nanofluid more effectively improved the heat transfer performance. However, since the PHP performance was dominantly affected by evaporator heat transfer performance, the overall benefit of enhanced condenser section performance was greatly limited. It was also observed that the poor heat transfer performance with nanofluid at the evaporator section led to lower operating pressure of PHP.

  20. A review of low-intensity focused ultrasound pulsation.

    PubMed

    Bystritsky, Alexander; Korb, Alex S; Douglas, Pamela K; Cohen, Mark S; Melega, William P; Mulgaonkar, Amit P; DeSalles, Antonio; Min, Byoung-Kyong; Yoo, Seung-Schik

    2011-07-01

    With the recent approval by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) of Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) for Parkinson's Disease, dystonia and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) for epilepsy and depression, and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) for the treatment of depression, neuromodulation has become increasingly relevant to clinical research. However, these techniques have significant drawbacks (eg, lack of special specificity and depth for the rTMS, and invasiveness and cumbersome maintenance for DBS). This article reviews the background, rationale, and pilot studies to date, using a new brain stimulation method-low-intensity focused ultrasound pulsation (LIFUP). The ability of ultrasound to be focused noninvasively through the skull anywhere within the brain, together with concurrent imaging (ie, functional magnetic resonance imaging [fMRI]) techniques, may create a role for research and clinical use of LIFUP. This technique is still in preclinical testing and needs to be assessed thoroughly before being advanced to clinical trials. In this study, we review over 50 years of research data on the use of focused ultrasound (FUS) in neuronal tissue and live brain, and propose novel applications of this noninvasive neuromodulation method.

  1. Variability and pulsations in the Be star 66 Ophiuchi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floquet, M.; Neiner, C.; Janot-Pacheco, E.; Hubert, A. M.; Jankov, S.; Zorec, J.; Briot, D.; Chauville, J.; Leister, N. V.; Percy, J. R.; Ballereau, D.; Bakos, A. G.

    2002-10-01

    66 Oph is a Be star seen under a moderate inclination angle that shows strong variability from UV to IR wavelengths. A concise review of long-term variability history is given. High resolution, high S/N spectroscopic observations obtained in 1997, 1998 and 2001 and spectropolarimetric observations obtained in 2000 are presented. These observations occurred during a long-term decrease of Hα intensity. Fundamental parameters of the star have been revisited from Barbier-Chalonge-Divan (BCD) calibrations. New V sin i values are obtained using Fourier transforms applied to observed helium lines and a rotational frequency f_rot = 1.29 c d-1 is determined. Time series analysis and Fourier Doppler Imaging (FDI) of He I lines (4713, 4921, 5876 and 6678 Å) lead for the first time to the detection of multi-periodicity in 66 Oph. The two main frequencies found are f = 2.22 c d-1 and f = 4.05 c d-1 . They are attributed to non-radial pulsations and can be associated with mode degree l = 2 and l = 3, respectively. Inspection of Stokes V profiles suggests the presence of a weak Zeeman signature but further observations are needed to confirm the detection of a magnetic field in 66 Oph. Based on observations taken at OHP and Pic du Midi Observatory (France), at MBT/LNA (Brazil) and on Brazilian observing time at La Silla (ESO, Chile).

  2. A pulsating auroral X-ray hot spot on Jupiter.

    PubMed

    Gladstone, G R; Waite, J H; Grodent, D; Lewis, W S; Crary, F J; Elsner, R F; Weisskopf, M C; Majeed, T; Jahn, J-M; Bhardwaj, A; Clarke, J T; Young, D T; Dougherty, M K; Espinosa, S A; Cravens, T E

    2002-02-28

    Jupiter's X-ray aurora has been thought to be excited by energetic sulphur and oxygen ions precipitating from the inner magnetosphere into the planet's polar regions. Here we report high-spatial-resolution observations that demonstrate that most of Jupiter's northern auroral X-rays come from a 'hot spot' located significantly poleward of the latitudes connected to the inner magnetosphere. The hot spot seems to be fixed in magnetic latitude and longitude and occurs in a region where anomalous infrared and ultraviolet emissions have also been observed. We infer from the data that the particles that excite the aurora originate in the outer magnetosphere. The hot spot X-rays pulsate with an approximately 45-min period, a period similar to that reported for high-latitude radio and energetic electron bursts observed by near-Jupiter spacecraft. These results invalidate the idea that jovian auroral X-ray emissions are mainly excited by steady precipitation of energetic heavy ions from the inner magnetosphere. Instead, the X-rays seem to result from currently unexplained processes in the outer magnetosphere that produce highly localized and highly variable emissions over an extremely wide range of wavelengths. PMID:11875561

  3. A helium based pulsating heat pipe for superconducting magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, Luis Diego; Miller, Franklin; Pfotenhauer, John

    2014-01-01

    This study was inspired to investigate an alternative cooling system using a helium-based pulsating heat pipes (PHP), for low temperature superconducting magnets. In addition, the same approach can be used for exploring other low temperature applications. The advantages of PHP for transferring heat and smoothing temperature profiles in various room temperature applications have been explored for the past 20 years. An experimental apparatus has been designed, fabricated and operated and is primarily composed of an evaporator and a condenser; in which both are thermally connected by a closed loop capillary tubing. The main goal is to measure the heat transfer properties of this device using helium as the working fluid. The evaporator end of the PHP is comprised of a copper winding in which heat loads up to 10 watts are generated, while the condenser is isothermal and can reach 4.2 K via a two stage Sumitomo RDK408A2 GM cryocooler. Various experimental design features are highlighted. Additionally, performance results in the form of heat transfer and temperature characteristics are provided as a function of average condenser temperature, PHP fill ratio, and evaporator heat load. Results are summarized in the form of a dimensionless correlation and compared to room temperature systems. Implications for superconducting magnet stability are highlighted.

  4. Solute uptake through the walls of a pulsating channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waters, S. L.

    2001-04-01

    We investigate the uptake of a passive solute through the walls of a pulsating, fluid-filled channel into an adjacent medium in which the solute diffuses and is consumed at a constant rate. One end of the channel is open to well-mixed fluid containing the solute. The channel walls oscillate periodically in time and this prescribed motion generates steady streaming within the channel. We determine how this flow enhances the overall solute consumption (i.e. the flux of solute into the channel), the solute dispersion along the channel and the quantity of solute in the adjacent medium. The solute disperses in the channel due to the interaction between advection and transverse diffusion. The time-mean solute distribution throughout the channel and the medium is determined for a wide range of parameters. The results are applied to a new surgical technique used to treat patients with severe coronary artery disease, in which narrow tubes are created within ischemic heart muscle in an attempt to reperfuse the area directly with oxygenated blood.

  5. PULSATION PERIOD VARIATIONS IN THE RRc LYRAE STAR KIC 5520878

    SciTech Connect

    Hippke, Michael; Learned, John G.; Zee, A.; Edmondson, William H.; Lindner, John F.; Kia, Behnam; Ditto, William L.; Stevens, Ian R. E-mail: jgl@phys.hawaii.edu E-mail: w.h.edmondson@bham.ac.uk E-mail: wditto@hawaii.edu E-mail: irs@star.sr.bham.ac.uk

    2015-01-01

    Learned et al. proposed that a sufficiently advanced extra-terrestrial civilization may tickle Cepheid and RR Lyrae variable stars with a neutrino beam at the right time, thus causing them to trigger early and jogging the otherwise very regular phase of their expansion and contraction. This would turn these stars into beacons to transmit information throughout the galaxy and beyond. The idea is to search for signs of phase modulation (in the regime of short pulse duration) and patterns, which could be indicative of intentional, omnidirectional signaling. We have performed such a search among variable stars using photometric data from the Kepler space telescope. In the RRc Lyrae star KIC 5520878, we have found two such regimes of long and short pulse durations. The sequence of period lengths, expressed as time series data, is strongly autocorrelated, with correlation coefficients of prime numbers being significantly higher (p = 99.8%). Our analysis of this candidate star shows that the prime number oddity originates from two simultaneous pulsation periods and is likely of natural origin. Simple physical models elucidate the frequency content and asymmetries of the KIC 5520878 light curve. Despite this SETI null result, we encourage testing of other archival and future time-series photometry for signs of modulated stars. This can be done as a by-product to the standard analysis, and can even be partly automated.

  6. Mass flow and its pulsation measurements in supersonic wing wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shmakov, A. S.; Shevchenko, A. M.; Yatskikh, A. A.; Yermolaev, Yu. G.

    2016-10-01

    The results of experimental study of the flow in the wing wake are presented. Experiments were carried out in supersonic wind tunnel T-325 of ITAM SB RAS. Rectangle half-wing with sharp edges with a chord length of 30 mm and semispan of 95 mm was used to generate vortex wake. Experimental data were obtained in the cross section located 6 chord length downstream of the trailing edge at Mach numbers of 2.5 and 4 and at wing angles of attack of 4 and 10 degrees. Constant temperature hot-wire anemometer was used to measure disturbances in supersonic flow. Hot-wire was made of a tungsten wire with a diameter of 10 μm and length of 1.5 mm. Shlieren flow visualization were performed. As a result, the position and size of the vortex core in the wake of a rectangular wing were determined. For the first time experimental data on the mass flow distribution and its pulsations in the supersonic longitudinal vortex were obtained.

  7. Pulsation Period Variations in the RRc Lyrae Star KIC 5520878

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hippke, Michael; Learned, John G.; Zee, A.; Edmondson, William H.; Lindner, John F.; Kia, Behnam; Ditto, William L.; Stevens, Ian R.

    2015-01-01

    Learned et al. proposed that a sufficiently advanced extra-terrestrial civilization may tickle Cepheid and RR Lyrae variable stars with a neutrino beam at the right time, thus causing them to trigger early and jogging the otherwise very regular phase of their expansion and contraction. This would turn these stars into beacons to transmit information throughout the galaxy and beyond. The idea is to search for signs of phase modulation (in the regime of short pulse duration) and patterns, which could be indicative of intentional, omnidirectional signaling. We have performed such a search among variable stars using photometric data from the Kepler space telescope. In the RRc Lyrae star KIC 5520878, we have found two such regimes of long and short pulse durations. The sequence of period lengths, expressed as time series data, is strongly autocorrelated, with correlation coefficients of prime numbers being significantly higher (p = 99.8%). Our analysis of this candidate star shows that the prime number oddity originates from two simultaneous pulsation periods and is likely of natural origin. Simple physical models elucidate the frequency content and asymmetries of the KIC 5520878 light curve. Despite this SETI null result, we encourage testing of other archival and future time-series photometry for signs of modulated stars. This can be done as a by-product to the standard analysis, and can even be partly automated.

  8. A pulsating auroral X-ray hot spot on Jupiter.

    PubMed

    Gladstone, G R; Waite, J H; Grodent, D; Lewis, W S; Crary, F J; Elsner, R F; Weisskopf, M C; Majeed, T; Jahn, J-M; Bhardwaj, A; Clarke, J T; Young, D T; Dougherty, M K; Espinosa, S A; Cravens, T E

    2002-02-28

    Jupiter's X-ray aurora has been thought to be excited by energetic sulphur and oxygen ions precipitating from the inner magnetosphere into the planet's polar regions. Here we report high-spatial-resolution observations that demonstrate that most of Jupiter's northern auroral X-rays come from a 'hot spot' located significantly poleward of the latitudes connected to the inner magnetosphere. The hot spot seems to be fixed in magnetic latitude and longitude and occurs in a region where anomalous infrared and ultraviolet emissions have also been observed. We infer from the data that the particles that excite the aurora originate in the outer magnetosphere. The hot spot X-rays pulsate with an approximately 45-min period, a period similar to that reported for high-latitude radio and energetic electron bursts observed by near-Jupiter spacecraft. These results invalidate the idea that jovian auroral X-ray emissions are mainly excited by steady precipitation of energetic heavy ions from the inner magnetosphere. Instead, the X-rays seem to result from currently unexplained processes in the outer magnetosphere that produce highly localized and highly variable emissions over an extremely wide range of wavelengths.

  9. Pulsational mode fluctuations and their basic conservation laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borah, B.; Karmakar, P. K.

    2015-01-01

    We propose a theoretical hydrodynamic model for investigating the basic features of nonlinear pulsational mode stability in a partially charged dust molecular cloud within the framework of the Jeans homogenization assumption. The inhomogeneous cloud is modeled as a quasi-neutral multifluid consisting of the warm electrons, warm ions, and identical inertial cold dust grains with partial ionization in a neutral gaseous background. The grain-charge is assumed not to vary in the fluctuation evolution time scale. The active inertial roles of the thermal species are included. We apply a standard multiple scaling technique centered on the gravito-electrostatic equilibrium to understand the fluctuations on the astrophysical scales of space and time. This is found that electrostatic and self-gravitational eigenmodes co-exist as diverse solitary spectral patterns governed by a pair of Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equations. In addition, all the relevant classical conserved quantities associated with the KdV system under translational invariance are methodologically derived and numerically analyzed. A full numerical shape-analysis of the fluctuations, scale lengths and perturbed densities with multi-parameter variation of judicious plasma conditions is carried out. A correlation of the perturbed densities and gravito-electrostatic spectral patterns is also graphically indicated. It is demonstrated that the solitary mass, momentum and energy densities also evolve like solitary spectral patterns which remain conserved throughout the spatiotemporal scales of the fluctuation dynamics. Astrophysical and space environments significant to our results are briefly highlighted.

  10. Pressure pulsation in Kaplan turbines: Prototype-CFD comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivetti, A.; Lucino1, C.; Liscia, S.; Muguerza, D.; Avellan, F.

    2012-11-01

    Pressure pulsation phenomena in a large Kaplan turbine are investigated by means of numerical simulations (CFD) and prototype measurements in order to study the dynamic behavior of flow due to the blade passage and its interaction with other components of the turbine. Numerical simulations are performed with the commercial software Ansys CFX code, solving the incompressible Unsteady Reynolds-Averaged-Navier Stokes equations under a finite volume scheme. The computational domain involves the entire machine at prototype scale. Special care is taken in the discretization of the wicket gate overhang and runner blade gap. Prototype measurements are performed using pressure transducers at different locations among the wicket gate outlet and the draft tube inlet. Then, CFD results are compared with temporary signals of prototype measurements at identical locations to validate the numerical model. A detailed analysis was focused on the tip gap flow and the pressure field at the discharge ring. From a rotating reference frame perspective, it is found that the mean pressure fluctuates accordingly the wicket gate passage. Moreover, in prototype measurements the pressure frequency that reveals the presence of modulated cavitation at the discharge ring is distinguished, as also verified from the shape of erosion patches in concordance with the number of wicket gates.

  11. Cranial diameter pulsations measured by non-invasive ultrasound decrease with tilt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ueno, Toshiaki; Ballard, Richard E.; Macias, Brandon R.; Yost, William T.; Hargens, Alan R.

    2003-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Intracranial pressure (ICP) may play a significant role in physiological responses to microgravity by contributing to the nausea associated with microgravity exposure. However, effects of altered gravity on ICP in astronauts have not been investigated, primarily due to the invasiveness of currently available techniques. We have developed an ultrasonic device that monitors changes in cranial diameter pulsation non-invasively so that we can evaluate ICP dynamics in astronauts during spaceflight. This study was designed to demonstrate the feasibility of our ultrasound technique under the physiological condition in which ICP dynamics are changed due to altered gravitational force. METHODS: Six healthy volunteers were placed at 60 degrees head-up, 30 degrees headup, supine, and 15 degrees head-down positions for 3 min at each angle. We measured arterial blood pressure (ABP) with a finger pressure cuff, and cranial diameter pulsation with a pulsed phase lock loop device (PPLL). RESULTS: Analysis of covariance demonstrated that amplitudes of cranial diameter pulsations were significantly altered with the angle of tilt (p < 0.001). The 95% confidence interval for linear regression coefficients of the cranial diameter pulsation amplitudes with tilt angle was 0.862 to 0.968. However, ABP amplitudes did not show this relationship. DISCUSSION: Our noninvasive ultrasonic technique reveals that the amplitude of cranial diameter pulsation decreases as a function of tilt angle, suggesting that ICP pulsation follows the same relationship. It is demonstrated that the PPLL device has a sufficient sensitivity to detect changes non-invasively in ICP pulsation caused by altered gravity.

  12. Pulsation-triggered Mass Loss from AGB Stars: The 60 Day Critical Period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, I.; Zijlstra, A. A.

    2016-06-01

    Low- and intermediate-mass stars eject much of their mass during the late, red giant branch (RGB) phase of evolution. The physics of their strong stellar winds is still poorly understood. In the standard model, stellar pulsations extend the atmosphere, allowing a wind to be driven through radiation pressure on condensing dust particles. Here, we investigate the onset of the wind, using nearby RGB stars drawn from the Hipparcos catalog. We find a sharp onset of dust production when the star first reaches a pulsation period of 60 days. This approximately coincides with the point where the star transitions to the first overtone pulsation mode. Models of the spectral energy distributions show stellar mass-loss rate suddenly increasing at this point, by a factor of ˜10 over the existing (chromospherically driven) wind. The dust emission is strongly correlated with both pulsation period and amplitude, indicating stellar pulsation is the main trigger for the strong mass loss, and determines the mass-loss rate. Dust emission does not strongly correlate with stellar luminosity, indicating radiation pressure on dust has little effect on the mass-loss rate. RGB stars do not normally appear to produce dust, whereas dust production by asymptotic giant branch stars appears commonplace, and is probably ubiquitous above the RGB-tip luminosity. We conclude that the strong wind begins with a step change in mass-loss rate and is triggered by stellar pulsations. A second rapid mass-loss-rate enhancement is suggested when the star transitions to the fundamental pulsation mode at a period of ˜300 days.

  13. The Nainital-Cape Survey. IV. A search for pulsational variability in 108 chemically peculiar stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, S.; Martinez, P.; Chowdhury, S.; Chakradhari, N. K.; Joshi, Y. C.; van Heerden, P.; Medupe, T.; Kumar, Y. B.; Kuhn, R. B.

    2016-05-01

    Context. The Nainital-Cape Survey is a dedicated ongoing survey program to search for and study pulsational variability in chemically peculiar (CP) stars to understand their internal structure and evolution. Aims: The main aims of this survey are to find new pulsating Ap and Am stars in the northern and southern hemisphere and to perform asteroseismic studies of these new pulsators. Methods: The survey is conducted using high-speed photometry. The candidate stars were selected on the basis of having Strömgren photometric indices similar to those of known pulsating CP stars. Results: Over the last decade a total of 337 candidate pulsating CP stars were observed for the Nainital-Cape Survey, making it one of the longest ground-based surveys for pulsation in CP stars in terms of time span and sample size. The previous papers of this series presented seven new pulsating variables and 229 null results. In this paper we present the light curves, frequency spectra and various astrophysical parameters of the 108 additional CP stars observed since the last reported results. We also tabulated the basic physical parameters of the known roAp stars. As a part of establishing the detection limits in the Nainital-Cape Survey, we investigated the scintillation noise level at the two observing sites used in this survey, Sutherland and Nainital, by comparing the combined frequency spectra stars observed from each location. Our analysis shows that both the sites permit the detection of variations of the order of 0.6 milli-magnitude (mmag) in the frequency range 1-4 mHz, Sutherland is on average marginally better. The dataset is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/590/A116

  14. δ Sct-type pulsations in eclipsing binary systems: RZ Cas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, E.; García, J. M.; Mkrtichian, D. E.; Costa, V.; Kim, S.-L.; López-González, M. J.; Hintz, E.; Kusakin, A. V.; Gamarova, A. Y.; Lee, J. W.; Youn, J.-H.; Janiashvili, E. B.; Garrido, R.; Moya, A.; Kang, Y. W.

    2004-02-01

    We present the results of a three-continent multisite photometric campaign carried out on the Algol-type eclipsing binary system RZ Cas, in which the primary component has recently been discovered to be a δ Sct-type pulsator. The present observations include, for the first time, complete simultaneous Strömgren uvby light curves together with a few Crawford Hβ data collected around the orbital phase of the first quadrature. The new observations confirm the pulsational behaviour of the primary component. A detailed photometric analysis, based on these observations, is presented for both binarity and pulsation. The results indicate a semidetached system where the secondary fills its Roche lobe. The appearance of the light curves reveals the presence of the mass stream from the secondary component and a hotspot where this stream impacts on the surface of the primary star. There are also some indications of chromospheric activity in the secondary. On the other hand, the pulsational behaviour out-of-primary eclipse can be well described with only one frequency at 64.1935 cd-1 similar to the main peak found by Ohshima et al. The existence of multiperiodicity is not confirmed in our data. Concerning the mode identification, our results indicate non-radial pulsation in a high radial order (n= 6), with l= 2, |m|= 1, 2 as the most suitable. However, additional effects must be taken into account in the predictions. Moreover, the pulsation amplitude in the u band is larger than in b and v, which is unusual among the δ Sct-type variables. This can be explained as due to pulsation in a high n value and close to the blue edge of the δ Sct region. On the other hand, the early data of Ohshima et al. have also been analysed and similar results are found concerning the frequency content and pulsational amplitude. Finally, a revision of all the photometric out-of-primary-eclipse data sets available in the literature is made together with some additional unpublished data leading to

  15. Effects of pulsation on separated flow and heat transfer in enlarged channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki; Kai, Tomonori; Munekata, Mizue; Ohba, Hideki

    2011-03-01

    Numerical results of three-dimensional separated flow and heat transfer in an enlarged rectangular channel are presented in this paper. The expansion ratio and aspect ratio of the channel are 2.0 and 16.0, respectively. Reynolds number of the flow is 200 and it is over the critical Reynolds number. Over the critical Reynolds number, the flow in the symmetric channel becomes asymmetric and deflects to one side of the walls. Effects of the pulsating fluctuation at the inlet upon the flow in the channel are investigated. It is clarified that the inlet flow with a pulsating fluctuation of Strouhal number 0.05 and 0.10 strongly affects on the flow in the channel, and heat transfer on the walls is enhanced, especially on the wall surface covered with long separation bubble. On the other hand, the pulsation of St = 0.0125 oscillates the shear layer more weakly than that of St = 0.05, 0.10 and the enhancement of heat transfer is smaller, though some vortices are shed from the vicinity of the side wall near the reattachment region. The oscillation of the main flow calms down gradually as the Strouhal number of the pulsation increases over 0.10. The influence of pulsation of St = 0.20 on the flow is restricted in the near downstream of the step, and heat transfer on the walls is almost similar to that of the steady flow in the channel.

  16. Pulsational mode-typing in line profile variables. I - Four Beta Cephei stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campos, A. J.; Smith, M. A.

    1980-01-01

    The detailed variations of line profiles in the Beta Cephei-type variable stars Gamma Pegasi, Beta Cephei, Delta Ceti and Sigma Scorpii are modeled throughout their pulsation cycles in order to classify the dominant pulsation mode as radial or nonradial. High-dispersion Reticon observations of the variables were obtained for the Si III line at 4567 A, and line profiles broadened by radial or nonradial pulsations, rotation and radial-tangential macroturbulence were calculated based on a model atmosphere. It is found that only a radial pulsation mode can reproduce the radial velocity amplitude, changes in line asymmetry and uniform line width observed in all four stars. Results are in agreement with the color-to-light arguments of Stamford and Watson (1978), and suggest that radial pulsation plays the dominant role in the observed variations in most Beta Cephei stars. Evidence for shocks or moving shells is also found in visual line data for Sigma Scorpii and an ultraviolet line of Beta Cephei, together with evidence of smooth, secular period changes in Beta Cephei and Delta Ceti.

  17. On the origin of burst Pc1 pulsations produced in interaction with an oblique interplanetary shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkhomov, V. A.; Dmitriev, A. V.; Tsegmed, B.

    2015-05-01

    We examined the features of bursts of unstructured Pc1 geomagnetic pulsations recorded with period in the range T=2-5 s on 19 November 2007 using simultaneous observations by the geosynchronous satellites GOES-10, 11, 12, a constellation of high-apogee satellites THEMIS and by the CARISMA ground-based network of magnetometers. The pulsation excitation resulted from contact of an oblique interplanetary shock wave (ISW) with the magnetosphere. At geosynchronous orbit, we found eastward drift of the source of Pc1 bursts observed first by GOES-11 (~09 MLT), then by GOES-12 (~13 MLT) and, finally, by GOES-10 (~14 MLT). Ground-based observatories with ~40° longitudinal separation observed the excitation of oscillations with a delay to the west and east as compared with the median Fort Simpson observatory. An increase in frequency, seen at the sharp leading edge of oscillations, lasted for about 150 s. We determined the propagation velocity of the pulsations' source from the difference between the first observations of the pulsations by the satellites and at the Earth. In order to interpret the observed patterns of pulsation we considered different mechanisms such as: (1) Eastward drifting clouds of energetic electrons accelerated due to compression of the magnetosphere; (2) Plasmaspheric bulges (or detached plasma); (3) Magnetopause surface waves generated in the region of contact with the ISW and resulting in undulation of the region of developing the cyclotron instability.

  18. Swarm Observations of Field-aligned Currents Associated with Pulsating Auroral Patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillies, D. M.; Knudsen, D. J.; Spanswick, E.; Donovan, E.; Burchill, J. K.; Patrick, M.

    2015-12-01

    Using the ground-based optical data from the THEMIS all-sky imager network in conjunction with magnetometers on board the Swarm satellites, we performed a study of in situ field-aligned currents located near the edges of regions of pulsating aurora. A total of nine traversals of Swarm over regions of pulsating aurora identified using THEMIS ASI were studied. We used a satellite-aligned keogram to identify when Swarm was within a patch of pulsating aurora. A downward current in the range of ~1-6 μA/m2 can be seen just poleward of the boundary. A weaker upward current of ~1-3 μA/m2 is observed throughout the interior of the patch. The existence of these currents has been reported before but their magnitudes have not been quantified. In this study we quantify the magnitudes, in some cases by using two satellites traversing the same pulsating regions. We also compared Swarm's two-satellite FAC product to the single-satellite results and determine that the data product can be compromised in regions of pulsating aurora, a phenomenon that occurs over widespread regions and tends to persist for hours. Acknowledgements: This research was supported by an ESA Living Planet Fellowship and various CSA grants.

  19. Hilbert-Huang Transform of geomagnetic pulsations at auroral expansion onset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kataoka, Ryuho; Miyoshi, Yoshizumi; Morioka, Akira

    2009-09-01

    The waveform of geomagnetic pulsations at auroral expansion onset looks irregular and is hardly resolved by Fourier transform. Here we perform a novel analysis of the Hilbert-Huang Transform (HHT) to address this problem, focusing on the event investigated in detail by Morioka et al. (2008), in which the auroral kilometric radiation (AKR) breakup was clearly identified. From the HHT analysis of high-latitude search coil ground magnetometer data, Pi1, Pc3, and Pi2 pulsations are extracted as the first, second, and third intrinsic mode functions, respectively. Amplification of the Pi1 and Pc3 pulsations is first detected as a clear precursor to the AKR breakup. The Pi1 and Pc3 pulsations show sudden enhancement at the AKR breakup. We suggest that the HHT is capable of automatically extracting the Pi1, Pi2, and Pc3 from the irregular high-latitude geomagnetic pulsations, providing a new type of diagnostic tools for understanding the onset mechanism of auroral substorms.

  20. Development of pulsating twin jets mechanism for mixing flow heat transfer analysis.

    PubMed

    Gitan, Ali Ahmed; Zulkifli, Rozli; Abdullah, Shahrir; Sopian, Kamaruzzaman

    2014-01-01

    Pulsating twin jets mechanism (PTJM) was developed in the present work to study the effect of pulsating twin jets mixing region on the enhancement of heat transfer. Controllable characteristics twin pulsed jets were the main objective of our design. The variable nozzle-nozzle distance was considered to study the effect of two jets interaction at the mixing region. Also, the phase change between the frequencies of twin jets was taken into account to develop PTJM. All of these factors in addition to the ability of producing high velocity pulsed jet led to more appropriate design for a comprehensive study of multijet impingement heat transfer problems. The performance of PTJM was verified by measuring the pulse profile at frequency of 20 Hz, where equal velocity peak of around 64 m/s for both jets was obtained. Moreover, the jet velocity profile at different pulsation frequencies was tested to verify system performance, so the results revealed reasonable velocity profile configuration. Furthermore, the effect of pulsation frequency on surface temperature of flat hot plate in the midpoint between twin jets was studied experimentally. Noticeable enhancement in heat transfer was obtained with the increasing of pulsation frequency.

  1. Study on the Pressure Pulsation inside Runner with Splitter Blades in Ultra-High Head Turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, L.; Zhang, S. P.; Zhou, L. J.; Wang, Z. W.

    2014-03-01

    Runners with splitter blades were used widely for the high efficiency and stability. In this paper, the unsteady simulation of an ultra-high head turbine at the best efficiency point, 50% and 75% discharge points were established, to analyze the pressure pulsation in the vaneless space, rotating domain and the draft tube. First of all, runners with different length splitter blades and without splitter blades were compared to learn the efficiency and the pressure distribution on the blade surface. And then the amplitude of the pressure pulsation was analysed. The peak efficiency of the runner with splitter blades is remarkably higher than that of the corresponding impeller without splitter blades. And the efficiency of the turbine is the highest when the length ratio of the splitter blades is 0.75 times the main blades. The pressure pulsation characteristics were also influenced, because the amplitudes of the pulsation induced by the RSI phenomenon were changed as a result of more blades. At last, the best design plan of the length of the splitter blades (length ratio=0.825) was obtained, which improved the pressure pulsation characteristics without significant prejudice to the efficiency.

  2. Nonlinear pulsations of stars with initial mass 3 {M_⊙} on the asymptotic giant branch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadeyev, Yu. A.

    2016-10-01

    Pulsation period changes in Mira type variables are investigated using the stellar evolution and nonlinear stellar pulsation calculations. We considered the evolutionary sequence of stellar models with initial mass {M_{ZAMS}} = 3{M_⊙} and population I composition. Pulsations of stars in the early stage of the asymptotic giant branch are shown to be due to instability of the fundamental mode. In the later stage of evolution when the helium shell source becomes thermally unstable the stellar oscillations occur in either the fundamental mode (for the stellar luminosuty L < 5.4 × {10^3}{L_⊙}) or the first overtone (L > 7 × {10^3}{L_⊙}). Excitation of pulsations is due to the κ-mechanism in the hydrogen ionization zone. Stars with intermediate luminosities 5.4 × {10^3}{L_⊙} < L < 7 × {10^3}{L_⊙} were found to be stable against radial oscillations. The pulsation period was determined as a function of evolutionary time and period change rates dot Π were evaluated for the first ten helium flashes. The period change rate becomes the largest in absolute value (dot Π/Π ≈ - {10^{ - 2}}y{r^{ - 1}}) between the helium flash and the maximum of the stellar luminosity. Period changes with rate | {dot Π/Π } | ≥slant - {10^{ - 3}}y{r^{ - 1}} take place during ≈500 yr, that is nearly one hundredth of the interval between helium flashes.

  3. Quasi-periodic Pulsations during the Impulsive and Decay phases of an X-class Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, L. A.; Gallagher, P. T.; Dennis, B. R.; Ireland, J.; Inglis, A. R.; Ryan, D. F.

    2016-08-01

    Quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) are often observed in X-ray emission from solar flares. To date, it is unclear what their physical origins are. Here, we present a multi-instrument investigation of the nature of QPP during the impulsive and decay phases of the X1.0 flare of 2013 October 28. We focus on the character of the fine structure pulsations evident in the soft X-ray (SXR) time derivatives and compare this variability with structure across multiple wavelengths including hard X-ray and microwave emission. We find that during the impulsive phase of the flare, high correlations between pulsations in the thermal and non-thermal emissions are seen. A characteristic timescale of ˜20 s is observed in all channels and a second timescale of ˜55 s is observed in the non-thermal emissions. SXR pulsations are seen to persist into the decay phase of this flare, up to 20 minutes after the non-thermal emission has ceased. We find that these decay phase thermal pulsations have very small amplitude and show an increase in characteristic timescale from ˜40 s up to ˜70 s. We interpret the bursty nature of the co-existing multi-wavelength QPPs during the impulsive phase in terms of episodic particle acceleration and plasma heating. The persistent thermal decay phase QPPs are most likely connected with compressive magnetohydrodynamic processes in the post-flare loops such as the fast sausage mode or the vertical kink mode.

  4. Method of LSD profile asymmetry for estimating the center of mass velocities of pulsating stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britavskiy, Nikolay; Pancino, Elena; Romano, Donatella; Tsymbal, Vadim

    2015-08-01

    We present radial velocity analysis for 20 solar neighborhood RR Lyrae and 3 Population II Cepheids. High-resolution spectra were observed with either TNG/SARG or VLT/UVES over varying phases. To estimate the center of mass (barycentric) velocities of the program stars, we utilized two independent methods. First, the 'classic' method was employed, which is based on RR Lyrae radial velocity curve templates. Second, we provide the new method that used absorption line profile asymmetry to determine both the pulsation and the barycentric velocities even with a low number of high-resolution spectra and in cases where the phase of the observations is uncertain. This new method is based on a Least Squares Deconvolution (LSD) of the line profiles in order to analyze line asymmetry that occurs in the spectra of pulsating stars. By applying this method to our sample stars we attain accurate measurements (± 1 km/s) of the pulsation component of the radial velocity. This results in determination of the barycentric velocity to within 5 km/s even with a low number of high-resolution spectra. A detailed investigation of LSD profile asymmetry shows the variable nature of the project factor at different pulsation phases, which should be taken into account in the detailed spectroscopic analysis of pulsating stars.

  5. Method of LSD profile asymmetry for estimating the center of mass velocities of pulsating stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britavskiy, N.; Pancino, E.; Tsymbal, V.; Romano, D.; Cacciari, C.; Clementini, C.

    2016-05-01

    We present radial velocity analysis for 20 solar neighborhood RR Lyrae and 3 Population II Cepheids. High-resolution spectra were observed with either TNG/SARG or VLT/UVES over varying phases. To estimate the center of mass (barycentric) velocities of the program stars, we utilized two independent methods. First, the 'classic' method was employed, which is based on RR Lyrae radial velocity curve templates. Second, we provide the new method that used absorption line profile asymmetry to determine both the pulsation and the barycentric velocities even with a low number of high-resolution spectra and in cases where the phase of the observations is uncertain. This new method is based on a least squares deconvolution (LSD) of the line profiles in order to an- alyze line asymmetry that occurs in the spectra of pulsating stars. By applying this method to our sample stars we attain accurate measurements (+- 2 kms^-1) of the pulsation component of the radial velocity. This results in determination of the barycentric velocity to within 5 kms^-1 even with a low number of high- resolution spectra. A detailed investigation of LSD profile asymmetry shows the variable nature of the project factor at different pulsation phases, which should be taken into account in the detailed spectroscopic analysis of pulsating stars.

  6. The Music of the Stars : Spectroscopy of Pulsations in gamma Doradus Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunsden, Emily

    2013-05-01

    p>The mysteries of the interior structures of stars are being tackled with asteroseismology. The observable parameters of the surface pulsations of stars inform us of the interior characteristics of numerous classes of stars. The main-sequence gamma Doradus stars, just a little hotter than the Sun, offer the potential of determining stellar structure right down to the core. To determine the structural profile of a star, the observed frequencies and a full geometric description must be determined. This is only possible with long-term spectroscopic monitoring and careful analysis of the pulsation signature in spectral lines. This work seeks to identify the pulsational geometry of several gamma Doradus stars and to identify areas of improvement for current observation, analysis and modelling techniques. More than 4500 spectra were gathered on five stars for this purpose. For three stars a successful multi-frequency and mode identification solution was determined and significant progress has been made towards the understanding of a binary system involving a gamma Doradus star. A hybrid gamma Doradus/nbsp;delta Scuti pulsator was also intensely monitored and results from this work raise important questions about the classification of this type of star. Current analysis techniques were found to be fit-for-purpose for pure gamma Doradus stars, but stars with complexities such as hybrid pulsations and/or fast rotation require future development of the current models./p>

  7. The superslow pulsation X-ray pulsars in high mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei

    2013-03-01

    There exists a special class of X-ray pulsars that exhibit very slow pulsation of P spin > 1000 s in the high mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs). We have studied the temporal and spectral properties of these superslow pulsation neutron star binaries in hard X-ray bands with INTEGRAL observations. Long-term monitoring observations find spin period evolution of two sources: spin-down trend for 4U 2206+54 (P spin ~ 5560 s with Ṗ spin ~ 4.9 × 10-7 s s-1) and long-term spin-up trend for 2S 0114+65 (P spin ~ 9600 s with Ṗ spin ~ -1 × 10-6 s s-1) in the last 20 years. A Be X-ray transient, SXP 1062 (P spin ~ 1062 s), also showed a fast spin-down rate of Ṗ spin ~ 3 × 10-6 s s-1 during an outburst. These superslow pulsation neutron stars cannot be produced in the standard X-ray binary evolution model unless the neutron star has a much stronger surface magnetic field (B > 1014 G). The physical origin of the superslow spin period is still unclear. The possible origin and evolution channels of the superslow pulsation X-ray pulsars are discussed. Superslow pulsation X-ray pulsars could be younger X-ray binary systems, still in the fast evolution phase preceding the final equilibrium state. Alternatively, they could be a new class of neutron star system - accreting magnetars.

  8. Classical Cepheid pulsation models --- VI. The Hertzsprung progression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bono, G.; Marconi, M.; Stellingwerf, R. F.

    2000-08-01

    We present the results of an extensive theoretical investigation on the pulsation behavior of Bump Cepheids. We constructed several sequences of full amplitude, nonlinear, convective models by adopting a chemical composition typical of Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) Cepheids (Y=0.25, Z=0.008) and stellar masses ranging from M/M⊙ =6.55 to 7.45. We find that theoretical light and velocity curves reproduce the HP, and indeed close to the blue edge the bump is located along the descending branch, toward longer periods it crosses at first the luminosity/velocity maximum and then it appears along the rising branch. In particular, we find that the predicted period at the HP center is PHP = 11.24∓0.46 d and that such a value is in very good agreement with the empirical value estimated by adopting the Fourier parameters of LMC Cepheid light curves i.e. PHP = 11.2 ∓ 0.8 d (Welch et al. 1997). Moreover, light and velocity amplitudes present a "double-peaked" distribution which is in good qualitative agreement with observational evidence on Bump Cepheids. It turns out that both the skewness and the acuteness typically show a well-defined minimum at the HP center and the periods range from PHP = 10.73 ∓ 0.97 d to PHP = 11.29 ∓ 0.53 d which are in good agreement with empirical estimates. We also find that the models at the HP center are located within the resonance region but not on the 2:1 resonance line (P2/P0 = 0.5), and indeed the P2/P0 ratios roughly range from 0.51 (cool models) to 0.52 (hot models). Interestingly enough, the predicted Bump Cepheid masses, based on a Mass-Luminosity (ML) relation which neglects the convective core overshooting, are in good agreement with the empirical masses of Galactic Cepheids estimated by adopting the Baade-Wesselink method (Gieren 1989). As a matter of fact, the observed mass at the HP center -P ≍ 11.2 d- is 6.9 ∓ 0.9 M⊙, while the predicted mass is 7.0 ∓ 0.45 M⊙. Even by accounting for the metallicity difference

  9. Design and Operation of a Cryogenic Nitrogen Pulsating Heat Pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diego Fonseca, Luis; Miller, Franklin; Pfotenhauer, John

    2015-12-01

    We report the design, experimental setup and successful test results using an innovative passive cooling system called a “Pulsating Heat Pipe” (PHP) operating at temperatures ranging from 77 K to 80 K and using nitrogen as the working fluid. PHPs, which transfer heat by two phase flow mechanisms through a closed loop tubing have the advantage that no electrical pumps are needed to drive the fluid flow. In addition, PHPs have an advantage over copper straps and thermal conductors since they are lighter in weight, exhibit lower temperature gradients and have higher heat transfer rates. PHPs consist of an evaporator section, thermally anchored to a solid, where heat is received at the saturation temperature where the liquid portion of the two-phase flow evaporates, and a condenser where heat is rejected at the saturation temperature where the vapor is condensed. The condenser section in our experiment has been thermally interfaced to a CT cryocooler from SunPower that has a cooling capacity of 10 W at 77 K. Alternating regions of liquid slugs and small vapor plugs fill the capillary tubing, with the vapor regions contracting in the condenser section and expanding in the evaporator section due to an electric heater that will generate heat loads up to 10 W. This volumetric expansion and contraction provides the oscillatory flow of the fluid throughout the capillary tubing thereby transferring heat from one end to the other. The thermal performance and temperature characteristics of the PHP will be correlated as a function of average condenser temperature, PHP fill liquid ratio, and evaporator heat load. The experimental data show that the heat transfer between the evaporator and condenser sections can produce an effective thermal conductivity up to 35000 W/m-K at a 3.5 W heat load.

  10. Early detection of microstructural white matter changes associated with arterial pulsatility.

    PubMed

    Jolly, Todd A D; Bateman, Grant A; Levi, Christopher R; Parsons, Mark W; Michie, Patricia T; Karayanidis, Frini

    2013-01-01

    Increased cerebral blood flow pulsatility is common in vascular dementia and is associated with macrostructural damage to cerebral white matter or leukoaraiosis (LA). In this study, we examine whether cerebral blood flow pulsatility is associated with macrostructural and microstructural changes in cerebral white matter in older adults with no or mild LA and no evidence of dementia. Diffusion Tensor Imaging was used to measure fractional anisotropy (FA), an index of the microstructural integrity of white matter, and radial diffusivity (RaD), a measure sensitive to the integrity of myelin. When controlling for age, increased arterial pulsation was associated with deterioration in both measures of white matter microstructure but not LA severity. A stepwise multiple linear regression model revealed that arterial pulsatility index was the strongest predictor of FA (R = 0.483, adjusted R (2) = 0.220), followed by LA severity, but not age. These findings suggest that arterial pulsatility may provide insight into age-related reduction in white matter FA. Specifically, increased arterial pulsatility may increase perivascular shear stress and lead to accumulation of damage to perivascular oligodendrocytes, resulting in microstructural changes in white matter and contributing to proliferation of LA over time. Changes in cerebral blood flow pulsatility may therefore provide a sensitive index of white matter health that could facilitate the early detection of risk for perivascular white matter damage and the assessment of the effectiveness of preventative treatment targeted at reducing pulsatility.

  11. Confronting White Privilege

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swalwell, Katy

    2012-01-01

    Even as the United States becomes more diverse, a new era of "white flight" is unfolding. Whether they live in urban, suburban or rural communities, white students are likely to attend schools that reinforce their perceptions of cultural dominance. The average white student attends a school where 77 percent of the student body is of their race.…

  12. Finding the first cosmic explosions. III. Pulsational pair-instability supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Whalen, Daniel J.; Smidt, Joseph; Even, Wesley; Fryer, Chris L.; Woosley, S. E.; Heger, Alexander; Stiavelli, Massimo

    2014-02-01

    Population III supernovae have been the focus of growing attention because of their potential to directly probe the properties of the first stars, particularly the most energetic events that can be seen at the edge of the observable universe. But until now pulsational pair-instability supernovae, in which explosive thermonuclear burning in massive stars fails to unbind them but can eject their outer layers into space, have been overlooked as cosmic beacons at the earliest redshifts. These shells can later collide and, like Type IIn supernovae, produce superluminous events in the UV at high redshifts that could be detected in the near infrared today. We present numerical simulations of a 110 M {sub ☉} pulsational pair-instability explosion done with the Los Alamos radiation hydrodynamics code Radiation Adaptive Grid Eulerian. We find that collisions between consecutive pulsations are visible in the near infrared out to z ∼ 15-20 and can probe the earliest stellar populations at cosmic dawn.

  13. Experimental study on heat transfer performance of pulsating heat pipe with refrigerants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xingyu; Jia, Li

    2016-10-01

    The effects of different refrigerants on heat transfer performance of pulsating heat pipe (PHP) are investigated experimentally. The working temperature of pulsating heat pipe is kept in the range of 20°C-50°C. The startup time of the pulsating heat pipe with refrigerants can be shorter than 4 min, when heating power is in the range of 10W?100W. The startup time decreases with heating power. Thermal resistances of PHP with filling ratio 20.55% were obviously larger than those with other filling ratios. Thermal resistance of the PHP with R134a is much smaller than that with R404A and R600a. It indicates that the heat transfer ability of R134a is better. In addition, a correlation to predict thermal resistance of PHP with refrigerants was suggested.

  14. Experimental study on rack cooling system based on a pulsating heat pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Qianyi; Jia, Li

    2016-02-01

    A rack cooling system based on a large scale flat plate pulsating heat pipe is proposed. The heat generated from IT equipment in a closed rack is transferred by the rear door pulsating heat pipe to the chilled air passage and is avoided to release into the room. The influence of the start-up performance of the heat pipe, the load of the rack and the load dissipation to the temperature and the velocity distribution in the rack are discussed. It is found that the temperature would be lower and the temperature distribution would be more uniform in the rack when the pulsating heat pipe is in operation. Also, the effect of rack electricity load on temperature distribution is analyzed. It is indicated that higher velocity of chilled air will improve heat transfer of the rack.

  15. RAT J0455+1305: a rare hybrid pulsating subdwarf B star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baran, A. S.; Gilker, J. T.; Fox-Machado, L.; Reed, M. D.; Kawaler, S. D.

    2011-02-01

    We present results on the second faintest pulsating subdwarf B (sdB) star, RAT J0455+1305, derived from photometric data obtained in 2009. It shows both short- and long-period oscillations, theoretically assigned as pressure and gravity modes. We identify six short-period frequencies (with one being a combination) and six long-period frequencies. This star is the fourth hybrid sdB star discovered so far which makes it of special interest as each type of mode probes a different part of the star. This star is similar to the sdB hybrid pulsator Balloon 090100001 in that it exhibits short-period mode groupings, which can be used to identify pulsation parameters and constrain theoretical models.

  16. Using velocity dispersion to put outer limits on the source of short duration pulsating aurora

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahrns, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    A recently published observation of pulsating aurora with a period of around 30ms suggests a source for the modulation low in the magnetosphere, away from the equatorial plane, due to the expected velocity dispersion of the auroral precipitation. We developed a numerical time-of-flight calculation to determine the dispersion at the ionosphere of electrons precipitated from a given location along the field line, then feed the result into an electron transport code to determine an emission intensity profile. Using source location and plasma temperature as adjustable parameters, we then step through the parameter space, building up an index of outer-bound estimates of the location for modulation, correlated to various observed auroral pulsation periods. Both weak diffusion and strong diffusion cases are considered. Preliminary results suggest that for realistic plasma temperatures these short pulsations are modulated below around 1.5 R_e above the ionosphere.

  17. Properties of strongly magnetized ultradense matter and its effects on magnetar pulsations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, C. Vásquez; Castro, L. B.; Lugones, G.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the effect of strong magnetic fields on the adiabatic radial oscillations of hadronic stars. We describe magnetized hadronic matter within the framework of the relativistic nonlinear Walecka model and integrate the equations of relativistic radial oscillations to determine the fundamental pulsation mode. We consider that the magnetic field increases, in a density dependent way, from the surface, where it has a typical magnetar value of 1015G , to the interior of the star, where it can be as large as 3 ×1018G . We show that magnetic fields of the order of 1018G at the stellar core produce a significant change in the frequency of neutron star pulsations with respect to unmagnetized objects. If radial pulsations are excited in magnetar flares, they can leave an imprint in the flare lightcurves and open a new window for the study of highly magnetized ultradense matter.

  18. Flow pulsation in the near-wall layer of impinging jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesař, V.

    2013-04-01

    Pulsation of impinging jets promises to become a useful way towards achieving the highest possible rate of passive scalar convective transport between fluid and a wall. Author investigated experimentally steady and pulsated impingement by hot-wire anemometer traversing along a radial line at a small height above the impingement wall. The data have shown two conspicuous local maxima of fluctuation intensity. In an attempt to reach understanding of these phenomena, numerical flowfield computations were also made, fitted to the experimental conditions. Despite simplification (isotropic handling of unsteadiness, eddies computed as Reynolds-type phase averages) the synergetic approach (experiment & computation) revealed interesting correlation and resulted in useful interpretations of the old problem of the off-axis extremes - and also brings new views on their behaviour in the pulsating jet case.

  19. Spectroscopic mode identification of main-sequence non-radially pulsating stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maisonneuve, F.; Pollard, K. R.; Cottrell, P. L.; Kilmartin, P. M.; Wright, D. J.; De Cat, P.

    2010-07-01

    We are undertaking an extensive observational campaign of a number of non-radially pulsating stars using the high-resolution HERCULES spectrograph on the 1.0-m telescope at the Mt John University Observatory. This is part of a large world-wide multi-site campaign to improve mode-identification techniques in non-radially pulsating stars, particularly for g-mode pulsators. This paper outlines our campaign and presents preliminary results for one γ Doradus star, HD 40745, and one β Cephei star, HD 61068. We have used a representative cross-correlation line-profile technique presented by Wright in 2008 to extract line profiles and these have then been analyzed using the FAMIAS package due to Zima published in 2006 to derive a spectroscopic mode identification.

  20. Blue Straggler Masses from Pulsation Properties. II. Topology of the Instability Strip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorentino, G.; Marconi, M.; Bono, G.; Dalessandro, E.; Ferraro, F. R.; Lanzoni, B.; Lovisi, L.; Mucciarelli, A.

    2015-09-01

    We present a new set of nonlinear, convective radial pulsation models for main-sequence stars computed assuming three metallicities: Z = 0.0001, 0.001, and 0.008. These chemical compositions bracket the metallicity of stellar systems hosting SX Phoenicis stars (SXPs, or pulsating Blue Stragglers), namely, Galactic globular clusters and nearby dwarf spheroidals. Stellar masses and luminosities of the pulsation models are based on alpha-enhanced evolutionary tracks from the BASTI website. We are able to define the topology of the instability strip (IS) and in turn the pulsation relations for the first four pulsation modes. We found that third overtones approach a stable nonlinear limit cycle. Predicted and empirical ISs agree quite well in the case of 49 SXPs belonging to ω Cen. We used theoretical period-luminosity (PL) relations in B and V bands to identify their pulsation mode. We assumed Z = 0.001 and Z = 0.008 as mean metallicities of SXPs in ω Cen. We found respectively 13-15 fundamental, 22-6 first-overtone, and 9-4 second-overtone modes. Five are unstable in the third-overtone mode only for Z = 0.001. Using the above mode identification and applying the proper mass-dependent PL relations, we found masses ranging from ˜1.0 to 1.2 {M}⊙ (< M> = 1.12, σ =0.04 {M}⊙ ) and from ˜1.2 to 1.5 {M}⊙ (< M> = 1.33, σ =0.03 {M}⊙ ) for Z = 0.001 and 0.008, respectively. Our investigation supports the use of evolutionary tracks to estimate SXP masses. We will extend our analysis to higher helium content, which may have an impact on our understanding of the blue straggler stars formation scenario.

  1. Swarm observations of field-aligned currents associated with pulsating auroral patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillies, D. M.; Knudsen, D.; Spanswick, E.; Donovan, E.; Burchill, J.; Patrick, M.

    2015-11-01

    We have performed a superposed epoch study of in situ field-aligned currents located near the edges of regions of pulsating aurora observed simultaneously using ground-based optical data from the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) all-sky imager (ASI) network and magnetometers on board the Swarm satellites. A total of nine traversals of Swarm over regions of pulsating aurora identified using THEMIS ASI were studied. We determined that in the cases where a clear boundary can be identified, strong downward currents are seen just poleward and equatorward of the pulsating patches. A downward current in the range of ~1-6 μA/m2 can be seen just poleward of the boundary. A weaker upward current of ~1-3 μA/m2 is observed throughout the interior of the patch. These observations indicate that currents carried by precipitating electrons within patches could close through horizontal currents and be returned at the edges, in agreement with Oguti and Hayashi (1984) and Hosokawa et al. (2010b). In addition to confirming these earlier results and adding to their statistical significance, the contribution of this study is to quantify the upward and downward current magnitudes, in some cases using two satellites traversing the same pulsating regions. Finally, we compare Swarm's two-satellite field-aligned current product to the single-satellite results and determine that the data product can be compromised in regions of pulsating aurora, a phenomenon that occurs over widespread regions and tends to persist for long periods of time. These results underscore the importance of electrical coupling between the ionosphere and magnetosphere in regions of patchy pulsating aurora.

  2. Topical Drug Delivery in Chronic Rhinosinusitis Patients before and after Sinus Surgery Using Pulsating Aerosols

    PubMed Central

    Möller, Winfried; Schuschnig, Uwe; Celik, Gülnaz; Münzing, Wolfgang; Bartenstein, Peter; Häussinger, Karl; Kreyling, Wolfgang G.; Knoch, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is a common chronic disease of the upper airways and has considerable impact on quality of life. Topical delivery of drugs to the paranasal sinuses is challenging, therefore the rate of surgery is high. This study investigates the delivery efficiency of a pulsating aerosol in comparison to a nasal pump spray to the sinuses and the nose in healthy volunteers and in CRS patients before and after sinus surgery. Methods 99mTc-DTPA pulsating aerosols were applied in eleven CRSsNP patients without nasal polyps before and after sinus surgery. In addition, pulsating aerosols were studied in comparison to nasal pump sprays in eleven healthy volunteers. Total nasal and frontal, maxillary and sphenoidal sinus aerosol deposition and lung penetration were assessed by anterior and lateral planar gamma camera imaging. Results In healthy volunteers nasal pump sprays resulted in 100% nasal, non-significant sinus and lung deposition, while pulsating aerosols resulted 61.3+/-8.6% nasal deposition and 38.7% exit the other nostril. 9.7+/-2.0 % of the nasal dose penetrated into maxillary and sphenoidal sinuses. In CRS patients, total nasal deposition was 56.7+/-13.3% and 46.7+/-12.7% before and after sinus surgery, respectively (p<0.01). Accordingly, maxillary and sphenoidal sinus deposition was 4.8+/-2.2% and 8.2+/-3.8% of the nasal dose (p<0.01). Neither in healthy volunteers nor in CRS patients there was significant dose in the frontal sinuses. Conclusion In contrast to nasal pump sprays, pulsating aerosols can deliver significant doses into posterior nasal spaces and paranasal sinuses, providing alternative therapy options before and after sinus surgery. Patients with chronic lung diseases based on clearance dysfunction may also benefit from pulsating aerosols, since these diseases also manifest in the upper airways. PMID:24040372

  3. A new eclipsing binary system with a pulsating component detected by CoRoT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolovsky, K.; Maceroni, C.; Hareter, M.; Damiani, C.; Balaguer-Núñez, L.; Ribas, I.

    2010-06-01

    We report the discovery of CoRoT 102980178 (α = 06h 50m12.10s , δ = -02°41' 21.8'', J2000) an Algol-type eclipsing binary system with a pulsating component (oEA). It was identified using a publicly available 55 day long monochromatic lightcurve from the CoRoT initial run dataset (exoplanet field). Eleven consecutive 1.26m deep total primary and the equal number of 0.25m deep secondary eclipses (at phase 0.50) were observed. The following light elements for the primary eclipse were derived: HJDMinI = 2454139.0680 + 5.0548d × E. The lightcurve modeling leads to a semidetached configuration with the photometric mass ratio q = 0.2 and orbital inclination i = 85°. The out-of-eclipse lightcurve shows ellipsoidal variability and positive O'Connell effect as well as clear 0.01m pulsations with the dominating frequency of 2.75 c/d. The pulsations disappear during the primary eclipses, which indicates the primary (more massive) component to be the pulsating star. Careful frequency analysis reveals the second independent pulsation frequency of 0.21 c/d and numerous combinations of these frequencies with the binary orbital frequency and its harmonics. On the basis of the CoRoT lightcurve and ground based multicolor photometry, we favor classification of the pulsating component as a γ Doradus type variable, however, classification as an SPB star cannot be excluded.

  4. Seasonal and diurnal dependence of Pc 3-5 magnetic pulsation power at geomagnetically conjugate stations in the auroral zones

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Hiroaki National Institute of Polar Research, Tokyo ); Sato, Natsuo ); Tonegawa, Yutaka ); Yoshino, Takeo ); Saemundsson, T. )

    1989-06-01

    Seasonal and diurnal variations of Pc 3-5 magnetic pulsation powers have been examined using 2 years of magnetic data from geomagnetically conjugate stations, Syowa in Antarctica and Husafell and Tjoernes in Iceland. The magnetic pulsation powers are found to be relatively higher at the winter hemisphere station than at the summer station. The pulsations observed during equinox show a diurnal dependence, i.e., that the power density is higher in the geomagnetic morning at the stations in Iceland than at Syowa, and this relationship is reversed in the afternoon. The power density ratio of Pc 3 pulsations between the conjugate stations, which is associated with the seasons and with local time, is higher than that of Pc 5. These characteristics can be attributed to the effects of sunlight in the ionosphere, i.e., Pc 3-5 pulsations are shielded when the waves propagate from the magnetosphere to the ground through the sunlit ionosphere.

  5. Feasibility study of tuned-resonator, pulsating cavitating water jet for deep-hole drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, V.E. Jr.; Lindenmuth, W.T.; Conn, A.F.; Frederick, G.S.

    1981-08-01

    This study presents the advantages of pulsing a submerged jet to increase its erosion capability (particularly as caused by cavitation) in augmenting deep-hole drill bits. Various methods of accomplishing the pulsation are presented and discussed. The most attractive systems uncovered are acoustic oscillators which passively accomplish pulsations in the flow at frequencies corresponding to a Strouhal number in the range of 0.2 to 1.0. Such passive oscillators are assessed to be feasible candidates for development into practical deep hole drill bit systems and a long range plan for this research and development is presented and discussed.

  6. Draft tube pressure pulsation predictions in Francis turbines with transient Computational Fluid Dynamics methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melot, M.; Nennemann, B.; Désy, N.

    2014-03-01

    An automatic Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) procedure that aims at predicting Draft Tube Pressure Pulsations (DTPP) at part load is presented. After a brief review of the physics involved, a description of the transient numerical setup is given. Next, the paper describes a post processing technique, namely the separation of pressure signals into synchronous, asynchronous and random pulsations. Combining the CFD calculation with the post-processing technique allows the quantification of the potential excitation of the mechanical system during the design phase. Consequently it provides the hydraulic designer with a tool to specifically target DTPP and thus helps in the development of more robust designs for part load operation of turbines.

  7. Relationship between the IMF magnitude and Pc 3 magnetic pulsations in the magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yumoto, K.; Saito, T.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Smith, E. J.; Akasofu, S.-I.

    1984-01-01

    The relationships between the IMF magnitude and pulsation frequencies in the Pc 3-4 range simultaneously observed both at synchronous orbit and at low latitudes on the ground are statistically described. A theoretical discussion is given on how these observations can be interpreted in terms of the characteristic frequency of compressional Pc 3-4 magnetic pulsations in the magnetosphere, based on the well-established ion cyclotron resonance mechanism between magnetosonic mode of low-frequency upstream waves and narrowly reflected ion beams in the earth's foreshock.

  8. Pulsation modes of long-period variables in the period-luminosity plane

    SciTech Connect

    Soszyński, I.; Udalski, A.; Wood, P. R. E-mail: udalski@astrouw.edu.pl

    2013-12-20

    We present a phenomenological analysis of long-period variables (LPVs) in the Large Magellanic Cloud with the aim of detecting pulsation modes associated with different period-luminosity (PL) relations. Among brighter LPVs, we discover a group of triple-mode semi-regular variables with the fundamental, first-overtone, and second-overtone modes simultaneously excited, which fall on PL sequences C, C', and B, respectively. The mode identification in the fainter red giants is more complicated. We demonstrate that the fundamental-mode pulsators partly overlap with the first-overtone modes. We show a possible range of fundamental mode and first overtone periods in the PL diagram.

  9. Wider pulsation instability regions for β Cephei and SPB stars calculated using new Los Alamos opacities

    DOE PAGES

    Walczak, Przemysław; Fontes, Christopher John; Colgan, James Patrick; Kilcrease, David Parker; Guzik, Joyce Ann

    2015-08-13

    Here, our goal is to test the newly developed OPLIB opacity tables from Los Alamos National Laboratory and check their influence on the pulsation properties of B-type stars. We calculated models using MESA and Dziembowski codes for stellar evolution and linear, nonadiabatic pulsations, respectively. We derived the instability domains of β Cephei and SPB-types for different opacity tables OPLIB, OP, and OPAL. As a result, the new OPLIB opacities have the highest Rosseland mean opacity coefficient near the so-called Z-bump. Therefore, the OPLIB instability domains are wider than in the case of OP and OPAL data.

  10. A new way to study the stellar pulsation; First Polar mission PAIX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadid, M.

    2015-12-01

    In the context of long and continuous time-series photometry and after the MOST, CoRoT, KEPLER space missions and large geographic longitude ground--based networks, a new way is offered by the polar location helping to cope with the problem associated with the Earth day--night cycle. In this paper, we present the first long time-series photometry from the heart of Antarctica -Dome Charlie- and we discuss briefly our new results and perspectives on the pulsating stars from Antarctica, especially the connection between temporal hydrodynamic phenomena and cyclic modulations. Finally, we highlight the impact of PAIX -the robotic Antarctica photometer- on the stellar pulsation study.

  11. Testing the evolution of the DB white dwarf GD 358: first results of a new approach using asteroseismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González Pérez, J. M.; Metcalfe, T. S.

    2009-01-01

    Aims: We present a new method that investigates the evolutionary history of the pulsating DB white dwarf GD 358 using asteroseismology. This is done considering the internal C/O profile, which describes the relative abundances of carbon and oxygen from the core of the star to its surface. Different evolutionary channels lead to the generation of different C/O profiles, and these affect the pulsation periods. Methods: We used the C/O profiles associated with white dwarfs that evolved through binary evolution channels where the progenitor experienced one or two episodes of mass loss during one or two common envelope (CE) phases, and two profiles from single-star evolution. We computed models using these different profiles and used a genetic algorithm (GA) to optimize the search in the parameter space for the best fit to the observed pulsation periods. We used three-parameter models, adjusting the stellar mass (Mstar), the effective temperature (T_eff), and the helium mass of the external layer (M_He). Results: Our results suggest that binary evolution profiles may provide a better match to the pulsation periods of GD 358. The best fit to the observations is obtained using a profile related to an evolutionary history where two episodes of mass loss happen during two CE phases, the first during the RGB (red giant branch) stage. The values obtained are T_eff = 24300 K, Mstar = 0.585 M⊙, and log (M_He/Mstar) = -5.66. The best-fit model has a mass close to the mean mass for DB white dwarfs found in various works and a temperature consistent with UV spectra obtained with the IUE satellite.

  12. Driver of quasi-periodic modulation of pulsating aurora: Role of cold electron flux and electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, N.; Kadokura, A.; Tanaka, Y.; Nishiyama, T.

    2013-12-01

    Pulsating auroras are common phenomena, which are observed universally during the recovery phase of substorm in the auroral and subauroral zones. But, even today, generation mechanism of fundamental characteristics of pulsating aurora, such as, their periodicity and shapes are still open to discussion. Simultaneous observations onboard satellites and on the ground are important method to examine such fundamental characteristics of pulsating aurora. In this study we examined some selected pulsating auroral events, which obtained onboard THEMIS spacecraft and the THEMIS ground-based all-sky camera network. THEMIS satellites were located in the post midnight sector near the equatorial plane in the magnetosphere. We found following signatures of particle, field and wave in the magnetosphere at the onset and during pulsating aurora; 1) All pulsating aurora associate with high-energy(>5 keV) electron flux enhancement, 2) There is no evidence to identify a quasi-periodic(QP) modulation of high-energy electron flux, which may be directly corresponding to pulsating aurora observed on the ground, 3) QP modulation of cold electron flux(<10 eV) and electric field often show one-to-one correspondence to QP modulation of ELF wave intensity, both type of electromagnetic lower-band chorus wave and electrostatic ECH(electron cyclotron harmonic) wave, which may be closely relating to visible pulsating aurora observed on the ground, 4) Not all pulsating aurora associate with ELF wave enhancement, 5) Pitch angle distribution of QP modulated cold electrons show field-aligned to ambient magnetic field. In this study we focus on the characteristics of QP modulation of cold electron flux and electric field, which may play the driver of quasi-periodic modulation of pulsating aurora.

  13. Evaluation of pump pulsation in respirable size-selective sampling: part II. Changes in sampling efficiency.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun Gyung; Lee, Taekhee; Kim, Seung Won; Lee, Larry; Flemmer, Michael M; Harper, Martin

    2014-01-01

    This second, and concluding, part of this study evaluated changes in sampling efficiency of respirable size-selective samplers due to air pulsations generated by the selected personal sampling pumps characterized in Part I (Lee E, Lee L, Möhlmann C et al. Evaluation of pump pulsation in respirable size-selective sampling: Part I. Pulsation measurements. Ann Occup Hyg 2013). Nine particle sizes of monodisperse ammonium fluorescein (from 1 to 9 μm mass median aerodynamic diameter) were generated individually by a vibrating orifice aerosol generator from dilute solutions of fluorescein in aqueous ammonia and then injected into an environmental chamber. To collect these particles, 10-mm nylon cyclones, also known as Dorr-Oliver (DO) cyclones, were used with five medium volumetric flow rate pumps. Those were the Apex IS, HFS513, GilAir5, Elite5, and Basic5 pumps, which were found in Part I to generate pulsations of 5% (the lowest), 25%, 30%, 56%, and 70% (the highest), respectively. GK2.69 cyclones were used with the Legacy [pump pulsation (PP) = 15%] and Elite12 (PP = 41%) pumps for collection at high flows. The DO cyclone was also used to evaluate changes in sampling efficiency due to pulse shape. The HFS513 pump, which generates a more complex pulse shape, was compared to a single sine wave fluctuation generated by a piston. The luminescent intensity of the fluorescein extracted from each sample was measured with a luminescence spectrometer. Sampling efficiencies were obtained by dividing the intensity of the fluorescein extracted from the filter placed in a cyclone with the intensity obtained from the filter used with a sharp-edged reference sampler. Then, sampling efficiency curves were generated using a sigmoid function with three parameters and each sampling efficiency curve was compared to that of the reference cyclone by constructing bias maps. In general, no change in sampling efficiency (bias under ±10%) was observed until pulsations exceeded 25% for the

  14. Evaluation of Pump Pulsation in Respirable Size-Selective Sampling: Part II. Changes in Sampling Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun Gyung; Lee, Taekhee; Kim, Seung Won; Lee, Larry; Flemmer, Michael M.; Harper, Martin

    2015-01-01

    This second, and concluding, part of this study evaluated changes in sampling efficiency of respirable size-selective samplers due to air pulsations generated by the selected personal sampling pumps characterized in Part I (Lee E, Lee L, Möhlmann C et al. Evaluation of pump pulsation in respirable size-selective sampling: Part I. Pulsation measurements. Ann Occup Hyg 2013). Nine particle sizes of monodisperse ammonium fluorescein (from 1 to 9 μm mass median aerodynamic diameter) were generated individually by a vibrating orifice aerosol generator from dilute solutions of fluorescein in aqueous ammonia and then injected into an environmental chamber. To collect these particles, 10-mm nylon cyclones, also known as Dorr-Oliver (DO) cyclones, were used with five medium volumetric flow rate pumps. Those were the Apex IS, HFS513, GilAir5, Elite5, and Basic5 pumps, which were found in Part I to generate pulsations of 5% (the lowest), 25%, 30%, 56%, and 70% (the highest), respectively. GK2.69 cyclones were used with the Legacy [pump pulsation (PP) = 15%] and Elite12 (PP = 41%) pumps for collection at high flows. The DO cyclone was also used to evaluate changes in sampling efficiency due to pulse shape. The HFS513 pump, which generates a more complex pulse shape, was compared to a single sine wave fluctuation generated by a piston. The luminescent intensity of the fluorescein extracted from each sample was measured with a luminescence spectrometer. Sampling efficiencies were obtained by dividing the intensity of the fluorescein extracted from the filter placed in a cyclone with the intensity obtained from the filter used with a sharp-edged reference sampler. Then, sampling efficiency curves were generated using a sigmoid function with three parameters and each sampling efficiency curve was compared to that of the reference cyclone by constructing bias maps. In general, no change in sampling efficiency (bias under ±10%) was observed until pulsations exceeded 25% for the

  15. Reconstitution of surfactant activity by using the 6 kDa apoprotein associated with pulmonary surfactant.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, S H; Possmayer, F

    1986-01-01

    Lipid extracts of bovine pulmonary surfactant containing the 6 kDa apoprotein, but lacking the 35 kDa apoprotein, can mimic the essential characteristics of pulmonary surfactant on a pulsating-bubble surfactometer. Reconstituted surfactant can be produced by combining silicic acid fractions containing 6 kDa apoprotein and phosphatidylglycerol with phosphatidylcholine. Treatment of the protein-containing fraction with proteolytic enzymes abolishes its efficacy. These results indicate that the presence of the 6 kDa apoprotein can account for some of the essential physical and biological characteristics of pulmonary surfactant. Immunodiffusion studies indicate that, contrary to earlier suggestions, the 6 kDa apoprotein is not structurally related to the major surfactant apoprotein that has a molecular mass of 35 kDa. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:3098235

  16. Spectral analysis of hot helium-rich white dwarfs.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreizler, S.; Werner, K.

    1996-10-01

    We present a model atmosphere analysis of most known hot helium-rich white dwarfs of spectral type DO. The stars represent the non-DA white dwarf cooling sequence from the hot end (T_eff_=~120000K) down to the DB gap (T_eff_=~45000K). From medium resolution optical spectra, effective temperatures, surface gravities, and element abundances are determined by means of non-LTE model atmospheres. Compared to previous LTE analyses available for some of the program stars, higher effective temperatures are derived. The existence of the DB gap is confirmed. For the first time reliable surface gravities for a large sample of DO white dwarfs are determined. With the help of theoretical evolutionary tracks the DO masses are determined. We find a mean value of 0.59+/-0.08Msun_ which virtually coincides with the mean masses of the DA and DB white dwarfs. Hydrogen cannot be identified in any optical DO spectrum, which includes the former DOA prototype HZ21. Hence HD149499B remains the only DO white dwarf with a positive (FUV) detection of trace hydrogen in the photosphere. The number ratio of DA/non-DA white dwarfs significantly increases along the cooling sequence and thus corroborates the hydrogen float-up hypothesis as an explanation for the DB gap. From optical, IUE, and HST spectra metal abundances or upper limits could be derived for most DOs, allowing a comprehensive comparison with predictions from diffusion/radiative levitation calculations. A large scatter in metallicities is found, even among objects with similar parameters and no clear trend along the cooling sequence is detectable. This is severely at odds with theoretical predictions. The evolutionary link between DO white dwarfs, the PG1159 stars and DB white dwarfs is discussed, in particular considering the overlapping positions of DO and PG1159 stars in the HR diagram.

  17. Whole Earth Telescope observations of V471 Tauri - The nature of the white dwarf variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clemens, J. C.; Nather, R. E.; Winget, D. E.; Robinson, E. L.; Wood, M. A.; Claver, C. F.; Provencal, J.; Kleinman, S. J.; Bradley, P. A.; Frueh, M. L.

    1992-01-01

    Time-series photometric observations of the binary star V471 Tauri were conducted using the Whole Earth Telescope observing network. The purpose was to determine the mechanism responsible for causing the 555 and 277 s periodic luminosity variations exhibited by the white dwarf in this binary. Previous observers have proposed that either g-mode pulsations or rotation of an accreting magnetic white dwarf could cause the variations, but were unable to decide which was the correct model. The present observations have answered this question. Learning the cause of the white dwarf variations has been possible because of the discovery of a periodic signal at 562 s in the Johnson U-band flux of the binary. By identifying this signal as reprocessed radiation and using its phase to infer the phase of the shorter wavelength radiation which produces it, made it possible to compare the phase of the 555 s U-band variations to the phase of the X-ray variations. It was found that U-band maximum coincides with X-ray minimum. From this result it was concluded that the magnetic rotator model accurately describes the variations observed, but that models involving g-mode pulsations do not.

  18. Mass ejection by pulsational pair instability in very massive stars and implications for luminous supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Takashi; Umeda, Hideyuki; Maeda, Keiichi; Ishii, Tatsuo

    2016-03-01

    Massive stars having a CO core of ˜40-60 M⊙ experience pulsational pair-instability (PPI) after carbon-burning. This instability induces strong pulsations of the whole star and a part of outer envelope is ejected. We investigate the evolution and mass ejection of metal-poor very massive stars which experience PPI. We use stellar models with initial masses of 140, 200, and 250 M⊙ and the metallicity Z = 0.004. Their masses decrease to 54.09, 58.65, and 61.03 M⊙ before the neon-burning owing to mass-loss and He mass fraction at the surface becomes about 20 per cent. During the PPI period of ˜1-2000 yr, they experience six, four, and three pulsations, respectively. The larger CO-core model has the longer PPI period and ejects the larger amount of mass. Since almost all surface He has been lost by the pulsations, these stars become Type Ic supernovae if they explode. Light curves during the PPI stage and supernovae are investigated and are implicated in luminous supernovae. The luminosity created by the interaction of different PPI ejecta becomes Mbol ˜ -16 to -20. The interaction between the circumstellar shell ejected by PPI and the supernova ejecta can be more luminous. These luminous transients could be an origin of Type I superluminous supernovae and supernovae with precursor.

  19. Ionospheric localisation and expansion of long-period Pi1 pulsations at substorm onset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milling, David K.; Rae, I. Jonathan; Mann, Ian R.; Murphy, Kyle R.; Kale, Andy; Russell, Christopher T.; Angelopoulos, Vassilis; Mende, Stephen

    2008-07-01

    We examine the initial ionospheric localisation and expansion of Pi1 pulsations associated with a substorm onset observed on 1st November 2006 with the combined CARISMA and THEMIS GMAG network of ground-based magnetometers. We demonstrate how the first ionospheric pulsation disturbance lies in the long-period Pi1 band. The long-period Pi1 pulsations at substorm onset are initially localised in longitude, and expands away from an epicentre in the ionosphere, with ~16 s timing between stations. We further establish a link between the location of the downward field-aligned current (FAC) element which subsequently develops within the substorm current wedge (SCW), and the initial location of the onset of long-period Pi1 pulsations. The arrival of the initial long-period Pi1 wavepacket demonstrates the importance of global networks of ground-based magnetometers for probing substorm onset. The Pi1 expansion proceeds westward at a rate of approximately 1 MLT hour per ~20 seconds, representing a very rapid expansion of the Pi1 signal at the ground. The resolution of the Pi1 localisation and the rate of expansion suggest Pi1 waves can play an important role in studies of the causal sequence of energy release in substorms.

  20. Statistical study on the characterization of ULF Pulsations in the Inner Magnetosphere by THEMIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, W.; Sarris, T.; Liu, X.; Elkington, S. R.; Ergun, R.; Kabin, K.; Rankin, R.; Angelopoulos, V.; Bonnell, J.; Glassmeier, K.; Auster, U.

    2008-12-01

    ULF pulsations (2~25 mHz) have significant influence on the transport of energetic particles trapped in the outer radiation belt, which have drift frequencies comparable to this range. However recent studies indicate that not all classes of ULF waves are equally important for radiation belt electron acceleration. For example, simulations suggest that electrons could be adiabatically accelerated through a drift-resonance interaction with either azimuthal (toroidal) mode or radial (poloidal) mode ULF waves. THEMIS electric field observations provide a good opportunity to study and fully characterize the features of the ULF pulsations in the inner magnetosphere. The ULF polarization study by Sarris et al [2008] focuses on the observations made by one THEMIS probe during its out-bound pass on September 4th, 2007. Here we will present the statistical studies of the polarizations of ULF pulsations, based on the spin-fit electric and magnetic field data from July 2007 to June 2008, with full local time coverage. Through this global coverage, ULF polarizations are characterized at different regions, in terms of radial distance and local times. Preliminary analysis indicates that the polarizations of electric field pulsation are more radial in dawn/dusk sectors and more azimuthal in noon/midnight sectors.

  1. Pulsating nighttime magnetic background noise in the upper ULF band at low latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bösinger, T.; Demekhov, A. G.; Ermakova, E. N.; Haldoupis, C.; Zhou, Q.

    2014-05-01

    We model long-period (~2 h) irregular pulsations in the ellipticity of magnetic background noise (MBN) in the upper ULF band which were frequently observed during nighttime at a low-latitude site on the Island of Crete. It is shown that such pulsations cannot be reproduced in the calculations when using the ionosphere parameters from the statistical IRI (International Reference Ionosphere) model, while regular diurnal signatures of the ellipticity spectrum at sunset and sunrise are successfully reproduced. We apply the same approach to the location of the Arecibo incoherent scatter radar and show that using actually measured ionosphere profiles (up to a height of 400 km) instead of IRI profiles produces the ellipticity pulsations very similar to those observed at Crete. Comparison of model results with the calculated behavior of Alfvén mode refractive index allows us to conclude that the observed nighttime long-period irregular pulsations in the MBN ellipticity are caused by dynamic processes at the upper boundary of the ionospheric E-F valley which serves as a subionospheric Alfvén resonator. Irregular widening, shrinking, and/or deepening of the valley with time scales of 1 to 4 h affect the electrodynamical properties of this resonator and manifest themselves in the magnetic background noise properties.

  2. An experimental study of pressure losses in pulsatile flows through rigid and pulsating stenosis.

    PubMed

    Rabinovitz, R; Degani, D; Gutfinger, C; Milo, S

    1984-11-01

    The time-dependent pressure curves of a pulsatile flow across rigid and pulsating stenoses were investigated experimentally in a laboratory simulator of the outflow tract of the heart right ventricle. The experiments were performed within the range of physiological conditions of frequency and flow rate. The experimental setup consisted of a closed flow system which was operated by a pulsatile pump, and a test chamber which enabled checking different modes of stenosis. Rigid constrictions were simulated by means of axisymmetric blunt-ended annular plugs with moderate-to-severe area reductions. The pulsating stenosis consisted of a short starling resistor device operated by a pulsating external pressure which was synchronized by the pulsatile flow. It was found that the shape of the time-dependent pressure curve upstream of the stenosis was different in the case of rigid stenosis than in the pulsating one. Potential clinical applications of the work may relate to diagnosis of the type of stenosis in the congenital heart disease known as Tetralogy of Fallot. PMID:6513525

  3. Arterial pulsation-driven cerebrospinal fluid flow in the perivascular space: a computational model.

    PubMed

    Bilston, Lynne E; Fletcher, David F; Brodbelt, Andrew R; Stoodley, Marcus A

    2003-08-01

    This study was conducted to determine whether local arterial pulsations are sufficient to cause cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow along perivascular spaces (PVS) within the spinal cord. A theoretical model of the perivascular space surrounding a "typical" small artery was analysed using computational fluid dynamics. Systolic pulsations were modelled as travelling waves on the arterial wall. The effects of wave geometry and variable pressure conditions on fluid flow were investigated. Arterial pulsations induce fluid movement in the PVS in the direction of arterial wave travel. Perivascular flow continues even in the presence of adverse pressure gradients of a few kilopascals. Flow rates are greater with increasing pulse wave velocities and arterial deformation, as both an absolute amplitude and as a proportion of the PVS. The model suggests that arterial pulsations are sufficient to cause fluid flow in the perivascular space even against modest adverse pressure gradients. Local increases in flow in this perivascular pumping mechanism or reduction in outflow may be important in the etiology of syringomyelia.

  4. Viscous Analysis of Pulsating Hydrodynamic Instability and Thermal Coupling Liquid-Propellant Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margolis, Stephen B.; Sacksteder, Kurt (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A pulsating form of hydrodynamic instability has recently been shown to arise during liquid-propellant deflagration in those parameter regimes where the pressure-dependent burning rate is characterized by a negative pressure sensitivity. This type of instability can coexist with the classical cellular, or Landau form of hydrodynamic instability, with the occurrence of either dependent on whether the pressure sensitivity is sufficiently large or small in magnitude. For the inviscid problem, it has been shown that, when the burning rate is realistically allowed to depend on temperature as well as pressure, sufficiently large values of the temperature sensitivity relative to the pressure sensitivity causes like pulsating form of hydrodynamic instability to become dominant. In that regime, steady, planar burning becomes intrinsically unstable to pulsating disturbances whose wave numbers are sufficiently small. This analysis is extended to the fully viscous case, where it is shown that although viscosity is stabilizing for intermediate and larger wave number perturbations, the intrinsic pulsating instability for small wave numbers remains. Under these conditions, liquid-propellant combustion is predicted to be characterized by large unsteady cells along the liquid/gas interface.

  5. Characteristics pertinent to propagation of pulsating pressure in the channels of turbine machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hong; Chen, Zuoyi

    2007-01-01

    A new model describing the propagation of the pressure pulsations in the intricately shaped channels of turbine machines is presented. The proposed model was successfully used to analyze two emergency events: a failure of a steam turbine’s cast diaphragm and a failure of a rocket engine’s oxygen pump booster stage.

  6. Influence of the pulsating electric field on the ECR heating in a nonuniform magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Balmashnov, A. A. Umnov, A. M.

    2011-12-15

    According to a computer simulation, the randomized pulsating electric field can strongly influence the ECR plasma heating in a nonuniform magnetic field. It has been found out that the electron energy spectrum is shifted to the high energy region. The obtained effect is intended to be used in the ECR sources for effective X-ray generation.

  7. Experimental study on the start up performance of flat plate pulsating heat pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chaofa; Jia, Li

    2011-06-01

    An experimental system of flat plate pulsating heat pipe was established and experimental research was carried out in this system to know the mechanism of heat transfer, start-up and operating characteristics. The factors, such as filling rate, heating power, heating method etc, which have great influence on the thermal performance of the plate pulsating heat pipe were discussed. The results indicate that heating power and filling rate are the important factors for the start-up of the plate pulsating heat pipe. The different start-up power is needed with different filling rate, and the start-up of the heat pipe in case of bottom heated is much easier than that of top heated. Increasing the heating power and enlarging the heating area can make the start-up easier. Heating power can also affect the start-up time of heat pipe under the condition of bottom heated, while it does not have some influence to the heat pipe of top heated. The thermal resistance of plate pulsating heat pipe is related with the heating power, and the higher the heating power is, the smaller the thermal resistance is. But the best filling rate which the heat pipe needs is different with different heating methods, and the performance of the heat pipe in the case of bottom heated is better than the others.

  8. Experimental Identification of the Transmittance Matrix for any Element of the Pulsating Gas Manifold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    CYKLIS, P.

    2001-07-01

    In positive-displacement compressor manifolds there are pressure pulsations due to their cyclic operation. The analysis of pressure pulsations in the compressor manifolds is important for various reasons: they directly affect the quantity of energy required for medium compression due to dynamic pressure charging, or inversely, dynamic suppression of suction and discharge processes; they cause mechanical vibrations of compressed gas piping network, they cause aerodynamic and mechanical noise; they affect the dynamics of working valves in valve compressors, they intensify the process of heat convection in heat exchangers in the gas network. The Helmholtz model used so far, which is the basis for users, who deal with pressure pulsation damping, contains many simplifying assumptions. This is because; a straight pipe segment substitutes each element of the piping system. In many cases this model is insufficient. An attempt of the analysis of other shapes was presented in references [1-3] but only simple geometry elements were considered. In other papers [4-8] the influence of the mean flow velocity caused problems. In the presented method, on the basis of pressure pulsation measurement results, firstly a division into the forward and backward going wave is determined, then the elements of the scattering (transmittance) matrix are calculated defining the installation element. This allows introducing the correction for gas mean velocity. The results of the method using correction for the gas mean velocity have been compared with the results without correction and Helmholtz model showing better accuracy.

  9. Self-sustained pulsations of light in a nonlinear thin-film system

    SciTech Connect

    Paulau, P.V.; Loiko, N.A.

    2005-07-15

    The propagation of light through the system composed of two thin films with resonant nonlinearity has been considered. Conditions for the multistability and Hopf bifurcations have been found. Two kinds of self-sustained pulsations including Rabi oscillations have been distinguished. A possible experimental observation of the effects described using quantum-confined semiconductor structures as a resonant medium has been discussed.

  10. Pulsational variability in proto-planetary nebulae and other post-AGB objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrivnak, Bruce J.

    2016-07-01

    Light and velocity curves of several classes of pulsating stars have been successfully modeled to determine physical properties of the stars. In this observational study, we review briefly the pulsational variability of the main classes of post-AGB stars. Our attention is focused in particular on proto-planetary nebulae (PPNe), those in the short-lived phase from AGB stars to the planetary nebulae. New light curves and period analyses have been used to determine the following general properties of the PPNe variability: (a) periods range from 35 to 160 days for those of F—G spectral types, with much shorter periods (< 1 day) found for those of early-B spectral type; (b) there is a correlation between the pulsation period, maximum amplitude, and temperature of the star, with cooler stars pulsating with longer periods and larger amplitudes; (c) similar correlations are found for carbon-rich, oxygen-rich, and lower-metalicity PPNe; and (d) multiple periods are found for all of them, with P2/P1 = 1.0±0.1. New models are needed to exploit these results.

  11. Morningside Pi2 Pulsation Observed in Space and on the Ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghamry, Essam

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we examined a morningside Pi2 pulsation, with a non-substorm signature, that occurred in very quiet geomagnetic conditions (Kp = 0) at 05:38 UT on December 8, 2012, using data obtained by Van Allen Probes A and B (VAP-A and VAP-B, respectively) and at a ground station. Using 1 sec resolution vector magnetic field data, we measured the X-component of the pulsation from the Abu Simbel ground station (L = 1.07, LT = UT +2 hr, where LT represents local time) in Egypt. At the time of the Pi2 event, Abu Simbel and VAP-A (L = 3.3) were in the morning sector (07:38 LT and 07:59 MLT, respectively, where MLT represents magnetic local time), and VAP-B was in the postmidnight sector (04:18 MLT and L = 5.7). VAP-A and VAP-B observed oscillations in the compressional magnetic field component (Bz), which were in close agreement with the X-component measurements of the Pi2 pulsation that were made at Abu Simbel. The oscillations observed by the satellites and on the ground were in phase. Thus, we concluded that the observed morningside Pi2 pulsation was caused by the cavity resonance mode rather than by ionospheric current systems.

  12. Suppression of stochastic pulsation in laser-plasma interaction by smoothing methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hora, Heinrich; Aydin, Meral

    1992-04-01

    The control of the very complex behavior of a plasma with laser interaction by smoothing with induced spatial incoherence or other methods was related to improving the lateral uniformity of the irradiation. While this is important, it is shown from numerical hydrodynamic studies that the very strong temporal pulsation (stuttering) will mostly be suppressed by these smoothing methods too.

  13. Suppression of stochastic pulsation in laser-plasma interaction by smoothing methods

    SciTech Connect

    Hora, H. ); Aydin, M. )

    1992-04-15

    The control of the very complex behavior of a plasma with laser interaction by smoothing with induced spatial incoherence or other methods was related to improving the lateral uniformity of the irradiation. While this is important, it is shown from numerical hydrodynamic studies that the very strong temporal pulsation (stuttering) will mostly be suppressed by these smoothing methods too.

  14. DISCOVERY OF 14 NEW SLOWLY PULSATING B STARS IN THE OPEN CLUSTER NGC 7654

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Y. P.; Han, Z. W.

    2012-02-10

    We carried out time-series BV CCD photometric observations of the open cluster NGC 7654 (Messier 52) to search for variable stars. Eighteen slowly pulsating B (SPB) stars have been detected, among which 14 candidates are newly discovered, three known ones are confirmed, and a previously found {delta} Scuti star is also identified as an SPB candidate. Twelve SPBs are probable cluster members based on membership analysis. This makes NGC 7654 the richest galactic open cluster in terms of SPB star content. It is also a new discovery that NGC 7654 hosts three {gamma} Dor star candidates. We found that all these stars (18 SPB and 3 {gamma} Dor stars) have periods longer than their corresponding fundamental radial mode. With such a big sample of g-mode pulsators in a single cluster, it is clear that multi-mode pulsation is more common in the upper part of the main sequence than in the lower part. All the stars span a narrow strip on the period-luminosity plane, which also includes the {gamma} Dor stars at the low-luminosity extension. This result implies that there may be a single period-luminosity relation applicable to all g-mode main-sequence pulsators. As a by-product, three EA-type eclipsing binaries and an EW-type eclipsing binary are also discovered.

  15. KIC 4739791: A New R CMa-type Eclipsing Binary with a Pulsating Component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae Woo; Kim, Seung-Lee; Hong, Kyeongsoo; Koo, Jae-Rim; Lee, Chung-Uk; Youn, Jae-Hyuck

    2016-02-01

    The Kepler light curve of KIC 4739791 exhibits partial eclipses, the inverse O’Connell effect, and multiperiodic pulsations. Including a starspot on either of the binary components, the light-curve synthesis indicates that KIC 4739791 is in detached or semi-detached configuration with both a short orbital period and a low mass ratio. Multiple frequency analyses were performed in the light residuals after subtracting the binarity effects from the original Kepler data. We detected 14 frequencies: 6 in the low-frequency region (0.1-2.3 days-1) and 8 in the high-frequency region (18.2-22.0 days-1). Among these, six high frequencies with amplitudes of 0.62-1.97 mmag were almost constant over time for 200 days. Their pulsation periods and pulsation constants are in the ranges of 0.048-0.054 days and 0.025-0.031 days, respectively. In contrast, the other frequencies may arise from the alias effects caused by the orbital frequency or combination frequencies. We propose that KIC 4739791 is a short-period R CMa binary with the lowest mass ratio in the known classical Algols and that its primary component is a δ Sct pulsating star. Only four R CMa stars have been identified, three of which exhibit δ Sct-type oscillations. These findings make KIC 4739791 an attractive target for studies of stellar interior structure and evolution.

  16. Pulsating aurora observed on the ground and in-situ by the Van Allen Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lessard, M.; Cohen, I. J.; Denton, R. E.; Engebretson, M. J.; Kletzing, C.; Wygant, J. R.; Bounds, S. R.; Smith, C. W.; MacDowall, R. J.; Kurth, W. S.

    2013-12-01

    Early observations and theory related to pulsating aurora suggested that the electrons that drive this aurora originate from the equatorial region of the magnetosphere and that a likely process that can scatter these electrons would involve chorus waves. Recent satellite observations during pulsating auroral events have provided important "firsts", including evidence of strong correlations between pulsating auroral patches and in-situ lower-band chorus (THEMIS), as well as correlations with energetic electron precipitation in the vicinity of geosynchronous orbit (GOES). These results provide important information regarding particle dynamics, leading to a question about how the chorus might be driven. We present observations of the Van Allen Probes in conjunction with a pulsating aurora event, as confirmed by observations on the ground. The in-situ data again show the presence of lower-band chorus. However, magnetic and electric field data also show that the wave bursts coincide with an apparent poloidal field-line resonance, begging the question of whether the resonance might be responsible for driving the VLF waves.

  17. Theoretical seismic properties of pre-main sequence γ Doradus pulsators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouabid, M.-P.; Montalbán, J.; Miglio, A.; Dupret, M.-A.; Grigahcène, A.; Noels, A.

    2011-07-01

    Context. The late A and F-type γ Doradus (γ Dor) stars pulsate with high-order gravity modes (g-modes). The existence of different evolutionary phases crossing the γ Dor instability strip raises the question whether pre-main sequence (PMS) γ Dor stars exist. Aims: We intend to study the differences between the asteroseismic behaviour of PMS and main sequence (MS) γ Dor pulsators as predicted by the current theory of stellar evolution and stability. Methods: We explore the adiabatic and non-adiabatic properties of high-order g-modes in a grid of PMS and MS models covering the mass range 1.2 M⊙ < M∗ < 2.5 M⊙. Results: We have derived the theoretical instability strip (IS) for the PMS γ Dor pulsators. This IS covers the same effective temperature range as the MS γ Dor one. Nevertheless, the frequency domain of unstable modes in PMS models with a fully radiative core is greater than in MS models, even if they present the same number of unstable modes. Moreover, the differences between MS and PMS internal structures are reflected in the average values of the period spacing, as well as in the dependence of the period spacing on the radial order of the modes, opening the window to determination of the evolutionary phase of γ Dor stars from their pulsation spectra.

  18. Ionospheric irregularities during a substorm event: Observations of ULF pulsations and GPS scintillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H.; Clauer, C. R.; Deshpande, K.; Lessard, M. R.; Weatherwax, A. T.; Bust, G. S.; Crowley, G.; Humphreys, T. E.

    2014-07-01

    Plasma instability in the ionosphere is often observed as disturbances and distortions of the amplitude and phase of the radio signals, which are known as ionospheric scintillations. High-latitude ionospheric plasma, closely connected to the solar wind and magnetospheric dynamics, produces very dynamic and short-lived Global Positioning System (GPS) scintillations, making it challenging to characterize them. It is observed that scintillations in the high-latitude ionosphere occur frequently during geomagnetic storms and substorms. In addition, it is well known that Ultra Low Frequency (ULF) pulsations (Pi2 and Pi1B) are closely associated with substorm activity. This study reports simultaneous observations of Pi2 and Pi1B pulsations and GPS phase scintillations during a substorm using a newly designed Autonomous Adaptive Low-Power Instrument Platform (AAL-PIP) installed at the South Pole. The magnetic field and GPS data from the instruments appear to be associated in terms of their temporal and spectral features. Moreover, the scintillation events were observed near the auroral latitudes where Pi1B pulsations are commonly detected. The temporal, spectral and spatial association between the scintillation and geomagnetic pulsation events suggests that the magnetic field perturbations and enhanced electric fields caused by substorm currents could contribute to the creation of plasma instability in the high-latitude ionosphere, leading to GPS scintillations.

  19. Coordinated ground-based and geosynchronous satellite-based measurements of auroral pulsations

    SciTech Connect

    Suszcynsky, David M.; Borovsky, Joseph E.; Thomsen, Michelle F.; McComas, David J.; Belian, Richard D.

    1996-09-01

    We describe a technique that uses a ground-based all-sky video camera and geosynchronous satellite-based plasma and energetic particle detectors to study ionosphere-magnetosphere coupling as it relates to the aurora. The video camera system was deployed in Eagle, Alaska for a seven month period at the foot of the magnetic field line that threads geosynchronous satellite 1989-046. Since 1989-046 corotates with the earth, its footprint remains nearly fixed in the vicinity of Eagle, allowing for routine continuous monitoring of an auroral field line at its intersections with the ground and with geosynchronous orbit. As an example of the utility of this technique, we present coordinated ground-based and satellite based observations during periods of auroral pulsations and compare this data to the predictions of both the relaxation oscillator theory and flow cyclotron maser theory for the generation of pulsating aurorae. The observed plasma and energetic particle characteristics at geosynchronous orbit during pulsating aurorae displays are found to be in agreement with the predictions of both theories lending further support that a cyclotron resonance mechanism is responsible for auroral pulsations.

  20. GALEX J201337.6+092801: THE LOWEST GRAVITY SUBDWARF B PULSATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Oestensen, R. H.; Papics, P. I.; Oreiro, R.; Reed, M. D.; Quint, A. C.; Gilker, J. T.; Hicks, L. L.; Baran, A. S.; Fox Machado, L.; Ottosen, T. A.; Telting, J. H.

    2011-04-10

    We present the recent discovery of a new subdwarf B variable (sdBV), with an exceptionally low surface gravity. Our spectroscopy places it at T{sub eff} = 32,100 {+-} 1000, log g = 5.15 {+-} 0.20, and log(N{sub He}/N{sub H}) = -2.8 {+-} 0.2. With a magnitude of B = 12.0, it is the second brightest V361 Hya star ever found. Photometry from three different observatories reveals a temporal spectrum with 11 clearly detected periods in the range 376-566 s, and at least five more close to our detection limit. These periods are unusually long for the V361 Hya class of short-period sdBV pulsators, but not unreasonable for p- and g-modes close to the radial fundamental, given its low surface gravity. Of the {approx}50 short-period sdB pulsators known to date, only a single one has been found to have comparable spectroscopic parameters to GALEX J201337.6+092801(J20136+0928, for short). This is the enigmatic high-amplitude pulsator V338 Ser, and we conclude that J20136+0928 is the second example of this rare subclass of sdB pulsators located well above the canonical extreme horizontal branch in the H-R diagram.

  1. A survey for pulsations in A-type stars using SuperWASP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holdsworth, Daniel L.

    2015-12-01

    "It is sound judgement to hope that in the not too distant future we shall be competent to understand so simple a thing as a star." - Sir Arthur Stanley Eddington, The Internal Constitution of Stars, 1926 A survey of A-type stars is conducted with the SuperWASP archive in the search for pulsationally variable stars. Over 1.5 million stars are selected based on their (J-H) colour. Periodograms are calculated for light curves which have been extracted from the archive and cleaned of spurious points. Peaks which have amplitudes greater than 0.5 millimagnitude are identified in the periodograms. In total, 202 656 stars are identified to show variability in the range 5-300 c/d. Spectroscopic follow-up was obtained for 38 stars which showed high-frequency pulsations between 60 and 235 c/d, and a further object with variability at 636 c/d. In this sample, 13 were identified to be normal A-type δ Sct stars, 14 to be pulsating metallic-lined Am stars, 11 to be rapidly oscillating Ap (roAp) stars, and one to be a subdwarf B variable star. The spectra were used not only to classify the stars, but to determine an effective temperature through Balmer line fitting. Hybrid stars have been identified in this study, which show pulsations in both the high- and low-overtone domains; an observation not predicted by theory. These stars are prime targets to perform follow-up observations, as a confirmed detection of this phenomenon will have significant impact on the theory of pulsations in A-type stars. The detected number of roAp stars has expanded the known number of this pulsator class by 22 per cent. Within these results both the hottest and coolest roAp star have been identified. Further to this, one object, KIC 7582608, was observed by the Kepler telescope for 4 yr, enabling a detailed frequency analysis. This analysis has identified significant frequency variations in this star, leading to the hypothesis that this is the first close binary star of its type. The observational

  2. Observations of the Ultraviolet Spectra of Helium (DB) White Dwarfs and a Study of the Ultraviolet Spectra of White Dwarfs Containing Carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wegner, G. A.

    1984-01-01

    Strong ultraviolet carbon lines were detected in the spectrum of the southern DC white dwarf BPM 11668. Observations of a number of hotter DB white dwarfs with IUE show no evidence of carbon features. Two additional DA white dwarfs were observed that have the strong unidentified absorption near 1400 A which now seems to be identified with another lower temperature feature as satellite lines to Lyman alpha radiation.

  3. Plasmasphere pulsations observed simultaneously by midlatitude SuperDARN radars, ground magnetometers and THEMIS spacecraft during an auroral substorm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Shi, X.; Baker, J. B. H.; Frissell, N. A.; Hartinger, M.; Liu, J.

    2015-12-01

    We present simultaneous ground and space-based observations of ultra-low frequency (ULF) pulsations which occurred during an auroral substorm on September 25th, 2014. Expansion phase onset began at 06:04 UT at which time three midlatitude SuperDARN radars observed strong pulsations in the Pi2 frequency range with peak to peak amplitude reaching as high as 1km/s. Similar pulsations occurred during a later auroral intensification which started at 06:20 UT. Both sets of pulsations were detected in a region of radar backscatter located inside the subauroral polarization stream (SAPS) equatorward of the auroral oval specified by THEMIS all sky imagers and inside the midlatitude density trough as mapped by GPS/TEC measurements. The amplitude of the pulsations was large enough to reverse the direction of the SAPS flow from westward to eastward. Similar pulsations were detected by electric field instrument aboard the THEMIS probe D located inside the plasmasphere. Simultaneous observations from several low-latitude ground magnetometers (some located on the dayside) further illustrate the global nature of the pulsations and suggest they may have been associated with a plasmaspheric cavity resonance (PCR). Pulsed tailward plasma flow observed by THEMIS probe E at the geosynchronous orbit suggests that the compressional energy to generate the PCR was from the Bursty Bulk Flows (BBFs) braking against the magnetospheric dipolar region.

  4. Effect on the flow and heat transfer characteristics for sinusoidal pulsating laminar flow in a heated square cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jiu-Yang; Lin, Wei; Zheng, Xiao-Tao

    2014-06-01

    Two-dimensional numerical simulation is performed to understand the effect of flow pulsation on the flow and heat transfer from a heated square cylinder at Re = 100. Numerical calculations are carried out by using a finite volume method based on the pressure-implicit with splitting of operators algorithm in a collocated grid. The effects of flow pulsation amplitude (0.2 ≤ A ≤ 0.8) and frequency (0 ≤ f p ≤ 20 Hz) on the detailed kinematics of flow (streamlines, vorticity patterns), the macroscopic parameters (drag coefficient, vortex shedding frequency) and heat transfer enhancement are presented in detail. The Strouhal number of vortices shedding, drag coefficient for non-pulsating flow are compared with the previously published data, and good agreement is found. The lock-on phenomenon is observed for a square cylinder in the present flow pulsation. When the pulsating frequency is within the lock-on regime, time averaged drag coefficient and heat transfer from the square cylinder is substantially augmented, and when the pulsating frequency in about the natural vortex shedding frequency, the heat transfer is also substantially enhanced. In addition, the influence of the pulsating amplitude on the time averaged drag coefficient, heat transfer enhancement and lock-on occurrence is discussed in detail.

  5. Energetic electron precipitation associated with pulsating aurora: EISCAT and Van Allen Probe observations

    SciTech Connect

    Miyoshi, Y.; Oyama, S.; Saito, S.; Kurita, S.; Fujiwara, H.; Kataoka, R.; Ebihara, Y.; Kletzing, C.; Reeves, G.; Santolik, O.; Clilverd, M.; Rodger, C. J.; Turunen, E.; Tsuchiya, F.

    2015-04-21

    Pulsating auroras show quasi-periodic intensity modulations caused by the precipitation of energetic electrons of the order of tens of keV. It is expected theoretically that not only these electrons but also subrelativistic/relativistic electrons precipitate simultaneously into the ionosphere owing to whistler mode wave-particle interactions. The height-resolved electron density profile was observed with the European Incoherent Scatter (EISCAT) Tromsø VHF radar on 17 November 2012. Electron density enhancements were clearly identified at altitudes >68 km in association with the pulsating aurora, suggesting precipitation of electrons with a broadband energy range from ~10 keV up to at least 200 keV. The riometer and network of subionospheric radio wave observations also showed the energetic electron precipitations during this period. During this period, the footprint of the Van Allen Probe-A satellite was very close to Tromsø and the satellite observed rising tone emissions of the lower band chorus (LBC) waves near the equatorial plane. Considering the observed LBC waves and electrons, we conducted a computer simulation of the wave-particle interactions. This showed simultaneous precipitation of electrons at both tens of keV and a few hundred keV, which is consistent with the energy spectrum estimated by the inversion method using the EISCAT observations. This result revealed that electrons with a wide energy range simultaneously precipitate into the ionosphere in association with the pulsating aurora, providing the evidence that pulsating auroras are caused by whistler chorus waves. We suggest that scattering by propagating whistler simultaneously causes both the precipitations of subrelativistic electrons and the pulsating aurora.

  6. Energetic electron precipitation associated with pulsating aurora: EISCAT and Van Allen Probe observations

    DOE PAGES

    Miyoshi, Y.; Oyama, S.; Saito, S.; Kurita, S.; Fujiwara, H.; Kataoka, R.; Ebihara, Y.; Kletzing, C.; Reeves, G.; Santolik, O.; et al

    2015-04-21

    Pulsating auroras show quasi-periodic intensity modulations caused by the precipitation of energetic electrons of the order of tens of keV. It is expected theoretically that not only these electrons but also subrelativistic/relativistic electrons precipitate simultaneously into the ionosphere owing to whistler mode wave-particle interactions. The height-resolved electron density profile was observed with the European Incoherent Scatter (EISCAT) Tromsø VHF radar on 17 November 2012. Electron density enhancements were clearly identified at altitudes >68 km in association with the pulsating aurora, suggesting precipitation of electrons with a broadband energy range from ~10 keV up to at least 200 keV. The riometermore » and network of subionospheric radio wave observations also showed the energetic electron precipitations during this period. During this period, the footprint of the Van Allen Probe-A satellite was very close to Tromsø and the satellite observed rising tone emissions of the lower band chorus (LBC) waves near the equatorial plane. Considering the observed LBC waves and electrons, we conducted a computer simulation of the wave-particle interactions. This showed simultaneous precipitation of electrons at both tens of keV and a few hundred keV, which is consistent with the energy spectrum estimated by the inversion method using the EISCAT observations. This result revealed that electrons with a wide energy range simultaneously precipitate into the ionosphere in association with the pulsating aurora, providing the evidence that pulsating auroras are caused by whistler chorus waves. We suggest that scattering by propagating whistler simultaneously causes both the precipitations of subrelativistic electrons and the pulsating aurora.« less

  7. Response of cricket and spider motion-sensing hairs to airflow pulsations.

    PubMed

    Kant, R; Humphrey, J A C

    2009-11-01

    Closed-form analytical solutions are presented for the angular displacement, velocity and acceleration of motion-sensing filiform hairs exposed to airflow pulsations of short time duration. The specific situations of interest correspond to a spider intentionally moving towards a cricket, or an insect unintentionally moving towards or flying past a spider. The trichobothria of the spider Cupiennius salei and the cercal hairs of the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus are explored. Guided by earlier work, the spatial characteristics of the velocity field due to a flow pulsation are approximated by the local incompressible flow field due to a moving sphere. This spatial field is everywhere modulated in time by a Gaussian function represented by the summation of an infinite Fourier series, thus allowing an exploration of the spectral dependence of hair motion. Owing to their smaller total inertia, torsional restoring constant and total damping constant, short hairs are found to be significantly more responsive than long hairs to a flow pulsation. It is also found that the spider trichobothria are underdamped, while the cercal hairs of the cricket are overdamped. As a consequence, the spider hairs are more responsive to sudden air motions. Analysis shows that while two spiders of different characteristic sizes and lunge velocities can generate pulsations with comparable energy content, the associated velocity fields display different patterns of spatial decay with distance from the pulsation source. As a consequence, a small spider lunging at a high velocity generates a smaller telltale far-field velocity signal than a larger spider lunging at a lower velocity. The results obtained are in broad agreement with several of the observations and conclusions derived from combined flow and behavioural experiments performed by Casas et al. for running spiders, and by Dangles et al. for spiders and a physical model of spiders lunging at crickets.

  8. A SEMI-COHERENT SEARCH FOR WEAK PULSATIONS IN AQUILA X–1

    SciTech Connect

    Messenger, C.; Patruno, A.

    2015-06-20

    Non-pulsating neutron stars in low mass X-ray binaries largely outnumber those that show pulsations. The lack of detectable pulses represents a big open problem for two important reasons. The first is that the structure of the accretion flow in the region closest to the neutron star is not well understood and it is therefore unclear what is the mechanism that prevents the pulse formation. The second is that the detection of pulsations would immediately reveal the spin of the neutron star. AQUILA X–1 is a special source among low mass X-ray binaries because it has showed the unique property of pulsating for only ∼150 s out of a total observing time of more than 1.5 million seconds. However, the existing upper limits on the pulsed fraction leave open two alternatives. Either AQUILA X–1 has very weak pulses which have been undetected, or it has genuinely pulsed only for a tiny amount of the observed time. Understanding which of the two scenarios is the correct one is fundamental to increase our knowledge about the pulse formation process and understand the chances we have to detect weak pulses in other low-mass X-ray binaries. In this paper we perform a semi-coherent search on the entire X-ray data available for AQUILA X–1. We find no evidence for (new) weak pulsations with the most stringent upper limits being of the order of 0.3% in the 7–25 keV energy band.

  9. Russian Pulsating Mixer Pump Deployment in the Gunite and Associated Tanks at ORNL

    SciTech Connect

    Hatchell, Brian K.; Lewis, Ben; Johnson, Marshall A.; Randolph, J. G.

    2001-03-01

    In FY 1998, Pulsating Mixer Pump (PMP) technology, consisting of a jet mixer powered by a reciprocating air supply, was selected for deployment in one of the Gunite and Associated Tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to mobilize settled solids. The pulsating mixer pump technology was identified during FY 1996 and FY 1997 technical exchanges between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Tanks Focus Area Retrieval and Closure program, the DOE Environmental Management International Programs, and delegates from Russia as a promising technology that could be implemented in the DOE complex. During FY 1997, the pulsating mixer pump technology, provided by the Russian Integrated Mining Chemical Company, was tested at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to observe its ability to suspend settled solids. Based on the results of this demonstration, ORNL and DOE staff determined that a modified pulsating mixer pump would meet project needs for remote sludge mobilization of Gunite tank sludge and reduce the cost of operation and maintenance of more expensive mixing systems. The functions and requirements of the system were developed by combining the results and recommendations from the pulsating mixer pump demonstration at PNNL with the requirements identified by staff at ORNL involved with the remediation of the Gunite and Associated Tanks. The PMP is comprised of a pump chamber, check valve, a working gas supply pipe, a discharge manifold, and four jet nozzles. The pump uses two distinct cycles, fill and discharge, to perform its mixing action. During the fill cycle, vacuum is applied to the pump chamber by an eductor, which draws liquid into the pump. When the liquid level inside the chamber reaches a certain level, the chamber is pressurized with compressed air to discharge the liquid through the jet nozzles and back into the tank to mobilize sludge and settled solids.

  10. Functional Changes of Diaphragm Type Shunt Valves Induced by Pressure Pulsation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chong-Sun; Suh, Chang-Min; Ra, Young-Shin

    Shunt valves used to treat patients with hydrocephalus were tested to investigate influence of pressure pulsation on their flow control characteristics. Our focus was on flow dynamic and functional changes of the small and thin diaphragms in the valves that serve as the main flow control mechanism and are made from silicone elastomer. Firstly, pressure-flow control curves were compared under pulsed and steady flow (without pulsation) conditions. Secondly, functional changes of the valves were tested after a long-term continuous pulsation with a peristaltic pump. Thirdly, flushing procedures selectively conducted by neurosurgeons were simulated with a fingertip pressed on the dome of the valves. As 20cc/hr of flow rate was adjusted at a constant pressure, application of 40mmH2O of pressure pulse increased flow rate through shunt valves more than 60%. As a 90cm length silicone catheter was connected to the valve outlet, increase in the flow rate was substantially reduced to 17.5%. Pressure-flow control characteristics of some valves showed significant changes after twenty-eight days of pressure pulsation at 1.0 Hz under 50.0cc/hr of flow rate. Flushing simulation resulted in temporary decrease in the pressure level. It took three hours to fully recover the normal pressure-flow control characteristics after the flushing. Our results suggest that shunt valves with a thin elastic diaphragm as the main flow control mechanism are sensitive to intracranial pressure pulsation or pressure spikes enough to change their pressure-flow control characteristics.

  11. STRAIN ELASTOGRAPHY USING DOBUTAMINE-INDUCED CAROTID ARTERY PULSATION IN CANINE THYROID GLAND.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gahyun; Jeon, Sunghoon; Lee, Sang-Kwon; Kim, Hyunwoo; Yu, Dohyeon; Choi, Jihye

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid disease is common in dogs and conventional ultrasonography is a standard diagnostic test for diagnosis and treatment planning. Strain elastography can provide additional information about tissue stiffness noninvasively after applying external or internal compression. However, natural carotid artery pulsations in the canine thyroid gland are too weak to maintain sufficient internal compression force. The objective of the present study was to describe the feasibility of strain elastography for evaluating the canine thyroid gland and the repeatability of dobutamine-induced carotid artery pulsation as an internal compression method. In seven healthy Beagle dogs, strain on each thyroid lobe was induced by external compression using the ultrasound probe and internal compression using carotid artery pulsation after dobutamine infusion. The thyroid appeared homogeneously green and the subcutaneous fat superficial to the thyroid lobe appeared blue. Strain values and strain ratios did not differ among dogs or between the left and right lobes. Interobserver repeatability was excellent for both compression methods. Intraobserver repeatability of the strain ratio measured using the carotid artery pulsation method (intraclass coefficient correlation = 0.933) was higher than that measured using the external compression method (0.760). Mean strain values of thyroid lobes for the external compression method (142.93 ± 6.67) differed from the internal method (147.31 ± 8.24; P < 0.05). Strain ratios between the two methods did not differ. Strain elastography was feasible for estimating thyroid stiffness in dogs. Carotid artery pulsation induced by dobutamine infusion can be used for canine thyroid strain elastography with excellent repeatability.

  12. Detection of Geomagnetic Pulsations of the Earth Using GPS-TEC Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koroglu, Ozan; Arikan, Feza; Köroǧlu, Meltem; Sabri Ozkazanc, Yakup

    2016-07-01

    The magnetosphere of the Earth is made up of both magnetic fields and plasma. In this layer, plasma waves propagate as Ultra Low Frequency (ULF) waves having mHz scale frequencies. ULF waves are produced due to complicated solar-geomagnetic interactions. In the literature, these ULF waves are defined as pulsations. The geomagnetic pulsations are classified into main two groups as continuous pulsations (Pc) and irregular pulsations (Pi). These pulsations can be determined by ionospheric parameters due to the complex lithosphere-ionosphere-magnetosphere coupling processes. Total Electron Content (TEC) is one of the most important parameters for investigating the variability of ionosphere. Global Positioning System (GPS) provides a cost-effective means for estimating TEC from GPS satellite orbital height of 20,000 km to the ground based receivers. Therefore, the time series of GPS-TEC inherently contains the above mentioned ULF waves. In this study, time series analysis of GPS-TEC is carried out by applying periodogram method to the mid-latitude annual TEC data. After the analysis of GPS-TEC data obtained for GPS stations located in Central Europe and Turkey for 2011, it is observed that some of the fundamental frequencies that are indicators of Pc waves, diurnal and semi-diurnal periodicity and earth-free oscillations can be identified. These results will be used in determination of low frequency trend structure of magnetosphere and ionosphere. Further investigation of remaining relatively low magnitude frequencies, all Pi and Pc can be identified by using time and frequency domain techniques such as wavelet analysis. This study is supported by the joint TUBITAK 115E915 and joint TUBITAK114E092 and AS CR 14/001 projects.

  13. Non-radial pulsation in first overtone Cepheids of the Small Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolec, R.; Śniegowska, M.

    2016-06-01

    We analyse photometry for 138 first overtone Cepheids from the Small Magellanic Cloud, in which Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment team discovered additional variability with period shorter than first overtone period, and period ratios in the P/P1O ∈ (0.60, 0.65) range. In the Petersen diagram, these stars form three well-separated sequences. The additional variability cannot correspond to other radial mode. This form of pulsation is still puzzling. We find that amplitude of the additional variability is small, typically 2-4 per cent of the first overtone amplitude, which corresponds to 2-5 mmag. In some stars, we find simultaneously two close periodicities corresponding to two sequences in the Petersen diagram. The most important finding is the detection of power excess at half the frequency of the additional variability (at subharmonic) in 35 per cent of the analysed stars. Interestingly, power excess at subharmonic frequency is detected mostly for stars of the middle sequence in the Petersen diagram (74 per cent), incidence rate is much lower for stars of the top sequence (31 per cent), and phenomenon is not detected for stars of the bottom sequence. The amplitude and/or phase of the additional periodicities strongly vary in time. Similar form of pulsation is observed in first overtone RR Lyrae stars. Our results indicate that the nature and cause of this form of pulsation is the same in the two groups of classical pulsators; consequently, a common model explaining this form of pulsation should be searched for. Our results favour the theory of the excitation of non-radial modes of angular degrees 7, 8 and 9, proposed recently by Dziembowski.

  14. White Dwarfs in the GALEX Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawka, Adela; Vennes, Stephane

    2007-01-01

    We have cross-correlated the 2dF QSO Redshift Survey (2QZ) white dwarf catalog with the GALEX 2nd Data Release and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data release 5 to obtain ultraviolet photometry (FUV, NUV) for approximately 700 objects and optical photometry (ugriz) for approximately 800 objects. We have compared the optical-ultraviolet colors to synthetic white dwarf colors to obtain temperature estimates for approximately 250 of these objects. These white dwarfs have effective temperatures ranging from 10 000 K (cooling age of about 1Gyr) up to about 40000 K (cooling age of about 3 Myrs), with a few that have even higher temperatures. We found that to distinguish white dwarfs from other stellar luminosity classes both optical and ultraviolet colors are necessary, in particular for the hotter objects where there is contamination from B and 0 main-sequence stars. Using this sample we build a luminosity function for the DA white dwarfs with Mv < 12 mag.

  15. White dwarf stars with carbon atmospheres.

    PubMed

    Dufour, P; Liebert, J; Fontaine, G; Behara, N

    2007-11-22

    White dwarfs represent the endpoint of stellar evolution for stars with initial masses between approximately 0.07 and 8-10, where is the mass of the Sun (more massive stars end their life as either black holes or neutron stars). The theory of stellar evolution predicts that the majority of white dwarfs have a core made of carbon and oxygen, which itself is surrounded by a helium layer and, for approximately 80 per cent of known white dwarfs, by an additional hydrogen layer. All white dwarfs therefore have been traditionally found to belong to one of two categories: those with a hydrogen-rich atmosphere (the DA spectral type) and those with a helium-rich atmosphere (the non-DAs). Here we report the discovery of several white dwarfs with atmospheres primarily composed of carbon, with little or no trace of hydrogen or helium. Our analysis shows that the atmospheric parameters found for these stars do not fit satisfactorily in any of the currently known theories of post-asymptotic giant branch evolution, although these objects might be the cooler counterpart of the unique and extensively studied PG 1159 star H1504+65 (refs 4-7). These stars, together with H1504+65, might accordingly form a new evolutionary sequence that follows the asymptotic giant branch. PMID:18033290

  16. White dwarf stars with carbon atmospheres.

    PubMed

    Dufour, P; Liebert, J; Fontaine, G; Behara, N

    2007-11-22

    White dwarfs represent the endpoint of stellar evolution for stars with initial masses between approximately 0.07 and 8-10, where is the mass of the Sun (more massive stars end their life as either black holes or neutron stars). The theory of stellar evolution predicts that the majority of white dwarfs have a core made of carbon and oxygen, which itself is surrounded by a helium layer and, for approximately 80 per cent of known white dwarfs, by an additional hydrogen layer. All white dwarfs therefore have been traditionally found to belong to one of two categories: those with a hydrogen-rich atmosphere (the DA spectral type) and those with a helium-rich atmosphere (the non-DAs). Here we report the discovery of several white dwarfs with atmospheres primarily composed of carbon, with little or no trace of hydrogen or helium. Our analysis shows that the atmospheric parameters found for these stars do not fit satisfactorily in any of the currently known theories of post-asymptotic giant branch evolution, although these objects might be the cooler counterpart of the unique and extensively studied PG 1159 star H1504+65 (refs 4-7). These stars, together with H1504+65, might accordingly form a new evolutionary sequence that follows the asymptotic giant branch.

  17. On the 630 nm red-line pulsating aurora: Red-line Emission Geospace Observatory observations and model simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Jun; Donovan, E.; Jackel, B.; Spanswick, E.; Gillies, M.

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we present observations of red-line (630 nm) pulsating auroras using the camera system of Red-line Emission Geospace Observatory (REGO), during a geomagnetic storm interval. We also develop a time-dependent model to simulate the 630 nm auroral pulsations in response to modulated precipitation inputs and compare the model outputs with REGO observations. Key results are as follows. (1) Notwithstanding the long radiative timescale of the 630 nm emission, red-line auroras can still be modulated by pulsating electron precipitations and feature noticeable oscillations, which constitute the red-line pulsating auroral phenomena. (2) In a majority of cases, the oscillation magnitude of red-line pulsating auroras is substantially smaller than that of the concurrent pulsating auroras seen on Thermal Emission Imaging System whitelight images (generally dominated by 557.7 nm green-line emissions). Under certain circumstances, e.g., when the characteristic energy of the precipitation is very high, some of the pulsating auroras may not show discernible imprints on red line. (3) The altitude range contributing most to the red-line pulsating aurora is systematically lower than that of the steady-state red-line aurora, since the slower O(1D) loss rate at higher altitudes tends to suppress the oscillation range of the 630 nm emission rate. (4) We find that some pulsating auroral patches are characterized by enhanced red-to-green color ratio during their on time, hinting that the percentage increase of the red-line auroral component exceeds that of the green-line auroral component for those patches. We suggest that those special patches might possibly be associated with lower energy (<1 keV) electron precipitations.

  18. The high-resolution spectrum of the pulsating, pre-white dwarf star PG 1159-035 (GW VIR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebert, James; Wesemael, F.; Husfeld, D.; Wehrse, R.; Starrfield, S. G.

    1989-01-01

    High-resolution and low-resolution UV spectra and a high-resolution optical spectrum were obtained for PG 1159-035, revealing apparent photospheric absorption features with defined cores from N V 1240 A, N IV 1270 A, O V 1371 A, and C IV 1550 A. The photospheric velocity derived using all of these lines except for C IV is about +35 km/s. Equivalent-width measurements determined for all of the features may provide a tighter constraint on the photospheric temperature in a detailed model atmosphere analysis treating the CNO ions.

  19. SNIa, white dwarfs and the variation of the gravitational constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isern, J.; Garcia-Berro, E.; Lorén-Aguilar, P.

    2010-11-01

    , it can be used to obtain a bound. White dwarfs also display g-mode pulsations driven by the κ-mechanism and the period of pulsation experiences a secular drift of Ṗ/P ≃ -aṪ/T + bṘ/R, where a and b are model-dependent constants of the order of unity. Since both Ṫ and Ṙ depend on Ġ, the measure of Ṗ can also provide useful constraints. Type Ia supernovae are thought to be the result of the thermonuclear explosion of a carbon-oxygen white dwarf with a mass near Chandrasekhar's limit in a close binary system. The peak luminosity of SNIa is proportional to the mass of nickel synthesized which can be considered as a fixed fraction of the mass of the exploding star, MNi ∝ MCh = (ħc)3/2/mp G3/2. Therefore the properties of this peak with redshift can be used to test the variation of G with cosmic ages. Although the bounds obtained in these ways have been currently superseeded by other more accurate methods, when the ongoing surveys searching for SNIa and white dwarfs will be completed, the expected bounds will be as tight as ~ 10-13 yr-1.

  20. Coordinated observations of Pc5 pulsations in a field line; ground, SuperDARN, and a satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaguchi, K.; Nagatsuma, T.; Obara, T.; Troshichev, O. A.

    2010-12-01

    Pc5 pulsations are electromagnetic wave at periods of 150-600 s in the ultra-low frequency (ULF) range, which are often observed and have been studied well by ground and satellite magnetometers. The most common mode of Pc5 pulsations is the field line resonance (FLR) of shear Alfvén waves standing along Earth’s magnetic field lines. The ionosphere in both hemisphere acts the reflection boundary of FLR and the ionospheric current generated by electromagnetic waves results in Pc5 pulsations of magnetic fields on the ground. In the magnetosphere, magnetometers and electric field instruments onboard satellites observe directly in situ amplitude of Pc5 pulsations. Previous studies identified Pc5 pulsations in the magnetosphere as one of the key mechanisms of transport and acceleration of energetic electrons in Earth’s outer radiation belt; wave power of Pc5 band is well correlated with radiation belt electron fluxes. In particular, waves in global mode (low-m) are likely more effective than localized mode (high-m). It is important for the space whether study to classify Pc5 effectiveness for radiation belt particles. However, it is difficult to know correct wave numbers from satellite nor ground observations, because satellites know only in situ signals and ground magnetometers integrate all neighbor signals. Thus, we investigated Pc5 pulsations using data from SuperDARN radars, which can observe two-dimensionally the Doppler velocity of ionospheric plasma due to electric-field pulsations of Pc5 along in the line of sight throughout the high latitude. First of all, we investigate the similarity and difference of Pc5 properties among on the ground at Pebek (PBK), Russia by the magnetometer, on the ionosphere in the Doppler velocity in the field-of-view of the SuperDARN rader at King Salmon (KSR), and in the magnetosphere at the geosynchronous ETS-8 satellite by the magnetometer; these align the almost same meridian. In this study, we focus on the toroidal mode