Science.gov

Sample records for pulse radiation facility

  1. Radioactive effluent measurements at the Army Pulse Radiation Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Scherpelz, R.I.; Glissmeyer, J.A.

    1994-11-01

    Staff from the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) performed measurements of the radioactive effluents emitted by the Army Pulse Radiation Facility (APRF). These measurements were performed by collecting the cooling air that passed by the APRF reactor as it operated, passing the air through filters to collect the particulates and iodines, and collecting samples of the air to be analyzed for noble gases. The reactor operated for four test runs, including two pulses and two steady state runs. After each reactor run, the filters were counted using gamma spectrometry to identify the nuclides and to determine the activity of nuclides deposited on the filters. The study provided radionuclide release fraction data that can be used to estimate the airborne emissions resulting from APRF operations. The release fraction for particulate fission products and radioiodines, as derived from these measurements, was found to be 8.9 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} for reactor pulses and 4.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} for steady state operation. These values compare to a theoretical value of 1.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}5}.

  2. Analysis of the Fall-1989 two-meter box test bed experiments performed at the Army Pulse Radiation Facility (APRF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, J. O.; Drischler, J. D.; Barnes, J. M.

    This report summarizes the results of a benchmark analysis of the Monte Carlo Adjoint Shielding Code System (MASH) against a series of experiments performed at the Army Pulse Radiation Facility (APRF) in Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. The series of experiments was performed in the Fall of 1989 and involved experimentalists from APRF; the Defense Research Establishment Ottawa, Canada (DREO); Bubble Technology Industries, Canada, (BTI); and the Establishment Technique Central de l'Armement, France (ETCA). The 'benchmark' analysis of MASH is designed to determine the capability of MASH to reproduce the measured neutron and gamma ray integral and differential (spectral) data. Results of the 'benchmark' analysis are to be used in the recommendations to the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) Panel 7 Ad Hoc Group of Shielding Experts for replacing the Vehicle Code System (VCS) with MASH as the reference code of choice for armored vehicle nuclear vulnerability calculations.

  3. Auditing radiation sterilization facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Jeffrey A.

    The diversity of radiation sterilization systems available today places renewed emphasis on the need for thorough Quality Assurance audits of these facilities. Evaluating compliance with Good Manufacturing Practices is an obvious requirement, but an effective audit must also evaluate installation and performance qualification programs (validation_, and process control and monitoring procedures in detail. The present paper describes general standards that radiation sterilization operations should meet in each of these key areas, and provides basic guidance for conducting QA audits of these facilities.

  4. SLAC pulsed x-ray facility

    SciTech Connect

    Ipe, N.E.; McCall, R.C.; Baker, E.D.

    1986-05-01

    The Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) operates a high energy (up to 33 GeV) linear accelerator delivering pulses up to a few microseconds wide. The pulsed nature of the electron beam creates problems in the detection and measurement of radiation both from the accelerator beam and the klystrons that provide the rf power for the accelerator. Hence, a pulsed x-ray facility has been built at SLAC mainly for the purpose of testing the response of different radiation detection instruments to pulsed radiation fields. The x-ray tube consists of an electron gun with a control grid. This provides a stream of pulsed electrons that can be accelerated towards a confined target-window. The window is made up of aluminium 0.051 cm (20 mils) thick, plated on the vacuum side with a layer of gold 0.0006 cm (1/4 mil) thick. The frequency of electron pulses can be varied by an internal pulser from 60 to 360 pulses per second with pulse widths of 360 ns to 5 ..mu..s. The pulse amplitude can be varied over a wide range of currents. An external pulser can be used to obtain other frequencies or special pulse shapes. The voltage across the gun can be varied from 0 to 100 kV. The major part of the x-ray tube is enclosed in a large walk-in-cabinet made of 1.9 cm (3/4 in) plywood and lined with 0.32 cm (1/8 in) lead to make a very versatile facility. 3 refs., 5 figs.

  5. Measurements of the Radiated Fields and Conducted Current Leakage from the Pulsed Power Systems in the National Ignition Facility at LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R A; Clancy, T J; Fulkerson, S; Petersen, D; Pendelton, D; Hulsey, S; Ullery, G; Tuck, J; Polk, M; Kamm, R; Newton, M; Moore, W B; Arnold, P; Ollis, C; Hinz, A; Robb, C; Fornes, J; Watson, J

    2003-07-31

    An important pulsed power system consideration is that they inherently generate fields and currents that can cause interference in other subsystems and diagnostics. Good pulsed power design, grounding and isolation practices can help mitigate these unwanted signals. During the laser commissioning shots for the NIF Early Light milestone at LLNL, measurements were made of the radiated field and conducted currents caused by the Power Conditioning System (PCS) modules with flash lamp load and the Plasma Electrode Pockels Cell (PEPC) driver. The measurements were made in the capacitor bay, laser bay, control room and target bay. The field measurements were made with B-dot and E-dot probes with bandwidth of about 100MHz. The current measurements were made with a clamp on probe with a bandwidth of about 20 MHz. The results of these measurements show fields and currents in the NIF Facility well below that required for interference with other subsystems. Currents on the target chamber from the pulsed power systems are well below the background noise currents.

  6. Radiation protection at synchrotron radiation facilities.

    PubMed

    Liu, J C; Vylet, V

    2001-01-01

    A synchrotron radiation (SR) facility typically consists of an injector, a storage ring, and SR beamlines. The latter two features are unique to SR facilities, when compared to other types of accelerator facilities. The SR facilities have the characteristics of low injection beam power, but high stored beam power. The storage ring is generally above ground with people occupying the experimental floor around a normally thin concrete ring wall. This paper addresses the radiation issues, in particular the shielding design, associated with the storage ring and SR beamlines. Normal and abnormal beam losses for injection and stored beams, as well as typical storage ring operation, are described. Ring shielding design for photons and neutrons from beam losses in the ring is discussed. Radiation safety issues and shielding design for SR beamlines, considering gas bremsstrahlung and synchrotron radiation, are reviewed. Radiation source terms and the methodologies for shielding calculations are presented.

  7. RADIATION FACILITY FOR NUCLEAR REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Currier, E.L. Jr.; Nicklas, J.H.

    1961-12-12

    A radiation facility is designed for irradiating samples in close proximity to the core of a nuclear reactor. The facility comprises essentially a tubular member extending through the biological shield of the reactor and containing a manipulatable rod having the sample carrier at its inner end, the carrier being longitudinally movable from a position in close proximity to the reactor core to a position between the inner and outer faces of the shield. Shield plugs are provided within the tubular member to prevent direct radiation from the core emanating therethrough. In this device, samples may be inserted or removed during normal operation of the reactor without exposing personnel to direct radiation from the reactor core. A storage chamber is also provided within the radiation facility to contain an irradiated sample during the period of time required to reduce the radioactivity enough to permit removal of the sample for external handling. (AEC)

  8. Accelerator Facilities for Radiation Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.

    1999-01-01

    HSRP Goals in Accelerator Use and Development are: 1.Need for ground-based heavy ion and proton facility to understand space radiation effects discussed most recently by NAS/NRC Report (1996). 2. Strategic Program Goals in facility usage and development: -(1) operation of AGS for approximately 600 beam hours/year; (2) operation of Loma Linda University (LLU) proton facility for approximately 400 beam hours/year; (3) construction of BAF facility; and (4) collaborative research at HIMAC in Japan and with other existing or potential international facilities. 3. MOA with LLU has been established to provide proton beams with energies of 40-250 important for trapped protons and solar proton events. 4. Limited number of beam hours available at Brookhaven National Laboratory's (BNL) Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS).

  9. The response of survey meters to pulsed radiation fields

    SciTech Connect

    McCall, R.C.; Ipe, N.E.

    1987-11-01

    The response of most survey meters to steady radiation fields is fairly well known and documented. However, hardly any data is available in the literature regarding the response of these instruments to pulsed radiation. Pulsed radiation fields are encountered, e.g., in the vicinity of linear electron accelerators or klystrons. An instrument that ordinarily responds well to the average dose rate spread out evenly in time may not be able to cope with such a high dose rate. Instruments which have long dead times such as Geiger Mueller and proportional counters tend to become saturated in such fields and only count repetition rate. Ionization chambers are less influenced, however, they must be operated with adequate voltage to overcome recombination losses. Scintillation survey meters may become non-linear at higher dose rates for pulsed radiation because the photomultiplier cannot handle the instantaneous currents that are required. Because of the need to test the response of different radiation detection instruments to pulsed fields, a pulsed x-ray facility has been built (I/sub p/87). A brief description of this facility is given along with tests of several different instruments. 5 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Electromagnetic Pulses at Short-Pulse Laser Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Jr., C G; Throop, A; Eder, D; Kimbrough, J

    2007-08-28

    Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) is a known issue for short-pulse laser facilities, and will also be an issue for experiments using the advanced radiographic capability (ARC) at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The ARC diagnostic uses four NIF beams that are compressed to picosecond durations for backlighting ignition capsules and other applications. Consequently, we are working to understand the EMP due to high-energy (MeV) electrons escaping from targets heated by short-pulse lasers. Our approach is to measure EMP in the Titan short-pulse laser at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and to employ that data to establish analysis and simulation capabilities. We have installed a wide variety of probes inside and outside the Titan laser chamber. We have high-frequency B-dots and D-dots, a photodiode, and fast current-viewing and integrating current transformers. The probe outputs are digitized by 10 and 20 Gsample/s oscilloscopes. The cables and oscilloscopes are well shielded to reduce noise. Our initial measurement campaign has yielded data useful mainly from hundreds of MHz to several GHz. We currently are supplementing our high-frequency probes with lower-frequency ones to obtain better low-frequency data. In order to establish analysis and simulation capabilities we are modeling the Titan facility using various commercial and LLNL numerical electromagnetic codes. We have simulated EMP generation by having a specified number of electrons leave the target and strike the chamber wall and other components in the chamber. This short impulse of electrons has a corresponding broad spectrum, exciting high-frequency structure in the resulting EMP. In this paper, we present results of our initial measurement campaign and comparisons between the measurements and simulations.

  11. Electromagnetic Pulses at Short-Pulse Laser Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, C G; Throop, A; Eder, D; Kimbrough, J

    2008-02-04

    Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) is a known issue for short-pulse laser facilities, and will also be an issue for experiments using the advanced radiographic capability (ARC) at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The ARC diagnostic uses four NIF beams that are compressed to picosecond durations for backlighting ignition capsules and other applications. Consequently, we are working to understand the EMP due to high-energy (MeV) electrons escaping from targets heated by short-pulse lasers. Our approach is to measure EMP in the Titan short-pulse laser at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and to employ that data to establish analysis and simulation capabilities. We have installed a wide variety of probes inside and outside the Titan laser chamber. We have high-frequency B-dot and D-dot probes, a photodiode, and fast current-viewing and integrating current transformers. The probe outputs are digitized by 10 and 20 Gsample/s oscilloscopes. The cables and oscilloscopes are well shielded to reduce noise. Our initial measurement campaign has yielded data useful mainly from several hundreds of MHz to several GHz. We currently are supplementing our high-frequency probes with lower-frequency ones to obtain better low-frequency data. In order to establish analysis and simulation capabilities we are modeling the Titan facility using various commercial and LLNL numerical electromagnetics codes. We have simulated EMP generation by having a specified number of electrons leave the target and strike the chamber wall and other components in the chamber. This short impulse of electrons has a correspondingly broad spectrum, exciting high-frequency structure in the resulting EMP. In this paper, we present results of our initial measurement campaign and comparisons between the measurements and simulations.

  12. Radiation Recordkeeping Practices at DOE Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Traub, R.J.

    1994-03-15

    In order to evaluate the radiation recordkeeping practices at DOE facilities, a questionnaire was sent to DOE and DOE contractor facilities which requested information concerning the record keeping systems. The questionnaire was sent to the DOE/DOE contractor facilities via DOE/HQ and the respective field offices. The questionnaire stipulated that at multiple contractor sites, only those facilities who kept the records should respond to the questionnaire; however, those responding should indicate the facilities for which they maintained records.

  13. NREL's Concentrated Solar Radiation User Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Lewandowski, A.

    1999-09-01

    Declared a national user facility in 1993, NREL's Concentrated Solar Radiation User Facility (CSR) allows industry, government, and university researchers to examine the effects and applications of as much as 50,000 suns of concentrated solar radiation using a High-Flux Solar Furnace and long-term exposure using an ultraviolet (UV) concentrator.

  14. Survivable pulse power space radiator

    DOEpatents

    Mims, J.; Buden, D.; Williams, K.

    1988-03-11

    A thermal radiator system is described for use on an outer space vehicle, which must survive a long period of nonuse and then radiate large amounts of heat for a limited period of time. The radiator includes groups of radiator panels that are pivotally connected in tandem, so that they can be moved to deployed configuration wherein the panels lie largely coplanar, and to a stowed configuration wherein the panels lie in a stack to resist micrometerorite damage. The panels are mounted on a boom which separates a hot power source from a payload. While the panels are stowed, warm fluid passes through their arteries to keep them warm enough to maintain the coolant in a liquid state and avoid embrittlement of material. The panels can be stored in a largely cylindrical shell, with panels progressively further from the boom being of progressively shorter length. 5 figs.

  15. Survivable pulse power space radiator

    DOEpatents

    Mims, James; Buden, David; Williams, Kenneth

    1989-01-01

    A thermal radiator system is described for use on an outer space vehicle, which must survive a long period of nonuse and then radiate large amounts of heat for a limited period of time. The radiator includes groups of radiator panels that are pivotally connected in tandem, so that they can be moved to deployed configuration wherein the panels lie largely coplanar, and to a stowed configuration wherein the panels lie in a stack to resist micrometeorite damage. The panels are mounted on a boom which separates a hot power source from a payload. While the panels are stowed, warm fluid passes through their arteries to keep them warm enough to maintain the coolant in a liquid state and avoid embrittlement of material. The panels can be stored in a largely cylindrical shell, with panels progressively further from the boom being of progressively shorter length.

  16. Electron trajectories in pulsed radiation fields

    SciTech Connect

    Einwohner, T.; Lippmann, B.A.

    1987-05-01

    The work reported here analyzes the dynamical behavior of an electron, initially at rest, when subjected to a radiation pulse of arbitrary, but integrable, shape. This is done by a general integration procedure that has been programmed in VAXIMA. Upon choosing a specific shape for the pulse, VAXIMA finds both the space-time trajectory and the four-momentum of the electron. These are obtained in analytic or numerical form - or both - at the choice of the user. Several examples of analytical and numerical solutions, for different pulse shapes, are given.

  17. Void growth and swelling for cyclic pulsed radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kmetyk, L.N.; Weertman, J.; Green, W.V.; Sommer, W.F.

    1980-09-01

    The analysis of Ghoniem and Kulcinski of a single radiation pulse has been extended to include the effects of temperature oscillations and multiple pulses by coupling six simultaneous nonlinear ordinary differential equations for point defect concentrations and sink strengths with a heat equation governing radiation-produced temperature fluctuations. The pulsed irradiation considered is that of the 800 MeV proton beam at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF), and numerical calculations have been done for aluminum and molybdenum. The model material is assumed to have been irradiated to a specific microstructure, and the calculation is begun after the material has returned to thermal equilibrium conditions. Void growth is seen to proceed at a nearly linear rate after initial transients (caused by the assumption of initial thermal equilibrium) in both vacancy concentration and vacancy loop size and number density. The temperature pulses associated with cyclic rather than steady irradiation generally enhance void growth if the ambient temperature is below the material peak swelling temperature, and conversely decreases void growth when the ambient temperature is above peak swelling temperature. The exception seen occurs when the temperature pulse is great enough that thermal emission of vacancies, rather than radiation production, is dominant. 27 figures.

  18. Radiation Safety Systems for Accelerator Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, James C

    2001-10-17

    The Radiation Safety System (RSS) of an accelerator facility is used to protect people from prompt radiation hazards associated with accelerator operation. The RSS is a fully interlocked, engineered system with a combination of passive and active elements that are reliable, redundant, and fail-safe. The RSS consists of the Access Control System (ACS) and the Radiation Containment System (RCS). The ACS is to keep people away from the dangerous radiation inside the shielding enclosure. The RCS limits and contains the beam/radiation conditions to protect people from the prompt radiation hazards outside the shielding enclosure in both normal and abnormal operations. The complexity of a RSS depends on the accelerator and its operation, as well as associated hazard conditions. The approaches of RSS among different facilities can be different. This report gives a review of the RSS for accelerator facilities.

  19. Radiation Safety Systems for Accelerator Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    James C. Liu; Jeffrey S. Bull; John Drozdoff; Robert May; Vaclav Vylet

    2001-10-01

    The Radiation Safety System (RSS) of an accelerator facility is used to protect people from prompt radiation hazards associated with accelerator operation. The RSS is a fully interlocked, engineered system with a combination of passive and active elements that are reliable, redundant, and fail-safe. The RSS consists of the Access Control System (ACS) and the Radiation Containment System (RCS). The ACS is to keep people away from the dangerous radiation inside the shielding enclosure. The RCS limits and contains the beam/radiation conditions to protect people from the prompt radiation hazards outside the shielding enclosure in both normal and abnormal operations. The complexity of a RSS depends on the accelerator and its operation, as well as associated hazard conditions. The approaches of RSS among different facilities can be different. This report gives a review of the RSS for accelerator facilities.

  20. Coherent Smith-Purcell radiation as a pulse length diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampel, M. C.

    1997-02-01

    Recently, Smith-Purcell radiation has been studied as a candidate for laser-type radiation production in the submillimeter regime. With appropriate choices of beam energy, impact parameter, and grating spacing, there is good coupling to strongly polarized, forward directed radiation [1,2]. Another regime of possible interest is to use Smith-Purcell radiation as a pulse length diagnostic for medium to high energy electron beams of extremely short pulse duration, on the order of tens of femtoseconds to 1000 fs. Strongly in favor of development of such a diagnostic is its relatively non-destructive nature. With the electron beam passing near, but not through, a metal grating, reaction of the beam distribution itself to the production of the radiation is reduced relative to the much stronger scattering induced by passage through a foil. By careful choice of parameters usable diagnostic radiation ought to be produced with acceptably small emittance growth for an on-line beam monitor, even for the extremely bright electron beams proposed for X-ray FELs, Compton backscatter X-ray sources, or laser/plasma accelerator schemes. In this paper coherent and incoherent Smith-Purcell radiation is examined for reasonable operating parameters of the SATURNUS system at UCLA, with comparisons with results reported from the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) at Brookhaven National Laboratory.

  1. Radiation hazard assessment of pulsed microwave radars.

    PubMed

    Puranen, L; Jokela, K

    1996-01-01

    Observed biological effects of pulsed microwave radiation are reviewed and the exposure standards for microwave radiation are summarized. The review indicates that the microwave auditory effect is the only well-established specific effect in realistic exposure situations. The threshold for the effect depends on the energy density per pulse and may be as low as 20 mJ/m2 for people with low hearing threshold. Energy density limits have been included in the most recent exposure standards. A new battery-operated, hand-held meter developed for measurements of pulse power densities around scanning radar antennas is described, and a simple new model for the calculation of power density in the main beam of radar antennas is presented. In the near field measured values differed from the calculated values by 2-3 dB.

  2. A Sub-Picosecond Photon Pulse Facility for SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Cornacchia, Max

    2001-08-28

    It is possible to generate very bright sub-picosecond pulses of spontaneous x-ray radiation utilizing the electron beam from the SLAC linear accelerator and an undulator. The present injection-damping ring system used to inject into the PEP-II B-Factory can be used for this purpose, without any modification to the linear accelerator except for a sequence of 4 bending magnets to compress the electron bunch. With a charge of 3.4 nC per bunch accelerated to 28 GeV and a 10 m long undulator it is quite feasible to generate pulses of x-rays of 8.3 kV energy (in a spectrum extending to over 1 MeV), 80 fsec long (full-width-half-maximum), with a peak brightness of the order of 10{sup 25} photons/(sec x mm{sup 2} x mrad{sup 2} x 0.1% bandwidth), and 10{sup 8} photons per pulse in a 0.1% bandwidth. This facility could be built and operated ahead of the LCLS schedule and would provide both a powerful tool for research in its own right, as well as a way to conduct critical accelerator and x-ray optics R and D for the LCLS.

  3. Radiated fields from an electromagnetic pulse simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelletier, M.; Delisle, G. Y.; Kashyap, S.

    Simulators of electromagnetic pulses allow generation within a limited time of very high-intensity fields such as those produced in a nuclear explosion. These fields can be radiated out of the test zone at a lower but nevertheless significant level; if the intensity of these fields is sufficiently high, damage to humans and electronic equipment can result. An evaluation of the potential danger of these simulator emissions requires knowledge of the amplitude, duration, and the energy of the radiated impulses. A technique is presented for calculating the fields radiated by a parallel-plane electromagnetic pulse simulator. The same method can also be applied to a rhombic type simulator. Sample numerical results are presented along with the calculations of the energy and power density and a discussion of the formation of the field in the frequency domain.

  4. New radiation protection calibration facility at CERN.

    PubMed

    Brugger, Markus; Carbonez, Pierre; Pozzi, Fabio; Silari, Marco; Vincke, Helmut

    2014-10-01

    The CERN radiation protection group has designed a new state-of-the-art calibration laboratory to replace the present facility, which is >20 y old. The new laboratory, presently under construction, will be equipped with neutron and gamma sources, as well as an X-ray generator and a beta irradiator. The present work describes the project to design the facility, including the facility placement criteria, the 'point-zero' measurements and the shielding study performed via FLUKA Monte Carlo simulations.

  5. High Intensity Radiation Laboratory Reverberation Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This photo depicts the interior of the large Reverberation Chamber located in the High Intensity, Radiation Facility (HIRL). These chambers are used to test susceptibility of aircraft avionics systems responses to high intensity radiated fields. These resources include a Gigahertz Transverse Electromagnetic Cell (GTEM), which provides a uniform field of up to 1000V/m from 10 kHz to 18 Ghz.

  6. Radiation protection at nuclear fuel cycle facilities.

    PubMed

    Endo, Kuniaki; Momose, Takumaro; Furuta, Sadaaki

    2011-07-01

    Radiation protection methodologies concerning individual monitoring, workplace monitoring and environmental monitoring in nuclear fuel facilities have been developed and applied to facilities in the Nuclear Fuel Cycle Engineering Laboratories (NCL) of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) for over 40 y. External exposure to photon, beta ray and neutron and internal exposure to alpha emitter are important issues for radiation protection at these facilities. Monitoring of airborne and surface contamination by alpha and beta/photon emitters at workplace is also essential to avoid internal exposure. A critical accident alarm system developed by JAEA has been proved through application at the facilities for a long time. A centralised area monitoring system is effective for emergency situations. Air and liquid effluents from facilities are monitored by continuous monitors or sampling methods to comply with regulations. Effluent monitoring has been carried out for 40 y to assess the radiological impacts on the public and the environment due to plant operation.

  7. Pulsed laser radiation therapy of skin tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Kozlov, A.P.; Moskalik, K.G.

    1980-11-15

    Radiation from a neodymium laser was used to treat 846 patients with 687 precancerous lesions or benign tumors of the skin, 516 cutaneous carcinomas, 33 recurrences of cancer, 51 melanomas, and 508 metastatic melanomas in the skin. The patients have been followed for three months to 6.5 years. No relapses have been observed during this period. Metastases to regional lymph nodes were found in five patients with skin melanoma. Pulsed laser radiation may be successfully used in the treatment of precancerous lesions and benign tumors as well as for skin carcinoma and its recurrences, and for skin melanoma. Laser radiation is more effective in the treatment of tumors inaccessible to radiation therapy and better in those cases in which surgery may have a bad cosmetic or even mutilating effect. Laser beams can be employed in conjunction with chemo- or immunotherapy.

  8. On prospects of powerful SXR pulse generation on “Gamma 4” facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordeev, V. S.; Grishin, A. V.; Orlov, A. P.; Mozgovoy, A. L.; Repin, B. G.; Glushkov, S. L.; Puchagin, S. Yu.; Strabykin, K. V.

    2014-08-01

    RFNC-VNIIEF is creating a multi-module multi-terawatt electro-physical facility “Gamma”, intended for research in the field of radiation physics. Up to now RFNC-VNIIEF created the first module of the facility - a high-current pulsed electron accelerator “Gamma-1”, having the following parameters: boundary energy of the electrons of ≤ 2.0 MeV, diode current of 0.75 MA, maximum electric power of 1.5 TW. Creation of the 4-module variant of the facility (Gamma-4) is the next stage of the work. This paper presents calculation research of expected characteristics of soft x-ray radiation output pulse at “Gamma-4” facility operation into a common load (Z-pinch).

  9. Numerical Simulations of High Enthalpy Pulse Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Gregory J.; Edwards, Thomas A. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Axisymmetric flows within shock tubes and expansion tubes are simulated including the effects of finite rate chemistry and both laminar and turbulent boundary layers. The simulations demonstrate the usefulness of computational fluid dynamics for characterizing the flows in high enthalpy pulse facilities. The modeling and numerical requirements necessary to simulate these flows accurately are also discussed. Although there is a large body of analysis which explains and quantifies the boundary layer growth between the shock and the interface in a shock tube, there is a need for more detailed solutions. Phenomena such as thermochemical nonequilibrium. or turbulent transition behind the shock are excluded in the assumptions of Mirels' analysis. Additionally there is inadequate capability to predict the influence of the boundary layer on the expanded gas behind the interface. Quantifying the gas in this region is particularly important in expansion tubes because it is the location of the test gas. Unsteady simulations of the viscous flow in shock tubes are computationally expensive because they must follow features such as a shock wave over the length of the facility and simultaneously resolve the small length scales within the boundary layer. As a result, efficient numerical algorithms are required. The numerical approach of the present work is to solve the axisymmetric gas dynamic equations using an finite-volume formulation where the inviscid fluxes are computed with a upwind TVD scheme. Multiple species equations are included in the formulation so that finite-rate chemistry can be modeled. The simulations cluster grid points at the shock and interface and translate this clustered grid with these features to minimize numerical errors. The solutions are advanced at a CFL number of less than one based on the inviscid gas dynamics. To avoid limitations on the time step due to the viscous terms, these terms are treated implicitly. This requires a block tri

  10. Optical pulse generation system for the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    SciTech Connect

    Penko, F; Braucht,; Browning, D; Crane, J K; Dane, B; Deadrick, F; Dreifuerst, G; Henesian, M; Jones, B A; Kot, L; Laumann, C; Martinez, M; Moran, B; Rothenberg, J E; Skulina, K; Wilcox, R B

    1998-06-18

    We describe the Optical Pulse Generation (OPG) system for the National Ignition Facility ( NIF ). The OPG system begins with the Master Oscillator Room ( MOR ) where the initial, seed pulse for the entire laser system is produced and properly formatted to enhance ignition in the target. The formatting consists of temporally shaping the pulse and adding additional bandwidth to increase the coupling of the laser generated x-rays to the high density target plasma. The pulse produced in the MOR fans out to 48 identical preamplifier modules where it is amplified by a factor of ten billion and spatially shaped for injection into the 192 main amplifier chai

  11. Assessment and Mitigation of Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) Impacts at Short-pulse Laser Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Jr., C G; Bond, E; Clancy, T; Dangi, S; Eder, D C; Ferguson, W; Kimbrough, J; Throop, A

    2009-10-02

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) will be impacted by electromagnetic pulse (EMP) during normal long-pulse operation, but the largest impacts are expected during short-pulse operation utilizing the Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC). Without mitigation these impacts could range from data corruption to hardware damage. We describe our EMP measurement systems on Titan and NIF and present some preliminary results and thoughts on mitigation.

  12. Assessment and Mitigation of Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) Impacts at Short-pulse Laser Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Jr., C G; Bond, E; Clancy, T; Dangi, S; Eder, D C; Ferguson, W; Kimbrough, J; Throop, A

    2010-02-04

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) will be impacted by electromagnetic pulse (EMP) during normal long-pulse operation, but the largest impacts are expected during short-pulse operation utilizing the Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC). Without mitigation these impacts could range from data corruption to hardware damage. We describe our EMP measurement systems on Titan and NIF and present some preliminary results and thoughts on mitigation.

  13. Progress of the Argonne Pulsed Cable Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.H.; Knott, M.J.; Krieger, C.I.; McGhee, D.G.

    1983-01-01

    Initial tests of the Pulsed Cable Test Facility (PCTF) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) have been completed. Additional components are prepared for the tests of developmental high-current cable conductors: a minicomputer based data acquisition system, a new 5.5 MW power supply for triangular or trapezoidal pulsing modes of the PCTF coil, and a pair of 25 kA current leads for the transport current of the testing conductors.

  14. Architecture and operation of the Z Pulsed Power Facility vacuum system.

    SciTech Connect

    Riddle, Allen Chauncey; Petmecky, Don; Weed, John Woodruff

    2010-11-01

    The Z Pulsed Power Facility at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA is one of the world's premier high energy density physics facilities. The Z Facility derives its name from the z-pinch phenomena which is a type of plasma confinement system that uses the electrical current in the plasma to generate a magnetic field that compresses it. Z refers to the direction of current flow, the z axis in a three dimensional Cartesian coordinate system. The multiterawatt, multimegajoule electrical pulse the Facility produces is 100-400 nanoseconds in time. Research and development programs currently being conducted on the Z Facility include inertial confinement fusion, dynamic material properties, laboratory astrophysics and radiation effects. The Z Facility vacuum system consists of two subsystems, center section and load diagnostics. Dry roughing pumps and cryogenic high vacuum pumps are used to evacuate the 40,000 liter, 200 square meter center section of the facility where the experimental load is located. Pumping times on the order of two hours are required to reduce the pressure from atmospheric to 10{sup -5} Torr. The center section is cycled from atmosphere to high vacuum for each experiment. The facility is capable of conducting one to two experiments per day. Numerous smaller vacuum pumping systems are used to evacuate load diagnostics. The megajoules of energy released during an experiment causes damage to the Facility that presents numerous challenges for reliable operation of the vacuum system.

  15. Deficiencies of active electronic radiation protection dosimeters in pulsed fields.

    PubMed

    Ankerhold, U; Hupe, O; Ambrosi, P

    2009-07-01

    Nowadays nearly all radiation fields used for X-ray diagnostics are pulsed. These fields are characterised by a high dose rate during the pulse and a short pulse duration in the range of a few milliseconds. The use of active electronic dosimeters has increased in the past few years, but these types of dosimeters might possibly not measure reliably in pulsed radiation fields. Not only personal dosimeters but also area dosimeters that are used mainly for dose rate measurements are concerned. These cannot be substituted by using passive dosimeter types. The characteristics of active electronic dosimeters determined in a continuous radiation field cannot be transferred to those in pulsed fields. Some provisional measurements with typical electronic dosimeters in pulsed radiation fields are presented to reveal this basic problem.

  16. Laboratory Astrophysics on High Power Lasers and Pulsed Power Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Remington, B A

    2002-02-05

    Over the past decade a new genre of laboratory astrophysics has emerged, made possible by the new high energy density (HED) experimental facilities, such as large lasers, z-pinch generators, and high current particle accelerators. (Remington, 1999; 2000; Drake, 1998; Takabe, 2001) On these facilities, macroscopic collections of matter can be created in astrophysically relevant conditions, and its collective properties measured. Examples of processes and issues that can be experimentally addressed include compressible hydrodynamic mixing, strong shock phenomena, radiative shocks, radiation flow, high Mach-number jets, complex opacities, photoionized plasmas, equations of state of highly compressed matter, and relativistic plasmas. These processes are relevant to a wide range of astrophysical phenomena, such as supernovae and supernova remnants, astrophysical jets, radiatively driven molecular clouds, accreting black holes, planetary interiors, and gamma-ray bursts. These phenomena will be discussed in the context of laboratory astrophysics experiments possible on existing and future HED facilities.

  17. Long-pulse magnetic field facility at Zaragoza

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Algarabel, P. A.; del Moral, A.; Martín, C.; Serrate, D.; Tokarz, W.

    2006-11-01

    The long-pulse magnetic field facility of the Laboratorio de Magnetismo - Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragón (Universidad de Zaragoza-CSIC) produces magnetic fields up to 31, with a pulse duration of 2.2s. Experimental set-ups for measurements of magnetization, magnetostriction and magnetoresistance are available. The temperature can be controlled between 1.4 and 335 K, being the inner bore of the He cryostat of 22.5 mm. Magnetization is measured using the mutual induction technique, the magnetostriction is determined with the strain-gage and the capacitive cantilever methods, and the magnetoresistance is measured by means of the aclock-in technique in the 4-probes geometry. An overview of the facility will be presented and the presently available experimental techniques will be discussed.

  18. A survey of veterinary radiation facilities in 2010.

    PubMed

    Farrelly, John; McEntee, Margaret C

    2014-01-01

    A survey of veterinary radiation therapy facilities in the United States, Canada, and Europe was done in 2010, using an online survey tool, to determine the type of equipment available, radiation protocols used, caseload, tumor types irradiated, as well as other details of the practice of veterinary radiation oncology. The results of this survey were compared to a similar survey performed in 2001. A total of 76 facilities were identified including 24 (32%) academic institutions and 52 (68%) private practice external beam radiation therapy facilities. The overall response rate was 51% (39/76 responded). Based on this survey, there is substantial variation among facilities in all aspects ranging from equipment and personnel to radiation protocols and caseloads. American College of Veterinary Radiology boarded radiation oncologists direct 90% of the radiation facilities, which was increased slightly compared to 2001. All facilities surveyed in 2010 had a linear accelerator. More facilities reported having electron capability (79%) compared to the 2001 survey. Eight facilities had a radiation oncology resident, and academic facilities were more likely to have residents. Patient caseload information was available from 28 sites (37% of radiation facilities), and based on the responses 1376 dogs and 352 cats were irradiated in 2010. The most frequently irradiated tumors were soft tissue sarcomas in dogs, and oral squamous cell carcinoma in cats.

  19. Dual amplitude pulse generator for radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Hoggan, Jerry M.; Kynaston, Ronnie L.; Johnson, Larry O.

    2001-01-01

    A pulsing circuit for producing an output signal having a high amplitude pulse and a low amplitude pulse may comprise a current source for providing a high current signal and a low current signal. A gate circuit connected to the current source includes a trigger signal input that is responsive to a first trigger signal and a second trigger signal. The first trigger signal causes the gate circuit to connect the high current signal to a pulse output terminal whereas the second trigger signal causes the gate circuit to connect the low current signal to the pulse output terminal.

  20. Cavity Optical Pulse Extraction: ultra-short pulse generation as seeded Hawking radiation.

    PubMed

    Eilenberger, Falk; Kabakova, Irina V; de Sterke, C Martijn; Eggleton, Benjamin J; Pertsch, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    We show that light trapped in an optical cavity can be extracted from that cavity in an ultrashort burst by means of a trigger pulse. We find a simple analytic description of this process and show that while the extracted pulse inherits its pulse length from that of the trigger pulse, its wavelength can be completely different. Cavity Optical Pulse Extraction is thus well suited for the development of ultrashort laser sources in new wavelength ranges. We discuss similarities between this process and the generation of Hawking radiation at the optical analogue of an event horizon with extremely high Hawking temperature. Our analytic predictions are confirmed by thorough numerical simulations.

  1. HEMP (High-Altitude Electromagnetic Pulse) validation of FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) radio facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Stephen C.

    1989-05-01

    The Harry Diamond Lab. provided high-altitude electromagnetic pulse (HEMP) and partial lightning hardness verification testing to a high-frequency radio facility for the FAA. The facility consisted of a shielded enclosure with antennas and cables connected through protective devices at the shield to dummy loads within the shield. It was exposed to low-level radiation with measurements of internal fields extrapolated to threat levels and compared to specific criteria. Each typical penetration was injected with a simulated lightning source, and internal measurements were compared to specific criteria. Although criteria were not always met, it was judged with confidence that the facility would protect radio equipment. It was noted that the ac power spark gap would remain shorted until ac power shut down, resulting in system upset.

  2. Long pulse, high power operation of the ELISE test facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wünderlich, D.; Kraus, W.; Fröschle, M.; Riedl, R.; Fantz, U.; Heinemann, B.

    2017-08-01

    The ion source of the ELISE test facility (0.9×1.0 m2 with an extraction area of 0.1 m2) has half the size of the ion source foreseen for the ITER NBI beam lines. Aim of ELISE is to demonstrate that such large RF driven negative ion sources can achieve the following parameters at a filling pressure of 0.3 Pa and for pulse lengths of up to one hour: extracted current densities of 28.5 mA/cm2 in deuterium and 33.0 mA/cm2 in hydrogen, a ratio of co-extracted electrons to extracted ions below one and deviations in the uniformity of the extracted beam of less than 10 %. From the results obtained at ELISE so far it can be deduced that for demonstrating the ITER parameters, an RF power of 80 kW/driver will be necessary, i.e. final aim is to demonstrate long pulses (up to one hour) at this power level and a stable source performance. The most crucial factor limiting the source performance during such pulses - in particular in deuterium - is a steady increase in the co-extracted electron current. This paper reports measures that counteract this steady increase, namely applying a dedicated long pulse caesium conditioning technique and modifying the filter field topology by adding strengthening external permanent magnets. Additionally, RF issues are discussed that prevented increasing the RF power towards the target value. Although it was not possible up to now to perform long pulses at 80 kW/driver, a significant improvement of the source performance and its stability are demonstrated. The latter allowed performing the very first 1 h deuterium pulse in ELISE.

  3. Modeling of the bipolar transistor under different pulse ionizing radiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonova, A. M.; Skorobogatov, P. K.

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes a 2D model of the bipolar transistor 2T312 under gamma, X-ray and laser pulse ionizing radiations. Both the Finite Element Discretization and Semiconductor module of Comsol 5.1 are used. There is an analysis of energy deposition in this device under different radiations and the results of transient ionizing current response for some different conditions.

  4. Assessment and mitigation of radiation, EMP, debris & shrapnel impacts at megajoule-class laser facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eder, D. C.; Anderson, R. W.; Bailey, D. S.; Bell, P.; Benson, D. J.; Bertozzi, A. L.; Bittle, W.; Bradley, D.; Brown, C. G.; Clancy, T. J.; Chen, H.; Chevalier, J. M.; Combis, P.; Dauffy, L.; Debonnel, C. S.; Eckart, M. J.; Fisher, A. C.; Geille, A.; Glebov, V. Y.; Holder, J.; Jadaud, J. P.; Jones, O.; Kaiser, T. B.; Kalantar, D.; Khater, H.; Kimbrough, J.; Koniges, A. E.; Landen, O. L.; MacGowan, B. J.; Masters, N. D.; MacPhee, A.; Maddox, B. R.; Meyers, M.; Osher, S.; Prasad, R.; Raffestin, D.; Raimbourg, J.; Rekow, V.; Sangster, C.; Song, P.; Stoeckl, C.; Stowell, M. L.; Teran, J. M.; Throop, A.; Tommasini, R.; Vierne, J.; White, D.; Whitman, P.

    2010-08-01

    The generation of neutron/gamma radiation, electromagnetic pulses (EMP), debris and shrapnel at mega-Joule class laser facilities (NIF and LMJ) impacts experiments conducted at these facilities. The complex 3D numerical codes used to assess these impacts range from an established code that required minor modifications (MCNP - calculates neutron and gamma radiation levels in complex geometries), through a code that required significant modifications to treat new phenomena (EMSolve - calculates EMP from electrons escaping from laser targets), to a new code, ALE-AMR, that is being developed through a joint collaboration between LLNL, CEA, and UC (UCSD, UCLA, and LBL) for debris and shrapnel modelling.

  5. Assessment and Mitigation of Radiation, EMP, Debris & Shrapnel Impacts at Megajoule-Class Laser Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Eder, D C; Anderson, R W; Bailey, D S; Bell, P; Benson, D J; Bertozzi, A L; Bittle, W; Bradley, D; Brown, C G; Clancy, T J; Chen, H; Chevalier, J M; Combis, P; Dauffy, L; Debonnel, C S; Eckart, M J; Fisher, A C; Geille, A; Glebov, V Y; Holder, J; Jadaud, J P; Jones, O; Kaiser, T B; Kalantar, D; Khater, H; Kimbrough, J; Koniges, A E; Landen, O L; MacGowan, B J; Masters, N D; MacPhee, A; Maddox, B R; Meyers, M; Osher, S; Prasad, R; Raffestin, D; Raimbourg, J; Rekow, V; Sangster, C; Song, P; Stoeckl, C; Stowell, M L; Teran, J M; Throop, A; Tommasini, R; Vierne, J; White, D; Whitman, P

    2009-10-05

    The generation of neutron/gamma radiation, electromagnetic pulses (EMP), debris and shrapnel at mega-Joule class laser facilities (NIF and LMJ) impacts experiments conducted at these facilities. The complex 3D numerical codes used to assess these impacts range from an established code that required minor modifications (MCNP - calculates neutron and gamma radiation levels in complex geometries), through a code that required significant modifications to treat new phenomena (EMSolve - calculates EMP from electrons escaping from laser targets), to a new code, ALE-AMR, that is being developed through a joint collaboration between LLNL, CEA, and UC (UCSD, UCLA, and LBL) for debris and shrapnel modelling.

  6. Quantum Quenching of Radiation Losses in Short Laser Pulses.

    PubMed

    Harvey, C N; Gonoskov, A; Ilderton, A; Marklund, M

    2017-03-10

    Accelerated charges radiate, and therefore must lose energy. The impact of this energy loss on particle motion, called radiation reaction, becomes significant in intense-laser matter interactions, where it can reduce collision energies, hinder particle acceleration schemes, and is seemingly unavoidable. Here we show that this common belief breaks down in short laser pulses, and that energy losses and radiation reaction can be controlled and effectively switched off by appropriate tuning of the pulse length. This "quenching" of emission is impossible in classical physics, but becomes possible in QED due to the discrete nature of quantum emissions.

  7. Quantum Quenching of Radiation Losses in Short Laser Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, C. N.; Gonoskov, A.; Ilderton, A.; Marklund, M.

    2017-03-01

    Accelerated charges radiate, and therefore must lose energy. The impact of this energy loss on particle motion, called radiation reaction, becomes significant in intense-laser matter interactions, where it can reduce collision energies, hinder particle acceleration schemes, and is seemingly unavoidable. Here we show that this common belief breaks down in short laser pulses, and that energy losses and radiation reaction can be controlled and effectively switched off by appropriate tuning of the pulse length. This "quenching" of emission is impossible in classical physics, but becomes possible in QED due to the discrete nature of quantum emissions.

  8. Development of nanosecond time-resolved infrared detection at the LEAF pulse radiolysis facility

    SciTech Connect

    Grills, David C.; Farrington, Jaime A.; Layne, Bobby H.; Preses, Jack M.; Bernstein, Herbert J.; Wishart, James F.

    2015-04-27

    When coupled with transient absorption spectroscopy, pulse radiolysis, which utilizes high-energy electron pulses from an accelerator, is a powerful tool for investigating the kinetics and thermodynamics of a wide range of radiation-induced redox and electron transfer processes. The majority of these investigations detect transient species in the UV, visible, or near-IR spectral regions. Unfortunately, the often-broad and featureless absorption bands in these regions can make the definitive identification of intermediates difficult. Time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy would offer much improved structural characterization, but has received only limited application in pulse radiolysis. In this paper, we describe in detail the development of a unique nanosecond time-resolved infrared (TRIR) detection capability for condensed-phase pulse radiolysis on a new beam line at the LEAF facility of Brookhaven National Laboratory. The system makes use of a suite of high-power, continuous wave external-cavity quantum cascade lasers as the IR probe source, with coverage from 2330-1051 cm⁻¹. The response time of the TRIR detection setup is ~40 ns, with a typical sensitivity of ~100 µOD after 4-8 signal averages using a dual-beam probe/reference normalization detection scheme. As a result, this new detection method has enabled mechanistic investigations of a range of radiation-induced chemical processes, some of which are highlighted here.

  9. Development of nanosecond time-resolved infrared detection at the LEAF pulse radiolysis facility

    SciTech Connect

    Grills, David C. Farrington, Jaime A.; Layne, Bobby H.; Preses, Jack M.; Wishart, James F.; Bernstein, Herbert J.

    2015-04-15

    When coupled with transient absorption spectroscopy, pulse radiolysis, which utilizes high-energy electron pulses from an accelerator, is a powerful tool for investigating the kinetics and thermodynamics of a wide range of radiation-induced redox and electron transfer processes. The majority of these investigations detect transient species in the UV, visible, or near-IR spectral regions. Unfortunately, the often-broad and featureless absorption bands in these regions can make the definitive identification of intermediates difficult. Time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy would offer much improved structural characterization, but has received only limited application in pulse radiolysis. In this paper, we describe in detail the development of a unique nanosecond time-resolved infrared (TRIR) detection capability for condensed-phase pulse radiolysis on a new beam line at the LEAF facility of Brookhaven National Laboratory. The system makes use of a suite of high-power, continuous wave external-cavity quantum cascade lasers as the IR probe source, with coverage from 2330 to 1051 cm{sup −1}. The response time of the TRIR detection setup is ∼40 ns, with a typical sensitivity of ∼100 μOD after 4-8 signal averages using a dual-beam probe/reference normalization detection scheme. This new detection method has enabled mechanistic investigations of a range of radiation-induced chemical processes, some of which are highlighted here.

  10. Development of nanosecond time-resolved infrared detection at the LEAF pulse radiolysis facility.

    PubMed

    Grills, David C; Farrington, Jaime A; Layne, Bobby H; Preses, Jack M; Bernstein, Herbert J; Wishart, James F

    2015-04-01

    When coupled with transient absorption spectroscopy, pulse radiolysis, which utilizes high-energy electron pulses from an accelerator, is a powerful tool for investigating the kinetics and thermodynamics of a wide range of radiation-induced redox and electron transfer processes. The majority of these investigations detect transient species in the UV, visible, or near-IR spectral regions. Unfortunately, the often-broad and featureless absorption bands in these regions can make the definitive identification of intermediates difficult. Time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy would offer much improved structural characterization, but has received only limited application in pulse radiolysis. In this paper, we describe in detail the development of a unique nanosecond time-resolved infrared (TRIR) detection capability for condensed-phase pulse radiolysis on a new beam line at the LEAF facility of Brookhaven National Laboratory. The system makes use of a suite of high-power, continuous wave external-cavity quantum cascade lasers as the IR probe source, with coverage from 2330 to 1051 cm(-1). The response time of the TRIR detection setup is ∼40 ns, with a typical sensitivity of ∼100 μOD after 4-8 signal averages using a dual-beam probe/reference normalization detection scheme. This new detection method has enabled mechanistic investigations of a range of radiation-induced chemical processes, some of which are highlighted here.

  11. Development of nanosecond time-resolved infrared detection at the LEAF pulse radiolysis facility

    DOE PAGES

    Grills, David C.; Farrington, Jaime A.; Layne, Bobby H.; ...

    2015-04-27

    When coupled with transient absorption spectroscopy, pulse radiolysis, which utilizes high-energy electron pulses from an accelerator, is a powerful tool for investigating the kinetics and thermodynamics of a wide range of radiation-induced redox and electron transfer processes. The majority of these investigations detect transient species in the UV, visible, or near-IR spectral regions. Unfortunately, the often-broad and featureless absorption bands in these regions can make the definitive identification of intermediates difficult. Time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy would offer much improved structural characterization, but has received only limited application in pulse radiolysis. In this paper, we describe in detail the development of amore » unique nanosecond time-resolved infrared (TRIR) detection capability for condensed-phase pulse radiolysis on a new beam line at the LEAF facility of Brookhaven National Laboratory. The system makes use of a suite of high-power, continuous wave external-cavity quantum cascade lasers as the IR probe source, with coverage from 2330-1051 cm⁻¹. The response time of the TRIR detection setup is ~40 ns, with a typical sensitivity of ~100 µOD after 4-8 signal averages using a dual-beam probe/reference normalization detection scheme. As a result, this new detection method has enabled mechanistic investigations of a range of radiation-induced chemical processes, some of which are highlighted here.« less

  12. Taking the pulse of the cambrian radiation.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, Bruce S

    2003-02-01

    The Cambrian radiation is that key episode in the history of life when a large number of animal phyla appeared in the fossil record over a geologically short period of time. Over the last 20 years, scientific understanding of this radiation has increased significantly. Still, fundamental questions remain about the timing of the radiation and also the tempo of evolution. Trilobites are an excellent group to address these questions because of their rich abundance and diversity. Moreover, their complex morphology makes them readily amenable to phylogenetic analysis, and deducing the nature of macroevolutionary processes during the Cambrian radiation requires an understanding of evolutionary patterns. Phylogenetic biogeographic analysis of Early Cambrian olenellid trilobites, based on a modified version of Brooks Parsimony Analysis, revealed the signature of the breakup of Pannotia, a tectonic event that most evidence suggests is constrained to the interval 600 to 550 Ma. As trilobites are derived metazoans, this suggests the phylogenetic proliferation associated with the Cambrian radiation was underway tens of millions of years before the Early Cambrian, although not hundreds of millions of years as some have argued.Phylogenetic information from Early Cambrian olenellid trilobites was also used in a stochastic approach based on two continuous time models to test the hypothesis that rates of speciation were unusually high during the Cambrian radiation. No statistical evidence was found to support this hypothesis. Instead, rates of evolution during the Cambrian radiation, at least those pertaining to speciation, were comparable to those that have occurred during other times of adaptive or taxic radiation throughout the history of life.

  13. A pulsed magnetic field test facility for conductors and joints

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, B.A.; Minervini, J.V.; Camille, R.J. Jr.

    1996-07-01

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and, in the US, the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) fusion programs both require conductor and joint testing in a pulsed magnetic background field in order to demonstrate that these components can operate successfully in a simulated, fusion-machine environment. Here, a pulsed magnetic field test facility is under construction at Massachusetts Institute of Technology for testing large scale cable-in-conduit superconductor and joint samples. Separate, demountable split-pair solenoid and saddle coils provide a combination of fields which can be either transverse of parallel to the sample axis. The solenoid and saddle magnets together can provide transverse peak fields as high as 8.4 T. Peak parallel fields of 6.6 T can be generated with the solenoid alone. Ramp-up rates of 1.5 T/s and ramp-down rates of 20 T/s are possible. Sample currents up to 50 kA are provided by a superconducting current transformer. The sample is connected to the transformer secondary through a pair of low resistance joints. Supercritical helium is provided to the sample at flow rates up to 20 g/s, pressures up to 1 MPa, and temperatures from 4.7 to 10 K. Programmable logic controllers provide coordination of the magnetic field, sample current, and helium flow rate and temperature in the sample. Sample and facility instrumentation signals are processed and data is stored on a workstation-based data acquisition system with comprehensive data reduction capability. Facility details and status are described.

  14. Ejecta experiments at the Pegasus Pulsed Power facility

    SciTech Connect

    Sorenson, D.S.; Carpenter, B.; King, N.S.P.

    1997-08-01

    When a shock wave interacts at the surface of a metal target, target material can be emitted from the surface called ejecta. The mass, size, shape, and velocity of ejecta varies depending on the initial shock conditions, and target material properties. In order to understand this phenomena, diagnostics have been developed and implemented at the Pegasus Pulsed Power facility located at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The facility provides both radial and axial access for making measurements. There exist optical, laser, and x-ray paths for performing measurements on the target assembly located near the center of the machine. The facility can provide many mega amps of current which is transported to a 5.0 cm diameter, 2.0 cm high aluminum cylinder. The current and associated magnetic field set up forces which implode the aluminum cylinder radially inward. As the aluminum cylinder reaches the appropriate velocity it impacts a target cylinder. Due to this impact, a shock wave is set up in the target and eventually interacts at the inner surface of the target cylinder where ejecta are produced. A 1.5 cm diameter collimator cylinder located inside the target cylinder is used to control the number of ejecta particles that arrive at the center region where ejecta measurements are made. Diagnostics have been developed including in-line Fraunhofer holography and visible shadowgraph. Details of these diagnostics are described.

  15. Selective Photothermolysis: Precise Microsurgery by Selective Absorption of Pulsed Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, R. Rox; Parrish, John A.

    1983-04-01

    Suitably brief pulses of selectively absorbed optical radiation can cause selective damage to pigmented structures, cells, and organelles in vivo. Precise aiming is unnecessary in this unique form of radiation injury because inherent optical and thermal properties provide target selectivity. A simple, predictive model is presented. Selective damage to cutaneous microvessels and to melanosomes within melanocytes is shown after 577-nanometer (3 × 10-7 second) and 351-nanometer (2 × 10-8 second) pulses, respectively. Hemodynamic, histological, and ultrastructural responses are discussed.

  16. Pulsed radiation-induced attenuation in certain optical fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, J.D. )

    1992-05-01

    Using the X-ray pulse from the HERMES II simulation machine at Sandia National Laboratories, the pulsed radiation-induced attenuation was measured in two optical fibers considered to be 'nonrad-hard': the 50-micron-core, graded-index fiber from Corning and the plastic (PMMA) fiber from the Mitsubishi Rayon Company. These fibers were exposed to radiation up to doses of 19.5 and 28 krad(Si), respectively. In addition, fits of their post-radiation recovery were made to the geminate recombination model, from which the recombination-rate and generation constants, characteristic of this theory, were determined. These parameters should be useful in determining the response of the fibers to radiation conditions other than those encountered here. 18 refs.

  17. Design considerations and test facilities for accelerated radiation effects testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, W. E.; Miller, C. G.; Parker, R. H.

    1972-01-01

    Test design parameters for accelerated dose rate radiation effects tests for spacecraft parts and subsystems used in long term mission (years) are detailed. A facility for use in long term accelerated and unaccelerated testing is described.

  18. Ultraviolet radiation from the pulsed corona discharge in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukes, Petr; Clupek, Martin; Babicky, Vaclav; Sunka, Pavel

    2008-05-01

    Quantitative analysis of ultraviolet radiation from the pulsed corona discharge in water with needle-plate electrode geometry (~1-3 J pulse-1) was performed using the potassium ferrioxalate actinometry. Photon flux J190-280 and radiant energy Q190-280 of the UV light emitted from the discharge at spectral region 190-280 nm was determined in dependence on the applied voltage (17-29 kV, positive polarity) and the solution conductivity (100-500 µS cm-1). The intensity of the UV radiation strongly increased with increasing water conductivity and applied voltage. Depending on the applied voltage the determined photon flux varied by more than two orders of magnitude within the range of solution conductivities 100-500 µS cm-1. It was found that photon flux from the discharge may be directly related to the discharge pulse mean power Pp as J190-280 = 44.33 P_p^{2.11} (quanta pulse-1). A significant role of UV radiation in the production of hydrogen peroxide and bacterial inactivation by the corona discharge in water has been identified. As the solution conductivity increased the yield of H2O2 produced by the discharge decreased due to increasing photolysis of H2O2 accounting for up to 14% of the total decomposition rate of H2O2. As regards bactericidal effects, it was estimated that the UV radiation contributes about 30% to the overall inactivation of Escherichia coli.

  19. External focusing of nanosecond pulsed X-ray radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begidov, A. A.; Fursey, G. N.; Polyakov, M. A.

    2016-02-01

    The feasibility of efficient focusing of high-power pulsed X-ray radiation generated by explosive electron emission from carbon nanoclusters is shown by direct experiments with the use of polycapillary X-ray optics. It is shown that the X-ray spot in the focus of the polycapillary lens can be reduced to 1/20 of its initial size.

  20. Atmospheric radiation measurement program facilities newsletter, September 2002.

    SciTech Connect

    Holdridge, D. J.

    2002-10-02

    This Atmospheric radiation measurement program facilities newsletter covers the following topics: The Raman lidar at the SGP central facility is receiving upgrades to its environmental controls; The instrument tower at Okmulgee State Park is receiving upgrades to prevent Turkey Vultures from roosting on the booms.

  1. Characterization of a medical X-ray machine for testing the response of electronic dosimeters in pulsed radiation fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guimarães, Margarete C.; Da Silva, Teógenes A.

    2014-11-01

    Electronic personal dosimeters (EPD) based on solid state detectors have been used for personnel monitoring for radiation protection purpose; their use has been extended to practices with pulsed radiation beams although their performance is not well known. Deficiencies in the EPD response in pulsed radiation fields have been reported; they were not detected before since type tests and calibrations of EPDs were established in terms of continuous X and gamma reference radiations. An ISO working group was formed to elaborate a standard for test conditions and performance requirements of EPDs in pulsed beams; the PTB/Germany implemented a special X-ray facility for generating the reference pulsed radiation beams. In this work, an 800 Plus VMI medical X-ray machine of the Dosimeter Calibration Laboratory of CDTN/CNEN was characterized to verify its feasibility to perform EPD tests. Characterization of the x-ray beam was done in terms of practical peak voltage, half-value layer, mean energy and air kerma rate. Reference dosimeters used for air kerma measurements were verified as far their metrological coherence and a procedure for testing EDPs was established. Electronic personal dosimeters (EPD) have been used for personnel monitoring. EPD use has been extended to pulsed radiation beams. Deficiencies in the EPD response in pulsed beams have been reported. The feasibility of using a medical X-ray machine to perform EPD tests was studied. Reference dosimeters were verified and EPD testing procedure was established.

  2. Shielding and Radiation Protection in Ion Beam Therapy Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wroe, Andrew J.; Rightnar, Steven

    Radiation protection is a key aspect of any radiotherapy (RT) department and is made even more complex in ion beam therapy (IBT) by the large facility size, secondary particle spectra and intricate installation of these centers. In IBT, large and complex radiation producing devices are used and made available to the public for treatment. It is thus the responsibility of the facility to put in place measures to protect not only the patient but also the general public, occupationally and nonoccupationally exposed personnel working within the facility, and electronics installed within the department to ensure maximum safety while delivering maximum up-time.

  3. Radiation Facilities at NSWC (Naval Surface Warfare Center)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    Phoenix, and TAGS. ’hle Navv’s ’.Vnulerability and Hirdening BuildilIg ( 1 30) houses the FIcetrons and ( Colbalt 60 Source. Appro~l cdi for publlli...except i(or tle (C() 60 source) is transient ili nature alnd o011 occLrs w’heni thle mAChlime ;ct U- ;1lly fil-es, there is n1o radiation hazard at ;any...NSWC/WO TECHNICAL LIBRARY I "c /’IO 6 ,’ Ce 4T RT A DT C IONoT_ FACIlL l I- 14-T IES12170 RADIATION FACILITIES AT NSWC Defense Nuclear Agency NAVAL

  4. Xenon plasma sustained by pulse-periodic laser radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Rudoy, I. G.; Solovyov, N. G.; Soroka, A. M.; Shilov, A. O.; Yakimov, M. Yu.

    2015-10-15

    The possibility of sustaining a quasi-stationary pulse-periodic optical discharge (POD) in xenon at a pressure of p = 10–20 bar in a focused 1.07-μm Yb{sup 3+} laser beam with a pulse repetition rate of f{sub rep} ⩾ 2 kHz, pulse duration of τ ⩾ 200 μs, and power of P = 200–300 W has been demonstrated. In the plasma development phase, the POD pulse brightness is generally several times higher than the stationary brightness of a continuous optical discharge at the same laser power, which indicates a higher plasma temperature in the POD regime. Upon termination of the laser pulse, plasma recombines and is then reinitiated in the next pulse. The initial absorption of laser radiation in successive POD pulses is provided by 5p{sup 5}6s excited states of xenon atoms. This kind of discharge can be applied in plasma-based high-brightness broadband light sources.

  5. Interaction of repetitively pulsed high energy laser radiation with matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugenschmidt, M.

    1986-05-01

    Laser target interaction processes and methods of improving the overall energy balance are discussed. This can be achieved with high repetition rate pulsed lasers even for initially highly reflecting materials, such as metals. Experiments were performed using a pulsed CO2 laser at mean powers up to 2 KW and repetition rates up to 100 Hz. The rates of temperature rise of aluminum for example are increased by more than a factor of 3 as compared to cw-radiation of comparable power density. Similar improvements are found for the overall absorptivities, that are increased by more than an order of magnitude.

  6. Pulsed electron accelerator for radiation technologies in the enviromental applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korenev, Sergey

    1997-05-01

    The project of pulsed electron accelerator for radiation technologies in the environmental applications is considered. An accelerator consists of high voltage generator with vacuum insulation and vacuum diode with plasma cathode on the basis discharge on the surface of dielectric of large dimensions. The main parameters of electron accelerators are following: kinetic energy 0.2 - 2.0 MeV, electron beam current 1 - 30 kA and pulse duration 1- 5 microseconds. The main applications of accelerator for decomposition of wastewaters are considered.

  7. Skin welding using pulsed laser radiation and a dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fried, Nathaniel M.; Walsh, Joseph T., Jr.

    1998-07-01

    Previous skin welding studies have used continuous wave (CW) delivery of radiation. However, heat diffusion during irradiation prevents strong welds from being achieved without creating large zones of thermal damage to surrounding tissue. This damage may prevent normal wound healing. Strong welds and minimal thermal damage can be achieved by introducing a dye and delivering the radiation in a pulsed mode. Two-cm-long, full-thickness incisions were made in guinea pig skin. India ink was used as an absorber, and egg white albumin was used as an adhesive. A 5-mm-diameter spot of CW, 1.06-micrometer Nd:YAG laser radiation was scanned over the weld site, producing 100 millisecond pulses. The cooling time between scans and number of scans was varied. Thermal damage zones were measured using a transmission polarizing microscope to identify birefringence changes in tissue. Tensile strengths were measured using a tensiometer. For pulsed welding and long cooling times, weld strengths of 2.4 kg/cm2 were measured, and thermal damage to the epidermis was limited to approximately 500 micrometers. With CW welding, comparable weld strengths resulted in approximately 2700 micrometer of thermal damage. CW laser radiation weld strengths were only 0.6 kg/cm2 when thermal damage in the epidermis was limited to approximately 500 micrometers.

  8. Atlas Pulsed Power Facility for High Energy Density Physics Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.B.; Ballard, E.O.; Barr, G.W.; Bowman, D.W.; Chochrane, J.C.; Davis, H.A.; Elizondo, J.M.; Gribble, R.F.; Griego, J.R.; Hicks, R.D.; Hinckley, W.B.; Hosack, K.W.; Nielsen, K.E.; Parker, J.V.; Parsons, M.O.; Rickets, R.L.; Salazar, H.R.; Sanchez, P.G.; Scudder, D.W.; Shapiro, C.; Thompson, M.C.; Trainor, R.J.; Valdez, G.A.; Vigil, B.N.; Watt, R.G.; Wysock, F.J.

    1999-06-07

    The Atlas facility, now under construction at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), will provide a unique capability for performing high-energy-density experiments in support of weapon-physics and basic-research programs. It is intended to be an international user facility, providing opportunities for researchers from national laboratories and academic institutions around the world. Emphasizing institutions around the world. Emphasizing hydrodynamic experiments, Atlas will provide the capability for achieving steady shock pressures exceeding 10-Mbar in a volume of several cubic centimeters. In addition, the kinetic energy associated with solid liner implosion velocities exceeding 12 km/s is sufficient to drive dense, hydrodynamic targets into the ionized regime, permitting the study of complex issues associated with strongly-coupled plasmas. The primary element of Atlas is a 23-MJ capacitor bank, comprised of 96 separate Marx generators housed in 12 separate oil-filled tanks, surrounding a central target chamber. Each tank will house two, independently-removable maintenance units, with each maintenance unit consisting of four Marx modules. Each Marx module has four capacitors that can each be charged to a maximum of 60 kilovolts. When railgap switches are triggered, the marx modules erect to a maximum of 240 kV. The parallel discharge of these 96 Marx modules will deliver a 30-MA current pulse with a 4-5-{micro}s risetime to a cylindrical, imploding liner via 24 vertical, tri-plate, oil-insulated transmission lines. An experimental program for testing and certifying all Marx and transmission line components has been completed. A complete maintenance module and its associated transmission line (the First Article) are now under construction and testing. The current Atlas schedule calls for construction of the machine to be complete by August, 2000. Acceptance testing is scheduled to begin in November, 2000, leading to initial operations in January, 2001.

  9. The NHMFL Pulsed Field Facility at Los Alamos National Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mielke, Chuck

    2014-03-01

    National user facilities provide scientists and industrial development companies with access to specialized experimental capabilities to enable development of materials and solve long standing technical problems. Magnetic fields have become an indispensable tool for researchers to better understand and manipulate ground states of electronic materials. As magnetic field intensities are increased the quantum nature of these materials become exponentially more likely to be observed and this is but one of the drivers to go further in high magnetic field generation. At the Los Alamos branch of the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory we have significant efforts in extremely high magnetic field generation and experimentation. In direct opposition with our efforts are the tremendous electro-mechanical forces exerted on our magnets and the electromagnetic interference that couples to the sample under study and the diagnostic equipment. Challenges in magnetic field generation and research will be presented. Various methods of pulsed high magnetic field generation and experimentation capabilities will be reviewed, including our recent ``World Record'' for the highest non-destructive magnetic field. NSF-DMR 1157490.

  10. Radiation properties of Turkish light source facility TURKAY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nergiz, Zafer

    2015-09-01

    The synchrotron light source TURKAY, which is one of the sub-project of Turkish Accelerator Center (TAC), has been supported by Ministry of Development of Turkey since 2006. The facility is designed to generate synchrotron radiation (SR) in range 0.01-60 keV from a 3 GeV storage ring with a beam emittance of 0.51 nm rad. Synchrotron radiation will be produced from the bending magnets and insertion devices in the storage ring. In this paper design studies for possible devices to produce synchrotron radiation and radiation properties of these devices with TURKAY storage ring parameters are presented.

  11. Ultrasonic Power Output Measurement by Pulsed Radiation Pressure.

    PubMed

    Fick, Steven E; Breckenridge, Franklin R

    1996-01-01

    Direct measurements of time-averaged spatially integrated output power radiated into reflectionless water loads can be made with high accuracy using techniques which exploit the radiation pressure exerted by sound on all objects in its path. With an absorptive target arranged to intercept the entirety of an ultrasound beam, total beam power can be determined as accurately as the radiation force induced on the target can be measured in isolation from confounding forces due to buoyancy, streaming, surface tension, and vibration. Pulse modulation of the incident ultrasound at a frequency well above those characteristics of confounding phenomena provides the desired isolation and other significant advantages in the operation of the radiation force balance (RFB) constructed in 1974. Equipped with purpose-built transducers and electronics, the RFB is adjusted to equate the radiation force and a counterforce generated by an actuator calibrated against reference masses using direct current as the transfer variable. Improvements made during its one overhaul in 1988 have nearly halved its overall measurement uncertainty and extended the capabilities of the RFB to include measuring the output of ultrasonic systems with arbitrary pulse waveforms.

  12. Ultrasonic Power Output Measurement by Pulsed Radiation Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Fick, Steven E.; Breckenridge, Franklin R.

    1996-01-01

    Direct measurements of time-averaged spatially integrated output power radiated into reflectionless water loads can be made with high accuracy using techniques which exploit the radiation pressure exerted by sound on all objects in its path. With an absorptive target arranged to intercept the entirety of an ultrasound beam, total beam power can be determined as accurately as the radiation force induced on the target can be measured in isolation from confounding forces due to buoyancy, streaming, surface tension, and vibration. Pulse modulation of the incident ultrasound at a frequency well above those characteristics of confounding phenomena provides the desired isolation and other significant advantages in the operation of the radiation force balance (RFB) constructed in 1974. Equipped with purpose-built transducers and electronics, the RFB is adjusted to equate the radiation force and a counterforce generated by an actuator calibrated against reference masses using direct current as the transfer variable. Improvements made during its one overhaul in 1988 have nearly halved its overall measurement uncertainty and extended the capabilities of the RFB to include measuring the output of ultrasonic systems with arbitrary pulse waveforms. PMID:27805084

  13. Portable radiation detection system for pulsed high energy photon sources

    SciTech Connect

    Harker, Y.D.; Lawrence, R.S.; Yoon, W.Y.

    1994-12-31

    Portable, battery-operated, radiation detection systems for measuring the intensity and energy characteristics of intense, pulsed photon sources (either high energy X-ray or gamma) have been developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. These field-deployable, suitcase-sized detection units are designed to measure and record the characteristics of a single radiation burst or multiple bursts from a pulsed ionizing radiation source. The recorded information can then be analyzed on a simple laptop computer at a location remote from the detection system and completely independent of the ongoing data acquisition process. Two detection unit designs are described. The first, called the MARK-1, has eight bismuth germanate (BGO) radiation detectors. Four of which are unshielded and have different thicknesses (diameters). The remaining four are the same size as the largest unshielded detector but have different thicknesses of lead shielding surrounding each detector. The second unit design, called the MARK-1 A, utilizes the same detection methodology as the MARK-1 but has ten BGO detectors instead of eight and utilizes a different method of amplifying detector signals enabling reduced overall size and weight of the detection unit. Both the detection system designs have sensitivity ranges from 3 x 10{sup {minus}9} cGy to 9 x 10{sup {minus}5} cGy per radiation burst. Experimental detection results will be presented and discussed along the systems` potential for commercial applications.

  14. Radiation risk management at DOE accelerator facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Dyck, O.B. van

    1997-01-01

    The DOE accelerator contractors have been discussing among themselves and with the Department how to improve radiation safety risk management. This activity-how to assure prevention of unplanned high exposures-is separate from normal exposure management, which historically has been quite successful. The ad-hoc Committee on the Accelerator Safety Order and Guidance [CASOG], formed by the Accelerator Section of the HPS, has proposed a risk- based approach, which will be discussed. Concepts involved are risk quantification and comparison (including with non-radiation risk), passive and active (reacting) protection systems, and probabilistic analysis. Different models of risk management will be presented, and the changing regulatory environment will also be discussed..

  15. Accuracy of Analog Fiber-Optic Links in Pulsed Radiation Environments

    SciTech Connect

    E. K. Miller, G. S. Macrum, I. J. McKenna, et al.

    2007-12-01

    Interferometric fiber-optic links used in pulsed-power experiments are evaluated for accuracy in the presence of radiation fields which alter fiber transmission. Amplitude-modulated format (e.g., Mach-Zehnder) and phase-modulated formats are compared. Historically, studies of radiation effects on optical fibers have focused on degradation and recovery of the fibers transmission properties; such work is either in the context of survivability of fibers in catastrophic conditions or suitability of fibers installed for command and control systems within an experimental facility [1], [2]. In this work, we consider links used to transmit realtime diagnostic data, and we analyze the error introduced by radiation effects during the drive pulse. The result is increased uncertainties in key parameters required to unfold the sinusoidal transfer function. Two types of modulation are considered: amplitude modulation typical of a Mach-Zehnder (M-Z) modulator [3], and phase modulation, which offers more flexible demodulation options but relies on the spatiotemporal coherence of the light in the fiber. The M-Z link is shown schematically in Fig. 1, and the phase-modulated link is shown in Fig. 2. We present data from two experimental environments: one with intense, controlled radiation fields to simulate conditions expected at the next generation of pulsed-power facilities, and the second with radiation effects below the noise level of the recording system. In the first case, we intentionally expose three types of single-mode fiber (SMF) to ionizing radiation and study the response by simultaneously monitoring phase and amplitude of the transmitted light. The phase and amplitude effects are evidently dominated by different physical phenomena, as their recovery dynamics are markedly different; both effects, though, show similar short-term behavior during exposure, integrating the dose at the dose levels studied, from 1 to 300 kRad, over the exposure times of 50 ps and 30 ns. In the

  16. HiRadMat: A high-energy, pulsed beam, material irradiation facility

    SciTech Connect

    Charitonidis, N.; Fabich, A.; Efthymiopoulos, I.

    2015-07-01

    HiRadMat is a recently constructed facility designed to provide high-intensity pulsed beams to an irradiation area where different material samples or accelerator components can be tested. The facility, located at the CERN SPS accelerator complex, uses a 440 GeV proton beam with a pulse length up to 7.2 μs and a maximum intensity up to 10{sup 13} protons / pulse. The facility, a unique place for performing state-of-the art beam-to-material experiments, operates under transnational access and welcomes and financially supports, under certain conditions, experimental teams to perform their experiments. (authors)

  17. Radiation protection at Hadron therapy facilities.

    PubMed

    Pelliccioni, Maorizio

    2011-07-01

    The Italian National Centre for Oncological Hadrontherapy is currently under construction in Pavia. It is designed for the treatment of deep-seated tumours (up to a depth of 27 cm of water equivalent) with proton and C-ion beams as well as for both clinical and radiobiological research. The particles will be accelerated by a 7-MeV u(-1) LINAC injector and a 400-MeV u(-1) synchrotron. In the first phase of the project, three treatment rooms will be in operation, equipped with four fixed beams, three horizontal and one vertical. The accelerators are currently undergoing commissioning. The main radiation protection problems encountered (shielding, activation, etc.) are hereby illustrated and discussed in relation to the constraints set by the Italian national authorities.

  18. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Annual Report 2008

    SciTech Connect

    LR Roeder

    2008-12-01

    The Importance of Clouds and Radiation for Climate Change: The Earth’s surface temperature is determined by the balance between incoming solar radiation and thermal (or infrared) radiation emitted by the Earth back to space. Changes in atmospheric composition, including greenhouse gases, clouds, and aerosols, can alter this balance and produce significant climate change. Global climate models (GCMs) are the primary tool for quantifying future climate change; however, there remain significant uncertainties in the GCM treatment of clouds, aerosol, and their effects on the Earth’s energy balance. In 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science created the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program to address scientific uncertainties related to global climate change, with a specific focus on the crucial role of clouds and their influence on the transfer of radiation in the atmosphere. To reduce these scientific uncertainties, the ARM Program uses a unique twopronged approach: • The ARM Climate Research Facility, a scientific user facility for obtaining long-term measurements of radiative fluxes, cloud and aerosol properties, and related atmospheric characteristics in diverse climate regimes; and • The ARM Science Program, focused on the analysis of ACRF and other data to address climate science issues associated with clouds, aerosols, and radiation, and to improve GCMs. This report provides an overview of each of these components and a sample of achievements for each in fiscal year (FY) 2008.

  19. 31. SECTIONS AND DETAILS OF ARVFS FACILITY, INCLUDING RADIATION HAZARD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. SECTIONS AND DETAILS OF ARVFS FACILITY, INCLUDING RADIATION HAZARD SIGN, WOOD RETAINING WALL, TANK COVER, AND DRAIN BOX. F.C. TORKELSON DRAWING NUMBER 842-ARVFS-701-3. INEL INDEX CODE NUMBER: 075 0701 851 151972. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Advanced Reentry Vehicle Fusing System, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  20. A Synchrotron Radiation Research Facility for Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winick, Herman

    2015-03-01

    Africa is the only habitable continent without a synchrotron light source. Dozens of African scientists use facilities abroad. Although South Africa has become a member of ESRF, the number of users is limited by distance and travel cost. A light source in Africa would give thousands of African scientists access to this tool. Momentum is now building for an African light source, as a collaboration involving several sub-Saharan African countries. An interim Steering Committee has been formed. SESAME, now nearing completion in Jordan as a collaboration of 9 countries in the Middle East (www.sesame.org.jo) may be the example followed. UNESCO became the umbrella organization for SESAME at its Executive Board 164th session, May 2002, as it did in the case of CERN in the 1950s. UNESCO's Executive Board described SESAME as ``a quintessential UNESCO project combining capacity building with vital peace-building through science'' and ``a model project for other regions''. It is likely that UNESCO, if asked, would play a similar role as a facilitator for an African light source.

  1. A Synchrotron Radiation Research Facility for Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans-Lutterodt, Kenneth; Mtingwa, Sekazi; Wague, Ahmadou; Tessema, Guebre; Winick, Herman

    2015-04-01

    Africa is the only habitable continent without a synchrotron light source. Dozens of African scientists use facilities abroad. Even though South Africa has become a member of ESRF, the number of users is limited by distance and travel cost. A light source in Africa would give many more African scientists access to this tool. Momentum is now building for an African light source, as a collaboration involving several African countries. An interim Steering Committee has been formed, with a mandate to plan a conference. SESAME, now nearing completion in Jordan, is a collaboration of 9 countries in the Middle East (www.sesame.org.jo) is an example to follow. UNESCO became the umbrella organization for SESAME at its Executive Board 164th session, May 2002, as it did in the case of CERN in the 1950s. UNESCO's Executive Board described SESAME as ``a quintessential UNESCO project combining capacity building with vital peace-building through science'' and ``a model project for other regions.'' It is likely that UNESCO, if asked, would play a similar role as a facilitator for an African light source.

  2. Characterization of radiation environments at selected Pacific Northwest Laboratory facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Oxley, C.L.

    1992-10-01

    This report is based on a study conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) from December 15, 1990 to December 15, 1991, to characterize the radiation environments at selected locations within PNL facilities. Thermoluminescent dosimeters were placed at 72 locations to measure non-productive radiation exposure to identify areas in which continuous occupation by a staff member would expose the staff member to radiation exceeding the 100 mrem/yr limit. The areas measured were found to be below the 0.05 mR/hr limit with the exception of three locations. At these three locations above the limit, radiation exposure was reduced by changing office locations and by additional shielding around radiation sources. Evaluations are recommended to determine the causes of elevated exposure rate readings.

  3. Excimer radiation from pulsed micro hollow cathode discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petzenhauser, Isfried; Ernst, Uwe; Frank, Klaus

    2001-10-01

    Since several years d.c. microhollow cathode discharges (MHCDs) are under investigation as efficient sources of VUV excimer radiation [1]. Up to now overall efficiency and the radiation power of the MHCDs are too low to compete e.g. with silent discharges. Substantial improvement in these parameters would make by its simple geometry MCHDs attractive for a wide range of applications. Experiments and simulations show that the efficiency of MCHDs is substantially reduced by high gas temperatures beyond 1500 K. Measurements in pure nitrogen showed that the gas temperature can be reduced about 40The actual experiments are with Xe and Ar bands in the VUV and the results of radiation output under d.c. and pulsed operation for different pulse duration and repetition rates are presented. [1] A. El-Habachi, K.H. Schoenbach, Appl. Phys. Lett. 73(7), pp. 885-887 (1998) [2] U. Ernst, "Emissionsspektroskopische Charakterisierung von Hochdruck-Mikrohohlkathodenentladungen", Ph. D thesis, Univ. of Erlangen-Nuremberg, 2001 This work was supported by DFG under the contact FR 1273-1

  4. High efficiency long pulse gigawatt sources of HPM radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arman, M. Joseph

    1999-05-01

    The High Power Microwave (HPM) technology has advanced tremendously in the last five decades. What started out as a mere passive tool in the form of radar for detecting airborne objects during the second world war, has grown to be an active vehicle that can influence and impact its target. Progress has been made in all fronts. The peak radiated power has gone up several orders of magnitude to several gigawatts, the efficiency has grown by a wide margin, and the total energy radiated for pulsed sources has grown to several hundreds of Jules per pulse. Major obstacles still exist. The number of sources that have already achieved one gigawatt or higher is too great to cover here. In what follows, we will briefly describe the sources that have radiated one gigawatt or higher with a pulselength of 300 ns or longer, and an rms efficiency of 10% or higher. We also address the obstacles lying ahead and suggest possible means of overcoming them. The sources presented are the Relativistic Klystron Oscillator (RKO), the Magnetically Insulated Line Oscillator (MILO), and the Tapered Magnetically Insulated Line Oscillator (TMILO).

  5. Design and Experiment of an Ultra-wideband Dual-Pulse Radiating Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitao, Z.; Guozhi, L.; Chaolong, Y.; Xiaoxin, S.; Yajun, F.; Lei, S.; Wenfeng, X.; Yufeng, Z.

    A method to widen the microwave spectrum by radiating two pulses of different FWHM is presented. Based on this method, a high-power ultra-wideband dual-pulse radiating antenna is developed. The antenna is made up of a half-impulse radiating antenna (IRA) over a ground plane. The diameter of the reflector is 3 m with focal length 1.2 m and the ground plane is a rectangle of metal with length of 4 m and width of 3 m. Three TEM horns are adopted to feed two pulses into the reflector. The antenna can radiate two different bipolar pulses with peak-to-peak width of 1.7 ns and 3 ns effectively. The 3 ns bipolar pulse is after 1.7 ns bipolar pulse with a delay of 12.5 ns. Simulation analysis and experiments on the antenna are performed. Good agreements between calculated and measured results are obtained. The radiated spectrum of the 1.7 ns pulse covers from 240 MHz to 400 MHz, while the radiated spectrum of the 3 ns pulse covers from 110 MHz to 210 MHz. The radiated spectrum of the combined 1.7 ns and 3 ns dual-pulse with a 12.5 ns delay covers from 100 MHz to 430 MHz. Results show that radiating the combined pulses is a more effective method to widen the microwave spectrum than radiating a single pulse.

  6. Interaction of Repetitively Pulsed High Energy Laser Radiation With Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugenschmidt, Manfred

    1986-10-01

    The paper is concerned with laser target interaction processes involving new methods of improving the overall energy balance. As expected theoretically, this can be achieved with high repetition rate pulsed lasers even for initially highly reflecting materials, such as metals. Experiments were performed by using a pulsed CO2 laser at mean powers up to 2 kW and repetition rates up to 100 Hz. The rates of temperature rise of aluminium for example were thereby increased by lore than a factor of 3 as compared to cw-radiation of comparable power density. Similar improvements were found for the overall absorptivities that were increased by this method by more than an order of magnitude.

  7. Computer program for pulsed thermocouples with corrections for radiation effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Will, H. A.

    1981-01-01

    A pulsed thermocouple was used for measuring gas temperatures above the melting point of common thermocouples. This was done by allowing the thermocouple to heat until it approaches its melting point and then turning on the protective cooling gas. This method required a computer to extrapolate the thermocouple data to the higher gas temperatures. A method that includes the effect of radiation in the extrapolation is described. Computations of gas temperature are provided, along with the estimate of the final thermocouple wire temperature. Results from tests on high temperature combustor research rigs are presented.

  8. Radiation from Pulsed Electron Beams in Space Plasmas.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-10-01

    Techtnicatz and engneeig auppo4tt withi.n ata. o6 competence i,6 p’LoviLded .to ESV PLd-g~ram 0-6-ic. (P,6 ) car- d o- Chet - ESV eZeehts .to pe4%6otm... D -R174 722 RADIATION FROM PULSED ELECTRON BEAMS IN SPACE PLASM s 1/i (U) STANFORD UNIV CA SPACE TELECOMMUNICATIONS AND RADIOSCIENCE LAB K J HARKER ET...beams. The study assumes an electron beam which has a well organized spatial structure determined by a fixed trajectory in a magnetic field and on/off

  9. Development of short pulse laser driven micro-hohlraums as a source of EUV radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krushelnick, Karl; Batson, Thomas; McKelvey, Andrew; Raymond, Anthony; Thomas, Alec; Yanovsky, Victor; Nees, John; Maksimchuk, Anatoly

    2015-11-01

    Experiments at large scale laser facilities such as NIF allow the radiativ properties of dens, high-temperature matter to be studied at previously unreachable regime, but are limited by cost and system availability. A scaled system using a short laser pulses and delivering energy to much smaller hohlraum could be capable of reaching comparable energy densities by depositing the energy in a much smaller volume before ablation of the wall material closes the cavit. The laser is tightl focused through the cavity and then expands to illuminate the wall. Experiments were performe using the Hercules Ti:Sapphire laser system at Michiga. Targets include cavities machined in bulk material using low laser power, and then shot in situ with a single full power pulse as well as micron scale pre-fabricate target. Spectral characteristics were measured using a soft X-ray spectromete, K-alpha x-ray imaging system and a filtered photo cathode array. Scalings of the radiation temperature were made for variations in the hohlraum cavit, the pulse duration as well as the focusing conditions. Proof of principle time resolved absorption spectroscopy experiments were also performe. These sources may allow opacity and atomic physics measurements with plasma an radiation temperatures comparable to much larger hohlraums, but with much higher repetition rate and in a university scale laboratory. We acknowledge funding from DTRA grant HDTRA1-11-1-0066.

  10. AREAL test facility for advanced accelerator and radiation source concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsakanov, V. M.; Amatuni, G. A.; Amirkhanyan, Z. G.; Aslyan, L. V.; Avagyan, V. Sh.; Danielyan, V. A.; Davtyan, H. D.; Dekhtiarov, V. S.; Gevorgyan, K. L.; Ghazaryan, N. G.; Grigoryan, B. A.; Grigoryan, A. H.; Hakobyan, L. S.; Haroutiunian, S. G.; Ivanyan, M. I.; Khachatryan, V. G.; Laziev, E. M.; Manukyan, P. S.; Margaryan, I. N.; Markosyan, T. M.; Martirosyan, N. V.; Mehrabyan, Sh. A.; Mkrtchyan, T. H.; Muradyan, L. Kh.; Nikogosyan, G. H.; Petrosyan, V. H.; Sahakyan, V. V.; Sargsyan, A. A.; Simonyan, A. S.; Toneyan, H. A.; Tsakanian, A. V.; Vardanyan, T. L.; Vardanyan, A. S.; Yeremyan, A. S.; Zakaryan, S. V.; Zanyan, G. S.

    2016-09-01

    Advanced Research Electron Accelerator Laboratory (AREAL) is a 50 MeV electron linear accelerator project with a laser driven RF gun being constructed at the CANDLE Synchrotron Research Institute. In addition to applications in life and materials sciences, the project aims as a test facility for advanced accelerator and radiation source concepts. In this paper, the AREAL RF photoinjector performance, the facility design considerations and its highlights in the fields of free electron laser, the study of new high frequency accelerating structures, the beam microbunching and wakefield acceleration concepts are presented.

  11. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program facilities newsletter, June 2001.

    SciTech Connect

    Holdridge, D.J.

    2001-07-10

    The ARM Program studies clouds, sunlight, and their interactions to understand how they affect Earth's climate. One of the many instruments used to look at clouds at the SGP CART site is the micropulse lidar (MPL; ''lidar'' was coined from ''light distance and ranging''). The ARM Program operates five MPLs. One is at the SGP central facility; one is at the North Slope of Alaska CART site in Barrow, Alaska; and three are for use at the Tropical Western Pacific site on Nauru and Manus islands. The MPL is a remote sensing instrument used to measure the height of overhead clouds and particles. An eye-safe laser in the system directs a beam vertically. As short pulses of laser light travel through the sky, they may encounter water droplets or aerosol particles in the atmosphere. These particles intercept the laser light and scatter it in different directions. Some of the scattered light returns to Earth's surface. A receiver on the ground collects backscattered light that bounces off atmospheric particles and uses the information to determine the distance between the ground and the particles. The signals detected are collected and plotted. The greater the signal strength, the more scatterers are present in the atmosphere. A plot based on this relationship provides a ''snapshot'' of the cloud overhead and shows the structure inside the cloud. In addition, the information gathered from the MPL can be used to determine the height of the planetary boundary layer, the well-mixed layer of the atmosphere that develops during daytime hours as the sun heats Earth's surface and sets up vertical mixing. Small airborne particles that can also be detected include smoke or dust carried into the atmosphere. This information is valuable to climate researchers. Because the MPL uses an eye-safe laser, it is not a danger to pilots of planes flying overhead and can be run continuously. The availability of continuous data is a great benefit to researchers in their efforts to incorporate the

  12. ARTICLES: Thermohydrodynamic models of the interaction of pulse-periodic radiation with matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arutyunyan, R. V.; Baranov, V. Yu; Bol'shov, Leonid A.; Malyuta, D. D.; Mezhevov, V. S.; Pis'mennyĭ, V. D.

    1987-02-01

    Experimental and theoretical investigations were made of the processes of drilling and deep melting of metals by pulsed and pulse-periodic laser radiation. Direct photography of the surface revealed molten metal splashing due to interaction with single CO2 laser pulses. A proposed thermohydrodynamic model was used to account for the experimental results and to calculate the optimal parameters of pulse-periodic radiation needed for deep melting. The melt splashing processes were simulated numerically.

  13. Radiation shielding for the Fermilab Vertical Cavity Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsburg, Camille; Rakhno, Igor; /Fermilab

    2010-03-01

    The results of radiation shielding studies for the vertical test cryostat VTS1 at Fermilab performed with the codes FISHPACT and MARS15 are presented and discussed. The analysis is focused on operations with two RF cavities in the cryostat. The vertical cavity test facility (VCTF) for superconducting RF cavities in Industrial Building 1 at Fermilab has been in operation since 2007. The facility currently consists of a single vertical test cryostat VTS1. Radiation shielding for VTS1 was designed for operations with single 9-cell 1.3 GHz cavities, and the shielding calculations were performed using a simplified model of field emission as the radiation source. The operations are proposed to be extended in such a way that two RF cavities will be in VTS1 at a time, one above the other, with tests for each cavity performed sequentially. In such a case the radiation emitted during the tests from the lower cavity can, in part, bypass the initially designed shielding which can lead to a higher dose in the building. Space for additional shielding, either internal or external to VTS1, is limited. Therefore, a re-evaluation of the radiation shielding was performed. An essential part of the present analysis is in using realistic models for cavity geometry and spatial, angular and energy distributions of field-emitted electrons inside the cavities. The calculations were performed with the computer codes FISHPACT and MARS15.

  14. Radiation-induced insulator discharge pulses in the CRRES Internal Discharge Monitor satellite experiment. [Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederickson, A. R.; Mullen, E. G.; Brautigam, D. H.; Kerns, K. J.; Robinson, P. A., Jr.; Holman, E. G.

    1991-01-01

    The Internal Discharge Monitor (IDM) is designed to observe electrical pulses from common electrical insulators in space service. The IDM is flying on the Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES). The sixteen insulator samples include G10 circuit boards, FR4 and PTFE fiberglass circuit boards, FEP Teflon, alumina, and wires with common insulations. The samples are fully enclosed, mutually isolated, and space radiation penetrates 0.02 cm of aluminum before striking the samples. The IDM results indicate the rate at which insulator pulses occur. Pulsing began on the seventh orbit. The maximum pulse rate occurred near orbit 600 when over 50 pulses occurred. The average pulse rate is approximately two per orbit, but nearly half of the first 600 orbits experienced no pulses. The pulse rate per unit flux of high energy electrons has not changed dramatically over the first ten months in space. These pulse rates are in agreement with laboratory experience on shorter time scales. Several of the samples have never pulsed. IDM pulses are the seeds of larger satellite electrical anomalies. The pulse rates are compared with space radiation intensities, L shell location, and spectral distributions from the radiation spectrometers on CRRES.

  15. Evaluation of material dispersion using a nanosecond optical pulse radiator.

    PubMed

    Horiguchi, M; Ohmori, Y; Miya, T

    1979-07-01

    To study the material dispersion effects on graded-index fibers, a method for measuring the material dispersion in optical glass fibers has been developed. Nanosecond pulses in the 0.5-1.7-microm region are generated by a nanosecond optical pulse radiator and grating monochromator. These pulses are injected into a GeO(2)-P(2)0(5)-doped silica graded-index fiber. Relative time delay changes between different wavelengths are used to determine material dispersion, core glass refractive index, material group index, and optimum profile parameter of the graded-index fiber. From the measured data, the optimum profile parameter on the GeO(2)-P(2)O(5)-doped silica graded-index fiber could be estimated to be 1.88 at 1.27 microm of the material dispersion free wavelength region and 1.82 at 1.55 microm of the lowest-loss wavelength region in silica-based optical fiber waveguides.

  16. Proton and heavy ion acceleration facilities for space radiation research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Jack

    2003-01-01

    The particles and energies commonly used for medium energy nuclear physics and heavy charged particle radiobiology and radiotherapy at particle accelerators are in the charge and energy range of greatest interest for space radiation health. In this article we survey some of the particle accelerator facilities in the United States and around the world that are being used for space radiation health and related research, and illustrate some of their capabilities with discussions of selected accelerator experiments applicable to the human exploration of space.

  17. Proton and heavy ion acceleration facilities for space radiation research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Jack

    2003-01-01

    The particles and energies commonly used for medium energy nuclear physics and heavy charged particle radiobiology and radiotherapy at particle accelerators are in the charge and energy range of greatest interest for space radiation health. In this article we survey some of the particle accelerator facilities in the United States and around the world that are being used for space radiation health and related research, and illustrate some of their capabilities with discussions of selected accelerator experiments applicable to the human exploration of space.

  18. 76 FR 13397 - DOE Response to Recommendation 2010-2 of the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, Pulse Jet...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-11

    ... Response to Recommendation 2010-2 of the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, Pulse Jet Mixing at the... Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 2010-2, concerning Pulse Jet Mixing at the Waste... Board (Board) Recommendation 2010-2, Pulse Jet Mixing at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant...

  19. Point source of UV-radiation with a frequency of 1 khz and short pulse duration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baksht, E. Kh.; Tarasenko, V. F.; Shut'ko, Yu. V.; Erofeev, M. V.

    2012-04-01

    Radiation of the discharge plasma from a nanosecond breakdown in a nonuniform electric field of short interelectrode gaps is investigated. Voltage pulses with incident wave amplitude of ~10 kV, pulse duration of ~1 ns (FWHM), and pulse front duration of ~0.2 ns are used. It is demonstrated that for pulsed-periodic breakdown of the gap 0.5 mm long in air at atmospheric pressure, the main contribution to plasma radiation give lines of the electrode material and the continuum, and the maximum radiation intensity is registered in the region of 200-300 nm, where ~40% of total radiation energy is concentrated.

  20. Design and characterisation of a pulsed neutron interrogation facility.

    PubMed

    Favalli, A; Pedersen, B

    2007-01-01

    The Joint Research Centre recently obtained a license to operate a new experimental device intended for research in the field of nuclear safeguards. The research projects currently being planned for the new device includes mass determination of fissile materials in matrices and detection of contraband non-nuclear materials. The device incorporates a commercial pulsed neutron generator and a large graphite mantle surrounding the sample cavity. In this configuration, a relatively high thermal neutron flux with a long lifetime is achieved inside the sample cavity. By pulsing the neutron generator, a sample may be interrogated by a pure thermal neutron flux during repeated time periods. The paper reports on the design of the new device and the pulsed fast and thermal neutron source. The thermal neutron flux caused by the neutron generator and the graphite structure has been characterised by foil activation, fission chamber and (3)He proportional counter measurements.

  1. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Facilities Newsletter - September 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Holdridge, D. J., ed

    1999-09-27

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program September 1999 Facilities Newsletter discusses the several Intensive Observation Periods (IOPs) that the ARM SGP CART site will host in the near future. Two projects of note are the International Pyrgeometer Intercomparison and the Fall Single Column Model (SCM)/Nocturnal Boundary Layer (NBL) IOP. Both projects will bring many US and international scientists to the SGP CART site to participate in atmospheric research.

  2. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility Management Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Mather, James

    2016-04-01

    Mission and Vision Statements for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility Mission The ARM Climate Research Facility, a DOE scientific user facility, provides the climate research community with strategically located in situ and remote-sensing observatories designed to improve the understanding and representation, in climate and earth system models, of clouds and aerosols as well as their interactions and coupling with the Earth’s surface. Vision To provide a detailed and accurate description of the Earth atmosphere in diverse climate regimes to resolve the uncertainties in climate and Earth system models toward the development of sustainable solutions for the nation's energy and environmental challenges.

  3. The Neutral Beam Test Facility and Radiation Effects Facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    McKenzie-Wilson, R.B.

    1990-01-01

    As part of the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has constructed a Neutral Beam Test Facility (NBTF) and a Radiation Effects Facility (REF). These two facilities use the surplus capacity of the 200-MeV Linac injector for the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS). The REF can be used to simulate radiation damage effects in space from both natural and man made radiation sources. The H{sup {minus}} beam energy, current and dimensions can be varied over a wide range leading to a broad field of application. The NBTF has been designed to carry out high precision experiments and contains an absolute reference target system for the on-line calibration of measurements carried out in the experimental hall. The H{sup {minus}} beam energy, current and dimensions can also be varied over a wide range but with tradeoffs depending on the required accuracy. Both facilities are fully operational and will be described together with details of the associated experimental programs.

  4. Detection of coincident radiations in a single transducer by pulse shape analysis

    DOEpatents

    Warburton, William K.; Tan, Hui; Hennig, Wolfgang

    2008-03-11

    Pulse shape analysis determines if two radiations are in coincidence. A transducer is provided that, when it absorbs the first radiation produces an output pulse that is characterized by a shorter time constant and whose area is nominally proportional to the energy of the absorbed first radiation and, when it absorbs the second radiation produces an output pulse that is characterized by a longer time constant and whose area is nominally proportional to the energy of the absorbed second radiation. When radiation is absorbed, the output pulse is detected and two integrals are formed, the first over a time period representative of the first time constant and the second over a time period representative of the second time constant. The values of the two integrals are examined to determine whether the first radiation, the second radiation, or both were absorbed in the transducer, the latter condition defining a coincident event.

  5. Early test facilities and analytic methods for radiation shielding: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Ingersoll, D T; Ingersoll, J K

    1992-11-01

    This report represents a compilation of eight papers presented at the 1992 American Nuclear Society/European Nuclear Society International Meeting. The meeting is of special significance since it commemorates the fiftieth anniversary of the first controlled nuclear chain reaction. The papers contained in this report were presented in a special session organized by the Radiation Protection and Shielding Division in keeping with the historical theme of the meeting. The paper titles are good indicators of their content and are: (1) The origin of radiation shielding research: The Oak Ridge experience, (2) Shielding research at the hanford site, (3) Aircraft shielding experiments at General Dynamics Fort Worth, 1950-1962, (4) Where have the neutrons gone , a history of the tower shielding facility, (5) History and evolution of buildup factors, (6) Early shielding research at Bettis atomic power laboratory, (7) UK reactor shielding: then and now, (8) A very personal view of the development of radiation shielding theory.

  6. Radiation-induced insulator discharge pulses in the CRRES internal discharge monitor satellite experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederickson, A. R.; Mullen, E. G.; Brautigam, D. H.; Kerns, K. J.

    1992-01-01

    The Internal Discharge Monitor (IDM) was designed to observe electrical pulses from common electrical insulators in space service. The sixteen insulator samples included twelve planar printed circuit boards and four cables. The samples were fully enclosed, mutually isolated, and space radiation penetrated 0.02 cm of aluminum before striking the samples. Pulsing began on the seventh orbit, the maximum pulse rate occurred on the seventeenth orbit when 13 pulses occurred, and the pulses slowly diminished to about one per 3 orbits six months later. After 8 months, the radiation belts abruptly increased and the pulse rates attained a new high. These pulse rates were in agreement with laboratory experience on shorter time scales. Several of the samples never pulsed. If the pulses were not confined within IDM, the physical processes could spread to become a full spacecraft anomaly. The IDM results indicate the rate at which small insulator pulses occur. Small pulses are the seeds of larger satellite electrical anomalies. The pulse rates are compared with space radiation intensities, L shell location, and spectral distributions from the radiation spectrometers on the Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite.

  7. Modeling of high power pulse generator based on the non-linear elements of pulsed facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Averyanov, G. P.; Dmitrieva, V. V.; Kobylyatskiy, A. V.

    2017-01-01

    The article considered the software implementation mathematical model of the voltage pulse generator with a hard switch. The interactive object-oriented software interface provides the choice of generator parameters and the type of its load, as well as pulses parameters analysis on the load at the generator switching.

  8. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program facilities newsletter, December 2002.

    SciTech Connect

    Holdridge, D. J.

    2003-01-09

    Radiometer Characterization System--The new Radiometer Characterization System (RCS) installed on the Guest Instrument Facility mezzanine at the SGP central facility will permit side-by-side evaluations of several new and modified broadband radiometers and comparisons with radiometers currently in use. If the new designs or modifications give substantially more accurate measurements, ARM scientists might elect to replace or modify the existing broadband radiometers. The RCS will also permit ARM scientists to determine whether the radiometers need cleaning more frequently than the current biweekly schedule, and an automatic radiometer washer will be evaluated for reliability and effectiveness in daily cleaning. A radiometer is an instrument used to measure radiant energy. ARM uses a pyranometer to measure the solar radiation reaching Earth's surface. Clouds, water vapor, dust, and other aerosol particles can interfere with the transmission of solar radiation. The amount of radiant energy reaching the ground depends on the type and quantity of absorbers and reflectors between the sun and Earth's surface. A pyranometer can also measure solar radiation reflected from the surface. A pyranometer has a thermoelectric device (a wire-wound, plated thermopile) that produces an electric current proportional to the broadband shortwave solar radiation reaching a detector. The detector, which is painted black, is mounted in a precision-ground glass sphere for protection from the elements. The glass must be kept very clean, because dirt and dust scatter and absorb solar radiation and make the measurement incorrect. Accurate measurements of solar radiation are needed so that scientists can accurately replicate the interactions of solar radiation and clouds in global climate models--a major goal of the ARM program. TX-2002 AIRS Validation Campaign Winding Down--The TX-2002 Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) Validation Campaign ended on December 13, 2002. The National Aeronautics

  9. Scintillator characterization using the LBL Pulsed X-ray Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, W.W.; Derenzo, S.E.; Weber, M.J.; Blankespoor, S.C.; Ho, M.H.; West, A.C.

    1994-10-01

    The authors have developed a bench-top pulsed x-ray system for measuring scintillation properties of compounds in crystal or powdered form. The source is a light-excited x-ray tube that produces 40 x-ray photons (mean energy 18.5 keV) per steradian in each 100 ps fwhm pulse. The repetition rate is adjustable from 0 to 10{sup 7} pulses per second. The fluorescent emanations from the x-ray excited samples are detected with either a sapphire-windowed microchannel plate photomultiplier tube (spectral range 150--650 nm, transit time jitter 40 ps fwhm) or a quartz windowed GaAs(Cs) photomultiplier tube (spectral range 160--930 nm, transit time jitter 4 ns fwhm). Decay time spectra are acquired using a TDC Havina 40 ps fwhm resolution over a 84 ms dynamic range. A computer controlled monochromator can be inserted into the optical path to measure the emission spectrum or wavelength resolved decay time spectrum. A computer controlled sample changer allows up to 64 samples to be measured without intervention.

  10. The Explosive Pulsed Power Test Facility at AFRL

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    Air Force Research Laboratory , AFRL /DEHP, Albuquerque...NM 87117 S. Coffey, A. Brown, B. Guffey NumerEx, Albuquerque, NM Abstract The Air Force Research Laboratory has developed and tested a...Chestnut Site on Kirtland Air Force Base. The facility is described in this paper, including details of recent upgrades. I.

  11. Design concepts for a pulse power test facility to simulate EMP surges in overhead power lines. Part I. Fast pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Ramrus, A.

    1986-02-01

    Objective of the study was to create conceptual designs of high voltage pulsers capable of simulating two types of electromagnetic pulses (EMPs) caused by a high-altitude nuclear burst; the slow rise time magnetohydrodynamic (MHD-EMP) and the fast rise time high-altitude EMP (HEMP). The pulser design was directed towards facilities capable of performing EMP vulnerability testing of components used in the national electric power system.

  12. Multi-MGy Radiation Hardened Camera for Nuclear Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Girard, Sylvain; Boukenter, Aziz; Ouerdane, Youcef; Goiffon, Vincent; Corbiere, Franck; Rolando, Sebastien; Molina, Romain; Estribeau, Magali; Avon, Barbara; Magnan, Pierre; Paillet, Philippe; Duhamel, Olivier; Gaillardin, Marc; Raine, Melanie

    2015-07-01

    There is an increasing interest in developing cameras for surveillance systems to monitor nuclear facilities or nuclear waste storages. Particularly, for today's and the next generation of nuclear facilities increasing safety requirements consecutive to Fukushima Daiichi's disaster have to be considered. For some applications, radiation tolerance needs to overcome doses in the MGy(SiO{sub 2}) range whereas the most tolerant commercial or prototypes products based on solid state image sensors withstand doses up to few kGy. The objective of this work is to present the radiation hardening strategy developed by our research groups to enhance the tolerance to ionizing radiations of the various subparts of these imaging systems by working simultaneously at the component and system design levels. Developing radiation-hardened camera implies to combine several radiation-hardening strategies. In our case, we decided not to use the simplest one, the shielding approach. This approach is efficient but limits the camera miniaturization and is not compatible with its future integration in remote-handling or robotic systems. Then, the hardening-by-component strategy appears mandatory to avoid the failure of one of the camera subparts at doses lower than the MGy. Concerning the image sensor itself, the used technology is a CMOS Image Sensor (CIS) designed by ISAE team with custom pixel designs used to mitigate the total ionizing dose (TID) effects that occur well below the MGy range in classical image sensors (e.g. Charge Coupled Devices (CCD), Charge Injection Devices (CID) and classical Active Pixel Sensors (APS)), such as the complete loss of functionality, the dark current increase and the gain drop. We'll present at the conference a comparative study between these radiation-hardened pixel radiation responses with respect to conventional ones, demonstrating the efficiency of the choices made. The targeted strategy to develop the complete radiation hard camera electronics will

  13. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Annual Report 2007

    SciTech Connect

    LR Roeder

    2007-12-01

    This annual report describes the purpose and structure of the program, and presents key accomplishments in 2007. Notable achievements include: • Successful review of the ACRF as a user facility by the DOE Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee. The subcommittee reinforced the importance of the scientific impacts of this facility, and its value for the international research community. • Leadership of the Cloud Land Surface Interaction Campaign. This multi-agency, interdisciplinary field campaign involved enhanced surface instrumentation at the ACRF Southern Great Plains site and, in concert with the Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Processing Study sponsored by the DOE Atmospheric Science Program, coordination of nine aircraft through the ARM Aerial Vehicles Program. • Successful deployment of the ARM Mobile Facility in Germany, including hosting nearly a dozen guest instruments and drawing almost 5000 visitors to the site. • Key advancements in the representation of radiative transfer in weather forecast models from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts. • Development of several new enhanced data sets, ranging from best estimate surface radiation measurements from multiple sensors at all ACRF sites to the extension of time-height cloud occurrence profiles to Niamey, Niger, Africa. • Publication of three research papers in a single issue (February 2007) of the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society.

  14. Generation of terahertz radiation by focusing femtosecond bichromatic laser pulses in a gas or plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Chizhov, P A; Volkov, Roman V; Bukin, V V; Ushakov, A A; Garnov, Sergei V; Savel'ev-Trofimov, Andrei B

    2013-04-30

    The generation of terahertz radiation by focusing two-frequency femtosecond laser pulses is studied. Focusing is carried out both in an undisturbed gas and in a pre-formed plasma. The energy of the terahertz radiation pulses is shown to reduce significantly in the case of focusing in a plasma. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  15. The Radiation Dose Determination of the Pulsed X-ray Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miloichikova, I.; Stuchebrov, S.; Zhaksybayeva, G.; Wagner, A.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper the radiation dose measurement technique of the pulsed X-ray source RAP-160-5 is described. The dose rate measurement results from the pulsed X-ray beams at the different distance between the pulsed X-ray source focus and the detector obtained with the help of the thermoluminescent detectors DTL-02, the universal dosimeter UNIDOS E equipped with the plane-parallel ionization chamber type 23342, the dosimeter-radiometer DKS-96 and the radiation dosimeter AT 1123 are demonstrated. The recommendations for the dosimetry measurements of the pulsed X-ray generator RAP-160-5 under different radiation conditions are proposed.

  16. Intercomparison of radiation protection instrumentation in a pulsed neutron field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caresana, M.; Denker, A.; Esposito, A.; Ferrarini, M.; Golnik, N.; Hohmann, E.; Leuschner, A.; Luszik-Bhadra, M.; Manessi, G.; Mayer, S.; Ott, K.; Röhrich, J.; Silari, M.; Trompier, F.; Volnhals, M.; Wielunski, M.

    2014-02-01

    In the framework of the EURADOS working group 11, an intercomparison of active neutron survey meters was performed in a pulsed neutron field (PNF). The aim of the exercise was to evaluate the performances of various neutron instruments, including commercially available rem-counters, personal dosemeters and instrument prototypes. The measurements took place at the cyclotron of the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH. The cyclotron is routinely used for proton therapy of ocular tumours, but an experimental area is also available. For the therapy the machine accelerates protons to 68 MeV. The interaction of the proton beam with a thick tungsten target produces a neutron field with energy up to about 60 MeV. One interesting feature of the cyclotron is that the beam can be delivered in bursts, with the possibility to modify in a simple and flexible way the burst length and the ion current. Through this possibility one can obtain radiation bursts of variable duration and intensity. All instruments were placed in a reference position and irradiated with neutrons delivered in bursts of different intensity. The analysis of the instrument response as a function of the burst charge (the total electric charge of the protons in the burst shot onto the tungsten target) permitted to assess for each device the dose underestimation due to the time structure of the radiation field. The personal neutron dosemeters were exposed on a standard PMMA slab phantom and the response linearity was evaluated.

  17. Optimized laser pulse profile for efficient radiation pressure acceleration of ions

    SciTech Connect

    Bulanov, S. S.; Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2012-12-21

    The radiation pressure acceleration regime of laser ion acceleration requires high intensity laser pulses to function efficiently. Moreover the foil should be opaque for incident radiation during the interaction to ensure maximum momentum transfer from the pulse to the foil, which requires proper matching of the target to the laser pulse. However, in the ultrarela-tivistic regime, this leads to large acceleration distances, over which the high laser intensity for a Gaussian laser pulse must be maintained. It is shown that proper tailoring of the laser pulse profile can significantly reduce the acceleration distance, leading to a compact laser ion accelerator, requiring less energy to operate.

  18. Optimized laser pulse profile for efficient radiation pressure acceleration of ions

    SciTech Connect

    Bulanov, S. S.; Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2012-09-15

    The radiation pressure acceleration regime of laser ion acceleration requires high intensity laser pulses to function efficiently. Moreover, the foil should be opaque for incident radiation during the interaction to ensure maximum momentum transfer from the pulse to the foil, which requires proper matching of the target to the laser pulse. However, in the ultrarelativistic regime, this leads to large acceleration distances, over which the high laser intensity for a Gaussian laser pulse must be maintained. It is shown that proper tailoring of the laser pulse profile can significantly reduce the acceleration distance, leading to a compact laser ion accelerator, requiring less energy to operate.

  19. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program facilities newsletter, February 2001.

    SciTech Connect

    Holdridge, D. J.

    2001-03-08

    This newsletter consists of the following: (1) ARM Science Team Meeting Scheduled--The 11th Annual ARM Science Team meeting is scheduled for March 19-23, 2001, in Atlanta, Georgia. Members of the science team will exchange research results achieved by using ARM data. The science team is composed of working groups that investigate four topics: instantaneous radiative flux, cloud parameterizations and modeling, cloud properties, and aerosols. The annual meeting brings together the science team's 150 members to discuss issues related to ARM and its research. The members represent universities, government laboratories and research facilities, and independent research companies. (2) Communications to Extended Facilities Upgraded--New communications equipment has been installed at all of the SGP extended facilities. Shelters were installed to house the new equipment used to transfer data from instruments via the Internet to the site data system at the central facility. This upgrade has improved data availability from the extended facilities to 100% and reduced telephone costs greatly. (3) SGP Goes ''Buggy''--Steve Sekelsky, a researcher from the University of Massachusetts, is planning to bring a 95-GHz radar to the SGP central facility for deployment in March-October 2001. The radar will help to identify signals due to insects flying in the air. The ARM millimeter cloud radar, which operates at 35 GHz, is sensitive to such insect interference. Testing will also be performed by using a second 35-GHz radar with a polarized radar beam, which can differentiate signals from insects versus cloud droplets. (4) Winter Fog--Fog can add to hazards already associated with winter weather. Common types of fog formation include advection, radiation, and steam. Advection fog: An advection fog is a dense fog that forms when a warm, moist air mass moves into an area with cooler ground below. For example, fog can form in winter when warmer, water-saturated air from the south (associated

  20. The Dosimetric Parameters Investigation of the Pulsed X-ray and Gamma Radiation Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuchebrov, S. G.; Miloichikova, I. A.; Shilova, X. O.

    2016-01-01

    The most common type of radiation used for diagnostic purposes are X-rays. However, X-rays methods have limitations related to the radiation dose for the biological objects. It is known that the use of the pulsed emitting source synchronized with the detection equipment for internal density visualization of objects significant reduces the radiation dose to the object. In the article the analysis of the suitability of the different dosimetric equipment for the radiation dose estimation of the pulsed emitting sources is carried out. The approbation results on the pulsed X-ray generator RAP-160-5 of the dosimetry systems workability with the pulse radiation and its operation range are presented. The results of the dose field investigation of the portable betatron OB-4 are demonstrated. The depth dose distribution in the air, lead and water of the pulsed bremsstrahlung generated by betatron are shown.

  1. Development of a cryogenic EOS capability for the Z Pulsed Radiation Source: Goals and accomplishments of FY97 LDRD project

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, D.L.; Johnston, R.R.; Asay, J.R.

    1998-03-01

    Experimental cryogenic capabilities are essential for the study of ICF high-gain target and weapons effects issues involving dynamic materials response at low temperatures. This report describes progress during the period 2/97-11/97 on the FY97 LDRD project ``Cryogenic EOS Capabilities on Pulsed Radiation Sources (Z Pinch)``. The goal of this project is the development of a general purpose cryogenic target system for precision EOS and shock physics measurements at liquid helium temperatures on the Z accelerator Z-pinch pulsed radiation source. Activity during the FY97 LDRD phase of this project has focused on development of a conceptual design for the cryogenic target system based on consideration of physics, operational, and safety issues, design and fabrication of principal system components, construction and instrumentation of a cryogenic test facility for off-line thermal and optical testing at liquid helium temperatures, initial thermal testing of a cryogenic target assembly, and the design of a cryogenic system interface to the Z pulsed radiation source facility. The authors discuss these accomplishments as well as elements of the project that require further work.

  2. Present and future synchrotron radiation facilities in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winick, H.

    1986-10-01

    I was very pleased to be invited by Takehiko Ishii to spend 4 months (September-December 1985) as a visiting scientist at the Institute for Solid State Physics (ISSP) of the University of Tokyo. This visit, co-sponsored by Kazuo Huke of the Photon Factory, gave me an excellent opportunity to find out first hand about the status and prospects for synchrotron radiation research in Japan. This article summarizes my observations and discussions during this visit. In an appendix an update on the present status of these facilities is presented, with particular emphasis on the Photon Factory, the largest and most capable facility. The interested reader is referred also to annual activity reports published by the SOR-Ring and Photon Factory labs and planned for 1986 by the UVSOR lab and also to other references listed at the end of this article.

  3. Transmission grating goniometer elements for use at synchrotron radiation facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatchyn, R.; Lindau, I.

    1982-04-01

    In this paper we show analytically that accurate detection of the positions of the diffracted orders from a holographic transmission grating can be used to compute the angle of incidence of the light onto the grating, irrespective of the light's frequency. Since such a device may be employed as a goniometer, and since beam height may be measured independently, we show that such grating may be employed as beam attitude/altitude detectors at synchrotron radiation facilities where beam steering and positioning are problematical.

  4. An X-ray microprobe facility using synchrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    Gordon, B M; Jones, K W; Hanson, A L; Pounds, J G; Rivers, M L; Spanne, P; Sutton, S R

    1990-01-01

    An X-ray microprobe for trace elemental analysis at micrometer spatial resolutions, using synchrotron radiation (SR), is under development. The facility consists of two beamlines, one including a 1:1 focusing mirror and the other an 8:1 ellipsoidal mirror. At present, "white light" is used for excitation of the characteristic X-ray fluorescence lines. Sensitivities in thin biological samples are in the range of 2-20 fg in 100 microns2 areas in 5 min irradiation times. Scanning techniques, as well as microtomography and chemical speciation, are discussed. Application to a specific biomedical study is included.

  5. An x-ray microprobe facility using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, B.M.; Jones, K.W.; Hanson, A.L.; Pounds, J.G.; Rivers, M.L.; Spanne, P.; Sutton, S.R.

    1989-01-01

    A x-ray microprobe for trace elemental analysis at micrometer spatial resolutions using synchrotron radiation (SR) is under development. The facility consists of two beamlines, one including a 1:1 focusing mirror and the other an 8:1 ellipsoidal mirror. At present ''white light''' is used for excitation of the characteristic x-ray fluorescence lines. Sensitivities in thin biological samples are in the range of 2-20 fg in 100 ..mu..m/sup 2/ areas in 5 min irradiation times. Scanning techniques as well as microtomography and chemical speciation are discussed. Application to a specific biomedical study is included. 13 refs., 2 figs.

  6. ELF radiation from the Tromsoe super heater facility

    SciTech Connect

    Barr, R.; Stubbe, P. )

    1991-06-01

    Direct comparisons have been made of the ionospheric ELF radiation produced by the new (1 GW ERP) and old (250 MW ERP) antennas of the Tromsoe heater system, but no significant differences in the ELF signal strength have been detected. This initially surprising result is shown to require a value of unity for the index relating the received ELF signal strength to HF power input to the antenna. A series of experiments performed solely to derive more accurate values for this power index provided values ranging from 0.74 to 0.97, dependent on the ELF frequencies generated. It has been suggested that ELF radiation from the normal Tromsoe heater facility should be limited by saturation effects, even when operating well below the maximum HF power density (3mW/m{sup 2} in the D-region). No evidence for such saturation effects has been found even at power densities greater than 10mW/m{sup 2}.

  7. Formation of a plasma with the determining role of radiative processes in thin foils irradiated by a pulse of the PEARL subpetawatt laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikuz, S. A.; Skobelev, I. Yu.; Alkhimova, M. A.; Pokrovskii, G. V.; Colgan, J.; Pikuz, T. A.; Faenov, A. Ya.; Soloviev, A. A.; Burdonov, K. F.; Eremeev, A. A.; Sladko, A. D.; Osmanov, R. R.; Starodubtsev, M. V.; Ginzburg, V. N.; Kuz'min, A. A.; Sergeev, A. M.; Fuchs, J.; Khazanov, E. A.; Shaikin, A. A.; Shaikin, I. A.; Yakovlev, I. V.

    2017-01-01

    A superbright X-ray source with a radiation temperature of 1.2 keV making it possible to create a solid-state plasma whose kinetics is determined by the radiative processes has been implemented under the impact of a 170-TW pulse of the PEARL femtosecond laser facility on an aluminum target with submicron thickness. The diagnostics of the created plasma is performed by X-ray spectral methods using spectral transitions in hollow multicharged ions.

  8. Novel protective lead shield and pulse fluoroscopy can reduce radiation exposure during the ERCP procedure.

    PubMed

    Kurihara, Toshio; Itoi, Takao; Sofuni, Atsushi; Itokawa, Fumihide; Tsuchiya, Takayoshi; Ishii, Kentaro; Tsuji, Shujiro; Ikeuchi, Nobuhito; Moriyasu, Fuminori

    2012-05-01

    ERCP-related procedures involve radiation exposure of patients and medical staff. We developed a novel protective lead shield which is attached around the fluoroscopy generator. Here we examine levels of radiation exposure to patients, endoscopists and assistants, and evaluate the usefulness of the newly designed protective shield. Four-hundred and seventy-one ERCP procedures were performed from April 2006 to April 2007. At first, we compared the radiation dose of consecutive fluoroscopy conditions with pulse fluoroscopy of 15 per second and then the radiation dose with and without the protective shield. Next, we measured the radiation exposure of endoscopists and assistants in the clinical setting monitored by digital dosimeter during ERCP procedure. The radiation dose was the most at the 45° direction. Using pulse fluoroscopy of 15 per second the radiation dose of patients and endoscopists decreased by about half. Using both pulse fluoroscopy of 15 per second and the protective shield, the radiation dose at the endoscopist's position was reduced up to 97%. The total fluoroscopy time was 5851 minutes in the 471 ERCP cases. Using pulse 15 and the protective lead shield, the radiation exposure dose of one endoscopist and two assistants were 2430.8, 2673.9 and 1375.0µSv, respectively. Novel protective lead shield in combination with pulse fluoroscopy can significantly reduce the radiation exposure leading to avoid unnecessary radiation exposure to patients and medical staff.

  9. System for determining the type of nuclear radiation from detector output pulse shape

    DOEpatents

    Miller, William H.; Berliner, Ronald R.

    1994-01-01

    A radiation detection system determines the type of nuclear radiation received in a detector by producing a correlation value representative of the statistical cross correlation between the shape of the detector signal and pulse shape data previously stored in memory and characteristic of respective types of radiation. The correlation value is indicative of the type of radiation. The energy of the radiation is determined from the detector signal and is used to produce a spectrum of radiation energies according to radiation type for indicating the nature of the material producing the radiation.

  10. System for determining the type of nuclear radiation from detector output pulse shape

    DOEpatents

    Miller, W.H.; Berliner, R.R.

    1994-09-13

    A radiation detection system determines the type of nuclear radiation received in a detector by producing a correlation value representative of the statistical cross correlation between the shape of the detector signal and pulse shape data previously stored in memory and characteristic of respective types of radiation. The correlation value is indicative of the type of radiation. The energy of the radiation is determined from the detector signal and is used to produce a spectrum of radiation energies according to radiation type for indicating the nature of the material producing the radiation. 2 figs.

  11. Design of the coolant system for the Large Coil Test Facility pulse coils

    SciTech Connect

    Bridgman, C.; Ryan, T.L.

    1983-01-01

    The pulse coils will be a part of the Large Coil Test Facility in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, which is designed to test six large tokamak-type superconducting coils. The pulse coil set consists of two resistive coaxial solenoid coils, mounted so that their magnetic axis is perpendicular to the toroidal field lines of the test coil. The pulse coils provide transient vertical fields at test coil locations to simulate the pulsed vertical fields present in tokamak devices. The pulse coils are designed to be pulsed for 30 s every 150 s, which results in a Joule heating of 116 kW per coil. In order to provide this capability, the pulse coil coolant system is required to deliver 6.3 L/s (100 gpm) of subcooled liquid nitrogen at 10-atm absolute pressure. The coolant system can also cool down each pulse coil from room temperature to liquid nitrogen temperature. This paper provides details of the pumping and heat exchange equipment designed for the coolant system and of the associated instrumentation and controls.

  12. Design description of the Large Coil Test Facility pulse-coil support and transport system

    SciTech Connect

    Queen, C.C.

    1981-01-01

    In order to simulate the transient fields which would be imposed on superconducting toroidal field coils in an operating tokamak reactor, the Large Coil Test Facility (LCTF) test stand includes a set of pulse coils. This set of pulse coils is designed to be moved from one test location to another within the LCTF vacuum vessel while the vessel is operating under vacuum and the test stand and test coils are at an operating temperature of 4.2K. This operating environment and the extremely high magnetic loads have necessitated some unique design features for the pulse coil support and transport system. The support structure for the pulse coil must react high overturning moments and axial loads induced on the pulse coil by the interaction of the pulse field with the field generated by the large test coils. These loads are reacted into the test stand support structure or spider frame by an arrangement of six pedestals and a support beam. In order to move the pulse coil set from one test location to another, the support beam containing the pulse coils must be driven across rollers mounted on the pedestals, then clamped securely to react the loads. Because these operations must be performed in a vacuum environment at cryogenic tmperature, special consideration was given to component design.

  13. Method and apparatus for providing pulse pile-up correction in charge quantizing radiation detection systems

    DOEpatents

    Britton, Jr., Charles L.; Wintenberg, Alan L.

    1993-01-01

    A radiation detection method and system for continuously correcting the quantization of detected charge during pulse pile-up conditions. Charge pulses from a radiation detector responsive to the energy of detected radiation events are converted to voltage pulses of predetermined shape whose peak amplitudes are proportional to the quantity of charge of each corresponding detected event by means of a charge-sensitive preamplifier. These peak amplitudes are sampled and stored sequentially in accordance with their respective times of occurrence. Based on the stored peak amplitudes and times of occurrence, a correction factor is generated which represents the fraction of a previous pulses influence on a preceding pulse peak amplitude. This correction factor is subtracted from the following pulse amplitude in a summing amplifier whose output then represents the corrected charge quantity measurement.

  14. Temporal structure of X-ray radiation pulses of picosecond laser plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Belyaev, V S; Kovkov, D V; Matafonov, A P; Karabadzhak, G F; Raikunov, G G; Faenov, A Ya; Pikuz, S A; Skobelev, I Yu; Pikuz, T A; Fokin, D A; Fortov, V E; Ignat'ev, G N; Kapitanov, S V; Krapiva, P S; Korotkov, K E

    2013-09-30

    The shape of the X-ray pulse generated by picosecond laser plasma is experimentally studied. The unusual phenomenon was experimentally observed for the first time for targets made of moderate-heavy chemical elements, namely, the pulse of hard X-ray radiation generated by laser plasma at the laser radiation flux of ∼10{sup 18} W cm{sup -2} had a longer duration than the pulse of softer X-ray radiation. A simple kinetic model is suggested for explaining this fact. We have suggested a method for controlling the temporal shape of X-ray pulse emitted by laser plasma by varying the contrast of laser pulse. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  15. Considerations concerning the use of counting active personal dosimeters in pulsed fields of ionising radiation.

    PubMed

    Ambrosi, Peter; Borowski, Markus; Iwatschenko, Michael

    2010-06-01

    Active personal electronic dosimeters (APDs) exhibit limitations in pulsed radiation fields, which cannot be overcome without the use of new detection technology. As an interim solution, this paper proposes a method by which some conventional dosimeters can be operated in a way such that, based on the basic knowledge about the pulsed radiation field, any dosimetric failure of the dosimeter is signalised by the instrument itself. This method is not applicable to all combinations of APD and pulsed radiation field. The necessary requirements for the APD and for the parameters of the pulsed radiation field are given in the paper. Up to now, all such requirements for APDs have not been tested or verified in a type test. The suitability of the method is verified for the use of one APD used in two clinical pulsed fields.

  16. Laser pulse spatial-temporal inversion technology for ICF laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ying; Geng, Yuanchao; Chen, Lin; Huang, Wanqing; Zhao, Junpu; Wang, Wenyi; Liu, Lanqin; Zheng, Kuixing; Zhu, Qihua; Wei, Xiaofeng

    2017-05-01

    The laser pulse should be shaped to satisfy the ICF physical requirement and the profile should be flattened to increase the extraction efficiency of the disk amplifiers and to ensure system safety in ICF laser facility. The spatial-temporal distribution of the laser pulse is affected by the gain saturation, uniformity gain profile of the amplifiers, and the frequency conversion process. The pulse spatial-temporal distribution can't be described by simply analytic expression, so new iteration algorithms are needed. We propose new inversion method and iteration algorithms in this paper. All of these algorithms have been integrated in SG99 software and the validity has been demonstrated. The result could guide the design of the ICF laser facility in the future.

  17. Radiation applications research and facilities in AECL research company

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iverson, S. L.

    In the 60's and 70's Atomic Energy of Canada had a very active R&D program to discover and develop applications of ionizing radiation. Out of this grew the technology underlying the company's current product line of industrial irradiators. With the commercial success of that product line the company turned its R&D attention to other activities. Presently, widespread interest in the use of radiation for food processing and the possibility of developing reliable and competitive machine sources of radiation hold out the promise of a major increase in industrial use of radiation. While many of the applications being considered are straightforward applications of existing knowledge, others depend on more subtle effects including combined effects of two or more agents. Further research is required in these areas. In March 1985 a new branch, Radiation Applications Research, began operations with the objective of working closely with industry to develop and assist the introduction of new uses of ionizing radiation. The Branch is equipped with appropriate analytical equipment including HPLC (high performance liquid chromatograph) and GC/MS (gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer) as well as a Gammacell 220 and an I-10/1, one kilowatt 10 MeV electron accelerator. The accelerator is located in a specially designed facility equipped for experimental irradiation of test quantities of packaged products as well as solids, liquids and gases in various configurations. A conveyor system moves the packaged products from the receiving area, through a maze, past the electron beam at a controlled rate and finally to the shipping area. Other necessary capabilities, such as gamma and electron dosimetry and a microbiology laboratory, have also been developed. Initial projects in areas ranging from food through environmental and industrial applications have been assessed and the most promising have been selected for further work. As an example, the use of charcoal adsorbent beds to concentrate

  18. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETERS: Direct amplification of picosecond pulses in neodymium glass with a power density above 100 GW cm-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Vladimir V.; Kutsenko, A. V.; Matsveiko, A. A.; Mikhailov, Yu A.; Popov, A. I.; Sklizkov, G. V.; Starodub, Aleksandr N.; Chekmarev, Alexander M.

    2003-09-01

    A scheme for amplification of ultrashort laser pulses is studied, which is used in experiments on symmetrisation of ablation pressure with the help of a prepulse upon acceleration of foils by laser radiation of high brightness. The possibility of direct amplification of short pulses before their expansion in order to increase the energy contrast is considered. In experiments performed on the PICO facility, the amplification of a 10-ps pulse with a power density exceeding 100 GW cm-2 is demonstrated with the gain equal to 1.2 and the inversion drop above 30 %.

  19. 76 FR 37798 - DOE Response to Recommendation 2010-2 of the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, Pulse Jet...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-28

    ... Response to Recommendation 2010-2 of the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, Pulse Jet Mixing at the..., concerning Pulse Jet Mixing at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant, to the Department of Energy. In... Safety Board (Board) Recommendation 2010-2, Pulse Jet Mixing (PJM) at the Waste Treatment and...

  20. Target diagnostics for commissioning the AWE HELEN Laser Facility 100 TW chirped pulse amplification beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eagleton, R. T.; Clark, E. L.; Davies, H. M.; Edwards, R. D.; Gales, S.; Girling, M. T.; Hoarty, D. J.; Hopps, N. W.; James, S. F.; Kopec, M. F.; Nolan, J. R.; Ryder, K.

    2006-10-01

    The capability of the HELEN laser at the Atomic Weapons Establishment Aldermaston has been enhanced by the addition of a short-pulse laser beam to augment the twin opposing nanosecond time scale beams. The short-pulse beam utilizes the chirped pulse amplification (CPA) technique and is capable of delivering up to 60J on target in a 500fs pulse, around 100TW, at the fundamental laser wavelength of 1.054μm. During the commissioning phase a number of diagnostic systems have been fielded, these include: x-ray pinhole imaging of the laser heated spot, charged particle time of flight, thermoluminescent dosimeter array, calibrated radiochromic film, and CR39 nuclear track detector. These diagnostic systems have been used to verify the performance of the CPA beam to achieve a focused intensity of around 1019Wcm-2 and to underwrite the facility radiological safety system.

  1. Comparison of Design and Practices for Radiation Safety among Five Synchrotron Radiation Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, James C.; Rokni, Sayed H.; Asano, Yoshihiro; Casey, William R.; Donahue, Richard J.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2005-06-29

    There are more and more third-generation synchrotron radiation (SR) facilities in the world that utilize low emittance electron (or positron) beam circulating in a storage ring to generate synchrotron light for various types of experiments. A storage ring based SR facility consists of an injector, a storage ring, and many SR beamlines. When compared to other types of accelerator facilities, the design and practices for radiation safety of storage ring and SR beamlines are unique to SR facilities. Unlike many other accelerator facilities, the storage ring and beamlines of a SR facility are generally above ground with users and workers occupying the experimental floor frequently. The users are generally non-radiation workers and do not wear dosimeters, though basic facility safety training is required. Thus, the shielding design typically aims for an annual dose limit of 100 mrem over 2000 h without the need for administrative control for radiation hazards. On the other hand, for operational and cost considerations, the concrete ring wall (both lateral and ratchet walls) is often desired to be no more than a few feet thick (with an even thinner roof). Most SR facilities have similar operation modes and beam parameters (both injection and stored) for storage ring and SR beamlines. The facility typically operates almost full year with one-month start-up period, 10-month science program for experiments (with short accelerator physics studies and routine maintenance during the period of science program), and a month-long shutdown period. A typical operational mode for science program consists of long periods of circulating stored beam (which decays with a lifetime in tens of hours), interposed with short injection events (in minutes) to fill the stored current. The stored beam energy ranges from a few hundreds MeV to 10 GeV with a low injection beam power (generally less than 10 watts). The injection beam energy can be the same as, or lower than, the stored beam energy

  2. Circularly polarized carrier-envelope-phase stable attosecond pulse generation based on coherent undulator radiation.

    PubMed

    Tóth, Gy; Tibai, Z; Nagy-Csiha, Zs; Márton, Zs; Almási, G; Hebling, J

    2015-09-15

    In this Letter, we present a new method for generation of circularly polarized attosecond pulses. According to our calculations, shape-controlled, carrier-envelope-phase stable pulses of several hundred nanojoule energy could be produced by exploitation of the coherent undulator radiation of an electron bunch. Our calculations are based on an existing particle accelerator system (FLASH II in DESY, Germany). We investigated the energy dependence of the attosecond pulses on the energy of electrons and the parameters of the radiator undulator, which generate the electromagnetic radiation.

  3. The future SwissFEL facility - challenges from a radiation protection point of view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strabel, Claudia; Fuchs, Albert; Galev, Roman; Hohmann, Eike; Lüscher, Roland; Musto, Elisa; Mayer, Sabine

    2017-09-01

    The Swiss Free Electron Laser is a new large-scale facility currently under construction at the Paul Scherrer Institute. Accessible areas surrounding the 720 m long accelerator tunnel, together with the pulsed time structure of the primary beam, lead to new challenges for ensuring that the radiation level in these areas remains in compliance with the legal constraints. For this purpose an online survey system based on the monitoring of the ambient dose rate arising from neutrons inside of the accelerator tunnel and opportunely calibrated to indicate the total dose rate outside of the tunnel, will be installed. The presented study provides a conceptual overview of this system, its underlying assumptions and measurements so far performed to validate its concept.

  4. Macrophage and tumor cell responses to repetitive pulsed X-ray radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buldakov, M. A.; Tretyakova, M. S.; Ryabov, V. B.; Klimov, I. A.; Kutenkov, O. P.; Kzhyshkowska, J.; Bol'shakov, M. A.; Rostov, V. V.; Cherdyntseva, N. V.

    2017-05-01

    To study a response of tumor cells and macrophages to the repetitive pulsed low-dose X-ray radiation. Methods. Tumor growth and lung metastasis of mice with an injected Lewis lung carcinoma were analysed, using C57Bl6. Monocytes were isolated from a human blood, using CD14+ magnetic beads. IL6, IL1-betta, and TNF-alpha were determined by ELISA. For macrophage phenotyping, a confocal microscopy was applied. “Sinus-150” was used for the generation of pulsed X-ray radiation (the absorbed dose was below 0.1 Gy, the pulse repetition frequency was 10 pulse/sec). The irradiation of mice by 0.1 Gy pulsed X-rays significantly inhibited the growth of primary tumor and reduced the number of metastatic colonies in the lung. Furthermore, the changes in macrophage phenotype and cytokine secretion were observed after repetitive pulsed X-ray radiation. Conclusion. Macrophages and tumor cells had a different response to a low-dose pulsed X-ray radiation. An activation of the immune system through changes of a macrophage phenotype can result in a significant antitumor effect of the low-dose repetitive pulsed X-ray radiation.

  5. Design of Power Supplies for the Pulsed High Magnetic Field Facility at HUST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Hongfa; Ding, Tonghai; Jiang, Chengxi; Xu, Yun; Xiao, Houxiu; Li, Liang; Duan, Xianzhong; Pan, Yuan

    2010-04-01

    Two types of pulsed power supply, a modular 12 MJ/25 kV capacitor bank and a 100 MVA flywheel pulsed generator, are under construction for the pulsed high magnetic field facility at the Huazhong University of Science and Technology (HUST) in Wuhan, China. The capacitor bank consists of 11 independent 1 MJ modules with a short circuit current of 40 kA each and 2 independent 0.5 MJ modules for 50 kA each. The bank is used to energize coils for magnetic fields in the 50-80 T range with pulse duration from 15 to 200 ms. The pulsed flywheel-alternator is used to energize a 50 T/100 ms long-pulse magnet via two 12-pulse power converter modules. Each converter module is designed to operate in the 95 to 66 Hz frequency operation range of the generator and can provide a no-load voltage of 4.6 kV and a full-load voltage of 3.4 kV at the rated current of 20 kA. In this paper the design of these two types of power supply is presented.

  6. Contribution for Iron Vapor and Radiation Distribution Affected by Current Frequency of Pulsed Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimokura, Takuya; Mori, Yusuke; Iwao, Toru; Yumoto, Motoshige

    Pulsed GTA welding has been used for improvement of stability, weld speed, and heat input control. However, the temperature and radiation power of the pulsed arc have not been elucidated. Furthermore, arc contamination by metal vapor changes the arc characteristics, e.g. by increasing radiation power. In this case, the metal vapor in pulsed GTA welding changes the distribution of temperature and radiation power as a function of time. This paper presents the relation between metal vapor and radiation power at different pulse frequencies. We calculate the Fe vapor distribution of the pulsed current. Results show that the Fe vapor is transported at fast arc velocity during the peak current period. During the base current period, the Fe vapor concentration is low and distribution is diffuse. The transition of Fe vapor distribution does not follow the pulsed current; the radiation power density distribution differs for high frequencies and low frequencies. In addition, the Fe vapor and radiation distribution are affected by the pulsed arc current frequency.

  7. Implementation of ultrafast X-ray diffraction at the 1W2B wiggler beamline of Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility.

    PubMed

    Sun, Da Rui; Xu, Guang Lei; Zhang, Bing Bing; Du, Xue Yan; Wang, Hao; Li, Qiu Ju; Zhou, Yang Fan; Li, Zhen Jie; Zhang, Yan; He, Jun; Yue, Jun Hui; Lei, Ge; Tao, Ye

    2016-05-01

    The implementation of a laser pump/X-ray probe scheme for performing picosecond-resolution X-ray diffraction at the 1W2B wiggler beamline at Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility is reported. With the hybrid fill pattern in top-up mode, a pixel array X-ray detector was optimized to gate out the signal from the singlet bunch with interval 85 ns from the bunch train. The singlet pulse intensity is ∼2.5 × 10(6) photons pulse(-1) at 10 keV. The laser pulse is synchronized to this singlet bunch at a 1 kHz repetition rate. A polycapillary X-ray lens was used for secondary focusing to obtain a 72 µm (FWHM) X-ray spot. Transient photo-induced strain in BiFeO3 film was observed at a ∼150 ps time resolution for demonstration.

  8. Status and Planned Experiments of the Hiradmat Pulsed Beam Material Test Facility at CERN SPS

    SciTech Connect

    Charitonidis, Nikolaos; Efthymiopoulos, Ilias; Fabich, Adrian; Meddahi, Malika; Gianfelice-Wendt, Eliana

    2015-06-01

    HiRadMat (High Irradiation to Materials) is a facility at CERN designed to provide high-intensity pulsed beams to an irradiation area where material samples as well as accelerator component assemblies (e.g. vacuum windows, shock tests on high power targets, collimators) can be tested. The beam parameters (SPS 440 GeV protons with a pulse energy of up to 3.4 MJ, or alternatively lead/argon ions at the proton equivalent energy) can be tuned to match the needs of each experiment. It is a test area designed to perform single pulse experiments to evaluate the effect of high-intensity pulsed beams on materials in a dedicated environment, excluding long-time irradiation studies. The facility is designed for a maximum number of 1016 protons per year, in order to limit the activation of the irradiated samples to acceptable levels for human intervention. This paper will demonstrate the possibilities for research using this facility and go through examples of upcoming experiments scheduled in the beam period 2015/2016.

  9. Central Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Facility Project-(II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, N.; Takashima, Y.; Katoh, M.; Hosaka, M.; Takami, K.; Morimoto, H.; Hori, Y.; Sasaki, S.; Koda, S.; Ito, T.; Sakurai, I.; Hara, H.; Okamoto, W.; Watanabe, N.; Takeda, Y.

    2010-06-01

    A synchrotron radiation facility that is used not only for basic research, but also for engineering and industrial research and development has been proposed to be constructed in the Central area of Japan. The key equipment of this facility is a compact electron storage ring that is able to supply hard X-rays. The circumference of the storage ring is 72 m with the energy of 1.2 GeV, the beam current of 300 mA, and the natural emittance of about 53 nm-rad. The configuration of the storage ring is based on four triple bend cells, and four of the twelve bending magnets are 5 T superconducting ones. The bending angle and critical energy are 12 degree and 4.8 keV, respectively. For the top-up operation, the electron beam will be injected from a booster synchrotron with the full energy. Currently, six beamlines are planned for the first phase starting from 2012.

  10. Numerical investigation of short-pulse laser radiation propagation in a turbulent atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Banakh, V A; Gerasimova, L O; Smalikho, I N

    2015-03-31

    An algorithm is presented for the numerical simulation of short-pulse optical radiation propagation in a turbulent atmosphere on the basis of the solution to the parabolic wave equation for the complex spectral amplitude of the wave field by the split-step method. We present examples of the use of this algorithm for simulating the propagation of a pulsed coherent spatially limited beam and a plane wave. It is shown that in the regime of strong optical turbulence the relative variance of fluctuations of energy density of femtosecond radiation becomes much smaller than the relative variance of the intensity of cw radiation. (laser radiation scattering)

  11. Electrode-plasma-driven radiation cutoff in long-pulse, high-power microwave devices

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, D. V.; Miller, C. L.; Welch, D. R.; Portillo, S.

    2013-03-15

    The impact of electrode plasma dynamics on the radiation production in a high power microwave device is examined using particle-in-cell simulations. Using the design of a compact 2.4 GHz magnetically insulated line oscillator (MILO) as the basis for numerical simulations, we characterize the time-dependent device power and radiation output over a range of cathode plasma formation rates. These numerical simulations can self-consistently produce radiation characteristics that are similar to measured signals in long pulse duration MILOs. This modeling capability should result in improved assessment of existing high-power microwave devices and lead to new designs for increased radiation pulse durations.

  12. Self-demodulation of acoustic pulses in the near zone of an acoustic radiator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansfel'd, A. D.; Sokolov, A. V.; Volkov, G. P.

    2011-05-01

    The self-demodulation of acoustic pulses in the near zone of an acoustic radiator is studied both theoretically and experimentally. In the experiment, the aforementioned nonlinear process is studied for three types of biological tissues.

  13. Biological dosimetry of radiation workers at the Sellafield nuclear facility.

    PubMed

    Tucker, J D; Tawn, E J; Holdsworth, D; Morris, S; Langlois, R; Ramsey, M J; Kato, P; Boice, J D; Tarone, R E; Jensen, R H

    1997-09-01

    The British Nuclear Fuels plc facility at Sellafield performs a range of nuclear-related activities. The site has been in operation since 1950 and has, in general, employed a stable work force, many of whom have accumulated relatively high occupational exposures to ionizing radiation. This paper compares the physical dosimetry with two biological end points for evaluating radiation exposure: fluorescence in situ hybridization with whole-chromosome painting probes to quantify stable chromosome aberrations (translocations and insertions), and glycophorin A (GPA) analysis of variant erythrocytes. For the cytogenetic analyses, 81 workers were evaluated in five dose categories, including 23 with minimal radiation exposure (< or = 50 mSv) and 58 with exposures ranging from 173 to 1108 mSv, all but 3 being > 500 mSv. In a univariate analysis, the mean stable chromosome aberration frequencies showed a significant increase with dose category (P = 0.032), and with cumulative dose when dose is treated as a continuous variable (P = 0.015). The slope of the dose response for stable aberrations is 0.79 +/- 0.22 aberrations per 100 cells per sievert (adjusted for smoking status), which is less than that observed among atomic bomb survivors, and suggests a dose and dose-rate effectiveness factor for chronic exposure of about 6. Analyses of the data for GPA N/O and N/N variants from 36 workers revealed no correlation with dose. Neither was there a correlation between the frequencies of N/O GPA variants and stable aberrations, although a weak negative association was observed between N/N variant frequency and stable aberrations (r = -0.38, P = 0.05). These results provide clear evidence for the accumulation of stable aberrations under conditions of chronic occupational exposure to ionizing radiation and show that stable chromosome aberrations are a more sensitive indicator for chronic radiation exposure than GPA variants. In comparison with human studies of brief exposure, chronic

  14. High-resolution pulsed-field ionization photoelectron spectroscopy using multi-bunch synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, C.W.; Evans, M.; Ng, C.Y.; Heimann, P.

    1997-04-01

    BL9.0.2.2 is the newly constructed experimental End Station 2 at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline 9.0.2 of the Advanced Light Source (ALS). It is dedicated to the high resolution photoionization study of molecules of interest to atmospheric and combustion chemistry. This End Station is equipped with a high resolution scanning monochromator, which has been demonstrated to have a world record resolution of E/{delta}E=70,000. Taking the advantage of the high resolution ALS light, the authors have improved the energy resolution in threshold photoelectron spectroscopy (TPES) to 0.8 meV. The TPES is a popular technique for photoionization experiments at all synchrotron radiation facilities due to its high energy resolution as compared to that of traditional photoelectron spectroscopy (PES). TPES achieves higher energy resolution by preferentially detecting near zero kinetic energy photoelectrons resulting from threshold photoionization. However, the spectra obtained from the TPES technique generally are complicated by the simultaneous detection of electrons with nonzero kinetic energy, which are not fully discriminated against. On the other hand, the spectra obtained from pulsed field ionization photoelectron spectroscopy (PFI-PES) are completely free of the contamination from kinetic electrons. The PFI-PE technique basically involves the detection of the photoelectrons from field ionization of the very high-n Rydberg states, a few cm{sup {minus}1} below the ionization energy (IE), by applying a delayed pulsed electric field. Within a delay of a few microseconds, all the prompt electrons formed from direct ionization will escape from the photoionization region and will not be collected. The authors have recently overcome problems with energy resolution of an electron time-of-flight technique, and incorporated the PFI-PE technique with multi-bunch VUV synchrotron radiation.

  15. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program facilities newsletter, July 2001.

    SciTech Connect

    Holdridge, D. J.

    2001-07-23

    Global Warming and Methane--Global warming, an increase in Earth's near-surface temperature, is believed to result from the buildup of what scientists refer to as ''greenhouse gases.'' These gases include water vapor, carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, perfluorocarbons, hydrofluoro-carbons, and sulfur hexafluoride. Greenhouse gases can absorb outgoing infrared (heat) radiation and re-emit it back to Earth, warming the surface. Thus, these gases act like the glass of a greenhouse enclosure, trapping infrared radiation inside and warming the space. One of the more important greenhouse gases is the naturally occurring hydrocarbon methane. Methane, a primary component of natural gas, is the second most important contributor to the greenhouse effect (after carbon dioxide). Natural sources of methane include wetlands, fossil sources, termites, oceans, fresh-waters, and non-wetland soils. Methane is also produced by human-related (or anthropogenic) activities such as fossil fuel production, coal mining, rice cultivation, biomass burning, water treatment facilities, waste management operations and landfills, and domesticated livestock operations (Figure 1). These anthropogenic activities account for approximately 70% of the methane emissions to the atmosphere. Methane is removed naturally from the atmosphere in three ways. These methods, commonly referred to as sinks, are oxidation by chemical reaction with tropospheric hydroxyl ion, oxidation within the stratosphere, and microbial uptake by soils. In spite of their important role in removing excess methane from the atmosphere, the sinks cannot keep up with global methane production. Methane concentrations in the atmosphere have increased by 145% since 1800. Increases in atmospheric methane roughly parallel world population growth, pointing to anthropogenic sources as the cause (Figure 2). Increases in the methane concentration reduce Earth's natural cooling efficiency by trapping more of the outgoing

  16. Influence of fast magnetic pulses on the superconducting magnet test facility TOSKA

    SciTech Connect

    Biro, O.; Maurer, W.

    1994-09-01

    An overview is given about the influence of fast magnetic field pulses (up to 40 T/s) on components of the TOSKA magnet test facility at KfK, Karlsruhe. Such fast magnetic field changes occur during the operation of poloidal field coils and accidental plasma disruptions in a Tokamak and also during safety discharges of superconducting magnets. Induced eddy currents in surrounding conductive components can cause some detrimental damage. FEM calculations were performed in order to study the influence on critical components of TOSKA and to identify necessary modifications of the facility. The paper presents the results of these calculations.

  17. Facile time-of-flight methods for characterizing pulsed superfluid helium droplet beams.

    PubMed

    He, Yunteng; Zhang, Jie; Li, Yang; Freund, William M; Kong, Wei

    2015-08-01

    We present two facile time-of-flight (TOF) methods of detecting superfluid helium droplets and droplets with neutral dopants. Without an electron gun and with only a heated filament and pulsed electrodes, the electron impact ionization TOF mass spectrometer can resolve ionized helium clusters such as He2(+) and He4(+), which are signatures of superfluid helium droplets. Without ionizing any helium atoms, multiphoton non-resonant laser ionization of CCl4 doped in superfluid helium droplets at 266 nm generates complex cluster ions of dopant fragments with helium atoms, including (He)(n)C(+), (He)(n)Cl(+), and (He)(n)CCl(+). Using both methods, we have characterized our cryogenic pulsed valve—the Even-Lavie valve. We have observed a primary pulse with larger helium droplets traveling at a slower speed and a rebound pulse with smaller droplets at a faster speed. In addition, the pickup efficiency of dopant is higher for the primary pulse when the nozzle temperature is higher than 13 K, and the total time duration of the doped droplet pulse is only on the order of 20 μs. These results stress the importance of fast and easy characterization of the droplet beam for sensitive measurements such as electron diffraction of doped droplets.

  18. Facile time-of-flight methods for characterizing pulsed superfluid helium droplet beams

    SciTech Connect

    He, Yunteng; Zhang, Jie; Li, Yang; Freund, William M.; Kong, Wei

    2015-08-15

    We present two facile time-of-flight (TOF) methods of detecting superfluid helium droplets and droplets with neutral dopants. Without an electron gun and with only a heated filament and pulsed electrodes, the electron impact ionization TOF mass spectrometer can resolve ionized helium clusters such as He{sub 2}{sup +} and He{sub 4}{sup +}, which are signatures of superfluid helium droplets. Without ionizing any helium atoms, multiphoton non-resonant laser ionization of CCl{sub 4} doped in superfluid helium droplets at 266 nm generates complex cluster ions of dopant fragments with helium atoms, including (He){sub n}C{sup +}, (He){sub n}Cl{sup +}, and (He){sub n}CCl{sup +}. Using both methods, we have characterized our cryogenic pulsed valve—the Even-Lavie valve. We have observed a primary pulse with larger helium droplets traveling at a slower speed and a rebound pulse with smaller droplets at a faster speed. In addition, the pickup efficiency of dopant is higher for the primary pulse when the nozzle temperature is higher than 13 K, and the total time duration of the doped droplet pulse is only on the order of 20 μs. These results stress the importance of fast and easy characterization of the droplet beam for sensitive measurements such as electron diffraction of doped droplets.

  19. Facile time-of-flight methods for characterizing pulsed superfluid helium droplet beams

    PubMed Central

    He, Yunteng; Zhang, Jie; Li, Yang; Freund, William M.; Kong, Wei

    2015-01-01

    We present two facile time-of-flight (TOF) methods of detecting superfluid helium droplets and droplets with neutral dopants. Without an electron gun and with only a heated filament and pulsed electrodes, the electron impact ionization TOF mass spectrometer can resolve ionized helium clusters such as He2+ and He4+, which are signatures of superfluid helium droplets. Without ionizing any helium atoms, multiphoton non-resonant laser ionization of CCl4 doped in superfluid helium droplets at 266 nm generates complex cluster ions of dopant fragments with helium atoms, including (He)nC+, (He)nCl+, and (He)nCCl+. Using both methods, we have characterized our cryogenic pulsed valve—the Even-Lavie valve. We have observed a primary pulse with larger helium droplets traveling at a slower speed and a rebound pulse with smaller droplets at a faster speed. In addition, the pickup efficiency of dopant is higher for the primary pulse when the nozzle temperature is higher than 13 K, and the total time duration of the doped droplet pulse is only on the order of 20 μs. These results stress the importance of fast and easy characterization of the droplet beam for sensitive measurements such as electron diffraction of doped droplets. PMID:26329210

  20. Construction and operation of an improved radiation calibration facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect

    1994-10-01

    Calibration of instruments used to detect and measure ionizing radiation has been conducted over the last 20 years at Brookhaven National Laboratory`s (BNL) Radiation Calibration Facility, Building 348. Growth of research facilities, projects in progress, and more stringent Department of Energy (DOE) orders which involve exposure to nuclear radiation have placed substantial burdens on the existing radiation calibration facility. The facility currently does not meet the requirements of DOE Order 5480.4 or American National Standards Institute (ANSI) N323-1978, which establish calibration methods for portable radiation protection instruments used in the detection and measurement of levels of ionizing radiation fields or levels of radioactive surface contaminations. Failure to comply with this standard could mean instrumentation is not being calibrated to necessary levels of sensitivity. The Laboratory has also recently obtained a new neutron source and gamma beam irradiator which can not be made operational at existing facilities because of geometry and shielding inadequacies. These sources are needed to perform routine periodic calibrations of radiation detecting instruments used by scientific and technical personnel and to meet BNL`s substantial increase in demand for radiation monitoring capabilities. To place these new sources into operation, it is proposed to construct an addition to the existing radiation calibration facility that would house all calibration sources and bring BNL calibration activities into compliance with DOE and ANSI standards. The purpose of this assessment is to identify potential significant environmental impacts associated with the construction and operation of an improved radiation calibration facility at BNL.

  1. Pulsed laser facilities operating from UV to IR at the Gas Laser Lab of the Lebedev Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionin, Andrei; Kholin, Igor; Vasil'Ev, Boris; Zvorykin, Vladimir

    2003-05-01

    Pulsed laser facilities developed at the Gas Lasers Lab of the Lebedev Physics Institute and their applications for different laser-matter interactions are discussed. The lasers operating from UV to mid-IR spectral region are as follows: e-beam pumped KrF laser (λ= 0.248 μm) with output energy 100 J; e-beam sustained discharge CO2(10.6 μm) and fundamental band CO (5-6 μm) lasers with output energy up to ~1 kJ; overtone CO laser (2.5-4.2 μm) with output energy ~ 50 J and N2O laser (10.9 μm) with output energy of 100 J; optically pumped NH3 laser (11-14 μm). Special attention is paid to an e-beam sustained discharge Ar-Xe laser (1.73 μm ~ 100 J) as a potential candidate for a laser-propulsion facility. The high energy laser facilities are used for interaction of laser radiation with polymer materials, metals, graphite, rocks, etc.

  2. A pulsed supersonic gas jet target for precision spectroscopy at the HITRAP facility at GSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiedemann, D.; Stiebing, K. E.; Winters, D. F. A.; Quint, W.; Varentsov, V.; Warczak, A.; Malarz, A.; Stöhlker, Th.

    2014-11-01

    A pulsed supersonic gas jet target for experiments at the HITRAP facility at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt has been designed and built as a multi-purpose installation for key experiments on fundamental atomic physics in strong fields. This setup is currently installed at the Institut für Kernphysik of Goethe-University, Frankfurt am Main (IKF), in order to explore its operation prior to its installation at the HITRAP facility. Design and performance of the target are described. The measured target densities of 5.9×1012 atoms/cm3 for helium and 8.1×1012 atoms/cm³ for argon at the stagnation pressure of 30 bar match the required values. The target-beam diameter of 0.9 mm and the pulsed operation mode (jet built-up-time ≤15 ms) are well suited for the use at HITRAP.

  3. Design, fabrication, and testing of the pulse coils for the Large Coil Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Chipley, K.K.; Parrelli, A.P.

    1983-01-01

    The Large Coil Test Facility (LCTF) will be able to test up to six large superconducting coils similar to those required for a tokamak reactor. In order to simulate the transient vertical field that will be part of the magnetic environment of an operating tokamak reactor, a set of pulse coils will be used in the facility. This set of two coils can be positioned in the bore of any of the test coils to provide a transient magnetic field to that particular coil. This paper describes the final design of the pulse coils and discusses the fabrication techniques used to build these coils. An extensive testing program has been carried out during fabrication to ensure that the coils will function satisfactorily.

  4. Optimization of a conical antenna for pulse radiation - An efficient design using resistive loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloney, James G.; Smith, Glenn S.

    1993-07-01

    The conical monopole antenna with a section of continuous resistive loading is considered as a radiator for temporally short, broad-bandwidth pulses. The geometrical details of the coaxial feed and the resistive loading are varied to optimize this structure for pulse radiation. Compared with the perfectly conducting cone, the optimized resistive cone radiates a better reproduction of the pulse excitation with no loss in amplitude, and has internal reflections that are much smaller in amplitude. Graphical displays of the field surrounding the antenna are used to give insight into the physical processes for transient radiation from this antenna. Experimental models were constructed to verify the optimization and demonstrate the practicality of the design. Measurements of both the reflected voltage in the feed line and the time-varying radiated field are in excellent agreement with the theoretical calculations.

  5. Development and Testing of Gallium Arsenide Photoconductive Detectors for Ultra Fast, High Dose Rate Pulsed Electron and Bremsstrahlung Radiation Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Kharashvili, George; Makarashvili, Vakhtang; Mitchell, Marc; Beezhold, Wendland; Spaulding, Randy; Wells, Douglas; Gesell, Thomas; Wingert, Wayne

    2009-03-10

    Real time radiation dose measurements are challenging in high dose rate environments such as those used for testing electronic devices or biological agents. Dosimetry needs in pulsed reactor fields and particle accelerator facilities require development of dosimeters with fast (10 s of picoseconds) response to pulsed radiation, linear response over a wide range of dose rates (up to 10{sup 11} Gy/s), high resistance to radiation damage, and successful operation in mixed gamma and neutron environments. Gallium arsenide photoconductive detectors (GaAs PCD) have been shown to exhibit many of these desirable characteristics, especially fast time response. Less than 50 ps time resolution has been demonstrated when previously irradiated by fission neutrons. We have conducted a study of the response-time dependence on neutron fluence, starting with fluences at {approx}10{sup 14} n/cm{sup 2}. A 23-MeV electron beam was used to produce photoneutrons in a tungsten target for irradiation of a GaAs wafer from which PCDs were made. The process was modeled using MCNPX computer code and the simulation results were compared to the experimental measurements. GaAs PCDs were fabricated from both neutron-irradiated and non-irradiated GaAs samples. The results of the preliminary tests of these devices in accelerator-produced pulses of electron and bremsstrahlung radiation of various energies (13 to 35 MeV) and pulse lengths (100 ps to 4 {mu}s) are presented together with an overview of the future plans of continuing GaAs PCD research at Idaho State University.

  6. Neutron Radiography Facility at IBR-2 High Flux Pulsed Reactor: First Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlenko, D. P.; Kichanov, S. E.; Lukin, E. V.; Rutkauskas, A. V.; Bokuchava, G. D.; Savenko, B. N.; Pakhnevich, A. V.; Rozanov, A. Yu.

    A neutron radiography and tomography facilityhave been developed recently at the IBR-2 high flux pulsed reactor. The facility is operated with the CCD-camera based detector having maximal field of view of 20x20 cm, and the L/D ratio can be varied in the range 200 - 2000. The first results of the radiography and tomography experiments with industrial materials and products, paleontological and geophysical objects, meteorites, are presented.

  7. Design of a 28 MW pulse facility for testing superconducting coils to several hundred megajoules capacity

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, H.F.

    1980-01-01

    Railway traction motors are available in unit sizes convenient for installation and series-parallel grouping. They are rugged. Industry builds and refurbishes them with good economy and in quantities replenishing the rolling stock. We find them well suited for reversing the current in a superconducting winding. We focus on a pulsed energy of 20 to 100 MJ, discussing our analysis and facility planning. Limitations are imposed by the following maximum numbers tolerated by the motor - pulsed current of 3.0 to 3.5 kA, current change of 40 kA/s, and pulsed voltage of 1.8 kV. Hence, the number of machines needed in parallel follows from the coil current and its rate of change. The number in series is determined by the voltage. The power transfer is limited by the torsional strength of the motor shaft to a value affected by the flywheel mass.

  8. Design concepts for a pulse power test facility to simulate EMP surges. Part II. Slow pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Dethlefsen, R.

    1985-10-01

    The work described in this report was sponsored by the Division of Electric Energy Systems (EES) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) through a subcontract with the Power Systems Technology Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The work deals with the effect of high altitude nuclear bursts on electric power systems. In addition to fast voltage transients, slow, quasi-dc currents are also induced into extended power systems with grounded neutral connections. Similar phenomena at lower magnitude are generated by solar induced electromagnetic pulses (EMP). These have caused power outages, related to solar storms, at northern latitudes. The applicable utility experience is reviewed in order to formulate an optimum approach to future testing. From a wide variety of options two pulser designs were selected as most practical, a transformer-rectifier power supply, and a lead acid battery pulser. both can be mounted on a trailer as required for field testing on utility systems. The battery system results in the least cost. Testing on power systems requires that the dc pulser pass high values of alternating current, resulting from neutral imbalance or from potential fault currents. Batteries have a high ability to pass alternating currents. Most other pulser options must be protected by an ac bypass in the form of an expensive capacitor bank. 8D truck batteries can meet the original specification of 1 kA test current. Improved batteries for higher discharge currents are available.

  9. Full circuit calculation for electromagnetic pulse transmission in a high current facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Wenkang; Guo, Fan; Chen, Lin; Song, Shengyi; Wang, Meng; Xie, Weiping; Deng, Jianjun

    2014-11-01

    We describe herein for the first time a full circuit model for electromagnetic pulse transmission in the Primary Test Stand (PTS)—the first TW class pulsed power driver in China. The PTS is designed to generate 8-10 MA current into a z -pinch load in nearly 90 ns rise time for inertial confinement fusion and other high energy density physics research. The PTS facility has four conical magnetic insulation transmission lines, in which electron current loss exists during the establishment of magnetic insulation. At the same time, equivalent resistance of switches and equivalent inductance of pinch changes with time. However, none of these models are included in a commercially developed circuit code so far. Therefore, in order to characterize the electromagnetic transmission process in the PTS, a full circuit model, in which switch resistance, magnetic insulation transmission line current loss and a time-dependent load can be taken into account, was developed. Circuit topology and an equivalent circuit model of the facility were introduced. Pulse transmission calculation of shot 0057 was demonstrated with the corresponding code FAST (full-circuit analysis and simulation tool) by setting controllable parameters the same as in the experiment. Preliminary full circuit simulation results for electromagnetic pulse transmission to the load are presented. Although divergences exist between calculated and experimentally obtained waveforms before the vacuum section, consistency with load current is satisfactory, especially at the rising edge.

  10. Method and apparatus for the production of pre pulse free smooth laser radiation pulses of variable pulse duration

    SciTech Connect

    Witte, K. J.; Fill, E.; Scrlac, W.

    1985-04-30

    The pulse duration of an iodine laser is adjusted between 400 ps and 20 ns primarily by changing the resonator length in the range of about 2 cm to about 100 cm and secondarily by the ratio of excitation energy to threshold energy of the laser. Iodine laser pulses without pre-pulse and substructure are achieved in that the gas pressure of the laser gas of the iodine laser is adapted to the resonator length in order to limit the band width of the amplification and thus the band width of the pulse to be produced. The longer are the laser pulses to be produced the lower is the pressure chosen. A prerequisite for the above results is that the excitation of the iodine laser occurs extremely rapidly. This is advantageously achieved by photo-dissociation of a perfluoroalkyl iodide as CF/sub 3/I by means of laser providing sufficiently short output pumping pulses, e.g. an excimer laser, as a KrF laser or XeCl laser or a frequency-multiplied Nd-glass or Nd-YAG laser, or a N/sub 2/ laser (in combination with t-C/sub 4/F/sub 9/I as laser medium). In addition to the substantial advantage of the easy variability of the pulse duration the method additionally has a number of further advantages, namely pre-pulse-free rise of the laser pulse up to the maximum amplitude; exchange of the laser medium between two pulses is not necessary at pulse repetition rates below about 1 hertz; high pulse repetion rates obtainable with laser gas regeneration; switching elements for isolating a laser oscillator from a subsequent amplifier cascade for the purpose of avoiding parasitic oscillations are not as critical as with flashlamp-pumped lasers.

  11. Observation of coherent undulator radiation from sub-picosecond electron pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Bocek, D.; Hernandez, M.; Kung, P.; Lihn, Hung-chi; Settakorn, C.; Wiedemann, H.

    1995-09-01

    The generation and observation of high power, coherent, far-infrared undulator radiation from sub-picosecond electron bunches at the SUNSHINE facility is reported. Coherent undulator radiation tunable from 50 to 200 microns wavelength is demonstrated. Measurements of the energy (up to 1.7 mJ per 1 microsecs macropulse), frequency spectrum, and spatial distribution of the radiation are reported. Apparent exponential growth of the radiated energy as a function of undulator length is observed.

  12. Surface shortwave aerosol radiative forcing during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Mobile Facility deployment in Niamey, Niger

    SciTech Connect

    McFarlane, Sally A.; Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Barnard, James C.; Flynn, Connor J.; Ackerman, Thomas P.

    2009-03-18

    This study presents ground-based remote sensing measurements of aerosol optical properties and corresponding shortwave surface radiative effect calculations for the deployment of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program’s Mobile Facility (AMF) to Niamey, Niger during 2006. Aerosol optical properties including aerosol optical depth (AOD), single scattering albedo (SSA), and asymmetry parameter (AP) were derived from multi-filter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) measurements during the two dry seasons (Jan-Apr and Oct-Dec) at Niamey. The vertical distribution of aerosol extinction was derived from the collocated micropulse lidar (MPL). The aerosol optical properties and vertical distribution of extinction varied significantly throughout the year, with higher AOD, lower SSA, and deeper aerosol layers during the Jan-Apr time period, when biomass burning aerosol layers were more frequent. Using the retrieved aerosol properties and vertical extinction profiles, broadband shortwave surface fluxes and atmospheric heating rate profiles were calculated. Corresponding calculations with no aerosol were used to estimate the aerosol direct radiative effect at the surface. Comparison of the calculated surface fluxes to observed fluxes for non-cloudy periods indicated that the remote sensing retrievals provided a reasonable estimation of the optical properties, with mean differences between calculated and observed fluxes of less than 5 W/m2 and RMS differences less than 25 W/m2. Sensitivity tests for a particular case study showed that the observed fluxes could be matched with variations of < 10% in the inputs to the radiative transfer model. We estimated the daily-averaged aerosol radiative effect at the surface by subtracting the clear calculations from the aerosol calculations. The average daily SW aerosol radiative effect over the study period was -27 W/m2, which is comparable to values estimated from satellite data and from climate models with sophisticated

  13. On the nature of the sources of hard pulse X-ray radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shklovskiy, I. S.

    1978-01-01

    Besides the identified sources of cosmic pulse X-ray radiation with globular clusters NGC 6624, NGC 1851 and MXB 1730-335 several new identifications were made. The source in Norma was probably identified with globular cluster NGC 5927, the source in Aquila with globular cluster NGC 6838 (M71), and the source in Puppis with globular cluster NGC 2298. Gamma pulses discovered by the Vela satellites and X-ray pulses thoroughly measured by the SAS-3, Ariel-5, and ANS satellites are thought to be the same phenomenon. The sources of such a radiation must be some kind of peculiarity at the central part of globular clusters; it is most probably a massive black hole. The sources of hard pulse radiation which cannot be identified with globular clusters are considered to be a new kind of galactic object, invisible globular clusters, which are naked nuclei of globular clusters.

  14. The effects of pulse duration on ablation pressure driven by laser radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Lei; Li, Xiao-Ya Zhu, Wen-Jun; Wang, Jia-Xiang; Tang, Chang-Jian

    2015-03-28

    The effects of laser pulse duration on the ablation pressure induced by laser radiation are investigated using Al target. Numerical simulation results using one dimensional radiation hydro code for laser intensities from 5×10{sup 12}W/cm{sup 2} to 5×10{sup 13}W/cm{sup 2} and pulse durations from 0.5 ns to 20 ns are presented. These results suggest that the laser intensity scaling law of ablation pressure differs for different pulse durations. And the theoretical analysis shows that the effects of laser pulse duration on ablation pressure are mainly caused by two regimes: the unsteady-state flow and the radiative energy loss to vacuum.

  15. Fluctuations of energy density of short-pulse optical radiation in the turbulent atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Banakh, V A; Smalikho, I N

    2014-09-22

    Fluctuations of energy density of short-pulse optical radiation in the turbulent atmosphere have been studied based on numerical solution of the parabolic wave equation for the complex spectral amplitude of the wave field by the split-step method. It has been shown that under conditions of strong optical turbulence, the relative variance of energy density fluctuations of pulsed radiation of femtosecond duration becomes much less than the relative variance of intensity fluctuations of continuous-wave radiation. The spatial structure of fluctuations of the energy density with a decrease of the pulse duration becomes more large-scale and homogeneous. For shorter pulses the maximal value of the probability density distribution of energy density fluctuations tends to the mean value of the energy density.

  16. General collection efficiency for liquid isooctane and tetramethylsilane in pulsed radiation.

    PubMed

    Johansson, B; Wickman, G; Bahar-Gogani, J

    1997-10-01

    The general collection efficiency in pulsed radiation was studied for isooctane (C8H18) and tetramethylsilane (Si(CH3)4). These two liquids were used as sensitive media in a parallel-plate liquid ionization chamber with a 1 mm sensitive layer. Measurements were carried out using 20 MV photon radiation from a linear accelerator with a pulse repetition frequency of 30 pulses/second and a pulse length of 3.5 microseconds. The general collection efficiency was determined for polarizing voltages in the interval 1000-2000 V for isooctane and 500-2000 V for tetramethylsilane and for pulse doses in the interval 0.06-1.9 mGy/pulse. An air ionization chamber was used as a pulse dose reference monitor. The experimental results were compared with those predicted by the equation for the general collection efficiency for gases in pulsed radiation, using the permittivity of each of the liquids. It was found that for general collection efficiencies down to 80% the differences between the predicted and experimental general collection efficiencies in the two liquids were within +/- 1% at electric field strengths exceeding 10(6) V m-1.

  17. K{sub α} and bremsstrahlung x-ray radiation backlighter sources from short pulse laser driven silver targets as a function of laser pre-pulse energy

    SciTech Connect

    Jarrott, L. C.; Mariscal, D.; McGuffey, C.; Beg, F. N.; Kemp, A. J.; Divol, L.; Chen, C.; Hey, D.; Maddox, B.; Hawreliak, J.; Park, H.-S.; Remington, B.; MacPhee, A.; Westover, B.; Suggit, M.; Wei, M. S.

    2014-03-15

    Measurements of silver K-shell and bremsstrahlung emission from thin-foil laser targets as a function of laser prepulse energy are presented. The silver targets were chosen as a potential 22 keV backlighter source for the National Ignition Facility Experiments. The targets were irradiated by the Titan laser with an intensity of 8 × 10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2} with 40 ps pulse length. A secondary nanosecond timescale laser pulse with controlled, variable energy was used to emulate the laser prepulse. Results show a decrease in both K{sub α} and bremsstrahlung yield with increasing artificial prepulse. Radiation hydrodynamic modeling of the prepulse interaction determined that the preplasma and intact target fraction were different in the three prepulse energies investigated. Interaction of the short pulse laser with the resulting preplasma and target was then modeled using a particle-in-cell code PSC which explained the experimental results. The relevance of this work to future Advanced Radiographic Capability laser x-ray backlighter sources is discussed.

  18. Pulse-Width Dependent Radiation Effects on Electronic Components

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-11-01

    d’un accelerateur lineaire ( LINAC ) a et6 realisee par le CRDO et d’autres groupes. Par contre, l’emploi du LINAC donne normalement des impulsions plus... LINAC ) has been performed by DREO and other groups. However, the use of a LINAC normally entails wider pulses than those expected on the battlefield...nuclear weapon on electronics, an electron linear accelerator ( LINAC ) is often used. The pulse widths available from most LINACs are longer than the

  19. Pulse-Width Dependent Radiation Effects on Electronic Components

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-11-01

    lineaire ( LINAC ) a ete realisee par le CRDO et d’autres groupes. Par contre, l’emploi du LINAC donne normalement des impulsions plus larges que celles...xtyibudon UnUSIId~ Z -!_ ABSTRACT The simulation of the prompt gamma-ray pulse effects on electronics with an electron linear accelerator ( LINAC ) has been...performed by DREO and other groups. However, the use of a LINAC normally entails wider pulses than those expected on the battlefield. This rcport

  20. Temperature field formed inside a blood vessel under the action of pulsed laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astafyeva, L. G.; Zheltov, G. I.

    2007-10-01

    A model that simulates the dynamics of the temperature field formed by pulsed laser radiation inside a biological structure containing blood vessels is developed. The threshold conditions of denaturation of vessel walls and subsequent blocking the blood flow are determined based on the thermochemical concept. The possibility of application of a pulsed modulation of the radiation for increasing the homogeneity of coagulation of vessel walls and reducing the risk of damage of tissues caused by the phase transition is considered. The modulation frequency range of radiation that ensures the realization of this effect is determined.

  1. Occupational radiation Exposure at Agreement State-Licensed Materials Facilities, 1997-2010

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research

    2012-07-07

    The purpose of this report is to examine occupational radiation exposures received under Agreement State licensees. As such, this report reflects the occupational radiation exposure data contained in the Radiation Exposure Information and Reporting System (REIRS) database, for 1997 through 2010, from Agreement State-licensed materials facilities.

  2. Intense Nanosecond-Pulsed Cavity-Dumped Laser Radiation at 1.04 THz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    We report first results of intense far-infrared (FIR) nanosecond-pulsed laser radiation at 1.04 THz from a previously described[2] cavity-dumped, optically-pumped molecular gas laser. The gain medium, methyl fluoride, is pumped by the 9R20 line of a TEA CO2 laser[3] with a pulse energy of 200 mJ. The THz laser pulses contain of 30 kW peak power in 5 nanosecond pulse widths at a pulse repetition rate of 10 Hz. The line width, measured by a scanning metal-mesh FIR Fabry-Perot interferometer, is 100 MHz. The novel THz laser is being used in experiments to resonantly excite coherent ns-pulsed 1.04 THz longitudinal acoustic phonons in silicon doping-superlattices. The research is supported by NASA EPSCoR NNX11AM04A and AFOSR FA9550-12-1-0100 awards.

  3. Thermomechanical effect of pulse-periodic laser radiation on cartilaginous and eye tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baum, O. I.; Zheltov, G. I.; Omelchenko, A. I.; Romanov, G. S.; Romanov, O. G.; Sobol, E. N.

    2013-08-01

    This paper is devoted to theoretical and experimental studies into the thermomechanical action of laser radiation on biological tissues. The thermal stresses and strains developing in biological tissues under the effect of pulse-periodic laser radiation are theoretically modeled for a wide range of laser pulse durations. The models constructed allow one to calculate the magnitude of pressures developing in cartilaginous and eye tissues exposed to laser radiation and predict the evolution of cavitation phenomena occurring therein. The calculation results agree well with experimental data on the growth of pressure and deformations, as well as the dynamics of formation of gas bubbles, in the laser-affected tissues. Experiments on the effect of laser radiation on the trabecular region of the eye in minipigs demonstrated that there existed optimal laser irradiation regimens causing a substantial increase in the hydraulic permeability of the radiation-exposed tissue, which can be used to develop a novel glaucoma treatment method.

  4. EFFECTS OF LASER RADIATION ON MATTER: Growth of periodic structures on the surface of germanium subjected to pulsed laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barsukov, D. O.; Gusakov, G. M.; Frolov, A. I.

    1991-12-01

    An experimental investigation was made of the dynamics of growth of periodic surface structures due to the interaction with pulsed laser radiation. Samples of Ge were subjected to laser pulses (λ = 1.06 μm, τ = 70 ns) with energy densities in the range 0.5-5.5 J/cm2. An investigation was made of the dynamics of the first-order diffraction of probe (λ = 0.53 μm) laser pulses with a time resolution 4 ns when p- and s-polarized laser radiation was incident at angles close to normal. A strong nonlinearity of the growth of such periodic surface structures was observed. The energy density from which such growth began depended on the quality of the polished Ge surface. The parameters of the dynamics of the growth of these structures were estimated.

  5. Evolution of energy deposition during glass cutting with pulsed femtosecond laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalupka, C.; Großmann, D.; Reininghaus, M.

    2017-05-01

    We report on investigations of the energy deposition in the volume of thin glass during an ablation cutting process with pulsed femtosecond laser radiation by time-resolved pump-probe shadowgraphy. For a single laser pulse, the temporal evolution of the transient electronic excitation of the glass volume is imaged up to 10 ps after initial excitation. For an increasing number of laser pulses, the spatial excitation of the glass volume significantly changes compared to single pulse irradiation. Sharp spikes are observed, which reduce the transmission of the illuminating probe pulse. This indicates local maxima of the absorption and, therefore, energy deposition of the pump pulse energy in the glass volume. Furthermore, for an increasing number of pulses, different shapes of the surface ablation crater are observed. To study the correlation between the shape of the surface ablation crater and the energy deposition in the glass volume, simulations of the spatial intensity distribution of the pump pulse are executed by means of linear beam propagation method. We show that the transient excitation spikes observed by pump-probe shadowgraphy can be explained by refraction and diffraction of the laser radiation at the surface ablation crater. Our results provide an experimental validation for the physical reason of an ablation stop for an ablation cutting process. Moreover, the simulations allow for the prediction of damage inside the glass volume.

  6. Progress on developing a PW ultrashort laser facility with ns, ps, and fs outputting pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Qihua; Huang, Xiaojun; Wang, Xiao; Zeng, Xiaoming; Xie, Xudong; Wang, Fang; Wang, Fengrui; Lin, Donghui; Wang, Xiaodong; Zhou, Kainan; Jiang, Dongbin; Deng, Wu; Zuo, Yanlei; Zhang, Ying; Deng, Ying; Wei, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Xiaomin; Fan, Dianyuan

    2008-03-01

    A petawatt laser facility with three beams for fast ignition research and strong-field physics applications has been designed and is being constructed. The first beam (referred as SILEX-I) is a Ti:sapphire femto-second laser which pulse width is 30 fs, and till now, output power has reached to 330 TW. The other two beams are Nd 3+:glass lasers which output energy are larger than 1kJ and pulse width are about 1ps and 1ns respectively. By using the technology of OPA pumped by 800nm femtosecond laser and seeded by super-continuum spectrum white light, the three beams are synchronized with each other without jitter time. By using the seeds from OPA pumped by femtosecond laser, and by using the pre-amplification stage of OPCPA, the signal to noise ratio of the Nd 3+:glass petawatt laser will reach to 10 8. Active methods are taken to control the gain narrowing effect of the Nd 3+:glass amplifiers, giving the option to compress the chirped pulse to ultrashort pulse with width less than 400fs. Tiled multilayer dielectric coating gratings are used for the compressor of the PW beam, which has been successfully demonstrated on a 100J picosecond Nd 3+:glass laser system.

  7. Progress of the ELISE test facility: towards one hour pulses in hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wünderlich, D.; Fantz, U.; Heinemann, B.; Kraus, W.; Riedl, R.; Wimmer, C.; the NNBI Team

    2016-10-01

    In order to fulfil the ITER requirements, the negative hydrogen ion source used for NBI has to deliver a high source performance, i.e. a high extracted negative ion current and simultaneously a low co-extracted electron current over a pulse length up to 1 h. Negative ions will be generated by the surface process in a low-temperature low-pressure hydrogen or deuterium plasma. Therefore, a certain amount of caesium has to be deposited on the plasma grid in order to obtain a low surface work function and consequently a high negative ion production yield. This caesium is re-distributed by the influence of the plasma, resulting in temporal instabilities of the extracted negative ion current and the co-extracted electrons over long pulses. This paper describes experiments performed in hydrogen operation at the half-ITER-size NNBI test facility ELISE in order to develop a caesium conditioning technique for more stable long pulses at an ITER relevant filling pressure of 0.3 Pa. A significant improvement of the long pulse stability is achieved. Together with different plasma diagnostics it is demonstrated that this improvement is correlated to the interplay of very small variations of parameters like the electrostatic potential and the particle densities close to the extraction system.

  8. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program facilities newsletter, October 2002.

    SciTech Connect

    Holdridge, D. J.

    2002-11-04

    Aerosol Observing System Upgraded--The Aerosol Observing System (AOS) at the SGP central facility recently received maintenance and was upgraded to improve its performance. The AOS measures the properties of the aerosol particles around it. Several AOS components were removed, repaired, and calibrated to operate within specifications. The system continuously gathers information about the way minute aerosol particles interact with solar radiation. A better understanding of these interactions will help climate change researchers integrate aerosol effects more accurately into global climate computer models. Polar Bears Make Work Dangerous at ARM North Slope of Alaska Site--The late development of seasonal sea ice has increased polar bear sitings at ARM's Barrow site. The bears were recently seen next to the ARM instrument towers at Barrow, making the normal work day a bit more tricky for the technicians who are at the site year-round. Polar bears are not afraid of people and will attack and kill. The bears usually spend most of their time on off-shore ice floes hunting seals. This season, a large storm pushed the floes out to sea while the bears were ashore at Barrow, leaving them to forage for food on land until the sea ice reforms with the onset of colder weather. The hungry bears have made working at the Barrow CART site a dangerous proposition. ARM workers carry shotguns with them at all times for protection. On a recent journey to the site, ARM instrument mentor Michael Ritsche encountered the animals. ''You become much more aware of your surroundings,'' said Ritsche after returning safely to Argonne. Barrow residents protect themselves by shooting warning shells to scare the bears away from developed areas. Hearing the firing in the early mornings and late evenings at Barrow reminded Ritsche that he was in a more dangerous world.

  9. Methods and devices for generation of broadband pulsed radiation

    DOEpatents

    Borguet, Eric; Isaienko, Oleksandr

    2013-05-14

    Methods and apparatus for non-collinear optical parametric ampliffication (NOPA) are provided. Broadband phase matching is achieved with a non-collinear geometry and a divergent signal seed to provide bandwidth gain. A chirp may be introduced into the pump pulse such that the white light seed is amplified in a broad spectral region.

  10. Design and construction of a PW ultrashort laser facility with ns, ps, and fs outputting pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Qihua; Huang, Xiaojun; Wang, Xiao; Zeng, Xiaoming; Xie, Xudong; Wang, Fang; Wang, Fengrui; Lin, Donghui; Jiang, Dongbin; Wang, Xiaodong; Zhou, Kainan; Zuo, Yanlei; Zhang, Ying; Deng, Ying; Wei, Xiaofeng; Fan, Dianyuan

    2007-06-01

    A petawatt laser facility with three beams for fast ignition research and strong-field physics applications has been designed and is being constructed. The first beam (referred as SILEX-I) is a Ti:sapphire femto-second laser which pulse width is 30 fs, and till now, output power has reached to 330 TW. The other two beams are Nd 3+:glass lasers which output energy are larger than 1kJ and pulse width are about 1ps and 1ns respectively. By using the technology of OPA pumped by 800nm femtosecond laser and seeded by super-continuum white light (SWL), the three beams are synchronized with each other without jitter time. Tiled multilayer dielectric coating gratings are used for the compressor of the PW beam.

  11. High-pressure dielectric barrier discharge Xenon lamps generating short pulses of high-peak-power VUV radiation (172nm) with high pulse-to-pulse reproducibility.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carman, Robert; Ward, Barry; Mildren, Richard; Kane, Deborah

    2003-10-01

    Dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) are used to efficiently generate radiation in the ultraviolet and vacuum-ultraviolet spectral regions (88nm-350nm) by forming rare-gas and rare-gas halide excimers in a transient plasma. Usually, DBD lamps generate the light output quasi-continuously or in bursts with a high degree of stochastic or random variability in the instantaneous UV/VUV intensity. However, regular pulses of high-peak-power UV/VUV, with high pulse-to-pulse reproducibility, are of interest for applications in biology, surface treatment and cleaning, and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. Such pulses can be generated from spatially homogeneous plasmas in a Xe DBD when the discharge is driven by uni-polar voltage pulses of short duration ( 100ns)^1. In the present study, we will report Xe DBD lamp performance and VUV output pulse characteristics for gas pressures up to 2.5bar and excitation conditions tailored for high-peak-power output. The experimental results will be compared to theoretical results from a detailed 1-D computer model of the spatio-temporal evolution of the plasma kinetics and Xe species population densities. ^1R.P.Mildren and R.J.Carman, J.Phys.D, 34, L1-L6, (2001)

  12. Design considerations for combined radiation effects facilities for twelve year outer planet spacecraft voyages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G.

    1972-01-01

    The design considerations influencing the choice and utility of environmental simulation methods and facilities are described, insofar as they relate to the requirements imposed on outer planet spacecraft because of radiation environments to be expected. Possible means for duplicating the radioisotope thermoelectric generator radiation environment, and for duplicating the effects of the trapped radiation belt environment are described, together with an assessment of radiation levels to be expected in the vicinity of an environmental testing chamber when in use.

  13. Atmospheric radiation measurement program facilities newsletter, April 2001.

    SciTech Connect

    Holdridge, D. J.

    2001-05-03

    ) Validation Campaign--Researchers from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in California will be deploying instruments at the CART site in May. Portable micrometeorology towers will be used to measure fluxes of carbon dioxide, water, and heat between the surface and the atmosphere. The exchange of these constituents varies with regional climate, soil type, and surface vegetation. Greater knowledge will improve the accuracy of computer models (and hence predictions) of the exchanges. Measurements made with the portable instruments will be compared with measurements being collected by instruments at the central facility. AWS Campaign--The State University of New York at Albany will deploy an oxygen A-band and water vapor band spectrometer (AWS) at the CART site on May 20-June 30, 2001. Measurements made by the AWS will be used to determine absorption of radiation by water vapor within clouds, a quantity important to understanding the behavior of solar radiation as it passes through clouds.

  14. Formation of an optical pulsed discharge in a supersonic air flow by radiation of a repetitively pulsed CO{sub 2} laser

    SciTech Connect

    Malov, Aleksei N; Orishich, Anatolii M

    2012-09-30

    Results of optimisation of repetitively pulsed CO{sub 2}-laser generation are presented for finding physical conditions of forming stable burning of an optical pulsed discharge (OPD) in a supersonic air flow and for studying the influence of pulse parameters on the energy absorption efficiency of laser radiation in plasma. The optical discharge in a supersonic air flow was formed by radiation of a repetitively pulsed CO{sub 2} laser with mechanical Q-switching excited by a discharge with a convective cooling of the working gas. For the first time the influence of radiation pulse parameters on the ignition conditions and stable burning of the OPD in a supersonic air flow was investigated and the efficiency of laser radiation absorption in plasma was studied. The influence of the air flow velocity on stability of plasma production was investigated. It was shown that stable burning of the OPD in a supersonic flow is realised at a high pulse repetition rate where the interval between radiation pulses is shorter than the time of plasma blowing-off. Study of the instantaneous value of the absorption coefficient shows that after a breakdown in a time lapse of 100 - 150 ns, a quasi-stationary 'absorption phase' is formed with the duration of {approx}1.5 ms, which exists independently of air flow and radiation pulse repetition rate. This phase of strong absorption is, seemingly, related to evolution of the ionisation wave. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  15. Analysis of energy resolution in the KURRI-LINAC pulsed neutron facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano, Tadafumi; Hori, Jun-ichi; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; Yashima, Hiroshi; Lee, Jaehong; Harada, Hideo

    2017-09-01

    In this study, we carried out Monte Carlo simulations to obtain the energy resolution of the neutron flux for TOF measurements in the KURRI-LINAC pulsed neutron facility. The simulation was performed on the moderated neutron flux from the pac-man type moderator at the energy range from 0.1 eV to 10 keV. As the result, we obtained the energy resolutions (ΔE/E) of about 0.7% to 1.3% between 0.1 eV to 10 keV. The energy resolution obtained from Monte Carlo simulation agreed with the resolution using the simplified evaluation formula. In addition, we compared the energy resolution among KURRI-LINAC and other TOF facilities, the energy dependency of the energy resolution with the pac-man type moderator in KURRI-LINAC was similar to the J-PARC ANNRI for the single-bunch mode.

  16. The radiation of a sound pulse from a jet nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloy, A. W.

    1985-03-01

    A high-amplitude sound pulse was produced in a jet pipe by injecting helium over a period of a few milliseconds. The test configuration allowed the incident and reflected waves to be isolated so that the pressure measurements in the jet pipe and in the far field could be directly compared. These measurements were made for jet Mach numbers in the range 0 less than or equal to M less than or equal to 0.7 and are compared with the low-frequency solutions of Cargill (1982). There is good agreement between experiment and theory, particularly at the lower jet Mach numbers, although the pulse amplitudes used in the experiments produce significant nonlinear effects when there is no mean flow.

  17. The radiation-wavefront instability in pulsed CO2 amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, S. V.; Iur'ev, M. S.

    1987-07-01

    The space-time evolution of a small-scale perturbation against a background of a smooth input beam which is incident on a pulsed CO2 amplifier is studied theoretically. Ranges of transverse frequency, longitudinal coordinate, and time values are found in which the perturbation growth is exponential in nature. It is shown that the wavefront instability is stabilized by the amplification of the main beam and sound damping.

  18. Explosive Device for Generation of Pulsed Fluxes of Soft X-Ray Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selemir, V. D.; Demidov, V. A.; Ivanovsky, A. V.; Yermolovich, V. F.; Kornilov, V. G.; Chelpanov, V. I.; Kazakov, S. A.; Vlasov, Y. V.; Orlov, A. P.

    2004-11-01

    The concept and realization of the explosive electrophysical device EMIR to generate soft x-ray radiation pulses are described. EMIR is based on the development of VNIIEF technologies in high-power flux compression generators, and on transforming systems based on lines with distributed parameters and current opening switches. Vacuum lines with magnetic insulation or water coaxial lines are considered for transmission of the energy pulses to the load. Transformation of magnetic energy to kinetic energy, thermalization and soft x-ray radiation are performed in a z-pinch with a double liner system.

  19. Transient radiation from a ring resonant medium excited by an ultrashort superluminal pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Arkhipov, R M; Arkhipov, M V; Tolmachev, Yu A; Babushkin, I V

    2015-06-30

    We report some specific features of transient radiation from a periodic spatially modulated one-dimensional medium with a resonant response upon excitation by an ultrashort pulse. The case of ring geometry (with particle density distributed along the ring according to the harmonic law) is considered. It is shown that the spectrum of scattered radiation contains (under both linear and nonlinear interaction), along with the frequency of intrinsic resonance of the medium, a new frequency, which depends on the pulse velocity and the spatial modulation period. The case of superluminal motion of excitation, when the Cherenkov effect manifests itself, is also analysed. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  20. Team Update on North American Proton Facilities for Radiation Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Label, Kenneth A.; Turflinger, Thomas; Haas, Thurman; George, Jeffrey; Moss, Steven; Davis, Scott; Kostic, Andrew; Wie, Brian; Reed, Robert; Guertin, Steven; Wert, Jerry; Foster, Charles

    2016-01-01

    In the wake of the closure of the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility (IUCF), this presentation provides an overview of the options for North American proton facilities. This includes those in use by the aerospace community as well as new additions from the cancer therapy regime. In addition, proton single event testing background is provided for understanding the criteria needed for these facilities for electronics testing.

  1. Team Update on North American Proton Facilities for Radiation Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaBel, Kenneth A.; Turflinger, Thomas; Haas, Thurman; George, Jeffrey; Moss, Steven; Davis, Scott; Kostic, Andrew; Wie, Brian; Reed, Robert; Guertin, Steven; hide

    2016-01-01

    In the wake of the closure of the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility (IUCF), this presentation provides an overview of the options for North American proton facilities. This includes those in use by the aerospace community as well as new additions from the cancer therapy regime. In addition, proton single event testing background is provided for understanding the criteria needed for these facilities for electronics testing.

  2. Experimental Study on Micro Hole Drilling Using Ultrashort Pulse Laser Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruner, Andreas; Schille, Joerg; Loeschner, Udo

    This paper discusses latest results obtained in micro hole percussion drilling in stainless steel. In the investigations a femtosecond laser source was used emitting 220 fs pulses at 1.03μm wavelength, whereas the spot size amounted to 31μm. Thereby, important process parameters like pulse energy, pulse repetition frequency, and pulse number were varied over a wide range in order to evaluate their influence both on the micro hole geometry like hole diameter, roundness, taper angle, and on the drilling quality such as thermal modification and melting residues. First, the required number of pulses for through hole drilling was estimated for material thicknesses ranging between 25μm and 1mm. It was found, that the polarization state of the laser beam has a considerable impact on micro hole formation. Therefore, linear and circular polarized laser radiation was applied. Finally, optimum parameters for highest available drilling quality and speed were identified.

  3. Nuclear reactor pulse calibration using a CdZnTe electro-optic radiation detector.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Kyle A; Geuther, Jeffrey A; Neihart, James L; Riedel, Todd A; Rojeski, Ronald A; Saddler, Jeffrey L; Schmidt, Aaron J; McGregor, Douglas S

    2012-07-01

    A CdZnTe electro-optic radiation detector was used to calibrate nuclear reactor pulses. The standard configuration of the Pockels cell has collimated light passing through an optically transparent CdZnTe crystal located between crossed polarizers. The transmitted light was focused onto an IR sensitive photodiode. Calibrations of reactor pulses were performed using the CdZnTe Pockels cell by measuring the change in the photodiode current, repeated 10 times for each set of reactor pulses, set between 1.00 and 2.50 dollars in 0.50 increments of reactivity.

  4. ARSA accelerator - small-size source of nanosecond pulses of electron and x-ray radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Elyash, S.L.; Alexandrin, A.I.; Donskoy, E.N.

    1993-12-31

    ARSA miniature accelerator is notable for high intensity of radiation and characteristics stability. Near the output window the electron an x ray dose in the air constitutes in a 10 ns pulse 3 x 10{sup 4} Gy and 3 Gy, respectively. Maximal electron and x-ray quanta energy of 700 keV provides high permeability. Dimensions of the accelerator high-voltage unit are small: 250 x 1000 mm and 50 kg weight. It operates in a single pulse regime or generates a pulse series according to the specified program.

  5. Radiation from high-intensity ultrashort-laser-pulse and gas-jet magnetized plasma interaction.

    PubMed

    Dorranian, Davoud; Starodubtsev, Mikhail; Kawakami, Hiromichi; Ito, Hiroaki; Yugami, Noboru; Nishida, Yasushi

    2003-08-01

    Using a gas-jet flow, via the interaction between an ultrashort high-intensity laser pulse and plasma in the presence of a perpendicular external dc magnetic field, the short pulse radiation from a magnetized plasma wakefield has been observed. Different nozzles are used in order to generate different densities and gas profiles. The neutral density of the gas-jet flow measured with a Mach-Zehnder interferometer is found to be proportional to back pressure of the gas jet in the range of 1 to 8 atm. Strength of the applied dc magnetic field varies from 0 to 8 kG at the interaction region. The frequency of the emitted radiation with the pulse width of 200 ps (detection limit) is in the millimeter wave range. Polarization and spatial distributions of the experimental data are measured to be in good agreement with the theory based on the V(p)xB radiation scheme, where V(p) is the phase velocity of the electron plasma wave and B is the steady magnetic field intensity. Characteristics of the radiation are extensively studied as a function of plasma density and magnetic field strength. These experiments should contribute to the development of a new kind of millimeter wavelength radiation source that is tunable in frequency, pulse duration, and intensity.

  6. Generating high-power short terahertz electromagnetic pulses with a multifoil radiator.

    PubMed

    Vinokurov, Nikolay A; Jeong, Young Uk

    2013-02-08

    We describe a multifoil cone radiator capable of generating high-field short terahertz pulses using short electron bunches. Round flat conducting foil plates with successively decreasing radii are stacked, forming a truncated cone with the z axis. The gaps between the foil plates are equal and filled with some dielectric (or vacuum). A short relativistic electron bunch propagates along the z axis. At sufficiently high particle energy, the energy losses and multiple scattering do not change the bunch shape significantly. When passing by each gap between the foil plates, the electron bunch emits some energy into the gap. Then, the radiation pulses propagate radially outward. For transverse electromagnetic waves with a longitudinal (along the z axis) electric field and an azimuthal magnetic field, there is no dispersion in these radial lines; therefore, the radiation pulses conserve their shapes (time dependence). At the outer surface of the cone, we have synchronous circular radiators. Their radiation field forms a conical wave. Ultrashort terahertz pulses with gigawatt-level peak power can be generated with this device.

  7. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Investigation of the energy balance components for a plane target irradiated with a picosecond laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borodin, V. G.; Il'in, V. V.; Komarov, V. M.; Malinov, V. A.; Migel', V. M.; Nikitin, N. V.; Charukhchev, Aleksandr V.; Chernov, V. N.

    2000-01-01

    The scattering and absorption of a high-power picosecond laser pulse by a solid target were investigated experimentally making use of the 'Progress-P' Nd:glass laser facility (λ = 1053 nm, τ = 1.4 ps) at radiation intensities I = 1016 — 1019 W cm-2 on the target surface. It was found that, for I <= 1017 W cm-2, more than 30% of the intensity of the scattered light was contained in the specularly reflected component. The absorption coefficient of the laser radiation with intensities ranging from 1018 to 1019 W cm-2 was higher for targets made of materials with higher atomic numbers.

  8. Atmospheric radiation measurement program facilities newsletter, January 2002.

    SciTech Connect

    Holdridge, D. J.

    2002-02-01

    Central Facility Benefits from Improvements--Three current projects are improving the ARM SGP central facility near Lamont, Oklahoma: construction of an instrument maintenance facility, installation of an instrument to measure carbon dioxide flux, and construction of a platform to accommodate instruments brought to the site by visiting scientists. Instrument Maintenance Facility--Construction of the instrument maintenance facility began on November 26, 2001. Being assembled from three mobile trailer units rescued from Argonne National Laboratory's excess equipment pool, this facility will add almost 2,400 square feet of space and will allow significant expansion of the onsite electronics laboratory that repairs and troubleshoots malfunctioning equipment. The facility will also consolidate instrument parts and repairs and provide much-needed office space and indoor restroom facilities for the field and electronics technicians who work at the central facility. New Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurements--In mid-December, scientists from Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and the University of Nebraska installed an instrument that measures carbon dioxide flux in a wheat field near the 60-meter tower at the central facility. Measurements of carbon dioxide flux during the winter wheat growing season will be used to validate measurements taken by similar equipment mounted on the nearby tower. Several similar systems may be installed in surrounding fields during January. All equipment will be removed before the May wheat harvest. New Platform for Guest Instruments--The guest instrument facility will be receiving an addition soon, in the form of an elevated deck on the north side of the building. The deck, measuring 15 feet by 30 feet, will accommodate instrumentation brought to the CART site by visiting scientists. The SGP CART site hosts an increasing number of guest instruments each year. The addition will provide adequate space for the temporary instrument installations.

  9. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program facilities newsletter, February 2003.

    SciTech Connect

    Holdridge, D. J.

    2003-02-28

    Cloudiness Inter-comparison IOP--Clouds are an important part of Earth's energy system. We take clouds for granted, but their role in weather and climate is considerable. Without clouds, life on Earth would be impossible. By helping to regulate surface temperatures, clouds establish livable conditions on the planet. Clouds produced by water vapor condensation play a complicated role in our climate system. Clouds decrease the amount of sunlight received by Earth's surface. Decreased sunlight reduces evaporation driven by sunlight and thus reduces cloud formation. With fewer clouds, Earth receives more sunlight, which eventually increases evaporation and cloud production. On the other hand, clouds also trap longwave (infrared) radiation emitted by Earth, as does water vapor. This heating effect increases evaporation. In summary, cloud formation is a complex, self-regulating, cyclic process. The SGP CART site is conducting a Cloudiness Inter-comparison IOP (intensive operational period) from mid-February through mid-April. The central facility near Lamont, Oklahoma, currently is home to several cloud-measuring instruments. The process of measuring cloudiness has always been somewhat subjective. Cloud measurements were once made by solely human observation, but new technology enables instruments to view the sky and make the more objective cloud measurements needed by both operational and research meteorologists. The SGP site currently operates eight different instruments that make cloud-related measurements. Data are collected on cloud cover, cloud top and base location, cloud water vapor and liquid water, sunshine duration and amount, and cloud number and area. During the Cloudiness Inter-comparison IOP, three additional cloud-measuring instruments are being brought to the CART site to be tested and assessed against the current instruments. Researchers are interested in testing whether the additional instruments can collect better data during nighttime hours, when

  10. Measurement of the Pulse Radiation of an IRA in Time Domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stadtler, Thiemo; Ter Haseborg, Jan Luiken; Sabath, Frank

    For radiation of UWB pulses special Impulse Radiating Antennas (IRA) have been designed and are continuously improved. The measurement of its near field can help optimizing this antenna type. This paper presents a time domain scanner which is able to determine the transient near field. The so called double probe near field scanner can be employed to measure the two dimensional field distribution in time domain.

  11. Transient Self-Amplified Cerenkov Radiation with a Short Pulse Electron Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Poole, B R; Blackfield, D T; Camacho, J F

    2009-01-22

    An analytic and numerical examination of the slow wave Cerenkov free electron maser is presented. We consider the steady state amplifier configuration as well as operation in the selfamplified spontaneous emission (SASE) regime. The linear theory is extended to include electron beams that have a parabolic radial density inhomogeneity. Closed form solutions for the dispersion relation and modal structure of the electromagnetic field are determined in this inhomogeneous case. To determine the steady state response, a macro-particle approach is used to develop a set of coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations for the amplitude and phase of the electromagnetic wave, which are solved in conjunction with the particle dynamical equations to determine the response when the system is driven as an amplifier with a time harmonic source. We then consider the case in which a fast rise time electron beam is injected into a dielectric loaded waveguide. In this case, radiation is generated by SASE, with the instability seeded by the leading edge of the electron beam. A pulse of radiation is produced, slipping behind the leading edge of the beam due to the disparity between the group velocity of the radiation and the beam velocity. Short pulses of microwave radiation are generated in the SASE regime and are investigated using particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. The nonlinear dynamics are significantly more complicated in the transient SASE regime when compared with the steady state amplifier model due to the slippage of the radiation with respect to the beam. As strong self-bunching of the electron beam develops due to SASE, short pulses of superradiant emission develop with peak powers significantly larger than the predicted saturated power based on the steady state amplifier model. As these superradiant pulses grow, their pulse length decreases and forms a series of soliton-like pulses. Comparisons between the linear theory, macro-particle model, and PIC simulations are

  12. Cross modulation method of transformation of the spatial coherence of pulsed laser radiation in a nonlinear medium

    SciTech Connect

    Kitsak, M A; Kitsak, A I

    2008-04-30

    The cross modulation method of transformation of the spatial coherence of low-power pulsed laser radiation in a nonlinear medium is proposed. The method is realised experimentally in a multimode optical fibre. The estimates of the degree of spatial coherence of radiation subjected to the phase cross modulation demonstrated the high efficiency of this radiation decorrelation mechanism. (control of laser radiation parameters)

  13. Innovative uses for conventional radiation detectors via pulse shape analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Beckedahl, D; Blair, J; Friensehner, A; Kammeraad, J E; Schmid, G

    1999-03-03

    In this report we have discussed two applications for digital pulse shape analysis in Ge detectors: Compton suppression and {gamma}-ray imaging. The Compton suppression aspect has been thoroughly studied during the past few years, and a real-time, laboratory-prototype system has been fielded. A summary of results from that set up have been discussed here. The {gamma}-ray imaging aspect, while not yet developed experimentally, looks very promising theoretically as the simulations presented here have shown. Experimental work currently underway at Berkeley (as discussed in section 4.3) should help further guide us towards the proper developmental path.

  14. Thermal nuclear pulse simulation at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, C.P.; Ralph, M.E. ); Ghanbari, C.M. ); Oeding, R.; Shaw, K. )

    1991-01-01

    The National Solar Thermal Test Facility (NSTTF) at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico is being used to simulate the thermal pulse from a nuclear weapon on relatively large surfaces. Pulses varying in length from 2 seconds to 7 seconds have been produced. The desired pulse length varies as a function of the yield of the weapon being simulated. The present experiment capability can accommodate samples as large as 1.2 {times} 1.5 meters. Samples can be flat or three-dimensional. Samples exposed have ranged from fabrics (protective clothing) to an aircraft canopy and cockpit system, complete with a mannequin in a flight suit and helmet. In addition, a windowed wind tunnel has been constructed which permits exposure of flight surface materials to thermal transients with air speed of Mach 0.8. The wind tunnel can accommodate samples up to .48 {times} .76 meters or an array of smaller samples. The maximum flux capability of the NSTTF is about 70 calories/cm{sup 2}-sec. A black-body temperature of about 6000 K is produced by the solar beam and is therefore ideal for simulating the nuclear source. 3 refs., 7 figs.

  15. Development of a 50-T pulsed magnetic field facility by using an 1.5-MJ capacitor bank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Y. H.; Kim, Yongmin

    2015-09-01

    Because DC magnets consume a huge amount of electricity (resistive DC magnet) or liquid helium (superconducting magnet), a capacitor-bank-driven pulsed magnet is known to be a cost-effective way of generating high magnetic fields. This type of pulsed magnet is normally operated at liquid nitrogen temperature and consumes little electric power to generate over 50 tesla (T) during a short transient time of less than 50 millisecond (ms). With modern fast data acquisition systems, almost all kinds of physical quantities, such as photoluminescence, magnetization or resistance can be measured during a short magnetic field pulse. We report a recently home-built capacitor-bankdriven pulsed magnetic field facility, in which a capacitor bank of 1.5-MJ maximum stored energy is utilized to generate pulsed magnetic fields up to 50 T with transient pulse time of 22 ms.

  16. Inactivation of E. Coli cell viability and DNA Photo-breakage by Pulsed Nitrogen Laser Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Cheba, Ben Amar; Alzaag, Ali; Tilfah, Nafie A.

    2005-03-17

    The mutagenic and lethal effect of nitrogen laser radiation: 337.1 nm wave length, 1.5 millijoul pulse energy, 10 nanosecond pulse with and pulse repetition rate range from 1 to 50 Pulse/ second was evaluated on E. Coli cells. Results indicated that irradiation of E. coli JMP39 with pulse repetition of 8 , 16 , 32 pulse/sec, for 1, 5 , 10, 25 min respectively led to a significant decrease in cell count proportional to irradiation dose with significant increase in lacmutation frequency accompanied with some mutations in pattern of antibiotic resistance. The effect of nitrogen laser on the genomic content of the strain JMP39 was also studied by irradiating the total DNA with 30 pulse/second for 1 ,5, 15 , 30 min then subjected to both agarose gel electrophoresis and scanning spectrophotometry. The first technique revealed to DNA photo breakage and significant decrease in DNA absorbency was noticed by scanning spectrophotometry. This could be attributed to photo-decomposition resulted from multi-photo-excitation of UV-Laser pulses.

  17. A source of high-power pulses of elliptically polarized ultrawideband radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, Yu. A. Efremov, A. M.; Koshelev, V. I.; Kovalchuk, B. M.; Petkun, A. A.; Sukhushin, K. N.; Zorkaltseva, M. Yu.

    2014-10-01

    Here, we describe a source of high-power ultrawideband radiation with elliptical polarization. The source consisting of a monopolar pulse generator, a bipolar pulse former, and a helical antenna placed into a radioparent container may be used in tests for electromagnetic compatibility. In the source, the helical antenna with the number of turns N = 4 is excited with a high-voltage bipolar pulse. Preliminary, we examined helical antennas at a low-voltage source aiming to select an optimal N and to estimate a radiation center position and boundary of a far-field zone. Finally, characteristics of the source in the operating mode at a pulse repetition rate of 100 Hz are presented in the paper as well. Energy efficiency of the antenna is 0.75 at the axial ratio equal to 1.3. The effective potential of radiation of the source at the voltage amplitudes of the bipolar pulse generator equal to -175/+200 kV reaches 280 kV.

  18. Measurement capabilities of a compact thermal-type standard of energy unit of pulse laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skrzeczanowski, Wojciech

    2001-08-01

    New instrument for measurements of laser pulse energy is described. Due to its parameters it can be used as a standard for unit of energy of pulse laser radiation. The instrument consists of a control unit, three sources of laser radiation, two receivers of optical signal, and a laptop. The whole system can be easily transported enabling one to carry out measurements in situ, at customer's, not only in laboratory conditions. This is a very important feature of the instrument because it allows inexpensive calibration and testing of large industrial laser installations and interesting laboratory intercomparisons as well. A method of measurement used in operation of the standard is presented. Main characteristics of the standard are shown. Methods of calculation of uncertainties of measurement during laser energy meters calibration by means of the standard of energy unit of pulse laser radiation are also presented. An alternative measurement option of the standard operating as an energy calibrator for unknown pulse optical radiation source is also available. Some results of testing of laser energy meters at eye-safe wavelength (1.54 micrometer) are presented.

  19. Crystallization of hydrogenated amorphous silicon films by exposure to femtosecond pulsed laser radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Volodin, V. A.; Kachko, A. S.

    2011-02-15

    To crystallize hydrogenated amorphous silicon films on glass substrates, pulsed Ti-sapphire laser radiation is used, with a pulse duration less than 30 fs. The initial films are grown by plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition at the temperatures 200 and 250 Degree-Sign C. The structural properties of the initial films and films treated with laser radiation pulses are studied by Raman spectroscopy. The conditions for complete crystallization of the films grown on glass substrates to thicknesses of up to 100 nm and hydrogen content of up to 20 at % are established. The conditions provide the fabrication of highly homogeneous films by scanning laser treatments. It is found that, if the hydrogen content in the film is 30-40 at %, the crystallization is an inhomogeneous process and laser ablation is observed in some areas of the films.

  20. Characteristics of dual element ultrasonic transducers in the long pulse radiation mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazakov, V. V.; Sanin, A. G.

    2017-01-01

    The frequency and transfer characteristics of dual element ultrasonic transducers are theoretically and experimentally investigated in the long pulse radiation mode for the case where one of the piezoelectric elements is connected to a control circuit in the form of an inductance coil or a resistor. For the controlled damper and controlled layer cases, the characteristic features of radiation as functions of the control circuit parameters are determined, as well as the conditions for an increase in ultrasonic wave radiation power. With certain conditions being satisfied, we demonstrate the possibility of amplitude modulation of the emitted ultrasonic wave by periodic switching of control circuit elements.

  1. [The effect of the pulsed radiation of a fast electron beam on the fluorescence of solutions of biological molecules].

    PubMed

    Vasin, A L; Ostrovskiĭ, A V; Erastov, A A; Vaĭner, E A; Garibov, R E; Ponomarev, V N; Kadomtseva, M B

    1993-01-01

    The intensity of fluorescence of amino acid and globular protein solutions, exposed to a pulsed electron beam in the presence and absence of the concurrent pulsed electromagnetic field was found to be a function of radiation dose. The observed decline in the fluorescence intensity was slightly dependent on the solution concentration and dependent on the time and dose-rate of irradiation. The effect of the concurrent pulsed radiation of the electromagnetic field was sometimes observed.

  2. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETERS: Generation of diffraction-limited nanosecond and subnanosecond pulses in a XeCl laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchenko, Yu N.; Losev, V. F.; Dudarev, V. V.

    2008-04-01

    The generation of nanosecond and subnanosecond pulses in a XeCl laser is studied. The short radiation pulses are generated in a resonator with a SBS mirror. By focusing laser radiation inside and on the surface of a nonlinear medium, it is possible to generate pulses of duration 3 ns and 150 ps, respectively. The laser beams obtained in this way contain more than 70% of energy within the diffraction angle and have the signal-to-noise ration exceeding 104.

  3. Response of nickel surface to pulsed fusion plasma radiations

    SciTech Connect

    Niranjan, Ram Rout, R. K. Srivastava, R. Gupta, Satish C.; Chakravarthy, Y.; Patel, N. N.; Alex, P.

    2014-04-24

    Nickel based alloys are being projected as suitable materials for some components of the next generation fusion reactor because of compatible thermal, electrical and mechanical properties. Pure nickel material is tested here for possibility of similar application purpose. Nickel samples (> 99.5 % purity) are exposed here to plasma radiations produced due to D-D fusion reaction inside an 11.5 kJ plasma focus device. The changes in the physical properties of the nickel surface at microscopic level which in turn change the mechanical properties are analyzed using scanning electron microscope, optical microscope, glancing incident X-ray diffractometer and Vicker's hardness gauge. The results are reported here.

  4. Response of nickel surface to pulsed fusion plasma radiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niranjan, Ram; Rout, R. K.; Srivastava, R.; Chakravarthy, Y.; Patel, N. N.; Alex, P.; Gupta, Satish C.

    2014-04-01

    Nickel based alloys are being projected as suitable materials for some components of the next generation fusion reactor because of compatible thermal, electrical and mechanical properties. Pure nickel material is tested here for possibility of similar application purpose. Nickel samples (> 99.5 % purity) are exposed here to plasma radiations produced due to D-D fusion reaction inside an 11.5 kJ plasma focus device. The changes in the physical properties of the nickel surface at microscopic level which in turn change the mechanical properties are analyzed using scanning electron microscope, optical microscope, glancing incident X-ray diffractometer and Vicker's hardness gauge. The results are reported here.

  5. Enhancement of proton acceleration by frequency-chirped laser pulse in radiation pressure mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vosoughian, H.; Riazi, Z.; Afarideh, H.; Yazdani, E.

    2015-07-01

    The transition from hole-boring to light-sail regime of radiation pressure acceleration by frequency-chirped laser pulses is studied using particle-in-cell simulation. The penetration depth of laser into the plasma with ramped density profile increases when a negatively chirped laser pulse is applied. Because of this induced transparency, the laser reflection layer moves deeper into the target and the hole-boring stage would smoothly transit into the light-sail stage. An optimum chirp parameter which satisfies the laser transparency condition, a 0 ≈ π n e l / n c λ , is obtained for each ramp scale length. Moreover, the efficiency of conversion of laser energy into the kinetic energy of particles is maximized at the obtained optimum condition. A relatively narrow proton energy spectrum with peak enhancement by a factor of 2 is achieved using a negatively chirped pulse compared with the un-chirped pulse.

  6. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory 1991 activity report. Facility developments January 1991--March 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Cantwell, K.; St. Pierre, M.

    1992-12-31

    SSRL is a national facility supported primarily by the Department of Energy for the utilization of synchrotron radiation for basic and applied research in the natural sciences and engineering. It is a user-oriented facility which welcomes proposals for experiments from all researchers. The synchrotron radiation is produced by the 3.5 GeV storage ring, SPEAR, located at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). SPEAR is a fully dedicated synchrotron radiation facility which operates for user experiments 7 to 9 months per year. SSRL currently has 24 experimental stations on the SPEAR storage ring. There are 145 active proposals for experimental work from 81 institutions involving approximately 500 scientists. There is normally no charge for use of beam time by experimenters. This report summarizes the activity at SSRL for the period January 1, 1991 to December 31, 1991 for research. Facility development through March 1992 is included.

  7. School Facilities and Electric and Magnetic Field Radiation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Richard L.

    1990-01-01

    The possibility that electric and magnetic field radiation poses a health hazard should be recognized during the planning and designing of a school. A preconstruction assessment of possible exposure should be evaluated before the start of construction. (MLF)

  8. Radiation protection aspects of the operation in a cyclotron facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, P. P. N.; Carneiro, J. C. G. G.

    2014-02-01

    The activated accelerator cyclotron components and the radioisotope production may impact on the personnel radiation exposure of the workers during the routine maintenance and emergency repair procedures and any modification of the equipment. Since the adherence of the principle of ALARA (as low as reasonable achievable) constitutes a major objective of the cyclotron management, it has become imperative to investigate the radiation levels at the workplace and the probable health effects to the worker caused by radiation exposure. The data analysis in this study was based on the individual monitoring records during the period from 2007 to 2011. Monitoring of the workplace was also performed using gamma and neutron detectors to determine the dose rate in various predetermined spots. The results of occupational radiation exposures were analysed and compared with the values established in national standards and international recommendations. Important guidelines have been developed to reduce the individual dose.

  9. Highly efficient terahertz radiation from a thin foil irradiated by a high-contrast laser pulse.

    PubMed

    Jin, Z; Zhuo, H B; Nakazawa, T; Shin, J H; Wakamatsu, S; Yugami, N; Hosokai, T; Zou, D B; Yu, M Y; Sheng, Z M; Kodama, R

    2016-09-01

    Radially polarized intense terahertz (THz) radiation behind a thin foil irradiated by ultrahigh-contrast ultrashort relativistic laser pulse is recorded by a single-shot THz time-domain spectroscopy system. As the thickness of the target is reduced from 30 to 2 µm, the duration of the THz emission increases from 5 to over 20 ps and the radiation energy increases dramatically, reaching ∼10.5mJ per pulse, corresponding to a laser-to-THz radiation energy conversion efficiency of 1.7%. The efficient THz emission can be attributed to reflection (deceleration and acceleration) of the laser-driven hot electrons by the target-rear sheath electric field. The experimental results are consistent with that of a simple model as well as particle-in-cell simulation.

  10. Pulse radiolysis in model studies toward radiation processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Von Sonntag, C.; Bothe, E.; Ulanski, P.; Deeble, D. J.

    1995-02-01

    Using the pulse radiolysis technique, the OH-radical-induced reactions of poly(vinyl alcohol) PVAL, poly(acrylic acid) PAA, poly(methacrylic acid) PMA, and hyaluronic acid have been investigated in dilute aqueous solution. The reactions of the free-radical intermediates were followed by UV-spectroscopy and low-angle laser light-scattering; the scission of the charged polymers was also monitored by conductometry. For more detailed product studies, model systems such as 2,4-dihydroxypentane (for PVAL) and 2,4-dimethyl glutaric acid (for PAA) was also investigated. With PVA, OH-radicals react predominantly by abstraction of an H-atom in α-position to the hydroxyl group (70%). The observed bimolecular decay rate constant of the PVAL-radicals decreases with time. This has been interpreted as being due to an initially fast decay of proximate radicals and a decrease of the probability of such encounters with time. Intramolecular crosslinking (loop formation) predominates at high doses per pulse. In the presence of O 2, peroxyl radicals are formed which in the case of the α-hydroxyperoxyl radicals can eliminate HO 2-radicals in competition with bimolecular decay processes which lead to a fragmentation of the polymer. In PAA, radicals both in α-position (characterized by an absorption near 300 nm) and in β-position to the carboxylate groups are formed in an approximately 1:2 ratio. The lifetime of the radicals increases with increasing electrolytic dissociation of the polymer. The β-radicals undergo a slow (intra- as well as intermolecular) H-abstraction yielding α-radicals, in competition to crosslinking and scission reactions. In PMA only β-radicals are formed. Their fragmentation has been followed by conductometry. In hyaluronic acid, considerable fragmeentation is observed even in the absence of oxygen which, in fact, has some protective effect against this process. Thus free-radical attack on this important biopolymer makes it especially vulnerable with respect

  11. Observation of coherent transition radiation using relativistic pico second electron pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, C.R.; Kosai, H.; Dutt, J.M.

    1995-12-31

    When an electron beams passes through boundaries of two different media with different dielectric constants, it generates radiation. The radiation emitted by the prebunched electron beam becomes coherent if the size of the bunch is smaller than the wavelength. Therefore, transition radiation can be considered as a possible broad band radiation source as well as a probe to the pico second and sub picosecond electron beam profiles. Using 1.2 MeV, 200 mA, macropulse electron beam, transition radiation was generated. The electron gun consists of 2.856 GHz Klystron, thermionic cathode. The emitted electron beam was bunched by passing through an alpha magnet. As a result of the combination, a pico second pulse (1.2 MeV, up to 80 A micropulse) was obtained. Experimental results, comparisons with the theory, and simulated electron beam profiles will be presented.

  12. Photon dosimetry using plastic scintillators in pulsed radiation fields

    SciTech Connect

    David L. Chichester; Brandon W. Blackburn; James T. Johnson; Scott W. Watson

    2007-04-01

    Simulations and experiments have been carried out to explore using a plastic scintillator as a dosimetry probe in the vicinity of a pulsed bremsstrahlung source in the range 4 to 20 MeV. Taking advantage of the tissue-equivalent properties of this detector in conjunction with the use of a fast digital signal processor near real-time dosimetry was shown to be possible. The importance of accounting for a broad energy electron beam in bremsstrahlung production, and photon scattering and build-up, in correctly interpreting dosimetry results at long stand-off distances is highlighted by comparing real world experiments with ideal geometry simulations. Close agreement was found between absorbed energy calculations based upon spectroscopic techniques and calculations based upon signal integration, showing a ratio between 10 MeV absorbed dose to 12 MeV absorbed dose of 0.66 at a distance of 91.4 m from the accelerator. This is compared with an idealized model simulation with a monoenergetic electron beam and without scattering, where the ratio was 0.46.

  13. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program facilities newsletter, July 2000.

    SciTech Connect

    Sisterson, D. L.; Holdridge, D. J., ed.

    2000-08-03

    For improved safety in and around the ARM SGP CART site, the ARM Program recently purchased and installed an aircraft detection radar system at the central facility near Lamont, Oklahoma. The new system will enhance safety measures already in place at the central facility. The SGP CART site, especially the central facility, houses several instruments employing laser technology. These instruments are designed to be eye-safe and are not a hazard to personnel at the site or pilots of low-flying aircraft over the site. However, some of the specialized equipment brought to the central facility by visiting scientists during scheduled intensive observation periods (IOPs) might use higher-power laser beams that point skyward to make measurements of clouds or aerosols in the atmosphere. If these beams were to strike the eye of a person in an aircraft flying above the instrument, damage to the person's eyesight could result. During IOPs, CART site personnel have obtained Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) approval to temporarily close the airspace directly over the central facility and keep aircraft from flying into the path of the instrument's laser beam. Information about the blocked airspace is easily transmitted to commercial aircraft, but that does not guarantee that the airspace remains completely plane-free. For this reason, during IOPs in which non-eye-safe lasers were in use in the past, ARM technicians watched for low-flying aircraft in and around the airspace over the central facility. If the technicians spotted such an aircraft, they would manually trigger a safety shutter to block the laser beam's path skyward until the plane had cleared the area.

  14. Time-dependent quasi-one-dimensional simulations of high enthalpy pulse facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Gregory J.

    1992-01-01

    A numerical methodology is presented for simulating the time-dependent reacting flow inside the entire length of high enthalpy pulse facilities. The methodology is based on a finite-volume TVD scheme for the quasi-1D Euler equations coupled with finite-rate chemistry. A moving mesh and tracking of gas interfaces are used to overcome certain numerical difficulties associated with these types of flows. Simulation results of a helium driven shock tube show that computations can be used to predict the off-tailored behavior of shock tubes and tunnels. Particular attention is given to computations of the flow through the NASA Ames 16-inch combustion driven shock tunnel which show the influence of nonuniformities in the driver section on the reservoir conditions; and the effect of finite secondary diaphragm opening times on the chemical composition of the test flow in the HYPULSE expansion tube.

  15. Magnetised bow shocks and oblique shock interactions: HEDLA experiments on the Magpie pulsed-power facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdiak, G. C.; Lebedev, S. V.; Chittenden, J. P.; Clayson, T.; Garcia, C.; Hare, J. D.; Niasse, N.; Suttle, L. G.; Suzuki-Vidal, F.; Frank, A.; Ciardi, A.

    2016-10-01

    We present results from magnetised shock experiments performed on the Magpie ( 1 MA, 250 ns) pulsed-power facility. Shocks are formed around cylindrical and oblique planar obstacles positioned in a supersonic, super-Alfvenic plasma flow (MS = 5 , MA = 2.5 , vf = 70 km/s). The plasma flow is produced by an inverse, exploding wire array z-pinch and carries an embedded magnetic field that is well frozen in (ReM = 20). We show how the structure of bow and oblique shocks is dramatically affected by the orientation of the advected magnetic field with respect to the obstacles. More complex obstacle geometries allow us to study the interaction of multiple magnetised oblique shocks. These systems can cause the annihilation of magnetic flux and the generation of shear flow along a slip layer. Work supported by DOE cooperative agreements No. DE-F03- 02NA00057 and No. DE-SC-0001063.

  16. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETERS: Cross modulation method of transformation of the spatial coherence of pulsed laser radiation in a nonlinear medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitsak, M. A.; Kitsak, A. I.

    2008-04-01

    The cross modulation method of transformation of the spatial coherence of low-power pulsed laser radiation in a nonlinear medium is proposed. The method is realised experimentally in a multimode optical fibre. The estimates of the degree of spatial coherence of radiation subjected to the phase cross modulation demonstrated the high efficiency of this radiation decorrelation mechanism.

  17. A comparative radiation study at ALBA synchrotron facility between Monte Carlo modeling and radiation monitors dosimetry measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devienne, A.; Aymerich, N.; García-Fusté, M. J.; Queralt, X.

    2015-11-01

    ALBA is the Spanish synchrotron facility formed with a 3 GeV electron synchrotron accelerator generating bright beams of synchrotron radiation, located in Cerdanyola del Vallès (Spain). The aim of this work is to study the origin of the radiation produced inside and outside the optical hutch of BOREAS beamline, an experimental station dedicated to study the resonant absorption and scattering of the photons. The objective is to characterize the radiation at the beamline, evaluating in particular the solid bremsstrahlung component of the radiation. The results are obtained after comparing radiation monitors detectors data with Monte Carlo modeling (FLUKA), giving the characteristics of the shielding required to consider the outside of the hutch as a public zone.

  18. Flow measurement by pulsed-neutron activation techniques at the PKL facility at Erlangen (Germany). [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Kehler, P.

    1982-03-01

    Flow velocities in the downcomer at the PKL facility (in Erlangen, Germany) were measured by the Pulsed-Neutron Activation (PNA) techniques. This was the first time that a fully automated PNA system, incorporating a dedicated computer for on-line data reduction, was used for flow measurements. A prototype of a portable, pulsed, high-output neutron source, developed by the Sandia National Laboratories for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, was also successfully demonstrated during this test. The PNA system was the primary flow-measuring device used at the PKL, covering the whole range of velocities of interest. In this test series, the PKL simulated small-break accidents similar to the one that occurred at TMI. The flow velocities in the downcomer were, therefore, very low, ranging between 0.03 and 0.35 m/sec. Two additional flow-measuring methods were used over a smaller range of velocities. Wherever comparison was possible, the PNA-derived velocity values agreed well with the measurements performed by the two more conventional methods.

  19. Effect of pulsed progressive fluoroscopy on reduction of radiation dose in the cardiac catheterization laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, D.R. Jr.; Wondrow, M.A.; Gray, J.E.; Vetter, R.J.; Fellows, J.L.; Julsrud, P.R. )

    1990-01-01

    The increased application of therapeutic interventional cardiology procedures is associated with increased radiation exposure to physicians, patients and technical personnel. New advances in imaging techniques have the potential for reducing radiation exposure. A progressive scanning video system with a standard vascular phantom has been shown to decrease entrance radiation exposure. The effect of this system on reducing actual radiation exposure to physicians and technicians was assessed from 1984 through 1987. During this time, progressive fluoroscopy was added sequentially to all four adult catheterization laboratories; no changes in shielding procedures were made. During this time, the case load per physician increased by 63% and the number of percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty procedures (a high radiation procedure) increased by 244%. Despite these increases in both case load and higher radiation procedures, the average radiation exposure per physician declined by 37%. During the same time, the radiation exposure for technicians decreased by 35%. Pulsed progressive fluoroscopy is effective for reducing radiation exposure to catheterization laboratory physicians and technical staff.

  20. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program facilities newsletter, April 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2000-05-05

    This issue of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM Program) monthly newsletter is about the ARM Program goal to improve scientific understanding of the interactions of sunlight (solar radiation) with the atmosphere, then incorporate this understanding into computer models of climate change. To model climate accurately all around the globe, a variety of data must be collected from many locations on Earth. For its Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) sites, ARM chose locations in the US Southern Great Plains, the North Slope of Alaska, and the Tropical Western Pacific Ocean to represent different climate types around the world. In this newsletter they consider the North Slope of Alaska site, with locations at Barrow and Atqasuk, Alaska.

  1. Preliminary investigation on the radiation transfer in dynamic hohlraums on the PTS facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Delong; Ye, Fan; Meng, Shijian; Ning, Jiamin; Qin, Yi; Hu, Qingyuan; Huang, Zhanchang; Yang, Jianlun; Chen, Faxin; Jiang, Shuqing; Ding, Ning; Xu, Rongkun; Xue, Chuang; Zhang, Yang; Sun, Shunkai; Shu, Xiaojian

    2017-09-01

    The radiation transfer in dynamic hohlraums on the PTS facility is preliminarily investigated in this paper. Simulation results show that as the accelerated wire-array plasma impacts onto the foam converter, energy thermalization takes place in a local interaction region near the boundary of the wire-array plasma and the foam converter, and then, high temperature radiation is gradually generated. Its transfer process largely depends on the radiation temperature and the mass density of the converter. When the mass ratio of the wire-array to the converter is near 1.0, the radiation temperature can be increased to about 120 eV with the PTS drive current. In this case, the radiation generated from the interaction region will quickly transfer to the center of the converter. The experimental end-on x-ray images present the overall process of radiation production and transfer of this kind of dynamic hohlraum. As the mass ratio is decreased, the radiation temperature will also be deceased, and the converter will become more opaque to the radiation. In the case of extremely low mass ratios such as lower than 0.3, the peak radiation temperature will be much lower than 100 eV, and the radiation transfers slowly to the interior of the converter and presents large non-uniformity, which is also observed in experiments on the PTS facility.

  2. An approach to radiation safety department benchmarking in academic and medical facilities.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Richard P

    2015-02-01

    Based on anecdotal evidence and networking with colleagues at other facilities, it has become evident that some radiation safety departments are not adequately staffed and radiation safety professionals need to increase their staffing levels. Discussions with management regarding radiation safety department staffing often lead to similar conclusions. Management acknowledges the Radiation Safety Officer (RSO) or Director of Radiation Safety's concern but asks the RSO to provide benchmarking and justification for additional full-time equivalents (FTEs). The RSO must determine a method to benchmark and justify additional staffing needs while struggling to maintain a safe and compliant radiation safety program. Benchmarking and justification are extremely important tools that are commonly used to demonstrate the need for increased staffing in other disciplines and are tools that can be used by radiation safety professionals. Parameters that most RSOs would expect to be positive predictors of radiation safety staff size generally are and can be emphasized in benchmarking and justification report summaries. Facilities with large radiation safety departments tend to have large numbers of authorized users, be broad-scope programs, be subject to increased controls regulations, have large clinical operations, have significant numbers of academic radiation-producing machines, and have laser safety responsibilities.

  3. Development of a tunable UV laser system synchronizing precisely with synchrotron radiation pulses from UVSOR.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, M; Tokeshi, M; Hiraya, A; Mitsuke, K

    1997-01-01

    A mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser is made to oscillate at the frequency of the UVSOR storage ring, 90.115 MHz, in a multi-bunch operation mode. The third harmonic of the laser is available in the wavelength range 243-280 nm. Synchrotron radiation from an undulator is monochromated by a grazing-incidence monochromator and introduced coaxially with the laser. The temporal profile of the photon pulses is monitored in situ by a luminescing substance/photomultiplier combination. The delay timing between the laser and synchrotron radiation can be changed from 0 to 11 ns by adjusting an electronic module that provides phase-locked loop stabilization of the laser pulse. The reliability and feasibility of this laser-synchrotron radiation combination technique are demonstrated by applying pump-probe experiments to two physical systems. The first system is photodissociation of iodomethane (CHA) with a laser photon, followed by photoionization of I and CH3 fragments with synchrotron radiation. The second, two-photon ionization of He atoms, is studied as the prototype of a time-resolved experiment. The He+ signal counts as a function of the laser-synchrotron radiation delay are found to be enhanced in a narrow time window, which can be interpreted in terms of a short lifetime of the resonant state, He*(1s2p 1P), produced by primary synchrotron radiation excitation.

  4. Combination of fiber-guided pulsed erbium and holmium laser radiation for tissue ablation under water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratisto, Hans; Frenz, Martin; Ith, Michael; Altermatt, Hans J.; Jansen, E. Duco; Weber, Heinz P.

    1996-07-01

    Because of the high absorption of near-infrared laser radiation in biological tissue, erbium lasers and holmium lasers emitting at 3 and 2 mu m, respectively, have been proven to have optimal qualities for cutting or welding and coagulating tissue. To combine the advantages of both wavelengths, we realized a multiwavelength laser system by simultaneously guiding erbium and holmium laser radiation by means of a single zirconium fluoride (ZrF4) fiber. Laser-induced channel formation in water and poly(acrylamide) gel was investigated by the use of a time-resolved flash-photography setup, while pressure transients were recorded simultaneously with a needle hydrophone. The shapes and depths of vapor channels produced in water and in a submerged gel after single erbium and after combination erbium-holmium radiation delivered by means of a 400- mu m ZrF4 fiber were measured. Transmission measurements were performed to determine the amount of pulse energy available for tissue ablation. The effects of laser wavelength and the delay time between pulses of different wavelengths on the photomechanical and photothermal responses of meniscal tissue were evaluated in vitro by the use of histology. It was observed that the use of a short (200- mu s, 100-mJ) holmium laser pulse as a prepulse to generate a vapor bubble through which the ablating erbium laser pulse can be transmitted (delay time, 100 mu s) increases the cutting depth in meniscus from 450 to 1120 mu m as compared with the depth following a single erbium pulse. The results indicate that a combination of erbium and holmium laser radiation precisely and efficiently cuts tissue under water with 20-50- mu m collateral tissue damage. wave, cavitation, channel formation, infrared-fiber-delivery system, tissue damage, cartilage.

  5. Applicability of a Bonner Shere technique for pulsed neutron in 120 GeV proton facility

    SciTech Connect

    Sanami, T.; Hagiwara, M.; Iwase, H.; Iwamoto, Y.; Sakamoto, Y.; Nakashima, H.; Arakawa, H.; Shigyo, N.; Leveling, A.F.; Boehnlein, D.J.; Vaziri, K.; /Fermilab

    2008-02-01

    The data on neutron spectra and intensity behind shielding are important for radiation safety design of high-energy accelerators since neutrons are capable of penetrating thick shielding and activating materials. Corresponding particle transport codes--that involve physics models of neutron and other particle production, transportation, and interaction--have been developed and used world-wide [1-8]. The results of these codes have been ensured through plenty of comparisons with experimental results taken in simple geometries. For neutron generation and transport, several related experiments have been performed to measure neutron spectra, attenuation length and reaction rates behind shielding walls of various thicknesses and materials in energy range up to several hundred of MeV [9-11]. The data have been used to benchmark--and modify if needed--the simulation modes and parameters in the codes, as well as the reference data for radiation safety design. To obtain such kind of data above several hundred of MeV, Japan-Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) collaboration for shielding experiments has been started in 2007, based on suggestion from the specialist meeting of shielding, Shielding Aspects of Target, Irradiation Facilities (SATIF), because of very limited data available in high-energy region (see, for example, [12]). As a part of this shielding experiment, a set of Bonner sphere (BS) was tested at the antiproton production target facility (pbar target station) at FNAL to obtain neutron spectra induced by a 120-GeV proton beam in concrete and iron shielding. Generally, utilization of an active detector around high-energy accelerators requires an improvement on its readout to overcome burst of secondary radiation since the accelerator delivers an intense beam to a target in a short period after relatively long acceleration period. In this paper, we employ BS for a spectrum measurement of neutrons that penetrate the shielding wall of the pbar target

  6. Site/Systems Operations, Maintenance and Facilities Management of the Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) Site

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Susan

    2005-08-01

    This contract covered the site/systems operations, maintenance, and facilities management of the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) Site.

  7. Nuclear forward scattering of synchrotron radiation in pulsed high magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Strohm, C; Van der Linden, P; Rüffer, R

    2010-02-26

    We report the demonstration of nuclear forward scattering of synchrotron radiation from 57Fe in ferromagnetic alpha iron in pulsed high magnetic fields up to 30 T. The observed magnetic hyperfine field follows the calculated high field bulk magnetization within 1%, establishing the technique as a precise tool for the study of magnetic solids in very high magnetic fields. To perform these experiments in pulsed fields, we have developed a detection scheme for fully time resolved nuclear forward scattering applicable to other pump probe experiments.

  8. Accurate modeling of antennas for radiating short pulses, FDTD analysis and experimental measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloney, James G.; Smith, Glenn S.

    1993-01-01

    Antennas used to radiate short pulses often require different design rules that those that are used to radiate essentially time-harmonic signals. The finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method is a very flexible numerical approach that can be used to treat a variety of electromagnetic problems in the time domain. It is well suited to the analysis and design of antennas for radiating short pulses; however, several advances had to be made before the method could be applied to this problem. In this paper, we will illustrate the use of the FDTD method with two antennas designed for the radiation of short pulses. The first is a simple, two-dimensional geometry, and open-ended parallel-plate waveguide, while the second is a three-dimensional, rotationally symmetric geometry, a conical monopole fed through an image by a coaxial transmission line. Both antennas are 'optimized' according to given criteria by adjusting geometrical parameters and including resistive loading that varies continuously with position along the antenna. The predicted performance for the conical monopole antenna is compared with experimental measurements; this verifies the optimization and demonstrates the practicality of the design.

  9. Effect of distance to radiation treatment facility on use of radiation therapy after mastectomy in elderly women

    SciTech Connect

    Punglia, Rinaa S. . E-mail: rpunglia@lroc.harvard.edu; Weeks, Jane C.; Neville, Bridget A.; Earle, Craig C.

    2006-09-01

    Purpose: We sought to study the effect of distance to the nearest radiation treatment facility on the use of postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) in elderly women. Methods and Materials: Using data from the linked Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare (SEER-Medicare) database, we analyzed 19,787 women with Stage I or II breast cancer who received mastectomy as definitive surgery during 1991 to 1999. Multivariable logistic regression was used to investigate the association of distance with receipt of PMRT after adjusting for clinical and sociodemographic factors. Results: Overall 2,075 patients (10.5%) treated with mastectomy received PMRT. In addition to cancer and patient characteristics, in our primary analysis, increasing distance to the nearest radiation treatment facility was independently associated with a decreased likelihood of receiving PMRT (OR 0.996 per additional mile, p = 0.01). Secondary analyses revealed that the decline in PMRT use appeared at distances of more than 25 miles and was statistically significant for those patients living more than 75 miles from the nearest radiation facility (odds of receiving PMRT of 0.58 [95% CI 0.34-0.99] vs. living within 25 miles of such a facility). The effect of distance on PMRT appeared to be more pronounced with increasing patient age (>75 years). Variation in the effect of distance on radiation use between regions of the country and nodal status was also identified. Conclusions: Oncologists must be cognizant of the potential barrier to quality care that is posed by travel distance, especially for elderly patients; and policy makers should consider this fact in resource allocation decisions about radiation treatment centers.

  10. Electrical delay line multiplexing for pulsed mode radiation detectors

    PubMed Central

    Vinke, Ruud; Yeom, Jung Yeol; Levin, Craig S.

    2015-01-01

    Medical imaging systems are composed of a large number of position sensitive radiation detectors to provide high resolution imaging. For example, whole-body Positron Emission Tomography (PET) systems are typically composed of thousands of scintillation crystal elements, which are coupled to photosensors. Thus, PET systems greatly benefit from methods to reduce the number of data acquisition channels, in order to reduce the system development cost and complexity. In this paper we present an electrical delay line multiplexing scheme that can significantly reduce the number of readout channels, while preserving the signal integrity required for good time resolution performance. We experimented with two 4 × 4 LYSO crystal arrays, with crystal elements having 3 mm × 3 mm × 5 mm and 3 mm × 3 mm × 20 mm dimensions, coupled to 16 Hamamatsu MPPC S10931-050P SiPM elements. Results show that each crystal could be accurately identified, even in the presence of scintillation light sharing and inter-crystal Compton scatter among neighboring crystal elements. The multiplexing configuration degraded the coincidence timing resolution from ~ 243 ps FWHM to ~272 ps FWHM when 16 SiPM signals were combined into a single channel for the 4 × 4 LYSO crystal array with 3 mm × 3 mm × 20 mm crystal element dimensions, in coincidence with a 3 mm × 3 mm × 5 mm LYSO crystal pixel. The method is exible to allow multiplexing configurations across different block detectors, and is scalable to an entire ring of detectors. PMID:25768002

  11. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Annual Report 2006

    SciTech Connect

    LR Roeder

    2005-11-30

    This annual report describes the purpose and structure of the ARM Climate Research Facility and ARM Science programs and presents key accomplishments in 2006. Noteworthy scientific and infrastructure accomplishments in 2006 include: • Collaborating with the Australian Bureau of Meteorology to lead the Tropical Warm Pool-International Cloud Experiment, a major international field campaign held in Darwin, Australia • Successfully deploying the ARM Mobile Facility in Niger, Africa • Developing the new ARM Aerial Vehicles Program (AVP) to provide airborne measurements • Publishing a new finding on the impacts of aerosols on surface energy budget in polar latitudes • Mitigating a long-standing double-Intertropical Convergence Zone problem in climate models using ARM data and a new cumulus parameterization scheme.

  12. Individual monitoring for external radiation at accelerator facilities.

    PubMed

    Tanner, R J; Hager, L G

    2011-07-01

    Individual monitoring at accelerator facilities is discussed, within the framework set out by the International Commission on Radiological Protection and with reference to the implementation of the recommendations of that body within the European Basic Safety Standards. Legislation in other parts of the world may differ, but a worldwide perspective on this subject would be too exhaustive. The fields at accelerator facilities are contrasted in terms of particle type and energy with those encountered at more conventional sites within the nuclear fuel cycle, medical applications and general industry. The implications for individual monitoring are discussed in relation to the dose quantities for these accelerator fields and also with respect to the personal dosemeters options.

  13. Computational study of radiation doses at UNLV accelerator facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodges, Matthew; Barzilov, Alexander; Chen, Yi-Tung; Lowe, Daniel

    2017-09-01

    A Varian K15 electron linear accelerator (linac) has been considered for installation at University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV). Before experiments can be performed, it is necessary to evaluate the photon and neutron spectra as generated by the linac, as well as the resulting dose rates within the accelerator facility. A computational study using MCNPX was performed to characterize the source terms for the bremsstrahlung converter. The 15 MeV electron beam available in the linac is above the photoneutron threshold energy for several materials in the linac assembly, and as a result, neutrons must be accounted for. The angular and energy distributions for bremsstrahlung flux generated by the interaction of the 15 MeV electron beam with the linac target were determined. This source term was used in conjunction with the K15 collimators to determine the dose rates within the facility.

  14. Isolated few-cycle radiation from chirped-pulse compression of a superradiant free-electron laser

    DOE PAGES

    Huang, Yen -Chieh; Zhang, Zhen; Chen, Chia -Hsiang; ...

    2015-08-31

    When a short electron bunch traverses an undulator to radiate a wavelength longer than the bunch length, intense superradiance from the electron bunch can quickly deplete the electron’s kinetic energy and lead to generation of an isolated chirped radiation pulse. Here, we develop a theory to describe this novel chirped pulse radiation in a superradiant free-electron laser and show the opportunity to generate isolated few-cycle high-power radiation through chirped-pulse compression after the undulator. The theory is completely characterized by how fast the electron energy is depleted for a given length of an undulator. We further present two design examples atmore » the THz and extreme-ultraviolet wavelengths and numerically generate isolated three- and nine-cycle radiation pulses, respectively.« less

  15. Atmospheric radiation measurement program facilities newsletter, August 2002.

    SciTech Connect

    Holdridge, D. J.

    2002-08-29

    ARM in Australia--The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has launched its newest Atmospheric Radiation and Cloud Station (ARCS) in Darwin, Australia. This is the fifth research site established since ARM Program inception in 1989. The new Darwin site and two other ARCS sites--on Manus Island and the island of Nauru--are in the Tropical Western Pacific region. The North American sites in the U.S. Southern Great Plains and on the North Slope of Alaska represent two different climate regions. A goal of the ARM Program is to improve understanding of (1) the ways clouds and atmospheric moisture interact with solar radiation and (2) the effects of these interactions on both a local and global climate. Years of collected data are being used to improve computer climate models so that their predictions are more accurate. The new Darwin site is at the Darwin International Airport, adjacent to the Darwin Airport Meteorological Office. The site features state-of-the-art instrumentation used to measure solar radiation and surface radiation balance; cloud parameters; and standard meteorological variables such as temperature, wind speed and direction, atmospheric moisture, precipitation rates, and barometric pressure. A data management system (DMS) consisting of two computer workstations collects, stores, processes, and backs up data from each of the ARCS instruments. Data are transmitted via the Internet to the United States for further processing and archiving with data from the other ARM sites. All ARM data are freely available via the Internet to the public and the worldwide scientific community (http://www.arm.gov/). Operational since April 2002, the Darwin site was officially dedicated on July 30, 2002, by dignitaries from both the United States and Australia. The site is a collaborative effort between DOE and the Australian Bureau of Meteorology's Special Services Unit--the equivalent of the U.S. National Weather Service

  16. Analyzing the effect of slotted foil on radiation pulse profile in a mode locked afterburner X-ray free electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sandeep; Hur, Min Sup; Chung, Moses

    2017-06-01

    Extremely short X-ray pulses in the attosecond (as) range are important tools for ultrafast dynamics, high resolution microscopy, and nuclear dynamics study. In this paper, we numerically examine the generation of gigawatt (GW) mode-locked (ML) multichromatic X-rays using the parameters of the Pohang Accelerator Laboratory (PAL)-X-ray free electron laser (XFEL), the Korean XFEL. In this vein, we analyze the ML-FEL [Thompson and McNeil, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 203901 (2008)] and mode-locked afterburner (MLAB) FEL [Dunning et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 104801 (2013)] schemes on the hard X-ray beamline of the PAL-XFEL. Using the ML scheme, we numerically demonstrate a train of radiation pulses in the hard X-ray (photon energy ˜12.4 keV) with 3.5 GW power and 16 as full-width half maximum (FWHM) pulse duration. On the other hand, using the MLAB scheme, a train of radiation pulses with 3 GW power and 1 as FWHM (900 zs in RMS) pulse duration has been obtained at 12.4 keV photon energy. Both schemes generate broadband, discrete, and coherent spectrum compared to the XFEL's narrowband spectrum. Furthermore, the effect of slotted foil is also studied first time on the MLAB-FEL output. Numerical comparisons show that the temporal structure of the MLAB-FEL output can be improved significantly by the use of the slotted foil. Such short X-ray pulses at XFEL facilities will allow the studies of electron-nuclear and nuclear dynamics in atoms or molecules, and the broadband radiation will substantially improve the efficiency of the experimental techniques such as X-ray crystallography and spectroscopy, paving the way for outstanding progress in biology and material science.

  17. A novel facility for ageing materials with narrow-band ultraviolet radiation exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Kaerhae, Petri; Ruokolainen, Kimmo; Heikkilae, Anu

    2011-02-15

    A facility for exploring wavelength dependencies in ultraviolet (UV) radiation induced degradation in materials has been designed and constructed. The device is essentially a spectrograph separating light from a lamp to spectrally resolved UV radiation. It is based on a 1 kW xenon lamp and a flat-field concave holographic grating 10 cm in diameter. Radiation at the wavelength range 250-500 nm is dispersed onto the sample plane of 1.5 cm in height and 21 cm in width. The optical performance of the device has been characterized by radiometric measurements. Using the facility, test samples prepared of regular newspaper have been irradiated from 1 to 8 h. Color changes on the different locations of the aged samples have been quantified by color measurements. Yellowness indices computed from the color measurements demonstrate the capability of the facility in revealing wavelength dependencies of the material property changes in reasonable time frames.

  18. Generation of 1.5-kW, 1-THz coherent radiation from a gyrotron with a pulsed magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Glyavin, M Yu; Luchinin, A G; Golubiatnikov, G Yu

    2008-01-11

    To cover a so-called terahertz gap in available sources of coherent electromagnetic radiation, the gyrotron with a pulsed solenoid producing up to a 40 T magnetic field has been designed, manufactured, and tested. At a 38.5 T magnetic field, the gyrotron generated coherent radiation at 1.022 THz frequency in 50 musec pulses. The microwave power and energy per pulse were about 1.5 kW and 75 mJ, respectively. Details of the gyrotron design, manufacturing, operation and measurements of output radiation are given.

  19. ARTICLES: Physical laws governing the interaction of pulse-periodic CO2 laser radiation with metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedenov, A. A.; Gladush, G. G.; Drobyazko, S. V.; Pavlovich, Yu V.; Senatorov, Yu M.

    1985-01-01

    It is shown theoretically and experimentally that the efficiency of welding metals with a pulse-periodic CO2 laser beam of low duty ratio, at low velocities, can exceed that of welding with cw lasers and with electron beams. For the first time an investigation was made of the influence of the laser radiation parameters (energy and frequency) and of the welding velocity on the characteristics of the weld and on the shape of the weldpool. The influence of the laser radiation polarization on the efficiency of deep penetration was analyzed.

  20. Effect of electromagnetic pulse transverse inhomogeneity on ion acceleration by radiation pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Lezhnin, K. V.; Kamenets, F. F.; Beskin, V. S.; Kando, M.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Bulanov, S. V.

    2015-03-15

    During ion acceleration by radiation pressure, a transverse inhomogeneity of an electromagnetic pulse leads to an off-axis displacement of the irradiated target, limiting the achievable ion energy. This effect is analytically described within the framework of a thin foil target model and with particle-in-cell simulations showing that the maximum energy of the accelerated ions decreases as the displacement from the axis of the target's initial position increases. The results obtained can be applied to the optimization of ion acceleration by the laser radiation pressure with mass-limited targets.

  1. Technical specifications manual for the MARK-1 pulsed ionizing radiation detection system. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, R.S.; Harker, Y.D.; Jones, J.L.; Hoggan, J.M.

    1993-03-01

    The MARK-1 detection system was developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for the US Department of Energy Office of Arms Control and Nonproliferation. The completely portable system was designed for the detection and analysis of intense photon emissions from pulsed ionizing radiation sources. This manual presents the technical design specifications for the MARK-1 detection system and was written primarily to assist the support or service technician in the service, calibration, and repair of the system. The manual presents the general detection system theory, the MARK-1 component design specifications, the acquisition and control software, the data processing sequence, and the system calibration procedure. A second manual entitled: Volume 2: Operations Manual for the MARK-1 Pulsed Ionizing Radiation Detection System (USDOE Report WINCO-1108, September 1992) provides a general operational description of the MARK-1 detection system. The Operations Manual was written primarily to assist the field operator in system operations and analysis of the data.

  2. Pulsed irradiation of optimized, MBE grown, AlGaAs/GaAs radiation hardened photodiodes. Rev

    SciTech Connect

    Wiczer, J.J.; Fischer, T.A.; Dawson, L.R.; Osbourn, G.C.; Zipperian, T.E.; Barnes, C.E.

    1984-01-01

    An AlGaAs/GaAs double heterojunction, mesa isolated, photodiode grown by molecular beam epitaxy was irradiated with 18 MeV electrons, 1 to 10 MeV x-rays, and neutrons from a pulsed reactor. Test results indicate that the AlGaAs/GaAs photodiodes generate approximately 10 to 20 times less photocurrent during exposure to a pulse of ionizing-radiation than radiation hardened silicon PIN photodiodes. Studies of neutron induced permanent damage in the AlGaAs/GaAs photodiode show only small changes in optical responsivity and a factor of 8 increase in leakage currents after exposure to 3.6 x 10/sup 15/ neutrons/cm/sup 2/ and 900 krad gamma. The silicon PIN photodiode was exposed to only 28% of the fluence used on the AlGaAs photodiodes and we observed a 40% decrease in optical responsivity and a factor of 7000 increase in leakage current.

  3. Neutron radiation effects on linear CCDs at different clock pulse frequency

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zujun Chen, Wei; Tang, Benqi; Xiao, Zhigang; Yao, Zhibin; He, Baoping; Liu, Minbo

    2015-06-15

    The experiments of reactor neutron radiation effects on linear CCDs are presented. The output voltage in dark field after neutron radiation are presented and compared at different clock pulse frequency. The degradation phenomena are analyzed in depth. The mean dark signal (K{sub D}) and dark signal non-uniformity (DSNU) versus neutron fluence is investigated at different clock pulse frequency. The degradation mechanisms of the dark signal and DSNU in linear CCDs are analyzed. The flux of the reactor neutron beams was about 1.33 × 10{sup 8} n/cm{sup 2}/s. The samples were exposed to 1MeV neutron-equivalent fluences of 1 × 10{sup 11}, 5 × 10{sup 11}, and 1 × 10{sup 12} n/cm{sup 2}, respectively.

  4. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER: Microstructures produced on spatially confined substrates exposed to repetitively pulsed laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolgaev, Sergei I.; Kirichenko, N. A.; Simakin, Aleksandr V.; Shafeev, Georgii A.

    2007-07-01

    The formation of microstructures is studied on metal substrates with characteristic dimensions of tens of micrometers that are comparable with the period of structures produced on extended substrates. Experiments were performed with nickel and nichrome targets composed of wires or a foil. Targets were irradiated in air by 510-nm, 20-ns pulses from a copper vapour laser operating at a pulse repetition rate of 7.5 kHz. Irradiation produced microcones and circular microstructures on substrates. The influence of the target geometry on the morphology and ordering of microstructures formed on it is demonstrated experimentally. The specific features of structures produced on spatially restricted targets are explained by the influence of boundary conditions on their development. A mathematical model of the initial phase of formation of the inhomogeneous profile of the surface of spatially restricted substrates exposed to laser radiation is proposed.

  5. A XeCl laser with a controlled radiation pulse shape

    SciTech Connect

    Fedorov, A I

    2009-04-30

    The pump parameters of a three-contour excitation system are studied in a gas-discharge excimer XeCl laser using a Ne-Xe-HCl mixture. A computation model is developed for finding the parameters of multi-contour excitation systems. A setup incorporating a three-contour system for excitation and automatic UV preionisation is designed, which provides multipulse generation of 65-ns, 26-mJ laser pulses at the laser efficiency of 1%. It is shown that generation of short radiation pulses of duration 7 ns and relatively long pulses of duration 65 ns in the multipulse generation regime is possible in the excitation system under study in Xe:HCl = 20:1 mixtures containing neon as buffer gas. (lasers)

  6. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program facilities newsletter, February 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Sisterson, D.L.

    2000-03-24

    This issue of the ARM facilities newsletter discusses the Spring 2000 cloud intensive observation period, March 1--21, 2000. The month of March brings researchers to the SGP CART site to participate in the Spring 2000 Cloud IOP. The purpose is to gather data about the three-dimensional structure and distribution of clouds over the CART site. This effort will help to produce a more accurate representation of the clouds and their influence on weather and climate for use in computer modeling.

  7. Evaluation of pelletron accelerator facility to study radiation effects on semiconductor devices

    SciTech Connect

    Prakash, A. P. Gnana; Pushpa, N.; Praveen, K. C.; Naik, P. S.; Revannasiddaiah, D.

    2012-06-05

    In this paper we present the comprehensive results on the effects of different radiation on the electrical characteristics of different semiconductor devices like Si BJT, n-channel MOSFETs, 50 GHz and 200 GHz silicon-germanium heterojunction bipolar transistor (SiGe HBTs). The total dose effects of different radiation are compared in the same total dose ranging from 100 krad to 100 Mrad. We show that the irradiation time needed to reach very high total dose can be reduced by using Pelletron accelerator facilities instead of conventional irradiation facilities.

  8. Synchrotron radiation A general overview and a review of storage rings, research facilities, and insertion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winick, Herman

    1989-04-01

    Synchrotron radiation, the electromagnetic radiation given off by electrons in circular motion, is revolutionizing many branches of science and technology by offering beams of vacuum ultraviolet light and x rays of immense flux and brightness. In the past decade there has been an explosion of interest in these applications leading activity to construct new research facilities based on advanced storage rings and insertion device sources. Applications include basic and applied research in biology, chemistry, medicine, and physics plus many areas of technology. In this article we present a general overview of the field of synchrotron radiation research, its history, the present status and future prospects of storage rings and research facilities, and the development of wiggler and undulator insertion devices as sources of synchrotron radiation.

  9. IKNO, a user facility for coherent terahertz and UV synchrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    Sannibale, Fernando; Marcelli, Augusto; Innocenzi, Plinio

    2008-11-01

    IKNO (Innovation and KNOwledge) is a proposal for a multi-user facility based on an electron storage ring optimized for the generation of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in the terahertz frequency range, and of broadband incoherent synchrotron radiation ranging from the IR to the VUV. IKNO can be operated in an ultra-stable CSR mode with photon flux in the terahertz frequency region up to nine orders of magnitude higher than in existing third-generation light sources. Simultaneously to the CSR operation, broadband incoherent synchrotron radiation up to VUV frequencies is available at the beamline ports. The main characteristics of the IKNO storage and its performance in terms of CSR and incoherent synchrotron radiation are described in this paper. The proposed location for the infrastructure facility is Sardinia, Italy.

  10. Raman distributed temperature measurement at CERN high energy accelerator mixed field radiation test facility (CHARM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toccafondo, Iacopo; Nannipieri, Tiziano; Signorini, Alessandro; Guillermain, Elisa; Kuhnhenn, Jochen; Brugger, Markus; Di Pasquale, Fabrizio

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we present a validation of distributed Raman temperature sensing (RDTS) at the CERN high energy accelerator mixed field radiation test facility (CHARM), newly developed in order to qualify electronics for the challenging radiation environment of accelerators and connected high energy physics experiments. By investigating the effect of wavelength dependent radiation induced absorption (RIA) on the Raman Stokes and anti-Stokes light components in radiation tolerant Ge-doped multi-mode (MM) graded-index optical fibers, we demonstrate that Raman DTS used in loop configuration is robust to harsh environments in which the fiber is exposed to a mixed radiation field. The temperature profiles measured on commercial Ge-doped optical fibers is fully reliable and therefore, can be used to correct the RIA temperature dependence in distributed radiation sensing systems based on P-doped optical fibers.

  11. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program facilities newsletter, October 2001.

    SciTech Connect

    Holdridge, D. J.

    2001-10-29

    Diffuse Shortwave Intensive Observation Period--The Diffuse Shortwave IOP ran from September 23 to October 12, 2001. During this IOP, Joe Michalsky (The State University of New York-Albany) and Tom Stoffel (National Renewable Energy Laboratory) deployed approximately 15 radiometers of various designs and manufacturers on the SGP Radiometer Calibration Facility. The purpose was to compare the accuracy of the radiometers for diffuse shortwave measurements. The Scripps Institution of Oceanography and Yankee Environmental Systems also participated in the IOP. SuomiNet Installations Completed--The installation of all SuomiNet equipment has been completed at 15 extended facility locations. Six of these stations are currently online and providing data to the SuomiNet project. SuomiNet is a university-based, real-time national global positioning system (GPS) network for atmospheric research and education. (See June 2000 issue of the ARM SGP Newsletter.) The network uses GPS to measure atmospheric moisture. To view real-time data from ARM sites, please visit this web site: http://www.gst.ucar.edu/gpsrg/realtime.html.

  12. Atmospheric radiation measurement program facilities newsletter, June 2002.

    SciTech Connect

    Holdridge, D. J.

    2002-07-03

    ARM Intensive Operational Period Scheduled to Validate New NASA Satellite--Beginning in July, all three ARM sites (Southern Great Plains [SGP], North Slope of Alaska, and Tropical Western Pacific; Figure 1) will participate in the AIRS Validation IOP. This three-month intensive operational period (IOP) will validate data collected by the satellite-based Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) recently launched into space. On May 4, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) launched Aqua, the second spacecraft in the Earth Observing System (EOS) series. The EOS satellites monitor Earth systems including land surfaces, oceans, the atmosphere, and ice cover. The first EOS satellite, named Terra, was launched in December 1999. The second EOS satellite is named Aqua because its primary focus is understanding Earth's water cycle through observation of atmospheric moisture, clouds, temperature, ocean surface, precipitation, and soil moisture. One of the instruments aboard Aqua is the AIRS, built by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a NASA agency. The AIRS Validation IOP complements the ARM mission to improve understanding of the interactions of clouds and atmospheric moisture with solar radiation and their influence on weather and climate. In support of satellite validation IOP, ARM will launch dedicated radiosondes at all three ARM sites while the Aqua satellite with the AIRS instrument is orbiting overhead. These radiosonde launches will occur 45 minutes and 5 minutes before selected satellite overpasses. In addition, visiting scientists from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory will launch special radiosondes to measure ozone and humidity over the SGP site. All launches will generate ground-truth data to validate satellite data collected simultaneously. Data gathered daily by ARM meteorological and solar radiation instruments will complete the validation data sets. Data from Aqua-based instruments, including AIRS, will aid in weather forecasting, climate modeling, and

  13. Basic features of electromagnetic pulse generated in a laser-target chamber at 3-TW laser facility PALS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Marco, M.; Pfeifer, M.; Krousky, E.; Krasa, J.; Cikhardt, J.; Klir, D.; Nassisi, V.

    2014-04-01

    We describe the radiofrequency emission taking place when 300 ps laser pulses irradiate various solid targets with an intensity of 1016 W/cm2. The emission of intense electromagnetic pulses was observed outside the laser target chamber by two loop antennas up to 1 GHz. Electromagnetic pulses can be 800 MHz transients, which decay from a peak electromagnetic field of E0 ≊ 7 kV/m and H0 ≊ 15 A/m. The occurrence of these electromagnetic pulses is associated with generation of hard x-rays with photon energies extending beyond 1 MeV. This contribution reports the first observation of this effect at the PALS facility.

  14. Time transfer between the Goddard Optical Research Facility and the U.S. Naval Observatory using 100 picosecond laser pulses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alley, C. O.; Rayner, J. D.; Steggerda, C. A.; Mullendore, J. V.; Small, L.; Wagner, S.

    1983-01-01

    A horizontal two-way time comparison link in air between the University of Maryland laser ranging and time transfer equipment at the Goddard Optical Research Facility (GORF) 1.2 m telescope and the Time Services Division of the U.S. Naval Observatory (USNO) was established. Flat mirrors of 25 cm and 30 cm diameter respectively were placed on top of the Washington Cathedral and on a water tower at the Beltsville Agricultural Research Center. Two optical corner reflectors at the USNO reflect the laser pulses back to the GORF. Light pulses of 100 ps duration and an energy of several hundred microjoules are sent at the rate of 10 pulses per second. The detection at the USNO is by means of an RCA C30902E avalanche photodiode and the timing is accomplished by an HP 5370A computing counter and an HP 1000 computer with respect to a 10 pps pulse train from the Master Clock.

  15. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from the ARM Aerial Facility

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is the largest global change research program supported by the U.S. Department of Energy. The primary goal of the ARM Program is to improve the treatment of cloud and radiation physics in global climate models in order to improve the climate simulation capabilities of these models. ARM data is collected both through permanent monitoring stations and field campaigns around the world. Airborne measurements required to answer science questions from researchers or to validate ground data are also collected. To find data from all categories of aerial operations, follow the links from the AAF information page at http://www.arm.gov/sites/aaf. Tables of information will provide start dates, duration, lead scientist, and the research site for each of the named campaigns. The title of a campaign leads, in turn, to a project description, contact information, and links to the data. Users will be requested to create a password, but the data files are free for viewing and downloading. The ARM Archive physically resides at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  16. A facility for magnetic resonance-guided radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Jaffray, David A; Carlone, Marco C; Milosevic, Michael F; Breen, Stephen L; Stanescu, Teodor; Rink, Alexandra; Alasti, Hamideh; Simeonov, Anna; Sweitzer, Michael C; Winter, Jeffrey D

    2014-07-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is routinely employed in the design of radiotherapy (RT) treatment plans for many disease sites. It is evident that tighter integration of MR imaging into the RT process would increase confidence in dose placement and facilitate the integration of new MR imaging information (including anatomical and functional imaging) into the therapy process. To this end, a dedicated MR-guided RT (MRgRT) facility has been created that integrates a state-of-the-art linear accelerator delivery system, high-dose rate brachytherapy afterloader, and superconducting MR scanner to allow MR-based online treatment guidance, adaptive replanning, and response monitoring while maintaining the clinical functionality of the existing delivery systems. This system is housed within a dedicated MRgRT suite and operates in a coordinated fashion to assure safe and efficient MRgRT treatments. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Electronic response of graphene to an ultrashort intense terahertz radiation pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Kenichi L.

    2013-05-01

    We have recently reported a study (Ishikawa 2010 Phys. Rev. B 82 201402) on a nonlinear optical response of graphene to a normally incident terahertz radiation pulse within the massless Dirac fermion (MDF) picture, where we have derived physically transparent graphene Bloch equations (GBE). Here we extend it to the tight-binding (TB) model and oblique incidence. The derived equations indicate that interband transitions are governed by the temporal variation of the spinor phase along the electron path in the momentum space and predominantly take place when the electron passes near the Dirac point. At normal incidence, the equations for electron dynamics within the TB model can be cast into the same form of GBE as for the MDF model. At oblique incidence, the equations automatically incorporate photon drag and satisfy the continuity equation for electron density. Single-electron dynamics strongly depend on the model and pulse parameters, but the rapid variations are averaged out after momentum-space integration. Direct current remaining after the pulse is generated in graphene irradiated by an intense monocycle terahertz pulse, even if it is linearly polarized and normally incident. The generated current depends on the carrier-envelope phase, pulse intensity and Fermi energy in a complex manner.

  18. Neutron imaging with the short-pulse laser driven neutron source at the Trident laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guler, N.; Volegov, P.; Favalli, A.; Merrill, F. E.; Falk, K.; Jung, D.; Tybo, J. L.; Wilde, C. H.; Croft, S.; Danly, C.; Deppert, O.; Devlin, M.; Fernandez, J.; Gautier, D. C.; Geissel, M.; Haight, R.; Hamilton, C. E.; Hegelich, B. M.; Henzlova, D.; Johnson, R. P.; Schaumann, G.; Schoenberg, K.; Schollmeier, M.; Shimada, T.; Swinhoe, M. T.; Taddeucci, T.; Wender, S. A.; Wurden, G. A.; Roth, M.

    2016-10-01

    Emerging approaches to short-pulse laser-driven neutron production offer a possible gateway to compact, low cost, and intense broad spectrum sources for a wide variety of applications. They are based on energetic ions, driven by an intense short-pulse laser, interacting with a converter material to produce neutrons via breakup and nuclear reactions. Recent experiments performed with the high-contrast laser at the Trident laser facility of Los Alamos National Laboratory have demonstrated a laser-driven ion acceleration mechanism operating in the regime of relativistic transparency, featuring a volumetric laser-plasma interaction. This mechanism is distinct from previously studied ones that accelerate ions at the laser-target surface. The Trident experiments produced an intense beam of deuterons with an energy distribution extending above 100 MeV. This deuteron beam, when directed at a beryllium converter, produces a forward-directed neutron beam with ˜5 × 109 n/sr, in a single laser shot, primarily due to deuteron breakup. The neutron beam has a pulse duration on the order of a few nanoseconds with an energy distribution extending from a few hundreds of keV to almost 80 MeV. For the experiments on neutron-source spot-size measurements, our gated neutron imager was setup to select neutrons in the energy range of 2.5-35 MeV. The spot size of neutron emission at the converter was measured by two different imaging techniques, using a knife-edge and a penumbral aperture, in two different experimental campaigns. The neutron-source spot size is measured ˜1 mm for both experiments. The measurements and analysis reported here give a spatial characterization for this type of neutron source for the first time. In addition, the forward modeling performed provides an empirical estimate of the spatial characteristics of the deuteron ion-beam. These experimental observations, taken together, provide essential yet unique data to benchmark and verify theoretical work into the

  19. Neutron imaging with the short-pulse laser driven neutron source at the TRIDENT Laser Facility

    DOE PAGES

    Guler, Nevzat; Volegov, Petr Lvovich; Favalli, Andrea; ...

    2016-10-17

    Emerging approaches to short-pulse laser-driven neutron production offer a possible gateway to compact, low cost, and intense broad spectrum sources for a wide variety of applications. They are based on energetic ions, driven by an intense short-pulse laser, interacting with a converter material to produce neutrons via breakup and nuclear reactions. Recent experiments performed with the high-contrast laser at the Trident laser facility of Los Alamos National Laboratory have demonstrated a laser-driven ion acceleration mechanism operating in the regime of relativistic transparency, featuring a volumetric laser-plasma interaction. This mechanism is distinct from previously studied ones that accelerate ions at themore » laser-target surface. The Trident experiments produced an intense beam of deuterons with an energy distribution extending above 100 MeV. This deuteron beam, when directed at a beryllium converter, produces a forward-directed neutron beam with ~5x109 n/sr, in a single laser shot, primarily due to deuteron breakup. The neutron beam has a pulse duration on the order of a few nanoseconds with an energy distribution extending from a few hundreds of keV to almost 80 MeV. For the experiments on neutron-source spot-size measurements, our gated neutron imager was setup to select neutrons in the energy range of 2.5 to 35 MeV. The spot size of neutron emission at the converter was measured by two different imaging techniques, using a knife-edge and a penumbral aperture, in two different experimental campaigns. The neutron-source spot size is measured ~1 mm for both experiments. The measurements and analysis reported here give a spatial characterization for this type of neutron source for the first time. In addition, the forward modeling performed provides an empirical estimate of the spatial characteristics of the deuteron ion-beam. Finally, these experimental observations, taken together, provide essential yet unique data to benchmark and verify theoretical

  20. Neutron imaging with the short-pulse laser driven neutron source at the TRIDENT Laser Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Guler, Nevzat; Volegov, Petr Lvovich; Favalli, Andrea; Merrill, Frank Edward; Falk, Katerina; Jung, D.; Tybo, Joshua L.; Wilde, Carl Huerstel; Croft, Stephen; Danly, Christopher R.; Deppert, O.; Devlin, Matthew James; Fernandez, Juan Carlos; Gautier, Donald Cort; Geissel, M; Haight, Robert Cameron; Hamilton, Christopher Eric; Hegelich, Bjorn Manuel; Henzlova, Daniela; Johnson, Randall Philip; Schaumann, G.; Schoenberg, Kurt Francis; Schollmeier, M.; Shimada, Tsutomu; Swinhoe, Martyn Thomas; Taddeucci, Terry Nicholas; Wender, Stephen Arthur; Wurden, Glen Anthony; Roth, Markus

    2016-10-17

    Emerging approaches to short-pulse laser-driven neutron production offer a possible gateway to compact, low cost, and intense broad spectrum sources for a wide variety of applications. They are based on energetic ions, driven by an intense short-pulse laser, interacting with a converter material to produce neutrons via breakup and nuclear reactions. Recent experiments performed with the high-contrast laser at the Trident laser facility of Los Alamos National Laboratory have demonstrated a laser-driven ion acceleration mechanism operating in the regime of relativistic transparency, featuring a volumetric laser-plasma interaction. This mechanism is distinct from previously studied ones that accelerate ions at the laser-target surface. The Trident experiments produced an intense beam of deuterons with an energy distribution extending above 100 MeV. This deuteron beam, when directed at a beryllium converter, produces a forward-directed neutron beam with ~5x109 n/sr, in a single laser shot, primarily due to deuteron breakup. The neutron beam has a pulse duration on the order of a few nanoseconds with an energy distribution extending from a few hundreds of keV to almost 80 MeV. For the experiments on neutron-source spot-size measurements, our gated neutron imager was setup to select neutrons in the energy range of 2.5 to 35 MeV. The spot size of neutron emission at the converter was measured by two different imaging techniques, using a knife-edge and a penumbral aperture, in two different experimental campaigns. The neutron-source spot size is measured ~1 mm for both experiments. The measurements and analysis reported here give a spatial characterization for this type of neutron source for the first time. In addition, the forward modeling performed provides an empirical estimate of the spatial characteristics of the deuteron ion-beam. Finally, these experimental observations, taken together, provide essential yet unique data to benchmark and verify theoretical

  1. Nonlinear currents generated in plasma by a radiation pulse with a frequency exceeding the electron plasma frequency

    SciTech Connect

    Grishkov, V. E.; Uryupin, S. A.

    2016-09-15

    It is shown that the nonlinear currents generated in plasma by a radiation pulse with a frequency exceeding the electron plasma frequency change substantially due to a reduction in the effective electron–ion collision frequency.

  2. Engineered and Administrative Safety Systems for the Control of Prompt Radiation Hazards at Accelerator Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, James C.; Vylet, Vashek; Walker, Lawrence S.; /SLAC

    2007-12-17

    The ANSI N43.1 Standard, currently in revision (ANSI 2007), sets forth the requirements for accelerator facilities to provide adequate protection for the workers, the public and the environment from the hazards of ionizing radiation produced during and from accelerator operations. The Standard also recommends good practices that, when followed, provide a level of radiation protection consistent with those established for the accelerator communities. The N43.1 Standard is suitable for all accelerator facilities (using electron, positron, proton, or ion particle beams) capable of producing radiation, subject to federal or state regulations. The requirements (see word 'shall') and recommended practices (see word 'should') are prescribed in a graded approach that are commensurate with the complexity and hazard levels of the accelerator facility. Chapters 4, 5 and 6 of the N43.1 Standard address specially the Radiation Safety System (RSS), both engineered and administrative systems, to mitigate and control the prompt radiation hazards from accelerator operations. The RSS includes the Access Control System (ACS) and Radiation Control System (RCS). The main requirements and recommendations of the N43.1 Standard regarding the management, technical and operational aspects of the RSS are described and condensed in this report. Clearly some aspects of the RSS policies and practices at different facilities may differ in order to meet the practical needs for field implementation. A previous report (Liu et al. 2001a), which reviews and summarizes the RSS at five North American high-energy accelerator facilities, as well as the RSS references for the 5 labs (Drozdoff 2001; Gallegos 1996; Ipe and Liu 1992; Liu 1999; Liu 2001b; Rokni 1996; TJNAF 1994; Yotam et al. 1991), can be consulted for the actual RSS implementation at various laboratories. A comprehensive report describing the RSS at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC 2006) can also serve as a reference.

  3. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program facilities newsletter, May 2000.

    SciTech Connect

    Sisterson, D.L.

    2000-06-01

    This month the authors will visit an ARM CART site with a pleasant climate: the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) CART site, along the equator in the western Pacific Ocean. The TWP locale lies between 10 degrees North latitude and 10 degrees South latitude and extends from Indonesia east-ward beyond the international date line. This area was selected because it is in and around the Pacific warm pool, the area of warm sea-surface temperatures that determine El Nino/La Nina episodes. The warm pool also adds heat and moisture to the atmosphere and thus fuels cloud formation. Understanding the way tropical clouds and water vapor affect the solar radiation budget is a focus of the ARM Program. The two current island-based CART sites in the TWP are in Manus Province in Papua New Guinea and on Nauru Island.

  4. Pulsed-Radiation-Induced Magnetization Relaxation in Single-Molecule Magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bal, M.; Friedman, J. R.; Chen, W.; Tuominen, M. T.; Shah, S.; Rumberger, E. M.; Hendrickson, D. N.; Avraham, N.; Myasoedov, Y.; Shtrikman, H.; Zeldov, E.

    2006-03-01

    Millimeter-wave radiation induces large dips in the magnetization of a single crystal of the Fe8 single-molecule magnet (SMM) when the radiation is on resonance with transitions between energy levels. In our recent studies, we pulsed the radiation with the goal of determining T1, the lifetime of the first excited state. We found that during a 0.2-ms pulse of intense radiation the spin system and the lattice are driven out of thermal equilibrium. Experiments at shorter time scales, carried out with the use of an inductive thin-film pick-up loop, revealed a surprisingly long relaxation time for magnetization on the order of ˜ 10 μs. A poor signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio required averaging of ˜ 4 x 10^5 individual traces to obtain acceptable data. Incorporating a superconducting interference device (SQUID) as a low-noise voltmeter into our experimental setup improves the S/N ratio, allowing us to explore the origin of the observed long relaxation time. The results of these experiments on Fe8 as well as other SMMs will be presented.

  5. Dependence of diode sensitivity on the pulse rate of delivered radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Jursinic, Paul A.

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: It has been reported that diode sensitivity decreases by as much as 2% when the average dose rate set at the accelerator console was decreased from 600 to 40 MU/min. No explanation was given for this effect in earlier publications. This work is a detailed investigation of this phenomenon: the change of diode sensitivity versus the rate of delivery of dose pulses in the milliseconds and seconds range. Methods: X-ray beams used in this work had nominal energies of 6 and 15 MV and were generated by linear accelerators. The average dose rate was varied from 25 to 600 MU/min, which corresponded to time between microsecond-long dose pulses of 60-2.7 ms, respectively. The dose-per-pulse, dpp, was changed by positioning the detector at different source-to-detector distance. A variety of diodes fabricated by a number of manufacturers were tested in this work. Also, diodes in three different MapCHECKs (Sun Nuclear, Melbourne, FL) were tested. Results: For all diodes tested, the diode sensitivity decreases as the average dose rate is decreased, which corresponds to an increase in the pulse period, the time between radiation pulses. A sensitivity decrease as large as 5% is observed for a 60-ms pulse period. The diode sensitivity versus the pulse period is modeled by an empirical exponential function. This function has a fitting parameter, t{sub eff}, defined as the effective lifetime. The values of t{sub eff} were found to be 1.0-14 s, among the various diodes. For all diodes tested, t{sub eff} decreases as the dpp decreases and is greater for 15 MV than for 6 MV x rays. The decrease in diode sensitivity after 20 s without radiation can be reversed by as few as 60 radiation pulses. Conclusions: A decrease in diode sensitivity occurs with a decrease in the average dose rate, which corresponds to an increase in the pulse period of radiation. The sensitivity decrease is modeled by an empirical exponential function that decreases with an effective lifetime, t{sub eff}, of

  6. Dependence of diode sensitivity on the pulse rate of delivered radiation.

    PubMed

    Jursinic, Paul A

    2013-02-01

    It has been reported that diode sensitivity decreases by as much as 2% when the average dose rate set at the accelerator console was decreased from 600 to 40 MU∕min. No explanation was given for this effect in earlier publications. This work is a detailed investigation of this phenomenon: the change of diode sensitivity versus the rate of delivery of dose pulses in the milliseconds and seconds range. X-ray beams used in this work had nominal energies of 6 and 15 MV and were generated by linear accelerators. The average dose rate was varied from 25 to 600 MU∕min, which corresponded to time between microsecond-long dose pulses of 60-2.7 ms, respectively. The dose-per-pulse, dpp, was changed by positioning the detector at different source-to-detector distance. A variety of diodes fabricated by a number of manufacturers were tested in this work. Also, diodes in three different MapCHECKs (Sun Nuclear, Melbourne, FL) were tested. For all diodes tested, the diode sensitivity decreases as the average dose rate is decreased, which corresponds to an increase in the pulse period, the time between radiation pulses. A sensitivity decrease as large as 5% is observed for a 60-ms pulse period. The diode sensitivity versus the pulse period is modeled by an empirical exponential function. This function has a fitting parameter, t(eff), defined as the effective lifetime. The values of t(eff) were found to be 1.0-14 s, among the various diodes. For all diodes tested, t(eff) decreases as the dpp decreases and is greater for 15 MV than for 6 MV x rays. The decrease in diode sensitivity after 20 s without radiation can be reversed by as few as 60 radiation pulses. A decrease in diode sensitivity occurs with a decrease in the average dose rate, which corresponds to an increase in the pulse period of radiation. The sensitivity decrease is modeled by an empirical exponential function that decreases with an effective lifetime, t(eff), of 1.0-14 s. t(eff) varies widely for different diodes

  7. Radiation control aspects of the civil construction for a high power free electron laser (FEL) facility

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, T.; Neil, G.; Stapleton, G.

    1996-12-31

    The paper discusses some of the assumptions and methods employed for the control of ionizing radiation in the specifications for the civil construction of a planned free electron laser facility based on a 200 MeV, 5 mA superconducting recirculation electron accelerator. Consideration is given firstly to the way in which the underlying building configuration and siting aspects were optimized on the basis of the early assumptions of beam loss and radiation goals. The various design requirements for radiation protection are then considered, and how they were folded into an aesthetically pleasing and functional building.

  8. Radiation control aspects of the civil construction for a high power free electron laser (FEL) facility

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, T.; Neil, G.; Stapleton, G.

    1997-02-01

    The paper discusses some of the assumptions and methods employed for the control of ionizing radiation in the specifications for the civil construction of a planned free electron laser facility based on a 200 MeV, 5 mA superconducting recirculation electron accelerator. Consideration is given firstly to the way in which the underlying building configuration and siting aspects were optimized on the basis of the early assumptions of beam loss and radiation goals. The various design requirements for radiation protection are then considered, and how they were folded into an aesthetically pleasing and functional building. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. HiRadMat at CERN SPS - A test facility with high intensity beam pulses to material samples

    SciTech Connect

    Charitonidis, N.; Fabich, A.; Efthymiopoulos, I.

    2015-07-01

    HiRadMat (High Irradiation to Materials) is a facility at CERN designed to provide high-intensity pulsed beams to an irradiation area where material samples as well as accelerator component assemblies (e.g. vacuum windows, shock tests on high power targets, collimators) can be tested. The beam parameters (SPS 440 GeV protons with a pulse energy of up to 3.4 MJ, or alternatively lead/argon ions at the proton equivalent energy) can be tuned to match the needs of each experiment. It is a test area designed to perform single pulse experiments to evaluate the effect of high-intensity pulsed beams on materials in a dedicated environment, excluding long-time irradiation studies. The facility is designed for a 10{sup 16} maximum number of protons per year, in order to limit the activation to acceptable levels for human intervention. This paper will demonstrate the possibilities for research using this facility and showing examples of upcoming experiments scheduled in the beam period 2014/2015. (authors)

  10. Spectral and amplitude-time characteristics of radiation of plasma of a repetitively pulsed discharge initiated by runaway electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomaev, M. I.; Beloplotov, D. V.; Sorokin, D. A.; Tarasenko, V. F.

    2016-02-01

    Spectral and amplitude-time characteristics of radiation of plasma of a repetitively pulsed discharge initiated by runaway electrons were studied experimentally in nitrogen. Intense emission lines of copper atoms, nitrogen atoms, and ions, as well as the first and the second positive systems of nitrogen, NO, and CN, were observed in the regime of repetitively pulsed excitation.

  11. Features of gallstone and kidney stone fragmentation by IR-pulsed Nd:YAG laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batishche, Sergei A.

    1995-05-01

    It is shown that infra-red ((lambda) equals 1064 nm) long pulse (approximately 100 microsecond(s) ) radiation of YAG:Nd laser, operating in free generation regime, effectively fragments gallstones, urinary calculus and kidney stones. The features of the mechanism of this process are investigated. Laser lithotripsy is nowadays a method widely used for fragmentation of gallstones, urinary calculus and kidney stones. Flashlamp pumped dye lasers of microsecond duration are most often used for such purposes. Nevertheless, there are some reports on lithotripsies with nanosecond duration laser pulses (for example, Q-switched YAG:Nd laser). The mechanism of the laser fragmentation of such stones was supposed to be the next. The laser powerful radiation, delivered through the optical fiber, is absorbed by the material of the stone. As a result of such highly localized energy absorption, dense plasma is formed, which expands. Such plasma and vapor, liquid confined, forms a cavitation bubble. This bubble grows, reaches its most dimension and then collapses on itself in some hundreds of micro seconds. Shock waves generated during the growth and the collapse of these bubbles are the origin of fragmentation of the stone. It is necessary to say that there are rather confined data on the hundreds microsecond laser pulse fragmentation especially what concerns the usage of infra-red (IR) YAG:Nd lasers with long laser pulses. Clearing this problem would result in better understanding of the fragmentation mechanism and it could favor development of simple and more reliable laser systems for lithotripsy. In this work we report about investigation of features of an effective fragmentation of gallstones, urinary calculus and kidney stones under exposure of IR ((lambda) equals 1064 nm) radiation of repetitive YAG:Nd laser working in free generation regime.

  12. High power radiators of ultra-short electromagnetic quasi-unipolar pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, V. M.; Ostashev, V. E.; Tarakanov, V. P.; Ul'yanov, A. V.

    2017-05-01

    Results of creation, operation, and diagnostics of the high power radiators for ultra-short length electromagnetic pulses (USEMPs) with a quasi-unipolar profile, which have been developed in our laboratory, are presented. The radiating module contains: the ultra-wideband (UWB) antenna array, the exciting high voltage pulse semiconductor generator (a pulser), the power source and the control unit. The principles of antenna array with a high efficiency aperture about 0.9 were developed using joint four TEM-horns with shielding electrodes in every TEM-horn. Sizes of the antenna apertures were (16-60) cm. The pulsers produced by “FID Technology” company had the following parameters: 50 Ohm connector impedance, unipolar pulses voltages (10-100) kV, the rise-time (0.04-0.15) ns, and the width (0.2-1) ns. The modules radiate the USEMPs of (0.1-10) GHz spectrum, their repetition rate is (1-100) kHz, and the effective potential is E*R = (20-400) kV, producing the peak E-field into the far-zone of R-distance. Parameters of the USEMP waves were measured by a calibrated sensor with the following characteristics: the sensitivity 0.32V/(kV/m), the rise-time 0.03 ns, the duration up to 7 ns. The measurements were in agreement with the simulation results, which were obtained using the 3-D code “KARAT”. The USEMP waves with amplitudes (1-10) kV/m and the pulse repetition rate (0.5-100) kHz were successfully used to examine various electronic devices for an electromagnetic immunity.

  13. Atmospheric radiation measurement program facilities newsletter, August 1999.

    SciTech Connect

    Sisterson, D.L.

    1999-09-03

    With the end of summer drawing near, the fall songbird migration season will soon begin. Scientists with the ARM Program will be able to observe the onset of the migration season as interference in the radar wind profiler (RWP) data. An RWP measures vertical profiles of wind and temperature directly above the radar from approximately 300 feet to 3 miles above the ground. The RWP accomplishes this by sending a pulse of electromagnetic energy skyward. Under normal conditions, the energy is scattered by targets in the atmosphere. Targets generally consist of atmospheric irregularities such as variations in temperature, humidity, and pressure over relatively short distances. During the spring and fall bird migration seasons, RWP beam signals are susceptible to overflying birds. The radar beams do not harm the birds, but the birds' presence hampers data collection by providing false targets to reflect the RWP beam, introducing errors into the data. Because of the wavelength of the molar beam, the number of individuals, and the small size of songbirds' bodies (compared to the larger geese or hawks), songbirds are quite likely to be sampled by the radar. Migrating birds usually fly with the prevailing wind, making their travel easier. As a result, winds from the south are ''enhanced'' or overestimated in the spring as the migrating birds travel northward, and winds from the north are overestimated in the fall as birds make their way south. This fact is easily confirmed by comparison of RWP wind data to wind data gathered by weather balloons, which are not affected by birds.

  14. Diagnosing Pulsed Power Produced Plasmas with X-ray Thomson Scattering at the Nevada Terawatt Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valenzuela, J. C.; Krauland, C.; Mariscal, D.; Krasheninnikov, I.; Beg, F. N.; Wiewior, P.; Covington, A.; Presura, R.; Ma, T.; Niemann, C.; Mabey, P.; Gregori, G.

    2015-11-01

    We present experimental results on X-ray Thomson scattering (XRTS) at the Nevada Terawatt Facility (NTF) to study current driven plasmas. Using the Leopard laser, ~ 30 J and pulse width of 0.8 ns, we generated He- α emission (4.75 keV) from a thin Ti foil. Initial parameter scans showed that the optimum intensity is ~ 1015W/cm2 with a foil thickness of 2 μm for forward X-ray production. Bandwidth measurements of the source, using a HAPG crystal in the Von Hamos configuration, were found to be ΔE/E ~ 0.01. Giving the scattering angle of our experimental setup of 129 degrees and X-ray probing energy, the non-collective regime was accessed. The ZEBRA load was a 3 mm wide, 500 μm thick, and 10 mm long graphite foil, placed at one of the six current return posts. Estimates of the plasma temperature, density and ionization state were made by fitting the scattering spectra with dynamic structure factor calculations based on the random phase approximation for the treatment of charged particle coupling. The work was partially funded by the Department of Energy grant number DE-NA0001995.

  15. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future)

    SciTech Connect

    JW Voyles

    2008-01-30

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  16. Radiation shielding for superconducting RF cavity test facility at A0

    SciTech Connect

    Dhanaraj, N.; Ginsburg, C.; Rakhno, I.; Wu, G.; /Fermilab

    2008-11-01

    The results of Monte Carlo radiation shielding study performed with the MARS15 code for the vertical test facility at the A0 north cave enclosure at Fermilab are presented and discussed. The vertical test facility at the A0 north cave is planned to be used for testing 1.3 GHz single-cell superconducting RF cavities with accelerating length of 0.115 m. The operations will be focused on high accelerating gradients--up to 50 MV/m. In such a case the facility can be a strong radiation source [1]. When performing a radiation shielding design for the facility one has to take into account gammas generated due to interactions of accelerated electrons with cavity walls and surroundings (for example, range of 3.7-MeV electrons in niobium is approximately 3.1 mm while the thickness of the niobium walls of such RF cavities is about 2.8 mm). The electrons are usually the result of contamination in the cavity. The radiation shielding study was performed with the MARS15 Monte Carlo code [2]. A realistic model of the source term has been used that describes spatial, energy and angular distributions of the field-emitted electrons inside the RF cavities. The results of the calculations are normalized using the existing experimental data on measured dose rate in the vicinity of such RF cavities.

  17. Simultaneous Spectral Albedo Measurements Near the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Southern Great Plains (ARM SGP) Central Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Michalsky, Joseph J.; Min, Qilong; Barnard, James C.; Marchand, Roger T.; Pilewskie, Peter

    2003-04-30

    In this study, a data analysis is performed to determine the area-averaged, spectral albedo at ARM's SGP central facility site. The spectral albedo is then fed into radiation transfer models to show that the diffuse discrepancy is diminished when the spectral albedo is used (as opposed to using the broadband albedo).

  18. Laser stand for irradiation of targets by laser pulses from the Iskra-5 facility at a repetition rate of 100 MHz

    SciTech Connect

    Annenkov, V I; Garanin, Sergey G; Eroshenko, V A; Zhidkov, N V; Zubkov, A V; Kalipanov, S V; Kalmykov, N A; Kovalenko, V P; Krotov, V A; Lapin, S G; Martynenko, S P; Pankratov, V I; Faizullin, V S; Khrustalev, V A; Khudikov, N M; Chebotar, V S

    2009-08-31

    A train of a few tens of high-power subnanosecond laser pulses with a repetition period of 10 ns is generated in the Iskra-5 facility. The laser pulse train has an energy of up to 300 J and contains up to 40 pulses (by the 0.15 intensity level), the single pulse duration in the train being {approx}0.5 ns. The results of experiments on conversion of a train of laser pulses to a train of X-ray pulses are presented. Upon irradiation of a tungsten target, a train of X-ray pulses is generated with the shape of an envelope in the spectral band from 0.18 to 0.28 keV similar to that of the envelope of the laser pulse train. The duration of a single X-ray pulse in the train is equal to that of a single laser pulse. (lasers)

  19. Atmospheric radiation measurement program facilities newsletter, September 2001.

    SciTech Connect

    Holdridge, D. J.

    2001-10-10

    Our Changing Climate--Is our climate really changing? How do we measure climate change? How can we predict what Earth's climate will be like for generations to come? One focus of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is to improve scientific climate models enough to achieve reliable regional prediction of future climate. According to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the global mean surface temperature has increased by 0.5-1.0 F since the late 19th century. The 20th century's 10 warmest years all occurred in the last 15 years of the century, with 1998 being the warmest year of record. The global mean surface temperature is measured by a network of temperature-sensing instruments distributed around the world, including ships, ocean buoys, and weather stations on land. The data from this network are retrieved and analyzed by various organizations, including the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and the World Meteorological Organization. Worldwide temperature records date back to 1860. To reconstruct Earth's temperature history before 1860, scientists use limited temperature records, along with proxy indicators such as tree rings, pollen records, and analysis of air frozen in ancient ice. The solar energy received from the sun drives Earth's weather and climate. Some of this energy is reflected and filtered by the atmosphere, but most is absorbed by Earth's surface. The absorbed solar radiation warms the surface and is re-radiated as heat energy into the atmosphere. Some atmospheric gases, called greenhouse gases, trap some of the re-emitted heat, keeping the surface temperature regulated and suitable for sustaining life. Although the greenhouse effect is natural, some evidence indicates that human activities are producing increased levels of some greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide. Scientists believe that the combustion of fossil fuels is

  20. Radiation-induced Breast Telangiectasias Treated with the Pulsed Dye Laser

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Anthony M.; Nehal, Kishwer S.

    2014-01-01

    Background and objectives: Radiation dermatitis is a frequent sequela of adjuvant radiation therapy for breast cancer. Clinical manifestations include prominent telangiectasias that may be physically disfiguring and psychologically distressing for the patient. The objective of this study was to review cases of breast cancer patients with radiation-induced breast telangiectasias treated with the pulsed dye laser and assess clinical efficacy. The patient’s perception of treatment was also reviewed. Study design: A retrospective chart review of patients treated for radiation-induced telangiectasias was conducted at the Dermatology Division of Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. Materials and methods: Pre- and post-clinical photos were used to assess clearance by two independent raters. Patient’s comments were assessed from visit notes and the treating physicians for the impact of treatment on the patient’s overall well-being. Results: All patients (n=11) experienced clinical improvement in the radiation-induced telangiectasias. The mean number of treatments was 4.3 (2–9) with an average fluence of 4.2J/cm2 (585nm platform) and 7.8J/cm2 (595nm) (4–8 J/cm2) used. The mean percent clearance was 72.7 percent (50–90%). Adverse effects were not encountered including those with breast implants or flap reconstruction. Patients reported an improvement in their well-being, including an improved sense of confidence. Limitations: Limitations include the small sample size, nonstandardized digital images, and nonsystematic collection of patient-reported outcomes. Conclusion: The pulsed dye laser is an efficacious treatment for radiation-induced breast telangiectasias. Multiple treatments are required for greater than 50-percent clearance and conservative treatment parameters are advised. Patients also reported an improved quality of life. PMID:25584136

  1. Radiation-induced Breast Telangiectasias Treated with the Pulsed Dye Laser.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Anthony M; Nehal, Kishwer S; Lee, Erica H

    2014-12-01

    Radiation dermatitis is a frequent sequela of adjuvant radiation therapy for breast cancer. Clinical manifestations include prominent telangiectasias that may be physically disfiguring and psychologically distressing for the patient. The objective of this study was to review cases of breast cancer patients with radiation-induced breast telangiectasias treated with the pulsed dye laser and assess clinical efficacy. The patient's perception of treatment was also reviewed. A retrospective chart review of patients treated for radiation-induced telangiectasias was conducted at the Dermatology Division of Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. Pre- and post-clinical photos were used to assess clearance by two independent raters. Patient's comments were assessed from visit notes and the treating physicians for the impact of treatment on the patient's overall well-being. All patients (n=11) experienced clinical improvement in the radiation-induced telangiectasias. The mean number of treatments was 4.3 (2-9) with an average fluence of 4.2J/cm(2) (585nm platform) and 7.8J/cm(2) (595nm) (4-8 J/cm(2)) used. The mean percent clearance was 72.7 percent (50-90%). Adverse effects were not encountered including those with breast implants or flap reconstruction. Patients reported an improvement in their well-being, including an improved sense of confidence. LIMITATIONS include the small sample size, nonstandardized digital images, and nonsystematic collection of patient-reported outcomes. The pulsed dye laser is an efficacious treatment for radiation-induced breast telangiectasias. Multiple treatments are required for greater than 50-percent clearance and conservative treatment parameters are advised. Patients also reported an improved quality of life.

  2. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program facilities newsletter, January 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Sisterson, D.L.

    2000-02-16

    The subject of this newsletter is the ARM unmanned aerospace vehicle program. The ARM Program's focus is on climate research, specifically research related to solar radiation and its interaction with clouds. The SGP CART site contains highly sophisticated surface instrumentation, but even these instruments cannot gather some crucial climate data from high in the atmosphere. The Department of Energy and the Department of Defense joined together to use a high-tech, high-altitude, long-endurance class of unmanned aircraft known as the unmanned aerospace vehicle (UAV). A UAV is a small, lightweight airplane that is controlled remotely from the ground. A pilot sits in a ground-based cockpit and flies the aircraft as if he were actually on board. The UAV can also fly completely on its own through the use of preprogrammed computer flight routines. The ARM UAV is fitted with payload instruments developed to make highly accurate measurements of atmospheric flux, radiance, and clouds. Using a UAV is beneficial to climate research in many ways. The UAV puts the instrumentation within the environment being studied and gives scientists direct measurements, in contrast to indirect measurements from satellites orbiting high above Earth. The data collected by UAVs can be used to verify and calibrate measurements and calculated values from satellites, therefore making satellite data more useful and valuable to researchers.

  3. Standing up the National Ignition Facility radiation protection program.

    PubMed

    Kohut, Thomas R; Thacker, Rick L; Beale, Richard M; Dillon, Jon T

    2013-06-01

    Operation of the NIF requires a large and varied number of routine and infrequent activities involving contaminated and radioactive systems, both in servicing online equipment and offline refurbishment of components. Routine radiological operations include up to several dozen entries into contaminated systems per day, multiple laboratories refurbishing radiologically impacted parts, handling of tens of curies of tritium, and (eventually) tens of workers spending most of their day working in radiation areas and handling moderately activated parts. Prior to the introduction of radioactive materials and neutron producing experiments (capable of causing activation), very few of the operating staff had any radiological qualifications or experience. To support the full NIF operating program, over 600 radiological workers needed to be trained, and a functional and large-scale radiological protection program needed to be put in place. It quickly became evident that there was a need to supplement the LLNL site radiological protection staff with additional radiological controls technicians and a radiological protection staff within NIF operations to manage day-to-day activities. This paper discusses the approach taken to stand up the radiological protection program and some lessons learned.

  4. ITS-90 Scale Realization on the New Radiation Thermometer Calibration Facility at NMi VSL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekker, P. R.; van der Ham, E. W. M.

    2008-06-01

    In the first half of 2005, Nederlands Meetinstituut Van Swinden Laboratorium B.V. (NMi VSL) redesigned their facilities for radiation thermometry in a new laboratory building and an opportunity arose to implement new measurement methods. The new facility is used for ITS-90 realization and dissemination in the temperature range from - 50 °C to 3,000 °C. A study was performed to compare a silver-point realization with a fixed-point blackbody radiator (FP-BBR) to a sodium heat-pipe blackbody radiator (HP-BBR) traceable via a HTSPRT to a contact thermometry silver point. It was found that the fixed-point realization transfer to the sodium heat pipe results in an uncertainty from 0.2 K to 2.4 K for the ITS-90 over the temperature range from 961.78 °C to 3,000 °C.

  5. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETERS: Transformation of the spatial coherence of pulsed laser radiation transmitted in the nonlinear regime through a multimode graded-index fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitsak, A. I.; Kitsak, M. A.

    2006-01-01

    A method is proposed for transformation of the spatial coherence of pulsed laser radiation upon nonlinear interaction in a multimode fibre. The specific features of the transmission of correlation properties of radiation in a graded-index fibre with regular and irregular profiles of the refractive index of the fibre core are analysed. A comparative analysis of the parameter of global degree of radiation coherence at the output of inhomogeneous waveguide and non-waveguide media is performed. It is shown that the most efficient mechanism of decorrelation of pulsed radiation in an optical fibre is fluctuations of the phase of radiation scattered by inhomogeneities of the refractive index of the fibre core induced due to nonlinear interaction with radiation with the spatially inhomogeneous intensity distribution.

  6. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program facilities newsletter, November 2002.

    SciTech Connect

    Holdridge, D. J.

    2002-12-03

    Fall 2002 Intensive Operation Periods: Single Column Model and Unmanned Aerospace Vehicle--In an Intensive Operation Period (IOP) on November 3-23, 2002, researchers at the SGP CART site are collecting a detailed data set for use in improving the Single Column Model (SCM), a scaled-down climate model. The SCM represents one vertical column of air above Earth's surface and requires less computation time than a full-scale global climate model. Researchers first use the SCM to efficiently improve submodels of clouds, solar radiation transfer, and atmosphere-surface interactions, then implement the results in large-scale global models. With measured values for a starting point, the SCM predicts atmospheric variables during prescribed time periods. A computer calculates values for such quantities as the amount of solar radiation reaching the surface and predicts how clouds will evolve and interact with incoming light from the sun. Researchers compare the SCM's predictions with actual measurements made during the IOP, then adjust the submodels to make predictions more reliable. A second IOP conducted concurrently with the SCM IOP involves high-altitude, long-duration aircraft flights. The original plan was to use an unmanned aerospace vehicle (UAV), but the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) aircraft Proteus will be substituted because all UAVs have been deployed elsewhere. The UAV is a small, instrument-equipped, remote-control plane that is operated from the ground by a computer. The Proteus is a manned aircraft, originally designed to carry telecommunications relay equipment, that can be reconfigured for uses such as reconnaissance and surveillance, commercial imaging, launching of small space satellites, and atmospheric research. The plane is designed for two on-board pilots in a pressurized cabin, flying to altitudes up to 65,000 feet for as long as 18 hours. The Proteus has a variable wingspan of 77-92 feet and is 56 feet long. The plane can carry

  7. Laser-plasma extreme ultraviolet and soft X-ray sources based on a double stream gas puff target: interaction of the radiation pulses with matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartnik, A.

    2015-06-01

    In this work a review of investigations concerning interaction of intense extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and soft X-ray (SXR) pulses with matter is presented. The investigations were performed using laser-produced plasma (LPP) EUV/SXR sources based on a double stream gas puff target. The sources are equipped with dedicated collectors allowing for efficient focusing of the EUV/SXR radiation pulses. Intense radiation in a wide spectral range, as well as a quasi-monochromatic radiation can be produced. In the paper different kinds of LPP EUV/SXR sources developed in the Institute of Optoelectronics, Military University of Technology are described. Radiation intensities delivered by the sources are sufficient for different kinds of interaction experiments including EUV/SXR induced ablation, surface treatment, EUV fluorescence or photoionized plasma creation. A brief review of the main results concerning this kind of experiments performed by author of the paper are presented. However, since the LPP sources cannot compete with large scale X-ray sources like synchrotrons, free electron lasers or high energy density plasma sources, it was indicated that some investigations not requiring extreme irradiation parameters can be performed using the small scale installations. Some results, especially concerning low temperature photoionized plasmas are very unique and could be hardly obtained using the large facilities.

  8. Atmospheric radiation measurement program facilities newsletter, August 2001.

    SciTech Connect

    Holdridge, D. J.,ed.

    2001-09-04

    need to be addressed promptly. Sunburn is something most of us have experienced. Severe burns can be dangerous and should be treated by a physician. Heat cramps (painful muscle cramps, usually of the leg muscles) are typically accompanied by heavy sweating. Heat exhaustion symptoms include sweating; weakness; cold, pale, clammy skin; fainting; and vomiting. Heat stroke (also called sunstroke), the most serious heat disorder, can cause the body temperature to rise to 106 F or higher. The skin becomes hot and dry, and the pulse is rapid. Heat stroke is a severe medical emergency and can be fatal. Everyone can take common-sense precautions to ease the danger of a heat wave. Reduce strenuous exercise and outdoor activities. Reschedule these activities for a cooler time of day or move them to an air-conditioned indoor location. Wear lightweight, light-colored clothing to help maintain a normal body temperature and reflect sunlight and heat. Drink plenty of non-alcoholic fluids, especially water, to help maintain good hydration, and eat light meals. Stay out of the sun if possible and spend time in air-conditioned places to reduce the stress of summer heat.

  9. Single-cycle Terahertz Pulses with >0.2 V/A Field Amplitudes via Coherent Transition Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Daranciang, Dan; Goodfellow, John; Fuchs, Matthias; Wen, Haidan; Ghimire, Shambhu; Reis, David A.; Loos, Henrik; Fisher, Alan S.; Lindenberg, Aaron M.; /Stanford U. Materials Sci. Dept. /SIMES, Stanford /SLAC, PULSE

    2012-02-15

    We demonstrate terahertz pulses with field amplitudes exceeding 0.2 V/{angstrom} generated by coherent transition radiation. Femtosecond, relativistic electron bunches generated at the Linac Coherent Light Source are passed through a beryllium foil, and the emitted radiation is characterized as a function of the bunch duration and charge. Broadband pulses centered at a frequency of 10 THz with energies of 140 {mu}J are measured. These far-below-bandgap pulses drive a nonlinear optical response in a silicon photodiode, with which we perform nonlinear autocorrelations that yield information regarding the terahertz temporal profile. Simulations of the spatiotemporal profile agree well with experimental results.

  10. Gamma radiation monitoring at the Eastern North Atlantic (ENA), Graciosa Island ARM facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, Susana; Miranda, Pedro; Azevedo, Eduardo B.; Nitschke, Kim

    2016-04-01

    Continuous monitoring of gamma radiation is often performed in nuclear facilities and industrial environments as a way to control the ambient radioactivity and give warning of potential accidents. However, gamma radiation is also ubiquitous in the natural environment. The main sources are i) cosmic radiation from space, including secondary radiation from the interaction with atoms in the atmosphere, ii) terrestrial sources from mineral grains in soils and rocks, particularly Potassium (K-40), Uranium (U-238) and Thorium (Th-232) and their decay products (e.g. Radium, Ra-226) , and iii) airborne Radon gas (Rn-222), which is the dominant source of natural environmental radioactivity. The temporal variability of this natural radiation background needs to be well understood and quantified in order to discriminate non-natural sources of radiation in the environment and artificial radionuclides contamination. To this end, continuous gamma radiation monitoring is being performed at the Eastern North Atlantic (ENA) facility located in the Graciosa island (Azores, 39N; 28W), a fixed site of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement programme (ARM), established and supported by the Department of Energy (DOE) of the United States of America with the collaboration of the local government and University of the Azores. The site is unique for the study of the natural radioactivity background on one hand due to the remote oceanic geographical location, in the middle of the North Atlantic Ocean and clear of direct continental influence, and on the other hand because of the comprehensive dataset of atmospheric parameters that is available for enhancing the interpretation of the radiation measurements, as a result of the vast array of very detailed and high-quality atmospheric measurements performed at the ARM-ENA facility. Gamma radiation in the range 475 KeV to 3000 KeV is measured continuously with a 3" x 3" NaI(Tl) scintillator. The campaign started started in May 2015, with gamma

  11. Measurement of the Radiofrequency-microwave Pulse Produced in Experiments of Laser-plasma Interaction in the ABC Laser Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Consoli, Fabrizio; De Angelis, Riccardo; Andreoli, Pierluigi; Cristofari, Giuseppe; Di Giorgioa, Giorgio

    The emission of electromagnetic waves in the radiofrequency-microwave range has been observed in many experiments of laser- plasma interaction. These fields can have very high intensity and estimated frequency band up to several gigahertz. The radiation normally affects the behaviour of most of the detectors, often up to hundreds of nanoseconds from the laser pulse, and can represent a serious limitation for the time-of-flight detection of fast particles, and in general for the safe operation of the electronic equipment. In this work we describe the measurements of this electromagnetic pulse, under different conditions of laser-plasma interaction.

  12. Assessment of Gamma Radiation Resistance of Spores Isolated from the Spacecraft Assembly Facility During MSL Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chopra, Arsh; Ramirez, Gustavo A.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri J.; Vaishampayan, Parag A.

    2011-01-01

    Spore forming bacteria, a common inhabitant of spacecraft assembly facilities, are known to tolerate extreme environmental conditions such as radiation, desiccation, and high temperatures. Since the Viking era (early 1970's), spores have been utilized to assess the degree and level of microbiological contamination on spacecraft and their associated spacecraft assembly facilities. There is a growing concern that desiccation and extreme radiation resistant spore forming microorganisms associated with spacecraft surfaces can withstand space environmental conditions and subsequently proliferate on another solar body. Such forward contamination would certainly jeopardize future life detection or sample return technologies. It is important to recognize that different classes of organisms are critical while calculating the probability of contamination, and methods must be devised to estimate their abundances. Microorganisms can be categorized based on radiation sensitivity as Type A, B, C, and D. Type C represents spores resistant to radiation (10% or greater survival above 0.8 mRad gamma radiation). To address these questions we have purified 96 spore formers, isolated during planetary protection efforts of Mars Science Laboratory assembly for gamma radiation resistance. The spores purified and stored will be used to generate data that can be used further to model and predict the probability of forward contamination.

  13. Assessment of Gamma Radiation Resistance of Spores Isolated from the Spacecraft Assembly Facility During MSL Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chopra, Arsh; Ramirez, Gustavo A.; Vaishampayan, Parag A.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri J.

    2011-01-01

    Spore forming bacteria, a common inhabitant of spacecraft assembly facilities, are known to tolerate extreme environmental conditions such as radiation, desiccation, and high temperatures. Since the Viking era (early 1970's), spores have been utilized to assess the degree and level of microbiological contamination on spacecraft and their associated spacecraft assembly facilities. There is a growing concern that desiccation and extreme radiation resistant spore forming microorganisms associated with spacecraft surfaces can withstand space environmental conditions and subsequently proliferate on another solar body. Such forward contamination would certainly jeopardize future life detection or sample return technologies. It is important to recognize that different classes of organisms are critical while calculating the probability of contamination, and methods must be devised to estimate their abundances. Microorganisms can be categorized based on radiation sensitivity as Type A, B, C, and D. Type C represents spores resistant to radiation (10% or greater survival above 0.8 Mrad gamma radiation). To address these questions we have purified 96 spore formers, isolated during planetary protection efforts of Mars Science Laboratory assembly for gamma radiation resistance. The spores purified and stored will be used to generate data that can be used further to model and predict the probability of forward contamination.

  14. Assessment of Gamma Radiation Resistance of Spores Isolated from the Spacecraft Assembly Facility During MSL Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chopra, Arsh; Ramirez, Gustavo A.; Vaishampayan, Parag A.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri J.

    2011-01-01

    Spore forming bacteria, a common inhabitant of spacecraft assembly facilities, are known to tolerate extreme environmental conditions such as radiation, desiccation, and high temperatures. Since the Viking era (early 1970's), spores have been utilized to assess the degree and level of microbiological contamination on spacecraft and their associated spacecraft assembly facilities. There is a growing concern that desiccation and extreme radiation resistant spore forming microorganisms associated with spacecraft surfaces can withstand space environmental conditions and subsequently proliferate on another solar body. Such forward contamination would certainly jeopardize future life detection or sample return technologies. It is important to recognize that different classes of organisms are critical while calculating the probability of contamination, and methods must be devised to estimate their abundances. Microorganisms can be categorized based on radiation sensitivity as Type A, B, C, and D. Type C represents spores resistant to radiation (10% or greater survival above 0.8 Mrad gamma radiation). To address these questions we have purified 96 spore formers, isolated during planetary protection efforts of Mars Science Laboratory assembly for gamma radiation resistance. The spores purified and stored will be used to generate data that can be used further to model and predict the probability of forward contamination.

  15. Assessment of Gamma Radiation Resistance of Spores Isolated from the Spacecraft Assembly Facility During MSL Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chopra, Arsh; Ramirez, Gustavo A.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri J.; Vaishampayan, Parag A.

    2011-01-01

    Spore forming bacteria, a common inhabitant of spacecraft assembly facilities, are known to tolerate extreme environmental conditions such as radiation, desiccation, and high temperatures. Since the Viking era (early 1970's), spores have been utilized to assess the degree and level of microbiological contamination on spacecraft and their associated spacecraft assembly facilities. There is a growing concern that desiccation and extreme radiation resistant spore forming microorganisms associated with spacecraft surfaces can withstand space environmental conditions and subsequently proliferate on another solar body. Such forward contamination would certainly jeopardize future life detection or sample return technologies. It is important to recognize that different classes of organisms are critical while calculating the probability of contamination, and methods must be devised to estimate their abundances. Microorganisms can be categorized based on radiation sensitivity as Type A, B, C, and D. Type C represents spores resistant to radiation (10% or greater survival above 0.8 mRad gamma radiation). To address these questions we have purified 96 spore formers, isolated during planetary protection efforts of Mars Science Laboratory assembly for gamma radiation resistance. The spores purified and stored will be used to generate data that can be used further to model and predict the probability of forward contamination.

  16. High energy density laboratory astrophysics experiments with supersonic magnetized plasmas on the MAGPIE pulsed-power facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, S. V.; Burdiak, G. C.; Chittenden, J. P.; Clayson, T.; Garcia, C.; Hare, J. D.; Suttle, L. G.; Suzuki-Vidal, F.; Frank, A.; Ciardi, A.; Loureiro, N. F.

    2016-10-01

    The use of plasma flows generated by pulsed-power facilities provides a natural platform for designing magnetized HEDLA experiments. The plasma in this case is created and accelerated by the JxB force of the driving, Mega-Ampere level currents, forming plasma flows with embedded, frozen-in magnetic fields. Here we present several recent experiments performed on the MAGPIE pulsed-power facility focusing on studies of the structure of magnetized bow shocks, the dynamics of counter-streaming plasma jets, the formation of shocks in inverse liners, and magnetic reconnection in colliding plasmas. The relatively large spatial and temporal scales characterizing these experimental platforms, together with excellent diagnostic access, allow detailed characterization of the key plasma parameters and quantitative comparison of the experimental results with numerical simulations. Work supported by DOE cooperative Agreements No. DE-F03-02NA00057 and No. DE-SC-0001063.

  17. Atmospheric radiation measurement program facilities newsletter, March 2002.

    SciTech Connect

    Holdridge, D. J.

    2002-04-18

    sparsely spaced, costly weather balloon releases. IHOP-2002 will give researchers an active platform for testing and evaluating the capabilities and limitations of several water vapor measurement instruments. For example, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Environmental Technology Laboratory will be bringing a mini-DIAL (differential absorption lidar) to the SGP central facility for comparison with the SGP Raman lidar. Lidars send beams of laser light skyward and measure scattered light not absorbed by water molecules. The collection of IHOP-2002 instruments includes 2 fixed radars, 6 mobile radars, 2 airborne radars, 8 lidars (6 of which can sample water vapor), 1 advanced wind profiler, 2 sodars, 3 interferometers, 18 special surface stations, 800 radiosondes, 400 dropsondes, 1 tethersonde system, 52 global positioning system receivers, 3 profiling radiometers, 1 mobile profiling radiometer and wind profiler, and 5 water vapor radiometers. Six research aircraft will be deployed during the course of the field campaign. The aircraft will occasionally fly low-level tracks and will deploy dropsondes. A dropsonde resembles a radiosonde, an instrument package attached to a helium-filled balloon that rises into the atmosphere, but the dropsonde is released from an airplane and collects data on its way down to the ground. Finders of dropsondes are asked to follow the instructions on the package for returning the device to the researcher. Funding for IHOP-2002 is from many sources, including NOAA, the National Science Foundation, the National Center for Atmospheric Research, and the U.S. Department of Energy. Participation is worldwide, including researchers from Australia, Canada, France, Germany, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom, and the United States.

  18. Response of air-filled ion chambers to high-intensity radiation pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, M.; Brown, D.

    1993-06-01

    Ion chambers are one of the most popular types of detectors used for beam loss-monitor systems. To provide a foundation for the development of future loss-monitor systems, and to fully characterize the ion chambers in use at LAMPF, we have studied the response of air-filled cylindrical ion chambers to high-intensity, short-duration radiation pulses. The most intense pulses were about 180 rad in 250 ns (the equivalent steady-state dose rate was about 700 Mrad/h). We filled our chambers with nitrogen gas at 760 Torr and air at 600 Torr. The ion chambers were driven into extreme nonlinear response. We hope these data will be used to design loss-monitor systems based on air-filled ion chambers, thus eliminating the need for gas-flow systems and/or airtight ion chambers.

  19. Response of air-filled ion chambers to high-intensity radiation pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, M.; Brown, D.

    1993-01-01

    Ion chambers are one of the most popular types of detectors used for beam loss-monitor systems. To provide a foundation for the development of future loss-monitor systems, and to fully characterize the ion chambers in use at LAMPF, we have studied the response of air-filled cylindrical ion chambers to high-intensity, short-duration radiation pulses. The most intense pulses were about 180 rad in 250 ns (the equivalent steady-state dose rate was about 700 Mrad/h). We filled our chambers with nitrogen gas at 760 Torr and air at 600 Torr. The ion chambers were driven into extreme nonlinear response. We hope these data will be used to design loss-monitor systems based on air-filled ion chambers, thus eliminating the need for gas-flow systems and/or airtight ion chambers.

  20. Radiative Characteristics of the Pulse-Periodic Discharge Plasma Initiated by Runaway Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomaev, M. I.; Beloplotov, D. V.; Tarasenko, V. F.; Sorokin, D. A.

    2016-07-01

    Results of experimental investigations of amplitude-temporal and spectral characteristics of radiation of a pulse-periodic discharge plasma initiated in nitrogen by runaway electrons are presented. The discharge was initiated by high-voltage nanosecond voltage pulses with repetition frequency of 60 Hz in a sharply inhomogeneous electric field in a gap between the conic potential cathode and the planar grounded aluminum anode. It is established that intensive lines of Al I atoms and Al II atomic ions, lines of N I atoms and N II ions, bands of the first (1+) and second positive (2+) nitrogen systems, as well as bands of cyanogen CN are observed in the emission spectrum of the discharge plasma under the given excitation conditions.

  1. Very Low-Power Consumption Analog Pulse Processing ASIC for Semiconductor Radiation Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Wessendorf, K.O.; Lund, J.C.; Brunett, B.A.; Laguna, G.R.; Clements, J.W.

    1999-08-23

    We describe a very-low power consumption circuit for processing the pulses from a semiconductor radiation detector. The circuit was designed for use with a cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector for unattended monitoring of stored nuclear materials. The device is intended to be battery powered and operate at low duty-cycles over a long period of time. This system will provide adequate performance for medium resolution gamma-ray pulse-height spectroscopy applications. The circuit incorporates the functions of a charge sensitive preamplifier, shaping amplifier, and peak sample and hold circuit. An application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) version of the design has been designed, built and tested. With the exception of the input field effect transistor (FET), the circuit is constructed using bipolar components. In this paper the design philosophy and measured performance characteristics of the circuit are described.

  2. Generation of efficient THz radiation by optical rectification in DAST crystal using tunable femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatesh, Mottamchetty; Thirupugalmani, K.; Rao, K. S.; Brahadeeswaran, S.; Chaudhary, A. K.

    2017-03-01

    We report the efficient THz generation by optical rectification from an indigenously grown organic DAST crystal using the 140 fs oscillator laser pulses tunable in between 780 and 850 nm. The generated THz pulse profile and powers have been measured using the photoconductive (PC) antennas and pyroelectric detector, respectively. The highest THz peak amplitude and power is obtained at 825 nm central wavelength. We have theoretically explained the enhancement of THz radiation based on the matching of average optical group refractive index and average THz refractive index of the DAST crystal at 825 nm. In addition, the dependence of THz peak amplitude and THz power on laser power have been carried out. The measured quantum conversion efficiency (QCE) of 0.5 and 1.5 THz bands are of the order 3.7 × 10-3, 1.4 × 10-3, respectively. Finally, an attempt has been made to study the effect of polarizations on generated THz signal.

  3. Radiative heat transfer in plasma of pulsed high pressure caesium discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapshin, V. F.

    2016-01-01

    Two-temperature many component gas dynamic model is used for the analysis of features of radiative heat transfer in pulsed high pressure caesium discharge plasma. It is shown that at a sufficiently high pressure the radial optical thickness of arc column is close to unit (τR (λ) ∼ 1) in most part of spectrum. In this case radiative heat transfer has not local character. In these conditions the photons which are emitted in any point of plasma volume are absorbed in other point remote from an emission point on considerable distance. As a result, the most part of the electric energy put in the discharge mainly near its axis is almost instantly redistributed on all volume of discharge column. In such discharge radial profiles of temperature are smooth. In case of low pressure, when discharge plasma is optically transparent for own radiation in the most part of a spectrum (τR(λ) << 1), the emission of radiation without reabsorption takes place. Radiative heat transfer in plasma has local character and profiles of temperature have considerable gradient.

  4. Developing Planetary Protection Technology: Microbial Diversity and Radiation Resistance of Microorganisms in a Spacecraft Assembly Facility.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, F.; La Duc, M. T.; Baker, A.; Koukol, R.; Barengoltz, J.; Kern, R.; Venkateswaran, K.

    2001-12-01

    Europa has attracted much attention as evidence suggests the presence of a liquid ocean beneath this Jupiter moon's frozen crust. Such an environment might be conducive to the origins of life. Since robotic exploration of Europa is being planned, it becomes crucial to prepare for bio-burden reduction of hardware assembled for Europa missions to avoid contamination of Europa's pristine environment. In this study, we examined the microbial diversity of samples collected from two flight-ready circuit boards and their assembly facility. Also, because Jupiter's strong radiation environment may be able to reduce the viable microbial contamination on flight components, we have also studied the effects of radiation on microbial communities found to be associated with the space-flight hardware and/or present in the assembly facility. Surface samples thought to be representative of considerable human contact were collected from two circuit boards and various locations within the assembly facility using polyester swabs (swab samples). Likewise, sterile wipes were used to sample a shelf above the workstation where the circuit boards were assembled and the floor of the facility (wipe samples). The swab and wipe samples were pooled separately and divided into two halves, one of which was irradiated with 1Mrad gamma radiation for 5.5 hours, the other was not irradiated. About 1.2x104 and 6x104 CFUs/m2 cultivable microbes were detected in the swab and wipe samples, respectively. Radiation proved effective in inhibiting the growth of most microbes. Further characterization of the bacterial colonies observed in the irradiated swab and wipe samples is necessary to determine the degree of the radiation resistance. The16S rDNA sequence analysis of the cultivable microbes indicated that the assembly facility consists mostly of the members of actinobacteria, corynebacteria and pseudomonads. However, the swab samples that include the circuit boards were predominantly populated with

  5. Stable radiation pressure acceleration of ions by suppressing transverse Rayleigh-Taylor instability with multiple Gaussian pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, M. L.; Liu, B.; Hu, R. H.; Shou, Y. R.; Lin, C.; Lu, H. Y.; Lu, Y. R.; Ma, W. J.; Gu, Y. Q.; Yan, X. Q.

    2016-08-15

    In the case of a thin plasma slab accelerated by the radiation pressure of an ultra-intense laser pulse, the development of Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) will destroy the acceleration structure and terminate the acceleration process much sooner than theoretical limit. In this paper, a new scheme using multiple Gaussian pulses for ion acceleration in a radiation pressure acceleration regime is investigated with particle-in-cell simulation. We found that with multiple Gaussian pulses, the instability could be efficiently suppressed and the divergence of the ion bunch is greatly reduced, resulting in a longer acceleration time and much more collimated ion bunch with higher energy than using a single Gaussian pulse. An analytical model is developed to describe the suppression of RTI at the laser-plasma interface. The model shows that the suppression of RTI is due to the introduction of the long wavelength mode RTI by the multiple Gaussian pulses.

  6. Melanin and the cellular effects of ultrashort-pulse, near-infrared laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glickman, Randolph D.; Kumar, Neeru; Rockwell, Benjamin A.; Noojin, Gary D.; Denton, Michael L.; Stolarski, David J.

    2003-07-01

    Our research into laser bioeffects has increasingly focused on cytotoxic mechanisms affecting genomic expression and programmed cellular stress responses. In the context of DNA damage, we previously reported that more DNA strand breaks were produced in cultured retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells exposed to ultrashort pulse, than to CW, near-infrared (NIR) laser radiation. To test the hypothesis that RPE melanin was the cellular chromophore responsible for mediating this damage, the experiments were repeated with a line of human-derived RPE cells that could be grown in culture expressing varying levels of pigmentation. Lightly-pigmented cells were either unexposed, or exposed to the output of a Ti:Sapphire laser producing 810 nm light in mode-locked pulses (48-fsec at 80 MHz), or as CW radiation. Cells were irradiated at 160 W/cm2 or 80 W/cm2 (the estimated ED50 or half-ED50 for a retinal lesion). Immediately following the laser exposure, cells were processed for the comet assay. Longer "comet" tails and larger "comet" areas indicated more DNA strand breaks. In lightly-pigmented RPE cells, the overall comet assay differences among the laser-exposed groups were smaller than those observed in our earlier experiments which utilized highly pigmented primary cells. The comet tail lengths of cells exposed to the mode-locked pulses at the ED50, however, were significantly longer than those of the controls or the CW-exposed cells. The other comet assay parameters examined (tail moment, comet area) did not show consistent differences among the groups. While these results support the involvement of melanin in the ultrashort pulse laser-induced damage to DNA, they do not exclude the involvement of other cellular chromophores. Some preliminary experiments describing other measures of cellular stress responses to laser-induced oxidative stress are described.

  7. Permeability changes induced by 130 GHz pulsed radiation on cationic liposomes loaded with carbonic anhydrase.

    PubMed

    Ramundo-Orlando, Alfonsina; Gallerano, Gian Piero; Stano, Pasquale; Doria, Andrea; Giovenale, Emilio; Messina, Giovanni; Cappelli, Mauro; D'Arienzo, Marco; Spassovsky, Ivan

    2007-12-01

    The effects of pulsed 130 GHz radiations on lipid membrane permeability were investigated by using cationic liposomes containing dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC), cholesterol, and stearylamine. Carbonic anhydrase (CA) was loaded inside the liposomes and the substrate p-nitrophenyl acetate (p-NPA) added in the bulk aqueous phase. Upon permeation across the lipid bilayer, the trapped CA catalyzes the conversion of the p-NPA molecules into products. Because the self-diffusion rate of p-NPA across intact liposomes is very low the CA reaction rate, expressed as Delta A/min, is used to track membrane permeability changes. The effect of 130 GHz radiation pulse-modulated at low frequencies of 5, 7, or 10 Hz, and at time-averaged incident intensity (I(AV)) up to 17 mW/cm(2) was studied at room temperature (22 degrees C), below the phase transition temperature of DPPC liposomes. At all the tested values of I(AV) a significant enhancement of the enzyme reaction rate in CA-loaded liposomes occurred when the pulse repetition rate was 7 Hz. Typically, an increase from Delta A/min = 0.0026 +/- 0.0010 (n = 11) to Delta A/min = 0.0045 +/- 0.0013 (n = 12) (P < 0.0005) resulted at I(AV) = 7.7 mW/cm(2). The effect of 130 GHz pulse-modulated at 7 Hz was also observed on cationic liposomes formed with palmitoyloleoyl phosphatidylcholine (POPC), at room temperature (22 degrees C), above the phase transition temperature of POPC liposomes. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Formation of short high-power laser radiation pulses in excimer mediums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losev, V. F., Sr.; Ivanov, N. G.; Panchenko, Yu. N.

    2007-06-01

    Presently an excimer mediums continue are examined as one of variants for formation of powerful and over powerful pulses of laser radiation with duration from units of nanosecond up to tens femtosecond. The researches on such powerful installations as "NIKE" (USA) and << SUPER ASHURA >>, Japan) proceed in this direction. The main advantage of excimer mediums is the opportunity to work in a frequency mode, absence of restriction on the size of active area, high uniformity of a gas working medium, high efficiency (up to 10 %) and wide spectral range of laser radiation (KrF, XeCl ~ 2nm, XeF (C-A), Xe IICl ~ 50-100 nanometers). Research in area of high quality laser beams formation in excimer mediums and its amplification in high power amplifiers are carried out the long time in Institute of High Current Electronics SB RAS, Tomsk, Russia. The wide aperture XeCl laser system of MELS-4k is used for these investigations. Last time we take part in program on development of high power excimer laser system with a petawatt level of power. This system supposes the formation and amplification high quality laser beams with different pulse duration from units of nanosecond up to tens femtosecond. We research the possibility of laser beams formation in excimer mediums with ps-ns pulse duration having the low noise and divergence near to diffraction limit. In other hand, we are developing the wide aperture XeF(C-A) amplifier with optical pump on base electron accelerator. According to our estimations of the XeF(C-A) amplifier based on the converter of e-beam energy to the Xe II* fluorescence at 172 nm will allow to obtain up to 100 TW peak power in a 30 fs pulse.

  9. Safety training and safe operating procedures written for PBFA (Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator) II and applicable to other pulsed power facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Donovan, G.L.; Goldstein, S.A.

    1986-12-01

    To ensure that work in advancing pulsed power technology is performed with an acceptably low risk, pulsed power research facilities at Sandia National Laboratories must satisfy general safety guidelines established by the Department of Energy, policies and formats of the Environment, Safety, and Health (ES and H) Department, and detailed procedures formulated by the Pulsed Power Sciences Directorate. The approach to safety training and to writing safe operating procedures, and the procedures presented here are specific to the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II (PBFA II) Facility but are applicable as guidelines to other research and development facilities which have similar hazards.

  10. Feasibility Study of SSTO Base Heating Simulation in Pulsed-Type Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Chung Sik; Sharma, Surendra; Edwards, Thomas A. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    A laboratory simulation of the base heating environment of the proposed reusable Single-Stage-To-Orbit vehicle during its ascent flight was proposed. The rocket engine produces CO2 and H2, which are the main combustible components of the exhaust effluent. The burning of these species, known as afterburning, enhances the base region gas temperature as well as the base heating. To determine the heat flux on the SSTO vehicle, current simulation focuses on the thermochemistry of the afterburning, thermophysical properties of the base region gas, and ensuing radiation from the gas. By extrapolating from the Saturn flight data, the Damkohler number for the afterburning of SSTO vehicle is estimated to be of the order of 10. The limitations on the material strengths limit the laboratory simulation of the flight Damkohler number as well as other flow parameters. A plan is presented in impulse facilities using miniature rocket engines which generate the simulated rocket plume by electric ally-heating a H2/CO2 mixture.

  11. Feasibility Study of SSTO Base Heating Simulation in Pulsed-Type Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Chung Sik; Sharma, Surendra; Edwards, Thomas A. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    A laboratory simulation of the base heating environment of the proposed reusable Single-Stage-To-Orbit vehicle during its ascent flight was proposed. The rocket engine produces CO2 and H2, which are the main combustible components of the exhaust effluent. The burning of these species, known as afterburning, enhances the base region gas temperature as well as the base heating. To determine the heat flux on the SSTO vehicle, current simulation focuses on the thermochemistry of the afterburning, thermophysical properties of the base region gas, and ensuing radiation from the gas. By extrapolating from the Saturn flight data, the Damkohler number for the afterburning of SSTO vehicle is estimated to be of the order of 10. The limitations on the material strengths limit the laboratory simulation of the flight Damkohler number as well as other flow parameters. A plan is presented in impulse facilities using miniature rocket engines which generate the simulated rocket plume by electric ally-heating a H2/CO2 mixture.

  12. Pegasus II experiments and plans for the Atlas pulsed power facility

    SciTech Connect

    Shlachter, J.S.; Adams, P.J.; Atchison, W.L.

    1997-09-01

    Atlas will be a high-energy (36 MJ stored), high-power ({approximately} 10 TW) pulsed power driver for high energy-density experiments, with an emphasis on hydrodynamics. Scheduled for completion in late 1999, Atlas is designed to produce currents in the 40-50 MA range with a quarter-cycle time of 4-5 {mu}s. It will drive implosions of heavy liners (typically 50 g) with implosion velocities exceeding 20 mm/{mu}s. Under these conditions very high pressures and magnetic fields are produced. Shock pressures in the 50 Mbar range and pressures exceeding 10 Mbar in an adiabatic compression will be possible. By performing flux compression of a seed field, axial magnetic fields in the 2000 T range may be achieved. A variety of concepts have been identified for the first experimental campaigns on Atlas. These experiments include Rayleigh-Taylor instability studies, convergent (e.g., Bell-Plesset type) instability studies, material strength experiments at very high strain and strain rate, hydrodynamic flows in 3-dimensional geometries, equation of state measurements along the hugoniot and adiabats, transport and shock propagation in dense strongly-coupled plasmas, and atomic and condensed matter studies employing ultra-high magnetic fields. Experimental configurations, associated physics issues, and diagnostic strategies are all under investigation as the design of the Atlas facility proceeds. Near-term proof-of-principle experiments employing the smaller Pegasus II capacitor bank have been identified, and several of these experiments have not been performed. This paper discusses a number of recent Pegasus II experiments and identifies several areas of research presently planned on Atlas.

  13. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER: Influence of a target on operation of a pulsed CO2 laser emitting microsecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranov, V. Yu; Dolgov, V. A.; Malyuta, D. D.; Mezhevov, V. S.; Semak, V. V.

    1987-12-01

    The profile of pulses emitted by a TEA CO2 laser with an unstable resonator changed as a result of interaction of laser radiation with the surface of a metal in the presence of a breakdown plasma. This influence of a target on laser operation and its possible applications in laser processing of materials are analyzed.

  14. Radiation transport and energetics of laser-driven half-hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, A. S. Graham, P.; Comley, A. J.; Foster, J.; Cooper, A. B. R.; Schneider, M. B.; MacLaren, S.; Lu, K.; Seugling, R.; Satcher, J.; Klingmann, J.; Marrs, R.; May, M.; Widmann, K.; Glendinning, G.; Castor, J.; Sain, J.; Baker, K.; Hsing, W. W.; Young, B.; and others

    2014-06-15

    Experiments that characterize and develop a high energy-density half-hohlraum platform for use in benchmarking radiation hydrodynamics models have been conducted at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Results from the experiments are used to quantitatively compare with simulations of the radiation transported through an evolving plasma density structure, colloquially known as an N-wave. A half-hohlraum is heated by 80 NIF beams to a temperature of 240 eV. This creates a subsonic diffusive Marshak wave, which propagates into a high atomic number Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} aerogel. The subsequent radiation transport through the aerogel and through slots cut into the aerogel layer is investigated. We describe a set of experiments that test the hohlraum performance and report on a range of x-ray measurements that absolutely quantify the energetics and radiation partition inside the target.

  15. Radiation transport and energetics of laser-driven half-hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, A. S.; Cooper, A. B. R.; Schneider, M. B.; MacLaren, S.; Graham, P.; Lu, K.; Seugling, R.; Satcher, J.; Klingmann, J.; Comley, A. J.; Marrs, R.; May, M.; Widmann, K.; Glendinning, G.; Castor, J.; Sain, J.; Back, C. A.; Hund, J.; Baker, K.; Hsing, W. W.; Foster, J.; Young, B.; Young, P.

    2014-06-01

    Experiments that characterize and develop a high energy-density half-hohlraum platform for use in benchmarking radiation hydrodynamics models have been conducted at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Results from the experiments are used to quantitatively compare with simulations of the radiation transported through an evolving plasma density structure, colloquially known as an N-wave. A half-hohlraum is heated by 80 NIF beams to a temperature of 240 eV. This creates a subsonic diffusive Marshak wave, which propagates into a high atomic number Ta2O5 aerogel. The subsequent radiation transport through the aerogel and through slots cut into the aerogel layer is investigated. We describe a set of experiments that test the hohlraum performance and report on a range of x-ray measurements that absolutely quantify the energetics and radiation partition inside the target.

  16. Radiation-pressure acceleration of ion beams driven by circularly polarized laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Henig, A; Steinke, S; Schnürer, M; Sokollik, T; Hörlein, R; Kiefer, D; Jung, D; Schreiber, J; Hegelich, B M; Yan, X Q; Meyer-ter-Vehn, J; Tajima, T; Nickles, P V; Sandner, W; Habs, D

    2009-12-11

    We present experimental studies on ion acceleration from ultrathin diamondlike carbon foils irradiated by ultrahigh contrast laser pulses of energy 0.7 J focused to peak intensities of 5x10(19) W/cm2. A reduction in electron heating is observed when the laser polarization is changed from linear to circular, leading to a pronounced peak in the fully ionized carbon spectrum at the optimum foil thickness of 5.3 nm. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations reveal that those C6+ ions are for the first time dominantly accelerated in a phase-stable way by the laser radiation pressure.

  17. Radiation levels in cyclotron-radiochemistry facility measured by a novel comprehensive computerized monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishani, E.; Lifshits, N.; Osavistky, A.; Kaufman, J.; Ankry, N.; Tal, N.; Chisin, R.

    1999-04-01

    Radiation levels in a cyclotron-radiochemistry facility were measured during the production of commonly used PET radiopharmaceuticals by a comprehensive computerized monitoring system. The system consists of three major components: on-line radiation monitoring channels, an area control unit, and a gas waste management unit. During production the radiation levels were measured in the cyclotron vault, inside automatic chemistry production and research shielded cells, in the radiochemistry room, in the gas waste decay tank, in the chimney filters, and at the top of the cells chimney. Each detector was calibrated in a known radiation field, and a special detector dead time correction was performed in order to achieve detected signal-to-radiation linearity for the Geiger tubes located in the radiochemistry production and research cells. During production of C-11 and O-15 PET radiopharmaceuticals, high radiation levels were measured in the gas waste decay tank (240 and 80 mR/h, respectively). In contrast, the radiation levels at the chimney filters and at the top of the cells chimney did not exceed the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Drive Air Concentration (DAC) recommended for C-11 or O-15. During production of FDG, high radiation levels were measured at the chimney filters, however the radiation level at the top of the chimney (3.7 μCi/m 3) did not exceed the F-18 DAC recommendation (27 μCi/m 3). Low radiation levels of approximately 0.5-1 mR/h were measured in the radiochemistry room during production of PET radiopharmaceuticals. In the cyclotron vault, 2 min after bombardment the radiation levels at 2 m from the cyclotron decreased to 1-2 mR/h. The addition of a gas waste decay system to computerized monitoring channels located near each strategic point of the site allows for a comprehensive survey of the radiochemical processes.

  18. Pulse

    MedlinePlus

    ... the underside of the opposite wrist, below the base of the thumb. Press with flat fingers until ... determine if the patient's heart is pumping. Pulse measurement has other uses as well. During or immediately ...

  19. Operational Radiation Protection in Synchrotron Light and Free Electron Laser Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, James C.; Rokni, Sayed H.; Vylet, Vaclav; /Jefferson Lab

    2009-12-11

    The 3rd generation synchrotron radiation (SR) facilities are storage ring based facilities with many insertion devices and photon beamlines, and have low injection beam power (< few tens of watts), but extremely high stored beam power ({approx} 1 GW). The 4th generation x-ray free electron laser (FEL) facilities are based on an electron Linac with a long undulator and have high injection beam power (a few kW). Due to its electron and photon beam characteristics and modes of operation, storage ring and photon beamlines have unique safety aspects, which are the main subjects of this paper. The shielding design limits, operational modes, and beam losses are first reviewed. Shielding analysis (source terms and methodologies) and interlocked safety systems for storage ring and photon beamlines (including SR and gas bremsstrahlung) are described. Specific safety issues for storage ring top-off injection operation and FEL facilities are discussed. The operational safety program, e.g., operation authorization, commissioning, training, and radiation measurements, for SR facilities is also presented.

  20. Parametric study of broadband terahertz radiation generation based on interaction of two-color ultra-short laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Moradi, S.; Ganjovi, A.; Shojaei, F.; Saeed, M.

    2015-04-15

    In this work, using a two-dimensional kinetic model based on particle in cell-Monte Carlo collision simulation method, the influence of different parameters on the broadband intense Terahertz (THz) radiation generation via application of two-color laser fields, i.e., the fundamental and second harmonic modes, is studied. These two modes are focused into the molecular oxygen (O{sub 2}) with uniform density background gaseous media and the plasma channels are created. Thus, a broadband THz pulse that is around the plasma frequency is emitted from the formed plasma channel and co-propagates with the laser pulse. For different laser pulse shapes, the THz electric field and its spectrum are both calculated. The effects of laser pulse and medium parameters, i.e., positive and negative chirp pulse, number of laser cycles in the pulse, laser pulse shape, background gas pressure, and exerted DC electric field on THz spectrum are verified. Application of a negatively chirped femtosecond (40 fs) laser pulse results in four times enhancement of the THz pulse energy (2 times in THz electric field). The emission of THz radiation is mostly observed in the forward direction.

  1. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1–September 30, 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Voyles, JW

    2012-10-10

    Individual datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile research sites are collected and routed to the Data Management Facility (DMF) for processing in near-real-time. Instrument and processed data are then delivered approximately daily to the ARM Data Archive, where they are made freely available to the research community. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Data Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  2. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report October 1–December 31, 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Voyles, JW

    2013-01-11

    Individual datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile research sites are collected and routed to the Data Management Facility (DMF) for processing in near-real-time. Instrument and processed data are then delivered approximately daily to the ARM Data Archive, where they are made freely available to the research community. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Data Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year dating back to 1998.

  3. Laser ablation of single-crystalline silicon by radiation of pulsed frequency-selective fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veiko, V. P.; Skvortsov, A. M.; Huynh, C. T.; Petrov, A. A.

    2015-07-01

    We have studied the process of destruction of the surface of a single-crystalline silicon wafer scanned by the beam of a pulsed ytterbium-doped fiber laser radiation with a wavelength of λ = 1062 nm. It is established that the laser ablation can proceed without melting of silicon and the formation of a plasma plume. Under certain parameters of the process (radiation power, beam scan velocity, and beam overlap density), pronounced oxidation of silicon microparticles with the formation of a characteristic loose layer of fine powdered silicon dioxide has been observed for the first time. The range of lasing and beam scanning regimes in which the growth of SiO2 layer takes place is determined.

  4. Formation of nanosecond 100 GW radiation pulses in the TIR-1 CO2 laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anisimov, V. N.; Baranov, V. Yu; Borzenko, V. L.; Burtsev, V. A.; Kozochkin, S. M.; Malyuta, D. D.; Satov, Yu A.; Sebrant, A. Yu; Smakovskiĭ, Yu B.; Strel'tsov, A. P.

    1980-07-01

    Experiments were carried out using a single-beam CO2 laser system (designated TIR-1), comprising a master oscillator, an electrooptic switch, a system of amplifiers with optical gas filters, and a chamber for interactions with a target. Measurements were made of the energy characteristics of the laser beam and of the shape of a radiation pulse at different points in the system. Gas absorption cells, designed to suppress self-excitation in the amplifiers, were investigated. The dependence of the cell transmission on the energy of the incident radiation was determined. An analysis was made of the energy parameters and the efficiency of the system was calculated for various real operating regimes.

  5. Proton Irradiation Facility and space radiation monitoring at the Paul Scherrer Institute.

    PubMed

    Hajdas, W; Zehnder, A; Adams, L; Buehler, P; Harboe-Sorensen, R; Daum, M; Nickson, R; Daly, E; Nieminen, P

    2001-01-01

    The Proton Irradiation Facility (PIF) has been designed and constructed, in cooperation between Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) and European Space Agency (ESA), for terrestrial proton testing of components and materials for spacecraft. Emphasis has been given to generating realistic proton spectra encountered by space-flights at any potential orbit. The facility, designed in a user-friendly manner, can be readily adapted to the individual requirements of experimenters. It is available for general use serving also in testing of radiation monitors and for proton experiments in different scientific disciplines. The Radiation Environment Monitor REM has been developed for measurements of the spacecraft radiation conditions. Two instruments were launched into space, one into a Geo-stationary Transfer Orbit on board of the STRV-1b satellite and one into a Low Earth Orbit on the Russian MIR station. The next generation of monitors (SREMs--Standard REMs) is currently under development in partnership of ESA, PSI and Contraves-Space. They will operate both as minimum intrusive monitors, which provide radiation housekeeping data and alert the spacecraft when the radiation level crosses allowed limits and as small scientific devices measuring particle spectra and fluxes. Future missions as e.g. INTEGRAL, STRV-1c and PROBA will be equipped with new SREMs.

  6. Absolute Radiation Measurement During Planetary Entry in the NASA Ames Electric Arc Shock Tube Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruden, Brett A.

    2011-05-01

    During planetary entry, a shock-heated plasma that imparts significant heating to the structure is formed in front of the space vehicle. At high velocities, a significant portion of that energy transfer originates from radiation from the shock-heated plasma. Shock tubes are capable of simulating the high velocity and low density conditions typical of planetary entry and thus are able to recreate the radiative environment encountered by spacecraft. The Electric Arc Shock Tube (EAST) at NASA Ames Research Center is one of the few shock tubes in the world that is capable of reaching the high velocities that are necessary to study more extreme entry conditions. The EAST is presently being utilized to simulate radiation in a variety of planetary atmospheres. It is presently the only facility in which radiation originating in the vacuum ultraviolet is being quantified. This paper briefly describes recent tests in the EAST facility relevant to Earth, Mars, and Venus entry conditions, and outlines the issues in relating ground test data to flight relevant condition via predictive radiation simulations.

  7. Environmental Radiation Dose Reconstruction for U.S. and Russian Weapons Production Facilities: Hanford and Mayak

    SciTech Connect

    Ansbaugh, Lynn R.; Degteva, M. O.; Kozheurov, V. P.; Napier, Bruce A.; Tolstykh, E. I.; Vorobiova, M. I.

    2003-05-01

    Another way to look at Cold War legacies is to examine the major environmental releases that resulted from past operation of Cold War-related facilities for the manufacture of nuclear weapons. Examining these historical releases and the resultant radiation dose to individuals living near these facilities is called environmental dose reconstruction. Dose reconstructions have been performed or are underway at most large Cold War installations in the United States, such as the Hanford facility; several are also underway in other countries, such as at the Mayak facility in Russia. The efforts in the United States are mostly based on historical operating records and current conditions, which are used to estimate environmental releases, transport, and human exposure. The Russian efforts are largely based on environmental measurements and measurements of human subjects; environmental transport modelling, when conducted, is used to organize and validate the measurements. Past operation of Cold War-related facilities for the manufacture of nuclear weapons has resulted in major releases of radionuclides into the environment. Reconstruction of the historical releases and the resultant radiation dose to individuals in the public living near these facilities is called environmental dose reconstruction. Dose reconstructions have been performed or are underway at most large Cold War installations in the United States; several are also underway in other countries. The types of activity performed, the operating histories, and the radionuclide releases vary widely across the different facilities. The U.S. Hanford Site and the Russian Mayak Production Association are used here to illustrate the nature of the assessed problems and the range of approaches developed to solve them.

  8. Radiative Characteristics of Pulsed Power Driven Stainless Steel Nested Wire Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, J.; Clark, R. W.; Thornhill, J. W.; Apruzese, J. P.; Velikovich, A.; Deeney, C.; Coverdale, C.; Lepell, D.

    2001-10-01

    The radiative characteristics of nested arrays of stainless steel wires are investigated with the aid of numerical simulations and compared with experimental results measured on the Z facility. The wire load contains a cocktail of 5 elements: Fe, Ni, Cr, Mg, and Si. This multimaterial load is ideal for benchmarking the simulation. The modeling and numerical simulations were done with a 1-D radiation MHD model self-consistently driven by an equivalent Z circuit model. The ionization dynamic model is represented by a collisional radiative model where the opacity for the lines and continuum is self-consistently calculated online and transported through the plasma. The collision between inner and outer arrays is treated classically allowing for differences in gap to wire diameter spacing. Results are presented for the L- and K-shell radiation yields and emission spectra as a function of photon energy from 0.01 to 10 keV. Numerical simulations and comparisons are also made between the TCREfootnote J. Thornhill, J. Apruzese, J. Davis, R. Clark, et. al., Phys. Plasmas \\underbar 8, 3480 (2001). and probability of escape radiation transport models.

  9. Radiation sensitivity of quartz crystal oscillators experiment for the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF), part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahearn, J. S.; Venables, J. D.

    1993-01-01

    The stability of high precision quartz crystal oscillators exposed to the radiation environment of NASA's Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) was studied. Comparisons between pre-flight and post-flight frequency drift rates indicate that oscillators made from swept premium Q quartz exhibited a significantly greater post-flight drift rate than before exposure, but that the effect annealed after five months aging at 75 C (the operating temperature). The result that six years worth of radiation damage annealed out in less than six months suggests that if the oscillators had been powered during the LDEF mission, no net change in drift rate beyond their normal baseline value would have occurred.

  10. Passive and Active Radiation Measurements Capability at the INL Zero Power Physics Reactor (ZPPR) Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Neibert; John Zabriskie; Collin Knight; James L. Jones

    2010-12-01

    The Zero Power Physics Reactor (ZPPR) facility is a Department of Energy facility located in the Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) Materials and Fuels Complex. It contains various nuclear and non-nuclear materials that are available to support many radiation measurement assessments. User-selected, single material, nuclear and non-nuclear materials can be readily utilized with ZPPR clamshell containers with almost no criticality concerns. If custom, multi-material configurations are desired, the ZPPR clamshell or an approved aluminum Inspection Object (IO) Box container may be utilized, yet each specific material configuration will require a criticality assessment. As an example of the specialized material configurations possible, the National Nuclear Security Agency’s Office of Nuclear Verification (NNSA/NA 243) has sponsored the assembly of six material configurations. These are shown in the Appendixes and have been designated for semi-permanent storage that can be available to support various radiation measurement applications.

  11. IKNO, a user facility for coherent terahertz and UV synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sannibale, Fernando; Marcelli, Augusto; Innocenzi, Plinio

    2008-04-26

    IKNO (Innovation and KNOwledge) is a proposal for a multi-user facility based on an electron storage ring optimized for the generation of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in the terahertz frequency range, and of broadband incoherent synchrotron radiation (SR) ranging from the IR to the VUV. IKNO can be operated in an ultra-stable CSR mode with photon flux in the terahertz frequency region up to nine orders of magnitude higher than in existing 3rd generation light sources. Simultaneously to the CSR operation, broadband incoherent SR up to VUV frequencies is available at the beamline ports. The main characteristics of the IKNO storage and its performance in terms of CSR and incoherent SR are described in this paper. The proposed location for the infrastructure facility is in Sardinia, Italy.

  12. Survey of high-enthalpy shock facilities in the perspective of radiation and chemical kinetics investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynier, Philippe

    2016-08-01

    This contribution is a survey of the capabilities of the main facilities, shock-tubes, shock-tunnels, expansion tubes and hot-shots that allow the experimental investigation of chemical kinetics and radiation of hypersonic flows encountered during atmospheric entry. At first, the capabilities of the main facilities available in Australia, Asia, Europe, and United States, have been surveyed using the available literature, and the specific use of each facility identified. The second step of the study consists in an analysis of each type of shock facility to identify their advantages and drawbacks. The main objective of this analysis is to support a trade-off for the selection of the type of facility to be developed in order to give Europe a ground test with the capabilities to support future exploration and sample return missions. The last point of the study has been to identify the experimental datasets related to the targeted application, and to select the most attractive for the validation of the future facility.

  13. Pulse radiolysis of nucleic acids and their base constituents: Bibliographies on radiation chemistry. XI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Sonntag, Clemens; Ross, Alberta B.

    In the elucidation of the primary processes involved in the free-radical-induced damage to DNA and its subunits, pulse radiolysis proves to be one of the most powerful tools. The first studies data back to 1964. The updating review (C. v. Sonntag, Radiat. Phys. Chem. 1987, 30, 313) which precedes this compilation has placed the emphasis on the more recent developments. It has been felt that a bibliography including the earlier literature on this subject might be helpful for further reading. For this compilation the data stored by the Radiation Chemistry Data Center bibliographic database (1) through 1986 were processed using the SELECT keywords: purines, pyrimidines, nucleotides, nucleosides, nucleic acids and pulse radiolysis. The number of citations found was reduced by about one-third by eliminating privately published symposia papers, theses and papers not strictly relevant to this topic, e.g. on flavins, NADH, one-electron reduction of nitrouracil or the redox potential of isobarbituric acid. On the other hand, a few more papers known to us but not revealed by the keywords were added. The bibliography is arranged in approximately chronological order, references grouped by year of publication. Reviews are collected at the end of the bibliography in a separate section.

  14. Reproducible radiation-damage processes in proteins irradiated by intense x-ray pulses.

    PubMed

    Hau-Riege, Stefan P; Bennion, Brian J

    2015-02-01

    X-ray free-electron lasers have enabled femtosecond protein nanocrystallography, a novel method to determine the structure of proteins. It allows time-resolved imaging of nanocrystals that are too small for conventional crystallography. The short pulse duration helps in overcoming the detrimental effects of radiation damage because x rays are scattered before the sample has been significantly altered. It has been suggested that, fortuitously, the diffraction process self-terminates abruptly once radiation damage destroys the crystalline order. Our calculations show that high-intensity x-ray pulses indeed trigger a cascade of damage processes in ferredoxin crystals, a particular metalloprotein of interest. However, we found that the damage process is initially not completely random. Correlations exist among the protein monomers, so that Bragg diffraction still occurs in the damaged crystals, despite significant atomic displacements. Our results show that the damage process is reproducible to a certain degree, which is potentially beneficial for the orientation step in single-molecule imaging.

  15. Radiation and temperature effects on LDEF fiber optic cable samples. [long duration exposure facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Alan R.; Hartmayer, Ron; Bergman, Larry A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper will concentrate on results obtained from the Jet Propulsion Lab (JPL) Fiber Optics Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) Experiment since the June 1991 Experimenters Workshop. Radiation darkening of the laboratory control samples will be compared with the LDEF flight samples. The results of laboratory temperature tests on the flight samples extending over a period of about nine years including the preflight and postflight analysis periods will be described.

  16. Automatic beam position control at Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effects Facility (LASREF)

    SciTech Connect

    Oothoudt, M.; Pillai, C.; Zumbro, M.

    1997-08-01

    Historically the Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effects Facility (LASREF) has used manual methods to control the position of the 800 kW, 800 MeV proton beam on targets. New experiments, however, require more stringent position control more frequently than can be done manually for long periods of time. Data from an existing harp is used to automatically adjust steering magnets to maintain beam position to required tolerances.

  17. RADIATION ACCESS ZONE AND VENTILATION CONFINEMENT ZONE CRITERIA FOR THE MGR SURFACE FACILITIES

    SciTech Connect

    D. A. Padula

    2000-09-13

    The objectives of this technical report are to: (1) Establish the criteria for Radiation Access Zone (RAZ) designation. (2) Establish the criteria for the Ventilation Confinement Zone (VCZ) designation. The scope will be to formulate the RAZ and VCZ zoning designation for the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) surface facilities and to apply the zoning designations to the current Waste Handling Building (WHB), Waste Treatment Building (WTB), and Carrier Preparation Building (CPB) configurations.

  18. Simulations of radiation damage as a function of the temporal pulse profile in femtosecond X-ray protein crystallography.

    PubMed

    Jönsson, H Olof; Tîmneanu, Nicuşor; Östlin, Christofer; Scott, Howard A; Caleman, Carl

    2015-03-01

    Serial femtosecond X-ray crystallography of protein nanocrystals using ultrashort and intense pulses from an X-ray free-electron laser has proved to be a successful method for structural determination. However, due to significant variations in diffraction pattern quality from pulse to pulse only a fraction of the collected frames can be used. Experimentally, the X-ray temporal pulse profile is not known and can vary with every shot. This simulation study describes how the pulse shape affects the damage dynamics, which ultimately affects the biological interpretation of electron density. The instantaneously detected signal varies during the pulse exposure due to the pulse properties, as well as the structural and electronic changes in the sample. Here ionization and atomic motion are simulated using a radiation transfer plasma code. Pulses with parameters typical for X-ray free-electron lasers are considered: pulse energies ranging from 10(4) to 10(7) J cm(-2) with photon energies from 2 to 12 keV, up to 100 fs long. Radiation damage in the form of sample heating that will lead to a loss of crystalline periodicity and changes in scattering factor due to electronic reconfigurations of ionized atoms are considered here. The simulations show differences in the dynamics of the radiation damage processes for different temporal pulse profiles and intensities, where ionization or atomic motion could be predominant. The different dynamics influence the recorded diffracted signal in any given resolution and will affect the subsequent structure determination.

  19. Calculations and experimental investigation of pulse transmission system in the typical module of the facility “Gamma”

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavyalov, N. V.; Punin, V. T.; Gordeev, V. S.; Grishin, A. V.; Nazarenko, S. T.; Balakin, V. A.; Glushkov, S. L.; Demanov, V. A.; Kozachek, A. V.; Pavlov, V. S.; Puchagin, S. Yu.; Strabykin, K. V.; Moiseevskikh, M. A.; Kalashnikov, D. A.; Spirin, D. P.; Mansurov, D. O.

    2014-08-01

    For the last few years in INRP RFNC-VNIIEF the works on development of a multi-module «Gamma» facility have been conducted. An important part of each module is a pulse transmission system (PTS), providing transportation of a high-volt electromagnetic pulse ( 2.3 MV, 60 ns) to a diode load, positioned at an angle of 80° to the axis of a module's forming system. Basic PTS units: a water-insulated transmission line (WTL), having a bended section, a vacuum insulator stack and a magnetically-insulated transmission line (MITL). At the first stage an experimental sample of PTS with diameter 0.65 m was studied. Performed studies allowed a conclusion that the given experimental PTS sample did not possess enough electric strength, what was a reason for electric breakdowns in the bended section of WTL. Reasons for breakdown occurrence were analyzed; conclusions were made on the necessity for increasing PTS diameter. As a result a PTS version with diameter 1 m was developed. This paper presents results of the experimental studies as a part of the facility module. Totally 200 shots of the module were performed with given PTS at different charge voltage of its forming lines. Reliable and steady operation of all PTS units, as well as correspondence between output module parameters and their calculated values were proved. When using PTS, without MITL in the module diode load, with impedance 3 Ohm the pulses with power 1.5 TW and total electron energy in a pulse 80 kJ were obtained. When using PTS with cylindrical MITL of 1.6 m length, the pulse power was 1.4 TW.

  20. FY05 LDRD Final ReportTime-Resolved Dynamic Studies using Short Pulse X-Ray Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, A; Dunn, J; van Buuren, T; Budil, K; Sadigh, B; Gilmer, G; Falcone, R; Lee, R; Ng, A

    2006-02-10

    Established techniques must be extended down to the ps and sub-ps time domain to directly probe product states of materials under extreme conditions. We used short pulse ({le} 1 ps) x-ray radiation to track changes in the physical properties in tandem with measurements of the atomic and electronic structure of materials undergoing fast laser excitation and shock-related phenomena. The sources included those already available at LLNL, including the picosecond X-ray laser as well as the ALS Femtosecond Phenomena beamline and the SSRL based sub-picosecond photon source (SPPS). These allow the temporal resolution to be improved by 2 orders of magnitude over the current state-of-the-art, which is {approx} 100 ps. Thus, we observed the manifestations of dynamical processes with unprecedented time resolution. Time-resolved x-ray photoemission spectroscopy and x-ray scattering were used to study phase changes in materials with sub-picosecond time resolution. These experiments coupled to multiscale modeling allow us to explore the physics of materials in high laser fields and extreme non-equilibrium states of matter. The ability to characterize the physical and electronic structure of materials under extreme conditions together with state-of-the-art models and computational facilities will catapult LLNL's core competencies into the scientific world arena as well as support its missions of national security and stockpile stewardship.

  1. An assessment of research opportunities and the need for synchrotron radiation facilities

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The workshop focused on six topics, all of which are areas of active research: (1) speciation, reactivity and mobility of contaminants in aqueous systems, (2) the role of surfaces and interfaces in molecular environmental science, (3) the role of solid phases in molecular environmental science, (4) molecular biological processes affecting speciation, reactivity, and mobility of contaminants in the environment, (5) molecular constraints on macroscopic- and field-scale processes, and (6) synchrotron radiation facilities and molecular environmental sciences. These topics span a range of important issues in molecular environmental science. They focus on the basic knowledge required for understanding contaminant transport and fate and for the development of science-based remediation and waste management technologies. Each topic was assigned to a working group charged with discussing recent research accomplishments, significant research opportunities, methods required for obtaining molecular-scale information on environmental contaminants and processes, and the value of synchrotron x-ray methods relative to other methods in providing this information. A special working group on synchrotron radiation facilities was convened to provide technical information about experimental facilities at the four DOE-supported synchrotron radiation sources in the US (NSLS, SSRL, AS and UPS) and synchrotron- based methods available for molecular environmental science research. Similar information on the NSF-funded Cornell High Energy synchrotron Source (CHESS) was obtained after the workshop was held.

  2. Radiation characteristics and implosion dynamics of Z-pinch dynamic hohlraums performed on PTS facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xian Bin; Ren, Xiao Dong; Dan, Jia Kun; Wang, Kun Lun; Xu, Qiang; Zhou, Shao Tong; Zhang, Si Qun; Cai, Hong Chun; Li, Jing; Wei, Bing; Ji, Ce; Feng, Shu Ping; Wang, Meng; Xie, Wei Ping; Deng, Jian Jun

    2017-09-01

    The preliminary experimental results of Z-pinch dynamic hohlraums conducted on the Primary Test Stand (PTS) facility are presented herein. Six different types of dynamic hohlraums were used in order to study the influence of load parameters on radiation characteristics and implosion dynamics, including dynamic hohlraums driven by single and nested arrays with different array parameters and different foams. The PTS facility can deliver a current of 6-8 MA in the peak current and 60-70 ns in the 10%-90% rising time to dynamic hohlraum loads. A set of diagnostics monitor the implosion dynamics of plasmas, the evolution of shock waves in the foam and the axial/radial X-ray radiation, giving the key parameters characterizing the features of dynamic hohlraums, such as the trajectory and related velocity of shock waves, radiation temperature, and so on. The experimental results presented here put our future study on Z-pinch dynamic hohlraums on the PTS facility on a firm basis.

  3. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report October 1-December 31, 2016

    SciTech Connect

    Voyles, Jimmy

    2017-01-01

    Individual datastreams from instrumentation at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile research observatories (sites) are collected and routed to the ARM Data Center (ADC). The Data Management Facility (DMF), a component of the ADC, executes datastream processing in near-real time. Processed data are then delivered approximately daily to the ARM Data Archive, also a component of the ADC, where they are made freely available to the research community. For each instrument, ARM calculates the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the ARM Data Archive to the expected number of data records. DOE requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data.

  4. A 60Co multipurpose radiation processing facility at Bahia Blanca, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curzio, O. A.; Croci, C. A.

    The aim of the project is to have a multipurpose facility which will enable us to show the techno-economic viability of the irradiation process applied to regional products, important from the economic point of view. The topics will fundamentally be connected with regional themes such as food preservation and the modification of polymer structures. This project will make it possible to carry out basic and applied studies related to radiation chemistry, dosimetry and engineering irradiation processes. The facility will operate in the Universidad Nacional del Sur (UNS) with a maximum activity of 18.5 PBq of Co-60. The viability and design of the irradiation facility is supported by the Government of the Buenos Aires Province since it is interested in the socio-economic benefit of this technology at the regional level.

  5. Dynamics of laser-induced channel formation in water and influence of pulse duration on the ablation of biotissue under water with pulsed erbium-laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ith, M.; Pratisto, H.; Altermatt, H. J.; Frenz, M.; Weber, H. P.

    1994-12-01

    The ability to use fiber-delivered erbium-laser radiation for non-contact arthroscopic meniscectomy in a liquid environment was studied. The laser radiation is transmitted through a water-vapor channel created by the leading part of the laser pulse. The dynamics of the channel formation around a submerged fiber tip was investigated with time-resolved flash photography. Strong pressure transients with amplitudes up to a few hundreds of bars measured with a needle hydrophone were found to accompany the channel formation process. Additional pressure transients in the range of kbars were observed after the laser pulse associated with the collapse of the vapor channel. Transmission measurements revealed that the duration the laser-induced channel stays open, and therefore the energy transmittable through it, is substantially determined by the laser pulse duration. The optimum pulse duration was found to be in the range between 250 and 350 µS. This was confirmed by histological evaluations of the laser incisions in meniscus: Increasing the pulse duration from 300 to 800 µs leads to a decrease in the crater depth from 1600 to 300 µm. A comparison of the histological examination after laser treatment through air and through water gave information on the influence of the vapor channel on the ablation efficiency, the cutting quality and the induced thermal damage in the adjacent tissue. The study shows that the erbium laser combined with an adequate fiber delivery system represents an effective surgical instrument liable to become increasingly accepted in orthopedic surgery.

  6. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER: Influence of surface breakdown on the process of drilling metals with pulsed CO2 laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arutyunyan, R. V.; Baranov, V. Yu; Bobkov, I. V.; Bol'shov, Leonid A.; Dolgov, V. A.; Kanevskiĭ, M. F.; Malyuta, D. D.; Mezhevov, V. S.

    1988-03-01

    A report is given of the influence of low-threshold surface optical breakdown, occurring under the action of short (~ 5-μs) radiation pulses from a CO2 laser, on the process of the laser drilling of metals. Data are given on the difference between the interaction of radiation pulses having the same duration but differing in shape. A study was made of the influence of the pressure of the atmosphere surrounding a target on the results of laser drilling of metals. A theoretical explanation is given of the experimental results.

  7. Summary of ionizing radiation analysis on the Long Duration Exposure Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parnell, T. A.

    1992-01-01

    The ionizing radiation measurements flown on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) were contained in 15 experiments which utilized passive detectors to pursue objectives in astrophysics and to measure the radiation environment and dosimetric quantities. The spacecraft structure became sufficiently radioactive to permit additional important studies. The induced activity allows extensive radiation mapping in the structure, and independent comparison with experiment dosimetric techniques, and significant studies of secondary effects. The long exposure time, attitude stability, and number and types of measurements produced a unique and critical set of data for low Earth orbit that will not be duplicated for more than a decade. The data allow an unprecedented test, and improvement if required, of models of the radiation environment and the radiation transport methods that are used to calculate the internal radiation and its effects in spacecraft. Results of measurements in the experiments, as well as from radioactivity in the structure, have clearly shown effects from the directional properties of the radiation environment, and progress was made in the dosimetric mapping of LDEF. These measurements have already influenced some Space Station Freedom design requirements. Preliminary results from experiments, reported at this symposium and in earlier papers, show that the 5.8 years exposure considerably enhanced the scientific return of the radiation measurements. The early results give confidence that the experiments will make significant advances in the knowledge of ultra heavy cosmic rays, anomalous cosmic rays, and heavy ions trapped in the radiation belts. Unexpected phenomena were observed, which require explanation. These include stopping iron group ions between the energy ranges anticipated for anomalous and galactic cosmic rays in the LDEF orbit. A surprising concentration of the Be-7 nuclide was discovered on the 'front' surface of LDEF, apparently

  8. The Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory: A high-brightness soft x-ray synchrotron-radiation facility

    SciTech Connect

    Schlachter, A.S.; Robinson, A.L.

    1990-07-01

    The Advanced Light Source, a third-generation national synchrotron-radiation facility now under construction at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, is scheduled to begin serving qualified users across a broad spectrum of research areas in the spring of 1993. Based on a low-emittance electron storage ring optimized to operate at 1.5 GeV, the ALS will have 10 long straight sections available for insertion devices (undulators and wigglers) and 24 high-quality bend-magnet ports. The short pulse width (30--50 ns) will be ideal for time-resolved measurements. Undulators will generate high-brightness soft x-ray and ultraviolet (XUV) radiation from below 20 eV to above 2 keV. Wigglers and bend magnets will extend the spectrum by generating high fluxes of hard x-rays to photon energies above 10 keV. The ALS will support an extensive research program in which XUV radiation is used to study matter in all its varied gaseous, liquid, and solid forms. The high brightness will open new areas of research in the materials sciences, such as spatially resolved spectroscopy (spectromicroscopy). Biological applications will include x-ray microscopy with element-specific sensitivity in the water window of the spectrum where water is much more transparent than protein. The ALS will be an excellent research tool for atomic physics and chemistry because the high flux will allow measurements to be made with tenuous gas-phase targets. 8 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Dose measurements in pulsed radiation fields with commercially available measuring components.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Sabrina; Hupe, Oliver

    2016-03-01

    Dose measurements in pulsed radiation fields with dosemeters using the counting technique are known to be inappropriate. Therefore, there is a demand for a portable device able to measure the dose in pulsed radiation fields. As a detector, ionisation chambers seem to be a good alternative. In particular, using a secondary standard ionisation chamber in combination with a reliable charge-measuring system would be a good solution. The Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) uses secondary standard ionisation chambers in combination with PTB-made measuring electronics for dose measurements at its reference fields. However, for general use, this equipment is too complex. For measurements on-site, a mobile special electronic system [Hupe, O. and Ankerhold, U. Determination of ambient and personal dose equivalent for personnel and cargo security screening. Radiat. Prot. Dosim. 121: (4), 429-437 (2006)] has been used successfully. Still, for general use, there is a need for a much simpler but a just as good solution. A measuring instrument with very good energy dependence for H*(10) is the secondary standard ionisation chamber HS01. An easy-to-use and commercially available electrometer for measuring the generated charges is the UNIDOS by PTW Freiburg. Depending on the expected dose values, the ionisation chamber used can be selected. In addition, measurements have been performed by using commercially available area dosemeters, e.g. the Mini SmartION 2120S by Thermo Scientific, using an ionisation chamber and the Szintomat 6134 A/H by Automess, using a scintillation detector. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Pulse shape discrimination techniques for correcting the effects of radiation damage on germanium detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, W.; Boggs, S.E.; Lin, R.P.

    1996-12-31

    For germanium detectors (GeDs), which provide the highest energy resolution for studying gamma ray line features from astrophysical sources, exposure to energetic particles in space leads to radiation damage. Trapping centers created in the GeDs, preferentially hole traps, reduce the efficiency of the transport of charge carriers and thereby degrade the energy resolution and line efficiency. In addition, the trapping may affect the performance of Pulse Shape Discrimination (PSD) techniques used in background reduction. We present here computer simulations of photon interactions and charge transport in a reverse-electrode, closed-end coaxial GeD. These simulations show that radiation damage does not significantly alter the shape of the current pulses, rendering the effect on PSD performance negligible. Furthermore, the simulations show that with PSD, significant improvements in the energy resolution of radiation damaged detectors can be obtained by applying a hole trapping correction to the energy measured by the detector. PSD provides the sizes and locations of the two largest energy depositions for photons that stop within the GeDs. For moderately damaged detectors (mean hole trapping length {lambda}{sub h} = 200 cm, which is equivalent to cosmic ray irradiation of {approximately}2 years), correcting for the trapping suffered by these two depositions provides almost complete recovery of the line shape and sensitivity: undamaged resolution and relative sensitivity (1.58 keV FWEM, 1.0), damaged (2.10 keV, 0.69), corrected (1.75 keV, 0.93). Even for severely damaged detectors ({lambda}{sub h} = 50 cm), a marked improvement is obtained. These improvements translate directly into an increase in sensitivity for the detection of weak fines.

  11. Assessment of radiation contamination at an abandoned tin smelter facility in Galveston County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Cornelius, J.M.; Laiche, T.P.; Zehner, W.B.

    1995-12-31

    The Region 6 US Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) and Technical Assistant Team (TAT) contractor, Ecology and Environment, Inc. (E and E), conducted a site assessment to determine the nature and extent of radiation contamination at an abandoned tin smelter facility in Texas City, Galveston County, Texas. Rapid, field-screening, radiation surveys were conducted, and four slag storage areas were located with gamma radiation levels above background levels. Comprehensive radiation surveys were performed at these locations with Global Positioning System (GPS) assistance for accurate location determination. Approximately 1,500 data points were collected from 10 acres. Accurate contour maps of gamma radiation levels were developed using geostatistical modeling and kriging. Radiation exposure levels ranged from background [< 10 microroentgen per hour ({micro}R/hour)] to more than 500 {micro}R/hour. Gamma spectroscopic analysis was performed on soil and slag samples using a field-portable, multichannel analyzer (MCA) system. Equilibrium activities of bismuth-214 and thallium-208 were measured as high as 100 picocuries per gram. Ten percent of all samples were sent to an independent radiochemistry laboratory for confirmation analysis. Laboratory and field screening results corresponded closely. In-situ radon emanation rates were measured with large area charcoal collectors (LACCs). Measured rates were less than one picocurie per square meter per second.

  12. Measurement and modeling of external radiation during 1985 from LAMPF (Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility) emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Bowen, B.M.; Olsen, W.A.; Chen, Ili; Van Etten, D.M.

    1987-11-01

    An array of three portable, pressurized ionization chambers (PICs) continued to measure external radiation levels during 1985 caused by radionuclides emitted from the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF). A Gaussian-type atmospheric dispersion model, using onsite meteorological and stack release data, was tested during this study. A more complex finite model, which takes into account the contribution of radiation at a receptor from different locations of the passing plume, was also tested. Monitoring results indicate that, as in 1984, a persistent wind up the Rio Grande Valley during the evening and early morning hours is largely responsible for causing the highest external radiation levels to occur to the northeast and north-northeast of LAMPF. However, because of increased turbulent mixing during the day, external radiation levels are generally much less during the day than at night. External radiation levels during 1985 show approximately a 75% reduction over 1984 levels. This resulted from a similar percentage reduction in LAMPF emissions caused by newly implemented emission controls. Comparison of predicted and measured daily external radiation levels indicates a high degree of correlation. The model also gives accurate estimates of measured concentrations over longer time periods. Comparison of predicted and measured hourly values indicates that the model generally tends to overpredict during the day and underpredict at night. 9 refs., 14 figs., 13 tabs.

  13. Counter-propagating radiative shock experiments on the Orion laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayson, T.; Suzuki-Vidal, F.; Lebedev, S. V.; Swadling, G. F.; Burdiak, G. C.; Patankar, S.; Smith, R. A.; Foster, J.; Skidmore, J.; Gumbrell, E.; Graham, P.; Danson, C.; Stehlé, C.; Singh, R. L.; Chaulagain, U.; Larour, J.; Kozlova, M.; Spindloe, C.

    2016-10-01

    The Orion high-power laser facility, at AWE Aldermaston UK, was used to produce hyper-sonic radiative shocks, travelling at 60km/s, in noble gases, between 0.1 and 1.0 bar. These experiments aimed to study the radiative precursor, a heat and ionization wave preceding the shock front, and dynamics of colliding radiative shocks. X-ray backlighting and optical self-emission streak imaging were used to study the shock front and collision dynamics, while multi-frame and streaked interferometry were used to simultaneously study the radiative precursor. These experiments compared the shock and collision dynamics in different gases (e.g. Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe), while maintaining a constant mass density, to vary the strength of the radiative precursor. Some shocks exhibited features suggesting the formation of hydrodynamic or radiative instabilities. The experimental data is in good agreement with 2-D rad-hydro simulations and provides a new benchmark for codes to be tested against. Supported by Orion Academic Access, the Royal Society, EPSRC, Labex PLAS@PAR.

  14. Knowledge, skills, and abilities for key radiation protection positions at DOE facilities

    SciTech Connect

    1997-01-01

    This document provides detailed qualification criteria for contractor key radiation protection personnel. Although federal key radiation protection positions are also identified, qualification standards for federal positions are provided in DOE O 360.1 and the DOE Technical Qualifications Program. Appendices B and D provide detailed listings for knowledge, skills, and abilities for contractor and DOE federal key radiation protection positions. This information may be used in developing position descriptions and individual development plans. Information provided in Appendix C may be useful in developing performance measures and assessing an individual`s performance in his or her specific position. Additionally, Federal personnel may use this information to augment their Office/facility qualification standards under the Technical Qualifications Program.

  15. Radiation hydrodynamic simulation of a photoionised plasma experiment at the Z facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, I. M.; Durmaz, T.; Mancini, R. C.; Bailey, J. E.; Rochau, G. A.

    2011-11-01

    New, high spectral resolution X-ray observations from astrophysical photoionised plasmas have been recorded in recent years by the Chandra and XMM-Newton orbiting telescopes. These observations provide a wealth of detailed information and have motivated new efforts at developing a detailed understanding of the atomic kinetics and radiation physics of photoionised plasmas. The Z facility at Sandia National Laboratories is a powerful source of X-rays that enables us to produce and study photoionised plasmas in the laboratory under well characterised conditions. We discuss a series of radiation-hydrodynamic simulations to help understand the X-ray environment, plasma hydrodynamics and atomic kinetics in experiments where a collapsing wire array at Z is used as an ionising source of radiation to create a photoionised plasma. The numerical simulations are used to investigate the role that the key experimental parameters have on the photoionised plasma characteristics.

  16. Installation of a Synchrotron Radiation Beamline Facility at the J. Bennett Johnston Center. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Gooden, R.

    2000-03-21

    The Johnston Center presents a unique opportunity for scientists and engineers at southern institutions to initiate and carry out original research using synchrotron radiation ranging from visible light to hard x-rays. The Science and Engineering Alliance proposes to carry out a comprehensive new synchrotron radiation research initiative at CAMD in carefully phased steps of increasing risks. (1) materials research on existing CAMD beam lines and end stations; (2) design, construction and installation of end stations on existing CAMD beam lines, and research with this new instrumentation; (3) design, construction and operation of dedicated synchrotron radiation beam lines that covers the full spectral range of the CAMD storage ring and expanded research in the new facility.

  17. Radiation transport and energetics of laser-driven half-hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, A. S.; Cooper, A. B.R.; Schneider, M. B.; MacLaren, S.; Graham, P.; Lu, K.; Seugling, R.; Satcher, J.; Klingmann, J.; Comley, A. J.; Marrs, R.; May, M.; Widmann, K.; Glendinning, G.; Castor, J.; Sain, J.; Back, C. A.; Hund, J.; Baker, K.; Hsing, W. W.; Foster, J.; Young, B.; Young, P.

    2014-06-01

    Experiments that characterize and develop a high energy-density half-hohlraum platform for use in bench-marking radiation hydrodynamics models have been conducted at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Results from the experiments are used to quantitatively compare with simulations of the radiation transported through an evolving plasma density structure, colloquially known as an N-wave. A half-hohlraum is heated by 80 NIF beams to a temperature of 240 eV. This creates a subsonic di usive Marshak wave which propagates into a high atomic number Ta2O5 aerogel. The subsequent radiation transport through the aerogel and through slots cut into the aerogel layer is investigated. We describe a set of experiments that test the hohlraum performance and report on a range

  18. Whistler wave radiation from a pulsed loop antenna located in a cylindrical duct with enhanced plasma density

    SciTech Connect

    Kudrin, Alexander V.; Shkokova, Natalya M.; Ferencz, Orsolya E.; Zaboronkova, Tatyana M.

    2014-11-15

    Pulsed radiation from a loop antenna located in a cylindrical duct with enhanced plasma density is studied. The radiated energy and its distribution over the spatial and frequency spectra of the excited waves are derived and analyzed as functions of the antenna and duct parameters. Numerical results referring to the case where the frequency spectrum of the antenna current is concentrated in the whistler range are reported. It is shown that under ionospheric conditions, the presence of an artificial duct with enhanced density can lead to a significant increase in the energy radiated from a pulsed loop antenna compared with the case where the same source is immersed in the surrounding uniform magnetoplasma. The results obtained can be useful in planning active ionospheric experiments with pulsed electromagnetic sources operated in the presence of artificial field-aligned plasma density irregularities that are capable of guiding whistler waves.

  19. Photon bubbles and ion acceleration in a plasma dominated by the radiation pressure of an electromagnetic pulse.

    PubMed

    Pegoraro, F; Bulanov, S V

    2007-08-10

    The stability of a thin plasma foil accelerated by the radiation pressure of a high intensity electromagnetic (e.m.) pulse is investigated analytically and with particle in cell numerical simulations. It is shown that the onset of a Rayleigh-Taylor-like instability can lead to transverse bunching of the foil and to broadening of the energy spectrum of fast ions. The use of a properly tailored e.m. pulse with a sharp intensity rise can stabilize the foil acceleration.

  20. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Ion acceleration by ultrahigh-power ultrashort laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brantov, A. V.; Bychenkov, V. Yu; Rozmus, V.

    2007-09-01

    Two- and three-dimensional numerical simulations of fast-ion generation under ultrashort high-power laser pulse irradiation of stratified targets of different density and thickness are performed by the 'particle-in-cell' technique. The intent of these simulations was to determine the optimal target for maximising the ion energy for a given energy of the laser pulse. The simulations were carried out for the presently highest laser radiation intensities.

  1. The radiation fields around a proton therapy facility: A comparison of Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ottaviano, G.; Picardi, L.; Pillon, M.; Ronsivalle, C.; Sandri, S.

    2014-02-01

    A proton therapy test facility with a beam current lower than 10 nA in average, and an energy up to 150 MeV, is planned to be sited at the Frascati ENEA Research Center, in Italy. The accelerator is composed of a sequence of linear sections. The first one is a commercial 7 MeV proton linac, from which the beam is injected in a SCDTL (Side Coupled Drift Tube Linac) structure reaching the energy of 52 MeV. Then a conventional CCL (coupled Cavity Linac) with side coupling cavities completes the accelerator. The linear structure has the important advantage that the main radiation losses during the acceleration process occur to protons with energy below 20 MeV, with a consequent low production of neutrons and secondary radiation. From the radiation protection point of view the source of radiation for this facility is then almost completely located at the final target. Physical and geometrical models of the device have been developed and implemented into radiation transport computer codes based on the Monte Carlo method. The scope is the assessment of the radiation field around the main source for supporting the safety analysis. For the assessment independent researchers used two different Monte Carlo computer codes named FLUKA (FLUktuierende KAskade) and MCNPX (Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended) respectively. Both are general purpose tools for calculations of particle transport and interactions with matter, covering an extended range of applications including proton beam analysis. Nevertheless each one utilizes its own nuclear cross section libraries and uses specific physics models for particle types and energies. The models implemented into the codes are described and the results are presented. The differences between the two calculations are reported and discussed pointing out disadvantages and advantages of each code in the specific application.

  2. Radiation defect dynamics in Si at room temperature studied by pulsed ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, J. B.; Myers, M. T.; Charnvanichborikarn, S.; Bayu Aji, L. B.; Kucheyev, S. O.; Shao, L.

    2015-10-07

    The evolution of radiation defects after the thermalization of collision cascades often plays the dominant role in the formation of stable radiation disorder in crystalline solids of interest to electronics and nuclear materials applications. Here, we explore a pulsed-ion-beam method to study defect interaction dynamics in Si crystals bombarded at room temperature with 500 keV Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe ions. The effective time constant of defect interaction is measured directly by studying the dependence of lattice disorder, monitored by ion channeling, on the passive part of the beam duty cycle. The effective defect diffusion length is revealed by the dependence of damage on the active part of the beam duty cycle. Results show that the defect relaxation behavior obeys a second order kinetic process for all the cases studied, with a time constant in the range of ∼4–13 ms and a diffusion length of ∼15–50 nm. Both radiation dynamics parameters (the time constant and diffusion length) are essentially independent of the maximum instantaneous dose rate, total ion dose, and dopant concentration within the ranges studied. However, both the time constant and diffusion length increase with increasing ion mass. This demonstrates that the density of collision cascades influences not only defect production and annealing efficiencies but also the defect interaction dynamics.

  3. Dye-Assisted Laser Skin Closure with Pulsed Radiation: An In Vitro Study of Weld Strength and Thermal Damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fried, Nathaniel M.; Walsh, Joseph T.

    1998-10-01

    Previous laser skin welding studies have used continuous wave delivery of radiation. However, heat diffusion during irradiation prevents strong welds from being achieved without creating large zones of thermal damage. Previously published results indicate that a thermal damage zone in skin greater than 200 micrometers may prevent normal wound healing. We proposed that both strong welds and minimal thermal damage can be achieved by introducing a dye and delivering the radiation in a series of sufficiently short pulses. Two-cm-long incisions were made in guinea pig skin, in vitro. India ink and egg white (albumin) were applied to the wound edges to enhance radiation absorption and to close the wound, respectively. Continuous wave (cw), 1.06 micrometers , Nd:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser radiation was scanned over the weld producing approximately 100 ms pulses. The cooling time between scans and the number of scans was varied. The thermal damage zone at the weld edges was measured using a transmission polarizing light microscope. The tensile strength of the welds was measured using a tensiometer. For pulsed welding and long cooling times between pulses (8 s), weld strengths of 2.4 +/- 0.9 kg/cm2 were measured, and lateral thermal damage at the epidermis was limited to 500 +/- 150 micrometers . With cw welding, comparable weld strengths produced 2700 +/- 300 micrometers of lateral thermal damage. The cw weld strengths were only 0.6 +/- 0.3 kg/cm2 for thermal damage zones comparable to pulsed welding.

  4. Pulse evolution and mode selection characteristics in a TEA-CO2 laser perturbed by injection of external radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flamant, P. H.; Menzies, R. T.; Kavaya, M. J.; Oppenheim, U. P.

    1983-01-01

    A grating-tunable TEA-CO2 laser with an unstable resonator cavity, modified to allow injection of CW CO2 laser radiation at the resonant transition line by means of an intracavity NaCl window, has been used to study the coupling requirements for generation of single frequency pulses. The width and shape of the mode selection region, and the dependence of the gain-switched spike buildup time and the pulse shapes on the intensity and detuning frequency of the injected radiation are reported. Comparisons of the experimental results with previously reported mode selection behavior are discussed.

  5. Generation of GW radiation pulses from a VUV free-electron laser operating in the femtosecond regime.

    PubMed

    Ayvazyan, V; Baboi, N; Bohnet, I; Brinkmann, R; Castellano, M; Castro, P; Catani, L; Choroba, S; Cianchi, A; Dohlus, M; Edwards, H T; Faatz, B; Fateev, A A; Feldhaus, J; Flöttmann, K; Gamp, A; Garvey, T; Genz, H; Gerth, Ch; Gretchko, V; Grigoryan, B; Hahn, U; Hessler, C; Honkavaara, K; Hüning, M; Ischebeck, R; Jablonka, M; Kamps, T; Körfer, M; Krassilnikov, M; Krzywinski, J; Liepe, M; Liero, A; Limberg, T; Loos, H; Luong, M; Magne, C; Menzel, J; Michelato, P; Minty, M; Müller, U-C; Nölle, D; Novokhatski, A; Pagani, C; Peters, F; Pflüger, J; Piot, P; Plucinski, L; Rehlich, K; Reyzl, I; Richter, A; Rossbach, J; Saldin, E L; Sandner, W; Schlarb, H; Schmidt, G; Schmüser, P; Schneider, J R; Schneidmiller, E A; Schreiber, H-J; Schreiber, S; Sertore, D; Setzer, S; Simrock, S; Sobierajski, R; Sonntag, B; Steeg, B; Stephan, F; Sytchev, K P; Tiedtke, K; Tonutti, M; Treusch, R; Trines, D; Türke, D; Verzilov, V; Wanzenberg, R; Weiland, T; Weise, H; Wendt, M; Will, I; Wolff, S; Wittenburg, K; Yurkov, M V; Zapfe, K

    2002-03-11

    Experimental results are presented from vacuum-ultraviolet free-electron laser (FEL) operating in the self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) mode. The generation of ultrashort radiation pulses became possible due to specific tailoring of the bunch charge distribution. A complete characterization of the linear and nonlinear modes of the SASE FEL operation was performed. At saturation the FEL produces ultrashort pulses (30-100 fs FWHM) with a peak radiation power in the GW level and with full transverse coherence. The wavelength was tuned in the range of 95-105 nm.

  6. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER: Effect of the pulse duration on graphitisation of diamond during laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kononenko, Vitalii V.; Kononenko, Taras V.; Pimenov, S. M.; Sinyavskii, M. N.; Konov, Vitalii I.; Dausinger, F.

    2005-03-01

    Processes of graphitisation of laser-irradiated polycrystalline diamond surface exposed to multipulse irradiation are studied experimentally. The thickness of the laser-modified layer as a function of the laser-pulse duration ranging from 100 fs to 1.5 μs and the effect of the radiation wavelength on this thickness are studied. It is shown that the diamond graphitisation during multipulse laser ablation is a thermally stimulated process. The dependences of the diamond-ablation rates on the radiation energy density under the action of laser pulses of various durations are presented.

  7. Investigation into the electromagnetic impulses from long-pulse laser illuminating solid targets inside a laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Tao; Yang, Jinwen; Yang, Ming; Wang, Chuanke; Yang, Weiming; Li, Tingshuai; Liu, Shenye; Jiang, Shaoen; Ding, Yongkun; Xiao, Shaoqiu

    2016-09-01

    Emission of the electromagnetic pulses (EMP) due to laser-target interaction in laser facility had been evaluated using a cone antenna in this work. The microwave in frequencies ranging from several hundreds of MHz to 2 GHz was recorded when long-pulse lasers with several thousands of joules illuminated the solid targets, meanwhile the voltage signals from 1 V to 4 V were captured as functions of laser energy and backlight laser, where the corresponding electric field strengths were obtained by simulating the cone antenna in combination with conducting a mathematical process (Tiknohov Regularization with L curve). All the typical coupled voltage oscillations displayed multiple peaks and had duration of up to 80 ns before decaying into noise and mechanisms of the EMP generation was schematically interpreted in basis of the practical measuring environments. The resultant data were expected to offer basic know-how to achieve inertial confinement fusion.

  8. Demonstration of Radiation Pulse Shaping with Nested-Tungsten-Wire-Array Z Pinches for High-Yield Inertial Confinement Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Cuneo, M.E.; Vesey, R.A.; Sinars, D.B.; Waisman, E.M.; Lemke, R.W.; Bliss, D.E.; Stygar, W.A.; Porter, J.L.; Mazarakis, M.G.; Chandler, G.A.; Mehlhorn, T.A.; Chittenden, J.P.; Lebedev, S.V.; Schroen, D.G.

    2005-10-28

    Nested wire-array Z pinches are shown to generate soft x-ray radiation pulse shapes required for three-shock isentropic compression and hot-spot ignition of high-yield inertial confinement fusion capsules. We demonstrate a reproducible and tunable foot pulse (first shock) produced by interaction of the outer and inner arrays. A first-step pulse (second shock) is produced by inner array collision with a central CH{sub 2} foam target. Stagnation of the inner array at the axis produces the third shock. Capsules optimized for several of these shapes produce 290-900 MJ fusion yields in 1D simulations.

  9. Generation of low-frequency nonlinear currents in plasma by an ultrashort pulse of high-frequency radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Grishkov, V. E.; Uryupin, S. A.

    2015-07-15

    A kinetic theory of low-frequency currents induced in plasma by an ultrashort high-frequency radiation pulse is developed. General expressions for the currents flowing along the propagation direction of the pulse and along the gradient of the field energy density are analyzed both analytically and numerically for pulse durations longer or shorter than or comparable with the electron collision time in plasma. It is demonstrated that the nonlinear current flowing along the gradient of the field energy density can be described correctly only when the modification of the isotropic part of the electron distribution function is taken into account.

  10. Electromagnetic pulse (EMP) radiation by laser interaction with a solid H2 ribbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Marco, M.; Krása, J.; Cikhardt, J.; Velyhan, A.; Pfeifer, M.; Dudžák, R.; Dostál, J.; Krouský, E.; Limpouch, J.; Pisarczyk, T.; Kalinowska, Z.; Chodukowski, T.; Ullschmied, J.; Giuffrida, L.; Chatain, D.; Perin, J.-P.; Margarone, D.

    2017-08-01

    The electromagnetic pulses (EMPs) generated during the interaction of a focused 1.315-μm sub-nanosecond laser pulse with a solid hydrogen ribbon were measured. The strength and temporal characteristics of EMPs were found to be dependent on the target density. If a low density target is ionized during the interaction with the laser, and the plasma does not physically touch the target holder, the EMP is weaker in strength and shorter in time duration. It is shown that during the H2 target experiment, the EMP does not strongly affect the response of fast electronic devices. The measurements of the EMP were carried out by Rohde&Schwarz B-Probes, particularly sensitive in the frequency range from 30 MHz and 1 GHz. Numerical simulations of resonant frequencies of the target chamber used in the experiment at the Prague Asterix Laser System kJ-class laser facility elucidate the peaked structure of EMP frequency spectra in the GHz domain.

  11. Competition between linear and nonlinear processes during generation of pulsed terahertz radiation in a ZnTe crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Gaivoronsky, Vladimir Ya; Shepelyavyi, Yevgenii V; Nazarov, Maksim M; Sapozhnikov, Dmitrii A; Shkel'nyuk, Svetlana A; Shkurinov, A P; Shuvaev, Aleksandr V

    2005-05-31

    The generation of terahertz (THz) pulses by the optical rectification of femtosecond laser pulses in a ZnTe crystal is studied. A substantial decrease in the THz radiation power was observed upon tight focusing of laser radiation into the crystal. It is shown that the consideration of competing two-photon absorption and second-harmonic generation processes proceeding simultaneously with optical rectification cannot explain this effect even qualitatively. It is assumed that the observed decrease in the THz radiation power is caused by a decrease in the size of a source of nonlinear polarisation. The conditions are found for the most efficient generation of THz radiation in the ZnTe crystal. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  12. Design and Realization of the Control and Measurement System of the Long Pulsed High Magnetic Field Facility Supplied by Battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, J. F.; Xiong, Y. D.; Han, X. T.; Ding, T. H.; Shi, J. T.; Li, L.

    2013-03-01

    A Control and Measurement System (CMS) is designed to ensure the reliable operation in the long pulsed high magnetic field facility supplied by lead-acid batteries. The CMS is mainly composed of a Programmable Logic Controller (PLC), a fault monitor and protection circuit, a signal processing and data acquisition unit, a local triggering sequence generator and the main control program. The system architecture and kernel parts of the CMS are analyzed and described in detail. The results prove that the designed CMS could perform efficiently and reliably.

  13. Visualization of transient phenomena during the interaction of pulsed CO2 laser radiation with matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, R.; Hugenschmidt, Manfred

    1996-05-01

    Carbon-dioxide-lasers operating in the pulsed mode with energy densities up to several tens of J/cm2 and peak power densities in the multi-MW/cm2-range may cause fast heating and melting. Eventually quasi-explosive ejection, decomposition or vaporization of material can be observed. Surface plasmas are strongly influencing the energy transfer from the laser radiation field to any target. For optically transparent plastics, such as PMMA for example, only slowly expanding plasmas (LSC-waves) are ignited at fluences around 20 J/cm2, with a low level of self-luminosity. High brightness, supersonically expanding plasma jets (LSD-waves) are generated at the same fluences on glasses. Similar conditions were found for metals as well. From recordings with a high speed CCD-camera, interesting features concerning the initial plasma phases and temporal evolution were deduced. Additionally, information was obtained concerning the quasi explosive ejection of material for PMMA.

  14. Latest results on solarization of optical glasses with pulsed laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedamzik, Ralf; Petzold, Uwe

    2017-02-01

    Femtosecond lasers are more and more used for material processing and lithography. Femtosecond laser help to generate three dimensional structures in photoresists without using masks in micro lithography. This technology is of growing importance for the field of backend lithography or advanced packaging. Optical glasses used for beam shaping and inspection tools need to withstand high laser pulse energies. Femtosecond laser radiation in the near UV wavelength range generates solarization effects in optical glasses. In this paper results are shown of femtosecond laser solarization experiments on a broad range of optical glasses from SCHOTT. The measurements have been performed by the Laser Zentrum Hannover in Germany. The results and their impact are discussed in comparison to traditional HOK-4 and UVA-B solarization measurements of the same materials. The target is to provide material selection guidance to the optical designer of beam shaping lens systems.

  15. Electromagnetic Fields, Pulsed Radiofrequency Radiation, and Epigenetics: How Wireless Technologies May Affect Childhood Development.

    PubMed

    Sage, Cindy; Burgio, Ernesto

    2017-05-15

    Mobile phones and other wireless devices that produce electromagnetic fields (EMF) and pulsed radiofrequency radiation (RFR) are widely documented to cause potentially harmful health impacts that can be detrimental to young people. New epigenetic studies are profiled in this review to account for some neurodevelopmental and neurobehavioral changes due to exposure to wireless technologies. Symptoms of retarded memory, learning, cognition, attention, and behavioral problems have been reported in numerous studies and are similarly manifested in autism and attention deficit hyperactivity disorders, as a result of EMF and RFR exposures where both epigenetic drivers and genetic (DNA) damage are likely contributors. Technology benefits can be realized by adopting wired devices for education to avoid health risk and promote academic achievement. © 2017 The Authors. Child Development © 2017 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  16. EFFECTS OF LASER RADIATION ON MATTER: Simulation of photon acceleration upon irradiation of a mylar target by femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, Stepan N.; Rukhadze, Anri A.; Tarakanov, V. P.; Yakutov, B. P.

    2010-01-01

    Acceleration of protons is simulated by the particle-in-cell (PIC) method upon irradiation of mylar targets of different thicknesses by femtosecond plane-polarised pulsed laser radiation and at different angles of radiation incidence on the target. The comparison of the results of calculations with the experimental data obtained in recent experiments shows their good agreement. The optimal angle of incidence (458) at which the proton energy achieves its absolute maximum is obtained.

  17. The generation of short-wave UV light in cells under the action of ultrashort pulses of intense visible radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovarsky, V. A.; Philipp, B. S.; Kovarsky, E. V.

    1997-02-01

    The action of intense laser pulses ( λ = 0.53 μm) on E.coli cells is considered (the cells are transparent in this range). The transformation of laser radiation into UV light due to the high-harmonics generation on the protein molecules (the dipole moment is 100-1000 D) leads to the appearance of thymine dimers in bacterial DNA and results in a lethal effect for strains of E.coli which are highly sensitive to UV radiation.

  18. EFFECTS OF LASER RADIATION ON MATTER: Efficient surface-erosion plasma formation in air due to the action of pulse-periodic laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min'ko, L. Ya; Chumakou, A. N.; Bosak, N. A.

    1990-11-01

    A study was made of the interaction of a series of periodic laser (λ = 1.06 μm) pulses with a number of materials (aluminum, copper, graphite, ebonite) in air at laser radiation power densities q = 107-109 W/cm2 and repetition frequencies f<=50 kHz. The radiation was concentrated in spots of ~ 10 - 2 cm2 area. Efficient formation of plasma as a result of laser erosion (q > 2 × 108 W/cm2, f>=5 kHz) was observed. A screening layer of an air plasma created by the first pulse of the series was expelled from the interaction zone and this was followed by erosion plasma formation under conditions of slight screening of the target during the action of the subsequent laser pulses.

  19. Dependence of the absorption of pulsed CO2-laser radiation by silane on wavenumber, fluence, pulse duration, temperature, optical path length, and pressure of absorbing and nonabsorbing gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bl/aŻejowski, Jerzy; Gruzdiewa, Ludwika; Rulewski, Jacek; Lampe, Frederick W.

    1995-05-01

    The absorption of three lines [P(20), 944.2 cm-1; P(14), 949.2 cm-1; and R(24), 978.5 cm-1] of the pulsed CO2 laser (0001-1000 transition) by SiH4 was measured at various pulse energy, pulse duration, temperature, optical path length, and pressure of the compound and nonabsorbing foreign gases. In addition, low intensity infrared absorption spectrum of silane was compared with high intensity absorption characteristics for all lines of the pulsed CO2 laser. The experimental dependencies show deviations from the phenomenological Beer-Lambert law which can be considered as arising from the high intensity of an incident radiation and collisions of absorbing molecules with surroundings. These effects were included into the expression, being an extended form of the Beer-Lambert law, which reasonably approximates all experimental data. The results, except for extending knowledge on the interaction of a high power laser radiation with matter, can help understanding and planning processes leading to preparation of silicon-containing technologically important materials.

  20. Modeling and Simulation of Radiative Compressible Flows in Aerodynamic Heating Arc-Jet Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bensassi, Khalil; Laguna, Alejandro A.; Lani, Andrea; Mansour, Nagi N.

    2016-01-01

    Numerical simulations of an arc heated flow inside NASA's 20 [MW] Aerodynamics heating facility (AHF) are performed in order to investigate the three-dimensional swirling flow and the current distribution inside the wind tunnel. The plasma is considered in Local Thermodynamics Equilibrium(LTE) and is composed of Air-Argon gas mixture. The governing equations are the Navier-Stokes equations that include source terms corresponding to Joule heating and radiative cooling. The former is obtained by solving an electric potential equation, while the latter is calculated using an innovative massively parallel ray-tracing algorithm. The fully coupled system is closed by the thermodynamics relations and transport properties which are obtained from Chapman-Enskog method. A novel strategy was developed in order to enable the flow solver and the radiation calculation to be preformed independently and simultaneously using a different number of processors. Drastic reduction in the computational cost was achieved using this strategy. Details on the numerical methods used for space discretization, time integration and ray-tracing algorithm will be presented. The effect of the radiative cooling on the dynamics of the flow will be investigated. The complete set of equations were implemented within the COOLFluiD Framework. Fig. 1 shows the geometry of the Anode and part of the constrictor of the Aerodynamics heating facility (AHF). Fig. 2 shows the velocity field distribution along (x-y) plane and the streamline in (z-y) plane.

  1. Development of a radiative-hydrodynamics testbed using the petawatt laser facility

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, J A; Bell, P M; Brown, C; Budil, K S; Estabrook, K G; Gold, D M; Hatchett, S P; Kane, J; Key, M H; Pennington, D M; Perry, M D; Remington, B A

    1998-08-27

    achieved in order to validate the models of the expanding blast wave launched by a supernova in both of its phases of evolution. We report on a new experiment designed to follow the propagation of a strong blast wave launched by the interaction of an intense short pulse laser with a solid target. This blast wave is generated by the irradiation of the front surface of a layered, solid target with N 400 J of 1 pm laser radiation in a 20 ps pulse focused to a N 50 ,um diameter spot, which produces an intensity in excess of 1018 W/cm². These conditions approximate a point explosion and a blast wave is predicted to be generated with an initial pressure of several hundred megabars which decays as it travels approximately radially outward from the interaction region. We have utilized streaked optical pyrometry of the blast front to determine its time of arrival at the rear surface of the target. Applications of a self-similar Taylor-Sedov blast wave solution allows the amount of energy deposited to be estimated. By varying the parameters of the laser pulse which impinges on the target, pressures on the order of 1 Gbar with initial temperatures in excess of 1 kev are achievable. At these temperatures and densities radiative processes are coupled to the hydrodynamic evolution of the system. Short pulse lasers produce a unique environment for the study of coupled radiation-hydrodynamics in a laboratory setting.

  2. Evaluation of a pulse counting type SOI pixel using synchrotron radiation X-ray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, R.; Arai, Y.; Igarashi, N.; Kumai, R.; Lu, Y.; Miyoshi, T.; Nishimura, R.; Ouyang, Q.; Zhou, Y.; Kishimoto, S.

    2017-03-01

    Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) technology was used to develop a fine pixelated detector with high performance. The first beam test for a prototype pulse-counting-type SOI chip, CPIXTEG3b, was performed at beamline BL-14A of the Photon Factory, KEK. CPIXTEG3b was designed using double SOI technology for decreasing crosstalk and increasing radiation hardness. It has a 64 × 64 pixel array wherein each pixel size is 50 μm × 50 μm. The sensitivity to incident X-rays was measured for each pixel with an X-ray beam 10 μm in diameter. We used the X-ray energy of 16 keV. Because of its small size, the pixel response was sensitive to the charge-sharing effect. We also considered the point spread function of the sensor. The discriminator of each pixel circuit was calibrated using a pulse generator, and performance was checked using flat-field X-rays.

  3. The radiation temperature and M-band fraction inside hohlraum on the SGIII-prototype laser facility

    SciTech Connect

    Yi Huo, Wen; Lan, Ke; Li, Yongsheng; Li, Xin; Wu, Changshu; Ren, Guoli; Zhao, Yiqing; Zou, Shiyang; Zheng, Wudi; Gu, Peijun; Wang, Min; Yang, Dong; Li, Sanwei; Yi, Rongqing; Jiang, Xiaohua; Song, Tianming; Li, Zhichao; Guo, Liang; Liu, Yonggang; Zhan, Xiayu; and others

    2014-02-15

    The radiation temperature T{sub R} and M-band fraction f{sub M} inside the vacuum Au hohlraum have been experimentally determined by a shock wave technique and a broadband soft x-ray spectrometer (SXS) on the SGIII-prototype laser facility. From the results of the shock wave technique, T{sub R} is about 202 eV, and f{sub M} is about 9% for the hohlraums driven by a 1 ns flattop pulse of 6 kJ laser energy. The Continuous Phase Plate (CPP) for beam smoothing is applied in the experiment, which increases T{sub R} to 207 eV while has almost no influence on f{sub M}. Comparisons between the results from the two kinds of technologies show that T{sub R} from the shock wave technique is lower than that from SXS whether with CPP or not. However, f{sub M} from the shock wave technique is consistent with that from SXS without CPP, but obviously lower than the SXS's result with CPP. The preheat effect on exterior surface of witness plate is reduced by thicker thickness of witness plate designed for higher laser driven energy.

  4. The radiation temperature and M-band fraction inside hohlraum on the SGIII-prototype laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi Huo, Wen; Yang, Dong; Lan, Ke; Li, Sanwei; Li, Yongsheng; Li, Xin; Wu, Changshu; Ren, Guoli; Zhao, Yiqing; Zou, Shiyang; Zheng, Wudi; Gu, Peijun; Wang, Min; Yi, Rongqing; Jiang, Xiaohua; Song, Tianming; Li, Zhichao; Guo, Liang; Liu, Yonggang; Zhan, Xiayu; Wang, Feng; Peng, Xiaoshi; Zhang, Huan; Yang, Jiamin; Liu, Shenye; Jiang, Shaoen; Ding, Yongkun

    2014-02-01

    The radiation temperature TR and M-band fraction fM inside the vacuum Au hohlraum have been experimentally determined by a shock wave technique and a broadband soft x-ray spectrometer (SXS) on the SGIII-prototype laser facility. From the results of the shock wave technique, TR is about 202 eV, and fM is about 9% for the hohlraums driven by a 1 ns flattop pulse of 6 kJ laser energy. The Continuous Phase Plate (CPP) for beam smoothing is applied in the experiment, which increases TR to 207 eV while has almost no influence on fM. Comparisons between the results from the two kinds of technologies show that TR from the shock wave technique is lower than that from SXS whether with CPP or not. However, fM from the shock wave technique is consistent with that from SXS without CPP, but obviously lower than the SXS's result with CPP. The preheat effect on exterior surface of witness plate is reduced by thicker thickness of witness plate designed for higher laser driven energy.

  5. Generation of thermo-acoustic waves from pulsed solar/IR radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Aowabin

    Acoustic waves could potentially be used in a wide range of engineering applications; however, the high energy consumption in generating acoustic waves from electrical energy and the cost associated with the process limit the use of acoustic waves in industrial processes. Acoustic waves converted from solar radiation provide a feasible way of obtaining acoustic energy, without relying on conventional nonrenewable energy sources. One of the goals of this thesis project was to experimentally study the conversion of thermal to acoustic energy using pulsed radiation. The experiments were categorized into "indoor" and "outdoor" experiments, each with a separate experimental setup. The indoor experiments used an IR heater to power the thermo-acoustic lasers and were primarily aimed at studying the effect of various experimental parameters on the amplitude of sound waves in the low frequency range (below 130 Hz). The IR radiation was modulated externally using a chopper wheel and then impinged on a porous solid, which was housed inside a thermo-acoustic (TA) converter. A microphone located at a certain distance from the porous solid inside the TA converter detected the acoustic signals. The "outdoor" experiments, which were targeted at TA conversion at comparatively higher frequencies (in 200 Hz-3 kHz range) used solar energy to power the thermo-acoustic laser. The amplitudes (in RMS) of thermo-acoustic signals obtained in experiments using IR heater as radiation source were in the 80-100 dB range. The frequency of acoustic waves corresponded to the frequency of interceptions of the radiation beam by the chopper. The amplitudes of acoustic waves were influenced by several factors, including the chopping frequency, magnitude of radiation flux, type of porous material, length of porous material, external heating of the TA converter housing, location of microphone within the air column, and design of the TA converter. The time-dependent profile of the thermo-acoustic signals

  6. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETER: Temporal evolution of a coherent stimulated radiation pulse in the three-level system in a Pr3+ : LaF3 crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agafonov, Aleksandr I.; Grigoryan, Grigorii G.; Znamenskiy, Nikolay V.; Manykin, Eduard A.; Orlov, Yurii V.; Petrenko, Evgenii A.; Shashkov, Andrei Yu

    2004-09-01

    The temporal characteristics of coherent stimulated radiation at the 3P0— 3H6 transition in the Pr3+ ion in a LaF3 matrix are studied by tuning the pump frequency in the vicinity of the 3H4— 3P0 transition. It is found that in the case of the exact tuning to the resonance, a laser pulse, consisting of a train of picosecond spikes of total duration about 10 ns, was delayed by 3-4 ns with respect to the pump pulse onset. As the pump pulse detuning was increased, the shape of the coherent laser pulse changes and its delay increased up to 10 ns. The experimental results are interpreted theoretically.

  7. A reference radiation facility for dosimetry at flight altitude and in space.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, A; Mitaroff, A; Silari, M

    2001-01-01

    A reference facility for the intercomparison of active and passive detectors in high-energy neutron fields is available at CERN since 1993. A positive charged hadron beam (a mixture of protons and pions) with momentum of 120 GeV/c hits a copper target, 50 cm thick and 7 cm in diameter. The secondary particles produced in the interaction are filtered by a shielding of either 80 cm of concrete or 40 cm of iron. Behind the iron shielding, the resulting neutron spectrum has a maximum at about 1 MeV, with an additional high-energy component. Behind the concrete shielding, the neutron spectrum has a pronounced maximum at about 70 MeV and resembles the high-energy component of the radiation field created by cosmic rays at commercial flight altitudes. The facility is used for a variety of investigations with active and passive neutron dosimeters. Its use for measurements related to the space programme is discussed.

  8. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January 1–March 31, 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Voyles, JW

    2012-04-13

    Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Data Archive, where they are made available to the research community. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  9. Concentrating Photovoltaic Module Testing at NREL's Concentrating Solar Radiation Users Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Bingham, C.; Lewandowski, A.; Stone, K.; Sherif, R.; Ortabasi, U.; Kusek, S.

    2003-05-01

    There has been much recent interest in photovoltaic modules designed to operate with concentrated sunlight (>100 suns). Concentrating photovoltaic (CPV) technology offers an exciting new opportunity as a viable alternative to dish Stirling engines. Advantages of CPV include potential for>40% cell efficiency in the long term (25% now), no moving parts, no intervening heat transfer surface, near-ambient temperature operation, no thermal mass, fast response, concentration reduces cost of cells relative to optics, and scalable to a range of sizes. Over the last few years, we have conducted testing of several CPV modules for DOEs Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) program. The testing facilities are located at the Concentrating Solar Radiation Users Facility (CRULF) and consist the 10 kW High-Flux Solar Furnace (HFSF) and a 14m2 Concentrating Technologies, LLC (CTEK) dish. This paper will primarily describe the test capabilities; module test results will be detailed in the presentation.

  10. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January 1 – March 31, 2007

    SciTech Connect

    DL Sisterson

    2007-04-01

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  11. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report - October 1 - December 31, 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Sisterson, DL

    2009-01-15

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  12. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report October 1 - December 31, 2007

    SciTech Connect

    DL Sisterson

    2008-01-08

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  13. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report - January 1 - March 31, 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Sisterson, DL

    2008-04-01

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  14. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report April 1 - June 30, 2008

    SciTech Connect

    DL Sisterson

    2008-06-01

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  15. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1 - September 30, 2007

    SciTech Connect

    DL Sisterson

    2007-10-01

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  16. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January 1 - March 31, 2009

    SciTech Connect

    DL Sisterson

    2009-03-17

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  17. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report - July 1 - September 30, 2008

    SciTech Connect

    DL Sisterson

    2008-09-30

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  18. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report April 1 - June 30, 2007

    SciTech Connect

    DL Sisterson

    2007-07-01

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  19. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1 – September 30, 2006

    SciTech Connect

    DL Sisterson

    2006-10-01

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year dating back to 1998.

  20. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report October 1–December 31, 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Voyles, JW

    2012-01-09

    Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  1. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1–September 30, 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Voyles, JW

    2011-10-10

    Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  2. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report: October 1 - December 31, 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Sisterson, DL

    2011-03-02

    Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  3. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1 – September 30, 2009

    SciTech Connect

    DL Sisterson

    2009-10-15

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data then are sent approximately daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by 1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and 2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  4. PLANNING TOOLS FOR ESTIMATING RADIATION EXPOSURE AT THE NATIONAL IGNITION FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Verbeke, J; Young, M; Brereton, S; Dauffy, L; Hall, J; Hansen, L; Khater, H; Kim, S; Pohl, B; Sitaraman, S

    2010-10-22

    A set of computational tools was developed to help estimate and minimize potential radiation exposure to workers from material activation in the National Ignition Facility (NIF). AAMI (Automated ALARA-MCNP Interface) provides an efficient, automated mechanism to perform the series of calculations required to create dose rate maps for the entire facility with minimal manual user input. NEET (NIF Exposure Estimation Tool) is a web application that combines the information computed by AAMI with a given shot schedule to compute and display the dose rate maps as a function of time. AAMI and NEET are currently used as work planning tools to determine stay-out times for workers following a given shot or set of shots, and to help in estimating integrated doses associated with performing various maintenance activities inside the target bay. Dose rate maps of the target bay were generated following a low-yield 10{sup 16} D-T shot and will be presented in this paper.

  5. X-ray transport and radiation response assessment (XTRRA) experiments at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, K. B.; Brown, C. G.; Yeoman, M. F.; Fisher, J. H.; Seiler, S. W.; Hinshelwood, D.; Compton, S.; Holdener, F. R.; Kemp, G. E.; Newlander, C. D.; Gilliam, R. P.; Froula, N.; Lilly, M.; Davis, J. F.; Lerch, MAJ. A.; Blue, B. E.

    2016-11-01

    Our team has developed an experimental platform to evaluate the x-ray-generated stress and impulse in materials. Experimental activities include x-ray source development, design of the sample mounting hardware and sensors interfaced to the National Ignition Facility's diagnostics insertion system, and system integration into the facility. This paper focuses on the X-ray Transport and Radiation Response Assessment (XTRRA) test cassettes built for these experiments. The test cassette is designed to position six samples at three predetermined distances from the source, each known to within ±1% accuracy. Built-in calorimeters give in situ measurements of the x-ray environment along the sample lines of sight. The measured accuracy of sample responses as well as planned modifications to the XTRRA cassette is discussed.

  6. Glow of the Plasma of a Pulse Discharge Produced in Nitrogen by High-Power Terahertz-Wave Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vodopyanov, A. V.; Glyavin, M. Yu.; Luchinin, A. G.; Razin, S. V.; Sidorov, A. V.; Fokin, A. P.

    2017-07-01

    We studied the glow of the plasma of a pulse discharge ignited in nitrogen by high-power focused radiation of a terahertz-wave gyrotron (a radiation frequency of 0.67 GHz, a pulse duration of 20 μs, and a power of 40 kW). The pressure in the discharge chamber varied in the range 0.1-350 Torr. It was found that at high pressures (more than 50 Torr), long-term (about 1.0-1.5 ms), a non-monotonic afterglow exists after the end of the terahertz pulse, whose intensity can exceed the plasma glow intensity significantly (by several times) during the action of the terahertz radiation pulse on the plasma. At pressures below 50 Torr, the afterglow duration proves to be significantly shorter, specifically, about several tens of microseconds. The observed long-term afterglow is radiation in certain vibrational bands of the second positive system of N2 and is due, evidently, to the processes of associative excitation of electron levels in nitrogen molecules with the participation of long-living metastables {N}_2({A}^3{\\varSigma}u+).

  7. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETERS: New stretcher scheme for a parametric amplifier of chirped pulses with frequency conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freidman, Gennadii I.; Yakovlev, I. V.

    2007-02-01

    The properties of hybrid prism-grating dispersion systems are studied. The scheme of a prism-grating stretcher matched to a standard compressor in the phase dispersion up to the fourth order inclusive is developed for a petawatt laser complex based on the optical parametric chirped-pulse amplification. The stretcher was used to obtain the ~200-TW peak power of laser radiation.

  8. National Institute of Standards and Technology Synchrotron Radiation Facilities for Materials Science

    PubMed Central

    Long, Gabrielle G.; Allen, Andrew J.; Black, David R.; Burdette, Harold E.; Fischer, Daniel A.; Spal, Richard D.; Woicik, Joseph C.

    2001-01-01

    Synchrotron Radiation Facilities, supported by the Materials Science and Engineering Laboratory of the National Institute of Standards and Technology, include beam stations at the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory and at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. The emphasis is on materials characterization at the microstructural and at the atomic and molecular levels, where NIST scientists, and researchers from industry, universities and government laboratories perform state-of-the-art x-ray measurements on a broad range of materials. PMID:27500070

  9. The recent development of an X-ray grating interferometer at Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Haohua; Kou Bingquan; Xi Yan; Qi Juncheng; Sun Jianqi; Mohr, Juergen; Boerner, Martin; Zhao Jun; Xu, Lisa X.; Xiao Tiqiao; Wang Yujie

    2012-07-31

    An X-ray grating interferometer has been installed at Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF). Three sets of phase gratings were designed to cover the wide X-ray energy range needed for biological and soft material imaging capabilities. The performance of the grating interferometer has been evaluated by a tomography study of a PMMA particle packing and a new born mouse chest. In the mouse chest study, the carotid artery and carotid vein inside the mouse can be identified in situ without contrast agents.

  10. Analysis of Dietz`s single, rectangular pulse theory for the generation of radiation via photoelectrons

    SciTech Connect

    Dipp, T.M.

    1993-12-01

    The generation of radiation via photoelectrons induced off of a conducting surface has been analytically modeled and computationally simulated by several researchers. This paper analyzes and compares Dietz`s theory predictions with my research to form a unified foundation of consistent, inter-supporting results that should provide confidence in the independently performed basic research and resulting scaling laws and predictions. In doing so, this paper concentrated on Dietz`s small-spot, single, rectangular, ``weak`` pulse theory and equations, which involve nonrelativistic, monoenergetic photoelectrons emitted normal to a conducting surface in vacuum. In this paper I: (1) analytically compare Dietz`s theory equations with my theory equations, (2) compare Dietz`s theoretical scaling laws with my Particle-In-Cell (PIC) code simulation results, and (3) make Dietz`s equations easier to use in predicting and optimizing photoelectron-generated radiation. As a result, it is shown that Dietz`s equations match my theory`s equations in their predicted scaling laws, differing only slightly in their coefficients and unique model parameters. Also, Dietz`s equations generally agree with the PIC code results. Finally, optimization analysis showed that theoretical conversion efficiencies for typical real metals can meet and exceed values of 10{sup {minus}5} if optimal photon energies of 15 to 20 eV are used. Even better efficiencies should be possible if the small-spot constraint is violated as well.

  11. Occupational Radiation Exposure at Commercial Nuclear Power Reactors and Other Facilities 2008

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research

    2009-12-01

    This report summarizes the occupational exposure data that are maintained in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Radiation Exposure Information and Reporting System (REIRS). The bulk of the information contained in the report was compiled from the 2008 annual reports submitted by five of the seven categories1 of NRC licensees subject to the reporting requirements of 10 CFR 20.2206. The annual reports submitted by these licensees consist of radiation exposure records for each monitored individual. These records are analyzed for trends and presented in this report in terms of collective dose and the distribution of dose among the monitored individuals. Because there are no geologic repositories for high-level waste currently licensed and no low-level waste disposal facilities in operation, only five categories will be considered in this report.

  12. Influences of different gases on the terahertz radiation based on the application of two-color laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Moradi, S.; Ganjovi, A.; Shojaei, F.; Saeed, M.

    2015-10-15

    In this work, using a two-dimensional Particle In Cell-Monte Carlo Collision simulation method, a comparative study is performed on the influences of different types of atomic and molecular gases at various background gas pressures on the generation of broadband and intense Terahertz (THz) radiation via the application of two-color laser pulses. These two modes are focused into Argon (Ar), Xenon (Xe), Nitrogen (N{sub 2}), Oxygen (O{sub 2}), and air as the background gaseous media and the plasma channel is created. It is observed that the THz radiation emission dramatically changes due to the propagation effects. A wider THz pulse is emitted from the formed plasma channel at the higher gas pressures. The significant effects of the propagation features of the emitted THz pulse on its energy at the longer lengths of the plasma channel are observed.

  13. Plasma channel produced by femtosecond laser pulses as a medium for amplifying electromagnetic radiation of the subterahertz frequency range

    SciTech Connect

    Bogatskaya, A V; Volkova, E A; Popov, A M

    2013-12-31

    The electron energy distribution function in the plasma channel produced by a femtosecond laser pulse with a wavelength of 248 nm in atmospheric-pressure gases was considered. Conditions were determined whereby this channel may be employed for amplifying electromagnetic waves up to the terahertz frequency range over the energy spectrum relaxation time ∼10{sup -7} s. Gains were calculated as functions of time and radiation frequency. The effect of electron – electron collisions on the rate of relaxation processes in the plasma and on its ability to amplify the electromagnetic radiation was investigated. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  14. Short pulse, high resolution, backlighters for point projection high-energy radiography at the National Ignition Facility

    DOE PAGES

    Tommasini, R.; Bailey, C.; Bradley, D. K.; ...

    2017-05-09

    High-resolution, high-energy X-ray backlighters are very active area of research for radiography experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [Miller et al., Nucl. Fusion 44, S228 (2004)], in particular those aiming at obtaining Compton-scattering produced radiographs from the cold, dense fuel surrounding the hot spot. We report on experiments to generate and characterize point-projection-geometry backlighters using short pulses from the advanced radiographic capability (ARC) [Crane et al., J. Phys. 244, 032003 (2010); Di Nicola et al., Proc. SPIE 2015, 93450I-12], at the NIF, focused on Au micro-wires. We show the first hard X-ray radiographs, at photon energies exceeding 60 keV,more » of static objects obtained with 30 ps-long ARC laser pulses, and the measurements of strength of the X-ray emission, the pulse duration and the source size of the Au micro-wire backlighters. For the latter, a novel technique has been developed and successfully applied.« less

  15. Short pulse, high resolution, backlighters for point projection high-energy radiography at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tommasini, R.; Bailey, C.; Bradley, D. K.; Bowers, M.; Chen, H.; Di Nicola, J. M.; Di Nicola, P.; Gururangan, G.; Hall, G. N.; Hardy, C. M.; Hargrove, D.; Hermann, M.; Hohenberger, M.; Holder, J. P.; Hsing, W.; Izumi, N.; Kalantar, D.; Khan, S.; Kroll, J.; Landen, O. L.; Lawson, J.; Martinez, D.; Masters, N.; Nafziger, J. R.; Nagel, S. R.; Nikroo, A.; Okui, J.; Palmer, D.; Sigurdsson, R.; Vonhof, S.; Wallace, R. J.; Zobrist, T.

    2017-05-01

    High-resolution, high-energy X-ray backlighters are very active area of research for radiography experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [Miller et al., Nucl. Fusion 44, S228 (2004)], in particular those aiming at obtaining Compton-scattering produced radiographs from the cold, dense fuel surrounding the hot spot. We report on experiments to generate and characterize point-projection-geometry backlighters using short pulses from the advanced radiographic capability (ARC) [Crane et al., J. Phys. 244, 032003 (2010); Di Nicola et al., Proc. SPIE 2015, 93450I-12], at the NIF, focused on Au micro-wires. We show the first hard X-ray radiographs, at photon energies exceeding 60 keV, of static objects obtained with 30 ps-long ARC laser pulses, and the measurements of strength of the X-ray emission, the pulse duration and the source size of the Au micro-wire backlighters. For the latter, a novel technique has been developed and successfully applied.

  16. 4C modeling of pulsed-load smoothing in the HELIOS facility using a controlled bypass valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanino, R.; Bonifetto, R.; Hoa, C.; Savoldi Richard, L.

    2013-10-01

    Large variations of the heat load coming from the superconducting magnets to the cryoplant in a tokamak are an undesired consequence of the intrinsically pulsed operation of the machine. In this paper, the cryogenic circuit module of the 4C (Cryogenic Circuit Conductor and Coil) code is used to analyze a subset of the results on pulsed load driven transients experimentally simulated in 2011 in the HELIOS facility (HElium Loop for hIgh lOads Smoothing) at CEA Grenoble, France. We focus on the tests where the smoothing of the pulsed heat load from the supercritical helium loop to the saturated helium bath was achieved by means of a controlled bypass valve. To address this issue, the modeling capability of the cryogenic circuit module of the 4C code is extended to include PI controllers. The computed evolution of temperature, pressure and mass flow rate at different circuit locations shows a good agreement with the measurements, both in the SHe loop and in the LHe bath. These results confirm the accuracy of 4C and contribute a needed step in the process of validation of the code.

  17. Roles of Interfering Radiation Emitted from Decaying Pulses Obeying Soliton Equations Belonging to the Ablowitz-Kaup-Newell-Segur Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujishima, Hironobu; Yajima, Tetsu

    2015-06-01

    The nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation under the box-type initial condition, which models general multiple pulses deviating from pure solitons, is analyzed. Following the approximation by splitting the initial pulse into many small bins [G. Boffetta and A. R. Osborne, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0021-9991(92)90370-E, J. Comp. Phys. 102, 252 (1992)], we can analyze the Zakharov-Shabat eigenvalue problem to construct transfer matrices connecting the Jost functions in each interval without direct numerical computation. We can obtain analytical expressions for the scattering data that describe interfering radiation emitted from initial pulses. The number of solitons that appear in the final stage is predicted theoretically, and the condition generating an unusual wave such as a double-pole soliton is derived. Numerical analyses under box-type initial conditions are also performed to show that the interplay between the tails from decaying pulses can affect the asymptotic profile.

  18. The radiation field in the Gamma Irradiation Facility GIF++ at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeiffer, Dorothea; Gorine, Georgi; Reithler, Hans; Biskup, Bartolomej; Day, Alasdair; Fabich, Adrian; Germa, Joffrey; Guida, Roberto; Jaekel, Martin; Ravotti, Federico

    2017-09-01

    The high-luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) upgrade is setting now a new challenge for particle detector technologies. The increase in luminosity will produce a particle background in the gas-based muon detectors that is ten times higher than under conditions at the LHC. The detailed knowledge of the detector performance in the presence of such a high background is crucial for an optimized design and efficient operation after the HL-LHC upgrade. A precise understanding of possible aging effects of detector materials and gases is of extreme importance. To cope with these challenging requirements, a new Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF++) was designed and built at the CERN SPS North Area as successor of the Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF) during the Long Shutdown 1 (LS1) period. It features an intense source of 662 keV photons with adjustable intensity, to simulate continuous background over large areas, and, combined with a high energy muon beam, to measure detector performance in the presence of the background. The new GIF++ facility has been operational since spring 2015. In addition to describing the facility and its infrastructure, the goal of this work is to provide an extensive characterization of the GIF++ photon field with different configurations of the absorption filters in both the upstream and downstream irradiation areas. Moreover, the measured results are benchmarked with Geant4 simulations to enhance the knowledge of the radiation field. The absorbed dose in air in the facility may reach up to 2.2 Gy/h directly in front of the irradiator. Of special interest is the low-energy photon component that develops due to the multiple scattering of photons within the irradiator and from the concrete walls of the bunker.

  19. Experiments on plasma heating by CO/sub 2/ laser radiation in the TIR-1 facility

    SciTech Connect

    Akimov, A.E.; Baranov, V.Y.; Boiko, V.A.; Borzenko, V.L.; Bryunetkin, B.A.; Kozochkin, S.M.; Makarov, K.N.; Malyuta, D.D.; Pis'mennyi, V.D.; Satov, Y.A.

    1983-08-01

    The results are given of experiments performed on the TIR-1 high-power laser facility, utilizing x-ray plasma diagnostic methods. The experiments were carried out at an energy of approx.50 J for a focal spot of approx.300 ..mu.. and a pulse duration of approx.2 nsec. The effective electron temperature in the energy cutoff range E/sub c//sub o/approx.3.5--5 keV was 7 keV. Photons with energies of 10--100 keV were detected. Spectra of the H-, He-, and Li-like fluorine ions were recorded and used to determine the plasma parameters: T/sub e/ = 220 eV, N/sub H//N/sub N/ = 13, N/sub H//sub e//N/sub H/ = 2.1, N/sub L//sub i//N/sub H//sub e/ = 0.06.

  20. Study of radiation effects on structural materials at the Moscow Meson Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Kravchuk, L.V.; Lebedev, S.G.; Matveev, V.A.; Perekrestenko, A.D.; Rakseev, A.V.; Stavissky, Y.Y.

    1998-12-31

    Three intense medium-energy proton accelerators are operating and available at present in the Unites States, Switzerland, and Canada. Analogous construction work at the research complex at the Moscow Meson Facility (MMF) of the Institute for Nuclear Research at the Russian Academy of Sciences (INR RAS) has been finished also. At this time, the first part of the MMF works at an energy of 400 MeV and a proton current up to 0.07 mA. The experimental investigations carried out at the meson physics facilities at Los Alamos National Laboratory and Villigen (Switzerland) have demonstrated the effectiveness of using of these accelerators for research on radiation effects in alloys. At high-energy, high-power accelerators such as TRIUMF, SIN, ISIS, and LAMPF, the environment for materials is similar to that at fusion reactors, especially in the case of internal targets and beam stops. Here, materials are subjected to a substantial fluence of high-energy particles, primarily protons and neutrons generated through spallation reactions. The high-energy particles produce higher energy primary atom recoils and damage states than do neutrons from a fission reactor environment. Transmutation atom impurity production is also substantially increased relative to a fission reactor environment. The authors now have the complementary possibility for radiation damage study at the MMF.

  1. Radiation damage parameters for modelling of FRM irradiation conditions at the RADEX facility of INR RAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koptelov, E. A.; Lebedev, S. G.; Sobolevsky, N. M.; Strebkov, Yu. S.; Subbotin, A. V.

    2002-12-01

    Results of MC calculations of primary radiation damage generated by the intense proton beam at the RADiation EXperiment (RADEX) facility of the Institute for Nuclear Research, Russian Academy of Sciences (INR RAS) are presented. RADEX is the irradiation channel located inside a proton target at the beam stop of the INR RAS linear proton accelerator having energy up to 600 MeV. The position of the irradiation channel at the facility can be changed by rotation of the proton target relative to the vertical axis, thus varying the relative influence of the primary protons and spallation neutrons on the primary damage kinetics. By shifting the proton target position outside the horizontal beam axis, one may reduce the predominant input of high-energy protons to the irradiation field. As a result, the spectrum of primary knock-on atoms in the irradiated sample may be significantly softened. This gives the possibility of changing irradiation parameters to simulate irradiation conditions at other installations (ITER and DEMO fusion devices and the IFMIF project).

  2. An experiment to test advanced materials impacted by intense proton pulses at CERN HiRadMat facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertarelli, A.; Berthome, E.; Boccone, V.; Carra, F.; Cerutti, F.; Charitonidis, N.; Charrondiere, C.; Dallocchio, A.; Fernandez Carmona, P.; Francon, P.; Gentini, L.; Guinchard, M.; Mariani, N.; Masi, A.; Marques dos Santos, S. D.; Moyret, P.; Peroni, L.; Redaelli, S.; Scapin, M.

    2013-08-01

    Predicting the consequences of highly energetic particle beams impacting protection devices as collimators or high power target stations is a fundamental issue in the design of state-of-the-art facilities for high-energy particle physics. These complex dynamic phenomena can be successfully simulated resorting to highly non-linear numerical tools (Hydrocodes). In order to produce accurate results, however, these codes require reliable material constitutive models that, at the extreme conditions induced by a destructive beam impact, are scarce and often inaccurate. In order to derive or validate such models a comprehensive, first-of-its-kind experiment has been recently carried out at CERN HiRadMat facility: performed tests entailed the controlled impact of intense and energetic proton pulses on a number of specimens made of six different materials. Experimental data were acquired relying on embedded instrumentation (strain gauges, temperature probes and vacuum sensors) and on remote-acquisition devices (laser Doppler vibrometer and high-speed camera). The method presented in this paper, combining experimental measurements with numerical simulations, may find applications to assess materials under very high strain rates and temperatures in domains well beyond particle physics (severe accidents in fusion and fission nuclear facilities, space debris impacts, fast and intense loadings on materials and structures etc.).

  3. An Investigation into the Effect of High-Power Pulse IR Radiation on the Properties of Surfaces of CdxHg1-хTe Heteroepitaxial Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boltar', K. O.; Burlakov, I. D.; Voitsekhovskii, А. V.; Sizov, А. L.; Sredin, V. G.; Talipov, N. Kh.; Shul'ga, S. А.

    2013-12-01

    The results of investigations into radiation modification of surfaces of Cd x Hg1- x Te (CMT) heteroepitaxial layers grown by molecular-beam and liquid-phase epitaxy (MBE- and LPE CMT HEL) affected by high-power pulse short-wavelength IR radiation are discussed. It is found that the surfaces of MBE CMT HEL and LPE CMT are enhanced by mercury as a result of high-power pulse short-wavelength IR radiation.

  4. Generation of surface waves and low-frequency radiation under exposure of a conductor to a laser pulse focused by a cylindrical lens

    SciTech Connect

    Uryupin, S A; Frolov, A A

    2014-09-30

    We have developed a theory of generation of low-frequency radiation and surface waves under the pondermotive action of a femtosecond laser pulse irradiating a conductor along the normal and focused by a cylindrical lens. It is shown that for the chosen focusing method and specified values of laser pulse duration and flux density it is possible to significantly increase the total energy of both surface waves and low-frequency radiation. (terahertz radiation)

  5. Pulsed infrared radiation excites cultured neonatal spiral and vestibular ganglion neurons by modulating mitochondrial calcium cycling

    PubMed Central

    Lumbreras, Vicente; Bas, Esperanza; Gupta, Chhavi

    2014-01-01

    Cochlear implants are currently the most effective solution for profound sensorineural hearing loss, and vestibular prostheses are under development to treat bilateral vestibulopathies. Electrical current spread in these neuroprostheses limits channel independence and, in some cases, may impair their performance. In comparison, optical stimuli that are spatially confined may result in a significant functional improvement. Pulsed infrared radiation (IR) has previously been shown to elicit responses in neurons. This study analyzes the response of neonatal rat spiral and vestibular ganglion neurons in vitro to IR (wavelength = 1,863 nm) using Ca2+ imaging. Both types of neurons responded consistently with robust intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) transients that matched the low-frequency IR pulses applied (4 ms, 0.25–1 pps). Radiant exposures of ∼637 mJ/cm2 resulted in continual neuronal activation. Temperature or [Ca2+] variations in the media did not alter the IR-evoked transients, ruling out extracellular Ca2+ involvement or primary mediation by thermal effects on the plasma membrane. While blockage of Na+, K+, and Ca2+ plasma membrane channels did not alter the IR-evoked response, blocking of mitochondrial Ca2+ cycling with CGP-37157 or ruthenium red reversibly inhibited the IR-evoked [Ca2+]i transients. Additionally, the magnitude of the IR-evoked transients was dependent on ryanodine and cyclopiazonic acid-dependent Ca2+ release. These results suggest that IR modulation of intracellular calcium cycling contributes to stimulation of spiral and vestibular ganglion neurons. As a whole, the results suggest selective excitation of neurons in the IR beam path and the potential of IR stimulation in future auditory and vestibular prostheses. PMID:24920028

  6. Pulsed infrared radiation excites cultured neonatal spiral and vestibular ganglion neurons by modulating mitochondrial calcium cycling.

    PubMed

    Lumbreras, Vicente; Bas, Esperanza; Gupta, Chhavi; Rajguru, Suhrud M

    2014-09-15

    Cochlear implants are currently the most effective solution for profound sensorineural hearing loss, and vestibular prostheses are under development to treat bilateral vestibulopathies. Electrical current spread in these neuroprostheses limits channel independence and, in some cases, may impair their performance. In comparison, optical stimuli that are spatially confined may result in a significant functional improvement. Pulsed infrared radiation (IR) has previously been shown to elicit responses in neurons. This study analyzes the response of neonatal rat spiral and vestibular ganglion neurons in vitro to IR (wavelength = 1,863 nm) using Ca(2+) imaging. Both types of neurons responded consistently with robust intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]i) transients that matched the low-frequency IR pulses applied (4 ms, 0.25-1 pps). Radiant exposures of ∼637 mJ/cm(2) resulted in continual neuronal activation. Temperature or [Ca(2+)] variations in the media did not alter the IR-evoked transients, ruling out extracellular Ca(2+) involvement or primary mediation by thermal effects on the plasma membrane. While blockage of Na(+), K(+), and Ca(2+) plasma membrane channels did not alter the IR-evoked response, blocking of mitochondrial Ca(2+) cycling with CGP-37157 or ruthenium red reversibly inhibited the IR-evoked [Ca(2+)]i transients. Additionally, the magnitude of the IR-evoked transients was dependent on ryanodine and cyclopiazonic acid-dependent Ca(2+) release. These results suggest that IR modulation of intracellular calcium cycling contributes to stimulation of spiral and vestibular ganglion neurons. As a whole, the results suggest selective excitation of neurons in the IR beam path and the potential of IR stimulation in future auditory and vestibular prostheses.

  7. Soliton radiation beat analysis of optical pulses generated from two continuous-wave lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zajnulina, M.; Böhm, M.; Blow, K.; Rieznik, A. A.; Giannone, D.; Haynes, R.; Roth, M. M.

    2015-10-01

    We propose a fibre-based approach for generation of optical frequency combs (OFCs) with the aim of calibration of astronomical spectrographs in the low and medium-resolution range. This approach includes two steps: in the first step, an appropriate state of optical pulses is generated and subsequently moulded in the second step delivering the desired OFC. More precisely, the first step is realised by injection of two continuous-wave (CW) lasers into a conventional single-mode fibre, whereas the second step generates a broad OFC by using the optical solitons generated in step one as initial condition. We investigate the conversion of a bichromatic input wave produced by two initial CW lasers into a train of optical solitons, which happens in the fibre used as step one. Especially, we are interested in the soliton content of the pulses created in this fibre. For that, we study different initial conditions (a single cosine-hump, an Akhmediev breather, and a deeply modulated bichromatic wave) by means of soliton radiation beat analysis and compare the results to draw conclusion about the soliton content of the state generated in the first step. In case of a deeply modulated bichromatic wave, we observed the formation of a collective soliton crystal for low input powers and the appearance of separated solitons for high input powers. An intermediate state showing the features of both, the soliton crystal and the separated solitons, turned out to be most suitable for the generation of OFC for the purpose of calibration of astronomical spectrographs.

  8. Soliton radiation beat analysis of optical pulses generated from two continuous-wave lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Zajnulina, M.; Giannone, D.; Haynes, R.; Roth, M. M.; Böhm, M.; Blow, K.; Rieznik, A. A.

    2015-10-15

    We propose a fibre-based approach for generation of optical frequency combs (OFCs) with the aim of calibration of astronomical spectrographs in the low and medium-resolution range. This approach includes two steps: in the first step, an appropriate state of optical pulses is generated and subsequently moulded in the second step delivering the desired OFC. More precisely, the first step is realised by injection of two continuous-wave (CW) lasers into a conventional single-mode fibre, whereas the second step generates a broad OFC by using the optical solitons generated in step one as initial condition. We investigate the conversion of a bichromatic input wave produced by two initial CW lasers into a train of optical solitons, which happens in the fibre used as step one. Especially, we are interested in the soliton content of the pulses created in this fibre. For that, we study different initial conditions (a single cosine-hump, an Akhmediev breather, and a deeply modulated bichromatic wave) by means of soliton radiation beat analysis and compare the results to draw conclusion about the soliton content of the state generated in the first step. In case of a deeply modulated bichromatic wave, we observed the formation of a collective soliton crystal for low input powers and the appearance of separated solitons for high input powers. An intermediate state showing the features of both, the soliton crystal and the separated solitons, turned out to be most suitable for the generation of OFC for the purpose of calibration of astronomical spectrographs.

  9. Generation of radiative knots in a randomly pulsed protostellar jet. I. Dynamics and energetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonito, R.; Orlando, S.; Peres, G.; Eislöffel, J.; Miceli, M.; Favata, F.

    2010-02-01

    Context. Herbig-Haro objects are characterized by a complex knotty morphology detected mainly along the axis of protostellar jets in a wide range of bands: from radio to IR to optical bands, with X-rays knots also detected in the past few years. Evidence of interactions between knots formed in different epochs have been found, suggesting that jets may result from the ejection of plasma blobs from the stellar source. Aims: We aim at investigating the physical mechanism leading to the irregular knotty structure observed in protostellar jets in different wavelength bands and the complex interactions occurring among blobs of plasma ejected from the stellar source. Methods: We performed 2D axisymmetric hydrodynamic numerical simulations of a randomly ejected pulsed jet. The jet consists of a train of blobs that ram with supersonic speed into the ambient medium. The initial random velocity of each blob follows an exponential distribution. We explored the ejection rate parameter to derive constraints on the physical properties of protostellar jets by comparing model results with observations. Our model takes the effects of radiative losses and thermal conduction into account. Results: We find that the mutual interactions of blobs ejected at different epochs and with different speeds lead to a variety of plasma components not described by current models of jets. The main features characterizing the randomly pulsed jet scenario are: single high-speed knots, showing a measurable proper motion in nice agreement with optical and X-rays observations; irregular chains of knots aligned along the jet axis and possibly interacting with each other; reverse shocks interacting with outgoing knots; oblique shock patterns produced by the reflection of shocks at the cocoon surrounding the jet. All these structures work together to help determining the morphology of the jet in different wavelength bands. We also find that the thermal conduction plays a crucial role in damping out

  10. The current status and possible future of the Los Alamos spallation radiation effects facility

    SciTech Connect

    Borden, M.J.; Sommer, W.F.

    1995-10-01

    The Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effects Facility (LASREF) has been configured for both proton and spallation neutron irradiations since 1985. The facility makes use of the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility 1 mA 800 MeV proton beam. Environment controlled proton and neutron irradiations have been demonstrated over the past nine years. The current copper beam stop configuration produces a maximum measured neutron flux of 4.6 x 10{sup 17} m{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1} for energies greater than 1 KeV. The maximum proton flux at the center of Gaussian shaped beam is 1.2 x 10{sup 14} protons cm{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1} with beam spot diameter of 3.5 cm at 2{sigma}. Previously published work has shown that the neutron flux can be increased by a factor of ten by changing the beam stop to tungsten and decreasing the diameter. Expertise exists at Los Alamos to further optimize this design to tailor neutron production and spectrum. Consideration and preliminary planning has also been done for increasing the LAMPF proton current from 1 mA to a few mA with a possible maximum of 10 mA. An upgrade of this type would produce current densities comparable to those proposed for the Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Technologies (ADTT) programs.

  11. The status of the macromolecular crystallography beamlines at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller-Dieckmann, Christoph; Bowler, Matthew W.; Carpentier, Philippe; Flot, David; McCarthy, Andrew A.; Nanao, Max H.; Nurizzo, Didier; Pernot, Petra; Popov, Alexander; Round, Adam; Royant, Antoine; de Sanctis, Daniele; von Stetten, David; Leonard, Gordon A.

    2015-04-01

    The European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) is the oldest and most powerful 3rd generation synchrotron in Europe, providing X-rays to more than 40 experimental stations welcoming several thousand researchers per year. A major success story has been the ESRF's facilities for macromolecular crystallography (MX). These are grouped around 3 straight sections: On ID23 canted undulators accommodate ID23-1, a mini-focus tuneable energy end station and ID23-2, the world's first micro-focus beamline dedicated to MX; ID29 houses a single, mini-focus, tuneable energy end station; ID30 will provide three end stations for MX due in operation from mid-2014 to early 2015. Here, one branch of a canted X-ray source feeds two fixed-energy end stations (MASSIF-1, MASSIF-3). The second feeds ID30B, a variable focus, tuneable energy beamline. MASSIF-1 is optimised for automatic high-throughput experiments requiring a relatively large beam size at the sample position, MASSIF-3 is a high-intensity, micro-focus facility designed to complement ID23-2. All end stations are highly automated, equipped with sample mounting robots and large area, fast-readout photon-counting detectors. Experiment control and tracking is achieved via a combination of the MXCuBE2 graphical user interface and the ISPyB database, the former allowing user-friendly control of all beamline components, the latter providing data tracking before, after and during experiments.

  12. A comparative study of the bactericidal activity and daily disinfection housekeeping surfaces by a new portable pulsed UV radiation device.

    PubMed

    Umezawa, Kazuo; Asai, Satomi; Inokuchi, Sadaki; Miyachi, Hayato

    2012-06-01

    Daily cleaning and disinfecting of non-critical surfaces in the patient-care areas are known to reduce the occurrence of health care-associated infections. However, the conventional means for decontamination of housekeeping surfaces of sites of frequent hand contact such as manual disinfection using ethanol wipes are laborious and time-consuming in daily practice. This study evaluated a newly developed portable pulsed ultraviolet (UV) radiation device for its bactericidal activity in comparison with continuous UV-C, and investigated its effect on the labor burden when implemented in a hospital ward. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Acinetobacter baumannii, Amikacin and Ciprofloxacin-resistant A. baumannii, Staphylococcus aureus, Methicillin-resistant S. aureus and Bacillus cereus were irradiated with pulsed UV or continuous UV-C. Pulsed UV and continuous UV-C required 5 and 30 s of irradiation, respectively, to attain bactericidal activity with more than 2Log growth inhibition of all the species. The use of pulsed UV in daily disinfection of housekeeping surfaces reduced the working hours by half in comparison to manual disinfection using ethanol wipes. The new portable pulsed UV radiation device was proven to have a bactericidal activity against critical nosocomial bacteria, including antimicrobial-resistant bacteria after short irradiation, and was thus found to be practical as a method for disinfecting housekeeping surfaces and decreasing the labor burden.

  13. Apparatus complex based on liquid xenon detector for gamma spectrometry in the intervals between pulses of intense radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirsanov, M. A.

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the effects of intense radiation on the operation of the liquid xenon spectrometer we have created apparatus complex on the basis of the liquid xenon detector. The experimental setup consists of a multifunctional chamber, gas system, cooling system, temperature control system, X-ray generator, a special preamp, passive protection, scintillation monitor of the accelerator beam, thermoluminescent dosimeters, copper monitor bremsstrahlung, Ge(Li) detector. Multifunctional chamber includes a detecting unit (flat or cylindrical ionization chamber), the cleaning unit of the xenon, control unit of the purity of liquid xenon. The liquid xenon detector was irradiated by bremsstrahlung pulses of the microtron. The frequency of irradiation pulses was 400 Hz. The absorbed dose was varied from 10-7 to 0.1 Gy per pulse. The electronic and ionic processes in liquid xenon at different radiation doses were investigated. The recovery time of the spectrometric mode of operation of the liquid xenon detector after intense pulse irradiation has been studied. Stable operation of the liquid xenon spectrometer in the intervals between the pulses of the accelerator shown for a long time.

  14. The PUR Experiment on the EXPOSE-R facility: biological dosimetry of solar extraterrestrial UV radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bérces, A.; Egyeki, M.; Fekete, A.; Horneck, G.; Kovács, G.; Panitz, C.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of our experiment Phage and Uracil Response was to extend the use of bacteriophage T7 and uracil biological dosimeters for measuring the biologically effective ultraviolet (UV) dose in the harsh extraterrestrial radiation conditions. The biological detectors were exposed in vacuum-tightly cases in the European Space Agency (ESA) astrobiological exposure facility attached to the external platform of Zvezda (EXPOSE-R). EXPOSE-R took off to the International Space Station (ISS) in November 2008 and was installed on the External platform of the Russian module Zvezda of the ISS in March 2009. Our goal was to determine the dose-effect relation for the formation of photoproducts (i.e. damage to phage DNA and uracil, respectively). The extraterrestrial solar UV radiation ranges over the whole spectrum from vacuum-UV (λ<200 nm) to UVA (315 nm<λ<400 nm), which causes photolesions (photoproducts) in the nucleic acids/their components either by photoionization or excitation. However, these wavelengths cause not only photolesions but in a wavelength-dependent efficiency the reversion of some photolesions, too. Our biological detectors measured in situ conditions the resultant of both reactions induced by the extraterrestrial UV radiation. From this aspect the role of the photoreversion in the extension of the biological UV dosimetry are discussed.

  15. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report. October 1 - December 31, 2009.

    SciTech Connect

    D. L. Sisterson

    2010-01-12

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 - (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the first quarter of FY 2010 for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale is 1,987.20 hours (0.90 x 2,208); for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,097.60 hours (0.95 x 2,208); and for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1,876.8 hours (0.85 x 2,208). The ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) deployment in Graciosa Island, the Azores, Portugal, continues; its OPSMAX time this quarter is 2,097.60 hours (0.95 x 2,208). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are the result of downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to

  16. Two-Channel Generator of the 8-mm Wavelength Range for Radiation with Subgigawatt Power Level Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostov, V. V.; Elchaninov, A. A.; Romanchenko, I. V.; Shunailov, S. A.; Ul'maskulov, M. R.; Sharypov, K. A.; Shpak, V. G.; Rukin, S. N.; Yalandin, M. I.

    2014-01-01

    We review the studies of phase stabilization of a pulsed relativistic backward-wave oscillator (BWO) excited by the feed voltage with a steep front. Results of radiation phase stabilization are compared with the results of in-phase excitation of two independent nanosecond relativistic microwave backward-wave oscillators of the 8-mm wavelength range. Stable and controlled (by correcting the voltage front) synchronization of two channels with identical high-current electron beams is demonstrated for the case of generation power of up to 230 MW and a pulse duration of up to 100 oscillation periods in each beam.

  17. Numerical and experimental studies of mechanisms underlying the effect of pulsed broadband terahertz radiation on nerve cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duka, M. V.; Dvoretskaya, L. N.; Babelkin, N. S.; Khodzitskii, M. K.; Chivilikhin, S. A.; Smolyanskaya, O. A.

    2014-08-01

    We have studied the mechanisms underlying the effect of pulsed broadband terahertz radiation on the growth of neurites of sensory ganglia using a comparative analysis of measured reflection spectra of ganglion neurites (in the frequency range 0.1 - 2.0 THz) and spectra obtained by numerical simulation with CST Microwave Studio. The observed changes are shown to be mainly due to pulse energy absorption in the ganglion neurites. Of particular interest are the observed single resonance frequencies related to resonance size effects, which can be used to irradiate ganglia in order to activate their growth.

  18. Numerical and experimental studies of mechanisms underlying the effect of pulsed broadband terahertz radiation on nerve cells

    SciTech Connect

    Duka, M V; Dvoretskaya, L N; Babelkin, N S; Khodzitskii, M K; Chivilikhin, S A; Smolyanskaya, O A

    2014-08-31

    We have studied the mechanisms underlying the effect of pulsed broadband terahertz radiation on the growth of neurites of sensory ganglia using a comparative analysis of measured reflection spectra of ganglion neurites (in the frequency range 0.1 – 2.0 THz) and spectra obtained by numerical simulation with CST Microwave Studio. The observed changes are shown to be mainly due to pulse energy absorption in the ganglion neurites. Of particular interest are the observed single resonance frequencies related to resonance size effects, which can be used to irradiate ganglia in order to activate their growth. (laser biophotonics)

  19. Measuring radiation damage dynamics by pulsed ion beam irradiation. 2015 Annual Progress Report for DOE/NE/NEET

    SciTech Connect

    Kucheyev, S. O.

    2016-03-07

    The major goal of this project is to develop and demonstrate a novel experimental approach to access the dynamic regime of radiation damage formation processes in nuclear materials. In particular, the project exploits a pulsed-ion-beam method in order to gain insight into defect interaction dynamics by measuring effective defect interaction time constants and defect diffusion lengths. For Year 2, this project had the following two major milestones: (i) measurement of the temperature dependence of defect dynamics in SiC and (ii) the evaluation of the robustness of the pulsed beam method from studies of the defect generation rate. As we describe below, both of these milestones have been met.

  20. Picosecond pulses of coherent MM-wave radiation in a photoinjector-driven waveguide free-selected laser

    SciTech Connect

    Fochs, S.N.; Le Sage, G.P.; Feng, L.

    1995-12-31

    A 5 MeV, high repetition rate (2.142 GHz in burst mode), high brightness, tabletop photoinjector is currently under construction at the UC Davis Department of Applied Science, on the LLNL site. Ultrashort pulses of coherent synchrotron radiation can be generated by transversally accelerating the electron beam with a wiggler in either metallic or dielectric-loaded waveguide FEL structures. This interaction is investigated theoretically and experimentally. Subpicosecond photoelectron bunches will be produced in the photoinjector by irradiating a high quantum efficiency Cs{sub 2}Te (Cesium Telluride) photocathode with a train of 100 UV (210 nm), ultra-short (250 fs) laser pulses. These bunches will be accelerated in a 1-1/2 cell {pi}-mode X-band RF gun e energized by a 20 MW, 8,568 GHz SLAC klystron. The peak current is 0.25 kA (0.25 nC, 1 ps), with a normalized beam emittance {epsilon}{sub n}<2.5 {pi} mm-mrad. This prebunched electron beam is then transversally accelerated in a cylindrical waveguide by a 30-mm period, 10 period long helical wiggler. The peak wiggler field is adjusted to 8.5 kG, so that the group velocity of the radiated electromagnetic waves matches the axial velocity of the electron bunch (grazing condition, zero slippage). Chirped output pulses in excess of 2 MW power are predicted, with an instantaneous bandwidth extending from 125 GHz to 225 GHz and a pulse duration of 15 ps (HWHM). To produce even shorter pulses, a dielectric-loaded waveguide can be used. The dispersion relation of this waveguide structure has an inflection point (zero group velocity dispersion). If the grazing condition is satisfied at this point, the final output pulse duration is no longer determined by slippage, or by group velocity dispersion and bandwidth, but by higher-order dispersive effects yielding transform-limited pulses.

  1. Single-pulse driven, large-aperture 2×1 array plasma-electrodes optical switch for SG-II upgrading facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun; Wu, Dengsheng; Zheng, Jiangang; Zheng, Kuixing; Zhu, Qihua; Zhang, Xiongjun

    2014-12-01

    We demonstrate the design and performance of an optical switch that has been constructed for the SG-II upgrading facility. The device is a longitudinal, potassium di-hydrogen phosphate (KDP), 360 mm×360 mm aperture, and 2×1 array electro-optical switch driven by a 20 kV output switching-voltage pulse generator through two plasma electrodes produced at the rise edge of the switching-voltage pulse. The results show that the temporal responses and the spatial performance of the optical switch fulfill the operation requirements of the SG-II upgrading facility.

  2. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER: IR multiphoton dissociation of trichlorosilane induced by pulsed CO2 and NH3 laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apatin, V. M.; Laptev, Vladimir B.; Ryabov, Evgenii A.

    2003-10-01

    The IR multiphoton dissociation of trichlorosilane (SiHCl3) molecules irradiated by pulses from CO2 and NH3 lasers is studied. The dependences of dissociation yield on the frequency and energy density of laser radiation, as well as on the parent pressure of SiHCl3, are determined. It is found that HCl and a solid precipitate, probably with a common chemical formula (SiCl2)n, are the main products of dissociation of trichlorosilane.

  3. Pulsed Magnetic Field System for Magnetized Target Experiments at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, M. A.; Solberg, J. M.; Logan, B. G.; Perkins, L. J.

    2014-10-01

    High-magnitude magnetic fields applied to inertially confined targets may improve fusion yield and enable basic science applications. We discuss the development of a pulsed magnetic field system for NIF with the goal of applying 10--70 T to various NIF targets. While the driver may be little more than a spark-gap switched capacitor, numerous complex challenges exist in fielding such a system on NIF. The coil surrounding the metallic hohlraum drives induced current in the hohlraum wall. Both the coil and hohlraum wall must survive ohmic heating and J × B forces for several microseconds. Pulsed power must couple to the coil in the NIF environment. The system must not cause late-time optics damage due to debris. There is very limited volume for the driver in a NIF Diagnostic Instrument Manipulator (DIM). We are modeling the coil and hohlraum MHD effects with the LLNL code, ALE3D. However, the simulations lack complete and accurate data for all the required thermo-physical material properties over the expected range of temperatures (below vaporization) and pressures. Therefore, substantial experimental development is planned in the coming year. We present coil and hohlraum simulations results, overall system design, and progress towards an operational prototype test-stand. LLNL is operated by LLNS, LLC, for the U.S. D.O.E., NNSA under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. This work was supported by LLNL LDRD 14-ER-028.

  4. Control of browning of minimally processed mangoes subjected to ultraviolet radiation pulses.

    PubMed

    de Sousa, Aline Ellen Duarte; Fonseca, Kelem Silva; da Silva Gomes, Wilny Karen; Monteiro da Silva, Ana Priscila; de Oliveira Silva, Ebenézer; Puschmann, Rolf

    2017-01-01

    The pulsed ultraviolet radiation (UVP) has been used as an alternative strategy for the control of microorganisms in food. However, its application causes the browning of minimally processed fruits and vegetables. In order to control the browning of the 'Tommy Atkins' minimally processed mango and treated with UVP (5.7 J cm(-2)) it was used 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) (0.5 μL L(-1)), an ethylene action blocker in separate stages, comprising five treatments: control, UVP (U), 1-MCP + UVP (M + U), UVP + 1-MCP (U + M) e 1-MCP + UVP + 1-MCP (M + U + M). At the 1st, 7th and 14th days of storage at 12 °C, we evaluated the color (L* and b*), electrolyte leakage, polyphenol oxidase, total extractable polyphenols, vitamin C and total antioxidant activity. The 1-MCP, when applied before UVP, prevented the loss of vitamin C and when applied in a double dose, retained the yellow color (b*) of the cubes. However, the 1-MCP reduced lightness (L*) of independent mango cubes whatever applied before and/or after the UVP. Thus, the application of 1-MCP did not control, but intensified the browning of minimally processed mangoes irradiated with UVP.

  5. Effects of pulse-modulated microwave radiation and conventional heating on sperm production

    SciTech Connect

    Lebovitz, R.M.; Johnson, L.; Samson, W.K.

    1987-01-01

    The effects on testicular function of pulse-modulated microwave radiation (PM MWR, 1.3 GHz) and of conventional heating were studied in the rat. Anesthetized adult males (Sprague-Dawley, 400-500 g) were treated then killed at specific intervals with respect to the 13-day cycle of the seminiferous epithelium. PM MWR at 7.7 mW/g (90 min) yielded a modest decline in daily sperm production (DSP) that derived primarily from effects on primary spermatocytes. PM MWR at 4.2 mW/g was ineffective. The mean intratesticular temperature during the former reached 40 degrees C and did not exceed 38 degrees C during the latter. MWR considerably in excess of 7.7 mW/g yielded decrements in virtually all germ cell types, with primary spermatocytes again being most markedly affected. Using conventional heating, intratesticular temperatures in excess of 39 degrees C for 60 min were required for significant decrements in DSP. Levels of circulating follicle-stimulating hormone and of leutinizing hormone were resistant to either treatment. We conclude that the damage threshold and the differential sensitivity of immature germ cells to PM MWR can be adequately explained by the consequent macroscopic heating.

  6. Pulse-Shape Effects in Ionization of Atomic Hydrogen by Short-Pulse XUV Intense Laser Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartschat, Klaus; Venzke, Joel; Grum Grzhimailo, Alexei N.

    2015-05-01

    In a recent publication, we investigated a displacement effect in strong-field atomic ionization by an XUV pulse. We found that the angular momentum of the ejected electron and, therefore, its angular distribution were strongly affected by the details in the short ramp-on/off characteristics of various pulses, all of which were otherwise identical with a plateau in the envelope function that was significantly longer than the ramp-on/off phase. In the present work, we studied the effect in more detail, especially regarding the role of the plateau, which is unlikely to occur in a realistic experimental setup. As expected, great care must be taken in setting up theoretical models to ensure that the pulses are, at least in principle, experimentally realizable. This work is supported by the United States National Science Foundation under grant No. PHY-1430245 and the XSEDE allocation PHY-090031, and by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research under Grant No. 12-02-01123.

  7. High-Precision Time Delay Control with Continuous Phase Shifter for Pump-Probe Experiments Using Synchrotron Radiation Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Yoshihito; Ohshima, Takashi; Moritomo, Yutaka; Tanaka, Hitoshi; Takata, Masaki

    2010-06-23

    Brilliant pulsed x-ray synchrotron radiation (SR) is useful for pump-probe experiment such as time-resolved x-ray diffraction, x-ray absorption fine structure, and x-ray spectroscopy. For laser pump-SR x-ray probe experiments, short pulsed lasers are generally synchronized to the SR master oscillator controlling the voltage for acceleration of electron bunches in an accelerator, and the interval between the laser and the SR pulses is changed around the time scale of target phenomenon. Ideal delay control produces any time delay as keeping the time-precision and pointing-stability of optical pulses at a sample position. We constructed the time delay control module using a continuous phase shifter of radio frequency signal and a frequency divider, which can produce the delayed trigger pulses to the laser without degradation of the time precision and the pointing stability. A picoseconds time-resolved x-ray diffraction experiment was demonstrated at SPring-8 storage ring for fast lattice response by femtosecond pulsed laser irradiation, and suggested the possibility of accurate sound velocity measurement. A delay control unit operating with subpicosecond precision has also been designed for femtosecond pump-probe experiments using a free electron laser at SPring-8 campus.

  8. Short-term variability of gamma radiation at the ARM Eastern North Atlantic facility (Azores).

    PubMed

    Barbosa, S M; Miranda, P; Azevedo, E B

    2017-06-01

    This work addresses the short-term variability of gamma radiation measured continuously at the Eastern North Atlantic (ENA) facility located in the Graciosa island (Azores, 39N; 28W), a fixed site of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement programme (ARM). The temporal variability of gamma radiation is characterized by occasional anomalies over a slowly-varying signal. Sharp peaks lasting typically 2-4 h are coincident with heavy precipitation and result from the scavenging effect of precipitation bringing radon progeny from the upper levels to the ground surface. However the connection between gamma variability and precipitation is not straightforward as a result of the complex interplay of factors such as the precipitation intensity, the PBL height, the cloud's base height and thickness, or the air mass origin and atmospheric concentration of sub-micron aerosols, which influence the scavenging processes and therefore the concentration of radon progeny. Convective precipitation associated with cumuliform clouds forming under conditions of warming of the ground relative to the air does not produce enhancements in gamma radiation, since the drop growing process is dominated by the fast accretion of liquid water, resulting in the reduction of the concentration of radionuclides by dilution. Events of convective precipitation further contribute to a reduction in gamma counts by inhibiting radon release from the soil surface and by attenuating gamma rays from all gamma-emitting elements on the ground. Anomalies occurring in the absence of precipitation are found to be associated with a diurnal cycle of maximum gamma counts before sunrise decreasing to a minimum in the evening, which are observed in conditions of thermal stability and very weak winds enabling the build-up of near surface radon progeny during the night. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Measuring x-ray burn history with the Streaked Polar Instrumentation for Diagnosing Energetic Radiation (SPIDER) at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, S. F.; Bell, P. M.; Bradley, D. K.; Burns, S. R.; Celeste, J. R.; Dauffy, L. S.; Eckart, M. J.; Gerhard, M. A.; Hagmann, C.; Headley, D. I.; Holder, J. P.; Izumi, N.; Jones, M. C.; Kellogg, J. W.; Khater, H. Y.; Kimbrough, J. R.; Macphee, A. G.; Opachich, Y. P.; Palmer, N. E.; Petre, R. B.; Porter, J. L.; Shelton, R. T.; Thomas, T. L.; Worden, J. B.

    2012-10-01

    We present a new diagnostic for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [1,2]. The Streaked Polar Instrumentation for Diagnosing Energetic Radiation (SPIDER) is an x-ray streak camera for use on almost-igniting targets, up to ~1017 neutrons per shot. It measures the x-ray burn history for ignition campaigns with the following requirements: X-Ray Energy 8-30keV, Temporal Resolution 10ps, Absolute Timing Resolution 30ps, Neutron Yield: 1014 to 1017. The features of the design are a heavily shielded instrument enclosure outside the target chamber, remote location of the neutron and EMP sensitive components, a precise laser pulse comb fiducial timing system and fast streaking electronics. SPIDER has been characterized for sweep linearity, dynamic range, temporal and spatial resolution. Preliminary DT implosion data shows the functionality of the instrument and provides an illustration of the method of burn history extraction.

  10. The hohlraum radiation temperature and M-band fraction on the SGIII-prototype laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Wenyi; Yang, Dong; Lan, Ke; Li, Sanwei; Li, Yongsheng

    2014-10-01

    The hohlraum radiation temperature and M-band fraction are determined by a shock-wave technique and measured by a broadband soft x-ray spectrometer. The peak radiation temperature TR and M-band fraction fm are simultaneously determined by using the observed shock velocities in Al and Ti. For the vacuum Au hohlraum used in the experiments, TR is about 160 eV and fm is between 4.3-6.3% under 1ns laser pulse of 2 k. And TR is about 202 eV and fm is about 9% with laser energy 6 kJ. The Continuous Phase Plate (CPP) for beam smoothing is applied in the experiment, which increases TR to 207 eV while has almost no influence on fm. Comparisons between the results from the two kinds of technologies show that TR from the shock wave technique is lower than that from SXS whether CPP is applied or not. However, fm from the shock wave technique is consistent with that from SXS without CPP, but obviously lower than the SXS's result with CPP.

  11. Episodic Mass Loss on the Timescale of Thermal Pulses: Radiative Transfer Modeling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speck, Angela; Nenkova, Maia; Meixner, Margaret; Eltizur, Moshe; Knapp, Gillian

    Using far-infrared observations obtained from the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO), we have discovered extremely large dust shells around two post-AGB stars (the Egg Nebula and AFGL 618; Speck, Meixner & Knapp 2001). These circumstellar shells contain the fossil record of their previous AGB mass loss. The radial profiles of these dust shells suggest that episodic mass loss has occurred with mass-loss enhancements on timescales corresponding to theoretical predictions of thermal pulses on the AGB. By modeling the dust emission, we can constrain how the mass loss varies as stars evolve on the AGB, which will constrain the mass-loss mechanisms. Furthermore this modeling allows the determination of the density distribution of the dust around the protoplanetary nebulae as a function of radius. However, modeling such large dust shells is not trivial. Previous studies of very large circumstellar shells showed that most of the outer shell is heated by the interstellar radiation field (ISRF) rather than the central star. Therefore using radiative transfer models with only the central star heating the dust is unrealistic. Furthermore, where the circumstellar shell ploughs into the surrounding interstellar medium may lead to a pile up of material at the outer edge of the dust shell. We present results of modeling the very large dust shells around the Egg Nebula and AFGL 618 using a version of the 1-d radiative transfer code DUSTY which includes external heating of the dust by the ISRF. The models require that the innermost regions has a rapid (1r3) dust density drop-off, indicative of the increased mass-loss rate towards the end of the AGB. Further out, the dust shell has an underlying 1r2 density drop-off, with two superimposed density enhancements. These results provide constraints on the spatial extent of increased density regions and therefore on the duration of increased mass-loss episodes. Furthermore, the modeling suggests that the mass loss rate was either higher in

  12. Radiation-Induced Chemical Reactions in Hydrogel of Hydroxypropyl Cellulose (HPC): A Pulse Radiolysis Study.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Shinichi; Ma, Jun; Marignier, Jean-Louis; Hiroki, Akihiro; Taguchi, Mitsumasa; Mostafavi, Mehran; Katsumura, Yosuke

    2016-12-01

    We performed studies on pulse radiolysis of highly transparent and shape-stable hydrogels of hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC) that were prepared using a radiation-crosslinking technique. Several fundamental aspects of radiation-induced chemical reactions in the hydrogels were investigated. With radiation doses less than 1 kGy, degradation of the HPC matrix was not observed. The rate constants of the HPC composing the matrix, with two water decomposition radicals [hydroxyl radical ((•)OH) and hydrated electron ([Formula: see text])] in the gels, were determined to be 4.5 × 10(9) and 1.8 × 10(7) M(-1) s(-1), respectively. Direct ionization of HPC in the matrix slightly increased the initial yield of [Formula: see text], but the additionally produced amount of [Formula: see text] disappeared immediately within 200 ps, indicating fast recombination of [Formula: see text] with hole radicals on HPC or on surrounding hydration water molecules. Reactions of [Formula: see text] with nitrous oxide (N2O) and nitromethane (CH3NO2) were also examined. Decay of [Formula: see text] due to scavenging by N2O and CH3NO2 were both slower in hydrogels than in aqueous solutions, showing slower diffusions of the reactants in the gel matrix. The degree of decrease in the decay rate was more effective for N2O than for CH3NO2, revealing lower solubility of N2O in gel than in water. It is known that in viscous solvents, such as ethylene glycol, CH3NO2 exhibits a transient effect, which is a fast reaction over the contact distance of reactants and occurs without diffusions of reactants. However, such an effect was not observed in the hydrogel used in the current study. In addition, the initial yield of [Formula: see text], which is affected by the amount of the scavenged precursor of [Formula: see text], in hydrogel containing N2O was slightly higher than that in water containing N2O, and the same tendency was found for CH3NO2.

  13. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operation quarterly report July 1 - September 30, 2010.

    SciTech Connect

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2010-10-26

    Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1-(ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the fourth quarter of FY2010 for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2097.60 hours (0.95 2208 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) locale is 1987.20 hours (0.90 2208) and for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1876.80 hours (0.85 2208). The first ARM Mobile Facility (AMF1) deployment in Graciosa Island, the Azores, Portugal, continues, so the OPSMAX time this quarter is 2097.60 hours (0.95 x 2208). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or datastream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous datastreams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to

  14. The Planck's character and temperature of visible radiation of a pulse-periodic discharge in cesium vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baksht, F. G.; Lapshin, V. F.

    2016-02-01

    The radiation spectrum of pulse-periodic discharge in cesium vapor has been simulated in the framework of a two-temperature multifluid radiative gasdynamic model. It is established that, at a broad range of vapor pressures, the discharge spectrum exhibits a Planck character in a significant part of the visible spectral interval, which accounts for the high quality of color rendering in the discharge radiation. The relation between color temperature T c and electron temperature T 0 on the discharge axis is determined by radial optical thickness τ R of the plasma column: T c ≈ T 0 at τ R ≈ 1, T c < T 0 at τ R < 1, and T c > T 0 at τ R > 1. As the vapor pressure increases from 83 to 1087 Torr, color rendering index Ra of the discharge radiation changes from 95 to 98 and the color temperature grows from 3600 to 5200 K.

  15. Reference Dosimetry for the 1992 NATO Battlefield Dosimetry Intercomparison at the Army Pulse Radiation Facility

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-01

    the surface of phantoms, normalized to reactor power, were measured using paired ionization chambers, a neptunium fission chamber, diodes, rhodium foils... Neptunium fission chamber (Np FC) (e) Silicon diodes (f) Rhodium foils (g) Aluminum oxide thermoluminescent dosimeters (AI20 3 TLD) 2. AFRRI (a

  16. Neutrons confirmed in Nagasaki and at the Army pulsed radiation Facility: Implications for Hiroshima

    SciTech Connect

    Straume, T.; Harris, L.J.; Marchett, A.A.; Egbert, S.D.

    1994-05-01

    Recent reports have clearly demonstrated that large discrepancies exist between neutron activation measured in Hiroshima and activation calculated using the current dosimetry system DS86. The reports confirmed previous results for cobalt activation in Hiroshoma that suggested problems, and this has spurred a joint U.S.-Japan effort to identify the source(s) of this discrepancy. Here, new results are presented that appear to eliminate both the measurements of neutron activation and the DS86 air-transport calculations are potential sources of the discrepancy in Hiroshima. Computer transport of DS86 fission neutrons through large distances of air was validated using concrete samples from Nagasaki and chloride detectors placed at selected distances from a bare uranium reactor. In both cases accelerator mass spectrometry was used to measure thermal neutron activation via the reaction. {sup 35}Cl(n, {gamma}){sup 36}Cl (half-life, 301,000 years). Good agreement was observed between measurements of neutron activation and DS86 calculations for Nagasaki, as well as for the reactor experiment. Thus the large discrepancy observed in Hiroshima appears not to be due to uncertainties in air-transport calculations or in the activation measurements; rather, the discrepancy appears to be due to uncertainties associated with the Hiroshima bomb itself. 15 refs., 3 figs., 8 tabs.

  17. Research on quasi-cw and pulse interaction of strong laser radiation with the military technical materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rycyk, Antoni; CzyŻ, Krzysztof; Sarzyński, Antoni; Skrzeczanowski, Wojciech; Ostrowski, Roman; Strzelec, Marek; Jach, Karol; Świerczyński, Robert

    2016-12-01

    The paper describes work connected to the investigation of the interaction of strong laser radiation with selected metals, constituting typical materials applied in military technology, like aluminum, copper, brass and titanium. A special laser experimental stand was designed and constructed to achieve this objective. The system consisted of two Nd:YAG lasers working in the regime of free generation (quasi-cw) and another Nd:YAG laser, generating short pre-pulses in the Qswitching regime. During the concurrent operation of both quasi-cw systems it was possible to obtain pulse energies amounting to 10 J in a time period (pulses) of 1 ms. The synchronized, serial operation resulted in energy amounting to 5 J over a time period (pulse) of 2 ms. Variations of the target's surface reflection coefficient, caused by the interaction of short pre-pulses with high power density were determined. The experiments were performed using a standard Nd:YAG laser with amplifiers, generating output pulses whose duration amounted to 10 ns and energy to 1 J, with near Gaussian profile. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was used to analyze the emission spectra of targets under the conditions of the interaction of destructive strong and weak as well as long and short excitation laser pulses. A decay of the spectra in the UV range from 200 to around 350 nm was observed when irradiating the target with a long, quasi-cw destructive pulse. Moreover, in the case of an Al target, some AlO molecular spectra appeared, suggesting a chemical reaction of the aluminum atoms with oxygen.

  18. A pulse-forming network for particle path visualization. [at Ames Aeromechanics Water Tunnel Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcalister, K. W.

    1981-01-01

    A procedure is described for visualizing nonsteady fluid flow patterns over a wide velocity range using discrete nonluminous particles. The paramount element responsible for this capability is a pulse-forming network with variable inductance that is used to modulate the discharge of a fixed amount of electrical energy through a xenon flashtube. The selectable duration of the resultant light emission functions as a variable shutter so that particle path images of constant length can be recorded. The particles employed as flow markers are hydrogen bubbles that are generated by electrolysis in a water tunnel. Data are presented which document the characteristics of the electrical circuit and establish the relation of particle velocity to both section inductance and film exposure.

  19. Drilling and cutting of thin metal plates in water with radiation of a repetitively pulsed Nd : YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glova, A. F.; Lysikov, A. Yu

    2011-10-01

    The conditions of drilling and cutting of 0.15-mm-thick titanium and stainless steel plates in water with the radiation of a repetitively pulsed Nd : YAG laser having the mean power up to 30 W are studied experimentally in the absence of water and gas jets. Dependences of the maximal cutting speed in water on the radiation power are obtained, the cutting efficiency is determined, and the comparison with the conditions of drilling and cutting of plates in air is carried out.

  20. Use of picosecond optical pulses and FET's integrated with printed circuit antennas to generate millimeter wave radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, D. C.; Plant, D. V.; Fetterman, H. R.; Matloubian, M.

    1991-03-01

    Millimeter-wave radiation has been generated from FETs and high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs), integrated with printed circuit antennas and illuminated with picosecond optical pulses. Modulation of the millimeter waves was achieved by applying a swept RF signal to the transistor gate. Using this technique, tunable electrical sidebands were added to the optically generated carrier providing a method of transmitting information. The technique also provides increased resolution for use in spectroscopic applications. Heterodyne detection demonstrated that the system continuously generated tunable radiation, constrained by the high-gain antenna, from 45 to 75 GHz.

  1. Drilling and cutting of thin metal plates in water with radiation of a repetitively pulsed Nd : YAG laser

    SciTech Connect

    Glova, A F; Lysikov, A Yu

    2011-10-31

    The conditions of drilling and cutting of 0.15-mm-thick titanium and stainless steel plates in water with the radiation of a repetitively pulsed Nd : YAG laser having the mean power up to 30 W are studied experimentally in the absence of water and gas jets. Dependences of the maximal cutting speed in water on the radiation power are obtained, the cutting efficiency is determined, and the comparison with the conditions of drilling and cutting of plates in air is carried out.

  2. X-ray transport and radiation response assessment (XTRRA) experiments at the National Ignition Facility

    DOE PAGES

    Fournier, K. B.; Brown, Jr., C. G.; Yeoman, M. F.; ...

    2016-08-10

    Our team has developed an experimental platform to evaluate the x-ray-generated stress and impulse in materials. Experimental activities include x-ray source development, design of the sample mounting hardware and sensors interfaced to the NIF’s diagnostics insertion system, and system integration into the facility. This paper focuses on the X-ray Transport and Radiation Response Assessment (XTRRA) test cassettes built for these experiments. The test cassette is designed to position six samples at three predetermined distances from the source, each known to within ±1% accuracy. Built in calorimeters give in situ measurements of the x-ray environment along the sample lines of sight.more » We discuss the measured accuracy of sample responses, as well as planned modifications to the XTRRA cassette.« less

  3. X-ray transport and radiation response assessment (XTRRA) experiments at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Fournier, K. B.; Brown, Jr., C. G.; Yeoman, M. F.; Fisher, J. H.; Seiler, S. W.; Hinshelwood, D.; Compton, S.; Holdener, F. R.; Kemp, G. E.; Newlander, C. D.; Gilliam, R. P.; Froula, N.; Lilly, M.; Davis, J. F.; Lerch, MAJ. A.; Blue, B. E.

    2016-08-10

    Our team has developed an experimental platform to evaluate the x-ray-generated stress and impulse in materials. Experimental activities include x-ray source development, design of the sample mounting hardware and sensors interfaced to the NIF’s diagnostics insertion system, and system integration into the facility. This paper focuses on the X-ray Transport and Radiation Response Assessment (XTRRA) test cassettes built for these experiments. The test cassette is designed to position six samples at three predetermined distances from the source, each known to within ±1% accuracy. Built in calorimeters give in situ measurements of the x-ray environment along the sample lines of sight. We discuss the measured accuracy of sample responses, as well as planned modifications to the XTRRA cassette.

  4. The Advanced Photon Source: A national synchrotron radiation research facility at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    The vision of the APS sprang from prospective users, whose unflagging support the project has enjoyed throughout the decade it has taken to make this facility a reality. Perhaps the most extraordinary aspect of synchrotron radiation research, is the extensive and diverse scientific makeup of the user community. From this primordial soup of scientists exchanging ideas and information, come the collaborative and interdisciplinary accomplishments that no individual alone could produce. So, unlike the solitary Roentgen, scientists are engaged in a collective and dynamic enterprise with the potential to see and understand the structures of the most complex materials that nature or man can produce--and which underlie virtually all modern technologies. This booklet provides scientists and laymen alike with a sense of both the extraordinary history of x-rays and the knowledge they have produced, as well as the potential for future discovery contained in the APS--a source a million million times brighter than the Roentgen tube.

  5. RAPID COMMUNICATION: First human transvenous coronary angiography at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elleaume, H.; Fiedler, S.; Estève, F.; Bertrand, B.; Charvet, A. M.; Berkvens, P.; Berruyer, G.; Brochard, T.; LeDuc, G.; Nemoz, C.; Renier, M.; Suortti, P.; Thomlinson, W.; LeBas, J. F.

    2000-09-01

    The first operation of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) medical beamline is reported in this paper. The goal of the angiography project is to develop a reduced risk imaging technique, which can be used to follow up patients after coronary intervention. After the intravenous injection of a contrast agent (iodine) two images are produced with monochromatic beams, bracketing the iodine K-edge. The logarithmic subtraction of the two measurements results in an iodine-enhanced image, which can be precisely quantified. A research protocol has been designed to evaluate the performances of this method in comparison with the conventional technique. Patients included in the protocol have previously undergone angioplasty. If a re-stenosis is suspected, the patient is imaged both at the ESRF and at the hospital with the conventional technique, within the next few days. This paper reports the results obtained with the first patients. To date, eight patients have been imaged and excellent image quality was obtained.

  6. X-ray transport and radiation response assessment (XTRRA) experiments at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Fournier, K. B.; Brown, Jr., C. G.; Yeoman, M. F.; Fisher, J. H.; Seiler, S. W.; Hinshelwood, D.; Compton, S.; Holdener, F. R.; Kemp, G. E.; Newlander, C. D.; Gilliam, R. P.; Froula, N.; Lilly, M.; Davis, J. F.; Lerch, MAJ. A.; Blue, B. E.

    2016-08-10

    Our team has developed an experimental platform to evaluate the x-ray-generated stress and impulse in materials. Experimental activities include x-ray source development, design of the sample mounting hardware and sensors interfaced to the NIF’s diagnostics insertion system, and system integration into the facility. This paper focuses on the X-ray Transport and Radiation Response Assessment (XTRRA) test cassettes built for these experiments. The test cassette is designed to position six samples at three predetermined distances from the source, each known to within ±1% accuracy. Built in calorimeters give in situ measurements of the x-ray environment along the sample lines of sight. We discuss the measured accuracy of sample responses, as well as planned modifications to the XTRRA cassette.

  7. X-ray transport and radiation response assessment (XTRRA) experiments at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Fournier, K. B. Brown, C. G.; Yeoman, M. F.; Compton, S.; Holdener, F. R.; Kemp, G. E.; Blue, B. E.; Fisher, J. H.; Newlander, C. D.; Gilliam, R. P.; Froula, N.; Seiler, S. W.; Davis, J. F.; Lerch, MAJ. A.; Hinshelwood, D.; Lilly, M.

    2016-11-15

    Our team has developed an experimental platform to evaluate the x-ray-generated stress and impulse in materials. Experimental activities include x-ray source development, design of the sample mounting hardware and sensors interfaced to the National Ignition Facility’s diagnostics insertion system, and system integration into the facility. This paper focuses on the X-ray Transport and Radiation Response Assessment (XTRRA) test cassettes built for these experiments. The test cassette is designed to position six samples at three predetermined distances from the source, each known to within ±1% accuracy. Built-in calorimeters give in situ measurements of the x-ray environment along the sample lines of sight. The measured accuracy of sample responses as well as planned modifications to the XTRRA cassette is discussed.

  8. A facile synthesis of metal nanoparticle - graphene composites for better absorption of solar radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Bindu; Mulla, Rafiq; Rabinal, M. K.

    2015-06-24

    Herein, a facile chemical approach has been adopted to prepare silver nanoparticles (AgNPs)- graphene (G) composite to study photothermal effect. Sodium borohydride (SBH), a strong reducing agent has been selected for this work. Effect of SBH concentrations on optical behavior of AgNPs-G composite was also investigated. Resultant materials were characterized by various techniques including X-ray diffraction (XRD), fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), optical absorption, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). SEM micrographs confirm wrapping of AgNPs into graphene whereas XRD analysis reveals their particle size variation between 47 nm to 69 nm. Optical studies throw a light on their strong absorption behavior towards solar radiation.

  9. Generation of high power pulsed terahertz radiation using a plasmonic photoconductive emitter array with logarithmic spiral antennas

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, Christopher W.; Hashemi, Mohammad R.; Jarrahi, Mona

    2014-02-24

    An array of 3 × 3 plasmonic photoconductive terahertz emitters with logarithmic spiral antennas is fabricated on a low temperature (LT) grown GaAs substrate and characterized in response to a 200 fs optical pump from a Ti:sapphire mode-locked laser at 800 nm wavelength. A microlens array is used to split and focus the optical pump beam onto the active area of each plasmonic photoconductive emitter element. Pulsed terahertz radiation with record high power levels up to 1.9 mW in the 0.1–2 THz frequency range is measured at an optical pump power of 320 mW. The record high power pulsed terahertz radiation is enabled by the use of plasmonic contact electrodes, enhancing the photoconductor quantum efficiencies, and by increasing the overall device active area, mitigating the carrier screening effect and thermal breakdown at high optical pump power levels.

  10. Efficient Cherenkov emission of broadband terahertz radiation from an ultrashort laser pulse in a sandwich structure with nonlinear core

    SciTech Connect

    Bodrov, S. B.; Bakunov, M. I.; Hangyo, M.

    2008-11-01

    A scheme for efficient generation of broadband terahertz radiation by a femtosecond laser pulse propagating in a planar sandwichlike structure is proposed. The structure consists of a thin nonlinear core cladded with prisms made of a material with low terahertz absorption. The focused into a line laser pulse propagates in the core as a leaky or waveguide mode and emits Cherenkov wedge of terahertz waves in the cladding. We developed a theory that describes terahertz generation in such a structure and calculated spatial distribution of the generated terahertz field, its energy spectrum and optical-to-terahertz conversion efficiency. The developed theory predicts the conversion efficiency of up to several percent in a 1 cm long and 1 cm wide Si-LiNbO{sub 3}-Si sandwich structure with a 20 {mu}m thick nonlinear layer pumped by 8.5 {mu}J Ti:sapphire laser with pulse duration of 100 fs.

  11. Interaction of soft x-ray laser pulse radiation with aluminum surface: Nano-meter size surface modification

    SciTech Connect

    Ishino, Masahiko; Faenov, Anatoly; Tanaka, Momoko; Hasegawa, Noboru; Nishikino, Masaharu; Tamotsu, Satoshi; Pikuz, Tatiana; Inogamov, Nail; Zhakhovsky, Vasily; Skobelev, Igor; Fortov, Vladimir; Khohlov, Viktor; Shepelev, Vadim; Ohba, Toshiyuki; Kaihori, Takeshi; Ochi, Yoshihiro; Imazono, Takashi; Kawachi, Tetsuya

    2012-07-11

    Interaction of soft x-ray laser radiation with material and caused modification of the exposed surface has both physical and practical interests. We irradiated the focusing soft x-ray laser (SXRL) pulses having a wavelength of 13.9 nm and the duration of 7 ps to aluminum (Al) surface. After the SXRL irradiation process, the irradiated Al surface was observed with a scanning electron microscope. The surface modifications caused by SXRL single pulse exposure were clearly seen. In addition, it was found that the conical structures having around 100 nm in diameters were formed in the shallow features. The nano-meter size modified structures at Al surface induced by SXRL pulse is interesting as the newly surface structure. Hence, the SXRL beam would be a candidate for a tool of micromachining. We also provide a thermomechanical modeling of SXRL interaction with Al briefly to explain the surface modification.

  12. Ultimate capabilities for few-cycle pulse formation via resonant interaction of XUV radiation with IR-field-dressed atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhmedzhanov, T. R.; Emelin, M. Yu.; Antonov, V. A.; Radeonychev, Y. V.; Ryabikin, M. Yu.; Kocharovskaya, Olga

    2017-02-01

    We perform an ab initio study of the ultimate capabilities and limits of applicability of the method for few-cycle pulse formation via the resonant interaction of extreme ultraviolet (XUV) radiation with atoms dressed by a moderately strong infrared (IR) laser field proposed in two earlier works [Y. V. Radeonychev et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 183902 (2010), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.105.183902 and V. A. Polovinkin et al., Opt. Lett. 36, 2296 (2011), 10.1364/OL.36.002296]. Taking into account all the multiphoton processes in the systems under consideration on the basis of numerical solution of the three-dimensional time-dependent Schrödinger equation (TDSE) in the single-active-electron approximation, we show the possibilities to produce 1.1-fs pulses from 124.6-nm XUV radiation via the linear Stark effect in atomic hydrogen, as well as 500-as pulses from 58.4-nm XUV radiation via excited-state ionization in helium. We derive a generalized analytical solution, which takes into account the interplay between sub-laser-cycle Stark effect and excited-state ionization and allows us to analyze the results of TDSE calculations. We found that the ultimate intensity of the IR field suitable for few-cycle pulse formation via the linear Stark effect or excited-state ionization is limited by the threshold for atomic ionization from the resonant excited state or the ground state, respectively. We show that the pulses with shorter duration can be produced in the medium of ions with higher values of the ionization potential.

  13. Accelerated radiation damage test facility using a 5 MV tandem ion accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wady, P. T.; Draude, A.; Shubeita, S. M.; Smith, A. D.; Mason, N.; Pimblott, S. M.; Jimenez-Melero, E.

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a new irradiation facility that allows to perform accelerated damage tests of nuclear reactor materials at temperatures up to 400 °C using the intense proton (<100 μA) and heavy ion (≈10 μA) beams produced by a 5 MV tandem ion accelerator. The dedicated beam line for radiation damage studies comprises: (1) beam diagnosis and focusing optical components, (2) a scanning and slit system that allows uniform irradiation of a sample area of 0.5-6 cm2, and (3) a sample stage designed to be able to monitor in-situ the sample temperature, current deposited on the sample, and the gamma spectrum of potential radio-active nuclides produced during the sample irradiation. The beam line capabilities have been tested by irradiating a 20Cr-25Ni-Nb stabilised stainless steel with a 3 MeV proton beam to a dose level of 3 dpa. The irradiation temperature was 356 °C, with a maximum range in temperature values of ±6 °C within the first 24 h of continuous irradiation. The sample stage is connected to ground through an electrometer to measure accurately the charge deposited on the sample. The charge can be integrated in hardware during irradiation, and this methodology removes uncertainties due to fluctuations in beam current. The measured gamma spectrum allowed the identification of the main radioactive nuclides produced during the proton bombardment from the lifetimes and gamma emissions. This dedicated radiation damage beam line is hosted by the Dalton Cumbrian Facility of the University of Manchester.

  14. Histological aspects of retinal damage following exposure to pulsed Nd:YAG laser radiation in rabbits: indication for mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadar, T.; Peri, D.; Turetz, J.; Fishbine, E.; Sahar, R.; Egoz, I.; Sapiens, N.; Brandeis, R.

    2007-02-01

    The severity and characteristics of retinal injury following laser radiation derived from laser and tissue related factors. We have previously shown that retinal damage following Nd:YAG Q-switched laser radiation in rabbits was related to physical parameters, i.e. energy levels and number of pulses. Yet, an extremely large variability in the severity of the damage was found under similar exposure paradigms, even within the same retina. This emphasizes the role of the biological variables in the pathological mechanism of laser-induced retinal damage. The aim of the present study was to further study histological parameters of the injury in relation to retinal site and to elucidate their role in the initiation and characteristics of the damage, following various energy levels (10-50 μJ) and number of pulses (1-4). Pigmented rabbits were exposed to Nd:YAG laser radiation (532nm, pulse duration: 20ns). Exposures were conducted in retina tissue, adjacent to the optic nerve, with a total of 20 exposures per retina. Animals were sacrificed 15 min or 24 hours post exposure, eyes enucleated and processed for paraffin embedding. 4μm thick serial sections, stained with hematoxylin and eosin, were examined under light microscopy. Two major types of retinal damage were observed: focal edema confined to the pigmented epithelium and the photoreceptor cells, and hemorrhages, associated with destruction of retinal tissue. While focal edema associated with slight elevation of the photoreceptor layer seems to depend on the pigmented epithelium, hemorrhages were related also to the choroid vasculature at the site of radiation. It is suggested that a thermo-mechanical mechanism is involved in laser induced retinal hemorrhages at energies above 10-30μJ (2-1 pulses, respectively).

  15. [Effect of low intensity pulse-modulated electromagnetic radiation on activity of alkaline phosphatase in blood serum].

    PubMed

    Pashovkina, M S; Akoev, I G

    2001-01-01

    The change in alkaline phosphotase activity in vitro with frequencies modulation at low intensity of pulse-modulated electromagnetic radiation was experimentally shown (EMR, 2375 MHz, intensity: 0.8, 8.0; 40.0 microW/cm2; range modulation: 30-310 Hz; time of interaction: 1-3 min). Revealed effects could be regarded as an evidence of informative character of interaction of modulated EMR.

  16. The structure and photoconductivity of SiGe/Si epitaxial layers modified by single-pulse laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivlev, G. D.; Kazuchits, N. M.; Prakopyeu, S. L.; Rusetsky, M. S.; Gaiduk, P. I.

    2014-12-01

    The effect of nanosecond pulses of ruby laser radiation on the structural state and morphology of the epitaxial layers of a SiO0.5Ge0.5 solid solution on silicon with the initiation of a crystal-melt phase transition has been studied by electron microscopy. Data on the photoelectric parameters of the laser-modified layers having a cellular structure owing to the segregation of germanium during the solidification of the binary melt have been derived.

  17. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Solidification structures on carbon materials surface-melted by repetitive laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramov, D. V.; Arakelyan, Sergei M.; Kutrovskaya, S. V.; Kucherik, A. O.; Prokoshev, V. G.

    2009-04-01

    The solidification morphology of carbon materials surface-melted by laser radiation at atmospheric pressure is studied. Electron microscopy results indicate that melt solidification is accompanied by the formation of surface microstructures, presumably due to the Rayleigh—Taylor instability in the molten carbon. The instability increment and surface tension coefficient of molten carbon are estimated, and the penetration of carbon vapour into the melt during one laser pulse is examined using numerical simulation.

  18. Effect of pulsed laser radiation on deformation band dynamics and discontinuous deformation in aluminum-magnesium Al-6%Mg alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibkov, A. A.; Zolotov, A. E.; Gasanov, M. F.; Zheltov, M. A.; Proskuryakov, K. A.

    2015-12-01

    The dynamics and morphology of deformation bands and the discontinuous deformation under local action of pulsed infrared fiber laser radiation on the surface of aluminum-magnesium Al-6%Mg alloy have been studied by high-speed video recording techniques. Conditions under which laser action leads to the formation of macrolocalized deformation bands and deformation jumps of several percent on the stress-strain diagram are experimentally established. A possible mechanism of this phenomenon is discussed.

  19. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETERS: Evolution of the shape and spectrum of ultrashort pulses upon active mode locking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaporozhchenko, V. A.

    2003-11-01

    Time sweeps of the autocorrelation function and the emission spectrum of an actively mode-locked Nd:YAG laser are recorded during the development of quasi-continuous pre-lasing maintained by a negative feedback loop. It is found that higher Hermitian—Gaussian supermodes are present at the transient stage of radiation, and the ultrashort pulse shortening is accompanied by the shift of the lasing spectrum to the red wing of the gain band of the active medium.

  20. Analysis of single event transient pulse-width in 65 nm commercial radiation-hardened logic cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Haisong; Wu, Longsheng; Yang, Bo; Jiang, Yihu

    2017-08-01

    With the critical charge reduced to generate a single event effect (SEE) and high working frequency for a nanometer integrated circuit, the single event effect (SET) becomes increasingly serious for high performance SOC and DSP chips. To analyze the radiation-hardened method of SET for the nanometer integrated circuit, the n+ guard ring and p+ guard ring have been adopted in the layout for a 65 nm commercial radiation-hardened standard cell library. The weakest driving capacity inverter cell was used to evaluate the single event transient (SET) pulse-width distribution. We employed a dual-lane measurement circuit to get more accurate SET’s pulse-width. Six kinds of ions, which provide LETs of 12.5, 22.5, 32.5, 42, 63, and 79.5 {MeV}\\cdot {{cm}}2/{mg}, respectively, have been utilized to irradiate the SET test circuit in the Beijing Tandem Accelerator Nuclear Physics National Laboratory. The testing results reveal that the pulse-width of most SETs is shorter than 400 ps in the range of LETeff from 12.5 {MeV}\\cdot {{cm}}2/{mg} to 79.5 {MeV}\\cdot {{cm}}2/{mg} and the pulse-width presents saturation tendency when the effective linear energy transfer (LETeff) value is larger than 40 {MeV}\\cdot {{cm}}2/{mg}. The test results also show that the hardened commercial standard cell’s pulse-width concentrates on 33 to 264 ps, which decreases by 40% compared to the pulse-width of the 65 nm commercial unhardened standard cell.