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Sample records for pulse-wave velocity measurement

  1. Blood pulse wave velocity measured by photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Chenghung; Hu, Song; Maslov, Konstantin; Wang, Lihong V.

    2013-03-01

    Blood pulse wave velocity (PWV) is an important indicator for vascular stiffness. In this letter, we present electrocardiogram-synchronized photoacoustic microscopy for in vivo noninvasive quantification of the PWV in the peripheral vessels of mice. Interestingly, strong correlation between blood flow speed and ECG were clearly observed in arteries but not in veins. PWV is measured by the pulse travel time and the distance between two spot of a chose vessel, where simultaneously recorded electrocardiograms served as references. Statistical analysis shows a linear correlation between the PWV and the vessel diameter, which agrees with known physiology. Keywords: photoacoustic microscopy, photoacoustic spectroscopy, bilirubin, scattering medium.

  2. Magnetic plethysmograph transducers for local blood pulse wave velocity measurement.

    PubMed

    Nabeel, P M; Joseph, Jayaraj; Sivaprakasam, Mohanasankar

    2014-01-01

    We present the design of magnetic plethysmograph (MPG) transducers for detection of blood pulse waveform and evaluation of local pulse wave velocity (PWV), for potential use in cuffless blood pressure (BP) monitoring. The sensors utilize a Hall effect magnetic field sensor to capture the blood pulse waveform. A strap based design is performed to enable reliable capture of large number of cardiac cycles with relative ease. The ability of the transducer to consistently detect the blood pulse is verified by in-vivo trials on few volunteers. A duality of such transducers is utilized to capture the local PWV at the carotid artery. The pulse transit time (PTT) between the two detected pulse waveforms, measured along a small section of the carotid artery, was evaluated using automated algorithms to ensure consistency of measurements. The correlation between the measured values of local PWV and BP was also investigated. The developed transducers provide a reliable, easy modality for detecting pulse waveform on superficial arteries. Such transducers, used for measurement of local PWV, could potentially be utilized for cuffless, continuous evaluation of BP at various superficial arterial sites.

  3. A Magnetic Plethysmograph Probe for Local Pulse Wave Velocity Measurement.

    PubMed

    P M, Nabeel; Joseph, Jayaraj; Sivaprakasam, Mohanasankar

    2017-08-29

    We present the design and experimental validation of an arterial compliance probe with dual magnetic plethysmograph (MPG) transducers for local pulse wave velocity (PWV) measurement. The MPG transducers (positioned at 23 mm distance apart) utilizes Hall-effect sensors and permanent magnets for arterial blood pulse detection. The MPG probe was initially validated on an arterial flow phantom using a reference method. Further, 20 normotensive subjects (14 males, age = 24 ± 3.5 years) were studied under two different physical conditions: 1) Physically relaxed condition, 2) Postexercise condition. Local PWV was measured from the left carotid artery using the MPG probe. Brachial blood pressure (BP) was measured to investigate the correlation of BP with local PWV. The proposed MPG arterial compliance probe was capable of detecting high-fidelity blood pulse waveforms. Reliable local pulse transit time estimates were assessed by the developed measurement system. Beat-by-beat local PWV was measured from multiple subjects under different physical conditions. A profound increment was observed in the carotid local PWV for all subjects after exercise (average increment = 0.42 ± 0.22 m/s). Local PWV values and brachial BP parameters were significantly correlated (r ≥ 0.72), except for pulse pressure (r = 0.42). MPG arterial compliance probe for local PWV measurement was validated. Carotid local PWV measurement, its variations due to physical exercise and correlation with BP levels were examined during the in vivo study. A novel dual MPG probe for local PWV measurement and potential use in cuffless BP measurement.

  4. Measurement of Aortic Pulse Wave Velocity With a Connected Bathroom Scale.

    PubMed

    Campo, David; Khettab, Hakim; Yu, Roger; Genain, Nicolas; Edouard, Paul; Buard, Nadine; Boutouyrie, Pierre

    2017-09-01

    Measurement of arterial stiffness should be more available. Our aim was to show that aortic pulse wave velocity can be reliably measured with a bathroom scale combining the principles of ballistocardiography (BCG) and impedance plethysmography on a single foot. The calibration of the bathroom scale was conducted on a group of 106 individuals. The aortic pulse wave velocity was measured with the SphygmoCor in the supine position. Three consecutive measurements were then performed on the Withings scale in the standing position. This aorta-leg pulse transit time (alPTT) was then converted into a velocity with the additional input of the height of the person. Agreement between the SphygmoCor and the bathroom scale so calibrated is assessed on a separate group of 86 individuals, following the same protocol. The bias is 0.25 m·s-1 and the SE 1.39 m·s-1. This agreement with Sphygmocor is "acceptable" according to the ARTERY classification. The alPTT correlated well with cfPTT with (Spearman) R = 0.73 in pooled population (cal 0.79, val 0.66). The aorta-leg pulse wave velocity correlated with carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity with R = 0.76 (cal 0.80, val 0.70). Estimation of the aortic pulse wave velocity is feasible with a bathroom scale. Further investigations are needed to improve the repeatability of measurements and to test their accuracy in different populations and conditions.

  5. Noninvasive Method for Measuring Local Pulse Wave Velocity by Dual Pulse Wave Doppler: In Vitro and In Vivo Studies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhen; Yang, Yong; Yuan, Li-jun; Liu, Jie; Duan, Yun-you; Cao, Tie-sheng

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the validity and reproducibility of a noninvasive dual pulse wave Doppler (DPWD) method, which involves simultaneous recording of flow velocity of two independent sample volumes with a measurable distance, for measuring the local arterial pulse wave velocity (PWV) through in vitro and in vivo studies. Methods The DPWD mode of Hitachi HI Vision Preirus ultrasound system with a 5–13MHz transducer was used. An in vitro model was designed to compare the PWV of a homogeneous rubber tubing with the local PWV of its middle part measured by DPWD method. In the in vivo study, local PWV of 45 hypertensive patients (25 male, 49.8±3.1 years) and 45 matched healthy subjects (25 male, 49.3±3.0 years) were investigated at the left common carotid artery (LCCA) by DPWD method. Results In the in vitro study, the local PWV measured by DPWP method and the PWV of the homogeneous rubber tubing did not show statistical difference (5.16 ± 0.28 m/s vs 5.03 ± 0.15 m/s, p = 0.075). The coefficient of variation (CV) of the intra- and inter- measurements for local PWV were 3.46% and 4.96%, for the PWV of the homogeneous rubber tubing were 0.99% and 1.98%. In the in vivo study, a significantly higher local PWV of LCCA was found in the hypertensive patients as compared to that in healthy subjects (6.29±1.04m/s vs. 5.31±0.72m/s, P = 0.019). The CV of the intra- and inter- measurements in hypertensive patients were 2.22% and 3.94%, in healthy subjects were 2.07% and 4.14%. Conclusions This study demonstrated the feasibility of the noninvasive DPWD method to determine the local PWV, which was accurate and reproducible not only in vitro but also in vivo studies. This noninvasive echocardiographic method may be illuminating to clinical use. PMID:25786124

  6. Influence of timing algorithm on brachialankle pulse wave velocity measurement.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xin; Li, Ke; Ren, Hongwei; Li, Peng; Wang, Xinpei; Liu, Changchun

    2014-01-01

    The baPWV measurement is a non-invasive and convenient technique in an assessment of arterial stiffness. Despite its widespread application, the influence of different timing algorithms is still unclear. The present study was conducted to investigate the influence of six timing algorithms (MIN, MAX, D1, D2, MDP and INS) on the baPWV measurement and to evaluate the performance of them. Forty-five CAD patients and fifty-five healthy subjects were recruited in this study. A PVR acquisition apparatus was built up for baPWV measurement. The baPWV and other related parameters were calculated separately by the six timing algorithms. The influence and performance of the six algorithms was analyzed. The six timing algorithms generate significantly different baPWV values (left: F=29.036, P<0.001; right: F=40.076, P<0.001). In terms of reproducibility, the MAX has significantly higher CV value (≥ 18.6%) than the other methods, while the INS has the lowest CV value (≤ 2.7%). On the performance of classification, the INS produces the highest AUC values (left: 0.854; right: 0.872). The MIN and D2 also have a passable performance (AUC > 0.8). The choice of timing algorithm affects baPWV values and the quality of measurement. The INS method is recommended for baPWV measurement.

  7. Non-contact measurement of pulse wave velocity using RGB cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Kazuya; Aoki, Yuta; Satoh, Ryota; Hoshi, Akira; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Nishidate, Izumi

    2016-03-01

    Non-contact measurement of pulse wave velocity (PWV) using red, green, and blue (RGB) digital color images is proposed. Generally, PWV is used as the index of arteriosclerosis. In our method, changes in blood volume are calculated based on changes in the color information, and is estimated by combining multiple regression analysis (MRA) with a Monte Carlo simulation (MCS) model of the transit of light in human skin. After two pulse waves of human skins were measured using RGB cameras, and the PWV was calculated from the difference of the pulse transit time and the distance between two measurement points. The measured forehead-finger PWV (ffPWV) was on the order of m/s and became faster as the values of vital signs raised. These results demonstrated the feasibility of this method.

  8. Noninvasive measurement of cardiac stroke volume using pulse wave velocity and aortic dimensions: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Babbs, Charles F

    2014-09-19

    Concerns about the cost-effectiveness of invasive hemodynamic monitoring in critically ill patients using pulmonary artery catheters motivate a renewed search for effective noninvasive methods to measure stroke volume. This paper explores a new approach based on noninvasively measured pulse wave velocity, pulse contour, and ultrasonically determined aortic cross sectional area. The Bramwell-Hill equation relating pulse wave velocity to aortic compliance is applied. At the time point on the noninvasively measured pulse contour, denoted th, when pulse amplitude has fallen midway between systolic and diastolic values, the portion of stroke volume remaining in the aorta, and in turn the entire stroke volume, can be estimated from the compliance and the pulse waveform. This approach is tested and refined using a numerical model of the systemic circulation including the effects of blood inertia, nonlinear compliance, aortic tapering, varying heart rate, and varying myocardial contractility, in which noninvasively estimated stroke volumes were compared with known stroke volumes in the model. The Bramwell-Hill approach correctly allows accurate calculation of known, constant aortic compliance in the numerical model. When nonlinear compliance is present the proposed noninvasive technique overestimates true aortic compliance when pulse pressure is large. However, a reasonable correction for nonlinearity can be derived and applied to restore accuracy for normal and for fast heart rates (correlation coefficient > 0.98). Accurate estimates of cardiac stroke volume based on pulse wave velocity are theoretically possible and feasible. The precision of the method may be less than desired, owing to the dependence of the final result on the square of measured pulse wave velocity and the first power of ultrasonically measured aortic cross sectional area. However, classical formulas for propagation of random errors suggest that the method may still have sufficient precision for

  9. Validity and reproducibility of arterial pulse wave velocity measurement using new device with oscillometric technique: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Naidu, Madireddy Umamaheshwar Rao; Reddy, Budda Muralidhar; Yashmaina, Sridhar; Patnaik, Amar Narayana; Rani, Pingali Usha

    2005-08-23

    Availability of a range of techniques and devices allow measurement of many variables related to the stiffness of large or medium sized arteries. There is good evidence that, pulse wave velocity is a relatively simple measurement and is a good indicator of changes in arterial properties. The pulse wave velocity calculated from pulse wave recording by other methods like doppler or tonometry is tedious, time-consuming and above all their reproducibility depends on the operator skills. It requires intensive resource involvement. For epidemiological studies these methods are not suitable. The aim of our study was to clinically evaluate the validity and reproducibility of a new automatic device for measurement of pulse wave velocity that can be used in such studies. In 44 subjects including normal healthy control and patients with coronary artery disease, heart brachial, heart ankle, brachial ankle and carotid femoral pulse wave velocities were recorded by using a new oscillometric device. Lead I and II electrocardiogram and pressure curves were simultaneously recorded. Two observers recorded the pulse wave velocity for validation and one observer recorded the velocity on two occasions for reproducibility. Pulse wave velocity and arterial stiffness index were recorded in 24 control and 20 coronary artery disease patients. All the velocities were significantly high in coronary artery disease patients. There was highly significant correlation between the values noted by the two observers with low standard deviation. The Pearson's correlation coefficient for various velocities ranged from (r = 0.88-0.90) with (p < 0.0001). The reproducibility was also very good as shown by Bland-Altman plot; most of the values were lying within 2 SD. The interperiod measurements of pulse wave velocity were also significantly correlated (r = 0.71-0.98) (P < 0.0001). Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity was found to correlate significantly with heart brachial, heart ankle, brachial ankle

  10. A new method for measurement of pulse wave velocity in arterial wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoming; Kinnick, Randall R.; Fatemi, Mostafa; Greenleaf, James F.

    2003-10-01

    Arterial wall stiffness can be associated with various diseases. The stiffness of an artery can be assessed by measurement of the pulse wave velocity (PWV). PWV is directly related to the Youngs modulus by the well-known Moens-Korteweg equation. Usually, PWV is estimated using the foot-to-foot method. However, the foot of the pressure wave is not very clear due to reflected waves. Also, the pressure wave is normally at a low frequency, hence, the time resolution is low. PWV is an average indicator of artery stiffness between the two measuring points, therefore it is not easy to identify local stiffness. We propose producing a very short pulse wave in the arterial wall using ultrasound radiation force and measuring its propagation speed along the artery by laser. The temporal resolution of this method is in the range of microseconds, which allows PWV to be measured accurately over a few millimeters. Experiments were carried out on a silicone tube in gelatin. PWV was measured by two scanning methods: (1) fixed source and scanning detector, (2) scanning source and fixed detector. Results: PWV was measured at 2 mm/40 μs by both methods. The Doppler technique was also tested which is potentially suitable for clinical applications.

  11. Identification of Vascular Parameters Based on the Same Pressure Pulses Waves Used to Measure Pulse Wave Velocity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-25

    fig. 3) was designed and included to the pre-developed PWV/PWA system. The implemented optimization algorithm was based on a steepest descend gradient ...of transmission of the pulse wave and elasticity of arteries,” Lancet, vol. I, pp. 891-892, 1922. [6] S. Graf et al., “ Desarrollo de um sistema para

  12. Doppler ultrasound in the measurement of pulse wave velocity: agreement with the Complior method

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Aortic stiffness is an independent predictor factor for cardiovascular risk. Different methods for determining pulse wave velocity (PWV) are used, among which the most common are mechanical methods such as SphygmoCor or Complior, which require specific devices and are limited by technical difficulty in obtaining measurements. Doppler guided by 2D ultrasound is a good alternative to these methods. We studied 40 patients (29 male, aged 21 to 82 years) comparing the Complior method with Doppler. Agreement of both devices was high (R = 0.91, 0.84-0.95, 95% CI). The reproducibility analysis revealed no intra-nor interobserver differences. Based on these results, we conclude that Doppler ultrasound is a reliable and reproducible alternative to other established methods for the measurement of aortic PWV. PMID:21496271

  13. Dual-beam laser Doppler vibrometer for measurement of pulse wave velocity in elastic vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campo, Adriaan; Dirckx, Joris

    2011-08-01

    When a fluid flowing through an elastic vessel is subjected to a sudden change in pressure gradient, pressure pulses will propagate through the fluid. Velocity of these pulse waves (PWV) can be determined by simultaneous detection of wall distension on two separate points on the vessel wall, along its trajectory. PWV depends on wall stiffness, and under certain circumstances, wall stiffness can be calculated from the propagation velocity. Optical interferometry is a noncontacting technique that allows measurement of wall distension on discrete locations. In this work we propose a miniaturized dual-beam laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) to measure wall distension simultaneously at two locations. Our dual-beam LDV is based on a single laser source and one acousto-optic modulator with as much as possible of the interferometer optics shared among the different beams. The dual-beam LDV was used for simultaneous detection of wall distension of several elastic vessels of different stiffness. We found that PWV as measured in elastic vessels agrees well with theoretically expected values, and measurement precision is better than 5%. Moreover, the dual-beam LDV performs almost as good as commercial systems for detection of PWV. The dual-beam LDV can have applications in cardiovascular risk management. Stiffness of large arteries has a very good predictive value for cardiovascular disease and overall mortality. This parameter can be estimated from arterial PWV. Current methods to measure arterial PWV suffer from several shortcomings. A dual-beam LDV can offer substantial advantages over existing techniques.

  14. Development of a novel pulse wave velocity measurement system: using dual piezoelectric elements.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Kei-ichiro; Takeuchi, Ryuya; Ogai, Kazuhiro; Xin, Zhu; Chen, Wenxi; Nemoto, Tetsu

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a painless system of measuring the brachial-ankle arterial pulse wave velocity (baPWV) without compression cuffs. The PWV reflects the compliance of the artery and is measured for the early diagnosis of arteriosclerotic vascular diseases. However, the conventional baPWV system, which measures four cuff pressures simultaneously, easily causes circulation block and tightening pain at the extremities. In addition, approximately 15 min are required to stabilise the blood pressure for re-examination. Therefore, we developed a novel baPWV measurement system using dual piezoelectric sensor elements. The principle of this high-sensitivity pressure pulse detection system is based on adding the two in-phase outputs from the coaxially arranged dual piezoelectric sensor. As our system facilitates the measurement of the baPWV by detecting the pulsation of an artery using sensors fixed on the skin where the pulse is palpable, it does not cause pain and reduces examination time. The coefficients of correlation between the baPWV values obtained from the conventional and present methods were 0.93 (right side) and 0.90 (left side). The results suggest that our system can be used to measure the baPWV without pressure cuffs as accurately as the conventional method. Copyright © 2014 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Real-time aortic pulse wave velocity measurement during exercise stress testing.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Paul A; Cowan, Brett R; Liu, Yingmin; Lin, Aaron C W; Nielsen, Poul M F; Taberner, Andrew J; Stewart, Ralph A H; Lam, Hoi Ieng; Young, Alistair A

    2015-10-05

    Pulse wave velocity (PWV), a measure of arterial stiffness, has been demonstrated to be an independent predictor of adverse cardiovascular outcomes. This can be derived non-invasively using cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR). Changes in PWV during exercise may reveal further information on vascular pathology. However, most known CMR methods for quantifying PWV are currently unsuitable for exercise stress testing. A velocity-sensitive real-time acquisition and evaluation (RACE) pulse sequence was adapted to provide interleaved acquisition of two locations in the descending aorta (at the level of the pulmonary artery bifurcation and above the renal arteries) at 7.8 ms temporal resolution. An automated method was used to calculate the foot-to-foot transit time of the velocity pulse wave. The RACE method was validated against a standard gated phase contrast (STD) method in flexible tube phantoms using a pulsatile flow pump. The method was applied in 50 healthy volunteers (28 males) aged 22-75 years using a MR-compatible cycle ergometer to achieve moderate work rate (38 ± 22 W, with a 31 ± 12 bpm increase in heart rate) in the supine position. Central pulse pressures were estimated using a MR-compatible brachial device. Scan-rescan reproducibility was evaluated in nine volunteers. Phantom PWV was 22 m/s (STD) vs. 26 ± 5 m/s (RACE) for a butyl rubber tube, and 5.5 vs. 6.1 ± 0.3 m/s for a latex rubber tube. In healthy volunteers PWV increased with age at both rest (R(2) = 0.31 p < 0.001) and exercise (R(2) = 0.40, p < 0.001). PWV was significantly increased at exercise relative to rest (0.71 ± 2.2 m/s, p = 0.04). Scan-rescan reproducibility at rest was -0.21 ± 0.68 m/s (n = 9). This study demonstrates the validity of CMR in the evaluation of PWV during exercise in healthy subjects. The results support the feasibility of using this method in evaluating of patients with systemic aortic disease.

  16. Measurements of Wall Shear Stress and Aortic Pulse Wave Velocity in Swine with Familial Hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Wentland, Andrew L.; Wieben, Oliver; Shanmuganayagam, Dhanansayan; Krueger, Christian G.; Meudt, Jennifer J.; Consigny, Daniel; Rivera, Leonardo; McBride, Patrick E.; Reed, Jess D.; Grist, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE To assess measurements of pulse wave velocity (PWV) and wall shear stress (WSS) in a swine model of atherosclerosis. MATERIALS AND METHODS Nine familial hypercholesterolemic (FH) swine with angioplasty balloon catheter-induced atherosclerotic lesions to the abdominal aorta (injured group) and ten uninjured FH swine were evaluated with a 4D phase contrast (PC) MRI acquisition, as well as with radial and Cartesian 2D PC acquisitions, on a 3T MR scanner. PWV values were computed from the 2D and 4D PC techniques, compared between the injured and uninjured swine, and were validated against reference standard pressure probe-based PWV measurements. WSS values were also computed from the 4D PC MRI technique and compared between injured and uninjured groups. RESULTS PWV values were significantly greater in the injured than in the uninjured groups with the 4D PC MRI technique (p=0.03) and pressure probes (p=0.02). No significant differences were found in PWV between groups using the 2D PC techniques (p=0.75–0.83). No significant differences were found for WSS values between the injured and uninjured groups. CONCLUSION The 4D PC MRI technique provides a promising means of evaluating PWV and WSS in a swine model of atherosclerosis, providing a potential platform for developing the technique for the early detection of atherosclerosis. PMID:24964097

  17. Carotid-Femoral Pulse Wave Velocity: Impact of Different Arterial Path Length Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Sugawara, Jun; Hayashi, Koichiro; Yokoi, Takashi; Tanaka, Hirofumi

    2009-01-01

    Background Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) is the most established index of arterial stiffness. Yet there is no consensus on the methodology in regard to the arterial path length measurements conducted on the body surface. Currently, it is not known to what extent the differences in the arterial path length measurements affect absolute PWV values. Methods Two hundred fifty apparently healthy adults (127 men and 123 women, 19-79 years) were studied. Carotid-femoral PWV was calculated using (1) the straight distance between carotid and femoral sites (PWVcar–fem), (2) the straight distance between suprasternal notch and femoral site minus carotid arterial length (PWV(ssn–fem)-(ssn–car)), (3) the straight distance between carotid and femoral sites minus carotid arterial length (PWV(car–fem)-(ssn–car)), and (4) the combined distance from carotid site to the umbilicus and from the umbilicus to femoral site minus carotid arterial length (PWV(ssn–umb–fem)-(ssn–car)). Results All the calculated PWV were significantly correlated with each other (r=0.966-0.995). PWV accounting for carotid arterial length were 16-31% lower than PWVcar–fem. PWVcar–fem value of 12 m/sec corresponded to 8.3 m/sec for PWV(ssn–fem)-(ssn–car), 10.0 m/sec for PWV(car–fem)-(ssn–car), and 8.9 m/sec for PWV(ssn–umb–fem)-(ssn–car). Conclusion Different body surface measurements used to estimate arterial path length would produce substantial variations in absolute PWV values. PMID:20396400

  18. Acute effects of ultrafiltration on aortic mechanical properties determined by measurement of pulse wave velocity and pulse propagation time in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Şahin Yildiz, Banu; Şahin, Alparslan; Başkurt Aladağ, Nazire; Arslan, Gülgün; Kaptanoğullari, Hakan; Akın, İbrahim; Yildiz, Mustafa

    2015-04-01

    The effects of acute hemodialysis session on pulse wave velocity are conflicting. The aim of the current study was to assess the acute effects of ultrafiltration on the aortic mechanical properties using carotid-femoral (aortic) pulse wave velocity and pulse propagation time. A total of 26 (12 women, 14 men) consecutive patients on maintenance hemodialysis (mean dialysis duration: 40.7±25.6 (4-70) months) and 29 healthy subjects (13 women, 16 men) were included in this study. Baseline blood pressure, carotid-femoral (aortic) pulse wave velocity, and pulse propagation time were measured using a Complior Colson device (Createch Industrie, France) before and immediately after the end of the dialysis session. While systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, mean blood pressure, pulse pressure, and pulse wave velocity were significantly higher in patients on hemodialysis than in healthy subjects, pulse propagation time was significantly higher in healthy subjects. Although body weight, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, mean blood pressure, pulse pressure, and pulse wave velocity were significantly decreased, heart rate and pulse propagation time were significantly increased after ultrafiltration. There was a significant positive correlation between pulse wave velocity and age, body height, waist circumference, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, mean blood pressure, pulse pressure, and heart rate. Although hemodialysis treatment may chronically worsen aortic mechanical properties, ultrafiltration during hemodialysis may significantly improve aortic pulse wave velocity, which is inversely related to aortic distensibility and pulse propagation time.

  19. Acute effects of ultrafiltration on aortic mechanical properties determined by measurement of pulse wave velocity and pulse propagation time in hemodialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Yıldız, Banu Şahin; Şahin, Alparslan; Aladağ, Nazire Başkurt; Arslan, Gülgün; Kaptanoğulları, Hakan; Akın, İbrahim; Yıldız, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The effects of acute hemodialysis session on pulse wave velocity are conflicting. The aim of the current study was to assess the acute effects of ultrafiltration on the aortic mechanical properties using carotid-femoral (aortic) pulse wave velocity and pulse propagation time. Methods: A total of 26 (12 women, 14 men) consecutive patients on maintenance hemodialysis (mean dialysis duration: 40.7±25.6 (4-70) months) and 29 healthy subjects (13 women, 16 men) were included in this study. Baseline blood pressure, carotid-femoral (aortic) pulse wave velocity, and pulse propagation time were measured using a Complior Colson device (Createch Industrie, France) before and immediately after the end of the dialysis session. Results: While systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, mean blood pressure, pulse pressure, and pulse wave velocity were significantly higher in patients on hemodialysis than in healthy subjects, pulse propagation time was significantly higher in healthy subjects. Although body weight, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, mean blood pressure, pulse pressure, and pulse wave velocity were significantly decreased, heart rate and pulse propagation time were significantly increased after ultrafiltration. There was a significant positive correlation between pulse wave velocity and age, body height, waist circumference, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, mean blood pressure, pulse pressure, and heart rate. Conclusion: Although hemodialysis treatment may chronically worsen aortic mechanical properties, ultrafiltration during hemodialysis may significantly improve aortic pulse wave velocity, which is inversely related to aortic distensibility and pulse propagation time. PMID:25413228

  20. Pulse Wave Velocity and Cardiac Output vs. Heart Rate in Patients with an Implanted Pacemaker Based on Electric Impedance Method Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soukup, Ladislav; Vondra, Vlastimil; Viščor, Ivo; Jurák, Pavel; Halámek, Josef

    2013-04-01

    The methods and device for estimation of cardiac output and measurement of pulse wave velocity simultaneously is presented here. The beat-to-beat cardiac output as well as pulse wave velocity measurement is based on application of electrical impedance method on the thorax and calf. The results are demonstrated in a study of 24 subjects. The dependence of pulse wave velocity and cardiac output on heart rate during rest in patients with an implanted pacemaker was evaluated. The heart rate was changed by pacemaker programming while neither exercise nor drugs were applied. The most important result is that the pulse wave velocity, cardiac output and blood pressure do not depend significantly on heart rate, while the stroke volume is reciprocal proportionally to the heart rate.

  1. Measurement of spatial pulse wave velocity by using a clip-type pulsimeter equipped with a Hall sensor and photoplethysmography.

    PubMed

    Nam, Dong-Hyun; Lee, Woo-Beom; Hong, You-Sik; Lee, Sang-Suk

    2013-04-09

    A prototype of a clip-type pulsimeter equipped with a magnetic field-sensing semiconductor Hall sensor was developed. It has a permanent magnet attached in the "Chwan" position to the center of a radial artery. The clip-type pulsimeter is composed of a hardware system measuring voltage signals. To measure spatial pulse wave velocity (SPWV), the signal from the radial artery pulsimeter and that from the photoplethysmography (PPG) were simultaneously compared. The pulse wave data from a clinical test of 39 clinical participants (male:female = 25:14) with a mean age of 24.36 (±2.35) years was analyzed. The mean SPWV, which was simultaneously measured from the radial artery pulsimeter and PPG, was 0.8 m/s. We suggest the SPWV results were higher for men than women, because of the better vascularity of terminal tissue in men. The findings of this research may be useful for developing a biomedical signal storage device for a U-health-care system.

  2. Pulse wave velocity measurement as a marker of arterial stiffness in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Lurz, Eberhard; Aeschbacher, Eliane; Carman, Nicholas; Schibli, Susanne; Sokollik, Christiane; Simonetti, Giacomo D

    2017-07-01

    In adults with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), the incidence of cardiovascular events is increased, leading to long-term morbidity. Arterial stiffness (AS) measured by pulse wave velocity (PWV) is a validated early precursor of cardiovascular disease (CVD), and measurement of PWV was shown to be a feasible test in children. The aim of this study was to assess AS in children with IBD. In this prospective study, we determined PWV between the carotid and femoral artery (PWVcf) in 25 children and adolescents with IBD (11 females, median age 14.1 years, median disease duration 2.8 years). The majority (68%) of the subjects were in clinical remission, and 48% received anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) treatment. AS was not increased in this cohort of children and adolescents with IBD, who did not have signs of cardiovascular disease, such as arterial hypertension. PWV seems to be normal in children with IBD in remission or with mild disease activity. Larger studies should assess its potential role as a valid and non-invasive follow-up marker in children with IBD, to avoid cardiovascular complications. What is Known : • Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a risk factor of cardiovascular disease (CVD). • Pulse wave velocity (PWV) measurement is the current gold standard to assess arterial stiffness (AS), which is an early predictor of CVD. What is New: • This is the first study using PWV measurements to determine AS in children with IBD. • In children with IBD in remission or only mild disease activity AS is not increased.

  3. Effects of inaccuracies in arterial path length measurement on differences in MRI and tonometry measured pulse wave velocity.

    PubMed

    Weir-McCall, Jonathan R; Khan, Faisel; Cassidy, Deirdre B; Thakur, Arsh; Summersgill, Jennifer; Matthew, Shona Z; Adams, Fiona; Dove, Fiona; Gandy, Stephen J; Colhoun, Helen M; Belch, Jill Jf; Houston, J Graeme

    2017-05-10

    Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cf-PWV) and aortic PWV measured using MRI (MRI-PWV) show good correlation, but with a significant and consistent bias across studies. The aim of the current study was to evaluate whether the differences between cf.-PWV and MRI-PWV can be accounted for by inaccuracies of currently used distance measurements. One hundred fourteen study participants were recruited into one of 4 groups: Type 2 diabetes melltus (T2DM) with cardiovascular disease (CVD) (n = 23), T2DM without CVD (n = 41), CVD without T2DM (n = 25) and a control group (n = 25). All participants underwent cf.-PWV, cardiac MRI and whole body MR angiography(WB-MRA). 90 study participants also underwent aortic PWV using MRI. cf.-PWVEXT was performed using a SphygmoCor device (Atcor Medical, West Ryde, Australia). The true intra-arterial pathlength was measured using the WB-MRA and then used to recalculate the cf.-PWVEXT to give a cf.-PWVMRA. Distance measurements were significantly lower on WB-MRA than on external tape measure (mean diff = -85.4 ± 54.0 mm,p < 0.001). MRI-PWV was significantly lower than cf.-PWVEXT (MRI-PWV = 8.1 ± 2.9 vs. cf.-PWVEXT = 10.9 ± 2.7 ms(-1),p < 0.001). When cf.-PWV was recalculated using the inter-arterial distance from WB-MRA, this difference was significantly reduced but not lost (MRI-PWV = 8.1 ± 2.9 ms(-1) vs. cf.-PWVMRA 9.1 ± 2.1 ms(-1), mean diff = -0.96 ± 2.52 ms(-1),p = 0.001). Recalculation of the PWV increased correlation with age and pulse pressure. Differences in cf.-PWV and MRI PWV can be predominantly but not entirely explained by inaccuracies introduced by the use of simple surface measurements to represent the convoluted arterial path between the carotid and femoral arteries.

  4. Evaluation of arterial stiffness with plasma GGT levels and pulse wave velocity measurement in patients with FMF.

    PubMed

    Yılmaz, Filiz; Ulu, Sena; Akcı, Önder; Ahsen, Ahmet; Demir, Kasım; Yüksel, Şeref

    2014-03-01

    Pulse wave velocity (PWV) is a non-invasive technique used to evaluate the arterial elasticity, which is an early indicator of atherosclerosis. Lately, gamma glutamyl transferase (GGT) is considered a determiner of arterial stiffness (AS). In this study, we aimed to evaluate the relationship between GGT levels and AS with PWV in patients with Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF). The study was conducted with 60 patients with FMF and 40 controls. Genetic analysis of the patients were performed. AS was assessed by PWV and, after the measurement of PWV, the presence of AS was determined. Mean PWV values and AS frequency were significantly higher in patients with FMF compared with the control group (p<0.001 and p=0.004, respectively). Mean GGT levels of FMF patients were higher than in the control group but the difference was not statistically different. In the correlation analysis, PWV and AS were positively correlated with FMF (r=0349, p<0.001; r=0.435, p<0.001, respectively). FMF duration and FMF were associated with GGT (r=0.300, p=0.02; r=0199, p=0.047, respectively). Increased PWV values in FMF patients may indicate arterial stiffness. These patients may be followed closely with PWV as an early indicator of atherosclerosis. Therefore, the cardiovascular risk can be determined in the early stages of disease and it may be possible to take necessary precautions.

  5. Effects of cardiac timing and peripheral resistance on measurement of pulse wave velocity for assessment of arterial stiffness.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Hanguang; Butlin, Mark; Tan, Isabella; Avolio, Alberto

    2017-07-20

    To investigate the effects of heart rate (HR), left ventricular ejection time (LVET) and wave reflection on arterial stiffness as assessed by pulse wave velocity (PWV), a pulse wave propagation simulation system (PWPSim) based on the transmission line model of the arterial tree was developed and was applied to investigate pulse wave propagation. HR, LVET, arterial elastic modulus and peripheral resistance were increased from 60 to 100 beats per minute (bpm), 0.1 to 0.45 seconds, 0.5 to 1.5 times and 0.5 to 1.5 times of the normal value, respectively. Carotid-femoral PWV (cfPWV) and brachial-ankle PWV (baPWV) were calculated by intersecting tangent method (cfPWVtan and baPWVtan), maximum slope (cfPWVmax and baPWVmax), and using the Moens-Korteweg equation ([Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text]). Results showed cfPWV and baPWV increased significantly with arterial elastic modulus but did not increase with HR when using a constant elastic modulus. However there were significant LVET dependencies of cfPWVtan and baPWVtan (0.17 ± 0.13 and 0.17 ± 0.08 m/s per 50 ms), and low peripheral resistance dependencies of cfPWVtan, cfPWVmax, baPWVtan and baPWVmax (0.04 ± 0.01, 0.06 ± 0.04, 0.06 ± 0.03 and 0.09 ± 0.07 m/s per 10% peripheral resistance), respectively. This study demonstrated that LVET dominates the effect on calculated PWV compared to HR and peripheral resistance when arterial elastic modulus is constant.

  6. Arterial pulse wave propagation velocity in healthy dogs by pulse wave Doppler ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Rodrigo B; Pereira, Lucas A; Basso, Alice F; da Fonseca, Ingrid S; Alves, Lorena A

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate the carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) values in healthy dogs using pulse wave Doppler ultrasound. A secondary aim was to determine the feasibility of this method and to report the intra- and interobserver reproducibilities of the PWV in conscious dogs. The data were studied in 30 healthy, adult, male (n = 15) and female (n = 15) dogs. The time interval marked between the R wave peak of the electrocardiogram and the intersection of the blood flow wave upstroke of the Doppler spectrum with the baseline of zero frequency was determined for the carotid (T1) and for the femoral (T2) arteries. The distance covered by the pulse wave (L) was determined. The PWV was then calculated using the following formula: L/T2 - T1. The mean values of PWV calculated from the total sample (n = 30) evaluated were 13.41 ± 2.20 m/s. No significant statistical difference was observed for the PWV measurements between males (14.82 ± 3.18 m/s) and females (12.64 ± 2.45 m/s). The analysis revealed no intra nor interobserver differences. A reasonable reproducibility of the PWV measurements was showed by intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC), and the coefficients of variation (CV). These data demonstrate that noninvasive vascular Doppler analysis is a feasible and reproducible method to determine the carotid-femoral PWV in dogs.

  7. Accuracy and repeatability of fourier velocity encoded M-mode and two-dimensional cine phase contrast for pulse wave velocity measurement in the descending aorta.

    PubMed

    Taviani, Valentina; Patterson, Andrew J; Graves, Martin J; Hardy, Christopher J; Worters, Pauline; Sutcliffe, Michael P F; Gillard, Jonathan H

    2010-05-01

    To assess the accuracy and repeatability of Fourier velocity encoded (FVE) M-mode and two-dimensional (2D) phase contrast with through-plane velocity encoding (2D-PC) for pulse wave velocity (PWV) evaluation in the descending aorta using five different analysis techniques. Accuracy experiments were conducted on a tubular human-tissue-mimicking phantom integrated into a flow simulator. The theoretical PWV value was derived from the Moens-Korteweg equation after measurement of the tube elastic modulus by uniaxial tensile testing (PWV = 6.6 +/- 0.7 m/s). Repeatability was assessed on 20 healthy volunteers undergoing three consecutive MR examinations. FVE M-mode PWV was more repeatable than 2D-PC PWV independently of the analysis technique used. The early systolic fit (ESF) method, followed by the maximum of the first derivative (1st der.) method, was the most accurate (PWV = 6.8 +/- 0.4 m/s and PWV = 7.0 +/- 0.6 m/s, respectively) and repeatable (inter-scan within-subject variation delta = 0.096 and delta = 0.107, respectively) for FVE M-mode. For 2D-PC, the 1st der. method performed best in terms of accuracy (PWV = 6.8 +/- 1.1 m/s), whereas the ESF algorithm was the most repeatable (delta = 0.386). FVE M-mode allows rapid, accurate and repeatable central PWV evaluation when the ESF algorithm is used. 2D-PC requires long scan times and can provide accurate although much less repeatable PWV measurements when the 1st der. method is used. Copyright 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Association of Brachial-Ankle Pulse Wave Velocity with Asymptomatic Intracranial Arterial Stenosis in Hypertension Patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Zhang, Jin; Qain, Yuesheng; Tang, Xiaofeng; Ling, Huawei; Chen, Kemin; Li, Yan; Gao, Pingjin; Zhu, Dingliang

    2016-08-01

    Intracranial arterial stenosis is a common cause of ischemic stroke in Asians. We therefore sought to explore the relationship of brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity and intracranial arterial stenosis in 834 stroke-free hypertensive patients. Intracranial arterial stenosis was evaluated through computerized tomographic angiography. Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity was measured by an automated cuff device. The top decile of brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity was significantly associated with intracranial arterial stenosis (P = .027, odds ratio = 1.82; 95% confidence interval: 1.07-3.10). The patients with the top decile of brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity showed 56% higher risk for the presence of intracranial arterial stenosis to the whole population, which was more significant in patients younger than 65 years old. We also found that brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity related to both intracranial arterial stenosis and homocysteine. Our study showed the association of brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity with asymptomatic intracranial arterial stenosis in hypertension patients, especially in relative younger subjects. Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity might be a relatively simple and repeatable measurement to detect hypertension patients in high risk of intracranial arterial stenosis. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. A Fast Multimodal Ectopic Beat Detection Method Applied for Blood Pressure Estimation Based on Pulse Wave Velocity Measurements in Wearable Sensors.

    PubMed

    Pflugradt, Maik; Geissdoerfer, Kai; Goernig, Matthias; Orglmeister, Reinhold

    2017-01-14

    Automatic detection of ectopic beats has become a thoroughly researched topic, with literature providing manifold proposals typically incorporating morphological analysis of the electrocardiogram (ECG). Although being well understood, its utilization is often neglected, especially in practical monitoring situations like online evaluation of signals acquired in wearable sensors. Continuous blood pressure estimation based on pulse wave velocity considerations is a prominent example, which depends on careful fiducial point extraction and is therefore seriously affected during periods of increased occurring extrasystoles. In the scope of this work, a novel ectopic beat discriminator with low computational complexity has been developed, which takes advantage of multimodal features derived from ECG and pulse wave relating measurements, thereby providing additional information on the underlying cardiac activity. Moreover, the blood pressure estimations' vulnerability towards ectopic beats is closely examined on records drawn from the Physionet database as well as signals recorded in a small field study conducted in a geriatric facility for the elderly. It turns out that a reliable extrasystole identification is essential to unsupervised blood pressure estimation, having a significant impact on the overall accuracy. The proposed method further convinces by its applicability to battery driven hardware systems with limited processing power and is a favorable choice when access to multimodal signal features is given anyway.

  10. A Fast Multimodal Ectopic Beat Detection Method Applied for Blood Pressure Estimation Based on Pulse Wave Velocity Measurements in Wearable Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Pflugradt, Maik; Geissdoerfer, Kai; Goernig, Matthias; Orglmeister, Reinhold

    2017-01-01

    Automatic detection of ectopic beats has become a thoroughly researched topic, with literature providing manifold proposals typically incorporating morphological analysis of the electrocardiogram (ECG). Although being well understood, its utilization is often neglected, especially in practical monitoring situations like online evaluation of signals acquired in wearable sensors. Continuous blood pressure estimation based on pulse wave velocity considerations is a prominent example, which depends on careful fiducial point extraction and is therefore seriously affected during periods of increased occurring extrasystoles. In the scope of this work, a novel ectopic beat discriminator with low computational complexity has been developed, which takes advantage of multimodal features derived from ECG and pulse wave relating measurements, thereby providing additional information on the underlying cardiac activity. Moreover, the blood pressure estimations’ vulnerability towards ectopic beats is closely examined on records drawn from the Physionet database as well as signals recorded in a small field study conducted in a geriatric facility for the elderly. It turns out that a reliable extrasystole identification is essential to unsupervised blood pressure estimation, having a significant impact on the overall accuracy. The proposed method further convinces by its applicability to battery driven hardware systems with limited processing power and is a favorable choice when access to multimodal signal features is given anyway. PMID:28098831

  11. Increased aortic pulse wave velocity in obese children.

    PubMed

    Celik, Ataç; Ozçetin, Mustafa; Yerli, Yasemin; Damar, Ibrahim Halil; Kadı, Hasan; Koç, Fatih; Ceyhan, Köksal

    2011-10-01

    Obesity may start in childhood and obese children are more likely to grow up to be obese adults. Atherosclerosis is one of the most important complications of obesity. Pulse wave velocity (PWV), a noninvasive measure of arterial stiffness, is accepted to be an indicator of subclinical atherosclerosis. The aim of the study was to determine PWV in obese children. The study included 30 obese (12 boys, 18 girls; mean age 13 ± 2 years) and 30 lean children (13 boys, 17 girls; mean age 12.5 ± 1.7 years). Weight and height were measured and obesity was defined as body mass index (BMI) of greater than the 95th percentile for age. All the subjects underwent echocardiographic evaluation and blood samples were obtained. Pulse-wave velocity was calculated using the following equation: PWV (m/sec) = height-based aortic length (cm)/(100xtransit time [sec]). The latter was measured as the difference in the time of onset of two flows at the diaphragm and the aortic valve. Obese subjects had significantly higher blood pressure levels compared to the control group (p<0.001). The two groups were similar with respect to fasting glucose, hemoglobin, serum creatinine, and lipid levels. Among echocardiographic parameters, left ventricular end-diastolic dimension, interventricular septum thickness, posterior wall thickness, left ventricular mass index, left atrium dimension, and aortic root dimension were significantly increased in obese subjects compared to controls (p<0.01). Obese children had significantly higher PWV values than the controls (4.0 ± 0.8 vs. 3.3 ± 0.7 m/sec, p<0.001). A positive significant correlation was found between PWV and BMI (r=0.391, p=0.002). Our findings show that aortic PWV is increased in obese children, suggesting that obesity may cause subclinical atherosclerosis even at early ages.

  12. Temporal pattern of pulse wave velocity during brachial hyperemia reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, S.; Valero, M. J.; Craiem, D.; Torrado, J.; Farro, I.; Zócalo, Y.; Valls, G.; Bía, D.; Armentano, R. L.

    2011-09-01

    Endothelial function can be assessed non-invasively with ultrasound, analyzing the change of brachial diameter in response to transient forearm ischemia. We propose a new technique based in the same principle, but analyzing a continuous recording of carotid-radial pulse wave velocity (PWV) instead of diameter. PWV was measured on 10 healthy subjects of 22±2 years before and after 5 minutes forearm occlusion. After 59 ± 31 seconds of cuff release PWV decreased 21 ± 9% compared to baseline, reestablishing the same after 533 ± 65 seconds. There were no significant changes observed in blood pressure. When repeating the study one hour later in 5 subjects, we obtained a coefficient of repeatability of 4.8%. In conclusion, through analysis of beat to beat carotid-radial PWV it was possible to characterize the temporal profiles and analyze the acute changes in response to a reactive hyperemia. The results show that the technique has a high sensitivity and repeatability.

  13. Comparison between multi-channel LDV and PWI for measurement of pulse wave velocity in distensible tubes: Towards a new diagnostic technique for detection of arteriosclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campo, Adriaan; Dudzik, Grzegorz; Apostolakis, Jason; Waz, Adam; Nauleau, Pierre; Abramski, Krzysztof; Dirckx, Joris; Konofagou, Elisa

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this work, was to compare pulse wave velocity (PWV) measurements using Laser Doppler vibrometry (LDV) and the more established ultrasound-based pulse wave imaging (PWI) in smooth vessels. Additionally, it was tested whether changes in phantom structure can be detected using LDV in vessels containing a local hardening of the vessel wall. Results from both methods showed good agreement illustrated by the non-parametric Spearman correlation analysis (Spearman-ρ = 1 and p< 0.05) and the Bland-Altman analysis (mean bias of -0.63 m/s and limits of agreement between -0.35 and -0.90 m/s). The PWV in soft phantoms as measured with LDV was 1.30±0.40 m/s and the PWV in stiff phantoms was 3.6±1.4 m/s. The PWV values in phantoms with inclusions were in between those of soft and stiff phantoms. However, using LDV, given the low number of measurement beams, the exact locations of inclusions could not be determined, and the PWV in the inclusions could not be measured. In conclusion, this study indicates that the PWV as measured with PWI is in good agreement with the PWV measured with LDV although the latter technique has lower spatial resolution, fewer markers and larger distances between beams. In further studies, more LDV beams will be used to allow detection of local changes in arterial wall dynamics due to e.g. small inclusions or local hardenings of the vessel wall.

  14. Blood characteristics effect on pulse wave velocity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong Youn; Yoon, Jihyun; Cho, Minhee; Lee, Byoung-Kwon; Karimi, Ali; Shin, Sehyun

    2013-01-01

    PWV, a surrogate marker for vascular stiffness, can be also expressed by the Bramwell-Hill equation. The effect of blood density to PWV has been ignored, because variation of blood density is assumed to be negligible. In some clinical situation, blood density could be changed, and blood density as a mechanical property of blood flow might affect to PWV. While the elastic property plays an important role in determining the wave propagation in an elastic tube, our assumption is that there might be some relation between blood flow and vascular wall, and that the characteristics of blood flow might influence PWV. This study was objected to investigate the role of mechanical and hemorheologic parameters on PWV in subjects with cardiovascular disease. We have measured and analyzed the PWV, hemorheologic parameters, and other clinical parameters in 814 patients with coronary arterial disease scheduled for coronary angiography. There is no commercial method for measuring whole blood density. So, we defined the density score, which is sum of hemoglobin and total protein. And the hemorheologic parameters were measured within 4 hours after sampling by automated microfluidic hemorheometer. And the effect of all the clinical and hemorheologic parameter on PWV was analyzed by multiple linear regression analysis. Many clinical parameters including age and blood pressure, high shear WBV and ESR as hemorheologic parameters, and density score were correlated well with ba-PWV. However, many clinical variables, high shear WBV and ESR lost the independent significance on multivariable regression analysis. Only age, SBP, and density score were independent variables (p < 0.001). In conclusion, density score as a mechanical property of blood might be suggested as an independent variable influencing PWV in addition to age and blood pressure, but hemorheologic parameters, such as RBC deformability, aggregation, and whole blood viscosity do not affect PWV independently.

  15. A pilot study comparison of a new method for aortic pulse wave velocity measurements using transthoracic bioimpedance and thigh cuff oscillometry with the standard tonometric method.

    PubMed

    Brinkmann, Julia; Jordan, Jens; Tank, Jens

    2015-04-01

    Aortic pulse wave velocity (aPWV) can be measured with different methodologies, including applanation tonometry. These pilot study findings suggest that impedance cardiography combined with thigh oscillometry provides comparable results. Intra- and inter-observer variability was tested by two observers in two subjects. We instrumented 41 patients and 12 healthy normotensive controls for impedance cardiography and consecutive applanation tonometry and compared methods using the Bland-Altman method. Observer variability for the impedance-thigh cuff method (range, 3.61%-7.77%) was comparable with the tonometric method (range, 2.93%-7.37%). Comparison of the two methods based on the Bland-Altman plot revealed a good agreement between methods. The bias between impedance and tonometric measurements was -0.28 ± 0.37 m/s. Both measurements were significantly correlated (r(2) = 0.94; P < .0001; slope = 1.038).Impedance cardiography combined with thigh oscillometry is an easy to use approach which, in addition to providing hemodynamic information, yields aPWV measurements comparable to applanation tonometry. Following full validation according to current guidelines, the methodology could prove useful in cardiovascular risk stratification. Copyright © 2015 American Society of Hypertension. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Comparison between Regional and Local Pulse-Wave Velocity Data.

    PubMed

    Simova, Iana; Katova, Tzvetana; Santoro, Ciro; Galderisi, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Gold standard for pulse-wave velocity (PWV) measurement is determination of the carotid-femoral cfPWV, reflecting regional aortic PWV. Nevertheless, in several echocardiographic laboratories, PWV is measured locally, most commonly at the common carotid artery (CCA). The aim of this study was to compare regional and local PWV values in healthy volunteers. The study population consisted of 22 prospectively enrolled healthy subjects, mean age 38.7 ± 11.1 years, 50% male. For regional PWV measurement, we evaluated cfPWV with a standard echo scanner. Regional PWV was measured at the CCA, with semiautomated dedicated software (MyLab, EsaOte, Italy). cfPWV and local PWV values correlated significantly with high Pearson correlation coefficient (0.62, P = 0.002). Mean regional cfPWV (9.29 ± 3.73 m/s), however, was significantly higher than mean local PWV value (5.96 ± 1.08 m/s) (P < 0.001). The difference persisted in the subgroup analysis using different cfPWV cutoff values (10, 9, 8, and 7 m/s), except for subjects with cfPWV ≤7 m/s, where regional and local PWV values were similar. In a group of healthy volunteers, regional and local PWV values showed a good correlation. However, regional PWV was significantly higher than local PWV. These findings should be carefully taken into account when using this technique in the clinical setting. © 2015, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Estimated Pulse Wave Velocity Calculated from Age and Mean Arterial Blood Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Greve, Sara V.; Laurent, Stephan; Olsen, Michael H.

    2017-01-01

    In a recently published paper, Greve et al [J Hypertens 2016;34:1279-1289] investigate whether the estimated carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (ePWV), calculated using an equation derived from the relationship between carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV), age, and blood pressure, predicts cardiovascular disease (CVD) as good as the measured cfPWV. Because ePWV predicts CVD as good as cfPWV, some might wonder whether ePWV could be replaced by cfPWV, which is a time-consuming measurement requiring an expensive apparatus. This question is addressed in this mini-review. PMID:28229052

  18. Pulse wave velocity and cognitive function in older adults.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Wenjun; Cruickshanks, Karen J; Schubert, Carla R; Carlsson, Cynthia M; Chappell, Richard J; Klein, Barbara E K; Klein, Ronald; Acher, Charles W

    2014-01-01

    Arterial stiffness may be associated with cognitive function. In this study, pulse wave velocity (PWV) was measured from the carotid to femoral (CF-PWV) and from the carotid to radial (CR-PWV) with the Complior SP System. Cognitive function was measured by 6 tests of executive function, psychomotor speed, memory, and language fluency. A total of 1433 participants were included (mean age 75 y, 43% men). Adjusting for age, sex, education, pulse rate, hemoglobin A1C, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, hypertension, cardiovascular disease history, smoking, drinking, and depression symptoms, a CF-PWV>12 m/s was associated with a lower Mini-Mental State Examination score (coefficient: -0.31, SE: 0.11, P=0.005), fewer words recalled on Auditory Verbal Learning Test (coefficient: -1.10, SE: 0.43, P=0.01), and lower score on the composite cognition score (coefficient: -0.10, SE: 0.05, P=0.04) and marginally significantly associated with longer time to complete Trail Making Test-part B (coefficient: 6.30, SE: 3.41, P=0.06), CF-PWV was not associated with Trail Making Test-part A, Digit Symbol Substation Test, or Verbal Fluency Test. No associations were found between CR-PWV and cognitive performance measures. Higher large artery stiffness was associated with worse cognitive function, and longitudinal studies are needed to confirm these associations.

  19. Pulse wave velocity in patients with severe head injury a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Shahsavari, S; McKelvey, T; Rydenhag, B; Ritzén, C Eriksson

    2010-01-01

    The study aimed to determine the potential of pulse wave velocity measurements to reflect changes in compliant cerebral arteries/arterioles in head injured patients. The approach utilizes the electrocardiogram and intracranial pressure signals to measure the wave transit time between heart and cranial cavity. Thirty five clinical records of nineteen head injured patients, with different levels of cerebrovascular pressure-reactivity response, were investigated through the study. Results were compared with magnitude of normalized transfer function at the fundamental cardiac frequency. In patients with intact cerebrovascular pressure-reactivity, magnitude of normalized transfer function at the fundamental cardiac component was found to be highly correlated with pulse wave transit time.

  20. [Pulse wave velocity of the leg minus that of the arm measured with a custom device correlates to the coronary calcium quantification].

    PubMed

    Rico Martín, S; de Nicolás Jiménez, J M; Moyano Calvente, S L; Mogollón Jiménez, M V; Vega Fernández, J; Calderón García, J F; Bacaicoa Lopez de Sabando, M A; Tardio, M; Sánchez Muñoz-Torrero, J F

    2016-05-01

    The pulse wave velocity (PWV) in the great arteries is an indicator of vascular risk. Our objective was to identify the PWV index between the arms and legs that best correlates with the coronary calcium quantification (CCQ) and to compare it with other methods. Eight-one patients without vascular disease underwent the following measurements: CCQ; carotid intima-media thickness (IMT); carotid-femoral PWV (cfPWV), using COMPLIOR; and PWV in the arms and legs, with our own device (abiPWV, ankle brachial index PWV). The difference in PWVs between the leg and arm (l-a PWV) measured with abiPWV was the index that best correlated with CCQ (r=0.401, P<.001). The correlation between IMT and CCQ and between CF-PWV and CCQ were r=0.366, P=.001; and r=0.385, P=.001, respectively. For a CCQ score higher than 100 as a marker of significant coronary arteriosclerosis, the areas under the curve for l-a PWV, IMT and cfPWV were 0.721 (P=.002), 0.758 (P<.001) and 0.636 (P=.058), respectively. For patients without vascular disease, the l-a PWV measured with abiPWV appears to be the index that best correlates with the CCQ. This association is comparable to that between IMT and CCQ and between cfPWV and CCQ. The abiPWV is an easy-to-use device that can help improve vascular risk stratification. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  1. RELATIONS BETWEEN DAIRY FOOD INTAKE AND ARTERIAL STIFFNESS: PULSE WAVE VELOCITY AND PULSE PRESSURE

    PubMed Central

    Crichton, Georgina E.; Elias, Merrrill F.; Dore, Gregory A.; Abhayaratna, Walter P.; Robbins, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    Modifiable risk factors, such as diet, are becomingly increasingly important in the management of cardiovascular disease, one of the greatest major causes of death and disease burden. Few studies have examined the role of diet as a possible means of reducing arterial stiffness, as measured by pulse wave velocity, an independent predictor of cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality. The aim of this study was to investigate whether dairy food intake is associated with measures of arterial stiffness including carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity and pulse pressure. A cross-sectional analysis of a subset of the Maine Syracuse Longitudinal Study sample was performed. A linear decrease in pulse wave velocity was observed across increasing intakes of dairy food consumption (ranging from never/rarely to daily dairy food intake). The negative linear relationship between pulse wave velocity and intake of dairy food was independent of demographic variables, other cardiovascular disease risk factors and nutrition variables. The pattern of results was very similar for pulse pressure, while no association between dairy food intake and lipid levels was found. Further intervention studies are needed to ascertain whether dairy food intake may be an appropriate dietary intervention for the attenuation of age-related arterial stiffening and reduction of cardiovascular disease risk. PMID:22431583

  2. [Velocity estimation of aortic propagation based on radial pulse wave analysis].

    PubMed

    Clara, Fernando; Blanco, Gustavo; Casarini, Alfredo; Corral, Pablo; Meschino, Gustavo; Scandurra, Adriana

    2011-01-01

    We analyzed the possibility of using the radial pulse wave morphology, obtained by a movement transducer, to evaluate the aortic pulse wave velocity. The radial pulse wave signals were obtained by using a transducer, located on the pulse palpation area, in 167 healthy normotensive male volunteers, ages 20 to 70. The reflected wave was identified in every case. Also, a speed coefficient was defined as the ratio between the individual's height and the time between the maximum systolic wave and the arrival time of the reflected wave. We found that the specified coefficient in normotensive individuals increased linearly with age, in a similar way to the increase in aortic propagation velocity measured by other methods. The procedure was repeated on another set of 125 individuals with hypertension, without other risk factors, aged between the 3rd and 7th decade. This time we found similar values to normotensive individuals only on the 3th decade, and a pronounced increase on the velocity coefficient at advanced ages was observed. These findings support the feasibility of using this type of signals to indirectly evaluate the propagation velocity together with the increase index, a parameter commonly used in pulse wave analysis.

  3. Noninvasive determination of pulse-wave velocity in mice.

    PubMed

    Hartley, C J; Taffet, G E; Michael, L H; Pham, T T; Entman, M L

    1997-07-01

    Some transgenic mice have abnormal vascular function, but arterial geometry and dynamics are difficult to evaluate. To examine whether ultrasonic velocimetry could be used to determine arterial pulse-wave velocity (PWV) in mice, a custom-made 20-MHz pulsed Doppler instrument was used to obtain blood flow velocity signals from the aortic arch and the abdominal aorta 4 cm downstream. The upstroke (foot) of the velocity wave was timed at each site with respect to the R wave of the electrocardiogram, and PWV was calculated by dividing the separation distance by the difference in R-foot times. Doppler determinations were compared with invasive tonometry, and PWV was altered pharmacologically. It was found that the upstrokes of pressure (by tonometry) and velocity were coincident (+/-1 ms) and that PWV could be calculated by either method on exposed vessels. With the use of Doppler methods, pulse transit time was determined noninvasively with +/-1-ms resolution in 140 of 142 attempts in 82 mice. The calculated PWV in mice ranged from 220 to 850 cm/s with vasodilating anesthetics producing the low values and vasoconstricting agents producing the higher values. Thus PWV can be determined noninvasively in mice, is similar to that in other mammals, and responds as expected to vasoactive agents.

  4. Imaging pulse wave velocity in mouse retina using swept-source OCT (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Shaozhen; Wei, Wei; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2016-03-01

    Blood vessel dynamics has been a significant subject in cardiology and internal medicine, and pulse wave velocity (PWV) on artery vessels is a classic evaluation of arterial distensibility, and has never been ascertained as a cardiovascular risk marker. The aim of this study is to develop a high speed imaging technique to capture the pulsatile motion on mouse retina arteries with the ability to quantify PWV on any arterial vessels. We demonstrate a new non-invasive method to assess the vessel dynamics on mouse retina. A Swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) system is used for imaging micro-scale blood vessel motion. The phase-stabilized SS-OCT provides a typical displacement sensitivity of 20 nm. The frame rate of imaging is ~16 kHz, at A-line rate of ~1.62 MHz, which allows the detection of transient pulse waves with adequate temporal resolution. Imaging volumes with repeated B-scans are obtained on mouse retina capillary bed, and the mouse oxymeter signal is recorded simultaneously. The pulse wave on artery and vein are resolved, and with the synchronized heart beat signal, the temporal delay on different vessel locations is determined. The vessel specific measurement of PWV is achieved for the first time with SS-OCT, for pulse waves propagating more than 100 cm/s. Using the novel methodology of retinal PWV assessment, it is hoped that the clinical OCT scans can provide extended diagnostic information of cardiology functionalities.

  5. Blood pulse wave velocity and pressure sensing via fiber based and free space based optical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirkis, Talia; Beiderman, Yevgeny; Agdarov, Sergey; Beiderman, Yafim; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2017-02-01

    Continuous noninvasive measurement of vital bio-signs, such as cardiopulmonary parameters, is an important tool in evaluation of the patient's physiological condition and health monitoring. On the demand of new enabling technologies, some works have been done in continuous monitoring of blood pressure and pulse wave velocity. In this paper, we introduce two techniques for non-contact sensing of vital bio signs. In the first approach the optical sensor is based on single mode in-fibers Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) to detect heartbeat, respiration and pulse wave velocity (PWV). The introduced interferometer is based on a new implanted scheme. It replaces the conventional MZI realized by inserting of discontinuities in the fiber to break the total internal reflection and scatter/collect light. The proposed fiber sensor was successfully incorporated into shirt to produce smart clothing. The measurements obtained from the smart clothing could be obtained in comfortable manner and there is no need to have an initial calibration or a direct contact between the sensor and the skin of the tested individual. In the second concept we show a remote noncontact blood pulse wave velocity and pressure measurement based on tracking the temporal changes of reflected secondary speckle patterns produced in human skin when illuminated by a laser beams. In both concept experimental validation of the proposed schemes is shown and analyzed.

  6. Left ventricular ejection time, not heart rate, is an independent correlate of aortic pulse wave velocity.

    PubMed

    Salvi, Paolo; Palombo, Carlo; Salvi, Giovanni Matteo; Labat, Carlos; Parati, Gianfranco; Benetos, Athanase

    2013-12-01

    Several studies showed a positive association between heart rate and pulse wave velocity, a sensitive marker of arterial stiffness. However, no study involving a large population has specifically addressed the dependence of pulse wave velocity on different components of the cardiac cycle. The aim of this study was to explore in subjects of different age the link between pulse wave velocity with heart period (the reciprocal of heart rate) and the temporal components of the cardiac cycle such as left ventricular ejection time and diastolic time. Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity was assessed in 3,020 untreated subjects (1,107 men). Heart period, left ventricular ejection time, diastolic time, and early-systolic dP/dt were determined by carotid pulse wave analysis with high-fidelity applanation tonometry. An inverse association was found between pulse wave velocity and left ventricular ejection time at all ages (<25 years, r(2) = 0.043; 25-44 years, r(2) = 0.103; 45-64 years, r(2) = 0.079; 65-84 years, r(2) = 0.044; ≥ 85 years, r(2) = 0.022; P < 0.0001 for all). A significant (P < 0.0001) negative but always weaker correlation between pulse wave velocity and heart period was also found, with the exception of the youngest subjects (P = 0.20). A significant positive correlation was also found between pulse wave velocity and dP/dt (P < 0.0001). With multiple stepwise regression analysis, left ventricular ejection time and dP/dt remained the only determinant of pulse wave velocity at all ages, whereas the contribution of heart period no longer became significant. Our data demonstrate that pulse wave velocity is more closely related to left ventricular systolic function than to heart period. This may have methodological and pathophysiological implications.

  7. Estimation of local pulse wave velocity using arterial diameter waveforms: Experimental validation in sheep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, S.; Craiem, D.; Barra, J. G.; Armentano, R. L.

    2011-12-01

    Increased arterial stiffness is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. Estimation of arterial stiffness using local pulse wave velocity (PWV) promises to be very useful for noninvasive diagnosis of arteriosclerosis. In this work we estimated in an instrumented sheep, the local aortic pulse wave velocity using two sonomicrometry diameter sensors (separated 7.5 cm) according to the transit time method (PWVTT) with a sampling rate of 4 KHz. We simultaneously measured aortic pressure in order to determine from pressure-diameter loops (PWVPDLoop), the "true" local aortic pulse wave velocity. A pneumatic cuff occluder was implanted in the aorta in order to compare both methods under a wide range of pressure levels. Mean pressure values ranged from 47 to 101 mmHg and mean proximal diameter values from 12.5. to 15.2 mm. There were no significant differences between PWVTT and PWVPDLoop values (451±43 vs. 447±48 cm/s, p = ns, paired t-test). Both methods correlated significantly (R = 0.81, p<0.05). The mean difference between both methods was only -4±29 cm/s, whereas the range of the limits of agreement (mean ± 2 standard deviation) was -61 to +53 cm/s, showing no trend. In conclusion, the diameter waveforms transit time method was found to allow an accurate and precise estimation of the local aortic PWV.

  8. Pulse Wave Velocity Predicts Response to Renal Denervation in Isolated Systolic Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Fengler, Karl; Rommel, Karl-Philipp; Hoellriegel, Robert; Blazek, Stephan; Besler, Christian; Desch, Steffen; Schuler, Gerhard; Linke, Axel; Lurz, Philipp

    2017-05-17

    Renal sympathetic denervation seems to be less effective as a treatment for hypertension in patients with isolated systolic hypertension, a condition associated with elevated central arterial stiffness. Because isolated systolic hypertension can also be caused by wave reflection or increased cardiac output, a more differentiated approach might improve patient preselection for renal sympathetic denervation. We sought to evaluate the additional predictive value of invasive pulse wave velocity for response to renal sympathetic denervation in patients with combined versus isolated systolic hypertension. Patients scheduled for renal sympathetic denervation underwent additional invasive measurement of pulse wave velocity and pulse pressure before denervation. Blood pressure was assessed via ambulatory measurement at baseline and after 3 months. In total 109 patients (40 patients with isolated systolic hypertension) were included in our analysis. After 3 months, blood pressure reduction was more pronounced among patients with combined hypertension compared with patients with isolated systolic hypertension (systolic 24-hour average 9.3±10.5 versus 5.0±11.5 mm Hg, P=0.046). However, when stratifying patients with isolated systolic hypertension by invasive pulse wave velocity, patients in the lowest tertile of pulse wave velocity had comparable blood pressure reduction (12.1±12.6 mm Hg, P=0.006) despite lower baseline blood pressure than patients with combined hypertension (systolic 24-hour average 154.8±12.5 mm Hg in combined hypertension versus 141.2±8.1, 148.4±10.9, and 150.5±12.7 mm Hg, respectively, by tertiles of pulse wave velocity, P=0.002). Extended assessment of arterial stiffness can help improve patient preselection for renal sympathetic denervation and identify a subgroup of isolated systolic hypertension patients who benefit from sympathetic modulation. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  9. [Pulse wave velocity as an early marker of diastolic heart failure in patients with hypertension].

    PubMed

    Moczulska, Beata; Kubiak, Monika; Bryczkowska, Anna; Malinowska, Ewa

    2017-04-21

    According to the WHO, hypertension is one of the major causes of death worldwide. It leads to a number of severe complications. Diastolic heart failure, that is heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF), is especially common. New, but simple, indices for the early detection of patients who have not yet developed complications or are in their early developmental stages are still searched for. The aim of this study is to examine the correlation between pulse wave velocity (PWV) and markers of diastolic heart failure (DHF) assessed in echocardiography in patients with hypertension and no symptoms of heart failure. The study was comprised of 65 patients with treated hypertension. Patients with symptoms of heart failure, those with diabetes and smokers were excluded. Arterial stiffness was measured with the Mobil-O-Graph NG PWA. Pulse wave velocity (PWV) was estimated. The following markers of diastolic heart failure were assessed in the echocardiographic examination: E/A ratio - the ratio of the early (E) to late (A) ventricular filling velocities, DT - decceleration time, E/E' - the ratio of mitral peak velocity of early filling (E) to early diastolic mitral annular velocity E' in tissue Doppler echocardiography. PWV was statistically significantly higher in the DHF group. In the group of patients with heart failure, the average E/A ratio was significantly lower as compared to the group with no heart failure. Oscillometric measurement of pulse wave velocity is non-invasive, lasts a few minutes and does not require the presence of a specialist. It allows for an early detection of patients at risk of diastolic heart failure even within the conditions of primary health care.

  10. A method for localized computation of Pulse Wave Velocity in carotid structure.

    PubMed

    Patil, Ravindra B; Krishnamoorthy, P; Sethuraman, Shriram

    2015-01-01

    Pulse Wave Velocity (PWV) promises to be a useful clinical marker for noninvasive diagnosis of atherosclerosis. This work demonstrates the ability to perform localized carotid PWV measurements from the distention waveform derived from the Radio Frequency (RF) ultrasound signal using a carotid phantom setup. The proposed system consists of low cost custom-built ultrasound probe and algorithms for envelope detection, arterial wall identification, echo tracking, distension waveform computation and PWV estimation. The method is proposed on a phantom data acquired using custom-built prototype non-imaging probe. The proposed approach is non-image based and can be seamlessly integrated into existing clinical ultrasound scanners.

  11. Heart-Carotid Pulse Wave Velocity a Useful Index of Atherosclerosis in Chinese Hypertensive Patients.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunyue; Xiong, Huahua; Pirbhulal, Sandeep; Wu, Dan; Li, Zhenzhou; Huang, Wenhua; Zhang, Heye; Wu, Wanqing

    2015-12-01

    This study was designed to investigate the relationship between heart-carotid pulse wave velocity (hcPWV) and carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) in hypertensive patients, and also to examine the effect of pre-ejection period (PEP) on it. Doppler ultrasound device was used to measure CIMT in left common carotid artery. Hypertensive patients were divided into normal (n = 36, CIMT ≤0.8 mm) and thickened (n = 31, CIMT > 0.8 mm) group. Electrocardiogram R-wave-based carotid pulse wave velocity (rcPWV) and aortic valve-carotid pulse wave velocity (acPWV) were calculated as the ratio of the travel length to the pulse transit time with or without PEP, respectively. CIMT has significant relations with rcPWV (r = 0.611, P < 0.0001) and acPWV (r = 0.384, P = 0.033) in thickened group. Moreover, CIMT showed stronger correlation with rcPWV than with acPWV in thickened group. Furthermore, both acPWV and rcPWV were determinant factors of CIMT in thickened group, independent of clinical confounders including age, gender, smoking behavior, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, fasting blood glucose, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, antihypertensive medication, and plaque occurrence. However, similar results were not found in normal group. Since CIMT has been considered as an index of atherosclerosis, our results suggested that both rcPWV and acPWV could be useful indexes of atherosclerosis in thickened CIMT hypertensive patients. Additionally, if hcPWV is computed with heart-carotid pulse transit time, including PEP could improve the accuracy of atherosclerosis assessment in hypertensive patients.

  12. Robust segmentation methods with an application to aortic pulse wave velocity calculation.

    PubMed

    Babin, Danilo; Devos, Daniel; Pižurica, Aleksandra; Westenberg, Jos; Vansteenkiste, Ewout; Philips, Wilfried

    2014-04-01

    Aortic stiffness has proven to be an important diagnostic and prognostic factor of many cardiovascular diseases, as well as an estimate of overall cardiovascular health. Pulse wave velocity (PWV) represents a good measure of the aortic stiffness, while the aortic distensibility is used as an aortic elasticity index. Obtaining the PWV and the aortic distensibility from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data requires diverse segmentation tasks, namely the extraction of the aortic center line and the segmentation of aortic regions, combined with signal processing methods for the analysis of the pulse wave. In our study non-contrasted MRI images of abdomen were used in healthy volunteers (22 data sets) for the sake of non-invasive analysis and contrasted magnetic resonance (MR) images were used for the aortic examination of Marfan syndrome patients (8 data sets). In this research we present a novel robust segmentation technique for the PWV and aortic distensibility calculation as a complete image processing toolbox. We introduce a novel graph-based method for the centerline extraction of a thoraco-abdominal aorta for the length calculation from 3-D MRI data, robust to artifacts and noise. Moreover, we design a new projection-based segmentation method for transverse aortic region delineation in cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) images which is robust to high presence of artifacts. Finally, we propose a novel method for analysis of velocity curves in order to obtain pulse wave propagation times. In order to validate the proposed method we compare the obtained results with manually determined aortic centerlines and a region segmentation by an expert, while the results of the PWV measurement were compared to a validated software (LUMC, Leiden, the Netherlands). The obtained results show high correctness and effectiveness of our method for the aortic PWV and distensibility calculation.

  13. Comparison of pulsed wave and color Doppler myocardial velocity imaging in healthy dogs.

    PubMed

    Wess, G; Killich, M; Hartmann, K

    2010-01-01

    Tissue velocity imaging (TVI) is increasingly used in small animal cardiology. Tissue velocity of the myocardial wall can be measured by pulsed wave (PW) or color Doppler (CD) imaging methods. Currently, the same reference ranges are used for PW TVI and CD TVI methods. However, if and how both methods correlate, and whether they can be used interchangeably, have not been assessed in small animals. To compare the results of PW TVI and CD TVI measurements. Seventy-one healthy dogs. Longitudinal myocardial velocity profiles were recorded from the 4-chamber left apical view. Peak maximal systolic (S), early (E), and late diastolic (A) velocities were measured off-line in a blinded fashion in the septal and lateral left ventricular wall by PW TVI and CD TVI. Differences between peak PW TVI and CD TVI waves were analyzed by a paired t-test. Regression analysis and Bland-Altman difference plots also were used to assess agreement between methods. There was a significant correlation between PW TVI and CD TVI (P < .001). However, S, E, and A waves measured by PW TVI were significantly higher than the CD TVI values (P < .001). Peak systolic and diastolic PW velocities were approximately 2.20 cm/s higher than corresponding mean CD TVI velocities. PW TVI measurements are significantly higher compared with CD TVI measurements. Theses differences are clinically relevant. These methods should not be used interchangeably, and different reference ranges for PW TVI and CD TVI should be used.

  14. Accurate measurement of the pulse wave delay with imaging photoplethysmography

    PubMed Central

    Kamshilin, Alexei A.; Sidorov, Igor S.; Babayan, Laura; Volynsky, Maxim A.; Giniatullin, Rashid; Mamontov, Oleg V.

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of the cardiovascular parameters using noncontact video-based or imaging photoplethysmography (IPPG) is usually considered as inaccurate because of strong influence of motion artefacts. To optimize this technique we performed a simultaneous recording of electrocardiogram and video frames of the face for 36 healthy volunteers. We found that signal disturbances originate mainly from the stochastically enhanced dichroic notch caused by endogenous cardiovascular mechanisms, with smaller contribution of the motion artefacts. Our properly designed algorithm allowed us to increase accuracy of the pulse-transit-time measurement and visualize propagation of the pulse wave in the facial region. Thus, the accurate measurement of the pulse wave parameters with this technique suggests a sensitive approach to assess local regulation of microcirculation in various physiological and pathological states. PMID:28018731

  15. The age‐dependent association between aortic pulse wave velocity and telomere length

    PubMed Central

    Yasmin; Butcher, Lee; Cockcroft, John R.; Wilkinson, Ian B.; Erusalimsky, Jorge D.; McEniery, Carmel M.

    2017-01-01

    Key points Age significantly modifies the relationship between aortic pulse wave velocity and telomere length.The differential relationships observed between aortic pulse wave velocity and telomere length in younger and older individuals suggest that the links between cellular and vascular ageing reflect a complex interaction between genetic and environmental factors acting over the life‐course. Abstract Ageing is associated with marked large artery stiffening. Telomere shortening, a marker of cellular ageing, is linked with arterial stiffening. However, the results of existing studies are inconsistent, possibly because of the confounding influence of variable exposure to cardiovascular risk factors. Therefore, we investigated the relationship between telomere length (TL) and aortic stiffness in well‐characterized, younger and older healthy adults, who were pre‐selected on the basis of having either low or high aortic pulse wave velocity (aPWV), a robust measure of aortic stiffness. Demographic, haemodynamic and biochemical data were drawn from participants in the Anglo‐Cardiff Collaborative Trial. Two age groups with an equal sex ratio were examined: those aged <30 years (younger) or >50 years (older). Separately for each age group and sex, DNA samples representing the highest (n = 125) and lowest (n = 125) extremes of aPWV (adjusted for blood pressure) were selected for analysis of leukocyte TL. Ultimately, this yielded complete phenotypic data on 904 individuals. In younger subjects, TL was significantly shorter in those with high aPWV vs. those with low aPWV (P = 0.017). By contrast, in older subjects, TL was significantly longer in those with high aPWV (P = 0.001). Age significantly modified the relationship between aPWV and TL (P < 0.001). Differential relationships are observed between aPWV and TL, with an inverse association in younger individuals and a positive association in older individuals. The links between cellular and vascular

  16. Favorable effect of aerobic exercise on arterial pressure and aortic pulse wave velocity during stress testing.

    PubMed

    Milatz, Florian; Ketelhut, Sascha; Ketelhut, Sascha; Ketelhut, Reinhard G

    2015-07-01

    Increased central pulse wave velocity is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. The favorable influence of exercise on arterial stiffness (AS) and blood pressure (BP) has been reported exclusively at rest. The present study investigated the influence of a single bout of acute cycling on AS and BP during recovery and, moreover, during cold pressor stress testing. 32 healthy men (33.7 ± 8 years, BMI 24 ± 2.5 kg/m²) performed a 60 minute endurance exercise on a bicycle ergometer (45 % VO2max). Before and after exercise aortic pulse wave velocity (aPWV) as well as central and peripheral BP were measured non-invasively at rest and at the end of a 2 minute cold pressor test (CPT). Even after 60 minutes of recovery aPWV (- 0.22 ± 0.3 m / sec) was significantly reduced (p < 0.01). Exercise decreased peripheral (- 8 ± 7 mmHg) and central (- 7 ± 8 mmHg) systolic BP as well as peripheral (- 3 ± 5 mmHg) and central (- 4 ± 7 mmHg) diastolic BP (p < 0.01). In comparison to measurements during CPT pre-exercise, there was a significant reduction in aPWV (- 0.19 ± 0.3 m / sec), peripheral (- 6 ± 10 mmHg) and central (- 5 ± 8 mmHg) systolic BP as well as peripheral (- 3 ± 6 mmHg) and central (- 3 ± 6 mmHg) diastolic BP during CPT after exercise (p < 0.01). The present study suggests that acute endurance exercise leads not only to decreased BP but even more reduces aPWV as a measure of AS even after 60 minutes of recovery. In particular, the investigation provides evidence that acute moderate-intensity exercise has a favorable effect on BP and aPWV during stress testing.

  17. Ethnic Differences in and Childhood Influences on Early Adult Pulse Wave Velocity

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Maria J.; Molaodi, Oarabile R.; Enayat, Zinat E.; Cassidy, Aidan; Karamanos, Alexis; Read, Ursula M.; Faconti, Luca; Dall, Philippa; Stansfield, Ben; Harding, Seeromanie

    2016-01-01

    Early determinants of aortic stiffness as pulse wave velocity are poorly understood. We tested how factors measured twice previously in childhood in a multiethnic cohort study, particularly body mass, blood pressure, and objectively assessed physical activity affected aortic stiffness in young adults. Of 6643 London children, aged 11 to 13 years, from 51 schools in samples stratified by 6 ethnic groups with different cardiovascular risk, 4785 (72%) were seen again at aged 14 to 16 years. In 2013, 666 (97% of invited) took part in a young adult (21–23 years) pilot follow-up. With psychosocial and anthropometric measures, aortic stiffness and blood pressure were recorded via an upper arm calibrated Arteriograph device. In a subsample (n=334), physical activity was measured >5 days via the ActivPal. Unadjusted pulse wave velocities in black Caribbean and white UK young men were similar (mean±SD 7.9±0.3 versus 7.6±0.4 m/s) and lower in other groups at similar systolic pressures (120 mm Hg) and body mass (24.6 kg/m2). In fully adjusted regression models, independent of pressure effects, black Caribbean (higher body mass/waists), black African, and Indian young women had lower stiffness (by 0.5–0.8; 95% confidence interval, 0.1–1.1 m/s) than did white British women (6.9±0.2 m/s). Values were separately increased by age, pressure, powerful impacts from waist/height, time spent sedentary, and a reported racism effect (+0.3 m/s). Time walking at >100 steps/min was associated with reduced stiffness (P<0.01). Effects of childhood waist/hip were detected. By young adulthood, increased waist/height ratios, lower physical activity, blood pressure, and psychosocial variables (eg, perceived racism) independently increase arterial stiffness, effects likely to increase with age. PMID:27141061

  18. ON THE ELIMINATION OF PULSE WAVE VELOCITY IN STROKE VOLUME DETERMINATION FROM THE ULTRALOW-FREQUENCY DISPLACEMENT BALLISTOCARDIOGRAM,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    stroke volume and ballistocardiographic amplitude was investigated for different pulse wave velocities. It was found that the amplitude of the...displacement ballistocardiogram, as used by Klensch (’J’ M minus ’I’ J), is strongly correlated to stroke volume; however, the relationship is highly...correlation between amplitude and stroke volume but is now independent of pulse wave velocity. (Author)

  19. A physics based approach to the pulse wave velocity prediction in compliant arterial segments.

    PubMed

    Liberson, Alexander S; Lillie, Jeffrey S; Day, Steven W; Borkholder, David A

    2016-10-03

    Pulse wave velocity (PWV) quantification commonly serves as a highly robust prognostic parameter being used in a preventative cardiovascular therapy. Being dependent on arterial elastance, it can serve as a marker of cardiovascular risk. Since it is influenced by a blood pressure (BP), the pertaining theory can lay the foundation in developing a technique for noninvasive blood pressure measurement. Previous studies have reported application of PWV, measured noninvasively, for both the estimation of arterial compliance and blood pressure, based on simplified physical or statistical models. A new theoretical model for pulse wave propagation in a compliant arterial segment is presented within the framework of pseudo-elastic deformation of biological tissue undergoing finite deformation. An essential ingredient is the dependence of results on nonlinear aspects of the model: convective fluid phenomena, hyperelastic constitutive relation, large deformation and a longitudinal pre-stress load. An exact analytical solution for PWV is presented as a function of pressure, flow and pseudo-elastic orthotropic parameters. Results from our model are compared with published in-vivo PWV measurements under diverse physiological conditions. Contributions of each of the nonlinearities are analyzed. It was found that the totally nonlinear model achieves the best match with the experimental data. To retrieve individual vascular information of a patient, the inverse problem of hemodynamics is presented, calculating local orthotropic hyperelastic properties of the arterial wall. The proposed technique can be used for non-invasive assessment of arterial elastance, and blood pressure using direct measurement of PWV, with account of hyperelastic orthotropic properties. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Reliability assessment for pulse wave measurement using artificial pulse generator.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chi-Wei; Wang, Wei-Kung

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed to assess intrinsic reliabilities of devices for pulse wave measurement (PWM). An artificial pulse generator system was constructed to create a periodic pulse wave. The stability of the periodic output was tested by the DP103 pressure transducer. The pulse generator system was then used to evaluate the TD01C system. Test-re-test and inter-device reliability assessments were conducted on the TD01C system. First, 11 harmonic components of the pulse wave were calculated using Fourier series analysis. For each harmonic component, coefficient of variation (CV), intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) and Bland-Altman plot were used to determine the degree of reliability of the TD01C system. In addition, device exclusion criteria were pre-specified to improve consistency of devices. The artificial pulse generator system was stable to evaluate intrinsic reliabilities of devices for PWM (ICCs > 0.95, p < 0.001). TD01C was reliable for repeated measurements (ICCs of test-re-test reliability > 0.95, p < 0.001; CVs all < 3%). Device exclusion criteria successfully excluded the device with defect; therefore, the criteria reduced inter-device CVs of harmonics and improved consistency of the selected devices for all harmonic components. This study confirmed the feasibility of intrinsic reliability assessment of devices for PWM using an artificial pulse generator system. Moreover, potential novel findings on the assessment combined with device exclusion criteria could be a useful method to select the measuring devices and to evaluate the qualities of them in PWM.

  1. Effect of viscosity on the wave propagation: Experimental determination of compression and expansion pulse wave velocity in fluid-fill elastic tube.

    PubMed

    Stojadinović, Bojana; Tenne, Tamar; Zikich, Dragoslav; Rajković, Nemanja; Milošević, Nebojša; Lazović, Biljana; Žikić, Dejan

    2015-11-26

    The velocity by which the disturbance travels through the medium is the wave velocity. Pulse wave velocity is one of the main parameters in hemodynamics. The study of wave propagation through the fluid-fill elastic tube is of great importance for the proper biophysical understanding of the nature of blood flow through of cardiovascular system. The effect of viscosity on the pulse wave velocity is generally ignored. In this paper we present the results of experimental measurements of pulse wave velocity (PWV) of compression and expansion waves in elastic tube. The solutions with different density and viscosity were used in the experiment. Biophysical model of the circulatory flow is designed to perform measurements. Experimental results show that the PWV of the expansion waves is higher than the compression waves during the same experimental conditions. It was found that the change in viscosity causes a change of PWV for both waves. We found a relationship between PWV, fluid density and viscosity.

  2. N-terminal Pro-B-type Natriuretic Peptide is Associated with Arterial Stiffness as Measured According to the Brachial-ankle Pulse Wave Velocity in Patients with Takayasu Arteritis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qing; Dang, Ai-Min; Chen, Bing-Wei; Lv, Na-Qiang; Wang, Xu; Zheng, De-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Takayasu arteritis (TA) is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and the degree of arterial stiffness is an independent predictor of cardiovascular mortality in a variety of diseases. In addition, the levels of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), a marker of ventricular dysfunction, have been found to be higher in patients with TA than in healthy controls. In this study, we aimed to investigate the relationship between the plasma NT-proBNP levels and arterial stiffness in patients with TA. Seventy-two patients with TA were recruited in this study. The participants were analyzed with respect to the NT-proBNP levels, cardiovascular risk factors, TA-related variables and arterial stiffness assessed according to the brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV). The patients were divided into two groups based on the mean baPWV, and the association between the NT-proBNP and baPWV values was tested using uni- and multivariate analyses. Twenty-four patients (33.3%) were classified into the high-baPWV group. The body mass index (p=0.035), systolic blood pressure (p<0.001), diastolic blood pressure (p=0.001), mean blood pressure (p<0.001), plasma NT-proBNP levels (p=0.036) and total cholesterol levels (p=0.030) were significantly higher in the high-baPWV group than in the low-baPWV group. A stepwise multiple linear regression analysis revealed the mean blood pressure (p<0.001), age (p=0.002), and NT-proBNP level (p=0.002) to be independent determinants of the ba-PWV after adjusting for other confounding factors. The plasma NT-proBNP levels are independently associated with the degree of arterial stiffness measured according to the baPWV in patients with TA.

  3. An Experimental-Computational Study of Catheter Induced Alterations in Pulse Wave Velocity in Anesthetized Mice.

    PubMed

    Cuomo, Federica; Ferruzzi, Jacopo; Humphrey, Jay D; Figueroa, C Alberto

    2015-07-01

    Computational methods for solving problems of fluid dynamics and fluid-solid-interactions have advanced to the point that they enable reliable estimates of many hemodynamic quantities, including those important for studying vascular mechanobiology or designing medical devices. In this paper, we use a customized version of the open source code SimVascular to develop a computational model of central artery hemodynamics in anesthetized mice that is informed with experimental data on regional geometries, blood flows and pressures, and biaxial wall properties. After validating a baseline model against available data, we then use the model to investigate the effects of commercially available catheters on the very parameters that they are designed to measure, namely, murine blood pressure and (pressure) pulse wave velocity (PWV). We found that a combination of two small profile catheters designed to measure pressure simultaneously in the ascending aorta and femoral artery increased the PWV due to an overall increase in pressure within the arterial system. Conversely, a larger profile dual-sensor pressure catheter inserted through a carotid artery into the descending thoracic aorta decreased the PWV due to an overall decrease in pressure. In both cases, similar reductions in cardiac output were observed due to increased peripheral vascular resistance. As might be expected, therefore, invasive transducers can alter the very quantities that are designed to measure, yet advanced computational models offer a unique method to evaluate or augment such measurements.

  4. Assessment of pulmonary artery pulse wave velocity in children: an MRI pilot study.

    PubMed

    Poon, Chuen Y; Edwards, Julie M; Evans, C John; Harris, Ashley D; Tsai-Goodman, Beverly; Bolton, Charlotte E; Cockcroft, John R; Wise, Richard G; Kotecha, Sailesh

    2013-12-01

    To assess the feasibility of measuring pulmonary artery (PA) pulse wave velocity (PWV) in children breathing ambient air and 12% oxygen. Velocity-encoded phase-contrast MR images of the PA were acquired in 15 children, aged 9-12years, without evidence of cardiac or pulmonary diseases. PWV was derived as the ratio of flow to area changes during early systole. Each child was scanned twice, in air and after at least 20minutes into inspiratory hypoxic challenge. Intra-observer and inter-observer variability and repeatability were also compared. PA PWV, which was successfully measured in all subjects, increased from 1.31±0.32m/s in air to 1.61±0.58m/s under hypoxic challenge (p=0.03). Intra- and inter-observer coefficients of variations were 9.0% and 15.6% respectively. Good correlation within and between observers of r=0.92 and r=0.72 respectively was noted for PA PWV measurements. Mean (95% limit of agreement) intra- and inter-observer agreement on Bland-Altman analysis were -0.02m/s (-0.41-0.38m/s) and -0.28m/s (-1.06-0.49m/s). PA PWV measurement in children using velocity-encoded MRI is feasible, reproducible and sufficiently sensitive to detect differences in PA compliance between normoxia and hypoxia. This technique can be used to detect early changes of PA compliance and monitor PAH in children. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Assessment of aortic pulse wave velocity by ultrasound: a feasibility study in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faita, Francesco; Di Lascio, Nicole; Stea, Francesco; Kusmic, Claudia; Sicari, Rosa

    2014-03-01

    Pulse wave velocity (PWV) is considered a surrogate marker of arterial stiffness and could be useful for characterizing cardiovascular disease progression even in mouse models. Aim of this study was to develop an image process algorithm for assessing arterial PWV in mice using ultrasound (US) images only and test it on the evaluation of age-associated differences in abdominal aorta PWV (aaPWV). US scans were obtained from six adult (7 months) and six old (19 months) wild type male mice (strain C57BL6) under gaseous anaesthesia. For each mouse, diameter and flow velocity instantaneous values were achieved from abdominal aorta B-mode and PW-Doppler images; all measurements were obtained using edge detection and contour tracking techniques. Single-beat mean diameter and velocity were calculated and time-aligned, providing the lnD-V loop. aaPWV values were obtained from the slope of the linear part of the loop (the early systolic phase), while relative distension (relD) measurements were calculated from the mean diameter signal. aaPWV values for young mice (3.5±0.52 m/s) were lower than those obtained for older ones (5.12±0.98 m/s) while relD measurements were higher in young (25%±7%) compared with older animals evaluations (15%±3%). All measurements were significantly different between the two groups (P<0.01 both). In conclusion, the proposed image processing technique well discriminate between age groups. Since it provides PWV assessment just from US images, it could represent a simply and useful system for vascular stiffness evaluation at any arterial site in the mouse, even in preclinical small animal models.

  6. Parametric estimation of pulse arrival time: a robust approach to pulse wave velocity.

    PubMed

    Solà, Josep; Vetter, Rolf; Renevey, Philippe; Chételat, Olivier; Sartori, Claudio; Rimoldi, Stefano F

    2009-07-01

    Pulse wave velocity (PWV) is a surrogate of arterial stiffness and represents a non-invasive marker of cardiovascular risk. The non-invasive measurement of PWV requires tracking the arrival time of pressure pulses recorded in vivo, commonly referred to as pulse arrival time (PAT). In the state of the art, PAT is estimated by identifying a characteristic point of the pressure pulse waveform. This paper demonstrates that for ambulatory scenarios, where signal-to-noise ratios are below 10 dB, the performance in terms of repeatability of PAT measurements through characteristic points identification degrades drastically. Hence, we introduce a novel family of PAT estimators based on the parametric modeling of the anacrotic phase of a pressure pulse. In particular, we propose a parametric PAT estimator (TANH) that depicts high correlation with the Complior(R) characteristic point D1 (CC = 0.99), increases noise robustness and reduces by a five-fold factor the number of heartbeats required to obtain reliable PAT measurements.

  7. Influence of biologic factor on the velocity of propagation of pulse waves in vessels of living organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumets, Pavel

    2012-11-01

    In this work there has been examined a mathematical model illustrating propagation of a pulse wave, with biological activity of a blood vessel's walls taken into consideration. The influence of the biological factor was allowed for in the equations connecting stresses and deformations of the vessel's walls among themselves. There has been deduced a formula defining the pulse wave propagation velocity in an orthotropic resilient blood-filled vessel, influenced by the biological factor. The obtained results allow us to make a conclusion that stimulation of muscle fibers of the vessel's wall brings on an increase in the pulse wave propagation velocity.

  8. An innovative numerical approach to resolve the pulse wave velocity in a healthy thoracic aorta model.

    PubMed

    Yang, An-Shik; Wen, Chih-Yung; Tseng, Li-Yu; Chiang, Chih-Chieh; Tseng, Wen-Yih Isaac; Yu, Hsi-Yu

    2014-04-01

    Aortic dissection and atherosclerosis are highly fatal diseases. The development of both diseases is closely associated with highly complex haemodynamics. Thus, in predicting the onset of cardiac disease, it is desirable to obtain a detailed understanding of the flowfield characteristics in the human cardiovascular circulatory system. Accordingly, in this study, a numerical model of a normal human thoracic aorta is constructed using the geometry information obtained from a phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI) technique. The interaction between the blood flow and the vessel wall dynamics is then investigated using a coupled fluid-structure interaction (FSI) analysis. The simulations focus specifically on the flowfield characteristics and pulse wave velocity (PWV) of the blood flow. Instead of using a conventional PC-MRI method to measure PWV, we present an innovative application of using the FSI approach to numerically resolve PWV for the assessment of wall compliance in a thoracic aorta model. The estimated PWV for a normal thoracic aorta agrees well with the results obtained via PC-MRI measurement. In addition, simulations which consider the FSI effect yield a lower predicted value of the wall shear stress at certain locations in the cardiac cycle than models which assume a rigid vessel wall. Consequently, the model provides a suitable basis for the future development of more sophisticated methods capable of performing the computer-aided analysis of aortic blood flows.

  9. Effect of Heart Rate on Arterial Stiffness as Assessed by Pulse Wave Velocity.

    PubMed

    Tan, Isabella; Butlin, Mark; Spronck, Bart; Xiao, Huanguang; Avolio, Alberto

    2017-07-24

    Vascular assessment is becoming increasingly important in the diagnosis of cardiovascular diseases. In particular, clinical assessment of arterial stiffness, as measured by pulse wave velocity (PWV), is gaining increased interest due to the recognition of PWV as an influential factor on the prognosis of hypertension as well as being an independent predictor of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. Whilst age and blood pressure are established as the two major determinants of PWV, the influence of heart rate on PWV measurements remains controversial with conflicting results being observed in both acute and epidemiological studies. In a majority of studies investigating the acute effects of heart rate on PWV, results were confounded by concomitant changes in blood pressure. Observations from epidemiological studies have also failed to converge, with approximately just half of such studies reporting a significant blood-pressure-independent association between heart rate and PWV. Further to the lack of consensus on the effects of heart rate on PWV, the possible mechanisms contributing to observed PWV changes with heart rate have yet to be fully elucidated, although many investigators have attributed heart-rate related changes in arterial stiffness to the viscoelasticity of the arterial wall. With elevated heart rate being an independent prognostic factor of cardiovascular disease and its association with hypertension, the interaction between heart rate and PWV continues to be relevant in assessing cardiovascular risk. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  10. Metabolomic study of carotid–femoral pulse-wave velocity in women

    PubMed Central

    Menni, Cristina; Mangino, Massimo; Cecelja, Marina; Psatha, Maria; Brosnan, Mary J.; Trimmer, Jeff; Mohney, Robert P.; Chowienczyk, Phil; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Spector, Tim D.; Valdes, Ana M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Carotid–femoral pulse-wave velocity (PWV) is a measure of aortic stiffness that is strongly associated with increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The aim of the current study was to identify the molecular markers and the pathways involved in differences in PWV in women, in order to further understand the regulation of arterial stiffening. Methods: A total of 280 known metabolites were measured in 1797 female twins (age range: 18–84 years) not on any antihypertensive medication. Metabolites associated with PWV (after adjustment for age, BMI, metabolite batch, and family relatedness) were entered into a backward linear regression. Transcriptomic analyses were further performed on the top compounds identified. Results: Twelve metabolites were associated with PWV (P < 1.8 × 10−4). One of the most strongly associated metabolites was uridine, which was not associated with blood pressure (BP) and traditional risk factors but correlated significantly with the gene-expression levels of the purinergic receptor P2RY2 (Beta = −0.010, SE = 0.003, P = 0.007), suggesting that it may play a role in regulating endothelial nitric oxide synthase phosphorylation. On the other hand, phenylacetylglutamine was strongly associated with both PWV and BP. Conclusion: Circulating levels of uridine, phenylacetylglutamine, and serine appear strongly correlated with PWV in women. PMID:25490711

  11. Intima-media thickness and pulse wave velocity in hypertensive adolescents.

    PubMed

    Gil, Tae Young; Sung, Choi Youn; Shim, Sung Shine; Hong, Young Mi

    2008-02-01

    Increased intima-media thickness (IMT) and pulse wave velocity (PWV) are noninvasive markers of early arterial wall alteration and are more widely used in adult clinical research. We investigated whether IMT and PWV are useful predictors of cardiovascular risk in hypertensive adolescents. Fifteen hypertensive adolescents (13-18 yr old, systolic BP > or = 140 mmHg, diastolic BP > or = 90 mmHg) and seventeen normotensive subjects were included. Height, weight, obesity index, body mass index (BMI), and fat distribution were obtained from each group. Serum lipid, insulin, vitamine B12, folate, renin, aldosterone, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), and homocysteine levels were compared. The carotid IMT and PWV were measured. Arterial wall compliance and distensibility were calculated with the equation. High systolic blood pressure significantly correlated with height, weight, BMI, obesity index, arm circumference, fat mass, and fat distribution. Hypertensive adolescents had significantly greater cIMT (carotid intima-media thickness) and lower elastic properties such as cross-sectional compliance and distensibility of the carotid artery. The carotid IMT significantly correlated with brachial-ankle PWV. In conclusion, the measurement of carotid IMT and brachial-ankle PWV might be useful to predict the development of atherosclerosis in hypertensive adolescents.

  12. Intima-Media Thickness and Pulse Wave Velocity in Hypertensive Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Gil, Tae Young; Sung, Choi Youn; Shim, Sung Shine

    2008-01-01

    Increased intima-media thickness (IMT) and pulse wave velocity (PWV) are noninvasive markers of early arterial wall alteration and are more widely used in adult clinical research. We investigated whether IMT and PWV are useful predictors of cardiovascular risk in hypertensive adolescents. Fifteen hypertensive adolescents (13-18 yr old, systolic BP ≥140 mmHg, diastolic BP ≥90 mmHg) and seventeen normotensive subjects were included. Height, weight, obesity index, body mass index (BMI), and fat distribution were obtained from each group. Serum lipid, insulin, vitamine B12, folate, renin, aldosterone, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), and homocysteine levels were compared. The carotid IMT and PWV were measured. Arterial wall compliance and distensibility were calculated with the equation. High systolic blood pressure significantly correlated with height, weight, BMI, obesity index, arm circumference, fat mass, and fat distribution. Hypertensive adolescents had significantly greater cIMT (carotid intima-media thickness) and lower elastic properties such as cross-sectional compliance and distensibility of the carotid artery. The carotid IMT significantly correlated with brachial-ankle PWV. In conclusion, the measurement of carotid IMT and brachial-ankle PWV might be useful to predict the development of atherosclerosis in hypertensive adolescents. PMID:18303196

  13. High-intensity interval cycling exercise on wave reflection and pulse wave velocity.

    PubMed

    Kingsley, J Derek; Tai, Yu Lun; Vaughan, Jeremiah; Mayo, Xián

    2016-08-18

    The purpose of the present study was to assess the effects of high-intensity exercise on wave reflection and aortic stiffness. Nine young, healthy men (mean±SD: Age: 22±2 yrs) participated in the study. The high-intensity interval cycling exercise consisted of 3 sets of Wingate Anaerobic Tests (WAT) with 7.5% of bodyweight as resistance and 2 minutes of rest between each set. Measurements were taken at rest and 1 min after completion of the WATs. Brachial and aortic blood pressures, as well as wave reflection characteristics, were measured via pulse wave analysis. Aortic stiffness was assessed via carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV). A repeated-measures ANOVA was used to investigate the effects of the WATs on blood pressure and vascular function across time. There was no change in brachial or aortic systolic pressure from rest to recovery. There was a significant (p<0.05) decrease in brachial diastolic pressure (rest: 73±6 mmHg; recovery: 67±9 mmHg) and aortic diastolic pressure (rest: 75±6 mmHg; recovery: 70±9 mmHg) from rest to recovery. In addition, there was no significant change in the augmentation index (rest: 111.4±6.5%; recovery: 109.8±5.8%, p=0.65) from rest to recovery. However, there was a significant (p<0.05) increase in the augmentation index normalized at 75 bpm (rest: 3.29±9.82; recovery 21.21±10.87) during recovery compared to rest. There was no change in cfPWV (rest: 5.3±0.8 m/sec; recovery: 5.7±0.5m/sec; p=0.09) in response to the WAT. These data demonstrate that high-intensity interval cycling exercise with short rest periods has a non-significant effect on vascular function.

  14. Reference Values of Pulse Wave Velocity in Healthy People from an Urban and Rural Argentinean Population

    PubMed Central

    Díaz, Alejandro; Galli, Cintia; Tringler, Matías; Ramírez, Agustín; Cabrera Fischer, Edmundo Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    In medical practice the reference values of arterial stiffness came from multicenter registries obtained in Asia, USA, Australia and Europe. Pulse wave velocity (PWV) is the gold standard method for arterial stiffness quantification; however, in South America, there are few population-based studies. In this research PWV was measured in healthy asymptomatic and normotensive subjects without history of hypertension in first-degree relatives. Normal PWV and the 95% confidence intervals values were obtained in 780 subjects (39.8 ± 18.5 years) divided into 7 age groups (10–98 years). The mean PWV found was 6.84 m/s ± 1.65. PWV increases linearly with aging with a high degree of correlation (r2 = 0.61; P < 0.05) with low dispersion in younger subjects. PWV progressively increases 6–8% with each decade of life; this tendency is more pronounced after 50 years. A significant increase of PWV over 50 years was demonstrated. This is the first population-based study from urban and rural people of Argentina that provides normal values of the PWV in healthy, normotensive subjects without family history of hypertension. Moreover, the age dependence of PWV values was confirmed. PMID:25215227

  15. 24-h ambulatory recording of aortic pulse wave velocity and central systolic augmentation: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Luzardo, Leonella; Lujambio, Inés; Sottolano, Mariana; da Rosa, Alicia; Thijs, Lutgarde; Noboa, Oscar; Staessen, Jan A; Boggia, José

    2012-10-01

    We assessed the feasibility of ambulatory pulse wave analysis by comparing this approach with an established tonometric technique. We investigated 35 volunteers (45.6 years; 51.0% women) exclusively at rest (R study) and 83 volunteers (49.9 years; 61.4% women) at rest and during daytime (1000-2000 h) ambulatory monitoring (R+A study). We recorded central systolic (cSP), diastolic (cDP) and pulse (cPP) pressures, augmentation index (cAI) and pulse wave velocity (PWV) by brachial oscillometry (Mobil-O-Graph 24h PWA Monitor) and radial tonometry (SphygmoCor). We applied the Bland and Altman's statistics. In the R study, tonometric and oscillometric estimates of cSP (105.6 vs. 106.9 mm Hg), cDP (74.6 vs. 74.7 mm Hg), cPP (31.0 vs. 32.1 mm Hg), cAI (21.1 vs. 20.6%) and PWV (7.3 vs. 7.0 m s(-1)) were similar (P0.11). In the R+A study, tonometric vs. oscillometric assessment yielded similar values for cSP (115.4 vs. 113.9 mm Hg; P=0.19) and cAI (26.5 vs. 25.3%; P=0.54), but lower cDP (77.8 vs. 81.9 mm Hg; P<0.0001), so that cPP was higher (37.6 vs. 32.1 mm Hg; P<0.0001). PWV (7.9 vs. 7.4 m s(-1)) was higher (P=0.0002) on tonometric assessment. The differences between tonometric and oscillometric estimates increased (P0.004) with cSP (r=0.37), cAI (r=0.39) and PWV (r=0.39), but not (P0.17) with cDP (r=0.15) or cPP (r=0.13). Irrespective of measurement conditions, brachial oscillometry compared with an established tonometric method provided similar estimates for cSP and systolic augmentation, but slightly underestimated PWV. Pending further validation, ambulatory assessment of central hemodynamic variables is feasible.

  16. Association of pulse wave velocity with total lung capacity: A cross-sectional analysis of the BOLD London study

    PubMed Central

    Amaral, André F.S.; Patel, Jaymini; Gnatiuc, Louisa; Jones, Meinir; Burney, Peter G.J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Low lung function, measured using spirometry, has been associated with mortality from cardiovascular disease, but whether this is explained by airflow obstruction or restriction is a question that remains unanswered. Objectives To assess the association of total lung capacity (TLC), forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) with several cardio-metabolic and inflammatory markers. Methods In the follow up of the Burden of Lung Disease (BOLD) study in London, acceptable post-bronchodilator spirometric, pulse rate, pulse wave velocity and blood pressure data were obtained from 108 participants. Blood samples for measurement of cardio-metabolic and inflammatory markers were also collected from these participants. Association of lung function and volume with the different biomarkers was examined in multivariable linear regression models adjusted for potential confounders. Results Following adjustment for age, sex, height, and ethnicity, TLC (adjusted coefficient = −1.53; 95% CI: −2.57, −0.49) and FVC (adjusted coefficient = −2.66; 95% CI: −4.98, −0.34) were inversely associated with pulse wave velocity, and further adjustment for smoking status, pack-years and body mass index (BMI) did not materially change these results. FEV1 was inversely associated with systolic blood pressure, and adjustment for smoking status, pack-years and BMI made this association stronger (adjusted coefficient = −9.47; 95% CI: −15.62, −3.32). Conclusion The inverse association of pulse wave velocity, which is a marker of cardiovascular disease, with TLC suggests that the association of the former with low FVC is independent of airflow obstruction. The association between FEV1 with systolic blood pressure after adjustment for FVC suggests an association with airflow obstruction rather than with restricted spirometry. PMID:26553156

  17. Pilot Study: Estimation of Stroke Volume and Cardiac Output from Pulse Wave Velocity.

    PubMed

    Obata, Yurie; Mizogami, Maki; Nyhan, Daniel; Berkowitz, Dan E; Steppan, Jochen; Barodka, Viachaslau

    2017-01-01

    Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) is increasingly replacing thermodilution pulmonary artery catheters to assess hemodynamics in patients at high risk for cardiovascular morbidity. However, one of the drawbacks of TEE compared to pulmonary artery catheters is the inability to measure real time stroke volume (SV) and cardiac output (CO) continuously. The aim of the present proof of concept study was to validate a novel method of SV estimation, based on pulse wave velocity (PWV) in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. This is a retrospective observational study. We measured pulse transit time by superimposing the radial arterial waveform onto the continuous wave Doppler waveform of the left ventricular outflow tract, and calculated SV (SVPWV) using the transformed Bramwell-Hill equation. The SV measured by TEE (SVTEE) was used as a reference. A total of 190 paired SV were measured from 28 patients. A strong correlation was observed between SVPWV and SVTEE with the coefficient of determination (R2) of 0.71. A mean difference between the two (bias) was 3.70 ml with the limits of agreement ranging from -20.33 to 27.73 ml and a percentage error of 27.4% based on a Bland-Altman analysis. The concordance rate of two methods was 85.0% based on a four-quadrant plot. The angular concordance rate was 85.9% with radial limits of agreement (the radial sector that contained 95% of the data points) of ± 41.5 degrees based on a polar plot. PWV based SV estimation yields reasonable agreement with SV measured by TEE. Further studies are required to assess its utility in different clinical situations.

  18. Pilot Study: Estimation of Stroke Volume and Cardiac Output from Pulse Wave Velocity

    PubMed Central

    Nyhan, Daniel; Berkowitz, Dan E.; Steppan, Jochen; Barodka, Viachaslau

    2017-01-01

    Background Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) is increasingly replacing thermodilution pulmonary artery catheters to assess hemodynamics in patients at high risk for cardiovascular morbidity. However, one of the drawbacks of TEE compared to pulmonary artery catheters is the inability to measure real time stroke volume (SV) and cardiac output (CO) continuously. The aim of the present proof of concept study was to validate a novel method of SV estimation, based on pulse wave velocity (PWV) in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Methods This is a retrospective observational study. We measured pulse transit time by superimposing the radial arterial waveform onto the continuous wave Doppler waveform of the left ventricular outflow tract, and calculated SV (SVPWV) using the transformed Bramwell-Hill equation. The SV measured by TEE (SVTEE) was used as a reference. Results A total of 190 paired SV were measured from 28 patients. A strong correlation was observed between SVPWV and SVTEE with the coefficient of determination (R2) of 0.71. A mean difference between the two (bias) was 3.70 ml with the limits of agreement ranging from -20.33 to 27.73 ml and a percentage error of 27.4% based on a Bland-Altman analysis. The concordance rate of two methods was 85.0% based on a four-quadrant plot. The angular concordance rate was 85.9% with radial limits of agreement (the radial sector that contained 95% of the data points) of ± 41.5 degrees based on a polar plot. Conclusions PWV based SV estimation yields reasonable agreement with SV measured by TEE. Further studies are required to assess its utility in different clinical situations. PMID:28060961

  19. An ultrasound-based method for determining pulse wave velocity in superficial arteries.

    PubMed

    Rabben, Stein Inge; Stergiopulos, Nikos; Hellevik, Leif Rune; Smiseth, Otto A; Slørdahl, Stig; Urheim, Stig; Angelsen, Bjørn

    2004-10-01

    In this paper, we present a method for estimating local pulse wave velocity (PWV) solely from ultrasound measurements: the area-flow (QA) method. With the QA method, PWV is estimated as the ratio between change in flow and change in cross-sectional area (PWV = dQ/dA) during the reflection-free period of the cardiac cycle. In four anaesthetized dogs and 21 human subjects (age 23-74) we measured the carotid flow and cross-sectional area non-invasively by ultrasound. As a reference method we used the Bramwell-Hill (BH) equation which estimates PWV from pulse pressure and cross-sectional area. Additionally, we therefore measured brachial pulse pressure by oscillometry in the human subjects, and central aortic pulse pressure by micro-manometry in the dogs. As predicted by the pressure dependency of arterial stiffness, the estimated PWV decreased when the aortic pressure was lowered in two of the dogs. For the human subjects, the QA and BH estimates were correlated (R=0.43, p<0.05) and agreed on average (mean difference of -0.14 m/s). The PWV by the BH method increased with age (p<0.01) whereas the PWV by the QA method tended to increase with age (p<0.1). This corresponded to a larger residual variance (residual = deviation of the estimated PWV from the regression line) for the QA method than for the BH method, indicating different precisions for the two methods. This study illustrates that the simple equation PWV = dQ/dA gives estimates correlated to the PWV of the reference method. However, improvements in the basic measurements seem necessary to increase the precision of the method.

  20. Aortic-Brachial Pulse Wave Velocity Ratio: A Blood Pressure-Independent Index of Vascular Aging.

    PubMed

    Fortier, Catherine; Sidibé, Aboubacar; Desjardins, Marie-Pier; Marquis, Karine; De Serres, Sacha A; Mac-Way, Fabrice; Agharazii, Mohsen

    2017-01-01

    Aortic stiffness, a cardiovascular risk factor, depends on the operating mean arterial pressure (MAP). The impact of aortic stiffness on cardiovascular outcomes is proposed to be mediated by the attenuation or the reversal of the arterial stiffness gradient. We hypothesized that arterial stiffness gradient is less influenced by changes in MAP. We aimed to study the relationship between MAP and aortic stiffness, brachial stiffness, and arterial stiffness gradient. In a cross-sectional study of a dialysis cohort (group A, n=304) and a cohort of hypertensive or kidney transplant recipient with an estimated glomerular filtration rate of >45 mL/min/1.73 m(2) (group B, n=114), we assessed aortic and brachial stiffness by measuring carotid-femoral and carotid-radial pulse wave velocities (PWV). We used aortic-brachial PWV ratio as a measure of arterial stiffness gradient. Although there was a positive relationship between MAP and carotid-femoral PWV (R(2)=0.10 and 0.08; P<0.001 and P=0.003) and MAP and carotid-radial PWV (R(2)=0.22 and 0.12; P<0.001 and P<0.001), there was no statistically or clinically significant relationship between MAP and aortic-brachial PWV ratio (R(2)=0.0002 and 0.0001; P=0.8 and P=0.9) in group A and B, respectively. Dialysis status and increasing age increased the slope of the relationship between MAP and cf-PWV. However, we found no modifying factor (age, sex, dialysis status, diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, and class of antihypertensive drugs) that could affect the lack of relationship between MAP and aortic-brachial PWV ratio. In conclusion, these results suggest that aortic-brachial PWV ratio could be considered as a blood pressure-independent measure of vascular aging. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. An ultrasound automated method for non-invasive assessment of carotid artery pulse wave velocity.

    PubMed

    Zardi, Enrico Maria; Di Geso, Luca; Afeltra, Antonella; Zardi, Domenico Maria; Giorgi, Chiara; Salaffi, Fausto; Carotti, Marina; Gutierrez, Marwin; Filippucci, Emilio; Grassi, Walter

    2017-09-02

    To validate the clinical applicability and feasibility of an automated ultrasound (US) method in measuring the arterial stiffness of patients with chronic inflammatory rheumatic diseases, comparing automated measurements performed by a rheumatologist without experience in vascular sonography with those obtained by a sonographer experienced in vascular US, using a standardized manual method.Twenty subjects affected by different chronic inflammatory rheumatic disorders were consecutively recruited. For each patient, the arterial stiffness of both common carotids was manually calculated. Subsequently, the measure of the pulse wave velocity (PWV) was obtained using an US device called Radio Frequency - Quality Arterial Stiffness (RF-QAS), provided by the same US system (ie, My Lab 70 XVG, Esaote SpA, Genoa, Italy) equipped with a 4-13 MHz linear probe. The reliability comparison between the two US methods was calculated using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). ICC between the values obtained with the two methods for calculating the arterial stiffness resulted 0.789. A significant positive correlation between the two methods was also established with Pearson's (r=0.62, p<0.0001) and Spearman's analysis (r=0.66, p=0.001). A significant performance comparison was seen using Bland-Altman plot. The acquisition of the arterial stiffness parameter with the automated method required about 2 min for each patient. Clinical applicability of this US automated method to assess PWV at common carotid level by a rheumatologist is reliable and feasible in comparison with a conventional manual method. © American Federation for Medical Research (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  2. Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity is negatively correlated with aortic diameter.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Marc A; Davies, Jennifer M; Griffin, Kathryn J; Bridge, Katherine I; Johnson, Anne B; Sohrabi, Soroush; Baxter, Paul D; Scott, D Julian A

    2014-10-01

    Cardiovascular events pose significant morbidity and mortality burden to abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) patients. Arterial stiffness as measured by pulse wave velocity (PWV) is an independent predictor of cardiovascular risk. We investigated the relationship between aortic diameter and PWV. Consecutive patients with AAA were invited to participate. Patients completed a health questionnaire, received aortic ultrasound and carotid-femoral PWV (cfPWV) recordings with a Vicorder. Thirty patients were used for reproducibility assessment. A linear regression model was used to identify significant predictors of cfPWV. Observer variation was assessed using Bland and Altman analysis and the intraclass correlation coefficient. Three hundred and nine patients were included-148 with AAA and 161 controls. The mean difference for repeated cfPWV between observers was 0.11 ms(-1). cfPWV was positively correlated with age (r=0.24, P<0.001) and systolic blood pressure (r=0.29, P<0.001) and negatively correlated with aortic diameter (r=-0.15, P=0.008). There was no difference in cfPWV between AAA and control groups (9.75±2.3 ms(-1) vs. 9.55±2.3 ms(-1), P=0.43). Aortic diameter (P=0.003) and systolic blood pressure (P<0.001) were significant predictors of cfPWV independent of age, aspirin usage and a history of myocardial infarction. Patients with large AAA (>5 cm) had decreased cfPWV compared with patients with small AAA (P=0.02) or normal diameter aorta (P=0.02). Vicorder measurements of cfPWV are repeatable. cfPWV is negatively associated with infra-renal aortic diameter and reduced in large AAA. cfPWV is likely invalid for accurate arterial stiffness assessment in patients with AAA owing to the apparent confounding effect of aortic size.

  3. Prediction of Coronary Artery Disease Extent and Severity Using Pulse Wave Velocity

    PubMed Central

    Chiha, Joseph; Mitchell, Paul; Gopinath, Bamini; Burlutsky, George; Plant, Adam; Kovoor, Pramesh; Thiagalingam, Aravinda

    2016-01-01

    Background Pulse-wave velocity (PWV) measures aortic stiffness. It is an independent predictor of cardiovascular events and mortality, yet there is paucity in the literature on its association with the severity and extent of coronary artery disease (CAD). Methods To examine the utility of PWV in predicting CAD burden in men and women the PWV was determined in 344 patients (Men = 266, Women = 78) presenting for invasive coronary angiography for the assessment of suspected CAD. Pearson correlations and multivariate analysis were used to evaluate the relationship between these coronary scores, PWV and traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Results Compared to men, women with chest pain had lower mean Extent scores (19.2 vs. 35.6; p = 0.0001) and Gensini scores (23.6 vs. 41.9; p = 0.0001). PWV was similar between men and women (12.35 ± 3.74 vs. 12.43 ± 4.58; p = 0.88) and correlated with Extent score (r = 0.21, p = 0.0001) but not Gensini or vessel score (r = 0.03, p = 0.64 and r = 0.06, p = 0.26, respectively). PWV was associated with Extent score in men (B = 2.25 ± 0.78, p = 0.004 for men and B = 1.50 ± 0.88, p = 0.09 for women). It was not a predictor of Gensini score (B = -0.10, P = 0.90). Conclusion PWV correlates with the extent of CAD, as measured by the ‘Extent’ score in men more than women. However, it does not correlate with the severity of obstructive CAD in either gender. PMID:28005967

  4. The 24-hour pulse wave velocity, aortic augmentation index, and central blood pressure in normotensive volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsova, Tatyana Y; Korneva, Viktoria A; Bryantseva, Evgeniya N; Barkan, Vitaliy S; Orlov, Artemy V; Posokhov, Igor N; Rogoza, Anatoly N

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the pulse wave velocity, aortic augmentation index corrected for heart rate 75 (AIx@75), and central systolic and diastolic blood pressure during 24-hour monitoring in normotensive volunteers. Overall, 467 subjects (206 men and 261 women) were recruited in this study. Participants were excluded from the study if they were less than 19 years of age, had blood test abnormalities, had a body mass index greater than 2 7.5 kg/m2, had impaired glucose tolerance, or had hypotension or hypertension. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) with the BPLab® device was performed in each subject. ABPM waveforms were analyzed using the special automatic Vasotens® algorithm, which allows the calculation of pulse wave velocity, AIx@75, central systolic and diastolic blood pressure for “24-hour”, “awake”, and “asleep” periods. Circadian rhythms and sex differences in these indexes were identified. Pending further validation in prospective outcome-based studies, our data may be used as preliminary diagnostic values for the BPLab ABPM additional index in adult subjects. PMID:24812515

  5. The 24-hour pulse wave velocity, aortic augmentation index, and central blood pressure in normotensive volunteers.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, Tatyana Y; Korneva, Viktoria A; Bryantseva, Evgeniya N; Barkan, Vitaliy S; Orlov, Artemy V; Posokhov, Igor N; Rogoza, Anatoly N

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the pulse wave velocity, aortic augmentation index corrected for heart rate 75 (AIx@75), and central systolic and diastolic blood pressure during 24-hour monitoring in normotensive volunteers. Overall, 467 subjects (206 men and 261 women) were recruited in this study. Participants were excluded from the study if they were less than 19 years of age, had blood test abnormalities, had a body mass index greater than 2 7.5 kg/m(2), had impaired glucose tolerance, or had hypotension or hypertension. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) with the BPLab(®) device was performed in each subject. ABPM waveforms were analyzed using the special automatic Vasotens(®) algorithm, which allows the calculation of pulse wave velocity, AIx@75, central systolic and diastolic blood pressure for "24-hour", "awake", and "asleep" periods. Circadian rhythms and sex differences in these indexes were identified. Pending further validation in prospective outcome-based studies, our data may be used as preliminary diagnostic values for the BPLab ABPM additional index in adult subjects.

  6. Feasibility of pulse wave velocity estimation from low frame rate US sequences in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zontak, Maria; Bruce, Matthew; Hippke, Michelle; Schwartz, Alan; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2017-03-01

    The pulse wave velocity (PWV) is considered one of the most important clinical parameters to evaluate CV risk, vascular adaptation, etc. There has been substantial work attempting to measure the PWV in peripheral vessels using ultrasound (US). This paper presents a fully automatic algorithm for PWV estimation from the human carotid using US sequences acquired with a Logic E9 scanner (modified for RF data capture) and a 9L probe. Our algorithm samples the pressure wave in time by tracking wall displacements over the sequence, and estimates the PWV by calculating the temporal shift between two sampled waves at two distinct locations. Several recent studies have utilized similar ideas along with speckle tracking tools and high frame rate (above 1 KHz) sequences to estimate the PWV. To explore PWV estimation in a more typical clinical setting, we used focused-beam scanning, which yields relatively low frame rates and small fields of view (e.g., 200 Hz for 16.7 mm filed of view). For our application, a 200 Hz frame rate is low. In particular, the sub-frame temporal accuracy required for PWV estimation between locations 16.7 mm apart, ranges from 0.82 of a frame for 4m/s, to 0.33 for 10m/s. When the distance is further reduced (to 0.28 mm between two beams), the sub-frame precision is in parts per thousand (ppt) of the frame (5 ppt for 10m/s). As such, the contributions of our algorithm and this paper are: 1. Ability to work with low frame-rate ( 200Hz) and decreased lateral field of view. 2. Fully automatic segmentation of the wall intima (using raw RF images). 3. Collaborative Speckle Tracking of 2D axial and lateral carotid wall motion. 4. Outlier robust PWV calculation from multiple votes using RANSAC. 5. Algorithm evaluation on volunteers of different ages and health conditions.

  7. Aortic pulse wave velocity predicts focal white matter hyperintensities in a biracial cohort of older adults.

    PubMed

    Rosano, Caterina; Watson, Nora; Chang, Yuefang; Newman, Anne B; Aizenstein, Howard J; Du, Yan; Venkatraman, Vijay; Harris, Tamara B; Barinas-Mitchell, Emma; Sutton-Tyrrell, Kim

    2013-01-01

    Although the cross-sectional relationship of arterial stiffness with cerebral small vessel disease is consistently shown in middle-aged and young-old adults, it is less clear whether these associations remain significant over time in very old adults. We hypothesize that arterial stiffness is longitudinally associated with white matter characteristics, and associations are stronger within watershed areas. Neuroimaging was obtained in 2006-2008 from 303 elderly (mean age 82.9 years, 59% women, 41% black) with pulse wave velocity (PWV) measures in 1997-1998. Multivariable regression models estimated the coefficients for PWV (cm/sec) in relationship to presence, severity, and spatial distribution of white matter hyperintensities (WMH), gray matter volume, and fractional anisotropy from diffusion tensor, adjusting for demographic, cardiovascular risk factors, and diseases from 1997-1998 to 2006-2008. Higher PWV in 1997-1998 was associated with greater WMH volume in 2006-2008 within the left superior longitudinal fasciculus (age and total brain WMH adjusted, P=0.023), but not with WMH in other tracts or with fractional anisotropy or gray matter volume from total brain (P>0.2). Associations were stronger in blacks than in whites, remaining significant in fully adjusted models. Elderly with WMH in tracts related to processing speed and memory are more likely to have had higher PWV values 10 years prior, before neuroimaging data being available. Future studies should address whether arterial stiffness can serve as an early biomarker of covert brain structural abnormalities and whether early arterial stiffness control can promote successful brain aging, especially in black elderly.

  8. Pulse wave velocity is increased in patients with transient myocardial ischemia.

    PubMed

    Baulmann, Johannes; Homsi, Rami; Uen, Sakir; Düsing, Rainer; Fimmers, Rolf; Vetter, Hans; Mengden, Thomas

    2006-10-01

    We have recently shown that mean pulse pressure is higher in patients with transient myocardial ischemia. Pulse pressure elevation might be an important consequence of increased arterial stiffness. The aim of this study was to prove if arterial stiffness is changed in patients with transient myocardial ischemia who bear a high cardiovascular risk. Additionally we investigated whether arterial stiffness or wave reflection is the best indicator for transient myocardial ischemia. Aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) is a measure of arterial stiffness, and augmentation index (AIx) an indication of arterial wave reflection. Both are indicators for cardiovascular risk. PWV (carotid-femoral) and AIx (SphygmoCor) were assessed in 74 hypertensive patients. Transient myocardial ischemia was detected using an ST-triggered 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring device. ST-segment depressions were recorded in 30 of 74 patients. There were no significant differences with regard to age, mean arterial pressure, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure or heart rate. PWV was seen to be higher in patients with transient myocardial ischemia (10.6 versus 9.5 m/s, P = 0.036). There was no significant difference in AIx between the two groups. PWV (r = 0.36, P = 0.002) but not AIx correlated with pulse pressure. PWV is higher in hypertensive individuals (age > 60 years) with transient myocardial ischemia, suggesting that PWV is an indicator of increased cardiovascular risk. Although AIx is known to be associated with several cardiovascular diseases, it was not seen to be associated with silent myocardial ischemia. Our results suggest that the clinical significance of parameters of arterial stiffness and arterial wave reflection change with age, with a higher clinical importance of PWV indicated in patients over the age of 60.

  9. Association between Pulse Wave Velocity and Coronary Artery Calcification in Japanese men.

    PubMed

    Torii, Sayuki; Arima, Hisatomi; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Fujiyoshi, Akira; Kadota, Aya; Takashima, Naoyuki; Kadowaki, Sayaka; Hisamatsu, Takashi; Saito, Yoshino; Miyagawa, Naoko; Zaid, Maryam; Murakami, Yoshitaka; Abbott, Robert D; Horie, Minoru; Miura, Katsuyuki; Ueshima, Hirotsugu

    2015-01-01

    Pulse wave velocity (PWV) is a simple and valid clinical method for assessing arterial stiffness. Coronary artery calcification (CAC) is an intermediate stage in the process leading to overt cardiovascular disease (CVD) and an established determinant of coronary artery disease. This study aimed to examine the association between PWV and CAC in a population-based sample of Japanese men. This is a cross-sectional study of 986 randomly selected men aged 40-79 years from Shiga, Japan. CVD-free participants were examined from 2006 to 2008. Brachial-ankle PWV (baPWV) was measured using an automatic waveform analyzer. CAC was assessed using computed tomography. Agatston scores ≥ 10 were defined as the presence of CAC. Prevalence of CAC progressively increased with rising levels of baPWV: 20.6%, 41.7%, 56.3%, and 66.7% across baPWV quartiles < 1378, 1378-1563, 1564-1849, and > 1849 cm/s (P < 0.001 for trend). Associations remained significant after adjusting for age and other factors, including body mass index, systolic blood pressure, pulse rate, total and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, hemoglobin A1c, drinking, smoking and exercise status, and the use of medication to treat hypertension, dyslipidemia and diabetes (P=0.042 for trend). The optimal cutoff level of baPWV to detect CAC was 1612 cm/s using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. Arterial stiffness as defined by an elevated baPWV is associated with an increased prevalence of CAC in a general population-based setting among Japanese men.

  10. Atorvastatin Treatment Does Not Alter Pulse Wave Velocity in Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Ballard, Kevin D.; Taylor, Beth A.; Capizzi, Jeffrey A.; Grimaldi, Adam S.; White, C. Michael; Thompson, Paul D.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Both statins and regular physical activity (PA) reduce arterial stiffness. The present post hoc analysis examined if arterial stiffness was improved with high-dose atorvastatin treatment in healthy adults and whether PA levels magnified this response. We utilized data from a double-blind, random-assignment clinical trial investigating the effects of atorvastatin 80 mg/d for 6 mo on skeletal muscle symptoms. Methods. Central and peripheral arterial pulse wave velocity (PWV) were measured and PA levels assessed at baseline and 6 mo in subjects randomized to atorvastatin (n = 21, 9 men) or placebo (n = 29, 16 men). Results. Baseline participant characteristics, PWV, and PA levels were not different between treatments. Central (means ± SD; 8.7 ± 2.6 to 9.0 ± 2.5 m/sec) and peripheral PWV (9.9 ± 1.3 to 9.8 ± 1.6 m/sec) were unchanged from baseline following atorvastatin treatment (time × drug interaction: P ≥ 0.13). Similarly, PA levels were unaffected by time or treatment. In sex and age adjusted models, baseline levels of PA were not related to changes in PWV with atorvastatin treatment. Conclusion. These data indicate that high-dose atorvastatin treatment for 6 mo does not influence arterial stiffness in healthy adults. Participation in habitual PA did not magnify the vascular effects of statin therapy. This study was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00609063. PMID:27351006

  11. Aortic pulse wave velocity, elasticity, and composition in a nonhuman primate model of atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Farrar, D J; Green, H D; Bond, M G; Wagner, W D; Gobbeé, R A

    1978-07-01

    Aortic pulse wave velocity was determined in Macaca fascicularis monkeys fed either atherogenic or control diets for 36 months. The foot-to-foot velocity and apparent phase velocities of the second through seventh Fourier harmonics at a given diastolic pressure in the atherosclerotic monkeys were 1.5 to 2.0 times the values for the control animals. More than 80% of the aortic intimal surface of the atherosclerotic monkeys was covered with fibrous or fatty plaque, which approximately doubled wall thickness and wall thickness to radius ratio. Angiochemical evaluations showed no difference in collagen or elastin concentration (as a fraction of lipid and mineral-free dried aorta), but the atherosclerotic aortas were 1.5 to 2.0 times that of control in collagen and elastin content (defined as the absolute quantity beneath a square centimeter of intimal surface). Total cholesterol and calcium concentrations in the atherosclerotic aortas were more than 10 times the values for the control aortas. The static circumferential distensibility of the excised atherosclerotic aortas was significantly less than control, but there was no difference in incremental (Young's) modulus of elasticity. The in vitro pressure-strain elastic modulus of the atherosclerotic aortas was more than twice that of control, which was predicted from the enhanced wave velocity. The significantly increased stiffness of the atherosclerotic arteries appeared to be due mainly to the increased wall thickness caused by the atherosclerotic plaques rather than to material changes described by Young's modulus. Extensive medial damage, however, also was present and could have had a major influence on stiffness. Atherosclerosis therefore can result in increased aortic stiffening, detectable by pulse wave velocity, even if there is no change in the overall Young's modulus of elasticity.

  12. Arterial viscoelasticity: role in the dependency of pulse wave velocity on heart rate in conduit arteries.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Hanguang; Tan, Isabella; Butlin, Mark; Li, Decai; Avolio, Alberto P

    2017-06-01

    Experimental investigations have established that the stiffness of large arteries has a dependency on acute heart rate (HR) changes. However, the possible underlying mechanisms inherent in this HR dependency have not been well established. This study aimed to explore a plausible viscoelastic mechanism by which HR exerts an influence on arterial stiffness. A multisegment transmission line model of the human arterial tree incorporating fractional viscoelastic components in each segment was used to investigate the effect of varying fractional order parameter (α) of viscoelasticity on the dependence of aortic arch to femoral artery pulse wave velocity (afPWV) on HR. HR was varied from 60 to 100 beats/min at a fixed mean flow of 100 ml/s. PWV was calculated by intersecting tangent method (afPWVTan) and by phase velocity from the transfer function (afPWVTF) in the time and frequency domain, respectively. PWV was significantly and positively associated with HR for α ≥ 0.6; for α = 0.6, 0.8, and 1, HR-dependent changes in afPWVTan were 0.01 ± 0.02, 0.07 ± 0.04, and 0.22 ± 0.09 m/s per 5 beats/min; HR-dependent changes in afPWVTF were 0.02 ± 0.01, 0.12 ± 0.00, and 0.34 ± 0.01 m/s per 5 beats/min, respectively. This crosses the range of previous physiological studies where the dependence of PWV on HR was found to be between 0.08 and 0.10 m/s per 5 beats/min. Therefore, viscoelasticity of the arterial wall could contribute to mechanisms through which large artery stiffness changes with changing HR. Physiological studies are required to confirm this mechanism.NEW & NOTEWORTHY This study used a transmission line model to elucidate the role of arterial viscoelasticity in the dependency of pulse wave velocity on heart rate. The model uses fractional viscoelasticity concepts, which provided novel insights into arterial hemodynamics. This study also provides a means of assessing the clinical manifestation of the association of pulse wave velocity and heart rate

  13. Increasing pulse wave velocity in a realistic cardiovascular model does not increase pulse pressure with age

    PubMed Central

    Mohiuddin, Mohammad W.; Rihani, Ryan J.; Laine, Glen A.

    2012-01-01

    The mechanism of the well-documented increase in aortic pulse pressure (PP) with age is disputed. Investigators assuming a classical windkessel model believe that increases in PP arise from decreases in total arterial compliance (Ctot) and increases in total peripheral resistance (Rtot) with age. Investigators assuming a more sophisticated pulse transmission model believe PP rises because increases in pulse wave velocity (cph) make the reflected pressure wave arrive earlier, augmenting systolic pressure. It has recently been shown, however, that increases in cph do not have a commensurate effect on the timing of the reflected wave. We therefore used a validated, large-scale, human arterial system model that includes realistic pulse wave transmission to determine whether increases in cph cause increased PP with age. First, we made the realistic arterial system model age dependent by altering cardiac output (CO), Rtot, Ctot, and cph to mimic the reported changes in these parameters from age 30 to 70. Then, cph was theoretically maintained constant, while Ctot, Rtot, and CO were altered. The predicted increase in PP with age was similar to the observed increase in PP. In a complementary approach, Ctot, Rtot, and CO were theoretically maintained constant, and cph was increased. The predicted increase in PP was negligible. We found that increases in cph have a limited effect on the timing of the reflected wave but cause the system to degenerate into a windkessel. Changes in PP can therefore be attributed to a decrease in Ctot. PMID:22561301

  14. Waveform Analysis of the Brachial-ankle Pulse Wave Velocity in Hemiplegic Stroke Patients and Healthy Volunteers: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ju-Hyun; Kim, Mee-Young; Lee, Jeong-Uk; Lee, Lim-Kyu; Yang, Seung-Min; Jeon, Hye-Joo; Lee, Won-Deok; Noh, Ji-Woong; Kwak, Taek-Yong; Lee, Tae-Hyun; Kim, Jin-Hwan; Huh, Yong; Kim, Junghwan

    2014-04-01

    [Purpose] Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (BaPWV), which has been reported as an index of arterial stiffness, is very closely related to cardiovascular risk factors. A high BaPWV indicates high cardiovascular risk. However, BaPWV and pressure waveforms after stroke are not fully understood. [Methods] BaPWV was measured in thirty-two subjects (twenty-two healthy volunteers and ten stroke patients) while they were in the supine position. It was measured in their bilateral upper and lower extremities. [Results] BaPWV was significantly increased in the stroke group compared with the healthy volunteers. It was also significantly increased on both the affected and non-affected sides of stroke patients in the stroke group. Furthermore, analysis of the pressure waveforms showed that the peak pressure was significantly increased in the stroke group compared with the control group. The peak pressure on both the affected and non-affected sides was also significantly greater than in the control group. However, the rise and decay times were significantly decreased in the stroke group compared with the control group. The rise and decay time on both the affected and non-affected sides were also significantly more decreased than in the control group. [Conclusion] The results demonstrated that increased BaPWV and changed pulse waves are closely associated with the pathologic states of hemiplegic stroke patients.

  15. Blood pressure and pulse wave velocity as metrics for evaluating pathologic ageing of the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Peter M; Khalili, Payam; Franklin, Stanley S

    2014-02-01

    The influence of chronological ageing on the components of the cardiovascular system is of fundamental importance for understanding how hemodynamics change and the cardiovascular risk increases with age, the most important risk marker. An increase in peripheral vascular resistance associated with increased stiffness of central elastic arteries represents hallmarks of this ageing effect on the vasculature, referred to as early vascular ageing (EVA). In clinical practice, it translates into increased brachial and central systolic blood pressure and corresponding pulse pressure in subjects above 50 years of age, as well as increased carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (c-f PWV)--a marker of arterial stiffness. A c-f PWV value ≥ 10 m/s is threshold for increased risk according. Improved lifestyle and control of risk factors via appropriate drug therapy are of importance in providing vascular protection related to EVA. One target group might be members of risk families including subjects with early onset cardiovascular disease.

  16. Role of birth weight and postnatal growth on pulse wave velocity in teenagers.

    PubMed

    Salvi, Paolo; Revera, Miriam; Joly, Laure; Reusz, George; Iaia, Maurizio; Benkhedda, Salim; Chibane, Ahcene; Parati, Gianfranco; Benetos, Athanase; Temmar, Mohamed

    2012-10-01

    Low birth weight and accelerated postnatal growth appear to play a significant role in the pathogenesis of hypertension and cardiovascular disease in adulthood. The aim of the present study was to characterize the factors determining pulse wave velocity (PWV) in teenagers and, in particular, to verify the relationship with birth weight, postnatal growth, timing of adiposity rebound, lifestyle, and hemodynamic parameters. Carotid-femoral and carotid-radial pulse wave velocities of 558 healthy teenagers (age range: 16.2-19.9 years) were determined by means of a PulsePen tonometer. Birth weight and gestational age were obtained from obstetrical records, and data regarding postnatal growth were obtained from pediatric clinical records. No change in aortic PWV was found in association with birth weight, postnatal growth, and timing of adiposity rebound. However, the study showed a strong association between accelerated growth from 0 to 12 months and carotid-radial PWV (trend: p = .02). Subjects with birth weight values <2,500 g showed higher values of upper limb PWV (p < .05) and higher values of diastolic and mean arterial pressure (p < .05). Stepwise regression analysis revealed that mean arterial pressure, age, and height were the main independent factors determining aortic PWV in this young population. These results suggest that there is no linear correlation between birth weight and hemodynamic parameters in teenagers; however, subjects characterized by very low birth weight and accelerated postnatal weight gain appear to demonstrate increased upper limb PWV and diastolic and mean arterial pressure values. Copyright © 2012 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Factors related to pulse wave velocity and augmentation index in chronic hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Celik, Gülperi; Demirci, Meltem Sezis; Tumuklu, Murat; Ascı, Gulay; Sipahi, Savas; Toz, Huseyin; Bascı, Ali; Ok, Ercan

    2011-01-01

    Augmentation index (AIx) and pulse wave velocity (PWV) are early markers of atherosclerotic vascular changes and also have been shown to be predictive of cardiovascular disease and total mortality. The aim of our study was to evaluate the relationship between PWV and AIx-HR75, which is the corrected form of AIx according to a heart rate of 75 beats/min, echocardiographic parameters and biochemical parameters in chronic hemodialysis (HD) patients. AIx-HR75 and PWV were measured in 556 HD patients by applanation tonometry using the SphygmoCor device. The mean PWV and AIx-HR75 values of the study group were 10.2 ± 2.4 and 28.4 ± 10.2 m/s. A positive correlation was found between PWV and AIx-HR75 (r = 0.214, p = 0.000). AIx-HR75 correlated with age (r = 0.093, p = 0.028), body surface area (BSA) (r = -0.194, p = 0.000), mean arterial pressure (MAP) (r = 0.335, p = 0.000), pulse pressure (PP) (r = 0.212, p = 0.000), cardiothoracic index (r = 0.155, p = 0.016), and presence of left ventricular hypertrophy (r = 0.152, p = 0.001). PWV correlated with MAP (r = 0.208, p = 0.000), PP (r = 0.098, r = 0.021), left ventricular mass (r = 0.105, p = 0.023), and predialysis sodium level (r = -0.105, p = 0.023). In the multivariate analyses, PWV was associated with MAP (t = 3.78, p = 0.000), presence of diabetes (t = 3.20, p = 0.001), and predialysis sodium level (t = -2.06, p = 0.040), and AIx-HR75 was associated with age (t = 2.48, p = 0.014), female sex (t = 3.98, p = 0.000), BSA (t = -2.15, p = 0.033), and MAP (t = 7.02, p = 0.000). There is a strong association between MAP and arterial stiffness parameters in HD patients. We feel that efficient control of blood pressure could lead to reduced arterial stiffness in HD patients.

  18. Comparison of an Oscillometric Method with Cardiac Magnetic Resonance for the Analysis of Aortic Pulse Wave Velocity

    PubMed Central

    Feistritzer, Hans-Josef; Reinstadler, Sebastian J.; Klug, Gert; Kremser, Christian; Seidner, Benjamin; Esterhammer, Regina; Schocke, Michael F.; Franz, Wolfgang-Michael; Metzler, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Pulse wave velocity (PWV) is the proposed gold-standard for the assessment of aortic elastic properties. The aim of this study was to compare aortic PWV determined by a recently developed oscillometric device with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR). Methods PWV was assessed in 40 volunteers with two different methods. The oscillometric method (PWVOSC) is based on a transfer function from the brachial pressure waves determined by oscillometric blood pressure measurements with a common cuff (Mobil-O-Graph, I.E.M. Stolberg, Germany). CMR was used to determine aortic PWVCMR with the use of the transit time method based on phase-contrast imaging at the level of the ascending and abdominal aorta on a clinical 1.5 Tesla scanner (Siemens, Erlangen, Germany). Results The median age of the study population was 34 years (IQR: 24–55 years, 11 females). A very strong correlation was found between PWVOSC and PWVCMR (r = 0.859, p < 0.001). Mean PWVOSC was 6.7 ± 1.8 m/s and mean PWVCMR was 6.1 ± 1.8 m/s (p < 0.001). Analysis of agreement between the two measurements using Bland-Altman method showed a bias of 0.57 m/s (upper and lower limit of agreement: 2.49 m/s and -1.34 m/s). The corresponding coefficient of variation between both measurements was 15%. Conclusion Aortic pulse wave velocity assessed by transformation of the brachial pressure waveform showed an acceptable agreement with the CMR-derived transit time method. PMID:25612307

  19. Effects of beam steering in pulsed-wave ultrasound velocity estimation.

    PubMed

    Steinman, Aaron H; Yu, Alfred C H; Johnston, K Wayne; Cobbold, Richard S C

    2005-08-01

    Experimental and computer simulation methods have been used to investigate the significance of beam steering as a potential source of error in pulsed-wave flow velocity estimation. By simulating a typical linear-array transducer system as used for spectral flow estimation, it is shown that beam steering can cause an angle offset resulting in a change in the effective beam-flow angle. This offset primarily depends on the F-number and the nominal steering angle. For example, at an F-number of 3 and a beam-flow angle of 70 degrees , the velocity error changed from -5% to + 5% when the steering angle changed from -20 degrees to + 20 degrees . Much higher errors can occur at higher beam-flow angles, with smaller F-numbers and greater steering. Our experimental study used a clinical ultrasound system, a tissue-mimicking phantom and a pulsatile waveform to determine peak flow velocity errors for various steering and beam-flow angles. These errors were found to be consistent with our simulation results.

  20. Pulse wave velocity and the non-invasive methods used to assess it: Complior, SphygmoCor, Arteriograph and Vicorder.

    PubMed

    Davies, Jennifer M; Bailey, Marc A; Griffin, Kathryn J; Scott, D Julian A

    2012-12-01

    Pulse wave velocity (PWV) is a known indicator of arterial stiffness and cardiovascular risk. We critically evaluated the evidence supporting the four main non-invasive devices available to assess it: Complior, SphygmoCor, Arteriograph and Vicorder. PubMed and Medline databases (1960-2011) were searched to identify studies reporting carotid-femoral PWV in humans using one or more of the four devices. Of the 183 articles retrieved, 43 met inclusion criteria. The Arteriograph device demonstrated least variance but had poor agreement with the other devices. Undisputable reference values for PWV need to be established and internationally agreed, and a standardized method for superficial distance measurement generated to reduce variability. Further studies comparing all four devices with invasive assessment are necessary.

  1. Brachial-ankle vs carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity as a determinant of cardiovascular structure and function.

    PubMed

    Yu, W-C; Chuang, S-Y; Lin, Y-P; Chen, C-H

    2008-01-01

    Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cf-PWV) is a validated marker of arterial stiffening over the central arteries. Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (ba-PWV) integrates the mechanical properties from both the central and peripheral arteries and may be more representative than cf-PWV as arterial load for left ventricle (LV). We compared ba-PWV with cf-PWV for the association of cardiovascular structure and function in 320 subjects with various degrees of abnormality in cardiac structure and function. ba-PWV (by oscillometric technique) and cf-PWV (by tonometric technique) were measured simultaneously, and were highly correlated (r=0.79, P<0.001). Both ba-PWV and cf-PWV were significantly correlated with LV mass, but the correlation was better with ba-PWV (r=0.29 vs r=0.22, P=0.0219). While ba-PWV and cf-PWV were similarly significantly correlated with LV end-systolic elastance and mitral E/A ratio, ba-PWV had better correlation with isovolumic relaxation constant (r=0.34 vs r=0.27, P=0.0202) than cf-PWV. In addition, the correlation was also significantly stronger with ba-PWV than with cf-PWV for other indices of arterial stiffness, including carotid incremental modulus (r=0.59 vs 0.50, P=0.0013), effective arterial elastance (r=0.41 vs r=0.33, P=0.0081) and carotid augmentation index (r=0.38 vs r=0.32, P=0.0368). In conclusion, ba-PWV correlates better with LV mass and diastolic function and other indices of arterial function than cf-PWV, probably because ba-PWV encompasses a greater territory of arterial tree than cf-PWV.

  2. Circulating resistin concentrations are independently associated with aortic pulse wave velocity in a community sample.

    PubMed

    Norman, Glenda; Norton, Gavin R; Gomes, Monica; Michel, Frederic; Majane, Olebogeng H I; Sareli, Pinhas; Millen, Aletta M E; Woodiwiss, Angela J

    2016-02-01

    The role of the adipokine, resistin in mediating increases in aortic stiffness is uncertain. We aimed to determine independent relations between circulating resistin concentrations and aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) and wave reflection in a community-based sample with a high prevalence of untreated hypertension and obesity. Plasma resistin, adiponectin, and C-reactive protein concentrations (ELISA); carotid-femoral (aortic) PWV and the aortic reflected wave index (applanation tonometry and SphygmoCor software) were determined in 683 randomly selected participants of African ancestry from SOWETO, South Africa who had never received antihypertensive therapy. Resistin concentrations were not independently associated with office or 24-h (n = 492) blood pressure (BP). In a stepwise regression model with BMI included in the model, age (P < 0.0001), mean arterial pressure (P < 0.0001), plasma resistin concentrations (P < 0.005), female sex (P = 0.01), and creatinine concentrations (P < 0.01) contributed independently to variations in PWV. Independent relations between resistin concentrations and PWV persisted with further adjustments for C-reactive protein concentrations (P < 0.005), and the homeostasis model of insulin resistance (P < 0.02). Similar relations were noted with waist circumference rather than BMI in the model. Resistin concentrations were not independently associated with aortic reflected wave index or aortic BP. Resistin is independently and directly associated with aortic stiffness and these effects occur beyond BP, insulin resistance, and general inflammation.

  3. Pulse Wave Velocity at Early Adulthood: Breastfeeding and Nutrition during Pregnancy and Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Gigante, Denise Petrucci; de Barros, Fernando Celso Lopes Fernandes

    2016-01-01

    Background Pulse wave velocity (PWV) is an early marker of arterial stiffness. Low birthweight, infant feeding and childhood nutrition have been associated with cardiovascular disease in adulthood. In this study, we evaluated the association of PWV at 30 years of age with birth condition and childhood nutrition, among participants of the 1982 Pelotas birth cohort. Methods In 1982, the hospital births in Pelotas, southern Brazil, were identified just after delivery. Those liveborn infants whose family lived in the urban area of the city were examined and have been prospectively followed. At 30 years of age, we tried to follow the whole cohort and PWV was assessed in 1576 participants. Results Relative weight gain from 2 to 4 years was positively associated with PWV. Regarding nutritional status in childhood, PWV was higher among those whose weight-for-age z-score at 4 years was >1 standard deviation above the mean. On the other hand, height gain, birthweight and duration of breastfeeding were not associated with PWV. Conclusion Relative weight gain after 2 years of age is associated with increased PWV, while birthweight and growth in the first two years of life were not associated. These results suggest that the relative increase of weight later in childhood is associated with higher cardiovascular risk. PMID:27073916

  4. Regulation of vascular tone and pulse wave velocity in human muscular conduit arteries: selective effects of nitric oxide donors to dilate muscular arteries relative to resistance vessels.

    PubMed

    Fok, Henry; Jiang, Benyu; Clapp, Brian; Chowienczyk, Phil

    2012-11-01

    Arterial tone in muscular conduit arteries may influence pressure wave reflection through changes in diameter and pulse wave velocity. We examined the relative specificity of vasodilator drugs for radial artery and forearm resistance vessels during intrabrachial arterial infusion. The nitric oxide (NO) donors, nitroglycerine and nitroprusside, and brain natriuretic peptide were compared with the α-adrenergic antagonist phentolamine, calcium-channel antagonist verapamil, and hydralazine. Radial artery diameter was measured by high resolution ultrasound, forearm blood flow by strain gauge plethysmography, and pulse wave velocity by pressure recording cuffs placed over the distal brachial and radial arteries. Norepinephrine was used to constrict the radial artery to generate a greater range of vasodilator tone when examining pulse wave velocity. Despite dilating resistance vasculature, phentolamine and verapamil had little effect on radial artery diameter (mean dilation <9%). By contrast, for comparable actions on resistance vessels, nitroglycerine and nitroprusside but not brain natriuretic peptide had powerful actions to dilate the radial artery (dilations of 31.3 ± 3.6%, 23.6 ± 3.1%, and 9.8 ± 2.0% for nitroglycerine, nitroprusside, and brain natriuretic peptide, respectively). Changes in pulse wave velocity followed those in arterial diameter irrespective of the signaling pathway used to modulate arterial tone (R=-0.89, P<0.05). Basal tone in human muscular arteries is relatively unaffected by α-adrenergic or calcium-channel blockade, but is functionally or directly antagonized by NO donors. The differential response to NO donors suggests that there is potential to manipulate the downstream pathway to confer greater specificity for large arteries with a resultant decrease in pressure wave reflection and systolic blood pressure.

  5. Non-invasive human extremely weak pulse wave measurement based on a high-precision laser self-mixing interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Ying-bin; Wei, Zheng; Huang, Wen-cai; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Li-juan

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, a technique based on laser self-mixing effect for acquiring pulse wave profile is proposed and demonstrated. For the characteristics of extremely weak vibration in human pulse waves, a method of multiple reflections with external cavity is designed to improve the measurement accuracy to λ/4. Based on the fringe counting algorithm, one period of pulse wave is successfully reconstructed. The measurement results show that the root mean square error ( RMSE) of the reconstructed pulse wave is 0.912 μm at sampling rate of 8 kHz. Besides, the correlation coefficients and heart beats of this method and the traditional photoplethysmography (PPG) measurement are analyzed.

  6. Independent associations of circulating galectin-3 concentrations with aortic pulse wave velocity and wave reflection in a community sample.

    PubMed

    Libhaber, Elena; Woodiwiss, Angela J; Raymond, Andrew; Gomes, Monica; Maseko, Muzi J; Sareli, Pinhas; Norton, Gavin R

    2015-06-01

    Although the profibrotic inflammatory substance galectin-3 predicts outcomes in the general population, the mechanisms responsible for this effect are uncertain. We aimed to determine whether circulating galectin-3 concentrations are associated with carotid femoral (aortic) pulse wave velocity and aortic reflective wave index (applanation tonometry and SphygmoCor software) in 966 randomly selected participants from a community sample. Galectin-3 concentrations were not independently associated with office (n=966) or 24-hour (n=661) systolic (P=0.88-0.92) or diastolic (P=0.65-0.94) blood pressure. In contrast, with adjustments for age, sex (in all participants), office or 24-hour mean arterial pressure (or systolic blood pressure and pulse pressure), pulse rate, body mass index, regular smoking, regular alcohol intake, total cholesterol concentrations, diabetes mellitus or an glycohemoglobin >6.1%, treatment for hypertension, and estimated glomerular filtration rate, galectin-3 was independently associated with aortic pulse wave velocity in all participants (partial r=0.15, P<0.0001) and reflective wave index in men (partial r=0.13, P<0.02). In 745 participants who had never received antihypertensive therapy, galectin-3 concentrations were similarly independently associated with pulse wave velocity in all participants (partial=0.16, P<0.0001) and reflective wave index in men (partial r=0.15, P<0.02). The blood pressure-independent relations between galectin-3 concentrations and aortic hemodynamics persisted with further adjustments for C-reactive protein concentrations (pulse wave velocity in all participants: partial r=0.14, P<0.0001; reflective wave index in men: partial r=0.12, P<0.05). In conclusion, despite a lack of independent association with brachial blood pressure, the profibrotic inflammatory substance galectin-3 may contribute toward adverse outcomes through an effect on aortic stiffness, an effect that cannot be attributed to general inflammatory

  7. [A calibrated method for blood pressure measurement based on volume pulse wave].

    PubMed

    Youde, Ding; Qinkai, Deng; Feixue, Liang; Jinseng, Guo

    2010-01-01

    Physiology parameters measurement based on volume pulse wave is suitable for the monitoring blood pressure continuously. This paper described that the systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) can be calibrated by measuring the pulse propagation time, just on one point of finger tip. The volume pulse wave was acquired by lighting the red and infrared LED alternately, and after signal processing, an accelerated pulse wave was obtained. Then by measuring the pulse wave propagation time between the progressive wave and reflected wave, we can find the relationship of the time and the blood pressure, and establish the related systolic blood pressure measurement equation. At the same time, based on the relationship between alternating current and direct current components in the volume pulse waveforms and through regression analysising, the relevant diastolic blood pressure measurement equation can be established. 33 clinical experimentation cases have been worked by dividing them into two groups: training group (18 cases) and control group (15 cases), by comparing with the measuring results of the OMRON electronic sphygmomanometer. The results indicated that the two methods had good coherence. The measurement described is simple and reliable, and may be served as a new method for noninvasively and continuously measurement of blood pressure.

  8. Direct Measurement of Basilar Membrane Motion Using Pulsed-Wave Doppler High-Frequency Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torbatian, Z.; Garland, P.; Adamson, R. B. A.; Bance, M.; Brown, J. A.

    2011-11-01

    We present a preliminary report on the use of a new technique for measuring the motion of the basilar membrane, high-frequency ultrasound Doppler vibrometry. Using a custom-built, 1 mm diameter probe, we collected ultrasonic reflections from intracochlear structures and applied pulsed-wave Doppler vibrometry to measure the basilar membrane response to pressure applied in the ear canal.

  9. Assessment of the severity of aortic regurgitation with pulsed wave Doppler velocity profile in the descending aorta.

    PubMed

    Kalaycı, Belma; Kalaycı, Süleyman; Türker Bayır, Pınar; Duyuler, Serkan; Güven, Saadet; Sen, Taner; Tüfekçioğlu, Omaç

    2014-08-01

    The quantitative parameters which are used to assess the severity of aortic regurgitation (AR) provide the most accurate information whereas these parameters are difficult and time-consuming. The aim of this study was to get a practical parameter to use in daily practice for assessing the severity of aortic regurgitation. The study was an observational cohort study on diagnostic accuracy of severity of aortic regurgitation. Thirty-seven patients with aortic regurgitation determined by quantitative parameters (18 patients with severe aortic regurgitation and 19 patients with moderate aortic regurgitation) were included in this study. Each patient's diastolic flow pattern in the descending aorta was examined by pulsed wave Doppler. Systolic and diastolic flow time-velocity integral (TVI), TVI time, systolic and diastolic TVI ratio in the descending aorta were evaluated. In addition to these parameters, dP/dt, peak acceleration time and end-diastolic flow velocity in the diastolic flow were determined. We investigated whether there a significant difference between two groups or not. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to determine the optimal cut-off values of echocardiographic parameters which were used to identify the severity of aortic regurgitation. The study population was composed of 16 female and 21 male patients. Their mean age was 46.5 years. The mean diastolic flow TVI of patients who had moderate and severe aortic regurgitation was found 10.1 cm and 18.6 cm, respectively (p<0.001). In the ROC curve analysis, the values of diastolic flow TVI above 13.5 cm was found to have 83% sensitivity and 90% specifity to predict the severity of aortic regurgitation (AUC: 0.91, 95% CI 0.80-1.0, p<0.001). Also we investigated the other parameters like systolic flow TVI, the ratio of systolic and diastolic flow TVI, mean diastolic flow time, mean systolic flow time, the ratio of systolic and diastolic flow time, end-diastolic velocity, peak

  10. Increased Pulse Wave Velocity Reflecting Arterial Stiffness in Patients with Colorectal Adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Yun Jeong; Kwack, Won Gun; Lee, Youg-Sup; Hahm, Ki Baik; Kim, Young-Kwon

    2010-01-01

    The obese patients with diabetes or cardiovascular risk factors are associated with increased risk of colorectal cancer as well as adenomas under the shared pathogenesis related to atherosclerosis. Here we determined the association between increased arterial stiffness and colorectal adenomas incorporating parameters including age, gender, waist circumference, body mass index, lipid profiles, fasting glucose, and blood pressure. Subjects who simultaneously underwent colonoscopies and pulse wave velocity (PWV) determinations between July 2005 and September 2006 were analyzed, based on which the subjects were classified into two groups as patients group with colorectal adenomas (n = 49) and control group (n = 200) with normal, non-polypoid benign lesions or hyperplastic polyps. Uni- and multi-variate analyses were performed to calculate the odd ratio for colon adenomas. Based on uni-variate analysis, age, waist circumference, body mass index, heart-femoral PWV (hfPWV), and brachial-ankle PWV were significantly associated with adenomas (p<0.05) and multiple logistic regression analysis showed that the heart-femoral PWV, waist circumference, and the levels of LDL-C were significant risk factor for colorectal adenoma. However, arterial stiffness did not affect the progression of colon adenoma. The finding that hfPWV, reflecting aortic stiffness, was increased in patients with colorectal adenomas lead to conclusion that patients who have prominently increased arterial stiffness can be recommended to undergo colonoscopic examinations and at the same time we also recommend counseling about the risk for atherosclerosis in those who have colorectal adenomas. PMID:21103036

  11. Pulse wave velocity is associated with muscle mass decline: Health ABC study.

    PubMed

    Abbatecola, Angela Marie; Chiodini, Paolo; Gallo, Ciro; Lakatta, Edward; Sutton-Tyrrell, Kim; Tylavsky, Frances A; Goodpaster, Bret; de Rekeneire, Natalie; Schwartz, Ann V; Paolisso, Giuseppe; Harris, Tamara

    2012-04-01

    Age-related mechanisms that lead to sarcopenia are not entirely understood. Basal leg blood flow declines with aging by augmented sympathetic vasoconstriction and arterial stiffening, thus a dysfunction in blood vessel dynamics may have an independent role on sarcopenia. We determined whether pulse wave velocity (PWV), marker of arterial stiffness, was associated with skeletal muscle decline. Observational cohort study of older adults(70-79 years) living in Pittsburgh, PA, USA or Memphis, TN, USA. Analyses included 2,405 participants. Correlations among muscle parameters including skeletal muscle density and intermuscular adipose tissue using mid-thigh CT scans were assessed. Linear mixed models tested the association between the change in the sarcopenic index (SI) (assessed by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry) over time and baseline PWV independently of multiple confounders. SI was defined: appendicular lean mass/squared height and calculated at every follow-up (n = 6). Baseline PWV was significantly higher in black women compared to white women (930 ± 431 vs. 843 ± 366; p = 0.0001), while there were no significant differences between black and white men (943 ± 402 vs. 911 ± 375; p = 0.1786). Baseline analyses showed an independent negative association between PWV and muscle parameters after adjusting for confounders in both genders. The PWV-by-race interaction was significant in women and analyses are reported separately by race. Prospective mixed models showed that PWV was an independent determinant of the SI in all men (β = -0.1043; p = 0.0065) and in white women (β = -0.1091; p = 0.0192). In analyses examining the effect of arterial stiffness on limb lean mass over time, PWV correlated with lower leg (β = -0.2196; p = 0.0002)and arm mass (β = -0.0985; p = 0.0011) in all men and lower leg mass(β = -0.1608; p = 0.0027)in white women. In older persons, arterial stiffening is associated with skeletal muscle mass decline differently for race and

  12. [Relationship between brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity and metabolic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Liu, Miao; He, Yao; Jiang, Bin; Wu, Lei; Wang, Jian-hua; Yang, Shan-shan; Wang, Yi-yan; Li, Xiao-ying

    2014-06-18

    To evaluate the association between brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (ba-PWV) and metabolic syndrome (MetS) among the Chinese elderly and the gender difference. We conducted a population-based cross-sectional study in a representative urban area of Beijing, China. A sample of 2 102 community elderly (848 males, and 1 254 females) aged 60 to 95 years were included in the study. MetS was defined according to the 2009 harmonizing definition. The prevalence of MetS was 59.1% (50.1% in males and 65.2% in females, P<0.001). The baPWV value was between 8.2 to 45.6 (20.0 ± 4.4) m/s, and showed an increasing trend with age (P<0.001). The partial correlation showed baPWV was positively associated with BMI (r=0.076, P=0.037), systolic blood pressure (r=0.380, P<0.001), diastolic blood pressure (r=0.276, P<0.001), triglyceride (r=0.040, P=0.046), fasting blood glucose (r=0.140, P<0.001), 2-hour post-meal blood glucose (r=0.121, P<0.001), and negatively associated with HDL-C (r=-0.128, P=0.048). There was a strong association between baPWV and prevalence of MetS and its component number in females but not in males. Compared with the lowest quartile of baPWV, the adjusted ORs were 1.22 (95%CI 0.83-1.79), 1.32 (95%CI 0.90-1.93), 1.46(95%CI 1.00-2.14) in males and 1.28 (95%CI 0.93-1.77), 1.55 (95%CI 1.12-2.16), 1.86(95%CI 1.32-2.61) in females for the second, third and top quartiles. The prevalence of MetS increases substantially with increasing levels of baPWV among the Chinese elderly, especially in females.

  13. Clinical usefulness and limitations of brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity in the evaluation of cardiovascular complications in hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Ito, Norihisa; Ohishi, Mitsuru; Takagi, Takashi; Terai, Minako; Shiota, Atsushi; Hayashi, Norihiro; Rakugi, Hiromi; Ogihara, Toshio

    2006-12-01

    The goal of this study was to clarify the clinical usefulness and limitations of brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (PWV) to evaluate hypertensive complications, in comparison with carotid-femoral PWV. Patients with essential hypertension (n=296, male/female=161/135; age=61.1+/-0.7 years) were enrolled. We measured brachial-ankle PWV, femoral-ankle PWV and carotid-femoral PWV simultaneously, and evaluated target organ damage and associated clinical conditions (cerebrovascular and cardiovascular disease) using the World Health Organization classification modified in 1999. Carotid-femoral PWV (p<0.0001; r=0.521) and brachial-ankle PWV (p<0.0001; r=0.478) but not femoral-ankle PWV were significantly correlated with age. Carotid-femoral PWV was significantly higher in patients with associated clinical conditions compared with that in patients with target organ damage (p<0.05) and those with no complications (p<0.0001). Brachial-ankle PWV was significantly higher in patients with associated clinical conditions (p<0.05) and target organ damage (p<0.05) compared to those with no complications, but there was no significant difference in brachial-ankle PWV between these two groups. Moreover, femoral-ankle PWV was significantly lower in patients with associated clinical conditions compared with that in patients with target organ damage (p<0.05). These data suggest that brachial-ankle PWV could underestimate arterial stiffness in hypertensive patients with a history of cardiovascular events.

  14. Assessment of arterial stiffness among schizophrenia-spectrum disorders using aortic pulse wave velocity and arterial compliance: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Aaron A; Warburton, Darren E R; Flynn, Sean W; Fredrikson, Diane; Lang, Donna J

    2014-01-30

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in individuals with chronic schizophrenia. Arterial stiffness provides a non-invasive indication of cardiovascular disease risk. To date, arterial stiffness, which has been shown to have independent predictive value for CVD morbidity and mortality, has not been evaluated in this population. We aimed to examine aortic pulse wave velocity (aPWV) as well as large and small artery compliance (Comp1 and Comp2) in patients being treated for schizophrenia, compared to healthy volunteers. Ten patients and 10 age and gendermatched volunteers underwent a comprehensive evaluation of arterial stiffness including: aPWV, Comp1, Comp2, stroke volume, cardiac output, and systemic vascular resistance. Patient aPWV was significantly elevated compared to healthy volunteers (9.1 ± 4.11 vs. 5.7 ± 1.4, P=0.03). Increased age, blood pressure, heart rate, and cigarettes/day were associated with reduced arterial health in patients. This is the first time aPWV has been described in those treated for schizophrenia. Arterial stiffness is increased in this population. Measuring arterial stiffness is a non-invasive, sensitive and effective tool for evaluating CVD risk in this population. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  15. The effect of workplace smoking bans on heart rate variability and pulse wave velocity of non-smoking hospitality workers.

    PubMed

    Rajkumar, Sarah; Schmidt-Trucksäss, Arno; Wellenius, Gregory A; Bauer, Georg F; Huynh, Cong Khanh; Moeller, Alexander; Röösli, Martin

    2014-08-01

    To investigate the effect of a change in second-hand smoke (SHS) exposure on heart rate variability (HRV) and pulse wave velocity (PWV), this study utilized a quasi-experimental setting when a smoking ban was introduced. HRV, a quantitative marker of autonomic activity of the nervous system, and PWV, a marker of arterial stiffness, were measured in 55 non-smoking hospitality workers before and 3-12 months after a smoking ban and compared to a control group that did not experience an exposure change. SHS exposure was determined with a nicotine-specific badge and expressed as inhaled cigarette equivalents per day (CE/d). PWV and HRV parameters significantly changed in a dose-dependent manner in the intervention group as compared to the control group. A one CE/d decrease was associated with a 2.3% (95% CI 0.2-4.4; p = 0.031) higher root mean square of successive differences (RMSSD), a 5.7% (95% CI 0.9-10.2; p = 0.02) higher high-frequency component and a 0.72% (95% CI 0.40-1.05; p < 0.001) lower PWV. PWV and HRV significantly improved after introducing smoke-free workplaces indicating a decreased cardiovascular risk.

  16. Noninvasive Assessment of Pulse-Wave Velocity and Flow-Mediated Vasodilation in Anesthetized Göttingen Minipigs

    PubMed Central

    Ludvigsen, Trine P; Wiinberg, Niels; Jensen, Christina J; Callesen, Annemette T; Andersen, Regitze W; Jørgensen, Anne Sofie H; Christoffersen, Berit Ø; Pedersen, Henrik D; Moesgaard, Sophia G; Olsen, Lisbeth H

    2014-01-01

    Few methods for noninvasive assessment of arterial stiffness and endothelial dysfunction in porcine models are available. The aim of this study was to evaluate methods for assessment of arterial stiffness and endothelial dysfunction in anesthetized Göttingen minipigs. Pulse-wave velocity (PWV) was assessed in male Göttingen minipigs (n = 8; age approximately 60 wk) by using applanation tonometry of the carotid and femoral arteries. In addition, flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD) was assessed by using vascular ultrasonography of the brachial artery to evaluate endothelial dysfunction. To evaluate the reproducibility of the methods, minipigs were anesthetized by intravenous infusion of ketamine and midazolam and examined every other day for a total of 3 trials. Neither examination day nor systolic, diastolic, or mean arterial blood pressure statistically influenced PWV or FMD. The median interexamination coefficient of variation was 17% for PWV and 59% for FMD. Measured values of PWV corresponded largely to those in clinically healthy humans, but FMD values were lower than expected for lean, young animals. Although the ketamine–midazolam anesthesia we used has been associated with minor hemodynamic effects in vivo, in vitro studies suggest that both drugs are vasodilatory. Therefore anesthesia might have influenced the endothelial response, contributing to the modest FMD response and the concurrent high coefficients of variation that we noted. We conclude that PWV—but not FMD—showed acceptable interexamination variation for its potential application in porcine models. PMID:25527028

  17. Effect of Aerobic versus Resistance Exercise on Pulse Wave Velocity, Intima Media Thickness and Left Ventricular Mass in Obese Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Horner, Katy; Kuk, Jennifer L; Barinas-Mitchell, Emma; Drant, Stacey; DeGroff, Curt; Lee, SoJung

    2015-11-01

    A cardiovascular comorbidity in obese adolescents is increased aortic pulse wave velocity (aPWV), carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) and left ventricular mass (LVM). We investigated in obese adolescents 1) the risk factors associated with aPWV, cIMT and LVM, and 2) the effects of aerobic (AE) versus resistance (RE) exercise alone (without calorie restriction) on aPWV, cIMT, LVM index (LVMI) and cardiometabolic risk factors. Eighty-one obese adolescents (12-18 yrs, BMI ≥95th percentile) were randomized to 3 months of AE (n = 30), RE (n = 27) or a control group (n = 24). Outcome measures included aPWV, cIMT, LVMI, body composition, cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF), blood pressure (BP) and lipids. At baseline, the strongest correlates of aPWV were body weight (r = .31) and diastolic BP (r = .28); of cIMT were body weight (r=0.26) and CRF (r=-0.25); and of LVMI was CRF (r=0.32) after adjusting for sex and race (p < .05 for all). Despite significant reductions in total fat and improvements in CRF in the AE and RE groups, aPWV, cIMT, LVMI, BP, lipids and body weight did not change as compared with controls (p > .05 for all). Interventions of longer duration or together with weight loss may be required to improve these early biomarkers of CVD in obese adolescents.

  18. The effect of workplace smoking bans on heart rate variability and pulse wave velocity of non-smoking hospitality workers

    PubMed Central

    Rajkumar, Sarah; Schmidt-Trucksäss, Arno; Wellenius, Gregory A.; Bauer, Georg F.; Huynh, Cong Khanh; Moeller, Alexander; Röösli, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the effect of a change in second hand smoke (SHS) exposure on heart rate variability (HRV) and pulse wave velocity (PWV), this study utilized a quasi-experimental setting when a smoking ban was introduced. Methods HRV, a quantitative marker of autonomic activity of the nervous system, and PWV, a marker of arterial stiffness, were measured in 55 non-smoking hospitality workers before and 3 to 12 months after a smoking ban and compared to a control group that did not experience an exposure change. SHS exposure was determined with a nicotine specific badge and expressed as inhaled cigarette equivalents per day (CE/d). Results PWV and HRV parameters significantly changed in a dose dependent manner in the intervention group compared to the control group. A one CE/d decrease was associated with a 2.3% (95% CI: 0.2, 4.4; p=0.031) higher root mean square of successive differences (RMSSD), a 5.7 % (95% CI: 0.9, 10.2; p=0.02) higher high frequency component and a 0.72% (95 % CI: 0.40–1.05; p<0.001) lower PWV. Conclusions PWV and HRV significantly improved after introducing smoke-free workplaces indicating a decreased cardiovascular risk. PMID:24504155

  19. Reproducibility of carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity in end-stage renal disease patients: methodological considerations.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Rosendo A; Cronin, Valerie; Ramsay, Timothy; Zimmerman, Deborah; Ruzicka, Marcel; Burns, Kevin D

    2016-01-01

    In end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients, increased arterial stiffness detected by carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cf-PWV) is associated with fatal cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality. Since cf-PWV is an operator-dependent technique, poor reproducibility may be a source of bias in the estimation of arterial stiffness. We assessed the week-to-week reproducibility of cf-PWV and radial artery pulse wave analysis in healthy subjects and ESRD patients. We also determined the extent of patient eligibility, enrollment, acceptance, and comfort. In a cohort study design, independent tonometric examinations of carotid, femoral, and radial arteries were conducted in 20 healthy subjects and 15 ESRD patients attending chronic hemodialysis treatments according to a randomized sequence by two operators on 2 days scheduled 1-week apart. cf-PWV, augmentation index (AIx@HR75) and central pulse pressure (CPP) were the outcome measures. Patients were tested at mid-week and prior to dialysis treatment. The variability on the distance measured between the suprasternal notch and femoral site using two different methods (standard vs direct) was compared. A post-examination survey assessed acceptance and comfort associated with examinations. Reproducibility was evaluated by intra-class correlations (ICCs). The mean age for healthy subjects and ESRD patients was 45 ± 12 and 63 ± 16 years, respectively. ESRD patients had higher cf-PWV (p = 0.0002), elevated AIx@HR75 (p = 0.003), and increased CPP (p = 0.001) compared to healthy subjects. The mean inter-visit differences for all stiffness indices were non-significant (p > 0.05), but the mean inter-operator differences for the cf-PWV were significant only in the healthy subject group (-0.7 m/s; p = 0.02). The ICCs between operators and visits were higher for the ESRD group compared to the healthy subjects (between operators, 0.870 vs 0.461; between visits, 0.830 vs 0.570). Distances were longer

  20. Pulse wave transit time measured by imaging photoplethysmography in upper extremities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volynsky, M. A.; Mamontov, O. V.; Sidorov, I. S.; Kamshilin, A. A.

    2016-08-01

    We describe highly reliable measurement method of the pulse wave transit time (PWTT) to human limbs by using simultaneous recordings of imaging photoplethysmography and electrocardiography. High accuracy of measurements was achieved by access to a larger number of statistically independent data obtained simultaneously in different points. The method is characterized by higher diagnostic reliability because of automatic selection of the regions less affected by environmental noise. The technique was tested in the group of 12 young healthy subjects aged from 21 to 33 years. Even though PWTT in right and left hands was comparable after averaging over the whole group of subjects, significant difference in the time delay of pulse wave between the hands was found in several individuals. The technique can be used for early-stage diagnostics of various vascular diseases.

  1. Pulse wave velocity and digital volume pulse as indirect estimators of blood pressure: pilot study on healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Padilla, Juan M; Berjano, Enrique J; Sáiz, Javier; Rodriguez, Rafael; Fácila, Lorenzo

    2009-09-01

    The purpose of the study was to asses the potential use of pulse wave velocity (PWV) and digital volume pulse (DVP) as estimators of systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DPB) blood pressure. Single and multiple correlation studies were conducted, including biometric parameters and risk factors. Brachial-ankle PWV (baPWV) and DVP signals were obtained from a Pulse Trace PWV and Pulse Trace PCA (pulse contour analysis), respectively. The DVP (obtained by photoplethysmography), allowed stiffness (SI) and reflection indexes (RI) to be derived. The first study on 47 healthy volunteers showed that both SBP and DPB correlated significantly both with baPWV and SI. Multiple regression models of the baPWV and the waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) allowed SBP and DBP to be modeled with r = 0.838 and r = 0.673, respectively. SI results also employed WHR and modeled SBP and DBP with r = 0.852 and r = 0.663, respectively. RI did not correlate either with SBP or DBP. In order to avoid the use of ultrasound techniques to measure PWV, we then developed a custom-built system to measure PWV by photoplethysmography and validated it against the Pulse Trace. With the same equipment we conducted a second pilot study with ten healthy volunteers. The best SBP multiple regression model for SBP achieved r = 0.997 by considering the heart-finger PWV (hfPWV measured between R-wave and index finger), WHR and heart rate. Only WHR was significant in the DBP model. Our findings suggest that the hfPWV photoplethysmography signal could be a reliable estimator of approximate SBP and could be used, for example, to monitor cardiac patients during physical exercise sessions in cardiac rehabilitation.

  2. Integrated multiomics approach identifies calcium and integrin-binding protein-2 as a novel gene for pulse wave velocity

    PubMed Central

    Mangino, Massimo; Cecelja, Marina; Menni, Cristina; Tsai, Pei-Chien; Yuan, Wei; Small, Kerrin; Bell, Jordana; Mitchell, Gary F.; Chowienczyk, Phillip; Spector, Tim D.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) is an important measure of arterial stiffness, which is an independent predictor of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. In this study, we used an integrated genetic, epigenetic and transcriptomics approach to uncover novel molecular mechanisms contributing to PWV. Methods and results: We measured PWV in 1505 healthy twins of European descendent. A genomewide association analysis was performed using standardized residual of the inverse of PWV. We identified one single-nucleotide polymorphism (rs7164338) in the calcium and integrin-binding protein-2 (CIB2) gene on chromosome 15q25.1 associated with PWV [β = −0.359, standard error (SE) = 0.07, P = 4.8 × 10–8]. The same variant was also associated with increased CIB2 expression in leucocytes (β = 0.034, SE = 0.008, P = 4.95 × 10–5) and skin (β = 0.072, SE = 0.01, P = 2.35 × 10–9) and with hypomethylation of the gene promoter (β = −0.899, SE = 0.098, P = 3.63 × 10–20). Conclusion: Our data indicate that reduced methylation of the CIB2 promoter in individuals carrying rs7164338 may lead to increased CIB2 expression. Given that CIB2 is thought to regulate intracellular calcium levels, an increase in protein levels may prevent the accumulation of serum calcium and phosphate, ultimately slowing down the process of vascular calcification. This study shows the power of integrating multiple omics to discover novel cardiovascular mechanisms. PMID:26378684

  3. The association of metabolic syndrome and its components with brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity in south China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liying; Zhu, Wenhua; Mai, Linhe; Fang, Lizheng; Ying, Kejing

    2015-06-01

    Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) can reflect both central and peripheral arterial stiffness. Metabolic syndrome (MS) and its components may increase arterial stiffness and the risks of cardiovascular diseases. However, the correlation of MS and its components with arterial stiffness has not been not well studied. The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between MS/its components and arterial stiffness by the measurement of baPWV in south China population. A total of 8599 subjects were selected from those who underwent health examination in our hospital. MS was defined by Joint Scientific Statement. BaPWV, waist circumference, blood pressure (BP), fasting plasma glucose (FPG), lipid profile and serum uric acid (UA) were measured. The relationship between baPWV and MS/its components was analyzed. BaPWV was significantly higher in the subjects with MS than in those without MS (P < 0.001 for both genders). By multivariate regression analysis, all the metabolic components were correlated to baPWV in the male and female subjects except low HDL-C and high UA in the male group. BP and FPG had the strongest correlation factors. The values of baPWV were positively correlated with the advanced age (P < 0.001) and the values of the MS components, and this correlation was stronger in the females than in the males (P < 0.001). Metabolic syndrome and its individual components were positively correlated with baPWV. Monitoring baPWV is helpful to identify early stage of arterial stiffness in those people with MS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Association of Brachial-Ankle Pulse Wave Velocity and Cardiomegaly With Aortic Arch Calcification in Patients on Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Ming-Chen Paul; Lee, Mei-Yueh; Huang, Jiun-Chi; Tsai, Yi-Chun; Chen, Jui-Hsin; Chen, Szu-Chia; Chang, Jer-Ming; Chen, Hung-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aortic arch calcification (AoAC) is associated with cardiovascular and all-cause mortality in end-stage renal disease population. AoAC can be simply estimated with an AoAC score using plain chest radiography. The objective of this study is to evaluate the association of AoAC with brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) and cardiomegaly in patients who have undergoing hemodialysis (HD). We retrospectively determined AoAC and cardiothoracic ratio (CTR) by chest x-ray in 220 HD patients who underwent the measurement of baPWV. The values of baPWV were measured by an ankle-brachial index-form device. Multiple stepwise logistic regression analysis was used to identify the factors associated with AoAC score >4. Compared patients with AoAC score ≦4, patients with AoAC score >4 had older age, higher prevalence of diabetes and cerebrovascular disease, lower diastolic blood pressure, higher baPWV, higher CTR, higher prevalence of CTR ≧50%, lower total cholesterol, and lower creatinine level. After the multivariate stepwise logistic analysis, old age, cerebrovascular disease, high baPWV (per 100 cm/s, odds ratio [OR] 1.065, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.003–1.129, P = 0.038), CTR (per 1%, OR 1.116, 95% CI 1.046–1.191, P = 0.001), and low total cholesterol level were independently associated with AoAC score >4. Our study demonstrated AoAC severity was associated with high baPWV and high CTR in patients with HD. Therefore, we suggest that evaluating AoAC on plain chest radiography may be a simple and inexpensive method for detecting arterial stiffness in HD patients. PMID:27175684

  5. Feasibility of two-dimensional speckle tracking in evaluation of arterial stiffness: Comparison with pulse wave velocity and conventional sonographic markers of atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Podgórski, Michał; Grzelak, Piotr; Kaczmarska, Magdalena; Polguj, Michał; Łukaszewski, Maciej; Stefańczyk, Ludomir

    2017-01-01

    Objective Arterial stiffening is an early marker of atherosclerosis that has a prognostic value for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Although many markers of arterial hardening have been proposed, the search is on for newer, more user-friendly and reliable surrogates. One such potential candidate has emerged from cardiology, the speckle-tracking technique. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of the two-dimensional speckle tracking for the evaluation of arterial wall stiffness in comparison with standard stiffness parameters. Methods Carotid ultrasound and applanation tonometry were performed in 188 patients with no cardiovascular risk factors. The following parameters were then evaluated: the intima-media complex thickness, distensibility coefficient, β-stiffness index, circumferential strain/strain rate, and pulse wave velocity and augmentation index. These variables were compared with each other and with patient age, and their reliability was assessed with Bland-Altman plots. Results Strain parameters derived from two-dimensional speckle tracking and intima-media complex thickness correlated better with age and pulse wave velocity than standard makers of arterial stiffness. Moreover, the reliability of these measurements was significantly higher than conventional surrogates. Conclusions Two-dimensional speckle tracing is a reliable method for the evaluation of arterial stiffness. Therefore, together with intima-media complex thickness measurement, it offers great potential in clinical practice as an early marker of atherosclerosis.

  6. Effect of salt intake and potassium supplementation on brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity in Chinese subjects: an interventional study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Y.; Mu, J.J.; Geng, L.K.; Wang, D.; Ren, K.Y.; Guo, T.S.; Chu, C.; Xie, B.Q.; Liu, F.Q.; Yuan, Z.Y.

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence has suggested that high salt and potassium might be associated with vascular function. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of salt intake and potassium supplementation on brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (PWV) in Chinese subjects. Forty-nine subjects (28-65 years of age) were selected from a rural community of northern China. All subjects were sequentially maintained on a low-salt diet for 7 days (3.0 g/day NaCl), a high-salt diet for an additional 7 days (18.0 g/day NaCl), and a high-salt diet with potassium supplementation for a final 7 days (18.0 g/day NaCl+4.5 g/day KCl). Brachial-ankle PWV was measured at baseline and on the last day of each intervention. Blood pressure levels were significantly increased from the low-salt to high-salt diet, and decreased from the high-salt diet to high-salt plus potassium supplementation. Baseline brachial-ankle PWV in salt-sensitive subjects was significantly higher than in salt-resistant subjects. There was no significant change in brachial-ankle PWV among the 3 intervention periods in salt-sensitive, salt-resistant, or total subjects. No significant correlations were found between brachial-ankle PWV and 24-h sodium and potassium excretions. Our study indicates that dietary salt intake and potassium supplementation, at least in the short term, had no significant effect on brachial-ankle PWV in Chinese subjects. PMID:25493387

  7. The product of resting heart rate times blood pressure is associated with high brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Anxin; Tao, Jie; Guo, Xiuhua; Liu, Xuemei; Luo, Yanxia; Liu, Xiurong; Huang, Zhe; Chen, Shuohua; Zhao, Xingquan; Jonas, Jost B; Wu, Shouling

    2014-01-01

    To investigate potential associations between resting heart rate, blood pressure and the product of both, and the brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) as a maker of arterial stiffness. The community-based "Asymptomatic Polyvascular Abnormalities in Community (APAC) Study" examined asymptomatic polyvascular abnormalities in a general Chinese population and included participants with an age of 40+ years without history of stroke and coronary heart disease. Arterial stiffness was defined as baPWV≥1400 cm/s. We measured and calculated the product of resting heart rate and systolic blood pressure (RHR-SBP) and the product of resting heart rate and mean arterial pressure (RHR-MAP). The study included 5153 participants with a mean age of 55.1 ± 11.8 years. Mean baPWV was 1586 ± 400 cm/s. Significant (P<0.0001) linear relationships were found between higher baPWV and higher resting heart rate or higher arterial blood pressure, with the highest baPWV observed in individuals from the highest quartiles of resting heart rate and blood pressure. After adjusting for confounding parameters such as age, sex, educational level, body mass index, fasting blood concentrations of glucose, blood lipids and high-sensitive C-reactive protein, smoking status and alcohol consumption, prevalence of arterial stiffness increased significantly (P<0.0001) with increasing RHR-SBP quartile (Odds Ratio (OR): 2.72;95%Confidence interval (CI):1.46,5.08) and increasing RHR-MAP (OR:2.10;95%CI:1.18,3.72). Similar results were obtained in multivariate linear regression analyses with baPWV as continuous variable. Higher baPWV as a marker of arterial stiffness was associated with a higher product of RHR-SBP and RHR-MAP in multivariate analysis. In addition to other vascular risk factors, higher resting heart rate in combination with higher blood pressure are risk factors for arterial stiffness.

  8. Pulse wave velocity for assessment of arterial stiffness among people with spinal cord injury: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Miyatani, Masae; Masani, Kei; Oh, Paul I; Miyachi, Motohiko; Popovic, Milos R; Craven, B Cathy

    2009-01-01

    The most significant complication and leading cause of death for people with spinal cord injury (SCI) is coronary artery disease (CAD). It has been confirmed that aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) is an emerging CAD predictor among able-bodied individuals. No prior study has described PWV values among people with SCI. The objective of this study was to compare aortic (the common carotid to femoral artery) PWV, arm (the brachial to radial artery) PWV, and leg (the femoral to posterior tibial artery) PWV in people with SCI (SCI group) to able-bodied controls (non-SCI group). Participants included 12 men with SCI and 9 non-SCI controls matched for age, sex, height, and weight. Participants with a history of CAD or current metabolic syndrome were excluded. Aortic, arm, and leg PWV was measured using the echo Doppler method. Aortic PWV (mean +/- SD) in the SCI group (1,274 +/- 369 cm/s) was significantly higher (P < 0.05) than in the non-SCI group (948 +/- 110 cm/s). There were no significant between-group differences in mean arm PWV (SCI: 1,152 +/- 193 cm/s, non-SCI: 1,237 +/- 193 cm/s) or mean leg PWV (SCI: 1,096 +/- 173 cm/s, non-SCI: 994 +/- 178 cm/s) values. Aortic PWV was higher among the SCI group compared with the non-SCI group. The higher mean aortic PWV values among the SCI group compared with the non-SCI group indicated a higher risk of CAD among people with SCI in the absence of metabolic syndrome.

  9. Brachial-Ankle Pulse Wave Velocity and the Risk Prediction of Cardiovascular Disease: An Individual Participant Data Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Ohkuma, Toshiaki; Ninomiya, Toshiharu; Tomiyama, Hirofumi; Kario, Kazuomi; Hoshide, Satoshi; Kita, Yoshikuni; Inoguchi, Toyoshi; Maeda, Yasutaka; Kohara, Katsuhiko; Tabara, Yasuharu; Nakamura, Motoyuki; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Watada, Hirotaka; Munakata, Masanori; Ohishi, Mitsuru; Ito, Norihisa; Nakamura, Michinari; Shoji, Tetsuo; Vlachopoulos, Charalambos; Yamashina, Akira

    2017-06-01

    An individual participant data meta-analysis was conducted in the data of 14 673 Japanese participants without a history of cardiovascular disease (CVD) to examine the association of the brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) with the risk of development of CVD. During the average 6.4-year follow-up period, 687 participants died and 735 developed cardiovascular events. A higher baPWV was significantly associated with a higher risk of CVD, even after adjustments for conventional risk factors (P for trend <0.001). When the baPWV values were classified into quintiles, the multivariable-adjusted hazard ratio for CVD increased significantly as the baPWV quintile increased. The hazard ratio in the subjects with baPWV values in quintile 5 versus that in those with the values in quintile 1 was 3.50 (2.14-5.74; P<0.001). Every 1 SD increase of the baPWV was associated with a 1.19-fold (1.10-1.29; P<0.001) increase in the risk of CVD. Moreover, addition of baPWV to a model incorporating the Framingham risk score significantly increased the C statistics from 0.8026 to 0.8131 (P<0.001) and also improved the category-free net reclassification (0.247; P<0.001). The present meta-analysis clearly established baPWV as an independent predictor of the risk of development of CVD in Japanese subjects without preexisting CVD. Thus, measurement of the baPWV could enhance the efficacy of prediction of the risk of development of CVD over that of the Framingham risk score, which is based on the traditional cardiovascular risk factors. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Reference values of brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity according to age and blood pressure in a central Asia population.

    PubMed

    Yiming, Gulinuer; Zhou, Xianhui; Lv, Wenkui; Peng, Yi; Zhang, Wenhui; Cheng, Xinchun; Li, Yaodong; Xing, Qiang; Zhang, Jianghua; Zhou, Qina; Zhang, Ling; Lu, Yanmei; Wang, Hongli; Tang, Baopeng

    2017-01-01

    Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV), a direct measure of aortic stiffness, has increasingly become an important assessment for cardiovascular risk. The present study established the reference and normal values of baPWV in a Central Asia population in Xinjiang, China. We recruited participants from a central Asia population in Xinjiang, China. We performed multiple regression analysis to investigate the determinants of baPWV. The median and 10th-90th percentiles were calculated to establish the reference and normal values based on these categories. In total, 5,757 Han participants aged 15-88 years were included in the present study. Spearman correlation analysis showed that age (r = 0.587, p < 0.001) and mean blood pressure (MBP, r = 0.599, p <0.001) were the major factors influencing the values of baPWV in the reference population. Furthermore, in the multiple linear regression analysis, the standardized regression coefficients of age (0.445) and MBP (0.460) were much higher than those of body mass index, triglyceride, and glycemia (-0.054, 0.035, and 0.033, respectively). In the covariance analysis, after adjustment for age and MBP, only diabetes was the significant independent determinant of baPWV (p = 0.009). Thus, participants with diabetes were excluded from the reference value population. The reference values ranged from 14.3 to 25.2 m/s, and the normal values ranged from 13.9 to 21.2 m/s. This is the first study that has established the reference and normal values for baPWV according to age and blood pressure in a Central Asia population.

  11. Effect of reactive hyperemia on carotid-radial pulse wave velocity in hypertensive participants and direct comparison with flow-mediated dilation: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kamran, Haroon; Salciccioli, Louis; Ko, Eun Hee; Qureshi, Ghazanfar; Kazmi, Haris; Kassotis, John; Lazar, Jason

    2010-01-01

    This pilot study assessed the effects of hyperemia on carotid-radial pulse wave velocity (PWV) in 39 normotensive (NT) and 23 hypertensive (HT) participants using applanation tonometry. Pulse wave velocity was measured at 1- and at 2-minute intervals. Baseline PWV was similar between the groups (P = .59). At 1 minute, PWV decreased (8.5 +/- 1.2 to 7.1 +/- 1.4 m/s, P < .001) in NT but not in HT (P = .83). Hyperemic PWV (DeltaPWV) response differed between the groups (-16% vs + 1.0%, P < .001). On multivariate analysis, HT, not age or blood pressure was independently related to DeltaPWV (R(2) = .43, P < .01). Among patients with cardiovascular risk factors/disease, DeltaPWV was inversely related to flow-mediated dilation (FMD; R( 2) = .43, P < .003). hyperemia decreases PWV(1min) in NT but not in HT. DeltaPWV is inversely related to FMD. Blunted hyperemic PWV response may represent impaired vasodilatory reserve.

  12. Baseline aortic pulse wave velocity is associated with central and peripheral pressor responses during the cold pressor test in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Borner, Anastasiya; Murray, Kyle; Trotter, Claire; Pearson, James

    2017-07-01

    Cold environmental temperatures increase sympathetic nerve activity and blood pressure, and increase the risk of acute cardiovascular events in aged individuals. The acute risk of cardiovascular events increases with aortic pulse wave velocity as well as elevated central and peripheral pulse pressures. The aim of this study was to examine the independent influence of aortic pulse wave velocity upon central and peripheral pressor responses to sympathetic activation via the cold pressor test (CPT). Twenty-two healthy subjects (age: 18-73 years) completed a CPT with the left hand immersed in 2-4°C water for 3 min. During the CPT, central (from: 36 ± 7 to: 51 ± 12 mmHg) and peripheral pulse pressure increased (from: 54 ± 7 to: 66 ± 11; both P < 0.05). In all subjects the increase in central pulse pressure during the CPT was independently associated with baseline aortic pulse wave velocity (r(2) = 0.221, P = 0.027) but not age (P > 0.05). In a subset of subjects with higher arterial stiffness, the increase in peripheral pulse pressure during the CPT was independently associated with baseline aortic pulse wave velocity (r(2) = 0.415, P = 0.032) but not age (P > 0.05). These data indicate that central and peripheral pulse pressure responses during sympathetic activation are positively and independently associated with aortic pulse wave velocity through a wide age range. Decreasing aortic pulse wave velocity in aged individuals with elevated arterial stiffness may help reduce the incidence of acute cardiovascular events upon exposure to cold environmental temperatures. © 2017 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  13. Detection of cerebral ischemia using the power spectrum of the pulse wave measured by near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ebihara, Akira; Tanaka, Yuichi; Konno, Takehiko; Kawasaki, Shingo; Fujiwara, Michiyuki; Watanabe, Eiju

    2013-10-01

    The diagnosis and medical treatment of cerebral ischemia are becoming more important due to the increase in the prevalence of cerebrovascular disease. However, conventional methods of evaluating cerebral perfusion have several drawbacks: they are invasive, require physical restraint, and the equipment is not portable, which makes repeated measurements at the bedside difficult. An alternative method is developed using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). NIRS signals are measured at 44 positions (22 on each side) on the fronto-temporal areas in 20 patients with cerebral ischemia. In order to extract the pulse-wave component, the raw total hemoglobin data recorded from each position are band-pass filtered (0.8 to 2.0 Hz) and subjected to a fast Fourier transform to obtain the power spectrum of the pulse wave. The ischemic region is determined by single-photon emission computed tomography. The pulse-wave power in the ischemic region is compared with that in the symmetrical region on the contralateral side. In 17 cases (85%), the pulse-wave power on the ischemic side is significantly lower than that on the contralateral side, which indicates that the transmission of the pulse wave is attenuated in the region with reduced blood flow. Pulse-wave power might be useful as a noninvasive marker of cerebral ischemia.

  14. Quantification of the Interrelationship between Brachial-Ankle and Carotid-Femoral Pulse Wave Velocity in a Workplace Population.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yi-Bang; Li, Yan; Sheng, Chang-Sheng; Huang, Qi-Fang; Wang, Ji-Guang

    2016-04-01

    Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (PWV) is increasingly used for the measurement of arterial stiffness. In the present study, we quantified the interrelationship between brachial-ankle and carotid-femoral PWV in a workplace population, and investigated the associations with cardiovascular risk factors and carotid intima-media thickness (IMT). Brachial-ankle and carotid-femoral PWV were measured using the Omron-Colin VP1000 and SphygmoCor devices, respectively. We investigated the interrelationship by the Pearson's correlation analysis and Bland-Altman plot, and performed sensitivity and specificity analyses. The 954 participants (mean ± standard deviation age 42.6 ± 14.2 years) included 630 (66.0%) men and 203 (21.3%) hypertensive patients. Brachial-ankle (13.4 ± 2.7 m/s) and carotid-femoral PWV (7.3 ± 1.6 m/s) were significantly correlated in all subjects (r = 0.75) as well as in men (r = 0.72) and women (r = 0.80) separately. For arterial stiffness defined as a carotid-femoral PWV of 10 m/s or higher, the sensitivity and specificity of brachial-ankle PWV of 16.7 m/s or higher were 72 and 94%, respectively. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.953. In multiple stepwise regression, brachial-ankle and carotid-femoral PWV were significantly (p < 0.001) associated with age (partial r = 0.33 and 0.34, respectively) and systolic blood pressure (partial r = 0.71 and 0.66, respectively). In addition, brachial-ankle and carotid-femoral PWV were significantly (p < 0.001) associated with carotid IMT (r = 0.57 and 0.55, respectively) in unadjusted analysis, but not in analysis adjusted for cardiovascular risk factors (p ≥ 0.08). Brachial-ankle and carotid-femoral PWV were closely correlated, and had similar determinants. Brachial-ankle PWV can behave as an ease-of-use alternative measure of arterial stiffness for assessing cardiovascular risk.

  15. Quantification of the Interrelationship between Brachial-Ankle and Carotid-Femoral Pulse Wave Velocity in a Workplace Population

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yi-Bang; Li, Yan; Sheng, Chang-Sheng; Huang, Qi-Fang; Wang, Ji-Guang

    2016-01-01

    Background Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (PWV) is increasingly used for the measurement of arterial stiffness. In the present study, we quantified the interrelationship between brachial-ankle and carotid-femoral PWV in a workplace population, and investigated the associations with cardiovascular risk factors and carotid intima-media thickness (IMT). Methods Brachial-ankle and carotid-femoral PWV were measured using the Omron-Colin VP1000 and SphygmoCor devices, respectively. We investigated the interrelationship by the Pearson's correlation analysis and Bland-Altman plot, and performed sensitivity and specificity analyses. Results The 954 participants (mean ± standard deviation age 42.6 ± 14.2 years) included 630 (66.0%) men and 203 (21.3%) hypertensive patients. Brachial-ankle (13.4 ± 2.7 m/s) and carotid-femoral PWV (7.3 ± 1.6 m/s) were significantly correlated in all subjects (r = 0.75) as well as in men (r = 0.72) and women (r = 0.80) separately. For arterial stiffness defined as a carotid-femoral PWV of 10 m/s or higher, the sensitivity and specificity of brachial-ankle PWV of 16.7 m/s or higher were 72 and 94%, respectively. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.953. In multiple stepwise regression, brachial-ankle and carotid-femoral PWV were significantly (p < 0.001) associated with age (partial r = 0.33 and 0.34, respectively) and systolic blood pressure (partial r = 0.71 and 0.66, respectively). In addition, brachial-ankle and carotid-femoral PWV were significantly (p < 0.001) associated with carotid IMT (r = 0.57 and 0.55, respectively) in unadjusted analysis, but not in analysis adjusted for cardiovascular risk factors (p ≥ 0.08). Conclusions Brachial-ankle and carotid-femoral PWV were closely correlated, and had similar determinants. Brachial-ankle PWV can behave as an ease-of-use alternative measure of arterial stiffness for assessing cardiovascular risk. PMID:27195246

  16. The velocity of the arterial pulse wave: a viscous-fluid shock wave in an elastic tube

    PubMed Central

    Painter, Page R

    2008-01-01

    Background The arterial pulse is a viscous-fluid shock wave that is initiated by blood ejected from the heart. This wave travels away from the heart at a speed termed the pulse wave velocity (PWV). The PWV increases during the course of a number of diseases, and this increase is often attributed to arterial stiffness. As the pulse wave approaches a point in an artery, the pressure rises as does the pressure gradient. This pressure gradient increases the rate of blood flow ahead of the wave. The rate of blood flow ahead of the wave decreases with distance because the pressure gradient also decreases with distance ahead of the wave. Consequently, the amount of blood per unit length in a segment of an artery increases ahead of the wave, and this increase stretches the wall of the artery. As a result, the tension in the wall increases, and this results in an increase in the pressure of blood in the artery. Methods An expression for the PWV is derived from an equation describing the flow-pressure coupling (FPC) for a pulse wave in an incompressible, viscous fluid in an elastic tube. The initial increase in force of the fluid in the tube is described by an increasing exponential function of time. The relationship between force gradient and fluid flow is approximated by an expression known to hold for a rigid tube. Results For large arteries, the PWV derived by this method agrees with the Korteweg-Moens equation for the PWV in a non-viscous fluid. For small arteries, the PWV is approximately proportional to the Korteweg-Moens velocity divided by the radius of the artery. The PWV in small arteries is also predicted to increase when the specific rate of increase in pressure as a function of time decreases. This rate decreases with increasing myocardial ischemia, suggesting an explanation for the observation that an increase in the PWV is a predictor of future myocardial infarction. The derivation of the equation for the PWV that has been used for more than fifty years is

  17. Altered dependence of aortic pulse wave velocity on transmural pressure in hypertension revealing structural change in the aortic wall.

    PubMed

    Gaddum, Nicholas R; Keehn, Louise; Guilcher, Antoine; Gomez, Alberto; Brett, Sally; Beerbaum, Philipp; Schaeffter, Tobias; Chowienczyk, Philip

    2015-02-01

    Aortic pulse wave velocity (aPWV), a major prognostic indicator of cardiovascular events, may be augmented in hypertension as a result of the aorta being stretched by a higher distending blood pressure or by a structural change. We used a novel technique to modulate intrathoracic pressure and thus aortic transmural pressure (TMP) to examine the variation of intrathoracic aPWV with TMP in hypertensive (n=20; mean±SD age, 52.1±15.3 years; blood pressure, 159.6±21.2/92.0±15.9 mm Hg) and normotensive (n=20; age, 55.5±11.1 years; blood pressure, 124.5±11.9/72.6±9.1 mm Hg) subjects. aPWV was measured using dual Doppler probes to insonate the right brachiocephalic artery and aorta at the level of the diaphragm. Resting aPWV was greater in hypertensive compared with normotensive subjects (897±50 cm/s versus 784±43 cm/s; P<0.05). aPWV was equal in hypertensive and normotensive subjects when measured at a TMP of 96 mm Hg. However, dependence of aPWV on TMP in normotensive subjects was greater than that in hypertensive subjects (9.6±1.6 versus 3.8±0.7 cm/s per mm Hg increase in TMP, respectively, means±SEM; P<0.01). This experimental behavior was best explained by a theoretical model incorporating strain-induced recruitment of stiffer fibers in normotensive subjects and fully recruited stiffer fibers in hypertensive subjects. These results explain previous contradictory findings with respect to isobaric aPWV in hypertensive compared with normotensive subjects. They suggest that hypertension is associated with a profound change in aortic wall mechanical properties possibly because of destruction of elastin leading to less strain-induced stiffening and predisposition to aortic dissection. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Consistency of aortic distensibility and pulse wave velocity estimates with respect to the Bramwell-Hill theoretical model: a cardiovascular magnetic resonance study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Arterial stiffness is considered as an independent predictor of cardiovascular mortality, and is increasingly used in clinical practice. This study aimed at evaluating the consistency of the automated estimation of regional and local aortic stiffness indices from cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) data. Results Forty-six healthy subjects underwent carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity measurements (CF_PWV) by applanation tonometry and CMR with steady-state free-precession and phase contrast acquisitions at the level of the aortic arch. These data were used for the automated evaluation of the aortic arch pulse wave velocity (Arch_PWV), and the ascending aorta distensibility (AA_Distc, AA_Distb), which were estimated from ascending aorta strain (AA_Strain) combined with either carotid or brachial pulse pressure. The local ascending aorta pulse wave velocity AA_PWVc and AA_PWVb were estimated respectively from these carotid and brachial derived distensibility indices according to the Bramwell-Hill theoretical model, and were compared with the Arch_PWV. In addition, a reproducibility analysis of AA_PWV measurement and its comparison with the standard CF_PWV was performed. Characterization according to the Bramwell-Hill equation resulted in good correlations between Arch_PWV and both local distensibility indices AA_Distc (r = 0.71, p < 0.001) and AA_Distb (r = 0.60, p < 0.001); and between Arch_PWV and both theoretical local indices AA_PWVc (r = 0.78, p < 0.001) and AA_PWVb (r = 0.78, p < 0.001). Furthermore, the Arch_PWV was well related to CF_PWV (r = 0.69, p < 0.001) and its estimation was highly reproducible (inter-operator variability: 7.1%). Conclusions The present work confirmed the consistency and robustness of the regional index Arch_PWV and the local indices AA_Distc and AA_Distb according to the theoretical model, as well as to the well established measurement of CF_PWV, demonstrating the relevance of the regional and local CMR indices. PMID

  19. Effect of endoskeleton stent graft design on pulse wave velocity in patients undergoing endovascular repair of the aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Hori, Daijiro; Akiyoshi, Kei; Yuri, Koichi; Nishi, Satoshi; Nonaka, Takao; Yamamoto, Takahiro; Imamura, Yusuke; Matsumoto, Harunobu; Kimura, Naoyuki; Yamaguchi, Atsushi

    2017-06-08

    Pulse wave velocity (PWV), which measures vascular stiffness, is a powerful predictor of cardiovascular event. Treatment of aneurysms with endovascular prosthesis has been reported to increase PWV. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether an endoskeleton stent graft design has less effect on PWV than the exoskeleton stent graft design. Between July 2008 and September 2016, 74 patients underwent endovascular treatment of aortic arch aneurysm in our institution. PWV before and after surgery were compared between those who underwent treatment with Najuta, an endoskeleton stent graft (n = 51), and those treated with other commercially available exoskeleton stent grafts (n = 23). Preoperative PWV (endoskeleton: 2004 ± 379.2 cm/s vs. exoskeleton: 2083 ± 454.5 cm/s, p = 0.47) was similar between the two groups. Factors that were associated with preoperative PWV were age (r = 0.37, 95% CI 0.15-0.56, p = 0.002) and mean arterial pressure (r = 0.53, 95% CI 0.34-0.68, p < 0.001). There was a significant increase in PWV in patients treated by exoskeleton stent grafts (before: 2083 ± 454.5 cm/s vs. after: 2305 ± 479.7 cm/s, p = 0.023) while endoskeleton stent graft showed no change in PWV (before: 2003 ± 379.2 vs. after: 2010 ± 521.1, p = 0.56). In a multivariate analysis, mean arterial pressure (coef 17.5, 95% CI 6.48-28.59, p = 0.002) and exoskeleton stent graft (coef 359.4, 95% CI 89.36-629.43, p = 0.010) were independently associated with PWV after surgery. Physiological changes after endovascular treatment should be considered including effect on vascular stiffness. Endoskeleton stent graft may provide aneurysm repair with minimum effect in PWV after surgery.

  20. Impact of seasonality and air pollutants on carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity and wave reflection in hypertensive patients

    PubMed Central

    Stea, Francesco; Massetti, Luciano; Taddei, Stefano; Ghiadoni, Lorenzo; Modesti, Pietro Amedeo

    2017-01-01

    Objective The effects of seasonality on blood pressure (BP) and cardiovascular (CV) events are well established, while the influence of seasonality and other environmental factors on arterial stiffness and wave reflection has never been analyzed. This study evaluated whether seasonality (daily number of hours of light) and acute variations in outdoor temperature and air pollutants may affect carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) and pressure augmentation. Design and method 731 hypertensive patients (30–88 years, 417 treated) were enrolled in a cross-sectional study during a 5-year period. PWV, central BP, Augmentation Index (AIx) and Augmentation Pressure (AP) were measured in a temperature-controlled (22–24°C) room. Data of the local office of the National Climatic Data Observatory were used to estimate meteorological conditions and air pollutants (PM10, O3, CO, N2O) exposure on the same day. Results PWV (mean value 8.5±1.8 m/s) was related to age (r = 0.467, p<0.001), body mass index (r = 0.132, p<0.001), central systolic (r = 0.414, p<0.001) and diastolic BP (r = 0.093, p = 0.013), daylight hours (r = -0.176, p<0.001), mean outdoor temperature (r = -0.082, p = 0.027), O3 (r = -0.135, p<0.001), CO (r = 0.096, p = 0.012), N2O (r = 0.087, p = 0.022). In multiple linear regression analysis, adjusted for confounders, PWV remained independently associated only with daylight hours (β = -0.170; 95% CI: -0.273 to -0.067, p = 0.001). No significant correlation was found between pressure augmentation and daylight hours, mean temperature or air pollutants. The relationship was stronger in untreated patients and women. Furthermore, a positive, independent association between O3 levels and PWV emerged in untreated patients (β: 0.018; p = 0.029; CI: 0.002 to 0.034) and in women (β: 0.027; p = 0.004; CI: 0.009 to 0.045). Conclusions PWV showed a marked seasonality in hypertensive patients. Environmental O3 levels may acutely reduce arterial stiffness in

  1. Pulse Wave Velocity Prediction and Compliance Assessment in Elastic Arterial Segments.

    PubMed

    Lillie, Jeffrey S; Liberson, Alexander S; Mix, Doran; Schwarz, Karl Q; Chandra, Ankur; Phillips, Daniel B; Day, Steven W; Borkholder, David A

    2015-03-01

    Pressure wave velocity (PWV) is commonly used as a clinical marker of vascular elasticity. Recent studies have increased clinical interest in also analyzing the impact of heart rate, blood pressure, and left ventricular ejection time on PWV. In this article we focus on the development of a theoretical one-dimensional model and validation via direct measurement of the impact of ejection time and peak pressure on PWV using an in vitro hemodynamic simulator. A simple nonlinear traveling wave model was developed for a compliant thin-walled elastic tube filled with an incompressible fluid. This model accounts for the convective fluid phenomena, elastic vessel deformation, radial motion, and inertia of the wall. An exact analytical solution for PWV is presented which incorporates peak pressure, ejection time, ejection volume, and modulus of elasticity. To assess arterial compliance, the solution is introduced in an alternative form, explicitly determining compliance of the wall as a function of the other variables. The model predicts PWV in good agreement with the measured values with a maximum difference of 3.0%. The results indicate an inverse quadratic relationship ([Formula: see text]) between ejection time and PWV, with ejection time dominating the PWV shifts (12%) over those observed with changes in peak pressure (2%). Our modeling and validation results both explain and support the emerging evidence that, both in clinical practice and clinical research, cardiac systolic function related variables should be regularly taken into account when interpreting arterial function indices, namely PWV.

  2. Ethnic Differences in and Childhood Influences on Early Adult Pulse Wave Velocity: The Determinants of Adolescent, Now Young Adult, Social Wellbeing, and Health Longitudinal Study.

    PubMed

    Cruickshank, J Kennedy; Silva, Maria J; Molaodi, Oarabile R; Enayat, Zinat E; Cassidy, Aidan; Karamanos, Alexis; Read, Ursula M; Faconti, Luca; Dall, Philippa; Stansfield, Ben; Harding, Seeromanie

    2016-06-01

    Early determinants of aortic stiffness as pulse wave velocity are poorly understood. We tested how factors measured twice previously in childhood in a multiethnic cohort study, particularly body mass, blood pressure, and objectively assessed physical activity affected aortic stiffness in young adults. Of 6643 London children, aged 11 to 13 years, from 51 schools in samples stratified by 6 ethnic groups with different cardiovascular risk, 4785 (72%) were seen again at aged 14 to 16 years. In 2013, 666 (97% of invited) took part in a young adult (21-23 years) pilot follow-up. With psychosocial and anthropometric measures, aortic stiffness and blood pressure were recorded via an upper arm calibrated Arteriograph device. In a subsample (n=334), physical activity was measured >5 days via the ActivPal. Unadjusted pulse wave velocities in black Caribbean and white UK young men were similar (mean±SD 7.9±0.3 versus 7.6±0.4 m/s) and lower in other groups at similar systolic pressures (120 mm Hg) and body mass (24.6 kg/m(2)). In fully adjusted regression models, independent of pressure effects, black Caribbean (higher body mass/waists), black African, and Indian young women had lower stiffness (by 0.5-0.8; 95% confidence interval, 0.1-1.1 m/s) than did white British women (6.9±0.2 m/s). Values were separately increased by age, pressure, powerful impacts from waist/height, time spent sedentary, and a reported racism effect (+0.3 m/s). Time walking at >100 steps/min was associated with reduced stiffness (P<0.01). Effects of childhood waist/hip were detected. By young adulthood, increased waist/height ratios, lower physical activity, blood pressure, and psychosocial variables (eg, perceived racism) independently increase arterial stiffness, effects likely to increase with age.

  3. Radiographic assessment of vascular calcification, aortic pulse wave velocity, ankle-brachial index and fibroblast growth factor-23 in chronic hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Breznik, Silva; Ekart, Robert; Hren, Martin; Rupreht, Mitja; Balon, Breda Pečovnik

    2013-08-01

    Vascular calcification is a frequent complication of chronic kidney disease and end stage renal disease. In both the general population and patients with end stage renal disease, vascular calcification is related to arterial stiffness and is a predictor of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Various diagnostic methods are currently used to assess vascular calcification. There is a preference for simple, reliable methods that can be used in daily practice. Therefore, several imaging and laboratory methods are investigated. Twenty-eight patients with mean age of 62 years on chronic hemodialysis were enrolled in the study. The mean duration of hemodialysis treatment was 70 months (range 3 to 350 months). Vascular calcification was assessed with coronary computed tomography and lateral lumbar, pelvic and hand radiographs. Vascular stiffness was evaluated using aortic pulse wave velocity and ankle-brachial index measurements, and finally serum levels of fibroblast growth factor-23 were followed. A statistically significant correlation was demonstrated between all the following parameters: coronary artery calcification score, aortic pulse wave velocity, abdominal aortic calcification score, simple vascular calcification scores in pelvis and hand. A statistically significant correlation of ankle-brachial index >1.3 to coronary artery calcification score was found. There was no correlation between the previous parameters and fibroblast growth factor-23. The results of our study indicate that simple imaging methods could provide confident vascular damage assessment and therefore potentially guide therapy adjustments. An association between fibroblast growth factor-23 and the other diagnostic modalities in our study was not found. © 2013 The Authors. Therapeutic Apheresis and Dialysis © 2013 International Society for Apheresis.

  4. High frame rate and high line density ultrasound imaging for local pulse wave velocity estimation using motion matching: A feasibility study on vessel phantoms.

    PubMed

    Li, Fubing; He, Qiong; Huang, Chengwu; Liu, Ke; Shao, Jinhua; Luo, Jianwen

    2016-04-01

    Pulse wave imaging (PWI) is an ultrasound-based method to visualize the propagation of pulse wave and to quantitatively estimate regional pulse wave velocity (PWV) of the arteries within the imaging field of view (FOV). To guarantee the reliability of PWV measurement, high frame rate imaging is required, which can be achieved by reducing the line density of ultrasound imaging or transmitting plane wave at the expense of spatial resolution and/or signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). In this study, a composite, full-view imaging method using motion matching was proposed with both high temporal and spatial resolution. Ultrasound radiofrequency (RF) data of 4 sub-sectors, each with 34 beams, including a common beam, were acquired successively to achieve a frame rate of ∼507 Hz at an imaging depth of 35 mm. The acceleration profiles of the vessel wall estimated from the common beam were used to reconstruct the full-view (38-mm width, 128-beam) image sequence. The feasibility of mapping local PWV variation along the artery using PWI technique was preliminarily validated on both homogeneous and inhomogeneous polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) cryogel vessel phantoms. Regional PWVs for the three homogeneous phantoms measured by the proposed method were in accordance with the sparse imaging method (38-mm width, 32-beam) and plane wave imaging method. Local PWV was estimated using the above-mentioned three methods on 3 inhomogeneous phantoms, and good agreement was obtained in both the softer (1.91±0.24 m/s, 1.97±0.27 m/s and 1.78±0.28 m/s) and the stiffer region (4.17±0.46 m/s, 3.99±0.53 m/s and 4.27±0.49 m/s) of the phantoms. In addition to the improved spatial resolution, higher precision of local PWV estimation in low SNR circumstances was also obtained by the proposed method as compared with the sparse imaging method. The proposed method might be helpful in disease detections through mapping the local PWV of the vascular wall. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. A database of virtual healthy subjects to assess the accuracy of foot-to-foot pulse wave velocities for estimation of aortic stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Chowienczyk, Phil; Alastruey, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    While central (carotid-femoral) foot-to-foot pulse wave velocity (PWV) is considered to be the gold standard for the estimation of aortic arterial stiffness, peripheral foot-to-foot PWV (brachial-ankle, femoral-ankle, and carotid-radial) are being studied as substitutes of this central measurement. We present a novel methodology to assess theoretically these computed indexes and the hemodynamics mechanisms relating them. We created a database of 3,325 virtual healthy adult subjects using a validated one-dimensional model of the arterial hemodynamics, with cardiac and arterial parameters varied within physiological healthy ranges. For each virtual subject, foot-to-foot PWV was computed from numerical pressure waveforms at the same locations where clinical measurements are commonly taken. Our numerical results confirm clinical observations: 1) carotid-femoral PWV is a good indicator of aortic stiffness and correlates well with aortic PWV; 2) brachial-ankle PWV overestimates aortic PWV and is related to the stiffness and geometry of both elastic and muscular arteries; and 3) muscular PWV (carotid-radial, femoral-ankle) does not capture the stiffening of the aorta and should therefore not be used as a surrogate for aortic stiffness. In addition, our analysis highlights that the foot-to-foot PWV algorithm is sensitive to the presence of reflected waves in late diastole, which introduce errors in the PWV estimates. In this study, we have created a database of virtual healthy subjects, which can be used to assess theoretically the efficiency of physiological indexes based on pulse wave analysis. PMID:26055792

  6. Genetically elevated levels of circulating triglycerides and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity in a Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Yao, W-M; Zhang, H-F; Zhu, Z-Y; Zhou, Y-L; Liang, N-X; Xu, D-J; Zhou, F; Sheng, Y-H; Yang, R; Gong, L; Yin, Z-J; Chen, F-K; Cao, K-J; Li, X-L

    2013-04-01

    Elevated levels of circulating triglycerides and increased arterial stiffness are associated with cardiovascular disease. Numerous studies have reported an association between levels of circulating triglycerides and arterial stiffness. We used Mendelian randomization to test whether this association is causal. We investigated the association between circulating triglyceride levels, the apolipoprotein A-V (ApoA5) -1131T>C single nucleotide polymorphism and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) by examining data from 4421 subjects aged 18-74 years who were recruited from the Chinese population. baPWV was significantly associated with the levels of circulating triglycerides after adjusting for age, sex, body mass index (BMI), systolic blood pressure, heart rate, waist-to-hip ratio, antihypertensive treatment and diabetes mellitus status. The -1131C allele was associated with a 5% (95% confidence interval 3-8%) increase in circulating triglycerides (adjusted for age, sex, BMI, waist-to-hip ratio, diabetes mellitus and antihypertensive treatment). Instrumental variable analysis showed that genetically elevated levels of circulating triglycerides were not associated with increased baPWV. These results do not support the hypothesis that levels of circulating triglycerides have a causal role in the development of arterial stiffness.

  7. Aortic augmentation index and pulse wave velocity in response to head-up tilting: effect of autonomic failure.

    PubMed

    Huijben, Auke M T; Mattace-Raso, Francesco U S; Deinum, Jaap; Lenders, Jacques; van den Meiracker, Anton H

    2012-02-01

    Aortic augmentation index (AIx) but not carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV) has reported to decrease in response to vasodilators, which has been related to changes in the timing and/or intensity of wave reflection. Yet, recent evidence indicates that arterial reservoir pressure rather than wave reflection is the most important determinant of AIx. Using radial artery applanation tonometry and a general transfer function AIx, aortic pulse wave reflection time and cfPWV (foot-to-foot method) were determined in 10 patients with severe autonomic failure and in 14 healthy individuals during supine rest and graded head-up tilting. During supine rest, mean blood pressure (BP) (127.6 ± 21.5 and 97.5 ± 9.4 mmHg), AIx (32.4 ± 13.0 and 23.1 ± 8.7%) and cfPWV (12.1 ± 3.6 and 8.9 ± 1.6 m/s) were higher in patients than in controls. In patients, BP decreased by 18.7 ± 9.8 and 39.6 ± 11.7%, AIx by 39.2 ± 27.5 and 100.9 ± 78.1% and cfPWV by 12.0 ± 10.5 and 27.7 ± 13.5% in response to 30 and 60° head-up tilting. Decreases in AIx and cfPWV correlated with the BP fall (r = 0.67, P = 0.001 and r = 0.75, P < 0.001), but changes in AIx and cfPWV were unrelated. In controls, AIx during head-up tilting decreased despite increases in vascular tone and cfPWV. Aortic reflection time in patients and controls during tilting did not change. Stepwise regression analysis revealed that 68% of the variation in AIx could be explained by the BP fall and reflection time and 76% of the variation in cfPWV by the BP fall and sex. In a clinical model of autonomic failure, both AIx and cfPWV largely depend on instantaneous BP, but these two variables are unrelated, supporting the contention that aortic reservoir pressure rather than wave reflection is the main determinant of AIx.

  8. Photoacoustic microscopy of blood pulse wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Chenghung; Hu, Song; Maslov, Konstantin; Wang, Lihong V.

    2012-07-01

    Blood pulse wave velocity (PWV) is an important physiological parameter that characterizes vascular stiffness. In this letter, we present electrocardiogram-synchronized, photoacoustic microscopy for noninvasive quantification of the PWV in the peripheral vessels of living mice. Interestingly, blood pulse wave-induced fluctuations in blood flow speed were clearly observed in arteries and arterioles, but not in veins or venules. Simultaneously recorded electrocardiograms served as references to measure the travel time of the pulse wave between two cross sections of a chosen vessel and vessel segmentation analysis enabled accurate quantification of the travel distance. PWVs were quantified in ten vessel segments from two mice. Statistical analysis shows a linear correlation between the PWV and the vessel diameter which agrees with known physiology.

  9. Effects of Levocarnitine on Brachial-Ankle Pulse Wave Velocity in Hemodialysis Patients: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Higuchi, Terumi; Abe, Masanori; Yamazaki, Toshio; Mizuno, Mari; Okawa, Erina; Ando, Hideyuki; Oikawa, Osamu; Okada, Kazuyoshi; Kikuchi, Fumito; Soma, Masayoshi

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims: Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease is the most common cause of mortality in patients with end-stage kidney disease. Chronic kidney disease patients often exhibit a deficiency in l-carnitine due to loss during hemodialysis (HD). We studied the effects of l-carnitine supplementation on brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV), a marker of atherosclerosis, in HD patients. Methods: This was a prospective, open-label, randomized, parallel controlled, multi-center trial testing the anti-atherosclerotic efficacy of oral l-carnitine administration (20 mg/kg/day). HD patients (n = 176, mean age, 67.2 ± 10.3 years old; mean duration of HD, 54 ± 51 months) with plasma free l-carnitine deficiency (<40 μmol/L) were randomly assigned to the oral l-carnitine group (n = 88) or control group (n = 88) and monitored during 12 months of treatment. Results: There were no significant differences in baseline clinical variables between the l-carnitine and control groups. l-carnitine supplementation for 12 months significantly increased total, free, and acyl carnitine levels, and reduced the acyl/free carnitine ratio. The baPWV value decreased from 2085 ± 478 cm/s at baseline to 1972 ± 440 cm/s after six months (p < 0.05) to 1933 ± 363 cm/s after 12 months (p < 0.001) of l-carnitine administration, while no significant changes in baPWV were observed in the control group. Baseline baPWV was the only factor significantly correlated with the decrease in baPWV. Conclusions: l-carnitine supplementation significantly reduced baPWV in HD patients. l-carnitine may be a novel therapeutic strategy for preventing the progression of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. PMID:25533009

  10. A high normal ankle-brachial index combined with a high pulse wave velocity is associated with cerebral microbleeds.

    PubMed

    Kinjo, Yoshino; Ishida, Akio; Kinjo, Kozen; Ohya, Yusuke

    2016-08-01

    Arterial stiffness is associated with the pathogenesis of cerebral microbleeds (CMBs). The ankle-brachial index (ABI) is used to predict arterial stiffness. We hypothesized that the increase in ABI with age occurs as a result of increasing arterial stiffness and wave reflection, and is thus associated with target organ damage. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between ABI, brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV), and CMBs. We recruited 990 cardiovascular disease-free and stroke-free participants [median age 53 (24-86) years, 531 were woman] who underwent brain MRI, ABI, and baPWV at a health checkup. The prevalence of CMBs was 4%. Both ABI (1.14 vs. 1.10) and baPWV (17.29 vs. 14.68 m/s) were higher in participants with CMBs than those without. Cutoff values of ABI and baPWV for the presence of CMBs were 1.12 and 16.07 m/s, respectively. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that ABI at least 1.12 [odds ratio (OR) 2.57, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.30-5.37, P < 0.05] and baPWV at least 16.07 m/s (OR 2.08, 95% CI 1.02-4.38, P < 0.05) were independently associated with CMBs. Moreover, the combination of ABI at least 1.12 and baPWV at least 16.07 m/s was strongly associated with CMBs (OR 5.26, 95% CI 1.93-16.92, P < 0.05). A high normal ABI, combined with a high baPWV, was strongly associated with CMBs in a screened Japanese cohort, suggesting a novel use for ABI as a predictor for target organ damage.

  11. Evaluation of aortic stiffness (aortic pulse-wave velocity) before and after elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repair procedures: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Paraskevas, Kosmas I; Bessias, Nikolaos; Psathas, Chrysovalantis; Akridas, Konstantinos; Dragios, Theodoros; Nikitas, Georgios; Andrikopoulos, Vassilios; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P; Kyriakides, Zenon S

    2009-12-09

    The main clinical criterion for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair operations is an AAA diameter >/=5.5 cm. When AAAs increase in size, specific changes occur in the mechanical properties of the aortic wall. Pulse-wave velocity (PWV) has been used as an indicator of vascular stiffness. A low PWV may predict AAA rupture risk and is an early predictor of cardiovascular mortality. We investigated the prognostic value of PWV before and after elective AAA repair procedures. Twenty four patients scheduled for an open AAA repair underwent a preoperative carotid-femoral aortic PWV measurement. A second aortic PWV measurement was carried out 6 months postoperatively. The mean aortic PWV increased from 7.84 +/- 1.85 preoperatively to 10.08 +/- 1.57 m/sec 6 months postoperatively (mean change: 2.25; 95% confidence interval 1.4 to 3.1 m/sec; p<0.0001). The preprocedural PWV measurement did not correlate with AAA diameter (Spearman's rank correlation coefficient rho=0.12; p=0.59). Whether the increase in aortic PWV postoperatively suggests a decreased cardiovascular risk following AAA repair remains to be established. Aortic PWV should also be investigated as an adjunct tool for assessing AAA rupture risk.

  12. Aerobic or Resistance Training and Pulse Wave Velocity in Kidney Transplant Recipients: A 12-Week Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial (the Exercise in Renal Transplant [ExeRT] Trial).

    PubMed

    Greenwood, Sharlene A; Koufaki, Pelagia; Mercer, Thomas H; Rush, Robert; O'Connor, Ellen; Tuffnell, Rachel; Lindup, Herolin; Haggis, Lynda; Dew, Tracy; Abdulnassir, Lyndsey; Nugent, Eilish; Goldsmith, David; Macdougall, Iain C

    2015-10-01

    Cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of death in kidney transplant recipients. This pilot study examined the potential effect of aerobic training or resistance training on vascular health and indexes of cardiovascular risk in kidney transplant recipients. Single-blind, randomized, controlled, parallel trial. 60 participants (mean age, 54 years; 34 men) were randomly assigned to aerobic training (n=20), resistance training (n=20), or usual care (n=20). Participants were included if they had a kidney transplant within 12 months prior to baseline assessment. Patients were excluded if they had unstable medical conditions or had recently started regular exercise. Aerobic training and resistance training were delivered 3 days per week for a 12-week period. The usual-care group received standard care. Pulse wave velocity, peak oxygen uptake (Vo2peak), sit-to-stand 60, isometric quadriceps force, and inflammatory biomarkers were assessed at 0 and 12 weeks. The anticipated 60 participants were recruited within 12 months. 46 participants completed the study (aerobic training, n=13; resistance training, n=13; and usual care, n=20), resulting in a 23% attrition rate. Analyses of covariance, adjusted for baseline values, age, and dialysis vintage pretransplantation, revealed significant mean differences between aerobic training and usual care in pulse wave velocity of -2.2±0.4 (95% CI, -3.1 to -1.3) m/s (P<0.001) and between resistance training and usual care of -2.6±0.4 (95% CI, -3.4 to -1.7) m/s (P<0.001) at 12 weeks. Secondary analyses indicated significant improvements in Vo2peak in the aerobic training group and in Vo2peak, sit-to-stand 60, and isometric muscle force in the resistance training group compared with usual care at 12 weeks. There were no reported adverse events, cardiovascular events, or hospitalizations as a result of the intervention. Pilot study, small sample size, no measure of endothelial function. Both aerobic training and resistance

  13. Carotid femoral pulse wave velocity in type 2 diabetes and hypertension: capturing arterial health effects of step counts

    PubMed Central

    Dasgupta, Kaberi; Rosenberg, Ellen; Joseph, Lawrence; Trudeau, Luc; Garfield, Natasha; Chan, Deborah; Sherman, Mark; Rabasa-Lhoret, Rémi; Daskalopoulou, Stella S.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Optimal medication use obscures the impact of physical activity on traditional cardiometabolic risk factors. We evaluated the relationship between step counts and carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV), a summative risk indicator, in patients with type 2 diabetes and/or hypertension. Research design and methods: Three hundred and sixty-nine participants were recruited (outpatient clinics; Montreal, Quebec; 2011–2015). Physical activity (pedometer/accelerometer), cfPWV (applanation tonometry), and risk factors (A1C, Homeostatic Model Assessment–Insulin Resistance, blood pressure, lipid profiles) were evaluated. Linear regression models were constructed to quantify the relationship of steps/day with cfPWV. Results: The study population comprised 191 patients with type 2 diabetes and hypertension, 39 with type 2 diabetes, and 139 with hypertension (mean ± SD: age 59.6 ± 11.2 years; BMI 31.3 ± 4.8 kg/m2; 54.2% women). Blood pressure (125/77 ± 15/9 mmHg), A1C (diabetes: 7.7 ± 1.3%; 61 mmol/mol), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (diabetes: 2.19 ± 0.8 mmol/l; without diabetes: 3.13 ± 1.1mmol/l) were close to target. Participants averaged 5125 ± 2722 steps/day. Mean cfPWV was 9.8 ± 2.2 m/s. Steps correlated with cfPWV, but not with other risk factors. A 1000 steps/day increment was associated with a 0.1 m/s cfPWV decrement across adjusted models and in subgroup analysis by diabetes status. In a model adjusted for age, sex, BMI, ethnicity, immigrant status, employment, education, diabetes, hypertension, medication classes, the mean cfPWV decrement was 0.11 m/s (95% confidence interval −0.2, −0.02). Conclusions: cfPWV is responsive to step counts in patients who are well controlled on cardioprotective medications. This ability to capture the ‘added value’ of physical activity supports the emerging role of cfPWV in arterial health monitoring. PMID:28129250

  14. Carotid-Femoral Pulse Wave Velocity Is Associated With Cerebral White Matter Lesions in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Laugesen, Esben; Høyem, Pernille; Stausbøl-Grøn, Brian; Mikkelsen, Anders; Thrysøe, Samuel; Erlandsen, Mogens; Christiansen, Jens S.; Knudsen, Søren T.; Hansen, Klavs W.; Kim, Won Y.; Hansen, Troels K.; Poulsen, Per L.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Patients with type 2 diabetes have a high incidence of cardiovascular events including stroke. Increased arterial stiffness (AS) predicts cardiovascular events in the general population. Cerebral white matter lesions (WMLs) are associated with an increased risk of stroke. It is unknown whether AS in patients with type 2 diabetes is associated with WMLs. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We examined 89 patients recently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes (<5 years) and 89 sex- and age-matched controls. AS was assessed with carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV). WMLs were identified using magnetic resonance imaging and graded qualitatively with the Breteler scale (no/slight changes = 0, moderate changes = 1, severe changes = 2) and semiquantitatively. RESULTS The diabetic population had excellent glycemic control (HbA1c, 6.5% [6.2–6.8]; median [interquartile range {IQR}]) and had, compared with the controls, lower office blood pressure (BP) (127 ± 12/79 ± 8 vs. 132 ± 14/84 ± 10 mmHg) and total cholesterol (4.3[3.9–4.7] vs. 5.6 [5.1–6.4]; mmol/L; median [IQR]), (P < 0.01 for all). Despite this, PWV was higher in the patients with diabetes compared with controls (9.3 ± 2.0 vs. 8.0 ± 1.6 m/s; P < 0.0001). PWV was associated with Breteler score (OR 1.36 [95% CI 1.17–1.58]; P < 0.001) and WML volume (OR 1.32 [95% CI 1.16–1.51]; P < 0.001) per 1 m/s increase in PWV. These associations remained significant when adjusted for age, sex, diabetes, 24-h mean arterial BP, BMI, heart rate, and use of antihypertensives and statins (Breteler score: OR 1.28 [95% CI 1.03–1.60]; P < 0.05 and WML volume: OR 1.30 [95% CI 1.06–1.58]; P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS PWV was higher among patients with well-controlled type 2 diabetes compared with controls and was independently associated with WMLs. PWV may represent a clinically relevant parameter in the evaluation of cerebrovascular disease risk in type 2 diabetes. PMID:23129135

  15. Brachial-Ankle Pulse Wave Velocity is Associated with Composite Carotid and Coronary Atherosclerosis in a Middle-Aged Asymptomatic Population

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Hyung Joon; Cho, Sang-A; Cho, Jae-Young; Lee, Seunghun; Park, Jae Hyoung; Hwang, Sung Ho; Hong, Soon Jun; Yu, Cheol Woong

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Although arterial stiffness has been associated with the development of atherosclerosis, the role of brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) for diagnosing composite coronary and carotid atherosclerosis has not been completely elucidated. Method: We enrolled 773 asymptomatic individuals who were referred from 25 public health centers in Seoul and who underwent carotid ultrasonography and coronary computed tomography. Noninvasive hemodynamic parameters, including baPWV, were also measured. Composite coronary and carotid atherosclerosis was defined as follows: 1) coronary artery calcium (CAC) score ≥ 100, 2) coronary artery stenosis (CAS) ≥ 50% of diameter stenosis, 3) carotid intima medial thickness (CIMT) ≥ 0.9 mm, or 4) presence of carotid artery plaque (CAP). Results: The incidence of composite coronary and carotid atherosclerosis was 28.2%. Coronary atherosclerosis (CAC and CAS) was significantly associated with carotid atherosclerosis (CIMT and CAP). Subjects with higher baPWV (highest quartile) had a higher prevalence of composite coronary and carotid atherosclerosis (p < .001). Although multivariate analysis failed to show baPWV as an independent predictor for composite atherosclerosis, baPWV had moderate diagnostic power to detect a subject with more than two positive subclinical atherosclerosis exams [area under the curve (AUC), 0.692]. Conclusion: baPWV was associated with the composite coronary and carotid atherosclerotic burden in a community-based asymptomatic population. PMID:27251176

  16. Effects of Short-Term Exenatide Treatment on Regional Fat Distribution, Glycated Hemoglobin Levels, and Aortic Pulse Wave Velocity of Obese Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients.

    PubMed

    Hong, Ju Young; Park, Keun Young; Kim, Byung Joon; Hwang, Won Min; Kim, Dong Ho; Lim, Dong Mee

    2016-03-01

    Most type 2 diabetes mellitus patients are obese and have obesity related vascular complications. Exenatide treatment is well known for both decreasing glycated hemoglobin levels and reduction in body weight. So, this study aimed to determine the effects of exenatide on body composition, glycated hemoglobin levels, and vascular stiffness in obese type 2 diabetes mellitus patients. For 1 month, 32 obese type 2 diabetes mellitus patients were administered 5 μg of exenatide twice daily. The dosage was then increased to 10 μg. Patients' height, body weight, glycated hemoglobin levels, lipid profile, pulse wave velocity (PWV), body mass index, fat mass, and muscle mass were measured by using Inbody at baseline and after 3 months of treatment. After 3 months of treatment, glycated hemoglobin levels decreased significantly (P=0.007). Triglyceride, total cholesterol, and low density lipoprotein levels decreased, while aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase levels were no change. Body weight, and fat mass decreased significantly (P=0.002 and P=0.001, respectively), while interestingly, muscle mass did not decrease (P=0.289). In addition to, Waist-to-hip ratio and aortic PWV decreased significantly (P=0.006 and P=0.001, respectively). Effects of short term exenatide use in obese type 2 diabetes mellitus with cardiometabolic high risk patients not only reduced body weight without muscle mass loss, body fat mass, and glycated hemoglobin levels but also improved aortic PWV in accordance with waist to hip ratio.

  17. Echocardiographically Derived Pulse Wave Velocity and Diastolic Dysfunction Are Associated with an Increased Incidence of Atrial Fibrillation in Patients with Systolic Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Bonapace, Stefano; Rossi, Andrea; Cicoira, Mariantonietta; Targher, Giovanni; Marino, Paolo; Benfari, Giovanni; Mugnai, Giacomo; Arcaro, Guido; Vassanelli, Corrado

    2016-07-01

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) is an established risk factor of atrial fibrillation (AF), but the prognostic value of cardiac and hemodynamic parameters in assessing the risk of developing AF among patients with CHF is less defined. We followed an outpatients cohort of CHF patients secondary to left ventricular (LV) systolic dysfunction, who were free of AF at baseline. All patients underwent clinical evaluation, comprehensive echocardiography, and blood drawing in the same morning. Aortic pulse wave velocity (aPWV), a measure of aortic stiffness, was determined by Doppler echocardiography. A total of 77 patients (age 63 ± 9 years; 79% male) with mean LVEF (34 ± 8%) formed the study population. Fifteen patients developed incidental AF. At baseline, CHF patients who developed AF during follow-up had higher E-wave velocity (75 ± 2 cm/sec vs. 60 ± 2 cm/sec; P = 0.02), higher difference duration between mitral and pulmonary vein A velocity (A'-A), (10 ± 35 msec vs. 43 ± 44 msec P = 0.02), aPWV (7.1 ± 2.6 vs. 5.3 ± 1.9 m/sec P = 0.004), and furosemide dosage (110 ± 145 mg vs. 49 ± 48 mg P = 0.01) than those remaining free from AF. The two groups of patients did not significantly differ in terms of NYHA, LV volumes, ejection fraction, left atrial volume, creatinine, hemoglobin, renin, epinephrine, amino-terminal propeptide of type III and I procollagens, ACE inhibitor, and β-blocker dose (P > 0.1 for all). Notably, higher aPWV (P = 0.01) and longer A-A' duration (P = 0.04) were associated with an increased incidence of AF, independently of potential confounders. Increased aortic stiffness and LV diastolic dysfunction are strong predictors of new onset of AF among patients with systolic CHF. © 2016, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Robot-assisted gait training improves brachial–ankle pulse wave velocity and peak aerobic capacity in subacute stroke patients with totally dependent ambulation

    PubMed Central

    Han, Eun Young; Im, Sang Hee; Kim, Bo Ryun; Seo, Min Ji; Kim, Myeong Ok

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Brachial–ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) evaluates arterial stiffness and also predicts early outcome in stroke patients. The objectives of this study were to investigate arterial stiffness of subacute nonfunctional ambulatory stroke patients and to compare the effects of robot-assisted gait therapy (RAGT) combined with rehabilitation therapy (RT) on arterial stiffness and functional recovery with those of RT alone. Method: The RAGT group (N = 30) received 30 minutes of robot-assisted gait therapy and 30 minutes of conventional RT, and the control group (N = 26) received 60 minutes of RT, 5 times a week for 4 weeks. baPWV was measured and calculated using an automated device. The patients also performed a symptom-limited graded exercise stress test using a bicycle ergometer, and parameters of cardiopulmonary fitness were recorded. Clinical outcome measures were categorized into 4 categories: activities of daily living, balance, ambulatory function, and paretic leg motor function and were evaluated before and after the 4-week intervention. Results: Both groups exhibited significant functional recovery in all clinical outcome measures after the 4-week intervention. However, peak aerobic capacity, peak heart rate, exercise tolerance test duration, and baPWV improved only in the RAGT group, and the improvements in baPWV and peak aerobic capacity were more noticeable in the RAGT group than in the control group. Conclusion: Robot-assisted gait therapy combined with conventional rehabilitation therapy represents an effective method for reversing arterial stiffness and improving peak aerobic capacity in subacute stroke patients with totally dependent ambulation. However, further large-scale studies with longer term follow-up periods are warranted to measure the effects of RAGT on secondary prevention after stroke. PMID:27741123

  19. Robot-assisted gait training improves brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity and peak aerobic capacity in subacute stroke patients with totally dependent ambulation: Randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Han, Eun Young; Im, Sang Hee; Kim, Bo Ryun; Seo, Min Ji; Kim, Myeong Ok

    2016-10-01

    Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) evaluates arterial stiffness and also predicts early outcome in stroke patients. The objectives of this study were to investigate arterial stiffness of subacute nonfunctional ambulatory stroke patients and to compare the effects of robot-assisted gait therapy (RAGT) combined with rehabilitation therapy (RT) on arterial stiffness and functional recovery with those of RT alone. The RAGT group (N = 30) received 30 minutes of robot-assisted gait therapy and 30 minutes of conventional RT, and the control group (N = 26) received 60 minutes of RT, 5 times a week for 4 weeks. baPWV was measured and calculated using an automated device. The patients also performed a symptom-limited graded exercise stress test using a bicycle ergometer, and parameters of cardiopulmonary fitness were recorded. Clinical outcome measures were categorized into 4 categories: activities of daily living, balance, ambulatory function, and paretic leg motor function and were evaluated before and after the 4-week intervention. Both groups exhibited significant functional recovery in all clinical outcome measures after the 4-week intervention. However, peak aerobic capacity, peak heart rate, exercise tolerance test duration, and baPWV improved only in the RAGT group, and the improvements in baPWV and peak aerobic capacity were more noticeable in the RAGT group than in the control group. Robot-assisted gait therapy combined with conventional rehabilitation therapy represents an effective method for reversing arterial stiffness and improving peak aerobic capacity in subacute stroke patients with totally dependent ambulation. However, further large-scale studies with longer term follow-up periods are warranted to measure the effects of RAGT on secondary prevention after stroke.

  20. Pressure dependency of aortic pulse wave velocity in vivo is not affected by vasoactive substances that alter aortic wall tension ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Butlin, Mark; Lindesay, George; Viegas, Kayla D; Avolio, Alberto P

    2015-05-15

    Aortic stiffness, a predictive parameter in cardiovascular medicine, is blood pressure dependent and experimentally requires isobaric measurement for meaningful comparison. Vasoactive drug administration to change peripheral resistance and blood pressure allows such isobaric comparison but may alter large conduit artery wall tension, directly changing aortic stiffness. This study quantifies effects of sodium nitroprusside (SNP, vasodilator) and phenylephrine (PE, vasoconstrictor) on aortic stiffness measured by aortic pulse wave velocity (aPWV) assessed by invasive pressure catheterization in anaesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 7). This was compared with nondrug-dependent alteration of blood pressure through reduced venous return induced by partial vena cava occlusion. In vivo drug concentration was estimated by modeling clearance rates. Ex vivo responses of excised thoracic and abdominal aortic rings to drugs was measured using myography. SNP administration did not alter aPWV compared with venous occlusion (P = 0.21-0.87). There was a 5% difference in aPWV with PE administration compared with venous occlusion (P < 0.05). The estimated in vivo maximum concentration of PE (7.0 ± 1.8 ×10(-7) M) and SNP (4.2 ± 0.6 ×10(-7) M) caused ex vivo equivalent contraction of 52 mmHg (thoracic) and 112 mmHg (abdominal) and relaxation of 96% (both abdominal and thoracic), respectively, despite having a negligible effect on aPWV in vivo. This study demonstrates that vasoactive drugs administered to alter systemic blood pressure have a negligible effect on aPWV and provide a useful tool to study pressure-normalized and pressure-dependent aPWV in large conduit arteries in vivo. However, similar drug concentrations affect aortic ring wall tension ex vivo. Future studies investigating in vivo and ex vivo kinetics will need to elucidate mechanisms for this marked difference.

  1. Numerical validation of a new method to assess aortic pulse wave velocity from a single recording of a brachial artery waveform with an occluding cuff.

    PubMed

    Trachet, B; Reymond, P; Kips, J; Swillens, A; De Buyzere, M; Suys, B; Stergiopulos, N; Segers, P

    2010-03-01

    Recently a new method has been proposed as a tool to measure arterial pulse wave velocity (PWV), a measure of the stiffness of the large arteries and an emerging parameter used as indicator of clinical cardiovascular risk. The method is based on measurement of brachial blood pressure during supra-systolic pressure inflation of a simple brachial cuff [the device is known as the Arteriograph (Tensiomed, Budapest, Hungary)]. This occlusion yields pronounced first and secondary peaks in the pressure waveform, the latter ascribed to a reflection from the aortic bifurcation, and PWV is calculated as the ratio of twice the jugulum-symphysis distance and the time difference between the two peaks. To test the validity of this working principle, we used a numerical model of the arterial tree to simulate pressures and flows in the normal configuration, and in a configuration with an occluded brachial artery. A pronounced secondary peak was indeed found in the brachial pressure signal of the occluded model, but its timing was only related to brachial stiffness and not to aortic stiffness. We also compared PWV's calculated with three different methods: PWVATG (approximately Arteriograph principle), PWVcar-fem (approximately carotid-femoral PWV, the current clinical gold standard method), and PWVtheor (approximately Bramwell-Hill equation). Both PWVATG (R2=0.94) and PWVcar-fem (R2=0.95) correlated well with PWVtheor, but their numerical values were lower (by 2.17+/-0.42 and 1.08+/-0.70 m/s for PWVATG and PWVcar-fem, respectively). In conclusion, our simulations question the working principle of the Arteriograph. Our data indicate that the method picks up wave reflection phenomena confined to the brachial artery, and derived values of PWV rather reflect the stiffness of the brachial arteries.

  2. Central blood pressure and pulse wave velocity: relationship to target organ damage and cardiovascular morbidity-mortality in diabetic patients or metabolic syndrome. An observational prospective study. LOD-DIABETES study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Diabetic patients show an increased prevalence of non-dipping arterial pressure pattern, target organ damage and elevated arterial stiffness. These alterations are associated with increased cardiovascular risk. The objectives of this study are the following: to evaluate the prognostic value of central arterial pressure and pulse wave velocity in relation to the incidence and outcome of target organ damage and the appearance of cardiovascular episodes (cardiovascular mortality, myocardial infarction, chest pain and stroke) in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus or metabolic syndrome. Methods/Design Design: This is an observational prospective study with 5 years duration, of which the first year corresponds to patient inclusion and initial evaluation, and the remaining four years to follow-up. Setting: The study will be carried out in the urban primary care setting. Study population: Consecutive sampling will be used to include patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes between 20-80 years of age. A total of 110 patients meeting all the inclusion criteria and none of the exclusion criteria will be included. Measurements: Patient age and sex, family and personal history of cardiovascular disease, and cardiovascular risk factors. Height, weight, heart rate and abdominal circumference. Laboratory tests: hemoglobin, lipid profile, creatinine, microalbuminuria, glomerular filtration rate, blood glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin, blood insulin, fibrinogen and high sensitivity C-reactive protein. Clinical and 24-hour ambulatory (home) blood pressure monitoring and self-measured blood pressure. Common carotid artery ultrasound for the determination of mean carotid intima-media thickness. Electrocardiogram for assessing left ventricular hypertrophy. Ankle-brachial index. Retinal vascular study based on funduscopy with non-mydriatic retinography and evaluation of pulse wave morphology and pulse wave velocity using the SphygmoCor system. The medication used for

  3. The relationship of brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity to future cardiovascular disease events in the general Japanese population: the Takashima Study.

    PubMed

    Takashima, N; Turin, T C; Matsui, K; Rumana, N; Nakamura, Y; Kadota, A; Saito, Y; Sugihara, H; Morita, Y; Ichikawa, M; Hirose, K; Kawakani, K; Hamajima, N; Miura, K; Ueshima, H; Kita, Y

    2014-05-01

    Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) is a non-invasive measure of arterial stiffness obtained using an automated system. Although baPWVs have been widely used as a non-invasive marker for evaluation of arterial stiffness, evidence for the prognostic value of baPWV in the general population is scarce. In this study, we assessed the association between baPWV and future cardiovascular disease (CVD) incidence in a Japanese population. From 2002 to 2009, baPWV was measured in a total of 4164 men and women without a history of CVD, and they were followed up until the end of 2009 with a median follow-up period of 6.5 years. Hazard ratios (HRs) for CVD incidence according to baPWV levels were calculated using a Cox proportional hazards model adjusted for potential confounding factors, including seated or supine blood pressure (BP). During the follow-up period, we observed 40 incident cases of CVD. In multivariable-adjusted model, baPWV as a continuous variable was not significantly associated with future CVD risk after adjustment for supine BP. However, compared with lower baPWV category (<18 m s(-1)), higher baPWV (< or = 18.0 m s(-1)) was significantly associated with an increased CVD risk (HR: 2.70, 95% confidence interval: 1.18-6.19). Higher baPWV (< or = 18.0 m s(-1)) would be an independent predictor of future CVD event in the general Japanese population.

  4. Lower muscle tissue is associated with higher pulse wave velocity: A systematic review and meta-analysis of observational study data.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Alexander J; Karim, Md N; Srikanth, Velandai; Ebeling, Peter R; Scott, David

    2017-10-01

    Muscle loss and arterial stiffness share common risk factors and are commonly seen in the elderly. We aimed to synthesise the existing literature on studies that have examined this association. We searched electronic databases for studies reporting correlations or associations between a measure of muscle tissue and a measure of arterial stiffness. Meta-analysis was conducted using Fisher's Z-transformed r-correlation (rZ ) values. Pooled weighted rZ and 95% confidence intervals were calculated in an inverse-variance, random-effects model. Heterogeneity was assessed by the inconsistency index (I(2) ). Study quality was assessed on a checklist using items from validated quality appraisal guidelines. 1195 records identified, 21 satisfied our inclusion criteria totalling 8558 participants with mean age 52±4 years (range 23-74). Most studies reported an inverse relationship between muscle tissue and arterial stiffness. Eight studies had data eligible for meta-analysis. Muscle tissue was inversely associated with pulse wave velocity in healthy individuals [rZ =-.15 (95% CI -0.24, -0.07); P=.0006; I(2) =85%; n=3577] and in any population [rZ =-.18 (-0.26, -0.10); P<.0001; I(2) =81%; n=3930]. In a leave-one-out sensitivity analysis, the results remained unchanged. Lower muscle tissue was associated with arterial stiffness. Studies were limited by cross-sectional design. Cardiovascular risk monitoring may be strengthened by screening for low muscle mass and maintaining muscle mass may be a primary prevention strategy. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  5. As compared to allopurinol, urate-lowering therapy with febuxostat has superior effects on oxidative stress and pulse wave velocity in patients with severe chronic tophaceous gout.

    PubMed

    Tausche, A-K; Christoph, M; Forkmann, M; Richter, U; Kopprasch, S; Bielitz, C; Aringer, M; Wunderlich, C

    2014-01-01

    We prospectively evaluated whether an effective 12-month uric acid-lowering therapy (ULT) with the available xanthine oxidase (XO) inhibitors allopurinol and febuxostat in patients with chronic tophaceous gout has an impact on oxidative stress and/or vascular function. Patients with chronic tophaceous gout who did not receive active ULT were included. After clinical evaluation, serum uric acid levels (SUA) and markers of oxidative stress were measured, and carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV) was assessed. Patients were then treated with allopurinol (n = 9) or with febuxostat (n = 8) to target a SUA level ≤ 360 μmol/L. After 1 year treatment, the SUA levels, markers of oxidative stress and the cfPWV were measured again. Baseline characteristics of both groups showed no significant differences except a higher prevalence of moderate impairment of renal function (estimated glomerular filtration rate <60 ml/min) in the febuxostat group. Uric acid lowering with either inhibitors of XO resulted in almost equally effective reduction in SUA levels. The both treatment groups did not differ in their baseline cfPWV (allopurinol group: 14.1 ± 3.4 m/s, febuxostat group: 13.7 ± 2.7 m/s, p = 0.80). However, after 1 year of therapy, we observed a significant cfPWV increase in the allopurinol group (16.8 ± 4.3 m/s, p = 0.001 as compared to baseline), but not in the febuxostat patients (13.3 ± 2.3 m/s, p = 0.55). Both febuxostat and allopurinol effectively lower SUA levels in patients with severe gout. However, we observed that febuxostat also appeared to be beneficial in preventing further arterial stiffening. Since cardiovascular events are an important issue in treating patients with gout, this unexpected finding may have important implications and should be further investigated in randomized controlled trials.

  6. Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity is associated with N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide level in patients with atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lin Y; Tai, Bee C; Foo, David C; Wong, Raymond C; Adabag, A Selcuk; Benditt, David G; Ling, Lieng H

    2011-01-01

    To determine the extent to which conduit artery stiffness is associated with plasma N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). Cross-sectional study. National University Hospital, Singapore. Cases (n=117) were patients with AF onset <65 years of age without heart failure or structural heart disease. Controls (n=274) were patients without AF who were seen at the general cardiology clinic. Transthoracic echocardiography, carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (CFPWV) measured using applanation tonometry and blood draw for plasma NT-proBNP at enrolment for all patients. Plasma NT-proBNP. In patients with AF, CFPWV was associated with NT-proBNP after adjusting for hypertension and factors that were univariately associated with NT-proBNP: age at enrolment, type of AF, body mass index, left ventricular mass index, left atrial volume index, mitral E/E', mitral deceleration time and use of β-blockers (β=0.234; 95% CI 0.100 to 0.367; p=0.001). In contrast, CFPWV was not associated with NT-proBNP in controls. In patients with AF, the adjusted mean NT-proBNP level in the highest quartile of CFPWV (350 pg/ml; 95% CI 237 to 517 pg/ml) was fivefold higher than the lowest quartile (69 pg/ml; 95% CI 47 to 103 pg/ml) (p=0.001). CFPWV is associated with NT-proBNP level in AF. Since elevated NT-proBNP is a marker of adverse cardiovascular outcomes, arterial stiffness may be associated with worse prognosis in patients with AF.

  7. Independent and Joint Effect of Brachial-Ankle Pulse Wave Velocity and Blood Pressure Control on Incident Stroke in Hypertensive Adults.

    PubMed

    Song, Yun; Xu, Benjamin; Xu, Richard; Tung, Renee; Frank, Eric; Tromble, Wayne; Fu, Tong; Zhang, Weiyi; Yu, Tao; Zhang, Chunyan; Fan, Fangfang; Zhang, Yan; Li, Jianping; Bao, Huihui; Cheng, Xiaoshu; Qin, Xianhui; Tang, Genfu; Chen, Yundai; Yang, Tianlun; Sun, Ningling; Li, Xiaoying; Zhao, Lianyou; Hou, Fan Fan; Ge, Junbo; Dong, Qiang; Wang, Binyan; Xu, Xiping; Huo, Yong

    2016-07-01

    Pulse wave velocity (PWV) has been shown to influence the effects of antihypertensive drugs in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases. Data are limited on whether PWV is an independent predictor of stroke above and beyond hypertension control. This longitudinal analysis examined the independent and joint effect of brachial-ankle PWV (baPWV) with hypertension control on the risk of first stroke. This report included 3310 hypertensive adults, a subset of the China Stroke Primary Prevention Trial (CSPPT) with baseline measurements for baPWV. During a median follow-up of 4.5 years, 111 participants developed first stroke. The risk of stroke was higher among participants with baPWV in the highest quartile than among those in the lower quartiles (6.3% versus 2.4%; hazard ratio, 1.66; 95% confidence interval, 1.06-2.60). Similarly, the participants with inadequate hypertension control had a higher risk of stroke than those with adequate control (5.1% versus 1.8%; hazard ratio, 2.32; 95% confidence interval, 1.49-3.61). When baPWV and hypertension control were examined jointly, participants in the highest baPWV quartile and with inadequate hypertension control had the highest risk of stroke compared with their counterparts (7.5% versus 1.3%; hazard ratio, 3.57; 95% confidence interval, 1.88-6.77). There was a significant and independent effect of high baPWV on stroke as shown among participants with adequate hypertension control (4.2% versus 1.3%; hazard ratio, 2.29, 95% confidence interval, 1.09-4.81). In summary, among hypertensive patients, baPWV and hypertension control were found to independently and jointly affect the risk of first stroke. Participants with high baPWV and inadequate hypertension control had the highest risk of stroke compared with other groups.

  8. Additional Value of Brachial-Ankle Pulse Wave Velocity to Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography in the Diagnosis of Coronary Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Jang, Kyeongmin; Kim, Hack-Lyoung; Park, Miri; Oh, Sohee; Oh, So Won; Lim, Woo-Hyun; Seo, Jae-Bin; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Zo, Joo-Hee; Kim, Myung-A

    2017-08-24

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether information on arterial stiffness can improve the value of single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in the detection of obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD). A total of 233 patients (age: 62.2±10.8 years, 60.3% males) with detected ischemia on SPECT undergoing invasive coronary angiography (ICA) and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) measurement within a month was retrospectively reviewed. Of the 233 patients, 190 (81.5%) had obstructive CAD (≥50% luminal stenosis). The difference in baPWV according to the presence of obstructive CAD was significant in patients in the mild ischemia group [summed stress score (SSS): 4-8] (1,770±364 cm versus 1,490±328 cm, p<0.001) but not in the moderate (SSS: 9-13) or severe (SSS: ≥14) ischemia groups (p>0.05 for each). Receiver operating characteristic curve analyses showed that the diagnostic value of baPWV for obstructive CAD was significant only in patients in the mild ischemia group (area under curve: 0.714; p=0.001) but not in the moderate or severe ischemia groups (p>0.05 for each). Adding information on baPWV to SPECT results and clinical parameters significantly increased diagnostic accuracy in the detection of obstructive CAD in patients with mild ischemia (integrated discrimination improvement p=0.006) but not in those with moderate or severe ischemia on SPECT (p>0.05 for each). The results of this study suggest that baPWV may have additional value to SPECT for the detection of obstructive CAD, especially in patients with mild ischemia on SPECT.

  9. Effect of stone Spa bathing and hot-spring bathing on pulse wave velocity in healthy, late middle-aged females.

    PubMed

    Morioka, Ikuharu; Izumi, Yurina; Inoue, Miyabi; Okada, Kanako; Sakaguchi, Kaho; Miyai, Natsuki

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the effect of stone spa bathing (Ganban-yoku) and hot-spring bathing on brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) in healthy, late middle-aged females. The subjects were 13 females (mean age, 47.3 years). The skin and tympanic temperatures, blood pressure, and baPWV were measured before and after stone spa bathing and hot-spring bathing. For the stone spa bathing, the subjects lay down three times for approximately 10 min each time over warm stone beds. Although body weight showed no change after the hot-spring bathing, it significantly increased after the stone spa bathing. The increase was significantly related to the amount of water intake. The skin and tympanic temperatures increased to a smaller degree after the stone spa bathing than after the hot-spring bathing. The diastolic blood pressure decreased to a smaller degree after the stone spa bathing. BaPWV showed no significant change after bathing both in the stone spa and in the hot-spring. The results of multiple regression analysis showed that the factors significantly related to the change in baPWV after the stone spa bathing were the changes in skin and tympanic temperatures and habit of smoking, and that after the hot-spring bathing was the change in skin temperature. The results suggest that, compared with the hot-spring bathing, stone spa bathing causes less strain on the body. The stone spa bathing and hot-spring bathing showed no marked effect on baPWV. However, there is a possibility that the stone spa bathing may be used as a load for investigating arterial stiffness.

  10. Local versus global aortic pulse wave velocity in early atherosclerosis: An animal study in ApoE-/--mice using ultrahigh field MRI

    PubMed Central

    Gotschy, Alexander; Bauer, Wolfgang R.; Winter, Patrick; Nordbeck, Peter; Rommel, Eberhard; Jakob, Peter M.; Herold, Volker

    2017-01-01

    Increased aortic stiffness is known to be associated with atherosclerosis and has a predictive value for cardiovascular events. This study aims to investigate the local distribution of early arterial stiffening due to initial atherosclerotic lesions. Therefore, global and local pulse wave velocity (PWV) were measured in ApoE-/- and wild type (WT) mice using ultrahigh field MRI. For quantification of global aortic stiffness, a new multi-point transit-time (TT) method was implemented and validated to determine the global PWV in the murine aorta. Local aortic stiffness was measured by assessing the local PWV in the upper abdominal aorta, using the flow/area (QA) method. Significant differences between age matched ApoE-/- and WT mice were determined for global and local PWV measurements (global PWV: ApoE-/-: 2.7±0.2m/s vs WT: 2.1±0.2m/s, P<0.03; local PWV: ApoE-/-: 2.9±0.2m/s vs WT: 2.2±0.2m/s, P<0.03). Within the WT mouse group, the global PWV correlated well with the local PWV in the upper abdominal aorta (R2 = 0.75, P<0.01), implying a widely uniform arterial elasticity. In ApoE-/- animals, however, no significant correlation between individual local and global PWV was present (R2 = 0.07, P = 0.53), implying a heterogeneous distribution of vascular stiffening in early atherosclerosis. The assessment of global PWV using the new multi-point TT measurement technique was validated against a pressure wire measurement in a vessel phantom and showed excellent agreement. The experimental results demonstrate that vascular stiffening caused by early atherosclerosis is unequally distributed over the length of large vessels. This finding implies that assessing heterogeneity of arterial stiffness by multiple local measurements of PWV might be more sensitive than global PWV to identify early atherosclerotic lesions. PMID:28207773

  11. Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity is associated with coronary calcium in young and middle-aged asymptomatic adults: The Kangbuk Samsung Health Study.

    PubMed

    Cainzos-Achirica, Miguel; Rampal, Sanjay; Chang, Yoosoo; Ryu, Seungho; Zhang, Yiyi; Zhao, Di; Cho, Juhee; Choi, Yuni; Pastor-Barriuso, Roberto; Lim, So Yeon; Bruguera, Jordi; Elosua, Roberto; Lima, Joao A C; Shin, Hocheol; Guallar, Eliseo

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the association between brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV), a convenient, non-radiating, readily available measurement of arterial stiffness, and coronary artery calcium (CAC), a reliable marker of coronary atherosclerosis, in a large sample of young and middle-aged asymptomatic adults; and to assess the incremental value of baPWV for detecting prevalent CAC beyond traditional risk factors. Cross-sectional study of 15,185 asymptomatic Korean adults who voluntarily underwent a comprehensive health screening program including measurement of baPWV and CAC. BaPWV was measured using an oscillometric method with cuffs placed on both arms and ankles. CAC burden was assessed using a multi-detector CT scan and scored following Agatston's method. The prevalence of CAC > 0 and CAC > 100 increased across baPWV quintiles. The multivariable-adjusted odds ratios (95% CI) for CAC > 0 comparing baPWV quintiles 2-5 versus quintile 1 were 1.06 (0.87-1.30), 1.24 (1.02-1.50), 1.39 (1.15-1.69) and 1.60 (1.31-1.96), respectively (P trend < 0.001). Similarly, the relative prevalence ratios for CAC > 100 were 1.30 (0.74-2.26), 1.59 (0.93-2.71), 1.74 (1.03-2.94) and 2.59 (1.54-4.36), respectively (P trend < 0.001). For CAC > 100, the area under the ROC curve for baPWV alone was 0.71 (0.68-0.74), and the addition of baPWV to traditional risk factors significantly improved the discrimination and calibration of models for detecting prevalent CAC > 0 and CAC > 100. BaPWV was independently associated with the presence and severity of CAC in a large sample of young and middle-aged asymptomatic adults. BaPWV may be a valuable tool for identifying apparently low-risk individuals with increased burden of coronary atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Pulse wave analysis with diffusing-wave spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Belau, Markus; Scheffer, Wolfgang; Maret, Georg

    2017-07-01

    Hypertension is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease and thus at the origin of many deaths by e.g. heart attack or stroke. Hypertension is caused by many factors including an increase in arterial stiffness which leads to changes in pulse wave velocity and wave reflections. Those often result in an increased left ventricular load which may result in heart failure as well as an increased pulsatile pressure in the microcirculation l to damage to blood vessels. In order to specifically treat the different causes of hypertension it is desirable to perform a pulse wave analysis as a complement to measurements of systolic and diastolic pressure by brachial cuff sphygmomanometry. Here we show that Diffusing Wave Spectroscopy, a novel non-invasive portable tool, is able to monitor blood flow changes with a high temporal resolution. The measured pulse travel times give detailed information of the pulse wave blood flow profile.

  13. Modification over time of pulse wave velocity parallel to changes in aortic BP, as well as in 24-h ambulatory brachial BP.

    PubMed

    Oliveras, A; Segura, J; Suarez, C; García-Ortiz, L; Abad-Cardiel, M; Vigil, L; Gómez-Marcos, M A; Sans Atxer, L; Martell-Claros, N; Ruilope, L M; de la Sierra, A

    2016-03-01

    Arterial stiffness as assessed by carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV) is a marker of preclinical organ damage and a predictor of cardiovascular outcomes, independently of blood pressure (BP). However, limited evidence exists on the association between long-term variation (Δ) on aortic BP (aoBP) and ΔcfPWV. We aimed to evaluate the relationship of ΔBP with ΔcfPWV over time, as assessed by office and 24-h ambulatory peripheral BP, and aoBP. AoBP and cfPWV were evaluated in 209 hypertensive patients with either diabetes or metabolic syndrome by applanation tonometry (Sphygmocor) at baseline(b) and at 12 months of follow-up(fu). Peripheral BP was also determined by using validated oscillometric devices (office(o)-BP) and on an outpatient basis by using a validated (Spacelabs-90207) device (24-h ambulatory BP). ΔcfPWV over time was calculated as follows: ΔcfPWV=[(cfPWVfu-cfPWVb)/cfPWVb] × 100. ΔBP over time resulted from the same formula applied to BP values obtained with the three different measurement techniques. Correlations (Spearman 'Rho') between ΔBP and ΔcfPWV were calculated. Mean age was 62 years, 39% were female and 80% had type 2 diabetes. Baseline office brachial BP (mm Hg) was 143±20/82±12. Follow-up (12 months later) office brachial BP (mm Hg) was 136±20/79±12. ΔcfPWV correlated with ΔoSBP (Rho=0.212; P=0.002), Δ24-h SBP (Rho=0.254; P<0.001), Δdaytime SBP (Rho=0.232; P=0.001), Δnighttime SBP (Rho=0.320; P<0.001) and ΔaoSBP (Rho=0.320; P<0.001). A multiple linear regression analysis included the following independent variables: ΔoSBP, Δ24-h SBP, Δdaytime SBP, Δnighttime SBP and ΔaoSBP. ΔcfPWV was independently associated with Δ24-h SBP (β-coefficient=0.195; P=0.012) and ΔaoSBP (β-coefficient= 0.185; P=0.018). We conclude that changes in both 24-h SBP and aoSBP more accurately reflect changes in arterial stiffness than do office BP measurements.

  14. Laser speckle contrast imaging: age-related changes in microvascular blood flow and correlation with pulse-wave velocity in healthy subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalil, Adil; Humeau-Heurtier, Anne; Mahé, Guillaume; Abraham, Pierre

    2015-05-01

    In the cardiovascular system, the macrocirculation and microcirculation-two subsystems-can be affected by aging. Laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) is an emerging noninvasive optical technique that allows the monitoring of microvascular function and can help, using specific data processing, to understand the relationship between the subsystems. Using LSCI, the goals of this study are: (i) to assess the aging effect over microvascular parameters (perfusion and moving blood cells velocity, MBCV) and macrocirculation parameters (pulse-wave velocity, PWV) and (ii) to study the relationship between these parameters. In 16 healthy subjects (20 to 62 years old), perfusion and MBCV computed from LSCI are studied in three physiological states: rest, vascular occlusion, and post-occlusive reactive hyperaemia (PORH). MBCV is computed from a model of velocity distribution. During PORH, the experimental results show a relationship between perfusion and age (R2=0.67) and between MBCV and age (R2=0.72), as well as between PWV and age at rest (R2=0.91). A relationship is also found between perfusion and MBCV for all physiological states (R2=0.98). Relationships between microcirculation and macrocirculation (perfusion-PWV or MBCV-PWV) are found only during PORH with R2=0.76 and R2=0.77, respectively. This approach may prove useful for investigating dysregulation in blood flow.

  15. Effects of first myocardial infarction on left ventricular systolic and diastolic function with the use of mitral annular velocity determined by pulsed wave doppler tissue imaging.

    PubMed

    Alam, M; Wardell, J; Andersson, E; Samad, B A; Nordlander, R

    2000-05-01

    This study was undertaken to assess the effect of a first myocardial infarction (MI) on the systolic and diastolic velocity profiles of the mitral annulus determined by pulsed wave Doppler tissue imaging and thereby evaluate left ventricular (LV) function after MI. Seventy-eight patients with a first MI were examined before discharge. Peak systolic, peak early diastolic, and peak late diastolic velocities were recorded at 4 different sites on the mitral annulus corresponding to the septum, anterior, lateral, and inferior sites of the left ventricle. In addition, the amplitude of mitral annular motion at the 4 above LV sites, the ejection fraction, and conventional Doppler diastolic parameters were recorded. Nineteen age-matched healthy subjects served as controls. Compared with healthy subjects, the MI patients had a significantly reduced peak systolic velocity at the mitral annulus, especially at the infarction sites. A relatively good linear correlation was found between the ejection fraction and the mean systolic velocity from the 4 LV sites (r = 0.74, P <.001). The correlation was also good when the mean peak systolic mitral annular velocity was tested against the magnitude of the mean mitral annular motion (r = 0.77, P <.001). When the patients were divided into 2 different groups with respect to an ejection fraction > or =0.50 or <0.50, a cutoff point of mean systolic mitral annular velocity of > or =7.5 cm/s had a sensitivity of 79% and a specificity of 88% in predicting a preserved global LV systolic function. Similar to systolic velocities, the early diastolic velocity was also reduced, especially at the infarction sites. The peak mitral annular early diastolic velocity correlated well with both LV ejection fraction (r =.66, P <.001) and mean systolic mitral annular motion (r = 0.68, P <.001). However, no correlation existed between the early diastolic velocity and conventional diastolic Doppler parameters. The reduced peak systolic mitral annular velocity

  16. Effect of modest salt reduction on blood pressure, urinary albumin, and pulse wave velocity in white, black, and Asian mild hypertensives.

    PubMed

    He, Feng J; Marciniak, Maciej; Visagie, Elisabeth; Markandu, Nirmala D; Anand, Vidya; Dalton, R Neil; MacGregor, Graham A

    2009-09-01

    A reduction in salt intake lowers blood pressure. However, most previous trials were in whites with few in blacks and Asians. Salt reduction may also reduce other cardiovascular risk factors (eg, urinary albumin excretion, arterial stiffness). However, few well-controlled trials have studied these effects. We carried out a randomized double-blind crossover trial of salt restriction with slow sodium or placebo, each for 6 weeks, in 71 whites, 69 blacks, and 29 Asians with untreated mildly raised blood pressure. From slow sodium to placebo, urinary sodium was reduced from 165+/-58 (+/-SD) to 110+/-49 mmol/24 hours (9.7 to 6.5 g/d salt). With this reduction in salt intake, there was a significant decrease in blood pressure from 146+/-13/91+/-8 to 141+/-12/88+/-9 mm Hg (P<0.001), urinary albumin from 10.2 (IQR: 6.8 to 18.9) to 9.1 (6.6 to 14.0) mg/24 hours (P<0.001), albumin/creatinine ratio from 0.81 (0.47 to 1.43) to 0.66 (0.44 to 1.22) mg/mmol (P<0.001), and carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity from 11.5+/-2.3 to 11.1+/-1.9 m/s (P<0.01). Subgroup analysis showed that the reductions in blood pressure and urinary albumin/creatinine ratio were significant in all groups, and the decrease in pulse wave velocity was significant in blacks only. These results demonstrate that a modest reduction in salt intake, approximately the amount of the current public health recommendations, causes significant falls in blood pressure in all 3 ethnic groups. Furthermore, it reduces urinary albumin and improves large artery compliance. Although both could be attributable to the falls in blood pressure, they may carry additional benefits on reducing cardiovascular disease above that obtained from the blood pressure falls alone.

  17. Effects of heart rate on brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity and ankle-brachial pressure index in patients without significant organic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Su, Ho-Ming; Lee, Kun-Tai; Chu, Chih-Sheng; Lee, Ming-Yi; Lin, Tsung-Hsien; Voon, Wen-Chol; Sheu, Sheng-Hsiung; Lai, Wen-Ter

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of heart rate (HR) on brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) and ankle-brachial pressure index (ABI). Thirty-two patients without significant organic heart disease underwent elective cardiac catheterization or electrophysiologic study, and were then enrolled in right atrial pacing (RAP; 11 men, 9 women; aged 48 -/+ 15 years) or right ventricular pacing (RVP; 6 men, 6 women, aged 45 -/+ 13 years) studies. Three different HR levels (90, 100, and 110 beats per minute) were paced in random order. By stepwise, multiple linear regression analysis, age, systolic blood pressure (SBP), and pulse pressure (PP) correlated positively with baseline baPWV. In the RAP group, as HR increased, baPWV and left brachial diastolic blood pressure increased significantly (p < or = 0.015), while ABI, left ankle SBP, left brachial PP, and left ankle PP decreased significantly (p < or = 0.013). In the RVP group, as HR increased, baPWV also increased significantly (p = 0.001), while ABI, left ankle SBP, and PP decreased significantly (p < or = 0.034). Values of baPWV and ABI may be influenced by HR in young and middle-aged patients without significant organic heart disease. When these values are used to evaluate and follow up cardiovascular risk in patients, HR changes should be considered.

  18. Is There an Association Between Carotid-Femoral Pulse Wave Velocity and Coronary Heart Disease in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Katsiki, Niki; Kollari, Erietta; Dardas, Sotirios; Dardas, Petros; Haidich, Anna-Bettina; Athyros, Vasilios G; Karagiannis, Asterios

    2016-01-01

    Arterial stiffness has been shown to predict cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV) is regarded the gold standard marker of arterial stiffness. In previous studies, cfPWV was associated with the presence of coronary heart disease (CHD). However, with regard to CHD severity as assessed by the Syntax Score, only brachial-ankle PWV was reported to correlate with Syntax Score; no data exist for cfPWV. In this pilot study, we evaluated the possible associations between cfPWV, CHD and Syntax Score in 62 consecutive pa-tients (49 males; mean age: 64±12years) with chest pain undergoing scheduled coronary angiography. cfPWV was signifi-cantly higher in CHD patients than in non-CHD individuals (10 vs. 8.4 m/s; p = 0.003). No significant association was found between cfPWV and CHD severity as assessed by Syntax Score. A cut-off point of 12.3 m/s was considered as diagnostic for abnormally increased cfPWV (specificity: 97%; sensitivity: 12%; positive likelihood ratio: 3.558). Further research is needed to establish the relationship between cfPWV and Syntax Score.

  19. The impact of ankle brachial index and pulse wave velocity on cardiovascular risk according to SCORE and Framingham scales and sex differences.

    PubMed

    Woźnicka-Leśkiewicz, L; Posadzy-Małaczyńska, A; Juszkat, R

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the usefulness of ankle brachial index (ABI) and pulse wave velocity (PWV) in patients with or without coronary artery disease (CAD) and hypertension (HT) in cardiovascular risk prediction. We studied 200 patients randomized to one of four groups: CAD+HT+; CAD+HT-; CAD-HT+; CAD-HT- (Department of Hypertensiology, Angiology and Internal Diseases, Poznan, Poland: 2009-2012). We evaluated: patient age, lipids profile, ABI and PWV. The cardiovascular risks according to SCORE and Framingham scales were assessed. Statistical calculations were performed in StatSoft Statistica 10. The most interesting aspects of this study were: logistic regression model evaluated the simultaneously influence of ABI and PWV on cardiovascular risk by the SCORE scale and logistic regression model evaluated the influence of ABI and PWV on cardiovascular risk according to the Framingham scale. They showed the possibility (SCORE) of more accurate estimation of cardiovascular risk in an individual patient and graduation of this risk in the exemplary patients. Analysis of the assessment of both: ABI and PWV in predicting of cardiovascular risk according to SCORE and Framingham scales using a logistic regression model indicates that the Framingham scale is less precise than the SCORE scale because it underestimates the real high cardiovascular risk.

  20. Measurement of the contrast agent intrinsic and native harmonic response with single transducer pulse waved ultrasound systems.

    PubMed

    Verbeek, X A; Willigers, J M; Brands, P J; Ledoux, L A; Hoeks, A P

    1999-01-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents, i.e., small gas filled microbubbles, enhance the echogenicity of blood and have the potential to be used for tissue perfusion assessment. The contrast agents scatter ultrasound in a nonlinear manner and thereby introduce harmonics in the ultrasound signal. This property is exploited in new ultrasound techniques like harmonic imaging, which aims to display only the contrast agent presence. Much attention has already been given to the physical properties of the contrast agent. The present study focuses on practical aspects of the measurement of the intrinsic harmonic response of ultrasound contrast agents with single transducer pulse waved ultrasound systems. Furthermore, the consequences of two other sources of harmonics are discussed. These sources are the nonlinear distortion of ultrasound in a medium generating native harmonics, and the emitted signal itself which might contain contaminating harmonics. It is demonstrated conceptually and by experiments that optimization of the contrast agent harmonic response measured with a single transducer is governed by the transducer spectral sensitivity distribution rather than the resonance properties of the contrast agent. Both native and contaminating harmonics may be of considerable strength and can be misinterpreted as intrinsic harmonics of the contrast agent. Practical difficulties to filter out the harmonic component selectively, without deteriorating the image, may cause misinterpretation of the fundamental as a harmonic.

  1. Reference Values and Z Scores for Pulsed-Wave Doppler and M-Mode Measurements in Fetal Echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, Catherine; Bigras, Jean-Luc; Fouron, Jean-Claude; Dallaire, Frederic

    2016-05-01

    Fetal echocardiography is now the standard approach for detailed investigations of fetal cardiac anatomy and function. Available studies proposing reference values for pulsed-wave Doppler (PWD) measurements are often focused on few parameters. Furthermore, the methodology used for validating these proposed reference values is sometimes insufficiently described, and parameters necessary to compute Z scores are not always available. Improved definition of reference values with adequate statistical validation is needed for proper interpretation of PWD measurements in a clinical setting. In this study, the authors propose a comprehensive set of reference values and Z score equations for fetal PWD and M-mode measurements with thorough assessment of Z score quality and validity. Women with normal singleton pregnancies between 18 and 39 weeks of gestational age were included. A set of 57 measurements was performed, including PWD, M-mode measurements, and calculation of systolic, diastolic, and global function indices. Several parametric regressions were tested to model each measurement against gestational age. The SD was also modeled to account for heteroscedasticity. Z score equations were computed, and the proposed reference values were tested for residual association, residual heteroscedasticity, and departure from the normal distribution. One hundred four uncomplicated singleton pregnancies with normal fetal hearts were included. Nonlinear relationships with gestational age were found for most measurements. Parametric normalization was successful for most measurements analyzed, and it was possible to compute Z score equations with minimal residual association with gestational age, no residual heteroscedasticity, and no significant departure from the normal distribution. The authors propose a comprehensive set of Z score equations for 57 fetal functional measurements, some of which do not have any published reference values. These Z score equations will allow

  2. Predictive value of brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity for long-term clinical outcomes after percutaneous coronary intervention in a Korean cohort.

    PubMed

    Ki, Young-Jae; Choi, Dong-Hyun; Lee, Young-Min; Lim, Leejin; Song, Heesang; Koh, Young-Youp

    2014-08-20

    The aim of this study was to determine the associations of brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV), high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T (hs-cTnT) and N-terminal pro-B type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) with the development of adverse outcomes after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). The baPWV, hs-cTnT and NT-proBNP were analyzed in 372 patients who underwent PCI. The primary endpoint was cardiac death. There were 21 events of cardiac death during a mean of 25.8 months of follow-up. When the baPWV cut-off level was set to 1672 cm/s using the receiver operating characteristic curve, the sensitivity was 85.7% and the specificity was 60.1% for differentiating between the group with cardiac death and the group without cardiac death. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that the higher baPWV group (≥1672 cm/s) had a significantly higher cardiac death rate than the lower baPWV group (<1672 cm/s) (11.4% vs. 1.4%, log-rank: P<0.0001). This value was more useful in patients with myocardial injury (hs-cTnT≥0.1 ng/mL) or heart failure (NT-proBNP≥450 pg/mL). The results of this study show that high baPWV is a predictive marker for cardiac death after PCI. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Direct angiotensin II type 2 receptor stimulation in Nω-nitro-L-arginine-methyl ester-induced hypertension: the effect on pulse wave velocity and aortic remodeling.

    PubMed

    Paulis, Ludovit; Becker, Sophie T R; Lucht, Kristin; Schwengel, Katja; Slavic, Svetlana; Kaschina, Elena; Thöne-Reineke, Christa; Dahlöf, Björn; Baulmann, Johannes; Unger, Thomas; Steckelings, U Muscha

    2012-02-01

    Pulse wave velocity (PWV), a direct marker of arterial stiffness, is an independent cardiovascular risk factor. Although the angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockade belongs to major antihypertensive and cardioprotective therapies, less is known about the effects of long-term stimulation of the angiotensin II type 2 receptor. Previously, compound 21, a selective nonpeptide angiotensin II type 2 receptor agonist improved the outcome of myocardial infarction in rats along with anti-inflammatory properties. We investigated whether compound 21 alone or in combination with angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockade by olmesartan medoxomil could prevent PWV increase and aortic remodeling in N(ω)-nitro-L-arginine-methyl ester (L-NAME)-induced hypertension. Male adult Wistar rats (n=65) were randomly assigned to control, L-NAME, L-NAME+compound-21, L-NAME+olmesartan, and L-NAME+olmesartan+compound-21 groups and treated for 6 weeks. We observed that L-NAME hypertension was accompanied by enhanced PWV, increased wall thickness, and stiffness of the aorta, along with elevated hydroxyproline concentration. Olmesartan completely prevented hypertension, PWV and wall thickness increase, and the increase of aortic stiffness and partly prevented hydroxyproline accumulation. Compound 21 partly prevented all of these alterations, yet without concomitant prevention of blood pressure rise. Although the combination therapy with olmesartan and compound 21 led to blood pressure levels, PWV, and wall thickness comparable to olmesartan-alone-treated rats, only in the combination group was complete prevention of increased hydroxyproline deposition achieved, resulting in even more pronounced stiffness reduction. We conclude that chronic angiotensin II type 2 receptor stimulation prevented aortic stiffening and collagen accumulation without preventing hypertension in rats with inhibited NO synthase. These effects were additive to angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockade, yet without additional

  4. The association of 25(OH)D with blood pressure, pulse pressure and carotid-radial pulse wave velocity in African women.

    PubMed

    Kruger, Iolanthé M; Kruger, Marlena C; Doak, Colleen M; Schutte, Aletta E; Huisman, Hugo W; Van Rooyen, Johannes M; Schutte, Rudolph; Malan, Leoné; Malan, Nicolaas T; Fourie, Carla M T; Kruger, Annamarie

    2013-01-01

    High susceptibility of the African population to develop cardiovascular disease obliges us to investigate possible contributing risk factors. Our aim was to determine whether low 25(OH)D status is associated with increased blood pressure and carotid-radial pulse wave velocity in black South African women. We studied 291 urban women (mean age: 57.56±9.00 yrs.). 25(OH)D status was determined by serum 25(OH)D levels. Women were stratified into sufficient (>30 ng/ml), and insufficient/deficient (<30 ng/ml) groups. Cardiovascular variables were compared between groups. Women with low 25(OH)D levels had significantly higher SBP (150.8±27.1 vs. 137.6±21.0), DBP (94.7±14.5 vs. 89.3±12.3) and PP (53.15(50.7;55.7) vs. 46.3(29.4;84.6)) compared to women with sufficient levels. No significant difference was observed with regards to c-rPWV. ANCOVA analyses still revealed significant differences between the two groups with regards to SBP, DBP as well as PP. Partial correlations revealed significant inverse association between SBP and 25(OH)D (p = .04;r = -.12). Women with low 25(OH)D levels were ∼2 times more likely to have high SBP (95% CI: 3.23;1.05). To conclude, women with deficient/insufficient 25(OH)D had significantly higher SBP compared to women with a sufficient 25(OH) status.

  5. Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity predicts all-cause mortality and cardiovascular events in patients with diabetes: the Kyushu Prevention Study of Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Yasutaka; Inoguchi, Toyoshi; Etoh, Erina; Kodama, Yoshimi; Sasaki, Shuji; Sonoda, Noriyuki; Nawata, Hajime; Shimabukuro, Michio; Takayanagi, Ryoichi

    2014-08-01

    Whether brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV), a noninvasive marker for arterial stiffness, is a useful predictive maker for cardiovascular events in subjects with diabetes is not established. In the present cohort study, we evaluated the benefit of baPWV for the prediction of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in subjects with diabetes. A total of 4,272 outpatients with diabetes were enrolled in the Kyushu Prevention Study of Atherosclerosis. Of these, 3,628 subjects, excluding those with an ankle-brachial index of <0.9, were prospectively followed for 3.2 ± 2.2 years. The baPWV at baseline was classified by recursive partitioning (RP) for each end point. We plotted the Kaplan-Meier curves for high- and low-baPWV groups, which were designated based on the cutoff points, and calculated Cox proportional hazards models. The elevation of baPWV quartiles was significantly correlated to the incidence of coronary artery events, cerebrovascular events, and all-cause mortality. RP revealed baPWVs of 14 and 24 m/s as statistically adequate cutoff points for cardiovascular events and mortality, respectively. High-baPWV classes showed significantly low event-free ratios in Kaplan-Meier curves for all end points and remained independent risks for all-cause mortality and cerebrovascular events, but not for coronary artery events after adjustments for age, sex, BMI, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, smoking, and hemoglobin A1c by Cox proportional hazards models. This large-scale cohort study provided evidence that high baPWV is a useful independent predictor of mortality and cardiovascular morbidity in subjects with diabetes. © 2014 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  6. Pulse-wave propagation in straight-geometry vessels for stiffness estimation: theory, simulations, phantoms and in vitro findings.

    PubMed

    Shahmirzadi, Danial; Li, Ronny X; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2012-11-01

    Pulse wave imaging (PWI) is an ultrasound-based method for noninvasive characterization of arterial stiffness based on pulse wave propagation. Reliable numerical models of pulse wave propagation in normal and pathological aortas could serve as powerful tools for local pulse wave analysis and a guideline for PWI measurements in vivo. The objectives of this paper are to (1) apply a fluid-structure interaction (FSI) simulation of a straight-geometry aorta to confirm the Moens-Korteweg relationship between the pulse wave velocity (PWV) and the wall modulus, and (2) validate the simulation findings against phantom and in vitro results. PWI depicted and tracked the pulse wave propagation along the abdominal wall of canine aorta in vitro in sequential Radio-Frequency (RF) ultrasound frames and estimates the PWV in the imaged wall. The same system was also used to image multiple polyacrylamide phantoms, mimicking the canine measurements as well as modeling softer and stiffer walls. Finally, the model parameters from the canine and phantom studies were used to perform 3D two-way coupled FSI simulations of pulse wave propagation and estimate the PWV. The simulation results were found to correlate well with the corresponding Moens-Korteweg equation. A high linear correlation was also established between PWV² and E measurements using the combined simulation and experimental findings (R² =  0.98) confirming the relationship established by the aforementioned equation.

  7. Long-term pulse wave velocity outcomes with aerobic and resistance training in kidney transplant recipients - A pilot randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Ellen M; Koufaki, Pelagia; Mercer, Thomas H; Lindup, Herolin; Nugent, Eilish; Goldsmith, David; Macdougall, Iain C; Greenwood, Sharlene A

    2017-01-01

    This pilot study examined long-term pulse wave velocity (PWV) and peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak) outcomes following a 12-week moderate-intensity aerobic or resistance training programme in kidney transplant recipients. Single-blind, bi-centre randomised controlled parallel trial. 42 out of 60 participants completed a 9-month follow-up assessment (Aerobic training = 12, Resistance training = 10 and usual care = 20). Participants completed 12 weeks of twice-weekly supervised aerobic or resistance training. Following the 12-week exercise intervention, participants were transitioned to self-managed community exercise activity using motivational interviewing techniques. Usual care participants received usual encouragement for physical activity during routine clinical appointments in the transplant clinic. PWV, VO2peak, blood pressure and body weight were assessed at 12 weeks and 12 months, and compared to baseline. ANCOVA analysis, covarying for baseline values, age, and length of time on dialysis pre-transplantation, revealed a significant mean between-group difference in PWV of -1.30 m/sec (95%CI -2.44 to -0.17, p = 0.03) between resistance training and usual care groups. When comparing the aerobic training and usual care groups at 9-month follow-up, there was a mean difference of -1.05 m/sec (95%CI -2.11 to 0.017, p = 0.05). A significant mean between-group difference in relative VO2peak values of 2.2 ml/kg/min (95% CI 0.37 to 4.03, p = 0.02) when comparing aerobic training with usual care was revealed. There was no significant between group differences in body weight or blood pressure. There were no significant adverse effects associated with the interventions. Significant between-group differences in 9-month follow-up PWV existed when comparing resistance exercise intervention with usual care. A long-term between-group difference in VO2peak was only evident when comparing aerobic intervention with usual care. This pilot study, with a small sample size, did not aim to

  8. Long-term pulse wave velocity outcomes with aerobic and resistance training in kidney transplant recipients – A pilot randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Koufaki, Pelagia; Mercer, Thomas H.; Lindup, Herolin; Nugent, Eilish; Goldsmith, David; Macdougall, Iain C.; Greenwood, Sharlene A.

    2017-01-01

    Background This pilot study examined long-term pulse wave velocity (PWV) and peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak) outcomes following a 12-week moderate-intensity aerobic or resistance training programme in kidney transplant recipients. Method Single-blind, bi-centre randomised controlled parallel trial. 42 out of 60 participants completed a 9-month follow-up assessment (Aerobic training = 12, Resistance training = 10 and usual care = 20). Participants completed 12 weeks of twice-weekly supervised aerobic or resistance training. Following the 12-week exercise intervention, participants were transitioned to self-managed community exercise activity using motivational interviewing techniques. Usual care participants received usual encouragement for physical activity during routine clinical appointments in the transplant clinic. PWV, VO2peak, blood pressure and body weight were assessed at 12 weeks and 12 months, and compared to baseline. Results ANCOVA analysis, covarying for baseline values, age, and length of time on dialysis pre-transplantation, revealed a significant mean between-group difference in PWV of -1.30 m/sec (95%CI -2.44 to -0.17, p = 0.03) between resistance training and usual care groups. When comparing the aerobic training and usual care groups at 9-month follow-up, there was a mean difference of -1.05 m/sec (95%CI -2.11 to 0.017, p = 0.05). A significant mean between-group difference in relative VO2peak values of 2.2 ml/kg/min (95% CI 0.37 to 4.03, p = 0.02) when comparing aerobic training with usual care was revealed. There was no significant between group differences in body weight or blood pressure. There were no significant adverse effects associated with the interventions. Conclusions Significant between-group differences in 9-month follow-up PWV existed when comparing resistance exercise intervention with usual care. A long-term between-group difference in VO2peak was only evident when comparing aerobic intervention with usual care. This pilot study

  9. Ambulatory aortic blood pressure, wave reflections and pulse wave velocity are elevated during the third in comparison to the second interdialytic day of the long interval in chronic haemodialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Koutroumbas, Georgios; Georgianos, Panagiotis I.; Sarafidis, Pantelis A.; Protogerou, Athanase; Karpetas, Antonios; Vakianis, Pantelis; Raptis, Vassilios; Liakopoulos, Vassilios; Panagoutsos, Stylianos; Syrganis, Christos; Passadakis, Ploumis

    2015-01-01

    Background Increased arterial stiffness and aortic blood pressure (BP) are independent predictors of cardiovascular outcomes in end-stage renal disease. The 3-day interdialytic interval is associated with elevated risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in haemodialysis. This study investigated differences in ambulatory aortic BP and arterial stiffness between the second and third day of the long interdialytic interval. Methods Ambulatory BP monitoring with Mobil-O-Graph monitor (IEM, Stolberg, Germany) was performed in 55 haemodialysis patients during a 3-day interval. Mobil-O-Graph records oscillometric brachial BP and pulse waves and calculates aortic BP and augmentation index (AIx) as measure of wave reflections, and pulse wave velocity (PWV) as measure of arterial stiffness. Results Ambulatory aortic systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were higher during the third versus second interdialytic day (123.6 ± 17.0 versus 118.5 ± 17.1 mmHg, P < 0.001; 81.5 ± 11.8 versus 78 ± 11.9 mmHg, P < 0.001, respectively). Similar differences were noted for brachial BP. Ambulatory AIx and PWV were also significantly increased during the third versus second day (30.5 ± 9.9 versus 28.8 ± 9.9%, P < 0.05; 9.6 ± 2.3 versus 9.4 ± 2.3 m/s, P < 0.001, respectively). Differences between Days 2 and 3 remained significant when day-time and night-time periods were compared separately. Aortic SBP and DBP, AIx and PWV showed gradual increases from the end of dialysis session onwards. Interdialytic weight gain was a strong determinant of the increase in the above parameters. Conclusions This study showed significantly higher ambulatory aortic BP, AIx and PWV levels during the third compared with the second interdialytic day. These findings support a novel pathway for increased cardiovascular risk during the third interdialytic day in haemodialysis. PMID:25920919

  10. Pulsed-wave Doppler tissue imaging velocities in normal geriatric cats and geriatric cats with primary or systemic diseases linked to specific cardiomyopathies in humans, and the influence of age and heart rate upon these velocities.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Kerry E; Gunn-Moore, Danièlle A; Shaw, Darren J; French, Anne T; Dukes-McEwan, Joanna; Moran, Carmel M; Corcoran, Brendan M

    2009-04-01

    Pulsed-wave Doppler tissue imaging (pw-DTI) techniques allow the non-invasive assessment of myocardial dynamics. pw-DTI has demonstrated regional and global diastolic impairment in various forms of human and feline cardiomyopathy. We hypothesise that in geriatric cats with systemic diseases that have been linked to specific cardiomyopathies in human beings, the myocardial velocity profile will be altered when compared to either normal or hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) cats; and that both age and heart rate have a significant affect upon pw-DTI velocities. The aims of this study were to determine whether the feline M-mode or myocardial velocity profile is altered in geriatric cats with disease states that have been linked to specific cardiomyopathies in humans when compared to normal geriatric cats or geriatric cats with HCM and to determine whether age or heart rate has a significant effect upon pw-DTI velocities within these groups of cats. Sixty-six cats aged 8 years or above were included in the study, and were divided as follows: Unaffected (n=8), basilar septal bulge (BSB) (17), HCM (14), hyperthyroid (HiT(4)) (12) and chronic renal failure (CRF) (15). Systolic blood pressure was normal in all the cats. pw-DTI systolic (S'), early (E') and late diastolic (A') velocities were assessed from standardised sites within the myocardium, and the relationships between these and disease group, age and heart rate were then assessed. In cats with HCM, the E' velocity was decreased at various sites. Conversely, the HiT(4) cats demonstrated increased S' velocities. The only site at which the age of the cat was significantly related to myocardial velocities was the S' velocity from the apical mid-septum. There were also significant positive relationships between heart rate and the magnitude of myocardial S', E' and A' velocities of radial motion and S' and A' velocities of longitudinal motion. pw-DTI detected diastolic dysfunction in untreated cats with HCM and increased

  11. Strength of relationships of the pulse wave velocity and central hemodynamic indices with the serum N-terminal fragment B-type natriuretic peptide levels in men: a worksite cohort study.

    PubMed

    Odaira, Mari; Tomiyama, Hirofumi; Matsumoto, Chisa; Yoshida, Masanobu; Shiina, Kazuki; Nagata, Mikio; Yamashina, Akira

    2012-01-01

    It has not been fully clarified as to which marker related to arterial stiffness or central hemodynamics might be most closely associated with the blood natriuretic peptide levels. The present cross-sectional study was conducted to examine the strength of the relationships of the arterial stiffness and central hemodynamic indices with the serum N-terminal fragment B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-pro BNP) levels. In a total of 2,657 male employees of a company (46±9 years old), the first and second peaks of the radial systolic pressure waveform (SBP1 and SBP2, respectively), the radial augmentation index (rAI), the PP2 (SBP2 minus the diastolic blood pressure), the brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV), and the serum NT-pro BNP levels were measured. Even after adjustments for confounding variables, the SBP1, SBP2, PP2, rAI and baPWV showed a significant positive association with the serum NT-pro BNP levels. A stepwise multivariate linear regression analysis demonstrated that among these variables, only PP2 contributed significantly to the serum NT-pro BNP levels (β=0.176, partial R-square=0.017, P<0.001). In middle-aged Japanese men, among the parameters related to arterial stiffness and central hemodynamics, PP2 showed the closest relationship with the serum NT-pro BNP levels. Therefore, elevation of the serum NT-pro BNP levels appears to reflect, at least in part, the pathophysiological abnormalities related to increased central pulse pressure.

  12. Opposite predictive value of pulse pressure and aortic pulse wave velocity on heart failure with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction: insights from an Eplerenone Post-Acute Myocardial Infarction Heart Failure Efficacy and Survival Study (EPHESUS) substudy.

    PubMed

    Regnault, Veronique; Lagrange, Jérémy; Pizard, Anne; Safar, Michel E; Fay, Renaud; Pitt, Bertram; Challande, Pascal; Rossignol, Patrick; Zannad, Faiez; Lacolley, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Although hypertension contributes significantly to worsen cardiovascular risk, blood pressure increment in subjects with heart failure is paradoxically associated with lower risk. The objective was to determine whether pulse pressure and pulse wave velocity (PWV) remain prognostic markers, independent of treatment in heart failure with reduced left ventricular function. The investigation involved 6632 patients of the Eplerenone Post-Acute Myocardial Infarction Heart Failure Efficacy and Survival Study. All subjects had acute myocardial infarction with left ventricular ejection fraction <40% and signs/symptoms of heart failure. Carotid-femoral PWV was measured in a subpopulation of 306 subjects. In the overall population, baseline mean arterial pressure <90 mm Hg was associated with higher all-cause death (hazard ratio, 1.14 [95% confidence interval, 1.00-1.30]; P<0.05), whereas higher left ventricular ejection fraction or pulse pressure was associated with lower rates of all-cause death, cardiovascular death/hospitalization, and cardiovascular death. In the subpopulation, increased baseline PWV was associated with worse outcomes (all-cause death: 1.16 [1.03-1.30]; P<0.05 and cardiovascular deaths: 1.16 [1.03-1.31]; P<0.05), independent of age and left ventricular ejection fraction. Using multiple regression analysis, systolic blood pressure and age were the main independent factors positively associated with pulse pressure or PWV, both in the entire population or in the PWV substudy. In heart failure and low ejection fraction, our results suggest that pulse pressure, being negatively associated with outcome, is more dependent on left ventricular function and thereby no longer a marker of aortic elasticity. In contrast, increased aortic stiffness, assessed by PWV, contributes significantly to cardiovascular death.

  13. Arterial pulse wave pressure transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, C.; Gorelick, D.; Chen, W. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    An arterial pulse wave pressure transducer is introduced. The transducer is comprised of a fluid filled cavity having a flexible membrane disposed over the cavity and adapted to be placed on the skin over an artery. An arterial pulse wave creates pressure pulses in the fluid which are transduced, by a pressure sensitive transistor in direct contact with the fluid, into an electric signal. The electrical signal is representative of the pulse waves and can be recorded so as to monitor changes in the elasticity of the arterial walls.

  14. Pulse wave imaging in normal, hypertensive and aneurysmal human aortas in vivo: a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ronny X.; Luo, Jianwen; Balaram, Sandhya K.; Chaudhry, Farooq A.; Shahmirzadi, Danial; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2013-07-01

    Arterial stiffness is a well-established biomarker for cardiovascular risk, especially in the case of hypertension. The progressive stages of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) have also been associated with varying arterial stiffness. Pulse wave imaging (PWI) is a noninvasive, ultrasound imaging-based technique that uses the pulse wave-induced arterial wall motion to map the propagation of the pulse wave and measure the regional pulse wave velocity (PWV) as an index of arterial stiffness. In this study, the clinical feasibility of PWI was evaluated in normal, hypertensive, and aneurysmal human aortas. Radiofrequency-based speckle tracking was used to estimate the pulse wave-induced displacements in the abdominal aortic walls of normal (N = 15, mean age 32.5 ± 10.2 years), hypertensive (N = 13, mean age 60.8 ± 15.8 years), and aneurysmal (N = 5, mean age 71.6 ± 11.8 years) human subjects. Linear regression of the spatio-temporal variation of the displacement waveform in the anterior aortic wall over a single cardiac cycle yielded the slope as the PWV and the coefficient of determination r2 as an approximate measure of the pulse wave propagation uniformity. The aortic PWV measurements in all normal, hypertensive, and AAA subjects were 6.03 ± 1.68, 6.69 ± 2.80, and 10.54 ± 6.52 m s-1, respectively. There was no significant difference (p = 0.15) between the PWVs of the normal and hypertensive subjects while the PWVs of the AAA subjects were significantly higher (p < 0.001) compared to those of the other two groups. Also, the average r2 in the AAA subjects was significantly lower (p < 0.001) than that in the normal and hypertensive subjects. These preliminary results suggest that the regional PWV and the pulse wave propagation uniformity (r2) obtained using PWI, in addition to the PWI images and spatio-temporal maps that provide qualitative visualization of the pulse wave, may potentially provide valuable information for the clinical characterization of aneurysms

  15. Common Genetic Variation in the 3-BCL11B Gene Desert Is Associated With Carotid-Femoral Pulse Wave Velocity and Excess Cardiovascular Disease Risk The AortaGen Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Gary F.; Verwoert, Germaine C.; Tarasov, Kirill V.; Isaacs, Aaron; Smith, Albert V.; Yasmin; Rietzschel, Ernst R.; Tanaka, Toshiko; Liu, Yongmei; Parsa, Afshin; Najjar, Samer S.; O’Shaughnessy, Kevin M.; Sigurdsson, Sigurdur; De Buyzere, Marc L.; Larson, Martin G.; Sie, Mark P.S.; Andrews, Jeanette S.; Post, Wendy S.; Mattace-Raso, Francesco U.S.; McEniery, Carmel M.; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Segers, Patrick; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; van Rijn, Marie Josee E.; Howard, Timothy D.; McArdle, Patrick F.; Dehghan, Abbas; Jewell, Elizabeth; Newhouse, Stephen J.; Bekaert, Sofie; Hamburg, Naomi M.; Newman, Anne B.; Hofman, Albert; Scuteri, Angelo; De Bacquer, Dirk; Ikram, Mohammad Arfan; Psaty, Bruce; Fuchsberger, Christian; Olden, Matthias; Wain, Louise V.; Elliott, Paul; Smith, Nicholas L.; Felix, Janine F.; Erdmann, Jeanette; Vita, Joseph A.; Sutton-Tyrrell, Kim; Sijbrands, Eric J.G.; Sanna, Serena; Launer, Lenore J.; De Meyer, Tim; Johnson, Andrew D.; Schut, Anna F.C.; Herrington, David M.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uda, Manuela; Wilkinson, Ian B.; Aspelund, Thor; Gillebert, Thierry C.; Van Bortel, Luc; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Oostra, Ben A.; Ding, Jingzhong; Gibson, Quince; Uitterlinden, André G.; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Cockcroft, John R.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; De Backer, Guy G.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Harris, Tamara B.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Levy, Daniel; Lakatta, Edward G.; Witteman, Jacqueline C.M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (CFPWV) is a heritable measure of aortic stiffness that is strongly associated with increased risk for major cardiovascular disease events. Methods and Results We conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association data in 9 community-based European ancestry cohorts consisting of 20,634 participants. Results were replicated in 2 additional European ancestry cohorts involving 5,306 participants. Based on a preliminary analysis of 6 cohorts, we identified a locus on chromosome 14 in the 3′-BCL11B gene desert that is associated with CFPWV (rs7152623, minor allele frequency = 0.42, beta=−0.075±0.012 SD/allele, P = 2.8 x 10−10; replication beta=−0.086±0.020 SD/allele, P = 1.4 x 10−6). Combined results for rs7152623 from 11 cohorts gave beta=−0.076±0.010 SD/allele, P=3.1x10−15. The association persisted when adjusted for mean arterial pressure (beta=−0.060±0.009 SD/allele, P = 1.0 x 10−11). Results were consistent in younger (<55 years, 6 cohorts, N=13,914, beta=−0.081±0.014 SD/allele, P = 2.3 x 10−9) and older (9 cohorts, N=12,026, beta=−0.061±0.014 SD/allele, P=9.4x10−6) participants. In separate meta-analyses, the locus was associated with increased risk for coronary artery disease (hazard ratio [HR]=1.05, confidence interval [CI]=1.02 to 1.08, P=0.0013) and heart failure (HR=1.10, CI=1.03 to 1.16, P=0.004). Conclusions Common genetic variation in a locus in the BCL11B gene desert that is thought to harbor one or more gene enhancers is associated with higher CFPWV and increased risk for cardiovascular disease. Elucidation of the role this novel locus plays in aortic stiffness may facilitate development of therapeutic interventions that limit aortic stiffening and related cardiovascular disease events. PMID:22068335

  16. Aortic-Radial Pulse Wave Velocity Ratio in End-stage Renal Disease Patients: Association with Age, Body Tissue Hydration Status, Renal Failure Etiology and Five Years of Hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Bia, Daniel; Valtuille, Rodolfo; Galli, Cintia; Wray, Sandra; Armentano, Ricardo; Zócalo, Yanina; Cabrera-Fischer, Edmundo

    2017-03-01

    The etiology of the end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and the hydration status may be involved in the arterial stiffening process observed in hemodialyzed patients. The ratio between carotid-femoral and carotid-radial pulse wave velocity (PWV ratio) was recently proposed to characterize the patient-specific stiffening process. to analyze: (1) the PWV-ratio in healthy and hemodialyzed subjects, analyzing potential changes associated to etiologies of the ESRD, (2) the PWV-ratio and hydration status using multiple-frequency bioimpedance and, (3) the effects of hemodialysis on PWV-ratio in a 5-year follow-up. PWV-ratio was evaluated in 151 patients differentiated by the pathology determining their ESRD. Total body fluid (TBF), intra and extra cellular fluid (ICF, ECF) were measured in 65 of these patients using bioelectrical-impedance. The association between arterial, hemodynamic or fluid parameters was analyzed. PWV-ratio was evaluated in a group of patients (n = 25) 5 years later (follow-up study). PWV-ratio increased in the ESRD cohort with respect to the control group (1.03 ± 0.23 vs. 1.31 ± 0.37; p < 0.001). PWV-ratio in the diabetic nephropathy group was higher than in all other etiological groups (1.61 ± 0.33; p < 0.05). PWV-ratio was associated with TBF (r = -0.238; p < 0.05), ICF (r = -0.323; p < 0.01), ECF/ICF (r = 0.400; p < 0.001) and ECF/TBF (r = 0.403; p < 0.001). PWV-ratio calculated in ESRD patients in 2007 increased 5 years later (1.14 ± 0.32 vs. 1.43 ± 0.44; p < 0.005). PWV-ratio increased the most in patients with diabetic nephropathy. PWV ratio was significantly associated with age and body hydration status, but not with the blood pressure. PWV-ratio could be considered a blood pressure-independent parameter, associated with the age and hydration status of the patient.

  17. Doppler aortic flow velocity measurement in healthy children.

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, S.; Kim, H. S.

    2001-01-01

    To determine normal values for Doppler parameters of left ventricular function, ascending aortic blood flow velocity was measured by pulsed wave Doppler echocardiography in 63 healthy children with body surface area (BSA) < 1 m(2) (age < 10 yr). Peak velocity was independent of sex, but increased with body size. Mean acceleration was related to peak velocity (r = 0.75, p < 0.0001). Both stroke distance and ejection time had strong negative correlations with heart rate and positive correlations with BSA, suggesting that these parameters should be evaluated in relation to heart rate and body size. Mean intra- and interobserver variability for peak velocity, ejection time, stroke and minute distance ranged from 3 to 7%, whereas variability for acceleration time was 9 to 13%. These data may be used as reference values for the assessment of hemodynamic states in young children with cardiac disease. PMID:11306737

  18. Measurement of DNA damage after acute exposure to pulsed-wave 2450 MHz microwaves in rat brain cells by two alkaline comet assay methods.

    PubMed

    Lagroye, I; Anane, R; Wettring, B A; Moros, E G; Straube, W L; Laregina, M; Niehoff, M; Pickard, W F; Baty, J; Roti Roti, J L

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the effect of 2450 MHz pulsed-wave microwaves on the induction of DNA damage in brain cells of exposed rats and to discover whether proteinase K is needed to detect DNA damage in the brain cells of rats exposed to 2450 MHz microwaves. Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to 2450 MHz pulsed-wave microwaves and sacrificed 4 h after a 2-h exposure. Rats irradiated whole-body with 1 Gy (137)Cs were included as positive controls. DNA damage was assayed by two variants of the alkaline comet assay on separate aliquots of the same cell preparation. Significant DNA damage was observed in the rat brain cells of rats exposed to gamma-rays using both versions of the alkaline comet assay independent of the presence or absence of proteinase K. However, neither version of the assay could detect any difference in comet length and/or normalized comet moment between sham- and 2450 MHz pulsed-wave microwave-exposed rats, regardless of the inclusion or omission of proteinase K in the comet assay. No DNA damage in brain cells was detected following exposure of rats to 2450 MHz microwaves pulsed-wave at a specific absorption rate of 1.2 W kg(-1) regardless of whether or not proteinase K was included in the assay. Thus, the results support the conclusion that low-level 2450 MHz pulsed-wave microwave exposures do not induce DNA damage detectable by the alkaline comet assay.

  19. Laboratory model of the cardiovascular system for experimental demonstration of pulse wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stojadinović, Bojana; Nestorović, Zorica; Djurić, Biljana; Tenne, Tamar; Zikich, Dragoslav; Žikić, Dejan

    2017-03-01

    The velocity by which a disturbance moves through the medium is the wave velocity. Pulse wave velocity is among the key parameters in hemodynamics. Investigation of wave propagation through the fluid-filled elastic tube has a great importance for the proper biophysical understanding of the nature of blood flow through the cardiovascular system. Here, we present a laboratory model of the cardiovascular system. We have designed an experimental setup which can help medical and nursing students to properly learn and understand basic fluid hemodynamic principles, pulse wave and the phenomenon of wave propagation in blood vessels. Demonstration of wave propagation allowed a real time observation of the formation of compression and expansion waves by students, thus enabling them to better understand the difference between the two waves, and also to measure the pulse wave velocity for different fluid viscosities. The laboratory model of the cardiovascular system could be useful as an active learning methodology and a complementary tool for understanding basic principles of hemodynamics.

  20. Early intervention of long-acting nifedipine GITS reduces brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity and improves arterial stiffness in Chinese patients with mild hypertension: a 24-week, single-arm, open-label, prospective study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jidong; Wang, Yan; Hu, Haijuan; Yang, Xiaohong; Tian, Zejun; Liu, Demin; Gu, Guoqiang; Zheng, Hongmei; Xie, Ruiqin; Cui, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Nifedipine gastrointestinal therapeutic system (GITS) is used to treat angina and hypertension. The authors aimed to study the early intervention impact on arterial stiffness and pulse wave velocity (PWV) independent of its blood-pressure-(BP) lowering effect in mild hypertensive patients. This single-center, single-arm, open-label, prospective, Phase IV study recruited patients with mild hypertension and increased PWV from December 2013 to December 2014 (N=138; age, 18-75 years; systolic blood pressure, 140-160 mmHg; diastolic BP, 90-100 mmHg; increased brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity [baPWV, ≥12 m/s]). Nifedipine GITS (30 mg/d) was administered for 24 weeks to achieve target BP of <140/90 mmHg. The dose was uptitrated at 60 mg/d in case of unsatisfactory BP reduction after 4 weeks. Primary study end point was the change in baPWV after nifedipine GITS treatment. Hemodynamic parameters (office BP, 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring, and heart rate and adverse events) were evaluated at baseline and followed-up at 2, 4, 8, 12, 18, and 24 weeks. Majority of patients (n=117; 84.8%) completed the study. baPWV decreased significantly at 4 weeks compared with baseline (1,598.87±239.82 vs 1,500.89±241.15 cm/s, P<0.001), was stable at 12 weeks (1,482.24±215.14 cm/s, P<0.001), and remained steady through 24 weeks (1,472.58±205.01 cm/s, P<0.001). Office BP reduced from baseline to week 4 (154/95 vs 136/85 mmHg) and remained steady until 24 weeks. Nifedipine GITS significantly decreased 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring (P<0.001) after 24 weeks from baseline. Mean arterial pressure and pulse pressure were lowered significantly after 4, 12, and 24 weeks of treatment (P<0.001). These changes in baPWV were significantly correlated with changes in systolic blood pressure, diastolic BP, and mean arterial pressure (P<0.05), but not with changes in pulse pressure (P>0.05). There were no other drug-related serious adverse events. Nifedipine GITS was considerably effective in

  1. Early intervention of long-acting nifedipine GITS reduces brachial–ankle pulse wave velocity and improves arterial stiffness in Chinese patients with mild hypertension: a 24-week, single-arm, open-label, prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jidong; Wang, Yan; Hu, Haijuan; Yang, Xiaohong; Tian, Zejun; Liu, Demin; Gu, Guoqiang; Zheng, Hongmei; Xie, Ruiqin; Cui, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Background Nifedipine gastrointestinal therapeutic system (GITS) is used to treat angina and hypertension. The authors aimed to study the early intervention impact on arterial stiffness and pulse wave velocity (PWV) independent of its blood-pressure-(BP) lowering effect in mild hypertensive patients. Methods This single-center, single-arm, open-label, prospective, Phase IV study recruited patients with mild hypertension and increased PWV from December 2013 to December 2014 (N=138; age, 18–75 years; systolic blood pressure, 140–160 mmHg; diastolic BP, 90–100 mmHg; increased brachial–ankle pulse wave velocity [baPWV, ≥12 m/s]). Nifedipine GITS (30 mg/d) was administered for 24 weeks to achieve target BP of <140/90 mmHg. The dose was uptitrated at 60 mg/d in case of unsatisfactory BP reduction after 4 weeks. Primary study end point was the change in baPWV after nifedipine GITS treatment. Hemodynamic parameters (office BP, 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring, and heart rate and adverse events) were evaluated at baseline and followed-up at 2, 4, 8, 12, 18, and 24 weeks. Results Majority of patients (n=117; 84.8%) completed the study. baPWV decreased significantly at 4 weeks compared with baseline (1,598.87±239.82 vs 1,500.89±241.15 cm/s, P<0.001), was stable at 12 weeks (1,482.24±215.14 cm/s, P<0.001), and remained steady through 24 weeks (1,472.58±205.01 cm/s, P<0.001). Office BP reduced from baseline to week 4 (154/95 vs 136/85 mmHg) and remained steady until 24 weeks. Nifedipine GITS significantly decreased 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring (P<0.001) after 24 weeks from baseline. Mean arterial pressure and pulse pressure were lowered significantly after 4, 12, and 24 weeks of treatment (P<0.001). These changes in baPWV were significantly correlated with changes in systolic blood pressure, diastolic BP, and mean arterial pressure (P<0.05), but not with changes in pulse pressure (P>0.05). There were no other drug-related serious adverse events. Conclusion

  2. Doppler velocity measurements from large and small arteries of mice

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Anilkumar K.; Madala, Sridhar; Entman, Mark L.; Michael, Lloyd H.; Taffet, George E.

    2011-01-01

    With the growth of genetic engineering, mice have become increasingly common as models of human diseases, and this has stimulated the development of techniques to assess the murine cardiovascular system. Our group has developed nonimaging and dedicated Doppler techniques for measuring blood velocity in the large and small peripheral arteries of anesthetized mice. We translated technology originally designed for human vessels for use in smaller mouse vessels at higher heart rates by using higher ultrasonic frequencies, smaller transducers, and higher-speed signal processing. With these methods one can measure cardiac filling and ejection velocities, velocity pulse arrival times for determining pulse wave velocity, peripheral blood velocity and vessel wall motion waveforms, jet velocities for the calculation of the pressure drop across stenoses, and left main coronary velocity for the estimation of coronary flow reserve. These noninvasive methods are convenient and easy to apply, but care must be taken in interpreting measurements due to Doppler sample volume size and angle of incidence. Doppler methods have been used to characterize and evaluate numerous cardiovascular phenotypes in mice and have been particularly useful in evaluating the cardiac and vascular remodeling that occur following transverse aortic constriction. Although duplex ultrasonic echo-Doppler instruments are being applied to mice, dedicated Doppler systems are more suitable for some applications. The magnitudes and waveforms of blood velocities from both cardiac and peripheral sites are similar in mice and humans, such that much of what is learned using Doppler technology in mice may be translated back to humans. PMID:21572013

  3. [Validation during exercise of a new device for cardiac output measurement using pulse wave transit time (comparison EsCCO(®) vs. Physioflow(®))].

    PubMed

    Stalter, A; Lanot, N; Bridon, G; Julian, V; Péreira, B; Richard, R

    2016-02-01

    EsCCO is a novel non-invasive continuous cardiac output monitoring system based on pulse wave transit time already validated at rest. The aim of our study was to compare cardiac output measurements obtained simultaneously by EsCCO(®) (Q˙cOP) and impedance cardiography (Physioflow(®) ; Q˙cIMP), in healthy subjects. Eight healthy subjects (age: 31±9 years, weight: 76±10kg, height: 179±5cm) realized two exercise tests: an incremental ergocycle test performed until exertion (Pmax=269±48W) and a constant load exercise (P=163±27W). Comparison between measurements (Q˙cOP versus Q˙cIMP) obtained during the first test allowed to evaluate the accuracy of the device. Reliability was determined on three repeated measures during the second test, realized at ventilatory threshold. Correlation coefficient between both methods is 0.88 (P<0.01). Mean difference is 0.04±1.49L/min (95 % limits of agreement: +2.94 to -3.00L/min) and only 3/74 measures are not included between the limits of agreement. At high intensity and for cardiac output over than 15 L/min, Q˙cOP signal is lost in almost half the time. Concerning reliability, reproducibility coefficient is 0.87 (P<0.05), only 1.8 % of this variability is due to the method. EsCCO(®) measurements are accurate, reliable and allow a good estimation of cardiac output on healthy subjects. The signal lost observed for high cardiac output levels (>15L/min) can limit its utilization during very high intensity exercise. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Pulse wave propagation in a model human arterial network: Assessment of 1-D visco-elastic simulations against in vitro measurements

    PubMed Central

    Alastruey, Jordi; Khir, Ashraf W.; Matthys, Koen S.; Segers, Patrick; Sherwin, Spencer J.; Verdonck, Pascal R.; Parker, Kim H.; Peiró, Joaquim

    2011-01-01

    The accuracy of the nonlinear one-dimensional (1-D) equations of pressure and flow wave propagation in Voigt-type visco-elastic arteries was tested against measurements in a well-defined experimental 1:1 replica of the 37 largest conduit arteries in the human systemic circulation. The parameters required by the numerical algorithm were directly measured in the in vitro setup and no data fitting was involved. The inclusion of wall visco-elasticity in the numerical model reduced the underdamped high-frequency oscillations obtained using a purely elastic tube law, especially in peripheral vessels, which was previously reported in this paper [Matthys et al., 2007. Pulse wave propagation in a model human arterial network: Assessment of 1-D numerical simulations against in vitro measurements. J. Biomech. 40, 3476–3486]. In comparison to the purely elastic model, visco-elasticity significantly reduced the average relative root-mean-square errors between numerical and experimental waveforms over the 70 locations measured in the in vitro model: from 3.0% to 2.5% (p<0.012) for pressure and from 15.7% to 10.8% (p<0.002) for the flow rate. In the frequency domain, average relative errors between numerical and experimental amplitudes from the 5th to the 20th harmonic decreased from 0.7% to 0.5% (p<0.107) for pressure and from 7.0% to 3.3% (p<10−6) for the flow rate. These results provide additional support for the use of 1-D reduced modelling to accurately simulate clinically relevant problems at a reasonable computational cost. PMID:21724188

  5. Continuous cardiac output measurement by un-calibrated pulse wave analysis and pulmonary artery catheter in patients with septic shock.

    PubMed

    Ganter, Michael T; Alhashemi, Jamal A; Al-Shabasy, Adel M; Schmid, Ursina M; Schott, Peter; Shalabi, Sanaa A; Badri, Ahmed M; Hartnack, Sonja; Hofer, Christoph K

    2016-02-01

    Septic shock is a serious medical condition. With increased concerns about invasive techniques, a number of non-invasive and semi-invasive devices measuring cardiac output (CO) have become commercially available. The aim of the present study was to determine the accuracy, precision and trending abilities of the FloTrac and the continuous pulmonary artery catheter thermodilution technique determining CO in septic shock patients. Consecutive septic shock patients were included in two centres and CO was measured every 4 h up to 48 h by FloTrac (APCO) and by pulmonary artery catheter (PAC) using the continuous (CCO) and intermittent (ICO) technique. Forty-seven septic shock patients with 326 matched sets of APCO, CCO and ICO data were available for analysis. Bland and Altman analysis revealed a mean bias ±2 SD of 0.0 ± 2.14 L min(-1) for APCO-ICO (%error = 34.5 %) and 0.23 ± 2.55 L min(-1) for CCO-ICO (%error = 40.4 %). Trend analysis showed a concordance of 85 and 81 % for APCO and CCO, respectively. In contrast to CCO, APCO was influenced by systemic vascular resistance and by mean arterial pressure. In septic shock patients, APCO measurements assessed by FloTrac but also the established CCO measurements using the PAC did not meet the currently accepted statistical criteria indicating acceptable clinical performance.

  6. High resolution wavenumber analysis for investigation of arterial pulse wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Hideyuki; Sato, Masakazu; Irie, Takasuke

    2016-07-01

    The propagation of the pulse wave along the artery is relatively fast (several m/s), and a high-temporal resolution is required to measure pulse wave velocity (PWV) in a regional segment of the artery. High-frame-rate ultrasound enables the measurement of the regional PWV. In analyses of wave propagation phenomena, the direction and propagation speed are generally identified in the frequency-wavenumber space using the two-dimensional Fourier transform. However, the wavelength of the pulse wave is very long (1 m at a propagation velocity of 10 m/s and a temporal frequency of 10 Hz) compared with a typical lateral field of view of 40 mm in ultrasound imaging. Therefore, PWV cannot be identified in the frequency-wavenumber space owing to the low resolution of the two-dimensional Fourier transform. In the present study, PWV was visualized in the wavenumber domain using phases of arterial wall acceleration waveforms measured by high-frame-rate ultrasound.

  7. Investigation on the generation characteristic of pressure pulse wave signal during the measurement-while-drilling process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Changqing, Zhao; Kai, Liu; Tong, Zhao; Takei, Masahiro; Weian, Ren

    2014-04-01

    The mud-pulse logging instrument is an advanced measurement-while-drilling (MWD) tool and widely used by the industry in the world. In order to improve the signal transmission rate, ensure the accurate transmission of information and address the issue of the weak signal on the ground of oil and gas wells, the signal generator should send out the strong mud-pulse signals with the maximum amplitude. With the rotary valve pulse generator as the study object, the three-dimensional Reynolds NS equations and standard k - ɛ turbulent model were used as a mathematical model. The speed and pressure coupling calculation was done by simple algorithms to get the amplitudes of different rates of flow and axial clearances. Tests were done to verify the characteristics of the pressure signals. The pressure signal was captured by the standpiece pressure monitoring system. The study showed that the axial clearances grew bigger as the pressure wave amplitude value decreased and caused the weakening of the pulse signal. As the rate of flow got larger, the pressure wave amplitude would increase and the signal would be enhanced.

  8. Relation of adiponectin and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein to pulse-wave velocity and N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide in the general population.

    PubMed

    Sung, Shih-Hsien; Chuang, Shao-Yuan; Sheu, Wayne Huey-Herng; Lee, Wen-Jane; Chou, Pesus; Chen, Chen-Huan

    2009-05-15

    The roles of metabolic syndrome and chronic subclinical inflammation in arterial stiffening and the development of heart failure remain to be elucidated. Whether adiponectin and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) were independently related to brachial-ankle pulse-wave velocity (ba-PWV) and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP) in the general population were investigated. Eligible study subjects were 445 Chinese residents aged > or =40 years who participated in a community-based survey, underwent examination of ba-PWV, and had complete data of serum adiponectin, hs-CRP (<10 mg/L), and NT-pro-BNP. Adiponectin, but not hs-CRP, was independently related to ba-PWV (standardized regression parameter -0.107, p <0.05) when age, gender, body mass index, and number of metabolic syndrome components were accounted for. On the other hand, ba-PWV, adiponectin, and hs-CRP were independently related to NT-pro-BNP (standardized regression parameters 0.116, 0.188, and 0.094, respectively; all p <0.05) when age, gender, body mass index, number of metabolic syndrome components, and renal function were accounted for. In conclusion, adiponectin, but not hs-CRP, is independently associated with both ba-PWV and NT-pro-BNP in the general population. Because adiponectin, hs-CRP, ba-PWV, and NT-pro-BNP may represent markers for metabolic syndrome, chronic subclinical inflammation, arterial stiffness, and ventricular dysfunction, respectively, our results suggest that adiponectin may directly modulate both arterial stiffening and ventricular dysfunction. In contrast, hs-CRP may independently contribute to ventricular dysfunction, but not arterial stiffening.

  9. High aortic pulse-wave velocity may be responsible for elevated red blood cell distribution width in overweight and obese people: a community-based, cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Altiparmak, Ibrahim Halil; Erkus, Muslihittin Emre; Gunebakmaz, Ozgur; Yusuf, Sezen; Zekeriya, Kaya; Demirbag, Recep; Kocarslan, Aydemir; Sezen, Hatice; Yildiz, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background: Obesity and overweight are risk factors for atherosclerosis. Red blood cell distribution width (RDW) is associated with subclinical cardiac diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between RDW and aortic stiffness in overweight or obese subjects. Methods: A total of 101 overweight or obese subjects without overt cardiovascular disorders, and 48 healthy controls were enrolled. RDW, aortic pulse-wave velocity (PWV) and augmentation index 75 (Aix75) were evaluated. The case subjects were divided into two sub-groups according to PWV values; ≥ 10 m/s in group I, and < 10 m/s in group II. Bivariate correlation and multiple regression analyses (stepwise) were performed. Results RDW and PWV were considerably increased in the case groups compared with the controls. RDW was significantly increased in group I compared with group II and the controls [median 12.0 m/s, interquartile range (IQR): 10.5–17.5; median 11.7 m/s, IQR: 10.2–14.2, and median 11.4 m/s, IQR: 9.6–15.5, p < 0.05, respectively]. Resting heart rate and age were higher in group I than group II (81 ± 11 vs 74 ± 12 beats/min and 41 ± 120 vs 36 ± 9 years, respectively, p < 0.05). Regression analyses revealed that while log-RDW, age and resting heart rate were independent predictors for aortic PWV, log-RDW was the most important predictor in the final model. Conclusions: RDW, resting heart rate and age independently predicted arterial stiffness, and RDW may be useful to provide an early recognition of subclinical atherosclerosis in overweight and obese individuals. PMID:26895298

  10. Pulse Wave Well Development Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Burdick, S.

    2001-02-23

    Conventional methods of well development at the Savannah River Site generate significant volumes of investigative derived waste (IDW) which must be treated and disposed of at a regulated Treatment, Storage, or Disposal (TSD) facility. Pulse Wave technology is a commercial method of well development utilizing bursts of high pressure gas to create strong pressure waves through the well screen zone, extending out into the formation surrounding the well. The patented process is intended to reduce well development time and the amount of IDW generated as well as to micro-fracture the formation to improve well capacity.

  11. Reference values for pulse wave Doppler and tissue Doppler imaging in pediatric echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Dallaire, Frederic; Slorach, Cameron; Hui, Wei; Sarkola, Taisto; Friedberg, Mark K; Bradley, Timothy J; Jaeggi, Edgar; Dragulescu, Andreea; Har, Ronnie L H; Cherney, David Z I; Mertens, Luc

    2015-02-01

    In pediatric echocardiography, pulse wave Doppler, and tissue Doppler imaging velocities are widely used to assess cardiac function. Current reference values and Z scores, allowing adjustment for growth are limited by inconsistent methodologies and small sample size. Using a standardized approach for parametric modeling and Z score quality assessment, we propose new pediatric reference values and Z score equations for most left ventricular pulse wave Doppler and tissue Doppler imaging measurements. Two hundred thirty-three healthy pediatric subjects 1 to 18 years of age were prospectively recruited. Thirteen pulse wave Doppler and 14 tissue Doppler imaging measurements were recorded. Normalization for growth was done via a complete and standardized approach for parametric nonlinear regression modeling. Several analyses were performed to ensure adequate Z score distribution and to detect potential residual associations with growth or residual heteroscedasticity. Most measurements adopted a nonlinear relationship with growth and displayed significant heteroscedasticity. Compared with age, height, and weight, normalization for body surface area was most efficient in removing the effect of growth. Generally, polynomial and allometric models yielded adequate goodness-of-fit. Residual values for several measurements had significant departure from the normal distribution, which could be corrected using logarithmic or reciprocal transformation. Overall, weighted parametric nonlinear models allowed us to compute Z score equations with adequate normal distribution and without residual association with growth. We present Z scores for normalized pulse wave Doppler and tissue Doppler imaging in pediatric echocardiography. Further studies are needed to define the threshold beyond which health becomes a disease by integrating other important factors such as ventricular morphology, loading conditions, and heart rate. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. Improving the accuracy of effective orifice area assessment after transcatheter aortic valve replacement: validation of left ventricular outflow tract diameter and pulsed-wave Doppler location and impact of three-dimensional measurements.

    PubMed

    Khalique, Omar K; Hamid, Nadira B; Kodali, Susheel K; Nazif, Tamim M; Marcoff, Leo; Paradis, Jean-Michel; Williams, Mathew R; Vahl, Torsten P; George, Isaac; Leon, Martin B; Hahn, Rebecca T

    2015-11-01

    Echocardiographic calculation of effective orifice area (EOA) after transcatheter aortic valve replacement is integral to the assessment of transcatheter heart valve (THV) function. The aim of this study was to determine the most accurate method for calculating the EOA of the Edwards SAPIEN and SAPIEN XT THVs. One hundred intraprocedural transesophageal echocardiograms were analyzed. To calculate the post-transcatheter aortic valve replacement left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) stroke volume (SV), four diameters were measured using two-dimensional echocardiography: (1) baseline LVOT diameter (LVOTd_PRE), (2) postimplantation LVOT diameter, (3) native aortic annular diameter, and (4) THV in-stent diameter. Four corresponding areas were planimetered by three-dimensional echocardiography. Two LVOT velocity-time integrals (VTI) were measured with the pulsed-wave Doppler sample volume at (1) the proximal (apical) edge of the valve stent or (2) within the valve stent at the level of the THV cusps. LVOT velocity-time integral with the sample volume at the proximal edge of the valve stent was used with the LVOT and aortic annular measurements above, whereas in-stent VTI was paired with the in-stent THV diameter to yield eight different SVs. Right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) SV was calculated using RVOT diameter and RVOT VTI and was used as the primary comparator. Transaortic VTI was obtained by continuous-wave Doppler, and EOA calculations using each SV measurement were compared with (1) EOA calculated using RVOTSV and (2) planimetered aortic valve area using three-dimensional echocardiography (AVAplanimetry3D). Post-transcatheter aortic valve replacement EOA calculated using LVOTd_PRE was not significantly different from EOA calculated using RVOTSV (1.88 ± 0.33 vs 1.86 ± 0.39 cm(2), P = .36) or from AVAplanimetry3D (1.85 ± 0.28, P = .38, n = 34). All other two-dimensional EOA calculations were statistically larger than EOA calculated using RVOTSV

  13. Particle Velocity Measuring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. Dickey (Inventor); Carl, James R. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for determining the velocity of individual food particles within a liquid/solid food mixture that is cooked by an aseptic cooking method whereby the food mixture is heated as it flows through a flowline. At least one upstream and at least one downstream microwave transducer are provided to determine the minimum possible travel time of the fastest food particle through the flowline. In one embodiment, the upstream detector is not required. In another embodiment, a plurality of small dipole antenna markers are secured to a plurality of food particles to provide a plurality of signals as the markers pass the upstream and downstream transducers. The dipole antenna markers may also include a non-linear element to reradiate a harmonic frequency of a transmitter frequency. Upstream and downstream transducers include dipole antennas that are matched to the impedance of the food slurry and a signal transmission cable by various impedance matching means including unbalanced feed to the antennas.

  14. The pioneer in hemodynamics and pulse-wave analysis, Otto Frank.

    PubMed

    Middeke, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Arterial pulse-wave velocity is a noninvasive index of arterial distensibility now generally advocated to assess cardiovascular health above-and-beyond merely measuring blood pressure. A host of recent findings supports its use. This evidence draws attention to the fact that vascular stiffness precedes the increase in blood pressure with age and that even nonpharmacological lifestyle interventions can improve distensibility independent of blood pressure. Where do these ingeniously modern ideas come from, and who defined the principles we embrace today? A worthwhile lesson in physiology and exercise in humility is the effort to revisit the origins of these concepts and the man to whom gratitude should be directed.

  15. Impact of changes in systemic vascular resistance on a novel non-invasive continuous cardiac output measurement system based on pulse wave transit time: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Hironori; Tsutsui, Masato

    2014-08-01

    The inaccuracy of arterial waveform analysis for measuring continuos cardiac output (CCO) associated with changes in systemic vascular resistance (SVR) has been well documented. A new non-invasive continuous cardiac output monitoring system (esCCO) mainly utilizing pulse wave transit time (PWTT) in place of arterial waveform analysis has been developed. However, the trending ability of esCCO to measure cardiac output during changes in SVR remains unclear. After a previous multicenter study on esCCO measurement, we retrospectively identified two cases in which apparent changes in SVR developed in a short period during data collection. In each case, the trending ability of esCCO to measure cardiac output and time component of PWTT were analyzed. Recorded data suggest that the time component of PWTT may have a significant impact on the accuracy of estimating stroke volume during changes in SVR. However, further prospective clinical studies are required to test this hypothesis.

  16. Laboratory Model of the Cardiovascular System for Experimental Demonstration of Pulse Wave Propagation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stojadinovic, Bojana; Nestorovic, Zorica; Djuric, Biljana; Tenne, Tamar; Zikich, Dragoslav; Žikic, Dejan

    2017-01-01

    The velocity by which a disturbance moves through the medium is the wave velocity. Pulse wave velocity is among the key parameters in hemodynamics. Investigation of wave propagation through the fluid-filled elastic tube has a great importance for the proper biophysical understanding of the nature of blood flow through the cardiovascular system.…

  17. Pulse wave imaging using coherent compounding in a phantom and in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacharias Apostolakis, Iason; McGarry, Matthew D. J.; Bunting, Ethan A.; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2017-03-01

    Pulse wave velocity (PWV) is a surrogate marker of arterial stiffness linked to cardiovascular morbidity. Pulse wave imaging (PWI) is a technique developed by our group for imaging the pulse wave propagation in vivo. PWI requires high temporal and spatial resolution, which conventional ultrasonic imaging is unable to simultaneously provide. Coherent compounding is known to address this tradeoff and provides full aperture images at high frame rates. This study aims to implement PWI using coherent compounding within a GPU-accelerated framework. The results of the implemented method were validated using a silicone phantom against static mechanical testing. Reproducibility of the measured PWVs was assessed in the right common carotid of six healthy subjects (n  =  6) approximately 10–15 mm before the bifurcation during two cardiac cycles over the course of 1–3 d. Good agreement of the measured PWVs (3.97  ±  1.21 m s‑1, 4.08  ±  1.15 m s‑1, p  =  0.74) was obtained. The effects of frame rate, transmission angle and number of compounded plane waves on PWI performance were investigated in the six healthy volunteers. Performance metrics such as the reproducibility of the PWVs, the coefficient of determination (r 2), the SNR of the PWI axial wall velocities (\\text{SN}{{\\text{R}}{{\\text{v}_{\\text{PWI}}}}} ) and the percentage of lateral positions where the pulse wave appears to arrive at the same time-point, indicating inadequacy of the temporal resolution (i.e. temporal resolution misses) were used to evaluate the effect of each parameter. Compounding plane waves transmitted at 1° increments with a linear array yielded optimal performance, generating significantly higher r 2 and \\text{SN}{{\\text{R}}{{\\text{v}_{\\text{PWI}}}}} values (p  ⩽  0.05). Higher frame rates (⩾1667 Hz) produced improvements with significant gains in the r 2 coefficient (p  ⩽  0.05) and significant increase in both r 2 and

  18. Pulse wave imaging using coherent compounding in a phantom and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Apostolakis, Iason Zacharias; McGarry, Matthew D J; Bunting, Ethan A; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2017-03-07

    Pulse wave velocity (PWV) is a surrogate marker of arterial stiffness linked to cardiovascular morbidity. Pulse wave imaging (PWI) is a technique developed by our group for imaging the pulse wave propagation in vivo. PWI requires high temporal and spatial resolution, which conventional ultrasonic imaging is unable to simultaneously provide. Coherent compounding is known to address this tradeoff and provides full aperture images at high frame rates. This study aims to implement PWI using coherent compounding within a GPU-accelerated framework. The results of the implemented method were validated using a silicone phantom against static mechanical testing. Reproducibility of the measured PWVs was assessed in the right common carotid of six healthy subjects (n  =  6) approximately 10-15 mm before the bifurcation during two cardiac cycles over the course of 1-3 d. Good agreement of the measured PWVs (3.97  ±  1.21 m s(-1), 4.08  ±  1.15 m s(-1), p  =  0.74) was obtained. The effects of frame rate, transmission angle and number of compounded plane waves on PWI performance were investigated in the six healthy volunteers. Performance metrics such as the reproducibility of the PWVs, the coefficient of determination (r (2)), the SNR of the PWI axial wall velocities ([Formula: see text]) and the percentage of lateral positions where the pulse wave appears to arrive at the same time-point, indicating inadequacy of the temporal resolution (i.e. temporal resolution misses) were used to evaluate the effect of each parameter. Compounding plane waves transmitted at 1° increments with a linear array yielded optimal performance, generating significantly higher r (2) and [Formula: see text] values (p  ⩽  0.05). Higher frame rates (⩾1667 Hz) produced improvements with significant gains in the r (2) coefficient (p  ⩽  0.05) and significant increase in both r (2) and [Formula: see text] from single plane wave imaging to 3-plane

  19. Measurement of retinal blood velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winchester, Leonard W., Jr.; Chou, Nee-Yin

    2006-02-01

    A fundus camera was modified to illuminate the retina of a rabbit model with low power laser light in order to obtain laser speckle images. A fast-exposure charge-coupled device (CCD) camera was used to capture laser speckle images of the retina. Image acquisition was synchronized with the arterial pulses of the rabbit to ensure that all images are obtained at the same point in the cardiac cycle. The rabbits were sedated and a speculum was inserted to prevent the eyelid from closing. Both albino (New Zealand; pigmented (Dutch belted) rabbits were used in the study. The rabbit retina is almost avascular. The measurements are obtained for choroidal tissue as well as retinal tissue. Because the retina is in a region of high metabolism, blood velocity is strongly affected by blood oxygen saturation. Measurements of blood velocity obtained over a wide range of O II saturations (58%-100%) showed that blood velocity increases with decreasing O II saturation. For most experiments, the left eye of the rabbit was used for laser measurements whereas the right eye served as a control. No observable difference between pre- and post-experimented eye was noted. Histological examinations of retinal tissue subjected to repeated laser measurements showed no indication of tissue damage.

  20. Tangential Velocity Measurement Using Interferometric MTI Radar

    SciTech Connect

    DOERRY, ARMIN W.; MILESHOSKY, BRIAN P.; BICKEL, DOUGLAS L.

    2002-11-01

    An Interferometric Moving Target Indicator radar can be used to measure the tangential velocity component of a moving target. Multiple baselines, along with the conventional radial velocity measurement, allow estimating the true 3-D velocity vector of a target.

  1. Detecting Subclinical Biventricular Impairment in Scleroderma Patients by Use of Pulsed-Wave Tissue Doppler Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Can, Ilknur; Onat, Ahmet Mesut; Aytemir, Kudret; Akdogan, Ali; Ureten, Kemal; Kiraz, Sedat; Ertenli, Ihsan; Tokgozoglu, Lale; Oto, Ali

    2009-01-01

    Systemic scleroderma is a disease that is characterized by excessive fibroblastic activity and collagen deposition in various organs, including the heart. We sought to evaluate the limits of biventricular function as derived noninvasively from pulsed-wave tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) of tricuspid and mitral annular motion in patients who had scleroderma. We enrolled 24 patients with scleroderma (study group; mean age, 49 ± 11 yr; 20 women) and 24 healthy participants (control group; mean age, 51 ± 9 yr; 19 women). Persons with cardiovascular risk factors were excluded. We obtained images by conventional echocardiography and by pulsed-wave TDI, measuring the respective peak systolic velocities (S, Sm) and peak early (E, Em) and late (A, Am) diastolic velocities. Mean Sm, mean Em, and mean Am were averages of the 4 measured sites (anterior, inferior, lateral, and septal). We calculated noninvasive estimates of left ventricular (LV) filling pressure by dividing E velocities (from the mitral inflow) by Em velocities (E/Em ratios). Biventricular regional Sm, regional LV myocardial Em, and ratios of myocardial Em/atrial component velocity (Em/Am) for the LV, and mean Sm, mean Em, and mean Em/mean Am ratios for the LV were significantly lower in the study group. The E/Em ratio was higher in the study group (7.3 ± 2.6 vs 5.2 ± 1.0, P = 0.01). Global LV systolic and diastolic function did not differ between the groups. Tissue Doppler imaging complements conventional echocardiography in detecting subclinical biventricular impairment in patients with scleroderma who have normal global measurements. PMID:19436783

  2. Measuring mean velocities with Pogo

    SciTech Connect

    Rossby, T.; Fontaine, J.; Hummon, J. )

    1991-10-01

    Pogo is a sample technique for measuring water transport between the surface and some preselected depth. Equipped with a 12-kHz pinger for tracking and range measurements, a xenon flasher for nighttime relocation, and a VHF beacon for daytime recovery, it has been used over 200 times in the Gulf Stream to measure volume transport and to provide a reference velocity (transport) for geostrophic calculations from pairs of hydrographic stations. This note gives a brief technical description of Pogo and how it is used. Loran C was used for navigation in this study, but with the advent of the Global Positioning System (GPS), Pogo can be used worldwide. 6 refs.

  3. Pulse Wave Variation during the Menstrual Cycle in Women with Menstrual Pain

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Soo Hyung; Kim, Kyu Kon; Lee, In Seon; Lee, Yong Tae; Kim, Gyeong Cheol; Chi, Gyoo Yong; Cho, Hye Sook; Kang, Hee Jung

    2016-01-01

    Objective. This study is performed to obtain objective diagnostic indicators associated with menstrual pain using pulse wave analysis. Methods. Using a pulse diagnostic device, we measured the pulse waves of 541 women aged between 19 and 30 years, placed in either an experimental group with menstrual pain (n = 329) or a control group with little or no menstrual pain (n = 212). Measurements were taken during both the menstrual and nonmenstrual periods, and comparative analysis was performed. Results. During the nonmenstrual period, the experimental group showed a significantly higher value in the left radial artery for the radial augmentation index (RAI) (p = 0.050) but significantly lower values for pulse wave energy (p = 0.021) and time to first peak from baseline (T1) (p = 0.035) in the right radial artery. During the menstrual period, the experimental group showed significantly lower values in the left radial artery for cardiac diastole and pulse wave area during diastole and significantly higher values for pulse wave area during systole, ratio of systolic phase to the full heartbeat, and systolic-diastolic ratio. Conclusion. We obtained indicators of menstrual pain in women during the menstrual period, including prolonged systolic and shortened diastolic phases, increases in pulse wave energy and area of representative pulse wave, and increased blood vessel resistance. PMID:27579304

  4. Pulse Wave Variation during the Menstrual Cycle in Women with Menstrual Pain.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Soo Hyung; Kim, Kyu Kon; Lee, In Seon; Lee, Yong Tae; Kim, Gyeong Cheol; Chi, Gyoo Yong; Cho, Hye Sook; Kang, Hee Jung; Kim, Jong Won

    2016-01-01

    Objective. This study is performed to obtain objective diagnostic indicators associated with menstrual pain using pulse wave analysis. Methods. Using a pulse diagnostic device, we measured the pulse waves of 541 women aged between 19 and 30 years, placed in either an experimental group with menstrual pain (n = 329) or a control group with little or no menstrual pain (n = 212). Measurements were taken during both the menstrual and nonmenstrual periods, and comparative analysis was performed. Results. During the nonmenstrual period, the experimental group showed a significantly higher value in the left radial artery for the radial augmentation index (RAI) (p = 0.050) but significantly lower values for pulse wave energy (p = 0.021) and time to first peak from baseline (T1) (p = 0.035) in the right radial artery. During the menstrual period, the experimental group showed significantly lower values in the left radial artery for cardiac diastole and pulse wave area during diastole and significantly higher values for pulse wave area during systole, ratio of systolic phase to the full heartbeat, and systolic-diastolic ratio. Conclusion. We obtained indicators of menstrual pain in women during the menstrual period, including prolonged systolic and shortened diastolic phases, increases in pulse wave energy and area of representative pulse wave, and increased blood vessel resistance.

  5. Engineering studies of vectorcardiographs in blood pressure measuring systems, appendix 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mark, R. G.

    1975-01-01

    The development of a cardiovascular monitoring system to noninvasively monitor the blood pressure and heart rate using pulse wave velocity was described. The following topics were covered: (1) pulse wave velocity as a measure of arterial blood pressure, (2) diastolic blood pressure and pulse wave velocity in humans, (3) transducer development for blood pressure measuring device, and (4) cardiovascular monitoring system. It was found, in experiments on dogs, that the pulse wave velocity is linearly related to diastolic blood pressure over a wide range of blood pressure and in the presence of many physiological perturbations. A similar relationship was observed in normal, young human males over a moderate range of pressures. Past methods for monitoring blood pressure and a new method based on pulse wave velocity determination were described. Two systems were tested: a Doppler ultrasonic transducer and a photoelectric plethysmograph. A cardiovascular monitoring system was described, including operating instructions.

  6. Alterations in pulse wave propagation reflect the degree of outflow tract banding in HH18 chicken embryos

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Liang; Goenezen, Sevan; Haller, Stephen; Hinds, Monica T.; Thornburg, Kent L.

    2013-01-01

    Hemodynamic conditions play a critical role in embryonic cardiovascular development, and altered blood flow leads to congenital heart defects. Chicken embryos are frequently used as models of cardiac development, with abnormal blood flow achieved through surgical interventions such as outflow tract (OFT) banding, in which a suture is tightened around the heart OFT to restrict blood flow. Banding in embryos increases blood pressure and alters blood flow dynamics, leading to cardiac malformations similar to those seen in human congenital heart disease. In studying these hemodynamic changes, synchronization of data to the cardiac cycle is challenging, and alterations in the timing of cardiovascular events after interventions are frequently lost. To overcome this difficulty, we used ECG signals from chicken embryos (Hamburger-Hamilton stage 18, ∼3 days of incubation) to synchronize blood pressure measurements and optical coherence tomography images. Our results revealed that, after 2 h of banding, blood pressure and pulse wave propagation strongly depend on band tightness. In particular, while pulse transit time in the heart OFT of control embryos is ∼10% of the cardiac cycle, after banding (35% to 50% band tightness) it becomes negligible, indicating a faster OFT pulse wave velocity. Pulse wave propagation in the circulation is likewise affected; however, pulse transit time between the ventricle and dorsal aorta (at the level of the heart) is unchanged, suggesting an overall preservation of cardiovascular function. Changes in cardiac pressure wave propagation are likely contributing to the extent of cardiac malformations observed in banded hearts. PMID:23709601

  7. Alterations in pulse wave propagation reflect the degree of outflow tract banding in HH18 chicken embryos.

    PubMed

    Shi, Liang; Goenezen, Sevan; Haller, Stephen; Hinds, Monica T; Thornburg, Kent L; Rugonyi, Sandra

    2013-08-01

    Hemodynamic conditions play a critical role in embryonic cardiovascular development, and altered blood flow leads to congenital heart defects. Chicken embryos are frequently used as models of cardiac development, with abnormal blood flow achieved through surgical interventions such as outflow tract (OFT) banding, in which a suture is tightened around the heart OFT to restrict blood flow. Banding in embryos increases blood pressure and alters blood flow dynamics, leading to cardiac malformations similar to those seen in human congenital heart disease. In studying these hemodynamic changes, synchronization of data to the cardiac cycle is challenging, and alterations in the timing of cardiovascular events after interventions are frequently lost. To overcome this difficulty, we used ECG signals from chicken embryos (Hamburger-Hamilton stage 18, ∼3 days of incubation) to synchronize blood pressure measurements and optical coherence tomography images. Our results revealed that, after 2 h of banding, blood pressure and pulse wave propagation strongly depend on band tightness. In particular, while pulse transit time in the heart OFT of control embryos is ∼10% of the cardiac cycle, after banding (35% to 50% band tightness) it becomes negligible, indicating a faster OFT pulse wave velocity. Pulse wave propagation in the circulation is likewise affected; however, pulse transit time between the ventricle and dorsal aorta (at the level of the heart) is unchanged, suggesting an overall preservation of cardiovascular function. Changes in cardiac pressure wave propagation are likely contributing to the extent of cardiac malformations observed in banded hearts.

  8. Hydrokinetic canal measurements: inflow velocity, wake flow velocity, and turbulence

    DOE Data Explorer

    Gunawan, Budi

    2014-06-11

    The dataset consist of acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) velocity measurements in the wake of a 3-meter diameter vertical-axis hydrokinetic turbine deployed in Roza Canal, Yakima, WA, USA. A normalized hub-centerline wake velocity profile and two cross-section velocity contours, 10 meters and 20 meters downstream of the turbine, are presented. Mean velocities and turbulence data, measured using acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV) at 50 meters upstream of the turbine, are also presented. Canal dimensions and hydraulic properties, and turbine-related information are also included.

  9. Novel wave intensity analysis of arterial pulse wave propagation accounting for peripheral reflections.

    PubMed

    Alastruey, Jordi; Hunt, Anthony A E; Weinberg, Peter D

    2014-02-01

    We present a novel analysis of arterial pulse wave propagation that combines traditional wave intensity analysis with identification of Windkessel pressures to account for the effect on the pressure waveform of peripheral wave reflections. Using haemodynamic data measured in vivo in the rabbit or generated numerically in models of human compliant vessels, we show that traditional wave intensity analysis identifies the timing, direction and magnitude of the predominant waves that shape aortic pressure and flow waveforms in systole, but fails to identify the effect of peripheral reflections. These reflections persist for several cardiac cycles and make up most of the pressure waveform, especially in diastole and early systole. Ignoring peripheral reflections leads to an erroneous indication of a reflection-free period in early systole and additional error in the estimates of (i) pulse wave velocity at the ascending aorta given by the PU-loop method (9.5% error) and (ii) transit time to a dominant reflection site calculated from the wave intensity profile (27% error). These errors decreased to 1.3% and 10%, respectively, when accounting for peripheral reflections. Using our new analysis, we investigate the effect of vessel compliance and peripheral resistance on wave intensity, peripheral reflections and reflections originating in previous cardiac cycles. © 2013 The Authors. International Journal for Numerical Methods in Biomedical Engineering published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Novel wave intensity analysis of arterial pulse wave propagation accounting for peripheral reflections

    PubMed Central

    Alastruey, Jordi; Hunt, Anthony A E; Weinberg, Peter D

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel analysis of arterial pulse wave propagation that combines traditional wave intensity analysis with identification of Windkessel pressures to account for the effect on the pressure waveform of peripheral wave reflections. Using haemodynamic data measured in vivo in the rabbit or generated numerically in models of human compliant vessels, we show that traditional wave intensity analysis identifies the timing, direction and magnitude of the predominant waves that shape aortic pressure and flow waveforms in systole, but fails to identify the effect of peripheral reflections. These reflections persist for several cardiac cycles and make up most of the pressure waveform, especially in diastole and early systole. Ignoring peripheral reflections leads to an erroneous indication of a reflection-free period in early systole and additional error in the estimates of (i) pulse wave velocity at the ascending aorta given by the PU–loop method (9.5% error) and (ii) transit time to a dominant reflection site calculated from the wave intensity profile (27% error). These errors decreased to 1.3% and 10%, respectively, when accounting for peripheral reflections. Using our new analysis, we investigate the effect of vessel compliance and peripheral resistance on wave intensity, peripheral reflections and reflections originating in previous cardiac cycles. PMID:24132888

  11. Comparison of the ability of two continuous cardiac output monitors to measure trends in cardiac output: estimated continuous cardiac output measured by modified pulse wave transit time and an arterial pulse contour-based cardiac output device.

    PubMed

    Terada, Takashi; Oiwa, Ayano; Maemura, Yumi; Robert, Samuna; Kessoku, Sayaka; Ochiai, Ryoichi

    2016-10-01

    Estimated continuous cardiac output (esCCO), a noninvasive technique for continuously measuring cardiac output (CO), is based on modified pulse wave transit time, which in turn is determined by pulse oximetry and electrocardiography. However, its trending ability has never been evaluated in patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery. Therefore, this study examined esCCO's ability to detect the exact changes in CO, compared with currently available arterial waveform analysis methods, in patients undergoing kidney transplantation. CO was measured using an esCCO system and arterial pressure-based CO (APCO), and compared with a corresponding intermittent bolus thermodilution CO (ICO) method. Percentage error and statistical methods, including concordance analysis and polar plot analysis, were used to analyze results from 15 adult patients. The difference in the CO values between esCCO and ICO was -0.39 ± 1.15 L min(-1) (percentage error, 35.6 %). And corrected precision for repeated measures was 1.16 L min(-1) (percentage error for repeated measures, 36.0 %). A concordance analysis showed that the concordance rate was 93.1 %. The mean angular bias was -1.8° and the radial limits of agreement were ±37.6°. The difference between the APCO and ICO CO values was 0.04 ± 1.37 L min(-1) (percentage error, 42.4 %). And corrected precision for repeated measures was 1.37 L min(-1) (percentage error for repeated measures, 42.5 %). The concordance rate was 89.7 %, with a mean angular bias of -3.3° and radial limits of agreement of ±42.2°. This study demonstrated that the trending ability of the esCCO system is not clinically acceptable, as judged by polar plots analysis; however, its trending ability is clinically acceptable based on a concordance analysis, and is comparable with currently available arterial waveform analysis methods.

  12. Inexpensive Time-of-Flight Velocity Measurements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Everett, Glen E.; Wild, R. L.

    1979-01-01

    Describes a circuit designed to measure time-of-flight velocity and shows how to use it to determine bullet velocity in connection with the ballistic pendulum demonstration of momentum conservation. (Author/GA)

  13. Inexpensive Time-of-Flight Velocity Measurements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Everett, Glen E.; Wild, R. L.

    1979-01-01

    Describes a circuit designed to measure time-of-flight velocity and shows how to use it to determine bullet velocity in connection with the ballistic pendulum demonstration of momentum conservation. (Author/GA)

  14. Tangential velocity measurement using interferometric MTI radar

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin W.; Mileshosky, Brian P.; Bickel, Douglas L.

    2006-01-03

    Radar systems use time delay measurements between a transmitted signal and its echo to calculate range to a target. Ranges that change with time cause a Doppler offset in phase and frequency of the echo. Consequently, the closing velocity between target and radar can be measured by measuring the Doppler offset of the echo. The closing velocity is also known as radial velocity, or line-of-sight velocity. Doppler frequency is measured in a pulse-Doppler radar as a linear phase shift over a set of radar pulses during some Coherent Processing Interval (CPI). An Interferometric Moving Target Indicator (MTI) radar can be used to measure the tangential velocity component of a moving target. Multiple baselines, along with the conventional radial velocity measurement, allow estimating the true 3-D velocity of a target.

  15. Pulsed-wave Doppler ultrasonographic evaluation of hepatic vein in dogs with tricuspid regurgitation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jaehwan; Kim, Soyoung

    2017-01-01

    This study was performed to identify the relationships between hepatic vein (HV) measurements, including flow velocity and waveform, using pulsed-wave (PW) Doppler ultrasonography, and the severity of tricuspid regurgitation (TR) in dogs. The study included 22 dogs with TR and 7 healthy dogs. The TR group was subdivided into 3 groups according to TR jet profile obtained by echocardiography. The hepatic venous waveform was obtained and classified into 3 types. A variety of HV measurements, including the maximal velocities of the atrial systolic, systolic (S), end ventricular systolic, and diastolic (D) waves and the ratio of the S- and D- wave velocities (S/D ratio), were acquired. TR severity was significantly correlated with the S- (r = −0.380, p = 0.042) and D- (r = 0.468, p = 0.011) wave velocities and the S/D ratio (r = −0.747, p < 0.001). Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis revealed the highest sensitivity and specificity for the S/D ratio (89% and 75%, respectively) at a threshold of 0.97 with excellent accuracy (AUC = 0.911, p < 0.001). In conclusion, PW Doppler ultrasonography of the HV can be used to identify the presence of significant TR and to classify TR severity in dogs. PMID:27515264

  16. Three-dimensional velocity measurements using LDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchhave, Preben

    The design requirements for and development of an LDA that measures the three components of the fluid velocity vector are described. The problems encountered in LDA measurements in highly turbulent flows, multivariate response, velocity bias, spatial resolution, temporal resolution, and dynamic range, are discussed. The use of the fringe and/or the reference beam methods to measure the three velocity components, and the use of color, frequency shift, and polarization to separate three velocity projections are examined. Consideration is given to the coordinate transformation, the presentation of three-dimensional LDA data, and the possibility of three-dimensional bias correction. Procedures for conducting three-dimensional LDA measurements are proposed.

  17. Measuring velocity profiles by the LDA method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamil, Šimeček; Katarína, Ratkovská

    2017-09-01

    This article describes in details an experiment, which was done by the method Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA). The experiment used the wind tunnel in the laboratory at the Department of Power System Engineering, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering. The result of measuring was air velocity profiles in the wind tunnel in cases with or without an obstacle in the airflow. The measurements take place in three planes perpendicular to the axis of the wind tunnel in the middle of the height of the tunnel end. Because the LDA method measures the velocity only in separated points, it is necessary to use traverse systems in the direction of measuring lines to make the velocity profiles. The results of this experiment are histograms (diagrams which show numbers of particulars values of velocity) and velocity profiles (for whole lines). These velocity profiles are compared with the results of the same experiment, which was measured by the method Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV).

  18. Noninvasive technique for the diagnosis of patent ductus arteriosus in premature infants by analyzing pulse wave phases on photoplethysmography signals measured in the right hand and the left foot.

    PubMed

    Goudjil, Sabrina; Imestouren, Fatiha; Armougon, Aurelie; Razafimanantsoa, Lucie; Mahmoudzadeh, Mahdi; Wallois, Fabrice; Leke, André; Kongolo, Guy

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) on the pulse phase difference (PPD) between the left foot (postductal region) and the right hand (preductal region). PPD was determined from arterial photoplethysmography signals (pulse waves) measured by infrared sensors routinely used for pulse oximetry in 56 premature infants less than 32 weeks gestation. Only infants with significant PDA (sPDA) diagnosed by echocardiography were treated with ibuprofen (for 3 days). Patients were classified according to whether or not they responded (Success/Failure) to this treatment. The Control group was composed of infants in whom ductus had already closed spontaneously at the time of the first echocardiography. The 3 groups were compared in terms of PPD at the beginning (T1) and at the end (T2) of the study. For patients in the Failure (n = 17) and Success groups (n = 18), T1 corresponded to the first day of treatment and T2 to the day after completion of the course of ibuprofen. In the Control group (n = 21), T1 corresponded to 1 to 3 days of life (DOL), and T2 to 4-6 DOL. Compared to the Control group, PPD was higher in the Failure (at T1 and T2) and Success (at T1) groups characterized by sPDA. After ibuprofen therapy, PPD in the Success group decreased to about the level observed in the Control group. The area under the ROC curve of PPD for the diagnosis of sPDA was 0.98 (95% CI 0.96-1); for an optimal cut-off of PPD ≥ 1.65 deg/cm, the sensitivity was 94.2% and the specificity was 98.3%. In this study, PPD was correlated with ductus arteriosus status evaluated by echocardiography, indicating involvement of the ductal shunt in the mechanism of redistribution in systemic vascular territories. PPD can be considered for the diagnosis of hemodynamically significant PDA.

  19. Modeling measured glottal volume velocity waveforms.

    PubMed

    Verneuil, Andrew; Berry, David A; Kreiman, Jody; Gerratt, Bruce R; Ye, Ming; Berke, Gerald S

    2003-02-01

    The source-filter theory of speech production describes a glottal energy source (volume velocity waveform) that is filtered by the vocal tract and radiates from the mouth as phonation. The characteristics of the volume velocity waveform, the source that drives phonation, have been estimated, but never directly measured at the glottis. To accomplish this measurement, constant temperature anemometer probes were used in an in vivo canine constant pressure model of phonation. A 3-probe array was positioned supraglottically, and an endoscopic camera was positioned subglottically. Simultaneous recordings of airflow velocity (using anemometry) and glottal area (using stroboscopy) were made in 3 animals. Glottal airflow velocities and areas were combined to produce direct measurements of glottal volume velocity waveforms. The anterior and middle parts of the glottis contributed significantly to the volume velocity waveform, with less contribution from the posterior part of the glottis. The measured volume velocity waveforms were successfully fitted to a well-known laryngeal airflow model. A noninvasive measured volume velocity waveform holds promise for future clinical use.

  20. Achromatic Emission Velocity Measurements in Luminous Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, S. J.; Fulghum, S. F.; Rostler, P. S.

    1997-01-01

    A new velocity measurement instrument for luminous flows was developed by Science Research Laboratory for NASA. The SIEVE (Segmented Image Emission VElocimeter) instrument uses broadband light emitted by the flow for the velocity measurement. This differs from other velocimetry techniques in that it does not depend on laser illumination and/or light scattering from particles in the flow. The SIEVE is a passive, non-intrusive diagnostic. By moving and adjusting the imaging optics, the SIEVE can provide three-dimensional mapping of a flow field and determine turbulence scale size. A SIEVE instrument was demonstrated on an illuminated rotating disk to evaluate instrument response and noise and on an oxy-acetylene torch to measure flame velocities. The luminous flow in rocket combustors and plumes is an ideal subject for the SIEVE velocity measurement technique.

  1. Noninvasive Technique for the Diagnosis of Patent Ductus Arteriosus in Premature Infants by Analyzing Pulse Wave Phases on Photoplethysmography Signals Measured in the Right Hand and the Left Foot

    PubMed Central

    Goudjil, Sabrina; Imestouren, Fatiha; Armougon, Aurelie; Razafimanantsoa, Lucie; Mahmoudzadeh, Mahdi; Wallois, Fabrice; Leke, André; Kongolo, Guy

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the impact of patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) on the pulse phase difference (PPD) between the left foot (postductal region) and the right hand (preductal region). Materials and Methods PPD was determined from arterial photoplethysmography signals (pulse waves) measured by infrared sensors routinely used for pulse oximetry in 56 premature infants less than 32 weeks gestation. Only infants with significant PDA (sPDA) diagnosed by echocardiography were treated with ibuprofen (for 3 days). Patients were classified according to whether or not they responded (Success/Failure) to this treatment. The Control group was composed of infants in whom ductus had already closed spontaneously at the time of the first echocardiography. The 3 groups were compared in terms of PPD at the beginning (T1) and at the end (T2) of the study. For patients in the Failure (n = 17) and Success groups (n = 18), T1 corresponded to the first day of treatment and T2 to the day after completion of the course of ibuprofen. In the Control group (n = 21), T1 corresponded to 1 to 3 days of life (DOL), and T2 to 4–6 DOL. Results Compared to the Control group, PPD was higher in the Failure (at T1 and T2) and Success (at T1) groups characterized by sPDA. After ibuprofen therapy, PPD in the Success group decreased to about the level observed in the Control group. The area under the ROC curve of PPD for the diagnosis of sPDA was 0.98 (95% CI 0.96–1); for an optimal cut-off of PPD ≥1.65 deg/cm, the sensitivity was 94.2% and the specificity was 98.3%. Conclusion In this study, PPD was correlated with ductus arteriosus status evaluated by echocardiography, indicating involvement of the ductal shunt in the mechanism of redistribution in systemic vascular territories. PPD can be considered for the diagnosis of hemodynamically significant PDA. PMID:24892695

  2. Spall velocity measurements from laboratory impact craters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polanskey, Carol A.; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    Spall velocities were measured for a series of impacts into San Marcos gabbro. Impact velocities ranged from 1 to 6.5 km/sec. Projectiles varied in material and size with a maximum mass of 4g for a lead bullet to a minimum of 0.04 g for an aluminum sphere. The spall velocities were calculated both from measurements taken from films of the events and from estimates based on range measurements of the spall fragments. The maximum spall velocity observed was 27 m/sec, or 0.5 percent of the impact velocity. The measured spall velocities were within the range predicted by the Melosh (1984) spallation model for the given experimental parameters. The compatability between the Melosh model for large planetary impacts and the results of these small scale experiments is considered in detail. The targets were also bisected to observe the internal fractures. A series of fractures were observed whose location coincided with the boundary of the theoretical near surface zone predicted by Melosh. Above this boundary the target material should receive reduced levels of compressive stress as compared to the more highly shocked region below.

  3. Spall velocity measurements from laboratory impact craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polanskey, Carol A.; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1986-01-01

    Spall velocities were measured for a series of impacts into San Marcos gabbro. Impact velocities ranged from 1 to 6.5 km/sec. Projectiles varied in material and size with a maximum mass of 4g for a lead bullet to a minimum of 0.04 g for an aluminum sphere. The spall velocities were calculated both from measurements taken from films of the events and from estimates based on range measurements of the spall fragments. The maximum spall velocity observed was 27 m/sec, or 0.5 percent of the impact velocity. The measured spall velocities were within the range predicted by the Melosh (1984) spallation model for the given experimental parameters. The compatability between the Melosh model for large planetary impacts and the results of these small scale experiments is considered in detail. The targets were also bisected to observe the internal fractures. A series of fractures were observed whose location coincided with the boundary of the theoretical near surface zone predicted by Melosh. Above this boundary the target material should receive reduced levels of compressive stress as compared to the more highly shocked region below.

  4. Internal Detonation Velocity Measurements Inside High Explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Benterou, J; Bennett, C V; Cole, G; Hare, D E; May, C; Udd, E

    2009-01-16

    In order to fully calibrate hydrocodes and dynamic chemistry burn models, initiation models and detonation models of high explosives, the ability to continuously measure the detonation velocity within an explosive is required. Progress on an embedded velocity diagnostic using a 125 micron diameter optical fiber containing a chirped fiber Bragg grating is reported. As the chirped fiber Bragg grating is consumed by the moving detonation wave, the physical length of the unconsumed Bragg grating is monitored with a fast InGaAs photodiode. Experimental details of the associated equipment and data in the form of continuous detonation velocity records within PBX-9502 are presented. This small diameter fiber sensor has the potential to measure internal detonation velocities on the order of 10 mm/{micro}sec along path lengths tens of millimeters long.

  5. Measurement of the velocity of a quantum object: a role of group velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostovtsev, Yuri V.

    2013-03-01

    We consider a free motion of a quantum particle. Introducing an explicit measurement procedure for velocity, we demonstrate that the measured velocity is related to the group and phase velocities of the corresponding matter waves. We show that for long distances the measured velocity coincides with the matter wave group velocity.

  6. Antarctica: measuring glacier velocity from satellite images

    SciTech Connect

    Lucchitta, B.K.; Ferguson, H.M.

    1986-11-28

    Many Landsat images of Antarctica show distinctive flow and crevasse features in the floating part of ice streams and outlet glaciers immediately below their grounding zones. Some of the features, which move with the glacier or ice stream, remain visible over many years and thus allow time-lapse measurements of ice velocities. Measurements taken from Landsat images of features on Byrd Glacier agree well with detailed ground and aerial observations. The satellite-image technique thus offers a rapid and cost-effective method of obtaining average velocities, to a first order of accuracy, of many ice streams and outlet glaciers near their termini.

  7. Antarctica: measuring glacier velocity from satellite images.

    PubMed

    Lucchitta, B K; Ferguson, H M

    1986-11-28

    Many Landsat images of Antarctica show distinctive flow and crevasse features in the floating part of ice streams and outlet glaciers immediately below their grounding zones. Some of the features, which move with the glacier or ice stream, remain visible over many years and thus allow time-lapse measurements of ice velocities. Measurements taken from Landsat images of features on Byrd Glacier agree well with detailed ground and aerial observations. The satellite-image technique thus offers a rapid and cost-effective method of obtaining average velocities, to a first order of accuracy, of many ice streams and outlet glaciers near their termini.

  8. Antarctica: Measuring glacier velocity from satellite images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lucchitta, B.K.; Ferguson, H.M.

    1986-01-01

    Many Landsat images of Antarctica show distinctive flow and crevasse features in the floating part of ice streams and outlet glaciers immediately below their grounding zones. Some of the features, which move with the glacier or ice stream, remain visible over many years and thus allow time-lapse measurements of ice velocities. Measurements taken from Landsat images of features on Byrd Glacier agree well with detailed ground and aerial observations. The satellite-image technique thus offers a rapid and cost-effective method of obtaining average velocities, to a first order of accuracy, of many ice streams and outlet glaciers near their termini.

  9. Velocity and turbulence measurements in combustion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, R. J.; Lau, K. Y.; Leung, C. C.

    1983-06-01

    A laser-Doppler velocimeter is used in the measurement of high-temperature gas flows. A two-stage fluidization particle generator provides magnesium oxide particles to serve as optical scattering centers. The one-dimensional dual-beam system is frequency shifted to permit measurements of velocities up to 300 meters per second and turbulence intensities greater than 100 percent. Exiting flows from can-type gas turbine combustors and burners with pre-mixed oxy-acetylene flames are described in terms of the velocity, turbulence intensity, and temperature profiles. The results indicate the influence of the combustion process on turbulence.

  10. Wave measurements using GPS velocity signals.

    PubMed

    Doong, Dong-Jiing; Lee, Beng-Chun; Kao, Chia Chuen

    2011-01-01

    This study presents the idea of using GPS-output velocity signals to obtain wave measurement data. The application of the transformation from a velocity spectrum to a displacement spectrum in conjunction with the directional wave spectral theory are the core concepts in this study. Laboratory experiments were conducted to verify the accuracy of the inversed displacement of the surface of the sea. A GPS device was installed on a moored accelerometer buoy to verify the GPS-derived wave parameters. It was determined that loss or drifting of the GPS signal, as well as energy spikes occurring in the low frequency band led to erroneous measurements. Through the application of moving average skill and a process of frequency cut-off to the GPS output velocity, correlations between GPS-derived, and accelerometer buoy-measured significant wave heights and periods were both improved to 0.95. The GPS-derived one-dimensional and directional wave spectra were in agreement with the measurements. Despite the direction verification showing a 10° bias, this exercise still provided useful information with sufficient accuracy for a number of specific purposes. The results presented in this study indicate that using GPS output velocity is a reasonable alternative for the measurement of ocean waves.

  11. Wave Measurements Using GPS Velocity Signals

    PubMed Central

    Doong, Dong-Jiing; Lee, Beng-Chun; Kao, Chia Chuen

    2011-01-01

    This study presents the idea of using GPS-output velocity signals to obtain wave measurement data. The application of the transformation from a velocity spectrum to a displacement spectrum in conjunction with the directional wave spectral theory are the core concepts in this study. Laboratory experiments were conducted to verify the accuracy of the inversed displacement of the surface of the sea. A GPS device was installed on a moored accelerometer buoy to verify the GPS-derived wave parameters. It was determined that loss or drifting of the GPS signal, as well as energy spikes occurring in the low frequency band led to erroneous measurements. Through the application of moving average skill and a process of frequency cut-off to the GPS output velocity, correlations between GPS-derived, and accelerometer buoy-measured significant wave heights and periods were both improved to 0.95. The GPS-derived one-dimensional and directional wave spectra were in agreement with the measurements. Despite the direction verification showing a 10° bias, this exercise still provided useful information with sufficient accuracy for a number of specific purposes. The results presented in this study indicate that using GPS output velocity is a reasonable alternative for the measurement of ocean waves. PMID:22346618

  12. Algal Cell Response to Pulsed Waved Stimulation and Its Application to Increase Algal Lipid Production

    PubMed Central

    Savchenko, Oleksandra; Xing, Jida; Yang, Xiaoyan; Gu, Quanrong; Shaheen, Mohamed; Huang, Min; Yu, Xiaojian; Burrell, Robert; Patra, Prabir; Chen, Jie

    2017-01-01

    Generating renewable energy while sequestering CO2 using algae has recently attracted significant research attention, mostly directing towards biological methods such as systems biology, genetic engineering and bio-refining for optimizing algae strains. Other approaches focus on chemical screening to adjust culture conditions or culture media. We report for the first time the physiological changes of algal cells in response to a novel form of mechanical stimulation, or a pulsed wave at the frequency of 1.5 MHz and the duty cycle of 20%. We studied how the pulsed wave can further increase algal lipid production on top of existing biological and chemical methods. Two commonly used algal strains, fresh-water Chlorella vulgaris and seawater Tetraselmis chuii, were selected. We have performed the tests in shake flasks and 1 L spinner-flask bioreactors. Conventional Gravimetric measurements show that up to 20% increase for algal lipid could be achieved after 8 days of stimulation. The total electricity cost needed for the stimulations in a one-liter bioreactor is only one-tenth of a US penny. Gas liquid chromatography shows that the fatty acid composition remains unchanged after pulsed-wave stimulation. Scanning electron microscope results also suggest that pulsed wave stimulation induces shear stress and thus increases algal lipid production. PMID:28186124

  13. Algal Cell Response to Pulsed Waved Stimulation and Its Application to Increase Algal Lipid Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savchenko, Oleksandra; Xing, Jida; Yang, Xiaoyan; Gu, Quanrong; Shaheen, Mohamed; Huang, Min; Yu, Xiaojian; Burrell, Robert; Patra, Prabir; Chen, Jie

    2017-02-01

    Generating renewable energy while sequestering CO2 using algae has recently attracted significant research attention, mostly directing towards biological methods such as systems biology, genetic engineering and bio-refining for optimizing algae strains. Other approaches focus on chemical screening to adjust culture conditions or culture media. We report for the first time the physiological changes of algal cells in response to a novel form of mechanical stimulation, or a pulsed wave at the frequency of 1.5 MHz and the duty cycle of 20%. We studied how the pulsed wave can further increase algal lipid production on top of existing biological and chemical methods. Two commonly used algal strains, fresh-water Chlorella vulgaris and seawater Tetraselmis chuii, were selected. We have performed the tests in shake flasks and 1 L spinner-flask bioreactors. Conventional Gravimetric measurements show that up to 20% increase for algal lipid could be achieved after 8 days of stimulation. The total electricity cost needed for the stimulations in a one-liter bioreactor is only one-tenth of a US penny. Gas liquid chromatography shows that the fatty acid composition remains unchanged after pulsed-wave stimulation. Scanning electron microscope results also suggest that pulsed wave stimulation induces shear stress and thus increases algal lipid production.

  14. Algal Cell Response to Pulsed Waved Stimulation and Its Application to Increase Algal Lipid Production.

    PubMed

    Savchenko, Oleksandra; Xing, Jida; Yang, Xiaoyan; Gu, Quanrong; Shaheen, Mohamed; Huang, Min; Yu, Xiaojian; Burrell, Robert; Patra, Prabir; Chen, Jie

    2017-02-10

    Generating renewable energy while sequestering CO2 using algae has recently attracted significant research attention, mostly directing towards biological methods such as systems biology, genetic engineering and bio-refining for optimizing algae strains. Other approaches focus on chemical screening to adjust culture conditions or culture media. We report for the first time the physiological changes of algal cells in response to a novel form of mechanical stimulation, or a pulsed wave at the frequency of 1.5 MHz and the duty cycle of 20%. We studied how the pulsed wave can further increase algal lipid production on top of existing biological and chemical methods. Two commonly used algal strains, fresh-water Chlorella vulgaris and seawater Tetraselmis chuii, were selected. We have performed the tests in shake flasks and 1 L spinner-flask bioreactors. Conventional Gravimetric measurements show that up to 20% increase for algal lipid could be achieved after 8 days of stimulation. The total electricity cost needed for the stimulations in a one-liter bioreactor is only one-tenth of a US penny. Gas liquid chromatography shows that the fatty acid composition remains unchanged after pulsed-wave stimulation. Scanning electron microscope results also suggest that pulsed wave stimulation induces shear stress and thus increases algal lipid production.

  15. Acoustic Measurement of Potato Cannon Velocity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Courtney, Michael; Courtney, Amy

    2007-01-01

    Potato cannon velocity can be measured with a digitized microphone signal. A microphone is attached to the potato cannon muzzle, and a potato is fired at an aluminum target about 10 m away. Flight time can be determined from the acoustic waveform by subtracting the time in the barrel and time for sound to return from the target. The potato…

  16. Optoelectronic System for Measuring Warhead Fragments Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ji; Zhao, Donge; Li, Yangjun; Zhou, Hanchang

    2011-02-01

    High-speed warhead fragments velocity measurement is one of the key technologies in investigating damage efficiency of warhead. We have designed and constructed a system to accurately determine the velocity of warhead fragments by measuring the time of flight between two parallel laser screens is presented. Each screen is formed by a laser source, a large photodetector and a retro-reflector. Optical output of the laser source is a collimated beam. The beam passes through cylindrical lens and the slit of photodetector reach to retro-reflector .The energy, reflected by retro-reflector; focus on the active area of photodetector. The system utilizes reflected ray by scotchlite retro-reflector as the start and end signal. And utilizes wideband circuit and data acquiring system to condition and sample signals. Experimental results show the system can measurement velocity are within the range from 20m/s to 2000m/s on target area of 1m2 and can perform satisfactorily with a wide range from 2000 lx to100,000lx. The measurement system also can be used to test velocity of projectile.

  17. Acoustic Measurement of Potato Cannon Velocity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Courtney, Michael; Courtney, Amy

    2007-01-01

    Potato cannon velocity can be measured with a digitized microphone signal. A microphone is attached to the potato cannon muzzle, and a potato is fired at an aluminum target about 10 m away. Flight time can be determined from the acoustic waveform by subtracting the time in the barrel and time for sound to return from the target. The potato…

  18. Velocity Dispersion Measurements in Cracked Quartzite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schijns, H. M.; Schmitt, D. R.; Jackson, I.

    2011-12-01

    Oscillating stress induced by seismic waves is expected to cause reversible fluid flow within low aspect ratio cracks, resulting in strongly frequency dependent seismic wave velocities. Laboratory measurements of seismic velocities typically made at MHz frequencies, well logging undertaken at kHz frequencies and in-situ exploration seismic (10-300 Hz) measurements are unlikely to be directly comparable as a result of this fluid flow effect. Experimental measurements over a broad range of frequencies are necessary to constrain theoretical velocity dispersion models. Here we present a preliminary comparison of ultrasonic (MHz) measurements on two cracked quartzite samples with measurements made in the mHz-Hz frequency band using forced oscillation. Quartzite samples from Cape Sorell, Australia and Alberta, Canada are cracked by thermally heating the samples to 1100 C and quenching them in liquid nitrogen and water, respectively. A relatively isotropic distribution of cracks, with average aperture of 1 μm and aspect ratio of <0.01, is induced in both samples for total porosities of ~2%. Measurements are made on the quartzite samples when they are dry, and after saturating with argon and water. The difference in viscosity between argon (0.025 mPa s at 10 MPa and 20 C) and water (1 mPa s) allow the investigation of different time scales of fluid flow. Further, measurements are made over effective pressures from 10-150 MPa, with progressive crack closure observed between 10-100 MPa. High frequency (0.64 MHz) measurements using piezoelectric transducers are used in conjunction with density measurements to calculate high frequency Young's and shear moduli. Low frequency (mHz-Hz) moduli are measured using a forced oscillation apparatus at Australian National University. The experimental assembly consists of a long cylindrical beam; the top of the beam is held fixed while the bottom is driven using time-varying electromagnetic drivers. The polarization of the applied force

  19. Shear wave velocity measurements in marine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, J. E.

    1982-09-01

    Pulsed ultrasonic techniques for the measurement of sound speed are reliable and well documented. Extension of these techniques to the measurement of shear wave velocities in marine sediments, generally was unsuccessful. Recently developed shear wave transducers, based upon piezoelectric benders operated at sonic frequencies, provide significantly improved transducer-sample mechanical coupling. This improved coupling allows the application of pulsed techniques to the measurement of shear wave velocities in marine sediments, and the rapid determination of sediment dynamic elastic properties. Two types of bender-based shear wave transducer and preliminary data are described: 1) a probe configuration for box core samples, and 2) a modification to the Hamilton Frame Velocimeter for cut samples.

  20. Dust Particle Velocity Measurement in Shock Tubes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-08

    00. . .. 0 . 37 21 Photography of Electronic System for CERF 6’ Shock Tubeo..o..... 38 22 Record of a Typical Doppler Burst...2.1 PRINCIPLE OF OPERATION. Direct measurement of the particle velocity was obtained using Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) [Ref. 2 and 3]. The...and transforms it into an electri- cal signal, known as Doppler burst. The period of the burst (T) is a function of the fringe spacing and the

  1. Simultaneous Velocity and Vorticity Measurement in Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Huixuan; Xu, Haitao; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2013-11-01

    A new paradigm of simultaneous velocity and vorticity measurement is developed to study turbulence. Instead of deducing vorticity from velocities measured at neighboring points, this innovative approach detects the translations and rotations of micro-sized particles directly. These hydrogel particles are spherical, transparent, and encapsulate micro-mirrors. This method outstands conventional ones, e.g., hotwire arrays or PIV because its spatial resolution is much higher. It does not require a non-zero mean flow, and it can provide all three vorticity components, which is not available from planar PIV data. Its principle is to illuminate the mirror and utilize the variation of the reflection directions to deduce the local flow vorticity. Meanwhile, the particle position is recorded as in normal particle tracking. Therefore, the velocity and vorticity of a particle can be obtained simultaneously in Lagrangian framework. The authors have made benchmark experiments to evaluate this novel method in Taylor Couette flows. The results show that the instantaneous vorticity measurement is as accurate as 3%. We are now setting up a von Karman disk pair device to study the turbulent flow. This novel technique will provide unprecedented information of high Reynolds number turbulence. The first author thanks the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation.

  2. Feasibility and Validation of 4-D Pulse Wave Imaging in Phantoms and In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Apostolakis, Iason-Zacharias; Nauleau, Pierre; Papadacci, Clement; McGarry, Matthew D; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2017-09-01

    Pulse wave imaging (PWI) is a noninvasive technique for tracking the propagation of the pulse wave along the arterial wall. The 3-D ultrasound imaging would aid in objectively estimating the pulse wave velocity (PWV) vector. This paper aims to introduce a novel PWV estimation method along the propagation direction, validate it in phantoms, and test its feasibility in vivo. A silicone vessel phantom consisting of a stiff and a soft segment along the longitudinal axis and a silicone vessel with a plaque were constructed. A 2-D array with a center frequency of 2.5 MHz was used. Propagation was successfully visualized in 3-D in each phantom and in vivo in six healthy subjects. In three of the healthy subjects, results were compared against conventional PWI using a linear array. PWVs were estimated in the stiff (3.42 ± 0.23 m [Formula: see text]) and soft (2.41 ± 0.07 m [Formula: see text]) phantom segments. Good agreement was found with the corresponding static testing values (stiff: 3.41 m [Formula: see text] and soft: 2.48 m [Formula: see text]). PWI-derived vessel compliance values were validated with dynamic testing. Comprehensive views of pulse propagation in the plaque phantom were generated and compared against conventional PWI acquisitions. Good agreement was found in vivo between the results of 4-D PWI (4.80 ± 1.32 m [Formula: see text]) and conventional PWI (4.28±1.20 m [Formula: see text]) ( n=3 ). PWVs derived for all of the healthy subjects ( n = 6 ) were within the physiological range. Thus, the 4-D PWI was successfully validated in phantoms and used to image the pulse wave propagation in normal human subjects in vivo.

  3. Measurement of the velocity of a quantum object: A role of phase and group velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapinski, Mikaila; Rostovtsev, Yuri V.

    2017-08-01

    We consider the motion of a quantum particle in a free space. Introducing an explicit measurement procedure for velocity, we demonstrate that the measured velocity is related to the group and phase velocities of the corresponding matter waves. We show that for long distances the measured velocity coincides with the matter wave group velocity. We discuss the possibilities to demonstrate these effects for the optical pulses in coherently driven media or for radiation propagating in waveguides.

  4. Relationship between radial and central arterial pulse wave and evaluation of central aortic pressure using the radial arterial pulse wave.

    PubMed

    Takazawa, Kenji; Kobayashi, Hideyuki; Shindo, Naohisa; Tanaka, Nobuhiro; Yamashina, Akira

    2007-03-01

    Since a decrease of central aortic pressure contributes to the prevention of cardiovascular events, simple measurement of not only brachial blood pressure but also central aortic pressure may be useful in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. In this study, we simultaneously measured radial artery pulse waves non-invasively and ascending aortic pressure invasively, before and after the administration of nicorandil. We then compared changes in central aortic pressure and radial arterial blood pressure calibrated with brachial blood pressure in addition to calculating the augmentation index (AI) at the aorta and radial artery. After nicorandil administration, the reduction in maximal systolic blood pressure in the aorta (Deltaa-SBP) was -14+/-15 mmHg, significantly larger than that in early systolic pressure in the radial artery (Deltar-SBP) (-9+/-12 mmHg). The reduction in late systolic blood pressure in the radial artery (Deltar-SBP2) was -15+/-14 mmHg, significantly larger than Deltar-SBP, but not significantly different from Deltaa-SBP. There were significant relationships between Deltaa-SBP and Deltar-SBP (r=0.81, p<0.001), and between Deltaa-SBP and Deltar-SBP2 (r=0.91, p<0.001). The slope of the correlation regression line with Deltar-SBP2 (0.83) was larger and closer to 1 than that with Deltar-SBP (0.63), showing that the relationship was close to 1:1. Significant correlations were obtained between aortic AI (a-AI) and radial AI (r-AI) (before nicorandil administration: r=0.91, p<0.001; after administration: r=0.70, p<0.001). These data suggest that the measurement of radial artery pulse wave and observation of changes in the late systolic blood pressure in the radial artery (r-SBP2) in addition to the ordinary measurement of brachial blood pressure may enable a more accurate evaluation of changes in maximal systolic blood pressure in the aorta (a-SBP).

  5. Measurement of neutrino masses from relative velocities.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hong-Ming; Pen, Ue-Li; Chen, Xuelei; Inman, Derek; Yu, Yu

    2014-09-26

    We present a new technique to measure neutrino masses using their flow field relative to dark matter. Present day streaming motions of neutrinos relative to dark matter and baryons are several hundred km/s, comparable with their thermal velocity dispersion. This results in a unique dipole anisotropic distortion of the matter-neutrino cross power spectrum, which is observable through the dipole distortion in the cross correlation of different galaxy populations. Such a dipole vanishes if not for this relative velocity and so it is a clean signature for neutrino mass. We estimate the size of this effect and find that current and future galaxy surveys may be sensitive to these signature distortions.

  6. Tomographic Particle Localization and Velocity Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirner, S.; Forster, G.; Schein, J.

    2015-01-01

    Wire arc spraying is one of the most common and elementary thermal spray processes. Due to its easy handling, high deposition rate, and relative low process costs, it is a frequently used coating technology for the production of wear and corrosion resistant coatings. In order to produce reliable and reproducible coatings, it is necessary to be able to control the coating process. This can be achieved by analyzing the parameters of the particles deposited. Essential for the coating quality are, for example, the velocity, the size, and the temperature of the particles. In this work, an innovative diagnostic for particle velocity and location determination is presented. By the use of several synchronized CMOS-Cameras positioned around the particle jet, a series of images from different directions is simultaneously taken. The images contain the information that is necessary to calculate the 3D-location-vector of the particles and finally with the help of the exposure time the trajectory can be determined. In this work, the experimental setup of the tomographic diagnostic is presented, the mathematical method of the reconstruction is explained, and first measured velocity distributions are shown.

  7. A new method for the acquisition of arterial pulse wave using self-mixing interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arasanz, A.; Azcona, F. J.; Royo, S.; Jha, A.; Pladellorens, J.

    2014-11-01

    In this paper we present a technique based on self-mixing interferometry as a method for the acquisition and reconstruction of the arterial pulse wave. A modification of the classic fringe counting reconstruction algorithm is proposed to deal with some of the problems caused by biological tissue surface roughness, therefore allowing a reconstruction of the arterial displacement with a resolution of 400 nm. The traits of the arterial pulse wave have been retrieved with high detail, allowing their interpretation by a skilled practitioner. The heart beat measurements show a good agreement when compared to the readings of a commercial pulse-meter, therefore proving the versatility and the viability of the technique for the measurement of other cardiovascular signals.

  8. Laser Doppler Velocimeter particle velocity measurement system

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, W.W.; Srikantaiah, D.V.; Philip, T.; George, A.

    1993-10-01

    This report gives a detailed description of the operation of the Laser Doppler Velocimeter (LDV) system maintained by DIAL at MSU. LDV is used for the measurement of flow velocities and turbulence levels in various fluid flow settings. Ills report details the operation and maintenance of the LDV system and provides a first-time user with pertinent information regarding the system`s setup for a particular application. Particular attention has been given to the use of the Doppler signal analyzer (DSA) and the burst spectrum analyzer (BSA) signal processors and data analysis.

  9. Spaceborne Radar Measurements of Rainfall Vertical Velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Im, Eastwood; Tanelli, Simone; Giuli, Dino; Durden, Stephen L.; Facheris, Luca

    2000-01-01

    This paper studies the performance of a spaceborne precipitation radar in measuring vertical Doppler velocity of rainfall. As far as a downward pointing precipitation radar is concerned, one of the major problems affecting Doppler measurement at the nadir direction arises from the Non-Uniform Beam-Filling effect (NUBF). That is, when significant variation in rain rate is present within the radar IFOV (Instrument Field of View) in the along track direction. the Doppler shift caused by the radial component of the horizontal speed of the satellite is weighted differently among the portions of IFOV. The effects of this non-uniform weighting may dominate any other contribution. Under this condition, shape, average value and width of the Doppler spectrum may not be directly correlated with the vertical velocity of the precipitating particles. However, by using an inversion technique which over-samples the radar measurements in the along track direction, we show that the shift due to NUBF can be evaluated, and that the NUBF induced errors on average fall speed can be reduced.

  10. Radionuclide counting technique for measuring wind velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, J.J.; Khandelwal, G.S.

    1981-12-01

    A technique for measuring wind velocities of meteorological interest is described. It is based on inverse-square-law variation of the counting rates as the radioactive source-to-counter distance is changed by wind drag on the source ball. Results of a feasibility study using a weak bismuth 207 radiation source and three Geiger-Muller radiation counters are reported. The use of the technique is not restricted to Martian or Mars-like environments. A description of the apparatus, typical results, and frequency response characteristics are included. A discussion of a double-pendulum arrangement is presented. Measurements reported herein indicate that the proposed technique may be suitable for measuring wind speeds up to 100 m/sec, which are either steady or whose rates of fluctuation are less than 1 kHz.

  11. Pulse wave analysis for the prediction of preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Carty, D M; Neisius, U; Rooney, L K; Dominiczak, A F; Delles, C

    2014-02-01

    Preeclampsia is associated with a number of changes to maternal vascular function. Assessment of arterial stiffness using pulse wave analysis (PWA) has been proposed as a means of predicting preeclampsia before the onset of clinically detectable disease. One hundred and eighty women with 2 risk factors for preeclampsia were examined at gestational weeks 16 and 28, of whom 17 (9.4%) developed preeclampsia. To study the effects of pregnancy itself women were also examined at 6-9 months post-natally; an additional 30 healthy non-pregnant women were also examined. PWA was performed using SphygmoCor; augmentation index (AIx), a marker of arterial wave reflection, was also measured using EndoPAT-2000. Women who developed preeclampsia were more likely to be overweight and had a higher brachial and central diastolic BP at gestational week 16 than those who remained normotensive. There was no difference in any parameter of arterial wave reflection between non-pregnant and pregnant women, nor between those who developed preeclampsia and those who remained normotensive, when examined at weeks 16 and 28 or post-natally. In this cohort of women with risk factors for preeclampsia, PWA did not provide additional information beyond brachial blood pressure and maternal risk factor profile about the risk of future development of preeclampsia.

  12. [A quick algorithm of dynamic spectrum photoelectric pulse wave detection based on LabVIEW].

    PubMed

    Lin, Ling; Li, Na; Li, Gang

    2010-02-01

    Dynamic spectrum (DS) detection is attractive among the numerous noninvasive blood component detection methods because of the elimination of the main interference of the individual discrepancy and measure conditions. DS is a kind of spectrum extracted from the photoelectric pulse wave and closely relative to the artery blood. It can be used in a noninvasive blood component concentration examination. The key issues in DS detection are high detection precision and high operation speed. The precision of measure can be advanced by making use of over-sampling and lock-in amplifying on the pick-up of photoelectric pulse wave in DS detection. In the present paper, the theory expression formula of the over-sampling and lock-in amplifying method was deduced firstly. Then in order to overcome the problems of great data and excessive operation brought on by this technology, a quick algorithm based on LabVIEW and a method of using external C code applied in the pick-up of photoelectric pulse wave were presented. Experimental verification was conducted in the environment of LabVIEW. The results show that by the method pres ented, the speed of operation was promoted rapidly and the data memory was reduced largely.

  13. Velocity Gradient Maps Directly Measured by PLF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintella, Cristina M.; Gonçalves, Cristiane C.; Lima, Angelo Mv; Pepe, Iuri M.

    2000-11-01

    Flows are macroscopically classified as laminar or turbulent due to their velocity distributions, nevertheless most chemical and biological phenomena are yield or enhanced by intermolecular orientation and microscopic turbulence. Here was studied a 100micra liquid sheet produced by a slit nozzle, both flowing freely into air and over a borosilicate surface (roughness bellow 5nm), ranging from 17 to 36Re (143 to 297cm/s, similar to muscles and brain blood flow). Mono ethylene glycol was used either pure, or with sodium alkyl benzene sulfated (ABS) surfactant (24.5mol/L, submicellar), or with poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) (1409ppm, 4millions aw). Velocity gradients were directly measured by 514nm polarized laser induced fluorescence (PLF) with R6G as probe. Intermolecular alignment (IA) maps were obtained all over the flow (about 1,950 points, 0.02mm2 precision). The free jet average IA has increased 57% when flowing over borosilicate. With ABS, the IA increased, suggesting wall drag reduction. With PEO the IA decreases due to solvent intermolecular forces attenuation, generating wider turbulent areas. PLF proved to be an excellent method to evaluate IA within liquid thin flows. Chosen solute additions permits IA control over wide regions.

  14. 21 CFR 882.1550 - Nerve conduction velocity measurement device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nerve conduction velocity measurement device. 882... conduction velocity measurement device. (a) Identification. A nerve conduction velocity measurement device is a device which measures nerve conduction time by applying a stimulus, usually to a...

  15. 21 CFR 882.1550 - Nerve conduction velocity measurement device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nerve conduction velocity measurement device. 882... conduction velocity measurement device. (a) Identification. A nerve conduction velocity measurement device is a device which measures nerve conduction time by applying a stimulus, usually to a...

  16. 21 CFR 882.1550 - Nerve conduction velocity measurement device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nerve conduction velocity measurement device. 882... conduction velocity measurement device. (a) Identification. A nerve conduction velocity measurement device is a device which measures nerve conduction time by applying a stimulus, usually to a...

  17. 21 CFR 882.1550 - Nerve conduction velocity measurement device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nerve conduction velocity measurement device. 882... conduction velocity measurement device. (a) Identification. A nerve conduction velocity measurement device is a device which measures nerve conduction time by applying a stimulus, usually to a...

  18. 21 CFR 882.1550 - Nerve conduction velocity measurement device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nerve conduction velocity measurement device. 882... conduction velocity measurement device. (a) Identification. A nerve conduction velocity measurement device is a device which measures nerve conduction time by applying a stimulus, usually to a...

  19. Quantification of ultrasound correlation-based flow velocity mapping and edge velocity gradient measurement.

    PubMed

    Park, Dae Woo; Kruger, Grant H; Rubin, Jonathan M; Hamilton, James; Gottschalk, Paul; Dodde, Robert E; Shih, Albert J; Weitzel, William F

    2013-10-01

    This study investigated the use of ultrasound speckle decorrelation- and correlation-based lateral speckle-tracking methods for transverse and longitudinal blood velocity profile measurement, respectively. By studying the blood velocity gradient at the vessel wall, vascular wall shear stress, which is important in vascular physiology as well as the pathophysiologic mechanisms of vascular diseases, can be obtained. Decorrelation-based blood velocity profile measurement transverse to the flow direction is a novel approach, which provides advantages for vascular wall shear stress measurement over longitudinal blood velocity measurement methods. Blood flow velocity profiles are obtained from measurements of frame-to-frame decorrelation. In this research, both decorrelation and lateral speckle-tracking flow estimation methods were compared with Poiseuille theory over physiologic flows ranging from 50 to 1000 mm/s. The decorrelation flow velocity measurement method demonstrated more accurate prediction of the flow velocity gradient at the wall edge than the correlation-based lateral speckle-tracking method. The novelty of this study is that speckle decorrelation-based flow velocity measurements determine the blood velocity across a vessel. In addition, speckle decorrelation-based flow velocity measurements have higher axial spatial resolution than Doppler ultrasound measurements to enable more accurate measurement of blood velocity near a vessel wall and determine the physiologically important wall shear.

  20. A fast algorithm for the simulation of arterial pulse waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Tao; Hu, Dan; Cai, David

    2016-06-01

    One-dimensional models have been widely used in studies of the propagation of blood pulse waves in large arterial trees. Under a periodic driving of the heartbeat, traditional numerical methods, such as the Lax-Wendroff method, are employed to obtain asymptotic periodic solutions at large times. However, these methods are severely constrained by the CFL condition due to large pulse wave speed. In this work, we develop a new numerical algorithm to overcome this constraint. First, we reformulate the model system of pulse wave propagation using a set of Riemann variables and derive a new form of boundary conditions at the inlet, the outlets, and the bifurcation points of the arterial tree. The new form of the boundary conditions enables us to design a convergent iterative method to enforce the boundary conditions. Then, after exchanging the spatial and temporal coordinates of the model system, we apply the Lax-Wendroff method in the exchanged coordinate system, which turns the large pulse wave speed from a liability to a benefit, to solve the wave equation in each artery of the model arterial system. Our numerical studies show that our new algorithm is stable and can perform ∼15 times faster than the traditional implementation of the Lax-Wendroff method under the requirement that the relative numerical error of blood pressure be smaller than one percent, which is much smaller than the modeling error.

  1. Determination of Testicular Blood Flow in Camelids Using Vascular Casting and Color Pulsed-Wave Doppler Ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Kutzler, Michelle; Tyson, Reid; Grimes, Monica; Timm, Karen

    2011-01-01

    We describe the vasculature of the camelid testis using plastic casting. We also use color pulsed-wave Doppler ultrasonography to measure testicular blood flow and compare the differences between testicular blood flow in fertile and infertile camelids. The testicular artery originates from the ventral surface of the aorta, gives rise to an epididymal branch, and becomes very tortuous as it approaches the testis. Within the supratesticular arteries, peak systolic velocity (PSV) was higher in fertile males compared to infertile males (P = 0.0004). In addition, end diastolic velocity (EDV) within the supratesticular arteries was higher for fertile males when compared to infertile males (P = 0.0325). Within the marginal arteries, PSV was also higher in fertile males compared to infertile males (P = 0.0104). However, EDV within the marginal arteries was not significantly different between fertile and infertile males (P = 0.121). In addition, the resistance index was not significantly different between fertile and infertile males within the supratesticular (P = 0.486) and marginal arteries (P = 0.144). The significance of this research is that in addition to information obtained from a complete reproductive evaluation, a male camelid's fertility can be determined using testicular blood flow measured by Doppler ultrasonography. PMID:21941690

  2. Spectrographs for the Measurement of Radial Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranne, A.

    A radial-velocity measurement derives from a shift in position of spectral features at the focus of a spectrographic instrument. We do not often think about how small these shifts are. It is not generally appreciated that the accuracy to which this shift must be measured is a tiny fraction of a pixel. Or, if we prefer to calculate in microns a surprising minuteness. What precautions should we be taking for the measurement of such small shifts? It is true that, thanks to computers, modern reduction methods allows us to correct for a wide variety of pertubations, provided that these are foreseen and understood; but such reduction procedures will give the best results if such pertubations are kept very small. We must therefore analyse these pertubations and think about how we can control them. The correlation method initiated in its modern form by Roger Griffin, and which we developed further with an optical mask in CORAVEL twenty-five years ago and more recently with a numerical mask in ELODIE, has demonstrated its power. In terms of these methods, the problem of high precision is to improve the correlation peak. Can this be done? Does the correlation method allow us to distinguish the overall radial velocity of the object from possible distortions of the lines? This is certainly a major problem which must be solved. The luminous efficiency of high-precision spectrographs is low. If the use of an optical fibre with scrambling for feeding the spectrograph seems inevitable to us today, it seems to me that the transmission of this system can be considerably improved by a better choice of the F-ratio of the image beam of the telescope which is to be matched with that of the spectrograph. This problem, common to all spectrographs, could be resolved with a specialised focal-plane instrument, giving a much greater than usual F-ratio, resulting in a simplification of the spectrograph optics, and hence an improvement in transmission and a serious decrease in size (which is

  3. Out-of-plane ultrasonic velocity measurement

    DOEpatents

    Hall, M.S.; Brodeur, P.H.; Jackson, T.G.

    1998-07-14

    A method for improving the accuracy of measuring the velocity and time of flight of ultrasonic signals through moving web-like materials such as paper, paperboard and the like, includes a pair of ultrasonic transducers disposed on opposing sides of a moving web-like material. In order to provide acoustical coupling between the transducers and the web-like material, the transducers are disposed in fluid-filled wheels. Errors due to variances in the wheel thicknesses about their circumference which can affect time of flight measurements and ultimately the mechanical property being tested are compensated by averaging the ultrasonic signals for a predetermined number of revolutions. The invention further includes a method for compensating for errors resulting from the digitization of the ultrasonic signals. More particularly, the invention includes a method for eliminating errors known as trigger jitter inherent with digitizing oscilloscopes used to digitize the signals for manipulation by a digital computer. In particular, rather than cross-correlate ultrasonic signals taken during different sample periods as is known in the art in order to determine the time of flight of the ultrasonic signal through the moving web, a pulse echo box is provided to enable cross-correlation of predetermined transmitted ultrasonic signals with predetermined reflected ultrasonic or echo signals during the sample period. By cross-correlating ultrasonic signals in the same sample period, the error associated with trigger jitter is eliminated. 20 figs.

  4. Out-of-plane ultrasonic velocity measurement

    DOEpatents

    Hall, Maclin S.; Brodeur, Pierre H.; Jackson, Theodore G.

    1998-01-01

    A method for improving the accuracy of measuring the velocity and time of flight of ultrasonic signals through moving web-like materials such as paper, paperboard and the like, includes a pair of ultrasonic transducers disposed on opposing sides of a moving web-like material. In order to provide acoustical coupling between the transducers and the web-like material, the transducers are disposed in fluid-filled wheels. Errors due to variances in the wheel thicknesses about their circumference which can affect time of flight measurements and ultimately the mechanical property being tested are compensated by averaging the ultrasonic signals for a predetermined number of revolutions. The invention further includes a method for compensating for errors resulting from the digitization of the ultrasonic signals. More particularly, the invention includes a method for eliminating errors known as trigger jitter inherent with digitizing oscilloscopes used to digitize the signals for manipulation by a digital computer. In particular, rather than cross-correlate ultrasonic signals taken during different sample periods as is known in the art in order to determine the time of flight of the ultrasonic signal through the moving web, a pulse echo box is provided to enable cross-correlation of predetermined transmitted ultrasonic signals with predetermined reflected ultrasonic or echo signals during the sample period. By cross-correlating ultrasonic signals in the same sample period, the error associated with trigger jitter is eliminated.

  5. Glycemic index, glycemic load, and pulse wave reflection in adults.

    PubMed

    Recio-Rodriguez, J I; Gomez-Marcos, M A; Patino-Alonso, M-C; Rodrigo-De Pablo, E; Cabrejas-Sánchez, A; Arietaleanizbeaskoa, M S; Repiso-Gento, I; Gonzalez-Viejo, N; Maderuelo-Fernandez, J A; Agudo-Conde, C; Garcia-Ortiz, L

    2015-01-01

    Diets with a high glycemic index (GI), high glycemic load (GL), or both, increase the risk of cardiovascular disease. This study examined the association of GI and GL in a regular diet with the peripheral augmentation index (i.e., a marker of vascular aging) in a sample of adults. Cross-sectional study. The findings presented in this manuscript are a subanalysis of the EVIDENT study whose purpose was to analyze the relationship between lifestyle and arterial aging. For the sample population, 1553 individuals aged 20-80 years were selected through random sampling from the patients of general practitioners at six health centers in Spain. GI and GL for each patient's diet were calculated from a previously validated, semi-quantitative, 137-item food frequency questionnaire. The peripheral augmentation index corrected for a heart rate of 75 bpm (PAIx75) was measured with pulse-wave application software (A-Pulse CASP). Based on a risk factor adjusted regression model, for every 5 unit increase in GI, the PAIx75 increased by 0.11 units (95% CI: 0.04-0.19). Similarly, for every increase in 10 units in GL, the PAIx75 increased by 1.13 (95% CI: 0.21-2.05). High PAIx75 values were observed in individuals with diets in the third GI tertile (i.e., the highest), and lower PAIx75 values in those with diets in the first tertile (i.e., the lowest), (93.1 vs. 87.5, respectively, p = 0.001). GI and GL were directly associated with PAIx75 values in adults without cardiovascular diseases regardless of age, gender, physical activity, and other confounders. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of horizontal velocity variations on ultrasonic velocity measurements in open channels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swain, E.D.

    1992-01-01

    Use of an ultrasonic velocity meter to determine discharge in open channels involves measuring the velocity in a line between transducers in the stream and relating that velocity to the average velocity in the stream. The standard method of calculating average velocity in the channel assumes that the velocity profile in the channel can be represented by the one-dimensional von Karman universal velocity profile. However, the velocity profile can be described by a two-dimensional equation that accounts for the horizontal velocity variations induced by the channel sides. An equation to calculate average velocity accounts for the two-dimensional variations in velocity within a stream. The use of this new equation to calculate average velocity was compared to the standard method in theoretical trapezoidal cross sections and in the L-31N and Snapper Creek Extension Canals near Miami, Florida. These comparisons indicate that the two-dimensional variations have the most significant effect in narrow, deep channels. Also, the two-dimensional effects may be significant in some field situations and need to be considered when determining average velocity and discharge with an ultrasonic velocity meter.

  7. FSI Simulations of Pulse Wave Propagation in Human Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: The Effects of Sac Geometry and Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Li, Han; Lin, Kexin; Shahmirzadi, Danial

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to quantify the effects of geometry and stiffness of aneurysms on the pulse wave velocity (PWV) and propagation in fluid–solid interaction (FSI) simulations of arterial pulsatile flow. Spatiotemporal maps of both the wall displacement and fluid velocity were generated in order to obtain the pulse wave propagation through fluid and solid media, and to examine the interactions between the two waves. The results indicate that the presence of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) sac and variations in the sac modulus affect the propagation of the pulse waves both qualitatively (eg, patterns of change of forward and reflective waves) and quantitatively (eg, decreasing of PWV within the sac and its increase beyond the sac as the sac stiffness increases). The sac region is particularly identified on the spatiotemporal maps with a region of disruption in the wave propagation with multiple short-traveling forward/reflected waves, which is caused by the change in boundary conditions within the saccular region. The change in sac stiffness, however, is more pronounced on the wall displacement spatiotemporal maps compared to those of fluid velocity. We conclude that the existence of the sac can be identified based on the solid and fluid pulse waves, while the sac properties can also be estimated. This study demonstrates the initial findings in numerical simulations of FSI dynamics during arterial pulsations that can be used as reference for experimental and in vivo studies. Future studies are needed to demonstrate the feasibility of the method in identifying very mild sacs, which cannot be detected from medical imaging, where the material property degradation exists under early disease initiation. PMID:27478394

  8. The comparison of a novel continuous cardiac output monitor based on pulse wave transit time and echo Doppler during exercise.

    PubMed

    Sugo, Yoshihiro; Sakai, Tomoyuki; Terao, Mami; Ukawa, Teiji; Ochiai, Ryoichi

    2012-01-01

    A new technology called estimated continuous cardiac output (esCCO) uses pulse wave transit time (PWTT) obtained from an electrocardiogram and pulse oximeter to measure cardiac output (CO) non-invasively and continuously. This study was performed to evaluate the accuracy of esCCO during exercise testing. We compared esCCO with CO measured by the echo Doppler aortic velocity-time integral (VTIao_CO). The correlation coefficient between esCCO and VTIao_CO was r= 0.87 (n= 72). Bias and precision were 0.33 ± 0.95 L/min and percentage error was 31%. The esCCO could detect change in VTIao_CO larger than 1 L/min with a concordance rate of 88%. In polar plot, 83% of data are within 0.5 L/min, and 100% of data are within 1 L/min. Those results show the acceptable accuracy and trend ability of esCCO. Change in pre-ejection period (PEP) measured by using M-mode of Diagnostic Ultrasound System accounted for approximately half of change in PWTT. This indicates that PEP included in PWTT has an impact on the accuracy of esCCO measurement. In this study, the validity of esCCO during exercise testing was assessed and shown to be acceptable. The result of this study suggests that we can expand its application.

  9. Compressional velocity measurements for a highly fractured lunar anorthosite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sondergeld, C. H.; Granryd, L. A.; Spetzler, H. A.

    1979-01-01

    The compressional wave (V sub p) velocities in three mutually perpendicular directions have been measured in lunar sample 60025,174, lunar anorthosite. V sub p measurements were made at ambient temperature and pressure and a new technique was developed to measure the velocities because of the tremendous acoustic wave attenuation of the lunar sample. The measured velocities were all less than 1 km/sec and displayed up to a 21% departure from the mean value of the three directions. The velocities agree with seismic wave velocities determined for the lunar surface at the collection site.

  10. Wearable sensor glove based on conducting fabric using electrodermal activity and pulse-wave sensors for e-health application.

    PubMed

    Lee, Youngbum; Lee, Byungwoo; Lee, Myoungho

    2010-03-01

    Improvement of the quality and efficiency of health in medicine, both at home and the hospital, calls for improved sensors that might be included in a common carrier such as a wearable sensor device to measure various biosignals and provide healthcare services that use e-health technology. Designed to be user-friendly, smart clothes and gloves respond well to the end users for health monitoring. This study describes a wearable sensor glove that is equipped with an electrodermal activity (EDA) sensor, pulse-wave sensor, conducting fabric, and an embedded system. The EDA sensor utilizes the relationship between drowsiness and the EDA signal. The EDA sensors were made using a conducting fabric instead of silver chloride electrodes, as a more practical and practically wearable device. The pulse-wave sensor measurement system, which is widely applied in oriental medicinal practices, is also a strong element in e-health monitoring systems. The EDA and pulse-wave signal acquisition module was constructed by connecting the sensor to the glove via a conductive fabric. The signal acquisition module is then connected to a personal computer that displays the results of the EDA and pulse-wave signal processing analysis and gives accurate feedback to the user. This system is designed for a number of applications for the e-health services, including drowsiness detection and oriental medicine.

  11. Flexible pulse-wave sensors from oriented aluminum nitride nanocolumns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, Morito; Ueno, Naohiro; Nonaka, Kazuhiro; Tateyama, Hiroshi

    2003-03-01

    Flexible pulse-wave sensors were fabricated from density-packed oriented aluminum nitride nanocolumns prepared on aluminum foils. The nanocolumns were prepared by the rf magnetron sputtering method and were perpendicularly oriented to the aluminum foil surfaces. The sensor structure is laminated, and the structure contributes to avoiding unexpected leakage of an electric charge. The resulting sensor thickness is 50 μm. The sensor is flexible like aluminum foil and can respond to frequencies from 0.1 to over 100 Hz. The sensitivity of the sensor to pressure is proportional to the surface area. The sensor sensitively causes reversible charge signals that correlate with the pulse wave form, which contains significant information on arteriosclerosis and cardiopathy of a man sitting on it.

  12. Measuring global monopole velocities, one by one

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Eiguren, Asier; Urrestilla, Jon; Achúcarro, Ana

    2017-01-01

    We present an estimation of the average velocity of a network of global monopoles in a cosmological setting using large numerical simulations. In order to obtain the value of the velocity, we improve some already known methods, and present a new one. This new method estimates individual global monopole velocities in a network, by means of detecting each monopole position in the lattice and following the path described by each one of them. Using our new estimate we can settle an open question previously posed in the literature: velocity-dependent one-scale (VOS) models for global monopoles predict two branches of scaling solutions, one with monopoles moving at subluminal speeds and one with monopoles moving at luminal speeds. Previous attempts to estimate monopole velocities had large uncertainties and were not able to settle that question. Our simulations find no evidence of a luminal branch. We also estimate the values of the parameters of the VOS model. With our new method we can also study the microphysics of the complicated dynamics of individual monopoles. Finally we use our large simulation volume to compare the results from the different estimator methods, as well as to asses the validity of the numerical approximations made.

  13. [A mathematical model of hemodynamic processes for distal pulse wave formation].

    PubMed

    Fedotov, A A

    2015-01-01

    A mathematical model of the formation of distal arterial pulse wave signal in the blood vessels of the upper limbs was considered. The formation of distal arterial pulse wave is represented as a composition of forward and reverse pulse waves propagating along the human arterial system. The system of formal analogy between pulse waves propagation along the human arterial system and the propagation of electrical oscillations in electrical transmission lines with distributed parameters was proposed. Dependencies of pulse wave propagation along the human arterial system were obtained by solving the one-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations for a few special cases.

  14. A Skin-attachable Flexible Piezoelectric Pulse Wave Energy Harvester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Sunghyun; Cho, Young-Ho

    2014-11-01

    We present a flexible piezoelectric generator, capable to harvest energy from human arterial pulse wave on the human wrist. Special features and advantages of the flexible piezoelectric generator include the multi-layer device design with contact windows and the simple fabrication process for the higher flexibility with the better energy harvesting efficiency. We have demonstrated the design effectiveness and the process simplicity of our skin- attachable flexible piezoelectric pulse wave energy harvester, composed of the sensitive P(VDF-TrFE) piezoelectric layer on the flexible polyimide support layer with windows. We experimentally characterize and demonstrate the energy harvesting capability of 0.2~1.0μW in the Human heart rate range on the skin contact area of 3.71cm2. Additional physiological and/or vital signal monitoring devices can be fabricated and integrated on the skin attachable flexible generator, covered by an insulation layer; thus demonstrating the potentials and advantages of the present device for such applications to the flexible multi-functional selfpowered artificial skins, capable to detect physiological and/or vital signals on Human skin using the energy harvested from arterial pulse waves.

  15. Acceleration and Velocity Sensing from Measured Strain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pak, Chan-Gi; Truax, Roger

    2016-01-01

    A simple approach for computing acceleration and velocity of a structure from the strain is proposed in this study. First, deflection and slope of the structure are computed from the strain using a two-step theory. Frequencies of the structure are computed from the time histories of strain using a parameter estimation technique together with an Autoregressive Moving Average model. From deflection, slope, and frequencies of the structure, acceleration and velocity of the structure can be obtained using the proposed approach. shape sensing, fiber optic strain sensor, system equivalent reduction and expansion process.

  16. Radial velocity measurements in the F corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beavers, W. I.; Eitter, J. J.; Carr, P. H.; Cook, B. C.

    1980-05-01

    A photoelectric radial velocity spectrometer was employed at the February 26, 1979 total solar eclipse in an attempt to detect motion in the F corona. Multiple dip features were recorded in scans made at points 3.2 and 4.3 solar radii west of the sun. By employing simple dynamic models these observations may be interpreted as evidence of the following two separate components of dust in the inner regions of the solar system: dust moving in prograde orbits outside the region beginning at about four solar radii from the sun, and dust falling into the sun with velocities from about 50 to 250 km/s.

  17. Acceleration and Velocity Sensing from Measured Strain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pak, Chan-Gi; Truax, Roger

    2015-01-01

    A simple approach for computing acceleration and velocity of a structure from the strain is proposed in this study. First, deflection and slope of the structure are computed from the strain using a two-step theory. Frequencies of the structure are computed from the time histories of strain using a parameter estimation technique together with an autoregressive moving average model. From deflection, slope, and frequencies of the structure, acceleration and velocity of the structure can be obtained using the proposed approach. Simple harmonic motion is assumed for the acceleration computations, and the central difference equation with a linear autoregressive model is used for the computations of velocity. A cantilevered rectangular wing model is used to validate the simple approach. Quality of the computed deflection, acceleration, and velocity values are independent of the number of fibers. The central difference equation with a linear autoregressive model proposed in this study follows the target response with reasonable accuracy. Therefore, the handicap of the backward difference equation, phase shift, is successfully overcome.

  18. Measuring the Velocity of a Tennis Serve.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eng, John; Lietman, Thomas

    1994-01-01

    Presents an alternative to the use of a radar to determine how fast an individual can serve a tennis ball. Equipped with a tape recorder and a Macintosh computer, students determine the velocity of a tennis ball by analyzing the sounds and echoes heard on the court. (ZWH)

  19. The shock Hugoniot of 316 ss and sound velocity measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Hixson, R.S.; McQueen, R.G.; Fritz, J.N.

    1993-01-01

    Type 316 stainless steel has been characterized for its high-pressure, shock-wave response. Measurements have been made of shock-wave and particle velocity, and of sound velocity. Our preliminary results for shock and particle velocity have been combined with previously unpublished results, and an overall fit made. Sound velocity results show a discontinuity that is attributed to shock-induced melting.

  20. The shock Hugoniot of 316 ss and sound velocity measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Hixson, R.S.; McQueen, R.G.; Fritz, J.N.

    1993-07-01

    Type 316 stainless steel has been characterized for its high-pressure, shock-wave response. Measurements have been made of shock-wave and particle velocity, and of sound velocity. Our preliminary results for shock and particle velocity have been combined with previously unpublished results, and an overall fit made. Sound velocity results show a discontinuity that is attributed to shock-induced melting.

  1. Accurate Sound Velocity Measurement in Ocean Near-Surface Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizarralde, D.; Xu, B. L.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate sound velocity measurement is essential in oceanography because sound is the only wave that can propagate in sea water. Due to its measuring difficulties, sound velocity is often not measured directly but instead calculated from water temperature, salinity, and depth, which are much easier to obtain. This research develops a new method to directly measure the sound velocity in the ocean's near-surface layer using multi-channel seismic (MCS) hydrophones. This system consists of a device to make a sound pulse and a long cable with hundreds of hydrophones to record the sound. The distance between the source and each receiver is the offset. The time it takes the pulse to arrive to each receiver is the travel time.The errors of measuring offset and travel time will affect the accuracy of sound velocity if we calculated with just one offset and one travel time. However, by analyzing the direct arrival signal from hundreds of receivers, the velocity can be determined as the slope of a straight line in the travel time-offset graph. The errors in distance and time measurement result in only an up or down shift of the line and do not affect the slope. This research uses MCS data of survey MGL1408 obtained from the Marine Geoscience Data System and processed with Seismic Unix. The sound velocity can be directly measured to an accuracy of less than 1m/s. The included graph shows the directly measured velocity verses the calculated velocity along 100km across the Mid-Atlantic continental margin. The directly measured velocity shows a good coherence to the velocity computed from temperature and salinity. In addition, the fine variations in the sound velocity can be observed, which is hardly seen from the calculated velocity. Using this methodology, both large area acquisition and fine resolution can be achieved. This directly measured sound velocity will be a new and powerful tool in oceanography.

  2. Shared velocity encoding: a method to improve the temporal resolution of phase-contrast velocity measurements.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hung-Yu; Bender, Jacob A; Ding, Yu; Chung, Yiu-Cho; Hinton, Alice M; Pennell, Michael L; Whitehead, Kevin K; Raman, Subha V; Simonetti, Orlando P

    2012-09-01

    Phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI) is used routinely to measure fluid and tissue velocity with a variety of clinical applications. Phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging methods require acquisition of additional data to enable phase difference reconstruction, making real-time imaging problematic. Shared Velocity Encoding (SVE), a method devised to improve the effective temporal resolution of phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging, was implemented in a real-time pulse sequence with segmented echo planar readout. The effect of SVE on peak velocity measurement was investigated in computer simulation, and peak velocities and total flow were measured in a flow phantom and in volunteers and compared with a conventional ECG-triggered, segmented k-space phase-contrast sequence as a reference standard. Computer simulation showed a 36% reduction in peak velocity error from 8.8 to 5.6% with SVE. A similar reduction of 40% in peak velocity error was shown in a pulsatile flow phantom. In the phantom and volunteers, volume flow did not differ significantly when measured with or without SVE. Peak velocity measurements made in the volunteers using SVE showed a higher concordance correlation (0.96) with the reference standard than non-SVE (0.87). The improvement in effective temporal resolution with SVE reconstruction has a positive impact on the precision and accuracy of real-time phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging peak velocity measurements.

  3. Laser Doppler anemometer signal processing for blood flow velocity measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Borozdova, M A; Fedosov, I V; Tuchin, V V

    2015-03-31

    A new method for analysing the signal in a laser Doppler anemometer based on the differential scheme is proposed, which provides the flow velocity measurement in strongly scattering liquids, particularly, blood. A laser Doppler anemometer intended for measuring the absolute blood flow velocity in animal and human near-surface arterioles and venules is developed. The laser Doppler anemometer signal structure is experimentally studied for measuring the flow velocity in optically inhomogeneous media, such as blood and suspensions of scattering particles. The results of measuring the whole and diluted blood flow velocity in channels with a rectangular cross section are presented. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  4. Assessments of arterial stiffness and endothelial function using pulse wave analysis.

    PubMed

    Stoner, Lee; Young, Joanna M; Fryer, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Conventionally, the assessments of endothelial function and arterial stiffness require different sets of equipment, making the inclusion of both tests impractical for clinical and epidemiological studies. Pulse wave analysis (PWA) provides useful information regarding the mechanical properties of the arterial tree and can also be used to assess endothelial function. PWA is a simple, valid, reliable, and inexpensive technique, offering great clinical and epidemiological potential. The current paper will outline how to measure arterial stiffness and endothelial function using this technique and include discussion of validity and reliability.

  5. Combination of pulsed-wave Doppler and real-time three-dimensional color Doppler echocardiography for quantifying the stroke volume in the left ventricular outflow tract.

    PubMed

    Tsujino, Hiroyuki; Jones, Michael; Qin, Jian Xin; Sitges, Marta; Cardon, Lisa A; Morehead, Annitta L; Zetts, Arthur D; Bauer, Fabrice; Kim, Yong Jin; Hang, Xi Yi; Greenberg, Neil; Thomas, James D; Shiota, Takahiro

    2004-11-01

    Real-time three-dimensional (3-D) color Doppler echocardiography (RT3D) is capable of quantifying flow. However, low temporal resolution limits its application to stroke volume (SV) measurements. The aim of the present study was, therefore, to develop a reliable method to quantify SV. In animal experiments, cross-sectional images of the LV outflow tract were selected from the RT3D data to calculate peak flow rates (Q(p3D)). Conventional pulsed-wave (PW) Doppler was performed to measure the velocity-time integral (VTI) and the peak velocity (V(p)). By assuming that the flow is proportional to the velocity temporal waveform, SV was calculated as alpha x Q(p3D) x VTI/V(p), where alpha is a temporal correction factor. There was an excellent correlation between the reference flow meter and RT3D SV (mean difference = -1. 3 mL, y = 1. 05 x -2. 5, r = 0. 94, p < 0. 01). The new method allowed accurate SV estimations without any geometric assumptions of the spatial velocity distributions.

  6. Effects of Acupuncture Stimulation on the Radial artery's Pressure Pulse Wave in Healthy Young Participants: Protocol for a prospective, single-Arm, Exploratory, Clinical Study.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jae-Young; Lee, Jun-Hwan; Ku, Boncho; Bae, Jang Han; Un, Min-Ho; Kim, Jaeuk U; Kim, Tae-Hun

    2016-09-01

    This study aims to investigate the effects of acupuncture stimulation on the radial artery's pressure pulse wave, along with various hemodynamic parameters, and to explore the possible underlying mechanism of pulse diagnosis in healthy participants in their twenties. This study is a prospective, single-arm, exploratory clinical study. A total of 25 healthy participants, without regard to gender, in their twenties will be recruited by physicians. Written informed consent will be obtained from all participants. The participants will receive acupuncture once at ST36 on both sides. The radial arterial pulse waves will be measured on the left arm of the subjects by using an applicable pulse tonometric device (KIOM-PAS). On the right arm (appearing twice), electrocardiogram (ECG), photoplethysmogram (PPG), respiration and cardiac output (CO) signals, will be measured using a physiological data acquisition system (Biopac module), while the velocity of blood flow, and the diameter and the depth of the blood vessel will be measured using an ultrasonogram machine on the right arm (appearing twice). All measurements will be conducted before, during, and after acupuncture. The primary outcome will be the spectral energy at high frequencies above 10 Hz (SE10-30Hz) calculated from the KIOM-PAS device signal. Secondary outcomes will be various variables obtained from the KIOM-PAS device, ECG, PPG, impedance cardiography modules, and an ultrasonogram machine. The results of this trial will provide information regarding the physiological and the hemodynamic mechanisms underlying acupuncture stimulation and clinical evidence for the influence of acupuncture on the pressure pulse wave in the radial artery. This study was approved by the Institutional Review Board (IRB) of Kyung Hee University's Oriental Medical Center, Seoul, Korea (KOMCIRB-150818-HR-030). The study findings will be published in peer-reviewed journals and presented at national and international conferences. This

  7. Effects of Acupuncture Stimulation on the Radial artery’s Pressure Pulse Wave in Healthy Young Participants: Protocol for a prospective, single-Arm, Exploratory, Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jae-Young; Lee, Jun-Hwan; Ku, Boncho; Bae, Jang Han; un, Min-Ho; Kim, Jaeuk U.; Kim, Tae-Hun

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: This study aims to investigate the effects of acupuncture stimulation on the radial artery’s pressure pulse wave, along with various hemodynamic parameters, and to explore the possible underlying mechanism of pulse diagnosis in healthy participants in their twenties. Methods and analysis: This study is a prospective, single-arm, exploratory clinical study. A total of 25 healthy participants, without regard to gender, in their twenties will be recruited by physicians. Written informed consent will be obtained from all participants. The participants will receive acupuncture once at ST36 on both sides. The radial arterial pulse waves will be measured on the left arm of the subjects by using an applicable pulse tonometric device (KIOM-PAS). On the right arm (appearing twice), electrocardiogram (ECG), photoplethysmogram (PPG), respiration and cardiac output (CO) signals, will be measured using a physiological data acquisition system (Biopac module), while the velocity of blood flow, and the diameter and the depth of the blood vessel will be measured using an ultrasonogram machine on the right arm (appearing twice). All measurements will be conducted before, during, and after acupuncture. The primary outcome will be the spectral energy at high frequencies above 10 Hz (SE10-30Hz) calculated from the KIOM-PAS device signal. Secondary outcomes will be various variables obtained from the KIOM-PAS device, ECG, PPG, impedance cardiography modules, and an ultrasonogram machine. Discussion: The results of this trial will provide information regarding the physiological and the hemodynamic mechanisms underlying acupuncture stimulation and clinical evidence for the influence of acupuncture on the pressure pulse wave in the radial artery. Ethics and dissemination: This study was approved by the Institutional Review Board (IRB) of Kyung Hee University’s Oriental Medical Center, Seoul, Korea (KOMCIRB-150818-HR-030). The study findings will be published in peer

  8. Arterial pulse wave dynamics after percutaneous aortic valve replacement: fall in coronary diastolic suction with increasing heart rate as a basis for angina symptoms in aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Davies, Justin E; Sen, Sayan; Broyd, Chris; Hadjiloizou, Nearchos; Baksi, John; Francis, Darrel P; Foale, Rodney A; Parker, Kim H; Hughes, Alun D; Chukwuemeka, Andrew; Casula, Roberto; Malik, Iqbal S; Mikhail, Ghada W; Mayet, Jamil

    2011-10-04

    Aortic stenosis causes angina despite unobstructed arteries. Measurement of conventional coronary hemodynamic parameters in patients undergoing valvular surgery has failed to explain these symptoms. With the advent of percutaneous aortic valve replacement (PAVR) and developments in coronary pulse wave analysis, it is now possible to instantaneously abolish the valvular stenosis and to measure the resulting changes in waves that direct coronary flow. Intracoronary pressure and flow velocity were measured immediately before and after PAVR in 11 patients with unobstructed coronary arteries. Using coronary pulse wave analysis, we calculated the intracoronary diastolic suction wave (the principal accelerator of coronary blood flow). To test physiological reserve to increased myocardial demand, we measured at resting heart rate and during pacing at 90 and 120 bpm. Before PAVR, the basal myocardial suction wave intensity was 1.9±0.3×10(-5) W · m(-2) · s(-2), and this increased in magnitude with increasing severity of aortic stenosis (r=0.59, P=0.05). This wave decreased markedly with increasing heart rate (β coefficient=-0.16×10(-4) W · m(-2) · s(-2); P<0.001). After PAVR, despite a fall in basal suction wave (1.9±0.3 versus 1.1±0.1×10(-5) W · m(-2) · s(-2); P=0.02), there was an immediate improvement in coronary physiological reserve with increasing heart rate (β coefficient=0.9×10(-3) W · m(-2) · s(-2); P=0.014). In aortic stenosis, the coronary physiological reserve is impaired. Instead of increasing when heart rate rises, the coronary diastolic suction wave decreases. Immediately after PAVR, physiological reserve returns to a normal positive pattern. This may explain how aortic stenosis can induce anginal symptoms and their prompt relief after PAVR. Clinical Trial Registration- URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01118442.

  9. Mean velocities measured with the double pulse technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, E.

    2004-10-01

    It was recently observed that double-pulse measurements of the mean velocities of a wide asymmetric spectrum are a function of the time lag between the pulses (Uspensky et al., 2004). Here we demonstrate that the observed relationship probably is influenced by the measurement technique in a way that is consistent with theoretical prediction. It is further shown that for small time lags the double pulse velocity is a good approximation to the mean Doppler velo-city.

  10. Velocity measurement using frequency domain interferometer and chirped pulse laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, K.; Nishimura, Y.; Mori, Y.; Hanayama, R.; Kitagawa, Y.; Sekine, T.; Sato, N.; Kurita, T.; Kawashima, T.; Sunahara, A.; Sentoku, Y.; Miura, E.; Iwamoto, A.; Sakagami, H.

    2017-02-01

    An ultra-intense short pulse laser induces a shock wave in material. The pressure of shock compression is stronger than a few tens GPa. To characterize shock waves, time-resolved velocity measurement in nano- or pico-second time scale is needed. Frequency domain interferometer and chirped pulse laser provide single-shot time-resolved measurement. We have developed a laser-driven shock compression system and frequency domain interferometer with CPA laser. In this paper, we show the principle of velocity measurement using a frequency domain interferometer and a chirped pulse laser. Next, we numerically calculated spectral interferograms and show the time-resolved velocity measurement can be done from the phase analysis of spectral interferograms. Moreover we conduct the laser driven shock generation and shock velocity measurement. From the spectral fringes, we analyze the velocities of the sample and shockwaves.

  11. A Distinguishing Arterial Pulse Waves Approach by Using Image Processing and Feature Extraction Technique.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsing-Chung; Kuo, Shyi-Shiun; Sun, Shen-Ching; Chang, Chia-Hui

    2016-10-01

    Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) is based on five main types of diagnoses methods consisting of inspection, auscultation, olfaction, inquiry, and palpation. The most important one is palpation also called pulse diagnosis which is to measure wrist artery pulse by doctor's fingers for detecting patient's health state. In this paper, it is carried out by using a specialized pulse measuring instrument to classify one's pulse type. The measured pulse waves (MPWs) were segmented into the arterial pulse wave curve (APWC) by image proposing method. The slopes and periods among four specific points on the APWC were taken to be the pulse features. Three algorithms are proposed in this paper, which could extract these features from the APWCs and compared their differences between each of them to the average feature matrix, individually. These results show that the method proposed in this study is superior and more accurate than the previous studies. The proposed method could significantly save doctors a large amount of time, increase accuracy and decrease data volume.

  12. Free-surface velocity measurements using an optically recording velocity interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jian-xin; Wang, Zhao; Liang, Jing; Shan, Yu-sheng; Zhou, Chuang-zhi; Xiang, Yi-huai; Lu, Ze; Tang, Xiu-zhang

    2007-01-01

    An optically recording velocity interferometer system (ORVIS) was developed for the free-surface velocity measurements in the equation of state experiments. The time history of free-surface velocity and the particle velocity in laser deduced shockwaves experiments can be recorded by the electronic streak camera in ORVIS. The interference fringe shifts recorded by the ORVIS is proportional to the Doppler shift of a laser beam induced by being reflected from the back suface of the monitored target. In the experiments, ORVIS got an 179 ps time resolution, and a higher time resolution could be got by minimizing the delay time. The equation of state experiments were carried out on the high power excimer laser system called "Heaven I", the velocity of iron and aluminium was researched.

  13. Lagrangian technique to calculate window interface velocity from shock velocity measurements: Application for quartz windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy, Chad A.; Knudson, Marcus D.

    2017-08-01

    Measurement of the window interface velocity is a common technique for investigating the dynamic response materials at high strain rates. However, these measurements are limited in pressure to the range where the window remains transparent. The most common window material for this application is lithium fluoride, which under single shock compression becomes opaque at ˜200 GPa. To date, no other window material has been identified for use at higher pressures. Here, we present a Lagrangian technique to calculate the interface velocity from a continuously measured shock velocity, with application to quartz. The quartz shock front becomes reflective upon melt, at ˜100 GPa, enabling the use of velocity interferometry to continuously measure the shock velocity. This technique overlaps with the range of pressures accessible with LiF windows and extends the region where wave profile measurements are possible to pressures in excess of 2000 GPa. We show through simulated data that the technique accurately reproduces the interface velocity within 20% of the initial state, and that the Lagrangian technique represents a significant improvement over a simple linear approximation.

  14. Velocity precision measurements using laser Doppler anemometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dopheide, D.; Taux, G.; Narjes, L.

    1985-07-01

    A Laser Doppler Anemometer (LDA) was calibrated to determine its applicability to high pressure measurements (up to 10 bars) for industrial purposes. The measurement procedure with LDA and the experimental computerized layouts are presented. The calibration procedure is based on absolute accuracy of Doppler frequency and calibration of interference strip intervals. A four-quadrant detector allows comparison of the interference strip distance measurements and computer profiles. Further development of LDA is recommended to increase accuracy (0.1% inaccuracy) and to apply the method industrially.

  15. Interferometric measurement of the angular velocity of moving humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanzer, Jeffrey A.

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the measurement of the angular velocity of walking humans using a millimeter-wave correlation interferometer. Measurement of the angular velocity of moving objects is a desirable function in remote sensing applications. Doppler radar sensors are able to measure the signature of moving humans based on micro-Doppler analysis; however, a person moving with little to no radial velocity produces negligible Doppler returns. Measurement of the angular movement of humans can be done with traditional radar techniques, however the process involves either continuous tracking with narrow beamwidth or angle-of-arrival estimation algorithms. A new method of measuring the angular velocity of moving objects using interferometry has recently been developed which measures the angular velocity of an object without tracking or complex processing. The frequency of the interferometer signal response is proportional to the angular velocity of the object as it passes through the interferometer beam pattern. In this paper, the theory of the interferometric measurement of angular velocity is covered and simulations of the response of a walking human are presented. Simulations are produced using a model of a walking human to show the significant features associated with the interferometer response, which may be used in classification algorithms.

  16. Radioisotope measurement of the velocity of tracheal mucus

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, K.J.; Palmer, D.W.; Beste, D.J.; Carl, G.A.; Belson, T.P.; Pelc, L.R.; Toohill, R.J.

    1985-04-01

    A radioisotope scanning technique for measuring the velocity of tracheal mucus has been developed utilizing a canine model. A solution of stannous phytate labeled with /sup 99m/Tc is introduced percutaneously into the lower trachea and the upward movement of the leading edge of the radioactivity is followed by repeat scanning at 2-minute intervals using a modified rectilinear scanner, thus allowing calculation of the velocity of the mucus. It is believed that this technique may be of value in studying the effect of experimentally induced tracheal injuries on mucus velocity. Possible applications of the technique for the study of the velocity of mucus in the human trachea are discussed.

  17. Cerebral vascular aging: extending the concept of pulse wave encephalopathy through capillaries to the cerebral veins.

    PubMed

    Henry-Feugeas, Marie Cecile; Koskas, Pierre

    2012-07-01

    The recent concept of pulse wave encephalopathy helps understanding the cerebral venous remodeling in aging. This so-called periventricular venous collagenosis is an expected mechanical consequence of the age-related changes in arterial pulsations and the mechanical fatigue of vascular smooth muscles. Unlike arteriolar mechanical stress, venular mechanical stress depends on both the blood pulse wave amplitude and the mechanical properties of the environment tissue. Thereby, there is a preferential periventricular location of venous collagenosis and a mechanistic link between venous collagenosis and foci of white matter rarefaction or leukoaraiosis. The recent concept of pulse wave encephalopathy also helps understanding the widening of retinal venules, the "mirror" of cerebral venules, in various manifestations of pulse wave encephalopathy, including progressive leukoara�osis, lacunar and hemorrhagic "pulse wave" strokes, and dementia. Indeed, the age-related chronic increase in arterial pulsations explains subsequent arteriolar myogenic "fatigue", marked attenuation in the arteriolar myogenic tone and abnormal penetration of the insufficiently dampened arterial pulse wave into the venules. Thus, retinal venular widening, a biomarker of advanced pulse wave encephalopathy, is also increasingly recognized as a biomarker for high cardiovascular risk. All these data support a shift in the concept of chronic cerebrovascular disease, from the classical model which is restricted to steno-occlusive cerebrovascular diseases to an enlarged model which would include the pulse wave encephalopathy concept. Thereby, preventing damage to the cerebral microvasculature by an undampened arterial pulse wave will become a logical target for the prevention and treatment of late-onset cognitive decline.

  18. Measurement of unsteady airflow velocity at nozzle outlet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyszko, René; Machů, Mário

    2017-09-01

    The paper deals with a method of measuring and evaluating the cooling air flow velocity at the outlet of the flat nozzle for cooling a rolled steel product. The selected properties of the Prandtl and Pitot sensing tubes were measured and compared. A Pitot tube was used for operational measurements of unsteady dynamic pressure of the air flowing from nozzles to abtain the flow velocity. The article also discusses the effects of air temperature, pressure and relative air humidity on air density, as well as the influence of dynamic pressure filtering on the error of averaged velocity.

  19. Laser Doppler anemometer measurements using nonorthogonal velocity components: error estimates.

    PubMed

    Orloff, K L; Snyder, P K

    1982-01-15

    Laser Doppler anemometers (LDAs) that are arranged to measure nonorthogonal velocity components (from which orthogonal components are computed through transformation equations) are more susceptible to calibration and sampling errors than are systems with uncoupled channels. In this paper uncertainty methods and estimation theory are used to evaluate, respectively, the systematic and statistical errors that are present when such devices are applied to the measurement of mean velocities in turbulent flows. Statistical errors are estimated for two-channel LDA data that are either correlated or uncorrelated. For uncorrelated data the directional uncertainty of the measured velocity vector is considered for applications where mean streamline patterns are desired.

  20. Laser Doppler anemometer measurements using nonorthogonal velocity components - Error estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orloff, K. L.; Snyder, P. K.

    1982-01-01

    Laser Doppler anemometers (LDAs) that are arranged to measure nonorthogonal velocity components (from which orthogonal components are computed through transformation equations) are more susceptible to calibration and sampling errors than are systems with uncoupled channels. In this paper uncertainty methods and estimation theory are used to evaluate, respectively, the systematic and statistical errors that are present when such devices are applied to the measurement of mean velocities in turbulent flows. Statistical errors are estimated for two-channel LDA data that are either correlated or uncorrelated. For uncorrelated data the directional uncertainty of the measured velocity vector is considered for applications where mean streamline patterns are desired.

  1. Measuring Stellar Radial Velocities with a LISA Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, David

    2016-05-01

    Conventional wisdom says it should not be possible to measure stellar radial velocities with a useful degree of precision with a spectrograph having spectral resolution of 1000. This paper will demonstrate that with a combination of careful observational technique and the use of cross correlation it is possible to far exceed initial expectations. This is confirmed by reproducing the known radial velocity of a catalogued SB1 star with a precision of 5.2 km/s. To demonstrate the scientific potential of such a spectrograph, we use radial velocity measurements to confirm the binary nature and measure the orbital period and parameters of a suspected post common envelope binary.

  2. Unsteady Pressure and Velocity Measurements in Pumps

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    to reproduce the data with controlled experiments . For example, the rotor exit flow measured by means of a stationary high response probe will be...Turbomachinery by Means of High-Frequency Pressure Transducers. ASME, J. of Turbomachinery, Vol. 114, pp. 100-107. [3] Castorph, D. (1975): Messung ...Dreiß, A.; Kosyna, G. (1997): Experimental Investigations of Cavitation-States in a Radial Pump Impeller. JSME CENTENNIAL GRAND CONGRESS Proceedings of

  3. Three Component Velocity and Acceleration Measurement Using FLEET

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danehy, Paul M.; Bathel, Brett F.; Calvert, Nathan; Dogariu, Arthur; Miles, Richard P.

    2014-01-01

    The femtosecond laser electronic excitation and tagging (FLEET) method has been used to measure three components of velocity and acceleration for the first time. A jet of pure N2 issuing into atmospheric pressure air was probed by the FLEET system. The femtosecond laser was focused down to a point to create a small measurement volume in the flow. The long-lived lifetime of this fluorescence was used to measure the location of the tagged particles at different times. Simultaneous images of the flow were taken from two orthogonal views using a mirror assembly and a single intensified CCD camera, allowing two components of velocity to be measured in each view. These different velocity components were combined to determine three orthogonal velocity components. The differences between subsequent velocity components could be used to measure the acceleration. Velocity accuracy and precision were roughly estimated to be +/-4 m/s and +/-10 m/s respectively. These errors were small compared to the approx. 100 m/s velocity of the subsonic jet studied.

  4. In-situ application of Ultrasonic Pulse Velocity measurements to determine the degree of zeolitic alteration of ignimbrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evren Çubukçu, H.; Yurdakul, Yasin; Erkut, Volkan; Akkaş, Efe; Akın, Lütfiye; Ulusoy, İnan; Şen, Erdal

    2016-04-01

    -wave velocities are positively correlated with the degree of zeolitization, where the highest velocities correspond to the intensely zeolitized ignimbrites. In-situ application of UPV measurements in the field can be utilized for revealing the spatial variation in zeolitization and for locating the probable sources responsible for hydrothermal alteration. Keywords: ultrasonic pulse wave, in-situ, ignimbrite, hydrothermal alteration, zeolitization

  5. Measuring the Stellar Halo Velocity Anisotropy With 3D Kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, Emily C.; Deason, Alis J.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Rockosi, Constance M.; van der Marel, Roeland P.; Sohn, S. Tony

    2016-08-01

    We present the first measurement of the anisotropy parameter β using 3D kinematic information outside of the solar neighborhood. Our sample consists of 13 Milky Way halo stars with measured proper motions and radial velocities in the line of sight of M31. Proper motions were measured using deep, multi-epoch HST imaging, and radial velocities were measured from Keck II/DEIMOS spectra. We measure β = -0.3-0.9 +0.4, which is consistent with isotropy, and inconsistent with measurements in the solar neighborhood. We suggest that this may be the kinematic signature of a relatively early, massive accretion event, or perhaps several such events.

  6. Near-wall velocity profile measurement for nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanjirakat, Anoop; Sadr, Reza

    2016-01-01

    We perform near-wall velocity measurements of a SiO2-water nanofluid inside a microchannel. Nanoparticle image velocimetry measurements at three visible depths within 500 nm of the wall are conducted. We evaluate the optical properties of the nanofluid and their effect on the measurement technique. The results indicate that the small effect of the nanoparticles on the optical properties of the suspension have a negligible effect on the measurement technique. Our measurements show an increase in nanofluid velocity gradients near the walls, with no measurable slip, relative to the equivalent basefluid flow. We conjecture that particle migration induced by shear may have caused this increase. The effect of this increase in the measured near wall velocity gradient has implications on the viscosity measurement for these fluids.

  7. 33. BENTZEL TUBE. A CURRENT VELOCITY MEASURING DEVICE DEVELOPED AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. BENTZEL TUBE. A CURRENT VELOCITY MEASURING DEVICE DEVELOPED AT WES IN 1932 BY CARL E. BENTZEL. - Waterways Experiment Station, Hydraulics Laboratory, Halls Ferry Road, 2 miles south of I-20, Vicksburg, Warren County, MS

  8. Exploratory Meeting on Airborne Doppler Lidar Wind Velocity Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, G. H. (Editor); Kaufman, J. W. (Editor); Vaughan, W. W. (Editor)

    1980-01-01

    The scientific interests and applications of the Airborne Doppler Lidar Wind Velocity Measurement System to severe storms and local weather are discussed. The main areas include convective phenomena, local circulation, atmospheric boundary layer, atmospheric dispersion, and industrial aerodynamics.

  9. Robonaut 2 Humanoid Robot holds instrument to measure air velocity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-03-14

    ISS030-E-148268 (14 March 2012) --- Controlled by teams on the ground, Robonaut 2 humanoid robot holds an instrument to measure air velocity during another system check out in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station.

  10. Robonaut 2 Humanoid Robot holds instrument to measure air velocity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-03-14

    ISS030-E-148257 (14 March 2012) --- Controlled by teams on the ground, Robonaut 2 humanoid robot holds an instrument to measure air velocity during another system check out in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station.

  11. Robonaut 2 Humanoid Robot holds instrument to measure air velocity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-03-14

    ISS030-E-148260 (14 March 2012) --- Controlled by teams on the ground, Robonaut 2 humanoid robot holds an instrument to measure air velocity during another system check out in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station.

  12. Robonaut 2 Humanoid Robot holds instrument to measure air velocity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-03-14

    ISS030-E-148273 (14 March 2012) --- Controlled by teams on the ground, Robonaut 2 humanoid robot holds an instrument to measure air velocity during another system check out in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station.

  13. Tip vortex core pressure estimates derived from velocity field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinding, Kyle; Krane, Michael

    2016-11-01

    We present estimates of tip vortex core pressure derived from velocity field measurements of a high Reynolds number flow over a lifting surface. Tip vortex cavitation decreases propulsor efficiency and contributes to both unwanted noise and surface damage. Coordinated load cell, pressure, and velocity measurements were performed in the 12-inch tunnel at the Applied Research Laboratory at Penn State University, over a range of angles of attack and flow speeds. Stereo PIV imaging planes were oriented normal to the tunnel axis. Pressure estimates in each measurement plane were estimated from the velocity field. Visual cavitation calls were performed over the same range of conditions as the optical velocity measurements, by varying the tunnel pressure until tip vortex cavitation was observed to initiate. The pressure differences between the tip vortex and the tunnel ambient pressure obtained with these two methods were then compared.

  14. Velocity field measurements of a laminar starting plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanny, J.; Shlien, D. J.

    1985-04-01

    The region of buoyant fluid resulting from the initiation of heating of an infinite fluid is called the starting plume. Here, velocity field measurements of this flow pattern are presented for the first time. The measurements were carried out by processing digitized tracer particle path photographs. Similarity of the velocity field of the starting plume as it rises was found to exist in the limited range of heat injection rates investigated. The vorticity computed from the velocity field was diffuse, there being no evidence of a distinctive core. Additional flow visualization experiments show the spiral structure in the starting plume cap.

  15. Continuous measurements of in-bore projectile velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Asay, J.R.; Konrad, C.H.; Hall, C.A. ); Shahinpoor, M. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Hickman, R. )

    1989-01-01

    The application of velocity interferometry to the continuous measurement of in-bore projectile velocity in a small-bore three-stage railgun is described. These measurements are useful for determining projectile acceleration and for evaluating gun performance. The launcher employed in these studies consists of a two-stage light gas gun used to inject projectiles into a railgun for additional acceleration. Results obtained for projectile velocities to 7.4 km/s with the two-stage injector are reported and potential improvements for railgun applications are discussed.

  16. Measurements of wind velocities in a street canyon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DePaul, F. T.; Sheih, C. M.

    Measurements of wind velocities in an urban street canyon with a height-to-width ratio of about 1.4 were made when ambient winds aloft were approximately perpendicular to the street. The mean wind velocities were determined by analysis of trajectories of tracer balloons that were released in the canyon and photographed in rapid sequence. The trajectories indicate the presence of a primary vortex cell within the canyon, provided the ambient wind velocity exceeds 1.5-2.0 m s -1. Measurements with hot-wire anemometers suggest that vehicular traffic at the street level is significant in increasing turbulence up to heights of approximately 7 m.

  17. Continuous measurements of in-bore projectile velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Asay, J.R.; Konrad, C.H.; Hall, C.A.; Shahinpoor, M.; Hickman, R.

    1988-01-01

    The application of velocity interferometry to the continuous measurement of in-bore projectile velocity in a small-bore three-stage railgun is described. These measurements are useful for determining projectile acceleration and for evaluating gun performance. The launcher employed in these studies consists of a two-stage light gas gun used to inject projectiles into a railgun for additional acceleration. Results obtained for projectile velocities to 7.4 km/s with the two-stage injector are reported and potential improvements for railgun applications are discussed. 12 refs., 7 figs.

  18. Measurement of angular velocity in the perception of rotation.

    PubMed

    Barraza, José F; Grzywacz, Norberto M

    2002-09-01

    Humans are sensitive to the parameters of translational motion, namely, direction and speed. At the same time, people have special mechanisms to deal with more complex motions, such as rotations and expansions. One wonders whether people may also be sensitive to the parameters of these complex motions. Here, we report on a series of experiments that explore whether human subjects can use angular velocity to evaluate how fast a rotational motion is. In four experiments, subjects were required to perform a task of speed-of-rotation discrimination by comparing two annuli of different radii in a temporal 2AFC paradigm. Results showed that humans could rely on a sensitive measurement of angular velocity to perform this discrimination task. This was especially true when the quality of the rotational signal was high (given by the number of dots composing the annulus). When the signal quality decreased, a bias towards linear velocity of 5-80% appeared, suggesting the existence of separate mechanisms for angular and linear velocity. This bias was independent from the reference radius. Finally, we asked whether the measurement of angular velocity required a rigid rotation, that is, whether the visual system makes only one global estimate of angular velocity. For this purpose, a random-dot disk was built such that all the dots were rotating with the same tangential speed, irrespectively of radius. Results showed that subjects do not estimate a unique global angular velocity, but that they perceive a non-rigid disk, with angular velocity falling inversely proportionally with radius.

  19. Pulse wave analysis in a 180-degree curved artery model: Implications under physiological and non-physiological inflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulusu, Kartik V.; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2013-11-01

    Systolic and diastolic blood pressures, pulse pressures, and left ventricular hypertrophy contribute to cardiovascular risks. Increase of arterial stiffness due to aging and hypertension is an important factor in cardiovascular, chronic kidney and end-stage-renal-diseases. Pulse wave analysis (PWA) based on arterial pressure wave characteristics, is well established in clinical practice for evaluation of arterial distensibility and hypertension. The objective of our exploratory study in a rigid 180-degree curved artery model was to evaluate arterial pressure waveforms. Bend upstream conditions were measured using a two-component, two-dimensional, particle image velocimeter (2C-2D PIV). An ultrasonic transit-time flow meter and a catheter with a MEMS-based solid state pressure sensor, capable of measuring up to 20 harmonics of the observed pressure waveform, monitored flow conditions downstream of the bend. Our novel continuous wavelet transform algorithm (PIVlet 1.2), in addition to detecting coherent secondary flow structures is used to evaluate arterial pulse wave characteristics subjected to physiological and non-physiological inflows. Results of this study will elucidate the utility of wavelet transforms in arterial function evaluation and pulse wave speed. Supported by NSF Grant No. CBET- 0828903 and GW Center for Biomimetics and Bioinspired Engineering.

  20. Development of a Standard Protocol for the Harmonic Analysis of Radial Pulse Wave and Assessing Its Reliability in Healthy Humans.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chi-Wei; Chen, Jiang-Ming; Wang, Wei-Kung

    2015-01-01

    This study was aimed to establish a standard protocol and to quantitatively assess the reliability of harmonic analysis of the radial pulse wave measured by a harmonic wave analyzer (TD01C system). Both intraobserver and interobserver assessments were conducted to investigate whether the values of harmonics are stable in successive measurements. An intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and a Bland-Altman plot were used for this purpose. For the reliability assessments of the intraobserver and the interobserver, 22 subjects (mean age 45 ± 14 years; 14 males and 8 females) were enrolled. The first eleven harmonics of the radial pulse wave presented excellent repeatability ([Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text]) for the intraobserver assessment and high reproducibility (ICCs range from 0.83 to 0.96 and [Formula: see text]) for the interobserver assessment. The Bland-Altman plot indicated that more than 90% of harmonic values fell within two standard deviations of the mean difference. Thus, we concluded that the harmonic analysis of the radial pulse wave using the TD01C system is a feasible and reliable method to assess a hemodynamic characteristic in clinical trial.

  1. Measurement of Poloidal Velocity on the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald E. Bell and Russell Feder

    2010-06-04

    A diagnostic suite has been developed to measure impurity poloidal flow using charge exchange recombination spectroscopy on the National Spherical Torus Experiment. Toroidal and poloidal viewing systems measure all quantities required to determine the radial electric field. Two sets of up/down symmetric poloidal views are used to measure both active emission in the plane of the neutral heating beams and background emission in a radial plane away from the neutral beams. Differential velocity measurements isolate the line-integrated poloidal velocity from apparent flows due to the energy-dependent chargeexchange cross section. Six f/1.8 spectrometers measure 276 spectra to obtain 75 active and 63 background channels every 10 ms. Local measurements from a similar midplane toroidal viewing system are mapped into two dimensions to allow the inversion of poloidal line-integrated measurements to obtain local poloidal velocity profiles. Radial resolution after inversion is 0.6-1.8 cm from the plasma edge to the center.

  2. Pulse wave transit time for monitoring respiration rate.

    PubMed

    Johansson, A; Ahlstrom, C; Lanne, T; Ask, P

    2006-06-01

    In this study, we investigate the beat-to-beat respiratory fluctuations in pulse wave transit time (PTT) and its subcomponents, the cardiac pre-ejection period (PEP) and the vessel transit time (VTT) in ten healthy subjects. The three transit times were found to fluctuate in pace with respiration. When applying a simple breath detecting algorithm, 88% of the breaths seen in a respiration air-flow reference could be detected correctly in PTT. Corresponding numbers for PEP and VTT were 76 and 81%, respectively. The performance during hypo- and hypertension was investigated by invoking blood pressure changes. In these situations, the error rates in breath detection were significantly higher. PTT can be derived from signals already present in most standard monitoring set-ups. The transit time technology thus has prospects to become an interesting alternative for respiration rate monitoring.

  3. A proposed method for wind velocity measurement from space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Censor, D.; Levine, D. M.

    1980-01-01

    An investigation was made of the feasibility of making wind velocity measurements from space by monitoring the apparent change in the refractive index of the atmosphere induced by motion of the air. The physical principle is the same as that resulting in the phase changes measured in the Fizeau experiment. It is proposed that this phase change could be measured using a three cornered arrangement of satellite borne source and reflectors, around which two laser beams propagate in opposite directions. It is shown that even though the velocity of the satellites is much larger than the wind velocity, factors such as change in satellite position and Doppler shifts can be taken into account in a reasonable manner and the Fizeau phase measured. This phase measurement yields an average wind velocity along the ray path through the atmosphere. The method requires neither high accuracy for satellite position or velocity, nor precise knowledge of the refractive index or its gradient in the atmosphere. However, the method intrinsically yields wind velocity integrated along the ray path; hence to obtain higher spatial resolution, inversion techniques are required.

  4. Velocity measurement by coherent x-ray heterodyning

    SciTech Connect

    Lhermitte, Julien R. M.; Rogers, Michael C.; Manet, Sabine; Sutton, Mark

    2017-01-01

    We present a small-angle coherent x-ray scattering technique used for measuring flow velocities in slow moving materials. The technique is an extension of X-ray Photon Correlation Spectroscopy (XPCS): It involves mixing the scattering from moving tracer particles with a static reference that heterodynes the signal. This acts to elongate temporal effects caused by flow in homodyne measurements, allowing for a more robust measurement of flow properties. Using coherent x-ray heterodyning, velocities ranging from 0.1 to 10 μm/s were measured for a viscous fluid pushed through a rectangular channel. We describe experimental protocols and theory for making these Poiseuille flow profile measurements and also develop the relevant theory for using heterodyne XPCS to measure velocities in uniform and Couette flows.

  5. Velocity measurement by coherent x-ray heterodyning.

    PubMed

    Lhermitte, Julien R M; Rogers, Michael C; Manet, Sabine; Sutton, Mark

    2017-01-01

    We present a small-angle coherent x-ray scattering technique used for measuring flow velocities in slow moving materials. The technique is an extension of X-ray Photon Correlation Spectroscopy (XPCS): It involves mixing the scattering from moving tracer particles with a static reference that heterodynes the signal. This acts to elongate temporal effects caused by flow in homodyne measurements, allowing for a more robust measurement of flow properties. Using coherent x-ray heterodyning, velocities ranging from 0.1 to 10 μm/s were measured for a viscous fluid pushed through a rectangular channel. We describe experimental protocols and theory for making these Poiseuille flow profile measurements and also develop the relevant theory for using heterodyne XPCS to measure velocities in uniform and Couette flows.

  6. Measuring the equatorial plasma bubble drift velocities over Morroco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagheryeb, Amine; Benkhaldoun, Zouhair; Makela, Jonathan J.; Harding, Brian; Kaab, Mohamed; Lazrek, Mohamed; Fisher, Daniel J.; Duly, Timothy M.; Bounhir, Aziza; Daassou, Ahmed

    2015-08-01

    In this work, we present a method to measure the drift velocities of equatorial plasma bubbles (EPBs) in the low latitude ionosphere. To calculate the EPB drift velocity, we use 630.0-nm airglow images collected by the Portable Ionospheric Camera and Small Scale Observatory (PICASSO) system deployed at the Oukkaimden observatory in Morocco. To extract the drift velocity, the individual images were processed by first spatially registering the images using the star field. After this, the stars were removed from the images using a point suppression methodology, the images were projected into geographic coordinates assuming an airglow emission altitude of 250 km. Once the images were projected into geographic coordinates, the intensities of the airglow along a line of constant geomagnetic latitude (31°) are used to detect the presence of an EPB, which shows up as a depletion in airglow intensity. To calculate the EPB drift velocity, we divide the spatial lag between depletions found in two images (found by the application of correlation analysis) by the time difference between these two images. With multiple images, we will have several velocity values and consequently we can draw the EPB drift velocity curve. Future analysis will compare the estimates of the plasma drift velocity with the thermospheric neutral wind velocity estimated by a collocated Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) at the observatory.

  7. New method to measure coronary velocity and coronary flow reserve.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z-D; Svendsen, M; Choy, J S; Sinha, A K; Huo, Y; Yoshida, K; Molloi, S; Kassab, G S

    2011-07-01

    Coronary flow reserve (CFR) is an important index of coronary microcirculatory function. The objective of this study was to validate the reproducibility and accuracy of intravascular conductance catheter-based method for measurements of baseline and hyperemic coronary flow velocity (and hence CFR). The absolute coronary blood velocity was determined by measuring the time of transit of a saline injection between two pairs of electrodes (known distance) on a conductance catheter during a routine saline injection without the need for reference flow. In vitro validation was made in the velocity range of 5 to 70 cm/s in reference to the volume collection method. In 10 swine, velocity measurements were compared with those from a flow probe in coronary arteries at different CFR attained by microsphere embolization. In vitro, the mean difference between the proposed method and volume collection was 0.7 ± 1.34 cm/s for steady flow and -0.77 ± 2.22 cm/s for pulsatile flow. The mean difference between duplicate measurements was 0 ± 1.4 cm/s. In in vivo experiments, the flow (product of velocity and lumen cross-sectional area that is also measured by the conductance catheter) was determined in both normal and stenotic vessels and the mean difference between the proposed method and flow probe was -1 ± 12 ml/min (flow ranged from 10 to 130 ml/min). For CFR, the mean difference between the two methods was 0.06 ± 0.28 (range of 1 to 3). Our results demonstrate the reproducibility and accuracy of velocity and CFR measurements with a conductance catheter by use of a standard saline injection. The ability of the combined measurement of coronary lumen area (as previously validated) and current velocity and CFR measurements provides an integrative diagnostic tool for interventional cardiology.

  8. Measuring discharge with ADCPs: Inferences from synthetic velocity profiles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rehmann, C.R.; Mueller, D.S.; Oberg, K.A.

    2009-01-01

    Synthetic velocity profiles are used to determine guidelines for sampling discharge with acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs). The analysis allows the effects of instrument characteristics, sampling parameters, and properties of the flow to be studied systematically. For mid-section measurements, the averaging time required for a single profile measurement always exceeded the 40 s usually recommended for velocity measurements, and it increased with increasing sample interval and increasing time scale of the large eddies. Similarly, simulations of transect measurements show that discharge error decreases as the number of large eddies sampled increases. The simulations allow sampling criteria that account for the physics of the flow to be developed. ?? 2009 ASCE.

  9. Measurements of velocity and discharge, Grand Canyon, Arizona, May 1994

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oberg, Kevin A.; Fisk, Gregory G.; ,

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) evaluated the feasibility of utilizing an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) to collect velocity and discharge data in the Colorado River in Grand Canyon, Arizona, in May 1994. An ADCP is an instrument that can be used to measure water velocity and discharge from a moving boat. Measurements of velocity and discharge were made with an ADCP at 54 cross sections along the Colorado River between the Little Colorado River and Diamond Creek. Concurrent measurements of discharge with an ADCP and a Price-AA current meter were made at three U.S. Geological Survey streamflow-gaging stations: Colorado River above the Little Colorado River near Desert View, Colorado River near Grand Canyon, and Colorado River above Diamond Creek near Peach Springs. Discharges measured with an ADCP were within 3 percent of the rated discharge at each streamflow-gaging station. Discharges measured with the ADCP were within 4 percent of discharges measured with a Price-AA meter, except at the Colorado River above Diamond Creek. Vertical velocity profiles were measured with the ADCP from a stationary position at four cross sections along the Colorado River. Graphs of selected vertical velocity profiles collected in a cross section near National Canyon show considerable temporal variation among profile.

  10. Time resolved velocity measurements of unsteady systems using spiral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayler, Alexander B.; Holland, Daniel J.; Sederman, Andrew J.; Gladden, Lynn F.

    2011-07-01

    Spiral imaging has been assessed as a tool for the measurement of spatially and temporally resolved velocity information for unsteady flow systems. Using experiments and simulated acquisitions, we have quantified the flow artefacts associated with spiral imaging. In particular, we found that despite the adverse effect of in-plane flow on the point spread function, for many physical systems the extent of blurring associated with spiral imaging is marginal because flows represented by high spatial Fourier coefficients, which would be those most affected by the distortion of the point spread function, exist at the physical boundaries of the flow and are therefore associated with much smaller velocities than are characteristic of the bulk flow. The necessity for a flow imaging technique which is robust to the accrual of velocity proportionate phase during imaging was demonstrated in an experimental comparison of spiral imaging and echo-planar imaging (EPI) applied to turbulent flow in a pipe. While the measurements acquired using EPI accrued substantial velocity proportionate phase, those acquired using spiral imaging were not significantly affected. High temporal velocity measurements using spiral imaging were demonstrated on turbulent flow in a pipe (image acquisition time 5.4 ms; 91 frames per second), which enabled the transient behaviour of wall instabilities to be captured. Additionally, the technique was applied to a multiphase flow system, where the wakes behind single rising bubbles were characterised. Spiral imaging thus seems an auspicious basis for the measurement of velocity fields for unsteady flow systems.

  11. Corrections on LIFPA velocity measurements in microchannel with moderate velocity fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Wei; Yang, Fang; Khan, Jamil; Reifsnider, Ken; Wang, Guiren

    2015-02-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence photobleaching anemometer (LIFPA) has been developed in order to measure velocity fluctuations of the unsteady micro electrokinetic turbulent flows in microfluidics. The statistical errors of LIFPA measurement, because of 3-D flows and Taylor's hypothesis (compared with local Taylor's hypothesis Pinton and Labbé in J Phys II 4:1461-1468, 1994), are theoretically estimated and compared to hot-wire anemometer (HWA) measurement that is used for conventional turbulence measurement. The correction factor in the direction parallel to the laser beam is estimated, and the influence of directional correction factors of LIFPA is also investigated. It is found that in our investigation, the error due to Taylor's hypothesis is negligible. The influence of 3-D flows on the first derivative variance of velocity fluctuations in LIFPA is smaller than that in HWA measurement.

  12. Near-wall velocity measurements by particle-shadow tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lancien, Pierre; Lajeunesse, Éric; Métivier, François

    2007-06-01

    We report a new method to measure the velocity of a fluid in the vicinity of a wall. The method, that we call particle-shadow tracking (PST), simply consists in seeding the fluid with a small number of fine tracer particles of density close to that of the fluid. The position of each particle and of its shadow on the wall are then tracked simultaneously, allowing one to accurately determine the distance separating tracers from the wall and therefore to extract the velocity field. We present an application of the method to the determination of the velocity profile inside a laminar density current flowing along an inclined plane.

  13. Accurately measuring volcanic plume velocity with multiple UV spectrometers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams-Jones, Glyn; Horton, Keith A.; Elias, Tamar; Garbeil, Harold; Mouginis-Mark, Peter J; Sutton, A. Jeff; Harris, Andrew J. L.

    2006-01-01

    A fundamental problem with all ground-based remotely sensed measurements of volcanic gas flux is the difficulty in accurately measuring the velocity of the gas plume. Since a representative wind speed and direction are used as proxies for the actual plume velocity, there can be considerable uncertainty in reported gas flux values. Here we present a method that uses at least two time-synchronized simultaneously recording UV spectrometers (FLYSPECs) placed a known distance apart. By analyzing the time varying structure of SO2 concentration signals at each instrument, the plume velocity can accurately be determined. Experiments were conducted on Kīlauea (USA) and Masaya (Nicaragua) volcanoes in March and August 2003 at plume velocities between 1 and 10 m s−1. Concurrent ground-based anemometer measurements differed from FLYSPEC-measured plume speeds by up to 320%. This multi-spectrometer method allows for the accurate remote measurement of plume velocity and can therefore greatly improve the precision of volcanic or industrial gas flux measurements.

  14. A technique for measuring hypersonic flow velocity profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gartrell, L. R.

    1973-01-01

    A technique for measuring hypersonic flow velocity profiles is described. This technique utilizes an arc-discharge-electron-beam system to produce a luminous disturbance in the flow. The time of flight of this disturbance was measured. Experimental tests were conducted in the Langley pilot model expansion tube. The measured velocities were of the order of 6000 m/sec over a free-stream density range from 0.000196 to 0.00186 kg/cu m. The fractional error in the velocity measurements was less than 5 percent. Long arc discharge columns (0.356 m) were generated under hypersonic flow conditions in the expansion-tube modified to operate as an expansion tunnel.

  15. Solenoidal filtering of volumetric velocity measurements using Gaussian process regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azijli, Iliass; Dwight, Richard P.

    2015-11-01

    Volumetric velocity measurements of incompressible flows contain spurious divergence due to measurement noise, despite mass conservation dictating that the velocity field must be divergence-free (solenoidal). We investigate the use of Gaussian process regression to filter spurious divergence, returning analytically solenoidal velocity fields. We denote the filter solenoidal Gaussian process regression (SGPR) and formulate it within the Bayesian framework to allow a natural inclusion of measurement uncertainty. To enable efficient handling of large data sets on regular and near-regular grids, we propose a solution procedure that exploits the Toeplitz structure of the system matrix. We apply SGPR to two synthetic and two experimental test cases and compare it with two other recently proposed solenoidal filters. For the synthetic test cases, we find that SGPR consistently returns more accurate velocity, vorticity and pressure fields. From the experimental test cases, we draw two important conclusions. Firstly, it is found that including an accurate model for the local measurement uncertainty further improves the accuracy of the velocity field reconstructed with SGPR. Secondly, it is found that all solenoidal filters result in an improved reconstruction of the pressure field, as verified with microphone measurements. The results obtained with SGPR are insensitive to correlation length, demonstrating the robustness of the filter to its parameters.

  16. Velocity Measurements of Turbulent Wake Flow Over a Circular Cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Chang-Lung; Chen, Wei-Cheng; Chang, Keh-Chin; Wang, Muh-Rong

    2016-06-01

    There are two general concerns in the velocity measurements of turbulence. One is the temporal characteristics which governs the turbulent mixing process. Turbulence is rotational and is characterized by high levels of fluctuating vorticity. In order to obtain the information of vorticity dynamics, the spatial characteristics is the other concern. These varying needs can be satisfied by using a variety of diagnostic techniques such as invasive physical probes and non-invasive optical instruments. Probe techniques for the turbulent measurements are inherently simple and less expensive than optical methods. However, the presence of a physical probe may alter the flow field, and velocity measurements usually become questionable when probing recirculation zones. The non-invasive optical methods are mostly made of the foreign particles (or seeding) instead of the fluid flow and are, thus, of indirect method. The difference between the velocities of fluid and foreign particles is always an issue to be discussed particularly in the measurements of complicated turbulent flows. Velocity measurements of the turbulent wake flow over a circular cylinder will be made by using two invasive instruments, namely, a cross-type hot-wire anemometry (HWA) and a split-fiber hot-film anemometry (HFA), and a non-invasive optical instrument, namely, particle image velocimetry (PIV) in this study. Comparison results show that all three employed diagnostic techniques yield similar measurements in the mean velocity while somewhat deviated results in the root-mean-squared velocity, particularly for the PIV measurements. It is demonstrated that HFA possesses more capability than HWA in the flow measurements of wake flow. Wake width is determined in terms of either the flatness factor or shear-induced vorticity. It is demonstrated that flow data obtained with the three employed diagnostic techniques are capable of yielding accurate determination of wake width.

  17. Measurement of turbulent wind velocities using a rotating boom apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Sandborn, V.A.; Connell, J.R.

    1984-04-01

    The present report covers both the development of a rotating-boom facility and the evaluation of the spectral energy of the turbulence measured relative to the rotating boom. The rotating boom is composed of a helicopter blade driven through a pulley speed reducer by a variable speed motor. The boom is mounted on a semiportable tower that can be raised to provide various ratios of hub height to rotor diameter. The boom can be mounted to rotate in either the vertical or horizontal plane. Probes that measure the three components of turbulence can be mounted at any location along the radius of the boom. Special hot-film sensors measured two components of the turbulence at a point directly in front of the rotating blade. By using the probe rotated 90/sup 0/ about its axis, the third turbulent velocity component was measured. Evaluation of the spectral energy distributions for the three components of velocity indicates a large concentration of energy at the rotational frequency. At frequencies slightly below the rotational frequency, the spectral energy is greatly reduced over that measured for the nonrotating case measurements. Peaks in the energy at frequencies that are multiples of the rotation frequency were also observed. We conclude that the rotating boom apparatus is suitable and ready to be used in experiments for developing and testing sensors for rotational measurement of wind velocity from wind turbine rotors. It also can be used to accurately measure turbulent wind for testing theories of rotationally sampled wind velocity.

  18. Estimating Radar Velocity using Direction of Arrival Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter; Horndt, Volker; Bickel, Douglas Lloyd; Naething, Richard M.

    2014-09-01

    Direction of Arrival (DOA) measurements, as with a monopulse antenna, can be compared against Doppler measurements in a Synthetic Aperture Radar ( SAR ) image to determine an aircraft's forward velocity as well as its crab angle, to assist the aircraft's navigation as well as improving high - performance SAR image formation and spatial calibration.

  19. Using embedded fibers to measure explosive detonation velocities

    SciTech Connect

    Podsednik, Jason W.; Parks, Shawn Michael; Navarro, Rudolfo J.

    2012-07-01

    Single-mode fibers were cleverly embedded into fixtures holding nitromethane, and used in conjunction with a photonic Doppler velocimeter (PDV) to measure the associated detonation velocity. These measurements have aided us in our understanding of energetic materials and enhanced our diagnostic capabilities.

  20. Normalized velocity profiles of field-measured turbidity currents

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xu, Jingping

    2010-01-01

    Multiple turbidity currents were recorded in two submarine canyons with maximum speed as high as 280 cm/s. For each individual turbidity current measured at a fixed station, its depth-averaged velocity typically decreased over time while its thickness increased. Some turbidity currents gained in speed as they traveled downcanyon, suggesting a possible self-accelerating process. The measured velocity profiles, first in this high resolution, allowed normalizations with various schemes. Empirical functions, obtained from laboratory experiments whose spatial and time scales are two to three orders of magnitude smaller, were found to represent the field data fairly well. The best similarity collapse of the velocity profiles was achieved when the streamwise velocity and the elevation were normalized respectively by the depth-averaged velocity and the turbidity current thickness. This normalization scheme can be generalized to an empirical function Y = exp(–αXβ) for the jet region above the velocity maximum. Confirming theoretical arguments and laboratory results of other studies, the field turbidity currents are Froude-supercritical.

  1. Simulated O VI Doppler dimming measurements of coronal outflow velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strachan, Leonard; Gardner, L. D.; Kohl, John L.

    1992-01-01

    The possibility of determining O(5+) outflow velocities by using a Doppler dimming analysis of the resonantly scattered intensities of O VI lambda 1031.9 and lambda 1037.6 is addressed. The technique is sensitive to outflow velocities, W, in the range W greater than 30 and less than 250 km/s and can be used for probing regions of the inner solar corona, where significant coronal heating and solar wind acceleration may be occurring. These velocity measurements, when combined with measurements of other plasma parameters (temperatures and densities of ions and electrons) can be used to estimate the energy and mass flux of O(5+). In particular, it may be possible to locate where the flow changes from subsonic to supersonic and to identify source regions for the high and low speed solar wind. The velocity diagnostic technique is discussed with emphasis placed on the requirements needed for accurate outflow velocity determinations. Model determinations of outflow velocities based on simulated Doppler observations are presented.

  2. Absolute blood velocity measured with a modified fundus camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, Donald D.; Lemaillet, Paul; Ibrahim, Mohamed; Nguyen, Quan Dong; Hiller, Matthias; Ramella-Roman, Jessica

    2010-09-01

    We present a new method for the quantitative estimation of blood flow velocity, based on the use of the Radon transform. The specific application is for measurement of blood flow velocity in the retina. Our modified fundus camera uses illumination from a green LED and captures imagery with a high-speed CCD camera. The basic theory is presented, and typical results are shown for an in vitro flow model using blood in a capillary tube. Subsequently, representative results are shown for representative fundus imagery. This approach provides absolute velocity and flow direction along the vessel centerline or any lateral displacement therefrom. We also provide an error analysis allowing estimation of confidence intervals for the estimated velocity.

  3. Laboratory Measurements of Velocity and Attenuation in Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmer, M A; Berge, P A; Bonner, B P; Prasad, M

    2004-06-08

    Laboratory measurements are required to establish relationships between the physical properties of unconsolidated sediments and P- and S-wave propagation through them. Previous work has either focused on measurements of compressional wave properties at depths greater than 500 m for oil industry applications or on measurements of dynamic shear properties at pressures corresponding to depths of less than 50 m for geotechnical applications. Therefore, the effects of lithology, fluid saturation, and compaction on impedance and P- and S-wave velocities of shallow soils are largely unknown. We describe two state-of-the-art laboratory experiments. One setup allows us to measure ultrasonic P-wave velocities at very low pressures in unconsolidated sediments (up to 0.1 MPa). The other experiment allows P- and S-wave velocity measurements at low to medium pressures (up to 20 MPa). We summarize the main velocity and attenuation results on sands and sand - clay mixtures under partially saturated and fully saturated conditions in two ranges of pressures (0 - 0.1 MPa and 0.1 - 20 MPa) representative of the top few meters and the top 1 km, respectively. Under hydrostatic pressures of 0.1 to 20 MPa, our measurements demonstrate a P- and S-wave velocity-dependence in dry sands around a fourth root (0.23 -0.26) with the pressure dependence for S-waves being slightly lower. The P- velocity-dependence in wet sands lies around 0.4. The Vp-Vs and the Qp-Qs ratios together can be useful tools to distinguish between different lithologies and between pressure and saturation effects. These experimental velocities at the frequency of measurement (200 kHz) are slightly higher that Gassmann's static result. For low pressures under uniaxial stress, Vp and Vs were a few hundred meters per second with velocities showing a strong dependence on packing, clay content, and microstructure. We provide a typical shallow soil scenario in a clean sand environment and reconstruct the velocity profile of

  4. Sound field separation with sound pressure and particle velocity measurements.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Grande, Efren; Jacobsen, Finn; Leclère, Quentin

    2012-12-01

    In conventional near-field acoustic holography (NAH) it is not possible to distinguish between sound from the two sides of the array, thus, it is a requirement that all the sources are confined to only one side and radiate into a free field. When this requirement cannot be fulfilled, sound field separation techniques make it possible to distinguish between outgoing and incoming waves from the two sides, and thus NAH can be applied. In this paper, a separation method based on the measurement of the particle velocity in two layers and another method based on the measurement of the pressure and the velocity in a single layer are proposed. The two methods use an equivalent source formulation with separate transfer matrices for the outgoing and incoming waves, so that the sound from the two sides of the array can be modeled independently. A weighting scheme is proposed to account for the distance between the equivalent sources and measurement surfaces and for the difference in magnitude between pressure and velocity. Experimental and numerical studies have been conducted to examine the methods. The double layer velocity method seems to be more robust to noise and flanking sound than the combined pressure-velocity method, although it requires an additional measurement surface. On the whole, the separation methods can be useful when the disturbance of the incoming field is significant. Otherwise the direct reconstruction is more accurate and straightforward.

  5. Brachial vs. central systolic pressure and pulse wave transmission indicators: a critical analysis.

    PubMed

    Izzo, Joseph L

    2014-12-01

    This critique is intended to provide background for the reader to evaluate the relative clinical utilities of brachial cuff systolic blood pressure (SBP) and its derivatives, including pulse pressure, central systolic pressure, central augmentation index (AI), and pulse pressure amplification (PPA). The critical question is whether the newer indicators add sufficient information to justify replacing or augmenting brachial cuff blood pressure (BP) data in research and patient care. Historical context, pathophysiology of variations in pulse wave transmission and reflection, issues related to measurement and model errors, statistical limitations, and clinical correlations are presented, along with new comparative data. Based on this overview, there is no compelling scientific or practical reason to replace cuff SBP with any of the newer indicators in the vast majority of clinical situations. Supplemental value for central SBP may exist in defining patients with exaggerated PPA ("spurious systolic hypertension"), managing cardiac and aortic diseases, and in studies of cardiovascular drugs, but there are no current standards for these possibilities.

  6. CARS measurement of velocity in a supersonic jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gustafson, E. K.; Mcdaniel, J. C.; Byer, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    It is shown that CW CARS can be used to measure velocity in supersonic flows. The accuracy with which the Doppler shift can be measured is determined through the drift in the laser frequencies. In the experiment described here, it is found that a laser drift error of 10 MHz during the recording of a spectrum would limit the velocity resolution to 34 m/s. It is noted that improved frequency stabilization of the laser sources could lead to a velocity measurement accuracy of several m/s. In the experiment, a 4-W single axial mode argon ion laser is the pump source, and the Stokes-shifted frequency is generated by a 100-mW tunable dye laser.

  7. Ultrasonic Velocity Profile Measurement for Thermal Convection of Liquid Gallium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasaka, Yuji; Kitaura, Hidekazu; Yoshida, Masataka; Takeda, Yasushi; Yanagisawa, Takatoshi

    2004-11-01

    Thermal convection caused by vertical temperature gradient in a slab shape container filled with liquid Gallium is investigated experimentally as low Prandtl number convection. Ultrasonic Velocity Profiler (UVP) measured instantaneous profiles of the horizontal velocity component along the span direction of the container. The results represent a convective flow pattern and its temporal fluctuation. The measured flow pattern is compared with visualized convective pattern in normal Pr liquid convection. The measurement was achieved for the range of Rayleigh number R, approximately 100 ≤ R/R_c ≤ 600, where R_c is critical Rayleigh number for Rayleigh-Bénard problem. Transition of flow pattern and variation of velocity fluctuation with respect to R is discussed.

  8. Near bottom velocity measurements in San Francisco Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gartner, Jeffrey W.; Cheng, Ralph T.; ,

    1996-01-01

    The ability to accurately measure long-term time-series of tidal currents in bays and estuaries is critical in estuarine hydrodynamic studies. Accurate measurements of tidal currents near the air-water interface and in the bottom boundary layer remain difficult in spite of the significant advances in technology for measuring tidal currents which have been achieved in recent years. One of the objectives of this study is to demonstrate that turbulent mean velocity distribution within the bottom boundary layer can be determined accurately by using a broad-band acoustic Doppler current profiler (BB-ADCP). A suite of instruments, including two BB-ADCPs and four electromagnetic (EM) current meters was deployed in San Francisco Bay, California in an investigation of resuspension and transport of sediment during March 1995. The velocity measurements obtained in the bottom boundary layer by BB-ADCP were highly coherent (r2>0.94) with the velocity measurements obtained by EM current meters. During early March 1995, both BB-ADCPs and EM current meters recorded a very unusual flow event. Agreement among independent measurements by these instruments in describing such an atypical hydrodynamic occurrence further validates the velocity measurements obtained by BB-ADCP in the bottom boundary layer.

  9. Sensors for Using Times of Flight to Measure Flow Velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fralick, Gutave; Wrbanek, John D.; Hwang, Danny; Turso, James

    2006-01-01

    Thin-film sensors for measuring flow velocities in terms of times of flight are undergoing development. These sensors are very small and can be mounted flush with surfaces of airfoils, ducts, and other objects along which one might need to measure flows. Alternatively or in addition, these sensors can be mounted on small struts protruding from such surfaces for acquiring velocity measurements at various distances from the surfaces for the purpose of obtaining boundary-layer flow-velocity profiles. These sensors are related to, but not the same as, hot-wire anemometers. Each sensor includes a thin-film, electrically conductive loop, along which an electric current is made to flow to heat the loop to a temperature above that of the surrounding fluid. Instantaneous voltage fluctuations in segments of the loop are measured by means of electrical taps placed at intervals along the loop. These voltage fluctuations are caused by local fluctuations in electrical resistance that are, in turn, caused by local temperature fluctuations that are, in turn, caused by fluctuations in flow-induced cooling and, hence, in flow velocity. The differential voltage as a function of time, measured at each pair of taps, is subjected to cross-correlation processing with the corresponding quantities measured at other pairs of taps at different locations on the loop. The cross-correlations yield the times taken by elements of fluid to travel between the pairs of taps. Then the component of velocity along the line between any two pairs of taps is calculated simply as the distance between the pairs of taps divided by the travel time. Unlike in the case of hot-wire anemometers, there is no need to obtain calibration data on voltage fluctuations versus velocity fluctuations because, at least in principle, the correlation times are independent of the calibration data.

  10. Detailed Measurement of Horizontal Groundwater Velocities Without a Borehole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakker, M.; Calje, R.; Van der Made, K. J.; Schaars, F.

    2014-12-01

    A new methodology has been developed to measure horizontal groundwater velocities in unconsolidated aquifers. Groundwater velocities are measured with a heat tracer experiment. Temperature is measured along fiber optic cables using a Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) system. Fiber optic cables and a separate heating cable are pushed into the ground to depths of tens of meters. The groundwater is heated with the heating cable and the response is measured along several nearby fiber optic cables. The measured temperature responses are used to estimate the distribution of the magnitude and direction of the horizontal groundwater velocity over the entire depth of the cables. The methodology has been applied in a phreatic aquifer in the dune area along the Dutch coast. Significant variations of groundwater velocities with depth were observed even though the dune sand is relatively homogeneous. Major advantages of the new methodology are that the fiber optic cables are in direct contact with the groundwater and that the cables and installation are relatively cheap. No expensive boreholes are needed and consequently measurements are not affected by movement and mixing of water inside a borehole.

  11. Optic-microwave mixing velocimeter for superhigh velocity measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Jidong; Wang, Xiang; Tao, Tianjiong; Liu, Cangli; Tan, Hua

    2011-12-01

    The phenomenon that a light beam reflected off a moving object experiences a Doppler shift in its frequency underlies practical interferometric techniques for remote velocity measurements, such as velocity interferometer system for any reflector (VISAR), displacement interferometer system for any reflector (DISAR), and photonic Doppler velocimetry (PDV). While VISAR velocimeters are often bewildered by the fringe loss upon high-acceleration dynamic process diagnosis, the optic-fiber velocimeters such as DISAR and PDV, on the other hand, are puzzled by high velocity measurement over 10 km/s, due to the demand for the high bandwidth digitizer. Here, we describe a new optic-microwave mixing velocimeter (OMV) for super-high velocity measurements. By using currently available commercial microwave products, we have constructed a simple, compact, and reliable OMV device, and have successfully obtained, with a digitizer of bandwidth 6 GH only, the precise velocity history of an aluminum flyer plate being accelerated up to 11.2 km/s in a three stage gas-gun experiment.

  12. Optic-microwave mixing velocimeter for superhigh velocity measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Weng Jidong; Wang Xiang; Tao Tianjiong; Liu Cangli; Tan Hua

    2011-12-15

    The phenomenon that a light beam reflected off a moving object experiences a Doppler shift in its frequency underlies practical interferometric techniques for remote velocity measurements, such as velocity interferometer system for any reflector (VISAR), displacement interferometer system for any reflector (DISAR), and photonic Doppler velocimetry (PDV). While VISAR velocimeters are often bewildered by the fringe loss upon high-acceleration dynamic process diagnosis, the optic-fiber velocimeters such as DISAR and PDV, on the other hand, are puzzled by high velocity measurement over 10 km/s, due to the demand for the high bandwidth digitizer. Here, we describe a new optic-microwave mixing velocimeter (OMV) for super-high velocity measurements. By using currently available commercial microwave products, we have constructed a simple, compact, and reliable OMV device, and have successfully obtained, with a digitizer of bandwidth 6 GH only, the precise velocity history of an aluminum flyer plate being accelerated up to 11.2 km/s in a three stage gas-gun experiment.

  13. Velocity measurements by laser resonance fluorescence. [single atom diffusional motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    She, C. Y.; Fairbank, W. M., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The photonburst correlation method was used to detect single atoms in a buffer gas. Real time flow velocity measurements with laser induced resonance fluorescence from single or multiple atoms was demonstrated and this method was investigated as a tool for wind tunnel flow measurement. Investigations show that single atoms and their real time diffusional motion on a buffer gas can be measured by resonance fluorescence. By averaging over many atoms, flow velocities up to 88 m/s were measured in a time of 0.5 sec. It is expected that higher flow speeds can be measured and that the measurement time can be reduced by a factor of 10 or more by careful experimental design. The method is clearly not ready for incorporation in high speed wind tunnels because it is not yet known whether the stray light level will be higher or lower, and it is not known what detection efficiency can be obtained in a wind tunnel situation.

  14. Illumination Profile & Dispersion Variation Effects on Radial Velocity Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grieves, Nolan; Ge, Jian; Thomas, Neil B.; Ma, Bo; Li, Rui; SDSS-III

    2015-01-01

    The Multi-object APO Radial-Velocity Exoplanet Large-Area Survey (MARVELS) measures radial velocities using a fiber-fed dispersed fixed-delay interferometer (DFDI) with a moderate dispersion spectrograph. This setup allows a unique insight into the 2D illumination profile from the fiber on to the dispersion grating. Illumination profile investigations show large changes in the profile over time and fiber location. These profile changes are correlated with dispersion changes and long-term radial velocity offsets, a major problem within the MARVELS radial velocity data. Characterizing illumination profiles creates a method to both detect and correct radial velocity offsets, allowing for better planet detection. Here we report our early results from this study including improvement of radial velocity data points from detected giant planet candidates. We also report an illumination profile experiment conducted at the Kitt Peak National Observatory using the EXPERT instrument, which has a DFDI mode similar to MARVELS. Using profile controlling octagonal-shaped fibers, long term offsets over a 3 month time period were reduced from ~50 m/s to within the photon limit of ~4 m/s.

  15. Bubbly flow velocity measurements near a heated cylindrical conductor

    SciTech Connect

    Canaan, R.E.; Hassan, Y.A. )

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this study is to apply recent advances and improvements in the digital pulsed laser velocimetry (DPLV) technique to the analysis of two-phase bubbly flow about a cylindrical conductor emitting a constant heat flux within a transparent rectangular enclosure. Pulsed laser velocimetry is a rapidly advancing fluid flow visualization technique that determines full-field instantaneous velocity vectors of a quantitative nature such that the flow field remains undisturbed by the measurement. The DPLV method offers several significant advantages over more traditional fluid velocity measurement techniques such as hot wire/film anemometry and laser Doppler anemometry because reliable instantaneous velocity data may be acquired over substantial flow areas in a single experiment.

  16. Particle and gas velocity measurements in a dc plasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Lesinski, J.; Mizera-Lesinska, B.; Jurewicz, J.; Boulos, M.I.

    1980-01-01

    Measurements were made, using Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA), of the velocity of 53 ..mu..m alumina particles as they are injected in a dc plasma jet operated with an argon-nitrogen mixture (18.9 l/min argon and 4.7 l/min nitrogen) at a power level of 15.2 kW. Results obtained at distances between 5 and 150 mm from the nozzle showed the particles to penetrate the plasma jet and attain the gas velocity at about 50 mm from their point of injection. Plasma velocity measurements in the core region of the jet proved to be particularly difficult. Limitations of the LDA system with regard to its spatial resolution and seeding requirements are discussed.

  17. Pulse Wave Amplitude Drops during Sleep are Reliable Surrogate Markers of Changes in Cortical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Delessert, Alexandre; Espa, Fabrice; Rossetti, Andrea; Lavigne, Gilles; Tafti, Mehdi; Heinzer, Raphael

    2010-01-01

    Background: During sleep, sudden drops in pulse wave amplitude (PWA) measured by pulse oximetry are commonly associated with simultaneous arousals and are thought to result from autonomic vasoconstriction. In the present study, we determine whether PWA drops were associated with changes in cortical activity as determined by EEG spectral analysis. Methods: A 20% decrease in PWA was chosen as a minimum for a drop. A total of 1085 PWA drops from 10 consecutive sleep recordings were analyzed. EEG spectral analysis was performed over 5 consecutive epochs of 5 seconds: 2 before, 1 during, and 2 after the PWA drop. EEG spectral analysis was performed over delta, theta, alpha, sigma, and beta frequency bands. Within each frequency band, power density was compared across the five 5-sec epochs. Presence or absence of visually scored EEG arousals were adjudicated by an investigator blinded to the PWA signal and considered associated with PWA drop if concomitant. Results: A significant increase in EEG power density in all EEG frequency bands was found during PWA drops (P < 0.001) compared to before and after drop. Even in the absence of visually scored arousals, PWA drops were associated with a significant increase in EEG power density (P < 0.001) in most frequency bands. Conclusions: Drops in PWA are associated with a significant increase in EEG power density, suggesting that these events can be used as a surrogate for changes in cortical activity during sleep. This approach may prove of value in scoring respiratory events on limited-channel (type III) portable monitors. Citation: Delessert A; Espa F; Rossetti A; Lavigne G; Tafti M; Heinzer R. Pulse wave amplitude drops during sleep are reliable surrogate markers of changes in cortical activity. SLEEP 2010;33(12):1687-1692. PMID:21120131

  18. Time-resolved particle velocity measurements at impact velocities of 10 km/s

    SciTech Connect

    Furnish, M.D.; Chhabildas, L.C.; Reinhart, W.D.

    1998-08-01

    Hypervelocity launch capabilities (9--16 km/s) with macroscopic plates have become available in recent years. It is now feasible to conduct instrumented plane-wave tests using this capability. Successfully conducting such tests requires a planar launch and impact at hypervelocities, appropriate triggering for recording systems, and time-resolved measurements of motion or stress at a particular point or set of points within the target or projectile during impact. The authors have conducted the first time-resolved wave-profile experiments using velocity interferometric techniques at impact velocities of 10 km/s. These measurements show that aluminum continues to exhibit normal release behavior to 161 GPa shock pressure, with complete loss of strength of the shocked state. These experiments have allowed a determination of shock-wave window transparency in conditions produced by a hypervelocity impact. In particular, lithium fluoride appears to lose transparency at a shock stress of 200 GPa; this appears to be the upper limit for conventional wave profile measurements using velocity interferometric techniques.

  19. Pulsed-wave Doppler echocardiography in birds of prey.

    PubMed

    Straub, J; Forbes, N A; Thielebein, J; Krautwald-Junghanns, M E

    2003-12-13

    Pulsed-wave spectral Doppler echocardiography was applied to 111 diurnal and nocturnal raptors of both sexes weighing between 190 and 4200 g. In the first stage, 40 birds were examined without special preparation; in the second stage, 15 birds were examined first when they were not anaesthetised and then when they were anaesthetised; in the third stage, 41 birds were examined after they had been fasted for different periods of time; and finally 15 birds, in which echocardiography had not been possible by using standard (dorsal) restraint and positioning, were examined after being placed in lateral and ventral recumbency. Doppler-derived diastolic inflow into the ventricles was detectable in approximately 80 per cent of the birds weighing between 190 and 2300 g independently of their weight, heart rate and whether they had been anaesthetised or fasted, and aortic blood flow was detected in about 50 per cent of them. It was possible to apply the technique under standard conditions of dorsal recumbency to only one of the birds weighing more than 3000 g and to about 80 per cent of those weighing between 190 and 2300 g. In 11 of 15 birds in which the technique could not be applied under standard conditions, blood flow could be detected in the ventricles and/or the aorta after the birds had been repositioned. No systolic blood flow through the pulmonary artery was detectable in any of the birds.

  20. Rayleigh Scattering Diagnostic for Dynamic Measurement of Velocity and Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seasholtz, Richard G.; Panda, J.

    2001-01-01

    A new technique for measuring dynamic gas velocity and temperature is described. The technique is based on molecular Rayleigh scattering of laser light, so no seeding of the flow is necessary. The Rayleigh scattered light is filtered with a fixed cavity, planar mirror Fabry-Perot interferometer. A minimum number of photodetectors were used in order to allow the high data acquisition rate needed for dynamic measurements. One photomultiplier tube (PMT) was used to measure the total Rayleigh scattering, which is proportional to the gas density. Two additional PMTs were used to detect light that passes through two apertures in a mask located in the interferometer fringe plane. An uncertainty analysis was used to select the optimum aperture parameters and to predict the measurement uncertainty due to photon shot-noise. Results of an experiment to measure the velocity of a subsonic free jet are presented.

  1. Intraglottal velocity and pressure measurements in a hemilarynx model.

    PubMed

    Oren, Liran; Gutmark, Ephraim; Khosla, Sid

    2015-02-01

    Determining the mechanisms of self-sustained oscillation of the vocal folds requires characterization of the pressures produced by intraglottal aerodynamics. Because most of the intraglottal aerodynamic forces cannot be measured in a tissue model of the larynx, current understanding of vocal fold vibration mechanism is derived from mechanical, analytical, and computational models. Previous studies have computed intraglottal pressures from measured intraglottal velocity fields and intraglottal geometry; however, this technique for determining pressures is not yet validated. In this study, intraglottal pressure measurements taken in a hemilarynx model are compared with pressure values that are computed from simultaneous velocity measurements. The results showed that significant negative pressure formed near the superior aspect of the folds during closing, which agrees with previous measurements in other hemilarynx models. Intraglottal velocity measurements show that the flow near the superior aspect separates from the glottal wall during closing and may develop into a vortex, which further augments the magnitude of negative pressure. Intraglottal pressure distributions, computed by solving the pressure Poisson equation, showed good agreement with pressure measurements. The match between the pressure computations and its measurements validates the current technique, which was previously used to estimate intraglottal pressure distribution in a full larynx model.

  2. Adaptive interferometric velocity measurements using a laser guide star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarske, J.; Radner, H.; Büttner, L.

    2015-07-01

    We have harnessed the power of programmable photonics devices for an interferometric measurement technique. Laser interferometers are widely used for flow velocity measurements, since they offer high temporal and spatial resolutions. However, often optical wavefront distortions deteriorate the measurement properties. In principle, adaptive optics enables the correction of these disturbances. One challenge is to generate a suitable reference signal for the closed loop operation of the adaptive optics. An adaptive Mach Zehnder interferometer is presented to measure through a dynamic liquid-gas phase boundary, which can lead to a misalignment of the interfering laser beams. In order to generate the reference signal for the closed loop control, the Fresnel reflex of the phase boundary is used as Laser Guide Star (LGS) for the first time to the best of the authors' knowledge. The concept is related to the generation of artificial stars in astronomy, where the light transmitted by the atmosphere is evaluated. However, the adaptive interferometric flow velocity measurements at real world experiments require a different concept, since only the reflected light can be evaluated. The used LGS allows to measure the wavefront distortions induced by the dynamic phase boundary. Two biaxial electromagnetically driven steering mirrors are employed to correct the wavefront distortions. This opens up the possibility for accurate flow measurements through a dynamic phase boundary using only one optical access. Our work represents a paradigm shift in interferometric velocity measurement techniques from using static to dynamic optical elements.

  3. Guidance for accurate and consistent tissue Doppler velocity measurement: comparison of echocardiographic methods using a simple vendor-independent method for local validation.

    PubMed

    Dhutia, Niti M; Zolgharni, Massoud; Willson, Keith; Cole, Graham; Nowbar, Alexandra N; Dawson, David; Zielke, Sayeh; Whelan, Carol; Newton, Jim; Mayet, Jamil; Manisty, Charlotte H; Francis, Darrel P

    2014-07-01

    Variability has been described between different echo machines and different modalities when measuring tissue velocities. We assessed the consistency of tissue velocity measurements across different modalities and different manufacturers in an in vitro model and in patients. Furthermore, we present freely available software tools to repeat these evaluations. We constructed a simple setup to generate reproducible motion and used it to compare velocities measured using three echocardiographic modalities: M-mode, speckle tracking, and tissue Doppler, with a straightforward, non-ultrasound, optical gold standard. In the clinical phase, 25 patients underwent M-mode, speckle tracking, and tissue Doppler measurements of s', e', and a' velocities. In vitro, the M-mode and speckle tracking velocities agreed with optical assessment. Of the three possible tissue Doppler measurement conventions (outer, middle, and inner edge) only the middle agreed with optical assessment (discrepancy -0.20 (95% CI -0.44 to 0.03) cm/s, P = 0.11, outer +5.19 (4.65 to 5.73) cm/s, P < 0.0001, inner -6.26 (-6.87 to -5.65) cm/s, P < 0.0001). A similar pattern occurred across all four studied manufacturers. M-mode was therefore chosen as the in vivo gold standard. Clinical measurements of s' velocities by speckle tracking and the middle line of the tissue Doppler showed concordance with M-mode, while the outer line overestimated significantly (+1.27(0.96 to 1.59) cm/s, P < 0.0001) and the inner line underestimated (-1.82 (-2.11 to -1.52) cm/s, P < 0.0001). Echocardiographic velocity measurements can be more consistent than previously suspected. The statistically modal velocity, found at the centre of the spectral pulsed wave tissue Doppler envelope, most closely represents true tissue velocity. This article includes downloadable, vendor-independent software enabling calibration of echocardiographic machines using a simple, inexpensive in vitro setup. Published on behalf of the European Society of

  4. Measurement of torque of trunk flexors at different velocities.

    PubMed

    Wessel, J; Ford, D; van Driesum, D

    1992-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the test-retest reliability of recording isometric and isokinetic torque of the trunk flexors and to examine the effect of velocity on the torque curves. Thirty healthy subjects were tested on two occasions for isometric torque of trunk flexion at four angles and eccentric and concentric torque at three velocities. Two subjects repeated these tests in the passive mode to determine the torque produced by the trunk when there was no active flexion effort. Intraclass correlation coefficients were above 0.85 for all isometric and isokinetic measures. Standard errors of measurement ranged from 6.9 to 19.5 Nm. Student t-tests indicated no significant differences between occasions for all outcome measures. Examination of passive and active torque curves indicated that the torque produced by the mass of the trunk increased with increasing velocity. It is concluded that both isometric and isokinetic testing of the trunk flexors are reliable, but that testing at higher velocities may not provide a valid measure of muscle performance.

  5. Particle velocity measurements of the reaction zone in nitromethane

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, S. A.; Engelke, R. P.; Alcon, R. R.; Gustavsen, R. L.; Robbins, D. L.; Stahl, D. B.; Stacy, H. L.; Whitehead, M.

    2002-01-01

    The detonation reaction-zone length in neat, deuterated, and chemically sensitized nitromethane (NM) has been measured by using several different laser-based velocity interferometry systems. The experiments involved measuring the particle velocity history at a NM/PMMA (polymethylmethacrylate) window interface during the time a detonation in the NM interacted with the interface. Initially, Fabry-Perot interferometry was used, but, because of low time resolution (>5 ns), several different configurations of VISAR interferometry were subsequently used. Early work was done with VISARs with a time resolution of about 3 ns. By making changes to the recording system, we were able to improve this to {approx}1 ns. Profiles measured at the NM/PMMA interface agree with the ZND theory, in that a spike ({approx}2.45 mm/{micro}s) is measured that is consistent with an extrapolated reactant NM Hugoniot matched to the PMMA window. The spike is rather sharp, followed by a rapid drop in particle velocity over a time of 5 to 10 ns; this is evidence of early fast reactions. Over about 50 ns, a much slower particle velocity decrease occurs to the assumed CJ condition - indicating a total reaction zone length of {approx}300 {micro}m. When the NM is chemically changed, such as replacing the hydrogen atoms with deuterium or chemically sensitizing with a base, some changes are observed in the early part of the reaction zone.

  6. Precise Measurement of Drift Velocities in Active-Target Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Louis

    2016-09-01

    Nuclear experiments with radioactive beams are needed to improve our understanding of nuclei structure far from stability. Radioactive beams typically have low beam rates, but active-target detectors can compensate for these low beam rates. In active-target detectors that are also Time-Projection Chambers (TPC), ionized electrons drift through an electric fieldto a detection device to imagethe trajectory of charged-particle ionization tracks within the chamber's gas volume. The measurement of the ionized electrons' drift velocity is crucial for the accurate imaging of these tracks. In order to measure this drift velocity, we will use a UV laser and photo-sensitive foil in a the ND-Cubedetector we are developing, periodically releasingelectrons from the foil at a known timesand a known distance from the electron detector, thereby precisely measuring the drift velocity in situ. We have surveyed several materials to find a material that will work well with typical solid-state UV lasers on the market. We plan to determine the best material and thickness of the foil to maximize the number of photoelectrons. The precision that will be afforded by this measurement of the drift velocity will allow us to eliminate a source of systematic uncertainty.

  7. Results on fibre scrambling for high accuracy radial velocity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avila, Gerardo; Singh, Paul; Chazelas, Bruno

    2010-07-01

    We present in this paper experimental data on fibres and scramblers to increase the photometrical stability of the spectrograph PSF. We have used round, square, octagonal fibres and beam homogenizers. This study is aimed to enhance the accuracy measurements of the radial velocities for ESO ESPRESSO (VLT) and CODEX (E-ELT) instruments.

  8. Improved Measurement of Ejection Velocities From Craters Formed in Sand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cintala, Mark J.; Byers, Terry; Cardenas, Francisco; Montes, Roland; Potter, Elliot E.

    2014-01-01

    A typical impact crater is formed by two major processes: compression of the target (essentially equivalent to a footprint in soil) and ejection of material. The Ejection-Velocity Measurement System (EVMS) in the Experimental Impact Laboratory has been used to study ejection velocities from impact craters formed in sand since the late 1990s. The original system used an early-generation Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) camera; custom-written software; and a complex, multicomponent optical system to direct laser light for illumination. Unfortunately, the electronic equipment was overtaken by age, and the software became obsolete in light of improved computer hardware.

  9. Evaluation of mean velocity and turbulence measurements with ADCPs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nystrom, E.A.; Rehmann, C.R.; Oberg, K.A.

    2007-01-01

    To test the ability of acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) to measure turbulence, profiles measured with two pulse-to-pulse coherent ADCPs in a laboratory flume were compared to profiles measured with an acoustic Doppler velocimeter, and time series measured in the acoustic beam of the ADCPs were examined. A four-beam ADCP was used at a downstream station, while a three-beam ADCP was used at a downstream station and an upstream station. At the downstream station, where the turbulence intensity was low, both ADCPs reproduced the mean velocity profile well away from the flume boundaries; errors near the boundaries were due to transducer ringing, flow disturbance, and sidelobe interference. At the upstream station, where the turbulence intensity was higher, errors in the mean velocity were large. The four-beam ADCP measured the Reynolds stress profile accurately away from the bottom boundary, and these measurements can be used to estimate shear velocity. Estimates of Reynolds stress with a three-beam ADCP and turbulent kinetic energy with both ADCPs cannot be computed without further assumptions, and they are affected by flow inhomogeneity. Neither ADCP measured integral time scales to within 60%. ?? 2007 ASCE.

  10. Inter-laboratory comparison of wave velocity measures.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waite, William F.; Santamarina, J.C.; Rydzy, M.; Chong, S.H.; Grozic, J.L.H.; Hester, K.; Howard, J.; Kneafsey, T.J.; Lee, J.Y.; Nakagawa, S.; Priest, J.; Reese, E.; Koh, H.; Sloan, E.D.; Sultaniya, A.

    2011-01-01

     This paper presents an eight-laboratory comparison of compressional and shear wave velocities measured in F110 Ottawa sand. The study was run to quantify the physical property variations one should expect in heterogeneous, multiphase porous materials by separately quantifying the variability inherent in the measurement techniques themselves. Comparative tests were run in which the sand was dry, water-saturated, partially water-saturated, partially ice-saturated and partially hydrate-saturated. Each test illustrates a collection of effects that can be classified as inducing either specimen-based or measurement-based variability. The most significant variability is due to void ratio variations between samples. Heterogeneous pore-fill distributions and differences in measurement techniques also contribute to the observed variability, underscoring the need to provide detailed sample preparation and system calibration information when reporting wave velocities in porous media. 

  11. An inexpensive instrument for measuring wave exposure and water velocity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Figurski, J.D.; Malone, D.; Lacy, J.R.; Denny, M.

    2011-01-01

    Ocean waves drive a wide variety of nearshore physical processes, structuring entire ecosystems through their direct and indirect effects on the settlement, behavior, and survivorship of marine organisms. However, wave exposure remains difficult and expensive to measure. Here, we report on an inexpensive and easily constructed instrument for measuring wave-induced water velocities. The underwater relative swell kinetics instrument (URSKI) is a subsurface float tethered by a short (<1 m) line to the seafloor. Contained within the float is an accelerometer that records the tilt of the float in response to passing waves. During two field trials totaling 358 h, we confirmed the accuracy and precision of URSKI measurements through comparison to velocities measured by an in situ acoustic Doppler velocimeter and those predicted by a standard swell model, and we evaluated how the dimensions of the devices, its buoyancy, and sampling frequency can be modified for use in a variety of environments.

  12. Extraction of Poloidal Velocity from Charge Exchange Recombination Spectroscopy Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    W.M. Solomon; K.H. Burrell; P. Gohil; R.J. Groebner; L.R. Baylor

    2004-07-16

    A novel approach has been implemented on DIII-D to allow the correct determination of the plasma poloidal velocity from charge exchange spectroscopy measurements. Unlike usual techniques, the need for detailed atomic physics calculations to properly interpret the results is alleviated. Instead, the needed atomic physics corrections are self-consistently determined directly from the measurements, by making use of specially chosen viewing chords. Modeling results are presented that were used to determine a set of views capable of measuring the correction terms. We present the analysis of a quiescent H-mode discharge, illustrating that significant modifications to the velocity profiles are required in these high ion temperature conditions. We also present preliminary measurements providing the first direct comparison of the standard cross-section correction to the atomic physics calculations.

  13. Ultrasonic Velocity Measurement of Grease as a Quality Control Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utrata, D.

    2007-03-01

    Grease is used in a variety of industries where it is desirable to hold in place a lubricating film without having this lubricant leak or run. Various thickeners and additives are used to hold the base oil in place, extend the operating temperature range of the grease, and enhance corrosion and wear resistance. The characteristic of grease that perhaps most dictates its usefulness for a given application is its consistency: too thin and the grease may not adhere to the surfaces needing lubrication; too thick and it may not flow properly. Grease consistency is rated by the National Lubricating Grease Institute (NLGI) using performance in cone penetration tests. This work correlates the ultrasonic velocity of various greases to their consistency grade. Results indicate that some greases exhibit a clear relationship between ultrasonic velocity and grade. This promises that the use of velocity measurement could be a viable quality control tool. Not all grease formulations respond well to such predictive attempts, however.

  14. 39 GHz Interferometer System for Measuring Detonation Velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, Patrick W.; Tran, Vu; Waltman, Thomas B.; Tringe, Joe; May, Chadd; Cradick, Jerry; Hodgin, Ralph; Kane, Ron

    2015-05-13

    A new 39 GHz RF interferometer system is presented for use in velocity measurements of high explosives (HE) detonations. The frequency was chosen to compliment the currently available suite, and provide more spatial information. An RF signal is generated and coupled to a waveguide adapter serving as an antenna. The HE is initially transparent to the RF. When the HE detonates, the detonation front becomes reflective to the RF. This reflection is picked up by the waveguide adapter and mixed with an unperturbed RF signal to give a low frequency signal which can be digitized with an oscilloscope. By comparing the signal with a reference signal, velocity information can be obtained using Fourier Transforms and wavelet models. Bench test results using a “slapper” are shown. The 39 GHz microwave interferometer is used in Deflagration to Detonation shots. The signal is reflected off a moving surface, and the Doppler shift of the reflected signal is used to calculate the velocity.

  15. Measurement of the Velocity of the Neutrino with MINOS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    44 th Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Systems and Applications Meeting 119 Measurement of the Velocity of the Neutrino with MINOS P...uses a beam of predominantly muon-type neutrinos generated using protons from the Main Injector at Fermilab in Batavia, IL, and travelling 735 km...the neutrino time of flight to be made. The time structure of the parent proton pulse is measured in the beamline after extraction from the Main

  16. Velocity measurements in the plume of an arcjet engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pivirotto, T. J.; Deininger, W. D.

    1987-01-01

    A nonintrusive technique has been used to conduct a radial survey in the flow field of an arcjet engine plume. The technique measures the Doppler shift of an optically thin line resulting from recombination and relaxation processes in the high Mach number stream, in order to determine flow velocities. Atom temperature can also be calculated from the same Doppler-broadened line widths, when these shifts are measured with a scanning Fabry-Perot spectrometer whose design is presented in detail.

  17. Velocity measurements in the plume of an arcjet engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pivirotto, T. J.; Deininger, W. D.

    1987-01-01

    A nonintrusive technique has been used to conduct a radial survey in the flow field of an arcjet engine plume. The technique measures the Doppler shift of an optically thin line resulting from recombination and relaxation processes in the high Mach number stream, in order to determine flow velocities. Atom temperature can also be calculated from the same Doppler-broadened line widths, when these shifts are measured with a scanning Fabry-Perot spectrometer whose design is presented in detail.

  18. Velocity measurements in the plume of an arcjet engine

    SciTech Connect

    Pivirotto, T.J.; Deininger, W.D.

    1987-05-01

    A nonintrusive technique has been used to conduct a radial survey in the flow field of an arcjet engine plume. The technique measures the Doppler shift of an optically thin line resulting from recombination and relaxation processes in the high Mach number stream, in order to determine flow velocities. Atom temperature can also be calculated from the same Doppler-broadened line widths, when these shifts are measured with a scanning Fabry-Perot spectrometer whose design is presented in detail. 19 references.

  19. Visualization of turbulent flows with simultaneous velocity and vorticity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ong, Lawrence

    1992-09-01

    An experimental study of the turbulent boundary layer at Re(sub theta) approx. equals 1070 was conducted. This study combines velocity and vorticity measurements using a nine-sensor hot-wire probe with simultaneously obtained flow visualization images. Detailed measurements within the boundary layer with and without smoke marking of the wall layer fluid were performed at various distances from the wall, ranging from approximately y(+) approx. equals 14 to y(+) approx. equals 156, and at three axial locations downstream from the smoke injection slot. The mean statistical properties of the fluctuating velocity and vorticity components agree well with previous experimental and numerically simulated data. These boundary layer measurements were used in a joint probability analysis of the various instantaneous velocity, velocity gradient and vorticity correlations that appear in the vorticity and enstrophy transport equations. Substantial evidence supporting postulated inclined vortex models was found. Conditional analysis based on the detection of strong Reynolds stress and enstrophy events was carried out. The combined visual and hot-wire data provide evidence showing that these smoke marked regions in the flow field, which indicate vertical mass flux, are also regions of high vertical momentum flux.

  20. Velocity measurement of flow over random soft porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selkirk, Isreal; Mirbod, Parisa

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this work is to experimentally examine the flow over random soft porous media in a three-dimensional channel. Various combination of fibrous material and the morphology of the fibers were chosen to achieve void volume fraction (ɛ) ranging from 0.4 to 0.7. Care has been taken to keep the Reynolds number low so that the flow was laminar. The channel height was constant, however the thickness of the fibrous media was varied to achieve different filling fraction. Before starting the tests in the duct with fiber arrays, a series of tests in an empty duct (i.e., without fibers) conducted to validate the experimental measurements. We also discussed the error and uncertainty sources in the experiments and described the techniques to improve their impact. We studied detailed velocity measurements of the flow over fibrous material inside a rectangular duct using a planar particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique. Using these measurements, we determined the values of the slip velocity at the interface between the fibrous media and the flow. It was found that values of the slip velocity normalized by the maximum velocity in the flow depend on solid volume fraction, pore spaces, and fraction of channel filled by the fiber layers.

  1. High resolved velocity measurements using Laser Cantilever Anemometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puczylowski, Jaroslaw; Hölling, Michael; Peinke, Joachim

    2016-11-01

    We have developed a new anemometer, namely the 2d-LCA (2d-Laser-Cantilever-Anemometer), that is capable of performing high resolved velocity measurements in fluids. The anemometer uses a micostructured cantilever made of silicon as a sensing element. The specific shape and the small dimensions (about 150µm) of the cantilever allow for precise measurements of two velocity component at a temporal resolution of about 150kHz. The angular acceptance range is 180° in total. The 2d-LCA is a simple to use alternative to x-wires and can be used in many areas of operation including measurements in liquids or in particle-laden flows. Unlike hot-wires, the resolution power of the 2d-LCA does not decrease with increasing flow velocity, making it particularly suitable for measurements in high-speed flows. In the recent past new cantilever designs were implemented with the goal to further improve the angular resolution and increase the stability. In addition, we have designed more robust cantilevers for measurements in rough environments such as offshore areas. Successful comparative measurements with hot-wires have been carried out in order to assess the performance of the 2d-LCA.

  2. Nonintrusive Temperature and Velocity Measurements in a Hypersonic Nozzle Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OByrne, S.; Danehy, P. M.; Houwing, A. F. P.

    2002-01-01

    Distributions of nitric oxide vibrational temperature, rotational temperature and velocity have been measured in the hypersonic freestream at the exit of a conical nozzle, using planar laser-induced fluorescence. Particular attention has been devoted to reducing the major sources of systematic error that can affect fluorescence tempera- ture measurements, including beam attenuation, transition saturation effects, laser mode fluctuations and transition choice. Visualization experiments have been performed to improve the uniformity of the nozzle flow. Comparisons of measured quantities with a simple one-dimensional computation are made, showing good agreement between measurements and theory given the uncertainty of the nozzle reservoir conditions and the vibrational relaxation rate.

  3. Velocity measurements in the near wake of a ship superstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brownell, Cody; Luznik, Luksa; Snyder, Murray; Kang, Hyung Suk; Wilkinson, Colin

    2011-11-01

    Velocity measurements in a ship airwake are obtained in situ aboard a 108 ft naval training vessel. Three-component sonic anemometers are placed at the bow of the ship, for reference wind measurement, and at numerous locations above a flight deck at the stern of the ship. The mean flow structure resembles that of a 3D backward-facing step, with a recirculation region covering much of the forward flight deck, and significant downwash over the remainder of the surface. Reynolds stresses and two-point velocity correlations are presented, and placed in the context of shipborne helicopter operations. The influence of an atmospheric boundary layer, often unavailable in ship airwake measurements from a wind tunnel, is discussed. Support from the ONR Young Investigator Program (PI: MR Snyder) is gratefully acknowledged.

  4. Nonintrusive measurement of temperature and velocity in free convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Stefan

    1993-12-01

    A technique for simultaneously measuring the temperature and velocity in liquid flows is developed. Small droplets of thermochromic liquid crystals, suspended in the liquid, serve as tracer particles. The color of the light reflected by the crystals yields the temperature, while their velocity was measured via PIV (particle image velocimetry) from their displacement in a time interval. The measurement and evaluation are performed by digital image processing of color video images. By shifting the plane of observation, a three dimensional flow field can be scanned. The technique was applied to the convective flow in a box with two differentially heated opposite side walls. Two cases were considered: the influence of the thermal boundary conditions on a stationary flow and the onset of convection in a fluid initially at rest after imposing a temperature difference on the heated walls. The results were compared with numerical simulations.

  5. Ventricular septal defect after myocardial infarction: assessment by cross sectional echocardiography with pulsed wave Doppler scanning.

    PubMed Central

    MacLeod, D; Fananapazir, L; de Bono, D; Bloomfield, P

    1987-01-01

    Eight patients who developed a ventricular septal defect after myocardial infarction were assessed by cross sectional echocardiography and pulsed wave Doppler scanning. Cross sectional echocardiography visualised the defect in four patients and gave an accurate assessment of global and regional left ventricular function in all eight. In all patients pulsed wave Doppler scanning detected turbulent flow at the apex of the right ventricle or adjacent to a wall motion abnormality affecting the interventricular septum. Pulsed wave Doppler detected coexisting mitral regurgitation in one patient and tricuspid regurgitation in another two. In all patients a left to right shunt was confirmed by oximetry and the location of the defect was identified by angiography or at operation or necropsy. Cross sectional echocardiography in combination with pulsed wave Doppler scanning is useful in the rapid bedside evaluation of patients with ventricular septal defect after myocardial infarction. Images Fig PMID:3663420

  6. Estimation of Arterial Stiffness by Time-Frequency Analysis of Pulse Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Masashi; Yamamoto, Yuya; Shibayama, Yuka; Matsukawa, Mami; Watanabe, Yoshiaki; Furuya, Mio; Asada, Takaaki

    2011-07-01

    Evaluation of a pulse wave is effective for the early diagnosis of arteriosclerosis because the pulse wave contains the reflected wave that is the age- and stiffness-dependent component. In this study, we attempted to extract the parameter reflecting the component by pulse wave analysis using continuous wavelet transform. The Morlet wavelet was used as the mother wavelet. We then investigated the relationship between the parameter and the reflected wave that was extracted from the pulse wave by our previously reported separation technique. Consequently, the result of wavelet transform of the differentiated pulse waveform changed markedly owing to age and had medium correlation with the peak of the reflected wave (R=0.68).

  7. Dwarf galaxies in the Coma cluster - I. Velocity dispersion measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kourkchi, E.; Khosroshahi, H. G.; Carter, D.; Karick, A. M.; Mármol-Queraltó, E.; Chiboucas, K.; Tully, R. B.; Mobasher, B.; Guzmán, R.; Matković, A.; Gruel, N.

    2012-03-01

    We present the study of a large sample of early-type dwarf galaxies in the Coma cluster observed with DEIMOS on the Keck II to determine their internal velocity dispersion. We focus on a subsample of 41 member dwarf elliptical galaxies for which the velocity dispersion can be reliably measured, 26 of which were studied for the first time. The magnitude range of our sample is -21 < MR < -15 mag. This paper (Paper I) focuses on the measurement of the velocity dispersion and their error estimates. The measurements were performed using penalized pixel fitting (PPXF) and using the calcium triplet absorption lines. We use Monte Carlo bootstrapping to study various sources of uncertainty in our measurements, namely statistical uncertainty, template mismatch and other systematics. We find that the main source of uncertainty is the template mismatch effect which is reduced by using templates with a range of spectral types. Combining our measurements with those from the literature, we study the Faber-Jackson relation (L∝σα) and find that the slope of the relation is α= 1.99 ± 0.14 for galaxies brighter than MR≃-16 mag. A comprehensive analysis of the results combined with the photometric properties of these galaxies is reported in Paper II.

  8. Arterial Stiffness and Pulse Wave Reflection Are Increased in Patients Suffering from Severe Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Jockel-Schneider, Yvonne; Harks, Inga; Haubitz, Imme; Fickl, Stefan; Eigenthaler, Martin; Schlagenhauf, Ulrich; Baulmann, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Aim This single blind cross-sectional study compared the vascular health of subjects suffering from severe chronic periodontitis, severe aggressive periodontitis and periodontal healthy controls by evaluating pulse wave velocity (PWV), augmentation index (AIx) and pulse pressure amplification (PPA). Material and Methods In a total of 158 subjects, 92 suffering from severe periodontitis and 66 matched periodontal healthy controls, PWV, AIx, central and peripheral blood pressure were recorded using an oscillometric device (Arteriograph). Results Subjects suffering from severe chronic or aggressive periodontitis exhibited significantly higher PWV (p = 0.00004), higher AIx (p = 0.0049) and lower PPA (p = 0.028) than matched periodontal healthy controls. Conclusions The results of this study confirm the association between periodontal inflammation and increased cardiovascular risk shown by impaired vascular health in case of severe periodontitis. As impaired vascular health is a common finding in patients suffering from severe periodontal disease a concomitant routine cardiovascular evaluation may be advised. PMID:25084111

  9. Research on the photoelectric measuring method of warhead fragment velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ji; Yu, Lixia; Zhang, Bin; Liu, Xiaoyan

    2016-09-01

    The velocity of warhead fragment is the key criteria to determine its mutilation efficiency. But owing to the small size, larger quantity, irregular shape, high speed, arbitrary direction, large dispersion of warhead fragment and adverse environment, the test of fragment velocity parameter is very difficult. The paper designed an optoelectronic system to measure the average velocity of warhead fragments accurately. The apparatus included two parallel laser screens spaced apart at a known fixed distance for providing time measurement between start and stop signals. The large effective screen area was composed of laser source, retro-reflector and large area photo-diode. Whenever a moving fragment interrupted two optical screens, the system would generate a target signal. Due to partial obscuration of the incident energy and the poor test condition of the explosion, fragment target signal is easily disturbed. Therefore, fragments signal processing technology has become a key technology of the system. The noise of signal was reduced by employing wavelet decomposition and reconstruction. The time of fragment passing though the target was obtained by adopting peak detection algorithm. Based on the method of search peak in different width scale and waveform trend by using optima wavelet, the problem of rolling waveform was solved. Lots of fragments experiments of the different types of the warheads were conducted. Experimental results show that: warhead fragments capture rate of system is better than 98%, which can give velocity of each fragment in the density of less than 20 pieces per m2.

  10. Investigation of gravity waves using horizontally resolved radial velocity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stober, G.; Sommer, S.; Rapp, M.; Latteck, R.

    2013-10-01

    The Middle Atmosphere Alomar Radar System (MAARSY) on the island of Andøya in Northern Norway (69.3° N, 16.0° E) observes polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSE). These echoes are used as tracers of atmospheric dynamics to investigate the horizontal wind variability at high temporal and spatial resolution. MAARSY has the capability of pulse-to-pulse beam steering allowing for systematic scanning experiments to study the horizontal structure of the backscatterers as well as to measure the radial velocities for each beam direction. Here we present a method to retrieve gravity wave parameters from these horizontally resolved radial wind variations by applying velocity azimuth display and volume velocity processing. Based on the observations a detailed comparison of the two wind analysis techniques is carried out in order to determine the zonal and meridional wind as well as to measure first-order inhomogeneities. Further, we demonstrate the possibility to resolve the horizontal wave properties, e.g., horizontal wavelength, phase velocity and propagation direction. The robustness of the estimated gravity wave parameters is tested by a simple atmospheric model.

  11. Investigation of gravity waves using horizontally resolved radial velocity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stober, G.; Sommer, S.; Rapp, M.; Latteck, R.

    2013-06-01

    The Middle Atmosphere Alomar Radar System (MAARSY) on the island Andøya in Northern Norway (69.3° N, 16.0° E) observes polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSE). These echoes are used as tracers of atmospheric dynamics to investigate the horizontal wind variability at high temporal and spatial resolution. MAARSY has the capability of a pulse-to-pulse beam steering allowing for systematic scanning experiments to study the horizontal structure of the backscatterers as well as to measure the radial velocities for each beam direction. Here we present a method to retrieve gravity wave parameters from these horizontally resolved radial wind variations by applying velocity azimuth display and volume velocity processing. Based on the observations a detailed comparison of the two wind analysis techniques is carried out in order to determine the zonal and meridional wind as well as to measure first order inhomogeneities. Further, we demonstrate the possibility to resolve the horizontal wave properties, e.g. horizontal wavelength, phase velocity and propagation direction. The robustness of the estimated gravity wave parameters is tested by a simple atmospheric model.

  12. Flow velocity measurement with the nonlinear acoustic wave scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Didenkulov, Igor; Pronchatov-Rubtsov, Nikolay

    2015-10-28

    A problem of noninvasive measurement of liquid flow velocity arises in many practical applications. To this end the most often approach is the use of the linear Doppler technique. The Doppler frequency shift of signal scattered from the inhomogeneities distributed in a liquid relatively to the emitted frequency is proportional to the sound frequency and velocities of inhomogeneities. In the case of very slow flow one needs to use very high frequency sound. This approach fails in media with strong sound attenuation because acoustic wave attenuation increases with frequency and there is limit in increasing sound intensity, i.e. the cavitation threshold. Another approach which is considered in this paper is based on the method using the difference frequency Doppler Effect for flows with bubbles. This method is based on simultaneous action of two high-frequency primary acoustic waves with closed frequencies on bubbles and registration of the scattered by bubbles acoustic field at the difference frequency. The use of this method is interesting since the scattered difference frequency wave has much lower attenuation in a liquid. The theoretical consideration of the method is given in the paper. The experimental examples confirming the theoretical equations, as well as the ability of the method to be applied in medical diagnostics and in technical applications on measurement of flow velocities in liquids with strong sound attenuation is described. It is shown that the Doppler spectrum form depends on bubble concentration velocity distribution in the primary acoustic beams crossing zone that allows one to measure the flow velocity distribution.

  13. Measurement uncertainty budget of an interferometric flow velocity sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bermuske, Mike; Büttner, Lars; Czarske, Jürgen

    2017-06-01

    Flow rate measurements are a common topic for process monitoring in chemical engineering and food industry. To achieve the requested low uncertainties of 0:1% for flow rate measurements, a precise measurement of the shear layers of such flows is necessary. The Laser Doppler Velocimeter (LDV) is an established method for measuring local flow velocities. For exact estimation of the flow rate, the flow profile in the shear layer is of importance. For standard LDV the axial resolution and therefore the number of measurement points in the shear layer is defined by the length of the measurement volume. A decrease of this length is accompanied by a larger fringe distance variation along the measurement axis which results in a rise of the measurement uncertainty for the flow velocity (uncertainty relation between spatial resolution and velocity uncertainty). As a unique advantage, the laser Doppler profile sensor (LDV-PS) overcomes this problem by using two fan-like fringe systems to obtain the position of the measured particles along the measurement axis and therefore achieve a high spatial resolution while it still offers a low velocity uncertainty. With this technique, the flow rate can be estimated with one order of magnitude lower uncertainty, down to 0:05% statistical uncertainty.1 And flow profiles especially in film flows can be measured more accurately. The problem for this technique is, in contrast to laboratory setups where the system is quite stable, that for industrial applications the sensor needs a reliable and robust traceability to the SI units, meter and second. Small deviations in the calibration can, because of the highly position depending calibration function, cause large systematic errors in the measurement result. Therefore, a simple, stable and accurate tool is needed, that can easily be used in industrial surroundings to check or recalibrate the sensor. In this work, different calibration methods are presented and their influences to the

  14. 3-D Velocity Measurement of Natural Convection Using Image Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinoki, Masatoshi; Ozawa, Mamoru; Okada, Toshifumi; Kimura, Ichiro

    This paper describes quantitative three-dimensional measurement method for flow field of a rotating Rayleigh-Benard convection in a cylindrical cell heated below and cooled above. A correlation method for two-dimensional measurement was well advanced to a spatio-temporal correlation method. Erroneous vectors, often appeared in the correlation method, was successfully removed using Hopfield neural network. As a result, calculated 3-D velocity vector distribution well corresponded to the observed temperature distribution. Consequently, the simultaneous three-dimensional measurement system for temperature and flow field was developed.

  15. High-speed velocity measurements on an EFI-system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prinse, W. C.; van't Hof, P. G.; Cheng, L. K.; Scholtes, J. H. G.

    2007-01-01

    For the development of an Exploding Foil Initiator for Insensitive Munitions applications the following topics are of interest: the electrical circuit, the exploding foil, the velocity of the flyer, the driver explosive, the secondary flyer and the acceptor explosive. Several parameters of the EFI have influences on the velocity of the flyer. To investigate these parameters a Fabry-Perot Velocity Interferometer System (F-PVIS) has been used. The light to and from the flyer is transported by a multimode fibre terminated with a GRIN-lens. By this method the velocity of very tiny objects (0.1 mm), can be measured. The velocity of flyer can be recorded with nanosecond resolution, depending on the Fabry-Perot etalon and the streak camera. With this equipment the influence of the dimensions of the exploding foil and the flyer on the velocity and the acceleration of the flyer are investigated. Also the integrity of the flyer during flight can be analyzed. To characterize the explosive material, to be used as driver explosive in EFI's, the initiation behaviour of the explosive has been investigated by taking pictures of the explosion with a high speed framing and streak camera. From these pictures the initiation distance and the detonation behaviour of the explosive has been analyzed. Normally, the driver explosive initiates the acceptor explosive (booster) by direct contact. This booster explosive is embedded in the main charge of the munitions. The combination of initiator, booster explosive and main charge explosive is called the detonation train. In this research the possibility of initiation of the booster by an intermediate flyer is investigated. This secondary flyer can be made of different materials, like aluminium, steel and polyester with different sizes. With the aid of the F-PVIS the acceleration of the secondary flyer is investigated. This reveals the influence of the thickness and density of the flyer on the acceleration and final velocity. Under certain

  16. Measuring velocity and temperature profile sectional pipeline behind confuser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siažik, Ján; Malcho, Milan; Lenhard, Richard; Novomestský, Marcel

    2016-06-01

    The article deals with the measuring of temperature and velocity profile in area behind confuser in real made scale model of bypass. For proper operation of the equipment it is necessary to know the actual flow in the pipe. Bypasses have wide application and can be also associated with devices for heat recovery, heat exchangers different designs in which may be used in certain circumstances. In the present case, the heat that would otherwise has not been used is used for heating of insulators, and heating the air in the spray-dryer. The measuring principle was verify how the above-mentioned temperature and velocity profile decomposition above confuser on real made scale model.

  17. Electric field measurements during the Condor critical velocity experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, M. C.; Pfaff, R. F.; Haerendel, G.

    1986-01-01

    The instrumentation of the Condor critical velocity Ba experiment (Wescott et al., 1986) for the measurements of the energetic particles and the electric field associated with a Ba explosion is described. The Ba explosion created a complex electric field pulse detected in situ by a single-axis double electric-field probe on a separate spacecraft. The measurements provide evidence of several important links in the critical-velocity chain, and are consistent with two hypotheses. The first hypothesis involves the creation of large polarization electric field due to charge separation; the second hypothesis implies a polarization of the beam by currents flowing across it. The chain of physical processes inferred from the observations is in agreement with most theories for the Alfven process.

  18. Optical velocity-measurement techniques for supersonic surfaces.

    SciTech Connect

    Briggs, M,E.; Hemsing, W. F.; Shinas, M. A.

    2004-01-01

    Interferometric techniques have been used routinely for more than 20 years to measure velocities of explosive shock-fronts. Recently, structured-light measurements have been used for the same purpose. Explosions accelerate surfaces to as much as 15 km/sec in a nanosecond or less, often generating much light, large changes in reflectivity, and ejecting particles or layers at different speeds. I will describe the current performance of fiber-optic displacement-interferometers, Fabret-Perot inteferometers, velocity interferometers (VISAR), and structured light, in this interesting physical space. We have designed and used for several years a 1/4 inch OD optical probe with large depth of field that both illuminates and returns the image from a surface inside a confined geometry. We report on its design and performance. The increased information from the surface requires greater automation from the analysis software. We report our software automation and analysis improvements.

  19. Electric field measurements during the Condor critical velocity experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, M. C.; Pfaff, R. F.; Haerendel, G.

    1986-01-01

    The instrumentation of the Condor critical velocity Ba experiment (Wescott et al., 1986) for the measurements of the energetic particles and the electric field associated with a Ba explosion is described. The Ba explosion created a complex electric field pulse detected in situ by a single-axis double electric-field probe on a separate spacecraft. The measurements provide evidence of several important links in the critical-velocity chain, and are consistent with two hypotheses. The first hypothesis involves the creation of large polarization electric field due to charge separation; the second hypothesis implies a polarization of the beam by currents flowing across it. The chain of physical processes inferred from the observations is in agreement with most theories for the Alfven process.

  20. Velocity measurements in a boundary layer with a density gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Neuwald, P.; Reichenbach, H.; Kuhl, A.L.

    1992-11-01

    A number of experiments were performed at the EMI shock tube facility on shock waves propagating in a stratified atmosphere with density gradient modelled by air layered above Freon (C Cl{sub 2} F{sub 2}). This report presents streamwise velocity data for the flow behind the shock front. Additional information from measurements of overpressure history and shadowgraphs of the flow will be presented in a future EMI-report.

  1. Thermodynamic properties of nitrogen gas from sound velocity measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Younglove, B. A.

    1979-01-01

    Thermodynamic properties of nitrogen gas have been calculated from 80 K to 350 K and at pressures to 10 bar from sound velocity measurements and existing P-V-T data using multiproperty fitting techniques. These new data are intended to improve existing predictive capability of the equation of state in the low density region needed for use with the NASA-Langley National Transonics Facility.

  2. Wavelet-based group and phase velocity measurements: Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, H. Y.; Wang, W. W.; Hung, S. H.

    2016-12-01

    Measurements of group and phase velocities of surface waves are often carried out by applying a series of narrow bandpass or stationary Gaussian filters localized at specific frequencies to wave packets and estimating the corresponding arrival times at the peak envelopes and phases of the Fourier spectra. However, it's known that seismic waves are inherently nonstationary and not well represented by a sum of sinusoids. Alternatively, a continuous wavelet transform (CWT) which decomposes a time series into a family of wavelets, translated and scaled copies of a generally fast oscillating and decaying function known as the mother wavelet, is capable of retaining localization in both the time and frequency domain and well-suited for the time-frequency analysis of nonstationary signals. Here we develop a wavelet-based method to measure frequency-dependent group and phase velocities, an essential dataset used in crust and mantle tomography. For a given time series, we employ the complex morlet wavelet to obtain the scalogram of amplitude modulus |Wg| and phase φ on the time-frequency plane. The instantaneous frequency (IF) is then calculated by taking the derivative of phase with respect to time, i.e., (1/2π)dφ(f, t)/dt. Time windows comprising strong energy arrivals to be measured can be identified by those IFs close to the frequencies with the maximum modulus and varying smoothly and monotonically with time. The respective IFs in each selected time window are further interpolated to yield a smooth branch of ridge points or representative IFs at which the arrival time, tridge(f), and phase, φridge(f), after unwrapping and correcting cycle skipping based on a priori knowledge of the possible velocity range, are determined for group and phase velocity estimation. We will demonstrate our measurement method using both ambient noise cross correlation functions and multi-mode surface waves from earthquakes. The obtained dispersion curves will be compared with those by a

  3. Thermodynamic properties of nitrogen gas from sound velocity measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Younglove, B. A.

    1979-01-01

    Thermodynamic properties of nitrogen gas have been calculated from 80 K to 350 K and at pressures to 10 bar from sound velocity measurements and existing P-V-T data using multiproperty fitting techniques. These new data are intended to improve existing predictive capability of the equation of state in the low density region needed for use with the NASA-Langley National Transonics Facility.

  4. Radionuclide counting technique for measuring wind velocity and direction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    An anemometer utilizing a radionuclide counting technique for measuring both the velocity and the direction of wind is described. A pendulum consisting of a wire and a ball with a source of radiation on the lower surface of the ball is positioned by the wind. Detectors and are located in a plane perpendicular to pendulum (no wind). The detectors are located on the circumferene of a circle and are equidistant from each other as well as the undisturbed (no wind) source ball position.

  5. Instantaneous velocity profile measurements in a turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, S. K.

    1986-01-01

    Instantaneous wall shear stress and streamwise velocities have been measured simultaneously in a flat-plate, turbulent boundary layer at moderate Reynolds number in an effort to provide experimental support for large eddy simulations. Data were obtained using a buried-wire, wall shear gage and a hot-wire rake positioned in the log region of the flow. Fluctuations of the instantaneous U(+) versus Y(+) profiles about a mean law of the wall are shown to be significant and complex. Peak cross-correlation values between wall shear stress and the velocities are high, and reflect the passage of a large structure inclined at a small angle to the wall. Estimates of this angle are consistent with those made by other investigators. Conditional sampling techniques were used to detect the passage of various sizes and types of flow disturbances (events), and to estimate their mean frequency of occurrence. Events characterized by large aand sudden streamwise accelerations were found to be highly coherent throughout the log region and were strongly correlated with large fluctuations in wall shear stress. Phase randomness between the near-wall quantities and the outer velocities was small. The results suggest that the flow events detected by conditional sampling applied to velocities in the log region may be related to the bursting process.

  6. Velocity Measurements of Thermoelectric Driven Flowing Liquid Lithium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szott, Matthew; Xu, Wenyu; Fiflis, Peter; Haehnlein, Ian; Kapat, Aveek; Kalathiparambil, Kishor; Ruzic, David N.

    2014-10-01

    Liquid lithium has garnered additional attention as a PFC due to its several advantages over solid PFCs, including reduced erosion and thermal fatigue, increased heat transfer, higher device lifetime, and enhanced plasma performance due to the establishment of low recycling regimes at the wall. The Lithium Metal Infused Trenches concept (LiMIT) has demonstrated thermoelectric magnetohydrodynamic flow of liquid lithium through horizontal open-faced metal trenches with measured velocities varying from 3.7+/-0.5 cm/s in the 1.76 T field of HT-7 to 22+/-3 cm/s in the SLiDE facility at UIUC at 0.059 T. To demonstrate the versatility of the concept, a new LiMIT design using narrower trenches shows steady state, thermoelectric-driven flow at an arbitrary angle from horizontal. Velocity characteristics are measured and discussed. Based on this LiMIT concept, a new limiter design has been developed to be tested on the mid-plane of the EAST plasma. Preliminary modelling suggests lithium flow of 6 cm/s in this device. Additionally, recent testing at the Magnum-PSI facility has given encouraging results, and velocity measurements in relation to magnetic field strength and plasma flux are also presented.

  7. ELODIE: A spectrograph for accurate radial velocity measurements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranne, A.; Queloz, D.; Mayor, M.; Adrianzyk, G.; Knispel, G.; Kohler, D.; Lacroix, D.; Meunier, J.-P.; Rimbaud, G.; Vin, A.

    1996-10-01

    The fibre-fed echelle spectrograph of Observatoire de Haute-Provence, ELODIE, is presented. This instrument has been in operation since the end of 1993 on the 1.93 m telescope. ELODIE is designed as an updated version of the cross-correlation spectrometer CORAVEL, to perform very accurate radial velocity measurements such as needed in the search, by Doppler shift, for brown-dwarfs or giant planets orbiting around nearby stars. In one single exposure a spectrum at a resolution of 42000 (λ/{DELTA}λ) ranging from 3906A to 6811A is recorded on a 1024x1024 CCD. This performance is achieved by using a tanθ=4 echelle grating and a combination of a prism and a grism as cross-disperser. An automatic on-line data treatment reduces all the ELODIE echelle spectra and computes cross-correlation functions. The instrument design and the data reduction algorithms are described in this paper. The efficiency and accuracy of the instrument and its long term instrumental stability allow us to measure radial velocities with an accuracy better than 15m/s for stars up to 9th magnitude in less than 30 minutes exposure time. Observations of 16th magnitude stars are also possible to measure velocities at about 1km/s accuracy. For classic spectroscopic studies (S/N>100) 9th magnitude stars can be observed in one hour exposure time.

  8. Velocity measurements in whole blood using acoustic resolution photoacoustic Doppler

    PubMed Central

    Brunker, Joanna; Beard, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic resolution photoacoustic Doppler velocimetry promises to overcome the spatial resolution and depth penetration limitations of current blood flow measuring methods. Despite successful implementation using blood-mimicking fluids, measurements in blood have proved challenging, thus preventing in vivo application. A common explanation for this difficulty is that whole blood is insufficiently heterogeneous relative to detector frequencies of tens of MHz compatible with deep tissue photoacoustic measurements. Through rigorous experimental measurements we provide new insight that refutes this assertion. We show for the first time that, by careful choice of the detector frequency and field-of-view, and by employing novel signal processing methods, it is possible to make velocity measurements in whole blood using transducers with frequencies in the tens of MHz range. These findings have important implications for the prospects of making deep tissue measurements of blood flow relevant to the study of microcirculatory abnormalities associated with cancer, diabetes, atherosclerosis and other conditions. PMID:27446707

  9. Velocity measurements in whole blood using acoustic resolution photoacoustic Doppler.

    PubMed

    Brunker, Joanna; Beard, Paul

    2016-07-01

    Acoustic resolution photoacoustic Doppler velocimetry promises to overcome the spatial resolution and depth penetration limitations of current blood flow measuring methods. Despite successful implementation using blood-mimicking fluids, measurements in blood have proved challenging, thus preventing in vivo application. A common explanation for this difficulty is that whole blood is insufficiently heterogeneous relative to detector frequencies of tens of MHz compatible with deep tissue photoacoustic measurements. Through rigorous experimental measurements we provide new insight that refutes this assertion. We show for the first time that, by careful choice of the detector frequency and field-of-view, and by employing novel signal processing methods, it is possible to make velocity measurements in whole blood using transducers with frequencies in the tens of MHz range. These findings have important implications for the prospects of making deep tissue measurements of blood flow relevant to the study of microcirculatory abnormalities associated with cancer, diabetes, atherosclerosis and other conditions.

  10. Estimating organic chain length through sound velocity measurements.

    PubMed

    Povey, Malcolm J W; Stec, Zoe; Hindle, Scott A; Kennedy, John D; Taylor, Richard G

    2005-02-01

    The ability to measure the length of polymers while monitoring their production is evidently extremely valuable, but is also a useful tool for chemical identification purposes at other times, e.g. the analysis of waste water. A study of the relationship between velocity of sound and chain length has been carried out. Initial studies were performed on two model systems; a series of pure liquid n-alkanes (pentane to hexadecane) and 1-alcohols (methanol to 1-dodecanol). This study was extended to look at an industrially significant system of dimethylsiloxanes 200 fluid (L2, 0.65 cSt) to 200 fluid (5000 cSt). Corresponding density data have been taken from the literature and the adiabatic compressibility determined. The measured adiabatic compressibility has been compared with two molecular models of wound velocity, the Schaaffs model and a development of the Urick equation. The Urick equation approach is based on a determination of the compressibility of the methylene or siloxane repeat units which make up the chains in these linear molecules. We show that the Urick equation approach accurately predicts sound velocity and compressibility for the higher members of each series, whilst the Schaaffs approach fails for the 1-alcohols. We suggest that this is because of the influence of the hydroxyl end group through hydrogen bonding with methylene groups within the chain. This interaction modifies the derived compressibility of the methylene groups, so reducing their compressibility relative to that of the n-alkanes. The technique described provides valuable new insights into end-group, intermolecular and intra-molecular interactions in liquid linear-chain molecules. From this detailed analysis of the mechanisms involved, a model is derived. This model can give very precise estimations of the composition of a pure liquid. In the case of mixtures of polymers, it is necessary to use the modified Urick equation and then, in addition, the concentration dependence of both the

  11. Coherent Laser Instrument Would Measure Range and Velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Daniel; Cardell, Greg; San Martin, Alejandro; Spiers, Gary

    2005-01-01

    A proposed instrument would project a narrow laser beam that would be frequency-modulated with a pseudorandom noise (PN) code for simultaneous measurement of range and velocity along the beam. The instrument performs these functions in a low mass, power, and volume package using a novel combination of established techniques. Originally intended as a low resource- footprint guidance sensor for descent and landing of small spacecraft onto Mars or small bodies (e.g., asteroids), the basic instrument concept also lends itself well to a similar application guiding aircraft (especially, small unmanned aircraft), and to such other applications as ranging of topographical features and measuring velocities of airborne light-scattering particles as wind indicators. Several key features of the instrument s design contribute to its favorable performance and resource-consumption characteristics. A laser beam is intrinsically much narrower (for the same exit aperture telescope or antenna) than a radar beam, eliminating the need to correct for the effect of sloping terrain over the beam width, as is the case with radar. Furthermore, the use of continuous-wave (CW), erbium-doped fiber lasers with excellent spectral purity (narrow line width) permits greater velocity resolution, while reducing the laser s power requirement compared to a more typical pulsed solid-state laser. The use of CW also takes proper advantage of the increased sensitivity of coherent detection, necessary in the first place for direct measurement of velocity using the Doppler effect. However, measuring range with a CW beam requires modulation to "tag" portions of it for time-of-flight determination; typically, the modulation consists of a PN code. A novel element of the instrument s design is the use of frequency modulation (FM) to accomplish both the PN-modulation and the Doppler-bias frequency shift necessary for signed velocity measurements. This permits the use of a single low-power waveguide electrooptic

  12. Measured and modeled dry deposition velocities over the ESCOMPTE area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michou, M.; Laville, P.; Serça, D.; Fotiadi, A.; Bouchou, P.; Peuch, V.-H.

    2005-03-01

    Measurements of the dry deposition velocity of ozone have been made by the eddy correlation method during ESCOMPTE (Etude sur Site pour COntraindre les Modèles de Pollution atmosphérique et de Transport d'Emissions). The strong local variability of natural ecosystems was sampled over several weeks in May, June and July 2001 for four sites with varying surface characteristics. The sites included a maize field, a Mediterranean forest, a Mediterranean shrub-land, and an almost bare soil. Measurements of nitrogen oxide deposition fluxes by the relaxed eddy correlation method have also been carried out at the same bare soil site. An evaluation of the deposition velocities computed by the surface module of the multi-scale Chemistry and Transport Model MOCAGE is presented. This module relies on a resistance approach, with a detailed treatment of the stomatal contribution to the surface resistance. Simulations at the finest model horizontal resolution (around 10 km) are compared to observations. If the seasonal variations are in agreement with the literature, comparisons between raw model outputs and observations, at the different measurement sites and for the specific observing periods, are contrasted. As the simulated meteorology at the scale of 10 km nicely captures the observed situations, the default set of surface characteristics (averaged at the resolution of a grid cell) appears to be one of the main reasons for the discrepancies found with observations. For each case, sensitivity studies have been performed in order to see the impact of adjusting the surface characteristics to the observed ones, when available. Generally, a correct agreement with the observations of deposition velocities is obtained. This advocates for a sub-grid scale representation of surface characteristics for the simulation of dry deposition velocities over such a complex area. Two other aspects appear in the discussion. Firstly, the strong influence of the soil water content to the plant

  13. A novel technique to measure subsurface flow velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmair, S.; Weiler, M.

    2010-12-01

    To better understand subsurface flow (SSF) processes at the hillslope scale, measuring subsurface flow velocity should be of great interest. However, due to the large heterogeneity in time and space, we are faced with the need to continuously measure SSF velocity at several locations within a hillslope over a distance being representative for certain hillslope segments. At present, SSF velocity is either measured by tracer tests over larger distances or via centimeter-scale measurements using heat dissipation or other tracers. This calls for a cheap and easily applicable method to continuously detect subsurface flow velocity in the field over a distance representative for certain hillslope segments. We currently develop a novel technique, which has shown promising results in the laboratory. The technique is based on an automatic salt tracer injection into a small-diameter borehole once the soil matrix has reached saturation. The tracer signal is captured by a 5TE probe (Decagon Devices) measuring soil moisture, electrical conductivity, and temperature every two minutes, which is inserted a few decimetres downslope of the injection point into the soil. The automatic injection is also controlled by the 5TE probe, which is connected to a CR1000 Logger (Campbell Scientific). Once saturated conditions have been established, a plug valve attached to an above-mounted bottle with NaCl solution is opened for 2 seconds and the tracer is injected into the borehole via a small steel tube screened at the bottom. Under saturated conditions the automatic injection is conducted every two hours and the breakthrough curves are analyzed for the mean effective velocity. In a first step, the technique was tested in a sand filled box with constant in- and outflow conditions representing a homogeneous miniature hillslope. Several experimental set-ups differing in hydraulic gradient, distance from injection point to 5TE probe, orientation of 5TE probe, and amount and concentration of

  14. Optimizing Estimates of Instantaneous Heart Rate from Pulse Wave Signals with the Synchrosqueezing Transform.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hau-Tieng; Lewis, Gregory F; Davila, Maria I; Daubechies, Ingrid; Porges, Stephen W

    2016-10-17

    With recent advances in sensor and computer technologies, the ability to monitor peripheral pulse activity is no longer limited to the laboratory and clinic. Now inexpensive sensors, which interface with smartphones or other computer-based devices, are expanding into the consumer market. When appropriate algorithms are applied, these new technologies enable ambulatory monitoring of dynamic physiological responses outside the clinic in a variety of applications including monitoring fatigue, health, workload, fitness, and rehabilitation. Several of these applications rely upon measures derived from peripheral pulse waves measured via contact or non-contact photoplethysmography (PPG). As technologies move from contact to non-contact PPG, there are new challenges. The technology necessary to estimate average heart rate over a few seconds from a noncontact PPG is available. However, a technology to precisely measure instantaneous heat rate (IHR) from non-contact sensors, on a beat-to-beat basis, is more challenging. The objective of this paper is to develop an algorithm with the ability to accurately monitor IHR from peripheral pulse waves, which provides an opportunity to measure the neural regulation of the heart from the beat-to-beat heart rate pattern (i.e., heart rate variability). The adaptive harmonic model is applied to model the contact or non-contact PPG signals, and a new methodology, the Synchrosqueezing Transform (SST), is applied to extract IHR. The body sway rhythm inherited in the non-contact PPG signal is modeled and handled by the notion of wave-shape function. The SST optimizes the extraction of IHR from the PPG signals and the technique functions well even during periods of poor signal to noise. We contrast the contact and non-contact indices of PPG derived heart rate with a criterion electrocardiogram (ECG). ECG and PPG signals were monitored in 21 healthy subjects performing tasks with different physical demands. The root mean square error of IHR

  15. Las Vegas Basin Seismic Response Project: Measured Shallow Soil Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luke, B. A.; Louie, J.; Beeston, H. E.; Skidmore, V.; Concha, A.

    2002-12-01

    The Las Vegas valley in Nevada is a deep (up to 5 km) alluvial basin filled with interlayered gravels, sands, and clays. The climate is arid. The water table ranges from a few meters to many tens of meters deep. Laterally extensive thin carbonate-cemented lenses are commonly found across parts of the valley. Lenses range beyond 2 m in thickness, and occur at depths exceeding 200 m. Shallow seismic datasets have been collected at approximately ten sites around the Las Vegas valley, to characterize shear and compression wave velocities in the near surface. Purposes for the surveys include modeling of ground response to dynamic loads, both natural and manmade, quantification of soil stiffness to aid structural foundation design, and non-intrusive materials identification. Borehole-based measurement techniques used include downhole and crosshole, to depths exceeding 100 m. Surface-based techniques used include refraction and three different methods involving inversion of surface-wave dispersion datasets. This latter group includes two active-source techniques, the Spectral Analysis of Surface Waves (SASW) method and the Multi-Channel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW) method; and a new passive-source technique, the Refraction Mictrotremor (ReMi) method. Depths to halfspace for the active-source measurements ranged beyond 50 m. The passive-source method constrains shear wave velocities to 100 m depths. As expected, the stiff cemented layers profoundly affect local velocity gradients. Scale effects are evident in comparisons of (1) very local measurements typified by borehole methods, to (2) the broader coverage of the SASW and MASW measurements, to (3) the still broader and deeper resolution made possible by the ReMi measurements. The cemented layers appear as sharp spikes in the downhole datasets and are problematic in crosshole measurements due to refraction. The refraction method is useful only to locate the depth to the uppermost cemented layer. The surface

  16. Method and apparatus for measuring flow velocity using matched filters

    DOEpatents

    Raptis, Apostolos C.

    1983-01-01

    An apparatus and method for measuring the flow velocities of individual phase flow components of a multiphase flow utilizes matched filters. Signals arising from flow noise disturbance are extracted from the flow, at upstream and downstream locations. The signals are processed through pairs of matched filters which are matched to the flow disturbance frequency characteristics of the phase flow component to be measured. The processed signals are then cross-correlated to determine the transit delay time of the phase flow component between sensing positions.

  17. Method and apparatus for measuring flow velocity using matched filters

    DOEpatents

    Raptis, A.C.

    1983-09-06

    An apparatus and method for measuring the flow velocities of individual phase flow components of a multiphase flow utilizes matched filters. Signals arising from flow noise disturbance are extracted from the flow, at upstream and downstream locations. The signals are processed through pairs of matched filters which are matched to the flow disturbance frequency characteristics of the phase flow component to be measured. The processed signals are then cross-correlated to determine the transit delay time of the phase flow component between sensing positions. 8 figs.

  18. Method and apparatus for measuring flow velocity using matched filters

    SciTech Connect

    Raptis, A.C.

    1981-07-17

    An apparatus and method for measuring the flow velocities of individual phase flow components of a multiphase flow is disclosed. Signals arising from flow noise disturbance are extracted from the flow, at upstream and downstream locations. The signals are processed through pairs of matched filters which are matched to the flow disturbance frequency characteristics of the phase flow component to be measured. The processed signals are then cross-correlated to determine the transit delay time of the phase flow component between sensing positions.

  19. Velocity field measurements on high-frequency, supersonic microactuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreth, Phillip A.; Ali, Mohd Y.; Fernandez, Erik J.; Alvi, Farrukh S.

    2016-05-01

    The resonance-enhanced microjet actuator which was developed at the Advanced Aero-Propulsion Laboratory at Florida State University is a fluidic-based device that produces pulsed, supersonic microjets by utilizing a number of microscale, flow-acoustic resonance phenomena. The microactuator used in this study consists of an underexpanded source jet that flows into a cylindrical cavity with a single, 1-mm-diameter exhaust orifice through which an unsteady, supersonic jet issues at a resonant frequency of 7 kHz. The flowfields of a 1-mm underexpanded free jet and the microactuator are studied in detail using high-magnification, phase-locked flow visualizations (microschlieren) and two-component particle image velocimetry. These are the first direct measurements of the velocity fields produced by such actuators. Comparisons are made between the flow visualizations and the velocity field measurements. The results clearly show that the microactuator produces pulsed, supersonic jets with velocities exceeding 400 m/s for roughly 60 % of their cycles. With high unsteady momentum output, this type of microactuator has potential in a range of ow control applications.

  20. Measurement of Damage Velocities in Bullet Impacts of Transparent Armor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Charles; Bigger, Rory; Weiss, Carl

    2013-06-01

    A series of impact experiments have been conducted to examine the response of transparent material to ballistic impact. The experiments consisted of impacting 15 mm of borosilicate glass back by 9.5 mm of Lexan. The projectile was a 0.30-cal hard steel bullet designed specifically for the experiments. Residual velocities and the residual length of the bullets (which were soft-recovered in a catch box) were measured as a function of impact velocity. High-speed imaging of the impact event and post-test analysis has permitted quantification of damage propagation and the rate of propagation. The results of several experiments are presented and compared to edge-on impact experiments that have been conducted by Strassburger et al..

  1. Measuring the Spin Period of a High-Velocity Pulsar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomsick, John

    2012-10-01

    X-ray observations of IGR J11014-6103 show that it has a complex morphology with a point source and two components of extended emission. Its properties indicate that it is very likely to be a pulsar wind nebula (PWN). Chandra and radio observations strongly suggest that the compact object is moving away from SNR MSH 11-61A. Based on the evolution of this supernova remnant, an association would indicate that IGR J11014-6103 has a transverse velocity of 2,400 to 2,900 km/s. The possibility of such a high kick velocity makes the proposed timing study important for proving that the compact object is a pulsar, determining its period (P), and measuring dP/dt to determine if the characteristic age is consistent with the pulsar originating in MSH 11-61A.

  2. In-situ measurements of velocity structure within turbidity currents

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xu, J. P.; Noble, M.A.; Rosenfeld, L.K.

    2004-01-01

    Turbidity currents are thought to be the main mechanism to move ???500,000 m3 of sediments annually from the head of the Monterey Submarine Canyon to the deep-sea fan. Indirect evidence has shown frequent occurrences of such turbidity currents in the canyon, but the dynamic properties of the turbidity currents such as maximum speed, duration, and dimensions are still unknown. Here we present the first-ever in-situ measurements of velocity profiles of four turbidity currents whose maximum along-canyon velocity reached 190 cm/s. Two turbidity currents coincided with storms that produced the highest swells and the biggest stream flows during the year-long deployment. Copyright 2004 by the American Geophysical Union.

  3. Diffraction correction for precision surface acoustic wave velocity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz M., Alberto; Nagy, Peter B.

    2002-09-01

    Surface wave dispersion measurements can be used to nondestructively characterize shot-peened, laser shock-peened, burnished, and otherwise surface-treated specimens. In recent years, there have been numerous efforts to separate the contribution of surface roughness from those of near-surface material variations, such as residual stress, texture, and increased dislocation density. As the accuracy of the dispersion measurements was gradually increased using state-of-the-art laser-ultrasonic scanning and sophisticated digital signal processing methods, it was recognized that a perceivable dispersive effect, similar to the one found on rough shot-peened specimens, is exhibited by untreated smooth surfaces as well. This dispersion effect is on the order of 0.1%, that is significantly higher than the experimental error associated with the measurements and comparable to the expected velocity change produced by near-surface compressive residual stresses in metals below their yield point. This paper demonstrates that the cause of this apparent dispersion is the diffraction of the surface acoustic wave (SAW) as it travels over the surface of the specimen. The results suggest that a diffraction correction may be introduced to increase the accuracy of surface wave dispersion measurements. A simple diffraction correction model was developed for surface waves and this correction was subsequently validated by laser-interferometric velocity measurements on aluminum specimens. copyright 2002 Acoustical Society of America.

  4. Measuring Heart Filling Propagation Velocity using the Cross Wavelet Transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niebel, Casandra; Ohara, Takahiro; Vlachos, Pavlos; Little, William

    2011-11-01

    During early diastole, a pressure gradient is formed across the mitral valve as the left ventricle (LV) relaxes, forcing blood from the left atrium into the LV. This process generates a rapid filling wave and creates an unsteady flow environment within the LV. A continuous wavelet transform is capable of dealing with non-stationary and noisy signals and is therefore ideal for measuring the wave speed of the early diastole rapid filling wave. This wave speed, or propagation velocity (Vp), is used clinically to evaluate diastolic function and is conventionally measured from a Color M-Mode (CMM) echocardiogram. A CMM scan gives a spatiotemporal map of the blood velocity in the left ventricle and is used to visualize flow patterns and manually measure the Vp. In this work, a moving cross wavelet transform is used to measure the phase shift between consecutive time steps in a CMM echocardiogram, providing a more robust and repeatable measurement of Vp, less sensitive to noise, aliasing boundaries, and user inputs.

  5. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) Measurements of Suspension-Feeding Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du Clos, K.; Jones, I. T.; Carrier, T. J.; Jumars, P. A.

    2016-02-01

    Active suspension feeders, such as bivalves and tunicates, connect benthic and pelagic ecosystems by packaging suspended matter into larger fecal and pseudofecal particles, greatly enhancing the flux of carbon and nutrients from the water column to the benthos. The volume of water processed by a population of suspension feeders is commonly estimated by scaling up results from experiments that measure the clearance rate (the volume of water cleared of particles per time) of one or a few individual suspension feeders. Clearance rates vary, however, between species, within a species, and over time for a single individual; and the velocity fields produced by suspension feeders are likely to interact in complex ways. We measured the water velocity fields produced by two species of bivalve, Mya arenaria and Mercenaria mercenaria, and the tunicate Ciona intestinalis, using particle image velocimetry (PIV). We used these measurements to calculate flow rates and Reynolds numbers of inhalant and exhalant siphons. We also observed strong entrainment of water by M. arenaria's exhalant siphon jet that may help to explain how the clam avoids depleting the water around it of particles and oxygen as it feeds. We are using these measurements to inform computational fluid mechanics (CFD) models of suspension feeding, allowing us to examine the interactions of flow fields produced by multiple suspension feeders and other effects not quantified by clearance-rate measurements.

  6. Ice Velocity Map of Antarctica measured with ALOS PALSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouginot, J.; Scheuchl, B.; Rignot, E. J.

    2010-12-01

    Ice velocity is fundamental characteristic of the dynamics of ice sheet and is essential to know for measuring the mass budget of ice sheet and for controlling ice sheet numerical models with realistic boundary conditions. Until recently, data were mostly available on a discrete basis over small areas with variable precision. Here, we report on our results of processing ice velocity from he interferometric synthetic-aperture radar data acquired by ALOS PALSAR in 2007, 2008 and 2009 by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and distributed by NASA's Alaska Satellite Facility (ASF). The goal of our project is to produce a new set of Earth Science Data Record (ESDR): high-resolution digital maps of ice velocity of the Antarctic ice sheet. This new ESDR will be based on spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data from multiple missions. It will be distributed to the scientific community via institutional links already in place at the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC). The EDSR will benefit glaciologists and ice sheet modelers, but also climate modelers interested in how ice sheets are evolving, physical oceanographers studying sea level change and changes in oceanic circulation, solid earth scientists interested in post-glacial rebound, atmospheric scientists interested in surface mass balance in Antarctica. This effort will establish a long-term legacy for quantitative measurements of the dynamics of polar ice sheets. Areas north of 78 degrees south were first covered by RADARSAT-1 during the RAMP campaign. ALOS PALSAR and ENVISAT ASAR were tasked to cover the area in 2007, 2008 and 2009. PALSAR 46-day speckle tracking works well even in areas where C-band sensors lose signal coherence, which helps us to complete a full coverage of Antarctica's coastal regions. One challenge for L-band data is the sensitivity to ionosphere disturbances and another is to lower data noise in vast interior where flow velocities drop to below a few meters per year. We

  7. Unsteady velocity measurements in a realistic intracranial aneurysm model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugron, Ádám; Farinas, Marie-Isabelle; Kiss, László; Paál, György

    2012-01-01

    The initiation, growth and rupture of intracranial aneurysms are intensively studied by computational fluid dynamics. To gain confidence in the results of numerical simulations, validation of the results is necessary. To this end the unsteady flow was measured in a silicone phantom of a realistic intracranial aneurysm. A flow circuit was built with a novel unsteady flow rate generating method, used to model the idealised shape of the heartbeat. This allowed the measurement of the complex three-dimensional velocity distribution by means of laser-optical methods such as laser doppler anemometry (LDA) and particle image velocimetry (PIV). The PIV measurements, available with high temporal and spatial distribution, were found to have good agreement with the control LDA measurements. Furthermore, excellent agreement was found with the numerical results.

  8. Spatiotemporal Dynamics of the Wind Velocity from Minisodar Measurement Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simakhin, V. A.; Cherepanov, O. S.; Shamanaeva, L. G.

    2016-04-01

    The spatiotemporal dynamics of the three wind velocity components in the atmospheric boundary layer is analyzed on the basis of Doppler minisodar measurements. The data were processed and analyzed with the help of robust nonparametric methods based on the weighted maximum likelihood method and classical methods. Distribution laws were obtained for each wind velocity component. There are outliers in the distribution functions; both right and left asymmetry of the distributions are observed. For the x- and ycomponents, the width of the distribution increases as the observation altitude is increased, but the maximum of the distribution function decreases, which is in agreement with the data available in the literature. For the zcomponents the width of the distribution remains practically constant, but the value of the maximum also decreases with altitude. Analysis of the hourly semidiurnal dynamics showed that all three components have maxima in the morning and evening hours. For the y- and z-components the maxima in the evening hours are more strongly expressed than in the morning hours. For the x- and y-components the horizontal wind shear is closely tracked in the evening hours. It is shown that adaptive estimates on the efficiency significantly exceed the classical parametric estimates and allow one to analyze the spatiotemporal dynamics of the wind velocity, and reveal jets and detect wind shears.

  9. Double-path acquisition of pulse wave transit time and heartbeat using self-mixing interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yingbin; Huang, Wencai; Wei, Zheng; Zhang, Jie; An, Tong; Wang, Xiulin; Xu, Huizhen

    2017-06-01

    We present a technique based on self-mixing interferometry for acquiring the pulse wave transit time (PWTT) and heartbeat. A signal processing method based on Continuous Wavelet Transform and Hilbert Transform is applied to extract potentially useful information in the self-mixing interference (SMI) signal, including PWTT and heartbeat. Then, some cardiovascular characteristics of the human body are easily acquired without retrieving the SMI signal by complicated algorithms. Experimentally, the PWTT is measured on the finger and the toe of the human body using double-path self-mixing interferometry. Experimental statistical data show the relation between the PWTT and blood pressure, which can be used to estimate the systolic pressure value by fitting. Moreover, the measured heartbeat shows good agreement with that obtained by a photoplethysmography sensor. The method that we demonstrate, which is based on self-mixing interferometry with significant advantages of simplicity, compactness and non-invasion, effectively illustrates the viability of the SMI technique for measuring other cardiovascular signals.

  10. An ultrasonic transducer array for velocity measurement in underwater vehicles.

    PubMed

    Boltryk, P; Hill, M; Keary, A; Phillips, B; Robinson, H; White, P

    2004-04-01

    A correlation velocity log (CVL) is an ultrasonic navigation aid for marine applications, in which velocity is estimated using an acoustic transmitter and a receiver array. CVLs offer advantages over Doppler velocity logs (DVLs) in many autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) applications, since they can achieve high accuracy at low velocities even during hover manoeuvres. DVLs require narrow beam widths, whilst ideal CVL transmitters have wide beam widths. This gives CVLs the potential to use lower frequencies thus permitting operation in deeper water, reducing power requirements for the same depth, or allowing the use of smaller transducers. Moving patterns in the wavefronts across a 2D receiver array are detected by calculating correlation coefficients between bottom reflections from consecutive transmitted pulses, across all combinations of receiver pairings. The position of the peak correlation value, on a surface representing receiver-pairing separations, is proportional to the vessel's displacement between pulses. A CVL aimed primarily for AUVs has been developed. Its acoustical and signal processing design has been optimised through sea trials and computer modelling of the sound field. This computer model is also used to predict how the distribution of the correlation coefficients varies with distance from the peak position. Current work seeks to increase the resolution of the peak estimate using surface fitting methods. Numerical simulations suggest that peak estimation methods significantly improve system precision when compared with simply identifying the position of the maximum correlation coefficient in the dataset. The peak position may be estimated by fitting a quadratic model to the measured data using least squares or maximum likelihood estimation. Alternatively, radial basis functions and Gaussian processes successfully predict the peak position despite variation between individual correlation datasets. This paper summarises the CVL's main acoustical

  11. Phase Velocity Method for Guided Wave Measurements in Composite Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, E.; Galarza, N.; Rubio, B.; Otero, J. A.

    Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer is a well-recognized material for aeronautic applications. Its plane structure has been widely used where anisotropic characteristics should be evaluated with flaw detection. A phase velocity method of ultrasonic guided waves based on a pitch-catch configuration is presented for this purpose. Both shear vertical (SV) and shear horizontal (SH) have been studied. For SV (Lamb waves) the measurements were done at different frequencies in order to evaluate the geometrical dispersion and elastic constants. The results for SV are discussed with an orthotropic elastic model. Finally experiments with lamination flaws are presented.

  12. Measurement of surface recombination velocity on heavily doped indium phosphide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Phillip; Ghalla-Goradia, Manju; Faur, Mircea; Faur, Maria; Bailey, Sheila

    1990-01-01

    Surface recombination velocity (SRV) on heavily doped n-type and p-type InP was measured as a function of surface treatment. For the limited range of substrates and surface treatments studied, SRV and surface stability depend strongly on the surface treatment. SRVs of 100,000 cm/sec in both p-type and n-type InP are obtainable, but in n-type the low-SRV surfaces were unstable, and the only stable surfaces on n-type had SRVs of more than 10to the 6th cm/sec.

  13. Measurement of surface recombination velocity on heavily doped indium phosphide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Phillip; Ghalla-Goradia, Manju; Faur, Mircea; Faur, Maria; Bailey, Sheila

    1990-01-01

    Surface recombination velocity (SRV) on heavily doped n-type and p-type InP was measured as a function of surface treatment. For the limited range of substrates and surface treatments studied, SRV and surface stability depend strongly on the surface treatment. SRVs of 100,000 cm/sec in both p-type and n-type InP are obtainable, but in n-type the low-SRV surfaces were unstable, and the only stable surfaces on n-type had SRVs of more than 10to the 6th cm/sec.

  14. Full field gas phase velocity measurements in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Devon W.; Yanis, William

    1995-01-01

    Measurement of full-field velocities via Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV) is common in research efforts involving fluid motion. While such measurements have been successfully performed in the liquid phase in a microgravity environment, gas-phase measurements have been beset by difficulties with seeding and laser strength. A synthesis of techniques developed at NASA LeRC exhibits promise in overcoming these difficulties. Typical implementation of PIV involves forming the light from a pulsed laser into a sheet that is some fraction of a millimeter thick and 50 or more millimeters wide. When a particle enters this sheet during a pulse, light scattered from the particle is recorded by a detector, which may be a film plane or a CCD array. Assuming that the particle remains within the boundaries of the sheet for the second pulse and can be distinguished from neighboring particles, comparison of the two images produces an average velocity vector for the time between the pulses. If the concentration of particles in the sampling volume is sufficiently large but the particles remain discrete, a full field map may be generated.

  15. Measurements of parallel electron velocity distributions using whistler wave absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Thuecks, D. J.; Skiff, F.; Kletzing, C. A.

    2012-08-15

    We describe a diagnostic to measure the parallel electron velocity distribution in a magnetized plasma that is overdense ({omega}{sub pe} > {omega}{sub ce}). This technique utilizes resonant absorption of whistler waves by electrons with velocities parallel to a background magnetic field. The whistler waves were launched and received by a pair of dipole antennas immersed in a cylindrical discharge plasma at two positions along an axial background magnetic field. The whistler wave frequency was swept from somewhat below and up to the electron cyclotron frequency {omega}{sub ce}. As the frequency was swept, the wave was resonantly absorbed by the part of the electron phase space density which was Doppler shifted into resonance according to the relation {omega}-k{sub ||v||} = {omega}{sub ce}. The measured absorption is directly related to the reduced parallel electron distribution function integrated along the wave trajectory. The background theory and initial results from this diagnostic are presented here. Though this diagnostic is best suited to detect tail populations of the parallel electron distribution function, these first results show that this diagnostic is also rather successful in measuring the bulk plasma density and temperature both during the plasma discharge and into the afterglow.

  16. A radionuclide counting technique for measuring wind velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, J. J.; Khandelwal, G. S.; Mall, G. H.

    1981-12-01

    A technique for measuring wind velocities of meteorological interest is described. It is based on inverse-square-law variation of the counting rates as the radioactive source-to-counter distance is changed by wind drag on the source ball. Results of a feasibility study using a weak bismuth 207 radiation source and three Geiger-Muller radiation counters are reported. The use of the technique is not restricted to Martian or Mars-like environments. A description of the apparatus, typical results, and frequency response characteristics are included. A discussion of a double-pendulum arrangement is presented. Measurements reported herein indicate that the proposed technique may be suitable for measuring wind speeds up to 100 m/sec, which are either steady or whose rates of fluctuation are less than 1 kHz.

  17. Low-cost optoelectronic devices to measure velocity of detonation

    NASA